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Sample records for absorption spectroscopy ir

  1. Infrared Cavity Ringdown Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (IR-CRLAS) in low pressure flames

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, J.J.; Rakestraw, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have employed Infrared Cavity Ringdown Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (IR-CRLAS) as a diagnostic tool for combustion chemistry studies. High resolution rovibrational absorption spectra have been obtained in low pressure laminar flames in the mid-infrared employing a pulsed single mode optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser system. The high sensitivity and generality of IR-CRLAS for combustion studies is demonstrated in a variety of flames and is shown to be robust even in sooting environments with high temperature gradients. The ability to obtain spatially resolved data is also demonstrated in one dimensional laminar flame studies. These preliminary results indicate the potential of IR-CRLAS as a combustion diagnostic which is capable of obtaining absolute concentrations of reactants, intermediates, and products simultaneously within a narrow spectral region. In this demonstration, two information rich mid-infrared spectral regions (1.6 and 3-4 microns) have been probed at Doppler-limited resolution with an effective laser bandwidth of < 0.007 cm{sup -1}.

  2. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study of the Effect of Rh doping in Sr2IrO4

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, C. H.; Cho, Deok-Yong; Kuo, C.-T.; Sandilands, L. J.; Qi, T. F.; Cao, G.; Noh, T. W.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effect of Rh doping in Sr2IrO4 using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). We observed appearance of new electron-addition states with increasing Rh concentration (x in Sr2Ir1−xRhxO4) in accordance with the concept of hole doping. The intensity of the hole-induced state is however weak, suggesting weakness of charge transfer (CT) effect and Mott insulating ground states. Also, Ir Jeff = 1/2 upper Hubbard band shifts to lower energy as x increases up to x = 0.23. Combined with optical spectroscopy, these results suggest a hybridisation-related mechanism, in which Rh doping can weaken the (Ir Jeff = 1/2)–(O 2p) orbital hybridisation in the in-planar Rh-O-Ir bond networks. PMID:27025538

  3. Two-dimensional (2D) infrared (IR) correlation spectroscopy for dynamic absorption behavior of oleic acid (OA) onto silica gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genkawa, Takuma; Kanematsu, Wataru; Shinzawa, Hideyuki

    2014-07-01

    Dynamic absorption behavior of oleic acid (OA) onto silica gel was probed by infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Once OA is injected into silica gel placed on a horizontal attenuated total reflectance prism, the silica gel starts to absorb the OA molecules due to the molecular-level interaction based on hydrogen bonding between the COOH of OA and the OH of silica gel. The substantial level of variation of spectral feature is readily observed during the absorption of OA onto silica gel. 2D correlation analysis of the time-dependent IR spectra reveals fine details of absorption dynamics of OA molecules depending on the molecular structure. The predominant absorption of the monomers occurs at the onset of the absorption, and it is then quickly followed by the decrease in the dimers. In other words, the dissociation of the liquid crystals occurs via the disuniting of the tightly packed OA dimers.

  4. Rapid screening and identification of illicit drugs by IR absorption spectroscopy and gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengali, Sandro; Liberatore, Nicola; Luciani, Domenico; Viola, Roberto; Cardinali, Gian Carlo; Elmi, Ivan; Poggi, Antonella; Zampolli, Stefano; Biavardi, Elisa; Dalcanale, Enrico; Bonadio, Federica; Delemont, Olivier; Esseiva, Pierre; Romolo, Francesco S.

    2013-01-01

    Analytical instruments based on InfraRed Absorption Spectroscopy (IRAS) and Gas Chromatography (GC) are today available only as bench-top instrumentation for forensic labs and bulk analysis. Within the 'DIRAC' project funded by the European Commission, we are developing an advanced portable sensor, that combines miniaturized GC as its key chemical separation tool, and IRAS in a Hollow Fiber (HF) as its key analytical tool, to detect and recognize illicit drugs and key precursors, as bulk and as traces. The HF-IRAS module essentially consists of a broadly tunable External Cavity (EC) Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL), thermo-electrically cooled MCT detectors, and an infrared hollow fiber at controlled temperature. The hollow fiber works as a miniaturized gas cell, that can be connected to the output of the GC column with minimal dead volumes. Indeed, the module has been coupled to GC columns of different internal diameter and stationary phase, and with a Vapour Phase Pre-concentrator (VPC) that selectively traps target chemicals from the air. The presentation will report the results of tests made with amphetamines and precursors, as pure substances, mixtures, and solutions. It will show that the sensor is capable of analyzing all the chemicals of interest, with limits of detection ranging from a few nanograms to about 100-200 ng. Furthermore, it is suitable to deal with vapours directly trapped from the headspace of a vessel, and with salts treated in a basic solution. When coupled to FAST GC columns, the module can analyze multi-components mixes in less than 5 minutes.

  5. Hot Carrier Dynamics in the X Valley in Si and Ge Measured by Pump-IR-Probe Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W. B.; Cavicchia, M. A.; Alfano, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Si is the semiconductor of choice for nanoelectronic roadmap into the next century for computer and other nanodevices. With growing interest in Si, Ge, and Si(sub m)Ge(sub n) strained superlattices, knowledge of the carrier relaxation processes in these materials and structures has become increasingly important. The limited time resolution for earlier studies of carrier dynamics in Ge and Si, performed using Nd:glass lasers, was not sufficient to observe the fast cooling processes. In this paper, we present a direct measurement of hot carrier dynamics in the satellite X valley in Si and Ge by time-resolved infrared(IR) absorption spectroscopy, and show the potential of our technique to identify whether the X valley is the lowest conduction valley in semiconductor materials and structures.

  6. Time-Resolved IR-Absorption Spectroscopy of Hot-Electron Dynamics in Satellite and Upper Conduction Bands in GaP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavicchia, M. A.; Alfano, R. R.

    1995-01-01

    The relaxation dynamics of hot electrons in the X6 and X7 satellite and upper conduction bands in GaP was directly measured by femtosecond UV-pump-IR-probe absorption spectroscopy. From a fit to the induced IR-absorption spectra the dominant scattering mechanism giving rise to the absorption at early delay times was determined to be intervalley scattering of electrons out of the X7 upper conduction-band valley. For long delay times the dominant scattering mechanism is electron-hole scattering. Electron transport dynamics of the upper conduction band of GaP has been time resolved.

  7. La-doping effect on spin-orbit coupled Sr2IrO4 probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jie; Sun, Xuanyong; Liu, Shengli; Li, Bin; Wang, Haiyun; Dong, Peng; Wang, Yu; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Sr2IrO4 was predicted to be an unconventional superconductor upon carrier doping since it highly resembles the high-temperature cuprates. Here, to understand carrier doping effect on spin-orbit coupled Mott insulator Sr2IrO4, the electronic structure and local structure distortion for Sr2 - x La x IrO4 system have been investigated by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. By comparing the intensity of white-line features at the Ir L 2,3 absorption edges, we observe remarkably large branching ratios in La-doped compounds, greater than that of the parent material Sr2IrO4, suggesting a strong spin-orbit interaction for Sr2IrO4-based system. Moreover, extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra demonstrate more regular IrO6 octahedra, i.e. the weakened crystal electric field versus La-doping. By theoretical calculations, the synergistic effect of regular IrO6 octahedra and electron doping is established, which accounts for the transition from a Mott insulator to a conductive state in Sr2 - x La x IrO4-based system.

  8. La-doping effect on spin–orbit coupled Sr2IrO4 probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jie; Sun, Xuanyong; Liu, Shengli; Li, Bin; Wang, Haiyun; Dong, Peng; Wang, Yu; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Sr2IrO4 was predicted to be an unconventional superconductor upon carrier doping since it highly resembles the high-temperature cuprates. Here, to understand carrier doping effect on spin–orbit coupled Mott insulator Sr2IrO4, the electronic structure and local structure distortion for Sr2 ‑ x La x IrO4 system have been investigated by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. By comparing the intensity of white-line features at the Ir L 2,3 absorption edges, we observe remarkably large branching ratios in La-doped compounds, greater than that of the parent material Sr2IrO4, suggesting a strong spin-orbit interaction for Sr2IrO4-based system. Moreover, extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra demonstrate more regular IrO6 octahedra, i.e. the weakened crystal electric field versus La-doping. By theoretical calculations, the synergistic effect of regular IrO6 octahedra and electron doping is established, which accounts for the transition from a Mott insulator to a conductive state in Sr2 ‑ x La x IrO4-based system.

  9. High-resolution IR Absorption Spectroscopy of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: The Realm of Anharmonicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, Elena; Petrignani, Annemieke; Candian, Alessandra; Mackie, Cameron J.; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan

    2015-11-01

    We report on an experimental and theoretical investigation of the importance of anharmonicity in the 3-μm CH stretching region of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. We present mass-resolved, high-resolution spectra of the gas-phase cold (∼4 K) linear PAH molecules naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene. The measured IR spectra show a surprisingly high number of strong vibrational bands. For naphthalene, the observed bands are well separated and limited by the rotational contour, revealing the band symmetries. Comparisons are made to the harmonic and anharmonic approaches of the widely used Gaussian software. We also present calculated spectra of these acenes using the computational program SPECTRO, providing anharmonic predictions with a Fermi-resonance treatment that utilizes intensity redistribution. We demonstrate that the anharmonicity of the investigated acenes is strong, dominated by Fermi resonances between the fundamental and double combination modes, with triple combination bands as possible candidates to resolve remaining discrepancies. The anharmonic spectra as calculated with SPECTRO lead to predictions of the main bands that fall within 0.5% of the experimental frequencies. The implications for the aromatic infrared bands, specifically the 3-μm band, are discussed.

  10. HIGH-RESOLUTION IR ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: THE REALM OF ANHARMONICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Maltseva, Elena; Buma, Wybren Jan; Petrignani, Annemieke; Candian, Alessandra; Mackie, Cameron J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.; Oomens, Jos E-mail: petrignani@strw.leidenuniv.nl

    2015-11-20

    We report on an experimental and theoretical investigation of the importance of anharmonicity in the 3-μm CH stretching region of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. We present mass-resolved, high-resolution spectra of the gas-phase cold (∼4 K) linear PAH molecules naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene. The measured IR spectra show a surprisingly high number of strong vibrational bands. For naphthalene, the observed bands are well separated and limited by the rotational contour, revealing the band symmetries. Comparisons are made to the harmonic and anharmonic approaches of the widely used Gaussian software. We also present calculated spectra of these acenes using the computational program SPECTRO, providing anharmonic predictions with a Fermi-resonance treatment that utilizes intensity redistribution. We demonstrate that the anharmonicity of the investigated acenes is strong, dominated by Fermi resonances between the fundamental and double combination modes, with triple combination bands as possible candidates to resolve remaining discrepancies. The anharmonic spectra as calculated with SPECTRO lead to predictions of the main bands that fall within 0.5% of the experimental frequencies. The implications for the aromatic infrared bands, specifically the 3-μm band, are discussed.

  11. High-Resolution IR Absorption Spectroscopy of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: The Realm of Anharmonicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maltseva, Elena; Petrignani, Annemieke; Candian, Alessandra; Mackie, Cameron J.; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan

    2016-01-01

    We report on an experimental and theoretical investigation of the importance of anharmonicity in the 3 micrometers CH stretching region of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. We present mass-resolved, high-resolution spectra of the gas-phase cold ((is) approximately 4K) linear PAH molecules naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene. The measured IR spectra show a surprisingly high number of strong vibrational bands. For naphthalene, the observed bands are well separated and limited by the rotational contour, revealing the band symmetries. Comparisons are made to the harmonic and anharmonic approaches of the widely used Gaussian software. We also present calculated spectra of these acenes using the computational program SPECTRO, providing anharmonic predictions enhanced with a Fermi-resonance treatment that utilizes intensity redistribution. We demonstrate that the anharmonicity of the investigated acenes is strong, dominated by Fermi resonances between the fundamental and double combination modes, with triple combination bands as possible candidates to resolve remaining discrepancies. The anharmonic spectra as calculated with SPECTRO lead to predictions of the main modes that fall within 0.5% of the experimental frequencies. The implications for the Aromatic Infrared Bands, specifically the 3-m band are discussed.

  12. Measurement of Gas and Aerosol Phase Absorption Spectra across the Visible and Near-IR Using Supercontinuum Photoacoustic Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Radney, James G; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2015-07-21

    We demonstrate a method to measure the absorption spectra of gas and aerosol species across the visible and near-IR (500 to 840 nm) using a photoacoustic (PA) spectrometer and a pulsed supercontinuum laser source. Measurements of gas phase absorption spectra were demonstrated using H2O(g) as a function of relative humidity (RH). The measured absorption intensities and peak shapes were able to be quantified and compared to spectra calculated using the 2012 High Resolution Transmission (HITRAN2012) database. Size and mass selected nigrosin aerosol was used to measure absorption spectra across the visible and near-IR. Spectra were measured as a function of aerosol size/mass and show good agreement to Mie theory calculations. Lastly, we measured the broadband absorption spectrum of flame generated soot aerosol at 5% and 70% RH. For the high RH case, we are able to quantifiably separate the soot and water absorption contributions. For soot, we observe an enhancement in the mass specific absorption cross section ranging from 1.5 at 500 nm (p < 0.01) to 1.2 at 840 nm (p < 0.2) and a concomitant increase in the absorption Ångström exponent from 1.2 ± 0.4 (5% RH) to 1.6 ± 0.3 (70% RH). PMID:26098142

  13. Activation and deactivation of a robust immobilized Cp*Ir-transfer hydrogenation catalyst: a multielement in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sherborne, Grant J; Chapman, Michael R; Blacker, A John; Bourne, Richard A; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Crossley, Benjamin D; Lucas, Stephanie J; McGowan, Patrick C; Newton, Mark A; Screen, Thomas E O; Thompson, Paul; Willans, Charlotte E; Nguyen, Bao N

    2015-04-01

    A highly robust immobilized [Cp*IrCl2]2 precatalyst on Wang resin for transfer hydrogenation, which can be recycled up to 30 times, was studied using a novel combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at Ir L3-edge, Cl K-edge, and K K-edge. These culminate in in situ XAS experiments that link structural changes of the Ir complex with its catalytic activity and its deactivation. Mercury poisoning and "hot filtration" experiments ruled out leached Ir as the active catalyst. Spectroscopic evidence indicates the exchange of one chloride ligand with an alkoxide to generate the active precatalyst. The exchange of the second chloride ligand, however, leads to a potassium alkoxide-iridate species as the deactivated form of this immobilized catalyst. These findings could be widely applicable to the many homogeneous transfer hydrogenation catalysts with Cp*IrCl substructure.

  14. IR nanoscale spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Eamonn; Yarrow, Fiona; Rice, James H.

    2011-10-01

    Sub diffraction limited infrared absorption imaging was applied to hemoglobin by coupling IR optics with an atomic force microscope. Comparisons between the AFM topography and IR absorption images of micron sized hemoglobin features are presented, along with nanoscale IR spectroscopic analysis of the metalloprotein.

  15. Surface-enhanced IR absorption spectroscopy of the KcsA potassium channel upon application of an electric field.

    PubMed

    Yamakata, Akira; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Oiki, Shigetoshi

    2015-09-01

    Surface-enhanced IR absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) is a powerful tool for studying the structure of molecules adsorbed on an electrode surface (ATR-SEIRA). Coupled with an electrochemical system, structural changes induced by changes in the electric field can be detected. All the membrane proteins are subjected to the effect of membrane electric field, but conformational changes at different membrane potentials and their functional relevance have not been studied extensively except for channel proteins. In this contribution, background information of potential-dependent functional and structural changes of a prototypical channel, the KcsA channel, is summarized, and SEIRAS applied to the KcsA channel under the application of the potential is shown. The potassium channels allow K(+) to permeate selectively through the structural part called the selectivity filter, in which dehydrated K(+) ions interact with backbone carbonyls. In the absence of K(+), the selectivity filter undergoes conformational changes to the non-conductive collapsed conformation. To apply the electric field, the KcsA channels were fixed on the gold surface in either upside or reverse orientation. The SEIRA spectrum in K(+) or Na(+) solution revealed both backbone structural changes and local changes in the OCO-carboxylate groups. Upon application of the negative electric field, the spectrum of OCO was enhanced only in the K(+) solution. These results indicate that the negative electric field accumulates local K(+) concentration, which turned the collapsed filter to the conductive conformation. ATR-SEIRA serves as an unprecedented experimental system for examining membrane proteins under an electric field.

  16. IR, NIR, and UV Absorption Spectroscopy of C60(2+) and C60(3+) in Neon Matrixes.

    PubMed

    Kern, Bastian; Strelnikov, Dmitry; Weis, Patrick; Böttcher, Artur; Kappes, Manfred M

    2014-02-01

    C60(2+) and C60(3+) were produced by electron-impact ionization of sublimed C60 and charge-state-selectively codeposited onto a gold mirror substrate held at 5 K together with neon matrix gas containing a few percent of the electron scavengers CO2 or CCl4. This procedure limits charge-changing of the incident fullerene projectiles during matrix isolation. IR, NIR, and UV-vis spectra were then measured. Ten IR absorptions of C60(2+) were identified. C60(3+) was observed to absorb in the NIR region close to the known vibronic bands of C60(+). UV spectra of C60, C60(+), and C60(2+) were almost indistinguishable, consistent with a plasmon-like nature of their UV absorptions. The measurements were supported by DFT and TDDFT calculations, revealing that C60(2+) has a singlet D5d ground state whereas C60(3+) forms a doublet of Ci symmetry. The new results may be of interest regarding the presence of C60(2+) and C60(3+) in space.

  17. Absorption Spectroscopy and Imaging from the Visible through Mid-IR with 20 nm Resolution Using AFM probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centrone, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Correlated nanoscale composition and optical property maps are important to engineer nanomaterials in applications ranging from photovoltaics to sensing and therapeutics. Wavelengths (λs) from the visible to near-IR probe electronic transitions in materials, providing information regarding band gap and defects while light in mid-IR probes vibrational transitions and provide chemical composition. However, light diffraction limits the lateral resolution of conventional micro-spectroscopic techniques to approximately λ/2, which is insufficient to image nanomaterials. Additionally, the λ-dependent resolution impedes direct comparison of spectral maps from different spectral ranges. Photo Thermal Induced Resonance (PTIR) is a novel technique that circumvents light diffraction by employing an AFM tip as a local detector for measuring light absorption with λ-independent nanoscale resolution. Our PTIR setup combines an AFM microscope with three lasers providing λ-tunability from 500 nm to 16000 nm continuously. The AFM tip transduces locally the sample thermal expansion induced by light absorption into large cantilever oscillations. Local absorption spectra (electronic or vibrational) and maps are obtained recording the amplitude of the tip deflection as a function of λ and position, respectively. The working principles of the PTIR technique will be described first, and nano-patterned polymer samples will be used to evaluate its lateral resolution, sensitivity and linearity. Results show that the PTIR signal intensity is proportional to the local absorbed energy suggesting applicability of this technique for quantitative chemical analysis at nanoscale, at least for thin (less than 1000 nm thick) samples. Additionally, a λ-independent resolution as high as 20 nm is demonstrated across the whole spectral range. In the second part of the talk, PTIR will be applied to image the dark plasmonic resonance of gold Asymmetric Split Ring Resonators (A-SRRs) in the mid-IR

  18. Enhancing the sensitivity of mid-IR quantum cascade laser-based cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy using RF current perturbation.

    PubMed

    Manfred, Katherine M; Kirkbride, James M R; Ciaffoni, Luca; Peverall, Robert; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2014-12-15

    The sensitivity of mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), often limited by cavity mode structure and diffraction losses, was enhanced by applying a broadband RF noise to the laser current. A pump-probe measurement demonstrated that the addition of bandwidth-limited white noise effectively increased the laser linewidth, thereby reducing mode structure associated with CEAS. The broadband noise source offers a more sensitive, more robust alternative to applying single-frequency noise to the laser. Analysis of CEAS measurements of a CO(2) absorption feature at 1890  cm(-1) averaged over 100 ms yielded a minimum detectable absorption of 5.5×10(-3)  Hz(-1/2) in the presence of broadband RF perturbation, nearly a tenfold improvement over the unperturbed regime. The short acquisition time makes this technique suitable for breath applications requiring breath-by-breath gas concentration information.

  19. High-resolution IR Absorption Spectroscopy of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the 3 μm Region: Role of Periphery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, Elena; Petrignani, Annemieke; Candian, Alessandra; Mackie, Cameron J.; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan

    2016-11-01

    In this work we report on high-resolution IR absorption studies that provide a detailed view on how the peripheral structure of irregular polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) affects the shape and position of their 3 μm absorption band. For this purpose, we present mass-selected, high-resolution absorption spectra of cold and isolated phenanthrene, pyrene, benz[a]antracene, chrysene, triphenylene, and perylene molecules in the 2950–3150 cm‑1 range. The experimental spectra are compared with standard harmonic calculations and anharmonic calculations using a modified version of the SPECTRO program that incorporates a Fermi resonance treatment utilizing intensity redistribution. We show that the 3 μm region is dominated by the effects of anharmonicity, resulting in many more bands than would have been expected in a purely harmonic approximation. Importantly, we find that anharmonic spectra as calculated by SPECTRO are in good agreement with the experimental spectra. Together with previously reported high-resolution spectra of linear acenes, the present spectra provide us with an extensive data set of spectra of PAHs with a varying number of aromatic rings, with geometries that range from open to highly condensed structures, and featuring CH groups in all possible edge configurations. We discuss the astrophysical implications of the comparison of these spectra on the interpretation of the appearance of the aromatic infrared 3 μm band, and on features such as the two-component emission character of this band and the 3 μm emission plateau.

  20. Looking into the volcano with a Mid-IR DFB diode laser and Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kassi, S; Chenevier, M; Gianfrani, L; Salhi, A; Rouillard, Y; Ouvrard, A; Romanini, D

    2006-11-13

    We report on the first application of extended-wavelength DFB diode lasers to Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy in-situ trace measurements on geothermal gases. The emission from the most active fumarole at the Solfatara volcano near Naples (Italy) was probed for the presence of CO and CH(4). After passing through a gas dryer and cooler, the volcanic gas flow (98% CO(2)) was analysed in real time for the concentration of these species, whose relatively strong absorption lines could be monitored simultaneously by a single Distributed Feed-Back (DFB) GaSb-based diode laser emitting around 2.33 mum (4300 cm(-1)) at room temperature. The concentrations were found to be about 3 ppm and 75 ppm, respectively, while actual detection limits for these molecules are around 1 ppb. We discuss the possibility of detecting other species of interest for volcanic emission monitoring. PMID:19529562

  1. Non-Destructive and Discriminating Identification of Illegal Drugs by Transient Absorption Spectroscopy in the Visible and Near-IR Wavelength Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Chie; Furube, Akihiro; Katoh, Ryuzi; Nonaka, Hidehiko; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2008-11-01

    We have tested the possibility of identifying illegal drugs by means of nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy with a 10-ns UV-laser pulse for the excitation light and visible-to-near-IR light for the probe light. We measured the transient absorption spectra of acetonitrile solutions of d-methamphetamine, dl-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine hydrochloride (MDMA), and dl-N-methyl-1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-butanamine hydrochloride (MBDB), which are illegal drugs widely consumed in Japan. Transient absorption signals of these drugs were observed between 400 and 950 nm, a range in which they are transparent in the ground state. By analyzing the spectra in terms of exponential and Gaussian functions, we could identify the drugs and discriminate them from chemical substances having similar structures. We propose that transient absorption spectroscopy will be a useful, non-destructive method of inspecting for illegal drugs, especially when they are dissolved in liquids. Such a method may even be used for drugs packed in opaque materials if it is further extended to utilize intense femtosecond laser pulses.

  2. Visualizing Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy with Computer Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Charles B.; Fine, Leonard W.

    1996-01-01

    IR Tutor, an interactive, animated infrared (IR) spectroscopy tutorial has been developed for Macintosh and IBM-compatible computers. Using unique color animation, complicated vibrational modes can be introduced to beginning students. Rules governing the appearance of IR absorption bands become obvious because the vibrational modes can be visualized. Each peak in the IR spectrum is highlighted, and the animation of the corresponding normal mode can be shown. Students can study each spectrum stepwise, or click on any individual peak to see its assignment. Important regions of each spectrum can be expanded and spectra can be overlaid for comparison. An introduction to the theory of IR spectroscopy is included, making the program a complete instructional package. Our own success in using this software for teaching and research in both academic and industrial environments will be described. IR Tutor consists of three sections: (1) The 'Introduction' is a review of basic principles of spectroscopy. (2) 'Theory' begins with the classical model of a simple diatomic molecule and is expanded to include larger molecules by introducing normal modes and group frequencies. (3) 'Interpretation' is the heart of the tutorial. Thirteen IR spectra are analyzed in detail, covering the most important functional groups. This section features color animation of each normal mode, full interactivity, overlay of related spectra, and expansion of important regions. This section can also be used as a reference.

  3. Isolated gramicidin peptides probed by IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rijs, Anouk M; Kabeláč, Martin; Abo-Riziq, Ali; Hobza, Pavel; de Vries, Mattanjah S

    2011-07-11

    We report double-resonant IR/UV ion-dip spectroscopy of neutral gramicidin peptides in the gas phase. The IR spectra of gramicidin A and C, recorded in both the 1000 cm(-1) to 1800 cm(-1) and the 2700 to 3750 cm(-1) region, allow structural analysis. By studying this broad IR range, various local intramolecular interactions are probed, and complementary IR modes can be accessed. Ab initio quantum chemical calculations are used to support the interpretation of the experimental IR spectra. The comparison of the calculated frequencies with the experimental IR spectrum probed via the strong infrared absorptions of all the amide groups (NH stretch, C=O stretch and NH bend), shows evidence for a helical structure in the gas phase, which is similar to that in the condensed phase. Additionally, we show that to improve the spectral resolution when studying large neutral molecular structures of the size of gramicidin, the use of heavier carrier gas could be advantageous.

  4. Photothermal absorption correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Octeau, Vivien; Cognet, Laurent; Duchesne, Laurence; Lasne, David; Schaeffer, Nicolas; Fernig, David G; Lounis, Brahim

    2009-02-24

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a popular technique, complementary to cell imaging for the investigation of dynamic processes in living cells. Based on fluorescence, this single molecule method suffers from artifacts originating from the poor fluorophore photophysics: photobleaching, blinking, and saturation. To circumvent these limitations we present here a new correlation method called photothermal absorption correlation spectroscopy (PhACS) which relies on the absorption properties of tiny nano-objects. PhACS is based on the photothermal heterodyne detection technique and measures akin FCS, the time correlation function of the detected signals. Application of this technique to the precise determination of the hydrodynamic sizes of different functionalized gold nanoparticles are presented, highlighting the potential of this method. PMID:19236070

  5. Ultrafast Photochemistry of Copper(II) Monochlorocomplexes in Methanol and Acetonitrile by Broadband Deep-UV-to-Near-IR Femtosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mereshchenko, Andrey S; Olshin, Pavel K; Myasnikova, Olesya S; Panov, Maxim S; Kochemirovsky, Vladimir A; Skripkin, Mikhail Yu; Moroz, Pavel N; Zamkov, Mikhail; Tarnovsky, Alexander N

    2016-03-24

    Photochemistry of copper(II) monochlorocomplexes in methanol and acetonitrile solutions is studied by UV-pump/broadband deep-UV-to-near-IR probe femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Upon 255 and 266 nm excitation, the complexes in acetonitrile and methanol, respectively, are promoted to the excited ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) state, which has a short (sub-250 fs) lifetime. From the LMCT state, the complexes decay via internal conversion to lower-lying ligand field (LF) d-d excited states or the vibrationally hot ground electronic state. A minor fraction of the excited complexes relaxes to the LF electronic excited states, which are relatively long-lived with lifetimes >1 ns. Also, in methanol solutions, about 3% of the LMCT-excited copper(II) monochlorocomplexes dissociate forming copper(I) solvatocomplexes and chlorine atoms, which then further react forming long-lived photoproducts. In acetonitrile, about 50% of the LMCT-excited copper(II) monochlorocomplexes dissociate forming radical and ionic products in a ratio of 3:2. Another minor process observed following excitation only in methanol solutions is the re-equilibration between several forms of the copper(II) ground-state complexes present in solutions. This re-equilibration occurs on a time scale from sub-nanoseconds to nanoseconds.

  6. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  7. Filament-induced visible-to-mid-IR supercontinuum in a ZnSe crystal: Towards multi-octave supercontinuum absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouawad, O.; Béjot, P.; Billard, F.; Mathey, P.; Kibler, B.; Désévédavy, F.; Gadret, G.; Jules, J.-C.; Faucher, O.; Smektala, F.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the generation of multiple-octave supercontinuum laser source spanning from 0.5 μm to 11 μm induced by multi-filamentation in a ZnSe crystal. The generated supercontinuum is both spatially and spectrally characterized. It is then exploited in a proof-of-principle experiment for methane spectroscopy measurements by means of the supercontinuum absorption spectroscopy technique. The entire absorption spectrum is successfully recorded within the whole spectral bandwidth of the supercontinuum. Experimental results are in fairly good agreement with the HITRAN database, confirming the reliability and stability over several hours of the generated supercontinuum.

  8. Characterization and dating of blue ballpoint pen inks using principal component analysis of UV-Vis absorption spectra, IR spectroscopy, and HPTLC.

    PubMed

    Senior, Samir; Hamed, Ezzat; Masoud, Mamdouh; Shehata, Eman

    2012-07-01

    The ink of pens and ink extracted from lines on white photocopier paper of 10 blue ballpoint pens were subjected to ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, infrared (IR), and high-performance thin-layer liquid chromatography (HPTLC). The R(f) values and color tones of the bands separated by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis used to classify the writing inks into three groups. The principal component analysis (PCA) investigates the pen responsible for a piece of writing, and how time affects spectroscopy of written ink. PCA can differentiate between pen ink and ink line indicates the influence of solvent extraction process on the results. The PCA loadings are useful in individualization of a questioned ink from a database. The PCA of ink lines extracted at different times can be used to estimate the time at which a questioned document was written. The results proved that the UV-Vis spectra are effective tool to separate blue ballpoint pen ink in most cases rather than IR and HPTLC. PMID:22390819

  9. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  10. NEW ACCURATE MEASUREMENT OF {sup 36}ArH{sup +} AND {sup 38}ArH{sup +} RO-VIBRATIONAL TRANSITIONS BY HIGH RESOLUTION IR ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Cueto, M.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.; Doménech, J. L.; Cernicharo, J.; Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M.

    2014-03-01

    The protonated argon ion, {sup 36}ArH{sup +}, was recently identified in the Crab Nebula from Herschel spectra. Given the atmospheric opacity at the frequency of its J = 1-0 and J = 2-1 rotational transitions (617.5 and 1234.6 GHz, respectively), and the current lack of appropriate space observatories after the recent end of the Herschel mission, future studies on this molecule will rely on mid-infrared observations. We report on accurate wavenumber measurements of {sup 36}ArH{sup +} and {sup 38}ArH{sup +} rotation-vibration transitions in the v = 1-0 band in the range 4.1-3.7 μm (2450-2715 cm{sup –1}). The wavenumbers of the R(0) transitions of the v = 1-0 band are 2612.50135 ± 0.00033 and 2610.70177 ± 0.00042 cm{sup –1} (±3σ) for {sup 36}ArH{sup +} and {sup 38}ArH{sup +}, respectively. The calculated opacity for a gas thermalized at a temperature of 100 K and with a linewidth of 1 km s{sup –1} of the R(0) line is 1.6 × 10{sup –15} × N({sup 36}ArH{sup +}). For column densities of {sup 36}ArH{sup +} larger than 1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup –2}, significant absorption by the R(0) line can be expected against bright mid-IR sources.

  11. An investigation of catalytic active phase-support interactions by IR, NMR and x-ray absorption spectroscopies. Progress report, January 15, 1991--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, G.L.

    1993-07-01

    Active catalytic phases (metal, mixed metals, oxide or mixed oxides) interacting with oxide support can affect percentage exposed, the morphology of supported particles, the degree of reducibility of cations, etc., in a variety of ways. Solid state {sup 29}Si NMR was used to obtain a new correlation between partial charge on the Si which comprises a part of the SiOHAl Br{o}nsted acid structure in amorphous silica-aluminas. We also describe two potential improvements in solid state NMR applied to catalysts and catalysts supports. One is experimental, dynamic angle spinning NMR, a new technique for obtaining high resolution spectra of quadrupolar nuclei, e.g., {sup 27}Al. The second approach is an alternative to the standard fast Fourier transform of the free induction decay to convert from the time to spectral domain, the maximum entropy method. Effect of different methods of preparation of Pd/L-zeolites is described. By comparison to analogous Pt systems, it is the inherent chemistry of the L-zeolite which results in better dispersion when impregnation preparation is used relative to ion exchange preparation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to compare the effect of support (SiO{sub 2} and L-zeolite) on the degree and kind of Pt-Ni interaction. When supported in L-zeolite and promoted with Ni, Pt has improved stability both with regard to self-poisoning and sulfur catalyzed agglomeration.

  12. Time-Resolved Quantitative Measurement of OH HO2 and CH2O in Fuel Oxidation Reactions by High Resolution IR Absorption Spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Haifeng; Rotavera, Brandon; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2014-08-01

    Combined with a Herriott-type multi-pass slow flow reactor, high-resolution differential direct absorption spectroscopy has been used to probe, in situ and quantitatively, hydroxyl (OH), hydroperoxy (HO 2 ) and formaldehyde (CH 2 O) molecules in fuel oxidation reactions in the reactor, with a time resolution of about 1 micro-second. While OH and CH 2 O are probed in the mid-infrared (MIR) region near 2870nm and 3574nm respectively, HO 2 can be probed in both regions: near-infrared (NIR) at 1509nm and MIR at 2870nm. Typical sensitivities are on the order of 10 10 - 10 11 molecule cm -3 for OH at 2870nm, 10 11 molecule cm -3 for HO 2 at 1509nm, and 10 11 molecule cm -3 for CH 2 O at 3574nm. Measurements of multiple important intermediates (OH and HO 2 ) and product (CH 2 O) facilitate to understand and further validate chemical mechanisms of fuel oxidation chemistry.

  13. Concentration-modulated absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Langley, A J; Beaman, R A; Baran, J; Davies, A N; Jones, W J

    1985-07-01

    Concentration modulation is demonstrated to be a technique capable of markedly extending sensitivity limits in absorption spectroscopy. The gain generated relates in such a manner to sample transmittance that for the first reported time direct spectroscopic concentration measurements become possible. When concentration modulation is used with picosecond lasers, state lifetimes can be determined to a limit of approximately 20 psec.

  14. IR Spectroscopy and Photo-Chemistry of Extraterrestrial Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Max P.; Mastrapa, Rachel; Elsila, Jamie; Sandford, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Dense molecular clouds from which planetary systems form and the outer Solar System are both cold environments dominated by ices. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is used to probe these ices, but the IR absorptions of molecules depend on the conditions. As a result appropriate lab data is needed to correctly fit spectra of extraterrestrial ices. Such fits have shown that most of these ices are composed primarily of H2O, but also contain 1-10 percent of other simple molecules such as CO2, CO, CH4, & NH3;. We shall present near IR spectra of ice mixtures of relevance to icy outer Solar System bodies and show that they still hold surprises, such as the Cheshire cat-like CO2 (2v3) overtone near 2.134 micrometers (4685 cm-1) that is absent from spectra of pure CO2 but present in H2O-CO2 mixtures.

  15. Cross-polarized optical absorption of single-walled carbon nanotubes probed by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy, UV-Vis-IR and polarized Raman Scatterings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    2008-03-01

    Because of the depolarization effect, or so-called antenna effect, optical absorption of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is weak when excited by light polarized perpendicular to the nanotube axis. However, in photoluminescence (PL) excitation spectra of isolated SWNTs, PL peaks due to cross-polarized excitation can be clearly identified. By decomposing the cross-polarized component, the optical transition energy of E12 or E21 can be? measured, and the smaller exciton binding energy for perpendicular excitations is concluded [1]. Cross-polarized absorption is dominant in the absorption of a vertically aligned film of SWNTs [2] when excited from the top of the film. In our previous study, a pi-plasmon absorption at 5.25 eV was revealed in contrast to 4.5 eV for parallel excitation [3]. Resonant Raman scattering from such a film is also influenced by the cross-polarized excitation [4]. Even though a Kataura plot for the E33 and E44 range has been proposed by using such a vertically aligned film [5], polarized Raman scattering spectra reveal more complicated features in the system because of the small bundle size, typically 5-8 nanotubes [6]. References: [1] Y. Miyauchi, M. Oba, S. Maruyama, Phys. Rev. B 74 (2006) 205440. [2] Y. Murakami, S. Chiashi, Y. Miyauchi, M. Hu, M. Ogura, T. Okubo, S. Maruyama, Chem. Phys. Lett. 385 (2004) 298. [3] Y. Murakami, E. Einarsson, T. Edamura, S. Maruyama, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 087402. [4] Y. Murakami, S. Chiashi, E. Einarsson, S. Maruyama, Phys. Rev. B 71 (2005) 085403. [5] P. T. Araujo, S. K. Doorn, S. Kilina, S. Tretiak, E. Einarsson, S. Maruyama, H. Chacham, M. A. Pimenta, A. Jorio, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 (2007) 067401. [6] E. Einarsson, H. Shiozawa, C. Kramberger, M. H. Ruemmeli, A. Gruneis, T. Pichler, S. Maruyama, J. Phys. Chem. C (2007) published on Web.

  16. IR Cards: Inquiry-Based Introduction to Infrared Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Jacqueline; Forster, Tabetha

    2010-01-01

    As infrared spectroscopy (IR) is frequently used in undergraduate organic chemistry courses, an inductive introduction to IR spectroscopy that uses index cards printed with spectra, structures, and chemical names is described. Groups of students are given an alphabetized deck of these "IR cards" to sort into functional groups. The students then…

  17. Electron Wavepacket Interference Observed by Attosecond Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallmann, L.; Holler, M.; Schapper, F.; Keller, U.

    Attosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy is performed in a dense helium target by superimposing an attosecond pulse train (APT) with a moderately strong infrared field. We observe rapid oscillations of the absorption of the individual harmonics as a function of time-delay between the APT and IR field even for harmonic energies well below the ionization threshold. The phase dependence of these modulations on atto-chirp and IR intensity yields direct evidence for the interference of transiently bound electronic wavepackets as the underlying mechanism.

  18. Graphene intracavity spaser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovik, Yu. E.; Nechepurenko, I. A.; Dorofeenko, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    We propose an intracavity plasmon absorption spectroscopy method based on graphene active plasmonics. It is shown that the plasmonic cavity contribution to the sensitivity is proportional to the quality factor Q of the graphene plasmonic cavity and reaches two orders of magnitude. The addition of gain medium into the cavity increases the sensitivity of method. Maximum sensitivity is reached in the vicinity of the plasmon generation threshold. The gain contribution to the sensitivity is proportional to Q1/2. The giant amplification of sensitivity in the graphene plasmon generator is associated with a huge path length, limited only by the decoherence processes. An analytical estimation of the sensitivity to loss caused by analyzed particles (molecules, nanoparticles, etc.) normalized by the single pass plasmon scheme is derived. Usage of graphene nanoflakes as plasmonic cavity allows a high spatial resolution to be reached, in addition to high sensitivity.

  19. From Ultrafast Structure Determination to Steering Reactions: Mixed IR/Non-IR Multidimensional Vibrational Spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2015-09-28

    Ultrafast multidimensional infrared spectroscopy is a powerful method for resolving features of molecular structure and dynamics that are difficult or impossible to address with linear spectroscopy. Augmenting the IR pulse sequences by resonant or nonresonant UV, Vis, or NIR pulses considerably extends the range of application and creates techniques with possibilities far beyond a pure multidimensional IR experiment. These include surface-specific 2D-IR spectroscopy with sub-monolayer sensitivity, ultrafast structure determination in non-equilibrium systems, triggered exchange spectroscopy to correlate reactant and product bands, exploring the interplay of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom, investigation of interactions between Raman- and IR-active modes, imaging with chemical contrast, sub-ensemble-selective photochemistry, and even steering a reaction by selective IR excitation. We give an overview of useful mixed IR/non-IR pulse sequences, discuss their differences, and illustrate their application potential. PMID:26394274

  20. IR absorption spectra of cellulose obtained from ozonated wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Autlov, S. A.; Kharlanov, A. N.; Bazarnova, N. G.; Lunin, V. V.

    2015-08-01

    The kinetic curves of ozone absorption by aspen wood were obtained. Processing of wood with peracetic acid gave cellulose samples. The yields of ozonated wood, water-soluble compounds, and cellulose were determined for the samples corresponding to different consumptions of ozone. The IR absorption spectra of wood and cellulose isolated from ozonated wood were analyzed. The supramolecular structure of cellulose can be changed by varying the conditions of wood ozonation.

  1. New developments in IR surface vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschmugl, C.J.; Lamont, C.L.A.; Williams, G.P.

    1995-12-31

    Low frequency dynamics at surfaces, particularly in the region of the adsorbate-substrate vibrational modes is of fundamental importance in areas as varied as sliding friction, catalysis, corrosion and epitaxial growth. This paper reviews the new developments in low frequency Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation as the source. Absolute changes induced in the far infrared for several adsorbate systems on Cu, including CO and H, are dominated by broadband reflectance changes and dipole forbidden vibrational modes which in some cases are an order of magnitude stronger than the dipole allowed modes. The experimental data can be explained by a theory developed by Persson, in which the dielectric response of the substrate is seen as playing a crucial role in the dynamics. In particular the relationships between the wavelength of the light, the penetration depth and the electron mean-free path, are critical.

  2. UV-UV hole burning and IR dip spectroscopy of homophenylalanine by laser desorption supersonic jet technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Woon Yong; Ishiuchi, Shun-ichi; Çarçabal, Pierre; Oba, Hikari; Fujii, Masaaki

    2014-12-01

    Conformer selected electronic and vibrational spectra of homophenylalanine, phenylalanine analogue molecule, were measured by UV-UV hole burning and IR dip spectroscopy combined with laser desorption technique. 10 conformers were found by UV-UV hole burning spectroscopy and their structures were assigned by IR dip and UV absorption spectra with aid of quantum chemical calculations in both S0 and S1. This study shows that the combination of simulated IR and UV spectra is powerful to assign flexible molecules.

  3. A novel CO 2 gas analyzer based on IR absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Wu, Xiaoli

    2004-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2) gas analyzer can be widely used in many fields. A novel CO 2 gas analyzer based on infrared ray (IR) absorption is presented sufficiently in this paper. Applying Lambert-Beer Law, a novel space-double-beam optical structure is established successfully. The optical structure includes an IR source, a gas cell, a bandpass filter with a transmission wavelength at 4.26 μm, another bandpass filter with a transmission wavelength at 3.9 μm, and two IR detectors. Based on Redial Basic Function (RBF) artificial neural network, the measuring model of IR CO 2 analyzer is established with a high accuracy. A dynamic compensation filter is effectively designed to improve the dynamic characteristic of the IR CO 2 analyzer without gas pump. The IR CO 2 analyzer possesses the advantages of high accuracy and mechanical reliability with small volume, lightweight, and low-power consumption. Therefore, it can be used in such relevant fields as environmental protection, processing control, chemical analysis, medical diagnosis, and space environmental and control systems.

  4. Neuron absorption study and mid-IR optical excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dingkai; Chen, Xing; Vadala, Shilpa; Leach, Jennie; Kostov, Yordan; Bewley, William W.; Kim, Chul-Soo; Kim, Mijin; Canedy, Chadwick L.; Merritt, Charles D.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry R.; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2012-02-01

    Neuronal optical excitation can provide non-contacting tools to explore brain circuitry and a durable stimulation interface for cardiac pacing and visual as well as auditory sensory neuronal stimulation. To obtain accurate absorption spectra, we scan the transmission of neurons in cell culture medium, and normalize it by subtracting out the absorption spectrum of the medium alone. The resulting spectra show that the main neuronal absorption peaks are in the 3000- 6000nm band, although there is a smaller peak near 1450nm. By coupling the output of a 3μm interband cascade laser (ICL) into a mid-IR fluorozirconate fiber, we can effectively deliver more than 1J/cm2 photon intensity to the excitation site for neuronal stimulation.

  5. Infrared spectroscopy of radio-luminous OH/IR stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Terry Jay; Hyland, A. R.; Fix, John D.; Cobb, Michael L.

    1988-01-01

    Low-resolution 1.5-2.5-micron spectra for 21 radio-luminous OH/IR stars are presented. These spectra divide into two broad classes. Those with very strong water-vapor absorption closely resemble the spectra of classical Mira variables and are classified Type VM. Those with weaker water-vapor absorption, but still showing strong CO absorption, resemble the spectra of true core-burning supergiants and are classified Type SG. Comparison of the classification of 30 radio-luminous OH/IR stars with their Delta(V)s and luminosities suggests this classification is a good indicator of the intrinsic nature of the underlying star. There is some evidence, however, that some true supergiants (massive main-sequence progenitors) develop the pulsation properties and photospheric characteristics of the Mira-like OH/IR stars when they become optically obscured OH/IR stars.

  6. Preliminary study of corrosion mechanisms of actinides alloys: calibration of FT-IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Magnien, Veronique; Cadignan, Marx; Faivret, Olivier; Rosa, Gaelle

    2008-07-01

    In situ analyzes of gaseous atmospheres could be performed by FT-IR spectroscopy in order to study the corrosion reactions of actinides. Nevertheless experimental conditions and the nature of studied species have a strong effect on IR absorption laws. Thus a prior calibration of our set-up is required to obtain an accurate estimation of gas concentration. For this purpose, the behavior of several air pure gases has been investigated according to their concentration from IR spectra. Reproducible results revealed subsequent increases of the most significant peak areas with gas pressure and small deviations from Beer Lambert's law. This preliminary work allowed to determine precise absorption laws for each studied pure gas in our in situ experimental conditions. Besides our FT-IR set-up was well suitable to quantitative analysis of gaseous atmosphere during corrosion reactions. Finally the effect of foreign gas will be investigated through more complex air mixtures to obtain a complete calibration network. (authors)

  7. Further advancement of differential optical absorption spectroscopy: theory of orthogonal optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liudchik, Alexander M

    2014-08-10

    A modified version of the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method is presented. The technique is called orthogonal optical absorption spectroscopy (OOAS). A widespread variant of DOAS with smoothing of the registered spectrum and absorption cross sections being made employing a polynomial regression is a particular case of OOAS. The concept of OOAS provides a variety of new possibilities for constructing computational schemes and analyzing the influence of different error sources on calculated concentrations. PMID:25320931

  8. Absorption spectroscopy: technique provides extremely high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Provencal, R A; Paul, J B; Michael, E; Saykally, R J

    1998-06-01

    Technology associated with cavity ringdown laser absorption spectroscopy is reviewed. The technique is used to study general trace analysis, free radicals in flames and chemical reactors, molecular ions in electrical discharges, biological molecules and water clusters in supersonic jets, and vibrational overtones of stable molecules. Its specific enough to detect about 1-ppm fractional absorption by a gaseous sample in about 10 microseconds. The use of mirrors in ringdown sepctroscopy is explained. Other topics include the generation of pulsed infrared rays and the adaptation of ringdown spectroscopy for use with narrow-bandwidth continuous-wave lasers. PMID:11541906

  9. Tumor diagnostics using fiber optical IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Harald; Bindig, Uwe; Waesche, Wolfgang; Liebold, K.; Roggan, Andre; Frege, P.; Gross, U. M.; Mueller, G.

    1999-04-01

    Aim of the project is the development of an in vivo endoscopic method to differentiate between cancerous from healthy tissue. The method is based on IR spectra in which each diseased state of the tissue has its own characteristic pattern as already shown in previous experiments. Two regions (1245 - 1195) cm-1 and (1045 - 995) cm-1 within the fingerprint (less than 1500 cm-1) region were selected for analysis. This paper will present the technical design of the laboratory set up and outcome of the development as well as the experiments. Two lead-salt diode lasers were used as excitation sources. The IR-radiation was transmitted via silverhalide fibers to the tissue to be investigated. On the detection side another IR fiber was used to transmit the signal to an MCT-detector (Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride). Measurement modes are Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) and diffuse Reflection/Remission. Spatial resolution was 100 X 100 micrometer2. The tissue used for these experiments was human colon carcinoma under humidity conditions. Samples were mapped using a stepper motor powered x/y/z-translation stage with a resolution of 1 micrometer. Results were compared with measurements carried out using a FTIR-interferometer and an FTIR-microscope in the region from 4000 - 900 cm-1. Soft- and Hardware control of the experiment is done using Labwindows/CVI (National Instruments, USA).

  10. Transient 2D IR spectroscopy of charge injection in dye-sensitized nanocrystalline thin films.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Laaser, Jennifer E; Paoprasert, Peerasak; Franking, Ryan A; Hamers, Robert J; Gopalan, Padma; Zanni, Martin T

    2009-12-23

    We use nonlinear 2D IR spectroscopy to study TiO(2) nanocrystalline thin films sensitized with a Re dye. We find that the free electron signal, which often obscures the vibrational features in the transient absorption spectrum, is not observed in the 2D IR spectra. Its absence allows the vibrational features of the dye to be much better resolved than with the typical IR absorption probe. We observe multiple absorption bands but no cross peaks in the 2D IR spectra, which indicates that the dyes have at least three conformations. Furthermore, by using a pulse sequence in which we initiate electron transfer in the middle of the infrared pulse train, we are able to assign the excited state features by correlating them to the ground state vibrational modes and determine that the three conformations have different time scales and cross sections for electron injection. 2D IR spectroscopy is proving to be very useful in disentangling overlapping structural distributions in biological and chemical physics processes. These experiments demonstrate that nonlinear infrared probes are also a powerful new tool for studying charge transfer at interfaces.

  11. Standoff imaging of chemicals using IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George; Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on a standoff spectroscopic technique for identifying chemical residues on surfaces. A hand-held infrared camera was used in conjunction with a wavelength tunable mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) to create hyperspectral image arrays of a target with an explosive residue on its surface. Spectral signatures of the explosive residue (RDX) were extracted from the hyperspectral image arrays and compared with a reference spectrum. Identification of RDX was achieved for residue concentrations of 20 g per cm2 at a distance of 1.5 m, and for 5 g per cm2 at a distance of 15 cm.

  12. Simultaneous multi-beam planar array IR (pair) spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Elmore, Douglas L.; Rabolt, John F.; Tsao, Mei-Wei

    2005-09-13

    An apparatus and method capable of providing spatially multiplexed IR spectral information simultaneously in real-time for multiple samples or multiple spatial areas of one sample using IR absorption phenomena requires no moving parts or Fourier Transform during operation, and self-compensates for background spectra and degradation of component performance over time. IR spectral information and chemical analysis of the samples is determined by using one or more IR sources, sampling accessories for positioning the samples, optically dispersive elements, a focal plane array (FPA) arranged to detect the dispersed light beams, and a processor and display to control the FPA, and display an IR spectrograph. Fiber-optic coupling can be used to allow remote sensing. Portability, reliability, and ruggedness is enhanced due to the no-moving part construction. Applications include determining time-resolved orientation and characteristics of materials, including polymer monolayers. Orthogonal polarizers may be used to determine certain material characteristics.

  13. Ir Spectroscopy and Nickel (II) Hexammines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reedijk, J.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment, for the general chemistry laboratory, intended to introduce the student to infrared spectroscopy. After being introduced to the theory of molecular vibrations on an elementary level, each student receives a list of 5-7 nickel (II) ammines to be prepared, analyzed and characterized by infrared spectoscopy. (MLH)

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jesse; Ollmann, Emily; Maxey, Evan; Finney, Lydia A

    2014-01-01

    Metalloproteins are enormously important in biology. While a variety of techniques exist for studying metals in biology, X-ray absorption spectroscopy is particularly useful in that it can determine the local electronic and physical structure around the metal center, and is one of the few avenues for studying "spectroscopically silent" metal ions like Zn(II) and Cu(I) that have completely filled valence bands. While X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) are useful for studying metalloprotein structure, they suffer the limitation that the detected signal is an average of all the various metal centers in the sample, which limits its usefulness for studying metal centers in situ or in cell lysates. It would be desirable to be able to separate the various proteins in a mixture prior to performing X-ray absorption studies, so that the derived signal is from one species only. Here we describe a method for performing X-ray absorption spectroscopy on protein bands following electrophoretic separation and western blotting.

  15. Triplet absorption spectroscopy and electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoor, F.; Nazmitdinov, R. G.

    2016-09-01

    Coherence phenomena in a four-level atomic system, cyclically driven by three coherent fields, are investigated thoroughly at zero and weak magnetic fields. Each strongly interacting atomic state is converted to a triplet due to a dynamical Stark effect. Two dark lines with a Fano-like profile arise in the triplet absorption spectrum with anomalous dispersions. We provide conditions to control the widths of the transparency windows by means of the relative phase of the driving fields and the intensity of the microwave field, which closes the optical system loop. The effect of Doppler broadening on the results of the triplet absorption spectroscopy is analysed in detail.

  16. Calculation of polarized IR absorption spectra for trans-1,4-polyisoprenes of various conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulov, Kh. Sh.

    2008-07-01

    Polarized IR spectra for two conformations of trans-1,4-polyisoprene (α-and β-gutta-percha) were calculated. The IR dichroism of the absorption bands was calculated for both conformations. The computed results for polarized IR spectra and IR dichroism agree reasonably well with the respective experiment data.

  17. New applications of fiber-optic IR spectroscopy in urologic practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cytron, Shmuel E.; Kravchick, Sergey; Sela, Ben-Ami; Shulzinger, Evgeny; Vasserman, Irena; Raichlin, Yosef; Katzir, Abraham

    2002-03-01

    The objective of this work was to use infrared (IR) fiberoptic spectroscopy for the analysis of urinary salts. Urine samples were obtained (with no sample preparation) from two groups of patients: 24 stone forming patients, after shock wave lithotripsy, and 24 normal subjects of similar ages. IR absorption measurements were performed in real time, using Fiberoptic Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy system, based on IR transmitting silver halide fibers. The absorption data were compared with the IR spectra of aqueous solutions with known concentrations of known urinary salts. The results were then used for the study of the chemical composition of salts in urine samples and for a quantitative analysis of the concentration of these salts. We established the composition of the stones in 20 of the 24 stone forming patients, based on the characteristic absorption peaks for oxalates, carbonates, urates and phosphates observed in their urinary samples. We also determined the concentrations of these salts in the urine samples with average error of 20 percent.

  18. Absorption spectroscopy with quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosterev, A. A.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Gmachl, C.; Capasso, F.; Sivco, D. L.; Baillargeon, J. N.; Hutchinson, A. L.; Cho, A. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Novel pulsed and cw quantum cascade distributed feedback (QC-DFB) lasers operating near lambda=8 micrometers were used for detection and quantification of trace gases in ambient air by means of sensitive absorption spectroscopy. N2O, 12CH4, 13CH4, and different isotopic species of H2O were detected. Also, a highly selective detection of ethanol vapor in air with a sensitivity of 125 parts per billion by volume (ppb) was demonstrated.

  19. Biometrics via IR spectroscopy of the epidermis: potential and difficulties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, David M.

    2012-06-01

    We discuss the potential and difficulties of using infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the human epidermis as a biometric. We present preliminary data on the fingerpads of 9 individuals demonstrating the potential for uniqueness and stability. We also present data on the challenges presented by complications such as sebum changes, intra-individual location variability, and skin care products.

  20. Proton Transfer in Neutral Peptides Examined by Conformational Specific IR and UV Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeqx, Sander; Oomens, Jos; Rijs, Anouk M.

    2012-06-01

    The combination of UV and IR spectroscopy offers a powerful probe to study molecular structure and intramolecular interactions. With resonance enhanced multi photon ionization (REMPI), the electronically excited state of biomolecules can be probed. As different conformations have different excited state energies, peaks in the REMPI spectrum can be attributed to different conformations. This allows us to perform conformation specific IR absorption spectroscopy using IR-UV ion-dip spectroscopy (IR-IDS) in the 1800-1000 cm-1 region by employing the free electron laser FELIX. IR-IDS in combination with DFT calculations allows us to determine the gas phase conformations of biomolecules. Here, we used these techniques on Z-Glu-OH and Z-Arg-OH to reveal their conformational structure and the possible presence of proton transfer. There is an ongoing debate on the gas phase structure of arginine. Proton transfer has been suggested to occur from the C-terminal COOH group to the guanidium side chain of arginine to form a zwitterion. Moreover, there can be two tautomers of canonical arginine. Here, we will elucidate the gas phase structure of arginine. In order to promote intramolecular proton transfer, we designed a peptide which contains both the most acid (Glu) as well as the most basic residue (Arg): Z-Glu-Arg-NHMe and Z-Glu-Ala_n-Arg-NHMe. Here, the occurrence of proton transfer will be probed via the carboxylic acid C=O stretch vibration.

  1. OH absorption spectroscopy in a flame using spatial heterodyne spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartula, Renata J.; Ghandhi, Jaal B.; Sanders, Scott T.; Mierkiewicz, Edwin J.; Roesler, Fred L.; Harlander, John M.

    2007-12-01

    We demonstrate measurements of OH absorption spectra in the post-flame zone of a McKenna burner using spatial heterodyne spectroscopy (SHS). SHS permits high-resolution, high-throughput measurements. In this case the spectra span ~308-310 nm with a resolution of 0.03 nm, even though an extended source (extent of ~2×10-7 m2 rad2) was used. The high spectral resolution is important for interpreting spectra when multiple absorbers are present for inferring accurate gas temperatures from measured spectra and for monitoring weak absorbers. The present measurement paves the way for absorption spectroscopy by SHS in practical combustion devices, such as reciprocating and gas-turbine engines.

  2. Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy - GASMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, Sune

    2008-09-01

    An overview of the new field of Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy (GASMAS) is presented. GASMAS combines narrow-band diode-laser spectroscopy with diffuse media optical propagation. While solids and liquids have broad absorption features, free gas in pores and cavities in the material is characterized by sharp spectral signatures, typically 10,000 times sharper than those of the host material. Many applications in materials science, food packaging, pharmaceutics and medicine have been demonstrated. So far molecular oxygen and water vapour have been studied around 760 and 935 nm, respectively. Liquid water, an important constituent in many natural materials, such as tissue, has a low absorption at such wavelengths, allowing propagation. Polystyrene foam, wood, fruits, food-stuffs, pharmaceutical tablets, and human sinus cavities have been studied. Transport of gas in porous media can readily be studied by first immersing the material in, e.g., pure nitrogen, and then observing the rate at which normal air, containing oxygen, reinvades the material. The conductance of the sinus connective passages can be measured in this way by flushing the nasal cavity with nitrogen. Also other dynamic processes such as drying of materials can be studied. The techniques have also been extended to remote-sensing applications (LIDAR-GASMAS).

  3. Discrimination of Chinese Sauce liquor using FT-IR and two-dimensional correlation IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Su-Qin; Li, Chang-Wen; Wei, Ji-Ping; Zhou, Qun; Noda, Isao

    2006-11-01

    We applied the three-step IR macro-fingerprint identification method to obtain the IR characteristic fingerprints of so-called Chinese Sauce liquor (Moutai liquor and Kinsly liquor) and a counterfeit Moutai. These fingerprints can be used for the identification and discrimination of similar liquor products. The comparison of their conventional IR spectra, as the first step of identification, shows that the primary difference in Sauce liquor is the intensity of characteristic peaks at 1592 and 1225 cm -1. The comparison of the second derivative IR spectra, as the second step of identification, shows that the characteristic absorption in 1400-1800 cm -1 is substantially different. The comparison of 2D-IR correlation spectra, as the third and final step of identification, can discriminate the liquors from another direction. Furthermore, the method was successfully applied to the discrimination of a counterfeit Moutai from the genuine Sauce liquor. The success of the three-step IR macro-fingerprint identification to provide a rapid and effective method for the identification of Chinese liquor suggests the potential extension of this technique to the identification and discrimination of other wine and spirits, as well.

  4. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  5. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using a picosecond UV laser as a light source was developed in our institute. Tropospheric OH radicals are measured by their rotational absorption lines around 308 nm. The spectra are obtained using a high resolution spectrograph. The detection system has been improved over the formerly used optomechanical scanning device by application of a photodiode array which increased the observed spectral range by a factor of 6 and which utilizes the light much more effectively leading to a considerable reduction of the measurement time. This technique provides direct measurements of OH because the signal is given by the product of the absorption coefficient and the OH concentration along the light path according to Lambert-Beers law. No calibration is needed. Since the integrated absorption coefficient is well known the accuracy of the measurement essentially depends on the extent to which the OH absorption pattern can be detected in the spectra. No interference by self generated OH radicals in the detection lightpath has been observed. The large bandwidth (greater than 0.15 nm) and the high spectral resolution (1.5 pm) allows absolute determination of interferences by other trace gas absorptions. The measurement error is directly accessible from the absorption-signal to baseline-noise ratio in the spectra. The applicability of the method strongly depends on visibility. Elevated concentrations of aerosols lead to considerable attenuation of the laser light which reduces the S/N-ratio. In the moderately polluted air of Julich, where we performed a number of OH measurement spectra. In addition absorption features of unidentified species were frequently detected. A quantitative deconvolution even of the known species is not easy to achieve and can leave residual structures in the spectra. Thus interferences usually increase the noise and deteriorate the OH detection sensitivity. Using diode arrays for sensitive

  6. Determination of molar IR absorptivities and their errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staat, H.; Korte, E. H.

