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Sample records for absorption spectroscopy raman

  1. Raman spectroscopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Raman spectroscopy has gained increased use and importance in recent years for accurate and precise detection of physical and chemical properties of food materials, due to the greater specificity and sensitivity of Raman techniques over other analytical techniques. This book chapter presents Raman s...

  2. Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  3. High-performance dispersive Raman and absorption spectroscopy as tools for drug identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawluczyk, Olga; Andrey, Sam; Nogas, Paul; Roy, Andrew; Pawluczyk, Romuald

    2009-02-01

    Due to increasing availability of pharmaceuticals from many sources, a need is growing to quickly and efficiently analyze substances in terms of the consistency and accuracy of their chemical composition. Differences in chemical composition occur at very low concentrations, so that highly sensitive analytical methods become crucial. Recent progress in dispersive spectroscopy with the use of 2-dimensional detector arrays, permits for signal integration along a long (up to 12 mm long) entrance slit of a spectrometer, thereby increasing signal to noise ratio and improving the ability to detect small concentration changes. This is achieved with a non-scanning, non-destructive system. Two different methods using P&P Optica high performance spectrometers were used. High performance optical dispersion Raman and high performance optical absorption spectroscopy were employed to differentiate various acetaminophen-containing drugs, such as Tylenol and other generic brands, which differ in their ingredients. A 785 nm excitation wavelength was used in Raman measurements and strong Raman signals were observed in the spectral range 300-1800 cm-1. Measurements with the absorption spectrometer were performed in the wavelength range 620-1020 nm. Both Raman and absorption techniques used transmission light spectrometers with volume phase holographic gratings and provided sufficient spectral differences, often structural, allowing for drug differentiation.

  4. Wafer-scale metasurface for total power absorption, local field enhancement and single molecule Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Best, Michael D.; Camden, Jon P.; Crozier, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to detect molecules at low concentrations is highly desired for applications that range from basic science to healthcare. Considerable interest also exists for ultrathin materials with high optical absorption, e.g. for microbolometers and thermal emitters. Metal nanostructures present opportunities to achieve both purposes. Metal nanoparticles can generate gigantic field enhancements, sufficient for the Raman spectroscopy of single molecules. Thin layers containing metal nanostructures (“metasurfaces”) can achieve near-total power absorption at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Thus far, however, both aims (i.e. single molecule Raman and total power absorption) have only been achieved using metal nanostructures produced by techniques (high resolution lithography or colloidal synthesis) that are complex and/or difficult to implement over large areas. Here, we demonstrate a metasurface that achieves the near-perfect absorption of visible-wavelength light and enables the Raman spectroscopy of single molecules. Our metasurface is fabricated using thin film depositions, and is of unprecedented (wafer-scale) extent. PMID:24091825

  5. X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopy studies of molybdenum environments in borosilicate waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, David A.; Gan, Hao; Pegg, Ian L.

    2017-05-01

    Mo-containing high-level nuclear waste borosilicate glasses were investigated as part of an effort to improve Mo loading while avoiding yellow phase crystallization. Previous work showed that additions of vanadium decrease yellow phase formation and increases Mo solubility. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize Mo environments in HLW borosilicate glasses and to investigate possible structural relationships between Mo and V. Mo XAS spectra for the glasses indicate isolated tetrahedral Mo6+O4 with Mo-O distances near 1.75 Å. V XANES indicate tetrahedral V5+O4 as the dominant species. Raman spectra show composition dependent trends, where Mo-O symmetrical stretch modemore » frequencies (ν1) are sensitive to the mix of alkali and alkaline earth cations, decreasing by up to 10 cm-1 for glasses that change from Li+ to Na+ as the dominant network-modifying species. This indicates that MoO4 tetrahedra are isolated from the borosilicate network and are surrounded, at least partly, by Na+ and Li+. Secondary ν1 frequency effects, with changes up to 7 cm-1, were also observed with increasing V2O5 and MoO3 content. These secondary trends may indicate MoO4-MoO4 and MoO4-VO4 clustering, suggesting that V additions may stabilize Mo in the matrix with respect to yellow phase formation.« less

  6. X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopy studies of molybdenum environments in borosilicate waste glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, David A.; Gan, Hao; Pegg, Ian L.

    2017-05-01

    Mo-containing high-level nuclear waste borosilicate glasses were investigated as part of an effort to improve Mo loading while avoiding yellow phase crystallization. Previous work showed that additions of vanadium decrease yellow phase formation and increases Mo solubility. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize Mo environments in HLW borosilicate glasses and to investigate possible structural relationships between Mo and V. Mo XAS spectra for the glasses indicate isolated tetrahedral Mo6+O4 with Mo-O distances near 1.75 Å. V XANES indicate tetrahedral V5+O4 as the dominant species. Raman spectra show composition dependent trends, where Mo-O symmetrical stretch mode frequencies (ν1) are sensitive to the mix of alkali and alkaline earth cations, decreasing by up to 10 cm-1 for glasses that change from Li+ to Na+ as the dominant network-modifying species. This indicates that MoO4 tetrahedra are isolated from the borosilicate network and are surrounded, at least partly, by Na+ and Li+. Secondary ν1 frequency effects, with changes up to 7 cm-1, were also observed with increasing V2O5 and MoO3 content. These secondary trends may indicate MoO4-MoO4 and MoO4-VO4 clustering, suggesting that V additions may stabilize Mo in the matrix with respect to yellow phase formation.

  7. Optical Absorption and Raman Spectroscopy of Multiple Shocked Liquid Benzene to 10 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Root, S.

    2005-07-01

    Liquid benzene samples were multiply shocked to peak pressures ranging from 3 GPa to 10 GPa to examine physical and chemical changes in benzene. A xenon flashlamp was used to probe the visible spectrum of benzene for loses in transmitted light intensity caused by changes in the electronic structure (absorption) or a possible liquid to solid phase transition (scattering). Raman spectroscopy was used to corroborate transmission measurements by examining changes in the benzene vibrational modes. The C-C symmetric ring breathing mode (992 cm-1), C-H symmetric stretch (3061 cm-1), along with several weaker modes at 607 cm-1, 1178 cm-1, 1586 cm-1, and 1606 cm-1 were monitored during shock loading. An EOS was developed to calculate the temperature of the shock compressed benzene. The present work has demonstrated that liquid benzene remains unchanged during multiple shock loading up to 10 GPa. Work supported by ONR and DOE.

  8. Rotamer-Specific Photoisomerization of Difluorostilbenes from Transient Absorption and Transient Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Quick, M; Dobryakov, A L; Ioffe, I N; Berndt, F; Mahrwald, R; Ernsting, N P; Kovalenko, S A

    2018-01-25

    Photoisomerization of 2,2'-, 3,3'-, and 4,4'-difluorostilbene (F2, F3, F4, respectively) in n-hexane, perfluoro-n-hexane, and acetonitrile is studied with broadband transient absorption (TA) and femtosecond stimulated Raman (FSR) spectroscopy and by DFT/TDDFT calculations. F2 and F3 possess three rotamers (rotational isomers) each, while F4 has one single conformation only. These differences are reflected in TA and FSR spectra. Thus F4 reveals a monoexponential decay of TA with τ 1 = 172 ps in n-hexane, as expected for a single species. For F2 and F3, the decays are biexponential in all solvents, corresponding to two distinctly discerned rotamers or rotamer fractions. Specifically, for F2 in n-hexane, τ 1 = 357 ps (83%) and τ 2 = 62 ps (17%), and for F3 in the same solvent, τ 1 = 222 ps (57%), and τ 2 = 81 ps (43%). The weights in brackets agree with theoretically estimated ground-state abundances of the rotamers. Furthermore, a global fit of the TA and FSR data allows us to extract the spectra of the pure rotamers. The Raman spectra of S 0 and S 1 are in qualitative agreement with calculations.

  9. Alcohol-catalyzed photoreduction of iron-porphyrin complexes revealed by resonance raman and absorption spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, T.; Fidler, V.; Ozaki, Y.; Kitagawa, T.

    1990-06-01

    Photoreduction of Fe III(OEP) (2-MeIm) (OEP is octaethylporphyrin; 2-MeIm is 2-methylimidazole) was found to be catalyzed by a trace amount of MeOH present in Ch 2Cl 2 as a stabilizer. The absence of either 2-MeIm or MeOH in the CH 2Cl 2 solution of Fe III(OEP) X (X is Cl -, Br - or I -) leads to no photoreduction. The presence of MeOH in the Fe III(OEP) (2-MeIm) solution results in the appearance of a new absorption band at 585 nm, and when Raman scattering was excited at 590 nm, a new Raman band appeared at 524 cm -. This band exhibited an upshift by 4 cm - with 54Fe(OEP) (2-MeIm)(CH 3OH) and a downshift by 12 cm -1 with 56Fe(OEP)(2-MeIm) (CD 3OD) and was therefore assigned to the Fe III-MeOH stretching vibration. The excitation profile of this band gave a peak around 585 nm and accordingly, the new absorption band at 584 nm was assigned to a charge-transfer (CT) band from MeOH to the Fe III ion. It was most unexpected that the photoreduction did not occur upon laser illumination within the CT band.

  10. High-Pressure Synchrotron Infrared Absorption and Raman Spectroscopy of ζ-N_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoryanz, E.; Goncharov, A. F.; Mao, H. K.; Hemley, R. J.

    2000-03-01

    Infrared mid-IR and Raman spectra of high-pressure, low-temperature phases of solid nitrogen have been measured to above 40 GPa. The transition to the lower-symmetry ordered phase ζ at 21 GPa, reported by Schiferl et al. [1]. has been confirmed. We observe three Raman-active and two IR components of the nu2 stretching mode (disk-like molecules) and only one Raman-active component of the nu1 mode (sphere-like molecules). All the vibron modes increase frequency with pressure. The structure of ζ-N2 phase is discussed. [1] Schiferl et al., J. Phys. Chem., 89, 2324 (1985).

  11. A new on-axis micro-spectrophotometer for combining Raman, fluorescence and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy with macromolecular crystallography at the Swiss Light Source.

    PubMed

    Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian S N; Thominet, Vincent; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Fuchs, Martin R

    2013-09-01

    The combination of X-ray diffraction experiments with optical methods such as Raman, UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy greatly enhances and complements the specificity of the obtained information. The upgraded version of the in situ on-axis micro-spectrophotometer, MS2, at the macromolecular crystallography beamline X10SA of the Swiss Light Source is presented. The instrument newly supports Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy, in addition to the previously available UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence modes. With the recent upgrades of the spectral bandwidth, instrument stability, detection efficiency and control software, the application range of the instrument and its ease of operation were greatly improved. Its on-axis geometry with collinear X-ray and optical axes to ensure optimal control of the overlap of sample volumes probed by each technique is still unique amongst comparable facilities worldwide and the instrument has now been in general user operation for over two years.

  12. A new on-axis micro-spectrophotometer for combining Raman, fluorescence and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy with macromolecular crystallography at the Swiss Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian S. N.; Thominet, Vincent; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Fuchs, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of X-ray diffraction experiments with optical methods such as Raman, UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy greatly enhances and complements the specificity of the obtained information. The upgraded version of the in situ on-axis micro-spectrophotometer, MS2, at the macromolecular crystallography beamline X10SA of the Swiss Light Source is presented. The instrument newly supports Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy, in addition to the previously available UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence modes. With the recent upgrades of the spectral bandwidth, instrument stability, detection efficiency and control software, the application range of the instrument and its ease of operation were greatly improved. Its on-axis geometry with collinear X-ray and optical axes to ensure optimal control of the overlap of sample volumes probed by each technique is still unique amongst comparable facilities worldwide and the instrument has now been in general user operation for over two years. PMID:23955041

  13. Raman spectroscopy in astrobiology.

    PubMed

    Jorge Villar, Susana E; Edwards, Howell G M

    2006-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is proposed as a valuable analytical technique for planetary exploration because it is sensitive to organic and inorganic compounds and able to unambiguously identify key spectral markers in a mixture of biological and geological components; furthermore, sample manipulation is not required and any size of sample can be studied without chemical or mechanical pretreatment. NASA and ESA are considering the adoption of miniaturised Raman spectrometers for inclusion in suites of analytical instrumentation to be placed on robotic landers on Mars in the near future to search for extinct or extant life signals. In this paper we review the advantages and limitations of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of complex specimens with relevance to the detection of bio- and geomarkers in extremophilic organisms which are considered to be terrestrial analogues of possible extraterrestial life that could have developed on planetary surfaces.

  14. Identification of different forms of cocaine and substances used in adulteration using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Penido, Ciro A F O; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu T; Zângaro, Renato A; Silveira, Landulfo

    2015-01-01

    Identification of cocaine and subsequent quantification immediately after seizure are problems for the police in developing countries such as Brazil. This work proposes a comparison between the Raman and FT-IR techniques as methods to identify cocaine, the adulterants used to increase volume, and possible degradation products in samples seized by the police. Near-infrared Raman spectra (785 nm excitation, 10 sec exposure time) and FT-IR-ATR spectra were obtained from different samples of street cocaine and some substances commonly used as adulterants. Freebase powder, hydrochloride powder, and crack rock can be distinguished by both Raman and FT-IR spectroscopies, revealing differences in their chemical structure. Most of the samples showed characteristic peaks of degradation products such as benzoylecgonine and benzoic acid, and some presented evidence of adulteration with aluminum sulfate and sodium carbonate. Raman spectroscopy is better than FT-IR for identifying benzoic acid and inorganic adulterants in cocaine. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. Raman spectroscopy of oral bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Andrew J.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Quivey, Robert G.

    2003-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been employed to measure the varying concentrations of two oral bacteria in simple mixtures. Evaporated droplets of centrifuged mixtures of Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mutans were analyzed via Raman microspectroscopy. The concentration of s. sanguis was determined based upon the measured Raman spectrum, using partial least squares cross-validation, with an r2 value of 0.98.

  16. Intrinsic Raman spectroscopy for quantitative biological spectroscopy Part II

    PubMed Central

    Bechtel, Kate L.; Shih, Wei-Chuan; Feld, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of intrinsic Raman spectroscopy (IRS) at reducing errors caused by absorption and scattering. Physical tissue models, solutions of varying absorption and scattering coefficients with known concentrations of Raman scatterers, are studied. We show significant improvement in prediction error by implementing IRS to predict concentrations of Raman scatterers using both ordinary least squares regression (OLS) and partial least squares regression (PLS). In particular, we show that IRS provides a robust calibration model that does not increase in error when applied to samples with optical properties outside the range of calibration. PMID:18711512

  17. Optical and biological properties of plasma-treated Neurospora crassa spores as studied by absorption, circular dichroism, and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Geon Joon; Park, Gyungsoon; Choi, Eun Ha

    2017-11-01

    We studied the effect of plasma treatment on the optical, structural and biological properties of Neurospora crassa ( N. crassa) spores. An atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in aqueous solution. The APPJ treatment of N. crassa spores in water significantly reduced the viability of spores. The reduction in the spore viability can be attributed to the reactive species from the plasma itself and those derived from the reaction of plasma radicals with aqueous solution. These structural modifications were contingent on the medium in which N. crassa spores were suspended; plasma treatment of N. crassa spores in PBS did not significantly affect the viability of spores as compared with N. crassa spores in water. Scanning electron microscopy images and circular dichroism spectra indicated that the spore cell wall was damaged by plasma treatment. The optical absorption spectrum of untreated N. crassa spores exhibited two resonance absorption bands at approximately λ1 ≈ 260 nm and λ2 ≈ 472 nm, originating from deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and β-carotene. The Raman spectrum of untreated N. crassa spores exhibited three main peaks at 1519, 1157 and 1006 cm -1, attributed to β-carotene inside the cell wall. The Raman spectra showed that the APPJ treatment of N. crassa spores in water caused degradation of β-carotene, affecting the viability of spores.

  18. Coordination of Fe, Ga and Ge in high pressure glasses by Moessbauer, Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and geological implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleet, M. E.; Henderson, G. S.; Herzberg, C. T.; Crozier, E. D.; Osborne, M. D.; Scarfe, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    For some time, it has been recognized that the structure of silicate liquids has a great bearing on such magma properties as viscosity, diffusivity, and thermal expansion and on the extrapolation of thermodynamic quantities outside of the experimentally measurable range. In this connection it is vital to know if pressure imposes changes in melt structure similar to the pressure-induced reconstructive transformations in crystals. In the present study on 1 bar and high pressure glasses, an investigation is conducted regarding the coordination of Fe(3+) in Fe silicate glasses by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy is employed to explore the coordinations of Ge(4+) in GeO2 glasses and of Ga(3+) in NaGa silicate glasses, while the coordination of Ga(3+) in NaGaSiO4 glasses is studied with the aid of methods of X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  19. Coordination of Fe, Ga and Ge in high pressure glasses by Moessbauer, Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and geological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleet, M. E.; Herzberg, C. T.; Henderson, G. S.; Crozier, E. D.; Osborne, M. D.; Scarfe, C. M.

    1984-07-01

    For some time, it has been recognized that the structure of silicate liquids has a great bearing on such magma properties as viscosity, diffusivity, and thermal expansion and on the extrapolation of thermodynamic quantities outside of the experimentally measurable range. In this connection it is vital to know if pressure imposes changes in melt structure similar to the pressure-induced reconstructive transformations in crystals. In the present study on 1 bar and high pressure glasses, an investigation is conducted regarding the coordination of Fe(3+) in Fe silicate glasses by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy is employed to explore the coordinations of Ge(4+) in GeO2 glasses and of Ga(3+) in NaGa silicate glasses, while the coordination of Ga(3+) in NaGaSiO4 glasses is studied with the aid of methods of X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  20. Raman Spectroscopy of Cocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Frank; Reardon, Paul; Ochoa, Romulo; Abourahma, Heba; Marti, Marcus; Dimeo, Rachel

    2010-02-01

    Cocrystals are a class of compounds that consist of two or more molecules that are held together by hydrogen bonding. Pharmaceutical cocrystals are those that contain an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) as one of the components. Pharmaceutical cocrystals are of particular interest and have gained a lot of attention in recent years because they offer the ability to modify the physical properties of the API, like solubility and bioavailability, without altering the chemical structure of the API. The APIs that we targeted for our studies are theophylline (Tp) and indomethacin (Ind). These compounds have been mixed with complementary coformers (cocrystal former) that include acetamide (AcONH2), melamine (MLM), nicotinic acid (Nic-COOH), 4-cyanopyridine (4-CNPy) and 4-aminopyridine (4-NH2Py). Raman spectroscopy has been used to characterize these cocrystals. Spectra of the cocrystals were compared to those of the coformers to analyze for peak shifts, specifically those corresponding to hydrogen bonding. A 0.5 m CCD Spex spectrometer was used, in a micro-Raman setup, for spectral analysis. An Argon ion Coherent laser at 514.5 nm was used as the excitation source. )

  1. Polarized micro Raman spectroscopy of bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Hyerim; Yoon, Duhee; Son, Young-Woo; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2009-03-01

    The frequency of Raman 2D band of the graphite depends on the excitation laser energy. This phenomenon is explained with double resonance Raman process. In polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy of single layer graphene, Raman G band (˜1586 cm-1) is isotropic, and 2D band (˜2686 cm-1) strongly depends on relative polarizations of the incident and scattered photons. This strong polarization dependence originates from inhomogeneous optical absorption and emission mediated by resonant electron-phonon interaction. In bi-layer graphene, Raman 2D band can be decomposed into four Lorenztian peaks which can be interpreted in terms of the four transition paths in the double resonance Raman process. We investigated the polarization dependence of each Lorenztian peak in the Raman 2D band of bi-layer graphene for different excitation laser energies. Strong polarization dependence of the Raman 2D band, similar to the case of single layer graphene, is observed. The excitation energy dependence of the polarized Raman scattering is analyzed in terms of the band structure of bi-layer graphene.

  2. Blood analysis by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Enejder, Annika M K; Koo, Tae-Woong; Oh, Jeankun; Hunter, Martin; Sasic, Slobodan; Feld, Michael S; Horowitz, Gary L

    2002-11-15

    Concentrations of multiple analytes were simultaneously measured in whole blood with clinical accuracy, without sample processing, using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were acquired with an instrument employing nonimaging optics, designed using Monte Carlo simulations of the influence of light-scattering-absorbing blood cells on the excitation and emission of Raman light in turbid medium. Raman spectra were collected from whole blood drawn from 31 individuals. Quantitative predictions of glucose, urea, total protein, albumin, triglycerides, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were made by means of partial least-squares (PLS) analysis with clinically relevant precision (r(2) values >0.93). The similarity of the features of the PLS calibration spectra to those of the respective analyte spectra illustrates that the predictions are based on molecular information carried by the Raman light. This demonstrates the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy for quantitative measurements of biomolecular contents in highly light-scattering and absorbing media.

  3. Near-field Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayars, Eric James

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate differences observed between Raman spectra when seen through a Near-field Scanning Optical Microscope (NSOM) and spectra of the same materials in conventional Raman or micro-Raman configurations. One source of differences in the observed spectra is a strong z polarized component in the near-field radiation; observations of the magnitude of this effect are compared with theoretical predictions for the field intensity near an NSOM tip. Large electric field gradients near the sharp NSOM probe may be another source of differences. This Gradient-Field Raman (GFR) effect was observed, and there is good evidence that it plays a significant role in Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). The NSOM data seen, however, are not sufficient to prove conclusively that the spectral variations seen are due to the field gradients.

  4. Raman Spectroscopy of Microbial Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid nondestructive technique providing spectroscopic and structural information on both organic and inorganic molecular compounds. Extensive applications for the method in the characterization of pigments have been found. Due to the high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for the detection of chlorophylls, carotenoids, scytonemin, and a range of other pigments found in the microbial world, it is an excellent technique to monitor the presence of such pigments, both in pure cultures and in environmental samples. Miniaturized portable handheld instruments are available; these instruments can be used to detect pigments in microbiological samples of different types and origins under field conditions. PMID:24682303

  5. Raman spectroscopy of white wines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Coralie; Bruneel, Jean-Luc; Guyon, François; Médina, Bernard; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Guillaume, François

    2015-08-15

    The feasibility of exploiting Raman scattering to analyze white wines has been investigated using 3 different wavelengths of the incoming laser radiation in the near-UV (325 nm), visible (532 nm) and near infrared (785 nm). To help in the interpretation of the Raman spectra, the absorption properties in the UV-visible range of two wine samples as well as their laser induced fluorescence have also been investigated. Thanks to the strong intensity enhancement of the Raman scattered light due to electronic resonance with 325 nm laser excitation, hydroxycinnamic acids may be detected and analyzed selectively. Fructose and glucose may also be easily detected below ca. 1000 cm(-1). This feasibility study demonstrates the potential of the Raman spectroscopic technique for the analysis of white wines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A new concept of efficient therapeutic drug monitoring using the high-resolution continuum source absorption spectrometry and the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yanlong; Fuss, Harald; Lademann, Jürgen; Huang, Mao Dong; Becker-Ross, Helmut; Florek, Stefan; Patzelt, Alexa; Meinke, Martina C.; Jung, Sora; Esser, Norbert

    2018-04-01

    In this study, a new therapeutic drug monitoring approach has been tested based on the combination of CaF molecular absorption using high-resolution continuum source absorption spectrometry (HR-CSAS) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). HR-CSAS with mini graphite tube was successfully tested for clinical therapeutic drug monitoring of the fluorine-containing drug capecitabine in sweat samples of cancer patients: It showed advantageous features of high selectivity (no interference from Cl), high sensitivity (characteristic mass of 0.1 ng at CaF 583.069 nm), low sample consumption (down to 30 nL) and fast measurement (no sample pretreatment and less than 1 min of responding time) in tracing the fluorine signal out of capecitabine. However, this technique has the disadvantage of the total loss of the drug's structure information after burning the sample at very high temperature. Therefore, a new concept of combining HR-CSAS with a non-destructive spectroscopic method (SERS) was proposed for the sensitive sensing and specific identification of capecitabine. We tested and succeed in obtaining the molecular characteristics of the metabolite of capecitabine (named 5-fluorouracil) by the non-destructive SERS technique. With the results shown in this work, it is demonstrated that the combined spectroscopic technique of HR-CSAS and SERS will be very useful in efficient therapeutic drug monitoring in the future.

  7. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrell, Robin L.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the basis for the technique and its experimental requirements. Describes a few examples of the analytical problems to which surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been and can be applied. Provides a perspective on the current limitations and frontiers in developing SERS as an analytical technique. (MVL)

  8. Quantitative fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy for tissue Raman measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Bergholt, Mads; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-03-01

    Molecular profiling of tissue using near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy has shown great promise for in vivo detection and prognostication of cancer. The Raman spectra measured from the tissue generally contain fundamental information about the absolute biomolecular concentrations in tissue and its changes associated with disease transformation. However, producing analogues tissue Raman spectra present a great technical challenge. In this preliminary study, we propose a method to ensure the reproducible tissue Raman measurements and validated with the in vivo Raman spectra (n=150) of inner lip acquired using different laser powers (i.e., 30 and 60 mW). A rapid Raman spectroscopy system coupled with a ball-lens fiber-optic Raman probe was utilized for tissue Raman measurements. The investigational results showed that the variations between the spectra measured with different laser powers are almost negligible, facilitating the quantitative analysis of tissue Raman measurements in vivo.

  9. Raman spectroscopy of bone metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Sottnik, Joseph; Morris, Michael; Keller, Evan

    2012-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy of bone has been used to characterize chemical changes occurring in diseases such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and osteomyelitis. Metastasis of cancer into bone causes changes to bone quality that are similar to those observed in osteoporosis, such as decreased bone strength, but with an accelerated timeframe. In particular, osteolytic (bone degrading) lesions in bone metastasis have a marked effect on patient quality of life because of increased risk of fractures, pain, and hypercalcemia. We use Raman spectroscopy to examine bone from two different mouse models of osteolytic bone metastasis. Raman spectroscopy measures physicochemical information which cannot be obtained through standard biochemical and histological measurements. This study was reviewed and approved by the University of Michigan University Committee on the Care and Use of Animals. Two mouse models of prostate cancer bone metastasis, RM1 (n=3) and PC3-luc (n=4) were examined. Tibiae were injected with RM1 or PC3-luc cancer cells, while the contralateral tibiae received a placebo injection for use as controls. After 2 weeks of incubation, the mice were sacrificed and the tibiae were examined by Raman microspectroscopy (λ=785 nm). Spectroscopic markers corresponding to mineral stoichiometry, bone mineralization, and mineral crystallinity were compared in spectra from the cancerous and control tibiae. X-ray imaging of the tibia confirmed extensive osteolysis in the RM1 mice, with tumor invasion into adjoining soft tissue and moderate osteolysis in the PC3-luc mice. Raman spectroscopic markers indicate that osteolytic lesions are less mineralized than normal bone tissue, with an altered mineral stoichiometry and crystallinity.