    1984-03-01

    Molar absorptivities of band maxima of acetonitrile, n-heptane, benzene, and toluene were determined from difference spectra. The statistical and most important systematic errors are given. Recently, we studied statistical and systematic errors occuring in the determination of IR absorptivities ɛ of liquids (ref. 1). Considerable systematic errors are caused by reflection losses at the outer and inner surfaces of the cell windows. It was shown that these are compensated for if the ratio of two transmittance spectra (T 1, T 2) due to different sample thicknesses (d 1, d 2) is used: In such a case Bouguer—Lambert-Beer's laws leads to ? where c denotes the concentration. The reliability of the absorptivities derived in this way, is mainly affected by the statistical error comprising the standard deviations of the transmittance measurements as well as by the systematic errors from multiple beam interference within the cell (the fringes do not compensate for each other because of their different periods) and from the finite slit width. Experimental conditions can be chosen so that errors from beam convergence, polarization, temperature variations, and thermal emission are negligible. The influences on the transmittance measurement by drift, unwanted radiation, reliability of wavenumber reading, and non-linearity of the detector system are not considered. The molar absorptivities of band maxima of acetonitrile, n-heptane, benzene, and toluene have been determined using equation (1) and are listed in the Table. The values ofΔd employed were in the order of 10 μm to 40 μm, therefore, the strongest bands could not be evaluated. The statistical error was calculated from ? and the systematic error due to finite spectral slit width (s) from ? with the band half-width 2γ. The deviation of the cell from planoparallel shape has been taken into account quantitatively, this is different to the method used previously (ref. 1). If the cell is wedge shaped so that its thickness

  7. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy: Part II. Advantages of FT-IR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    This is Part II in a series on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Described are various advantages of FT-IR spectroscopy including energy advantages, wavenumber accuracy, constant resolution, polarization effects, and stepping at grating changes. (RH)

  8. Gas-phase absorption cross sections of 24 monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the UV and IR spectral ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etzkorn, Thomas; Klotz, Björn; Sørensen, Søren; Patroescu, Iulia V.; Barnes, Ian; Becker, Karl H.; Platt, Ulrich

    Absorption cross sections of 24 volatile and non-volatile derivatives of benzene in the ultraviolet (UV) and the infrared (IR) regions of the electromagnetic spectrum have been determined using a 1080 l quartz cell. For the UV a 0.5 m Czerny-Turner spectrometer coupled with a photodiode array detector (spectral resolution 0.15 nm) was used. IR spectra were recorded with an FT-IR spectrometer (Bruker IFS-88, spectral resolution 1 cm -1). Absolute absorption cross sections and the instrument function are given for the UV, while for the IR, absorption cross sections and integrated band intensities are reported. The study focused primarily on the atmospherically relevant methylated benzenes (benzene, toluene, o-xylene, m-xylene, p-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, ethylbenzene, styrene) and their ring retaining oxidation products (benzaldehyde, o-tolualdehyde, m-tolualdehyde, p-tolualdehyde, phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol, 2,3-dimethylphenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, 2,5-dimethylphenol, 2,6-dimethylphenol, 3,4-dimethylphenol, 3,5-dimethylphenol, 2,4,6-trimethylphenol and ( E,Z)- and ( E,E)-2,4-hexadienedial). The UV absorption cross sections reported here can be used for the evaluation of DOAS spectra (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) for measurements of the above compounds in the atmosphere and in reaction chambers, while the IR absorption cross sections will primarily be useful in laboratory studies on atmospheric chemistry, where FT-IR spectrometry is an important tool.

  9. Temperature dependence of C-terminal carboxylic group IR absorptions in the amide I‧ region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Benjamin A.; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins using IR spectroscopy often rely on subtle changes in the amide I‧ band as a function of temperature. However, these changes can be obscured by the overlap with other absorptions, namely the side-chain and terminal carboxylic groups. The former were the subject of our previous report (Anderson et al., 2014). In this paper we investigate the IR spectra of the asymmetric stretch of α-carboxylic groups for amino acids representing all major types (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ser, Thr, Asp, Glu, Lys, Asn, His, Trp, Pro) as well as the C-terminal groups of three dipeptides (Gly-Gly, Gly-Ala, Ala-Gly) in D2O at neutral pH. Experimental temperature dependent IR spectra were analyzed by fitting of both symmetric and asymmetric pseudo-Voigt functions. Qualitatively the spectra exhibit shifts to higher frequency, loss in intensity and narrowing with increased temperature, similar to that observed previously for the side-chain carboxylic groups of Asp. The observed dependence of the band parameters (frequency, intensity, width and shape) on temperature is in all cases linear: simple linear regression is therefore used to describe the spectral changes. The spectral parameters vary between individual amino acids and show systematic differences between the free amino acids and dipeptides, particularly in the absolute peak frequencies, but the temperature variations are comparable. The relative variations between the dipeptide spectral parameters are most sensitive to the C-terminal amino acid, and follow the trends observed in the free amino acid spectra. General rules for modeling the α-carboxylic IR absorption bands in peptides and proteins as the function of temperature are proposed.

  10. Temperature dependence of C-terminal carboxylic group IR absorptions in the amide I' region.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Benjamin A; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins using IR spectroscopy often rely on subtle changes in the amide I' band as a function of temperature. However, these changes can be obscured by the overlap with other absorptions, namely the side-chain and terminal carboxylic groups. The former were the subject of our previous report (Anderson et al., 2014). In this paper we investigate the IR spectra of the asymmetric stretch of α-carboxylic groups for amino acids representing all major types (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ser, Thr, Asp, Glu, Lys, Asn, His, Trp, Pro) as well as the C-terminal groups of three dipeptides (Gly-Gly, Gly-Ala, Ala-Gly) in D₂O at neutral pH. Experimental temperature dependent IR spectra were analyzed by fitting of both symmetric and asymmetric pseudo-Voigt functions. Qualitatively the spectra exhibit shifts to higher frequency, loss in intensity and narrowing with increased temperature, similar to that observed previously for the side-chain carboxylic groups of Asp. The observed dependence of the band parameters (frequency, intensity, width and shape) on temperature is in all cases linear: simple linear regression is therefore used to describe the spectral changes. The spectral parameters vary between individual amino acids and show systematic differences between the free amino acids and dipeptides, particularly in the absolute peak frequencies, but the temperature variations are comparable. The relative variations between the dipeptide spectral parameters are most sensitive to the C-terminal amino acid, and follow the trends observed in the free amino acid spectra. General rules for modeling the α-carboxylic IR absorption bands in peptides and proteins as the function of temperature are proposed.

  11. Atmospheric Measurements by Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Since the last decade, atmospheric environmental monitoring has benefited from the development of novel spectroscopic measurement techniques owing to the significant breakthroughs in photonic technology from the UV to the infrared spectral domain [1]. In this presentation, we will overview our recent development and applications of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy techniques for in situ optical monitoring of chemically reactive atmospheric species (such as HONO, NO3, NO2, N2O5) in intensive campaigns [2] and/or in smog chamber studies [3]. These field deployments demonstrated that modern photonic technologies (newly emergent light sources combined with high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques) can provide a useful tool to improve our understanding of tropospheric chemical processes which affect climate, air quality, and the spread of pollution. Experimental detail and preliminary results will be presented. Acknowledgements. The financial support from the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under the NexCILAS (ANR-11-NS09-0002) and the CaPPA (ANR-10-LABX-005) contracts is acknowledged. References [1] X. Cui, C. Lengignon, T. Wu, W. Zhao, G. Wysocki, E. Fertein, C. Coeur, A. Cassez,L. Croisé, W. Chen, et al., "Photonic Sensing of the Atmosphere by absorption spectroscopy", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 113 (2012) 1300-1316 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, "Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer for measurements of atmospheric HONO and NO2 in Hong Kong", Atmos. Environ. 95 (2014) 544-551 [3] T. Wu, C. Coeur-Tourneur, G. Dhont,A. Cassez, E. Fertein, X. He, W. Chen,"Application of IBBCEAS to kinetic study of NO3 radical formation from O3 + NO2 reaction in an atmospheric simulation chamber", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 133 (2014)199-205

  12. Early fire sensing using near-IR diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomse, David S.; Hovde, D. Christian; Chen, Shin-Juh; Silver, Joel A.

    2002-09-01

    We describe research leading to a trace gas detection system based on optical absorption using near-IR diode lasers that is intended to provide early warning of incipient fires. Applications include "high loss" structures such as office buildings, hospitals, hotels and shopping malls as well as airplanes and manned spacecraft where convention smoke detectors generate unacceptably high false alarm rates. Simultaneous or near-simultaneous detection of several gases (typically carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, acetylene and hydrogen cyanide) provides high sensitivity while reducing the chance of false alarms. Continuous measurement of carbon dioxide concentrations also provides an internal check of instrument performance because ambient levels will not drop below ~350 ppm.

  13. Mid-IR fiber-optic reflectance spectroscopy for identifying the finish on wooden furniture.

    PubMed

    Poli, T; Chiantore, O; Nervo, M; Piccirillo, A

    2011-05-01

    Mid-IR fiber-optic reflectance spectroscopy (FORS) is a totally noninvasive infrared analytical technique allowing the investigation of artworks without the need for any sampling. The development and optimization of this analytical methodology can provide a tool that is capable of supporting conservators during the first steps of their interventions, yielding fast results and dramatically reducing the number of samples needed to identify the materials involved. Furthermore, since reflection IR spectra suffer from important spectral anomalies that complicate accurate spectral interpretation, it is important to characterize known reference materials and substrates in advance. This work aims to verify the possibility of investigating and identifying the most widely used wood finishes by means of fiber-optic (chalcogenide and metal halides) mid-infrared spectroscopy. Two historically widely employed wood finishes (beeswax, shellac) and two modern ones (a hydrogenated hydrocarbon resin and a microcrystalline wax) were investigated in an extended IR range (from 1000 to 6000 cm(-1)) with reflectance spectroscopy and with FORS. The broad spectral response of the MCT detector was exploited in order to include overtones and combination bands from the NIR spectral range in the investigation. The reflectance spectra were compared with those collected in transmission mode in order to highlight modifications to shapes and intensities, to assign absorptions, and finally to select "marker" bands indicating the presence of certain finishing materials, even when applied onto a substrate such as wood, which shows many absorptions in the mid-infrared region. After the characterization, the different products were applied to samples of aged pear wood and investigated with the same techniques in order to check the ability of mid-IR FORS to reveal the presence and composition of the product on the wooden substrate.

  14. Precision Saturated Absorption Spectroscopy of H3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yu-chan; Liao, Yi-Chieh; Chang, Yung-Hsiang; Peng, Jin-Long; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2016-06-01

    In our previous work on the Lamb dips of the νb{2} fundamental band of H3+, the saturated absorption spectrum was obtained by the third-derivative spectroscopy using frequency modulation [1]. However, the frequency modulation also causes error in absolute frequency determination. To solve this problem, we have built an offset-locking system to lock the OPO pump frequency to an iodine-stabilized Nd:YAG laser. With this modification, we are able to scan the OPO idler frequency precisely and obtain the profile of the Lamb dips. Double modulation (amplitude modulation of the idler power and concentration modulation of the ion) is employed to subtract the interference fringes of the signal and increase the signal-to-noise ratio effectively. To Determine the absolute frequency of the idler wave, the pump wave is offset locked on the R(56) 32-0 a10 hyperfine component of 127I2, and the signal wave is locked on a GPS disciplined fiber optical frequency comb (OFC). All references and lock systems have absolute frequency accuracy better than 10 kHz. Here, we demonstrate its performance by measuring one transition of methane and sixteen transitions of H3+. This instrument could pave the way for the high-resolution spectroscopy of a variety of molecular ions. [1] H.-C. Chen, C.-Y. Hsiao, J.-L. Peng, T. Amano, and J.-T. Shy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 263002 (2012).

  15. Tunable diode and fibre laser spectroscopy in the near-IR for measurement of gas parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, George; Johnstone, Walter; Arsad, Norhana; Duffin, Kevin

    2008-04-01

    There has been much research performed in recent years on tunable diode laser spectroscopy for detection of gases such as methane, carbon dioxide, acetylene, etc., which possess near-IR absorption lines. To attain adequate sensitivity with weak near-IR lines, wavelength modulation spectroscopy with phase-sensitive detection is normally employed. However injection current modulation of diode lasers produces both wavelength and amplitude modulation, with a phase shift dependent on the modulation frequency. This results in residual amplitude modulation on the output and in distortion of the harmonic signals derived from the absorption line. These are important issues for calibration and where it is desired to accurately recover the line-shape function in order to make simultaneous measurements of gas concentration, pressure or temperature in industrial applications. Here we discuss how calibration-free measurements may be obtained with diode lasers and explore the implications for fibre laser based systems for spectroscopy which conventionally employ thermal or piezoelectric tuning of the wavelength. In particular, we consider modulation techniques which may be applied to ring fibre lasers which use un-pumped erbium fibre as a saturable absorber to prevent mode-hopping or to DFB fibre lasers which use a short cavity with a Bragg grating to ensure single mode operation.

  16. IR/THz Double Resonance Spectroscopy Approach for Remote Chemical Detection at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Elizabeth A.; Phillips, Dane J.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Everitt, Henry O.

    2013-06-01

    A remote sensing methodology based on infrared/terahertz (IR/THz) double resonance (DR) spectroscopy is shown to overcome limitations traditionally associated with either IR or THz spectroscopic approaches for detecting trace gases in an atmosphere. The applicability of IR/THz DR spectroscopy is explored by estimating the IR and THz power requirements for detecting a 100 part-per-million-meter cloud of methyl fluoride, methyl chloride, or methyl bromide at ranges up to 1km in three atmospheric windows below 0.3 THz. These prototypical molecules are used to ascertain the dependence of the DR signal-to-noise ratio on IR and THz beam power. A line-tunable CO_2 laser with 100 ps pulse duration generates a DR signature in four rotational transitions on a time scale commensurate with collisional relaxations caused by atmospheric N_2 and O_2. A continuous wave THz beam is frequency tuned to probe one of these rotational transitions so that laser-induced absorption variations in the analyte cloud are detected as temporal power fluctuations synchronized with the laser pulses. A combination of molecule-specific physics and scenario-dependent atmospheric conditions are used to predict the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for detecting an analyte as a function of cloud column density. A methodology is presented by which the optimal IR/THz pump/probe frequencies are identified. These estimates show the potential for low concentration chemical detection in a challenging atmospheric scenario with currently available or near term hardware components.

  17. Determination of Cellulose Fiber Structure Using IR Reflectance Spectroscopy of Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkacheva, O. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and non-destructive method for analyzing the structure of cellulose fibers using IR reflectance spectroscopy from a paper surface was developed and verified for correctness. IR absorption and reflectance spectra of standard paper samples of known composition (sheets made of four fibers of different origin without additives and with additives of kaolin and chalk) were analyzed. Good correlations between these two spectral methods were found for the studied samples. Calibration curves were useful for assessing the structure of cellulose samples from XVIth century historical paper. Data on the degree of cellulose ordering that were obtained from the paper reflectance spectra indicated that the studied sheets consisted mainly of flax fibers with added cotton. This agreed fully with the historical fact that the studied samples were rag papers.

  18. Non-destructive plant health sensing using absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bledsoe, Jim; Manukian, Ara; Pearce, Michael; Weiss, Lee

    1988-01-01

    The sensor group of the 1988 EGM 4001 class, working on NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) project, investigated many different plant health indicators and the technologies used to test them. The project selected by the group was to measure chlorophyll levels using absorption spectroscopy. The spectrometer measures the amount of chlorophyll in a leaf by measuring the intensity of light of a specific wavelength that is passed through a leaf. The three wavelengths of light being used corresponded to the near-IR absorption peaks of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and chlorophyll-free structures. Experimentation showed that the sensor is indeed measuring levels of chlorophyll a and b and their changes before the human eye can see any changes. The detector clamp causes little damage to the leaf and will give fairly accurate readings on similar locations on a leaf, freeing the clamp from having to remain on the same spot of a leaf for all measurements. External light affects the readings only slightly so that measurements may be taken in light or dark environments. Future designs and experimentation will concentrate on reducing the size of the sensor and adapting it to a wider range of plants.

  19. Transient absorption spectroscopy of laser shocked explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrane, Shawn D; Dang, Nhan C; Whitley, Von H; Bolome, Cindy A; Moore, D S

    2010-01-01

    Transient absorption spectra from 390-890 nm of laser shocked RDX, PETN, sapphire, and polyvinylnitrate (PVN) at sub-nanosecond time scales are reported. RDX shows a nearly linear increase in absorption with time after shock at {approx}23 GPa. PETN is similar, but with smaller total absorption. A broad visible absorption in sapphire begins nearly immediately upon shock loading but does not build over time. PVN exhibits thin film interference in the absorption spectra along with increased absorption with time. The absorptions in RDX and PETN are suggested to originate in chemical reactions happening on picosecond time scales at these shock stresses, although further diagnostics are required to prove this interpretation.

  20. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis.

  1. Applications of Absorption Spectroscopy Using Quantum Cascade Lasers.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis.

  2. Performance of a high-resolution mid-IR optical-parametric-oscillator transient absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Echebiri, Geraldine O; Smarte, Matthew D; Walters, Wendell W; Mullin, Amy S

    2014-06-16

    We report on a mid-IR optical parametric oscillator (OPO)-based high resolution transient absorption spectrometer for state-resolved collisional energy transfer. Transient Doppler-broadened line profiles at λ = 3.3 μm are reported for HCl R7 transitions following gas-phase collisions with vibrationally excited pyrazine. The instrument noise, analyzed as a function of IR wavelength across the absorption line, is as much as 10 times smaller than in diode laser-based measurements. The reduced noise is attributed to larger intensity IR light that has greater intensity stability, which in turn leads to reduced detector noise and better frequency locking for the OPO.

  3. Rapid identification of Chinese Sauce liquor from different fermentation positions with FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changwen; Wei, Jiping; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Suqin

    2008-07-01

    FT-IR and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-IR) technology were applied to discriminate Chinese Sauce liquor from different fermentation positions (top, middle and bottom of fermentation cellar) for the first time. The liquors at top, middle and bottom of fermentation cellar, possessed the characteristic peaks at 1731 cm -1, 1733 cm -1 and 1602 cm -1, respectively. In the 2D correlation infrared spectra, the differences were amplified. A strong auto-peak at 1725 cm -1 showed in the 2D spectra of the Top Liquor, which indicated that the liquor might contain some ester compounds. Different from Top Liquor, three auto-peaks at 1695, 1590 and 1480 cm -1 were identified in 2D spectra of Middle Liquor, which were the characteristic absorption of acid, lactate. In 2D spectra of Bottom Liquor, two auto-peaks at 1570 and 1485 cm -1 indicated that lactate was the major component. As a result, FT-IR and 2D-IR correlation spectra technology provided a rapid and effective method for the quality analysis of the Sauce liquor.

  4. Differentiation of Leishmania species by FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Josafá C.; Mittmann, Josane; Ferreira, Isabelle; Ferreira-Strixino, Juliana; Raniero, Leandro

    2015-05-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic infectious disease caused by protozoa that belong to the genus Leishmania. It is transmitted by the bite of an infected female Sand fly. The disease is endemic in 88 countries Desjeux (2001) [1] (16 developed countries and 72 developing countries) on four continents. In Brazil, epidemiological data show the disease is present in all Brazilian regions, with the highest incidences in the North and Northeast. There are several methods used to diagnose leishmaniasis, but these procedures have many limitations, are time consuming, have low sensitivity, and are expensive. In this context, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) analysis has the potential to provide rapid results and may be adapted for a clinical test with high sensitivity and specificity. In this work, FT-IR was used as a tool to investigate the promastigotes of Leishmaniaamazonensis, Leishmaniachagasi, and Leishmaniamajor species. The spectra were analyzed by cluster analysis and deconvolution procedure base on spectra second derivatives. Results: cluster analysis found four specific regions that are able to identify the Leishmania species. The dendrogram representation clearly indicates the heterogeneity among Leishmania species. The band deconvolution done by the curve fitting in these regions quantitatively differentiated the polysaccharides, amide III, phospholipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. L. chagasi and L. major showed a greater biochemistry similarity and have three bands that were not registered in L. amazonensis. The L. amazonensis presented three specific bands that were not recorded in the other two species. It is evident that the FT-IR method is an indispensable tool to discriminate these parasites. The high sensitivity and specificity of this technique opens up the possibilities for further studies about characterization of other microorganisms.

  5. Using Fourier transform IR spectroscopy to analyze biological materials

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Matthew J; Trevisan, Júlio; Bassan, Paul; Bhargava, Rohit; Butler, Holly J; Dorling, Konrad M; Fielden, Peter R; Fogarty, Simon W; Fullwood, Nigel J; Heys, Kelly A; Hughes, Caryn; Lasch, Peter; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Obinaju, Blessing; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Sulé-Suso, Josep; Strong, Rebecca J; Walsh, Michael J; Wood, Bayden R; Gardner, Peter; Martin, Francis L

    2015-01-01

    IR spectroscopy is an excellent method for biological analyses. It enables the nonperturbative, label-free extraction of biochemical information and images toward diagnosis and the assessment of cell functionality. Although not strictly microscopy in the conventional sense, it allows the construction of images of tissue or cell architecture by the passing of spectral data through a variety of computational algorithms. Because such images are constructed from fingerprint spectra, the notion is that they can be an objective reflection of the underlying health status of the analyzed sample. One of the major difficulties in the field has been determining a consensus on spectral pre-processing and data analysis. This manuscript brings together as coauthors some of the leaders in this field to allow the standardization of methods and procedures for adapting a multistage approach to a methodology that can be applied to a variety of cell biological questions or used within a clinical setting for disease screening or diagnosis. We describe a protocol for collecting IR spectra and images from biological samples (e.g., fixed cytology and tissue sections, live cells or biofluids) that assesses the instrumental options available, appropriate sample preparation, different sampling modes as well as important advances in spectral data acquisition. After acquisition, data processing consists of a sequence of steps including quality control, spectral pre-processing, feature extraction and classification of the supervised or unsupervised type. A typical experiment can be completed and analyzed within hours. Example results are presented on the use of IR spectra combined with multivariate data processing. PMID:24992094

  6. IRS spectroscopy of a complete, unbiased sample of submm galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carilli, Chris; Aguirre, James; Aravena, Manuel; Aussel, Herve; Bertoldi, Frank; Sanders, Dave; Schinnerer, Eva; Scoville, Nick; Sheth, Kartik

    2008-03-01

    We propose 51.5 hours of IRS spectroscopy of a complete, luminosity limited sample of 12 submm galaxies detected at high significance at 250 GHz (> 5sigma) in the Cosmos field. These observations will address two fundamental questions concerning the submm galaxies: (i) do starbursts dominate the energetics of these systems, and if so, how do the physical conditions compare to lower z, lower luminosity starbursts?, and (ii) is there a substantial (up to 30%) high redshift tail (z > 3.6) of hyper-luminous IR galaxies? Such a high redshift tail provides key leverage into models of massive galaxy formation in the early universe. A major legacy of Spitzer has been the demonstration that accurate redshifts for distant, luminous, dust-obscured star forming galaxies can be derived from the PAH features, in addition to the important physical diagnostics on dust heating and composition that come from such spectra. Observing the high S/N, unbiased Cosmos/MAMBO sample will complete this legacy, and test the theory that submm galaxies represent the formation of large elliptical galaxies in massive, dusty starbursts in dense environments at high redshift.

  7. SPICA: Mid-IR exoplanet spectroscopy in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, I. P.; Swinyard, B.; Tessenyi, M.; Tinetti, G.

    2014-04-01

    In less than three decades, the field of exoplanetary science has undergone nothing short of a revolution. We have gone from the oddball discovery of a 'planetary sized object' orbiting a pulsar star (Wolszczan and Frail, 1992) to efficient and systematic all-sky surveys with nearly two thousand confirmed exoplanets and over three thousand candidates awaiting confirmation (Burke et al., 2013). With such wealth of systems discovered, we are constantly edging closer to finding the holy grail of planetary science: an Earth analogue with habitable conditions. To understand conditions of habitability, we must characterise the exoplanets. This is best achieved by the spectroscopy of their atmospheres in the near to mid-IR wavelength ranges (5-20 microns) where complex molecules emit. Whilst JWST/MIRI does cover these wavelength ranges in four separate filters, the importance of oneshot, simultaneous wavelength coverage to constrain stellar and planetary variability cannot be overstated. In this talk we will present the concept of a highstability spectrograph on the proposed SPICA mission, featuring a continuous wavelength coverage from the near to mid-IR, ideally placed to characterise warm- Neptunes to habitable zone planets.

  8. Near-IR Spectroscopy of Amalthea (JV) and Thebe (JXIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustani, D.; Bell, J. F., III; Veverka, J.; Brown, R. H.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    1997-07-01

    We used the NASA IRTF, the NSFCAM 256x256 InSb array camera, and the JPL Cooled Coronograph (CoCo) to obtain H and K spectra of the faint inner Jovian satellites Amalthea (JV, Mv=14.1) and Thebe (JXIV, Mv=15.7). The observations were obtained on 25 and 26 July 1996 UT, near Jupiter opposition, when the satellites had a maximum limb elongation of 36" (JV) and 49" (JXIV). CoCo was designed for imaging of faint sources in the vicinity of much brighter sources (e.g., stellar companions), but in order to further supress scattered light from Jupiter (an extended source ~ 10(4) times brighter than these faint satellites), we inserted a special hard mask aperture ahead of the NSFCAM/CoCo optical path. In order to obtain spectra with this setup we attached a crude ~ 2" wide razor-edge slit to the top of the hard mask. The resulting spectral resolution is moderate (R ~ 440 in H and R ~ 870 in K) and is adequate for initial near-IR survey spectra of these objects. We obtained 4 spectra each of JV and JXIV in H (1.44 to 1.98 mu m) and 4 spectra each of JV and JXIV in K (2.0 to 2.35 mu m), as well as comparison spectra of Titan, Mimas, two solar-type stars, and Ne and Kr wavelength calibration lamps. Our calibrated Titan and Mimas CoCo spectra are consistent with previous H and K measurements of these objects. Our preliminary spectra of Amalthea reveal a relatively featureless spectrum in the 1.44 to 1.98 mu m and 2.06 to 2.17 mu m regions, but show evidence for an as-yet unidentified absorption from 2.20 to 2.30 mu m, apparently centered near 2.27 mu m. Our preliminary spectra of Thebe reveal a relatively featureless spectrum from 1.44 to 1.65 mu m and from 2.00 to 2.27 mu m, but show evidence for an as-yet unidentified weak absorption from ~ 1.70 to ~ 1.80 mu m, centered near 1.75 mu m. Continued refinement of the reflectance and wavelength calibrations is proceeding, and possible origins and band assignments for these near-IR absorption features are being investigated.

  9. Infrared Cavity Ringdown Laser Absorption Spectroscopy of jet-cooled clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, Robert Allen

    Infrared Cavity Ringdown Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (IR-CRLAS) employing stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of pulsed dye lasers as the tunable IR source has been developed. This technique allows highly sensitive (ca. 1 ppm fractional absorption) direct absorption measurements to be performed in the 2-8 μm spectral range with complete wavelength coverage. Basic CR-LAS principles and essential SRS theory are reviewed. IR- CRLAS spectrometers based on both a Raman shifted dye laser and a pulsed Alexandrite ring laser are described. The IR-CRLAS spectrometer has been used in a comparative study of the O-H-stretching vibrations of small alcohol clusters. Results indicate an increase in the hydrogen bond strength as the alcohol chain length increases. An IR-CRLAS investigation of the aromatic C-H stretches of benzene and berizene/methane mixtures, performed in an effort to provide experimental support for a theoretically proposed ``antihydrogen bond'', produced negative results. Similarly, negative results from a visible CRLAS search for water cluster absorptions in connection with the anomalous atmospheric absorption of solar radiation are presented. Infrared laser spectroscopic studies of the structures and bonding in jet-cooled carbon clusters are discussed. The measurement and analysis of a rovibrational band at 2074 cm-1, tentatively assigned to linear C10 is presented. The astrophysical significance of carbon clusters is also discussed in conjunction with the first detection of a non polar molecule (C3) in a cold interstellar dust forming region, performed using far-infrared heterodyne spectroscopy aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory.

  10. Hydrogen Bond Lifetimes and Energetics for Solute-Solvent Complexes Studied with 2D-IR Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Junrong; Fayer, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Weak π hydrogen bonded solute-solvent complexes are studied with ultrafast two dimensional infrared (2D-IR) vibrational echo chemical exchange spectroscopy, temperature dependent IR absorption spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Eight solute-solvent complexes composed of a number of phenol derivatives and various benzene derivatives are investigated. The complexes are formed between the phenol derivative (solute) in a mixed solvent of the benzene derivative and CCl4. The time dependence of the 2D-IR vibrational echo spectra of the phenol hydroxyl stretch is used to directly determine the dissociation and formation rates of the hydrogen bonded complexes. The dissociation rates of the weak hydrogen bonds are found to be strongly correlated with their formation enthalpies. The correlation can be described with an equation similar to the Arrhenius equation. The results are discussed in terms of transition state theory. PMID:17373792

  11. Stencil lithography of gold-black IR absorption coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjwani, Deep; Yesiltas, Mehmet; Singh, Simranjit; Barco, Enrique Del; Peale, R. E.; Hirschmugl, Carol; Sedlemair, Julia

    2014-09-01

    Gold black coatings are deposited through a stencil shadow mask to produce infrared-absorbing patterns with sub-mm lateral dimensions. Such dimensions match the characteristic pitch of Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) array bolometers. Infrared spectral imaging with sub-micron spatial resolution reveals the spatial distribution of absorption across the pattern.

  12. Application of Fourier-transform infrared (FT-ir) spectroscopy to in-situ studies of coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Ottesen, D K; Thorne, L R

    1982-04-01

    The feasibility of using Fourier-transform infrared (FT-ir) spectroscopy for in situ measurement of gas phase species concentrations and temperature during coal combustion is examined. This technique is evaluated in terms of its potential ability to monitor several important chemical and physical processes which occur in pulverized coal combustion. FT-ir absorption measurements of highly sooting, gaseous hydrocarbon/air flames are presented to demonstrate the fundamental usefulness of the technique for in situ detection of gas phase temperatures and species concentrations in high temperature combustion environments containing coal, char, mineral matter and soot particles. Preliminary results for coal/gaseous fuel/air flames are given.

  13. Indirect Terahertz Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions Using Highly Accurate and Precise Mid-Ir Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Andrew A.; Ford, Kyle B.; Kreckel, Holger; Perera, Manori; Crabtree, Kyle N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2009-06-01

    With the advent of Herschel and SOFIA, laboratory methods capable of providing molecular rest frequencies in the terahertz and sub-millimeter regime are increasingly important. As of yet, it has been difficult to perform spectroscopy in this wavelength region due to the limited availability of radiation sources, optics, and detectors. Our goal is to provide accurate THz rest frequencies for molecular ions by combining previously recorded microwave transitions with combination differences obtained from high precision mid-IR spectroscopy. We are constructing a Sensitive Resolved Ion Beam Spectroscopy setup which will harness the benefits of kinematic compression in a molecular ion beam to enable very high resolution spectroscopy. This ion beam is interrogated by continuous-wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy using a home-made widely tunable difference frequency laser that utilizes two near-IR lasers and a periodically-poled lithium niobate crystal. Here, we report our efforts to optimize our ion beam spectrometer and to perform high-precision and high-accuracy frequency measurements using an optical frequency comb. footnote

  14. Composition of the Martian aerosols through near-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erard, Stephane; Cerroni, Priscilla; Coradini, Angioletta

    1993-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy is a powerful technique to study the composition of planetary surfaces, as the main minerals exhibit absorption bands in this spectral range. It gave important information on the mineralogy and petrology of Mars in the past twenty years although in this case it is well known that a large fraction of light is scattered by the airborne particles before reaching the surface. The measured signal is thus the sum of two different contributions that should be studied separately: One from the surface and one from the aerosols that depends on their density, size distribution and composition. Data from the ISM imaging spectrometer are used here to derive the aerosols spectrum. They consist in sets of spectra (from 0.76 to 3.16 microns) of approximately 3000 pixels approximately 25x25 sq km in size. The resulting spectrum exhibits both water-ice and clay mineral features superimposed on a scattering continuum.

  15. Development of a Near-Ir Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectrometer for the Detection of Atmospheric Oxidation Products and Organoamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddingsaas, Nathan C.; Jewell, Breanna; Thurnherr, Emily

    2014-06-01

    An estimated 10,000 to 100,000 different compounds have been measured in the atmosphere, each one undergoes many oxidation reactions that may or may not degrade air quality. To date, the fate of even some of the most abundant hydrocarbons in the atmosphere is poorly understood. One difficulty is the detection of atmospheric oxidation products that are very labile and decompose during analysis. To study labile species under atmospheric conditions, a highly sensitive, non-destructive technique is needed. Here we describe a near-IR incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) setup that we are developing to meet this end. We have chosen to utilize the near-IR, where vibrational overtone absorptions are observed, due to the clean spectral windows and better spectral separation of absorption features. In one spectral window we can simultaneously and continuously monitor the composition of alcohols, hydroperoxides, and carboxylic acids in an air mass. In addition, we have used our CEAS setup to detect organoamines. The long effective path length of CEAS allows for low detection limits, even of the overtone absorption features, at ppb and ppt levels.

  16. Detection of starch adulteration in onion powder by FT-NIR and FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lohumi, Santosh; Lee, Sangdae; Lee, Wang-Hee; Kim, Moon S; Mo, Changyeun; Bae, Hanhong; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2014-09-24

    Adulteration of onion powder with cornstarch was identified by Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The reflectance spectra of 180 pure and adulterated samples (1-35 wt % starch) were collected and preprocessed to generate calibration and prediction sets. A multivariate calibration model of partial least-squares regression (PLSR) was executed on the pretreated spectra to predict the presence of starch. The PLSR model predicted adulteration with an R(p)2 of 0.98 and a standard error of prediction (SEP) of 1.18% for the FT-NIR data and an R(p)2 of 0.90 and SEP of 3.12% for the FT-IR data. Thus, the FT-NIR data were of greater predictive value than the FT-IR data. Principal component analysis on the preprocessed data identified the onion powder in terms of added starch. The first three principal component loadings and β coefficients of the PLSR model revealed starch-related absorption. These methods can be applied to rapidly detect adulteration in other spices.

  17. Ir Spectroscopy of Selected Atmospheric Monoterpenes and Oxydation Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles Moreno, Juan-Ramon; Huet, T. R.; Goubet, Manuel; Soulard, Pascale; Asselin, Pierre; Georges, Robert; Pirali, Olivier; Roy, P.

    2014-06-01

    Several monoterpenes are biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCS) present in the atmosphere. They can react with OH, O_3, NO_x, etc. to give rise to several oxydation and degradation products. We have studied the gas phase spectroscopy of monocyclic (limonene, γ-terpinene) and bicyclic (α-pinene, β-pinene) atmospheric monoterpenes (C10H_{16}), as well as two C10H_{14O} oxydation products (perillaldehyde, carvone). In the first step of this work, theoretical calculations and microwave spectroscopy were used in order to evidence the most stable conformers and their relative energies. In the present communication we will present the results of the IR study. Infrared spectra have been recorded on the FTIR spectrometer of the AILES beamline at synchrotron SOLEIL, using the Jet-AILES molecular beam and a long path cell. Special attention was given to the 700-1300 wn atmospheric window, to the CH vibration region, and to the "finger print" FIR region. Quantum calculations have been performed at different levels of theory (DFT, ab initio). In particular anharmonic force fields were obtained in order to model the vibrational structures. J. R. Aviles Moreno, F. Partal Urena, J. J. Lopez Gonzalez and T. R. Huet, C. Phys. Lett. 473 (2009) 17 J. R. Aviles Moreno, T. R. Huet, F. Partal Urena, J. J. Lopez Gonzalez, Struc. Chem. 24 (2013) 1163 J. R. Aviles Moreno, E. Neeman, T. R. Huet, manuscript in preparation Support from the French Laboratoire d'Excellence CaPPA (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) through contract ANR-10-LABX-0005 of the Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir is acknowledged. The experiment on the AILES beam-line at synchrotron SOLEIL was performed under project number 20130192.

  18. Human LDL Structural Diversity Studied by IR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Higuero, José A.; Salvador, Ana M.; Martín, Cesar; Milicua, José Carlos G.; Arrondo, José L. R.

    2014-01-01

    Lipoproteins are responsible for cholesterol traffic in humans. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) delivers cholesterol from liver to peripheral tissues. A misleading delivery can lead to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. LDL has a single protein, apoB-100, that binds to a specific receptor. It is known that the failure associated with a deficient protein-receptor binding leads to plaque formation. ApoB-100 is a large single lipid-associated polypeptide difficulting the study of its structure. IR spectroscopy is a technique suitable to follow the different conformational changes produced in apoB-100 because it is not affected by the size of the protein or the turbidity of the sample. We have analyzed LDL spectra of different individuals and shown that, even if there are not big structural changes, a different pattern in the intensity of the band located around 1617 cm−1 related with strands embedded in the lipid monolayer, can be associated with a different conformational rearrangement that could affect to a protein interacting region with the receptor. PMID:24642788

  19. Study of a V-shape flame based on IR spectroscopy and IR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouplin, J.; Collin, A.; Acem, Z.; Parent, G.; Boulet, P.; Vena, P.; Galizzi, C.; Kühni, M.; André, F.; Escudié, D.

    2016-01-01

    Applicability of an IR imaging/spectroscopy diagnostic was tested on a laboratory- scale flame. For this purpose, measurements were carried out on a V-shape flame developed along a wall, with the aim of evaluating the wall temperature and of identifying the flame properties (temperature and species concentrations). Infrared measurements with a multiband camera and a spectrometer were post-processed and compared, in particular, with thermocouple measurements carried out for the wall temperature. Simple evaluation involving a correction for the emissivity showed a quite good agreement when assessed against experimental data. An attempt to reconstruct a flame emission spectrum was also carried out, expecting a possible inverse identification of the flame properties. The method showed a promising behaviour on synthetic data built with a radiative transfer model for gas and wall radiation. However, the spectrum reconstruction method is not yet accurate enough to allow an identification of the flame properties in full confidence when applied to actual experimental data. First tests showed a correct qualitative behaviour, but model refinements are required at least for the flame radiation, before getting accurate flame properties.

  20. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy on a smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Ast, Sandra; Rutledge, Peter J.; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    A self-powered smartphone-based field-portable "dual" spectrometer has been developed for both absorption and fluorescence measurements. The smartphone's existing flash LED has sufficient optical irradiance to undertake absorption measurements within a 3D-printed case containing a low cost nano-imprinted polymer diffraction grating. A UV (λex ~ 370 nm) and VIS (λex ~ 450 nm) LED are wired into the circuit of the flash LED to provide an excitation source for fluorescence measurements. Using a customized app on the smartphone, measurements of absorption and fluorescence spectra are demonstrated using pH-sensitive and Zn2+-responsive probes. Detection over a 300 nm span with 0.42 nm/pixel spectral resolution is demonstrated. Despite the low cost and small size of the portable spectrometer, the results compare well with bench top instruments.

  1. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis. PMID:25239063

  2. Ultrafast carrier dynamics of titanic acid nanotubes investigated by transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhao, Hui; Pan, Lin Yun; Weng, Yu Xiang; Nakato, Yoshihiro; Tamai, Naoto

    2010-12-01

    Carrier dynamics of titanic acid nanotubes (phase of H2Ti2O5.H2O) deposited on a quartz plate was examined by visible/near-IR transient absorption spectroscopy with an ultraviolet excitation. The carrier dynamics of titanic acid nanotubes follows the fast trapping process which attributed to the intrinsic tubular structure, the relaxation of shallow trapped carriers and the recombination as a second-order kinetic process. Transient absorption of titanic acid nanotubes was dominated by the absorption of surface-trapped holes in visible region around 500 nm, which was proved by the faster decay dynamics in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol as a hole-scavenger. However, the slow relaxation of free carriers was much more pronounced in the TiO2 single crystals, as compared with the transient absorption spectra of titanic acid nanotubes under the similar excitation.

  3. Plant Sunscreens in Nature: UV and IR Spectroscopy of Sinapate Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Jacob C.; Walsh, Patrick S.; Zwier, Timothy S.; Allais, Florent

    2013-06-01

    Plants are exposed to prolonged amounts of UV radiation, with elevated levels of UV-B (280-320 nm) as the ozone layer is depleted. When UV-B radiation penetrates the leaf epidermis, substantial oxidative damage can occur to plant tissues and plant growth can be inhibited. Sinapate esters, particularly sinapoyl malate, have been shown to efficiently prevent such damaging effects. By studying a series of molecules in this unique class under the isolated, cold conditions of a supersonic expansion, the fundamental UV-spectroscopic properties and photophysical aspects following UV absorption can be interrogated in detail. Sinapic acid and neutral sinapoyl malate were brought into the gas phase by laser desorption and detected via resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI). IR-UV double resonance methods were employed to obtain single-conformation UV and IR spectra. As the UV chromophore of interest is the sinapoyl moiety, sinapic acid served as the simplest model to compare directly to the more functionalized sinapoyl malate. It has a spectrum much like most aromatics, with a strong {ππ}^* origin, and well-resolved vibronic structure. By contrast, the spectrum for sinapoyl malate displays a large, broad absorption with little resolved vibronic structure, reflecting its role in nature as a pivotal and efficient UV protectant for plants, serving as the plant's sunscreen. Using conformer-specific IR spectroscopy, the individual conformations of both species were assigned and used as the basis for further ab initio calculations of the excited states that give rise to the observed behavior. Landry, L.G.; Chapple, C.S.; Last, R.L. Plant Physiol. {1995}, 109, 1159-1166.

  4. New High-Resolution Absorption Cross-Section Measurements of HCFC-142B in the Mid-Ir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bris, Karine; Strong, Kimberly; Melo, Stella

    2009-06-01

    HCFC-142b (1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane) is a temporary substitute for ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). However, due to its high absorption cross-sections in the mid-IR, HCFC-142b is also a highly potent greenhouse gas, now detectable from space by satellite missions. So far, the accuracy of the retrieval has been limited by the lack of reference data in a range of temperatures compatible with atmospheric observations. We present new absorption cross section measurements of HCFC-142b at high-resolution (0.02 cm^{-1}) from 223 K to 283 K in the 600 cm^{-1}- 4000 cm^{-1} spectral window. The composite spectra are calculated for each temperature from a set of acquisitions at different pressures by Fourier transform spectroscopy.

  5. IR fiber-optic evanescent wave spectroscopy (FEWS) for sensing applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzir, Abraham

    2016-03-01

    We developed crystalline AgClBr fibers of diameters 0.7-0.9mm that are flexible, non-toxic, insoluble in water and highly transparent between 4-15µm. We used these fibers for various sensing applications. Highly sensitive absorption measurements in the mid-IR may be carried out by Fiber-optic Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy (FEWS). A typical FEWS system is based on three mid-IR components: a tunable source, a detector and a AgClBr fiber sensor that is brought in contact with the samples. We used FTIR spectrometers or tunable gas lasers or quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as mid-IR sources. We used this FEWS system for measurements on gases, liquids and solids. In particular we used it for several biomedical applications. Measurements in vivo: (1) Early detection of skin diseases (e.g. melanoma). (2) Measurements on cells and bacteria. (3) Measurements on cornea. Measurements in vitro: (4) Characterization of urinary and biliary stones. (5) Blood measurements. The FEWS method is simple, inexpensive and does not require sample processing. It would be useful for diagnostic measurements on the outer part of the body of a patient, as well as for endoscopic measurements. It would also useful for measurements on tissue samples removed from the body. In addition we develop Scanning Near-field Infrared Microscope that will be used for spectral imaging with sub-wavelength resolution in the mid-IR. The various AgClBr fiber-optic sensors are expected to be important diagnostic tools at the hand of physicians in the future.

  6. [Study of retrieving formaldehyde with differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Jin; Xie, Pin-Hua; Qin, Min; Qu, Xiao-Ying; Hu, Lin

    2009-01-01

    The present paper introduces the method of retrieving the concentration of HCHO with differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). The authors measured ambient HCHO in Beijing region with the help of differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument made by ourself, and discussed numerous factors in retrieving the concentration of HCHO with differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), especially, the choice of HCHO wave band, how to avoid absorption of ambient SO2, NO2 and O3, and the influence of the Xenon lamp spectrum structure on the absorption of ambient HCHO. The authors achieved the HCHO concentration by simultaneously retrieving the concentrations of HCHO, SO2, NO2 and O3 with non-linear least square fitting method, avoiding the effect of choosing narrow wave of HCHO and the residual of SO2, NO2, O3 and the Xenon lamp spectrum structure in retrieving process to attain the concentration of HCHO, Finally the authors analyzed the origin of error in retrieving the concentration of HCHO with differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), and the total error is within 13.7% in this method. PMID:19385238

  7. Atomic absorption spectroscopy with high temperature flames.

    PubMed

    Willis, J B

    1968-07-01

    An account is given of the history of the development of high temperature flames for the atomic absorption measurement of metals forming refractory oxides. The principles governing the design of premix burners for such flames, and the relative merits of different types of nebulizer burner systems are described. After a brief account of the structure and emission characteristics of the premixed oxygen-acetylene and nitrous oxide-acetylene flames, the scope and limitations of the latter flame in chemical analysis are discussed.

  8. Impact and radiation influence on solid hydrocarbon transformation and structuring (by IR-spectroscopy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, O.

    2009-04-01

    Solid hydrocarbons (bitumens)-typical specimens of natural organic minerals-are one of the most essential objects of petroleum geology and at the same time-one of the least investigated objects of organic mineralogy. Moreover they can be treated as admissible analogs of meteorite carbonaceous materials. According to terrestrial analog of meteoritic organic matter it's possible to estimate the chemical structure of extraterrestrial matter. Further investigation of impact force and radiation influence on the bitumen chemical structure change will make it possible to connect them with extraterrestrial organic matter. This work represents the research of impact influence on the processes of transformation and structuring of asphaltite and changes in the molecular structure of solid bitumens constituting the carbonization series (asphaltite--kerite--anthraxolite), which were subjected to the impact of high radiation doses (10 and 100 Mrad) by infrared spectroscopy (IRS). In percussion experiments peak pressure varied from 10 to 63.4 GPa; temperature - from the first tens degrees to several hundreds degrees Celsius. The radiation experiment was performed in the Arzamas-16 Federal Nuclear Center in line with conditions described in [1]. Asphaltite, which sustained shock load from 17.3 to 23 GPa, didn't undergo considerable changes in its element composition. Though their IR-spectra differ from the spectrum of initial asphaltite by heightened intensity of absorption bands of aromatic groups, as well as by insignificant rise of heterogroups and condensed structures oscillation strength. At the same time the intensity of aliphatic (СН2 and СН3) groups absorption hasn't changed. Probably there've just been the carbon and hydrogen atomic rearrangement. However, shock load up to 26.7 GPa leads to asphaltite transformation into the albertite. There've been observed the intensity decrease of aliphatic groups on its IR-spectrum. Under growth of shock load up to 60 GPa bitumen

  9. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing.

    PubMed

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-02-17

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF₂ microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line.

  10. ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy in the region of 500-230 cm -1 for identification of inorganic red pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahur, Signe; Knuutinen, Ulla; Leito, Ivo

    2009-08-01

    It is demonstrated that micro-ATR-FT-IR in the low wave number range (500-230 cm -1) can be well used for identification of pigments in paint samples thereby markedly extending the possibilities of pigment identification by ATR-IR spectroscopy into the realm of pigments having no absorptions in the mid-IR region. Reference spectra of pigments can be conveniently obtained by mixing them with linseed oil in approximately 1:1 mass ratio. Vermilion (or cinnabar), read lead, different red iron oxide pigments and cadmium red can be identified. In some cases the method can be used alone for pigment identification and in many cases it provides useful additional evidence for pigment identification using other instrumental techniques (electron microprobe analysis, XRF, optical microscopy).

  11. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing.

    PubMed

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF₂ microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line. PMID:26901199

  12. Tunable Microcavity-Stabilized Quantum Cascade Laser for Mid-IR High-Resolution Spectroscopy and Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Borri, Simone; Siciliani de Cumis, Mario; Insero, Giacomo; Bartalini, Saverio; Cancio Pastor, Pablo; Mazzotti, Davide; Galli, Iacopo; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Eliyahu, Danny; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Akikusa, Naota; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute; De Natale, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The need for highly performing and stable methods for mid-IR molecular sensing and metrology pushes towards the development of more and more compact and robust systems. Among the innovative solutions aimed at answering the need for stable mid-IR references are crystalline microresonators, which have recently shown excellent capabilities for frequency stabilization and linewidth narrowing of quantum cascade lasers with compact setups. In this work, we report on the first system for mid-IR high-resolution spectroscopy based on a quantum cascade laser locked to a CaF2 microresonator. Electronic locking narrows the laser linewidth by one order of magnitude and guarantees good stability over long timescales, allowing, at the same time, an easy way for finely tuning the laser frequency over the molecular absorption line. Improvements in terms of resolution and frequency stability of the source are demonstrated by direct sub-Doppler recording of a molecular line. PMID:26901199

  13. Diode laser absorption spectroscopy of lithium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, Ignacio E.; González, Iván A.

    2016-10-01

    We study Doppler-limited laser intensity absorption, in a thermal lithium vapor containing 7Li and 6Li atoms in a 9 to 1 ratio, using a narrow-linewidth single-longitudinal-mode tunable external cavity diode laser at the wavelength of 670.8 nm. The lithium vapor was embedded in helium or argon buffer gas. The spectral lineshapes were rigorously predicted for D_1 and D_2 for the lithium 6 and 7 isotope lines using reduced optical Bloch equations, specifically derived, from a density matrix analysis. Here, a detailed comparison is provided of the predicted lineshapes with the measured 7Li-D_2, 7Li-D_1, 6Li-D_2 and 6Li-D_1 lines, in the case of high vapor density and with intensity above the saturation intensity. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such detailed comparison is reported in the open literature. The calculations were also extended to saturated absorption spectra and compared to measured Doppler-free 7Li-D_2 and 6Li-D_2 hyperfine lines.

  14. Determination of methyl radical concentrations in a methane/air flame by infrared cavity ringdown laser absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, J.J.; Aniolek, K.W.; Cernansky, N.P.; Rakestraw, D.J.

    1997-10-01

    Infrared cavity ringdown laser absorption spectroscopy (IR-CRLAS) is employed to determine absolute methyl radical concentrations in a 37.5 Torr laminar methane/air flame. IR-CRLAS rovibrational absorption spectra of the {nu}{sub 3} fundamental band system near 3200thinspcm{sup {minus}1} are combined with N{sub 2}-CARS temperature measurements to obtain methyl radical concentrations as a function of height above the burner surface. These data are compared with flame chemistry simulations under both stoichiometric and rich flame conditions. Issues regarding the applicability of IR-CRLAS for combustion studies are discussed, including the uncertainties present for the specific case of methyl radical. These IR-CRLAS measurements indicate the ability to monitor reactants, intermediates, and products within a narrow spectral window, and, to our knowledge, constitute the first infrared detection of a polyatomic radical in a flame. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. A combined IR/IR and IR/UV spectroscopy study on the proton transfer coordinate of isolated 3-hydroxychromone in the electronic ground and excited state.

    PubMed

    Stamm, A; Weiler, M; Brächer, A; Schwing, K; Gerhards, M

    2014-10-21

    In this paper the excited state proton transfer (ESPT) of isolated 3-hydroxychromone (3-HC), the prototype of the flavonols, is investigated for the first time by combined IR/UV spectroscopy in molecular beam experiments. The IR/UV investigations are performed both for the electronically excited and electronic ground state indicating a spectral overlap of transitions of the 3-HC monomer and clusters with water in the electronic ground state, whereas in the excited state only the IR frequencies of the proton-transferred monomer structure are observed. Due to the loss of isomer and species selectivity with respect to the UV excitations IR/IR techniques are applied in order to figure out the assignment of the vibrational transitions in the S0 state. In this context the quadruple resonance IR/UV/IR/UV technique (originally developed to distinguish different isomers in the electronically excited state) could be applied to identify the OH stretching vibration of the monomer in the electronic ground state. In agreement with calculations the OH stretching frequency differs significantly from the corresponding values of substituted hydroxychromones.

  16. Molecular shock response of explosives: electronic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrne, Shawn D; Moore, David S; Whitley, Von H; Bolme, Cindy A; Eakins, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the question of the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference from the shock front as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation hypotheses and the need for time dependent absorption data (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  17. Transmittance, Reflectance, and Emission Spectroscopy of Meteorites from the UV to the IR Spectral Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Koulen, J. M.; Ferrari, S.; Martellato, E.

    2016-08-01

    Transmittance, reflectance, and emissivity Spectra of six meteorites have been collected at the Planetary Spectroscopy Laboratory (PSL) of DLR in Berlin in the whole spectral range from the UV to the IR.

  18. Phthalocyanine adsorption to graphene on Ir(111): Evidence for decoupling from vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Endlich, M. Gozdzik, S.; Néel, N.; Kröger, J.; Rosa, A. L. da; Frauenheim, T.; Wehling, T. O.

    2014-11-14

    Phthalocyanine molecules have been adsorbed to Ir(111) and to graphene on Ir(111). From a comparison of scanning tunneling microscopy images of individual molecules adsorbed to the different surfaces alone it is difficult to discern potential differences in the molecular adsorption geometry. In contrast, vibrational spectroscopy using inelastic electron scattering unequivocally hints at strong molecule deformations on Ir(111) and at a planar adsorption geometry on graphene. The spectroscopic evidence for the different adsorption configurations is supported by density functional calculations.

  19. Developing a Transdisciplinary Teaching Implement for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explain why I wrote the set of teaching notes on Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and why they look the way they do. The notes were intended as a student reference to question, highlight and write over as much as they wish during an initial practical demonstration of the threshold concept being introduced, in this case…

  20. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Walter

    1982-01-01

    The status of current techniques and methods of atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy (flame, hybrid, and furnace AA) is discussed, including limitations. Technological opportunities and how they may be used in AA are also discussed, focusing on automation, microprocessors, continuum AA, hybrid analyses, and others. (Author/JN)

  1. Visualizing the Solute Vaporization Interference in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockery, Christopher R.; Blew, Michael J.; Goode, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Every day, tens of thousands of chemists use analytical atomic spectroscopy in their work, often without knowledge of possible interferences. We present a unique approach to study these interferences by using modern response surface methods to visualize an interference in which aluminum depresses the calcium atomic absorption signal. Calcium…

  2. Laser photothermal spectroscopy of light-induced absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Skvortsov, L A

    2013-01-31

    Basic methods of laser photothermal spectroscopy, which are used to study photoinduced absorption in various media, are briefly considered. Comparative analysis of these methods is performed and the latest results obtained in this field are discussed. Different schemes and examples of their practical implementation are considered. (review)

  3. Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy of a Lasing Material: Ruby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposti, C. Degli; Bizzocchi, L.

    2007-01-01

    Ruby is a crystalline material, which comes very expensive and is of great significance, as it helped in the creation of first laser. An experiment to determine the absorption and emission spectroscopy, in addition to the determination of the room-temperature lifetime of the substance is being described.

  4. Titanium-silicon oxide film structures for polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Iain E.; Zorn, Stefan; Richter, Gunther; Srot, Vesna; Kelsch, Marion; van Aken, Peter A.; Skoda, Maximilian; Gerlach, Alexander; Spatz, Joachim P.; Schreiber, Frank

    2010-01-01

    We present a titanium-silicon oxide film structure that permits polarization modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy on silicon oxide surfaces. The structure consists of a ~6 nm sputtered silicon oxide film on a ~200 nm sputtered titanium film. Characterization using conventional and scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray reflectometry is presented. We demonstrate the use of this structure to investigate a selectively protein-resistant self-assembled monolayer (SAM) consisting of silane-anchored, biotin-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). PEG-associated IR bands were observed. Measurements of protein-characteristic band intensities showed that this SAM adsorbed streptavidin whereas it repelled bovine serum albumin, as had been expected from its structure. PMID:20418963

  5. UV-Vis Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy at air-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rubia-Payá, Carlos; de Miguel, Gustavo; Martín-Romero, María T; Giner-Casares, Juan J; Camacho, Luis

    2015-11-01

    UV-Visible Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (UVRAS) technique is reviewed with a general perspective on fundamental and applications. UVRAS is formally identical to IR Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS), and therefore, the methodology developed for this IR technique can be applied in the UV-visible region. UVRAS can be applied to air-solid, air-liquid or liquid-liquid interfaces. This review focuses on the use of UVRAS for studying Langmuir monolayers. We introduce the theoretical framework for a successful understanding of the UVRAS data, and we illustrate the usage of this data treatment to a previous study from our group comprising an amphiphilic porphyrin. For ultrathin films with a thickness of few nm, UVRAS produces positive or negative bands when p-polarized radiation is used, depending on the incidence angle and the orientation of dipole absorption. UVRAS technique provides highly valuable information on tilt of chromophores at the air-liquid interface, and moreover allows the determination of optical parameters. We propose UVRAS as a powerful technique to investigate the in situ optical properties of Langmuir monolayers. PMID:26385430

  6. IR and IR + UV spectroscopy of isolated [Al-AcPheOMe]n+ cluster cations (n = 1, 3).

    PubMed

    Bialach, P M; Martin, T C; Gerhards, M

    2012-06-14

    Singly and triply charged cationic clusters of aluminium and the protected amino acid AcPheOMe are investigated in a supersonic beam by using a combination of a thermic and a laser ablation ion source. For the singly charged species UV- and IR photodissociation spectroscopy is applied. In the case of the triply charged clusters a variant of combined IR + UV spectroscopy is used to obtain information in the NH-stretching region. By comparison with DFT calculations structural assignments are suggested and it turns out that both clusters prefer a helical arrangement with aluminium being aggregated to both carbonyl groups. For the triply charged cluster a globular structure is formed in which aluminium is captured both by the carbonyl groups and the phenyl ring.

  7. FT-IR spectroscopy characterization of schwannoma: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Isabelle; Neto, Lazaro P. M.; das Chagas, Maurilio José; Carvalho, Luís. Felipe C. S.; dos Santos, Laurita; Ribas, Marcelo; Loddi, Vinicius; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    Schwannoma are rare benign neural neoplasia. The clinical diagnosis could be improved if novel optical techniques are performed. Among these techniques, FT-IR is one of the currently techniques which has been applied for samples discrimination using biochemical information with minimum sample preparation. In this work, we report a case of a schwannoma in the cervical region. A histological examination described a benign process. An immunohistochemically examination demonstrated positivity to anti-S100 protein antibody, indicating a diagnosis of schwannoma. The aim of this analysis was to characterize FT-IR spectrum of the neoplastic and normal tissue in the fingerprint (1000-1800 cm-1) and high wavenumber region (2800-3600 cm-1). The IR spectra were collect from tumor tissue and normal nerve samples by a FT-IR spectrophotometer (Spotlight Perkin Elmer 400, USA) with 64 scans, and resolution of 4 cm-1. A total of twenty spectra were recorded (10 from schwannoma and 10 from nerve). Multivariate Analysis was used to classify the data. Through average and standard deviation analysis we observed that the main spectral change occurs at ≍1600 cm-1 (amide I) and ≍1400 cm-1 (amide III) in the fingerprint region, and in CH2/CH3 protein-lipids and OH-water vibrations for the high wavenumber region. In conclusion, FT-IR could be used as a technique for schwannoma analysis helping to establish specific diagnostic.

  8. Rapid discrimination of extracts of Chinese propolis and poplar buds by FT-IR and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan-Wen; Sun, Su-Qin; Zhao, Jing; Li, Yi; Zhou, Qun

    2008-07-01

    The extract of Chinese propolis (ECP) has recently been adulterated with that of poplar buds (EPB), because most of ECP is derived from the poplar plant, and ECP and EPB have almost identical chemical compositions. It is very difficult to differentiate them by using the chromatographic methods such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC). Therefore, how to effectively discriminate these two mixtures is a problem to be solved urgently. In this paper, a rapid method for discriminating ECP and EPB was established by the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra combined with the two-dimensional infrared correlation (2D IR) analysis. Forty-three ECP and five EPB samples collected from different areas of China were analyzed by the FT-IR spectroscopy. All the ECP and EPB samples tested show similar IR spectral profiles. The significant differences between ECP and EPB appear in the region of 3000-2800 cm -1 of the spectra. Based on such differences, the two species were successfully classified with the soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) pattern recognition technique. Furthermore, these differences were well validated by a series of temperature-dependent dynamic FT-IR spectra and the corresponding 2D IR plots. The results indicate that the differences in these two natural products are caused by the amounts of long-chain alkyl compounds (including long-chain alkanes, long-chain alkyl esters and long chain alkyl alcohols) in them, rather than the flavonoid compounds, generally recognized as the bioactive substances of propolis. There are much more long-chain alkyl compounds in ECP than those in EPB, and the carbon atoms of the compounds in ECP remain in an order Z-shaped array, but those in EPB are disorder. It suggests that FT-IR and 2D IR spectroscopy can provide a valuable method for the rapid differentiation of similar natural products, ECP and EPB. The IR spectra could directly reflect the integrated chemical

  9. Temperature dependence of amino acid side chain IR absorptions in the amide I' region.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Benjamin A; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Amide I' IR spectra are widely used for studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins as a function of temperature. Temperature dependent absorptions of amino acid side-chains that overlap the amide I' may significantly complicate the structural analyses. While the side-chain IR spectra have been investigated previously, thus far their dependence on temperature has not been reported. Here we present the study of the changes in the IR spectra with temperature for side-chain groups of aspartate, glutamate, asparagine, glutamine, arginine, and tyrosine in the amide I' region (in D2O). Band fitting analysis was employed to extract the temperature dependence of the individual spectral parameters, such as peak frequency, integrated intensity, band width, and shape. As expected, the side-chain IR bands exhibit significant changes with temperature. The majority of the spectral parameters, particularly the frequency and intensity, show linear dependence on temperature, but the direction and magnitude vary depending on the particular side-chain group. The exception is arginine, which exhibits a distinctly nonlinear frequency shift with temperature for its asymmetric CN3H5(+) bending signal, although a linear fit can account for this change to within ~1/3 cm(-1). The applicability of the determined spectral parameters for estimations of temperature-dependent side-chain absorptions in peptides and proteins are discussed.

  10. Multiwavelength diode-laser absorption spectroscopy using external intensity modulation by semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Karagiannopoulos, Solon; Cheadle, Edward; Wright, Paul; Tsekenis, Stylianos; McCann, Hugh

    2012-12-01

    A novel opto-electronic scheme for line-of-sight Near-IR gas absorption measurement based on direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) is reported. A diode-laser-based, multiwavelength system is designed for future application in nonintrusive, high temporal resolution tomographic imaging of H2O in internal combustion engines. DAS is implemented with semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) to enable wavelength multiplexing and to induce external intensity modulation for phase-sensitive detection. Two overtone water transitions in the Near-IR have been selected for ratiometric temperature compensation to enable concentration measurements, and an additional wavelength is used to account for nonabsorbing attenuation. A wavelength scanning approach was used to evaluate the new modulation technique, and showed excellent absorption line recovery. Fixed-wavelength, time-division-multiplexing operation with SOAs has also been demonstrated. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time SOAs have been used for modulation and switching in a spectroscopic application. With appropriate diode laser selection this scheme can be also used for other chemical species absorption measurements. PMID:23207374

  11. Multiwavelength diode-laser absorption spectroscopy using external intensity modulation by semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Karagiannopoulos, Solon; Cheadle, Edward; Wright, Paul; Tsekenis, Stylianos; McCann, Hugh

    2012-12-01

    A novel opto-electronic scheme for line-of-sight Near-IR gas absorption measurement based on direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) is reported. A diode-laser-based, multiwavelength system is designed for future application in nonintrusive, high temporal resolution tomographic imaging of H2O in internal combustion engines. DAS is implemented with semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) to enable wavelength multiplexing and to induce external intensity modulation for phase-sensitive detection. Two overtone water transitions in the Near-IR have been selected for ratiometric temperature compensation to enable concentration measurements, and an additional wavelength is used to account for nonabsorbing attenuation. A wavelength scanning approach was used to evaluate the new modulation technique, and showed excellent absorption line recovery. Fixed-wavelength, time-division-multiplexing operation with SOAs has also been demonstrated. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time SOAs have been used for modulation and switching in a spectroscopic application. With appropriate diode laser selection this scheme can be also used for other chemical species absorption measurements.

  12. Impact and radiation influence on solid hydrocarbon transformation and structuring (by IR-spectroscopy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, O.