  10. FT-Raman Spectroscopy: A Catalyst for the Raman Explosion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The limitations of Fourier transform (FT) Raman spectroscopy, which is used to detect and analyze the scattered radiation, are discussed. FT-Raman has served to revitalize a field that was lagging and the presence of Raman instrumentation as a routine analytical tool is established for the foreseeable future.

  11. Study and application of new Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiushi; Zhang, Xiaohua

    2016-03-01

    Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) is a new type of Raman Spectroscopy technology, which can detect the medium concealed in the opaque or sub-transparent material fast and nondestructively. The article summarized Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy`s international and domestic study and application progress on contraband detecting, medical science (bone ingredient, cancer diagnose etc.), agricultural products, historical relic identification etc. and stated the technology would become an effective measurement which had wide application prospect.

  12. Transcutaneous Raman Spectroscopy of Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Jason R.

    Clinical diagnoses of bone health and fracture risk typically rely upon measurements of bone density or structure, but the strength of a bone is also dependent upon its chemical composition. One technology that has been used extensively in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies to measure the chemical composition of bone is Raman spectroscopy. This spectroscopic technique provides chemical information about a sample by probing its molecular vibrations. In the case of bone tissue, Raman spectra provide chemical information about both the inorganic mineral and organic matrix components, which each contribute to bone strength. To explore the relationship between bone strength and chemical composition, our laboratory has contributed to ex vivo, exposed-bone animal studies of rheumatoid arthritis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, and prolonged lead exposure. All of these studies suggest that Raman-based predictions of biomechanical strength may be more accurate than those produced by the clinically-used parameter of bone mineral density. The utility of Raman spectroscopy in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies has inspired attempts to perform bone spectroscopy transcutaneously. Although the results are promising, further advancements are necessary to make non-invasive, in vivo measurements of bone that are of sufficient quality to generate accurate predictions of fracture risk. In order to separate the signals from bone and soft tissue that contribute to a transcutaneous measurement, we developed an overconstrained extraction algorithm that is based upon fitting with spectral libraries derived from separately-acquired measurements of the underlying tissue components. This approach allows for accurate spectral unmixing despite the fact that similar chemical components (e.g., type I collagen) are present in both soft tissue and bone and was applied to experimental data in order to transcutaneously detect, to our knowledge for the first time, age- and disease-related spectral

  13. Raman and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy in Mineral Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, J. W.

    2014-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is particularly useful for rapid identification of minerals and gemstones. Raman spectrometers also allow PL studies for authentication of samples and geological provenance, diamond type screening and detection of HPHT treatments.

  14. Raman spectroscopy of biomedical polyethylenes.

    PubMed

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2017-06-01

    With the development of three-dimensional Raman algorithms for local mapping of oxidation and plastic strain, and the ability to resolve molecular orientation patterns with microscopic spatial resolution, there is an opportunity to re-examine many of the foundations on which our understanding of biomedical grade ultra-high molecular weight polyethylenes (UHMWPEs) are based. By implementing polarized Raman spectroscopy into an automatized tool with an improved precision in non-destructively resolving Euler angles, oxidation levels, and microscopic strain, we become capable to make accurate and traceable measurements of the in vitro and in vivo tribological responses of a variety of commercially available UHMWPE bearings for artificial hip and knee joints. In this paper, we first review the foundations and the main algorithms for Raman analyses of oxidation and strain of biomedical polyethylene. Then, we critically re-examine a large body of Raman data previously collected on different polyethylene joint components after in vitro testing or in vivo service, in order to shed new light on an area of particular importance to joint orthopedics: the microscopic nature of UHMWPE surface degradation in the human body. A complex scenario of physical chemistry appears from the Raman analyses, which highlights the importance of molecular-scale phenomena besides mere microstructural changes. The availability of the Raman microscopic probe for visualizing oxidation patterns unveiled striking findings related to the chemical contribution to wear degradation: chain-breaking and subsequent formation of carboxylic acid sites preferentially occur in correspondence of third-phase regions, and they are triggered by emission of dehydroxylated oxygen from ceramic oxide counterparts. These findings profoundly differ from more popular (and simplistic) notions of mechanistic tribology adopted in analyzing joint simulator data. Statement of Significance This review was dedicated to the

  15. Raman Spectroscopy of Ocular Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Gellermann, Warner

    The optically transparent nature of the human eye has motivated numerous Raman studies aimed at the non-invasive optical probing of ocular tissue components critical to healthy vision. Investigations include the qualitative and quantitative detection of tissue-specific molecular constituents, compositional changes occurring with development of ocular pathology, and the detection and tracking of ocular drugs and nutritional supplements. Motivated by a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cataract formation in the aging human lens, a great deal of work has centered on the Raman detection of proteins and water content in the lens. Several protein groups and the hydroxyl response are readily detectable. Changes of protein compositions can be studied in excised noncataractous tissue versus aged tissue preparations as well as in tissue samples with artificially induced cataracts. Most of these studies are carried out in vitro using suitable animal models and conventional Raman techniques. Tissue water content plays an important role in optimum light transmission of the outermost transparent ocular structure, the cornea. Using confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to non-invasively measure the water to protein ratio as a measure of hydration status and to track drug-induced changes of the hydration levels in the rabbit cornea at various depths. The aqueous humor, normally supplying nutrients to cornea and lens, has an advantageous anterior location for Raman studies. Increasing efforts are pursued to non-invasively detect the presence of glucose and therapeutic concentrations of antibiotic drugs in this medium. In retinal tissue, Raman spectroscopy proves to be an important tool for research into the causes of macular degeneration, the leading cause of irreversible vision disorders and blindness in the elderly. It has been possible to detect the spectral features of advanced glycation and advanced lipooxydation end products in

  16. Raman Plus X: Biomedical Applications of Multimodal Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Das, Nandan K; Dai, Yichuan; Liu, Peng; Hu, Chuanzhen; Tong, Lieshu; Chen, Xiaoya; Smith, Zachary J

    2017-07-07

    Raman spectroscopy is a label-free method of obtaining detailed chemical information about samples. Its compatibility with living tissue makes it an attractive choice for biomedical analysis, yet its translation from a research tool to a clinical tool has been slow, hampered by fundamental Raman scattering issues such as long integration times and limited penetration depth. In this review we detail the how combining Raman spectroscopy with other techniques yields multimodal instruments that can help to surmount the translational barriers faced by Raman alone. We review Raman combined with several optical and non-optical methods, including fluorescence, elastic scattering, OCT, phase imaging, and mass spectrometry. In each section we highlight the power of each combination along with a brief history and presentation of representative results. Finally, we conclude with a perspective detailing both benefits and challenges for multimodal Raman measurements, and give thoughts on future directions in the field.

  17. Raman Plus X: Biomedical Applications of Multimodal Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nandan K.; Dai, Yichuan; Liu, Peng; Hu, Chuanzhen; Tong, Lieshu; Chen, Xiaoya

    2017-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a label-free method of obtaining detailed chemical information about samples. Its compatibility with living tissue makes it an attractive choice for biomedical analysis, yet its translation from a research tool to a clinical tool has been slow, hampered by fundamental Raman scattering issues such as long integration times and limited penetration depth. In this review we detail the how combining Raman spectroscopy with other techniques yields multimodal instruments that can help to surmount the translational barriers faced by Raman alone. We review Raman combined with several optical and non-optical methods, including fluorescence, elastic scattering, OCT, phase imaging, and mass spectrometry. In each section we highlight the power of each combination along with a brief history and presentation of representative results. Finally, we conclude with a perspective detailing both benefits and challenges for multimodal Raman measurements, and give thoughts on future directions in the field. PMID:28686212

  18. Raman spectroscopy of skin neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moryatov, A. A.; Kozlov, S. V.; Kaganov, O. I.; Orlov, A. E.; Zaharov, V. P.; Batrachenko, I. A.; Artemiev, D. N.; Blinov, N. V.

    2017-09-01

    Skin melanoma is spread inhomogeneously worldwide, particularly in Samara region there are high figures of skin neoplasms sick rate as well—18.6%. Research goal: to develop a new method of early non-invasive differential diagnostics of skin neoplasms. Registration of Raman spectrum was implemented in the distance of 3-4 mm, the spectrum registration from pathologically changed zone was subsequently conducted, then from healthy skin zone. The test time for 1 patient was no longer than 3-5 min. In a range of experiments ex vivo there were the following results: melanoma—24, basal cell cancer—25, squamosus cell sarcinoma—7, nevus pigmentosis—9, other malignant neoplasms—6; in vivo: melanoma—9, basal cell cancer—8, nevus pigmentosis—2, other benign neoplasms—2. The first results of the research dedicated to studying permissive opportunities of Raman spectroscopy, with successive two-phase analysis of received parameters display high efficiency of method of differential diagnostic for skin melanoma and other malignant neoplasms, pigment and benign skin neoplasms. Safety and rapidity of the research reveal a high potential of the technique.

  19. Stimulated Raman spectroscopy of 13CF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, R. Z.; Bermejo, D.; Boudon, V.

    2018-06-01

    CF4 is a powerful greenhouse gas, mostly released in the atmosphere by industries. A careful modeling of its absorption spectrum is required in order to allow accurate atmospheric concentration measurements. For this aim, high resolution Raman spectroscopy is of great help, since it gives access to rovibrational levels that are not directly reachable through dipolar absorption, although they are involved in hot band generation. Following our previous work on 12CF4, we present here a similar investigation of the second isotopologue, 13CF4. The spectra of the ν1 (909.21 cm-1), 2ν1 -ν1 (906.77 cm-1), ν1 +ν2 -ν2 (909.33 cm-1), ν2 (435.47 cm-1), 2ν2 (868.10 cm-1) and 3ν2 -ν2 (865.73 cm-1) bands were obtained with a quasi-continuous wave stimulated Raman spectrometer. These six bands were studied at temperatures of 140 and 298 K (for the hot bands). These spectra could be assigned and modeled thanks to the XTDS and SPVIEW software developed in the Dijon group.

  20. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in life science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Airton A.; T. Soto, Cláudio A.; Ali, Syed M.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Canevari, Renata A.; Pereira, Liliane; Fávero, Priscila P.

    2015-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been applied to the analysis of biological samples for the last 12 years providing detection of changes occurring at the molecular level during the pathological transformation of the tissue. The potential use of this technology in cancer diagnosis has shown encouraging results for the in vivo, real-time and minimally invasive diagnosis. Confocal Raman technics has also been successfully applied in the analysis of skin aging process providing new insights in this field. In this paper it is presented the latest biomedical applications of Raman spectroscopy in our laboratory. It is shown that Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been used for biochemical and molecular characterization of thyroid tissue by micro-Raman spectroscopy and gene expression analysis. This study aimed to improve the discrimination between different thyroid pathologies by Raman analysis. A total of 35 thyroid tissues samples including normal tissue (n=10), goiter (n=10), papillary (n=10) and follicular carcinomas (n=5) were analyzed. The confocal Raman spectroscopy allowed a maximum discrimination of 91.1% between normal and tumor tissues, 84.8% between benign and malignant pathologies and 84.6% among carcinomas analyzed. It will be also report the application of in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy as an important sensor for detecting advanced glycation products (AGEs) on human skin.

  1. Coronagraphic Notch Filter for Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, David; Stirbl, Robert

    2004-01-01

    A modified coronagraph has been proposed as a prototype of improved notch filters in Raman spectrometers. Coronagraphic notch filters could offer alternatives to both (1) the large and expensive double or triple monochromators in older Raman spectrometers and (2) holographic notch filters, which are less expensive but are subject to environmental degradation as well as to limitations of geometry and spectral range. Measurement of a Raman spectrum is an exercise in measuring and resolving faint spectral lines close to a bright peak: In Raman spectroscopy, a monochromatic beam of light (the pump beam) excites a sample of material that one seeks to analyze. The pump beam generates a small flux of scattered light at wavelengths slightly greater than that of the pump beam. The shift in wavelength of the scattered light from the pump wavelength is known in the art as the Stokes shift. Typically, the flux of scattered light is of the order of 10 7 that of the pump beam and the Stokes shift lies in the wave-number range of 100 to 3,000 cm 1. A notch filter can be used to suppress the pump-beam spectral peak while passing the nearby faint Raman spectral lines. The basic principles of design and operation of a coronagraph offer an opportunity for engineering the spectral transmittance of the optics in a Raman spectrometer. A classical coronagraph may be understood as two imaging systems placed end to end, such that the first system forms an intermediate real image of a nominally infinitely distant object and the second system forms a final real image of the intermediate real image. If the light incident on the first telescope is collimated, then the intermediate image is a point-spread function (PSF). If an appropriately tailored occulting spot (e.g., a Gaussian-apodized spot with maximum absorption on axis) is placed on the intermediate image plane, then the instrument inhibits transmission of light from an on-axis source. However, the PSFs of off-axis light sources are

  2. Raman spectroscopy: Watching a molecule breathe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatkowski, Lukasz; Hugall, James T.; van Hulst, Niek F.

    2014-08-01

    Marrying the single-molecule detection ability of surface-enhanced Raman scattering with the extreme time resolution of ultrafast coherent spectroscopy enables the vibrations of a single molecule to be observed.

  3. Micro-mirror arrays for Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, W. M.

    2015-03-01

    In this research we study Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies as non-destructive and noninvasive methods for probing biological material and "living systems." Particularly for a living material any probe need be non-destructive and non-invasive, as well as provide real time measurement information and be cost effective to be generally useful. Over the past few years the components needed to measure weak and complex processes such as Raman scattering have evolved substantially with the ready availability of lasers, dichroic filters, low noise and sensitive detectors, digitizers and signal processors. A Raman spectrum consists of a wavelength or frequency spectrum that corresponds to the inelastic (Raman) photon signal that results from irradiating a "Raman active" material. Raman irradiation of a material usually and generally uses a single frequency laser. The Raman fingerprint spectrum that results from a Raman interaction can be determined from the frequencies scattered and received by an appropriate detector. Spectra are usually "digitized" and numerically matched to a reference sample or reference material spectra in performing an analysis. Fortunately today with the many "commercial off-the-shelf" components that are available, weak intensity effects such as Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy can be used for a number of analysis applications. One of the experimental limitations in Raman measurement is the spectrometer itself. The spectrometer is the section of the system that either by interference plus detection or by dispersion plus detection that "signal" amplitude versus energy/frequency signals are measured. Particularly in Raman spectroscopy, optical signals carrying desired "information" about the analyte are extraordinarily weak and require special considerations when measuring. We will discuss here the use of compact spectrometers and a micro-mirror array system (used is the digital micro-mirror device (DMD) supplied by the DLP® Products group of

  4. Heme Structural Perturbation of PEG-Modified Horseradish Peroxidase C in Aromatic Organic Solvents Probed by Optical Absorption and Resonance Raman Dispersion Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qing; Al-Azzam, Wasfi; Griebenow, Kai; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2003-01-01

    The heme structure perturbation of poly(ethylene glycol)-modified horseradish peroxidase (HRP-PEG) dissolved in benzene and toluene has been probed by resonance Raman dispersion spectroscopy. Analysis of the depolarization ratio dispersion of several Raman bands revealed an increase of rhombic B1g distortion with respect to native HRP in water. This finding strongly supports the notion that a solvent molecule has moved into the heme pocket where it stays in close proximity to one of the heme's pyrrole rings. The interactions between the solvent molecule, the heme, and the heme cavity slightly stabilize the hexacoordinate high spin state without eliminating the pentacoordinate quantum mixed spin state that is dominant in the resting enzyme. On the contrary, the model substrate benzohydroxamic acid strongly favors the hexacoordinate quantum mixed spin state and induces a B2g-type distortion owing to its position close to one of the heme methine bridges. These results strongly suggest that substrate binding must have an influence on the heme geometry of HRP and that the heme structure of the enzyme-substrate complex (as opposed to the resting state) must be the key to understanding the chemical reactivity of HRP. PMID:12719258

  5. Applications of Raman spectroscopy to gemology.

    PubMed

    Bersani, Danilo; Lottici, Pier Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Being nondestructive and requiring short measurement times, a low amount of material, and no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is used for routine investigation in the study of gemstone inclusions and treatments and for the characterization of mounted gems. In this work, a review of the use of laboratory Raman and micro-Raman spectrometers and of portable Raman systems in the gemology field is given, focusing on gem identification and on the evaluation of the composition, provenance, and genesis of gems. Many examples are shown of the use of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for the identification of imitations, synthetic gems, and enhancement treatments in natural gemstones. Some recent developments are described, with particular attention being given to the semiprecious stone jade and to two important organic materials used in jewelry, i.e., pearls and corals.

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of urine by an ingenious near-infrared Raman spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Weiwei; Li, Yongzeng; Chen, Guannan; Huang, Zufang; Liao, Xiaohua; Xie, Zhiming; Chen, Rong

    2007-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of an elaborately devised near-infrared Raman system in analysis of urine. The broad band in the long-wavelength region of the electronic absorption spectra of the sol with added adsorbent at certain concentrations has been explained in terms of the aggregation of the colloidal silver particles. We have reported the surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) spectra of urine, and studied the silver solution enhanced effects on the urine Raman scattering. The Raman bands of human's urine was assigned to certain molecule vibrations. We have found that different donators have dissimilar SERS of urine in different physiological condition. Comparatively few studies have explored the ability of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of urine acid. In the present report, we investigated the ability of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy to measure uric acid in the human urine. The results suggested that the present Raman system holds considerable promise for practical use. Practical applications such as the quantitative medical examination of urine metabolites may also be feasible in the near future.

  7. Emerging technology: applications of Raman spectroscopy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kast, Rachel E; Tucker, Stephanie C; Killian, Kevin; Trexler, Micaela; Honn, Kenneth V; Auner, Gregory W

    2014-09-01

    There is a need in prostate cancer diagnostics and research for a label-free imaging methodology that is nondestructive, rapid, objective, and uninfluenced by water. Raman spectroscopy provides a molecular signature, which can be scaled from micron-level regions of interest in cells to macroscopic areas of tissue. It can be used for applications ranging from in vivo or in vitro diagnostics to basic science laboratory testing. This work describes the fundamentals of Raman spectroscopy and complementary techniques including surface enhanced Raman scattering, resonance Raman spectroscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, confocal Raman spectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering, and spatially offset Raman spectroscopy. Clinical applications of Raman spectroscopy to prostate cancer will be discussed, including screening, biopsy, margin assessment, and monitoring of treatment efficacy. Laboratory applications including cell identification, culture monitoring, therapeutics development, and live imaging of cellular processes are discussed. Potential future avenues of research are described, with emphasis on multiplexing Raman spectroscopy with other modalities.

  8. Multiplex coherent raman spectroscopy detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Peter; Joyner, Candace C.; Patrick, Sheena T.; Guyer, Dean R.

    2004-06-08

    A multiplex coherent Raman spectrometer (10) and spectroscopy method rapidly detects and identifies individual components of a chemical mixture separated by a separation technique, such as gas chromatography. The spectrometer (10) and method accurately identify a variety of compounds because they produce the entire gas phase vibrational Raman spectrum of the unknown gas. This is accomplished by tilting a Raman cell (20) to produce a high-intensity, backward-stimulated, coherent Raman beam of 683 nm, which drives a degenerate optical parametric oscillator (28) to produce a broadband beam of 1100-1700 nm covering a range of more than 3000 wavenumber. This broadband beam is combined with a narrowband beam of 532 nm having a bandwidth of 0.003 wavenumbers and focused into a heated windowless cell (38) that receives gases separated by a gas chromatograph (40). The Raman radiation scattered from these gases is filtered and sent to a monochromator (50) with multichannel detection.

  9. Multiplex coherent raman spectroscopy detector and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyner, Candace C. (Inventor); Patrick, Sheena T. (Inventor); Chen, Peter (Inventor); Guyer, Dean R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A multiplex coherent Raman spectrometer (10) and spectroscopy method rapidly detects and identifies individual components of a chemical mixture separated by a separation technique, such as gas chromatography. The spectrometer (10) and method accurately identify a variety of compounds because they produce the entire gas phase vibrational Raman spectrum of the unknown gas. This is accomplished by tilting a Raman cell (20) to produce a high-intensity, backward-stimulated, coherent Raman beam of 683 nm, which drives a degenerate optical parametric oscillator (28) to produce a broadband beam of 1100-1700 nm covering a range of more than 3000 wavenumber. This broadband beam is combined with a narrowband beam of 532 nm having a bandwidth of 0.003 wavenumbers and focused into a heated windowless cell (38) that receives gases separated by a gas chromatograph (40). The Raman radiation scattered from these gases is filtered and sent to a monochromator (50) with multichannel detection.

  10. Coherent Raman spectroscopy for supersonic flow measurments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.

    1986-01-01

    In collaboration with NASA/Langley Research Center, a truly nonintrusive and nonseeding method for measuring supersonic molecular flow parameters was proposed and developed at Colorado State University. The feasibility of this Raman Doppler Velocimetry (RDV), currently operated in a scanning mode, was demonstrated not only in a laboratory environment at Colorado State University, but also in a major wind tunnel at NASA/Langley Research Center. The research progress of the RDV development is summarized. In addition, methods of coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin spectroscopy and single-pulse coherent Raman spectroscopy are investigated, respectively, for measurements of high-pressure and turbulent flows.

  11. Raman spectroscopy and Raman imaging for early detection of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Ortega, Angel; Estrela, Jose Maria

    2004-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique as it provides fundamental information about vibrational modes of a system. Eigenvalues of these modes are very sensitive to the strength of the chemical bonds and perturbations caused by the environment, particularly charge distribution and alterations in the dipole strength of the system. All these parameters are profoundly modified during the tumor formation process nad hence Raman technique could be a unique and also a direct approach for evaluating tumor genesis at early stages. for this pupose the present investigation was carried out. We used cultured wild type and c-ras transformed NIH 3T3 fibroblast. The samples were treated with methyl alcohol solution ina conventional manner and then Raman spectra nad images were obtained by a specially developed confocal Raman microscope. The present results reveal differences between both cell types in the spectral details as well as in the morphology. Raman images are able to detect the exact site where cancer-related changes have taken place. These results clearly indicate the superiority of the present technique over conventional methods such as images obtained by X-rays or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). Moreover, unlike other approaches, Raman images detect alterations at the submicron level rather than in the centimeter or millimeter range. Being an optical method it can be applied in vivo as a non-invasive technique potentially useful to early detection of cancer (particularly easy accessible cancers such as those of the skin and the digestive tract). The obtained resulsts suggest the great potential of Raman imaging in premature clinical diagnostic approaches.

  12. Optimizing laser crater enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lednev, V N; Sdvizhenskii, P A; Grishin, M Ya; Filichkina, V A; Shchegolikhin, A N; Pershin, S M

    2018-03-20

    Raman signal enhancement by laser crater production was systematically studied for 785 nm continuous wave laser pumping. Laser craters were produced in L-aspartic acid powder by a nanosecond pulsed solid state neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser (532 nm, 8 ns, 1 mJ/pulse), while Raman spectra were then acquired by using a commercial spectrometer with 785 nm laser beam pumping. The Raman signal enhancement effect was studied in terms of the number of ablating pulses used, the lens-to-sample distance, and the crater-center-laser-spot offset. The influence of the experiment parameters on Raman signal enhancement was studied for different powder materials. Maximum Raman signal enhancement reached 11 fold for loose powders but decreased twice for pressed tablets. Raman signal enhancement was demonstrated for several diverse powder materials like gypsum or ammonium nitrate with better results achieved for the samples tending to give narrow and deep craters upon the laser ablation stage. Alternative ways of cavity production (steel needle tapping and hole drilling) were compared with the laser cratering technique in terms of Raman signal enhancement. Drilling was found to give the poorest enhancement of the Raman signal, while both laser ablation and steel needle tapping provided comparable results. Here, we have demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that a Raman signal can be enhanced 10 fold with the aid of simple cavity production by steel needle tapping in rough highly reflective materials. Though laser crater enhancement Raman spectroscopy requires an additional pulsed laser, this technique is more appropriate for automatization compared to the needle tapping approach.

  13. Rapid identification of staphylococci by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rebrošová, Katarína; Šiler, Martin; Samek, Ota; Růžička, Filip; Bernatová, Silvie; Holá, Veronika; Ježek, Jan; Zemánek, Pavel; Sokolová, Jana; Petráš, Petr

    2017-11-01

    Clinical treatment of the infections caused by various staphylococcal species differ depending on the actual cause of infection. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a fast and reliable method for identification of staphylococci. Raman spectroscopy is an optical method used in multiple scientific fields. Recent studies showed that the method has a potential for use in microbiological research, too. Our work here shows a possibility to identify staphylococci by Raman spectroscopy. We present a method that enables almost 100% successful identification of 16 of the clinically most important staphylococcal species directly from bacterial colonies grown on a Mueller-Hinton agar plate. We obtained characteristic Raman spectra of 277 staphylococcal strains belonging to 16 species from a 24-hour culture of each strain grown on the Mueller-Hinton agar plate using the Raman instrument. The results show that it is possible to distinguish among the tested species using Raman spectroscopy and therefore it has a great potential for use in routine clinical diagnostics.