    2009-04-01

    Solid hydrocarbons (bitumens)-typical specimens of natural organic minerals-are one of the most essential objects of petroleum geology and at the same time-one of the least investigated objects of organic mineralogy. Moreover they can be treated as admissible analogs of meteorite carbonaceous materials. According to terrestrial analog of meteoritic organic matter it's possible to estimate the chemical structure of extraterrestrial matter. Further investigation of impact force and radiation influence on the bitumen chemical structure change will make it possible to connect them with extraterrestrial organic matter. This work represents the research of impact influence on the processes of transformation and structuring of asphaltite and changes in the molecular structure of solid bitumens constituting the carbonization series (asphaltite--kerite--anthraxolite), which were subjected to the impact of high radiation doses (10 and 100 Mrad) by infrared spectroscopy (IRS). In percussion experiments peak pressure varied from 10 to 63.4 GPa; temperature - from the first tens degrees to several hundreds degrees Celsius. The radiation experiment was performed in the Arzamas-16 Federal Nuclear Center in line with conditions described in [1]. Asphaltite, which sustained shock load from 17.3 to 23 GPa, didn't undergo considerable changes in its element composition. Though their IR-spectra differ from the spectrum of initial asphaltite by heightened intensity of absorption bands of aromatic groups, as well as by insignificant rise of heterogroups and condensed structures oscillation strength. At the same time the intensity of aliphatic (СН2 and СН3) groups absorption hasn't changed. Probably there've just been the carbon and hydrogen atomic rearrangement. However, shock load up to 26.7 GPa leads to asphaltite transformation into the albertite. There've been observed the intensity decrease of aliphatic groups on its IR-spectrum. Under growth of shock load up to 60 GPa bitumen

  13. Communication: XUV transient absorption spectroscopy of iodomethane and iodobenzene photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drescher, L.; Galbraith, M. C. E.; Reitsma, G.; Dura, J.; Zhavoronkov, N.; Patchkovskii, S.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Mikosch, J.

    2016-07-01

    Time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy of iodomethane and iodobenzene photodissociation at the iodine pre-N4,5 edge is presented, using femtosecond UV pump pulses and XUV probe pulses from high harmonic generation. For both molecules the molecular core-to-valence absorption lines fade immediately, within the pump-probe time-resolution. Absorption lines converging to the atomic iodine product emerge promptly in CH3I but are time-delayed in C6H5I. We attribute this delay to the initial π → σ* excitation in iodobenzene, which is distant from the iodine reporter atom. We measure a continuous shift in energy of the emerging atomic absorption lines in CH3I, attributed to relaxation of the excited valence shell. An independent particle model is used to rationalize the observed experimental findings.

  14. Biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy and metalloproteomics.

    PubMed

    Ascone, Isabella; Strange, Richard

    2009-05-01

    In the past seven years the size of the known protein sequence universe has been rapidly expanding. At present, more then five million entries are included in the UniProtKB/TrEMBL protein database. In this context, a retrospective evaluation of recent X-ray absorption studies is undertaken to assess its potential role in metalloproteomics. Metalloproteomics is the structural and functional characterization of metal-binding proteins. This is a new area of active research which has particular relevance to biology and for which X-ray absorption spectroscopy is ideally suited. In the last three years, biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (BioXAS) has been included among the techniques used in post-genomics initiatives for metalloprotein characterization. The emphasis of this review is on the progress in BioXAS that has emerged from recent meetings in 2007-2008. Developments required to enable BioXAS studies to better contribute to metalloproteomics throughput are also discussed. Overall, this paper suggests that X-ray absorption spectroscopy could have a higher impact on metalloproteomics, contributing significantly to the understanding of metal site structures and of reaction mechanisms for metalloproteins. PMID:19395808

  15. FT-IR spectroscopy of lipoproteins—A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krilov, Dubravka; Balarin, Maja; Kosović, Marin; Gamulin, Ozren; Brnjas-Kraljević, Jasminka

    2009-08-01

    FT-IR spectra, in the frequency region 4000-600 cm -1, of four major lipoprotein classes: very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and two subclasses of high density lipoproteins (HDL 2 and HDL 3) were analyzed to obtain their detailed spectral characterization. Information about the protein domain of particle was obtained from the analysis of amide I band. The procedure of decomposition and curve fitting of this band confirms the data already known about the secondary structure of two different apolipoproteins: apo A-I in HDL 2 and HDL 3 and apo B-100 in LDL and VLDL. For information about the lipid composition and packing of the particular lipoprotein the well expressed lipid bands in the spectra were analyzed. Characterization of spectral details in the FT-IR spectrum of natural lipoprotein is necessary to study the influence of external compounds on its structure.

  16. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P.

    1993-12-01

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  17. Multiphoton cascade absorption in single molecule fluorescence saturation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Winckler, Pascale; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2013-05-01

    Saturation spectroscopy is a relevant method to investigate photophysical parameters of single fluorescent molecules. Nevertheless, the impact of a gradual increase, over a broad range, of the laser excitation on the intramolecular dynamics is not completely understood, particularly concerning their fluorescence emission (the so-called brightness). Thus, we propose a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study to interpret the unexpected evolution of the brightness with the laser power taking into account the cascade absorption of two and three photons. Furthermore, we highlight the key role played by the confocal observation volume in fluorescence saturation spectroscopy of single molecules in solution.

  18. Beta-decay studies using total absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GSI-TAS Collaboration; LUCRECIA-TAgS Collaboration; Algora, A.; Batist, L.; Borge, M. J. G.; Cano-Ott, D.; Collatz, R.; Courtin, S.; Dessagne, Ph; Fraile, L. M.; Gadea, A.; Gelletly, W.; Hellström, M.; Janas, Z.; Jungclaus, A.; Kirchner, R.; Karny, M.; Le Scornet, G.; Miehé, Ch; Maréchal, F.; Moroz, F.; Nácher, E.; Poirier, E.; Roeckl, E.; Rubio, B.; Rykaczewski, K.; Tain, J. L.; Tengblad, O.; Wittmann, V.

    2003-04-01

    . Beta-decay experiments are a primary source of information for nuclear-structure studies and at the same time complementary to in-beam investigations of nuclei far from stability. Although both types of experiment are mainly based on γ -ray spectroscopy, they face different experimental problems. The so-called Pandemonium effect is a critical problem in β -decay if we are to test theoretically calculated transition probabilities. In this contribution we will present a solution to this problem using total absorption spectroscopy methods. We will also present some examples of experiments carried out with the Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS) at GSI an describe a new device LUCRECIA recently installed at CERN.

  19. Ir-Spectroscopy of Glycine and its Complexes with Water in Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letzner, M.; Grün, S. A.; Schwaab, G.; Havenith, M.

    2011-06-01

    Glycine is the smallest amino acid, and therefore it is of special interest as a model and starting point for theoretical and experimental studies. Whereas the crystalline form of glycine consists of zwitterions NH_3+-CH_2-COO-, gas phase glycine is known to exist in the nonionized form NH_2-CH_2-COOH. The interaction between glycine and water has been widely studied using a large variety of theoretical methods. Depending on the theoretical level used, a stabilisation of the zwitterionic form is predicted for complexes containing from 2 to 7 water molecules. In low-temperature Ar matrices a set of characteristic IR absorption bands for the zwitterionic form has been observed. The higher stoichiometry complexes (glycine)\\cdots(H_2O)_n with n larger than 3 are demonstrated to be zwitterionic H-bonded complexes. The multitude of conformations expected for these glycine-water complexes makes a combination of low temperature and high resolution spectroscopy essential. We want to use the advantages of our experiment to investigate glycine and its complexes with water in helium-nanodroplets at ultracold temperatures in the range from 3000-3800 Cm-1. Our measurements were carried out using a high power IR-OPO (cw: 2.7 W) as radiation source and a helium nanodroplet spectrometer. Helium-nanodroplets are formed by expansion of helium at 55 bar through a 5 μm nozzle which is kept at a temperature of 16 K. The status of the project is presented. P.-G. Jönsson et al., Acta Crystallogr., Sect. B: Struct. Crystallogr. Cryst. Chem. 28, 1827 (1972) G. Junk et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 85, 839 (1963) R. Ramaekers et al., J. Chem. Phys., 120 (2004)

  20. Determination of Ethanol in Gasoline by FT-IR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Alfred, Jr.; Goldcamp, Michael J.; Barrett, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol is the primary oxygenate in gasoline in the United States. Gasoline containing various percentages of ethanol is readily available in the market place. A laboratory experiment has been developed in which the percentage of ethanol in hexanes can easily be determined using the O-H and alkane C-H absorptions in an infrared spectrum. Standard…

  1. Label free detection of phospholipids by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Tahsin; Foster, Erick; Vigil, Genevieve; Khan, Aamir A.; Bohn, Paul; Howard, Scott S.

    2014-08-01

    We present our study on compact, label-free dissolved lipid sensing by combining capillary electrophoresis separation in a PDMS microfluidic chip online with mid-infrared (MIR) absorption spectroscopy for biomarker detection. On-chip capillary electrophoresis is used to separate the biomarkers without introducing any extrinsic contrast agent, which reduces both cost and complexity. The label free biomarker detection could be done by interrogating separated biomarkers in the channel by MIR absorption spectroscopy. Phospholipids biomarkers of degenerative neurological, kidney, and bone diseases are detectable using this label free technique. These phospholipids exhibit strong absorption resonances in the MIR and are present in biofluids including urine, blood plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid. MIR spectroscopy of a 12-carbon chain phosphatidic acid (PA) (1,2-dilauroyl-snglycero- 3-phosphate (sodium salt)) dissolved in N-methylformamide, exhibits a strong amide peak near wavenumber 1660 cm-1 (wavelength 6 μm), arising from the phosphate headgroup vibrations within a low-loss window of the solvent. PA has a similar structure to many important phospholipids molecules like phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and phosphatidylserine (PS), making it an ideal molecule for initial proof-of-concept studies. This newly proposed detection technique can lead us to minimal sample preparation and is capable of identifying several biomarkers from the same sample simultaneously.

  2. Simultaneous near-IR spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging to assess cerebral oxygenation and brain water during hypoxia-ischemia in two-week-old rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, R. A.; Tuor, U. I.; Foniok, T.; Bascaramurty, S.; Ringland, K.; McKenzie, E.; Qiao, M.; Tomanek, B.; Mantsch, Henry H.

    2001-10-01

    Cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy can potentially probe several parameters related to the onset of stroke and the ensuing tissue damage. One obvious marker of ischemia is cerebral oxygenation, which can be lowered sharply in stroke-affected tissue. Also commonly assessed, though less straightforward to recover, is the redox state of the cytochrome aa3 copper center. Finally, parameters that are in principle available but seldom recovered from in vivo near-IR spectra are changes in water concentration and scattering properties of the tissue. We have evaluated the potential for near-IR spectroscopy to detect relevant changes in cerebral oxygenation, blood volume, water content, and scattering properties in an infant rat stroke model that is well characterized by magnetic resonance imaging methods. The specific aim was to acquire near-IR spectra simultaneously with MR images and to correlate stroke-associated changes detected via these two modalities prior to, during and after a hypoxia-ischemia episode within this stroke model. Presented here are results from the design and testing of a near-IR illumination/detection system that is compatible with an MR imaging system, and the recovery of trends in the near-IR spectra that complement the hypoxic-ischemic changes observed in the MR images. Unexpectedly large intensity changes observed for the in vivo near-IR water absorptions are ascribed to hypoxia-induced variations in effective optical pathlength, suggesting that the water absorptions may prove generally useful as a means to track such changes.

  3. Terahertz vibrational absorption spectroscopy using microstrip-line waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, M. B.; Cunningham, J.; Tych, K.; Burnett, A. D.; Stringer, M. R.; Wood, C. D.; Dazhang, L.; Lachab, M.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.

    2008-11-01

    We demonstrate that terahertz microstrip-line waveguides can be used to measure absorption spectra of polycrystalline materials with a high frequency resolution (˜2 GHz) and with a spatial resolution that is determined by the microstrip-line dimensions, rather than the free-space wavelength. The evanescent terahertz-bandwidth electric field extending above the microstrip line interacts with, and is modified by, overlaid dielectric samples, thus enabling the characteristic vibrational absorption resonances in the sample to be probed. As an example, the terahertz absorption spectrum of polycrystalline lactose monohydrate was investigated; the lowest lying mode was observed at 534(±2) GHz, in excellent agreement with free-space measurements. This microstrip technique offers both a higher spatial and frequency resolution than free-space terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and requires no contact between the waveguide and sample.

  4. External-Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser Spectroscopy for Mid-IR Transmission Measurements of Proteins in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Alcaráz, Mirta R; Schwaighofer, Andreas; Kristament, Christian; Ramer, Georg; Brandstetter, Markus; Goicoechea, Héctor; Lendl, Bernhard

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we report mid-IR transmission measurements of the protein amide I band in aqueous solution at large optical paths. A tunable external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) operated in pulsed mode at room temperature allowed one to apply a path length of up to 38 μm, which is four times larger than that applicable with conventional FT-IR spectrometers. To minimize temperature-induced variations caused by background absorption of the ν2-vibration of water (HOH-bending) overlapping with the amide I region, a highly stable temperature control unit with relative temperature stability within 0.005 °C was developed. An advanced data processing protocol was established to overcome fluctuations in the fine structure of the emission curve that are inherent to the employed EC-QCL due to its mechanical instabilities. To allow for wavenumber accuracy, a spectral calibration method has been elaborated to reference the acquired IR spectra to the absolute positions of the water vapor absorption bands. Employing this setup, characteristic spectral features of five well-studied proteins exhibiting different secondary structures could be measured at concentrations as low as 2.5 mg mL(-1). This concentration range could previously only be accessed by IR measurements in D2O. Mathematical evaluation of the spectral overlap and comparison of second derivative spectra confirm excellent agreement of the QCL transmission measurements with protein spectra acquired by FT-IR spectroscopy. This proves the potential of the applied setup to monitor secondary structure changes of proteins in aqueous solution at extended optical path lengths, which allow experiments in flow through configuration.

  5. Acoustic levitation as an IR spectroscopy sampling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, J. T.; Brill, T. B.

    1989-02-01

    Acoustic levitation of liquid droplets (/lt/4 mm diameter), bubbles,and solid particles is described as an unusual sampling techniquefor obtaining the infrared spectrum of samples that might be incompatiblewith conventional sample support methods, and for studies of materialsunder extreme conditions. Excellent FT-IR spectra were recorded ofbubbles of a concentrated aqueous nitrate solution, of mineral oil,and of an aqueous surfactant solution. Polymethacrylic acidpacking foam also produced a high-quality spectrum. Large aqueousdroplets and dense solids gave unsatisfactory spectra. The designof the levitator and various spectroscopic considerations are discussed.

  6. Use of absorption spectroscopy for refined petroleum product discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Michael

    1991-07-01

    On-line discrimination between arbitrary petroleum products is necessary for optimal control of petroleum refinery and pipeline operation and process control involving petroleum distillates. There are a number of techniques by which petroleum products can be distinguished from one another. Among these, optical measurements offer fast, non-intrusive, real-time characterization. The application examined here involves optically monitoring the interface between dissimilar batches of fluids in a gasoline pipeline. After examination of near- infrared and mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform mid-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was chosen as the best candidate for implementation. On- line FTIR data is presented, verifying the applicability of the technique for batch interface detection.

  7. Structural dynamics of membrane proteins - time-resolved and surface-enhanced IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heberle, Joachim

    2013-03-01

    Membrane proteins are the target of more than 50% of all drugs and are encoded by about 30% of the human genome. Electrophysiological techniques, like patch-clamp, unravelled many functional aspects of membrane proteins but suffer from structural sensitivity. We have developed Surface Enhanced Infrared Difference Absorption Spectroscopy (SEIDAS) to probe potential-induced structural changes of a protein on the level of a monolayer. A novel concept is introduced to incorporate membrane proteins into solid supported lipid bilayers in an orientated manner via the affinity of the His-tag to the Ni-NTA terminated gold surface. General applicability of the methodological approach is shown by tethering photosystem II to the gold surface. In conjunction with hydrogenase, the basis is set towards a biomimetic system for hydrogen production. Recently, we succeeded to record IR difference spectra of a monolayer of sensory rhodopsin II under voltage-clamp conditions. This approach opens an avenue towards mechanistic studies of voltage-gated ion channels with unprecedented structural and temporal sensitivity. Initial vibrational studies on the novel light-gated channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) will be presented. ChR2 represents a versatile tool in the new field of optogenetics where physiological reactions are controlled by light.

  8. High Resolution FIR and IR Spectroscopy of Methanol Isotopologues

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, R. M.; Xu, Li-Hong; Appadoo, D. R. T.; Billinghurst, B.

    2010-02-03

    New astronomical facilities such as HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory, the SOFIA airborne IR telescope and the ALMA sub-mm telescope array will yield spectra from interstellar and protostellar sources with vastly increased sensitivity and frequency coverage. This creates the need for major enhancements to laboratory databases for the more prominent interstellar 'weed' species in order to model and account for their lines in observed spectra in the search for new and more exotic interstellar molecular 'flowers'. With its large-amplitude internal torsional motion, methanol has particularly rich spectra throughout the FIR and IR regions and, being very widely distributed throughout the galaxy, is perhaps the most notorious interstellar weed. Thus, we have recorded new spectra for a variety of methanol isotopic species on the high-resolution FTIR spectrometer on the CLS FIR beamline. The aim is to extend quantum number coverage of the data, improve our understanding of the energy level structure, and provide the astronomical community with better databases and models of the spectral patterns with greater predictive power for a range of astrophysical conditions.

  9. Investigation of the coal fly ashes using IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozgawa, W.; Król, M.; Dyczek, J.; Deja, J.

    2014-11-01

    The results of FT-IR spectroscopic studies of coal fly ashes, originated from various polish power plants are reported. The results of MIR investigations were compared to the X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements and chemical analyses. They are mainly composed of silica, alumina and lime. The infrared spectrum in the middle range can be used to describe both the structure of phases present in the fly ash and to identify the characteristic elements of the individual components of ash. The results indicate that the amount of aluminosilicate and its Si/Al ratio induce a shift in the T-O stretching band appearing at 950-1100 cm-1. Moreover, FWHM of these bands indicates the participation of the crystalline phase relative to amorphous. The presence of carbonate phases generates substantial changes in the 1450-1400 cm-1 area of the spectra. The presence of such phases as anhydrite, mullite or illite has also been established on the basis of IR spectra.

  10. VLT near- to mid-IR imaging and spectroscopy of the M 17 UC1 - IRS5 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nürnberger, Dieter E. A.; Chini, Rolf; Jiang, Zhibo; Fang, Min

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the surroundings of the hypercompact H ii region M 17 UC1 to probe the physical properties of the associated young stellar objects and the environment of massive star formation. Methods: We use diffraction-limited near-IR (VLT/NACO) and mid-IR (VLT/VISIR) images to reveal the different morphologies at various wavelengths. Likewise, we investigate the stellar and nebular content of the region with VLT/SINFONI integral field spectroscopy with a resolution R ˜ 1500 at H + K bands. Results: Five of the seven point sources in this region show L-band excess emission. A geometric match is found between the H2 emission and near-IR polarized light in the vicinity of IRS5A, and between the diffuse mid-IR emission and near-IR polarization north of UC1. The H2 emission is typical for dense photodissociation regions (PDRs), which are initially far-ultraviolet pumped and repopulated by collisional de-excitation. The spectral types of IRS5A and B273A are B3-B7 V/III and G4-G5 III, respectively. The observed infrared luminosity LIR in the range 1-20 μm is derived for three objects; we obtain 2.0 × 103 L⊙ for IRS5A, 13 L⊙ for IRS5C, and 10 L⊙ for B273A. Conclusions: IRS5 might be a young quadruple system. Its primary star IRS5A is confirmed to be a high-mass protostellar object (˜9 M⊙, ˜1 × 105 yrs); it might have terminated accretion due to the feedback from stellar activities (radiation pressure, outflow) and the expanding H ii region of M 17. The object UC1 might also have terminated accretion because of the expanding hypercompact H ii region, which it ionizes. The disk clearing process of the low-mass young stellar objects in this region might be accelerated by the expanding H ii region. The outflows driven by UC1 are running south-north with its northeastern side suppressed by the expanding ionization front of M 17; the blue-shifted outflow lobe of IRS5A is seen in two types of tracers along the same line of sight in the form of H2 emission

  11. Study on Angelica and its different extracts by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-xia; Sun, Su-qin; Lv, Guang-hua; Chan, Kelvin K. C.

    2006-05-01

    In order to develop a rapid and effective analysis method for studying integrally the main constituents in the medicinal materials and their extracts, discriminating the extracts from different extraction process, comparing the categories of chemical constituents in the different extracts and monitoring the qualities of medicinal materials, we applied Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) associated with second derivative infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D-IR) to study the main constituents in traditional Chinese medicine Angelica and its different extracts (extracted by petroleum ether, ethanol and water in turn). The findings indicated that FT-IR spectrum can provide many holistic variation rules of chemical constituents. Use of the macroscopical fingerprint characters of FT-IR and 2D-IR spectrum can not only identify the main chemical constituents in medicinal materials and their different extracts, but also compare the components differences among the similar samples. This analytical method is highly rapid, effective, visual and accurate for pharmaceutical research.

  12. IR absorption and surface-enhanced Raman spectra of the isoquinoline alkaloid berberine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strekal', N. D.; Motevich, I. G.; Nowicky, J. W.; Maskevich, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    We present the IR absorption and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of the isoquinoline alkaloid berberine adsorbed on a silver hydrosol and on the surface of a silver electrode for different potentials. Based on quantum chemical calculations, for the first time we have assigned the vibrations in the berberine molecule according to vibrational mode. The effect of the potential of the silver electrode on the geometry of sorption of the molecule on the surface is considered, assuming a short-range mechanism for enhancement of Raman scattering.

  13. Picosecond ir hole-burning spectroscopy on HDO ice Ih

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, G.; Weidlich, K.; Graener, H.

    1997-12-01

    Transient hole-burning experiments using picosecond ir pulses in the region of the OH stretching vibration of crystalline HDO (in D2O) ice are reported; holes with a minimum width of 26 cm-1 are measured, proving the OH band to be inhomogeneously broadened. The inhomogeneous distribution having a half width of approximately 25 cm-1 can be related to structural disorder in ice. A vibrational lifetime of 0.5 ps<=T1<=2 ps is found for the OH stretching mode. Additional features in the transient data are attributed to the dissipation of excess energy; particularly microscopic energy flow in the immediate surroundings of primarily excited OH groups can be monitored.

  14. IR spectroscopy of pyridine-water structures in helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Pablo; Letzner, Melanie; Endres, Torsten; Schwaab, Gerhard; Havenith, Martina

    2014-05-14

    We present the results of an IR spectroscopic study of pyridine-water heterodimer formation in helium nanodroplets. The experiments were carried out in the frequency range of the pyridine C-H stretch region (3055-3100 cm(-1)) and upon water deuteration in the D-O stretch region (2740-2800 cm(-1)). In order to come to an unambiguous assignment we have determined the angle between the permanent dipole and the vibrational transition moment of the aggregates. The experiments have been accompanied by theoretical simulations which yielded two minimum structures with a 16.28 kJ mol(-1) energy difference. The experimentally observed bands were assigned to two structures with different H-bonds: an N···H bond and a bifurcated O···H-C bond.

  15. The Secret IR Lives of Cepheids: Spitzer IRS Spectroscopy of Circumstellar Envelopes, Winds and Chromospheric Emissions in Nearby Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward; Engle, Scott; Evans, Nancy; Harper, Graham; Marenago, Massimo

    2007-05-01

    We are carrying out an intensive study of the physical and evolutionary properties of Classical Cepheids, known as the 'Secret Lives of Cepheids' (SLiC) program. This program covers a wide range of periods and pulsation amplitudes, and makes use of X-ray/UV/optical observations. The major science goals of our proposed Spitzer program are to investigate two recently discovered characteristics of Classical Cepheids, hitherto unknown. These are the presence of circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) around three nearby Cepheids (Polaris, delta Cep and L Car - all SLiC program stars), and the existence of O VI (1032/36A) and C III (977A) emission lines in the far-UV spectra of two program stars - Polaris and beta Dor. These lines form in the chromospheres/transition regions of the Cepheids and, in the case of beta Dor, show variations that correlate to the pulsations of the star. We propose SST/IRS high-resolution spectroscopy of these four nearby, bright Classical Cepheids, three of which have been found, from long-baseline near-IR interferometry, to have CSEs ~0.5-3.0 AU from the central star. From the proposed IRS spectra, we will determine the physical characteristics of the circumstellar material/envelopes, likely arising from mass loss or, given the young ages of Cepheids, debris disks. Also, we will use the IRS spectra to explore the presence of emission lines related to those discovered in the far-UV. Possible low density He I and H I wind lines will also be measured, if present. As in the case of the FUSE far-UV observations, SST/IRS also provides the opportunity to observe and measure these emission lines at wavelengths where the Cepheid photospheric continua are very low. In the near-UV to near-IR regions, emission lines are overwhelmed by the photospheric continua. With the modest amount of time requested (~1.86-hours), the proposed IRS observations will be crucial in understanding these newly discovered characteristics of Astronomy's most important and 'best

  16. Pathlength Determination for Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Liang; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Svanberg, Sune

    2014-01-01

    Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy (GASMAS) has been extensively studied and applied during recent years in, e.g., food packaging, human sinus monitoring, gas diffusion studies, and pharmaceutical tablet characterization. The focus has been on the evaluation of the gas absorption pathlength in porous media, which a priori is unknown due to heavy light scattering. In this paper, three different approaches are summarized. One possibility is to simultaneously monitor another gas with known concentration (e.g., water vapor), the pathlength of which can then be obtained and used for the target gas (e.g., oxygen) to retrieve its concentration. The second approach is to measure the mean optical pathlength or physical pathlength with other methods, including time-of-flight spectroscopy, frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry and the frequency domain photon migration method. By utilizing these methods, an average concentration can be obtained and the porosities of the material are studied. The last method retrieves the gas concentration without knowing its pathlength by analyzing the gas absorption line shape, which depends upon the concentration of buffer gases due to intermolecular collisions. The pathlength enhancement effect due to multiple scattering enables also the use of porous media as multipass gas cells for trace gas monitoring. All these efforts open up a multitude of different applications for the GASMAS technique. PMID:24573311

  17. APPLICATION OF ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY TO ACTINIDE PROCESS ANALYSIS AND MONITORING

    SciTech Connect

    Lascola, R.; Sharma, V.

    2010-06-03

    The characteristic strong colors of aqueous actinide solutions form the basis of analytical techniques for actinides based on absorption spectroscopy. Colorimetric measurements of samples from processing activities have been used for at least half a century. This seemingly mature technology has been recently revitalized by developments in chemometric data analysis. Where reliable measurements could formerly only be obtained under well-defined conditions, modern methods are robust with respect to variations in acidity, concentration of complexants and spectral interferents, and temperature. This paper describes two examples of the use of process absorption spectroscopy for Pu analysis at the Savannah River Site, in Aiken, SC. In one example, custom optical filters allow accurate colorimetric measurements of Pu in a stream with rapid nitric acid variation. The second example demonstrates simultaneous measurement of Pu and U by chemometric treatment of absorption spectra. The paper concludes with a description of the use of these analyzers to supplement existing technologies in nuclear materials monitoring in processing, reprocessing, and storage facilities.

  18. Hydrogen bonding and Raman, IR, and 2D-IR spectroscopy of dilute HOD in liquid D2O.

    PubMed

    Auer, B; Kumar, R; Schmidt, J R; Skinner, J L

    2007-09-01

    We present improvements on our previous approaches for calculating vibrational spectroscopy observables for the OH stretch region of dilute HOD in liquid D2O. These revised approaches are implemented to calculate IR and isotropic Raman spectra, using the SPC/E simulation model, and the results are in good agreement with experiment. We also calculate observables associated with three-pulse IR echoes: the peak shift and 2D-IR spectrum. The agreement with experiment for the former is improved over our previous calculations, but discrepancies between theory and experiment still exist. Using our proposed definition for hydrogen bonding in liquid water, we decompose the distribution of frequencies in the OH stretch region in terms of subensembles of HOD molecules with different local hydrogen-bonding environments. Such a decomposition allows us to make the connection with experiments and calculations on water clusters and more generally to understand the extent of the relationship between transition frequency and local structure in the liquid.

  19. Absorption spectroscopy with sub-angstrom beams: ELS in STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, John C. H.

    2006-03-01

    Electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) performed using a modern transmission scanning electron microscope (STEM) now offers sub-nanometre spatial resolution and an energy resolution down to 200 meV or less, in favourable cases. The absorption spectra, which probe empty states, cover the soft x-ray region and may be obtained under conditions of well-defined momentum transfer (angle-resolved), providing a double projection onto crystallographic site and symmetry within the density of states. By combining the very high brightness of field-emission electron sources (brighter than a synchrotron) with the high cross-section of electron scattering, together with parallel detection (not possible with scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy), a form of spectroscopy ideally suited to the study of nanostructures, interfacial states and defects in materials is obtained with uniquely high spatial resolution. We review the basic theory, the relationship of EELS to optical properties and the dielectric response function, the removal of multiple scattering artefacts and channelling effects. We consider applications in the light of recent developments in aberration corrector and electron monochromator design. Examples are cited of inner-shell spectra obtained from individual atoms within thin crystals, of the detection of interfacial electronic states in semiconductors, of inner-shell near edge structure mapped with sub-nanometre spatial resolution in glasses and of spectra obtained from individual carbon nanotubes, amongst many others.

  20. Comparison between ATR-IR, Raman, concatenated ATR-IR and Raman spectroscopy for the determination of total antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content of Chinese rice wine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhengzong; Xu, Enbo; Long, Jie; Pan, Xiaowei; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu; Jiao, Aiquan

    2016-03-01

    The application of attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), Raman spectroscopy (RS) and combination of ATR-IR and RS for measurements of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total phenolic content (TPC) of Chinese rice wine (CRW) were investigated in this study. Synergy interval partial least-squares (SiPLS), support vector machine (SVM) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to process the merged data from two individual instruments. It was observed that the performances of models based on the RS spectra were better than those based on the ATR-IR spectra. In addition, SVM models based on the efficient information extracted from ATR-IR and RS spectra were superior to PLS models based on the same information and PLS models based on ATR-IR or RS spectra. The overall results demonstrated that integrating ATR-IR and RS was possible and could improve the prediction accuracy of TAC and TPC in CRWs.

  1. Surface characterization of Kevlar fibers by FT-IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzi, E.G.

    1987-01-01

    The Kevlar-49 aramid fiber offers considerable potential for utilization in high-performance composite materials. However, it has poor adhesion to the polymer matrix resin. In order to improve the adhesion the surface of the fiber was characterized by using two nondestructive Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) techniques. It was shown that the polymer chains in the skin are oriented parallel to the surface, while in the core they are almost radially oriented. This orientation as well as the fact that the functional groups are intermolecularly hydrogen-bonded might limit their availability for reacting with the polymer matrix. The author also characterized the water absorbed in both the skin and the core of the fiber and found the existence of three types of water: (a) weakly hydrogen-bonded between one NH and one carbonyl group, (b) between two carbonyl groups and (c) liquid-like water clustered in microvoids and other sites inside the fibers. It was also found that 30% of the NH groups of the Kevlar-49 fiber are accessible for deuterium exchange. These groups on one hand are available for reactions that would improve the adhesion, but on the other hand can hydrogen-bond with water, which would be detrimental for the mechanical properties of the composite.

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Iwao; Tanida, Hajime; Kawauchi, Sigehiro; Harada, Makoto; Nomura, Masaharu

    1997-09-01

    An apparatus has been constructed for x-ray absorption spectroscopy of elements at air/aqueous solution interface. Its surface sensitivity is gained from glancing incidence of synchrotron radiation under total reflection condition. The absorption is detected by total conversion He ion-yield method. This apparatus was operated at the beam line 7C of Photon Factory, where the incident photon beam comes from a sagittal focus double-crystal monochromator via a 70-cm-long bent mirror. The mirror focuses the beam vertically and changes the beam direction downward by 1 mrad to irradiate solution surface. The essential requirement of this technique, ripple-free liquid surface at accurate position, was attained by introducing a trough on a floating boat, continuous surface level monitoring, and an automatic Z-stage control. The x-ray absorption edge jump demonstrated that surface concentration of bromide ion follows the Langmuir type adsorption for tetraalkylammonuim bromide solution. By comparing the jump values for surface-active and -inactive bromide salt solutions, the detecting depth of the present technique was determined to be 8.8 nm. An extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis of bromide ion segregated to the surface by stearyltrimethylammonium cation indicated that its solvation structure is different from that of bulk.

  3. Diagnostic potential of cosmic-neutrino absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Mena Requejo, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    Annihilation of extremely energetic cosmic neutrinos on the relic-neutrino background can give rise to absorption lines at energies corresponding to formation of the electroweak gauge boson Z{sup 0}. The positions of the absorption dips are set by the masses of the relic neutrinos. Suitably intense sources of extremely energetic (10{sup 21} - 10{sup 25}-eV) cosmic neutrinos might therefore enable the determination of the absolute neutrino masses and the flavor composition of the mass eigenstates. Several factors--other than neutrino mass and composition--distort the absorption lines, however. We analyze the influence of the time-evolution of the relic-neutrino density and the consequences of neutrino decay. We consider the sensitivity of the lineshape to the age and character of extremely energetic neutrino sources, and to the thermal history of the Universe, reflected in the expansion rate. We take into account Fermi motion arising from the thermal distribution of the relic-neutrino gas. We also note the implications of Dirac vs. Majorana relics, and briefly consider unconventional neutrino histories. We ask what kinds of external information would enhance the potential of cosmic-neutrino absorption spectroscopy, and estimate the sensitivity required to make the technique a reality.

  4. The determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crump-Wiesner, Hans J.; Feltz, H.R.; Purdy, W.C.

    1971-01-01

    A standard addition method is described for the determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. Sample pH is adjusted to 1.0 with concentrated hydrochloric acid and the vanadium is directly extracted with 5% cupferron in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The ketone layer is then aspirated into the flame and the recorded absorption values are plotted as a function of the concentration of the added metal. As little as 2.5 ??g l-1 of vanadium can be detected under the conditions of the procedure. Tungsten and tin interfere when present in excess of 5 and 10 ??g ml-1, respectively. The concentrations of the two interfering ions normally found in brines are well below interference levels. ?? 1971.

  5. Optimized interferometric setup for chiral and achiral ultrafast IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Biplab; Helbing, Jan

    2015-06-15

    We report an actively stabilized interferometer-based set-up for the detection of vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and optical rotatory dispersion (VORD) with femtosecond laser pulses. Our approach combines and improves elements of several previous measurement strategies, including signal amplification in a crossed polarizer configuration, precise control and modulation of polarization, phase stability, tight focusing, broad-band detection and spectral interferometry. Their importance for static and transient measurements is motivated by a signal analysis based on Jones matrices and response theory. Only depending on the pump-beam polarization, the set-up can selectively detect transient VCD and VORD or transient linear birefringence (LB) and linear dichroism (LD), which usually constitute the dominant artifacts in the chiral measurements. For illustration we present transient LB and LD data of an achiral Rhenium carbonyl complex, detected simultaneously by spectral interferometry, and we analyze residual background signals in the experimental configuration for transient chiral spectroscopy. PMID:26193616

  6. Spatially resolved concentration measurements based on backscatter absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ze; Sanders, Scott T.; Robinson, Michael A.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of spatially resolved measurements of gas properties using direct absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with backscattered signals. We report a 1-D distribution of H2O mole fraction with a spatial resolution of 5 mm. The peak and average discrepancy between the measured and expected mole fraction are 21.1 and 8.0 %, respectively. The demonstration experiment is related to a diesel aftertreatment system; a selective catalytic reduction brick made of cordierite is used. The brick causes volume scattering interference; advanced baseline fitting based on a genetic algorithm is used to reduce the effects of this interference by a factor of 2.3.

  7. Atmospheric absorption spectroscopy using Tm: fiber sources around two microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadwani, Pankaj; Chia, Jeffrey; Altal, Faleh; Sims, Robert A.; Willis, Christina; Shah, Lawrence; Killinger, Dennis; Richardson, Martin C.

    2011-03-01

    We report on a thulium doped silica fiber ASE source for absorption spectroscopy of CO2. The average spectral power of this source was 2.3-6.1 μW/nm. This low spectral power of this source posed limitation in the sensitivity of the system which was overcome by using an ultrashort pulsed Raman amplifier system with 50-125 μW/nm average spectral power. This system produced CO2 sensitivity better than 300 ppm making measurement of CO2 possible at standard atmospheric concentrations.

  8. Piezo-locking a diode laser with saturated absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Debs, J. E.; Robins, N. P.; Lance, A.; Kruger, M. B.; Close, J. D

    2008-10-01

    We demonstrate modulation-based frequency locking of an external cavity diode laser, utilizing a piezo-electrically actuated mirror, external to the laser cavity, to create an error signal from saturated absorption spectroscopy. With this method, a laser stabilized to a rubidium hyperfine transition has a FWHM of 130 kHz over seconds, making the locked laser suitable for experiments in atomic physics, such as creating and manipulating Bose-Einstein condensates. This technique combines the advantages of low-amplitude modulation, simplicity, performance, and price, factors that are usually considered to be mutually exclusive.

  9. Laser absorption spectroscopy system for vaporization process characterization and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkowski, Joseph J.; Hagans, Karla G.

    1994-03-01

    In support of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) Program, a laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (LAS) system has been developed. This multilaser system is capable of simultaneously measuring the line densities of 238U ground and metastable states, 235U ground and metastable states, iron, and ions at up to nine locations within the separator vessel. Supporting enrichment experiments that last over one hundred hours, this laser spectroscopy system is employed to diagnose and optimize separator system performance, control the electron beam vaporizer and metal feed systems, and provide physics data for the validation of computer models. As a tool for spectroscopic research, vapor plume characterization, vapor deposition monitoring, and vaporizer development, LLNL's LAS laboratory with its six argon-ion-pumped ring dye lasers and recently added Ti:Sapphire and external-cavity diode- lasers has capabilities far beyond the requirements of its primary mission.

  10. Probing electrons in TiO2 polaronic trap states by IR-absorption: Evidence for the existence of hydrogenic states

    PubMed Central

    Sezen, Hikmet; Buchholz, Maria; Nefedov, Alexei; Natzeck, Carsten; Heissler, Stefan; Di Valentin, Cristiana; Wöll, Christof

    2014-01-01

    An important step in oxide photochemistry, the loading of electrons into shallow trap states, was studied using infrared (IR) spectroscopy on both, rutile TiO2 powders and single-crystal, r-TiO2(110) oriented samples. After UV-irradiation or n-doping by exposure to H-atoms broad IR absorption lines are observed for the powders at around 940 cm−1. For the single crystal substrates, the IR absorption bands arising from an excitation of the trapped electrons into higher-lying final states show additional features not observed in previous work. On the basis of our new, high-resolution data and theoretical studies on the polaron binding energy in rutile we propose that the trap states correspond to polarons and are thus intrinsic in nature. We assign the final states probed by the IR-experiments to hydrogenic states within the polaron potential. Implications of these observations for photochemistry on oxides will be briefly discussed. PMID:24448350

  11. Detection of starch adulteration in onion powder by FT-NIR and FT-IR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adulteration of onion powder with cornstarch was identified by Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The reflectance spectra of 180 pure and adulterated samples (1–35 wt% starch) were collected and preprocessed to generate calibration and predi...

  12. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  13. Ground-Based IR Spectroscopy of Mercury for Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.

    2001-01-01

    Remote sensing measurements of the Moon and Mercury in the thermal infrared have been plagued with problems due to atmospheric absorption and other effects. Controversial results have been discussed by Nash et al. and by Salisbury et al.. We have developed a technique to obtain thermal infrared spectra of Mercury together with solar and sky spectra in the 8-13 micrometer region suitable for determining the presence or absence of mineralogical features. High-resolution (0.05 cm(exp -1) between data points) spectra were obtained during daylight using the Fourier Transform Spectrograph (FTS) at the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope Facility at Kitt Peak National Observatory, Arizona. The reduced data were independent of any model of the transmission of the Earth's atmosphere and rest on a calibration using sky spectra along the same line-of-sight through the atmosphere as the actual Mercury raw spectrum. This method can be applied at all solar elongation angles including small elongation angles (5 deg or less). The basic sequence and the technique are robust.

  14. Allophane on Mars: Evidence from IR Spectroscopy and TES Spectral Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Rampe, E. B.; Kraft, M. D.; Sharp. T. G.; Golden, D. C.; Christensen, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    Allophane is an alteration product of volcanic glass and a clay mineral precursor that is commonly found in basaltic soils on Earth. It is a poorly-crystalline or amorphous, hydrous aluminosilicate with Si/Al ratios ranging from approx.0.5-1 [Wada, 1989]. Analyses of thermal infrared (TIR) spectra of the Martian surface from TES show high-silica phases at mid-to-high latitudes that have been proposed to be primary volcanic glass [Bandfield et al., 2000; Bandfield, 2002; Rogers and Christensen, 2007] or poorly-crystalline secondary silicates such as allophane or aluminous amorphous silica [Kraft et al., 2003; Michalski et al., 2006; Rogers and Christensen, 2007; Kraft, 2009]. Phase modeling of chemical data from the APXS on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit suggest the presence of allophane in chemically weathered rocks [Ming et al., 2006]. The presence of allophane on Mars has not been previously tested with IR spectroscopy because allophane spectra have not been available. We synthesized allophanes and allophanic gels with a range of Si/Al ratios to measure TIR emission and VNIR reflectance spectra and to test for the presence of allophane in Martian soils. VNIR reflectance spectra of the synthetic allophane samples have broad absorptions near 1.4 m from OH stretching overtones and 1.9 m from a combination of stretching and bending vibrations in H2O. Samples have a broad absorption centered near 2.25 microns, from AlAlOH combination bending and stretching vibrations, that shifts position with Si/Al ratio. Amorphous silica (opaline silica or primary volcanic glass) has been identified in CRISM spectra of southern highland terrains based on the presence of 1.4, 1.9, and broad 2.25 m absorptions [Mustard et al., 2008]; however, these absorptions are also consistent with the presence of allophane. TIR emission spectra of the synthetic allophanes show two spectrally distinct types: Si-rich and Al-rich. Si-rich allophanes have two broad absorptions centered near 1080

  15. Allophane on Mars: Evidence from IR spectroscopy and TES spectral models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Christensen, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    Allophane is an alteration product of volcanic glass and a clay mineral precursor that is commonly found in basaltic soils on Earth. It is a poorly-crystalline or amorphous, hydrous aluminosilicate with Si/Al ratios ranging from ~0.5-1 [Wada, 1989]. Analyses of thermal infrared (TIR) spectra of the Martian surface from TES show high-silica phases at mid-to-high latitudes that have been proposed to be primary volcanic glass [Bandfield et al., 2000; Bandfield, 2002; Rogers and Christensen, 2007] or poorly-crystalline secondary silicates such as allophane or aluminous amorphous silica [Kraft et al., 2003; Michalski et al., 2006; Rogers and Christensen, 2007; Kraft, 2009]. Phase modeling of chemical data from the APXS on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit suggest the presence of allophane in chemically weathered rocks [Ming et al., 2006]. The presence of allophane on Mars has not been previously tested with IR spectroscopy because allophane spectra have not been available. We synthesized allophanes and allophanic gels with a range of Si/Al ratios to measure TIR emission and VNIR reflectance spectra and to test for the presence of allophane in Martian soils. VNIR reflectance spectra of the synthetic allophane samples have broad absorptions near 1.4 µm from OH stretching overtones and 1.9 µm from a combination of stretching and bending vibrations in H2O. Samples have a broad absorption centered near 2.25 µm, from AlAlOH combination bending and stretching vibrations, that shifts position with Si/Al ratio. Amorphous silica (opaline silica or primary volcanic glass) has been identified in CRISM spectra of southern highland terrains based on the presence of 1.4, 1.9, and broad 2.25 µm absorptions [Mustard et al., 2008]; however, these absorptions are also consistent with the presence of allophane. TIR emission spectra of the synthetic allophanes show two spectrally distinct types: Si-rich and Al-rich. Si-rich allophanes have two broad absorptions centered near 1080 and

  16. Characterization of crystallinity in PET bottles by IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tuan Q.; Christopher, Plummer J. G.

    2000-03-01

    PET is a semicrystalline thermoplastic widely used to package foods and beverages. Most of these applications rely on the barrier properties of the polymer, which improve with the proportion of crystalline phase. It is therefore important for the industries concerned to develop a fast, simple and reliable technique to quantify the degree of crystallization. Current FTIR and Raman spectroscopy correlate cristallinity with the trans to gauche ratio of the ethylene conformational isomers. Such a procedure, however, is based on the naive assumption that the proportion of trans isomers in the crystalline regions and that of the trans/gauche isomers in the amorphous regions vary linearly with the total crystallinity. By combining density measurements with DSC, WAXS and FTIR, we have shown the conformer technique to work well for isotropic PET sheets, but not for bottles. Biaxial extension of the preform during processing results in strain-induced cristallinity with a different morphology to that induced thermally. As a result, PET should be treated as a three-component mixture with distinct physical and spectroscopic properties for each phase. Using ATR, micro-transmission FTIR and factor analysis, our primary goal has been to develop a routine technique which allows one to identify the contribution of each component in the spectra of commercial PET bottles.

  17. Monitoring PVD metal vapors using laser absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D.G.; Anklam, T.M.; Berzins, L.V.; Hagans, K.G.

    1994-04-01

    Laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) has been used by the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program for over 10 years to monitor the co-vaporization of uranium and iron in its separators. During that time, LAS has proven to be an accurate and reliable method to monitor both the density and composition of the vapor. It has distinct advantages over other rate monitors, in that it is completely non-obtrusive to the vaporization process and its accuracy is unaffected by the duration of the run. Additionally, the LAS diagnostic has been incorporated into a very successful process control system. LAS requires only a line of sight through the vacuum chamber, as all hardware is external to the vessel. The laser is swept in frequency through an absorption line of interest. In the process a baseline is established, and the line integrated density is determined from the absorption profile. The measurement requires no hardware calibration. Through a proper choice of the atomic transition, a wide range of elements and densities have been monitored (e.g. nickel, iron, cerium and gadolinium). A great deal of information about the vapor plume can be obtained from the measured absorption profiles. By monitoring different species at the same location, the composition of the vapor is measured in real time. By measuring the same density at different locations, the spatial profile of the vapor plume is determined. The shape of the absorption profile is used to obtain the flow speed of the vapor. Finally, all of the above information is used evaluate the total vaporization rate.

  18. Mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haibach, Fred; Erlich, Adam; Deutsch, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Block Engineering has developed an absorption spectroscopy system based on widely tunable Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL). The QCL spectrometer rapidly cycles through a user-selected range in the mid-infrared spectrum, between 6 to 12 μm (1667 to 833 cm-1), to detect and identify substances on surfaces based on their absorption characteristics from a standoff distance of up to 2 feet with an eye-safe laser. It can also analyze vapors and liquids in a single device. For military applications, the QCL spectrometer has demonstrated trace explosive, chemical warfare agent (CWA), and toxic industrial chemical (TIC) detection and analysis. The QCL's higher power density enables measurements from diffuse and highly absorbing materials and substrates. Other advantages over Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy include portability, ruggedness, rapid analysis, and the ability to function from a distance through free space or a fiber optic probe. This paper will discuss the basic technology behind the system and the empirical data on various safety and security applications.

  19. Sensitive detection of weak absorption signals in photoacoustic spectroscopy by using derivative spectroscopy and wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jincun; Tang, Zhilie; He, Yongheng; Guo, Lina

    2008-05-01

    This report presents a practical analytical method of photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy that is based on wavelet transform (WT) and the first-derivative PA spectrum. An experimental setup is specially designed to obtain the first-derivative spectrum, which aims to identify some unnoticeable absorption peaks in the normal PA spectrum. To enhance the detectability of overlapping spectral bands, the WT is used to decompose the PA spectrum signals into a series of localized contributions (details and approximation) on the basis of the frequency. For the decomposed contributions do not change the absorption peak position of PA spectrum, one can retrieve the weak absorption signals by the decomposed result of WT. Because of the use of derivative spectroscopy and WT, three unnoticeable absorption peaks that are hidden in the PA spectrum of carbon absorption are precisely retrieved, the wavelengths of which are 699.7, 752.7, and 775.5nm, respectively. This analytical method, which has the virtue of using a physical method and using a computer software method, can achieve great sensitivity and accuracy for PA spectral analysis.

  20. Detection of cancerous biological tissue areas by means of infrared absorption and SERS spectroscopy of intercellular fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velicka, M.; Urboniene, V.; Ceponkus, J.; Pucetaite, M.; Jankevicius, F.; Sablinskas, V.

    2015-08-01

    We present a novel approach to the detection of cancerous kidney tissue areas by measuring vibrational spectra (IR absorption or SERS) of intercellular fluid taken from the tissue. The method is based on spectral analysis of cancerous and normal tissue areas in order to find specific spectral markers. The samples were prepared by sliding the kidney tissue over a substrate - surface of diamond ATR crystal in case of IR absorption or calcium fluoride optical window in case of SERS. For producing the SERS signal the dried fluid film was covered by silver nanoparticle colloidal solution. In order to suppress fluorescence background the measurements were performed in the NIR spectral region with the excitation wavelength of 1064 nm. The most significant spectral differences - spectral markers - were found in the region between 400 and 1800 cm-1, where spectral bands related to various vibrations of fatty acids, glycolipids and carbohydrates are located. Spectral markers in the IR and SERS spectra are different and the methods can complement each other. Both of them have potential to be used directly during surgery. Additionally, IR absorption spectroscopy in ATR mode can be combined with waveguide probe what makes this method usable in vivo.

  1. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface.

    PubMed

    Erikat, I A; Hamad, B A

    2013-11-01

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75 ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir-C and Ir-Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

  2. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy of silanized silicon quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntermann, Volker; Cimpean, Carla; Brehm, Georg; Sauer, Guido; Kryschi, Carola; Wiggers, Hartmut

    2008-03-01

    Excitonic properties of colloidal silicon quantum dots (Si qdots) with mean sizes of 4nm were examined using stationary and time-resolved optical spectroscopy. Chemically stable silicon oxide shells were prepared by controlled surface oxidation and silanization of HF-etched Si qdots. The ultrafast relaxation dynamics of photogenerated excitons in Si qdot colloids were studied on the picosecond time scale from 0.3psto2.3ns using femtosecond-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The time evolution of the transient absorption spectra of the Si qdots excited with a 150fs pump pulse at 390nm was observed to consist of decays of various absorption transitions of photoexcited electrons in the conduction band which overlap with both the photoluminescence and the photobleaching of the valence band population density. Gaussian deconvolution of the spectroscopic data allowed for disentangling various carrier relaxation processes involving electron-phonon and phonon-phonon scatterings or arising from surface-state trapping. The initial energy and momentum relaxation of hot carriers was observed to take place via scattering by optical phonons within 0.6ps . Exciton capturing by surface states forming shallow traps in the amorphous SiOx shell was found to occur with a time constant of 4ps , whereas deeper traps presumably localized in the Si-SiOx interface gave rise to exciton trapping processes with time constants of 110 and 180ps . Electron transfer from initially populated, higher-lying surface states to the conduction band of Si qdots (>2nm) was observed to take place within 400 or 700fs .

  3. Rapid Scan Absorption Spectroscopy with Applications for Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, K.; Maxwell, S. E.; Truong, G.; Van Zee, R. D.; Hodges, J. T.; Plusquellic, D.; Long, D.; Whetstone, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Our objective is to develop accurate and reliable methods for quantifying distributed carbon sources and sinks to support both mitigation efforts and climate change research. The presentation will describe a method for rapid step-scan absorption spectroscopy in the near-infrared wavelength range for the measurement of greenhouse gases. The method utilizes a fiber coupled laser system and a free space confocal cavity to effectively scan the laser system over a bandwidth of 37.5 GHz (1.25 cm-1), with a step size of 300 MHz (0.01 cm-1) and a scan rate of 40 kHz. The laser system is scanned with microwave precision over a full absorption lineshape profile. Measurements have been demonstrated in a 45 m long multipass cell for detection of carbon dioxide near 1602.4 nm (6240.6 cm-1) and for methane near 1645.5 nm (6077.2 cm 1). Ambient level detection is demonstrated using the multipass cell with a signal-to-noise ratio of ~5:1 in a 5 ms integration time. The scan speed, resolution and bandwidth are well suited for remote sensing using integrated path and differential absorption LIDAR techniques.

  4. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10-5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 104 atoms cm-3. The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  5. Copper binding to bilirubin as determined by FT-IR and EPR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, J.R.; Wu, J.; Soloway, R.D.; Li, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, D.; Shen, G.

    1996-07-01

    Copper is known to form complexes with bilirubin (H2BR). Such complexes have received increased attention due to their clinical significance as free-radical scavengers. The purpose of this study was to examine a series of Cu(2+) BR complexes to ascertain the nature of the binding between Cu(2+) and BR. Several physical measurements of the salts were made, such as Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The complexes were prepared by dissolving protonated BR in NaOH, and adding different ratios of aqueous CuCl2. At ratios of Cu(2+):H2BR of 1:1 and 2:1, soluble complexes were formed. In solution EPR spectra demonstrated nine hyperfine peaks, which from the splitting, is indicative of Cu(2+) coordinated to four nitrogen atoms coming from two molecules of BR. The solid obtained from the solutions demonstrated predominant infrared absorptions at 1574cm({minus}1) and 1403cm({minus}1) (assigned previously as COO- vibrations, asymmetric and symmetric), whereas the 1710cm({minus}1) vibration appears only as a shoulder (assigned previously as the free COOH vibration) indicative that most of the COO groups have reacted with sodium, thus accounting for the aqueous solubility. The NH stretching vibration in the pyrrole group of H2BR has disappeared and is replaced with the OH stretching vibration in H2O. At higher ratios of 3:1 and 5:1 (Cu2+H2BR), black precipitates are formed, which produce no EPR signals. Furthermore, the NH vibration disappears as in the soluble solution complexes. It can be concluded that the insoluble salts (higher Cu2+:H2BR ratios) are mixed complexes containing the Cu nitrogen chelate and Cu salts involving the COOH groups. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  6. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leen, J Brian; O'Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10(-10) cm(-1)/√Hz; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features. PMID:25273701

  7. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leen, J. Brian; O’Keefe, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10−10 cm−1/\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\sqrt {{\\rm Hz;}}$\\end{document} Hz ; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features. PMID:25273701

  8. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leen, J. Brian O’Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-15

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10{sup −10} cm{sup −1}/√(Hz;) an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  9. Remote Thermal IR Spectroscopy of our Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Theodor; Hewagama, Tilak; Goldstein, Jeffrey; Livengood, Timothy; Fast, Kelly

    1999-01-01

    Indirect methods to detect extrasolar planets have been successful in identifying a number of stars with companion planets. No direct detection of an extrasolar planet has yet been reported. Spectroscopy in the thermal infrared region provides a potentially powerful approach to detection and characterization of planets and planetary systems. We can use knowledge of our own solar system, its planets and their atmospheres to model spectral characteristics of planets around other stars. Spectra derived from modeling our own solar system seen from an extrasolar perspective can be used to constrain detection strategies, identification of planetary class (terrestrial vs. gaseous) and retrieval of chemical, thermal and dynamical information. Emission from planets in our solar system peaks in the thermal infrared region, approximately 10 - 30 microns, substantially displaced from the maximum of the much brighter solar emission in the visible near 0.5 microns. This fact provides a relatively good contrast ratio to discriminate between stellar (solar) and planetary emission and optimize the delectability of planetary spectra. Important molecular constituents in planetary atmospheres have rotational-vibrational spectra in the thermal infrared region. Spectra from these molecules have been well characterized in the laboratory and studied in the atmospheres of solar system planets from ground-based and space platforms. The best example of such measurements are the studies with Fourier transform spectrometers, the Infrared Interferometer Spectrometers (IRIS), from spacecraft: Earth observed from NIMBUS 8, Mars observed from Mariner 9, and the outer planets observed from Voyager spacecraft. An Earth-like planet is characterized by atmospheric spectra of ozone, carbon dioxide, and water. Terrestrial planets have oxidizing atmospheres which are easily distinguished from reducing atmospheres of gaseous giant planets which lack oxygen-bearing species and are characterized by spectra

  10. Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands measured in the IR spectral range .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, S.; Piccioni, G.; Snels, M.; Adriani, A.; Grassi, D.

    In this work we present two experimental setup able to characterize the optical properties of gases, in particular CO_2 and H_2, at typically planetary conditions. The apparatus consists of a Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IT) interferometer able to work in a wide spectral range, from 350 to 25000 cm-1 (0.4 to 29 mu m ) with a relatively high spectral resolution, from 10 to 0.07 cm-1. Two dedicated gas cells have been integrated with the FT-IR. The first, called High Pressure High Temperature (HP-HT), can support pressures up to 300 bar, temperatures up to 300oC and is characterized by an optical path of 2 cm. The second one, a Multi Pass (MP) absorption gas cell, is designed to have a variable optical path, from 2.5 to 30 m, can be heated up to 200o and operate at pressures up to 10 bar. In this paper, measurements of Collision-Induced Absorption (CIA) bands in carbon dioxide and hydrogen recorded in the InfraRed spectral range will be presented. In principle, linear symmetric molecules such as CO_2 and H_2 possess no dipole moment, but, even when the pressure is only a few bar, we have observed the Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands. This absorption results from a short-time collisional interaction between molecules. The band integrated intensity shows a quadratic dependence versus density opposed to the absorption by isolated molecules, which follows Beer's law \\citep{Beer's}. This behaviour suggests an absorption by pairs rather than by individual molecules. The bands integrated intensities show a linear dependence vs square density according to \\citep {CIA Shape} and \\citep{CIA posi}. For what concerns the H_2 CIA bands, a preliminary comparison between simulated data obtained with the model described in \\citep{CIA H2}and measured, shows a good agreement. These processes are very relevant in the dense atmospheres of planets, such as those of Venus and Jupiter and also in extrasolar planets. A detailed knowledge of these contributions is very

  11. Rapid identification of Pterocarpus santalinus and Dalbergia louvelii by FTIR and 2D correlation IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang-Da; Xu, Chang-Hua; Li, Ming-Yu; Huang, An-Min; Sun, Su-Qin

    2014-07-01

    Since Pterocarpus santalinus and Dalbergia louvelii, which are of precious Rosewood, are very similar in their appearance and anatomy characteristics, cheaper Hongmu D. louvelii is often illegally used to impersonate valuable P. santalinus, especially in Chinese furniture manufacture. In order to develop a rapid and effective method for easy confused wood furniture differentiation, we applied tri-step identification method, i.e., conventional infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), second derivative infrared (SD-IR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2DCOS-IR) spectroscopy to investigate P. santalinus and D. louvelii furniture. According to FT-IR and SD-IR spectra, it has been found two unconditional stable difference at 848 cm-1 and 700 cm-1 and relative stable differences at 1735 cm-1, 1623 cm-1, 1614 cm-1, 1602 cm-1, 1509 cm-1, 1456 cm-1, 1200 cm-1, 1158 cm-1, 1055 cm-1, 1034 cm-1 and 895 cm-1 between D. louvelii and P. santalinus IR spectra. The stable discrepancy indicates that the category of extractives is different between the two species. Besides, the relative stable differences imply that the content of holocellulose in P. santalinus is more than that of D. louvelii, whereas the quantity of extractives in D. louvelii is higher. Furthermore, evident differences have been observed in their 2DCOS-IR spectra of 1550-1415 cm-1 and 1325-1030 cm-1. P. santalinus has two strong auto-peaks at 1459 cm-1 and 1467 cm-1, three mid-strong auto-peaks at 1518 cm-1, 1089 cm-1 and 1100 cm-1 and five weak auto-peaks at 1432 cm-1, 1437 cm-1, 1046 cm-1, 1056 cm-1 and 1307 cm-1 while D. louvelii has four strong auto-peaks at 1465 cm-1, 1523 cm-1, 1084 cm-1 and 1100 cm-1, four mid-strong auto-peaks at 1430 cm-1, 1499 cm-1, 1505 cm-1 and 1056 cm-1 and two auto-peaks at 1540 cm-1 and 1284 cm-1. This study has proved that FT-IR integrated with 2DCOS-IR could be applicable for precious wood furniture authentication in a direct, rapid and holistic manner.

  12. Sulfur species in Asphaltene, Resin, and Oil Fractions of Crude Oils by XANES and IR Spectroscopy Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtley, Sudipa

    2002-03-01

    XANES (X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy) method has been employed to elucidate the sulfoxide percentages in the resin and oil fraction of a particular crude oil, which is known to have a high sulfoxide content in the asphaltene fraction. This investigation is performed to determine whether the sulfoxide polar group is also a dominant sulfur form in the resin and the oil fractions of the same crude oil; typically, the oil fractions are non-polar. The asphaltene fraction, as well as the resin and oil fraction of another crude oil are systematically low in sulfoxide content. The IR results confirm the sulfoxide finding. This supports the view that the oxidation process probably took place within the earth formation. These sulfoxide results should be considered when comparing asphaltenes from different studies and samples, as the polar sulfoxides often determine the asphaltene fraction.

  13. Detection of metanil yellow contamination in turmeric using FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Sagar; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon; Schmidt, Walter; Chan, Dian

    2016-05-01

    Turmeric is well known for its medicinal value and is often used in Asian cuisine. Economically motivated contamination of turmeric by chemicals such as metanil yellow has been repeatedly reported. Although traditional technologies can detect such contaminants in food, high operational costs and operational complexities have limited their use to the laboratory. This study used Fourier Transform Raman Spectroscopy (FT-Raman) and Fourier Transform - Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) to identify metanil yellow contamination in turmeric powder. Mixtures of metanil yellow in turmeric were prepared at concentrations of 30%, 25%, 20%, 15%, 10%, 5%, 1% and 0.01% (w/w). The FT-Raman and FT-IR spectral signal of pure turmeric powder, pure metanil yellow powder and the 8 sample mixtures were obtained and analyzed independently to identify metanil yellow contamination in turmeric. The results show that FT-Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR spectroscopy can detect metanil yellow mixed with turmeric at concentrations as low as 1% and 5%, respectively, and may be useful for non-destructive detection of adulterated turmeric powder.

  14. Structural modifications of Tilia cordata wood during heat treatment investigated by FT-IR and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Maria-Cristina; Froidevaux, Julien; Navi, Parviz; Popescu, Carmen-Mihaela

    2013-02-01

    It is known that heat treatment of wood combined with a low percent of relative humidity causes transformations in the chemical composition of it. The modifications and/or degradation of wood components occur by hydrolysis, oxidation, and decarboxylation reactions. The aim of this study was to give better insights on wood chemical modifications during wood heat treatment under low temperature at about 140 °C and 10% percentage of relative humidity, by infrared, principal component analysis and two dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy. For this purpose, hardwood samples of lime (Tilia cordata) were investigated and analysed. The infrared spectra of treated samples were compared with the reference ones, the most important differences being observed in the "fingerprint" region. Due to the complexity of this region, which have contributions from all the wood constituents the chemical changes during hydro-thermal treatment were examined in detail using principal component analysis and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy. By hydro-thermal treatment of wood results the formation of acetic acid, which catalyse the hydrolysis reactions of hemicelluloses and amorphous cellulose. The cleavage of the β-O-4 linkages and splitting of the aliphatic methoxyl chains from the aromatic lignin ring was also observed. For the first treatment interval, a higher extent of carbohydrates degradation was observed, then an increase of the extent of the lignin degradation also took place.

  15. Intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy of platinum fluoride, PtF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handler, Kimberly G.; Harris, Rachel A.; O'Brien, Leah C.; O'Brien, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Two vibrational bands of an electronic transition of PtF occurring at 11 940 cm -1 and 12 496 cm -1 were recorded and analyzed. These transitions are identified as the (0,0) and (1,0) bands of an [11.9] Ω = 3/2 - XΩ = 3/2 electronic transition. Gas phase PtF was produced in a copper hollow cathode lined with platinum foil using a trace amount of SF 6, and the spectrum was recorded at Doppler resolution by intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy. This work represents the first published spectroscopic data on PtF. Molecular constants for the ground and excited electronic states are presented.

  16. High Resolution Absorption Spectroscopy using Externally Dispersed Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, J; Erskine, D J

    2005-07-06

    We describe the use of Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) for high-resolution absorption spectroscopy. By adding a small fixed-delay interferometer to a dispersive spectrograph, a precise fiducial grid in wavelength is created over the entire spectrograph bandwidth. The fiducial grid interacts with narrow spectral features in the input spectrum to create a moire pattern. EDI uses the moire pattern to obtain new information about the spectra that is otherwise unavailable, thereby improving spectrograph performance. We describe the theory and practice of EDI instruments and demonstrate improvements in the spectral resolution of conventional spectrographs by a factor of 2 to 6. The improvement of spectral resolution offered by EDI can benefit space instruments by reducing spectrograph size or increasing instantaneous bandwidth.

  17. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Kinetics of Free Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, Robert F; Glass, Graham

    2004-11-01

    This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of the chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. Work on the reaction of OH with acetaldehyde has been completed and published and work on the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} has been completed and submitted for publication. In the course of our investigation of branching ratios of the reactions of O({sup 1}D) with acetaldehyde and methane, we discovered that hot atom chemistry effects are not negligible at the gas pressures (13 Torr) initially used. Branching ratios of the reaction of O({sup 1}D) with CH{sub 4} have been measured at a tenfold higher He flow and fivefold higher pressure.

  18. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, A.; Rodriguez de la Fuente, O.; Collado, V.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Castro, G. R.; Monton, C.; Garcia, M. A.

    2012-08-15

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -5}, depending on the particular experiment.

  19. Investigating Actinide Molecular Adducts From Absorption Edge Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Den Auwer, C.; Conradson, S.D.; Guilbaud, P.; Moisy, P.; Mustre de Leon, J.; Simoni, E.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-10-27

    Although Absorption Edge Spectroscopy has been widely applied to the speciation of actinide elements, specifically at the L{sub III} edge, understanding and interpretation of actinide edge spectra are not complete. In that sense, semi-quantitative analysis is scarce. In this paper, different aspects of edge simulation are presented, including semi-quantitative approaches. Comparison is made between various actinyl (U, Np) aquo or hydroxy compounds. An excursion into transition metal osmium chemistry allows us to compare the structurally related osmyl and uranyl hydroxides. The edge shape and characteristic features are discussed within the multiple scattering picture and the role of the first coordination sphere as well as contributions from the water solvent are described.

  20. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, A.; Rodríguez de la Fuente, O.; Collado, V.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Monton, C.; Castro, G. R.; García, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10-3 to 10-5, depending on the particular experiment.

  1. La Saturated Absorption Spectroscopy for Applications in Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Patrick; Donoghue, Liz; Dungan, Kristina; Liu, Jackie; Olmschenk, Steven

    2015-05-01

    Quantum information may revolutionize computation and communication by utilizing quantum systems based on matter quantum bits and entangled light. Ions are excellent candidates for quantum bits as they can be well-isolated from unwanted external influences by trapping and laser cooling. Doubly-ionized lanthanum in particular shows promise for use in quantum information as it has infrared transitions in the telecom band, with low attenuation in standard optical fiber, potentially allowing for long distance information transfer. However, the hyperfine splittings of the lowest energy levels, required for laser cooling, have not been measured. We present progress and recent results towards measuring the hyperfine splittings of these levels in lanthanum by saturated absorption spectroscopy with a hollow cathode lamp. This research is supported by the Army Research Office, Research Corporation for Science Advancement, and Denison University.

  2. Near-IR Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy in surgery and medicine: ophthalmic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Shuming; Yu, Nai-Teng; Ren, Qiushi

    1992-08-01

    This report describes the application of a recently developed spectroscopic technique, near- infrared-excited Fourier transform Raman scattering (abbreviated as near-IR FT-Raman) in the molecular-level characterization of normal and pathological human ocular tissues. The near-IR FT-Raman technique was shown to be particularly well-suited for the noninvasive analysis of intact ophthalmic samples because it exhibits such attractive features as complete fluorescence elimination, great sampling flexibility, high data acquisition speed, and measurement accuracy. For both intact human lenses and corneas, systematic FT-Raman studies were carried out in order to probe detailed molecular changes involved in cataract formation and cornea diseases. FT-Raman measurement was also made for synthetic biomaterials that can be attached to the corneal surface for laser refractive surgery. The technique of near-IR FT- Raman spectroscopy is potentially a nondestructive, non-invasive fingerprinting modality for monitoring lens aging, cataract formation, and corneal disease development.

  3. Particular features of the application of IR reflection spectroscopy methods in studies in archeology and paleontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotarev, V. M.; Khlopachev, G. A.

    2013-06-01

    We have considered an optical model of a porous rough surface with optical properties of objects (bone, flint) that are typical of archeology and paleontology. We have formulated an approach that makes it possible to perform mathematical processing of the IR reflection spectra of objects of this kind using standard algorithms and determine criteria that ensure obtaining reliable information on objects with a rough surface in the course of interpretation of frequencies in their IR reflection spectra. The potential of the approach has been demonstrated using as an example an investigation by the IR Fourier-transform reflection spectroscopy of mineralization processes of mammoth tusks from two paleolithic sites (14000 and 16000 BCE) located by the town of Yudinovo, Bryansk oblast, Russia.

  4. Temperature and pressure measurement based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with gas absorption linewidth detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yunxia; Liu, Tiegen; Liu, Kun; Jiang, Junfeng; Wang, Tao; Wang, Ranran

    2014-11-01

    A gas temperature and pressure measurement method based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) detecting linewidth of gas absorption line was proposed in this paper. Combined with Lambert-Beer Law and ideal gas law, the relationship between temperature, pressure and gas linewidth with Lorentzian line shape was investigated in theory. Taking carbon monoxide (CO) at 1567.32 nm for example, the linewidths of gas absorption line in different temperatures and pressures were obtained by simulation. The relationship between the linewidth of second harmonic and temperature, pressure with the coefficient 0.025 pm/K and 0.0645 pm/kPa respectively. According to the relationship of simulation results and detected linewidth, the undefined temperature and pressure of CO gas were measured. The gas temperature and pressure measurement based on linewidth detection, avoiding the influence of laser intensity, is an effective temperature and pressure measurement method. This method also has the ability to detect temperature and pressure of other gases with Lorentzian line shape.

  5. Solution Structures of Highly Active Molecular Ir Water-Oxidation Catalysts from Density Functional Theory Combined with High-Energy X-ray Scattering and EXAFS Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke R; Matula, Adam J; Kwon, Gihan; Hong, Jiyun; Sheehan, Stafford W; Thomsen, Julianne M; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H; Tiede, David M; Chen, Lin X; Batista, Victor S

    2016-05-01

    The solution structures of highly active Ir water-oxidation catalysts are elucidated by combining density functional theory, high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. We find that the catalysts are Ir dimers with mono-μ-O cores and terminal anionic ligands, generated in situ through partial oxidation of a common catalyst precursor. The proposed structures are supported by (1)H and (17)O NMR, EPR, resonance Raman and UV-vis spectra, electrophoresis, etc. Our findings are particularly valuable to understand the mechanism of water oxidation by highly reactive Ir catalysts. Importantly, our DFT-EXAFS-HEXS methodology provides a new in situ technique for characterization of active species in catalytic systems. PMID:27087202

  6. Adsorption and oxidation of formaldehyde on a polycrystalline Pt film electrode: An in situ IR spectroscopy search for adsorbed reaction intermediates.

    PubMed

    Jusys, Zenonas; Behm, R Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    As part of a mechanistic study of the electrooxidation of C1 molecules we have systematically investigated the dissociative adsorption/oxidation of formaldehyde on a polycrystalline Pt film electrode under experimental conditions optimizing the chance for detecting weakly adsorbed reaction intermediates. Employing in situ IR spectroscopy in an attenuated total reflection configuration (ATR-FTIRS) with p-polarized IR radiation to further improve the signal-to-noise ratio, and using low reaction temperatures (3 °C) and deuterium substitution to slow down the reaction kinetics and to stabilize weakly adsorbed reaction intermediates, we could detect an IR absorption band at 1660 cm(-1) characteristic for adsorbed formyl intermediates. This assignment is supported by an isotope shift in wave number. Effects of temperature, potential and deuterium substitution on the formation and disappearance of different adsorbed species (COad, adsorbed formate, adsorbed formyl), are monitored and quantified. Consequences on the mechanism for dissociative adsorption and oxidation of formaldehyde are discussed.

  7. Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehling, Randy L.

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy refers to measurement of the absorption of different frequencies of IR radiation by foods or other solids, liquids, or gases. IR spectroscopy began in 1800 with an experiment by Herschel. When he used a prism to create a spectrum from white light and placed a thermometer at a point just beyond the red region of the spectrum, he noted an increase in temperature. This was the first observation of the effects of IR radiation. By the 1940s, IR spectroscopy had become an important tool used by chemists to identify functional groups in organic compounds. In the 1970s, commercial near-IR reflectance instruments were introduced that provided rapid quantitative determinations of moisture, protein, and fat in cereal grains and other foods. Today, IR spectroscopy is used widely in the food industry for both qualitative and quantitative analysis of ingredients and finished foods.

  8. Rapid detection of talcum powder in tea using FT-IR spectroscopy coupled with chemometrics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoli; Zhang, Yuying; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigated the feasibility of Fourier transform infrared transmission (FT-IR) spectroscopy to detect talcum powder illegally added in tea based on chemometric methods. Firstly, 210 samples of tea powder with 13 dose levels of talcum powder were prepared for FT-IR spectra acquirement. In order to highlight the slight variations in FT-IR spectra, smoothing, normalize and standard normal variate (SNV) were employed to preprocess the raw spectra. Among them, SNV preprocessing had the best performance with high correlation of prediction (RP = 0.948) and low root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP = 0.108) of partial least squares (PLS) model. Then 18 characteristic wavenumbers were selected based on a hybrid of backward interval partial least squares (biPLS) regression, competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS) algorithm and successive projections algorithm (SPA). These characteristic wavenumbers only accounted for 0.64% of the full wavenumbers. Following that, 18 characteristic wavenumbers were used to build linear and nonlinear determination models by PLS regression and extreme learning machine (ELM), respectively. The optimal model with RP = 0.963 and RMSEP = 0.137 was achieved by ELM algorithm. These results demonstrated that FT-IR spectroscopy with chemometrics could be used successfully to detect talcum powder in tea. PMID:27468701

  9. Rapid detection of talcum powder in tea using FT-IR spectroscopy coupled with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoli; Zhang, Yuying; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigated the feasibility of Fourier transform infrared transmission (FT-IR) spectroscopy to detect talcum powder illegally added in tea based on chemometric methods. Firstly, 210 samples of tea powder with 13 dose levels of talcum powder were prepared for FT-IR spectra acquirement. In order to highlight the slight variations in FT-IR spectra, smoothing, normalize and standard normal variate (SNV) were employed to preprocess the raw spectra. Among them, SNV preprocessing had the best performance with high correlation of prediction (RP = 0.948) and low root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP = 0.108) of partial least squares (PLS) model. Then 18 characteristic wavenumbers were selected based on a hybrid of backward interval partial least squares (biPLS) regression, competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS) algorithm and successive projections algorithm (SPA). These characteristic wavenumbers only accounted for 0.64% of the full wavenumbers. Following that, 18 characteristic wavenumbers were used to build linear and nonlinear determination models by PLS regression and extreme learning machine (ELM), respectively. The optimal model with RP = 0.963 and RMSEP = 0.137 was achieved by ELM algorithm. These results demonstrated that FT-IR spectroscopy with chemometrics could be used successfully to detect talcum powder in tea. PMID:27468701

  10. Rapid detection of talcum powder in tea using FT-IR spectroscopy coupled with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoli; Zhang, Yuying; He, Yong

    2016-07-29

    This paper investigated the feasibility of Fourier transform infrared transmission (FT-IR) spectroscopy to detect talcum powder illegally added in tea based on chemometric methods. Firstly, 210 samples of tea powder with 13 dose levels of talcum powder were prepared for FT-IR spectra acquirement. In order to highlight the slight variations in FT-IR spectra, smoothing, normalize and standard normal variate (SNV) were employed to preprocess the raw spectra. Among them, SNV preprocessing had the best performance with high correlation of prediction (RP = 0.948) and low root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP = 0.108) of partial least squares (PLS) model. Then 18 characteristic wavenumbers were selected based on a hybrid of backward interval partial least squares (biPLS) regression, competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS) algorithm and successive projections algorithm (SPA). These characteristic wavenumbers only accounted for 0.64% of the full wavenumbers. Following that, 18 characteristic wavenumbers were used to build linear and nonlinear determination models by PLS regression and extreme learning machine (ELM), respectively. The optimal model with RP = 0.963 and RMSEP = 0.137 was achieved by ELM algorithm. These results demonstrated that FT-IR spectroscopy with chemometrics could be used successfully to detect talcum powder in tea.

  11. Optimized external IR reflection spectroscopy for quantitative determination of borophosphosilicate glass parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Franke, J.E.; Niemczyk, T.M.; Haaland, D.M.

    1997-02-01

    Infrared (IR) external reflection spectroscopy has been optimized for the quantitative determination of composition and film thickness of borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) deposited on silicon wafer substrates. The precision of the partial least-squares calibrations for boron and phosphorus contents and thin-film thickness were measured as the cross-validated standard error of prediction statistic. The results showed that BPSG IR reflection spectra collected over a wide range of incident IR radiation angles (15{degree}, 25{degree}, 45{degree}, and 60{degree}) can be used for the simultaneous quantification of these three BPSG parameters. When high angles of incidence were employed, the measurement was found to be more sensitive to small errors in the angle of incidence. The polarization state of the incident IR radiation did not noticeably affect the prediction of the three calibrated BPSG parameters. The results achieved in this study provide guidelines for at-line process monitoring and quality control of BPSG thin films used in the fabrication of microelectronic devices. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  12. Breath air measurement using wide-band frequency tuning IR laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistenev, Yury V.; Borisov, Alexey V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Bulanova, Anna A.; Boyko, Andrey A.; Kostyukova, Nadezhda Y.; Karapuzikov, Alexey A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of measuring of biomarkers in breath air of patients with broncho-pulmonary diseases using wide-band frequency tuning IR laser photo-acoustic spectroscopy and the methods of data mining are presented. We will discuss experimental equipment and various methods of intellectual analysis of the experimental spectra in context of above task. The work was carried out with partial financial support of the FCPIR contract No 14.578.21.0082 (ID RFMEFI57814X0082).

  13. Interaction between ketopantolactone and chirally modified Pt investigated by attenuated total reflection IR concentration modulation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bonalumi, Norberto; Bürgi, Thomas; Baiker, Alfons

    2003-11-01

    The combination of ATR-IR and modulation spectroscopy allowed for the study of the interaction of ketopantolactone with Pt/Al2O3 films chirally modified by cinchonidine under hydrogenation conditions. The spectra reveal a significant influence of ketopantolactone on the adsorption of the modifier and indicate a N-H-O hydrogen bond between modifier and reactant. The latter was corroborated by a comparative study with N-methyl cinchonidine chloride modified Pt/Al2O3.

  14. Investigation of bis-crown ethers for ion-selective electrodes by FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egyed, O.; Izvekov, V. P.; Toth, K.; Holly, S.; Pungor, E.

    1990-03-01

    The structure of bis-benzo-15-crown-5 derivatives containing nitro groups and urethane linkages has been studied by FT-IR spectroscopy, regarding especially the secondary bonds (H-bridges) of the chain connecting the two crow rings of the molecule. It was concluded that the formation of an ion trap stabilized by intramolecular cross H-bonds between urethane NH groups and O atoms is presumable.

  15. Practical Analysis of materials with depth varying compositions using FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS)

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. McClelland; R.W. Jones; Siquan Luo

    2004-09-30

    FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is discussed as a nondestructive method to probe the molecular composition of materials versus depth on the basis of the analysis of layers of experimentally controllable thickness, which are measured from the sample surface to depths of some tens of micrometers, depending on optical and thermal properties. Computational methods are described to process photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra for both semi-quantitative and quantitative depth analyses. These methods are demonstrated on layered and gradient samples.

  16. Simultaneous monitoring of curing shrinkage and degree of cure of thermosets by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fernàndez-Francos, Xavier; Kazarian, Sergei G; Ramis, Xavier; Serra, Àngels

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel methodology to simultaneously monitor of the degree of cure and curing shrinkage of thermosetting formulations. This methodology is based on the observation of changes in the infrared absorption of reactive functional groups and the groups used as a standard reference for normalization. While the optical path length is exact and controlled in transmission infrared spectroscopy, in attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR), the exact determination of volume changes requires the measurement of the refractive indices of the studied system throughout the curing process or at least an indirect parallel measurement of this property. The methodology presented here allows one to achieve quantitative measurements of the degree of cure and shrinkage for thermosets using in situ ATR FT-IR spectroscopy.

  17. The detection and discrimination of human body fluids using ATR FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Orphanou, Charlotte-Maria; Walton-Williams, Laura; Mountain, Harry; Cassella, John

    2015-07-01

    Blood, saliva, semen and vaginal secretions are the main human body fluids encountered at crime scenes. Currently presumptive tests are routinely utilised to indicate the presence of body fluids, although these are often subject to false positives and limited to particular body fluids. Over the last decade more sensitive and specific body fluid identification methods have been explored, such as mRNA analysis and proteomics, although these are not yet appropriate for routine application. This research investigated the application of ATR FT-IR spectroscopy for the detection and discrimination of human blood, saliva, semen and vaginal secretions. The results demonstrated that ATR FT-IR spectroscopy can detect and distinguish between these body fluids based on the unique spectral pattern, combination of peaks and peak frequencies corresponding to the macromolecule groups common within biological material. Comparisons with known abundant proteins relevant to each body fluid were also analysed to enable specific peaks to be attributed to the relevant protein components, which further reinforced the discrimination and identification of each body fluid. Overall, this preliminary research has demonstrated the potential for ATR FT-IR spectroscopy to be utilised in the routine confirmatory screening of biological evidence due to its quick and robust application within forensic science.

  18. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Erikat, I. A.; Hamad, B. A.

    2013-11-07

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75 ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir–C and Ir–Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

  19. Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy -- Laser Spectroscopy in Unconventional Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, Sune

    2010-02-01

    An overview of the new field of Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy (GASMAS) is presented. The GASMAS technique combines narrow-band diode-laser spectroscopy with optical propagation in diffuse media. Whereas solids and liquids have broad absorption features, free gas in pores and cavities in the material is characterized by sharp spectral signatures. These are typically 10,000 times sharper than those of the host material. Many applications in materials science, food packaging, pharmaceutics and medicine have been demonstrated. Molecular oxygen and water vapor have been studied around 760 and 935 nm, respectively. Liquid water, an important constituent in many natural materials, such as tissue, has a low absorption at such wavelengths, allowing propagation. Polystyrene foam, wood, fruits, food-stuffs, pharmaceutical tablets, and human sinus cavities have been studied, demonstrating new possibilities for characterization and diagnostics. Transport of gas in porous media can readily be studied by first immersing the material in, e.g., pure nitrogen gas, and then observing the rate at which normal air, containing oxygen, reinvades the material. The conductance of the human sinus connective passages can be measured in this way by flushing the nasal cavity with nitrogen, while breathing normally through the mouth. A clinical study comprising 40 patients has been concluded.

  20. Structural analysis of bioinspired nano materials with synchrotron far IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Seoudi, Rania S; Dowd, Annette; Smith, Brian J; Mechler, Adam

    2016-04-28

    Bioinspired fibres and hierarchical nano-materials are based on the self-assembly of organic building blocks such as polypeptides. Confirming the core structure of such materials is often challenging as they lack the long-range order required by crystallographic methods. Far-IR spectroscopy characterizes the vibrational modes of large molecular units. These vibrational modes are very sensitive to angle strain and second order interactions such as hydrogen bonding. As such, far-IR spectra hold information about the secondary structure and interactions of large biomolecules. Here we analyze the far-IR vibrational spectra of fibrous nano-materials based on three isomeric unnatural tripeptides, Ac-β(3)Leu-β(3)Ile-β(3)Ala, Ac-β(3)Ile-β(3)Ala-β(3)Leu, and Ac-β(3)Ala-β(3)Leu-β(3)Ile. These peptides have well described self-assembly characteristics, forming one-dimensional nanorods that impose tight conformational constraints on the constituent molecules. The synchrotron far-IR spectroscopic results were interpreted by using density functional theory (DFT) modelling based vibrational analysis. The sensitivity of the spectra to peptide conformation was assessed by comparing the experimental spectra with DFT predictions. In high dielectric implicit solvent, intramolecular hydrogen-bonding is inhibited and thus the energy minimized peptide structure remains close to the 14-helix folding characteristic of substituted β(3)-peptides, giving good agreement between the experimental and predicted vibration spectra. In contrast, energy minimization in vacuum alters the peptide conformation leading to intramolecular hydrogen bonds, and hence the predicted vibration spectra do not agree with the experimental data. Therefore, our results demonstrate the ability of far-IR spectroscopy to identify correct structural predictions and thus open the way for using far-IR spectroscopy for the characterization and structural analysis of bioinspired nano-materials and potentially their

  1. Attosecond XUV absorption spectroscopy of doubly excited states in helium atoms dressed by a time-delayed femtosecond infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. Q.; Ye, D. F.; Ding, Thomas; Pfeifer, Thomas; Fu, L. B.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy of doubly excited states of helium atoms by solving the time-dependent two-electron Schrödinger equation numerically based on a one-dimensional model. The helium atoms are subjected to an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse and a time-delayed infrared (IR) few-cycle laser pulse. A superposition of doubly excited states populated by the XUV pulse is identified, which interferes with the direct ionization pathway leading to Fano resonance profiles in the photoabsorption spectrum. In the presence of an IR laser, however, the Fano line profiles are strongly modified: A shifting, splitting, and broadening of the original absorption lines is observed when the XUV attosecond pulse and infrared few-cycle laser pulse overlap in time, which is in good agreement with recent experimental results. At certain time delays, we observe symmetric Lorentz, inverted Fano profiles, and even negative absorption cross sections indicating that the XUV light can be amplified during the interaction with atoms. We further prove that the above pictures are general for different doubly excited states by suitably varying the frequency of the IR field to coherently couple the corresponding states.

  2. Polarization shaping in the mid-IR and polarization-based balanced heterodyne detection with application to 2D IR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Chris T.; Strasfeld, David B.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate amplitude, phase and polarization shaping of femtosecond mid-IR pulses using a germanium acousto-optical modulator by independently shaping the frequency-dependent amplitudes and phases of two orthogonally polarized pulses which are then collinearly overlapped using a wire-grid polarizer. We use a feedback loop to set and stabilize the relative phase of the orthogonal pulses. We have also used a wire-grid polarizer to implement polarization-based balanced heterodyne detection for improved signal-to-noise of 2D IR spectra collected in a pump-probe geometry. Applications include coherent control of molecular vibrations and improvements in multidimensional IR spectroscopy. PMID:19687931

  3. Differentiation of the root of Cultivated Ginseng, Mountain Cultivated Ginseng and Mountain Wild Ginseng using FT-IR and two-dimensional correlation IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Li, Yong-Guo; Xu, Hong; Sun, Su-Qin; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2008-07-01

    Ginseng is one of the most widely used herbal medicines. Based on the grown environments and the cultivate method, three kinds of ginseng, Cultivated Ginseng (CG), Mountain Cultivated Ginseng (MCG) and Mountain Wild Ginseng (MWG) are classified. A novel and scientific-oriented method was developed and established to discriminate and identify three kinds of ginseng using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), secondary derivative IR spectra and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D-IR). The findings indicated that the relative contents of starch in the CG were more than that in MCG and MWG, while the relative contents of calcium oxalate and lipids in MWG were more than that in CG and MCG, and the relative contents of fatty acid in MCG were more than that in CG and MWG. The hierarchical cluster analysis was applied to data analysis of MWG, CG and MWG, which could be classified successfully. The results demonstrated the macroscopic IR fingerprint method, including FT-IR, secondary derivative IR and 2D-IR, can be applied to discriminate different ginsengs rapidly, effectively and non-destructively.

  4. Study on antibacterial alginate-stabilized copper nanoparticles by FT-IR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Visurraga, Judith; Daza, Carla; Pozo, Claudio; Becerra, Abraham; von Plessing, Carlos; García, Apolinaria

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to clarify the intermolecular interaction between antibacterial copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs) and sodium alginate (NaAlg) by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and to process the spectra applying two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) correlation analysis. To our knowledge, the addition of NaAlg as a stabilizer of copper nanoparticles has not been previously reported. It is expected that the obtained results will provide valuable additional information on: (1) the influence of reducing agent ratio on the formation of copper nanoparticles in order to design functional nanomaterials with increased antibacterial activity, and (2) structural changes related to the incorporation of Cu NPs into the polymer matrix. Methods Cu NPs were prepared by microwave heating using ascorbic acid as reducing agent and NaAlg as stabilizing agent. The characterization of synthesized Cu NPs by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and semiquantitative analysis of the weight percentage composition indicated that the average particle sizes of Cu NPs are about 3–10 nm, they are spherical in shape, and consist of zerovalent Cu and Cu2O. Also, crystallite size and relative particle size of stabilized Cu NPs were calculated by XRD using Scherrer’s formula and FT from the X-ray diffraction data. Thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), FT-IR, second-derivative spectra, and 2D-IR correlation analysis were applied to studying the stabilization mechanism of Cu NPs by NaAlg molecules. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of stabilized Cu NPs against five bacterial strains (Staphylococccus aureus ATCC 6538P, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and O157: H7, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 13311 and 14028) were evaluated with macrodilution

  5. Monitoring lipase-catalyzed interesterification for bulky fat modification with FT-IR/NIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tinghong; Lai, Xuxin; Zhang, Hong; Søndergaard, Ib; Xu, Xuebing

    2005-12-28

    This work demonstrates the application of FT-IR and FT-NIR spectroscopy to monitor the enzymatic interesterification process for bulky fat modification. The reaction was conducted between palm stearin and coconut oil (70:30, w/w) with the catalysis of Lipozyme TL IM at 70 degrees C in a batch reactor. The blends and interesterified fat samples in liquid form were measured by attenuated total reflectance based FT-IR (spectra region, 1516-781 cm(-1)) and transmission mode based FT-NIR (spectra region, 5369-4752 cm(-1)) with the temperature of both controlled at 70 degrees C. The samples in solid form were also measured by reflectance-based FT-NIR (spectra regions, 7037-6039 and 5995-5612 cm(-1)) at room temperature. Calibrations of FT-IR and FT-NIR for conversion degrees (evaluated by triglyceride profile), solid fat contents (SFC), and dropping points of interesterified products were carried out by using partial least-squares regression. High correlations (r > 0.96) were obtained from cross validations of the data estimated by FT-IR, FT-NIR, and the above-mentioned conventional analytical methods, except for correlations (r = 0.90-0.95) between FT-IR and SFC profiles. Overall, FT-NIR spectroscopy coupled with transmission mode measured at 70 degrees C had the highest correlations, which also had the closest conditions to the sampled products in the process, indicating a great potential for implementation as an on-line control for monitoring the enzymatic interesterification process. PMID:16366664

  6. Potential of mid IR spectroscopy in the rapid label free identification of skin malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastl, Lena; Kemper, Björn; Lloyd, Gavin R.; Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Stone, Nick; Naranjo, Valery; Penaranda, Francisco; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The rapid inspection of suspicious skin lesions for pathological cell types is the objective of optical point of care diagnostics technologies. A marker free fast diagnosis of skin malignancies would overcome the limitations of the current gold standard surgical biopsy. The time consuming and costly biopsy procedure requires the inspection of each sample by a trained pathologist, which limits the analysis of potentially malignant lesions. Optical technologies like RAMAN or infrared spectroscopy, which provide both, localization and chemical information, can be used to differentiate malignant from healthy tissue by the analysis of multi cell structures and cell type specific spectra. We here report the application of midIR spectroscopy towards fast and reliable skin diagnostics. Within the European research project MINERVA we developed standardized in vitro skin systems with increasing complexity, from single skin cell types as fibroblasts, keratinocytes and melanoma cells, to mixtures of these and finally three dimensional human skin equivalents. The standards were characterized in the established midIR range and also with newly developed systems for fast imaging up to 12 μm. The analysis of the spectra by novel data processing algorithms demonstrated the clear separation of all cell types, especially the tumor cells. The signals from single cell layers were sufficient for cell type differentiation. We have compared different midIR systems and found all of them suitable for specific cell type identification. Our data demonstrate the potential of midIR spectroscopy for fast image acquisition and an improved data processing as sensitive and specific optical biopsy technology.

  7. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Strontium(II) Coordination.

    PubMed

    Sahai; Carroll; Roberts; O'Day

    2000-02-15

    Sorption of dissolved strontium on kaolinite, amorphous silica, and goethite was studied as a function of pH, aqueous strontium concentration, the presence or absence of atmospheric CO(2) or dissolved phosphate, and aging over a 57-day period. Selected sorption samples ([Sr(aq)](i) approximately 0.5-1x10(-3) m) were examined with synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at low (13-23 K) and room temperatures to determine the local molecular coordination around strontium. Quantitative analyses of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of kaolinite, amorphous silica, and most goethite sorption samples showed a single first shell of 9-10 (+/-1) oxygen atoms around strontium at an average Sr-O bond-distance of 2.61 (+/-0.02) Å, indicating hydrated surface complexes. The EXAFS spectra were unchanged after reaction for up to 57 days. Likewise, in kaolinite sorption samples prepared in 100% nitrogen atmosphere, the presence of dissolved phosphate (0.5x10(-3) m) in addition to strontium did not change the local coordination around strontium. In two goethite sorption samples reacted in air at pH approximately 8.5, the EXAFS spectra (collected at low and room temperature) clearly showed that the local structure around strontium is that of strontianite (SrCO(3)(s)). We also noted an increase in strontium uptake on goethite in the presence of atmospheric CO(2) in batch experiments, relative to CO(2)-free experiments. These observations suggest that sorption of carbonate may nucleate the precipitation of SrCO(3) in the pH range in which carbonate sorption on goethite is near a maximum. At higher pH, carbonate surface sorption decreases as dissolved CO(2) decreases. For goethite sorption samples above pH 8.6, hydrated surface complexes, rather than a precipitate, were observed in the EXAFS spectra. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  8. Indirect absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers: mid-infrared refractometry and photothermal spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Marcel; Ruf, Alexander; Fischer, Peer

    2013-11-01

    We record vibrational spectra with two indirect schemes that depend on the real part of the index of refraction: mid-infrared refractometry and photothermal spectroscopy. In the former, a quantum cascade laser (QCL) spot is imaged to determine the angles of total internal reflection, which yields the absorption line via a beam profile analysis. In the photothermal measurements, a tunable QCL excites vibrational resonances of a molecular monolayer, which heats the surrounding medium and changes its refractive index. This is observed with a probe laser in the visible. Sub-monolayer sensitivities are demonstrated.

  9. Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy and Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Human Breath Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtas, J.; Tittel, F. K.; Stacewicz, T.; Bielecki, Z.; Lewicki, R.; Mikolajczyk, J.; Nowakowski, M.; Szabra, D.; Stefanski, P.; Tarka, J.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes two different optoelectronic detection techniques: cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and photoacoustic spectroscopy. These techniques are designed to perform a sensitive analysis of trace gas species in exhaled human breath for medical applications. With such systems, the detection of pathogenic changes at the molecular level can be achieved. The presence of certain gases (biomarkers), at increased concentration levels, indicates numerous human diseases. Diagnosis of a disease in its early stage would significantly increase chances for effective therapy. Non-invasive, real-time measurements, and high sensitivity and selectivity, capable of minimum discomfort for patients, are the main advantages of human breath analysis. At present, monitoring of volatile biomarkers in breath is commonly useful for diagnostic screening, treatment for specific conditions, therapy monitoring, control of exogenous gases (such as bacterial and poisonous emissions), as well as for analysis of metabolic gases.

  10. [Measurements of IR absorption across section and spectrum simulation of lewisite].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-peng; Wang, Hai-tao; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Liu; Guo, Xiao-di; Bai, Yun; Sun, Hao

    2015-02-01

    The vapor infrared transmission spectra of varied concentration of lewisite-1 were measured by a long-path FT-IR spectrometer, and its characteristic frequencies are 814, 930, 1563 cm(-1); their infrared absorption cross section (a) were determined using Beer-Lambert law. The corresponding sigma values are 3.89 +/- 0.01, 1.43 +/- 0.06, 4.47 +/- 0.05 ( X 10(-20) cm2 x molecule(-1)). Two little teeny peaks, 1158, 1288 cm(-1) were found in the measured spectra. Density Functional Theory (DFT) was applied to calculated the infrared spectra of lewisite-1, -2, -3 on a b3lyp/6-311+g(d, p) level by Gauss09 package. The vibration modes were assigned by Gaussview5. 08. The calculated spectra and experimental spectra are in good agreement with each other in 600-1600 cm(-1) range, for the Person's r is 0.9991. The calculated spectra also showed three characteristic frequencies (293, 360, 374 cm(-1)) related to As atom. 0.977 was a scaling factor we determined for lewisite-1 through least-square error and its performance to scale lewisite-1, -2, -3 was acceptable. The results of this work are useful for monitoring environmental atmospheric concentrations of lewisite. PMID:25970914

  11. Size control of semimetal bismuth nanoparticles and the UV-visible and IR absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y W; Hong, Byung Hee; Kim, Kwang S

    2005-04-21

    We introduced a simple chemical method to synthesize semimetal bismuth nanoparticles in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) by reducing Bi(3+) with sodium borohydride (NaBH(4)) in the presence of poly(vinylpyrroldone) (PVP) at room temperature. The size and dispersibility of Bi nanoparticles can be easily controlled by changing the synthetic conditions such as the molar ratio of PVP to BiCl(3) and the concentration of BiCl(3). The UV-visible absorption spectra of Bi nanoparticles of different diameters are systematically studied. The surface plasmon peaks broaden with the increasing molar ratio of PVP to BiCl(3) as the size of bismuth nanoparticles decreases. Infrared (IR) spectra of the complexes with different molar ratios of PVP/BiCl(3) show a strong interaction between the carboxyl oxygen (C=O) of PVP and Bi(3+) ion and a weak interaction between the carboxyl oxygen (C=O) of PVP and the Bi atom in nanoparticles. This indicates that PVP serves as an effective capping ligand, which prevents the nanoparticles from aggregation.

  12. Identification and characterization of salmonella serotypes using DNA spectral characteristics by fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of DNA samples of Salmonella serotypes (Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Kentucky) were performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectrometer by placing directly in contact with a diamond attenua...

  13. Absorption and emission spectroscopy of individual semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Matthew P.

    The advent of controllable synthetic methods for the production of semiconductor nanostructures has led to their use in a host of applications, including light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, sensors, and even television displays. This is, in part, due to the size, shape, and morphologically dependent optical and electrical properties that make this class of materials extremely customizable; wire-, rod- and sphere-shaped nanocrystals are readily synthesized through common wet chemical methods. Most notably, confining the physical dimension of the nanostructure to a size below its Bohr radius (aB) results in quantum confinement effects that increase its optical energy gap. Not only the size, but the shape of a particle can be exploited to tailor its optical and electrical properties. For example, confined CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and nanowires (NWs) of equivalent diameter possess significantly different optical gaps. This phenomenon has been ascribed to electrostatic contributions arising from dielectric screening effects that are more pronounced in an elongated (wire-like) morphology. Semiconducting nanostructures have thus received significant attention over the past two decades. However, surprisingly little work has been done to elucidate their basic photophysics on a single particle basis. What has been done has generally been accomplished through emission-based measurements, and thus does not fully capture the full breadth of these intriguing systems. What is therefore needed then are absorption-based studies that probe the size and shape dependent evolution of nanostructure photophysics. This thesis summarizes the single particle absorption spectroscopy that we have carried out to fill this knowledge gap. Specifically, the diameter-dependent progression of one-dimensional (1D) excitonic states in CdSe NWs has been revealed. This is followed by a study that focuses on the polarization selection rules of 1D excitons within single CdSe NWs. Finally

  14. The importance of correcting for variable probe-sample interactions in AFM-IR spectroscopy: AFM-IR of dried bacteria on a polyurethane film.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Daniel E; Biffinger, Justin C; Cockrell-Zugell, Allison L; Lo, Michael; Kjoller, Kevin; Cook, Debra; Lee, Woo Kyung; Pehrsson, Pehr E; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Hung, Chia-Suei; Nadeau, Lloyd J; Russell, John N

    2016-08-01

    AFM-IR is a combined atomic force microscopy-infrared spectroscopy method that shows promise for nanoscale chemical characterization of biological-materials interactions. In an effort to apply this method to quantitatively probe mechanisms of microbiologically induced polyurethane degradation, we have investigated monolayer clusters of ∼200 nm thick Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 bacteria (Pf) on a 300 nm thick polyether-polyurethane (PU) film. Here, the impact of the different biological and polymer mechanical properties on the thermomechanical AFM-IR detection mechanism was first assessed without the additional complication of polymer degradation. AFM-IR spectra of Pf and PU were compared with FTIR and showed good agreement. Local AFM-IR spectra of Pf on PU (Pf-PU) exhibited bands from both constituents, showing that AFM-IR is sensitive to chemical composition both at and below the surface. One distinct difference in local AFM-IR spectra on Pf-PU was an anomalous ∼4× increase in IR peak intensities for the probe in contact with Pf versus PU. This was attributed to differences in probe-sample interactions. In particular, significantly higher cantilever damping was observed for probe contact with PU, with a ∼10× smaller Q factor. AFM-IR chemical mapping at single wavelengths was also affected. We demonstrate ratioing of mapping data for chemical analysis as a simple method to cancel the extreme effects of the variable probe-sample interactions. PMID:27403761

  15. Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics Lecture: 2D IR Spectroscopy of Peptide Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2012-02-01

    Descriptions of protein and peptide conformation are colored by the methods we use to study them. Protein x-ray and NMR structures often lead to impressions of rigid or well-defined conformations, even though these are dynamic molecules. The conformational fluctuations and disorder of proteins and peptides is more difficult to quantify. This presentation will describe an approach toward characterizing and quantifying structural heterogeneity and disorder in peptides using 2D IR spectroscopy. Using amide I vibrational spectroscopy, isotope labeling strategies, and computational modeling based on molecular dynamics simulations and Markov state models allows us to characterize distinct peptide conformers and conformational variation. The examples illustrated include the beta-hairpin tripzip2 and elastin-like peptides.

  16. Dye aggregation identified by vibrational coupling using 2D IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oudenhoven, Tracey A.; Laaser, Jennifer E.; Zanni, Martin T.; Joo, Yongho; Gopalan, Padma

    2015-06-07

    We report that a model dye, Re(CO){sub 3}(bypy)CO{sub 2}H, aggregates into clusters on TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles regardless of our preparation conditions. Using two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we have identified characteristic frequencies of monomers, dimers, and trimers. A comparison of 2D IR spectra in solution versus those deposited on TiO{sub 2} shows that the propensity to dimerize in solution leads to higher dimer formation on TiO{sub 2}, but that dimers are formed even if there are only monomers in solution. Aggregates cannot be washed off with standard protocols and are present even at submonolayer coverages. We observe cross peaks between aggregates of different sizes, primarily dimers and trimers, indicating that clusters consist of microdomains in close proximity. 2D IR spectroscopy is used to draw these conclusions from measurements of vibrational couplings, but if molecules are close enough to be vibrationally coupled, then they are also likely to be electronically coupled, which could alter charge transfer.

  17. Amide I'-II' 2D IR spectroscopy provides enhanced protein secondary structural sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Deflores, Lauren P; Ganim, Ziad; Nicodemus, Rebecca A; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-03-11

    We demonstrate how multimode 2D IR spectroscopy of the protein amide I' and II' vibrations can be used to distinguish protein secondary structure. Polarization-dependent amide I'-II' 2D IR experiments on poly-l-lysine in the beta-sheet, alpha-helix, and random coil conformations show that a combination of amide I' and II' diagonal and cross peaks can effectively distinguish between secondary structural content, where amide I' infrared spectroscopy alone cannot. The enhanced sensitivity arises from frequency and amplitude correlations between amide II' and amide I' spectra that reflect the symmetry of secondary structures. 2D IR surfaces are used to parametrize an excitonic model for the amide I'-II' manifold suitable to predict protein amide I'-II' spectra. This model reveals that the dominant vibrational interaction contributing to this sensitivity is a combination of negative amide II'-II' through-bond coupling and amide I'-II' coupling within the peptide unit. The empirically determined amide II'-II' couplings do not significantly vary with secondary structure: -8.5 cm(-1) for the beta sheet, -8.7 cm(-1) for the alpha helix, and -5 cm(-1) for the coil.

  18. Collaborative Student Laboratory Exercise Using FT-IR Spectroscopy for the Kinetics Study of a Biotin Analogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leong, Jhaque; Ackroyd, Nathan C.; Ho, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of N-methoxycarbonyl-2-imidazolidone, an analogue of biotin, was conducted by organic chemistry students and confirmed using FT-IR and H NMR. Spectroscopy students used FT-IR to measure the rate of hydrolysis of the product and determined the rate constant for the reaction using the integrated rate law. From the magnitude of the rate…

  19. Near Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhez, Olivier; Ade, Harald; Urquhart, Stephen

    2001-03-01

    Synthetic and natural polymers exhibit a rich carbon, nitrogen and oxygen K-edge Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS). The spectroscopic variations with chemical structure and composition are interesting in their own right. In addition, the large spectroscopic variability can be utilized for the compositional analysis of materials. This is particularly useful for high spatial resolution NEXAFS microanalysis at lateral spatial resolutions exceeding that achievable with more traditional compositional analysis tools such as Infrared and NMR spectroscopy. To increase our understanding of NEXAFS spectra and to start a database for microanalysis, we acquired carbon NEXAFS spectra of the following polymers: polycarbonate, poly(oxybenzoate-co-2,6oxynaphthoate), poly (p-phenylene terephtalamide), toluene diisocyanate polyurethane, toluene diisocyanate polyurea, 4,4'-methylene di-p-phenylene isocyanate polyurethane, 4,4'-methylene di-p-phenylene isocyanate polyurea, poly(ether ether ketone), poly(alpha-methylstyrene), poly-styrene, poly bromostyrene, poly(2-vinyl styrene), polyethylene, poly(ethylene oxide), polypropylene, poly(propylene oxide), polyisobutylene, ethylene propylene rubber, poly(methyl -metacrylate). These spectra were obtained in transmission with an energy resolution of 150 meV. The energy scale was carefully calibrated in-situ utilizing C02 gas as a reference. Spectral assignments are made based on model compounds and theoretical calculations.

  20. Urban ozone measurements using differential optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Morales, J A; Treacy, J; Coffey, S

    2004-05-01

    In order to improve the air quality in Europe the European Commission has issued a number of directives with regard to acceptable levels of a range of gaseous pollutants, which includes ozone. Therefore, monitoring of this compound is necessary to comply with EU legislation, to provide improved pollution warnings for those who are sensitive to air pollutants as well as providing valuable data for environmental planning. Open-path spectroscopic techniques, such as differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), are ideal for monitoring pollutants because of the advantages they offer over classical methods and point-source analysers. A DOAS system has been installed in Dublin city centre to monitor a range of criteria pollutants including ozone. Observations of urban background ozone concentrations are presented. The measurements are compared with those obtained using a UV point-source analyser and are presented in the context of the current EU directive. The influence of trans-boundary pollution from mainland Europe leading to ozone episodes is also discussed. Observations of high ozone during this measurement campaign coincided with the influx of photochemically polluted air masses which originated over continental Europe. For the analysed time interval, the data suggest that the ground ozone level in Dublin might be significantly influenced by long-range transport from the United Kingdom and continental Europe. PMID:14963627

  1. Decay Heat Measurements Using Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, S.; Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Taín, J. L.; Regan, P. H.; Podolyák, Z.; Agramunt, J.; Gelletly, W.; Nichols, A. L.

    2012-09-01

    A knowledge of the decay heat emitted by thermal neutron-irradiated nuclear fuel is an important factor in ensuring safe reactor design and operation, spent fuel removal from the core, and subsequent storage prior to and after reprocessing, and waste disposal. Decay heat can be readily calculated from the nuclear decay properties of the fission products, actinides and their decay products as generated within the irradiated fuel. Much of the information comes from experiments performed with HPGe detectors, which often underestimate the beta feeding to states at high excitation energies. This inability to detect high-energy gamma emissions effectively results in the derivation of decay schemes that suffer from the pandemonium effect, although such a serious problem can be avoided through application of total absorption γ-ray spectroscopy (TAS). The beta decay of key radionuclei produced as a consequence of the neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu are being re-assessed by means of this spectroscopic technique. A brief synopsis is given of the Valencia-Surrey (BaF2) TAS detector, and their method of operation, calibration and spectral analysis.

  2. Compact large-aperture Fabry-Perot interferometer modules for gas spectroscopy at mid-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantojärvi, Uula; Varpula, Aapo; Antila, Tapani; Holmlund, Christer; Mäkynen, Jussi; Näsilä, Antti; Mannila, Rami; Rissanen, Anna; Antila, Jarkko; Disch, Rolf J.; Waldmann, Torsten A.

    2014-03-01

    VTT has developed Fabry-Pérot Interferometers (FPI) for visible and infrared wavelengths since 90's. Here we present two new platforms for mid-infrared gas spectroscopy having a large optical aperture to provide high optical throughput but still enabling miniaturized instrument size. First platform is a tunable filter that replaces a traditional filter wheel, which operates between wavelengths of 4-5 um. Second platform is for correlation spectroscopy where the interferometer provides a comb-like transmission pattern mimicking absorption of diatomic molecules at the wavelength range of 4.7-4.8 um. The Bragg mirrors have 2-4 thin layers of polysilicon and silicon oxide.

  3. External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser for Quartz Tuning Fork Photoacoustic Spectroscopy of Broad Absorption Features

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Cannon, Bret D.

    2007-05-01

    We demonstrate mid-infrared spectroscopy of large molecules with broad absorption features using a tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. Absorption spectra for two different Freons are measured over the range 1130-1185 cm-1 with 0.2 cm-1 resolution via laser photoacoustic spectroscopy with quartz tuning forks as acoustic transducers. The measured spectra are in excellent agreement with published reference absorption spectra.

  4. 193Ir Mössbauer spectroscopy of Pt-IrO 2 nanoparticle catalysts developed for detection and removal of carbon monoxide from air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, J. A.; Marcinkowska, K.; Wagner, F. E.

    2010-08-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy of 73.0 keV gamma-ray transition in 193Ir and supplementary analytical techniques were used to study the microstructure and chemical form of polymer-supported hydrophobic bimetallic Pt-Ir catalysts for detection and removal of CO from humid air at ambient conditions. The catalysts, typically with a composition of 9 wt.% Pt and 1 wt.% Ir, were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of polystyrene-divinylbenzene (SDB) granules with ethanol solutions of hexachloroplatinic and hexachloroiridic acids. This procedure, followed by reduction in H 2 or CO at only 200 °C or 250 °C, resulted in formation of highly-dispersed Pt-Ir particles usually smaller than 20 nm and having high catalytic activity and selectivity. Mössbauer spectra of 73.0 keV gamma-ray transition in 193Ir were taken after consecutive steps of preparation and exposure of catalysts to better understand and further improve the fabrication processes. In the as-impregnated state, iridium was found mostly as Ir(III) in [IrCl 6] 3- ions, with only a small fraction of Ir(IV) in [IrCl 6] 2- ions. The iridium in bimetallic clusters formed by reduction in hydrogen showed a strong tendency towards oxidation on exposure to air at room temperature, while Pt remained mostly metallic. In the most active and stable catalysts, the Ir and Pt in metallic regions of the clusters did not tend to segregate, unlike in Pt-Ir/silica-supported catalysts studied by us earlier. Further, this study shows that the IrO 2-like regions in the clusters exhibit stronger deviations from local symmetry and stoichiometry of crystalline IrO 2 than observed previously in Pt-Ir/silica catalysts. Our study also indicates that in the examined Pt-IrO 2 nanoparticles iridium largely provides the dissociative O 2 adsorption sites, while the CO adsorption occurs primarily at metallic Pt sites.

  5. Linear dichroism amplification: Adapting a long-known technique for ultrasensitive femtosecond IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rehault, Julien; Helbing, Jan; Zanirato, Vinicio; Olivucci, Massimo

    2011-03-28

    We demonstrate strong amplification of polarization-sensitive transient IR signals using a pseudo-null crossed polarizer technique first proposed by Keston and Lospalluto [Fed. Proc. 10, 207 (1951)] and applied for nanosecond flash photolysis in the visible by Che et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 224, 145 (1994)]. We adapted the technique to ultrafast pulsed laser spectroscopy in the infrared using photoelastic modulators, which allow us to measure amplified linear dichroism at kilohertz repetition rates. The method was applied to a photoswitch of the N-alkylated Schiff base family in order to demonstrate its potential of strongly enhancing sensitivity and signal to noise in ultrafast transient IR experiments, to simplify spectra and to determine intramolecular transition dipole orientations.

  6. Thermal properties of tannin extracted from Anacardium occidentale L. using TGA and FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Vinod; Leo, Vincent Vineeth; Prabha, S Sabna; Prabhakumari, C; Potty, V P; Jisha, M S

    2016-01-01

    The chemical nature of the polyphenols of cashew kernel testa has been determined. Testa contains tannins, which present large molecular complexity and has an ancient use as tanning agents. The use of tannins extracted from cashew testa, considered in many places as a waste, grants an extra value to the cashew. In this work we have analysed through high performance liquid chromatography, infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermo gravimetric analysis the average molecular weight, main functional groups and thermal properties of tannins extracted from Anacardium occidentale L. The results of these analyses are compared with the commercial grade tannic acid. The FT-IR spectra showed bands characteristic of C = C, C-C and OH bonds. This important bioactive compound present in the cashew nut kernel testa was suggested as an interesting economical source of antioxidants for use in the food and nutraceutical industry. PMID:26119693

  7. Thermal properties of tannin extracted from Anacardium occidentale L. using TGA and FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Vinod; Leo, Vincent Vineeth; Prabha, S Sabna; Prabhakumari, C; Potty, V P; Jisha, M S

    2016-01-01

    The chemical nature of the polyphenols of cashew kernel testa has been determined. Testa contains tannins, which present large molecular complexity and has an ancient use as tanning agents. The use of tannins extracted from cashew testa, considered in many places as a waste, grants an extra value to the cashew. In this work we have analysed through high performance liquid chromatography, infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermo gravimetric analysis the average molecular weight, main functional groups and thermal properties of tannins extracted from Anacardium occidentale L. The results of these analyses are compared with the commercial grade tannic acid. The FT-IR spectra showed bands characteristic of C = C, C-C and OH bonds. This important bioactive compound present in the cashew nut kernel testa was suggested as an interesting economical source of antioxidants for use in the food and nutraceutical industry.

  8. Femtosecond IR pump-probe spectroscopy of nonlinear energy localization in protein models and model proteins.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Peter

    2009-02-01

    This paper reviews our experimental and theoretical efforts toward understanding vibrational self-trapping of the amide I and N-H mode of crystalline acetanilide (ACN), other similar hydrogen-bonded crystals, as well as of model peptides. In contrast to previous works, we used nonlinear IR spectroscopy as the experimental tool, which is specifically sensitive to the anharmonic contributions of the intramolecular interactions (as the nonlinear IR response of set of harmonic oscillators vanishes exactly). Our work reconfirms the previous assignment of the two bands of the amide I mode of ACN as being a self-trapped and a free exciton state, but in addition also establishes the lifetimes of these states and identifies the relevant phonons. Furthermore, we provide evidence for vibrationally self-trapped states also in model alpha-helices. However, given the short lifetime, any biological relevance in the sense of Davydov's initial proposal can probably be ruled out. PMID:19669566

  9. Separation of deuterium by IR multiphoton decomposition of chlorodifluoromethane. IR multiphoton absorption by and decomposition of a CF 2DCl/CF 2HCl mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschke, K. O.; Gauthier, M.; Hackett, P. A.

    1983-08-01

    IR multiphoton absorption by various pressures of CF 2HCl or of 1??? CF 2DCl in CF 2HCl was studied at several 9P and 10R lines of the CO 2 laser using temporally unmodified pulses. Values of < n> for the individual molecules, and thus the optical selectivities, obtained from these data indicate that the molecule is not a promising candidate for deuterium separation in these frequency ranges. A measurement of D-isotope depletion during the multiphoton decomposition of the same mixture at 9P42 (1025.2 cm -1) gave a minimum estimate of the isotopic selectivity of the dissociation process of 35.

  10. Residue-Specific Structural Kinetics of Proteins through the Union of Isotope Labeling, Mid-IR Pulse Shaping, and Coherent 2D IR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Chris T.; Woys, Ann Marie; Mukherjee, Sudipta S.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a methodology for studying protein kinetics using a rapid-scan technology for collecting 2D IR spectra. In conjunction with isotope labeling, 2D IR spectroscopy is able to probe the secondary structure and environment of individual residues in polypeptides and proteins. It is particularly useful for membrane and aggregate proteins. Our rapid-scan technology relies on a mid-IR pulse shaper that computer generates the pulse shapes, much like in an NMR spectrometer. With this device, data collection is faster, easier, and more accurate. We describe our 2D IR spectrometer, as well as protocols for 13C=18O isotope labeling, and then illustrate the technique with an application to the aggregation of the human islet amyloid polypeptide form type 2 diabetes. PMID:20472067

  11. Relaxation mechanism of β-carotene from S2 (1Bu(+)) state to S1 (2Ag(-)) state: femtosecond time-resolved near-IR absorption and stimulated resonance Raman studies in 900-1550 nm region.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Tomohisa; Iwata, Koichi

    2014-06-12

    Carotenoids have two major low-lying excited states, the second lowest (S2 (1Bu(+))) and the lowest (S1 (2Ag(-))) excited singlet states, both of which are suggested to be involved in the energy transfer processes in light-harvesting complexes. Studying vibrational dynamics of S2 carotenoids requires ultrafast time-resolved near-IR Raman spectroscopy, although it has much less sensitivity than visible Raman spectroscopy. In this study, the relaxation mechanism of β-carotene from the S2 state to the S1 state is investigated by femtosecond time-resolved multiplex near-IR absorption and stimulated Raman spectroscopy. The energy gap between the S2 and S1 states is estimated to be 6780 cm(-1) from near-IR transient absorption spectra. The near-IR stimulated Raman spectrum of S2 β-carotene show three bands at 1580, 1240, and 1050 cm(-1). When excess energy of 4000 cm(-1) is added, the S1 C═C stretch band shows a large upshift with a time constant of 0.2 ps. The fast upshift is explained by a model that excess energy generated by internal conversion from the S2 state to the S1 state is selectively accepted by one of the vibronic levels of the S1 state and is redistributed among all the vibrational modes.

  12. Distributed nerve gases sensor based on IR absorption in hollow optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, R.; Liberatore, N.; Luciani, D.; Mengali, S.; Pierno, L.

    2010-10-01

    The Nerve gases are persistent gases that appear as very challenging menace in homeland security scenarios, due to the low pressure vapor at ambient temperature, and the very low lethal concentrations. A novel approach to the detection and identification of these very hazardous volatile compounds in large areas such as airports, underground stations, big events arenas, aimed to a high selectivity (Low false alarm probability), has been explored under the SENSEFIB Corporate Project of Finmeccanica S.p.A. The technical demonstrator under development within the Project is presented. It is based on distributed line sensors performing infrared absorption measurements to reveal even trace amounts of target compounds from the retrieval of their spectral fingerprint. The line sensor is essentially constituted by a widely tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL), coupled to IR thermoelectrically cooled MCT fast detectors by means of a infrared hollow core fibers (HCF). The air is sampled through several micro-holes along the HCF, by means of a micropump, while the infrared radiation travels inside the fiber from the source to the detector, that are optically coupled with the opposite apertures of the HCF. The architecture of the sensor and its principle of operation, in order to cover large areas with a few line sensors instead of with a grid of many point sensors, are illustrated. The sensor is designed to use the HCF as an absorption cell, exploiting long path length and very small volume, (e.g fast response), at the same time. Furthermore the distributed sensor allows to cover large areas and/or not easily accessible locations, like air ducts, with a single line sensor by extending the HCF for several tens of meters. The main components implemented in the sensor are described, in particular: the EC-QCL source to span the spectral range of wavelength between 9.15um and 9.85um; and the hollow core fiber, exhibiting a suitably low optical loss in this spectral

  13. FT-IR and FT-NIR Raman spectroscopy in biomedical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, D.

    1998-06-01

    FT-IR and FT-NIR Raman spectra of intact microbial, plant animal or human cells, tissues, and body fluids are highly specific, fingerprint-like signatures which can be used to discriminate between diverse microbial species and strains, characterize growth-dependent phenomena and cell-drug interactions, and differentiate between various disease states. The spectral information potentially useful for biomedical characterizations may be distributed over the entire infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, i.e. over the near-, mid-, and far-infrared. It is therefore a key problem how the characteristic vibrational spectroscopic information can be systematically extracted from the infrared spectra of complex biological samples. In this report these questions are addressed by applying factor and cluster analysis treating the classification problem of microbial infrared spectra as a model task. Particularly interesting applications arise by means of a light microscope coupled to the FT-IR spectrometer. FT-IR spectra of single microcolonies of less than 40 μm in diameter can be obtained from colony replica applying a stamping technique that transfers the different, spatially separated microcolonies from the culture plate to a special IR-sample holder. Using a computer controlled x,y-stage together with mapping and video techniques, the fundamental tasks of microbiological analysis, namely detection, enumeration, and differentiation of micro-organisms can be integrated in one single apparatus. Since high quality, essentially fluorescence free Raman spectra may now be obtained in relatively short time intervals on previously intractable biological specimens, FT-IR and NIR-FT-Raman spectroscopy can be used in tandem to characterize biological samples. This approach seems to open up new horizons for biomedical characterizations of complex biological systems.

  14. Water of Hydration Dynamics in Minerals Gypsum and Bassanite: Ultrafast 2D IR Spectroscopy of Rocks.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chang; Nishida, Jun; Yuan, Rongfeng; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-08-01

    Water of hydration plays an important role in minerals, determining their crystal structures and physical properties. Here ultrafast nonlinear infrared (IR) techniques, two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) and polarization selective pump-probe (PSPP) spectroscopies, were used to measure the dynamics and disorder of water of hydration in two minerals, gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) and bassanite (CaSO4·0.5H2O). 2D IR spectra revealed that water arrangement in freshly precipitated gypsum contained a small amount of inhomogeneity. Following annealing at 348 K, water molecules became highly ordered; the 2D IR spectrum became homogeneously broadened (motional narrowed). PSPP measurements observed only inertial orientational relaxation. In contrast, water in bassanite's tubular channels is dynamically disordered. 2D IR spectra showed a significant amount of inhomogeneous broadening caused by a range of water configurations. At 298 K, water dynamics cause spectral diffusion that sampled a portion of the inhomogeneous line width on the time scale of ∼30 ps, while the rest of inhomogeneity is static on the time scale of the measurements. At higher temperature, the dynamics become faster. Spectral diffusion accelerates, and a portion of the lower temperature spectral diffusion became motionally narrowed. At sufficiently high temperature, all of the dynamics that produced spectral diffusion at lower temperatures became motionally narrowed, and only homogeneous broadening and static inhomogeneity were observed. Water angular motions in bassanite exhibit temperature-dependent diffusive orientational relaxation in a restricted cone of angles. The experiments were made possible by eliminating the vast amount of scattered light produced by the granulated powder samples using phase cycling methods. PMID:27385320

  15. Efficient enhancement of the visible-light absorption of cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes triplet photosensitizers with Bodipy and applications in photooxidation and triplet-triplet annihilation upconversion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jifu; Zhong, Fangfang; Yi, Xiuyu; Zhao, Jianzhang

    2013-06-01

    We report molecular designing strategies to enhance the effective visible-light absorption of cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes. Cationic cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes were prepared in which boron-dipyrromethene (Bodipy) units were attached to the 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) ligand via -C≡C- bonds at either the meso-phenyl (Ir-2) or 2 position of the π core of Bodipy (Ir-3). For the first time the effect of π conjugating (Ir-3) or tethering (Ir-2) of a light-harvesting chromophore to the coordination center on the photophysical properties was compared in detail. Ir(ppy)2(bpy) (Ir-1; ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) was used as model complex, which gives the typical weak absorption in visible range (ε < 4790 M(-1) cm(-1) in region > 400 nm). Ir-2 and Ir-3 showed much stronger absorption in the visible range (ε = 71,400 M(-1) cm(-1) at 499 nm and 83,000 M(-1) cm(-1) at 527 nm, respectively). Room-temperature phosphorescence was only observed for Ir-1 (λ(em) = 590 nm) and Ir-3 (λ(em) = 742 nm). Ir-3 gives RT phosphorescence of the Bodipy unit. On the basis of the 77 K emission spectra, nanosecond transient absorption spectra, and spin density analysis, we proposed that Bodipy-localized long-lived triplet excited states were populated for Ir-2 (τT = 23.7 μs) and Ir-3 (87.2 μs). Ir-1 gives a much shorter triplet-state lifetime (0.35 μs). Complexes were used as singlet oxygen ((1)O2) photosensitizers in photooxidation. The (1)O2 quantum yield of Ir-3 (ΦΔ = 0.97) is ca. 2-fold of Ir-2 (ΦΔ = 0.52). Complexes were also used as triplet photosensitizer for TTA upconversion; upconversion quantum yields of 1.2% and 2.8% were observed for Ir-2 and Ir-3, respectively. Our results proved that the strong absorption of visible light of Ir-2 failed to enhance production of a triplet excited state. These results are useful for designing transition metal complexes that show effective strong visible-light absorption and long-lived triplet excited states, which can be used as ideal

  16. Electrostatic interactions in phospholipid membranes revealed by coherent 2D IR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, V. V.; Chelli, R.; Zhuang, W.; Nuti, F.; Takaoka, Y.; Papini, A. M.; Mukamel, S.; Righini, R.