  14. Quantitative determinations using portable Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Navin, Chelliah V; Tondepu, Chaitanya; Toth, Roxana; Lawson, Latevi S; Rodriguez, Jason D

    2017-03-20

    A portable Raman spectrometer was used to develop chemometric models to determine percent (%) drug release and potency for 500mg ciprofloxacin HCl tablets. Parallel dissolution and chromatographic experiments were conducted alongside Raman experiments to assess and compare the performance and capabilities of portable Raman instruments in determining critical drug attributes. All batches tested passed the 30min dissolution specification and the Raman model for drug release was able to essentially reproduce the dissolution profiles obtained by ultraviolet spectroscopy at 276nm for all five batches of the 500mg ciprofloxacin tablets. The five batches of 500mg ciprofloxacin tablets also passed the potency (assay) specification and the % label claim for the entire set of tablets run were nearly identical, 99.4±5.1 for the portable Raman method and 99.2±1.2 for the chromatographic method. The results indicate that portable Raman spectrometers can be used to perform quantitative analysis of critical product attributes of finished drug products. The findings of this study indicate that portable Raman may have applications in the areas of process analytical technology and rapid pharmaceutical surveillance. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Raman spectroscopy of saliva as a perspective method for periodontitis diagnostics Raman spectroscopy of saliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Minaeva, S.

    2012-01-01

    In view of its potential for biological tissues analyses at a molecular level, Raman spectroscopy in optical range has been the object of biomedical research for the last years. The main aim of this work is the development of Raman spectroscopy for organic content identifying and determination of biomarkers of saliva at a molecular level for periodontitis diagnostics. Four spectral regions were determined: 1155 and 1525 cm-1, 1033 and 1611 cm-1, which can be used as biomarkers of this widespread disease.

  16. Citrus fruits freshness assessment using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nekvapil, Fran; Brezestean, Ioana; Barchewitz, Daniel; Glamuzina, Branko; Chiş, Vasile; Cintă Pinzaru, Simona

    2018-03-01

    The freshness of citrus fruits commonly available in the market was non-destructively assessed by Raman spectroscopy. Intact clementine, mandarin and tangerine species were characterised concerning their carotenoids skin Raman signalling in a time course from the moment they were acquired as fresh stock, supplying the market, to the physical degradation, when they were no longer attractive to consumers. The freshness was found to strongly correlate to the peel Raman signal collected from the same area of the intact fruits in a time course of a maximum of 20days. We have shown that the intensity of the carotenoid Raman signal is indeed a good indicator of fruit freshness and introduced a Raman coefficient of freshness (C Fresh ), whose time course is linearly decreasing, with different slope for different citrus groups. Additionally, we demonstrated that the freshness assessment could be achieved using a portable Raman instrument. The results could have a strong impact for consumer satisfaction and the food industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Candida parapsilosis biofilm identification by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Samek, Ota; Mlynariková, Katarina; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Růžička, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Mahelová, Martina

    2014-12-22

    Colonies of Candida parapsilosis on culture plates were probed directly in situ using Raman spectroscopy for rapid identification of specific strains separated by a given time intervals (up to months apart). To classify the Raman spectra, data analysis was performed using the approach of principal component analysis (PCA). The analysis of the data sets generated during the scans of individual colonies reveals that despite the inhomogeneity of the biological samples unambiguous associations to individual strains (two biofilm-positive and two biofilm-negative) could be made.

  18. Candida parapsilosis Biofilm Identification by Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Samek, Ota; Mlynariková, Katarina; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Růžička, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Mahelová, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Colonies of Candida parapsilosis on culture plates were probed directly in situ using Raman spectroscopy for rapid identification of specific strains separated by a given time intervals (up to months apart). To classify the Raman spectra, data analysis was performed using the approach of principal component analysis (PCA). The analysis of the data sets generated during the scans of individual colonies reveals that despite the inhomogeneity of the biological samples unambiguous associations to individual strains (two biofilm-positive and two biofilm-negative) could be made. PMID:25535081

  19. Blood proteins analysis by Raman spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, D. N.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Khristoforova, Yu. A.; Lykina, A. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Kuzmina, T. P.; Davydkin, I. L.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    This work is devoted to study the possibility of plasma proteins (albumin, globulins) concentration measurement using Raman spectroscopy setup. The blood plasma and whole blood were studied in this research. The obtained Raman spectra showed significant variation of intensities of certain spectral bands 940, 1005, 1330, 1450 and 1650 cm-1 for different protein fractions. Partial least squares regression analysis was used for determination of correlation coefficients. We have shown that the proposed method represents the structure and biochemical composition of major blood proteins.

  20. Raman spectroscopy of triolein under high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tefelski, D. B.; Jastrzębski, C.; Wierzbicki, M.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Rostocki, A. J.; Wieja, K.; Kościesza, R.

    2010-03-01

    This article presents results of the high pressure Raman spectroscopy of triolein. Triolein, a triacylglyceride (TAG) of oleic acid, is an unsaturated fat, present in natural oils such as olive oil. As a basic food component and an energy storage molecule, it has considerable importance for food and fuel industries. To generate pressure in the experiment, we used a high-pressure cylindrical chamber with sapphire windows, presented in (R.M. Siegoczyński, R. Kościesza, D.B. Tefelski, and A. Kos, Molecular collapse - modification of the liquid structure induced by pressure in oleic acid, High Press. Res. 29 (2009), pp. 61-66). Pressure up to 750 MPa was applied. A Raman spectrometer in "macro"-configuration was employed. Raman spectroscopy provides information on changes of vibrational modes related to structural changes of triolein under pressure. Interesting changes in the triglyceride C‒H stretching region at 2650-3100 cm-1 were observed under high-pressures. Changes were also observed in the ester carbonyl (C˭ O) stretching region 1700-1780 cm-1 and the C‒C stretching region at 1050-1150 cm-1. The overall luminescence of the sample decreased under pressure, making it possible to set longer spectrum acquisition time and obtain more details of the spectrum. The registered changes suggest that the high-pressure solid phase of triolein is organized as β-polymorphic, as was reported in (C. Akita, T. Kawaguchi, and F. Kaneko, Structural study on polymorphism of cis-unsaturated triacylglycerol: Triolein, J. Phys. Chem. B 110 (2006), pp. 4346-4353; E. Da Silva and D. Rousseau, Molecular order and thermodynamics of the solid-liquid transition in triglycerides via Raman spectroscopy, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10 (2008), pp. 4606-4613) (with temperature-induced phase transitions). The research has shown that Raman spectroscopy in TAGs under pressure reveals useful information about its structural changes.

  1. Remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe

    DOEpatents

    Schmucker, John E.; Blasi, Raymond J.; Archer, William B.

    1999-01-01

    A remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe allows for analyzing Raman scattered light from a point of interest external probe. An environmental barrier including at least one window separates the probe from the point of interest. An optical tube is disposed adjacent to the environmental barrier and includes a long working length compound lens objective next to the window. A beam splitter and a mirror are at the other end. A mechanical means is used to translated the prove body in the X, Y, and Z directions resulting in a variable focus optical apparatus. Laser light is reflected by the beam splitter and directed toward the compound lens objective, then through the window and focused on the point of interest. Raman scattered light is then collected by the compound lens objective and directed through the beam splitter to a mirror. A device for analyzing the light, such as a monochrometer, is coupled to the mirror.

  2. Drug Stability Analysis by Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Chetan; Smith, Wayne; Brouillette, Carl; Farquharson, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical drugs are available to astronauts to help them overcome the deleterious effects of weightlessness, sickness and injuries. Unfortunately, recent studies have shown that some of the drugs currently used may degrade more rapidly in space, losing their potency before their expiration dates. To complicate matters, the degradation products of some drugs can be toxic. Here, we present a preliminary investigation of the ability of Raman spectroscopy to quantify mixtures of four drugs; acetaminophen, azithromycin, epinephrine, and lidocaine, with their primary degradation products. The Raman spectra for the mixtures were replicated by adding the pure spectra of the drug and its degradant to determine the relative percent contributions using classical least squares. This multivariate approach allowed determining concentrations in ~10 min with a limit of detection of ~4% of the degradant. These results suggest that a Raman analyzer could be used to assess drug potency, nondestructively, at the time of use to ensure crewmember safety. PMID:25533308

  3. Characterization of Kevlar Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washer, Glenn; Brooks, Thomas; Saulsberry, Regor

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the characterization of Kevlar composite materials using Raman spectroscopy. The goal of the research is to develop and understand the Raman spectrum of Kevlar materials to provide a foundation for the development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies based on the interaction of laser light with the polymer Kevlar. The paper discusses the fundamental aspects of experimental characterization of the spectrum of Kevlar, including the effects of incident wavelength, polarization and laser power. The effects of environmental exposure of Kevlar materials on certain characteristics of its Raman spectrum are explored, as well as the effects of applied stress. This data may provide a foundation for the development of NDE technologies intended to detect the in-situ deterioration of Kevlar materials used for engineering applications that can later be extended to other materials such as carbon fiber composites.

  4. Hyper-Raman spectroscopy of Earth related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellwig, H.

    2004-12-01

    Raman and infrared spectroscopy proved extremely successful in obtaining structural information and thermodynamic data on samples under high pressure conditions in a diamond anvil cell [1,2]. With substantial advances in CCD detector technology and the possibility to focus visible laser light down to several microns, Raman spectroscopy can nowadays be regarded one of the standard techniques for diamond anvil cell investigations. Nevertheless, Raman scattering suffers from often strong fluorescence and the strong Raman signal of the diamonds. Infrared spectroscopy is limited by the sample size and the diffraction limit of mid- or far-infrared radiation. With increasing pressure, diamonds also show strong infrared activity, which can interfere with the signal from the sample. Detectors in the mid- and far-infrared are inherently noisy, often leading to low signal-to-noise ratios for infrared measurements. With new techniques and instrumentation available, such as low noise CCD cameras and stable diode-pumped solid state laser systems, more demanding techniques become feasible as well. Especially hyper-Raman scattering, a nonlinear optical variant of infrared spectroscopy, can be used on a more routine basis for the first time. Pioneering work in the 70s and 80s have explored some of the capabilities of Hyper-Raman spectroscopy [3]. Unlike infrared spectroscopy, Hyper-Raman is not limited by the diffraction limit of mid- or far-infrared radiation, typically restricting the lower frequency limit to several hundred wave numbers. The major advantages of hyper-Raman are essentially background free spectra and the use of wavelengths in the near-infrared and visible, making possible micro focusing and taking advantage of high efficiencies, low noise, and smooth wavelength dependencies of CCD detectors. Hyper-Raman does not suffer from saturation caused by strong absorption in the infrared and is therefore less sensitive to surface effects. For centrosymmetric materials

  5. Raman spectroscopy of synthetic and natural iowaite.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Adebajo, Moses O; Erickson, Kristy L

    2005-02-01

    The chemistry of a magnesium based hydrotalcite known as iowaite Mg6Fe2Cl2(OH)16.4H2O has been studied using Raman spectroscopy. Iowaite has chloride as the counter anion in the interlayer. The formula of synthetic iowaite was found to be Mg5.78Fe2.09(Cl,(CO3)0.5)(OH)16.4H2O. Oxidation of natural iowaite results in the formation of Mg4FeO(Cl,CO3) (OH)8.4H2O. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the iowaite is a layered structure with a d(001) spacing of 8.0 angtsroms. For synthetic iowaite three Raman bands at 1376, 1194 and 1084 cm(-1) are attributed to CO3 stretching vibrations. These bands are not observed for the natural iowaite but are observed when the natural iowaite is exposed to air. The Raman spectrum of natural iowaite shows three bands at 708, 690 and 620 cm(-1) and upon exposure to air, two broad bands are found at 710 and 648 cm(-1). The Raman spectrum of synthetic iowaite has a very broad band at 712 cm(-1). The Raman spectrum of natural iowaite shows an intense band at 527 cm(-1). The air oxidized iowaite shows two bands at 547 and 484 cm(-1) attributed to the (CO3)(2-)nu2 bending mode. Raman spectroscopy has proven most useful for the study of the chemistry of iowaite and chemical changes induced in natural iowaite upon exposure to air.

  6. Raman Spectroscopy of 3-D Printed Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, Vanessa; Wood, Erin; Hight Walker, Angela; Seppala, Jonathan; Kotula, Anthony

    Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques, such as 3-D printing are becoming an innovative and efficient way to produce highly customized parts for applications ranging from automotive to biomedical. Polymer-based AM parts can be produced from a myriad of materials and processing conditions to enable application-specific products. However, bringing 3-D printing from prototype to production relies on understanding the effect of processing conditions on the final product. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful and non-destructive characterization technique that can assist in determining the chemical homogeneity and physical alignment of polymer chains in 3-D printed materials. Two polymers commonly used in 3-D printing, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polycarbonate (PC), were investigated using 1- and 2-D hyperspectral Raman imaging. In the case of ABS, a complex thermoplastic, the homogeneity of the material through the weld zone was investigated by comparing Raman peaks from each of the three components. In order to investigate the effect of processing conditions on polymer chain alignment, polarized Raman spectroscopy was used. In particular, the print speed or shear rate and effect of strain on PC filaments was investigated with perpendicular and parallel polarizations. National Institute of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, MD ; Society of Physics Students.

  7. Detecting changes during pregnancy with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargis, Elizabeth; Robertson, Kesha; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Reese, Jeff; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-02-01

    Preterm labor is the second leading cause of neonatal mortality and leads to a myriad of complications like delayed development and cerebral palsy. Currently, there is no way to accurately predict preterm labor, making its prevention and treatment virtually impossible. While there are some at-risk patients, over half of all preterm births do not fall into any high-risk category. This study seeks to predict and prevent preterm labor by using Raman spectroscopy to detect changes in the cervix during pregnancy. Since Raman spectroscopy has been used to detect cancers in vivo in organs like the cervix and skin, it follows that spectra will change over the course of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that fluorescence decreased during pregnancy and increased during post-partum exams to pre-pregnancy levels. We believe significant changes will occur in the Raman spectra obtained during the course of pregnancy. In this study, Raman spectra from the cervix of pregnant mice and women will be acquired. Specific changes that occur due to cervical softening or changes in hormonal levels will be observed to understand the likelihood that a female mouse or a woman will enter labor.

  8. Raman Spectroscopy for Analysis of Thorium Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yin-Fong; Johnson, Timothy J.; Olsen, Khris B.

    2016-05-12

    The thorium fuel cycle is an alternative to the uranium fuel cycle in that when 232Th is irradiated with neutrons it is converted to 233U, another fissile isotope. There are several chemical forms of thorium which are used in the Th fuel cycle. Recently, Raman spectroscopy has become a very portable and facile analytical technique useful for many applications, including e.g. determining the chemical composition of different materials such as for thorium compounds. The technique continues to improve with the development of ever-more sensitive instrumentation and better software. Using a laboratory Fourier-transform (FT)-Raman spectrometer with a 785 nm wavelength laser,more » we were able to obtain Raman spectra from a series of thorium-bearing compounds of unknown origin. These spectra were compared to the spectra of in-stock-laboratory thorium compounds including ThO2, ThF4, Th(CO3)2 and Th(C2O4)2. The unknown spectra showed very good agreement to the known standards, demonstrating the applicability of Raman spectroscopy for detection and identification of these nuclear materials.« less

  9. Raman scattering spectroscopy for explosives identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagli, L.; Gaft, M.

    2007-04-01

    Real time detection and identification of explosives at a standoff distance is a major issue in efforts to develop defense against so-called Improvised Explosive Devices (IED). It is recognized that the only technique, which is potentially capable to standoff detection of minimal amounts of explosives is laser-based spectroscopy. LDS technique belongs to trace detection, namely to its micro-particles variety. We applied gated Raman and time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy for detection of main explosive materials, both factory and homemade. Raman system was developed and tested by LDS for field remote detection and identification of minimal amounts of explosives on relevant surfaces at a distance of up to 30 meters.

  10. Femtosecond transient absorption, Raman, and electrochemistry studies of tetrasulfonated copper phthalocyanine in water solutions.

    PubMed

    Abramczyk, H; Brozek-Płuska, B; Kurczewski, K; Kurczewska, M; Szymczyk, I; Krzyczmonik, P; Błaszczyk, T; Scholl, H; Czajkowski, W

    2006-07-20

    Ultrafast time-resolved electronic spectra of the primary events induced in the copper tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine Cu(tsPc)4-) in aqueous solution has been measured by femtosecond pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy. The primary events initiated by the absorption of a photon occurring within the femtosecond time scale are discussed on the basis of the electron transfer mechanism between the adjacent phthalocyanine rings proposed recently in our laboratory. The femtosecond transient absorption results are compared with the low temperature emission spectra obtained with Raman spectroscopy and the voltammetric curves.

  11. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include themore » inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.« less

  12. Perspective: Two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molesky, Brian P.; Guo, Zhenkun; Cheshire, Thomas P.; Moran, Andrew M.

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy has been developed for studies of photochemical reaction mechanisms and structural heterogeneity in complex systems. The 2DRR method can leverage electronic resonance enhancement to selectively probe chromophores embedded in complex environments (e.g., a cofactor in a protein). In addition, correlations between the two dimensions of the 2DRR spectrum reveal information that is not available in traditional Raman techniques. For example, distributions of reactant and product geometries can be correlated in systems that undergo chemical reactions on the femtosecond time scale. Structural heterogeneity in an ensemble may also be reflected in the 2D spectroscopic line shapes of both reactive and non-reactive systems. In this perspective article, these capabilities of 2DRR spectroscopy are discussed in the context of recent applications to the photodissociation reactions of triiodide and myoglobin. We also address key differences between the signal generation mechanisms for 2DRR and off-resonant 2D Raman spectroscopies. Most notably, it has been shown that these two techniques are subject to a tradeoff between sensitivity to anharmonicity and susceptibility to artifacts. Overall, recent experimental developments and applications of the 2DRR method suggest great potential for the future of the technique.

  13. Intraoperative Raman Spectroscopy of Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, John Q.; Gowani, Zain S.; O’Connor, Maggie; Pence, Isaac J.; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Holt, Ginger E.; Schwartz, Herbert S.; Halpern, Jennifer L.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are a rare and heterogeneous group of malignant tumors that are often treated through surgical resection. Current intraoperative margin assessment methods are limited and highlight the need for an improved approach with respect to time and specificity. Here we investigate the potential of near-infrared Raman spectroscopy for the intraoperative differentiation of STS from surrounding normal tissue. Materials and Methods In vivo Raman measurements at 785 nm excitation were intraoperatively acquired from subjects undergoing STS resection using a probe based spectroscopy system. A multivariate classification algorithm was developed in order to automatically identify spectral features that can be used to differentiate STS from the surrounding normal muscle and fat. The classification algorithm was subsequently tested using leave-one-subject-out cross-validation. Results With the exclusion of well-differentiated liposarcomas, the algorithm was able to classify STS from the surrounding normal muscle and fat with a sensitivity and specificity of 89.5% and 96.4%, respectively. Conclusion These results suggest that single point near-infrared Raman spectroscopy could be utilized as a rapid and non-destructive surgical guidance tool for identifying abnormal tissue margins in need of further excision. PMID:27454580

  14. Intraoperative Raman spectroscopy of soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, John Q; Gowani, Zain S; O'Connor, Maggie; Pence, Isaac J; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Holt, Ginger E; Schwartz, Herbert S; Halpern, Jennifer L; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2016-10-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are a rare and heterogeneous group of malignant tumors that are often treated through surgical resection. Current intraoperative margin assessment methods are limited and highlight the need for an improved approach with respect to time and specificity. Here we investigate the potential of near-infrared Raman spectroscopy for the intraoperative differentiation of STS from surrounding normal tissue. In vivo Raman measurements at 785 nm excitation were intraoperatively acquired from subjects undergoing STS resection using a probe based spectroscopy system. A multivariate classification algorithm was developed in order to automatically identify spectral features that can be used to differentiate STS from the surrounding normal muscle and fat. The classification algorithm was subsequently tested using leave-one-subject-out cross-validation. With the exclusion of well-differentiated liposarcomas, the algorithm was able to classify STS from the surrounding normal muscle and fat with a sensitivity and specificity of 89.5% and 96.4%, respectively. These results suggest that single point near-infrared Raman spectroscopy could be utilized as a rapid and non-destructive surgical guidance tool for identifying abnormal tissue margins in need of further excision. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:774-781, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Impact of Array Detectors on Raman Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denson, Stephen C.; Pommier, Carolyn J. S.; Denton, M. Bonner

    2007-01-01

    The impact of array detectors in the field of Raman spectroscopy and all low-light-level spectroscopic techniques is examined. The high sensitivity of array detectors has allowed Raman spectroscopy to be used to detect compounds at part per million concentrations and to perform Raman analyses at advantageous wavelengths.

  16. Raman and photothermal spectroscopies for explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finot, Eric; Brulé, Thibault; Rai, Padmnabh; Griffart, Aurélien; Bouhélier, Alexandre; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Detection of explosive residues using portable devices for locating landmine and terrorist weapons must sat- isfy the application criteria of high reproducibility, specificity, sensitivity and fast response time. Vibrational spectroscopies such as Raman and infrared spectroscopies have demonstrated their potential to distinguish the members of the chemical family of more than 30 explosive materials. The characteristic chemical fingerprints in the spectra of these explosives stem from the unique bond structure of each compound. However, these spectroscopies, developed in the early sixties, suffer from a poor sensitivity. On the contrary, MEMS-based chemical sensors have shown to have very high sensitivity lowering the detection limit down to less than 1 picogram, (namely 10 part per trillion) using sensor platforms based on microcantilevers, plasmonics, or surface acoustic waves. The minimum amount of molecules that can be detected depends actually on the transducer size. The selectivity in MEMS sensors is usually realized using chemical modification of the active surface. However, the lack of sufficiently selective receptors that can be immobilized on MEMS sensors remains one of the most critical issues. Microcantilever based sensors offer an excellent opportunity to combine both the infrared photothermal spectroscopy in their static mode and the unique mass sensitivity in their dynamic mode. Optical sensors based on localized plasmon resonance can also take up the challenge of addressing the selectivity by monitoring the Surface Enhanced Raman spectrum down to few molecules. The operating conditions of these promising localized spectroscopies will be discussed in terms of reliability, compactness, data analysis and potential for mass deployment.

  17. Raman spectroscopy for diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, Candace Elise

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and most fatal malignant brain tumor, is highly infiltrative and incurable. Although improved prognosis has been demonstrated by surgically resecting the bulk tumor, a lack of clear borders at the tumor margins complicates the selection decision during surgery. This dissertation investigates the potential of Raman spectroscopy for distinguishing between normal and malignant brain tissue and sets the groundwork for a surgical diagnostic guide for resection of gross malignant gliomas. These studies revealed that Raman spectroscopy was capable of discriminating between normal scid mouse brain tissue and human xenograft tumors induced in those mice. The spectra of normal and malignant tissue were normalized by dividing by the respective magnitudes of the peaks near 1440 cm -1. Spectral differences include the shape of the broad peaks near 1440 cm-1 and 1660 cm-1 and the relative magnitudes of the peaks at 1264 cm-1, 1287 cm-1, 1297 cm-1, 1556 cm -1, 1586 cm-1, 1614 cm-1, and 1683 cm-1. From these studies emerged questions regarding how to objectively normalize and compare spectra for future automation. Some differences in the Raman spectra were shown to be inherent in the disease states of the cells themselves via differences in the Raman spectra of normal human astrocytes in culture and cultured cells derived from GBM tumors. The spectra of astrocytes and glioma cells were normalized by dividing by the respective magnitudes of the peaks near 1450 cm-1. The differences between the Raman spectra of normal and transformed cells include the ratio of the 1450 cm-1/1650 cm-1 peaks and the relative magnitudes of the peaks at 1181 cm-1, 1191 cm-1, 1225 cm-1, 1263 cm -1, 1300 cm-1, 1336 cm-1, 1477 cm-1, 1494 cm-1, and 1695 cm -1. Previous Raman spectroscopic studies of biological cells have shown that the magnitude of the Raman signal decreases over time, indicating sample damage. Cells exposed to laser excitation at similar power

  18. Optimizing laser crater enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lednev, V. N.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A.; Grishin, M. Ya.; Fedorov, A. N.; Khokhlova, O. V.; Oshurko, V. B.; Pershin, S. M.

    2018-05-01

    The laser crater enhanced Raman scattering (LCERS) spectroscopy technique has been systematically studied for chosen sampling strategy and influence of powder material properties on spectra intensity enhancement. The same nanosecond pulsed solid state Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 10 ns, 0.1-1.5 mJ/pulse) was used for laser crater production and Raman scattering experiments for L-aspartic acid powder. Increased sampling area inside crater cavity is the key factor for Raman signal improvement for the LCERS technique, thus Raman signal enhancement was studied as a function of numerous experimental parameters including lens-to-sample distance, wavelength (532 and 1064 nm) and laser pulse energy utilized for crater production. Combining laser pulses of 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths for crater ablation was shown to be an effective way for additional LCERS signal improvement. Powder material properties (particle size distribution, powder compactness) were demonstrated to affect LCERS measurements with better results achieved for smaller particles and lower compactness.

  19. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process.

  20. Noninvasive glucose sensing by transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Wei-Chuan; Bechtel, Kate L.; Rebec, Mihailo V.

    2015-05-01

    We present the development of a transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy system and analysis algorithm for noninvasive glucose sensing. The instrument and algorithm were tested in a preclinical study in which a dog model was used. To achieve a robust glucose test system, the blood levels were clamped for periods of up to 45 min. Glucose clamping and rise/fall patterns have been achieved by injecting glucose and insulin into the ear veins of the dog. Venous blood samples were drawn every 5 min and a plasma glucose concentration was obtained and used to maintain the clamps, to build the calibration model, and to evaluate the performance of the system. We evaluated the utility of the simultaneously acquired Raman spectra to be used to determine the plasma glucose values during the 8-h experiment. We obtained prediction errors in the range of ˜1.5-2 mM. These were in-line with a best-case theoretical estimate considering the limitations of the signal-to-noise ratio estimates. As expected, the transition regions of the clamp study produced larger predictive errors than the stable regions. This is related to the divergence of the interstitial fluid (ISF) and plasma glucose values during those periods. Two key contributors to error beside the ISF/plasma difference were photobleaching and detector drift. The study demonstrated the potential of Raman spectroscopy in noninvasive applications and provides areas where the technology can be improved in future studies.