    2007-01-01

    The inter- and intramolecular interactions of the carbonyl moieties at the polar interface of a phospholipid membrane are probed by using nonlinear femtosecond infrared spectroscopy. Two-dimensional IR correlation spectra separate homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings and show a distinct cross-peak pattern controlled by electrostatic interactions. The inter- and intramolecular electrostatic interactions determine the inhomogeneous character of the optical response. Using molecular dynamics simulation and the nonlinear exciton equations approach, we extract from the spectra short-range structural correlations between carbonyls at the interface. PMID:17881567

  17. Adsorption of boric acid trimethyl ester on silica surface studied by FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianke; Ying, Pinliang; Xin, Qin; Li, Can

    1998-04-01

    Adsorption of boric acid trimethyl ester (BATE) on high-surface-area silica has been studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. It is found that surface hydroxyls remaining after outgassing at high temperatures act as weak basic sites for BATE adsorption. Coordinate interaction of BATE with isolated hydroxyls dominates the adsorption and induces two splitting B-O vibrational bands at 1375 and 1345 cm -1. In addition, a small amount of BATE reacts with hydrogen-bonded hydroxyls and strained oxygen generated after high-temperature dehydroxylation.

  18. Using FT-IR Spectroscopy to Elucidate the Structures of Ablative Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    The composition and structure of an ablative polymer has a multifaceted influence on its thermal, mechanical and ablative properties. Understanding the molecular level information is critical to the optimization of material performance because it helps to establish correlations with the macroscopic properties of the material, the so-called structure-property relationship. Moreover, accurate information of molecular structures is also essential to predict the thermal decomposition pathways as well as to identify decomposition species that are fundamentally important to modeling work. In this presentation, I will describe the use of infrared transmission spectroscopy (FT-IR) as a convenient tool to aid the discovery and development of thermal protection system materials.

  19. Structure-Activity Relations In Enzymes: An Application Of IR-ATR Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fringeli, Urs P.; Ahlstrom, Peter; Vincenz, Claudius; Fringeli, Marianna

    1985-12-01

    Relations between structure and specific activity in immobilized acetylcholinesterase (ACNE) have been studied by means of pH- and Ca++-modulation technique combined with attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared (IR) spectroscopy and enzyme activity measurement. Periodic modulation of pH and Ca++-concentration enabled a periodic on-off switching of about 40% of the total enzyme activity. It was found that about 0.5 to 1% of the amino acids were involved in this process. These 15 to 30 amino acids assumed antiparallel pleated sheet structure in the inhibited state and random and/or helical structure in the activated state.

  20. Characterization of laser-treated Opuntia using FT-IR spectroscopy and thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejías Díaz, K. D.; Flores Reyes, T.; Ponce Cabrera, L.; Domínguez Sánchez, M.; Arronte García, M.; de Posada Piñán, E.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the characterization of Opuntia samples whose thorns were removed by laser pulses. The characterization was performed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In this study we performed a comparative analysis of samples before and after treatment by using a Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1064 nm with an energy variable of up to 0.9 J. It was determined that no significant morphological or compositional changes had taken place in the cactus epidermis due to the laser treatment.

  1. Intercomparison of NO2 Slant Column Densities and Vertical Profiles Inferred from Balloon-borne Measurements of Solar Absorption Spectra in the IR and UV/vis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, A.; Boesch, H.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Dorf, M.; Dufour, G.; Payan, S.; Weidner, F.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2003-04-01

    During a series of LPMA/DOAS (Laboratoire de Physique Moléculaire et Applications/Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) stratospheric balloon flights direct solar spectra in the UV/vis and near IR were simultaneously measured by the onboard installed Fourier Transform (LPMA) and two channel grating spectrometer (DOAS). The measurements were conducted in spring and summer at high and midlatitudes during ascent of the balloon into the stratosphere (30 - 40 km) and solar occultation at balloon float altitude. Here we present a direct intercomparison of the NO_2 slant column densities (SCDs) and vertical profiles retrieved from UV/vis-DOAS and IR-LPMA measurements for a wide range of geophysical conditions (ambient pressure and temperature and solar illumination). The comparison study thus allows us to verify the applied retrieval procedures, i.e., the underlying spectroscopic dataset as well as the inversion algorithms. First intercomparison studies showed a sizeable discrepancy between NO_2 inferred by LPMA in the IR and DOAS in the visible spectral range indicating deficiencies in the spectral retrieval techniques. After introducing a temperature correction scheme for the DOAS retrieval and a new LPMA MULTIFIT procedure which minimizes the correlations of the fitting parameters by performing the inversion simultaneously in several micro-windows, a reasonably good agreement between NO_2 inferred from both instruments is found.

  2. Nocturnal Measurements of HONO by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtal, P.; McLaren, R.

    2011-12-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) was used to quantify the concentration of HONO, NO2 and SO2 in the nocturnal urban atmosphere at York University over a period of one year. These measurements form a comprehensive HONO data set, including a large range of temperatures, relative humidity, surface conditions (snow, water, dry, etc.) and NO2 concentrations. Laboratory studies and observations within the nocturnal boundary layer reported in the literature suggest heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on surface adsorbed water as the major nighttime source of HONO. HONO formation and photolysis is believed to represent a major source term in the hydroxyl radical budget in polluted continental regions. Currently, most air quality models tend to significantly underpredict HONO, caused by the lack of understanding of HONO formation processes and the parameters that affect its concentration. Recently, we reported nocturnal pseudo steady states (PSS) of HONO in an aqueous marine environment and a conceptual model for HONO formation on aqueous surfaces was proposed. The data set collected at York University is being analyzed with a view towards further understanding the nighttime HONO formation mechanism and testing several hypotheses: 1) A HONO PSS can exist during certain times at night in an urban area in which the HONO concentration is independent of NO2, given the surface contains sufficient water coverage and is saturated with nitrogen containing precursors; 2) The concentration of HONO is positively correlated with temperature during periods where a PSS exists; 3) Different conversion efficiencies of NO2 to HONO exist on dry, wet and snow surfaces; 4) HONO formation has a NO2 order dependence between 0 and 2nd order, dependant on NO2 concentration, relative humidity, etc. The data set will be presented along with statistical analysis that sheds new light on the source of HONO in urban areas at night.

  3. Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organic molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Joan E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2008-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on -alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto γ-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

  4. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy of Atmospheric Trace Gases HCl, NO and SO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haridass, C.; Aw-Musse, A.; Dowdye, E.; Bandyopadhyay, C.; Misra, P.; Okabe, H.

    1998-01-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectral data have been recorded in the spectral region 400-4000/cm of hydrogen chloride and sulfur dioxide with I/cm resolution and of nitric oxide with 0.25 cm-i resolution, under quasi-static conditions, when the sample gas was passed through tubings of aluminum, copper, stainless steel and teflon. The absorbance was measured for the rotational lines of the fundamental bands of (1)H(35)Cl and (1)H(37)Cl for pressures in the range 100-1000 Torr and for the (14)N(16)O molecule in the range 100-300 Torr. The absorbance was also measured for individual rotational lines corresponding to the three modes of vibrations (upsilon(sub 1) - symmetric stretch, upsilon(sub 2) - symmetric bend, upsilon(sub 3) - anti-symmetric stretch) of the SO2 molecule in the pressure range 25-150 Torr. A graph of absorbance versus pressure was plotted for the observed rotational transitions of the three atmospherically significant molecules, and it was found that the absorbance was linearly proportional to the pressure range chosen, thereby validating Beer's law. The absorption cross-sections were determined from the graphical slopes for each rotational transition recorded for the HCl, NO and SO2 species. Qualitative and quantitative spectral changes in the FT-IR data will be discussed to identify and characterize various tubing materials with respect to their absorption features.

  5. Biological oxygen sensing via two-photon absorption by an Ir(III) complex using a femtosecond fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritomo, Hiroki; Fujii, Akinari; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Kawamata, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Near-infrared two-photon absorption of the phosphorescent Ir(III) complex (2,4-pentanedionato-κO 2,κO 4)bis[2-(6-phenanthridinyl-κN)benzo[b]thien-3-yl-κC]iridium (BTPHSA) was characterized. It exhibited a 800-1200 nm two-photon absorption band, and thus could be electronically excited by 1030-nm femtosecond Ti:sapphire and Yb-doped fiber lasers. By using BTPHSA, oxygen concentrations in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells were imaged. These results demonstrate two-photon oxygen sensing of live tissues via easily operable excitation sources.

  6. Biological oxygen sensing via two-photon absorption by an Ir(III) complex using a femtosecond fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritomo, Hiroki; Fujii, Akinari; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Kawamata, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Near-infrared two-photon absorption of the phosphorescent Ir(III) complex (2,4-pentanedionato-κO 2,κO 4)bis[2-(6-phenanthridinyl-κN)benzo[b]thien-3-yl-κC]iridium (BTPHSA) was characterized. It exhibited a 800–1200 nm two-photon absorption band, and thus could be electronically excited by 1030-nm femtosecond Ti:sapphire and Yb-doped fiber lasers. By using BTPHSA, oxygen concentrations in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells were imaged. These results demonstrate two-photon oxygen sensing of live tissues via easily operable excitation sources.

  7. Spectroscopy of the enigmatic short-period cataclysmic variable IR Com in an extended low state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manser, C. J.; Gänsicke, B. T.

    2014-07-01

    We report the occurrence of a deep low state in the eclipsing short-period cataclysmic variable (CV) IR Com, lasting more than two years. Spectroscopy obtained in this state shows the system as a detached white dwarf plus low-mass companion, indicating that accretion has practically ceased. The spectral type of the companion derived from the SDSS spectrum is M6-7, somewhat later than expected for the orbital period of IR Com. Its radial velocity amplitude, K2 = 419.6 ± 3.4 km s-1, together with the inclination of 75°-90° implies 0.8 < Mwd <1.0 M⊙. We estimate the white dwarf temperature to be ≃15 000 K, and the absence of Zeeman splitting in the Balmer lines rules out magnetic fields in excess of ≃5 MG. IR Com still defies an unambiguous classification, in particular the occurrence of a deep, long low state is so far unique among short-period CVs that are not strongly magnetic.

  8. Study of interaction between NO radicals and Martin's spirosilane by means of IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zins, E L; Krim, L; Lenormand, H; Goddard, J-P; Fensterbank, L

    2013-04-25

    The matrix isolation method is used to record the IR spectrum of C18H8O2F12Si in the 4000-500 cm(-1) range. To gain an IR spectrum with a sufficient resolution, this technique was used with neon as the dilution medium at 5 K. The generated species were characterized by in situ fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Once the Martin's spirosilane 1 (C18H8O2F12Si) was characterized, its reactivity toward NO was investigated under the same experimental conditions (i.e., using neon as a dilution medium at 5 K). In this case, the use of neon at very low temperature leads to the formation of a chemically inert matrix in which the species are trapped and isolated from one another, thus hindering consecutive reactions. As a consequence, intermediates can be observed. This approach allowed us to characterize the NO adduct, leading to the formation of 1-(NO). Concentration effects as well as annealing experiments were carried out. In addition to this experimental approach, products were identified by using reference spectra. Our results proved that, in the dilute phase, the reaction between 1 and NO radicals leads to the formation of an adduct. This stable species can further react with NO to form a more stable compound: 1-(NO)2. This proves the ability of such species to trap NO.

  9. Ir Spectroscopy of First-Row Transition Metal Clusters and Their Complexes with Simple Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiawi, D. M.; Bakker, J.; Oomens, J.; Buma, W. J.; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2014-06-01

    Iron is an important element in the formation of solids in space. Spectroscopic observations of interstellar iron shows that its atomic gas-phase abundance is strongly depleted with respect to that of hydrogen. In contrast, sulfur is mostly found in the gas phase in low-density regions of interstellar space, but is highly depleted in regions of star- and planet formation. Furthermore, the dominant source of sulfur in our solar system is solid FeS, as found in primitive meteorites, implying an efficient chemical pathway to convert sulphur or sulphur containing compounds into solid FeS during the (early phases of) the star formation process. We address the evolution of iron and sulfur in space on a molecular level by studying metal nanoclusters and their interaction with ligands using IR action spectroscopy. Clusters are formed through laser ablation of solid precursor materials and brought into a molecular beam environment. Complexes with ligands are obtained by directing the beam through a reaction channel containing low-pressure reactant gas. Mass-selected IR action spectra are recorded by irradiating the clusters using the Free Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments (FELIX). Experimental spectra are then compared with DFT predictions which enables us to determine the structure of the selected cluster and its binding interactions with ligands. As part of this project, we here present IR action spectra of size-selected Fe clusters and the chemically closely related Co clusters, and their complexes with relevant ligands.

  10. New ultrarapid-scanning interferometer for FT-IR spectroscopy with microsecond time-resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süss, B.; Ringleb, F.; Heberle, J.

    2016-06-01

    A novel Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) rapid-scan spectrometer has been developed (patent pending EP14194520.4) which yields 1000 times higher time resolution as compared to conventional rapid-scanning spectrometers. The central element to achieve faster scanning rates is based on a sonotrode whose front face represents the movable mirror of the interferometer. A prototype spectrometer with a time resolution of 13 μs was realized, capable of fully automated long-term measurements with a flow cell for liquid samples, here a photosynthetic membrane protein in solution. The performance of this novel spectrometer is demonstrated by recording the photoreaction of bacteriorhodopsin initiated by a short laser pulse that is synchronized to the data recording. The resulting data are critically compared to those obtained by step-scan spectroscopy and demonstrate the relevance of performing experiments on proteins in solution. The spectrometer allows for future investigations of fast, non-repetitive processes, whose investigation is challenging to step-scan FT-IR spectroscopy.

  11. Pyrolysis GC/MS and IR spectroscopy in chitin analysis of molluscan shells.

    PubMed

    Furuhashi, Takeshi; Beran, Anton; Blazso, Marianne; Czegeny, Zsuzsanna; Schwarzinger, Clemens; Steiner, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Chitin is an insoluble component in the shells of several molluscan species. It is thought to play important roles, in biomineralization and shell structure. To date, however, reports are scarce and sometimes contradictory, and suffer from methodological problems. Only in a single cephalopod species has the chitin been identified as beta-chitin. We present data on chitin occurrence in 22 species of shell-bearing Mollusca (Conchifera) and Polyplacophora, including the first evidence for scaphopods, based on pyrolysis gas chromatography, mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and infrared spectroscopy (IR). Pyrolysis GC-MS detected chitin in every tested member of the Conchifera. IR spectroscopy before and after chitinase treatment revealed at least three distinct patterns of peak changes. The contents of the insoluble shell organics included not only chitin and proteins, but also insoluble polysaccharides, e.g., glucan. We conclude that chitin was present in the last common ancestor of the Conchifera and that its abundance in the shell matrix depends on the differentiation of the shell. PMID:19129649

  12. Spectroscopy and electronic structure of Sr2YRuO6 and Sr2YRu0.75Ir0.25O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedes, E. B.; Abbate, M.; Abud, F.; Jardim, R. F.; Vicentin, F. C.; Mossanek, R. J. O.

    2016-07-01

    We study the electronic structure of the Sr2YRuO6 and Sr2YRu0.75Ir0.25O6 compounds using x-ray (resonant) photoemission and absorption spectroscopies. The experimental results are interpreted with first-principles calculations, which give a good agreement with all the spectra. These results show that, although the spin-orbit coupling does not induce orbital anisotropies in these systems, it is responsible for the reduction of magnetic moments within the the Ir5 +O6 octahedra, weakening the magnetic ordering in the substituted system. Finally, our findings support the idea that the canting of Ru5 + magnetic moments actually plays an important role in the stabilization of the intriguing magnetic ordering in the Sr2YRuO6 compound.

  13. Utility of FT-IR imaging spectroscopy in estimating differences between the quality of bovine blastocysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiecheć, A.; Opiela, J.; Lipiec, E.; Kwiatek, W. M.

    2013-10-01

    This study was conducted to verify whether the FT-IR spectroscopy and Focal Plane Array (FPA) imaging can be successfully applied to estimate the quality of bovine blastocysts (on the basis of the concentration of nucleic acids and amides). The FT-IR spectra of inner cell mass from blastocysts of three different culture systems were examined. The spectral changes between blastocysts were analyzed in DNA (spectral range of 1240-950 cm-1) and protein amides (1800-1400 cm-1). Blastocyst 1 (BL1-HA) was developed from the fertilized oocyte cultured with low concentration of hialuronian (HA), Blastocyst 2 and 3 were developed from the oocytes cultured in standard conditions. Cleavage stage blastocyst 2 (BL2-SOF) has been cultured in SOF medium while blastocyst 3 (BL3-VERO) was cultured in co-culture with VERO cells. The multivariate statistical analysis (Hierarchical Cluster Analysis - HCA and Principal Component Analysis - PCA) of single cells spectra showed high similarity of cells forming the inner cell mass within single blastocyst. The main variance between the three examined blastocysts was related to amides bands. Differences in the intensities of the amides' peaks between the bovine blastocysts derived from different culture systems indicated that specific proteins reflecting the appearance of a new phenotype were produced. However, for the three blastocysts, the α-helix typical peak was twice more intensive than the β-sheet typical peak suggesting that the differentiation processes had been started. Taking into account the quantitative and qualitative composition of the protein into examined blastocysts, it can be assumed, that the quality of the BL1-HA turned out much more similar to BL3-VERO than to BL2-SOF. FT-IR spectroscopy can be successfully applied in reproductive biology research for quality estimation of oocytes and embryos at varied stages of their development. Moreover this technique proved to be particularly useful when the quantity of the

  14. Evaluation of Polymerization Efficacy in Composite Resins via FT-IR Spectroscopy and Vickers Microhardness Test

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh, Tahereh-Sadat; Erfan, Mohammad; Behroozibakhsh, Marjan; Fatemi, Mostafa; Masaeli, Reza; Rezaei, Yashar; Bagheri, Hossein; Erfan, Yasaman

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Polymerization efficacy affects the properties and performance of composite resin restorations.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of polymerization of two micro-hybrid, two nano-hybrid and one nano-filled ormocer-based composite resins, cured by two different light-curing systems, using Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Vickers microhardness testing at two different depths (top surface, 2 mm). Materials and methods. For FT-IR spectrometry, five cylindrical specimens (5mm in diameter × 2 mm in length) were prepared from each composite resin using Teflon molds and polymerized for 20 seconds. Then, 70-μm wafers were sectioned at the top surface and at2mm from the top surface. The degree of conversion for each sample was calculated using FT-IR spectroscopy. For Vickers micro-hardness testing, three cylindrical specimens were prepared from each composite resin and polymerized for 20 seconds. The Vickers microhardness test (Shimadzu, Type M, Japan) was performed at the top and bottom (depth=2 mm) surfaces of each specimen. Three-way ANOVA with independent variables and Tukey tests were performed at 95% significance level. Results. No significant differences were detected in degree of conversion and microhardness between LED and QTH light-curing units except for the ormocer-based specimen, CeramX, which exhibited significantly higher DC by LED. All the composite resins showed a significantly higher degree of conversion at the surface. Microhardness was not significantly affected by depth, except for Herculite XRV Ultra and CeramX, which showed higher values at the surface. Conclusion. Composite resins containing nano-particles generally exhibited more variations in degree of conversion and microhardness. PMID:26889359

  15. Near-IR spectroscopy of the highly inflated, hottest known Jupiter KOI-13.01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming

    2013-10-01

    We propose to use the WFC3 IR-G141 grism to measure the near-IR dayside emission spectrum of the highly inflated, hottest known Jupiter KOI-13.01 via secondary eclipses. The A-type host star of KOI-13.01 has the highest temperature among all known hot Jupiter hosts, producing extreme irradiation and making the planet's atmosphere probably quite different from others'. It is therefore an extreme and unique target to test exoplanetary atmosphere models and observed correlation between thermal inversion and irradiation. The host star of KOI-13.01 has a companion of same brightness and spectral type at 1.2 arcsec. Because the two stars will be well-resolved by WFC3, the stellar companion provides a unique advantage to calibrate the common-mode systematics of the eclipse light curves, enabling high precision and high fidelity spectroscopy of the planet's dayside emission. The WFC3 observations will definitively determine the presence or absence of a thermal inversion in the planet's upper atmosphere by probing the water bands between 1.1 - 1.7 microns. When combined with the Kepler nightside thermal emission measurement in visible light, the near-IR spectroscopy from WFC3 will also help tightly constrain its albedo and heat transport efficiency. Furthermore, resolving the binary and measuring the secondary eclipses will allow us to definitively verify whether the brigher star is indeed the host of the planet. This study can only be done with HST because of the ultra-high precision requisite and the coverage of water bands unavailable from ground.

  16. Monitoring spacecraft atmosphere contaminants by laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    Data were obtained which will provide a test of the accuracy of the differential absorption method for trace contaminant detection in many-component gas mixtures. The necessary accurate absorption coefficient determinations were carried out for several gases; acetonitrile, 1,2-dichloroethane, Freon-113, furan, methyl ethyl ketone, and t-butyl alcohol. The absorption coefficients are displayed graphically. An opto-acoustic method was tested for measuring absorbance, similar to the system described by Dewey.

  17. INFRARED ABSORPTION LINES TOWARD NGC 7538 IRS 1: ABUNDANCES OF H{sub 2}, H{sub 3}{sup +}, AND CO

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Miwa; Geballe, T. R.; Usuda, Tomonori E-mail: tgeballe@gemini.edu

    2015-06-10

    We report high-resolution near-infrared absorption spectroscopy of H{sub 2}, H{sub 3}{sup +}, and CO toward the young high mass object NGC 7538 IRS 1. The v = 1–0 H{sub 2} S(0) line and lines in the CO v = 2–0 band were detected; the v = 1–0 H{sub 2} S(1) line and the v = 1–0 H{sub 3}{sup +} lines [R(1, 1){sup l}, R(1, 0), R(1, 1){sup u}] were not detected. The line of sight traverses two clouds, with temperatures 45 and 259 K and with roughly equal column densities of CO. Assuming that H{sub 2} is at the same temperature as CO and that the two species are uniformly mixed, [H{sub 2}]/[CO] = 3600 ± 1200. NGC 7538 is the most distant object from the Galactic center for which [H{sub 2}]/[CO] has been directly measured using infrared absorption spectroscopy.

  18. Mineral Specific IR Molar Absorption Coefficients for Routine Water Determination in Olivine, SiO2 polymorphs and Garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S.; Koch-Mueller, M.; Reichart, P.; Rhede, D.; Thomas, R.

    2007-12-01

    Conventionally applied Infrared (IR) calibrations [1, 2] for quantitative water analyses in solids are established on hydrous minerals and glasses with several wt% water. These calibrations are based on a negative correlation between the IR molar absorption coefficient (ɛ) for water and the mean wavenumber of the corresponding OH pattern. The correlation reflects the dependence of the OH band position on the appropriate O- H...O distances and thereby the magnitude of the dipole momentum which is proportional to the band intensity. However, it has been observed that these calibrations can not be adopted to nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) [3].To study the potential dependence of ɛ on structure and chemistry in NAMs we synthesized olivine and SiO2 polymorphs with specific isolated hydroxyl point defects, e.g. quartz, coesite and stishovite with B3++H+=Si4+ and/or Al3++H+=Si4+ substitutions. Experiments were performed with water in excess in piston cylinder and multi-anvil presses. Single crystal IR spectra demonstrate that we successfully managed to seperate generally complex OH patterns as e.g. observed in natural quartz and synthetic coesite. We quantified sample water contents of both natural samples and our run products by applying proton-proton-scattering [4], confocal microRaman spectroscopy [5] and Secondary Ion mass spectrometry. Resulting water concentrations were used to calculate new mineral specific ɛs. For olivine with the mean wavenumber of 3517 cm-1 we determined an ɛ value of 41,000±5,000 lmol-1H2Ocm-2. Quantification of olivine with the mean wavenumber of 3550 cm-1 in contrast resulted in an ɛ value of 47,000±1,000 lmol-1H2Ocm-2. Taking into account previous studies [6, 7] there is evidence to suggest a linear wavenumber dependent correlation for olivine, where ɛ increases with decreasing wavenumber. In case of the SiO2 system it turns out that the magnitude of ɛ within one structure type is independent of the liable OH point defect and

  19. Far-Ir Spectroscopy of Neutral Gas Phase Peptides: Signatures from Combined Experiments and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahé, Jérôme; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Bakker, Daniël; Jaeqx, Sander; Rijs, Anouk

    2016-06-01

    Within the past two decades, action vibrational spectroscopy has become an almost routine experimental method to probe the structures of molecules and clusters in the gas phase (neutral and ions). Such experiments are mainly performed in the 1000-4000 wn fingerprint regions. Though successful in many respects, these spectral domains can be however restrictive in the information provided, and sometimes reach limitations for unravelling structures without ambiguity. In a collaborative work with the group of Dr A.M. Rijs (FELIX laboratory, Radbout University, The Netherlands) we have launched a new strategy where the far-IR/Tera-Hertz domain (100-800 wn domain) is experimentally probed for neutral gas phase molecules. Our group in Paris apply finite temperature DFT-based molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations in order to unravel the complex signatures arising in the far-IR domain, and provide an unambiguous assignment both of the structural conformation of the gas phase molecules (taking into account the experimental conditions) and an understanding of the spectral signatures/fingerprints. We will discuss our experimental and theoretical investigations on two neutral peptides in the 100-800 wn far-IR spectral domain, i.e. Z-Ala6 and PheGly dipeptide, that represent two systems which definitive conformational assignment was not possible without the far IR signatures. We will also present our very recent results on the Phe-X peptide series, where X stands for Gly, Ala, Pro, Val, Ser, Cys, combining experiments and DFT-MD simulations, providing a detailed understanding of the vibrational fingerprints in the far-IR domain. In all exemples, we will show how DFT-MD simulations is the proper theoretical tool to account for vibrational anharmonicities and mode couplings, of prime importance in the far-IR domain. References : J. Mahé, S. Jaeqx, A.M. Rijs, M.P. Gaigeot, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 17 :25905 (2015) S. Jaeqx, J. Oomens, A. Cimas, M.P. Gaigeot, A.M. Rijs, Angew

  20. Far-Ir Action Spectroscopy of Aminophenol and Ethylvanillin: Experiment and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyna, Vasyl; Feifel, Raimund; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali; Bakker, Daniël; Rijs, Anouk

    2015-06-01

    Investigations of molecular structure and conformational isomerism are at the forefront of today's biophysics and biochemistry. In particular, vibrations excited by far-IR radiation can be highly sensitive to the molecular 3D structure as they are delocalized over large parts of the molecule. Current theoretical predictions of vibrational frequencies in the far-IR range are not accurate enough because of the non-local character and anharmonicity of these vibrations. Therefore experimental studies in the far-IR are vital to guide theory towards improved methodology. In this work we present the conformer-specific far-IR spectra of aminophenol and ethylvanillin molecules in the range of 220-800 wn utilizing ion-dip action spectroscopy carried out at the free electron laser FELIX in Nijmegen, Netherlands. The systems studied are aromatic molecules with important functional groups such as the hydroxyl (OH) and amino (NH_2) groups in aminophenol, and the hydroxyl, ethoxy (OCH_2CH_3) and formyl (CHO) groups in ethylvanillin. The experimental spectra show well resolved conformer-specific vibrational bands. In the case of ethylvanillin only two planar conformers have been observed under supersonic jet expansion conditions. Despite the fact that these conformers differ only in the position of oxygen of the formyl group with respect to ethoxy group, they are well distinguishable in far-IR spectra. The capability of numerical methods based on density functional theory (DFT) for predicting vibrational frequencies in this spectral region within the harmonic approximation has been investigated by using several hybrid-functionals such as B3LYP, PBE0, B2PLYP and CAM-B3LYP. An anharmonic correction based on vibrational second order perturbation theory approach was also applied. We have found that the methods we considered are well suited for the assignment of far-IR vibrational features except the modes which are strongly anharmonic, like the NH_2 wagging mode in aminophenol which

  1. A cavity type absorption cell for double resonance microwave spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; White, W. F.

    1972-01-01

    Description of an experimental dual resonant cavity absorption cell for observing microwave spectroscopic double-resonance effects. The device is composed of two Fabry-Perot interferometers excited by independent microwave sources and mounted at right angles in a suitable vacuum enclosure. The pumping transition is modulated by one source and the modulation induced on the rf absorption in the orthogonal cavity is detected.

  2. Application of FT-IR spectroscopy for control of the medium composition during the biodegradation of nitro aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Grube, Mara; Muter, Olga; Strikauska, Silvija; Gavare, Marita; Limane, Baiba

    2008-11-01

    Previous studies showed that cabbage leaf extract (CLE) added to the growth medium can noticeably promote the degradation of nitro aromatic compounds by specific consortium of bacteria upon their growth. For further development of the approach for contaminated soil remediation it was necessary to evaluate the qualitative and/or quantitative composition of different origin CLE and their relevance on the growth of explosives-degrading bacteria. Six CLE (different by species, cultivars and harvesting time) were tested and used as additives to the growth medium. It was shown that nitro aromatic compounds can be identified in the FT-IR absorption spectra by the characteristic band at 1,527 cm(-1), and in CLE by the characteristic band at 1,602 cm(-1). The intensity of the CLE band at 1,602 cm(-1) correlated with the concentration of total nitrogen (R2=0.87) and decreased upon the growth of bacteria. The content of nitrogen in CLE differed (0.22-1.00 vol.%) and significantly influenced the content of total carbohydrates (9.50-16.00% DW) and lipids [3.90-9.90% dry weight (DW)] accumulated in bacterial cells while the content of proteins was similar in all samples. Though this study showed quantitative differences in the composition of the studied CLE and the response of bacterial cells to the composition of the growth media, and proved the potential of this additive for remediation of contaminated soil. It was shown that analysis of CLE and monitoring of the conversion of nitro aromatic compounds can be investigated by FT-IR spectroscopy as well as by conventional chemical methods.

  3. Study of the processes of carbonization and oxidation of porous silicon by Raman and IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vasin, A. V.; Okholin, P. N.; Verovsky, I. N.; Nazarov, A. N.; Lysenko, V. S.; Kholostov, K. I. Bondarenko, V. P.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2011-03-15

    Porous silicon layers were produced by electrochemical etching of single-crystal silicon wafers with the resistivity 10 {Omega} cm in the aqueous-alcohol solution of hydrofluoric acid. Raman spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy are used to study the processes of interaction of porous silicon with undiluted acetylene at low temperatures and the processes of oxidation of carbonized porous silicon by water vapors. It is established that, even at the temperature 550 Degree-Sign C, the silicon-carbon bonds are formed at the pore surface and the graphite-like carbon condensate emerges. It is shown that the carbon condensate inhibits oxidation of porous silicon by water vapors and contributes to quenching of white photoluminescence in the oxidized carbonized porous silicon nanocomposite layer.

  4. Application of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to the study of the modification of epoxidized sunflower oil by acrylation.

    PubMed

    Irinislimane, Ratiba; Belhaneche-Bensemra, Naima

    2012-12-01

    Commercial sunflower oil was epoxidized at the laboratory-scale. The epoxidized sunflower oil (ESFO) was modified following the acrylation reaction. Modification was carried out simultaneously using acrylic acid (AA) and triethylamine (TEA). To optimize the reaction conditions, the effects of four temperatures (40, 60, 80, and 100 °C), the ESFO:AA (100:100) ratio, and 0.2% TEA were investigated. The rate of conversion was analyzed with both FT-IR and titration of the oxirane ring. After that, the temperature with the highest conversion was selected and used throughout for all modification reactions. Then, four ratios (100:100, 100:90, 100:80, and 100:75) of ESFO:AA were analyzed at four different concentrations of TEA (0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5%) to determine the best estimate for both the ESFO:AA ratio and the catalyst concentration. Conversion rate was analyzed using FT-IR spectroscopy by measuring the concentrations of ester, carbonyl, and alcohol groups. Moreover, oxirane-ring concentration was estimated using the titration method (with gentian violet as indicator) and FT-IR spectroscopy (epoxy ring absorptions at 1270 cm(-1) and 877 cm(-1)). Based on conversion yield, the optimum ESFO:AA ratio corresponds to 100:80; the best temperature reaction was at 60 °C, and the best TEA concentration was 0.2%. The critical amounts of reactants needed to reach maximum conversion were established. The final acid value of the acrylated ESFO after washing (pH = 7) was 2.1 mg potassium hydroxide (KOH)·g(-1). All results show that FT-IR spectroscopy is a simple, low-cost, rapid method for investigating the kinetics of a reaction. PMID:23231904

  5. Resolving voltage-dependent structural changes of a membrane photoreceptor by surface-enhanced IR difference spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X; Zaitseva, E; Schmidt, M; Siebert, F; Engelhard, M; Schlesinger, R; Ataka, K; Vogel, R; Heberle, J

    2008-08-26

    Membrane proteins are molecular machines that transport ions, solutes, or information across the cell membrane. Electrophysiological techniques have unraveled many functional aspects of ion channels but suffer from the lack of structural sensitivity. Here, we present spectroelectrochemical data on vibrational changes of membrane proteins derived from a single monolayer. For the seven-helical transmembrane protein sensory rhodopsin II, structural changes of the protein backbone and the retinal cofactor as well as single ion transfer events are resolved by surface-enhanced IR difference absorption spectroscopy (SEIDAS). Angular changes of bonds versus the membrane normal have been determined because SEIDAS monitors only those vibrations whose dipole moment are oriented perpendicular to the solid surface. The application of negative membrane potentials (DeltaV = -0.3 V) leads to the selective halt of the light-induced proton transfer at the stage of D75, the counter ion of the retinal Schiff base. It is inferred that the voltage raises the energy barrier of this particular proton-transfer reaction, rendering the energy deposited in the retinal by light excitation insufficient for charge transfer to occur. The other structural rearrangements that accompany light-induced activity of the membrane protein, are essentially unaffected by the transmembrane electric field. Our results demonstrate that SEIDAS is a generic approach to study processes that depend on the membrane potential, like those in voltage-gated ion channels and transporters, to elucidate the mechanism of ion transfer with unprecedented spatial sensitivity and temporal resolution.

  6. Cold, Gas-Phase UV and IR Spectroscopy of Protonated Leucine Enkephalin and its Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Nicole L.; Redwine, James; Dean, Jacob C.; McLuckey, Scott A.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2014-06-01

    The conformational preferences of peptide backbones and the resulting hydrogen bonding patterns provide critical biochemical information regarding the structure-function relationship of peptides and proteins. The spectroscopic study of cryogenically-cooled peptide ions in a mass spectrometer probes these H-bonding arrangements and provides information regarding the influence of a charge site. Leucine enkephalin, a biologically active endogenous opiod peptide, has been extensively studied as a model peptide in mass spectrometry. This talk will present a study of the UV and IR spectroscopy of protonated leucine enkephalin [YGGFL+H]+ and two of its analogues: the sodiated [YGGFL+Na]+ and C-terminally methyl esterified [YGGFL-OMe+H]+ forms. All experiments were performed in a recently completed multi-stage mass spectrometer outfitted with a cryocooled ion trap. Ions are generated via nano-electrospray ionization and the analyte of interest is isolated in a linear ion trap. The analyte ions are trapped in a 22-pole ion trap held at 5 K by a closed cycle helium cryostat and interrogated via UV and IR lasers. Photofragments are trapped and isolated in a second LIT and mass analyzed. Double-resonance UV and IR methods were used to assign the conformation of [YGGFL+H]+, using the NH/OH stretch, Amide I, and Amide II regions of the infrared spectrum. The assigned structure contains a single backbone conformation at vibrational/rotational temperatures of 10 K held together with multiple H-bonds that self-solvate the NH3+ site. A "proton wire" between the N and C termini reinforces the H-bonding activity of the COO-H group to the F-L peptide bond, whose cleavage results in formation of the b4 ion, which is a prevalent, low-energy fragmentation pathway for [YGGFL+H]+. The reinforced H-bonding network in conjunction with the mobile proton theory may help explain the prevalence of the b4 pathway. In order to elucidate structural changes caused by modifying this H-bonding activity

  7. 2D IR spectroscopy at 100 kHz utilizing a Mid-IR OPCPA laser source.

    PubMed

    Luther, Bradley M; Tracy, Kathryn M; Gerrity, Michael; Brown, Susannah; Krummel, Amber T

    2016-02-22

    We present a 100 kHz 2D IR spectrometer. The system utilizes a ytterbium all normal dispersion fiber oscillator as a common source for the pump and seed beams of a MgO:PPLN OPCPA. The 1030 nm OPCPA pump is generated by amplification of the oscillator in cryocooled Yb:YAG amplifiers, while the 1.68 μm seed is generated in a OPO pumped by the oscillator. The OPCPA outputs are used in a ZGP DFG stage to generate 4.65 μm pulses. A mid-IR pulse shaper delivers pulse pairs to a 2D IR spectrometer allowing for data collection at 100 kHz. PMID:26907062

  8. IR spectroscopy of ethanol in nitrogen cryomatrices with different concentration ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldiyarov, A.; Aryutkina, M.; Drobyshev, A.; Kurnosov, V.

    2011-06-01

    Thin films of cryovacuum condensates of ethanol-nitrogen mixtures formed by co-condensation of gas mixtures with different concentrations on a cooled metal substrate are studied by IR spectrometry. The condensation temperature was Tc = 16 K and the pressure of the gaseous phase during cryodeposition was P = 10-5 Torr. The ethanol concentration in nitrogen was varied from 0.5 to 10% and the film thickness, from 1 to 30 μm. Measurements were made in the range from 400 to 4200 cm-1. An analysis of the IR spectra and a comparison with published data shows that ethanol monomers and dimers are present in the nitrogen matrix. This is indicated by an absorption band at a frequency of 3658 cm-1 owing to vibrations of O-H bonds of ethanol monomers and dimers. The local minima of this band at 3645 and 3658 cm-1 are related to the existence of two conformational states of the ethanol molecule: anti (3658 cm-1) and gauche (3645 cm-1). In addition, the presence of ethanol dimers and monomers in the matrix leads to the appearance of absorption bands at 1259 and 1276 cm-1 attributable to deformation vibrations δ(COH) of the anti- and gauche-isomers, respectively, as well as bands corresponding to a combination of ν(CCO) valence vibrations and rotational oscillations of the methyl group r(CH3) attributable to anti-dimers (ν = 1090 cm-1) and anti-monomers (ν = 1095 cm-1). Local minima within 3000-3600 cm-1 also indicate the presence of cyclical dimers, trimers, and tetramers, as well as hexamers in the matrix. A broad band over 3250-3330 cm-1 indicates that large polyaggregates, with ethanol molecules in a hydrogen-bond state (multimer), exist in the matrix.

  9. The use of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy for studies of natively disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Permyakov, Eugene A

    2012-01-01

    Absorption spectroscopy can be used to monitor structural changes upon transitions from ordered to disordered state in proteins. Changes in environment of tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine residues result in changes of their absorption spectra. In most cases the changes are small and can be measured only in a differential mode.

  10. Direct and quantitative photothermal absorption spectroscopy of individual particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Eon Han, Sang; Burg, Brian R.; Chen, Gang; Zheng, Ruiting; Shen, Sheng

    2013-12-23

    Photonic structures can exhibit significant absorption enhancement when an object's length scale is comparable to or smaller than the wavelength of light. This property has enabled photonic structures to be an integral component in many applications such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, and photothermal therapy. To characterize this enhancement at the single particulate level, conventional methods have consisted of indirect or qualitative approaches which are often limited to certain sample types. To overcome these limitations, we used a bilayer cantilever to directly and quantitatively measure the spectral absorption efficiency of a single silicon microwire in the visible wavelength range. We demonstrate an absorption enhancement on a per unit volume basis compared to a thin film, which shows good agreement with Mie theory calculations. This approach offers a quantitative approach for broadband absorption measurements on a wide range of photonic structures of different geometric and material compositions.

  11. The use of CNDO in spectroscopy. XV. Two photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchese, Francis T.; Seliskar, C. J.; Jaffé, H. H.

    1980-04-01

    Two-photon absorptivities have been calculated within the CNDO/S-CI molecular orbital framework of Del Bene and Jaffé utilizing the second order time dependent perturbation equations of Göppert-Mayer and polarization methods of McClain. Good agreement is found between this theory and experiment for transition energies, symmetries, and two-photon absorptivities for the following molecules: biphenyl, terphenyl, 2,2'-difluorobiphenyl, 2,2'-bipyridyl, phenanthrene, and the isoelectronic series: fluorene, carbazole, dibenzofuran.

  12. Atmospheric pressure and temperature profiling using near IR differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with differential absorption lidar techniques for remotely measuring the atmospheric temperature and pressure profile, surface pressure, and cloud top pressure-height. The procedure used in determining the pressure is based on the conduction of high-resolution measurements of absorption in the wings of lines in the oxygen A band. Absorption with respect to these areas is highly pressure sensitive in connection with the mechanism of collisional line broadening. The method of temperature measurement utilizes a determination of the absorption at the center of a selected line in the oxygen A band which originates from a quantum state with high ground state energy.

  13. Trace gas absorption spectroscopy using laser difference-frequency spectrometer for environmental application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W.; Cazier, F.; Boucher, D.; Tittel, F. K.; Davies, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    A widely tunable infrared spectrometer based on difference frequency generation (DFG) has been developed for organic trace gas detection by laser absorption spectroscopy. On-line measurements of concentration of various hydrocarbons, such as acetylene, benzene, and ethylene, were investigated using high-resolution DFG trace gas spectroscopy for highly sensitive detection.

  14. The hydration dependence of CaCO3 absorption lines in the Far IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Johnny; Emery, Logan P

    2014-06-01

    The far infrared (FIR) absorption lines of CaCO3 have been measured at a range of relative humidities (RH) between 33 and 92% RH using a Bruker 66v/S spectrometer. Hydration measurements on CaCO3 have been made in the mid-infrared (MIR) by [Al-Hosney, H.A. and Grassian, V.H., 2005, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 7, 1266], and astrophysically-motivated temperature-dependent FIR measurements of CaCO3 in vacuum have also been reported [Posch, T., et al., 2007, Ap. J., 668, 993]. The custom sample cell constructed for these hydrated-FIR spectra is required because the 66v/S bench is under vacuum (3 mbar) during typical measurements. Briefly, the sample cell consists of two Thalium Bromoiodide (KRS-5) windows, four O-rings, a plastic ring for separating the windows and providing a volume for the saturated atmosphere. CaCO3 was deposited on KRS-5 windows using doubly-distilled water as an intermediary. The KRS-5 window with sample and assembled sample cell were placed in a desiccator with the appropriated saturated salt solution [Washburn, E.W. (Ed.), International Critical Tables of Numerical Data, Physics Chemistry and Technology, Vol. 1, (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1926), p. 67-68] and allowed to hydrate for 23 hours. For spectroscopy the desiccator was quickly opened and the second KRS-5 window placed in the cell to seal the chamber. A spectrum was then taken of the sample at the appropriate RH. The spectra taken characterize the adsorption of water vapor and CaCO3 that might occur in circumstellar environments [Melnick, G.J., et al. 2001, Nature, 412, 160].The MIR and FIR reflectance spectra of calcite (CaCO3) have been thoroughly studied by [Hellwege, K.H., et al., 1970, Z. Physik, 232, 61]. Five Lorentzian curves were fit to our data in the range from 378-222 cm-1/SUP> and each was able to be assigned to a known mode of CaCO3. The data does not support the conclusion of a hydration effect on these modes of CaCO3, but it does suggest a possible broadening of three modes

  15. Kinetic evidence suggests spinodal phase separation in stratum corneum models by IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Richard; Selevany, Ibrahim; Moore, David J; Mack Correa, M Catherine; Mao, Guangru; Walters, Russel M; Flach, Carol R

    2014-04-24

    Although lipid structure in models for the stratum corneum (SC), the main barrier to skin permeability, has been extensively studied, only limited data are extant concerning the kinetic mechanism for the formation of domains, lamellar phases, and lipid packing motifs. Such information would be of substantial interest in the characterization of the effects of disease states which disrupt the barrier. Kinetic IR spectroscopy measurements probed the temporal sequence of molecular events producing ordered structures in a three-component SC model of equimolar ceramide[NS] (cer[NS]), perdeuterated stearic acid-d35 (SA-d35), and cholesterol. Samples, heated above Tm, were quenched to 31 °C, and then spectra were recorded at ∼15 min intervals for a total of 20-150 h. IR provides unique molecular structure information about headgroup H-bonding, lipid packing, and lipid chain order. The following sequence for phase separation was observed: (1) Formation of ceramide amide H-bonds from disordered forms to ordered structures (0.5-4 h); (2) appearance of ordered ceramide chains with some orthorhombically packed structures (0.5-8 h); and (3) phase separation of large orthorhombic domains of SA-d35 (4-10 h). A spinodal decomposition mechanism, defined by continuous composition changes during the phase separation, suggests a qualitative description for these events.

  16. Identification of forged Bank of England £20 banknotes using IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnex, Emily; Almond, Matthew J.; Baum, John V.; Bond, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Bank of England notes of £20 denomination have been studied using infrared spectroscopy in order to generate a method to identify forged notes. An aim of this work was to develop a non-destructive method so that a small, compact Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) instrument could be used by bank workers, police departments or others such as shop assistants to identify forged notes in a non-lab setting. The ease of use of the instrument is the key to this method, as well as the relatively low cost. The presence of a peak at 1400 cm-1 arising from νasym (CO32-) from the blank paper section of a forged note proved to be a successful indicator of the note's illegality for the notes that we studied. Moreover, differences between the spectra of forged and genuine £20 notes were observed in the ν(OH) (ca. 3500 cm-1), ν(Csbnd H) (ca. 2900 cm-1) and ν(Cdbnd O) (ca. 1750 cm-1) regions of the IR spectrum recorded for the polymer film covering the holographic strip. In cases where these simple tests fail, we have shown how an infrared microscope can be used to further differentiate genuine and forged banknotes by producing infrared maps of selected areas of the note contrasting inks with background paper.

  17. Evaluation of lead(II) immobilization by a vermicompost using adsorption isotherms and IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Carrasquero-Durán, Armando; Flores, Iraima

    2009-02-01

    The immobilization of lead ions by a vermicompost with calcite added was evaluated by adsorption isotherms and the results were explained on basis of the pH dependent surface charge and by IR spectroscopy. The results showed maximum adsorption values between 113.6 mg g(-1) (33 degrees C) and 123.5mg g(-1) (50 degrees C). The point of zero net charge (PZC) was 7.5+/-0.1, indicating the presence of a positive surface charge at the pH of batch experiments. The differences in the IR spectra at pH 3.8 and 7.0 in the region from 1800 to 1300 cm(-1), were interpreted on the basis of the carboxyl acid ionization, that reduced the band intensity around 1725 cm(-1), producing signals at 1550 cm(-1) and 1390 cm(-1) of carboxylate groups. Similar changes were detected at pH 3.8 when Pb2+ was present suggesting that the ion complexation takes place by a cationic exchange equilibrium, between the protons and Pb2+ ions.

  18. IR spectroscopy of α- and β-protonated pyrrole via argon complex photodissociation.

    PubMed

    Mosley, J D; Ricks, A M; Schleyer, P v R; Wu, J I; Duncan, M A

    2012-10-01

    Protonated pyrrole cations are produced in a pulsed discharge/supersonic expansion source, mass-selected in a time-of-flight spectrometer, and studied with infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. Vibrational spectra in both the fingerprint and C-H/N-H stretching regions are obtained using the method of tagging with argon. Sharp vibrational structure is compared to IR spectra predicted by theory for the possible α-, β-, and N-protonated structures. The spectral differences among these isomers are much larger than the frequency shifts due to argon attachment at alternative sites. Though α-protonation predominates thermodynamically, the kinetically favored β-protonated species is also observed for the first time (in 3-4 times lower abundance under the conditions employed here). Theoretical investigations attribute the greater stability of α-protonated pyrrole to topological charge stabilization, rather than merely to the greater number of resonance contributors. The far-IR pattern of protonated pyrrole does not match the interstellar UIR bands.

  19. Defect sites in highly siliceous HZSM-5 zeolites: A study performed by alumination and IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagishi, Kouji; Namba, Seitaro; Yashima, Tatsuaki )

    1991-01-24

    The concentration of oxygen atoms on defect sites in a highly siliceous HZSM-5 type zeolite was estimated by the {sup 18}O-exchange reaction between C{sup 18}O{sub 2} and the zeolite. The concentration of oxygen atoms on defect sites could be controlled by means of changes of the gel composition and of the use of various silica sources in the hydrothermal synthesis. The relationship between the concentration of oxygen atoms on defect sites in a highly siliceous HZSM-5 and the concentration of aluminum introduced into the framework of the HZSM-5 by an alumination was examined. The concentration of the framework aluminum was the same as one-fourth that of the oxygen atoms on defect sites. These results suggest that the defect sites into which aluminum atoms are introduced tetrahedrally can be identified with hydroxyl nests that consist of four silanol groups. The existence of hydroxyl nests could be confirmed by IR spectroscopy. From the {sup 18}O-exchange reaction and IR measurements, the authors conclude that the sharp band at 3,740 cm{sup {minus}1} can be attributed to both isolated SiOH groups on the external surface and intracrystalline isolated SiOH groups and that the broad band at 3,505 cm{sup {minus}1} can be attributed to the SiOH groups in hydroxyl nests.

  20. Solvent effect on aggregational properties of β-amyloid polypeptides studied by FT IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Z.; Jost, K.; Soós, K.; Zarándi, M.; Kiss, J. T.; Penke, B.

    1999-05-01

    Aggregation of the β-amyloid peptides is the major hallmark of the brain in case of Alzheimer's disease. On the basis of some results it is assumed that the toxic centrum of the βA4 (1-42) amyloid peptide is primarily the (31-35) fragment [N.W. Kowall, A.C. McKee, B.A. Yanker, M.P. Beal, Neurobiol. Aging 13 537-542; B. Penke, L. Tóth, K. Soós, J. Varga, E.Z. Szabó, J. Márki-Zay, A. Baranyi, in: H.L.S. Maia (Ed.), Peptides 1994, Proceedings of the 23rd European Peptide Symposium Escom, Leiden, 1995, pp. 101-102; I. Laczkó, Z. Kónya, J. Varga, K. Soós, M. Hollósi, B. Penke, in: H.L.S. Maia (Ed.), Peptides 1994, Proceedings of the 23rd European Peptide Symposium Escom, Leiden, 1995, pp. 549-550]. Two analogues of βA4 (1-42) were synthetized: one of them includes the toxic fragment (31-35) unchanged and consists mainly of hydrophilic residues, denoted as MOD-3. The other one does not contain the toxic fragment and has mainly hydrophobic residues, denoted as MOD-4. Peptides were dissolved in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol to have deaggregated samples. After the addition of the D 2O as second solvent, the aggregation was followed by FT-IR spectroscopy. Changes of the spectra as a function of the composition of the solvent mixtures will be shown and discussed. Based on the results, FT-IR spectroscopy seems to be a suitable analytical control in standardizing the aggregation grade of β-amyloid peptides.

  1. Diamond-like carbon films for polyethylene femoral parts: Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy before and after incubation in simulated body liquid.

    PubMed

    Dorner-Reisel, A; Gärtner, G; Reisel, G; Irmer, G

    2008-03-01

    In artificial prosthetics for knee, hip, finger or shoulder joints, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) is a significant material. Several attempts to reduce the wear rate of UHMW-PE, i.e. the application of suitable coatings, are in progress. A surface modification of polyethylene with wear-resistant hydrogenated diamond-like carbon is favourable, owing to the chemical similarity of polyethylene (-C-H(2)-)(n) and C:H or amorphous C:H (a-C:H) coatings with diamond-like properties. In the present study, the microstructure of a-C:H coatings on UHMW-PE substrates was investigated by Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. FT-IR spectroscopy shows very broad absorption lines, which point to the disorder and diversity of different symmetric, asymmetric aromatic, olefin sp(2)-hybridized or sp(3)-hybridized C-H groups in the amorphous diamond-like carbon coating. Following a long incubation of 12 months in a simulated body liquid, the structural investigations were repeated. Furthermore, fractured cross-sections and the wetting behaviour with polar liquids were examined. After incubation in simulated body liquid, Raman spectroscopy pointed to a reduction of the C-H bonds in the diamond-like carbon coatings. On the basis of these findings, one can conclude that hydrogenated diamond-like carbon is able to interact with salt solutions by substituting the hydrogen with appropriate ions. PMID:18157668

  2. Method and apparatus for aerosol particle absorption spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Campillo, Anthony J.; Lin, Horn-Bond

    1983-11-15

    A method and apparatus for determining the absorption spectra, and other properties, of aerosol particles. A heating beam source provides a beam of electromagnetic energy which is scanned through the region of the spectrum which is of interest. Particles exposed to the heating beam which have absorption bands within the band width of the heating beam absorb energy from the beam. The particles are also illuminated by light of a wave length such that the light is scattered by the particles. The absorption spectra of the particles can thus be determined from an analysis of the scattered light since the absorption of energy by the particles will affect the way the light is scattered. Preferably the heating beam is modulated to simplify the analysis of the scattered light. In one embodiment the heating beam is intensity modulated so that the scattered light will also be intensity modulated when the particles absorb energy. In another embodiment the heating beam passes through an interferometer and the scattered light reflects the Fourier Transform of the absorption spectra.

  3. Review on VUV to MIR absorption spectroscopy of atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Stephan; Santos Sousa, Joao; Stancu, Gabi Daniel; Hubertus van Helden, Jean-Pierre

    2015-10-01

    Absorption spectroscopy (AS) represents a reliable method for the characterization of cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets. The method’s simplicity stands out in comparison to competing diagnostic techniques. AS is an in situ, non-invasive technique giving absolute densities, free of calibration procedures, which other diagnostics, such as laser-induced fluorescence or optical emission spectroscopy, have to rely on. Ground state densities can be determined without the knowledge of the influence of collisional quenching. Therefore, absolute densities determined by absorption spectroscopy can be taken as calibration for other methods. In this paper, fundamentals of absorption spectroscopy are presented as an entrance to the topic. In the second part of the manuscript, a review of AS performed on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets, as they are used e.g. in the field of plasma medicine, is presented. The focus is set on special techniques overcoming not only the drawback of spectrally overlapping absorbing species, but also the line-of-sight densities that AS usually provides or the necessity of sufficiently long absorption lengths. Where references are not available for measurements on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets, other plasma sources including low-pressure plasmas are taken as an example to give suggestions for possible approaches. The final part is a table summarizing examples of absorption spectroscopic measurements on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets. With this, the paper provides a ‘best practice’ guideline and gives a compendium of works by groups performing absorption spectroscopy on cold atmospheric pressure plasma jets.

  4. gamma-Irradiation effects on the thermal decomposition behaviour and IR absorption spectra of piperacillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahfouz, R. M.; Gaffar, M. A.; Abu El-Fadl, A.; Hamad, Ar. G. K.

    2003-11-01

    The thermal decomposition behaviour of unirradiated and pre-gamma-irradiated piperacillin (pipril) as a semi-synthetic penicillin antibiotic has been studied in the temperature range of (273-1072 K). The decomposition was found to proceed through three major steps both for unirradiated and gamma-irradiated samples. Neither appearance nor disappearance of new bands in the IR spectrum of piperacillin was recorded as a result of gamma-irradiation but only a decrease in the intensity of most bands was observed. A degradation mechanism was suggested to explain the bond rupture and the decrease in the intensities of IR bands of gamma-irradiated piperacillin.

  5. Direct and quantitative broadband absorptance spectroscopy with multilayer cantilever probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Tong, Jonathan Kien-Kwok; Liao, Bolin; Chen, Gang

    2015-04-21

    A system for measuring the absorption spectrum of a sample is provided that includes a broadband light source that produces broadband light defined within a range of an absorptance spectrum. An interferometer modulates the intensity of the broadband light source for a range of modulation frequencies. A bi-layer cantilever probe arm is thermally connected to a sample arm having at most two layers of materials. The broadband light modulated by the interferometer is directed towards the sample and absorbed by the sample and converted into heat, which causes a temperature rise and bending of the bi-layer cantilever probe arm. A detector mechanism measures and records the deflection of the probe arm so as to obtain the absorptance spectrum of the sample.

  6. Analysis of functional groups in atmospheric aerosols by infrared spectroscopy: sparse methods for statistical selection of relevant absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahama, Satoshi; Ruggeri, Giulia; Dillner, Ann M.

    2016-07-01

    Various vibrational modes present in molecular mixtures of laboratory and atmospheric aerosols give rise to complex Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectra. Such spectra can be chemically informative, but they often require sophisticated algorithms for quantitative characterization of aerosol composition. Naïve statistical calibration models developed for quantification employ the full suite of wavenumbers available from a set of spectra, leading to loss of mechanistic interpretation between chemical composition and the resulting changes in absorption patterns that underpin their predictive capability. Using sparse representations of the same set of spectra, alternative calibration models can be built in which only a select group of absorption bands are used to make quantitative prediction of various aerosol properties. Such models are desirable as they allow us to relate predicted properties to their underlying molecular structure. In this work, we present an evaluation of four algorithms for achieving sparsity in FT-IR spectroscopy calibration models. Sparse calibration models exclude unnecessary wavenumbers from infrared spectra during the model building process, permitting identification and evaluation of the most relevant vibrational modes of molecules in complex aerosol mixtures required to make quantitative predictions of various measures of aerosol composition. We study two types of models: one which predicts alcohol COH, carboxylic COH, alkane CH, and carbonyl CO functional group (FG) abundances in ambient samples based on laboratory calibration standards and another which predicts thermal optical reflectance (TOR) organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) mass in new ambient samples by direct calibration of infrared spectra to a set of ambient samples reserved for calibration. We describe the development and selection of each calibration model and evaluate the effect of sparsity on prediction performance. Finally, we ascribe

  7. Gaz Phase IR and UV Spectroscopy of Neutral Contact Ion Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habka, Sana; Brenner, Valerie; Mons, Michel; Gloaguen, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Cations and anions, in solution, tend to pair up forming ion pairs. They play a crucial role in many fundamental processes in ion-concentrated solutions and living organisms. Despite their importance and vast applications in physics, chemistry and biochemistry, they remain difficult to characterize namely because of the coexistence of several types of pairing in solution. However, an interesting alternative consists in applying highly selective gas phase spectroscopy which can offer new insights on these neutral ion pairs. Our study consists in characterizing contact ion pairs (CIPs) in isolated model systems (M+, Ph-(CH2)n-COO- with M=Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, and n=1-3), to determine their spectral signatures and compare them to ion pairs in solution. We have used laser desorption to vaporize a solid tablet containing the desired salt. Structural information for each system was obtained by mass-selective, UV and IR laser spectroscopy combined with high level quantum chemistry calculations1. Evidence of the presence of neutral CIPs was found by scanning the π-π* transition of the phenyl ring using resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI). Then, conformational selective IR/UV double resonance spectra were recorded in the CO2- stretch region for each conformation detected. The good agreement between theoretical data obtained at the BSSE-corrected-fullCCSD(T)/dhf-TZVPP//B97-D3/dhf-TZVPP level and experimental IR spectra led us to assign the 3D structure for each ion pair formed. Spectral signatures of (M+, Ph-CH2-COO-) pairs, were assigned to a bidentate CIPs between the alkali cation and the carboxylate group. In the case of (Li+, Ph-(CH2)3-COO-) pairs, the presence of a flexible side chain promotes a cation-π interaction leading to a tridentate O-O-π structure with its unique IR and UV signatures. IR spectra obtained on isolated CIPs were found very much alike the ones published on lithium and sodium acetate in solution2. However, in the case of sodium acetate, solution

  8. Role of thermal diffusion in cw IR laser absorption in gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Maleissye, J T; Lempereur, F

    1982-01-15

    The absorption of radiation from a cw CO(2) laser by a mixture of absorbing SF(6) and transparent buffer gases has been measured as a function of pressure of added transparent gas (C(4)H(10)). The results are analyzed in terms of thermal diffusion of excited SF6 molecules out of the irradiation zone. In the 60-400-Torr pressure range, thermal difusion depletes the concentration of SF(6) so that the overall absorption is decreased and competes with the various channels of collisional relaxation which enhance absorption. An approximate semiempirical expression is used to determine the transient perturbation of concentration which occurs inside the laser beam.

  9. Analysis of a Brazilian baroque sculpture using Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Renato P; Ribeiro, Iohanna M; Calza, Cristiane; Oliveira, Ana L; Felix, Valter S; Ferreira, Douglas S; Pimenta, André R; Pereira, Ronaldo V; Pereira, Marcelo O; Lopes, Ricardo T

    2016-02-01

    In this study, samples were taken from the sculpture of Our Lady of Sorrows and analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR. This sculpture has been dated to the early eighteenth century. Samples were also examined using optical microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Based on chemical analysis, the pigments vermilion [HgS], massicot [PbO] and azurite [Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2]were found in the sculpture polychrome. The results indicate that the green polychrome of the sculpture's mantle comes from the blending of massicot and azurite. Because the literature reports that the mantle of the Our Lady of Sorrows sculpture is blue, the mixing of these pigments results from a production error. The results also indicate the presence of Au in the sculpture, which indicates the originality of the piece. The results from this study helped restorers to choose the appropriate procedures for intervening in the sculpture and contributed to the knowledge about the manufacturing process of Brazilian baroque sculptures. PMID:26513229

  10. Analysis of a Brazilian baroque sculpture using Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Renato P.; Ribeiro, Iohanna M.; Calza, Cristiane; Oliveira, Ana L.; Felix, Valter S.; Ferreira, Douglas S.; Pimenta, André R.; Pereira, Ronaldo V.; Pereira, Marcelo O.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, samples were taken from the sculpture of Our Lady of Sorrows and analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR. This sculpture has been dated to the early eighteenth century. Samples were also examined using optical microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Based on chemical analysis, the pigments vermilion [HgS], massicot [PbO] and azurite [Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2] were found in the sculpture polychrome. The results indicate that the green polychrome of the sculpture's mantle comes from the blending of massicot and azurite. Because the literature reports that the mantle of the Our Lady of Sorrows sculpture is blue, the mixing of these pigments results from a production error. The results also indicate the presence of Au in the sculpture, which indicates the originality of the piece. The results from this study helped restorers to choose the appropriate procedures for intervening in the sculpture and contributed to the knowledge about the manufacturing process of Brazilian baroque sculptures.

  11. Nonlinear 2D-IR spectroscopy as a tool to study peptide dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Peter

    2000-03-01

    The structure of bio-macromolecules (peptides, proteins, enzymes and DNA) crucially defines their function and it is the enormous progress in structure-sensitive methods (NMR, x-ray) which has lead to an extremely detailed microscopic understanding of reactions in biological systems. Our knowledge on the dynamics of these structures, which presumably is as important for the function as the structure itself, is essentially based on computer simulations with essentially no or very indirect experimental feedback. Nonlinear 2D vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) on the amide I mode of small globular peptides has been demonstrated recently and a detailed relationship between the static 3D structure and the strength of cross peaks has been established (in analogy to COSY in 2D-NMR spectroscopy). An extension of this technique allows to observe equilibrium fluctuations of model helices by incorporating an additional population period (i.e. 'mixing time'), giving rise to spectral diffusion of the diagonal peaks and incoherent population transfer between excitonic states (the latter being equivalent to the nuclear Overhauser effect, NOESY). In contrast to spin transitions, however, the processes are not in the 'motional narrowing limit' (i. e. τ_c>=T_2) so that the timescales of protein fluctuation can be measured directly on a picosecond timescale and in a site specific manner.