  1. Resonance Raman spectroscopy in malaria research.

    PubMed

    Wood, Bayden R; McNaughton, Don

    2006-10-01

    In recent years, the field of Raman spectroscopy has witnessed a surge in technological development, with the incorporation of ultrasensitive, charge-coupled devices, improved laser sources and precision Rayleigh-filter systems. This has led to the development of sensitive confocal micro-Raman spectrometers and imaging spectrometers that are capable of obtaining high spatial-resolution spectra and images of subcellular components within single living cells. This review reports on the application of resonance micro-Raman spectroscopy to the study of malaria pigment (hemozoin), a by-product of hemoglobin catabolization by the malaria parasite, which is an important target site for antimalarial drugs. The review aims to briefly describe recent studies on the application of this technology, elucidate molecular and electronic properties of the malaria pigment and its synthetic analog beta-hematin, provide insight into the mechanism of hemozoin formation within the food vacuole of the parasite, and comment on developing strategies for using this technology in drug-screening protocols.

  2. Noninvasive glucose sensing by transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wei-Chuan; Bechtel, Kate L; Rebec, Mihailo V

    2015-05-01

    We present the development of a transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy system and analysis algorithm for noninvasive glucose sensing. The instrument and algorithm were tested in a preclinical study in which a dog model was used. To achieve a robust glucose test system, the blood levels were clamped for periods of up to 45 min. Glucose clamping and rise/fall patterns have been achieved by injecting glucose and insulin into the ear veins of the dog. Venous blood samples were drawn every 5 min and a plasma glucose concentration was obtained and used to maintain the clamps, to build the calibration model, and to evaluate the performance of the system. We evaluated the utility of the simultaneously acquired Raman spectra to be used to determine the plasma glucose values during the 8-h experiment. We obtained prediction errors in the range of ~1.5-2  mM. These were in-line with a best-case theoretical estimate considering the limitations of the signal-to-noise ratio estimates. As expected, the transition regions of the clamp study produced larger predictive errors than the stable regions. This is related to the divergence of the interstitial fluid (ISF) and plasma glucose values during those periods. Two key contributors to error beside the ISF/plasma difference were photobleaching and detector drift. The study demonstrated the potential of Raman spectroscopy in noninvasive applications and provides areas where the technology can be improved in future studies.

  3. Simultaneous Conoscopic Holography and Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Kaiser, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    A new instrument was developed for chemical characterization of surfaces that combines the analytical power of Raman spectroscopy with the three-dimensional topographic information provided by conoscopic holography. The figure schematically depicts the proposed hybrid instrument. The output of the conoscopic holographic portion of the instrument is a topographical map of the surface; the output of the Raman portion of the instrument is hyperspectral Raman data, from which the chemical and/or biological composition of the surface would be deduced. By virtue of the basic principles of design and operation of the instrument, the hyperspectral image data would be inherently spatially registered with the topographical data. In conoscopic holography, the object and reference beams of classical holography are replaced by the ordinary and extraordinary components generated by a single beam traveling through a birefringent, uniaxial crystal. In the basic conoscopic configuration, a laser light is projected onto a specimen and the resulting illuminated spot becomes a point source of diffuse light that propagates in every direction. The laser beam is rasterscanned in two dimensions (x and y) perpendicular to the beam axis (z), and at each x,y location, the pattern of interference between the ordinary and extraordinary rays is recorded. The recorded interferogram constitutes the conoscopic hologram. Of particular significance for the proposed instrument is that the conoscopic hologram contains information on the z coordinate (height) of the illuminated surface spot. Hence, a topographical map of the specimen is constructed point-by-point by rastering the laser beam in the x and y directions and correlating the x and y coordinates with the z information obtained from the interferograms. Conoscopic imaging is an established method, and conoscopic laboratory instruments for surface metrology are commercially available. In Raman spectroscopy of a surface, one measures the spectrum

  4. Chemical analysis of acoustically levitated drops by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tuckermann, Rudolf; Puskar, Ljiljana; Zavabeti, Mahta; Sekine, Ryo; McNaughton, Don

    2009-07-01

    An experimental apparatus combining Raman spectroscopy with acoustic levitation, Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopy (RALS), is investigated in the field of physical and chemical analytics. Whereas acoustic levitation enables the contactless handling of microsized samples, Raman spectroscopy offers the advantage of a noninvasive method without complex sample preparation. After carrying out some systematic tests to probe the sensitivity of the technique to drop size, shape, and position, RALS has been successfully applied in monitoring sample dilution and preconcentration, evaporation, crystallization, an acid-base reaction, and analytes in a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy colloidal suspension.

  5. Coherent Raman spectroscopies for measuring molecular flow velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.

    1982-01-01

    Various types of coherent Raman spectroscopy are characterized and their application to molecular flow velocity and direction measurement and species concentration and temperature determination is discussed.

  6. Fourier-Transform Raman Spectroscopy Of Biological Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Ira W.; Lewis, E. Neil

    1989-12-01

    sets of experimental problems that may entail an initial, relatively steep learning curve. These difficulties originate particularly from the fragility of the weakly scattering aggregate paired with the dilute nature of the biochemical or cellular dispersion. Often, the Raman scattered intensity from these samples can be increased by carefully peileting the biological suspension using ultracentrifugation techniques. Since the overtone region of water, the usual medium for biological samples, absorbs radiation from both the Rayleigh signal at the exciting wavelength of the Nd:YAG laser and the longer wavelength Raman scattering from the sample, reproducible temperature measurements and temperature control become significant concerns. In these cases one appeals to internal temperature calibrations, use of deuterium oxide (D20) as a solvent (since absorptions of the laser exciting wavelength and Raman scattered photons are minimized), manipulation of incident laser spot size and the use of fiber optic bundles to carry the exciting and scattered radiation. In the present discussion we briefly cite some of the experimental approaches we have developed and experiences we have encountered in adapting near-infrared FT-Raman spectroscopy to the more challenging biophysical and biochemical systems amenable to vibrational analysis. We emphasize here the determination of the spectra of membrane assemblies and membrane related materials; in particular, we elucidate the interaction of several polyene antibiotics, including amphotericin A, amphotericin B and nystatin, with a model membrane system composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers.

  7. Role of Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Cerys A; Lewis, Paul D; Dunstan, Peter R; Harris, Dean A

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cancer in the United Kingdom and is the second largest cause of cancer related death in the United Kingdom after lung cancer. Currently in the United Kingdom there is not a diagnostic test that has sufficient differentiation between patients with cancer and those without cancer so the current referral system relies on symptomatic presentation in a primary care setting. Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) are forms of vibrational spectroscopy that offer a non-destructive method to gain molecular information about biological samples. The techniques offer a wide range of applications from in vivo or in vitro diagnostics using endoscopic probes, to the use of micro-spectrometers for analysis of biofluids. The techniques have the potential to detect molecular changes prior to any morphological changes occurring in the tissue and therefore could offer many possibilities to aid the detection of CRC. The purpose of this review is to look at the current state of diagnostic technology in the United Kingdom. The development of Raman spectroscopy and SERS in clinical applications relation for CRC will then be discussed. Finally, future areas of research of Raman/SERS as a clinical tool for the diagnosis of CRC are also discussed. PMID:27190582

  8. UTI diagnosis and antibiogram using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastanos, Evdokia; Kyriakides, Alexandros; Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Pitris, Constantinos

    2009-07-01

    Urinary tract infection diagnosis and antibiogram require a 48 hour waiting period using conventional methods. This results in ineffective treatments, increased costs and most importantly in increased resistance to antibiotics. In this work, a novel method for classifying bacteria and determining their sensitivity to an antibiotic using Raman spectroscopy is described. Raman spectra of three species of gram negative Enterobacteria, most commonly responsible for urinary tract infections, were collected. The study included 25 samples each of E.coli, Klebsiella p. and Proteus spp. A novel algorithm based on spectral ratios followed by discriminant analysis resulted in classification with over 94% accuracy. Sensitivity and specificity for the three types of bacteria ranged from 88-100%. For the development of an antibiogram, bacterial samples were treated with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin to which they were all sensitive. Sensitivity to the antibiotic was evident after analysis of the Raman signatures of bacteria treated or not treated with this antibiotic as early as two hours after exposure. This technique can lead to the development of new technology for urinary tract infection diagnosis and antibiogram with same day results, bypassing urine cultures and avoiding all undesirable consequences of current practice.

  9. In vivo Raman spectroscopy of cervix cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubina, S.; Sathe, Priyanka; Dora, Tapas Kumar; Chopra, Supriya; Maheshwari, Amita; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Cervix-cancer is the third most common female cancer worldwide. It is the leading cancer among Indian females with more than million new diagnosed cases and 50% mortality, annually. The high mortality rates can be attributed to late diagnosis. Efficacy of Raman spectroscopy in classification of normal and pathological conditions in cervix cancers on diverse populations has already been demonstrated. Our earlier ex vivo studies have shown the feasibility of classifying normal and cancer cervix tissues as well as responders/non-responders to Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The present study was carried out to explore feasibility of in vivo Raman spectroscopic methods in classifying normal and cancerous conditions in Indian population. A total of 182 normal and 132 tumor in vivo Raman spectra, from 63 subjects, were recorded using a fiberoptic probe coupled HE-785 spectrometer, under clinical supervision. Spectra were acquired for 5 s and averaged over 3 times at 80 mW laser power. Spectra of normal conditions suggest strong collagenous features and abundance of non-collagenous proteins and DNA in case of tumors. Preprocessed spectra were subjected to Principal Component-Linear Discrimination Analysis (PCLDA) followed by leave-one-out-cross-validation. Classification efficiency of ~96.7% and 100% for normal and cancerous conditions respectively, were observed. Findings of the study corroborates earlier studies and suggest applicability of Raman spectroscopic methods in combination with appropriate multivariate tool for objective, noninvasive and rapid diagnosis of cervical cancers in Indian population. In view of encouraging results, extensive validation studies will be undertaken to confirm the findings.

  10. Determining the Authenticity of Gemstones Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aponick, Aaron; Marchozzi, Emedio; Johnston, Cynthia R.; Wigal, Carl T.

    1998-04-01

    The benefits of laser spectroscopy in the undergraduate curriculum have been the focus of several recent articles in this journal. Raman spectroscopy has been of particular interest since the similarities of Raman to conventional infrared spectroscopy make the interpretation of spectral data well within undergraduate comprehension. In addition, the accessibility to this technology is now within the reach of most undergraduate institutions. This paper reports the development of an experiment using Raman spectroscopy which determines the authenticity of both diamonds and pearls. The resulting spectra provide an introduction to vibrational spectroscopy and can be used in a variety of laboratory courses ranging from introductory chemistry to instrumental analysis.

  11. Scanning Angle Raman spectroscopy in polymer thin film characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Vy H.T.

    The focus of this thesis is the application of Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of thin polymer films. Chapter 1 provides background information and motivation, including the fundamentals of Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, scanning angle Raman scattering and scanning angle Raman scattering for applications in thin polymer film characterization. Chapter 2 represents a published manuscript that focuses on the application of scanning angle Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of submicron thin films with a description of methodology for measuring the film thickness and location of an interface between two polymer layers. Chapter 3 provides an outlook and future directionsmore » for the work outlined in this thesis. Appendix A, contains a published manuscript that outlines the use of Raman spectroscopy to aid in the synthesis of heterogeneous catalytic systems. Appendix B and C contain published manuscripts that set a foundation for the work presented in Chapter 2.« less

  12. The hallmarks of breast cancer by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramczyk, H.; Surmacki, J.; Brożek-Płuska, B.; Morawiec, Z.; Tazbir, M.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents new biological results on ex vivo breast tissue based on Raman spectroscopy and demonstrates its power as diagnostic tool with the key advantage in breast cancer research. The results presented here demonstrate the ability of Raman spectroscopy to accurately characterize cancer tissue and distinguish between normal, malignant and benign types. The goal of the paper is to develop the diagnostic ability of Raman spectroscopy in order to find an optical marker of cancer in the breast tissue. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in breast cancer research are in the early stages of development in the world. To the best of our knowledge, this paper is one of the most statistically reliable reports (1100 spectra, 99 patients) on Raman spectroscopy-based diagnosis of breast cancers among the world women population.

  13. Measurement of clathrate hydrates via Raman spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sum, A.K.; Burruss, R.C.; Sloan, E.D.

    1997-01-01

    Raman spectra of clathrate hydrate guest molecules are presented for three known structures (I (sI), II (sII), and H (sH)) in the following systems: CH4 (sI), CO2 (sI), C3H8 (sII), CH4 + CO2 (sI), CD4 + C3H8 (sII), CH4 + N2 (sI), CH4 + THF-d8 (sII), and CH4 + C7D14 (sH). Relative occupancy of CH4 in the large and small cavities of sI were determined by deconvoluting the ??1 symmetric bands, resulting in hydration numbers of 6.04 ?? 0.03. The frequency of the ??1 bands for CH4 in structures I, II, and H differ statistically, so that Raman spectroscopy is a potential tool to identify hydrate crystal structure. Hydrate guest compositions were also measured for two vapor compositions of the CH4 + CO2 system, and they compared favorably with predictions. The large cavities were measured to be almost fully occupied by CH4 and CO2, whereas only a small fraction of the small cavities are occupied by CH4. No CO2 was found in the small cavities. Hydration numbers from 7.27 to 7.45 were calculated for the mixed hydrate.

  14. Raman spectroscopy of the mineral rhodonite.

    PubMed

    Mills, Stuart J; Frost, Ray L; Kloprogge, J Theo; Weier, Matt L

    2005-11-01

    The mineral rhodonite an orthosilicate has been characterised by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra of three rhodonites from Broken Hill, Pachapaqui and Franklin were compared and found to be similar. The spectra are characterised by an intense band at around 1000 cm(-1) assigned to the nu(1) symmetric stretching mode and three bands at 989, 974 and 936 cm(-1) assigned to the nu(3) antisymmetric stretching modes of the SiO(4) units. An intense band at around 667 cm(-1) was assigned to the nu(4) bending mode and showed additional bands exhibiting loss of degeneracy of the SiO(4) units. The low wave number region of rhodonite is complex. A strong band at 421.9 cm(-1) is attributed to the nu(2) bending mode. The spectra of the three rhodonite mineral samples are similar but subtle differences are observed. It is proposed that these differences depend upon the cationic substitution of Mn by Ca and/or Fe(2+) and Mg.

  15. Molecular velocimetry using stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J.; Hillard, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Molecular flow velocity of N2 was measured in a supersonic wind tunnel using inverse Raman spectroscopy. This technique employs the large Doppler shift exhibited by the molecules when the pump and probe laser beams are counter-propagating (backward scattering). A retrometer system is employed to yield a vibration-free optical configuration which has the additional advantage of obtaining both the forward and backward scattered spectra simultaneously. The linebreadths and their relative Doppler shift can be used to determine the static pressure, translational temperature, and molecular flow velocity. A demonstration of the concept was performed in a supersonic wind tunnel and included: (1) measurements over the Mach number range 2.50 to 4.63; (2) static pressure measurements (at Mach 2.50) corresponding to a Reynolds number per foot range of 1 to 5 x 10 to the 6th power; and (3) measurements behind the shock wave of a flat plate model.

  16. Raman Spectroscopy of Optically Trapped Single Biological Micro-Particles

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Brandon; Schwab, Mark J.; Pan, Yong-le

    2015-01-01

    The combination of optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful method for the study, characterization, and identification of biological micro-particles. In essence, optical trapping helps to overcome the limitation imposed by the relative inefficiency of the Raman scattering process. This allows Raman spectroscopy to be applied to individual biological particles in air and in liquid, providing the potential for particle identification with high specificity, longitudinal studies of changes in particle composition, and characterization of the heterogeneity of individual particles in a population. In this review, we introduce the techniques used to integrate Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping in order to study individual biological particles in liquid and air. We then provide an overview of some of the most promising applications of this technique, highlighting the unique types of measurements enabled by the combination of Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping. Finally, we present a brief discussion of future research directions in the field. PMID:26247952

  17. Noninvasive Monitoring of Blood Glucose with Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Rishikesh; Paidi, Santosh Kumar; Valdez, Tulio A; Zhang, Chi; Spegazzini, Nicolas; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Barman, Ishan

    2017-02-21

    The successful development of a noninvasive blood glucose sensor that can operate reliably over sustained periods of time has been a much sought after but elusive goal in diabetes management. Since diabetes has no well-established cure, control of elevated glucose levels is critical for avoiding severe secondary health complications in multiple organs including the retina, kidney and vasculature. While fingerstick testing continues to be the mainstay of blood glucose detection, advances in electrochemical sensing-based minimally invasive approaches have opened the door for alternate methods that would considerably improve the quality of life for people with diabetes. In the quest for better sensing approaches, optical technologies have surfaced as attractive candidates as researchers have sought to exploit the endogenous contrast of glucose, notably its absorption, scattering, and polarization properties. Vibrational spectroscopy, especially spontaneous Raman scattering, has exhibited substantial promise due to its exquisite molecular specificity and minimal interference of water in the spectral profiles acquired from the blood-tissue matrix. Yet, it has hitherto been challenging to leverage the Raman scattering signatures of glucose for prediction in all but the most basic studies and under the least demanding conditions. In this Account, we discuss the newly developed array of methodologies that address the key challenges in measuring blood glucose accurately using Raman spectroscopy and unlock new prospects for translation to sustained noninvasive measurements in people with diabetes. Owing to the weak intensity of spontaneous Raman scattering, recent research has focused on enhancement of signals from the blood constituents by designing novel excitation-collection geometries and tissue modulation methods while our attempts have led to the incorporation of nonimaging optical elements. Additionally, invoking mass transfer modeling into chemometric algorithms has

  18. Raman spectroscopy for cancer detection and characterization in metastasis models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Shigehiro; Oshima, Yusuke; Sato, Mitsunori; Ishimaru, Kei; Yoshida, Motohira; Yamamoto, Yuji; Matsuno, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yuji

    2017-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy provides a wealth of diagnostic information to the surgeon with in situ cancer detection and label-free histopathology in clinical practice. Raman spectroscopy is a developing optical technique which can analyze biological tissues with light scattering. The difference in frequencies between the incident light and the scattering light are called Raman shifts, which correspond to the vibrational energy of the molecular bonds. Raman spectrum gives information about the molecular structure and composition in biological specimens. We had been previously reported that Raman spectroscopy could distinguish various histological types of human lung cancer cells from normal cells in vitro. However, to identify and detect cancer diagnostic biomarkers in vivo on Raman spectroscopy is still challenging, because malignancy can be characterized not only by the cancer cells but also by the environmental factors including immune cells, stroma cells, secretion vesicles and extracellular matrix. Here we investigate morphological and molecular dynamics in both cancer cells and their environment in xenograft models and spontaneous metastasis models using Raman spectroscopy combined with fluorescence microscopy and photoluminescence imaging. We are also constructing a custom-designed Raman spectral imaging system for both in vitro and in vivo assay of tumor tissues to reveal the metastasis process and to evaluate therapeutic effects of anti-cancer drugs and their drug delivery toward the clinical application of the technique.

  19. Forensic and homeland security applications of modern portable Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Izake, Emad L

    2010-10-10

    Modern detection and identification of chemical and biological hazards within the forensic and homeland security contexts may well require conducting the analysis in field while adapting a non-contact approach to the hazard. Technological achievements on both surface and resonance enhancement Raman scattering re-developed Raman spectroscopy to become the most adaptable spectroscopy technique for stand-off and non-contact analysis of hazards. On the other hand, spatially offset Raman spectroscopy proved to be very valuable for non-invasive chemical analysis of hazards concealed within non-transparent containers and packaging. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Periodontitis diagnostics using resonance Raman spectroscopy on saliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Biryukova, T.; Tsvetkov, M.; Bagratashvily, V.

    2013-07-01

    In view of its wealth of molecular information, Raman spectroscopy has been the subject of active biomedical research. The aim of this work is Raman spectroscopy (RS) application for the determination of molecular biomarkers in saliva with the objective of early periodontitis detection. As was shown in our previous study, carotenoids contained in saliva can be molecular fingerprint information for the periodontitis level. It is shown here that the carotenoid RS lines at wavenumbers of 1156 and 1524 cm-1 can be easily detected and serve as reliable biomarkers of periodontitis using resonance Raman spectroscopy of dry saliva.

  1. Investigation of biomineralization by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatscher, Robert William

    Biomineralization is a process in which living organism grow composite materials consisting of inorganic and organic materials. This produces a composite material consisting of both inorganic and organic components, with superior mechanical properties. In the human body bone and dentin are both examples of biominerals. In this research Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize dentin from mice and human teeth, to determine composition. In the mouse tooth samples areas of irregular dentin were found, along the inside of the tooth, to be in the process of mineralization. By analyzing the samples along these areas we were able to determine the composition of dentin and track how it changed in these area. By analysis of the mineral to matrix ratio the areas of irregular dentin were determined to have less mineral present. Observations of other organic components and collagen in increased concentrations in this area suggested these area were in the process of biomineralization. The understanding of the structure of dentin and its biomineralization process is of crucial importance when trying reproduce dentin. Scientists and engineers are able to produce dentin minerals in vitro by culturing various dental stem cells. The ability to create dentin mineral from cells could lead to methods of repairing dentin in patients, or even lead to the creation of a completely engineered tooth. While dentin-like materials can be produced in a laboratory environment, analysis and comparison of the composition of these materials must be performed to ensure the mineral produced is consistent with dentin. Mineralized nodules from six different dental stem cell lines were cultured to produce a mineralized deposit. Utilizing Raman spectroscopy, we were able to determine cell source dependent differences in a variety of dental stem cells, and compare the mineral produced to native dentin. Orthopedic implants are implants used to replace damaged bone, examples include knee, hip and dental

  2. Sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy to normal patient variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargis, Elizabeth; Byrd, Teresa; Logan, Quinisha; Khabele, Dineo; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2011-11-01

    Many groups have used Raman spectroscopy for diagnosing cervical dysplasia; however, there have been few studies looking at the effect of normal physiological variations on Raman spectra. We assess four patient variables that may affect normal Raman spectra: Race/ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), parity, and socioeconomic status. Raman spectra were acquired from a diverse population of 75 patients undergoing routine screening for cervical dysplasia. Classification of Raman spectra from patients with a normal cervix is performed using sparse multinomial logistic regression (SMLR) to determine if any of these variables has a significant effect. Results suggest that BMI and parity have the greatest impact, whereas race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status have a limited effect. Incorporating BMI and obstetric history into classification algorithms may increase sensitivity and specificity rates of disease classification using Raman spectroscopy. Studies are underway to assess the effect of these variables on disease.

  3. Clinical instrumentation and applications of Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pence, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnostic devices provide new sources of information that give insight about the state of health which can then be used to manage patient care. These tools can be as simple as an otoscope to better visualize the ear canal or as complex as a wireless capsule endoscope to monitor the gastrointestinal tract. It is with tools such as these that medical practitioners can determine when a patient is healthy and to make an appropriate diagnosis when he/she is not. The goal of diagnostic medicine then is to efficiently determine the presence and cause of disease in order to provide the most appropriate intervention. The earliest form of medical diagnostics relied on the eye – direct visual observation of the interaction of light with the sample. This technique was espoused by Hippocrates in his 5th century BCE work Epidemics, in which the pallor of a patient’s skin and the coloring of the bodily fluids could be indicative of health. In the last hundred years, medical diagnosis has moved from relying on visual inspection to relying on numerous technological tools that are based on various types of interaction of the sample with different types of energy – light, ultrasound, radio waves, X-rays etc. Modern advances in science and technology have depended on enhancing technologies for the detection of these interactions for improved visualization of human health. Optical methods have been focused on providing this information in the micron to millimeter scale while ultrasound, X-ray, and radio waves have been key in aiding in the millimeter to centimeter scale. While a few optical technologies have achieved the status of medical instruments, many remain in the research and development phase despite persistent efforts by many researchers in the translation of these methods for clinical care. Of these, Raman spectroscopy has been described as a sensitive method that can provide biochemical information about tissue state while maintaining the capability of

  4. Application of Raman Spectroscopy for Nondestructive Evaluation of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washer, Glenn A.; Brooks, Thomas M. B.; Saulsberry, Regor

    2007-01-01

    This paper will present an overview of efforts to investigate the application of Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of Kevlar materials. Raman spectroscopy is a laser technique that is sensitive to molecular interactions in materials such as Kevlar, graphite and carbon used in composite materials. The overall goal of this research reported here is to evaluate Raman spectroscopy as a potential nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tool for the detection of stress rupture in Kevlar composite over-wrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). Characterization of the Raman spectra of Kevlar yarn and strands will be presented and compared with analytical models provided in the literature. Results of testing to investigate the effects of creep and high-temperature aging on the Raman spectra will be presented.

  5. Polarized Raman spectroscopy of bone tissue: watch the scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Mekhala; Sahar, Nadder D.; Wilson, Robert H.; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Pleshko, Nancy; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.

    2010-02-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy is widely used in the study of molecular composition and orientation in synthetic and natural polymer systems. Here, we describe the use of Raman spectroscopy to extract quantitative orientation information from bone tissue. Bone tissue poses special challenges to the use of polarized Raman spectroscopy for measurement of orientation distribution functions because the tissue is turbid and birefringent. Multiple scattering in turbid media depolarizes light and is potentially a source of error. Using a Raman microprobe, we show that repeating the measurements with a series of objectives of differing numerical apertures can be used to assess the contributions of sample turbidity and depth of field to the calculated orientation distribution functions. With this test, an optic can be chosen to minimize the systematic errors introduced by multiple scattering events. With adequate knowledge of the optical properties of these bone tissues, we can determine if elastic light scattering affects the polarized Raman measurements.