  12. Time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy: a differential absorption approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taroni, Paola; Bassi, Andrea; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Pifferi, Antonio

    2009-07-01

    A method was developed to estimate spectral changes of the absorption properties of turbid media from time-resolved reflectance/transmittance measurements. It was derived directly from the microscopic Beer-Lambert law, and tested against simulations and phantom measurements.

  13. 2D IR Spectroscopy using Four-Wave Mixing, Pulse Shaping, and IR Upconversion: A Quantitative Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Rock, William; Li, Yun-Liang; Pagano, Philip; Cheatum, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances have led to major changes in the apparatuses used to collect 2D IR spectra. Pulse shaping offers several advantages including rapid data collection, inherent phase stability, and phase cycling capabilities. Visible array detection via upconversion allows the use of visible detectors that are cheaper, faster, more sensitive, and less noisy than IR detectors. However, despite these advantages, many researchers are reluctant to implement these technologies. Here we present a quantitative study of the S/N of 2D IR spectra collected with a traditional four-wave mixing (FWM) apparatus, with a pulse shaping apparatus, and with visible detection via upconversion to address the question of whether or not weak chromophores at low concentrations are still accessible with such an apparatus. We find that the enhanced averaging capability of the pulse shaping apparatus enables the detection of small signals that would be challenging to measure even with the traditional FWM apparatus, and we demonstrate this ability on a sample of cyanylated dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). PMID:23687988

  14. Observation of temperature dependence of the IR hydroxyl absorption bands in silica optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Bonnell, Elizabeth; Homa, Daniel; Pickrell, Gary; Wang, Anbo; Ohodnicki, P. R.; Woodruff, Steven; Chorpening, Benjamin; Buric, Michael

    2016-07-01

    This study reports on the temperature dependent behavior of silica based optical fibers upon exposure to high temperatures in hydrogen and ambient air. The hydroxyl absorption bands in the wavelength range of 1000-2500 nm of commercially available multimode fibers with pure silica and germanium doped cores were examined in the temperature range of 20-800 °C. Two hydroxyl-related infrared absorption bands were observed: ∼2200 nm assigned to the combination of the vibration mode of Si-OH bending and the fundamental hydroxyl stretching mode, and ∼1390 nm assigned to the first overtone of the hydroxyl stretching. The absorption in the 2200 nm band decreased in intensity, while the 1390 nm absorption band shifted to longer wavelengths with an increase in temperature. The observed phenomena were reversible with temperature and suspected to be due, in part, to the conversion of the OH spectral components into each other and structural relaxation.

  15. [The Research for Trace Ammonia Escape Monitoring System Based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-fang; Wang, Fei; Yu, Li-bin; Yan, Jian-hua; Cen, Ke-fa

    2015-06-01

    In order to on-line measure the trace ammonia slip of the commercial power plant in the future, this research seeks to measure the trace ammonia by using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy under ambient temperature and pressure, and at different temperatures, and the measuring temperature is about 650 K in the power plant. In recent years lasers have become commercially available in the near-infrared where the transitions are much stronger, and ammonia's spectroscopy is pretty complicated and the overlapping lines are difficult to resolve. A group of ammonia transitions near 4 433.5 cm(-1) in the v2 +v3 combination band have been thoroughly selected for detecting lower concentration by analyzing its absorption characteristic and considering other absorption interference in combustion gases where H2O and CO2 mole fraction are very large. To illustrate the potential for NH3 concentration measurements, predictions for NH3, H2O and CO2 are simultaneously simulated, NH3 absorption lines near 4 433.5 cm(-1) wavelength meet weaker H2O absorption than the commercial NH3 lines, and there is almost no CO2 absorption, all the parameters are based on the HITRAN database, and an improved detection limit was obtained for interference-free NH3 monitoring, this 2.25 μm band has line strengths several times larger than absorption lines in the 1.53 μm band which was often used by NH3 sensors for emission monitoring and analyzing. The measurement system was developed with a new Herriott cell and a heated gas cell realizing fast absorption measurements of high resolution, and combined with direct absorption and wavelenguh modulation based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy at different temperatures. The lorentzian line shape is dominant at ambient temperature and pressure, and the estimated detectivity is approximately 0.225 x 10(-6) (SNR = 1) for the directed absorption spectroscopy, assuming a noise-equivalent absorbance of 1 x 10(-4). The heated cell

  16. Nonlinear absorption and transmission properties of Ge, Te and InAs using tuneable IR FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Amirmadhi, F.; Becker, K.; Brau, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Nonlinear absorption properties of Ge, Te and InAs are being investigated using the transmission of FEL optical pulses through these semiconductors (z-scan method). Wavelength, intensity and macropulse dependence are used to differentiate between two-photon and free-carrier absorption properties of these materials. Macropulse dependence is resolved by using a Pockles Cell to chop the 4-{mu}s macropulse down to 100 ns. Results of these experiments will be presented and discussed.

  17. Ion irradiation of Allende meteorite probed by visible, IR, and Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetto, R.; Lantz, C.; Ledu, D.; Baklouti, D.; Barucci, M. A.; Beck, P.; Delauche, L.; Dionnet, Z.; Dumas, P.; Duprat, J.; Engrand, C.; Jamme, F.; Oudayer, P.; Quirico, E.; Sandt, C.; Dartois, E.

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about carbonaceous asteroids weathering in space as previous studies have struggled to define a general spectral trend among dark surfaces. Here we present experiments on ion irradiation of the Allende meteorite, performed using 40 keV He+ and Ar+ ions, as a simulation of solar wind irradiation of primitive bodies surfaces. We used different fluences up to 3 × 1016 ions/cm2, corresponding to short timescales of ∼103-104 yrs in the main asteroid belt. Samples were analyzed before and after irradiation using visible to far-IR (0.4-50 μm) reflectance spectroscopy, and Raman micro-spectroscopy. Similarly to what observed in previous experiments, results show a reddening and darkening of VIS-NIR reflectance spectra. These spectral variations are however comparable to other spectral variations due to viewing geometry, grain size, and sample preparation, suggesting an explanation for the contradictory space weathering studies of dark asteroids. After irradiation, the infrared bands of the matrix olivine silicates change profile and shift to longer wavelength, possibly as a consequence of a more efficient sputtering effect on Mg than Fe (lighter and more volatile species are preferentially sputtered backwards) and/or preferential amorphization of Mg-rich olivine. Spectral variations are compatible with the Hapke weathering model. Raman spectroscopy shows that the carbonaceous component is substantially affected by irradiation: different degrees of de-ordering are produced as a function of dose, to finally end with a highly disordered carbon. All observed modifications seem to scale with the nuclear elastic dose.

  18. Detection and classification of salmonella serotypes using spectral signatures collected by fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spectral signatures of Salmonella serotypes namely Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Infantis, Salmonella Heidelberg and Salmonella Kentucky were collected using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). About 5-10 µL of Salmonella suspensions with concentrations of 1...

  19. NMR and IR Spectroscopy for the Structural Characterization of Edible Fats and Oils: An Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Molly W.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an upper-level instrumental laboratory for undergraduates that explores the complementary nature of IR and NMR spectroscopy for analysis of several edible fats and oils that are structurally similar but differ in physical properties and health implications. Five different fats and oils are analyzed for average chain length,…

  20. Photoinduced Graft-Polymerization of Acrylic Acid on Polyethylene and Polypropylene Surfaces: Comparative Study Using IR-ATR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, A. A.; Tretinnikov, O. N.; Shkrabatovskaya, L. V.; Prikhodchenko, L. K.

    2014-11-01

    Photoinduced graft-polymerization of acrylic acid on the surface of polyethylene and polypropylene films containing a photoinitiator pre-adsorbed from a thin layer of non-de-aerated aqueous monomer solution was investigated. Data about the monomer conversion and grafting depth as functions of the UV irradiation time and polymer nature were obtained using IR-ATR spectroscopy.

  1. Molecular orientation of molybdate ions adsorbed on goethite nanoparticles revealed by polarized in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davantès, Athénaïs; Lefèvre, Grégory

    2016-11-01

    The speciation of species adsorbed on nanoparticles is a major concern for several fields, as environmental pollution and remediation, surface functionalization, or catalysis. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) was amongst the rare methods able to give in situ information about the geometry of surface complexes on nanoparticles. A new possibility using this technique is illustrated here with the MoO42 -/goethite system. Using deuterated goethite to avoid spectral interferences, adsorption of molybdate ions on a spontaneous oriented film of nanoparticles has been followed using a polarized infrared beam. From the decomposition of spectra in the x, y and z directions, a monodentate surface complex on the {101} faces has been found as the most probable geometry. This result demonstrates that polarized ATR-IR allows to characterize in more details adsorption mode at the atomic scale, in comparison with usual ATR-IR spectroscopy.

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of chicken sulfite oxidase crystals

    SciTech Connect

    George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.; Kisker, C.

    1999-05-17

    Sulfite oxidase catalyzes the physiologically vital oxidation of sulfite to sulfate. Recently, the crystal structure of chicken sulfite oxidase has been reported at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. In contrast to the information available from previous X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies, the active site indicated by crystallography was a mono-oxo species. Because of this the possibility that the crystals did in fact contain a reduced molybdenum species was considered in the crystallographic work. The authors report herein an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of polycrystalline sulfite oxidase prepared in the same manner as the previous single-crystal samples, and compare this with data for frozen solutions of oxidized and reduced enzyme.

  3. Differential optical spectroscopy for absorption characterization of scattering media.

    PubMed

    Billet, Cyril; Sablong, Raphaël

    2007-11-15

    Reflectance techniques are commonly used to characterize the optical properties of tissues. However, the precise determination of local chromophore concentrations in turbid media is usually difficult because of the nonlinear dependence of light intensity as a function of scattering and absorption coefficients. A technique is presented to easily determine absorbent compound concentration ratios in a turbid media from three optical reflectance spectra, in the visible range, measured for source-detector distances less than 1cm. The validity of the method is experimentally established, in cases of sets of diluted milk containing absorbent inks, over a relatively wide range of absorption (0.05-0.5 cm(-1)) and reduced scattering (10-20 cm(-1)) coefficients.

  4. Ultrafast Extreme Ultraviolet Absorption Spectroscopy of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkamp, Max A.; Lin, Ming-Fu; Ryland, Elizabeth S.; Vura-Weis, Josh

    2016-06-01

    Methylammonium lead iodide (perovskite) is a leading candidate for use in next-generation solar cell devices. However, the photophysics responsible for its strong photovoltaic qualities are not fully understood. Ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) absorption was used to investigate electron and hole dynamics in perovskite by observing transitions from a common inner-shell level (I 4d) to the valence and conduction bands. Ultrashort (30 fs) pulses of XUV radiation with a broad spectrum (40-70 eV) were generated via high-harmonic generation using a tabletop instrument. Transient absorption measurements with visible pump and XUV probe directly observed the relaxation of charge carriers in perovskite after above-band excitation in the femtosecond and picosecond time ranges.

  5. Two-photon absorption spectroscopy of rubrene single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irkhin, Pavel; Biaggio, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    We determine the wavelength dependence of the two-photon absorption cross section in rubrene single crystals both by direct measurement of nonlinear transmission and from the two-photon excitation spectrum of the photoluminescence. The peak two-photon absorption coefficient for b-polarized light was found to be (4.6±1)×10-11 m/W at a wavelength of 850±10 nm. It is 2.3 times larger for c-polarized light. The lowest energy two-photon excitation peak corresponds to an excited state energy of 2.92±0.04 eV and it is followed by a vibronic progression of higher energy peaks separated by ˜0.14 eV.

  6. Time-resolved pump and probe x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 at PETRA III.

    PubMed

    Göries, D; Dicke, B; Roedig, P; Stübe, N; Meyer, J; Galler, A; Gawelda, W; Britz, A; Geßler, P; Sotoudi Namin, H; Beckmann, A; Schlie, M; Warmer, M; Naumova, M; Bressler, C; Rübhausen, M; Weckert, E; Meents, A

    2016-05-01

    We report about the development and implementation of a new setup for time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 utilizing the outstanding source properties of the low-emittance PETRA III synchrotron storage ring in Hamburg. Using a high intensity micrometer-sized X-ray beam in combination with two positional feedback systems, measurements were performed on the transition metal complex fac-Tris[2-phenylpyridinato-C2,N]iridium(III) also referred to as fac-Ir(ppy)3. This compound is a representative of the phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes, which play an important role in organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology. The experiment could directly prove the anticipated photoinduced charge transfer reaction. Our results further reveal that the temporal resolution of the experiment is limited by the PETRA III X-ray bunch length of ∼103 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM). PMID:27250401

  7. Time-resolved pump and probe x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 at PETRA III.

    PubMed

    Göries, D; Dicke, B; Roedig, P; Stübe, N; Meyer, J; Galler, A; Gawelda, W; Britz, A; Geßler, P; Sotoudi Namin, H; Beckmann, A; Schlie, M; Warmer, M; Naumova, M; Bressler, C; Rübhausen, M; Weckert, E; Meents, A

    2016-05-01

    We report about the development and implementation of a new setup for time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 utilizing the outstanding source properties of the low-emittance PETRA III synchrotron storage ring in Hamburg. Using a high intensity micrometer-sized X-ray beam in combination with two positional feedback systems, measurements were performed on the transition metal complex fac-Tris[2-phenylpyridinato-C2,N]iridium(III) also referred to as fac-Ir(ppy)3. This compound is a representative of the phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes, which play an important role in organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology. The experiment could directly prove the anticipated photoinduced charge transfer reaction. Our results further reveal that the temporal resolution of the experiment is limited by the PETRA III X-ray bunch length of ∼103 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM).

  8. Chemical Sensors Based on IR Spectroscopy and Surface-Modified Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Gabriel P.; Niemczyk, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Sol-gel processing techniques have been used to apply thin porous films to the surfaces of planar infrared (IR) waveguides to produce widely useful chemical sensors. The thin- film coating serves to diminish the concentration of water and increase the concentration of the analyte in the region probed by the evanescent IR wave. These porous films are composed of silica, and therefore, conventional silica surface modification techniques can be used to give the surface a specific functional character. The sol-gel film was surface-modified to make the film highly hydrophobic. These sensors were shown to be capable of detecting non-polar organic analytes, such as benzonitrile, in aqueous solution with detection limits in the ppb range. Further, these porous sol-gel structures allow the analytes to diffuse into and out of the films rapidly, thus reaching equilibrium in less than ten seconds. These sensors are unique because of the fact that their operation is based on the measurement of an IR absorption spectrum. Thus, these sensors are able to identify the analytes as well as measure concentration with high sensitivity. These developments have been documented in previous reports and publications. Recently, we have also targeted detection of the polar organic molecules acetone and isopropanol in aqueous solution. Polar organics are widely used in industrial and chemical processes, hence it is of interest to monitor their presence in effluents or decontamination process flows. Although large improvements in detection limits were expected with non-polar organic molecules in aqueous solutions using very hydrophobic porous sol-gel films on silicon attenuated total reflectance (Si ATR) waveguides, it was not as clear what the detection enhancements might be for polar organic molecules. This report describes the use of modified sol-gel-coated Si ATR sensors for trace detection and quantitation of small polar organic molecules in aqueous solutions. The detection of both acetone

  9. Characterization of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis by FT-IR spectroscopy and nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Isabelle; Ferreira-Strixino, Juliana; Castilho, Maiara L; Campos, Claudia B L; Tellez, Claudio; Raniero, Leandro

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, the etiological agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, is a dimorphic fungus existing as mycelia in the environment (or at 25°C in vitro) and as yeast cells in the human host (or at 37°C in vitro). Because mycological examination of lesions in patients frequently is unable to show the presence of the fungus and serological tests can misdiagnose the disease with other mycosis, the development of new approach's for molecular identification of P. brasiliensis spurges is needed. This study describes the use of a gold nanoprobe of a known gene sequence of P. brasiliensis as a molecular tool to identify P. brasiliensis by regular polymerase chain reaction (PCR) associated with a colorimetric methods. This approach is suitable for testing in remote areas because it does not require any further step than gene amplification, being safer and cheaper than electrophoresis methods. The proposed test showed a color change of the PCR reaction mixture from red to blue in negative samples, whereas the solution remains red in positive samples. We also performed a Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy analysis to characterize and compare the chemical composition between yeast and mycelia forms, which revealed biochemical differences between these two forms. The analysis of the spectra showed that differences were distributed in chemical bonds of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates. The most prominent difference between both forms was vibration modes related to 1,3-β-glucan usually found in mycelia and 1,3-α-glucan found in yeasts and also chitin forms. In this work, we introduce FT-IR as a new method suitable to reveal overall differences that biochemically distinguish each form of P. brasiliensis that could be additionally used to discriminate biochemical differences among a single form under distinct environmental conditions.

  10. Characterization of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis by FT-IR spectroscopy and nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Isabelle; Ferreira-Strixino, Juliana; Castilho, Maiara L.; Campos, Claudia B. L.; Tellez, Claudio; Raniero, Leandro

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, the etiological agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, is a dimorphic fungus existing as mycelia in the environment (or at 25 °C in vitro) and as yeast cells in the human host (or at 37 °C in vitro). Because mycological examination of lesions in patients frequently is unable to show the presence of the fungus and serological tests can misdiagnose the disease with other mycosis, the development of new approach's for molecular identification of P. brasiliensis spurges is needed. This study describes the use of a gold nanoprobe of a known gene sequence of P. brasiliensis as a molecular tool to identify P. brasiliensis by regular polymerase chain reaction (PCR) associated with a colorimetric methods. This approach is suitable for testing in remote areas because it does not require any further step than gene amplification, being safer and cheaper than electrophoresis methods. The proposed test showed a color change of the PCR reaction mixture from red to blue in negative samples, whereas the solution remains red in positive samples. We also performed a Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy analysis to characterize and compare the chemical composition between yeast and mycelia forms, which revealed biochemical differences between these two forms. The analysis of the spectra showed that differences were distributed in chemical bonds of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates. The most prominent difference between both forms was vibration modes related to 1,3-β-glucan usually found in mycelia and 1,3-α-glucan found in yeasts and also chitin forms. In this work, we introduce FT-IR as a new method suitable to reveal overall differences that biochemically distinguish each form of P. brasiliensis that could be additionally used to discriminate biochemical differences among a single form under distinct environmental conditions.

  11. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Of Thin Foils Irradiated By An Ultra-short Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaudin, P.; Lecherbourg, L.; Blancard, C.; Cossé, P.; Faussurier, G.; Audebert, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Geindre, J.-P.; Shepherd, R.

    2007-08-01

    Point-projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy has been used to measure absorption spectra of transient plasma created by an ultra-short laser pulse. The 1s-2p and 1s-3p absorption lines of weakly ionized aluminum and the 2p-3d absorption lines of bromine were measured over an extended range of densities in a low-temperature regime. Independent plasma characterization was obtained using frequency domain interferometry diagnostic (FDI) that allows the interpretation of the absorption spectra in terms of spectral opacities. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium, spectral opacity calculations have been performed using the density and temperature inferred from the FDI diagnostic to compare to the measured absorption spectra. A good agreement is obtained when non-equilibrium effects due to non-stationary atomic physics are negligible at the x-ray probe time.

  12. Grism Performance for Mid-IR (5-40 microns) Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, K. A.; Mar, D. J.; Jaffe, D. T.; Marsh, J. P.; Keller, L. D.; Herter, T. L.; Greene, T. P.; Adams, J. D.

    2006-01-01

    Grisms provide a straightforward method to transform an imager into a spectrometer with little change to the original imaging optics. This paper addresses the performance of a suite of grisms as part of an Astrobiology Science and Instrument Development (ASTID) Program to implement a moderate resolution spectroscopic capability to the mid/far-IR facility instrument FORCAST for the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) [see accompanying abstract by Adams et al.]. A moderate resolution mid-IR spectrometer on SOFIA will offer advantages not available to either ground or space-based instruments after the Spitzer Space Telescope ceases operation in approx. 2007. SOFIA will begin operations in 2007 and will have an operational lifetime of approx. 20 years. From aircraft altitudes, it will be possible to cover a range of wavelengths, particularly in the critical 5-9 micron band, where detection of astrobiologically interesting molecules have key spectral signatures, that are not accessible from the ground. This grism suite consists of six grisms: four monolithic Si grisms [see accompanying abstract by Mar et al.] and two KRS-5 grisms. These devices will allow long slit low-resolution and short slit, cross-dispersed high-resolution spectroscopic modes selectable by simply moving the camera filter wheels. This configuration will enable observing programs to gather images and spectra in a single SOFIA flight. The four silicon grisms, whose performance is highlighted in this paper, will operate in the following wavelength ranges: 5-8, 17-28, and 28-37 microns. In the 5-8 micron range, R=1200 is achievable for a 2 arcsecond slit using the grism as a cross-disperser. For the 17-28 and 28-37 micron ranges, the resolving powers are R approx. 130, 250 when used in low orders with a slit of 3 arcseconds. The silicon grisms demonstrate a new family of dispersive elements with good optical performance for spectroscopy from 1.2-8 micron and beyond 18 microns

  13. Attenuated total reflection surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy of carboxyl terminated self-assembled monolayers on gold.

    PubMed

    Goutev, Nikolay; Futamata, Masayuki

    2003-05-01

    A new recipe for surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) active island Au films with improved adhesion in aqueous solution, low resistivity, and enhancement of the infrared (IR) absorption of about 300 was developed. The Au films prepared were utilized in studies of the ionization of self-assembled monolayers of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid in Na2SO4 aqueous solutions by attenuated total reflection surface-enhanced infrared absorption (ATR-SEIRA) spectroscopy. It was found that the carboxyl end groups of the self-assembled monolayer turn into carboxylate anions on going from anodic to cathodic potentials or from acidic to alkaline pH. The water molecules close to the self-assembled monolayer in acidic solutions or at anodic potentials are preferentially aligned with their dipole moments parallel to the interface. This type of alignment can be ascribed to the dipole-dipole interaction between the carboxyl groups and the water molecules. On the other hand, in alkaline solutions or at cathodic potentials the structure of water close to the self-assembled monolayer is essentially bulk-like, with randomly oriented water molecules. This observation suggests that in alkaline solutions or at cathodic potentials the charge of the carboxylate anions is almost completely compensated for by strongly adsorbed counter cations. As a result, the electric field close to the surface of the ionized self-assembled monolayer is weak and has little influence on the orientation and hydrogen bonding of the water molecules.

  14. Adsorption and oxidation of formaldehyde on a polycrystalline Pt film electrode: An in situ IR spectroscopy search for adsorbed reaction intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Behm, R Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Summary As part of a mechanistic study of the electrooxidation of C1 molecules we have systematically investigated the dissociative adsorption/oxidation of formaldehyde on a polycrystalline Pt film electrode under experimental conditions optimizing the chance for detecting weakly adsorbed reaction intermediates. Employing in situ IR spectroscopy in an attenuated total reflection configuration (ATR-FTIRS) with p-polarized IR radiation to further improve the signal-to-noise ratio, and using low reaction temperatures (3 °C) and deuterium substitution to slow down the reaction kinetics and to stabilize weakly adsorbed reaction intermediates, we could detect an IR absorption band at 1660 cm−1 characteristic for adsorbed formyl intermediates. This assignment is supported by an isotope shift in wave number. Effects of temperature, potential and deuterium substitution on the formation and disappearance of different adsorbed species (COad, adsorbed formate, adsorbed formyl), are monitored and quantified. Consequences on the mechanism for dissociative adsorption and oxidation of formaldehyde are discussed. PMID:24991512

  15. A heated chamber burner for atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venghiattis, A A

    1968-07-01

    A new heated chamber burner is described. The burner is of the premixed type, and burner heads of the types conventionally used in atomic absorption may be readily adapted to it. This new sampling system has been tested for Ag, Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Si, Ti, and Zn in aqueous solutions. An improvement of the order of ten times has been obtained in sensitivity, and in detection limits as well, for the elements determined. Interferences controllable are somewhat more severe than in conventional burners but are controllable.

  16. A GAS TEMPERATURE PROFILE BY INFRARED EMISSION-ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas. Emphasis is on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing water vapor or carbon dioxide as radiating gases. The temperature profile is assumed to be axisymmetric with a functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters are calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared spectrum. Infrared emission and absorption measurements at two or more wavelengths provide a method of determining a gas temperature profile along a path through the gas by using a radiation source and receiver located outside the gas stream being measured. This permits simplified spectral scanning of a jet or rocket engine exhaust stream with the instrumentation outside the exhaust gas stream. This program provides an iterative-cyclic computation in which an initial assumed temperature profile is altered in shape until the computed emission and absorption agree, within specified limits, with the actual instrument measurements of emission and absorption. Temperature determination by experimental measurements of emission and absorption at two or more wavelengths is also provided by this program. Additionally, the program provides a technique for selecting the wavelengths to be used for determining the temperature profiles prior to the beginning of the experiment. By using this program feature, the experimenter has a higher probability of selecting wavelengths which will result in accurate temperature profile measurements. This program provides the user with a technique for determining whether this program will be sufficiently accurate for his particular application, as well as providing a means of finding the solution. The input to the program consists of four types of data: (1) computer program control constants, (2) measurements of gas radiance and transmittance at selected wavelengths, (3) tabulations from the literature of gas

  17. Absorption spectroscopy of a laboratory photoionized plasma experiment at Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, I. M.; Durmaz, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2014-03-15

    The Z facility at the Sandia National Laboratories is the most energetic terrestrial source of X-rays and provides an opportunity to produce photoionized plasmas in a relatively well characterised radiation environment. We use detailed atomic-kinetic and spectral simulations to analyze the absorption spectra of a photoionized neon plasma driven by the x-ray flux from a z-pinch. The broadband x-ray flux both photoionizes and backlights the plasma. In particular, we focus on extracting the charge state distribution of the plasma and the characteristics of the radiation field driving the plasma in order to estimate the ionisation parameter.

  18. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV absorption, 1H and 13C NMR) and theoretical (in B3LYP/6-311++G** level) studies on alkali metal salts of caffeic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świsłocka, Renata

    The effect of some metals on the electronic system of benzoic and nicotinic acids has recently been investigated by IR, Raman and UV spectroscopy [1-3]. Benzoic and nicotinic acids are regarded model systems representing a wide group of aromatic ligands which are incorporated into enzymes. In this work the FT-IR (in solid state and in solution), FT-Raman, UV absorption and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) and its salts with lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium were registered, assigned and analyzed. The effect of alkali metals on the electronic system of ligands was discussed. Studies of differences in the number and position of bands from the IR, Raman, UV absorption spectra and chemical shifts from NMR spectra allowed to conclude on the distribution of electronic charge in the molecules, the delocalization energy of π electrons and the reactivity of ligands in metal complexes. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G** basis set. Bond lengths, angles and dipole moments for the optimized structures of caffeic acid and lithium, sodium, potassium caffeinates were also calculated. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra were obtained. The calculated parameters were compared to the experimental characteristics of investigated compounds. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris.

  19. [Retrieval of tropospheric NO2 by multi axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Xie, Pin-hua; Si, Fu-qi; Dou, Ke; Li, Ang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Wen-qing

    2010-09-01

    A method of retrieving NO2 in troposphere based on multi axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) was introduced. The differential slant column density (dSCD) of NO2 was evaluated by differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), removing the Fraunhofer structure and Ring effect. Combining the results of different observing directions, the tropospheric NO2 differential slant column density (deltaSCD) was evaluated, and the air mass factor (AMF) was calculated with the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN and the tropospheric NO2 vertical column density (VCD) was retrieved. To ensure the accuracy of the results, it was compared with the results of long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS), a good accordance was shown with the correlation coefficients of 0.94027 and 0.96924. PMID:21105419

  20. Simulation-based comparison of noise effects in wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lins, B.; Zinn, P.; Engelbrecht, R.; Schmauss, B.

    2010-08-01

    A simulative investigation of noise effects in wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) and direct absorption diode laser absorption spectroscopy is presented. Special attention is paid to the impact of quantization noise of the analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) of the photodetector signal in the two detection schemes with the goal of estimating the necessary ADC resolution for each technique. With laser relative intensity noise (RIN), photodetector shot noise and thermal amplifier noise included, the strategies used for noise reduction in direct and wavelength modulation spectroscopy are compared by simulating two respective systems. Results show that because of the combined effects of dithering by RIN and signal averaging, the resolutions required for the direct absorption setup are only slightly higher than for the WMS setup. Only for small contributions of RIN an increase in resolution will significantly improve signal quality in the direct scheme.

  1. Properties of Liquid Silicon Observed by Time-Resolved X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. L.; Heimann, P. A.; Lindenberg, A. M.; Jeschke, H. O.; Garcia, M. E.; Chang, Z.; Lee, R. W.; Rehr, J. J.; Falcone, R. W.

    2003-10-01

    Time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy at the Si L edges is used to probe the electronic structure of an amorphous Si foil as it melts following absorption of an ultrafast laser pulse. Picosecond temporal resolution allows observation of the transient liquid phase before vaporization and before the liquid breaks up into droplets. The melting causes changes in the spectrum that match predictions of molecular dynamics and ab initio x-ray absorption codes.

  2. WaFIRS, a Waveguide Far-IR Spectrometer: Enabling Space-Borne Spectroscopy of High-z Galaxies in the Far-IR and Submm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, C. M.; Bock, J. J.; Dragovan, M.; Earle, L.; Glenn, J.; Naylor, B.; Nguyen, H.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2004-01-01

    The discovery of galaxies beyond z approximately equal to 1 which emit the bulk of their luminosity at long wavelengths has demonstrated the need for high sensitivity, broadband spectroscopy in the far-IR/submm/mm bands. Because many of these sources are not detectable in the optical, long wavelength spectroscopy is key to measuring their redshifts and ISM conditions. The continuum source list will increase in the next decade with new ground-based instruments (SCUBA2, Bolocam, MAMBO) and the surveys of HSO and SIRTF. Yet the planned spectroscopic capabilities lag behind, primarily due to the difficulty in scaling existing IR spectrograph designs to longer wavelengths. To overcome these limitations, we are developing WaFIRS, a novel concept for long-wavelength spectroscopy which utilizes a parallel-plate waveguide and a curved diffraction grating. WaFIRS provides the large (approximately 60%) instantaneous bandwidth and high throughput of a conventional grating system, but offers a dramatic reduction in volume and mass. WaFIRS requires no space overheads for extra optical elements beyond the diffraction grating itself, and is two-dimensional because the propagation is confined between two parallel plates. Thus several modules could be stacked to multiplex either spatially or in different frequency bands. The size and mass savings provide opportunities for spectroscopy from space-borne observatories which would be impractical with conventional spectrographs. With background-limited detectors and a cooled 3.5 telescope, the line sensitivity would be better than that of ALMA, with instantaneous broad-band coverage. We have built and tested a WaFIRS prototype for 1-1.6 mm, and are currently constructing Z-Spec, a 100 mK model to be used as a ground-based lambda/DELTAlambda approximately equal to 350 submillimeter galaxy redshift machine.

  3. XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR Spectroscopy of In Situ Crystallization of Lithium Disilicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuss, T.; Mogus-Milankovic, A.; Ray, C. S.; Lesher, C. E.; Youngman, R.; Day, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a Li2O-2SiO2 (LS2) glass was investigated as a function of pressure and temperature up to 6 GPa and 750 C respectively, using XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR spectroscopy. Glass densified at 6 GPa has an average Si-O-Si bond angle approx.7deg lower than that found in glass processed at 4.5 GPa. At 4.5 GPa, lithium disilicate crystallizes from the glass, while at 6 GPa a new high pressure form of lithium metasilicate crystallizes. The new phase, while having lithium metasilicate crystal symmetry, contains at least 4 different Si sites. NMR results for 6 GPa sample indicate the presence of Q4 species with (Q(sup 4))Si-O-Si(Q(sup 4)) bond angles of approx.157deg. This is the first reported occurrence of Q(sup 4) species with such large bond angles in alumina free alkali silicate glass. No five- or six- coordinated Si are found.

  4. Far-IR Spectroscopy and FDTD Simulations of Graphene Plasmonic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strait, Jared; Nene, Parinita; Chan, Weimin; Manolatou, Christina; Kevek, Joshua; McEuen, Paul; Rana, Farhan

    2013-03-01

    Plasmonics, the field of manipulating charge density waves, is uniquely suited to graphene due to graphene's high mobility and tunable plasma frequency in the THz range. Graphene microstructures, such as strips, discs, and rings confine plasmon modes, leading to plasma resonances with THz frequencies. These micro- and nanostructures form the building blocks of graphene plasmonic devices for tunable terahertz generation, detection, filtering, and switching. We present experimental results on the spectroscopy of plasmon resonances in the far-IR wavelength range in various graphene microstructures. Analytical methods of modeling even the simplest graphene plasmonic structures are not quantitatively accurate, and as such, we developed a 3D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) tool for simulating the plasmon modes. By fitting simulations to the measured data, we have quantitatively extracted the parameters characterizing graphene's intraband conductivity and carrier scattering time with good accuracy. We have also investigated the interaction between plasmon modes of nearby structures and found them to be strong when the distance between structures is less than the dimension of the structures. FDTD simulations enable a quantitative characterization of such interactions.

  5. IR spectroscopy of monohydrated tryptamine cation: Rearrangement of the intermolecular hydrogen bond induced by photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakota, Kenji; Kouno, Yuuki; Harada, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Fujii, Masaaki; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2012-12-01

    Rearrangement of intermolecular hydrogen bond in a monohydrated tryptamine cation, [TRA(H2O)1]+, has been investigated in the gas phase by IR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. In the S0 state of TRA(H2O)1, a water molecule is hydrogen-bonded to the N atom of the amino group of a flexible ethylamine side chain [T. S. Zwier, J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 8827 (2001), 10.1021/jp011659+]. A remarkable change in the hydrogen-bonding motif of [TRA(H2O)]+ occurs upon photoionization. In the D0 state of [TRA(H2O)1]+, the water molecule is hydrogen-bonded to the NH group of the indole ring of TRA+, indicating that the water molecule transfers from the amino group to NH group. Quantum chemical calculations are performed to investigate the pathway of the water transfer. Two potential energy barriers emerge in [TRA(H2O)1]+ along the intrinsic reaction coordinate of the water transfer. The water transfer event observed in [TRA(H2O)1]+ is not an elementary but a complex process.

  6. Identification of Forged Bank of England 20 Gbp Banknotes Using IR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnex, Emily

    2014-06-01

    Bank of England notes of 20 GBP denomination have been studied using infrared spectroscopy in order to generate a method to identify forged notes. A principal aim of this work was to develop a method so that a small, compact ATR FTIR instrument could be used by bank workers, police departments or others such as shop assistants to identify forged notes in a non-lab setting. The ease of use of the instrument is the key to this method, as well as the relatively low cost. The presence of a peak at 1400 wn from the blank paper section of a forged note proved to be a successful indicator of the note's illegality for the notes that we studied. Moreover, differences between the spectra of forged and genuine 20 GBP notes were observed in the ν(OH) (ca. 3500 wn), ν(C-H) (ca. 2900 wn) and ν(C=O) (ca. 1750 wn) regions of the IR spectrum recorded for the polymer film covering the holographic strip. In cases where these simple tests fail, we have shown how an infrared microscope can be used to further differentiate genuine and forged banknotes by producing infrared maps of selected areas of the note contrasting inks with background paper. Further to this, with an announcement by the Bank of England to produce polymer banknotes in the future, the work has been extended using Australian polymer banknotes to show that the method would be transferable.

  7. Investigation of the hydrated 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin dimer by combined IR/UV spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stamm, A; Schwing, K; Gerhards, M

    2014-11-21

    The first molecular beam investigations on a coumarin dimer and clusters of a coumarin dimer with water both in the neutral (S0) and cationic (D0) electronic ground state are performed. The structure and structural changes due to ionization of the isolated 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin dimer (7H4MC)2 as well as its mono- and dihydrate (7H4MC)2(H2O)1-2 are analyzed by applying combined IR/UV spectroscopy compared with density functional theory calculations. In case of the neutral dimer of 7H4MC a doubly hydrogen-bonded structure is formed. This doubly hydrogen-bonded arrangement opens to a singly hydrogen-bonded structure in the ion presenting a rearrangement reaction within an isolated dimer. By attaching one or two water molecules to the neutral 7H4MC dimer water is inserted into the hydrogen bonds. In contrast to the non-hydrated species this general binding motif with water in a bridging function does not change via ionization but especially for the dihydrate the spatial arrangement of the two 7H4MC units changes strengthening the interaction between the aromatic chromophores. The presented analyses illustrate the strong dependence of binding motifs as a function of successive hydration and charge including a rearrangement reaction.

  8. Investigation of the hydrated 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin dimer by combined IR/UV spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stamm, A.; Schwing, K.; Gerhards, M.

    2014-11-21

    The first molecular beam investigations on a coumarin dimer and clusters of a coumarin dimer with water both in the neutral (S{sub 0}) and cationic (D{sub 0}) electronic ground state are performed. The structure and structural changes due to ionization of the isolated 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin dimer (7H4MC){sub 2} as well as its mono- and dihydrate (7H4MC){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 1-2} are analyzed by applying combined IR/UV spectroscopy compared with density functional theory calculations. In case of the neutral dimer of 7H4MC a doubly hydrogen-bonded structure is formed. This doubly hydrogen-bonded arrangement opens to a singly hydrogen-bonded structure in the ion presenting a rearrangement reaction within an isolated dimer. By attaching one or two water molecules to the neutral 7H4MC dimer water is inserted into the hydrogen bonds. In contrast to the non-hydrated species this general binding motif with water in a bridging function does not change via ionization but especially for the dihydrate the spatial arrangement of the two 7H4MC units changes strengthening the interaction between the aromatic chromophores. The presented analyses illustrate the strong dependence of binding motifs as a function of successive hydration and charge including a rearrangement reaction.

  9. Forensic Hair Differentiation Using Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR FT-IR) Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Manheim, Jeremy; Doty, Kyle C; McLaughlin, Gregory; Lednev, Igor K

    2016-07-01

    Hair and fibers are common forms of trace evidence found at crime scenes. The current methodology of microscopic examination of potential hair evidence is absent of statistical measures of performance, and examiner results for identification can be subjective. Here, attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to analyze synthetic fibers and natural hairs of human, cat, and dog origin. Chemometric analysis was used to differentiate hair spectra from the three different species, and to predict unknown hairs to their proper species class, with a high degree of certainty. A species-specific partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) model was constructed to discriminate human hair from cat and dog hairs. This model was successful in distinguishing between the three classes and, more importantly, all human samples were correctly predicted as human. An external validation resulted in zero false positive and false negative assignments for the human class. From a forensic perspective, this technique would be complementary to microscopic hair examination, and in no way replace it. As such, this methodology is able to provide a statistical measure of confidence to the identification of a sample of human, cat, and dog hair, which was called for in the 2009 National Academy of Sciences report. More importantly, this approach is non-destructive, rapid, can provide reliable results, and requires no sample preparation, making it of ample importance to the field of forensic science. PMID:27412186

  10. pH-induced structural changes of ovalbumin studied by 2D correlation IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Daehoon; Ryu, Soo Ryeon; Park, Yeonju; Czarnik-Matusewicz, Bogusława; Jung, Young Mee

    2014-07-01

    The secondary structural changes of pH-induced ovalbumin during the transition from native state into intermediate state were studied with the use of 2D correlation spectroscopy and principal component analysis. 2D correlation spectra constructed from the pH-dependent IR spectra of ovalbumin solution revealed the following scenario of the intensity changes with pH decrease. When pH decreased from 5.5 and 3.6 intensity of components attributed to the β-turns, the α-helical elements, and native β-sheets increased. It was caused by protonation induced changes in environment of these elements. When the protonation of the acidic groups were finalized the system adopted the intermediate structure. It was accompanied by weak structural changes that mainly included the β-turns and the α-helices. In extreme acidic conditions at pH below pH 2 the intermediate structure was no longer stable and oligomers rich in the β-sheet structure were formed.

  11. Dogfish egg case structural studies by ATR FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iconomidou, Vassiliki A; Georgaka, Martha E; Chryssikos, Georgios D; Gionis, Vassilis; Megalofonou, Persefoni; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2007-06-01

    The dogfish egg case is a composite structure that combines mechanical tensile strength, toughness and elasticity with high permeability to small molecules and ions. Presumably, it provides both a protective and a filtering role for the egg/embryo contained within it. In this work, we performed structural studies of the Galeus melastomus egg case at two different stages of the hardening process, utilizing ATR FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy. Based on these data we deduce that: (a) The G. melastomus egg case, in close analogy to that of the related species Scyliorhinus cunicula, is a complex, composite structure which consists mainly of an analogue of collagen IV. This network forming protein appears to have common secondary structural characteristics in the entire egg case. (b) The outermost layer of the non-sclerotized egg case is especially rich in tyrosine, while the innermost layer is rich in polysaccharides, presumably glycosaminoglycans, and lipids. These differences are diminished upon hardening. (c) Disulfide bonds do not appear to play a significant role in cross-linking. However, cross-links involving tyrosine residues appear to sclerotize the egg case. It is proposed that the intensity of the Raman band at ca. 1615 cm(-1), which is due to ring stretching vibrations of Tyr, might be a useful indicator of the sclerotization status of a certain proteinaceous tissue, when tyrosines are involved in sclerotization mechanisms. PMID:17292464

  12. Sub-mm Imaging and Spectroscopy of NGC 3603 IRS 9A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Christian

    2013-06-01

    Massive stars present the newest and perhaps most challenging opportunity for long baseline interferometry to excel. Large distances require high angular resolution both to study the means of accreting enough mass in a short time and to split new-born multiples into their components for the determination of their fundamental parameters. Dust obscuration of young stellar objects require interferometry in the infrared, while post-mainsequence stellar phases require high-precision measurements to challenge stellar evolution models. I will summarize our work on a massive YSO in NGC 3603 including modeling mid-IR interferometric observations, as well as recent sub-mm imaging and spectroscopy with APEX. We find some evidence for a disk in the MIR, resolve multiple cores in the sub-mm with emission line spectra untypical for hot cores. I also report on the derivation of masses and luminosities of a massive O-type supergiant (ζ Orionis) in another star forming region in Orion. The small radial velocity semi-amplitudes coupled with few usable (i.e. wind-free) lines have made this work very challenging and forced us to base the mass determination on a photometric distance estimate. As a rapidly evolving application of interferometry, massive stars have a bright future.

  13. Design of mini-multi-gas monitoring system based on IR absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qiu-lin; Zhang, Wen-dong; Xue, Chen-yang; Xiong, Ji-jun; Ma, You-chun; Wen, Fen

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, a novel non-dispersive infrared ray (IR) gas detection system is described. Conventional devices typically include several primary components: a broadband source (usually an incandescent filament), a rotating chopper shutter, a narrow-band filter, a sample tube and a detector. But we mainly use the mini-multi-channel detector, electrical modulation means and mini-gas-cell structure. To solve the problems of gas accidents in coal mines, and for family safety that results from using gas, this new IR detection system with integration, miniaturization and non-moving parts has been developed. It is based on the principle that certain gases absorb infrared radiation at specific (and often unique) wavelengths. The infrared detection optics principle used in developing this system is mainly analyzed. The idea of multi-gas detection is introduced and guided through the analysis of the single-gas detection. Through researching the design of cell structure, a cell with integration and miniaturization has been devised. By taking a single-chip microcomputer (SCM) as intelligence handling, the functional block diagram of a gas detection system is designed with the analyzing and devising of its hardware and software system. The way of data transmission on a controller area network (CAN) bus and wireless data transmission mode is explained. This system has reached the technology requirement of lower power consumption, mini-volume, wide measure range, and is able to realize multi-gas detection.

  14. Total absorption spectroscopy of N = 51 nucleus 85Se

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, K. C.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Karny, M.; Fialkowska, A.; Wolinska-Cichocka, M.; Rasco, B. C.; Zganjar, E. F.; Johnson, J. W.; Gross, C. J.

    2014-09-01

    An experimental campaign utilizing the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer (MTAS) was conducted at the HRIBF facility in January of 2012. The campaign studied 22 isotopes, many of which were identified as the highest priority for decay heat analysis during a nuclear fuel cycle, see the report by the OECD-IAEA Nuclear Energy Agency in 2007. The case of 85Se will be discussed. 85Se is a Z = 34, N = 51 nucleus with the valence neutron located in the positive parity sd single particle state. Therefore, its decay properties are determined by interplay between first forbidden decays of the valence neutron and Gamow-Teller decay of a 78Ni core. Analysis of the data obtained during the January 2012 run indicates a significant increase of the beta strength function when compared with previous measurements, see Ref..

  15. Monitoring spacecraft atmosphere contaminants by laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.

    1976-01-01

    Laser-based spectrophotometric methods which have been proposed for the detection of trace concentrations of gaseous contaminants include Raman backscattering (LIDAR) and passive radiometry (LOPAIR). Remote sensing techniques using laser spectrometry are presented and in particular a simple long-path laser absorption method (LOLA), which is capable of resolving complex mixtures of closely related trace contaminants at ppm levels is discussed. A number of species were selected for study which are representative of those most likely to accumulate in closed environments, such as submarines or long-duration manned space flights. Computer programs were developed which will permit a real-time analysis of the monitored atmosphere. Estimates of the dynamic range of this monitoring technique for various system configurations, and comparison with other methods of analysis, are given.

  16. The Synthesis and Characterization of a Group of Transition Metal Octabutoxynaphthalocyanines and the Absorption and Emission Properties of the Co, Rh, Ir, Ni, Pd and Pt Members of This Group.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhwan; Soldatova, Alexandra V; Rodgers, Michael A J; Kenney, Malcolm E

    2013-07-01

    The synthesis and photophysical properties of new metallo-octabutoxynaphthalocyanines with Rh(III), Ir(III), and Pt(II) are reported. Various metals were inserted into the metal-free octabutoxynaphthalocyanine and the resultant metal complexes were fully characterized by NMR, UV-vis spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. The absorption and emission properties of these new complexes were also examined and compared to those of Co(II), Ni(II), and Pd(II) octabutoxynaphthalocyanines. The results provide useful information to understand the effect of these transition metals on the properties of this macrocyclic ring. PMID:23745014

  17. The Synthesis and Characterization of a Group of Transition Metal Octabutoxynaphthalocyanines and the Absorption and Emission Properties of the Co, Rh, Ir, Ni, Pd and Pt Members of This Group

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhwan; Soldatova, Alexandra V.; Rodgers, Michael A. J.; Kenney, Malcolm E.

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis and photophysical properties of new metallo-octabutoxynaphthalocyanines with Rh(III), Ir(III), and Pt(II) are reported. Various metals were inserted into the metal-free octabutoxynaphthalocyanine and the resultant metal complexes were fully characterized by NMR, UV-vis spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. The absorption and emission properties of these new complexes were also examined and compared to those of Co(II), Ni(II), and Pd(II) octabutoxynaphthalocyanines. The results provide useful information to understand the effect of these transition metals on the properties of this macrocyclic ring. PMID:23745014

  18. Cryogenic Far-IR Laser Absorptivity Measurements of the Herschel Space Observatory Telescope Mirror Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J.; Klaassen, T. O.; Hovenier, J. N.; Jakob, G.; Poglitsch, A.; Sternberg, O.

    2004-05-01

    Far-infrared laser calorimetry was used to measure the absorptivity, and thus the emissivity, of aluminum-coated silicon carbide mirror samples produced during the coating qualification run of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope to be launched by the European Space Agency in 2007. The samples were measured at 77 Kelvin to simulate the operating temperature of the telescope in its planned orbit around the second Lagrangian point, L2, of the Earth-Sun system. Together, the telescope equilibrium temperature in space and the emissivity of the mirror surfaces will determine the far-infrared/submillimeter background and thus the sensitivity of two of the three astronomical instruments aboard the Observatory, if stray light levels can be kept low relative to the mirror emission. Absorptivities of both clean and dust-contaminated samples were measured at 70, 118, 184 and 496 μ m. Theoretical fits to the data predict absorptivities in the range 0.2 -- 0.4% for the clean sample and 0.2 -- 0.8% for the dusty sample, over the spectral range of the Herschel Space Observatory instruments. This work was funded by the ESA Herschel/Planck Project Office, the Office of Naval Research, and the NASA Herschel/Planck Project Office at JPL.

  19. Characteristics of the complexing of chitosan with sodium dodecyl sulfate, according to IR spectroscopy data and quantum-chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilova, S. V.; Romanova, K. A.; Galyametdinov, Yu. G.; Tret'yakova, A. Ya.; Barabanov, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    The complexing of protonated chitosan with dodecyl sulfate ions in water solutions is studied using IR spectroscopy data and quantum-chemical calculations. It is established that the electrostatic interaction between the protonated amino groups of chitosan and dodecyl sulfate ions is apparent in the IR spectrum as a band at 833 cm-1. The need to consider the effect the solvent has on the formation of hydrogen-bound ion pairs [CTS+ ṡ C12H25O 3 - ] is shown via a quantum-chemical simulation of the equilibrium geometry and the energy characteristics of complexing and hydration.

  20. Examination of the local structure in composite and lowdimensional semiconductor by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Demchenko, I.N.; Piskorska, E.; Wolska,A.; Talik, E.; Zakharov, D.N.; Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2006-09-25

    X-ray absorption methods have been successfully used to obtain quantitative information about local atomic composition of two different materials. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure analysis and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy allowed us to determine seven chemical compounds and their concentrations in c-BN composite. Use of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure in combination with Transmission Electron Microscopy enabled us to determine the composition and size of buried Ge quantum dots. It was found that the quantum dots consisted out of pure Ge core covered by 1-2 monolayers of a layer rich in Si.

  1. Identification of multiple conformers of the ionic liquid [emim][tf2n] in the gas phase using IR/UV action spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Booth, Ryan S; Annesley, Christopher J; Young, Justin W; Vogelhuber, Kristen M; Boatz, Jerry A; Stearns, Jaime A

    2016-06-22

    In this study we investigate the effect of deuteration and molecular beam temperature on the hydrogen bond in the ionic liquid [emim][tf2n]. Using IR/UV double resonance spectroscopy, we probe the microscopic structure of the [emim][tf2n] ion pair and its mono-deuterated, [emim-d1][tf2n], analog. Comparisons of the infrared absorption frequencies between these two species show that there are multiple conformers of the ion pair present in the gas phase and trapped through the molecular beam cooling process. Furthermore, each conformer has a characteristic red shift in the frequency of its C2-H group that reveals the variation in strength of a hydrogen bond between the cation and anion. PMID:27298098

  2. [Novel analysis algorithms for differential optical absorption spectroscopy for pollution monitoring].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Dian; Huang, Xian; Xu, Ke-Xin

    2007-11-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy, or DOAS, is a widely used method to determine concentrations of atmospheric species. The principle of DOAS for measuring the concentration of air pollutants is presented in briefly. Using the linear relationship between the area of the measured differential absorbance curve and that of the differential absorption cross-section curve as taken from the literature, an alternative method for calculating the gas concentration on the basis of the proportionality between differential absorbance and differential absorption cross section of the gas under study was developed. The method can be used on its own for single-component analysis or as a complement to the standard technique in multi-component cases. The procedure can be used with differential absorption cross sections measured in the laboratory or taken from the literature. In addition, the method provides a criterion to discriminate between different species having absorption features in the same wavelength range.

  3. Formation of Random, RIE-Textured Silicon Surfaces with Reduced Reflection and Enhanced Near IR Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    ZAIDI, SALEEM H

    2001-04-01

    The authors have developed novel metal-assisted texturing processes that have led to optically favorable surfaces for solar cells. Large area ({approximately} 200 cm{sup 2}) uniform texturing has been achieved. The physical dimensions of the chamber limited texturing of even larger wafers. Surface contamination and residual RIE-induced damage were removed by incorporation of a complete RCA clean process followed by wet-chemical etching treatments. RIE-textured solar cells with optimized profiles providing performance comparable to the random, wet-chemically etched cells have been demonstrated. A majority of the texture profiles exhibit an enhanced IQE response in the near IR region.using scanning electron microscope measurements, they carried out a detailed analysis of the microstructure of random RIE-textured surfaces. The random microstructure represents a superposition of sub-{micro}m grating structures with a wide distribution of periods, depths, and profiles as determined by the SEM measurements. These structures were modeled using GSOLVER{trademark} software for periodic patterns. The enhanced IR response from random, RIE-textured surfaces is attributed to enhanced coupling of light into the transmitted diffraction orders. These obliquely propagating diffraction orders generate electron-hole pairs closer to the surface, thus, reducing bulk recombination losses relative to a non-scattering, planar surface with identical hemispherical reflection. The optimized texture and damage removal processes have been applied to large area (100--132 cm{sup 2}) multi-crystalline wafers. initial results have demonstrated improved performance relative to planar, control wafers. However, the texture and solar cell fabrication processes require further optimization in the RCA clean, DRE treatments, and emitter formation in order to fully realize the benefits of the low-reflection ({approximately}1-2%) textured surfaces.

  4. Time-Resolved O3 Chemical Chain Reaction Kinetics Via High-Resolution IR Laser Absorption Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulcke, Axel; Blackmon, Brad; Chapman, William B.; Kim, In Koo; Nesbitt, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Excimer laser photolysis in combination with time-resolved IR laser absorption detection of OH radicals has been used to study O3/OH(v = 0)/HO2 chain reaction kinetics at 298 K, (i.e.,(k(sub 1) is OH + 03 yields H02 + 02 and (k(sub 2) is H02 + 03 yields OH + 202). From time-resolved detection of OH radicals with high-resolution near IR laser absorption methods, the chain induction kinetics have been measured at up to an order of magnitude higher ozone concentrations ([03] less than or equal to 10(exp 17) molecules/cu cm) than accessible in previous studies. This greater dynamic range permits the full evolution of the chain induction, propagation, and termination process to be temporally isolated and measured in real time. An exact solution for time-dependent OH evolution under pseudo- first-order chain reaction conditions is presented, which correctly predicts new kinetic signatures not included in previous OH + 03 kinetic analyses. Specifically, the solutions predict an initial exponential loss (chain "induction") of the OH radical to a steady-state level ([OH](sub ss)), with this fast initial decay determined by the sum of both chain rate constants, k(sub ind) = k(sub 1) + k(sub 2). By monitoring the chain induction feature, this sum of the rate constants is determined to be k(sub ind) = 8.4(8) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/molecule/s for room temperature reagents. This is significantly higher than the values currently recommended for use in atmospheric models, but in excellent agreement with previous results from Ravishankara et al.

  5. Absorption and Scattering Coefficients: A Biophysical-Chemistry Experiment Using Reflectance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordon, Gabriela B.; Lagorio, M. Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    A biophysical-chemistry experiment, based on the reflectance spectroscopy for calculating the absorption and scattering coefficients of leaves is described. The results show that different plants species exhibit different values for both the coefficients because of their different pigment composition.

  6. Application of x-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of corrosion and inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, A.J.; Isaacs, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique for determination of valency and coordination. Measurements can be made in air or in situ under electrochemical control. The technique will be described and its application to the analysis of passive oxide films, corrosion products, and inhibitors will be reviewed.

  7. Circuit Board Analysis for Lead by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in a Course for Nonscience Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidenhammer, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    A circuit board analysis of the atomic absorption spectroscopy, which is used to measure lead content in a course for nonscience majors, is being presented. The experiment can also be used to explain the potential environmental hazards of unsafe disposal of various used electronic equipments.

  8. DETERMINING BERYLLIUM IN DRINKING WATER BY GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of beryllium in drinking water has been derived from a method for determining beryllium in urine. Ammonium phosphomolybdate and ascorbic acid were employed as matrix modifiers. The matrix modifiers s...

  9. Gas concentration measurement by optical similitude absorption spectroscopy: methodology and experimental demonstration.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Christophe; Welschinger, Jean-Yves; Cariou, Jean-Pierre; Miffre, Alain; Rairoux, Patrick

    2016-06-13

    We propose a new methodology to measure gas concentration by light-absorption spectroscopy when the light source spectrum is larger than the spectral width of one or several molecular gas absorption lines. We named it optical similitude absorption spectroscopy (OSAS), as the gas concentration is derived from a similitude between the light source and the target gas spectra. The main OSAS-novelty lies in the development of a robust inversion methodology, based on the Newton-Raphson algorithm, which allows retrieving the target gas concentration from spectrally-integrated differential light-absorption measurements. As a proof, OSAS is applied in laboratory to the 2ν3 methane absorption band at 1.66 µm with uncertainties revealed by the Allan variance. OSAS has also been applied to non-dispersive infra-red and the optical correlation spectroscopy arrangements. This all-optics gas concentration retrieval does not require the use of a gas calibration cell and opens new tracks to atmospheric gas pollution and greenhouse gases sources monitoring.

  10. Gas concentration measurement by optical similitude absorption spectroscopy: methodology and experimental demonstration.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Christophe; Welschinger, Jean-Yves; Cariou, Jean-Pierre; Miffre, Alain; Rairoux, Patrick

    2016-06-13

    We propose a new methodology to measure gas concentration by light-absorption spectroscopy when the light source spectrum is larger than the spectral width of one or several molecular gas absorption lines. We named it optical similitude absorption spectroscopy (OSAS), as the gas concentration is derived from a similitude between the light source and the target gas spectra. The main OSAS-novelty lies in the development of a robust inversion methodology, based on the Newton-Raphson algorithm, which allows retrieving the target gas concentration from spectrally-integrated differential light-absorption measurements. As a proof, OSAS is applied in laboratory to the 2ν3 methane absorption band at 1.66 µm with uncertainties revealed by the Allan variance. OSAS has also been applied to non-dispersive infra-red and the optical correlation spectroscopy arrangements. This all-optics gas concentration retrieval does not require the use of a gas calibration cell and opens new tracks to atmospheric gas pollution and greenhouse gases sources monitoring. PMID:27410280

  11. Rapid evaluation and quantitative analysis of thyme, origano and chamomile essential oils by ATR-IR and NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Hartwig; Quilitzsch, Rolf; Krüger, Hans

    2003-12-01

    The essential oils obtained from various chemotypes of thyme, origano and chamomile species were studied by ATR/FT-IR as well as NIR spectroscopy. Application of multivariate statistics (PCA, PLS) in conjunction with analytical reference data leads to very good IR and NIR calibration results. For the main essential oil components (e.g. carvacrol, thymol, γ-terpinene, α-bisabolol and β-farnesene) standard errors are in the range of the applied GC reference method. In most cases the multiple coefficients of determination ( R2) are >0.97. Using the IR fingerprint region (900-1400 cm -1) a qualitative discrimination of the individual chemotypes is possible already by visual judgement without to apply any chemometric algorithms.The described rapid and non-destructive methods can be applied in industry to control very easily purifying, blending and redistillation processes of the mentioned essential oils.

  12. Differentiation of Body Fluid Stains on Fabrics Using External Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Félix; de la Ossa, Ma Ángeles Fernández; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    Body fluids are evidence of great forensic interest due to the DNA extracted from them, which allows genetic identification of people. This study focuses on the discrimination among semen, vaginal fluid, and urine stains (main fluids in sexual crimes) placed on different colored cotton fabrics by external reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) combined with chemometrics. Semen-vaginal fluid mixtures and potential false positive substances commonly found in daily life such as soaps, milk, juices, and lotions were also studied. Results demonstrated that the IR spectral signature obtained for each body fluid allowed its identification and the correct classification of unknown stains by means of principal component analysis (PCA) and soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA). Interestingly, results proved that these IR spectra did not show any bands due to the color of the fabric and no substance of those present in daily life which were analyzed, provided a false positive. PMID:26896150

  13. Aminophenol isomers unraveled by conformer-specific far-IR action spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yatsyna, Vasyl; Bakker, Daniël J; Feifel, Raimund; Rijs, Anouk M; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2016-02-17

    Spectroscopic studies of molecular structure can strongly benefit from extending the conventional mid-IR range to the far-IR and THz regions, as low-frequency molecular vibrations provide unique fingerprints and high sensitivity to intra- and intermolecular interactions. In this work, the gas-phase conformer specific far-IR spectra of aminophenol isomers, recorded in the spectral range of 220-800 cm(-1) at the free-electron laser laboratory FELIX in Nijmegen (the Netherlands), are reported. Many distinct far-IR vibrational signatures which are specific for the molecular structure of the different aminophenol isomers are revealed and assigned. The observed far-IR transitions of the NH2 wagging (inversion) motion have been treated with a double-minimum harmonic well potential model that has enabled us to obtain the inversion barrier values. Moreover, we discuss the limitations and capability of conventional DFT frequency calculations to describe the far-IR vibrational modes. PMID:26854118

  14. Spectrum sensing of trace C(2)H(2) detection in differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Dong, Xiaopeng

    2014-09-10

    An improved algorithm for trace C(2)H(2) detection is presented in this paper. The trace concentration is accurately calculated by focusing on the absorption spectrum from the frequency domain perspective. The advantage of the absorption spectroscopy frequency domain algorithm is its anti-interference capability. First, the influence of the background noise on the minimum detectable concentration is greatly reduced. Second, the time-consuming preprocess of spectra calibration in the differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique is skipped. Experimental results showed the detection limit of 50 ppm is achieved at a lightpath length of 0.2 m. This algorithm can be used in real-time spectrum analysis with high accuracy.

  15. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the basis of hybrid X-pinch radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tilikin, I. N. Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-07-15

    Results of experiments on X-ray absorption spectroscopy carried out at the BIN (270 kA, 100 ns) and XP (450 kA, 45 ns) facilities are presented. Continuum radiation of a Mo hybrid X-pinch was used as probing radiation, against which absorption lines of the plasma of exploded Al wires placed in the return current circuit of a hybrid X-pinch, as well as in a two- and four-wire array, were observed. The experiments have demonstrated that the radiation of a hybrid X-pinch hot spot can be used as probing radiation for X-ray absorption spectroscopy and that, in many parameters, such a source surpasses those on the basis of laser-produced plasma. The plasma parameters in arrays made of two and four Al wires were studied experimentally.

  16. IR-spectroscopy of CO adsorption on mixed-terminated ZnO surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, Maria; Yu, Xiaojuan; Yang, Chengwu; Heißler, Stefan; Nefedov, Alexei; Wang, Yuemin; Wöll, Christof

    2016-10-01

    The adsorption of CO on two different mixed-terminated, single-crystal surfaces of zinc oxide, ZnO(10 1 -0) and ZnO(11 2 -0), was investigated by employing infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) using p- and s-polarized light. For both surfaces, one negative CO band was observed only for p-polarized light, indicating that CO is bound to the surface Zn2 + sites in a nearly upright geometry. In addition, we observed a substantial coverage-induced frequency shift for CO adsorption on both ZnO surfaces. For ZnO(10 1 -0), the ν(C-O) band shows a red shift of 16 cm- 1 when increasing the CO coverage from 0.5 ML (2185 cm- 1) to 1 ML (2169 cm- 1). On the ZnO(11 2 -0) surface, for isolated CO molecules, a frequency of 2192 cm- 1 was detected. The CO band shifts to 2170 cm- 1 at full monolayer. On both surfaces, the coverage-dependent frequency shift is attributed to a combination of dynamic and substrate-mediated static adsorbate-adsorbate interactions.