  6. Indium nanoparticles for ultraviolet surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rupali; Soni, R. K.

    2018-05-01

    Ultraviolet Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (UVSERS) has emerged as an efficient molecular spectroscopy technique for ultra-sensitive and ultra-low detection of analyte concentration. The generic SERS substrates based on gold and silver nanostructures have been extensively explored for high local electric field enhancement only in visible-NIR region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The template synthesis of controlled nanoscale size metallic nanostructures supporting localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the UV region have been recently explored due to their ease of synthesis and potential applications in optoelectronic, catalysis and magnetism. Indium (In0) nanoparticles exhibit active surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in ultraviolet (UV) and deep-ultaviolet (DUV) region with optimal absorption losses. This extended accessibility makes indium a promising material for UV plasmonic, chemical sensing and more recently in UV-SERS. In this work, spherical indium nanoparticles (In NPs) were synthesized by modified polyol reduction method using NaBH4 having local surface plasmon resonance near 280 nm. The as-synthesized spherical In0 nanoparticles were then coated with thin silica shells of thickness ˜ 5nm by a modified Stober method protecting the nanoparticles from agglomeration, direct contact with the probed molecules as well as prevent oxidation of the nanoparticles. Morphological evolution of In0 nanoparticles and SiO2 coating were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM). An enhanced near resonant shell-isolated SERS activity from thin film of tryptophan (Tryp) molecules deposited on indium coated substrates under 325nm UV excitation was observed. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is employed to comprehend the experimental results and simulate the electric field contours which showed amplified electromagnetic field localized around the nanostructures. The comprehensive analysis indicates that indium is a promising alternate

  7. Applications of spatially offset Raman spectroscopy to defense and security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guicheteau, Jason; Hopkins, Rebecca

    2016-05-01

    Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) allows for sub-surface and through barrier detection and has applications in drug analysis, cancer detection, forensic science, as well as defense and security. This paper reviews previous efforts in SORS and other through barrier Raman techniques and presents a discussion on current research in defense and security applications.

  8. Raman spectroscopy of CNC-and CNF-based nanocomposites

    Treesearch

    Umesh P. Agarwal

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, applications of Raman spectroscopy to nanocelluloses and nanocellulose composites are reviewed, and it is shown how use of various techniques in Raman can provide unique information. Some of the most important uses consisted of identification of cellulose nanomaterials, estimation of cellulose crystallinity, study of dispersion of cellulose...

  9. Continuous gradient temperature Raman spectroscopy of unsaturated fatty acids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new innovative technique gradient temperature, Raman spectroscopy (GTRS), identifies Raman frequency shifts in solid or liquid samples, and correlates them with specific temperature ranges within which flexible structures absorb heat. GTRS can easily detect changes that occur within one celcius te...

  10. Simultaneous optimization method for absorption spectroscopy postprocessing.

    PubMed

    Simms, Jean M; An, Xinliang; Brittelle, Mack S; Ramesh, Varun; Ghandhi, Jaal B; Sanders, Scott T

    2015-05-10

    A simultaneous optimization method is proposed for absorption spectroscopy postprocessing. This method is particularly useful for thermometry measurements based on congested spectra, as commonly encountered in combustion applications of H2O absorption spectroscopy. A comparison test demonstrated that the simultaneous optimization method had greater accuracy, greater precision, and was more user-independent than the common step-wise postprocessing method previously used by the authors. The simultaneous optimization method was also used to process experimental data from an environmental chamber and a constant volume combustion chamber, producing results with errors on the order of only 1%.

  11. [Identification of B jade by Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zu, En-dong; Chen, Da-peng; Zhang, Peng-xiang

    2003-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been found to be a useful tool for identification of bleached and polymer-impregnated jadeites (so-called B jade). The major advantage of this system over classical methods of gem testing is the non-destructive identification of inclusions in gemstones and the determination of organic fracture filling in jade. Fissures in jadeites have been filled with oils and various resins to enhance their clarity, such as paraffin wax, paraffin oil, AB glue and epoxy resins. They show different peaks depending on their chemical composition. The characteristic spectrum ranges from 1,200-1,700 cm-1 to 2,800-3,100 cm-1. The spectra of resins show that they all have four strongest peaks related with phenyl: two C-C stretching modes at 1,116 and 1,609 cm-1, respectively, one C-H stretching mode at 3,069 cm-1, and a in-plane C-H bending mode at 1,189 cm-1. In addition, other two -CH2, -CH3 stretching modes at 2,906 and 2,869 cm-1, respectively, are very similar to paraffin. Therefore, the peaks at 1,116, 1,609, 1,189 and 3,069 cm-1 are important in distinguishing resin from paraffin, and we can identify B jade depending on them.

  12. Characterization of the Ground Paprika Samples Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucsik, A.; Veres, M.; Himics, L.; Rigó, I.

    2017-11-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy as a powerful technique can be used in food industry, especially in the ground pepper or paprika characterization in order to deter-mine the paprika sample’s origin as well as their quality.

  13. Developing Raman spectroscopy for the nondestructive testing of composite materials.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-08-01

    The proposed research will develop the application of Raman Spectroscopy as a nondestructive evaluation tool for the condition assessment of carbon fiber composites. Composite materials are increasingly being used in engineered structures and compone...

  14. Comparison of Fresh and Aged TNT with Multiwavelength Raman Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-04

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6730--14-9572 Comparison of Fresh and Aged TNT with Multiwavelength Raman Spectroscopy...NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Comparison of Fresh and Aged TNT with Multiwavelength Raman Spectroscopy Robert Lunsford, Jacob Grun, and...fresh and aged variants. This is particularly true of UV aging which had the greater effect on the sample of the two aging processes tested

  15. Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy based on a line-scan hyperspectral Raman system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) is a technique that can obtain subsurface layered information by collecting Raman spectra from a series of surface positions laterally offset from the excitation laser. The current methods of SORS measurement are typically either slow due to mechanical move...

  16. Approximate chemical analysis of volcanic glasses using Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Morgavi, Daniele; Hess, Kai‐Uwe; Neuville, Daniel R.; Borovkov, Nikita; Perugini, Diego; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of chemical composition on the Raman spectra of a series of natural calcalkaline silicate glasses has been quantified by performing electron microprobe analyses and obtaining Raman spectra on glassy filaments (~450 µm) derived from a magma mingling experiment. The results provide a robust compositionally‐dependent database for the Raman spectra of natural silicate glasses along the calcalkaline series. An empirical model based on both the acquired Raman spectra and an ideal mixing equation between calcalkaline basaltic and rhyolitic end‐members is constructed enabling the estimation of the chemical composition and degree of polymerization of silicate glasses using Raman spectra. The model is relatively insensitive to acquisition conditions and has been validated using the MPI‐DING geochemical standard glasses1 as well as further samples. The methods and model developed here offer several advantages compared with other analytical and spectroscopic methods such as infrared spectroscopy, X‐ray fluorescence spectroscopy, electron and ion microprobe analyses, inasmuch as Raman spectroscopy can be performed with a high spatial resolution (1 µm2) without the need for any sample preparation as a nondestructive technique. This study represents an advance in efforts to provide the first database of Raman spectra for natural silicate glasses and yields a new approach for the treatment of Raman spectra, which allows us to extract approximate information about the chemical composition of natural silicate glasses using Raman spectroscopy. We anticipate its application in handheld in situ terrestrial field studies of silicate glasses under extreme conditions (e.g. extraterrestrial and submarine environments). © 2015 The Authors Journal of Raman Spectroscopy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd PMID:27656038

  17. Raman Spectroscopy Detects Cardiac Allograft Rejection with Molecular Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yoon Gi; Tu, Qiang; Cao, Dianjun; Harada, Shuko; Eisen, Howard J; Chang, Chang

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy is shown here to be capable of molecular‐specific detection without exogenous labeling. This molecular specificity is achieved by detecting the strong and characteristic Raman spectral signature of an indole derivative, serotonin, whose selective existence in rejected heart transplants serves as the biomarker. The study also corroborates the increasingly recognized role of serotonin receptors in various immune responses, including cardiac allograft rejection. Combining both medical and physical sciences, this work demonstrates the potential use of Raman spectroscopy in replacing the invasive endomyocardial biopsy as the standard for post‐transplantation rejection surveillance and presents a new paradigm in advancing clinical care through interdisciplinary studies. PMID:20443894

  18. On the Contribution of Raman Spectroscopy to Forensic Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzini, Patrick; Massonnet, Genevieve

    2010-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy has only recently sparked interest from forensic laboratories. The Raman technique has demonstrated important advantages such as its nondestructive nature, its fast analysis time, and especially the possibility of performing microscopical in situ analyses. In forensic applications, it is a versatile technique that covers a wide spectrum of substances such as trace evidence, illicit drugs and inks. An overview of the recent developments of Raman spectroscopy in forensic science will be discussed. Also, the requirements for an analytical technique for the examination of physical evidence will be described. Examples of casework will be depicted.

  19. Micro-Raman spectroscopy for meat type detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Biasio, M.; Stampfer, P.; Leitner, R.; Huck, C. W.; Wiedemair, V.; Balthasar, D.

    2015-06-01

    The recent horse meat scandal in Europe increased the demand for optical sensors that can identify meat type. Micro-Raman spectroscopy is a promising technique for the discrimination of meat types. Here, we present micro-Raman measurements of chicken, pork, turkey, mutton, beef and horse meat test samples. The data was analyzed with different combinations of data normalization and classification approaches. Our results show that Raman spectroscopy can discriminate between different meat types. Red and white meat are easily discriminated, however a sophisticated chemometric model is required to discriminate species within these groups.

  20. Planetary Surface Exploration Using Raman Spectroscopy on Rovers and Landers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Alerstam, E.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.; Rossman, G. R.

    2013-10-01

    Planetary surface exploration using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to probe the composition of rocks has recently become a reality with the operation of the mast-mounted ChemCam instrument onboard the Curiosity rover. Following this success, Raman spectroscopy has steadily gained support as a means for using laser spectroscopy to identify not just composition but mineral phases, without the need for sample preparation. The RLS Raman Spectrometer is included on the payload for the ExoMars mission, and a Raman spectrometer has been included in an example strawman payload for NASA’s Mars 2020 mission. Raman spectroscopy has been identified by the community as a feasible means for pre-selection of samples on Mars for subsequent return to Earth. We present a next-generation instrument that builds on the widely used green-Raman technique to provide a means for performing Raman spectroscopy without the background noise that is often generated by fluorescence of minerals and organics. Microscopic Raman spectroscopy with a laser spot size smaller than the grains of interest can provide surface mapping of mineralogy while preserving morphology. A very small laser spot size 1 µm) is often necessary to identify minor phases that are often of greater interest than the matrix phases. In addition to the difficulties that can be posed by fine-grained material, fluorescence interference from the very same material is often problematic. This is particularly true for many of the minerals of interest that form in environments of aqueous alteration and can be highly fluorescent. We use time-resolved laser spectroscopy to eliminate fluorescence interference that can often make it difficult or impossible to obtain Raman spectra. We will discuss significant advances leading to the feasibility of a compact time-resolved spectrometer, including the development of a new solid-state detector capable of sub-ns time resolution. We will present results on planetary analog

  1. Characterisation of signal enhancements achieved when utilizing a photon diode in deep Raman spectroscopy of tissue

    PubMed Central

    Vardaki, Martha Z.; Matousek, Pavel; Stone, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    We characterise the performance of a beam enhancing element (‘photon diode’) for use in deep Raman spectroscopy (DRS) of biological tissues. The optical component enhances the number of laser photons coupled into a tissue sample by returning escaping photons back into it at the illumination zone. The method is compatible with transmission Raman spectroscopy, a deep Raman spectroscopy concept, and its implementation leads to considerable enhancement of detected Raman photon rates. In the past, the enhancement concept was demonstrated with a variety of samples (pharmaceutical tablets, tissue, etc) but it was not systematically characterized with biological tissues. In this study, we investigate the enhancing properties of the photon diode in the transmission Raman geometry as a function of: a) the depth and b) the optical properties of tissue samples. Liquid tissue phantoms were employed to facilitate systematic variation of optical properties. These were chosen to mimic optical properties of human tissues, including breast and prostate. The obtained results evidence that a photon diode can enhance Raman signals of tissues by a maximum of × 2.4, although it can also decrease the signals created towards the back of samples that exhibit high scattering or absorption properties. PMID:27375932

  2. Micro-Raman spectroscopy on oral tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenone, F.; Lepore, M.; Perna, G.; Carmone, P.; Riccio, R.; Gaeta, G. M.; Capozzi, V.

    2006-02-01

    Micro-Raman Spectroscopy (μ-RS) provides a unique tool in medicine for a not invasive and real time analysis of biological tissue for biopsy and "in vivo" investigation. Based on the evaluation of molecular vibration frequencies, the μ-RS is able to detect the main molecular bonds of protein constituents, as the C-H and C-C ones. Changes in frequency or in the relative intensity of the vibration modes revealed by μ-RS can be related to changes of chemical bond and of protein structure induced by pathology. The μ-RS has been performed on samples of oral tissue from informed patients, affected by pemphigus vulgaris (an oral pathology) in an advanced regression state. The biopsies were thin slices (about 1mm thick) with 6mm diameter. The sample was measured through a 170 μm thick cover-glass. The experimental set-up was mainly composed by a He-Ne laser and a monochromator equipped with a Peltier cell and with a grating of 1800 grooves/mm. The laser light was focused on the sample surface by means of a long focal length 50X optical objective. The main protein bonds are clearly detectable in the considered samples and this give important information on the integrity and on the state of tissue components (lipids and proteins), and consequently on the occurrence of pathology. The potential application of this method for in vivo analysis is an invaluable alternative to biopsy and pathological examinations for many medical application as screening diagnostic, therapy progress examination, and surgical support.

  3. Validating in vivo Raman spectroscopy of bone in human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmonde-White, Francis W. L.; Morris, Michael D.

    2013-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy can non-destructively measure properties of bone related to mineral density, mineral composition, and collagen composition. Bone properties can be measured through the skin in animal and human subjects, but correlations between the transcutaneous and exposed bone measurements have only been reported for human cadavers. In this study, we examine human subjects to collect measurements transcutaneously, on surgically exposed bone, and on recovered bone fragments. This data will be used to demonstrate in vivo feasibility and to compare transcutaneous and exposed Raman spectroscopy of bone. A commercially available Raman spectrograph and optical probe operating at 785 nm excitation are used for the in vivo measurements. Requirements for applying Raman spectroscopy during a surgery are also discussed.

  4. Ultrafast and nonlinear surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gruenke, Natalie L; Cardinal, M Fernanda; McAnally, Michael O; Frontiera, Renee R; Schatz, George C; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2016-04-21

    Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has the potential to study molecular dynamics near plasmonic surfaces to better understand plasmon-mediated chemical reactions such as plasmonically-enhanced photocatalytic or photovoltaic processes. This review discusses the combination of ultrafast Raman spectroscopic techniques with plasmonic substrates for high temporal resolution, high sensitivity, and high spatial resolution vibrational spectroscopy. First, we introduce background information relevant to ultrafast SERS: the mechanisms of surface enhancement in Raman scattering, the characterization of plasmonic materials with ultrafast techniques, and early complementary techniques to study molecule-plasmon interactions. We then discuss recent advances in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies with ultrafast pulses with a focus on the study of molecule-plasmon coupling and molecular dynamics with high sensitivity. We also highlight the challenges faced by this field by the potential damage caused by concentrated, highly energetic pulsed fields in plasmonic hotspots, and finally the potential for future ultrafast SERS studies.

  5. Application of Raman spectroscopy technology to studying Sudan I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Guoping; Chen, Chen

    2006-06-01

    Being an industrial dye, the Sudan I may have a toxic effect after oral intake on the body, and has recently been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice and rabbits. Because China and some other countries have detected the Sudan I in samples of the hot chilli powder and the chilli products, it is necessary to study the characteristics of this dye. As one kind of molecule scattering spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy is characterized by the frequency excursion caused by interactions of molecules and photons. The frequency excursion reflects the margin between certain two vibrational or rotational energy states, and shows the information of the molecule. Because Raman spectroscopy can provides quick, easy, reproducible, and non-destructive analysis, both qualitative and quantitative, with no sample preparation required, Raman spectroscopy has been a particularly promising technique for analyzing the characteristics and structures of molecules, especially organic ones. Now, it has a broad application in biological, chemical, environmental and industrial applications. This paper firstly introduces Sudan I dye and the Raman spectroscopy technology, and then describes its application to the Sudan I. Secondly, the fingerprint spectra of the Sudan I are respectively assigned and analyzed in detail. Finally, the conclusion that the Raman spectroscopy technology is a powerful tool to determine the Sudan I is drawn.

  6. [Current views on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy in microbiology].

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaoxiao; Li, Jing; Qin, Tian; Deng, Aihua; Liu, Wenjun

    2015-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy has generated many branches during the development for more than 90 years. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) improves SNR by using the interaction between tested materials and the surface of rough metal, as to quickly get higher sensitivity and precision spectroscopy without sample pretreatment. This article describes the characteristic and classification of SERS, and updates the theory and clinical application of SERS. It also summarizes the present status and progress of SERS in various disciplines and illustrates the necessity and urgency of its research, which provides rationale for the application for SERS in microbiology.

  7. Laser Raman spectroscopy of some local anesthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcolea, M.; Sigüenza, C.; Santos, M.; Gonzalez-Diaz, P. F.

    1986-03-01

    The Raman spectra of benzocaine and procaine hydrochlorides in solid phase are reported. From the assigned inversion and torsion modes we have also estimated the corresponding barriers by using the harmonic approximation.

  8. Evaluation of thyroid tissue by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, C. S. B.; Bitar, R. A.; Santos, A. B. O.; Kulcsar, M. A. V.; Friguglietti, C. U. M.; Martinho, H. S.; da Costa, R. B.; Martin, A. A.

    2010-02-01

    Thyroid gland is a small gland in the neck consisting of two lobes connected by an isthmus. Thyroid's main function is to produce the hormones thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3) and calcitonin. Thyroid disorders can disturb the production of these hormones, which will affect numerous processes within the body such as: regulating metabolism and increasing utilization of cholesterol, fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. The gland itself can also be injured; for example, neoplasias, which have been considered the most important, causing damage of to the gland and are difficult to diagnose. There are several types of thyroid cancer: Papillary, Follicular, Medullary, and Anaplastic. The occurrence rate, in general is between 4 and 7%; which is on the increase (30%), probably due to new technology that is able to find small thyroid cancers that may not have been found previously. The most common method used for thyroid diagnoses are: anamnesis, ultrasonography, and laboratory exams (Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy- FNAB). However, the sensitivity of those test are rather poor, with a high rate of false-negative results, therefore there is an urgent need to develop new diagnostic techniques. Raman spectroscopy has been presented as a valuable tool for cancer diagnosis in many different tissues. In this work, 27 fragments of the thyroid were collected from 18 patients, comprising the following histologic groups: goitre adjacent tissue, goitre nodular tissue, follicular adenoma, follicular carcinoma, and papillary carcinoma. Spectral collection was done with a commercial FTRaman Spectrometer (Bruker RFS100/S) using a 1064 nm laser excitation and Ge detector. Principal Component Analysis, Cluster Analysis, and Linear Discriminant Analysis with cross-validation were applied as spectral classification algorithm. Comparing the goitre adjacent tissue with the goitre nodular region, an index of 58.3% of correct classification was obtained. Between goitre (nodular region and

  9. Raman spectroscopy of shocked gypsum from a meteorite impact crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brolly, Connor; Parnell, John; Bowden, Stephen

    2017-07-01

    Impact craters and associated hydrothermal systems are regarded as sites within which life could originate on Earth, and on Mars. The Haughton impact crater, one of the most well preserved craters on Earth, is abundant in Ca-sulphates. Selenite, a transparent form of gypsum, has been colonized by viable cyanobacteria. Basement rocks, which have been shocked, are more abundant in endolithic organisms, when compared with un-shocked basement. We infer that selenitic and shocked gypsum are more suitable for microbial colonization and have enhanced habitability. This is analogous to many Martian craters, such as Gale Crater, which has sulphate deposits in a central layered mound, thought to be formed by post-impact hydrothermal springs. In preparation for the 2020 ExoMars mission, experiments were conducted to determine whether Raman spectroscopy can distinguish between gypsum with different degrees of habitability. Ca-sulphates were analysed using Raman spectroscopy and results show no significant statistical difference between gypsum that has experienced shock by meteorite impact and gypsum, which has been dissolved and re-precipitated as an evaporitic crust. Raman spectroscopy is able to distinguish between selenite and unaltered gypsum. This shows that Raman spectroscopy can identify more habitable forms of gypsum, and demonstrates the current capabilities of Raman spectroscopy for the interpretation of gypsum habitability.

  10. Raman spectroscopy of selected copper minerals of significance in corrosion.

    PubMed

    Frost, R L

    2003-04-01

    The Raman spectroscopy of selected minerals of the corrosion products has been measured including nantokite, eriochalcite, claringbullite, atacamite, paratacamite, clinoatacamite and brochantite and related minerals. The free energy of formation shows that each mineral is stable relative to copper metal. The mineral, which is formed in copper corrosion, depends on the kinetics and conditions of the reaction. Raman spectroscopy clearly identifies each mineral by its characteristic Raman spectrum. The Raman spectrum is related to the mineral structure and bands are assigned to CuCl stretching and bending modes and to SO stretching modes. Clinoatacamite is identified as the polymorph of atacamite and not paratacamite. Paratacamite is a separate mineral with a similar but different structure to that of atacamite.

  11. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and near-field polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yuika; Mino, Toshihiro; Verma, Prabhat

    2015-12-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is a powerful tool for High-resolution Raman spectroscopy. In this method, a metal coated nano-tip acts as a plasmonic antenna to enhance the originally weak Raman scattering from a nanometric volume of a sample. The technique enables to detect Raman scattering light from nano-scale area and also enhance the light intensity with combination of near-filed light and localized surface plasmon generated at a metallized tip apex. Nowadays TERS is used to investigate various nano-scale samples, for examples, carbon nanotubes, graphenes DNA and biomaterials. As the TERS developed, there is high demand to investigate the properties of near-field light e.g. polarization properties. We have analyzed the polarization properties of near-field light in TERS and successfully realized the quantitative nano-imaging by visible light.

  12. Raman spectroscopy and imaging: applications in human breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Brozek-Pluska, Beata; Musial, Jacek; Kordek, Radzislaw; Bailo, Elena; Dieing, Thomas; Abramczyk, Halina

    2012-08-21

    The applications of spectroscopic methods in cancer detection open new possibilities in early stage diagnostics. Raman spectroscopy and Raman imaging represent novel and rapidly developing tools in cancer diagnosis. In the study described in this paper Raman spectroscopy has been employed to examine noncancerous and cancerous human breast tissues of the same patient. The most significant differences between noncancerous and cancerous tissues were found in regions characteristic for the vibrations of carotenoids, lipids and proteins. Particular attention was paid to the role played by unsaturated fatty acids in the differentiation between the noncancerous and the cancerous tissues. Comparison of Raman spectra of the noncancerous and the cancerous tissues with the spectra of oleic, linoleic, α-linolenic, γ-linolenic, docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids has been presented. The role of sample preparation in the determination of cancer markers is also discussed in this study.

  13. Quantitative detection of astaxanthin and cantaxanthin in Atlantic salmon by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2006-02-01

    Two major carotenoids species found in salmonids muscle tissues are astaxanthin and cantaxanthin. They are taken up from fish food and are responsible for the attractive red-orange color of salmon filet. Since carotenoids are powerful antioxidants and biomarkers of nutrient consumption, they are thought to indicate fish health and resistance to diseases in fish farm environments. Therefore, a rapid, accurate, quantitative optical technique for measuring carotenoid content in salmon tissues is of economic interest. We demonstrate the possibility of using fast, selective, quantitative detection of astaxanthin and cantaxanthin in salmon muscle tissues, employing resonance Raman spectroscopy. Analyzing strong Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the carotenoid molecules under blue laser excitation, we are able to characterize quantitatively the concentrations of carotenoids in salmon muscle tissue. To validate the technique, we compared Raman data with absorption measurements of carotenoid extracts in acetone. A close correspondence was observed in absorption spectra for tissue extract in acetone and a pure astaxanthin solution. Raman results show a linear dependence between Raman and absorption data. The proposed technique holds promise as a method of rapid screening of carotenoid levels in fish muscle tissues and may be attractive for the fish farm industry to assess the dietary status of salmon, risk for infective diseases, and product quality control.

  14. Single Molecule Raman Spectroscopy Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuanxi; Dlott, Dana

    2014-06-01

    Pressure effects on surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra of Rhdoamine 6G adsorbed on silver nanoparticle surfaces was studied using a confocal Raman microscope. Colloidal silver nanoparticles were treated with Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and its isotopically substituted partner, R6G-d4. Mixed isotopomers let us identify single-molecule spectra, since multiple-molecule spectra would show vibrational transitions from both species. The nanoparticles were embedded into a poly vinyl alcohol film, and loaded into a diamond anvil cell for the high-pressure Raman scattering measurement. Argon was the pressure medium. Ambient pressure Raman scattering spectra showed few single-molecule spectra. At moderately high pressure ( 1GPa), a surprising effect was observed. The number of sites with observable spectra decreased dramatically, and most of the spectra that could be observed were due to single molecules. The effects of high pressure suppressed the multiple-molecule Raman sites, leaving only the single-molecule sites to be observed.

  15. Identification and discrimination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutis, Edward; Szymanski, Paul; Applin, Daniel; Goltz, Douglas

    2016-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely present throughout the Solar System and beyond. They have been implicated as a contributor to unidentified infrared emission bands in the interstellar medium, comprise a substantial portion of the insoluble organic matter in carbonaceous chondrites, are expected stable components of organic matter on Mars, and are present in a wide range of terrestrial hydrocarbons and as components of biomolecules. However, PAH structures can be very complicated, making their identification challenging. Raman spectroscopy is known to be especially sensitive to the highly polarizable C-C and C=C bonds found in PAHs, and therefore, can be a powerful tool for PAH structural and compositional elucidation. This study examined Raman spectra of 48 different PAHs to determine the degree to which Raman spectroscopy could be used to uniquely identify different species, factors that control the positions of major Raman peaks, the degree to which induced fluorescence affects the intensity of Raman peaks, its usefulness for PAH discrimination, and the effects of varying excitation wavelength on some PAH Raman spectra. It was found that the arrangement and composition of phenyl (benzene) rings, and the type and position of functional groups can greatly affect fluorescence, positions and intensities of Raman peaks associated with the PAH backbone, and the introduction of new Raman peaks. Among the functional groups found on many of the PAHs that were analyzed, only a few Raman peaks corresponding to the molecular vibrations of these groups could be clearly distinguished. Comparison of the PAH Raman spectra that were acquired with both 532 and 785 nm excitation found that the longer wavelength resulted in reduced fluorescence, consistent with previous studies.

  16. Application of laser Raman spectroscopy to dental diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izawa, Takahiro; Wakaki, Moriaki

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this research is related with the diagnosis of caries by use of a laser. We study the fundamental characterization of the diagnosis method using both fluorescence and Raman scattering spectroscopy. We try to evaluate the possibility of the caries diagnosis using Raman spectroscopy and its clinical application. We focus on the PO34- ion that flows out with the dissolution of hydroxyapatite (HAp), and the fluorescence that increases in connection with caries. The Raman line of P-O vibration is overlapped on the continuous, background spectrum by fluorescence. Consequently, we try to find out the correlation between a healthy part and a carious part by analyzing both fluorescence and Raman spectra. It was found that Raman intensity of HAp at carious lesion was weaker than those of healthy parts and the florescence intensity at the same portions was stronger. We have obtained the feasibility to estimate the degree of caries and health condition by deriving the ratio between Raman and florescence intensity. And the trial measurements in vivo were carried out to verify the availability of the method by using a fiber probe type multi channel Raman spectrometer. The process of remineralization is under researching for the development of preventive medicine.

  17. The substrate matters in the Raman spectroscopy analysis of cells

    PubMed Central

    Mikoliunaite, Lina; Rodriguez, Raul D.; Sheremet, Evgeniya; Kolchuzhin, Vladimir; Mehner, Jan; Ramanavicius, Arunas; Zahn, Dietrich R.T.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful analytical method that allows deposited and/or immobilized cells to be evaluated without complex sample preparation or labeling. However, a main limitation of Raman spectroscopy in cell analysis is the extremely weak Raman intensity that results in low signal to noise ratios. Therefore, it is important to seize any opportunity that increases the intensity of the Raman signal and to understand whether and how the signal enhancement changes with respect to the substrate used. Our experimental results show clear differences in the spectroscopic response from cells on different surfaces. This result is partly due to the difference in spatial distribution of electric field at the substrate/cell interface as shown by numerical simulations. We found that the substrate also changes the spatial location of maximum field enhancement around the cells. Moreover, beyond conventional flat surfaces, we introduce an efficient nanostructured silver substrate that largely enhances the Raman signal intensity from a single yeast cell. This work contributes to the field of vibrational spectroscopy analysis by providing a fresh look at the significance of the substrate for Raman investigations in cell research. PMID:26310910

  18. The substrate matters in the Raman spectroscopy analysis of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikoliunaite, Lina; Rodriguez, Raul D.; Sheremet, Evgeniya; Kolchuzhin, Vladimir; Mehner, Jan; Ramanavicius, Arunas; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful analytical method that allows deposited and/or immobilized cells to be evaluated without complex sample preparation or labeling. However, a main limitation of Raman spectroscopy in cell analysis is the extremely weak Raman intensity that results in low signal to noise ratios. Therefore, it is important to seize any opportunity that increases the intensity of the Raman signal and to understand whether and how the signal enhancement changes with respect to the substrate used. Our experimental results show clear differences in the spectroscopic response from cells on different surfaces. This result is partly due to the difference in spatial distribution of electric field at the substrate/cell interface as shown by numerical simulations. We found that the substrate also changes the spatial location of maximum field enhancement around the cells. Moreover, beyond conventional flat surfaces, we introduce an efficient nanostructured silver substrate that largely enhances the Raman signal intensity from a single yeast cell. This work contributes to the field of vibrational spectroscopy analysis by providing a fresh look at the significance of the substrate for Raman investigations in cell research.

  19. Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) As Next Generation Nonlinear LIDAR Spectroscopy and Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2009-07-10

    Nonlinear spectroscopy using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and femtosecond laser pulses has been successfully developed as powerful tools for chemical analysis and biological imaging. Recent developments show promising possibilities of incorporating CARS into LIDAR system for remote detection of molecular species in airborne particles. The corresponding theory is being developed to describe nonlinear scattering of a mesoscopic particle composed of complex molecules by laser pulses with arbitrary shape and spectral content. Microscopic many-body transform theory is used to compute the third order susceptibility for CARS in molecules with known absorption spectrum and vibrational modes. The theory is combined with anmore » integral scattering formula and Mie-Lorentz formulae, giving a rigorous formalism which provides powerful numerical experimentation of CARS spectra, particularly on the variations with the laser parameters and the direction of detection.« less

  20. Metallized Capillaries as Probes for Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, Michael

    2003-01-01

    A class of miniature probes has been proposed to supplant the fiber-optic probes used heretofore in some Raman and fluorescence spectroscopic systems. A probe according to the proposal would include a capillary tube coated with metal on its inside to make it reflective. A microlens would be hermetically sealed onto one end of the tube. A spectroscopic probe head would contain a single such probe, which would both deliver laser light to a sample and collect Raman or fluorescent light emitted by the sample.

  1. Characterization of uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4) with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Wellons, Matthew S.

    The Raman spectrum of uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4) is unambiguously characterized with multiple Raman excitation laser sources for the first time. Across different laser excitation wavelengths, UF 4 demonstrates 16 distinct Raman bands within the 50-400 cm -1 region. The observed Raman bands are representative of various F-F vibrational modes. UF 4 also shows intense fluorescent bands in the 325 – 750 nm spectral region. Comparison of the UF 4 spectrum with the ZrF 4 spectrum, its crystalline analog, demonstrates a similar Raman band structure consistent with group theory predictions for expected Raman bands. Additionally, a demonstration of combined scanningmore » electron microscopy (SEM) and in situ Raman spectroscopy microanalytical measurements of UF 4 particulates shows that despite the inherent weak intensity of Raman bands, identification and characterization are possible for micron-sized particulates with modern instrumentation. The published well characterized UF 4 spectrum is extremely relevant to nuclear materials and nuclear safeguard applications.« less

  2. Characterization of uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4) with Raman spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Wellons, Matthew S.

    2016-03-22

    The Raman spectrum of uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4) is unambiguously characterized with multiple Raman excitation laser sources for the first time. Across different laser excitation wavelengths, UF 4 demonstrates 16 distinct Raman bands within the 50-400 cm -1 region. The observed Raman bands are representative of various F-F vibrational modes. UF 4 also shows intense fluorescent bands in the 325 – 750 nm spectral region. Comparison of the UF 4 spectrum with the ZrF 4 spectrum, its crystalline analog, demonstrates a similar Raman band structure consistent with group theory predictions for expected Raman bands. Additionally, a demonstration of combined scanningmore » electron microscopy (SEM) and in situ Raman spectroscopy microanalytical measurements of UF 4 particulates shows that despite the inherent weak intensity of Raman bands, identification and characterization are possible for micron-sized particulates with modern instrumentation. The published well characterized UF 4 spectrum is extremely relevant to nuclear materials and nuclear safeguard applications.« less

  3. OH absorption spectroscopy in a flame using spatial heterodyne spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartula, Renata J.; Ghandhi, Jaal B.; Sanders, Scott T.; Mierkiewicz, Edwin J.; Roesler, Fred L.; Harlander, John M.

    2007-12-01

    We demonstrate measurements of OH absorption spectra in the post-flame zone of a McKenna burner using spatial heterodyne spectroscopy (SHS). SHS permits high-resolution, high-throughput measurements. In this case the spectra span ~308-310 nm with a resolution of 0.03 nm, even though an extended source (extent of ~2×10-7 m2 rad2) was used. The high spectral resolution is important for interpreting spectra when multiple absorbers are present for inferring accurate gas temperatures from measured spectra and for monitoring weak absorbers. The present measurement paves the way for absorption spectroscopy by SHS in practical combustion devices, such as reciprocating and gas-turbine engines.

  4. Raman spectroscopy of garnet-group minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mingsheng, P.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Dien, L.; Chao, E.C.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Raman spectra of the natural end members of the garnet-group minerals, which include pyrope, almandine and spessarite of Fe-Al garnet series and grossularite, andradite and uvarovite of Ca-Fe garnet series, have been studied. Measured Raman spectra of these minerals are reasonably and qualitatively assigned to the internal modes, translational and rotatory modes of SiO4 tetrahedra, as well as the translational motion of bivalent cations in the X site. The stretch and rotatory Alg modes for the Fe-Al garnet series show obvious Raman shifts as compared with those for the Ca-Fe garnet series, owing to the cations residing in the X site connected with SiO4 tetrahedra by sharing the two edges. The Raman shifts of all members within either of the series are attributed mainly to the properties of cations in the X site for the Fe-Al garnet series and in the Y site for the Ca-Fe garnet series. ?? 1994 Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Principles and applications of Raman spectroscopy in pharmaceutical drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Gala, Urvi; Chauhan, Harsh

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, Raman spectroscopy has become increasingly important as an analytical technique in various scientific areas of research and development. This is partly due to the technological advancements in Raman instrumentation and partly due to detailed fingerprinting that can be derived from Raman spectra. Its versatility of applications, rapidness of collection and easy analysis have made Raman spectroscopy an attractive analytical tool. The following review describes Raman spectroscopy and its application within the pharmaceutical industry. The authors explain the theory of Raman scattering and its variations in Raman spectroscopy. The authors also highlight how Raman spectra are interpreted, providing examples. Raman spectroscopy has a number of potential applications within drug discovery and development. It can be used to estimate the molecular activity of drugs and to establish a drug's physicochemical properties such as its partition coefficient. It can also be used in compatibility studies during the drug formulation process. Raman spectroscopy's immense potential should be further investigated in future.

  6. Development and biological applications of optical tweezers and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chang'an

    Optical tweezers is a three-dimensional manipulation tool that employs a gradient force that originates from the single highly focused laser beam. Raman spectroscopy is a molecular analytical tool that can give a highly unique "fingerprint" for each substance by measuring the unique vibrations of its molecules. The combination of these two optical techniques offers a new tool for the manipulation and identification of single biological cells and microscopic particles. In this thesis, we designed and implemented a Laser-Tweezers-Raman-Spectroscopy (LTRS) system, also called the Raman-tweezers, for the simultaneous capture and analysis of both biological particles and non-biological particles. We show that microparticles can be conveniently captured at the focus of a laser beam and the Raman spectra of trapped particles can be acquired with high quality. The LTRS system overcomes the intrinsic Brownian motion and cell motility of microparticles in solution and provides a promising tool for in situ identifying suspicious agents. In order to increase the signal to noise ratio, several schemes were employed in LTRS system to reduce the blank noise and the fluorescence signal coming from analytes and the surrounding background. These techniques include near-infrared excitation, optical levitation, confocal microscopy, and frequency-shifted Raman difference. The LTRS system has been applied for the study in cell biology at the single cell level. With the built Raman-tweezers system, we studied the dynamic physiological processes of single living cells, including cell cycle, the transcription and translation of recombinant protein in transgenic yeast cells and the T cell activation. We also studied cell damage and associated biochemical processes in optical traps, UV radiations, and evaluated heating by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. These studies show that the Raman-tweezers system is feasible to provide rapid and reliable diagnosis of cellular disorders and can be

  7. Condition Assessment of Kevlar Composite Materials Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washer, Glenn; Brooks, Thomas; Saulsberry, Regor

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation includes the following main concepts. Goal: To evaluate Raman spectroscopy as a potential NDE tool for the detection of stress rupture in Kevlar. Objective: Test a series of strand samples that have been aged under various conditions and evaluate differences and trends in the Raman response. Hypothesis: Reduction in strength associated with stress rupture may manifest from changes in the polymer at a molecular level. If so, than these changes may effect the vibrational characteristics of the material, and consequently the Raman spectra produced from the material. Problem Statement: Kevlar composite over-wrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) on the space shuttles are greater than 25 years old. Stress rupture phenomena is not well understood for COPVs. Other COPVs are planned for hydrogen-fueled vehicles using Carbon composite material. Raman spectroscopy is being explored as an non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique to predict the onset of stress rupture in Kevlar composite materials. Test aged Kevlar strands to discover trends in the Raman response. Strength reduction in Kevlar polymer will manifest itself on the Raman spectra. Conclusions: Raman spectroscopy has shown relative changes in the intensity and FWHM of the 1613 cm(exp -1) peak. Reduction in relative intensity for creep, fleet leader, and SIM specimens compared to the virgin strands. Increase in FWHM has been observed for the creep and fleet leader specimens compared to the virgin strands. Changes in the Raman spectra may result from redistributing loads within the material due to the disruption of hydrogen bonding between crystallites or defects in the crystallites from aging the Kevlar strands. Peak shifting has not been observed to date. Analysis is ongoing. Stress measurements may provide a tool in the short term.

  8. Spectral reconstruction for shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS).

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuxia; Chernavskaia, Olga; Popp, Jürgen; Bocklitz, Thomas

    2018-08-15

    Fluorescence emission is one of the major obstacles to apply Raman spectroscopy in biological investigations. It is usually several orders more intense than Raman scattering and hampers further analysis. In cases where the fluorescence emission is too intense to be efficiently removed via routine mathematical baseline correction algorithms, an alternative approach is needed. One alternative approach is shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS), where two Raman spectra are recorded with two slightly different excitation wavelengths. Ideally, the fluorescence emission at the two excitations does not change while the Raman spectrum shifts according to the excitation wavelength. Hence the fluorescence is removed in the difference of the two recorded Raman spectra. For better interpretability a spectral reconstruction procedure is necessary to recover the fluorescence-free Raman spectrum. This is challenging due to the intensity variations between the two recorded Raman spectra caused by unavoidable experimental changes as well as the presence of noise. Existent approaches suffer from drawbacks like spectral resolution loss, fluorescence residual, and artefacts. In this contribution, we proposed a reconstruction method based on non-negative least squares (NNLS), where the intensity variations between the two measurements are utilized in the reconstruction model. The method achieved fluorescence-free reconstruction on three real-world SERDS datasets without significant information loss. Thereafter, we quantified the performance of the reconstruction based on artificial datasets from four aspects: reconstructed spectral resolution, precision of reconstruction, signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), and fluorescence residual. The artificial datasets were constructed with varied Raman to fluorescence intensity ratio (RFIR), SNR, full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), excitation wavelength shift, and fluorescence variation between the two spectra. It was demonstrated that

  9. Kerr-gated picosecond Raman spectroscopy and Raman photon migration of equine bone tissue with 400-nm excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Michael D.; Goodship, Allen E.; Draper, Edward R. C.; Matousek, Pavel; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W.

    2004-07-01

    We show that Raman spectroscopy with visible lasers, even in the deep blue is possible with time-gated Raman spectroscopy. A 4 picosec time gate allows efficient fluorescence rejection, up to 1000X, and provides almost background-free Raman spectra with low incident laser power. The technology enables spectroscopy with better than 10X higher scattering efficiency than is possible with the NIR (785 nm and 830 nm) lasers that are conventionally used. Raman photon migration is shown to allow depth penetration. We show for the first time that Kerr-gated Raman spectra of bone tissue with blue laser excitation enables both fluorescence rejection and depth penetration.

  10. Detection of anions by normal Raman spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of cationic-coated substrates.

    PubMed

    Mosier-Boss, P A; Lieberman, S H

    2003-09-01

    The use of normal Raman spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of cationic-coated silver and gold substrates to detect polyatomic anions in aqueous environments is examined. For normal Raman spectroscopy, using near-infrared excitation, linear concentration responses were observed. Detection limits varied from 84 ppm for perchlorate to 2600 ppm for phosphate. In general, detection limits in the ppb to ppm concentration range for the polyatomic anions were achieved using cationic-coated SERS substrates. Adsorption of the polyatomic anions on the cationic-coated SERS substrates was described by a Frumkin isotherm. The SERS technique could not be used to detect dichromate, as this anion reacted with the coatings to form thiol esters. A competitive complexation method was used to evaluate the interaction of chloride ion with the cationic coatings. Hydrogen bonding and pi-pi interactions play significant roles in the selectivity of the cationic coatings.

  11. Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy - GASMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, Sune

    2008-09-01

    An overview of the new field of Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy (GASMAS) is presented. GASMAS combines narrow-band diode-laser spectroscopy with diffuse media optical propagation. While solids and liquids have broad absorption features, free gas in pores and cavities in the material is characterized by sharp spectral signatures, typically 10,000 times sharper than those of the host material. Many applications in materials science, food packaging, pharmaceutics and medicine have been demonstrated. So far molecular oxygen and water vapour have been studied around 760 and 935 nm, respectively. Liquid water, an important constituent in many natural materials, such as tissue, has a low absorption at such wavelengths, allowing propagation. Polystyrene foam, wood, fruits, food-stuffs, pharmaceutical tablets, and human sinus cavities have been studied. Transport of gas in porous media can readily be studied by first immersing the material in, e.g., pure nitrogen, and then observing the rate at which normal air, containing oxygen, reinvades the material. The conductance of the sinus connective passages can be measured in this way by flushing the nasal cavity with nitrogen. Also other dynamic processes such as drying of materials can be studied. The techniques have also been extended to remote-sensing applications (LIDAR-GASMAS).

  12. Vibrational characterization of pheomelanin and trichochrome F by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván, Ismael; Jorge, Alberto; Solano, Francisco; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2013-06-01

    We characterize for the first time the vibrational state of natural pheomelanin using Raman spectroscopy and model pigment synthesized from 5-S-cysteinyldopa. The shape of the Raman spectrum was very different from that of eumelanin. Four Raman bands were visible in the 500-2000 cm-1 wavenumber region about 500, 1150, 1490 and 2000 cm-1, which we assigned to the out-of-plane deformation and the stretching vibration of the phenyl rings, to the stretching vibration of C-N bonds or the stretching and wagging vibration of CH2, and to overtone or combination bands. Interestingly, we also show that the Raman spectrum of synthetic trichochrome F, a pigment that may be produced along with pheomelanin during pheomelanogenesis, is different from that of pheomelanin and similar to the spectrum of eumelanin. We could detect Raman signal of both eumelanin and pheomelanin in feathers and hairs where both pigments simultaneously occur without the need of isolating the pigment. This indicates that Raman spectroscopy represents a non-invasive method to detect pheomelanin and distinguish it from other pigments. This may be especially relevant to detect pheomelanin in animal skin including humans, where it has been associated with animal appearance and classification, human phototypes, prevention of skin diseases and cancer risk.

  13. Raman Spectroscopy Study of Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Bulk Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devpura, S.; Dai, H.; Thakur, J. S.; Naik, R.; Cao, A.; Pandya, A.; Auner, G. W.; Sarkar, F.; Sakr, W.; Naik, V.

    2009-03-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer among men. The mortality rate for this disease can be dramatically reduced if it can be diagnosed in its early stages. Raman spectroscopy is one of the optical techniques which can provide fingerprints of a disease in terms of its molecular composition which changes due to the onset of disease. The aim of this project is to investigate the differences in the Raman spectra to identify benign epithelium (BE), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and adenocarcinoma of various Gleason grades in archived bulk tissues embedded in paraffin wax. For each tissue, two adjacent tissue sections were cut and dewaxed, where one of the sections was stained using haematoxylin and eosin for histological examination and the other unstained adjacent section was used for Raman spectroscopic studies. We have collected Raman spectra from 10 prostatic adenocarcinoma dewaxed tissue sections using Raman microscope (785 nm excitation laser). The data were analyzed using statistical methods of principal component analysis and discriminant function analysis to classify the tissue regions. The results indicate that Raman Spectroscopy can differentiate between BE, PIN and Cancer regions.

  14. Raman spectroscopy for bacterial identification and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatová, Silvie; Samek, Ota; Pilát, Zdeněk.; Šerý, Mojmír.; Ježek, Jan; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Zemánek, Pavel; Ružička, Filip

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of our investigation is to use Raman tweezers technique so that the responce of Raman scattering on microorganisms suspended in liquid media (bacteria, algae and yeast cells in microfluidic chips) can be used to identify different species. The investigations presented here include identification of different bacteria strains (biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative) and yeast cells by using principal component analysis (PCA). The main driving force behind our investigation was a common problem in the clinical microbiology laboratory - how to distinguish between contaminant and invasive isolates. Invasive bacterial/yeast isolates can be assumed to form a biofilm, while isolates which do not form a biofilm can be treated as contaminant. Thus, the latter do not represent an important virulence factor.

  15. Raman spectroscopy and oral exfoliative cytology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Aditi; Shah, Nupur; Mahimkar, Manoj; Garud, Mandavi; Pagare, Sandeep; Nair, Sudhir; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Early detection of oral cancers can substantially improve disease-free survival rates. Ex vivo and in vivo Raman spectroscopic (RS) studies on oral cancer have demonstrated the applicability of RS in identifying not only malignant and premalignant conditions but also cancer-field-effects: the earliest events in oral carcinogenesis. RS has also been explored for cervical exfoliated cells analysis. Exfoliated cells are associated with several advantages like non-invasive sampling, higher patient compliance, transportation and analysis at a central facility: obviating need for on-site instrumentation. Thus, oral exfoliative cytology coupled with RS may serve as a useful adjunct for oral cancer screening. In this study, exfoliated cells from healthy controls with and without tobacco habits, premalignant lesions (leukoplakia and tobacco-pouch-keratosis) and their contralateral mucosa were collected using a Cytobrush. Cells were harvested by vortexing and centrifugation at 6000 rpm. The cellular yield was ascertained using Neubauer's chamber. Cell pellets were placed on a CaF2 window and Raman spectra were acquired using a Raman microprobe (40X objective) coupled HE-785 Raman spectrometer. Approximately 7 spectra were recorded from each pellet, following which pellet was smeared onto a glass slide, fixed in 95% ethanol and subjected to Pap staining for cytological diagnosis (gold standard). Preliminary PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out cross validation indicate delineation of cells from healthy and all pathological conditions. A tendency of classification was also seen between cells from contralateral, healthy tobacco and site of premalignant lesions. These results will be validated by cytological findings, which will serve as the basis for building standard models of each condition.

  16. Raman Spectroscopy with High Power Diode Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claps, Ricardo

    1998-10-01

    Our group has demonstrated in the past that it is possible to record, with a high power Diode Laser, Raman spectra of low pressure gases. An external cavity was used to lock the laser into single mode operation. Also, the use of atomic filters permitted the observation of rotational Raman lines only 1 cm-1 apart from the excitation frequency ( J.Sabbaghzadeh, M.Fink, et-all; Applied Physics ) B 60 (1995), p.261-265.. We present now an improved version of the experiment, with beamshaping optics that help to correct the highly astigmatic output of the Diode Laser; this allowed us to put 300 mW of cw power through a multi-pass cell in the sample chamber, `increasing the signal by a factor of ~ 15. We present examples of rotational and vibrational spectra from CO_2, N_2, and air. The results show that we are able to obtain spectra with a S/N ratio of 0.011 per Torr, per √s, which means that we can detect 1 Torr of these gases in a few hours of exposure, at a maximum resolution of 0.85 cm-1 over a range of 200 cm-1. The laser stability in power, frequency and bandwidth, ensures the feasibility of long exposure experiments. We plan to apply the Raman technique to study flow properties of gases under different dynamic conditions; as a result, we expect to use our instrument for the study of the vibrational Raman spectra of alkali-halide dimers in vapour phase at low pressures.

  17. Raman spectroscopy as a tool to understand Kerogen production potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatibi, S.; Ostadhassan, M.; Mohammed, R. A.; Alexeyev, A.

    2017-12-01

    A lot attention has given to unconventional reservoirs specifically oil shale in North America during the last decades. Understanding Kerogen properties in terms of maturity and production potential are crucial for unconventional reservoir. Since, the amount of hydrocarbon generation is a function of kerogen type and content in the formation, and the magnitude and duration in which heat and pressure were applied. This study presents a non-destructive and fast method to determine Kerogen properties in terms of Rock-Eval parameters by means of Raman Spectroscopy. Samples were gathered from upper and lower Bakken formation, with different maturities at different depth. Raman spectroscopy as a powerful nondestructive analytical tool for molecular reconstruction was employed to find Raman spectra of different samples. In the next step, Rock-Eval was performed for each sample and different measurements were made. Then in an original approach, correlation between Rock-Eval parameters with Raman Spectroscopy results was established to fully understand how kerogen productivity potentials can be reflected on the Raman response. Results showed, maturity related parameters (RO, Tmax), S1 (already generated oil in the rock), S2 (potential hydrocarbon) and OSI (oil saturation index as indication of potential oil flow zones) can be correlated to band separation, D band intensity, G band intensity and G/D intensity, respectively. Proposed method provide a fast nondestructive method to evaluate Kerogen quality even at field without any special sample preparation.

  18. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using a picosecond UV laser as a light source was developed in our institute. Tropospheric OH radicals are measured by their rotational absorption lines around 308 nm. The spectra are obtained using a high resolution spectrograph. The detection system has been improved over the formerly used optomechanical scanning device by application of a photodiode array which increased the observed spectral range by a factor of 6 and which utilizes the light much more effectively leading to a considerable reduction of the measurement time. This technique provides direct measurements of OH because the signal is given by the product of the absorption coefficient and the OH concentration along the light path according to Lambert-Beers law. No calibration is needed. Since the integrated absorption coefficient is well known the accuracy of the measurement essentially depends on the extent to which the OH absorption pattern can be detected in the spectra. No interference by self generated OH radicals in the detection lightpath has been observed. The large bandwidth (greater than 0.15 nm) and the high spectral resolution (1.5 pm) allows absolute determination of interferences by other trace gas absorptions. The measurement error is directly accessible from the absorption-signal to baseline-noise ratio in the spectra. The applicability of the method strongly depends on visibility. Elevated concentrations of aerosols lead to considerable attenuation of the laser light which reduces the S/N-ratio. In the moderately polluted air of Julich, where we performed a number of OH measurement spectra. In addition absorption features of unidentified species were frequently detected. A quantitative deconvolution even of the known species is not easy to achieve and can leave residual structures in the spectra. Thus interferences usually increase the noise and deteriorate the OH detection sensitivity. Using diode arrays for sensitive

  19. Parallelism between gradient temperature raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry results

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy (TDR) applies the temperature gradients utilized in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to Raman spectroscopy, providing a straightforward technique to identify molecular rearrangements that occur just prior to phase transitions. Herein we apply TDR and D...

  20. Experimental artifacts influencing polarization sensitive magneto-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunavukkuarasu, K.; Lu, Z.; Su, L.; Yu, Y.; Cao, L.; Ballotin, M. V.; Christianen, P. C. M.; Zhang, Y.; Smirnov, D.