  17. FT-IR spectroscopy of microorganisms at the Robert Koch Institute: experiences gained during a successful project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, Dieter

    2008-02-01

    The characterization and identification of microorganisms by infrared or Raman spectroscopy is probably one of the best developed and most frequent applications of biomedical vibrational spectroscopy. The serial types of dedicated instruments for routine FT-IR characterizations of microorganisms are now available on the market and already used in routine microbiological laboratories. The experiences gained to date, especially the necessity to define standards for sampling and measurement procedures and the details of how data compatibility between different laboratories is achieve will be discussed as well as the problem to establish validated reference data bases for objective species or strain identifications.

  18. Fatty Acid Chain Length Dependence of Phase Separation Kinetics in Stratum Corneum Models by IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Richard; Rabie, Emann; Walters, Russel M; Flach, Carol R

    2015-07-30

    The main barrier to permeability in human skin resides in the stratum corneum (SC), a layered structure consisting of anucleated, flattened cells (corneocytes) embedded in a heterogeneous lamellar lipid matrix. While lipid structures and packing propensities in the SC and in SC models have been extensively investigated, only limited data are available concerning the kinetics and mechanism of formation of lamellar phases and particular lipid packing motifs. In our prior investigation, kinetic IR spectroscopy measurements probed the temporal sequence of phase separation leading to ordered structures in a three component SC model of equimolar structurally heterogeneous ceramide[NS], chain perdeuterated stearic acid, and cholesterol. In the current work, the phase separation kinetic effects of specific fatty acid chain lengths with a synthetic structurally homogeneous ceramide[NS] in similar ternary mixtures are examined. These are compared with a mixture containing ceramide[NS] with an unsaturated acid chain. The kinetic events are sensitive to the difference in chain lengths between the ceramide acid chain and the fatty acid as well as to the presence of unsaturation in the former. The observed kinetic behaviors span a wide range of phase separation times, ranging from the formation of a solid solution stable for at least 200 h, to a system in which an orthorhombic fatty acid structure is essentially completely formed within the time resolution of the experiment (15 min). The data seem to offer some features of a spinodal phase separation at relatively short times. Overall the approach offers a possible means for addressing several unanswered questions pertinent to skin pharmacology, such as the roles of a wide variety of ceramide and fatty acid species and the design of therapeutic interventions for repair of pathological conditions of the SC.

  19. IGRINS Near-IR High-resolution Spectroscopy of Multiple Jets around LkHα 234

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Heeyoung; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Yuk, In-Soo; Park, Byeong-Gon; Park, Chan; Chun, Moo-Young; Pak, Soojong; Kim, Kang-Min; Sok Oh, Jae; Jeong, Ueejeong; Yu, Young Sam; Lee, Jae-Joon; Kim, Hwihyun; Hwang, Narae; Kaplan, Kyle; Pavel, Michael; Mace, Gregory; Lee, Hye-In; Nguyen Le, Huynh Anh; Lee, Sungho; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of high-resolution near-IR spectroscopy toward the multiple outflows around the Herbig Be star LkHα 234 using the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph. Previous studies indicate that the region around LkHα 234 is complex, with several embedded young stellar objects and the outflows associated with them. In simultaneous H- and K-band spectra from HH 167, we detected 5 [Fe ii] and 14 H2 emission lines. We revealed a new [Fe ii] jet driven by radio continuum source VLA 3B. Position-velocity diagrams of the H2 1-0 S(1) λ2.122 μm line show multiple velocity peaks. The kinematics may be explained by a geometrical bow shock model. We detected a component of H2 emission at the systemic velocity (VLSR = -10.2 km s-1) along the whole slit in all slit positions, which may arise from the ambient photodissociation region. Low-velocity gas dominates the molecular hydrogen emission from knots A and B in HH 167, which is close to the systemic velocity; [Fe ii] emission lines are detected farther from the systemic velocity, at VLSR = -100--130 km s-1. We infer that the H2 emission arises from shocked gas entrained by a high-velocity outflow. Population diagrams of H2 lines imply that the gas is thermalized at a temperature of 2500-3000 K and the emission results from shock excitation. This paper includes data taken at The McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  20. Proteolytically-induced changes of secondary structural protein conformation of bovine serum albumin monitored by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and UV-circular dichroism spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, Günnur; Vorob'ev, Mikhail M.; Vogel, Vitali; Mäntele, Werner

    2016-05-01

    Enzymatically-induced degradation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) by serine proteases (trypsin and α-chymotrypsin) in various concentrations was monitored by means of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and ultraviolet circular dichroism (UV-CD) spectroscopy. In this study, the applicability of both spectroscopies to monitor the proteolysis process in real time has been proven, by tracking the spectral changes together with secondary structure analysis of BSA as proteolysis proceeds. On the basis of the FTIR spectra and the changes in the amide I band region, we suggest the progression of proteolysis process via conversion of α-helices (1654 cm- 1) into unordered structures and an increase in the concentration of free carboxylates (absorption of 1593 and 1402 cm- 1). For the first time, the correlation between the degree of hydrolysis and the concentration of carboxylic groups measured by FTIR spectroscopy was revealed as well. The far UV-CD spectra together with their secondary structure analysis suggest that the α-helical content decreases concomitant with an increase in the unordered structure. Both spectroscopic techniques also demonstrate that there are similar but less spectral changes of BSA for the trypsin attack than for α-chymotrypsin although the substrate/enzyme ratio is taken the same.

  1. Mid-IR Ultra-Deep Spectroscopy of the Cosmic Infrared Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lin; Bertoldi, Frank; Blain, Andrew; Caputi, Karina; Cesarsky, Catherine; Dole, Herve; Draine, Bruce; Fadda, Dario; Flores, Hector; Frayer, Dave; Genzel, Reinhard; Helou, George; Lagache, Guilaine; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Lutz, Dieter; Puget, Jean-Loup; Sajina, Anna; Sanders, Dave; Spoon, Henrik; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2006-05-01

    We propose to obtain low resolution, mid-IR spectra of a sample of 48 galaxies at z~1 and 2 with 24um flux densities between 0.15-0.5mJy in the CDFS. These sub-mJy 24um sources are shown to dominate the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) emission at 70 & 160um (Dole et al. 2006). Their redshift distribution peaks around 1, with a secondary peak at z~2. This implies these sources are LIRGs and ULIRGs at z=1 and 2, respectively. Measurements of IR luminosity functions support these findings and directly show these populations are responsible for more than 70% of the total (UV+IR) luminosity density at z=0.8-2.5. The proposed program is the natural extension of our previous studies of brighter, mJy 24um galaxies. Our primary goal is to characterize the mid-IR spectral properties of the galaxies producing the bulk of CIB. Specifically, we will disentangle the AGN/SB contribution to mid-IR emission, thus constrain the estimate of bolometric luminosities. The proposed spectra, in combination with brighter samples from previous IRS surveys, will allow us to trace the evolution of AGN/SB ratio, strength of PAH emission and mid-IR opacities as a function of L(ir) and z. The deep mid-IR spectra, together with the existing multi-wavelength dataset, will provide the lasting legacy for the astronomical communities for many years to come.

  2. The application of the derivative IR-spectroscopy and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS in the analysis of archaeology resin.

    PubMed

    Zareva, S; Kuleff, I

    2010-07-01

    The applicability of the reducing-difference procedure for the interpretation of the conventional IR-spectroscopy as successful scientific technique for the analysis of ancient and modern resins has been demonstrated. The new temperature tool for modeling of the ancient resin samples has also been shown. The experimental infrared data are supported by the hydride approach of HPLC-MS-MS with ES-ionisation.

  3. The application of the derivative IR-spectroscopy and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS in the analysis of archaeology resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zareva, S.; Kuleff, I.

    2010-07-01

    The applicability of the reducing-difference procedure for the interpretation of the conventional IR-spectroscopy as successful scientific technique for the analysis of ancient and modern resins has been demonstrated. The new temperature tool for modeling of the ancient resin samples has also been shown. The experimental infrared data are supported by the hydride approach of HPLC-MS-MS with ES-ionisation.

  4. Surface relaxation in liquid water and methanol studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Kevin R.; Schaller, R. D.; Co, D. T.; Saykally, R. J.; Rude, Bruce S.; Catalano, T.; Bozek, J. D.

    2002-10-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful probe of local electronic structure in disordered media. By employing extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of liquid microjets, the intermolecular O-O distance has been observed to undergo a 5.9% expansion at the liquid water interface, in contrast to liquid methanol for which there is a 4.6% surface contraction. Despite the similar properties of liquid water and methanol (e.g., abnormal heats of vaporization, boiling points, dipole moments, etc.), this result implies dramatic differences in the surface hydrogen bond structure, which is evidenced by the difference in surface tension of these liquids. This result is consistent with surface vibrational spectroscopy, which indicates both stronger hydrogen bonding and polar ordering at the methanol surface as a consequence of "hydrophobic packing" of the methyl group.

  5. Ultra-soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy: A bulk and surface probe of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.A. ); Mitchell, G.E.; Dekoven, B.M. ); Yeh, A.T.; Gland, J.L. ); Moodenbaugh, A.R. )

    1993-01-01

    Direct comparisons between surface and bulk of diverse materials can be made by simultaneous electron yield (5 nm depth sensitivity) and fluorescence yield (200 nm) ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements utilizing a rapid sample interchange apparatus. For example the orientations of functional groups have been characterized at and near the surface of a series of model polymeric materials highlighting the chemical and molecular sensitivity of ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition we discuss a bulk sensitive use of fluorescence yield to non destructively study a buried metal polymer interface. A second bulk sensitive example is the use of fluorescence yield oxygen K near edge x-ray spectroscopy as a method to determine the hole state density of high Tc materials.

  6. Ultra-soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy: A bulk and surface probe of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.A.; Mitchell, G.E.; Dekoven, B.M.; Yeh, A.T.; Gland, J.L.; Moodenbaugh, A.R.

    1993-06-01

    Direct comparisons between surface and bulk of diverse materials can be made by simultaneous electron yield (5 nm depth sensitivity) and fluorescence yield (200 nm) ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements utilizing a rapid sample interchange apparatus. For example the orientations of functional groups have been characterized at and near the surface of a series of model polymeric materials highlighting the chemical and molecular sensitivity of ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition we discuss a bulk sensitive use of fluorescence yield to non destructively study a buried metal polymer interface. A second bulk sensitive example is the use of fluorescence yield oxygen K near edge x-ray spectroscopy as a method to determine the hole state density of high Tc materials.

  7. [Influence of silver/silicon dioxide on infrared absorption spectroscopy of sodium nitrate].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Ling; Yue, Li; Jia, Zhi-Jun

    2014-09-01

    Quickly detecting of ocean nutrient was one important task in marine pollution monitoring. We discovered the application of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy in the detection of ocean nutrient through researching the evaporation of sodium nitrate solution. The silicon dioxide (SiO2) with highly dispersion was prepared by Stober method, The silver/silica (Ag/SiO2) composite materials were prepared by mixing ammonia solution and silicon dioxide aqueous solution. Three kinds of composite materials with different surface morphology were fabricated through optimizing the experimental parameter and changing the experimental process. The surface morphology, crystal orientation and surface plasmon resonance were investigated by means of the scanning electronic microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Visible absorption spectrum and infrared ab- sorption spectroscopy. The SEM images showed that the sample A was purified SiO2, sample B and sample C were mixture of silver nanoparticle and silicon dioxide, while sample D was completed nanoshell structure. The absorption spectroscopy showed that there was surface plasmon resonance in the UV-visible region, while there was possibility of surface plasmon resonance in the Infrared absorption region. The effect of Ag/SiO2 composite material on the infrared absorption spectra of sodium nitrite solution was investigated through systematically analyzing the infrared absorption spectroscopy of sodium nitrate solution during its evaporation, i. e. the peak integration area of nitrate and the peak integration area of water molecule. The experimental results show that the integration area of nitrate was enhanced greatly during the evaporation process while the integration area of water molecule decreased continuously. The integration area of nitrate comes from the anti-symmetric stretch vibration and the enhancement of the vibration is attributed to the interface effect of Ag/SiO2 which is consistent with Jensen T

  8. [The Diagnostics of Detonation Flow External Field Based on Multispectral Absorption Spectroscopy Technology].

    PubMed

    Lü, Xiao-jing; Li, Ning; Weng, Chun-sheng

    2016-03-01

    Compared with traditional sampling-based sensing method, absorption spectroscopy technology is well suitable for detonation flow diagnostics, since it can provide with us fast response, nonintrusive, sensitive solution for situ measurements of multiple flow-field parameters. The temperature and concentration test results are the average values along the laser path with traditional absorption spectroscopy technology, while the boundary of detonation flow external field is unknown and it changes all the time during the detonation engine works, traditional absorption spectroscopy technology is no longer suitable for detonation diagnostics. The trend of line strength with temperature varies with different absorption lines. By increasing the number of absorption lines in the test path, more information of the non-uniform flow field can be obtained. In this paper, based on multispectral absorption technology, the reconstructed model of detonation flow external field distribution was established according to the simulation results of space-time conservation element and solution element method, and a diagnostic method of detonation flow external field was given. The model deviation and calculation error of the least squares method adopted were studied by simulation, and the maximum concentration and temperature calculation error was 20.1% and 3.2%, respectively. Four absorption lines of H2O were chosen and detonation flow was scanned at the same time. The detonation external flow testing system was set up for the valveless gas-liquid continuous pulse detonation engine with the diameter of 80 mm. Through scanning H2O absorption lines with a high frequency of 10 kHz, the on-line detection of detonation external flow was realized by direct absorption method combined with time-division multiplexing technology, and the reconstruction of dynamic temperature distribution was realized as well for the first time, both verifying the feasibility of the test method. The test results

  9. [The Diagnostics of Detonation Flow External Field Based on Multispectral Absorption Spectroscopy Technology].

    PubMed

    Lü, Xiao-jing; Li, Ning; Weng, Chun-sheng

    2016-03-01

    Compared with traditional sampling-based sensing method, absorption spectroscopy technology is well suitable for detonation flow diagnostics, since it can provide with us fast response, nonintrusive, sensitive solution for situ measurements of multiple flow-field parameters. The temperature and concentration test results are the average values along the laser path with traditional absorption spectroscopy technology, while the boundary of detonation flow external field is unknown and it changes all the time during the detonation engine works, traditional absorption spectroscopy technology is no longer suitable for detonation diagnostics. The trend of line strength with temperature varies with different absorption lines. By increasing the number of absorption lines in the test path, more information of the non-uniform flow field can be obtained. In this paper, based on multispectral absorption technology, the reconstructed model of detonation flow external field distribution was established according to the simulation results of space-time conservation element and solution element method, and a diagnostic method of detonation flow external field was given. The model deviation and calculation error of the least squares method adopted were studied by simulation, and the maximum concentration and temperature calculation error was 20.1% and 3.2%, respectively. Four absorption lines of H2O were chosen and detonation flow was scanned at the same time. The detonation external flow testing system was set up for the valveless gas-liquid continuous pulse detonation engine with the diameter of 80 mm. Through scanning H2O absorption lines with a high frequency of 10 kHz, the on-line detection of detonation external flow was realized by direct absorption method combined with time-division multiplexing technology, and the reconstruction of dynamic temperature distribution was realized as well for the first time, both verifying the feasibility of the test method. The test results

  10. Measurements of the mass absorption cross section of atmospheric soot particles using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordmann, S.; Birmili, W.; Weinhold, K.; Müller, K.; Spindler, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2013-11-01

    Soot particles are a major absorber of shortwave radiation in the atmosphere. The mass absorption cross section is an essential quantity to describe this light absorption process. This work presents new experimental data on the mass absorption cross section of soot particles in the troposphere over Central Europe. Mass absorption cross sections were derived as the ratio between the light absorption coefficient determined by multiangle absorption photometry (MAAP) and the soot mass concentration determined by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman method is sensitive to graphitic structures present in the particle samples and was calibrated in the laboratory using Printex®90 model particles. Mass absorption cross sections were determined for a number of seven observation sites, ranging between 3.9 and 7.4 m2 g-1depending on measurement site and observational period. The highest values were found in a continentally aged air mass in winter, where soot particles were assumed to be mainly internally mixed. Our values are in the lower range of previously reported values, possibly due to instrumental differences to the former photometer and mass measurements. Overall, a value of 5.3m2 g-1from orthogonal regression over all samples is considered to be representative for the soot mass absorption cross section in the troposphere over Central Europe.

  11. Sensing Properties of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Grown in MW Plasma Torch: Electronic and Electrochemical Behavior, Gas Sensing, Field Emission, IR Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Majzlíková, Petra; Sedláček, Jiří; Prášek, Jan; Pekárek, Jan; Svatoš, Vojtěch; Bannov, Alexander G.; Jašek, Ondřej; Synek, Petr; Eliáš, Marek; Zajíčková, Lenka; Hubálek, Jaromír

    2015-01-01

    Vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) with an average diameter below 80 nm and a thickness of the uniform VA-MWCNT layer of about 16 μm were grown in microwave plasma torch and tested for selected functional properties. IR absorption important for a construction of bolometers was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Basic electrochemical characterization was performed by cyclic voltammetry. Comparing the obtained results with the standard or MWCNT‐modified screen-printed electrodes, the prepared VA-MWCNT electrodes indicated their high potential for the construction of electrochemical sensors. Resistive CNT gas sensor revealed a good sensitivity to ammonia taking into account room temperature operation. Field emission detected from CNTs was suitable for the pressure sensing application based on the measurement of emission current in the diode structure with bending diaphragm. The advantages of microwave plasma torch growth of CNTs, i.e., fast processing and versatility of the process, can be therefore fully exploited for the integration of surface-bound grown CNTs into various sensing structures. PMID:25629702

  12. Sensing properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown in MW plasma torch: electronic and electrochemical behavior, gas sensing, field emission, IR absorption.

    PubMed

    Majzlíková, Petra; Sedláček, Jiří; Prášek, Jan; Pekárek, Jan; Svatoš, Vojtěch; Bannov, Alexander G; Jašek, Ondřej; Synek, Petr; Eliáš, Marek; Zajíčková, Lenka; Hubálek, Jaromír

    2015-01-01

    Vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) with an average diameter below 80 nm and a thickness of the uniform VA-MWCNT layer of about 16 µm were grown in microwave plasma torch and tested for selected functional properties. IR absorption important for a construction of bolometers was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Basic electrochemical characterization was performed by cyclic voltammetry. Comparing the obtained results with the standard or MWCNT‑modified screen-printed electrodes, the prepared VA-MWCNT electrodes indicated their high potential for the construction of electrochemical sensors. Resistive CNT gas sensor revealed a good sensitivity to ammonia taking into account room temperature operation. Field emission detected from CNTs was suitable for the pressure sensing application based on the measurement of emission current in the diode structure with bending diaphragm. The advantages of microwave plasma torch growth of CNTs, i.e., fast processing and versatility of the process, can be therefore fully exploited for the integration of surface-bound grown CNTs into various sensing structures. PMID:25629702

  13. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  14. Strong-field induced dissociation dynamics in 1,2-dibromoethane traced by femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterley, A. S.; Lackner, F.; Neumark, D. M.; Leone, S. R.; Gessner, O.

    2016-05-01

    Strong field induced dissociation dynamics of the small haloalkane 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE) have been explored using femtosecond XUV transient absorption spectroscopy. Dynamics are initiated by a near IR pump pulse with intensities between 75 and 220 TW cm-2, and are probed by the atomic site specific XUV absorption of the Br 3d levels. Immediately upon ionization, the spectral signatures of molecular ions appear. These molecular peaks decay in tandem with the appearance of atomic Br peaks in charge states of 0, + 1 and + 2, which are all monitored simultaneously. Neutral Br atoms are eliminated in 300 fs, presumably from statistical dissociation of vibrationally hot DBE+ ions, Br+ ions are eliminated in 70 fs from a more energetic dissociative ionization pathway, and Br++ ions are eliminated within the duration of the 35 fs pump pulse. The simultaneous recording of multiple parent molecule and fragment ion traces enables new insight into predominant dissociation pathways induced by strong field ionization of organic molecules.

  15. Recovery of acetylene absorption line profile basing on tunable diode laser spectroscopy with intensity modulation and photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Thursby, Graham; Stewart, George; Arsad, Norhana; Uttamchandani, Deepak; Culshaw, Brian; Wang, Yiding

    2010-04-01

    A novel and direct absorption line recovery technique based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy with intensity modulation is presented. Photoacoustic spectroscopy is applied for high sensitivity, zero background and efficient acoustic enhancement at a low modulation frequency. A micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) mirror driven by an electrothermal actuator is used for generating laser intensity modulation (without wavelength modulation) through the external reflection. The MEMS mirror with 10μm thick structure material layer and 100nm thick gold coating is formed as a circular mirror of 2mm diameter attached to an electrothermal actuator and is fabricated on a chip that is wire-bonded and placed on a PCB holder. Low modulation frequency is adopted (since the resonant frequencies of the photoacoustic gas cell and the electrothermal actuator are different) and intrinsic high signal amplitude characteristics in low frequency region achieved from measured frequency responses for the MEMS mirror and the gas cell. Based on the property of photoacoustic spectroscopy and Beer's law that detectable sensitivity is a function of input laser intensity in the case of constant gas concentration and laser path length, a Keopsys erbium doped fibre amplifier (EDFA) with opto-communication C band and high output power up to 1W is chosen to increase the laser power. High modulation depth is achieved through adjusting the MEMS mirror's reflection position and driving voltage. In order to scan through the target gas absorption line, the temperature swept method is adopted for the tunable distributed feed-back (DFB) diode laser working at 1535nm that accesses the near-infrared vibration-rotation spectrum of acetylene. The profile of acetylene P17 absorption line at 1535.39nm is recovered ideally for ~100 parts-per-million (ppm) acetylene balanced by nitrogen. The experimental signal to noise ratio (SNR) of absorption line recovery for 500mW laser power was ~80 and hence the

  16. Photocarrier dynamics in anatase TiO{sub 2} investigated by pump-probe absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, H. E-mail: okamotoh@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Matsui, Y.; Uchida, R.; Yada, H.; Terashige, T.; Li, B.-S.; Sawa, A.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.; Okamoto, H. E-mail: okamotoh@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-02-07

    The dynamics of photogenerated electrons and holes in undoped anatase TiO{sub 2} were studied by femtosecond absorption spectroscopy from the visible to mid-infrared region (0.1–2.0 eV). The transient absorption spectra exhibited clear metallic responses, which were well reproduced by a simple Drude model. No mid-gap absorptions originating from photocarrier localization were observed. The reduced optical mass of the photocarriers obtained from the Drude-model analysis is comparable to theoretically expected one. These results demonstrate that both photogenerated holes and electrons act as mobile carriers in anatase TiO{sub 2}. We also discuss scattering and recombination dynamics of photogenerated electrons and holes on the basis of the time dependence of absorption changes.

  17. Communication: IR spectroscopy of neutral transition metal clusters through thermionic emission.

    PubMed

    Lapoutre, Vivike J F; Haertelt, Marko; Meijer, Gerard; Fielicke, André; Bakker, Joost M

    2013-09-28

    The resonant multiple photon excitation of neutral niobium clusters using tunable infrared (IR) radiation leads to thermionic emission. By measuring the mass-resolved ionization yield as a function of IR wavenumber species selective IR spectra are obtained for Nb(n) (n = 5-20) over the 200-350 cm(-1) spectral range. The IR resonance-enhanced multiple photon ionization spectra obtained this way are in good agreement with those measured using IR photodissociation of neutral Nb(n)-Ar clusters. An investigation of the factors determining the applicability of this technique identifies the internal energy threshold towards thermionic emission in combination with a minimum required photon flux that rapidly grows as a function of excitation wavelength.

  18. Far-IR Absorption Features of Titan Aerosol Analogs Produced from Aromatic Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebree, Joshua; Trainer, M. G.; Anderson, C. M.; Loeffler, M. J.

    2012-10-01

    The arrival of the Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn has led to the discovery of benzene (C6H6) at ppm levels, as well as large positive ions in Titan’s atmosphere, tentatively identified as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).[1] The presence of aromatic molecules, which are photolytically active in the ultraviolet, may be an important part of the formation of aerosol particles in Titan’s haze layers, even at these low concentrations. To date, there have been no laboratory experiments in the literature exploring this area of study. The analysis of data from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on-board Cassini has recently uncovered a broad emission feature centered at 140 cm-1 in the far-IR that is unique to the aerosol layers of Titan’s atmosphere.[2] Current optical constants from laboratory-generated aerosol analogs have been unable to reproduce this feature.[3,4] From the broadness of this feature, we speculate that the emission is a blended composite of low-energy vibrations of large molecules such as PAHs and their nitrogen containing counterparts, polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles (PANHs). We hypothesize that the inclusion of trace amounts of aromatic precursors will aid in the production of these large structures in the laboratory-generated aerosols. In this study, we perform UV irradiation of several aromatic precursors, both with and without nitrogen heteroatoms, to understand their influence on the observable characteristics of the aerosol. Measured optical and chemical properties will be compared to those formed from CH4/N2 mixtures [5,6] as well as to those from Cassini observations. [1] Waite, J. H., et al. (2007) Science 316 870-875. [2] Anderson, C.M, et al. (2011) Icarus 212 762-778. [3] Khare, B.N., et al. (1984) Icarus 60 127-137. [4] Imanaka, H., et al. (2012) Icarus 218 247-261. [5] Trainer, M.G., et al. (2006) PNAS 103 18035-18042. [6] Trainer, M.G., et al. (2012) Astrobiology 12 315-326.

  19. Minute Concentration Measurements of Simple Hydrocarbon Species Using Supercontinuum Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jihyung; Traina, Nicholas; Halloran, Michael; Lee, Tonghun

    2016-06-01

    Minute concentration measurements of simple hydrocarbon gases are demonstrated using near-infrared supercontinuum laser absorption spectroscopy. Absorption-based gas sensors, particularly when combined with optical fiber components, can significantly enhance diagnostic capabilities to unprecedented levels. However, these diagnostic techniques are subject to limitations under certain gas sensing applications where interference and harsh conditions dominate. Supercontinuum laser absorption spectroscopy is a novel laser-based diagnostic technique that can exceed the above-mentioned limitations and provide accurate and quantitative concentration measurement of simple hydrocarbon species while maintaining compatibility with telecommunications-grade optical fiber components. Supercontinuum radiation generated using a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber is used to probe rovibrational absorption bands of four hydrocarbon species using full-spectral absorption diagnostics. Absorption spectra of methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2), and ethylene (C2H4) were measured in the near-infrared spectrum at various pressures and concentrations to determine the accuracy and feasibility of the diagnostic strategy. Absorption spectra of propane (C3H8) were subsequently probed between 1650 nm and 1700 nm, to demonstrate the applicability of the strategy. Measurements agreed very well with simulated spectra generated using the HITRAN database as well as with previous experimental results. Absorption spectra of CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 were then analyzed to determine their respective measurement accuracy and detection limit. Concentration measurements integrated from experimental results were in very good agreement with independent concentration measurements. Calculated detection limits of CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure are 0.1%, 0.09%, and 0.17%, respectively. PMID:27091905

  20. [The principle and technical analysis of methane detection using infrared absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yi-Ding; Li, Li; Zheng, Chuan-Tao; An, Yu-Peng; Song, Zhen-Yu

    2008-11-01

    There has been considerable interest recently in methane sensor based on infrared absorption spectroscopy for industrial detection and environment monitoring. The present paper presents the intensites of methane mid-infrared fundamental absorption bands, near-infrared combination band of v2 + 2v3 and overtone band of 2v3, and it was found that the absorption strengths of fundamental bands are two orders of magnitude higher than those of overtone bands and three orders of magnitude higher than those of the combinations. Theoretically, mid-infrared detection system is much better. However, because the near-infrared source and detector are more maturely developed and cheaper, near-infrared technology is widely used. Furthermore, the near-infrared radiation can be transmitted through ordinary low-loss silica fiber, suitable for long-distance methane sensing system, meeting the needs of industrial mining and other aspects. But with the development of mid-infrared detector and high-power high-sensitivity devices, low priced micro sensor modules will be more and more developed. The development of optical methane sensors is reported in this paper. Several detection technologies were investigated such as differential absorption, harmonic detection, cavity spectroscopy enhancement and photoacoustic spectroscopy. The theoretical formula, sensitivity and system structure of these technologies are presented. PMID:19271479

  1. Rapid, Time-Division Multiplexed, Direct Absorption- and Wavelength Modulation-Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Alexander; Witzel, Oliver; Ebert, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We present a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a novel, rapid time multiplexed direct absorption- and wavelength modulation-spectroscopy operation mode. The new technique allows enhancing the precision and dynamic range of a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer without sacrificing accuracy. The spectroscopic technique combines the benefits of absolute concentration measurements using calibration-free direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) with the enhanced noise rejection of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). In this work we demonstrate for the first time a 125 Hz time division multiplexed (TDM-dTDLAS-WMS) spectroscopic scheme by alternating the modulation of a DFB-laser between a triangle-ramp (dTDLAS) and an additional 20 kHz sinusoidal modulation (WMS). The absolute concentration measurement via the dTDLAS-technique allows one to simultaneously calibrate the normalized 2f/1f-signal of the WMS-technique. A dTDLAS/WMS-spectrometer at 1.37 μm for H2O detection was built for experimental validation of the multiplexing scheme over a concentration range from 50 to 3000 ppmV (0.1 MPa, 293 K). A precision of 190 ppbV was achieved with an absorption length of 12.7 cm and an averaging time of two seconds. Our results show a five-fold improvement in precision over the entire concentration range and a significantly decreased averaging time of the spectrometer. PMID:25405508

  2. Determining Concentrations and Temperatures in Semiconductor Manufacturing Plasmas via Submillimeter Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helal, Yaser H.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Ewing, Paul R.; Agarwal, Ankur; Craver, Barry; Stout, Phillip J.; Armacost, Michael D.

    2016-06-01

    Plasmas used in the manufacturing processes of semiconductors are similar in pressure and temperature to plasmas used in studying the spectroscopy of astrophysical species. Likewise, the developed technology in submillimeter absorption spectroscopy can be used for the study of industrial plasmas and for monitoring manufacturing processes. An advantage of submillimeter absorption spectroscopy is that it can be used to determine absolute concentrations and temperatures of plasma species without the need for intrusive probes. A continuous wave, 500 - 750 GHz absorption spectrometer was developed for the purpose of being used as a remote sensor of gas and plasma species. An important part of this work was the optical design to match the geometry of existing plasma reactors in the manufacturing industry. A software fitting routine was developed to simultaneously fit for the background and absorption signal, solving for concentration, rotational temperature, and translational temperature. Examples of measurements made on inductively coupled plasmas will be demonstrated. We would like to thank the Texas Analog Center of Excellence/Semiconductor Research Corporation (TxACE/SRC) and Applied Materials for their support of this work.

  3. Redox Chemisty of Tantalum Clusters on Silica Characterized by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nemana,S.; Gates, B.

    2006-01-01

    SiO{sub 2}-supported clusters of tantalum were synthesized from adsorbed Ta(CH{sub 2}Ph){sub 5} by treatment in H{sub 2} at 523 K. The surface species were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES)) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The EXAFS data show that SiOO{sub 2}-supported tantalum clusters were characterized by a Ta-Ta coordination number of approximately 2, consistent with the presence of tritantalum clusters, on average. When these were reduced in H{sub 2} and reoxidized in O{sub 2}, the cluster nuclearity remained essentially unchanged, although reduction and oxidation occurred, respectively, as shown by XANES and UV-vis spectra; in the reoxidation, the tantalum oxidation state change was approximately two electronic charges per tritantalum cluster. The data demonstrate an analogy between the chemistry of group 5 metals on the SiO{sub 2} support and their chemistry in solution, as determined by the group of Cotton.

  4. High sensitivity ultra-broad-band absorption spectroscopy of inductively coupled chlorine plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Daniil; Foucher, Mickaël; Campbell, Ewen; Brouard, Mark; Chabert, Pascal; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method to measure the densities of vibrationally excited Cl2(v) molecules in levels up to v  =  3 in pure chlorine inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs). The absorption continuum of Cl2 in the 250-450 nm spectral range is deconvoluted into the individual components originating from the different vibrational levels of the ground state, using a set of ab initio absorption cross sections. It is shown that gas heating at constant pressure is the major depletion mechanism of the Cl2 feedstock in the plasma. In these line-integrated absorption measurements, the absorption by the hot (and therefore rarefied) Cl2 gas in the reactor centre is masked by the cooler (and therefore denser) Cl2 near the walls. These radial gradients in temperature and density make it difficult to assess the degree of vibrational excitation in the centre of the reactor. The observed line-averaged vibrational distributions, when analyzed taking into account the radial temperature gradient, suggest that vibrational and translational degrees of freedom in the plasma are close to local equilibrium. This can be explained by efficient vibrational-translational (VT) relaxation between Cl2 and Cl atoms. Besides the Cl2(v) absorption band, a weak continuum absorption is observed at shorter wavelengths, and is attributed to photodetachment of Cl- negative ions. Thus, line-integrated densities of negative ions in chlorine plasmas can be directly measured using broad-band absorption spectroscopy.

  5. On the Use of Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy and Synthetic Calibration Spectra to Quantify Gas Concentrations in a Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst System.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Frank T; Johnson, Natasha M; Nuth, Joseph A

    2015-10-01

    One possible origin of prebiotic organic material is that these compounds were formed via Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) reactions of carbon monoxide and hydrogen on silicate and oxide grains in the warm, inner-solar nebula. To investigate this possibility, an experimental system has been built in which the catalytic efficiency of different grain-analog materials can be tested. During such runs, the gas phase above these grain analogs is sampled using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. To provide quantitative estimates of the concentration of these gases, a technique in which high-resolution spectra of the gases are calculated using the High-Resolution Transmission Molecular Absorption (HITRAN) database is used. Next, these spectra are processed via a method that mimics the processes giving rise to the instrumental line shape of the FT-IR spectrometer, including apodization, self-apodization, and broadening due to the finite resolution. The result is a very close match between the measured and computed spectra. This technique was tested using four major gases found in the FTT reactions: carbon monoxide, methane, carbon dioxide, and water. For the ranges typical of the FTT reactions, the carbon monoxide results were found to be accurate to within 5% and the remaining gases accurate to within 10%. These spectra can then be used to generate synthetic calibration data, allowing the rapid computation of the gas concentrations in the FTT experiments.

  6. On the Use of Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy and Synthetic Calibration Spectra to Quantify Gas Concentrations in a Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Frank T.; Johnson, Natasha M.; Nuth, Joseph A., III

    2015-01-01

    One possible origin of prebiotic organic material is that these compounds were formed via Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) reactions of carbon monoxide and hydrogen on silicate and oxide grains in the warm, inner-solar nebula. To investigate this possibility, an experimental system has been built in which the catalytic efficiency of different grain-analog materials can be tested. During such runs, the gas phase above these grain analogs is sampled using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. To provide quantitative estimates of the concentration of these gases, a technique in which high-resolution spectra of the gases are calculated using the high-resolution transmission molecular absorption (HITRAN) database is used. Next, these spectra are processed via a method that mimics the processes giving rise to the instrumental line shape of the FT-IR spectrometer, including apodization, self-apodization, and broadening due to the finite resolution. The result is a very close match between the measured and computed spectra. This technique was tested using four major gases found in the FTT reactions: carbon monoxide, methane, carbon dioxide, and water. For the ranges typical of the FTT reactions, the carbon monoxide results were found to be accurate to within 5% and the remaining gases accurate to within 10%. These spectra can then be used to generate synthetic calibration data, allowing the rapid computation of the gas concentrations in the FTT experiments.

  7. On the Use of Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy and Synthetic Calibration Spectra to Quantify Gas Concentrations in a Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst System.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Frank T; Johnson, Natasha M; Nuth, Joseph A

    2015-10-01

    One possible origin of prebiotic organic material is that these compounds were formed via Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) reactions of carbon monoxide and hydrogen on silicate and oxide grains in the warm, inner-solar nebula. To investigate this possibility, an experimental system has been built in which the catalytic efficiency of different grain-analog materials can be tested. During such runs, the gas phase above these grain analogs is sampled using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. To provide quantitative estimates of the concentration of these gases, a technique in which high-resolution spectra of the gases are calculated using the High-Resolution Transmission Molecular Absorption (HITRAN) database is used. Next, these spectra are processed via a method that mimics the processes giving rise to the instrumental line shape of the FT-IR spectrometer, including apodization, self-apodization, and broadening due to the finite resolution. The result is a very close match between the measured and computed spectra. This technique was tested using four major gases found in the FTT reactions: carbon monoxide, methane, carbon dioxide, and water. For the ranges typical of the FTT reactions, the carbon monoxide results were found to be accurate to within 5% and the remaining gases accurate to within 10%. These spectra can then be used to generate synthetic calibration data, allowing the rapid computation of the gas concentrations in the FTT experiments. PMID:26449809

  8. Photodissociation of thioglycolic acid studied by femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Attar, Andrew R.; Blumling, Daniel E.; Knappenberger, Kenneth L. Jr.

    2011-01-14

    Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopies were employed to study the photodissociation of both the neutral (HS-CH{sub 2}-COOH) and doubly deprotonated ({sup -}S-CH{sub 2}-COO{sup -}) forms of thioglycolic acid (TGA), a common surface-passivating ligand used in the aqueous synthesis and organization of semiconducting nanostructures. Room temperature UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy indicated strong absorption by the S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} excited states at 250 nm and 185 nm, respectively. The spectrum also contained a weaker absorption band that extended to approximately 550 nm, which was assigned to the {pi}{sub CO}{sup *}(leftarrow)n{sub O} transition. Femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy was performed on TGA using 400 nm excitation and a white-light continuum probe to provide the temporally and spectrally resolved data. Both forms of TGA underwent a photoinduced dissociation from the excited state to form an {alpha}-thiol-substituted acyl radical ({alpha}-TAR, S-CH{sub 2}-CO). For the acidic form of TGA, radical formation occurred with an apparent time constant of 60 {+-} 5 fs; subsequent unimolecular decay took 400 {+-} 60 fs. Similar kinetics were observed for the deprotonated form of TGA (70 {+-} 10 fs radical formation; 420 {+-} 40 fs decay). The production of the {alpha}-TAR was corroborated by the observation of its characteristic optical absorption. Time-resolved data indicated that the photoinduced dissociation of TGA via cleavage of the C-OH bond occurred rapidly ({<=}100 fs). The prevalence of TGA in aqueous semiconducting nanoparticles makes its absorption in the visible spectral region and subsequent dissociation key to understanding the behavior of nanoscale systems.

  9. Infrared-laser spectroscopy using a long-pathlength absorption cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.C.; Briesmeister, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The absorption measurements in an ordinary cell may require typically a few torr pressure of sample gas. At these pressures the absorption lines are usually pressure-broadened and, therefore, closely spaced transitions are poorly resolved even at diode-laser resolution. This situation is greatly improved in Doppler-limited spectroscopy at extremely low sample pressures. Two very long-pathlength absorption cells were developed to be used in conjunction with diode lasers. They were designed to operate at controlled temperatures with the optical pathlength variable up to approx. 1.5 km. Not only very low sample pressures are used for studies with such cells but also the spectroscopic sensitivity is enhanced over conventional methods by a factor of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/, improving the analytical capability of measuring particle densities to the order of 1 x 10'' molecules/cm/sup 3/. This paper presents some analytical aspects of the diode laser spectroscopy using the long-pathlength absorption cells in the areas of absorption line widths, pressure broadening coefficients, isotope composition measurements and trace impurity analysis.

  10. Near-IR spectroscopy of the eruptive variable source V2493 Cyg (HBC 722)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzetti, D.; Efimova, N.; Larionov, V.; Arkharov, A.; Gorshanov, D.; Giannini, T.; Antoniucci, S.; Di Paola, A.

    2012-05-01

    As part of our near-IR spectroscopic monitoring program of EXor pre-Main sequence variables (Lorenzetti et al. 2009 ApJ 693, 1056) on-going at the AZT24 1m IR telescope (Campo Imperatore, Italy), we have recently (2012 May 11) obtained a low resolution (R~250) near-IR spectrum (0.8 - 2.5 μm) of the outbursting source V2493 Cyg (otherwise called HBC 722). Since its outburst in August 2009 (Miller et al.

  11. UV and IR Spectroscopy of Cold H2O(+)-Benzo-Crown Ether Complexes.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Ebata, Takayuki; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2015-11-12

    The H2O(+) radical ion, produced in an electrospray ion source via charge transfer from Eu(3+), is encapsulated in benzo-15-crown-5 (B15C5) or benzo-18-crown-6 (B18C6). We measure UV photodissociation (UVPD) spectra of the (H2O·B15C5)(+) and (H2O·B18C6)(+) complexes in a cold, 22-pole ion trap. These complexes show sharp vibronic bands in the 35 700-37 600 cm(-1) region, similar to the case of neutral B15C5 or B18C6. These results indicate that the positive charge in the complexes is localized on H2O, giving the forms H2O(+)·B15C5 and H2O(+)·B18C6, in spite of the fact that the ionization energy of B15C5 and B18C6 is lower than that of H2O. The formation of the H2O(+) complexes and the suppression of the H3O(+) production through the reaction of H2O(+) and H2O can be attributed to the encapsulation of hydrated Eu(3+) clusters by B15C5 and B18C6. On the contrary, the main fragment ions subsequent to the UV excitation of these complexes are B15C5(+) and B18C6(+) radical ions; the charge transfer occurs from H2O(+) to B15C5 and B18C6 after the UV excitation. The position of the band origin for the H2O(+)·B18C6 complex (36323 cm(-1)) is almost the same as that for Rb(+)·B18C6 (36315 cm(-1)); the strength of the intermolecular interaction of H2O(+) with B18C6 is similar to that of Rb(+). The spectral features of the H2O(+)·B15C5 complex also resemble those of the Rb(+)·B15C5 ion. We measure IR-UV spectra of these complexes in the CH and OH stretching region. Four conformers are found for the H2O(+)·B15C5 complex, but there is one dominant form for the H2O(+)·B18C6 ion. This study demonstrates the production of radical ions by charge transfer from multivalent metal ions, their encapsulation by host molecules, and separate detection of their conformers by cold UV spectroscopy in the gas phase.

  12. Diamond solid state ionization chambers for x-ray absorption spectroscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    De Sio, A.; Bocci, A.; Pace, E.; Castellano, C.; Cinque, G.; Tartoni, N.; D'Acapito, F.

    2008-08-25

    The photoresponse of a diamond detector has been compared with a standard ionization chamber in x-ray absorption spectroscopy applications. A photoconductive device based on a nitrogen-doped single crystal diamond has been tested by synchrotron radiation. Time stability and linearity have been studied by x rays at 10 keV to assess its performances. Finally, extended x-ray absorption fine structure at the Fe K-edge was carried on a standard iron target using both the diamond device and the IC. Spectroscopical results have been compared including references to literature.

  13. Assignment of benzodiazepine UV absorption spectra by the use of photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvostenko, O. G.; Tzeplin, E. E.; Lomakin, G. S.

    2002-04-01

    Correlations between singlet transition energies and energy gaps of corresponding pairs of occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals were revealed in a series of benzodiazepines. The occupied orbital energies were taken from the photoelectron spectra of the compound investigated, the unoccupied ones were obtained from MNDO/d calculations, and the singlet energies were taken from the UV absorption spectra. The correspondence of the singlet transitions to certain molecular orbitals was established using MNDO/d calculations and comparing between UV and photoelectron spectra. It has been concluded that photoelectron spectroscopy can be applied for interpretation of UV absorption spectra of various compounds on the basis of similar correlations.

  14. First calibration measurements of an FTIR absorption spectroscopy system for liquid hydrogen isotopologues for the isotope separation system of fusion power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Groessle, R.; Beck, A.; Bornschein, B.; Fischer, S.; Kraus, A.; Mirz, S.; Rupp, S.

    2015-03-15

    Fusion facilities like ITER and DEMO will circulate huge amounts of deuterium and tritium in their fuel cycle with an estimated throughput of kg per hour. One important capability of these fuel cycles is to separate the hydrogen isotopologues (H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, T{sub 2}, HD, HT, DT). For this purpose the Isotope Separation System (ISS), using cryogenic distillation, as part of the Tritium Enrichment Test Assembly (TRENTA) is under development at Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) has been selected to prove its capability for online monitoring of the tritium concentration in the liquid phase at the bottom of the distillation column of the ISS. The actual research-development work is focusing on the calibration of such a system. Two major issues are the identification of appropriate absorption lines and their dependence on the isotopic concentrations and composition. For this purpose the Tritium Absorption IR spectroscopy experiment has been set up as an extension of TRENTA. For calibration a Raman spectroscopy system is used. First measurements, with equilibrated mixtures of H{sub 2}, D{sub 2} and HD demonstrate that FTIR can be used for quantitative analysis of liquid hydro-gen isotopologues and reveal a nonlinear dependence of the integrated absorbance from the D{sub 2} concentration in the second vibrational branch of D{sub 2} FTIR spectra. (authors)

  15. Rate constant of exciton quenching of Ir(ppy)3 with hole measured by time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Shiho; Sakai, Heisuke; Murata, Hideyuki

    2016-03-01

    We observed the quenching of tris(2-phenylpyridinato)iridium(III) [Ir(ppy)3] excitons by polarons (holes or electrons) by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy to clarify the dynamics of the triplet-polaron quenching of excitons. We employed a hole-only device (HOD) and an electron-only device (EOD), where the emitting layer consists of Ir(ppy)3 doped in 4,4‧-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl. Time-resolved PL spectroscopy of the EOD and HOD were measured under a constant current density. The results showed that the excitons of Ir(ppy)3 were significantly quenched only by holes. The PL decay curves of HOD were well fitted by the biexponential function, where lifetimes (τ1 and τ2) remain unchanged but the coefficient of each exponential term depends on hole current density. From the results, we proposed a model of exciton quenching where the exciton-hole quenching area expands with increasing hole current density. On the basis of the model, the triplet-polaron quenching rate constant Kq was determined.

  16. Metabolic responses of eukaryotic microalgae to environmental stress limit the ability of FT-IR spectroscopy for species identification

    PubMed Central

    Driver, Thomas; Bajhaiya, Amit K.; Allwood, J. William; Goodacre, Royston; Pittman, Jon K.; Dean, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is a robust method for macromolecular analysis and differentiation of microorganisms. However, most studies are performed in controlled conditions and it is unclear whether this tool is appropriate for the identification of eukaryotic microalgae species from variable environments. In order to address this, nine closely-related species of marine and freshwater microalgae were grown under controlled (non-stressed) and variable (non-stressed and stressed) conditions, including nutrient-stressed and wastewater-stressed conditions. Following optimization of data processing methods, FT-IR spectra from all species and conditions were compared. The substantial metabolic changes that were caused by nutrient starvation restricted the ability of FT-IR spectroscopy to differentiate the microalgal species grown under variable conditions efficiently. Comparison of unsupervised and supervised multivariate data analysis methods found that principal component-discriminant function analysis was able best to differentiate between some species under controlled conditions but still gave poor differentiation under variable environmental conditions. PMID:26839765

  17. Electrochemical flowcell for in-situ investigations by soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwanke, C.; Lange, K. M.; Golnak, R.; Xiao, J.

    2014-10-15

    A new liquid flow-cell designed for electronic structure investigations at the liquid-solid interface by soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented. A thin membrane serves simultaneously as a substrate for the working electrode and solid state samples as well as for separating the liquid from the surrounding vacuum conditions. In combination with counter and reference electrodes this approach allows in-situ studies of electrochemical deposition processes and catalytic reactions at the liquid-solid interface in combination with potentiostatic measurements. As model system in-situ monitoring of the deposition process of Co metal from a 10 mM CoCl{sub 2} aqueous solution by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented.

  18. Monitoring the folding kinetics of a β-hairpin by time-resolved IR spectroscopy in silico.

    PubMed

    Daidone, Isabella; Thukral, Lipi; Smith, Jeremy C; Amadei, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Protein folding is one of the most fundamental problems in modern biochemistry. Time-resolved infrared (IR) spectroscopy in the amide I region is commonly used to monitor folding kinetics. However, associated atomic detail information on the folding mechanism requires simulations. In atomistic simulations structural order parameters are typically used to follow the folding process along the simulated trajectories. However, a rigorous test of the reliability of the mechanisms found in the simulations requires calculation of the time-dependent experimental observable, i.e., in the present case the IR signal in the amide I region. Here, we combine molecular dynamics simulation with a mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics theoretical methodology, the Perturbed Matrix Method, in order to characterize the folding of a β-hairpin peptide, through modeling the time-dependence of the amide I IR signal. The kinetic and thermodynamic data (folding and unfolding rate constants, and equilibrium folded- and unfolded-state probabilities) obtained from the fit of the calculated signal are in good agreement with the available experimental data [Xu et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 15388-15394]. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the simulation of the time-resolved IR signal of a complex process occurring on a long (microsecond) time scale.

  19. Monitoring the folding kinetics of a β-hairpin by time-resolved IR spectroscopy in silico.

    PubMed

    Daidone, Isabella; Thukral, Lipi; Smith, Jeremy C; Amadei, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Protein folding is one of the most fundamental problems in modern biochemistry. Time-resolved infrared (IR) spectroscopy in the amide I region is commonly used to monitor folding kinetics. However, associated atomic detail information on the folding mechanism requires simulations. In atomistic simulations structural order parameters are typically used to follow the folding process along the simulated trajectories. However, a rigorous test of the reliability of the mechanisms found in the simulations requires calculation of the time-dependent experimental observable, i.e., in the present case the IR signal in the amide I region. Here, we combine molecular dynamics simulation with a mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics theoretical methodology, the Perturbed Matrix Method, in order to characterize the folding of a β-hairpin peptide, through modeling the time-dependence of the amide I IR signal. The kinetic and thermodynamic data (folding and unfolding rate constants, and equilibrium folded- and unfolded-state probabilities) obtained from the fit of the calculated signal are in good agreement with the available experimental data [Xu et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 15388-15394]. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the simulation of the time-resolved IR signal of a complex process occurring on a long (microsecond) time scale. PMID:25777154

  20. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  1. X-ray absorption spectroscopy beyond the core-hole lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Haemaelaeinen, K.; Hastings, J.B.; Siddons, D.P.; Berman, L.

    1992-10-01

    A new technique to overcome the core-hole lifetime broadening in x-ray absorption spectroscopy is presented. It utilizes a high resolution fluorescence spectrometer which can be used to analyze the fluorescence photon energy with better resolution than the natural lifetime width. Furthermore, the high resolution spectrometer can also be used to select the final state in the fluorescence process which can offer spin selectivity even without long range magnetic order in the sample.

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopy beyond the core-hole lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Haemaelaeinen, K.; Hastings, J.B.; Siddons, D.P.; Berman, L.

    1992-01-01

    A new technique to overcome the core-hole lifetime broadening in x-ray absorption spectroscopy is presented. It utilizes a high resolution fluorescence spectrometer which can be used to analyze the fluorescence photon energy with better resolution than the natural lifetime width. Furthermore, the high resolution spectrometer can also be used to select the final state in the fluorescence process which can offer spin selectivity even without long range magnetic order in the sample.

  3. Narrow-band, tunable, semiconductor-laser-based source for deep-UV absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kliner, D A; Koplow, J P; Goldberg, L

    1997-09-15

    Tunable, narrow-bandwidth (<200-MHz), ~215-nm radiation was produced by frequency quadrupling the ~860-nm output of a high-power, pulsed GaAlAs tapered amplifier seeded by an external-cavity diode laser. Pulsing the amplifier increased the 860 nm?215 nm conversion efficiency by 2 orders of magnitude with respect to cw operation. Detection of nitric oxide and sulfur dioxide by high-resolution absorption spectroscopy was demonstrated. PMID:18188256

  4. Nile blue shows its true colors in gas-phase absorption and luminescence ion spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stockett, M H; Houmøller, J; Brøndsted Nielsen, S

    2016-09-14

    Nile blue is used extensively in biology as a histological stain and fluorescent probe. Its absorption and emission spectra are strongly solvent dependent, with variations larger than 100 nm. The molecule is charged due to an iminium group, and it is therefore an obvious target for gas-phase ion spectroscopy. Here we report the absorption and emission spectra of the mass-selected bare ions isolated in vacuo, and based on our results we revisit the interpretation of solution-phase spectra. An accelerator mass spectrometer was used for absorption spectroscopy where the absorption is represented by the yield of photofragment ions versus excitation wavelength (action spectroscopy). The luminescence experiments were done with a newly built ion trap setup equipped with an electrospray ion source, and some details on the mass selection technique will be given which have not been described before. In vacuo, the absorption and emission maxima are at 580 ± 10 nm and 628 ± 1 nm. These values are somewhat blue-shifted relative to those obtained in most solvents; however, they are much further to the red than those in some of the most non-polar solvents. Furthermore, the Stokes shift in the gas phase (1300 cm(-1)) is much smaller than that in these non-polar solvents but similar to that in polar ones. An explanation based on charge localization by solvent dipoles, or by counterions in some non-polar solvents, can fully account for these findings. Hence in the case of ions, it is nontrivial to establish intrinsic electronic transition energies from solvatochromic shifts alone. PMID:27634256

  5. Nile blue shows its true colors in gas-phase absorption and luminescence ion spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stockett, M H; Houmøller, J; Brøndsted Nielsen, S

    2016-09-14

    Nile blue is used extensively in biology as a histological stain and fluorescent probe. Its absorption and emission spectra are strongly solvent dependent, with variations larger than 100 nm. The molecule is charged due to an iminium group, and it is therefore an obvious target for gas-phase ion spectroscopy. Here we report the absorption and emission spectra of the mass-selected bare ions isolated in vacuo, and based on our results we revisit the interpretation of solution-phase spectra. An accelerator mass spectrometer was used for absorption spectroscopy where the absorption is represented by the yield of photofragment ions versus excitation wavelength (action spectroscopy). The luminescence experiments were done with a newly built ion trap setup equipped with an electrospray ion source, and some details on the mass selection technique will be given which have not been described before. In vacuo, the absorption and emission maxima are at 580 ± 10 nm and 628 ± 1 nm. These values are somewhat blue-shifted relative to those obtained in most solvents; however, they are much further to the red than those in some of the most non-polar solvents. Furthermore, the Stokes shift in the gas phase (1300 cm(-1)) is much smaller than that in these non-polar solvents but similar to that in polar ones. An explanation based on charge localization by solvent dipoles, or by counterions in some non-polar solvents, can fully account for these findings. Hence in the case of ions, it is nontrivial to establish intrinsic electronic transition energies from solvatochromic shifts alone.

  6. Nile blue shows its true colors in gas-phase absorption and luminescence ion spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockett, M. H.; Houmøller, J.; Brøndsted Nielsen, S.

    2016-09-01

    Nile blue is used extensively in biology as a histological stain and fluorescent probe. Its absorption and emission spectra are strongly solvent dependent, with variations larger than 100 nm. The molecule is charged due to an iminium group, and it is therefore an obvious target for gas-phase ion spectroscopy. Here we report the absorption and emission spectra of the mass-selected bare ions isolated in vacuo, and based on our results we revisit the interpretation of solution-phase spectra. An accelerator mass spectrometer was used for absorption spectroscopy where the absorption is represented by the yield of photofragment ions versus excitation wavelength (action spectroscopy). The luminescence experiments were done with a newly built ion trap setup equipped with an electrospray ion source, and some details on the mass selection technique will be given which have not been described before. In vacuo, the absorption and emission maxima are at 580 ± 10 nm and 628 ± 1 nm. These values are somewhat blue-shifted relative to those obtained in most solvents; however, they are much further to the red than those in some of the most non-polar solvents. Furthermore, the Stokes shift in the gas phase (1300 cm-1) is much smaller than that in these non-polar solvents but similar to that in polar ones. An explanation based on charge localization by solvent dipoles, or by counterions in some non-polar solvents, can fully account for these findings. Hence in the case of ions, it is nontrivial to establish intrinsic electronic transition energies from solvatochromic shifts alone.

  7. Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR) Applied to Study the Distribution of Ink Components in Printed Newspapers.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Nuria; Molleda, Cristina; Quintana, Ester; Carbajo, José M; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Villar, Juan C

    2016-09-01

    A new method was developed to study how the oil and cyan pigments of cold-set ink are distributed in newspaper thickness. The methodology involved laboratory printing followed by delamination of the printed paper. The unprinted side, printed side, and resulting layers were analyzed using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR). Three commercial newspapers and black and cyan cold-set inks were chosen for the study. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy enabled the proportion of oil and cyan pigment on the printed surface and throughout the sheet thickness to be measured. Oil percentage was evaluated as the area increment of the region from 2800 cm(-1) to 3000 cm(-1) The relative amount of cyan pigment was determined as the area of the absorption band at 730 cm(-1) The ink oil was found mainly below half the paper thickness, whereas the pigment was detected at the layers closer to the printed surface, at a depth penetration of less than 15 µm (20% of thickness). Distribution of these two components in paper thickness depended on the type of cold-set ink, the amount of ink transferred, and the newspaper properties. PMID:27129363

  8. Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR) Applied to Study the Distribution of Ink Components in Printed Newspapers.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Nuria; Molleda, Cristina; Quintana, Ester; Carbajo, José M; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Villar, Juan C

    2016-09-01

    A new method was developed to study how the oil and cyan pigments of cold-set ink are distributed in newspaper thickness. The methodology involved laboratory printing followed by delamination of the printed paper. The unprinted side, printed side, and resulting layers were analyzed using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR). Three commercial newspapers and black and cyan cold-set inks were chosen for the study. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy enabled the proportion of oil and cyan pigment on the printed surface and throughout the sheet thickness to be measured. Oil percentage was evaluated as the area increment of the region from 2800 cm(-1) to 3000 cm(-1) The relative amount of cyan pigment was determined as the area of the absorption band at 730 cm(-1) The ink oil was found mainly below half the paper thickness, whereas the pigment was detected at the layers closer to the printed surface, at a depth penetration of less than 15 µm (20% of thickness). Distribution of these two components in paper thickness depended on the type of cold-set ink, the amount of ink transferred, and the newspaper properties.

  9. X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF YB3+-DOPED OPTICAL FIBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Citron, Robert; Kropf, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Optical fibers doped with Ytterbium-3+ have become increasingly common in fiber lasers and amplifiers. Yb-doped fibers provide the capability to produce high power and short pulses at specific wavelengths, resulting in highly effective gain media. However, little is known about the local structure, distribution, and chemical coordination of Yb3+ in the fibers. This information is necessary to improve the manufacturing process and optical qualities of the fibers. Five fibers doped with Yb3+ were studied using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), in addition to Yb3+ mapping. The Yb3+ distribution in each fiber core was mapped with 2D and 1D intensity scans, which measured X-ray fluorescence over the scan areas. Two of the five fibers examined showed highly irregular Yb3+ distributions in the core center. In four of the five fibers Yb3+ was detected outside of the given fiber core dimensions, suggesting possible Yb3+ diffusion from the core, manufacturing error, or both. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis has so far proven inconclusive, but did show that the fibers had differing EXAFS spectra. The Yb3+ distribution mapping proved highly useful, but additional modeling and examination of fiber preforms must be conducted to improve XAS analysis, which has been shown to have great potential for the study of similar optical fi bers.

  10. X-ray microprobe for micro x-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopies at GSECARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newville, M.; Sutton, S.; Rivers, M.

    2002-12-01

    The hard x-ray microprobe for x-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy at GeoSoilEnviroCARS is presented. Using focused synchrotron radiation from an undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Lab, the x-ray microprobe provides bright, monochromatic x-rays with typical spot sizes down to 1x1 μm for x-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopies. Quantitative x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis gives precise elemental composition and correlations, while x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) gives the chemical state and local atomic coordination for a selected atomic species. These two techniques can be used in conjunction with one another on a wide range of samples, including minerals, glasses, fluid inclusions, soils, sediments, and plant tissue. This x-ray microprobe is part of the GeoSoilEnviroCARS user facility, available for use in all areas geological, soil, and environmental sciences, and selected examples from these fields will be given.

  11. Crystal and molecular structure of norspermine copper(II) sulphate trihydrate studied by X-ray and IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkowska, A.; Małuszyńska, H.

    1999-09-01

    The title compound [Cu(C 9H 18N 4)]SO 4·3H 2O [A] was studied by X-ray and IR spectroscopy. It crystallises as monoclinic, in the space group P2 1/c with a=9.719(2), b=13.470(3), c=12.865(3) Å, β=95.36(3) and Z=4. The copper atom is five-coordinated with four nitrogen atoms and one oxygen atom from the sulphate group, forming a tricyclic chelated norspermine complex consisting of three six-membered rings, one of which is disordered. The amine groups from norspermine are hydrogen bonded to the sulphate anions. The water molecules of crystallisation form infinite (H 2O) n chains and through the sulphate anions link the norspermine complexes in the three-dimensional hydrogen bond network. The FT-IR spectra before and after dehydration of [A] confirm the X-ray results.

  12. Synthesis and selective IR absorption properties of iminodiacetic-acid intercalated MgAl-layered double hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lijing; Xu Xiangyu; Evans, David G.; Duan Xue; Li Dianqing

    2010-05-15

    An MgAl-NO{sub 3}-layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursor has been prepared by a method involving separate nucleation and aging steps (SNAS). Reaction with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) under weakly acidic conditions led to the replacement of the interlayer nitrate anions by iminodiacetic acid anions. The product was characterized by XRD, FT-IR, TG-DTA, ICP, elemental analysis and SEM. The results show that the original interlayer nitrate anions of LDHs precursor were replaced by iminodiacetic acid anions and that the resulting intercalation product MgAl-IDA-LDH has an ordered crystalline structure. MgAl-IDA-LDH was mixed with low density polyethylene (LDPE) using a masterbatch method. LDPE films filled with MgAl-IDA-LDH showed a higher mid to far infrared absorption than films filled with MgAl-CO{sub 3}-LDH in the 7-25 {mu}m range, particularly in the key 9-11 {mu}m range required for application in agricultural plastic films. - Graphical abstract: Intercalation of iminodiacetic acid (IDA) anions in a MgAl-NO{sub 3}-layered double hydroxide host leads to an enhancement of its infrared absorbing ability for application in agricultural plastic films.

  13. Absorption spectroscopy setup for determination of whole human blood and blood-derived materials spectral characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, M. S.; Gnyba, M.; Milewska, D.; Mitura, K.; Karpienko, K.