    Since the discovery of graphene, there has been an explosion of research on 2D layered materials such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Among several experimental techniques utilized for studying these materials, Raman spectroscopy has proven to be a very powerful tool due to it's sensitivity to layer numbers, interlayer coupling etc. Layered MoS2, member of TMD family, is a typical example with promising applications in nano-optoelectronics. A recent magneto-Raman investigations on MoS2 published by J. Ji etal reported an observation of giant magneto-optical effect. In this work, the intensity of Raman modes exhibited dramatic change in intensities and was attributed to field-induced broken symmetry on Raman scattering cross-section. Due to the ambiguous nature of the interpretation presented in this publication, we performed further Raman studies on MoS2 at high magnetic fields to illustrate the experimental factors overlooked by the previous study. It is highly important to consider the magnetic field-induced rotation of the polarization of the light and its effect on the Raman active phonon modes in anisotropic materials. A detailed report of our magneto-Raman experiments and their outcomes will be presented.

  1. RAMAN spectroscopy imaging improves the diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Julietta V.; Graziani, Valerio; Fosca, Marco; Taffon, Chiara; Rocchia, Massimiliano; Crucitti, Pierfilippo; Pozzilli, Paolo; Onetti Muda, Andrea; Caricato, Marco; Crescenzi, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Recent investigations strongly suggest that Raman spectroscopy (RS) can be used as a clinical tool in cancer diagnosis to improve diagnostic accuracy. In this study, we evaluated the efficiency of Raman imaging microscopy to discriminate between healthy and neoplastic thyroid tissue, by analyzing main variants of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC), the most common type of thyroid cancer. We performed Raman imaging of large tissue areas (from 100 × 100 μm2 up to 1 × 1 mm2), collecting 38 maps containing about 9000 Raman spectra. Multivariate statistical methods, including Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), were applied to translate Raman spectra differences between healthy and PTC tissues into diagnostically useful information for a reliable tissue classification. Our study is the first demonstration of specific biochemical features of the PTC profile, characterized by significant presence of carotenoids with respect to the healthy tissue. Moreover, this is the first evidence of Raman spectra differentiation between classical and follicular variant of PTC, discriminated by LDA with high efficiency. The combined histological and Raman microscopy analyses allow clear-cut integration of morphological and biochemical observations, with dramatic improvement of efficiency and reliability in the differential diagnosis of neoplastic thyroid nodules, paving the way to integrative findings for tumorigenesis and novel therapeutic strategies.

  2. Remote laser evaporative molecular absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip; Cohen, Alexander; Madajian, Jonathan; Kulkarni, Neeraj; Zhang, Qicheng; Griswold, Janelle; Brashears, Travis

    2016-09-01

    We describe a novel method for probing bulk molecular and atomic composition of solid targets from a distant vantage. A laser is used to melt and vaporize a spot on the target. With sufficient flux, the spot temperature rises rapidly, and evaporation of surface materials occurs. The melted spot creates a high-temperature blackbody source, and ejected material creates a plume of surface materials in front of the spot. Molecular and atomic absorption occurs as the blackbody radiation passes through the ejected plume. Bulk molecular and atomic composition of the surface material is investigated by using a spectrometer to view the heated spot through the ejected plume. The proposed method is distinct from current stand-off approaches to composition analysis, such as Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), which atomizes and ionizes target material and observes emission spectra to determine bulk atomic composition. Initial simulations of absorption profiles with laser heating show great promise for Remote Laser-Evaporative Molecular Absorption (R-LEMA) spectroscopy. The method is well-suited for exploration of cold solar system targets—asteroids, comets, planets, moons—such as from a spacecraft orbiting the target. Spatial composition maps could be created by scanning the surface. Applying the beam to a single spot continuously produces a borehole or trench, and shallow subsurface composition profiling is possible. This paper describes system concepts for implementing the proposed method to probe the bulk molecular composition of an asteroid from an orbiting spacecraft, including laser array, photovoltaic power, heating and ablation, plume characteristics, absorption, spectrometry and data management.

  3. Cone penetrometer fiber optic raman spectroscopy probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kyle, Kevin R.; Brown, Steven B.

    2000-01-01

    A chemically and mechanically robust optical Raman spectroscopy probe assembly that can be incorporated in a cone penetrometer (CPT) for subsurface deployment. This assembly consists of an optical Raman probe and a penetrometer compatible optical probe housing. The probe is intended for in-situ chemical analysis of chemical constituents in the surrounding environment. The probe is optically linked via fiber optics to the light source and the detection system at the surface. A built-in broadband light source provides a strobe method for direct measurement of sample optical density. A mechanically stable sapphire window is sealed directly into the side-wall of the housing using a metallic, chemically resistant, hermetic seal design. This window permits transmission of the interrogation light beam and the resultant signal. The spectroscopy probe assembly is capable of accepting Raman, Laser induced Fluorescence, reflectance, and other optical probes with collimated output for CPT deployment.

  4. Principle, system, and applications of tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, MingQian; Wang, Rui; Wu, XiaoBin; Wang, Jia

    2012-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique in chemical information characterization. However, this spectral method is subject to two obstacles in nano-material detection. One is diffraction limited spatial resolution, and the other is its inherent small Raman cross section and weak signaling. To resolve these problems, a new approach has been developed, denoted as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). TERS is capable of high-resolution and high-sensitivity detection and demonstrated to be a promising spectroscopic and micro-topographic method to characterize nano-materials and nanostructures. In this paper, the principle and experimental system of TERS are discussed. The latest application of TERS in molecule detection, biological specimen identification, nanao-material characterization, and semi-conductor material determination with some specific experimental examples are presented.

  5. Raman scattering excitation spectroscopy of monolayer WS2.

    PubMed

    Molas, Maciej R; Nogajewski, Karol; Potemski, Marek; Babiński, Adam

    2017-07-11

    Resonant Raman scattering is investigated in monolayer WS 2 at low temperature with the aid of an unconventional technique, i.e., Raman scattering excitation (RSE) spectroscopy. The RSE spectrum is made up by sweeping the excitation energy, when the detection energy is fixed in resonance with excitonic transitions related to either neutral or charged excitons. We demonstrate that the shape of the RSE spectrum strongly depends on the selected detection energy. The resonance of outgoing light with the neutral exciton leads to an extremely rich RSE spectrum, which displays several Raman scattering features not reported so far, while no clear effect on the associated background photoluminescence is observed. Instead, when the outgoing photons resonate with the negatively charged exciton, a strong enhancement of the related emission occurs. Presented results show that the RSE spectroscopy can be a useful technique to study electron-phonon interactions in thin layers of transition metal dichalcogenides.

  6. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of natural and synthetic indigo samples.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Peter; Moens, Luc

    2003-02-01

    In this work indigo samples from three different sources are studied by using Raman spectroscopy: the synthetic pigment and pigments from the woad (Isatis tinctoria) and the indigo plant (Indigofera tinctoria). 21 samples were obtained from 8 suppliers; for each sample 5 Raman spectra were recorded and used for further chemometrical analysis. Principal components analysis (PCA) was performed as data reduction method before applying hierarchical cluster analysis. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was implemented as a non-hierarchical supervised pattern recognition method to build a classification model. In order to avoid broad-shaped interferences from the fluorescence background, the influence of 1st and 2nd derivatives on the classification was studied by using cross-validation. Although chemically identical, it is shown that Raman spectroscopy in combination with suitable chemometric methods has the potential to discriminate between synthetic and natural indigo samples.

  7. Determination of nutritional parameters of yoghurts by FT Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaja, Tomasz; Baranowska, Maria; Mazurek, Sylwester; Szostak, Roman

    2018-05-01

    FT-Raman quantitative analysis of nutritional parameters of yoghurts was performed with the help of partial least squares models. The relative standard errors of prediction for fat, lactose and protein determination in the quantified commercial samples equalled to 3.9, 3.2 and 3.6%, respectively. Models based on attenuated total reflectance spectra of the liquid yoghurt samples and of dried yoghurt films collected with the single reflection diamond accessory showed relative standard errors of prediction values of 1.6-5.0% and 2.7-5.2%, respectively, for the analysed components. Despite a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio in the obtained spectra, Raman spectroscopy, combined with chemometrics, constitutes a fast and powerful tool for macronutrients quantification in yoghurts. Errors received for attenuated total reflectance method were found to be relatively higher than those for Raman spectroscopy due to inhomogeneity of the analysed samples.

  8. Raman-spectroscopy-based biosensing for applications in ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusciano, Giulia; Capriglione, Paola; Pesce, Giuseppe; Zito, Gianluigi; Del Prete, Antonio; Cennamo, Giovanni; Sasso, Antonio

    2013-05-01

    Cell-based biosensors rely on the detection and identification of single cells as well as monitoring of changes induced by interaction with drugs and/or toxic agents. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool to reach this goal, being non-destructive analytical technique, allowing also measurements of samples in aqueous environment. In addition, micro-Raman measurements do not require preliminary sample preparation (as in fluorescence spectroscopy), show a finger-print spectral response, allow a spatial resolution below typical cell sizes, and are relatively fast (few s or even less). All these properties make micro-Raman technique particularly promising for high-throughput on-line analysis integrated in lab-on-a-chip devices. Herein, we demonstrate some applications of Raman analysis in ophthalmology. In particular, we demonstrate that Raman analysis can provide useful information for the therapeutic treatment of keratitis caused by Acanthamoeba Castellanii (A.), an opportunistic protozoan that is widely distributed in the environment and is known to produce blinding keratitis and fatal encephalitis. In particular, by combining Raman analysis with Principal Component Analysis (PCA), we have demonstrated that is possible to distinguish between live and dead cells, enabling, therefore to establish the effectiveness of therapeutic strategies to vanquish the protozoa. As final step, we have analyzed the presence of biochemical differences in the conjunctival epithelial tissues of patients affected by keratitis with respect to healthy people. As a matter of facts, it is possible to speculate some biochemical alterations of the epithelial tissues, rendering more favorable the binding of the protozoan. The epithelial cells were obtained by impression cytology from eyes of both healthy and keratitis-affected individuals. All the samples were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy within a few hours from cells removal from eyes. The results of this analysis are discussed.

  9. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mu-ying; He, Lin; Chen, Gui-hua; Yang, Guang; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-08-01

    Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped micro-particle, but is generally less effective for individual nano-sized objects in the 10-100 nm range. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap (SWOT) with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus is more stable and sensitive in measuring nanoparticles in liquid with 4-8 fold increase in the Raman signals. It can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, polystyrene beads (100 nm), SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles with a low laser power of a few milliwatts. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  10. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy of synthetic and biological calcium phosphates.

    PubMed

    Sauer, G R; Zunic, W B; Durig, J R; Wuthier, R E

    1994-05-01

    Fourier-transform (FT) Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the organic and mineral components of biological and synthetic calcium phosphate minerals. Raman spectroscopy provides information on biological minerals that is complimentary to more widely used infrared methodologies as some infrared-inactive vibrational modes are Raman-active. The application of FT-Raman technology has, for the first time, enabled the problems of high sample fluorescence and low signal-to-noise that are inherent in calcified tissues to be overcome. Raman spectra of calcium phosphates are dominated by a very strong band near 960 cm-1 that arises from the symmetric stretching mode (v1) of the phosphate group. Other Raman-active phosphate vibrational bands are seen at approximately 1075 (v3), 590 (v4), and 435 cm-1 (v2). Minerals containing acidic phosphate groups show additional vibrational modes. The different calcium phosphate mineral phases can be distinguished from one another by the relative positions and shapes of these bands in the Raman spectra. FT-Raman spectra of nascent, nonmineralized matrix vesicles (MV) show a distinct absence of the phosphate v1 band even though these structures are rich in calcium and phosphate. Similar results were seen with milk casein and synthetic Ca-phosphatidyl-serine-PO4 complexes. Hence, the phosphate and/or acidic phosphate ions in these noncrystalline biological calcium phosphates is in a molecular environment that differs from that in synthetic amorphous calcium phosphate. In MV, the first distinct mineral phase to form contained acidic phosphate bands similar to those seen in octacalcium phosphate. The mineral phase present in fully mineralized MV was much more apatitic, resembling that found in bones and teeth.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Raman spectroscopy of sputtered metal-graphene and metal-oxide-graphene interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Tzu; Gajek, Marcin; Freitag, Marcus; Kuroda, Marcelo; Perebeinos, Vasili; Raoux, Simone

    2012-02-01

    In this talk, we report our recent development in sputtering deposition of magnetic and non-magnetic metal and metal-oxide thin films on graphene for applications in spintronics and nanoeleoctronics. TEM and SEM images demonstrate homogeneous coverage, uniform thickness, and good crystallinity of the sputtered films. Raman spectroscopy shows that the structure of the underlying graphene is well preserved, and the spectral weight of the defect D mode is comparable to that of the e-beam evaporated samples. Most significantly, we report the first observation of graphene-enhanced surface excitations of crystalline materials. Specifically, we discover two pronounced dispersive Raman modes at the interface of graphene and the nickel-oxide and cobalt-oxide films which we attribute to the strong light absorption and high-order resonant scattering process in the graphene layer. We will present the frequency-dependent, polarization-dependent Raman data of these two modes and discuss their microscopic origin.

  12. Combined IR-Raman vs vibrational sum-frequency heterospectral correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sandra; Beutier, Clémentine; Hore, Dennis K.

    2018-06-01

    Vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy is a valuable probe of surface structure, particularly when the same molecules are present in one of the adjacent bulk solid or solution phases. As a result of the non-centrosymmetric requirement of SFG, the signal generated is a marker of the extent to which the molecules are ordered in an arrangement that breaks the up-down symmetry at the surface. In cases where the accompanying changes in the bulk are of interest in understanding and interpreting the surface structure, simultaneous analysis of the bulk IR absorption or bulk Raman scattering is helpful, and may be used in heterospectral surface-bulk two-dimensional correlation. We demonstrate that, in such cases, generating a new type of bulk spectrum that combines the IR and Raman amplitudes is a better candidate than the individual IR and Raman spectra for the purpose of correlation with the SFG signal.

  13. Determination of cellulose I crystallinity by FT-Raman spectroscopy

    Treesearch

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Richard S. Reiner; Sally A. Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Two new methods based on FT-Raman spectroscopy, one simple, based on band intensity ratio, and the other, using a partial least-squares (PLS) regression model, are proposed to determine cellulose I crystallinity. In the simple method, crystallinity in semicrystalline cellulose I samples was determined based on univariate regression that was first developed using the...

  14. Stress Analysis of SiC MEMS Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, Stanley J.; Marciniak, M. A.; Lott, J. A.; Starman, L. A.; Busbee, J. D.; Melzak, J. M.

    2003-03-01

    During the fabrication of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), residual stress is often induced in the thin films that are deposited to create these systems. These stresses can cause the device to fail due to buckling, curling, or fracture. Industry is looking for ways to characterize the stress during the deposition of thin films in order to reduce or eliminate device failure. Micro-Raman spectroscopy has been successfully used to characterize poly-Si MEMS devices made with the MUMPS® process. Raman spectroscopy was selected because it is nondestructive, fast and has the potential for in situ stress monitoring. This research attempts to use Raman spectroscopy to analyze the stress in SiC MEMS made with the MUSiC® process. Raman spectroscopy is performed on 1-2-micron-thick SiC thin films deposited on silicon, silicon nitride, and silicon oxide substrates. The most common poly-type of SiC found in thin film MEMS made with the MUSiC® process is 3C-SiC. Research also includes baseline spectra of 6H, 4H, and 15R poly-types of bulk SiC.

  15. Analysis of scorpion venom composition by Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Zérega, Brenda E.; González-Solís, José L.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we study the venom of two Centruroides scorpion species using Raman spectroscopy. The spectra analysis allows to determine the venoms chemical composition and to establish the main differences and similarities among the species. It is also shown that the use of Principal Component Analysis may help to tell apart between the scorpion species.

  16. Planetary surface exploration using Raman spectroscopy for minerals and organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, J.; Alerstam, E.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.; Rossman, G. R.; Shkolyar, S.; Farmer, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been identified as one of the primary techniques for planetary surface mineralogy. It is widely used as a laboratory technique since it can identify nearly all crystalline mineral phases. Using a small spot size on the surface (on the order of a micron), mineral phases can be mapped onto microscopic images preserving information about surface morphology. As a result, this technique has been steadily gaining support for in situ exploration of a variety of target bodies, for example Mars, the Moon, Venus, asteroids, and comets. In addition to in situ exploration, Raman spectroscopy has been identified as a feasible means for pre-selection of samples on Mars for subsequent return to Earth. This is in part due to the fact that Raman can detect many organics in addition to minerals. As a result, the most relevant rock samples containing organics (potentially fossil biosignatures) may potentially be selected for return to Earth. We present a next-generation instrument that builds on the widely used 532 nm Raman technique to provide a means for performing Raman spectroscopy without the background noise that is often generated by fluorescence of minerals and organics. We use time-resolved laser spectroscopy to eliminate this fluorescence interference that can often make it difficult or impossible to obtain Raman spectra. We will discuss significant advances leading to the feasibility of a compact time-resolved spectrometer, including the development of a new solid-state detector capable of sub-ns temporal resolution. We will address the challenges of analyzing surface materials, often organics, that exhibit short-lifetime fluorescence. We will present result on planetary analog samples to demonstrate the instrument performance including fluorescence rejection.

  17. Fabricating a UV-Vis and Raman Spectroscopy Immunoassay Platform.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Cynthia; Israelsen, Nathan D; Sieverts, Michael; Vargis, Elizabeth

    2016-11-10

    Immunoassays are used to detect proteins based on the presence of associated antibodies. Because of their extensive use in research and clinical settings, a large infrastructure of immunoassay instruments and materials can be found. For example, 96- and 384-well polystyrene plates are available commercially and have a standard design to accommodate ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy machines from various manufacturers. In addition, a wide variety of immunoglobulins, detection tags, and blocking agents for customized immunoassay designs such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) are available. Despite the existing infrastructure, standard ELISA kits do not meet all research needs, requiring individualized immunoassay development, which can be expensive and time-consuming. For example, ELISA kits have low multiplexing (detection of more than one analyte at a time) capabilities as they usually depend on fluorescence or colorimetric methods for detection. Colorimetric and fluorescent-based analyses have limited multiplexing capabilities due to broad spectral peaks. In contrast, Raman spectroscopy-based methods have a much greater capability for multiplexing due to narrow emission peaks. Another advantage of Raman spectroscopy is that Raman reporters experience significantly less photobleaching than fluorescent tags 1 . Despite the advantages that Raman reporters have over fluorescent and colorimetric tags, protocols to fabricate Raman-based immunoassays are limited. The purpose of this paper is to provide a protocol to prepare functionalized probes to use in conjunction with polystyrene plates for direct detection of analytes by UV-Vis analysis and Raman spectroscopy. This protocol will allow researchers to take a do-it-yourself approach for future multi-analyte detection while capitalizing on pre-established infrastructure.

  18. Charge Transfer Effect on Raman and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Furfural Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wan, Fu; Shi, Haiyang; Chen, Weigen; Gu, Zhaoliang; Du, Lingling; Wang, Pinyi; Wang, Jianxin; Huang, Yingzhou

    2017-08-02

    The detection of furfural in transformer oil through surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is one of the most promising online monitoring techniques in the process of transformer aging. In this work, the Raman of individual furfural molecules and SERS of furfural-M x (M = Ag, Au, Cu) complexes are investigated through density functional theory (DFT). In the Raman spectrum of individual furfural molecules, the vibration mode of each Raman peak is figured out, and the deviation from experimental data is analyzed by surface charge distribution. In the SERS of furfural-M x complexes, the influence of atom number and species on SERS chemical enhancement factors (EFs) are studied, and are further analyzed by charge transfer effect. Our studies strengthen the understanding of charge transfer effect in the SERS of furfural molecules, which is important in the online monitoring of the transformer aging process through SERS.

  19. Charge Transfer Effect on Raman and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Furfural Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Fu; Shi, Haiyang; Chen, Weigen; Gu, Zhaoliang; Du, Lingling; Wang, Pinyi; Wang, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    The detection of furfural in transformer oil through surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is one of the most promising online monitoring techniques in the process of transformer aging. In this work, the Raman of individual furfural molecules and SERS of furfural-Mx (M = Ag, Au, Cu) complexes are investigated through density functional theory (DFT). In the Raman spectrum of individual furfural molecules, the vibration mode of each Raman peak is figured out, and the deviation from experimental data is analyzed by surface charge distribution. In the SERS of furfural-Mx complexes, the influence of atom number and species on SERS chemical enhancement factors (EFs) are studied, and are further analyzed by charge transfer effect. Our studies strengthen the understanding of charge transfer effect in the SERS of furfural molecules, which is important in the online monitoring of the transformer aging process through SERS. PMID:28767053

  20. Remote detection of explosives using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, Jack

    2011-05-01

    Stand-off detection of potentially hazardous small molecules at distances that allow the user to be safe has many applications, including explosives and chemical threats. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, with EYZtek, Inc. of Ohio, developed a prototype stand-off, eye-safe Raman spectrometer. With a stand-off distance greater than twenty meters and scanning optics, this system has the potential of addressing particularly difficult challenges in small molecule detection. An overview of the system design and desired application space is presented.

  1. Fluorescence and Raman Spectroscopy of Doped Nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, O. S.; Khomich, A. A.; Sedov, V. S.; Ekimov, E. A.; Vlasov, I. I.

    2018-05-01

    Raman and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques were used to study doped nanodiamonds synthesized at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT technique) and by chemical vapor deposition from the gas phase (CVD technique). For the CVD diamonds, a hundred-fold increase in fluorescence intensity of the silicon-vacancy centers normalized to the volume of the probe material was observed with an increase in synthesized diamond particle diameter from 150 to 300 nm. Graphitization temperature upon heating in the air significantly lower than for detonation nanodiamonds was found for the boron-doped HPHT nanodiamonds.

  2. A line-scan hyperspectral Raman system for spatially offset Raman spectroscopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conventional methods of spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) typically use single-fiber optical measurement probes to slowly and incrementally collect a series of spatially offset point measurements moving away from the laser excitation point on the sample surface, or arrays of multiple fiber ...

  3. Exploring Raman spectroscopy for the evaluation of glaucomatous retinal changes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Grozdanic, Sinisa D; Harper, Matthew M; Hamouche, Nicolas; Kecova, Helga; Lazic, Tatjana; Yu, Chenxu

    2011-10-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells and subsequent loss of visual function. Early detection of glaucoma is critical for the prevention of permanent structural damage and irreversible vision loss. Raman spectroscopy is a technique that provides rapid biochemical characterization of tissues in a nondestructive and noninvasive fashion. In this study, we explored the potential of using Raman spectroscopy for detection of glaucomatous changes in vitro. Raman spectroscopic imaging was conducted on retinal tissues of dogs with hereditary glaucoma and healthy control dogs. The Raman spectra were subjected to multivariate discriminant analysis with a support vector machine algorithm, and a classification model was developed to differentiate disease tissues versus healthy tissues. Spectroscopic analysis of 105 retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from glaucomatous dogs and 267 RGCs from healthy dogs revealed spectroscopic markers that differentiated glaucomatous specimens from healthy controls. Furthermore, the multivariate discriminant model differentiated healthy samples and glaucomatous samples with good accuracy [healthy 89.5% and glaucomatous 97.6% for the same breed (Basset Hounds); and healthy 85.0% and glaucomatous 85.5% for different breeds (Beagles versus Basset Hounds)]. Raman spectroscopic screening can be used for in vitro detection of glaucomatous changes in retinal tissue with a high specificity.

  4. Bladder cancer diagnosis during cystoscopy using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimbergen, M. C. M.; van Swol, C. F. P.; Draga, R. O. P.; van Diest, P.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Stone, N.; Bosch, J. H. L. R.

    2009-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique that can be used to obtain specific molecular information of biological tissues. It has been used successfully to differentiate normal and pre-malignant tissue in many organs. The goal of this study is to determine the possibility to distinguish normal tissue from bladder cancer using this system. The endoscopic Raman system consists of a 6 Fr endoscopic probe connected to a 785nm diode laser and a spectral recording system. A total of 107 tissue samples were obtained from 54 patients with known bladder cancer during transurethral tumor resection. Immediately after surgical removal the samples were placed under the Raman probe and spectra were collected and stored for further analysis. The collected spectra were analyzed using multivariate statistical methods. In total 2949 Raman spectra were recorded ex vivo from cold cup biopsy samples with 2 seconds integration time. A multivariate algorithm allowed differentiation of normal and malignant tissue with a sensitivity and specificity of 78,5% and 78,9% respectively. The results show the possibility of discerning normal from malignant bladder tissue by means of Raman spectroscopy using a small fiber based system. Despite the low number of samples the results indicate that it might be possible to use this technique to grade identified bladder wall lesions during endoscopy.

  5. Exploring Raman spectroscopy for the evaluation of glaucomatous retinal changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Grozdanic, Sinisa D.; Harper, Matthew M.; Hamouche, Nicolas; Kecova, Helga; Lazic, Tatjana; Yu, Chenxu

    2011-10-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells and subsequent loss of visual function. Early detection of glaucoma is critical for the prevention of permanent structural damage and irreversible vision loss. Raman spectroscopy is a technique that provides rapid biochemical characterization of tissues in a nondestructive and noninvasive fashion. In this study, we explored the potential of using Raman spectroscopy for detection of glaucomatous changes in vitro. Raman spectroscopic imaging was conducted on retinal tissues of dogs with hereditary glaucoma and healthy control dogs. The Raman spectra were subjected to multivariate discriminant analysis with a support vector machine algorithm, and a classification model was developed to differentiate disease tissues versus healthy tissues. Spectroscopic analysis of 105 retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from glaucomatous dogs and 267 RGCs from healthy dogs revealed spectroscopic markers that differentiated glaucomatous specimens from healthy controls. Furthermore, the multivariate discriminant model differentiated healthy samples and glaucomatous samples with good accuracy [healthy 89.5% and glaucomatous 97.6% for the same breed (Basset Hounds); and healthy 85.0% and glaucomatous 85.5% for different breeds (Beagles versus Basset Hounds)]. Raman spectroscopic screening can be used for in vitro detection of glaucomatous changes in retinal tissue with a high specificity.