    2015-09-01

    A dedicated absorption spectroscopy system was set up using tungsten-halogen broadband source, optical fibers, sample holder, and a commercial spectrometer with CCD array. Analysis of noise present in the setup was carried out. Data processing was applied to the absorption spectra to reduce spectral noise, and improve the quality of the spectra and to remove the baseline level. The absorption spectra were measured for whole blood samples, separated components: plasma, saline, washed erythrocytes in saline and human whole blood with biomarkers - biocompatible nanodiamonds (ND). Blood samples had been derived from a number of healthy donors. The results prove a correct setup arrangement, with adequate preprocessing of the data. The results of blood-ND mixtures measurements show no toxic effect on blood cells, which proves the NDs as a potential biocompatible biomarkers.

  14. Deep ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy: A resonance-absorption trade-off illustrated by diluted liquid benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, C. T.; Willitsford, A. H.; Philbrick, C. R.; Hallen, H. D.

    2015-12-01

    The magnitude of resonance Raman intensity, in terms of the real signal level measured on-resonance compared to the signal level measured off-resonance for the same sample, is investigated using a tunable laser source. Resonance Raman enhancements, occurring as the excitation energy is tuned through ultraviolet absorption lines, are used to examine the 1332 cm-1 vibrational mode of diamond and the 992 cm-1 ring-breathing mode of benzene. Competition between the wavelength dependent optical absorption and the magnitude of the resonance enhancement is studied using measured signal levels as a function of wavelength. Two system applications are identified where the resonance Raman significantly increases the real signal levels despite the presence of strong absorption: characterization of trace species in laser remote sensing and spectroscopy of the few molecules in the tiny working volumes of near-field optical microscopy.

  15. Identification of different forms of cocaine and substances used in adulteration using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Penido, Ciro A F O; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu T; Zângaro, Renato A; Silveira, Landulfo

    2015-01-01

    Identification of cocaine and subsequent quantification immediately after seizure are problems for the police in developing countries such as Brazil. This work proposes a comparison between the Raman and FT-IR techniques as methods to identify cocaine, the adulterants used to increase volume, and possible degradation products in samples seized by the police. Near-infrared Raman spectra (785 nm excitation, 10 sec exposure time) and FT-IR-ATR spectra were obtained from different samples of street cocaine and some substances commonly used as adulterants. Freebase powder, hydrochloride powder, and crack rock can be distinguished by both Raman and FT-IR spectroscopies, revealing differences in their chemical structure. Most of the samples showed characteristic peaks of degradation products such as benzoylecgonine and benzoic acid, and some presented evidence of adulteration with aluminum sulfate and sodium carbonate. Raman spectroscopy is better than FT-IR for identifying benzoic acid and inorganic adulterants in cocaine. PMID:25428273

  16. The potential of UV-VIS-NIR absorption spectroscopy in glass studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulebroeck, Wendy; Baert, Kitty; Ceglia, Andrea; Cosyns, Peter; Wouters, Hilde; Nys, Karin; Terryn, Herman; Thienpont, Hugo

    Absorption spectroscopy is the technique that measures the absorption of radiation as a function of wavelength, due to its interaction with the material. During a research project funded by our home university, we were able to investigate the possibilities of this technique to study ancient glasses. One of our main conclusions is that UV-VIS-NIR absorption spectroscopy is especially suited to characterize colored artifacts in terms of composition and furnace conditions. Moreover, for naturally colored window glasses, we have shown that this technique allows us to classify fragments based on differences in iron impurity levels. It is a semi-quantitative analysis tool that can be applied for a first-line analysis of (large) glass collections. Thanks to the commercial available portable instruments, these measurements can be performed at relative high speed and this in-situ if necessary. To illustrate the possibilities of this technique, we describe in this paper two case-studies. In a first test-case we analyze 63 naturally colored window glasses and demonstrate how groups with different iron concentrations can be identified by calculating the absorption edge position from the measured optical spectrum. In a second case-study 8 modern naturally colored and 31 intentionally colored Roman glass fragments are the point of focus. For these samples we first estimate which samples are potentially fabricated under the same furnace conditions. This is done based on the calculated color values. Finally we identify the type of applied colorants.

  17. Conformational Analysis of R-(+)-3-METHYLCYCLOPENTANONE by IR Spectroscopy in Para-Hydrogen Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Basheer, Watheq; Toh, Shin Yi; Miyazaki, Jun; Momose, Takamasa

    2014-06-01

    Para-hydrogen (pH_2) soft quantum crystal is an ideal isolation matrix due to its impressive intrinsic properties, i.e. its significant lattice constant, large zero-point vibration as well as its ability to repair itself of crystal defects. To investigate molecular conformation of a chiral ketone, IR spectra of R-(+)-3-methylcyclopentanone (R3MCP), hosted in pH_2 crystal, were recorded as a function of sample concentration and host pH_2 crystal temperature over the low deposition range {3.5-6.0K}. IR spectra of R3MCP in pH_2 crystal will be presented and compared against corresponding spectra in Ar matrix as well as IR spectra of the neat crystalline R3MCP at low deposition temperatures. Furthermore, density functional theory calculations of simulated IR spectra for the optimized geometries of R3MCP, equatorial-methyl and axial-methyl conformers are compared against experimental spectra for the purpose of investigating molecular conformation. Upon comparison between theoretical and experimental IR spectra, vibrational modes arising from equatorial and axial conformers have been successfully assigned and related to the individual conformer's structure.

  18. Fourier transform two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy using an octave-spanning mid-IR probe.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, James D; Courtney, Trevor L; Balasubramanian, Madhumitha; Khalil, Munira

    2016-06-15

    The development of coherent Fourier transform two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2D EV) spectroscopy with acousto-optic pulse-shaper-generated near-UV pump pulses and an octave-spanning broadband mid-IR probe pulse is detailed. A 2D EV spectrum of a silicon wafer demonstrates the full experimental capability of this experiment, and a 2D EV spectrum of dissolved hexacyanoferrate establishes the viability of our 2D EV experiment for studying condensed phase molecular ensembles. PMID:27304316

  19. Theory of dynamic absorption spectroscopy of nonstationary states. 4. Application to 12-fs resonant impulsive Raman spectroscopy of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, W.T.; Peteanu, L.A.; Mathies, R.A.

    1992-07-23

    A time-dependent theory for femtosecond dynamic absorption spectroscopy is used to describe the creation and observation of molecular ground-state vibrational coherence through the resonance impulsive stimulated Raman mechanism. Model calculations show that the oscillatory absorption signal that arises from this ground-state coherence is maximized for a limited range of pulse lengths and that there is a complex relationship between the probe wavelength and the strength of the spectral oscillations. The generalized time-dependent linear susceptibility of the nonstationary system created by the impulsive pump pulse is defined and used to discuss the strong dependence of the measured signals on the properties of the probe pulse. Finally, calculations are presented to analyze the high-frequency oscillations ({approximately}20-fs period) recently observed in the transient absorption spectra of light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin (BR{sub 568}) following excitation with a 12-fs optical pulse. At the probe wavelengths used in this experiment, the contribution of stimulated emission is negligible at long times because of the extremely rapid excited-state isomerization; as a result, the spectral oscillations observed after this time are due to the impulsive excitation of coherent vibrations in the ground state. The transient response observed for BR{sub 568} is calculated using a 29-mode harmonic potential surface derived from a prior resonance Raman intensity analysis. Both the oscillatory signals and their dependence on the probe wavelength are satisfactorily reproduced. 68 refs., 11 figs.

  20. A split imaging spectrometer for temporally and spatially resolved titanium absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hager, J D; Lanier, N E; Kline, J L; Flippo, K A; Bruns, H C; Schneider, M; Saculla, M; McCarville, T

    2014-11-01

    We present a temporally and a spatially resolved spectrometer for titanium x-ray absorption spectroscopy along 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight. Each line-of-sight of the instrument uses an elliptical crystal to acquire both the 2p and 3p Ti absorption lines on a single, time gated channel of the instrument. The 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight allow the 2p and 3p absorption features to be measured through the same point in space using both channels of the instrument. The spatially dependent material temperature can be inferred by observing the 2p and the 3p Ti absorption features. The data are recorded on a two strip framing camera with each strip collecting data from a single line-of-sight. The design is compatible for use at both the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility. The spectrometer is intended to measure the material temperature behind a Marshak wave in a radiatively driven SiO2 foam with a Ti foam tracer. In this configuration, a broad band CsI backlighter will be used for a source and the Ti absorption spectrum measured. PMID:25430177

  1. A split imaging spectrometer for temporally and spatially resolved titanium absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, J. D. Lanier, N. E.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Bruns, H. C.; Schneider, M.; Saculla, M.; McCarville, T.

    2014-11-15

    We present a temporally and a spatially resolved spectrometer for titanium x-ray absorption spectroscopy along 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight. Each line-of-sight of the instrument uses an elliptical crystal to acquire both the 2p and 3p Ti absorption lines on a single, time gated channel of the instrument. The 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight allow the 2p and 3p absorption features to be measured through the same point in space using both channels of the instrument. The spatially dependent material temperature can be inferred by observing the 2p and the 3p Ti absorption features. The data are recorded on a two strip framing camera with each strip collecting data from a single line-of-sight. The design is compatible for use at both the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility. The spectrometer is intended to measure the material temperature behind a Marshak wave in a radiatively driven SiO{sub 2} foam with a Ti foam tracer. In this configuration, a broad band CsI backlighter will be used for a source and the Ti absorption spectrum measured.

  2. [Study on removing the lamp spectrum structure in differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiao-ying; Li, Yu-jin

    2010-11-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique has been used to measure trace gases in the atmosphere by their strongly structured absorption of radiation in the UV and visible spectral range, and nowadays this technique has been widely utilized to measure trace polluted gases in the atmosphere e.g. SO2, NO2, O3, HCHO, etc. However, there exists lamp (xenon lamp or deuteriumlamp) spectrum structure in the measured band (300-700 nm) of the absorption spectra of atmosphere, which badly impacts on precision of retrieving the concentration of trace gases in the atmosphere. People home and abroad generally employ two ways to handle this problem, one is segmenting band retrieving method, another is remedial retrieving method. In the present paper, a new retrieving method to deal with this trouble is introduced. The authors used moving-window average smoothing method to obtain the slow part of the absorption spectra of atmosphere, then achieved the lamp (xenon lamp in the paper) spectrum structure in the measured band of the absorption spectra of atmosphere. The authors analyzed and retrieved the measured spectrum of the atmosphere, and the result is better than the forenamed ways. Chi-square of residuum is 2.995 x 10(-4), and this method was proved to be able to avoid shortcoming of choosing narrowband and disadvantage of discovering the new component of atmosphere in retrieving the concentration of air pollutants and measuring the air pollutants. PMID:21284148

  3. Complex formation in liquid diethyl ether-chloroform mixtures examined by 2D correlation MID-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsyk, Andrii; Ilchenko, Oleksii; Pilgun, Yuriy; Obukhovsky, Vyacheslav; Nikonova, Viktoria

    2016-11-01

    Molecular complexes formation in diethyl ether-chloroform liquid solution is investigated by Mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy. The spectra were measured in spectral ranges of 1000-1550 cm-1 and 2650-3100 cm-1. 2D correlation analysis of spectral data indicates the presence of a third component in the solution. Excess spectroscopy shows that maximum of complex concentration is concentrated at around of 55% (vol.) of diethyl ether. 2D codistribution analysis supports such conclusion and provides the order of species distribution. Three-components MCR decomposition of spectral data was performed for the determination of concentration and spectral profiles of mixture components. Spectral transformations due to intermolecular interactions are in full agreement with those calculated according to density functional theory with B3LYP functional and cc-pVTz basis set for the case of equimolecular complex.

  4. Organic Spectroscopy Laboratory: Utilizing IR and NMR in the Identification of an Unknown Substance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glagovich, Neil M.; Shine, Timothy D.

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that emphasizes the interpretation of both infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra in the elucidation of the structure of an unknown compound was developed. The method helps students determine [to the first power]H- and [to the thirteenth power]C-NMR spectra from the structures of compounds and to…

  5. Use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the search for the best LIGO mirror coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Stephen C.

    2008-03-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) seeks to improve its sensitivity for gravity-wave detection by a factor of ten during its next phase of operation, Advanced LIGO. In order to achieve this goal it is necessary to design and fabricate test mass mirrors that help minimize the noise in the interferometers and in doing so maximize gravity-wave detection capability. In this talk we will present recent results from our program of X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements to obtain detailed chemical composition and structure of titania (TiO2)-doped tantala (Ta2O5) multilayers fabricated via ion beam sputtering on SiO2 substrates. Our investigations focus on how the microscopic features of the coatings influence their macroscopic mechanical loss properties. Our goal is to obtain correlations between chemical impurities and/or dopants and the optical absorption and mechanical loss characteristics of these multilayer coatings. To examine our samples we use synchrotron-based X-ray absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) techniques including Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS), X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). We present chemical and structural data obtained at the titanium K-edge and tantalum LIII-edge as well as relative elemental distribution information (Ti/Ta, Fe/Ta, and Cr/Ta) obtained via XRF. Following a brief description of the LIGO experiment, our program of research in optical materials for use in advanced versions of the interferometer will be described.

  6. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesinger, R.; Schade, U.; Kleber, Ch.; Schreiner, M.

    2014-06-15

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations.

  7. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes.

    PubMed

    Wiesinger, R; Schade, U; Kleber, Ch; Schreiner, M

    2014-06-01

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations.

  8. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesinger, R.; Schade, U.; Kleber, Ch.; Schreiner, M.

    2014-06-01

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations.

  9. Triosmium clusters on a support: determination of structure by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mehraeen, Shareghe; Kulkarni, Apoorva; Chi, Miaofang; Reed, Bryan W; Okamoto, Norihiko L; Browning, Nigel D; Gates, Bruce C

    2011-01-17

    The structures of small, robust metal clusters on a solid support were determined by a combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods: extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and aberration-corrected STEM. The samples were synthesized from [Os(3) (CO)(12) ] on MgO powder to provide supported clusters intended to be triosmium. The results demonstrate that the supported clusters are robust in the absence of oxidants. Conventional high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) STEM images demonstrate a high degree of uniformity of the clusters, with root-mean-square (rms) radii of 2.03±0.06 Å. The EXAFS OsOs coordination number of 2.1±0.4 confirms the presence of triosmium clusters on average and correspondingly determines an average rms cluster radius of 2.02±0.04 Å. The high-resolution STEM images show the individual Os atoms in the clusters, confirming the triangular structures of their frames and determining OsOs distances of 2.80±0.14 Å, matching the EXAFS value of 2.89±0.06 Å. IR and EXAFS spectra demonstrate the presence of CO ligands on the clusters. This set of techniques is recommended as optimal for detailed and reliable structural characterization of supported clusters. PMID:21226118

  10. Triosmium Clusters on a Support: Determination of Structure by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy and High-Resolution Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shareghe, Mehraeen; Chi, Miaofang; Browning, Nigel D.

    2011-01-01

    The structures of small, robust metal clusters on a solid support were determined by a combination of spectroscopic and microscopic methods: extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and aberration-corrected STEM. The samples were synthesized from [Os{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}] on MgO powder to provide supported clusters intended to be triosmium. The results demonstrate that the supported clusters are robust in the absence of oxidants. Conventional high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) STEM images demonstrate a high degree of uniformity of the clusters, with root-mean-square (rms) radii of 2.03 {+-} 0.06 {angstrom}. The EXAFS OsOs coordination number of 2.1 {+-} 0.4 confirms the presence of triosmium clusters on average and correspondingly determines an average rms cluster radius of 2.02 {+-} 0.04 {angstrom}. The high-resolution STEM images show the individual Os atoms in the clusters, confirming the triangular structures of their frames and determining OsOs distances of 2.80 {+-} 0.14 {angstrom}, matching the EXAFS value of 2.89 {+-} 0.06 {angstrom}. IR and EXAFS spectra demonstrate the presence of CO ligands on the clusters. This set of techniques is recommended as optimal for detailed and reliable structural characterization of supported clusters.

  11. Classification of edible oils and modeling of their physico-chemical properties by chemometric methods using mid-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Aderval S.; da Silva, Arnaldo P.; Ferré, Joan; Boqué, Ricard

    This research work describes two studies for the classification and characterization of edible oils and its quality parameters through Fourier transform mid infrared spectroscopy (FT-mid-IR) together with chemometric methods. The discrimination of canola, sunflower, corn and soybean oils was investigated using SVM-DA, SIMCA and PLS-DA. Using FT-mid-IR, DPLS was able to classify 100% of the samples from the validation set, but SIMCA and SVM-DA were not. The quality parameters: refraction index and relative density of edible oils were obtained from reference methods. Prediction models for FT-mid-IR spectra were calculated for these quality parameters using partial least squares (PLS) and support vector machines (SVM). Several preprocessing alternatives (first derivative, multiplicative scatter correction, mean centering, and standard normal variate) were investigated. The best result for the refraction index was achieved with SVM as well as for the relative density except when the preprocessing combination of mean centering and first derivative was used. For both of quality parameters, the best results obtained for the figures of merit expressed by the root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) and prediction (RMSEP) were equal to 0.0001.

  12. Surface arsenic speciation of a drinking-water treatment residual using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Parsons, Jason G; Datta, Rupali; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2007-07-15

    Drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs) present a low-cost geosorbent for As-contaminated waters and soils. Previous work has demonstrated the high affinity of WTRs for As, but data pertaining to the stability of sorbed As is missing. Sorption/desorption and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), both XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) studies, were combined to determine the stability of As sorbed by an Fe-based WTR. Arsenic(V) and As(III) sorption kinetics were biphasic in nature, sorbing >90% of the initial added As (15,000 mg kg(-1)) after 48 h of reaction. Subsequent desorption experiments with a high P load (7500 mg kg(-1)) showed negligible As desorption for both As species, approximately <3.5% of sorbed As; the small amount of desorbed As was attributed to the abundance of sorption sites. XANES data showed that sorption kinetics for either As(III) or As(V) initially added to solution had no effect on the sorbed As oxidation state. EXAFS spectroscopy suggested that As added either as As(III) or as As(V) formed inner-sphere mononuclear, bidentate complexes, suggesting the stability of the sorbed As, which was further corroborated by the minimum As desorption from the Fe-WTR.

  13. High Speed H2O Concentration Measurements Using Absorption Spectroscopy to Monitor Exhaust Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kranendonk, Laura; Parks, II, James E; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y; Partridge Jr, William P

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential for fast absorption spectroscopy measurements in diesel-engine exhaust to track H2O concentration transients. Wavelength-agile absorption spectroscopy is an optical technique that measures broadband absorption spectra between 10kHz and 100 MHz. From these measured spectra, gas temperature and absorber concentration can be determined. The Fourier-domain mode-locking (FDML) laser is becoming recognized as one of the most robust and reliable wavelength-agile sources available. H2O concentration measurements during combustion events at crank angle resolved speeds are beneficial for a wide variety of applications, such as product improvements for industry, control and reliability checks for experimental researchers, and measures of fit for numerical simulations. The difficulties associated with measuring diesel exhaust compared to in-cylinder measurements are discussed. A full description of the experimental configuration and data processing is explained. Measurements of engine exhaust H2O transients with 10- s temporal resolution are presented for a range of engine conditions.

  14. [Signal analysis and spectrum distortion correction for tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy system].

    PubMed

    Bao, Wei-Yi; Zhu, Yong; Chen, Jun; Chen, Jun-Qing; Liang, Bo

    2011-04-01

    In the present paper, the signal of a tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) trace gas sensing system, which has a wavelength modulation with a wide range of modulation amplitudes, is studied based on Fourier analysis method. Theory explanation of spectrum distortion induced by laser intensity amplitude modulation is given. In order to rectify the spectrum distortion, a method of synchronous amplitude modulation suppression by a variable optical attenuator is proposed. To validate the method, an experimental setup is designed. Absorption spectrum measurement experiments on CO2 gas were carried out. The results show that the residual laser intensity modulation amplitude of the experimental system is reduced to -0.1% of its original value and the spectrum distortion improvement is 92% with the synchronous amplitude modulation suppression. The modulation amplitude of laser intensity can be effectively reduced and the spectrum distortion can be well corrected by using the given correction method and system. By using a variable optical attenuator in the TDLAS (tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy) system, the dynamic range requirements of photoelectric detector, digital to analog converter, filters and other aspects of the TDLAS system are reduced. This spectrum distortion correction method can be used for online trace gas analyzing in process industry.

  15. Excited state X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Probing both electronic and structural dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Simon P.; Averbukh, Vitali; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of X-ray absorption spectra, simulated using a general method, to properties of molecular excited states. Recently, Averbukh and co-workers [M. Ruberti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 184107 (2014)] introduced an efficient and accurate L 2 method for the calculation of excited state valence photoionization cross-sections based on the application of Stieltjes imaging to the Lanczos pseudo-spectrum of the algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) representation of the electronic Hamiltonian. In this paper, we report an extension of this method to the calculation of excited state core photoionization cross-sections. We demonstrate that, at the ADC(2)x level of theory, ground state X-ray absorption spectra may be accurately reproduced, validating the method. Significantly, the calculated X-ray absorption spectra of the excited states are found to be sensitive to both geometric distortions (structural dynamics) and the electronic character (electronic dynamics) of the initial state, suggesting that core excitation spectroscopies will be useful probes of excited state non-adiabatic dynamics. We anticipate that the method presented here can be combined with ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to simulate the time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of excited state molecular wavepacket dynamics.

  16. High-performance dispersive Raman and absorption spectroscopy as tools for drug identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawluczyk, Olga; Andrey, Sam; Nogas, Paul; Roy, Andrew; Pawluczyk, Romuald

    2009-02-01

    Due to increasing availability of pharmaceuticals from many sources, a need is growing to quickly and efficiently analyze substances in terms of the consistency and accuracy of their chemical composition. Differences in chemical composition occur at very low concentrations, so that highly sensitive analytical methods become crucial. Recent progress in dispersive spectroscopy with the use of 2-dimensional detector arrays, permits for signal integration along a long (up to 12 mm long) entrance slit of a spectrometer, thereby increasing signal to noise ratio and improving the ability to detect small concentration changes. This is achieved with a non-scanning, non-destructive system. Two different methods using P&P Optica high performance spectrometers were used. High performance optical dispersion Raman and high performance optical absorption spectroscopy were employed to differentiate various acetaminophen-containing drugs, such as Tylenol and other generic brands, which differ in their ingredients. A 785 nm excitation wavelength was used in Raman measurements and strong Raman signals were observed in the spectral range 300-1800 cm-1. Measurements with the absorption spectrometer were performed in the wavelength range 620-1020 nm. Both Raman and absorption techniques used transmission light spectrometers with volume phase holographic gratings and provided sufficient spectral differences, often structural, allowing for drug differentiation.

  17. Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with hard x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Obara, Yuki; Misawa, Kazuhiko; Bhattacharya, Atanu; Kurahashi, Naoya; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2013-09-23

    We have developed a method of dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL), generated by a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mechanism. A transmission grating was utilized for splitting SASE-XFEL light, which has a relatively large bandwidth (ΔE/E ∼ 5 × 10{sup −3}), into several branches. Two primary split beams were introduced into a dispersive spectrometer for measuring signal and reference spectra simultaneously. After normalization, we obtained a Zn K-edge absorption spectrum with a photon-energy range of 210 eV, which is in excellent agreement with that measured by a conventional wavelength-scanning method. From the analysis of the difference spectra, the noise ratio was evaluated to be ∼3 × 10{sup −3}, which is sufficiently small to trace minute changes in transient spectra induced by an ultrafast optical laser. This scheme enables us to perform single-shot, high-accuracy x-ray absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution.

  18. Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy of hyperfine layers on surfaces of semiconductors and dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzinov, S. N.; Tolstoy, V. P.

    1988-02-01

    Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy of film son surfaces of transparent or weakly absorbing semiconductor and dielectric substrates is analyzed theoretically, the purpose being to establish the conditions for maximum sensitivity of this method. The absorption factor, namely the relative change of the reflection coefficient upon formation of a film on the substrate surface, is selected as the sensitivity criterion. The analysis is based on exact relations, one for a homogeneous isotopic absorbing film between substrate and ambient medium with plane-parallel boundaries and one for a reflecting layer with the possibility of multiple reflections taken into account. Calculations have been programmed on a computer for up to 60 nm thick SiO2 films on various substrates and infrared radiation within the 8 to 11 gmm waveband. The results indicate that the dependence of the absorption factor on the radiation wavelength and on the film thickness is different with the radiation s-polarized than with the radiation p-polarized. Calculations have also yielded the dispersion of optical constants characterizing a SiO2 film. According to these results, infrared spectroscopy is most sensitive to films on substrates with a small refractive index and when done with p-polarized radiation incident at exactly or approximately the Brewster angle for a determination of their presence and their composition respectively, also when no multiple reflections occur.

  19. Time resolved metal line profile by near-ultraviolet tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelaru, C.; de Poucques, L.; Minea, T. M.; Popa, G.

    2011-03-01

    Pulsed systems are extensively used to produce active species such as atoms, radicals, excited states, etc. The tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TD-LAS) is successfully used to quantify the density of absorbing species, but especially for stationary or slow changing systems. The time resolved-direct absorption profile (TR-DAP) measurement method by TD-LAS, with time resolution of μs is proposed here as an extension of the regular use of diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The spectral narrowness of laser diodes, especially in the blue range (˜0.01 pm), combined with the nanosecond fast trigger of the magnetron pulsed plasma and long trace recording on the oscilloscope (period of second scale) permit the detection of the sputtered titanium metal evolution in the afterglow (˜ms). TR-DAP method can follow the time-dependence of the temperature (Doppler profile) and the density (deduced from the absorbance) of any medium and heavy species in a pulsed system.

  20. Surface Arsenic Speciation of a Drinking-Water Treatment Residual Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Makris, K.C.; Sarkar, D.; Parsons, J.G.; Datta, R.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.

    2009-06-03

    Drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs) present a low-cost geosorbent for As-contaminated waters and soils. Previous work has demonstrated the high affinity of WTRs for As, but data pertaining to the stability of sorbed As is missing. Sorption/desorption and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), both XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) studies, were combined to determine the stability of As sorbed by an Fe-based WTR. Arsenic(V) and As(III) sorption kinetics were biphasic in nature, sorbing <90% of the initial added As (15,000 mg kg{sup -1}) after 48 h of reaction. Subsequent desorption experiments with a high P load (7500 mg kg{sup -1}) showed negligible As desorption for both As species, approximately <3.5% of sorbed As; the small amount of desorbed As was attributed to the abundance of sorption sites. XANES data showed that sorption kinetics for either As(III) or As(V) initially added to solution had no effect on the sorbed As oxidation state. EXAFS spectroscopy suggested that As added either as As(III) or as As(V) formed inner-sphere mononuclear, bidentate complexes, suggesting the stability of the sorbed As, which was further corroborated by the minimum As desorption from the Fe-WTR.

  1. Complexation of Neptunium(V) with Glutaroimide Dioxime: A Study by Absorption Spectroscopy, Microcalorimetry, and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Seraj A; Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Zhang, Zhicheng; Rao, Linfeng

    2015-09-01

    Complexation of NpO2(+) ions with glutaroimide dioxime (H2L), a cyclic imide dioxime ligand that has been shown to form strong complexes with UO2(2+) in aqueous solutions, was studied by absorption spectroscopy and microcalorimetry in 1.0 M NaClO4 aqueous solutions. NpO2(+) forms two successive complexes, NpO2(HL)(aq) and NpO2(HL)2(-) (where HL(-) stands for the partially deprotonated glutaroimide dioxime ligand), with stability constants of log β111 = 17.8 ± 0.1 and log β122 = 33.0 ± 0.2, respectively. The complexation is both enthalpy- and entropy-driven, with negative enthalpies (ΔH111 = -52.3 ± 1.0 kJ/mol and ΔH122 = -96.1 ± 1.4 kJ/mol) and positive entropies (ΔS111 = 164 ± 3 J/mol/K and ΔS122 = 310 ± 4 J/mol/K). The thermodynamic parameters suggest that, similar to complexation of UO2(2+), the ligand coordinates with NpO2(+) in a tridentate mode, via the two oxygen atoms of the oxime groups and the nitrogen atom of the imide group. Density functional theory calculations have helped to interpret the optical absorption properties of the NpO2(HL)2(-) complex, by showing that the cis and trans configurations of the complex have very similar energies so that both configurations could be present in the aqueous solutions. It is the noncentrosymmetric cis configuration that makes the 5f → 5f transition allowable so that the NpO2(HL)2(-) complex absorbs in the near-IR region.

  2. Accelerated Aging of BKC 44306-10 Rigid Polyurethane Foam: FT-IR Spectroscopy, Dimensional Analysis, and Micro Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbertson, Robert D.; Patterson, Brian M.; Smith, Zachary

    2014-01-02

    An accelerated aging study of BKC 44306-10 rigid polyurethane foam was carried out. Foam samples were aged in a nitrogen atmosphere at three different temperatures: 50 °C, 65 °C, and 80 °C. Foam samples were periodically removed from the aging canisters at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 month intervals when FT-IR spectroscopy, dimensional analysis, and mechanical testing experiments were performed. Micro Computed Tomography imaging was also employed to study the morphology of the foams. Over the course of the aging study the foams the decreased in size by a magnitude of 0.001 inches per inch of foam. Micro CT showed the heterogeneous nature of the foam structure likely resulting from flow effects during the molding process. The effect of aging on the compression and tensile strength of the foam was minor and no cause for concern. FT-IR spectroscopy was used to follow the foam chemistry. However, it was difficult to draw definitive conclusions about the changes in chemical nature of the materials due to large variability throughout the samples.

  3. Water dynamics in salt solutions studied with ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fayer, Michael D; Moilanen, David E; Wong, Daryl; Rosenfeld, Daniel E; Fenn, Emily E; Park, Sungnam

    2009-09-15

    Water is ubiquitous in nature, but it exists as pure water infrequently. From the ocean to biology, water molecules interact with a wide variety of dissolved species. Many of these species are charged. In the ocean, water interacts with dissolved salts. In biological systems, water interacts with dissolved salts as well as charged amino acids, the zwitterionic head groups of membranes, and other biological groups that carry charges. Water plays a central role in a vast number of chemical processes because of its dynamic hydrogen-bond network. A water molecule can form up to four hydrogen bonds in an approximately tetrahedral arrangement. These hydrogen bonds are continually being broken, and new bonds are being formed on a picosecond time scale. The ability of the hydrogen-bond network of water to rapidly reconfigure enables water to accommodate and facilitate chemical processes. Therefore, the influence of charged species on water hydrogen-bond dynamics is important. Recent advances in ultrafast coherent infrared spectroscopy have greatly expanded our understanding of water dynamics. Two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo spectroscopy is providing new observables that yield direct information on the fast dynamics of molecules in their ground electronic state under thermal equilibrium conditions. The 2D IR vibrational echoes are akin to 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) but operate on time scales that are many orders of magnitude shorter. In a 2D IR vibrational echo experiment (see the Conspectus figure), three IR pulses are tuned to the vibrational frequency of interest, which in this case is the frequency of the hydroxyl stretching mode of water. The first two pulses "label" the initial molecular structures by their vibrational frequencies. The system evolves between pulses two and three, and the third pulse stimulates the emission of the vibrational echo pulse, which is the signal. The vibrational echo pulse is heterodyne, detected by combining it

  4. Phosphorylation-induced conformational changes of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator monitored by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform IR spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grimard, Vinciane; Li, Canhui; Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Bear, Christine E; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie

    2004-02-13

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ABC protein superfamily. Phosphorylation of a regulatory domain of this protein is a prerequisite for activity. We analyzed the effect of protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation on the structure of purified and reconstituted CFTR protein. 1H/2H exchange monitored by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform IR spectroscopy demonstrates that CFTR is highly accessible to aqueous medium. Phosphorylation of the regulatory (R) domain by PKA further increases this accessibility. More specifically, fluorescence quenching of cytosolic tryptophan residues revealed that the accessibility of the cytoplasmic part of the protein is modified by phosphorylation. Moreover, the combination of polarized IR spectroscopy with 1H/2H exchange suggested an increase of the accessibility of the transmembrane domains of CFTR. This suggests that CFTR phosphorylation can induce a large conformational change that could correspond either to a displacement of the R domain or to long range conformational changes transmitted from the phosphorylation sites to the nucleotide binding domains and the transmembrane segments. Such structural changes may provide better access for the solutes to the nucleotide binding domains and the ion binding site.

  5. Broadband spectroscopy with external cavity quantum cascade lasers beyond conventional absorption measurements.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, Armin; Pfeifer, Marcel; Konz, Werner; Herbst, Johannes; Axtmann, Felix

    2014-05-01

    Laser spectroscopy is a powerful tool for analyzing small molecules, i.e. in the gas phase. In the mid-infrared spectral region quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have been established as the most frequently used laser radiation source. Spectroscopy of larger molecules in the gas phase, of complex mixtures, and analysis in the liquid phase requires a broader tuning range and is thus still the domain of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. However, the development of tunable external cavity (EC) QCLs is starting to change this situation. The main advantage of QCLs is their high spectral emission power that is enhanced by a factor of 10(4) compared with thermal light sources. Obviously, transmission measurements with EC-QCLs in strongly absorbing samples are feasible, which can hardly be measured by FTIR due to detector noise limitations. We show that the high power of EC-QCLs facilitates spectroscopy beyond simple absorption measurements. Starting from QCL experiments with liquid samples, we show results of fiber evanescent field analysis (FEFA) to detect pesticides in drinking water. FEFA is a special case of attenuated total reflection spectroscopy. Furthermore, powerful CW EC-QCLs enable fast vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy of chiral molecules in the liquid phase - a technique which is very time consuming with standard FTIR equipment. We present results obtained for the chiral compound 1,1'-bi-2-naphthol (BINOL). Finally, powerful CW EC-QCLs enable the application of laser photothermal emission spectroscopy (LPTES). We demonstrate this for a narrowband and broadband absorber in the gas phase. All three techniques have great potential for MIR process analytical applications.

  6. High sensitivity gas sensor based on IR spectroscopy technology and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hengyi

    2016-06-01

    Due to extremely effective advantages of the quantum cascade laser spectroscopy and technology for trace gas detection, this paper presents spectroscopy scanning, the characteristics of temperature tuning, system resolution, sensitivity, and system stability with the application of the presented gas sensor. Experimental results showed that the sensor resolution was ≤0.01cm-1 (equivalent to 0.06 nm), and the sensor sensitivity was at the level of 194 ppb with the application of H2CO measurement.

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopy from H-passivated porous Si and oxidized Si nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Schuppler, S.; Marcus, M.A.; Friedman, S.L.

    1994-11-01

    Quantum confinement in nanoscale Si structures is widely believed to be responsible for the visible luminescence observed from anodically etched porous silicon (por-Si), but little is known about the actual size or shape of these structures. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure data from a wide variety of por-Si samples show significantly reduced average Si coordination numbers due to the sizable contribution of surface-coordinated H. (The IUSI ratios, as large as 1.2, were independently confirmed by ir-absorption and {alpha}-recoil measurements.) The Si coordinations imply very large surface/volume ratios, enabling the average Si structures to be identified as crystalline particles (not wires) whose dimensions are typically <15 {Angstrom}. Comparison of the size-dependent peak luminescence energies with those of oxidized Si nanocrystals, whose shapes are known, shows remarkable agreement. Furthermore, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements of the nanocrystals shows the outer oxide and interfacial suboxide layers to be constant over a wide range of nanocrystal sizes. The combination of these results effectively rules out surface species as being responsible for the observed visible luminescence in por-Si, and strongly supports quantum confinement as the dominant mechanism occurring in Si particles which are substantially smaller than previously reported or proposed.

  8. Cavity Enhanced absorption spectroscopy with an Optical Comb: Detection of atmospheric radicals in the near UV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méjean, G.; Kassi, S.; Romanini, D.

    2009-04-01

    The atmospheric chemistry community suffers a lack of fast, reliable and space resolved measurement for a wide set of very reactive molecules (e.g. radicals such as OH, NO3, BrO, IO, etc.). Due to their high reactivity, these molecules largely control the lifetime and concentration of numerous key atmospheric species. The concentrations of radicals are extremely low (ppbv or less) and highly variable in time and space. Measuring their concentration is often extremely laborious, expensive and requires heavy equipment (chemical sampling and treatment followed by mass spectrometry and/or chromatography). We recently introduced an optical spectroscopy technique based on a femtosecond laser oscillator, "Mode-Locked Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy", that we propose to develop into an instrument for in situ measurement of local concentration of traces of reactive molecules [1-3]. We have already demonstrated the possibility of measuring part in 1E12 by volume concentrations of radicals of high atmospheric interest, such as IO or BrO [4], as needed for monitoring these species in the environment. We apply cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the near UV range using a frequency-doubled Ti:Sa modelocked femtosecond laser. Efficient broadband injection of a high finesse cavity is obtained by matching this optical frequency-comb source to the comb of cavity transmission resonances. A grating spectrograph and a detector array disperse and detect the spectrum transmitted by the cavity carrying the absorption features of intracavity molecules. IO traces were obtained by mixing together controlled flows of gaseous iodine and ozone inside a high finesse cavity (F~6000). A Chameleon Ultra II ML-Laser (gracefully lent during 1 month by Coherent Inc.) was frequency doubled to address an absorption band of IO at 436 nm. A locking scheme allowed the cavity transmission to be smooth and stable. The transmitted light was dispersed using a high resolution (0.07nm) grating

  9. The analysis of time-resolved optical waveguide absorption spectroscopy based on positive matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Li, Zhu; Li, Bo; Shi, Guolong; Li, Minqiang; Yu, Daoyang; Liu, Jinhuai

    2013-08-01

    Time-resolved optical waveguide absorption spectroscopy (OWAS) makes use of an evanescent field to detect the polarized absorption spectra of sub-monomolecular adlayers. This technique is suitable for the investigation of kinetics at the solid/liquid interface of dyes, pigments, fluorescent molecules, quantum dots, metallic nanoparticles, and proteins with chromophores. In this work, we demonstrate the application of positive matrix factorization (PMF) to analyze time-resolved OWAS for the first time. Meanwhile, PCA is researched to compare with PMF. The absorption/desorption kinetics of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) onto a hydrophilic glass surface and the dynamic process of Meisenheimer complex between Cysteine and TNT are selected as samples to verify experimental system and analytical methods. The results are shown that time-resolved OWAS can well record the absorption/desorption of R6G onto a hydrophilic glass surface and the dynamic formation process of Meisenheimer complexes. The feature of OWAS extracted by PMF is dynamic and consistent with the results analyzed by the traditional function of time/wavelength-absorbance. Moreover, PMF prevents the negative factors from occurring, avoids contradicting physical reality, and makes factors more easily interpretable. Therefore, we believe that PMF will provide a valuable analysis route to allow processing of increasingly large and complex data sets.

  10. Temperature and multi-species measurements by supercontinuum absorption spectroscopy for IC engine applications.

    PubMed

    Werblinski, Thomas; Engel, Sascha R; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    The first supercontinuum (SC) absorption spectroscopy measurements showing the feasibility of quantitative temperature evaluation are presented to the best of the authors' knowledge. Temperature and multi-species measurements were carried out at a detection rate of ~2 MHz in a high-temperature flow cell within a temperature range from 450 K to 750 K at 0.22 MPa, representing conditions during the suction and compression stroke in an internal combustion (IC) engine. The broadband SC pulses were temporally dispersed into fast wavelength sweeps, covering the overtone absorption bands 2ν(1), 2ν(3), ν(1) + ν(3) of H2O and 3ν(3) of CO2 in the near-infrared region from 1330 nm to 1500 nm. The temperature information is inferred from the peak ratio of a temperature sensitive (1362.42 nm) and insensitive (1418.91 nm) absorption feature in the ν(1) + ν(3) overtone bands of water. The experimental results are in very good agreement with theoretical intensity ratios calculated from absorption spectra based on HiTran data. PMID:23736618

  11. Simple Monte Carlo methods to estimate the spectra evaluation error in differential-optical-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, M; Brandenburger, U; Brauers, T; Dorn, H P

    1999-01-20

    Differential-optical-absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) permits the sensitive measurement of concentrations of trace gases in the atmosphere. DOAS is a technique of well-defined accuracy; however, the calculation of a statistically sound measurement precision is still an unsolved problem. Usually one evaluates DOAS spectra by performing least-squares fits of reference absorption spectra to the measured atmospheric absorption spectra. Inasmuch as the absorbance from atmospheric trace gases is usually very weak, with optical densities in the range from 10(-5) to 10(-3), interference caused by the occurrence of nonreproducible spectral artifacts often determines the detection limit and the measurement precision. These spectral artifacts bias the least-squares fitting result in two respects. First, spectral artifacts to some extent are falsely interpreted as real absorption, and second, spectral artifacts add nonstatistical noise to spectral residuals, which results in a significant misestimation of the least-squares fitting error. We introduce two new approaches to investigate the evaluation errors of DOAS spectra accurately. The first method, residual inspection by cyclic displacement, estimates the effect of false interpretation of the artifact structures. The second method applies a statistical bootstrap algorithm to estimate properly the error of fitting, even in cases when the condition of random and independent scatter of the residual signal is not fulfilled. Evaluation of simulated atmospheric measurement spectra shows that a combination of the results of both methods yields a good estimate of the spectra evaluation error to within an uncertainty of ~10%.

  12. Stability of widely tuneable, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade laser for absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyutich, Vasili L.; Raja Ibrahim, R. K.; Martin, Philip A.

    2010-09-01

    The performance of widely tuneable, continuous wave (cw) external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) has been evaluated for direct absorption spectroscopy measurements of nitric oxide (NO) in the wavenumber range 1872-1958 cm -1 and with a 13.5 cm long optical cell. In order to reduce the absorption measurement errors due to the large variations of laser intensity, normalisation with a reference channel was used. Wavelength stability within the scans was analysed using the Allan plot technique for the reduced wavenumber range of 1892.4-1914.5 cm -1. The Allan variances of the NO absorption peak centres and areas were observed to increase with successive scan averaging for all absorption peaks across the wavelength scan, thus revealing short- and long-term drifts of the cw EC-QCL wavelength between successive scans. As an example application, the cw EC-QCL was used for NO measurements in the exhaust of an atmospheric pressure packed-bed plasma reactor applied to the decomposition of dichloromethane in waste gas streams. Etalon noise was reduced by subtracting a reference spectrum recorded when the plasma was off. The NO limit of detection (SNR = 1) was estimated to be ˜2 ppm at atmospheric pressure in a 20.5 cm long optical cell with a double pass and a single 7 s scan over 1892.4-1914.5 cm -1.

  13. Temperature and multi-species measurements by supercontinuum absorption spectroscopy for IC engine applications.

    PubMed

    Werblinski, Thomas; Engel, Sascha R; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    The first supercontinuum (SC) absorption spectroscopy measurements showing the feasibility of quantitative temperature evaluation are presented to the best of the authors' knowledge. Temperature and multi-species measurements were carried out at a detection rate of ~2 MHz in a high-temperature flow cell within a temperature range from 450 K to 750 K at 0.22 MPa, representing conditions during the suction and compression stroke in an internal combustion (IC) engine. The broadband SC pulses were temporally dispersed into fast wavelength sweeps, covering the overtone absorption bands 2ν(1), 2ν(3), ν(1) + ν(3) of H2O and 3ν(3) of CO2 in the near-infrared region from 1330 nm to 1500 nm. The temperature information is inferred from the peak ratio of a temperature sensitive (1362.42 nm) and insensitive (1418.91 nm) absorption feature in the ν(1) + ν(3) overtone bands of water. The experimental results are in very good agreement with theoretical intensity ratios calculated from absorption spectra based on HiTran data.

  14. [Concentration retrieving method of SO2 using differential optical absorption spectroscopy based on statistics].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Sun, Chang-Ku; Zhang, Chi; Zhao, Yu-Mei; Liu, Jun-Ping

    2011-01-01

    A concentration retrieving method using statistics is presented, which is applied in differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) for measuring the concentration of SO2. The method uses the standard deviation of the differential absorption to represents the gas concentration. Principle component analysis (PCA) method is used to process the differential absorption spectrum. In the method, the basis data for the concentration retrieval of SO2 is the combination of the PCA processing result, the correlation coefficient, and the standard deviation of the differential absorption. The method is applied to a continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) with optical path length of 0.3 m. Its measuring range for SO2 concentration is 0-5 800 mg x m(-3). The nonlinear calibration and the temperature compensation for the system were executed. The full scale error of the retrieving concentration is less than 0.7% FS. And the measuring result is -4.54 mg x m(-3) when the concentration of SO2 is zero. PMID:21428087

  15. An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Mo oxidation in Pb at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shanshan; Olive, Daniel; Terry, Jeff; Segre, Carlo U.

    2009-06-30

    The corrosion of fuel cladding and structural materials by lead and lead-bismuth eutectic in the liquid state at elevated temperatures is an issue that must be considered when designing advanced nuclear systems and high-power spallation neutron targets. In this work, lead corrosion studies of molybdenum were performed to investigate the interaction layer as a function of temperature by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In situ X-ray absorption measurements on a Mo substrate with a 3-6 {micro}m layer of Pb deposited by thermal evaporation were performed at temperatures up to 900 C and at a 15{sup o} angle to the incident X-rays. The changes in the local atomic structure of the corrosion layer are visible in the difference extended X-ray absorption fine structure and the linear combination fitting of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure to as-deposited molybdenum sample and molybdenum oxide (MoO{sub 2} and MoO{sub 3}) standards. The data are consistent with the appearance of MoO{sub 3} in an intermediate temperature range (650-800 C) and the more stable MoO{sub 2} phase dominating at high and low temperatures.

  16. Absorption spectroscopy of wire-array plasma at the non-radiative stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Hakel, P.; Mancini, R. C.; Wiewior, P.; Durmaz, T.; Anderson, A.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Chalyy, O.; Altemara, S. D.; Papp, D.; McKee, E.; Chittenden, J. P.; Niasse, N.; Shevelko, A. P.

    2010-11-01

    Absorption spectroscopy was applied to 1 MA wire-array Z-pinches. The 50 TW Leopard laser was coupled with the Zebra generator for x-ray backlighting of wire arrays. Wire-array plasmas were investigated at the ablation and implosion stages. Broadband x-ray radiation from a laser produced Sm plasma was used to backlight Al star wire arrays in the range of 7-9 å. Two time-integrated x-ray conical spectrometers recorded reference and main spectra. The backlighting radiation was separated from the powerful Z-pinch x-ray burst by collimators. A comparison of the backlighting radiation spectra that passed through the plasma with reference spectra indicates absorption lines in the range of 8.2-8.4 å. A plasma density profile was simulated with a 3D resistive MHD code. Simulations with atomic kinetics models derived an electron temperature of Al wire-array plasma.

  17. Melting of iron determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to 100 GPa

    PubMed Central

    Aquilanti, Giuliana; Trapananti, Angela; Karandikar, Amol; Kantor, Innokenty; Marini, Carlo; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Boehler, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Temperature, thermal history, and dynamics of Earth rely critically on the knowledge of the melting temperature of iron at the pressure conditions of the inner core boundary (ICB) where the geotherm crosses the melting curve. The literature on this subject is overwhelming, and no consensus has been reached, with a very large disagreement of the order of 2,000 K for the ICB temperature. Here we report new data on the melting temperature of iron in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell to 103 GPa obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, a technique rarely used at such conditions. The modifications of the onset of the absorption spectra are used as a reliable melting criterion regardless of the solid phase from which the solid to liquid transition takes place. Our results show a melting temperature of iron in agreement with most previous studies up to 100 GPa, namely of 3,090 K at 103 GPa. PMID:26371317

  18. Melting of iron determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to 100 GPa.

    PubMed

    Aquilanti, Giuliana; Trapananti, Angela; Karandikar, Amol; Kantor, Innokenty; Marini, Carlo; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Boehler, Reinhard

    2015-09-29

    Temperature, thermal history, and dynamics of Earth rely critically on the knowledge of the melting temperature of iron at the pressure conditions of the inner core boundary (ICB) where the geotherm crosses the melting curve. The literature on this subject is overwhelming, and no consensus has been reached, with a very large disagreement of the order of 2,000 K for the ICB temperature. Here we report new data on the melting temperature of iron in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell to 103 GPa obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, a technique rarely used at such conditions. The modifications of the onset of the absorption spectra are used as a reliable melting criterion regardless of the solid phase from which the solid to liquid transition takes place. Our results show a melting temperature of iron in agreement with most previous studies up to 100 GPa, namely of 3,090 K at 103 GPa.

  19. Measurement of temperature profiles in flames by emission-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, F. S.; Arnold, C. B.; Lindquist, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to explore the use of infrared and ultraviolet emission-absorption spectroscopy for determination of temperature profiles in flames. Spectral radiances and absorptances were measured in the 2.7-micron H2O band and the 3064-A OH band in H2/O2 flames for several temperature profiles which were directly measured by a sodium line-reversal technique. The temperature profiles, determined by inversion of the infrared and ultraviolet spectra, showed an average disagreement with line-reversal measurements of 50 K for the infrared and 200 K for the ultraviolet at a temperature of 2600 K. The reasons for these discrepancies are discussed in some detail.

  20. Note: cavity enhanced self-absorption spectroscopy: a new diagnostic tool for light emitting matter.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Anton J; Zhao, Dongfeng; Linnartz, Harold

    2013-02-01

    We introduce the concept of Cavity Enhanced Self-Absorption Spectroscopy (CESAS), a new sensitive diagnostic tool for analyzing light-emitting samples. The technique works without an additional light source and its implementation is straight forward. In CESAS, a sample (plasma, flame, or combustion source) is located in an optically stable cavity consisting of two high reflectivity mirrors, and here it acts both as light source and absorbing medium. A modest portion of the emitted light is trapped inside the cavity, making 10(4)-10(5) cavity round trips while crossing the sample and an artificial augmentation of the path length of the absorbing medium occurs as the light transverses the cavity. Light leaking out of the cavity simultaneously provides emission and absorption features. The performance is illustrated by CESAS results on supersonically expanding pulsed hydrocarbon plasma. We expect CESAS to become a generally applicable analytical tool for real time and in situ diagnostics.

  1. Reconstruction of an excited-state molecular wave packet with attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yan; Chini, Michael; Wang, Xiaowei; González-Castrillo, Alberto; Palacios, Alicia; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando; Chang, Zenghu

    2016-08-01

    Attosecond science promises to allow new forms of quantum control in which a broadband isolated attosecond pulse excites a molecular wave packet consisting of a coherent superposition of multiple excited electronic states. This electronic excitation triggers nuclear motion on the molecular manifold of potential energy surfaces and can result in permanent rearrangement of the constituent atoms. Here, we demonstrate attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (ATAS) as a viable probe of the electronic and nuclear dynamics initiated in excited states of a neutral molecule by a broadband vacuum ultraviolet pulse. Owing to the high spectral and temporal resolution of ATAS, we are able to reconstruct the time evolution of a vibrational wave packet within the excited B'Σ1u+ electronic state of H2 via the laser-perturbed transient absorption spectrum.

  2. Measurement of exhaled nitric oxide in beef cattle using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, C. B.; Holland, B. P.; McMillen, G.; Step, D. L.; Krehbiel, C. R.; Namjou, K.; McCann, P. J.

    2007-03-01

    Measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in the expired breath of crossbred calves received at a research facility was performed using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Exhaled NO (eNO) concentrations were measured using NO absorption lines at 1912.07 cm-1 and employing background subtraction. The lower detection limit and measurement precision were determined to be ˜330 parts in 1012 per unit volume. A custom breath collection system was designed to collect lower airway breath of spontaneously breathing calves while in a restraint chute. Breath was collected and analyzed from calves upon arrival and periodically during a 42 day receiving period. There was a statistically significant relationship between eNO, severity of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in terms of number of times treated, and average daily weight gain over the first 15 days postarrival. In addition, breathing patterns and exhaled CO2 showed a statistically significant relationship with BRD morbidity.

  3. Intra-cavity absorption spectroscopy with narrow-ridge microfluidic quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Belkin, Mikhail A; Loncar, Marko; Lee, Benjamon G; Pflugl, Christian; Audet, Ross; Diehl, Laurent; Capasso, Federico; Bour, David; Corzine, Scott; Hofler, Gloria

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate microfluidic laser intra-cavity absorption spectroscopy with mid-infrared lambda approximately 9mum quantum cascade lasers. A deepetched narrow ridge waveguide laser is placed in a microfluidic chamber. The evanescent tails of the laser mode penetrate into a liquid on both sides of the ridge. The absorption lines of the liquid modify the laser waveguide loss, resulting in significant changes in the laser emission spectrum and the threshold current. A volume of liquid as small as ~10pL may, in principle, be sufficient for sensing using the proposed technique. This method, similar to the related gas-phase technique, shows promise as a sensitive means of detecting chemicals in small volumes of solutions.

  4. Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy of Thin Films Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-02-04

    We present experimental demonstrations using a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) to perform Reflection-Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy (RAIRS) of thin layers and residues on surfaces. The ECQCL compliance voltage was used to measure fluctuations in the ECQCL output power and improve the performance of the RAIRS measurements. Absorption spectra from self-assembled monolayers of a fluorinated alkane thiol and a thiol carboxylic acid were measured and compared with FTIR measurements. RAIRS spectra of the explosive compounds PETN, RDX, and tetryl deposited on gold substrates were also measured. Rapid measurement times and low noise were demonstrated, with < 1E-3 absorbance noise for a 10 second measurement time.

  5. Tunable erbium-doped fiber ring laser for applications of infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Han Young; Lee, Won-Kyu; Moon, Han Seb; Suh, Ho Suhng

    2007-07-01

    We fabricate a low noise erbium-doped fiber ring laser that can be continuously tuned over 102 nm by insertion of the fiber Fabry-Perot tunable filter (FFP-TF) in the ring cavity with a novel cavity structure and the optimal gain medium length. As an application of this fiber ring laser, we performed the absorption spectroscopy of acetylene (13C2H2) and hydrogen cyanide (H13C14N) and measure the absorption spectra of more than 50 transition lines of these gases with an excellent signal to noise ratio (SNR). The pressure broadening coefficients of four acetylene transition lines are obtained using this fiber ring laser and an external cavity laser diode.

  6. Picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of ultrafast aluminum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Audebert, P; Renaudin, P; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S; Geindre, J-P; Chenais-Popovics, C; Tzortzakis, S; Nagels-Silvert, V; Shepherd, R; Matsushima, I; Gary, S; Girard, F; Peyrusse, O; Gauthier, J-C

    2005-01-21

    We have used point-projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy to infer the ionization and recombination dynamics of transient aluminum plasmas. Two femtosecond beams of the 100 TW laser at the LULI facility were used to produce an aluminum plasma on a thin aluminum foil (83 or 50 nm), and a picosecond x-ray backlighter source. The short-pulse backlighter probed the aluminum plasma at different times by adjusting the delay between the two femtosecond driving beams. Absorption x-ray spectra at early times are characteristic of a dense and rather homogeneous plasma. Collisional-radiative atomic physics coupled with hydrodynamic simulations reproduce fairly well the measured average ionization as a function of time. PMID:15698184

  7. Electronic structure investigation of highly compressed aluminum with K edge absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Dorchies, F; Recoules, V; Festa, F; Peyrusse, O; Levy, A; Ravasio, A; Hall, T; Koenig, M; Amadou, N; Brambrink, E; Mazevet, S

    2011-10-14

    The electronic structure evolution of highly compressed aluminum has been investigated using time resolved K edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy. A long laser pulse (500 ps, I(L)≈8×10(13) W/cm(2)) was used to create a uniform shock. A second ps pulse (I(L)≈10(17)  W/cm(2)) generated an ultrashort broadband x-ray source near the Al K edge. The main target was designed to probe aluminum at reshocked conditions up to now unexplored (3 times the solid density and temperatures around 8 eV). The hydrodynamical conditions were obtained using rear side visible diagnostics. Data were compared to ab initio and dense plasma calculations, indicating potential improvements in either description. This comparison shows that x-ray-absorption near-edge structure measurements provide a unique capability to probe matter at these extreme conditions and severally constrains theoretical approaches currently used. PMID:22107398

  8. Infrared and near infrared transient absorption spectroscopy of molecular free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, T.J.; Wu, M.; Hall, G.E.; Chang, B.C.; Hansford, G.; Bloch, J.C.; Field, R.W.

    1993-12-31

    The advantages of absorption spectroscopy at low absorbances include a linear relationship between signal size and number of absorbing molecules, line of sight measurement, and easily interpretable lineshape functions. The main disadvantage is due to the necessity of measuring a small change in light intensity, usually in the presence of a strong background, which limits the sensitivity. In this work, recent results obtained using absorption techniques with continuous wave lasers to measure vibrational and electronic spectra in the mid- and near-infrared of small free radicals are reported. The radical of interest was generated by excimer laser photolysis of a chemically stable precursor molecule and detected by measuring the transient decrease in power of a continuous wave probe laser that traversed the photolyzed volume before being imaged onto a detector.

  9. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Ron; Carr, Zak; MacLean, Matthew; Dufrene, Aaron; Mehta, Manish

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) measurement of several water transitions that were interrogated during a hot-fire testing of the Space Launch Systems (SLS) sub-scale vehicle installed in LENS II. The temperature of the recirculating gas flow over the base plate was found to increase with altitude and is consistent with CFD results. It was also observed that the gas above the base plate has significant velocity along the optical path of the sensor at the higher altitudes. The line-by-line analysis of the H2O absorption features must include the effects of the Doppler shift phenomena particularly at high altitude. The TDLAS experimental measurements and the analysis procedure which incorporates the velocity dependent flow will be described.

  10. Application of terahertz absorption spectroscopy to evaluation of aging variation of medicine.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Masaya; Saito, Tadashi; Ogawa, Masafumi; Uejima, Hideki; Hatsuda, Yasutoshi; Kawanishi, Sonoyo; Hirotani, Yoshihiko; Myotoku, Michiaki; Ikeda, Kenji; Konishi, Hiroki; Iga, Ikumi; Yamakawa, Junji; Nishizawa, Seizi; Yamamoto, Kohji; Tani, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    The absorption spectra of three kinds of medicines both before and after the expiration date: Amlodin OD(®) (5 mg), Basen OD(®) (0.2 mg) and Gaster D(®) (10 mg) have been measured by terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). All the medicines show some differences in the THz absorption spectra between medicines before and after the expiration dates. X-Ray powder diffraction (XRD) studies of all medicines suggest that the polymorph of the main effective compound is not changed before and after the expiration date. Therefore, the differences in the THz spectra between medicines before and after the expiration dates arise from aging variation of diluting agents and/or from modifications of intermolecular interaction between the effective compounds and diluting agents. PMID:21321447

  11. Ground-based imaging differential optical absorption spectroscopy of atmospheric gases.

    PubMed

    Lohberger, Falko; Hönninger, Gerd; Platt, Ulrich

    2004-08-20

    We describe a compact remote-sensing instrument that permits spatially resolved mapping of atmospheric trace gases by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) and present our first applications of imaging of the nitrogen dioxide contents of the exhaust plumes of two industrial emitters. DOAS permits the identification and quantification of various gases, e.g., NO2, SO2, and CH2O, from their specific narrowband (differential) absorption structures with high selectivity and sensitivity. With scattered sunlight as the light source, DOAS is used with an imaging spectrometer that is simultaneously acquiring spectral information on the incident light in one spatial dimension (column). The second spatial dimension is scanned by a moving mirror. PMID:15352396

  12. [Measurement of OH radicals in flame with high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Liu, Wen-Qing; Kan, Rui-Feng; Si, Fu-Qi; Xu, Zhen-Yu; Hu, Ren-Zhi; Xie, Pin-Hua

    2011-10-01

    The present paper describes a new developed high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument used for the measurement of OH radicals in flame. The instrument consists of a Xenon lamp for light source; a double pass high resolution echelle spectrometer with a resolution of 3.3 pm; a multiple-reflection cell of 20 meter base length, in which the light reflects in the cell for 176 times, so the whole path length of light can achieve 3 520 meters. The OH radicals'6 absorption lines around 308 nm were simultaneously observed in the experiment. By using high resolution DOAS technology, the OH radicals in candles, kerosene lamp, and alcohol burner flames were monitored, and their concentrations were also inverted. PMID:22250529

  13. Fluorescence and UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy studies on polymer blend films for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Stam, Jan; Lindqvist, Camilla; Hansson, Rickard; Ericsson, Leif; Moons, Ellen

    2015-08-01

    The quinoxaline-based polymer TQ1 (poly[2,3-bis-(3-octyloxyphenyl)quinoxaline-5,8-diyl-alt-thiophene-2,5- diyl]) is a promising candidate as electron donor in organic solar cells. In combination with the electron acceptor [6,6]- phenyl-C71- butyric acid methyl ester (PC70BM), TQ1 has resulted in solar cells with power conversion efficiencies of 7 %. We have studied TQ1 films, with and without PC70BM, spin-casted from different solvents, by fluorescence spectroscopy and UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy. We used chloroform (CF), chlorobenzene (CB), and odichlorobenzene (o-DCB) as solvents for the coating solutions and 1-chloronaphthalene (CN) as solvent additive. CN addition has been shown to enhance photo-conversion efficiency of these solar cells. Phase-separation causes lateral domain formation in the films and the domain size depends on the solvent . These morphological differences coincide with changes in the spectroscopic patterns of the films. From a spectroscopic point of view, TQ1 acts as fluorescent probe and PC70BM as quencher. The degree of fluorescence quenching is coupled to the morphology through the distance between TQ1 and PC70BM. Furthermore, if using a bad solvent for PC70BM, morphological regions rich in the fullerene yield emission characteristic for aggregated PC70BM. Clear differences were found, comparing the TQ1:PC70BM blend films casted from different solvents and at different ratios between the donor and acceptor. The morphology also influences the UV/VIS absorption spectra, yielding further information on the composition. The results show that fluorescence and UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy can be used to detect aggregation in blended films and that these methods extend the morphological information beyond the scale accessible with microscopy.

  14. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  15. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore » data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  16. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  17. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  18. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  19. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy--digital detection of gas absorption harmonics based on Fourier analysis.

    PubMed

    Mei, Liang; Svanberg, Sune

    2015-03-20

    This work presents a detailed study of the theoretical aspects of the Fourier analysis method, which has been utilized for gas absorption harmonic detection in wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). The lock-in detection of the harmonic signal is accomplished by studying the phase term of the inverse Fourier transform of the Fourier spectrum that corresponds to the harmonic signal. The mathematics and the corresponding simulation results are given for each procedure when applying the Fourier analysis method. The present work provides a detailed view of the WMS technique when applying the Fourier analysis method.

  20. A quality control technique based on UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy for tequila distillery factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa Garcia, O.; Ramos Ortiz, G.; Maldonado, J. L.; Pichardo Molina, J.; Meneses Nava, M. A.; Landgrave, Enrique; Cervantes, M. J.

    2006-02-01

    A low cost technique based on the UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy is presented for the quality control of the spirit drink known as tequila. It is shown that such spectra offer enough information to discriminate a given spirit drink from a group of bottled commercial tequilas. The technique was applied to white tequilas. Contrary to the reference analytic methods, such as chromatography, for this technique neither special personal training nor sophisticated instrumentations is required. By using hand-held instrumentation this technique can be applied in situ during the production process.