  6. Quantitative transmission Raman spectroscopy of pharmaceutical tablets and capsules.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jonas; Sparén, Anders; Svensson, Olof; Folestad, Staffan; Claybourn, Mike

    2007-11-01

    Quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical formulations using the new approach of transmission Raman spectroscopy has been investigated. For comparison, measurements were also made in conventional backscatter mode. The experimental setup consisted of a Raman probe-based spectrometer with 785 nm excitation for measurements in backscatter mode. In transmission mode the same system was used to detect the Raman scattered light, while an external diode laser of the same type was used as excitation source. Quantitative partial least squares models were developed for both measurement modes. The results for tablets show that the prediction error for an independent test set was lower for the transmission measurements with a relative root mean square error of about 2.2% as compared with 2.9% for the backscatter mode. Furthermore, the models were simpler in the transmission case, for which only a single partial least squares (PLS) component was required to explain the variation. The main reason for the improvement using the transmission mode is a more representative sampling of the tablets compared with the backscatter mode. Capsules containing mixtures of pharmaceutical powders were also assessed by transmission only. The quantitative results for the capsules' contents were good, with a prediction error of 3.6% w/w for an independent test set. The advantage of transmission Raman over backscatter Raman spectroscopy has been demonstrated for quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical formulations, and the prospects for reliable, lean calibrations for pharmaceutical analysis is discussed.

  7. Raman Spectrograph for Ocean Worlds: Integrating Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, Kurt D.; Moore, Thomas Z.; Davis, Michael W.; Howett, Carly; Soto, Alejandro; Raut, Ujjwal; Molyneux, Philippa M.; Nowicki, Keith; Mandt, Kathleen; E Schmidt, Britney; Mason, John; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Fry, Edward S.; RSO Team

    2017-10-01

    We present a new concept for a Raman spectrograph instrument designed to conduct high sensitivity measurements of biomarkers within Ocean Worlds environments. Our Raman Spectrograph for Ocean worlds (RSO) instrument is a UV+IR multi-laser enhanced Raman system capable of detecting complex, biologically-relevant molecular species mixed within icy surfaces in the outer Solar System. Incorporating two or more lasers with different excitation-emission pathways is crucial for thorough and definitive interpretation of the spectral fingerprints that identify unknown constituents within a sample. Our approach strives to remove fluorescence-driven ambiguities from degenerate, non-unique signatures expected for the most interesting trace constituents, i.e., those best revealed by UV excitation. Our design for deep-UV measurements is based on a novel high-reflectivity integrating cavity invented at Texas A&M University and further developed at SwRI. We report nanomole-range sensitivities of several complex organic molecules measured with our laboratory prototype cavities. Weak optical signals from Raman or fluorescence based instruments require sensitive low-noise detectors and long integration times, which by comparison are undesirable for the high radiation environment and limited battery power conditions anticipated for the Europa Lander mission. The two-to-five orders of magnitude enhanced sensitivity over standard Raman spectroscopy enabled by the integrating cavity enhanced spectroscopy technique makes it well suited for the Europa Lander payload and other future Ocean Worlds missions.

  8. Absorption and resonance Raman characteristics of β-carotene in water-ethanol mixtures, emulsion and hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Suhr, Christian; Kniggendorf, Ann-Kathrin; Roth, Bernhard

    2018-05-01

    Absorption or resonance Raman scattering are often used to identify and even quantify carotenoids in situ. We studied the absorption spectra, the Raman spectra and their resonance behavior of β-carotene in different molecular environments set up as mixtures from lipid (emulsion) and non-polar (ethanol) solvents and a polar component (water) with regard to their application as references for in situ measurement. We show how both absorption profiles and resonance spectra of β-carotene strongly depend on the molecular environment. Most notably, our data suggests that the characteristic bathochromic absorption peak of J-aggregates does not contribute to carotenoid resonance conditions, and show how the Raman shift of the C=C stretching mode is dependent on both, the molecular environment and the excitation wavelength. Overall, the spectroscopic data collected here is highly relevant for the interpretation of in situ spectroscopic data in terms of carotenoid identification and quantification by resonance Raman spectroscopy as well as the preparation of reference samples. In particular, our data promotes careful consideration of appropriate molecular environment for reference samples.

  9. Measuring Rocket Engine Temperatures with Hydrogen Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.; Osborne, Robin J.; Trinh, Huu P.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Optically accessible, high pressure, hot fire test articles are available at NASA Marshall for use in development of advanced rocket engine propellant injectors. Single laser-pulse ultraviolet (UV) Raman spectroscopy has been used in the past in these devices for analysis of high pressure H2- and CH4-fueled combustion, but relies on an independent pressure measurement in order to provide temperature information. A variation of UV Raman (High Resolution Hydrogen Raman Spectroscopy) is under development and will allow temperature measurement without the need for an independent pressure measurement, useful for flows where local pressure may not be accurately known. The technique involves the use of a spectrometer with good spectral resolution, requiring a small entrance slit for the spectrometer. The H2 Raman spectrum, when created by a narrow linewidth laser source and obtained from a good spectral resolution spectrograph, has a spectral shape related to temperature. By best-fit matching an experimental spectrum to theoretical spectra at various temperatures, a temperature measurement is obtained. The spectral model accounts for collisional narrowing, collisional broadening, Doppler broadening, and collisional line shifting of each Raman line making up the H2 Stokes vibrational Q-branch spectrum. At pressures from atmospheric up to those associated with advanced preburner components (5500 psia), collisional broadening though present does not cause significant overlap of the Raman lines, allowing high resolution H2 Raman to be used for temperature measurements in plumes and in high pressure test articles. Experimental demonstrations of the technique are performed for rich H2-air flames at atmospheric pressure and for high pressure, 300 K H2-He mixtures. Spectrometer imaging quality is identified as being critical for successful implementation of technique.

  10. Standoff detection of explosive molecules using nanosecond gated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jin Hyuk; Cho, Soo Gyeong

    2013-06-01

    Recently, improvised explosive device (IED) has been a serious threat for many countries. One of the approaches to alleviate this threat is standoff detection of explosive molecules used in IEDs. Raman spectroscopy is a prospective method among many technologies under research to achieve this goal. It provides unique information of the target materials, through which the ingredients used in IEDs can be analyzed and identified. The main problem of standoff Raman spectroscopic detection is the large background noise hindering weak Raman signals from the target samples. Typical background noise comes from both ambient fluorescent lights indoor and sunlight outdoor whose intensities are usually much larger than that of Raman scattering from the sample. Under the proper condition using pulse laser and ICCD camera with nanosecond pulse width and gating technology, we succeed to separate and remove these background noises from Raman signals. For this experiment, we build an optical system for standoff detection of explosive molecules. We use 532 nm, 10 Hz, Q-switching Nd:YAG laser as light source, and ICCD camera triggered by laser Qswitching time with proper gate delay regarding the flight time of Raman from target materials. Our detection system is successfully applied to detect and identify more than 20 ingredients of IEDs including TNT, RDX, and HMX which are located 10 to 54 meters away from the system.

  11. Quantitative polarized Raman spectroscopy in highly turbid bone tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Mekhala; Sahar, Nadder D.; Wilson, Robert H.; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Pleshko, Nancy; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.

    2010-05-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy allows measurement of molecular orientation and composition and is widely used in the study of polymer systems. Here, we extend the technique to the extraction of quantitative orientation information from bone tissue, which is optically thick and highly turbid. We discuss multiple scattering effects in tissue and show that repeated measurements using a series of objectives of differing numerical apertures can be employed to assess the contributions of sample turbidity and depth of field on polarized Raman measurements. A high numerical aperture objective minimizes the systematic errors introduced by multiple scattering. We test and validate the use of polarized Raman spectroscopy using wild-type and genetically modified (oim/oim model of osteogenesis imperfecta) murine bones. Mineral orientation distribution functions show that mineral crystallites are not as well aligned (p<0.05) in oim/oim bones (28+/-3 deg) compared to wild-type bones (22+/-3 deg), in agreement with small-angle X-ray scattering results. In wild-type mice, backbone carbonyl orientation is 76+/-2 deg and in oim/oim mice, it is 72+/-4 deg (p>0.05). We provide evidence that simultaneous quantitative measurements of mineral and collagen orientations on intact bone specimens are possible using polarized Raman spectroscopy.

  12. Perspective: Echoes in 2D-Raman-THz spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Peter; Shalit, Andrey

    2017-04-07

    Recently, various spectroscopic techniques have been developed, which can measure the 2D response of the inter-molecular degrees of freedom of liquids in the THz regime. By employing hybrid Raman-THz pulse sequences, the inherent experimental problems of 2D-Raman spectroscopy are circumvented completely, culminating in the recent measurement of the 2D-Raman-THz responses of water and aqueous salt solutions. This review article focuses on the possibility to observe echoes in such experiments, which would directly reveal the inhomogeneity of the typically extremely blurred THz bands of liquids, and hence the heterogeneity of local structures that are transiently formed, in particular, in a hydrogen-bonding liquid such as water. The generation mechanisms of echoes in 2D-Raman-THz spectroscopy are explained, which differ from those in "conventional" 2D-IR spectroscopy in a subtle but important manner. Subsequently, the circumstances are discussed, under which echoes are expected, revealing a physical picture of the information content of an echo. That is, the echo decay reflects the lifetime of local structures in the liquid on a length scale that equals the delocalization length of the intermolecular modes. Finally, recent experimental results are reviewed from an echo perspective.

  13. Quantitative polarized Raman spectroscopy in highly turbid bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Mekhala; Sahar, Nadder D; Wilson, Robert H; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Pleshko, Nancy; Kohn, David H; Morris, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy allows measurement of molecular orientation and composition and is widely used in the study of polymer systems. Here, we extend the technique to the extraction of quantitative orientation information from bone tissue, which is optically thick and highly turbid. We discuss multiple scattering effects in tissue and show that repeated measurements using a series of objectives of differing numerical apertures can be employed to assess the contributions of sample turbidity and depth of field on polarized Raman measurements. A high numerical aperture objective minimizes the systematic errors introduced by multiple scattering. We test and validate the use of polarized Raman spectroscopy using wild-type and genetically modified (oim/oim model of osteogenesis imperfecta) murine bones. Mineral orientation distribution functions show that mineral crystallites are not as well aligned (p<0.05) in oim/oim bones (28+/-3 deg) compared to wild-type bones (22+/-3 deg), in agreement with small-angle X-ray scattering results. In wild-type mice, backbone carbonyl orientation is 76+/-2 deg and in oim/oim mice, it is 72+/-4 deg (p>0.05). We provide evidence that simultaneous quantitative measurements of mineral and collagen orientations on intact bone specimens are possible using polarized Raman spectroscopy.

  14. Raman spectroscopy and immunohistochemistry for schwannoma characterization: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Lazaro P. M.; das Chagas, Maurilio J.; Carvalho, Luis Felipe C. S.; Ferreira, Isabelle; dos Santos, Laurita; Haddad, Marcelo; Loddi, Vinicius; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    The schwannomas is a tumour of the tissue that covers nerves, called the nerve sheath. Schwannomas are often benign tumors of the Schwan cells, which are the principal glia of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Preoperative diagnosis of this lesion usually is difficult, therefore, new techniques are being studied as pre surgical evaluation. Among these, Raman spectroscopy, that enables the biochemical identification of the tissue analyzed by their optical properties, may be used as a tool for schwannomas diagnosis. The aim of this study was to discriminate between normal nervous tissue and schwannoma through the confocal Raman spectroscopy and Raman optical fiber-based techniques combined with immunohistochemical analysis. Twenty spectra were analyzed from a normal nerve tissue sample (10) and schwannoma (10) by Holospec f / 1.8 (Kayser Optical Systems) coupled to an optical fiber with a 785nm laser line source. The data were pre-processed and vector normalized. The average analysis and standard deviation was performed associated with cluster analysis. AML, 1A4, CD34, Desmin and S-100 protein markers were used for immunohistochemical analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis was positive only for protein S-100 marker which confirmed the neural schwanomma originality. The immunohistochemistry analysis were important to determine the source of the injury, whereas Raman spectroscopy were able to differentiated tissues types indicating important biochemical changes between normal and benign neoplasia.

  15. Raman spectroscopy on simple molecular systems at very high density

    SciTech Connect

    Schiferl, D.; LeSar, R.S.; Moore, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    We present an overview of how Raman spectroscopy is done on simple molecular substances at high pressures. Raman spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools for studying these substances. It is often the quickest means to explore changes in crystal and molecular structures, changes in bond strength, and the formation of new chemical species. Raman measurements have been made at pressures up to 200 GPa (2 Mbar). Even more astonishing is the range of temperatures (4-5200/degree/K) achieved in various static and dynamic (shock-wave) pressure experiments. One point we particularly wish to emphasize is the need for a good theoreticalmore » understanding to properly interpret and use experimental results. This is particularly true at ultra-high pressures, where strong crystal field effects can be misinterpreted as incipient insulator-metal transitions. We have tried to point out apparatus, techniques, and results that we feel are particularly noteworthy. We have also included some of the /open quotes/oral tradition/close quotes/ of high pressure Raman spectroscopy -- useful little things that rarely or never appear in print. Because this field is rapidly expanding, we discuss a number of exciting new techniques that have been informally communicated to us, especially those that seem to open new possibilities. 58 refs., 18 figs.« less

  16. Raman and FTIR spectroscopy of methane in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A.; Oze, C.; Rossman, G. R.; Celestian, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    Olivine has been proposed to be a direct source of methane (CH4) in serpentinization systems and experiments. Here, Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to verify the presence and abundance of CH4 in olivine samples from nine localities, including the San Carlos olivine. Raman analyses did not identify any methane in the olivine samples. As olivine is orthorhombic, three polarized FTIR spectra were obtained for the olivine samples. No methane was detected in any of the olivine samples using FTIR. Overall, olivine investigated in this study does not appear to be a primary source of methane.

  17. Raman spectroscopy on ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weikusat, C.; Kipfstuhl, S.

    2012-04-01

    Ice cores are invaluable archives for the reconstruction of the climatic history of the earth. Besides the analysis of various climatic processes from isotopes and chemical signatures they offer the unique possibility of directly extracting the past atmosphere from gaseous inclusions in the ice. Many aspects of the formation and alterations of these inclusions, e.g. the entrapment of air at the firn-ice-transition, the formation of crystalline gas hydrates (clathrates) from the bubbles or the structural relaxation during storage of the cores, need to be better understood to enable reliable interpretations of the obtained data. Modern micro Raman spectroscopy is an excellent tool to obtain high-quality data for all of these aspects. It has been productively used for phase identification of solid inclusions [1], investigation of air clathrates [2] and high-resolution measurements of N2/O2 mixing ratios inside individual air bubbles [3,4]. Detailed examples of the various uses of Raman spectroscopy will be presented along with practical information about the techniques required to obtain high-quality spectra. Retrieval and interpretation of quantitative data from the spectra will be explained. Future possibilities for advanced uses of Raman spectroscopy for ice core research will be discussed. [1] T. Sakurai et al., 2009, Direct observation of salts as micro-inclusions in the Greenland GRIP ice core. Journal of Glaciology, 55, 777-783. [2] F. Pauer et al., 1995, Raman spectroscopic study of nitrogen/oxygen ratio in natural ice clathrates in the GRIP ice core. Geophysical Research Letters, 22, 969-971. [3] T. Ikeda-Fukazawa et al., 2001, Variation in N2/O2 ratio of occluded air in Dome Fuji antarctic ice. Journal of Geophysical Research, 106, 17799-17810. [4] C. Weikusat et al., Raman spectroscopy of gaseous inclusions in EDML ice core: First results - microbubbles. Journal of Glaciology, accepted.

  18. [Laser Raman Spectroscopy and Its Application in Gas Hydrate Studies].

    PubMed

    Fu, Juan; Wu, Neng-you; Lu, Hai-long; Wu, Dai-dai; Su, Qiu-cheng

    2015-11-01

    Gas hydrates are important potential energy resources. Microstructural characterization of gas hydrate can provide information to study the mechanism of gas hydrate formation and to support the exploitation and application of gas hydrate technology. This article systemly introduces the basic principle of laser Raman spectroscopy and summarizes its application in gas hydrate studies. Based on Raman results, not only can the information about gas composition and structural type be deduced, but also the occupancies of large and small cages and even hydration number can be calculated from the relative intensities of Raman peaks. By using the in-situ analytical technology, laser Raman specstropy can be applied to characterize the formation and decomposition processes of gas hydrate at microscale, for example the enclathration and leaving of gas molecules into/from its cages, to monitor the changes in gas concentration and gas solubility during hydrate formation and decomposition, and to identify phase changes in the study system. Laser Raman in-situ analytical technology has also been used in determination of hydrate structure and understanding its changing process under the conditions of ultra high pressure. Deep-sea in-situ Raman spectrometer can be employed for the in-situ analysis of the structures of natural gas hydrate and their formation environment. Raman imaging technology can be applied to specify the characteristics of crystallization and gas distribution over hydrate surface. With the development of laser Raman technology and its combination with other instruments, it will become more powerful and play a more significant role in the microscopic study of gas hydrate.

  19. Development of F.T. Raman Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-19

    vibrations of. the OHO group. The work nears completion. ’a have examined a range of tellurium organometallics and their z_-plexes. The high quality of-the...chemistry. High oxidation states of Mo, VIv, MnVI. Curi , Fe r r’ and several others have been identified as problematic since absorption of the laser...polymers is in hand. In these, spectral charges through and above the melting point are of interest. Several fibre systems have been studied including

  20. A transform from absorption to Raman excitation profile. A time-dependent approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo-Y.; Yeo, Robert C. K.

    1994-04-01

    An alternative time-frame approach, which is canonically conjugate to the energy-frame approach, for implementing the transform relations for calculating Raman excitation profiles directly from the optical absorption spectrum is presented. Practical and efficient fast Fourier transformation in the time frame replaces the widely used Chan and Page algorithm for evaluating the Hilbert transform in the energy frame. The time-frame approach is applied to: (a) a two-mode model which illustrates the missing mode effect in both absorption and Raman excitation profiles, (b) carotene, in which both the absorption spectrum and the Raman excitation profile show vibrational structure and (c) hexamethylbenzene: TCNE electron donor—acceptor complex where the same spectra are structureless and the Raman excitation profile for the 168 cm -1 mode poses a problem for the energy-frame approach. A similar time-frame approach can be used for the inverse transform from the Raman excitation profile to the optical absorption spectrum.

  1. Development of Raman Spectroscopy as a Clinical Diagnostic Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borel, Santa

    Raman spectroscopy is the collection of inelastically scattered light in which the spectra contain biochemical information of the probed cells or tissue. This work presents both targeted and untargeted ways that the technique can be exploited in biological samples. First, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) gold nanoparticles conjugated to targeting antibodies were shown to be successful for multiplexed detection of overexpressed surface antigens in lung cancer cell lines. Further work will need to optimize the conjugation technique to preserve the strong binding affinity of the antibodies. Second, untargeted Raman microspectroscopy combined with multivariate statistical analysis was able to successfully differentiate mouse ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cells and spontaneously transformed ovarian surface epithelial (STOSE) cells with high accuracy. The differences between the two groups were associated with increased nucleic acid content in the STOSE cells. This shows potential for single cell detection of ovarian cancer.

  2. Optimally shaped narrowband picosecond pulses for femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, David P; Valley, David; Ellis, Scott R; Creelman, Mark; Mathies, Richard A

    2013-09-09

    A comparison between a Fabry-Pérot etalon filter and a conventional grating filter for producing the picosecond (ps) Raman pump pulses for femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is presented. It is shown that for pulses of equal energy the etalon filter produces Raman signals twice as large as that of the grating filter while suppressing the electronically resonant background signal. The time asymmetric profile of the etalon-generated pulse is shown to be responsible for both of these observations. A theoretical discussion is presented which quantitatively supports this hypothesis. It is concluded that etalons are the ideal method for the generation of narrowband ps pulses for FSRS because of the optical simplicity, efficiency, improved FSRS intensity and reduced backgrounds.

  3. Influence of Culture Media on Microbial Fingerprints Using Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mlynáriková, Katarína; Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Růžička, Filip; Ježek, Jan; Hároniková, Andrea; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika

    2015-11-24

    Raman spectroscopy has a broad range of applications across numerous scientific fields, including microbiology. Our work here monitors the influence of culture media on the Raman spectra of clinically important microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans). Choosing an adequate medium may enhance the reproducibility of the method as well as simplifying the data processing and the evaluation. We tested four different media per organism depending on the nutritional requirements and clinical usage directly on a Petri dish. Some of the media have a significant influence on the microbial fingerprint (Roosvelt-Park Institute Medium, CHROMagar) and should not be used for the acquisition of Raman spectra. It was found that the most suitable medium for microbiological experiments regarding these organisms was Mueller-Hinton agar.

  4. Influence of Culture Media on Microbial Fingerprints Using Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mlynáriková, Katarína; Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Růžička, Filip; Ježek, Jan; Hároniková, Andrea; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has a broad range of applications across numerous scientific fields, including microbiology. Our work here monitors the influence of culture media on the Raman spectra of clinically important microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans). Choosing an adequate medium may enhance the reproducibility of the method as well as simplifying the data processing and the evaluation. We tested four different media per organism depending on the nutritional requirements and clinical usage directly on a Petri dish. Some of the media have a significant influence on the microbial fingerprint (Roosvelt-Park Institute Medium, CHROMagar) and should not be used for the acquisition of Raman spectra. It was found that the most suitable medium for microbiological experiments regarding these organisms was Mueller-Hinton agar. PMID:26610516

  5. Atmospheric Measurements by Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Since the last decade, atmospheric environmental monitoring has benefited from the development of novel spectroscopic measurement techniques owing to the significant breakthroughs in photonic technology from the UV to the infrared spectral domain [1]. In this presentation, we will overview our recent development and applications of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy techniques for in situ optical monitoring of chemically reactive atmospheric species (such as HONO, NO3, NO2, N2O5) in intensive campaigns [2] and/or in smog chamber studies [3]. These field deployments demonstrated that modern photonic technologies (newly emergent light sources combined with high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques) can provide a useful tool to improve our understanding of tropospheric chemical processes which affect climate, air quality, and the spread of pollution. Experimental detail and preliminary results will be presented. Acknowledgements. The financial support from the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under the NexCILAS (ANR-11-NS09-0002) and the CaPPA (ANR-10-LABX-005) contracts is acknowledged. References [1] X. Cui, C. Lengignon, T. Wu, W. Zhao, G. Wysocki, E. Fertein, C. Coeur, A. Cassez,L. Croisé, W. Chen, et al., "Photonic Sensing of the Atmosphere by absorption spectroscopy", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 113 (2012) 1300-1316 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, "Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer for measurements of atmospheric HONO and NO2 in Hong Kong", Atmos. Environ. 95 (2014) 544-551 [3] T. Wu, C. Coeur-Tourneur, G. Dhont,A. Cassez, E. Fertein, X. He, W. Chen,"Application of IBBCEAS to kinetic study of NO3 radical formation from O3 + NO2 reaction in an atmospheric simulation chamber", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 133 (2014)199-205

  6. Precision saturated absorption spectroscopy of H3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yu-Chan; Chang, Yung-Hsiang; Liao, Yi-Chieh; Peng, Jin-Long; Wang, Li-Bang; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2018-03-01

    In our previous work on the Lamb-dips of the ν2 fundamental band transitions of H3+, the saturated absorption spectrum was obtained by third-derivative spectroscopy using frequency modulation with an optical parametric oscillator (OPO). However, frequency modulation also caused errors in the absolute frequency determination. To solve this problem, we built a tunable offset locking system to lock the pump frequency of the OPO to an iodine-stabilized Nd:YAG laser. With this improvement, we were able to scan the OPO idler frequency precisely and obtain the saturated absorption profile using intensity modulation. Furthermore, ion concentration modulation was employed to subtract the background noise and increase the signal-to-noise ratio. To determine the absolute frequency of the idler wave, the OPO signal frequency was locked to an optical frequency comb. The absolute frequency accuracy of our spectrometer was better than 7 kHz, demonstrated by measuring the wavelength standard transition of methane at 3.39 μm. Finally, we measured 16 transitions of H3+ and our results agree very well with other precision measurements. This work successfully resolved the discrepancies between our previous measurements and other precision measurements.

  7. Determination of human coronary artery composition by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brennan, J F; Römer, T J; Lees, R S; Tercyak, A M; Kramer, J R; Feld, M S

    1997-07-01

    We present a method for in situ chemical analysis of human coronary artery using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. It is rapid and accurate and does not require tissue removal; small volumes, approximately 1 mm3, can be sampled. This methodology is likely to be useful as a tool for intravascular diagnosis of artery disease. Human coronary artery segments were obtained from nine explanted recipient hearts within 1 hour of heart transplantation. Minces from one or more segments were obtained through grinding in a mortar and pestle containing liquid nitrogen. Artery segments and minces were excited with 830 nm near-infrared light, and Raman spectra were collected with a specially designed spectrometer. A model was developed to analyze the spectra and quantify the amounts of cholesterol, cholesterol esters, triglycerides and phospholipids, and calcium salts present. The model provided excellent fits to spectra from the artery segments, indicating its applicability to intact tissue. In addition, the minces were assayed chemically for lipid and calcium salt content, and the results were compared. The relative weights obtained using the Raman technique agreed with those of the standard assays within a few percentage points. The chemical composition of coronary artery can be quantified accurately with Raman spectroscopy. This opens the possibility of using histochemical analysis to predict acute events such as plaque rupture, to follow the progression of disease, and to select appropriate therapeutic interventions.

  8. Advances in Raman spectroscopy for explosive identification in aviation security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, Javier D.; Brown, Christopher D.; Jalenak, Wayne

    2007-04-01

    In the operational airport environment, the rapid identification of potentially hazardous materials such as improvised explosive devices, chemical warfare agents and flammable and explosive liquids is increasingly critical. Peroxide-based explosives pose a particularly insidious threat because they can be made from commonly available and relatively innocuous household chemicals, such as bleach and hydrogen peroxide. Raman spectroscopy has been validated as a valuable tool for rapid identification of chemicals, explosives, and narcotics and their precursors while allowing "line-of-sight" interrogation through bottles or other translucent containers. This enables safe identification of both precursor substances, such as acetone, and end-products, such as TATP, without direct sampling, contamination and exposure by security personnel. To date, Raman systems have been laboratory-based, requiring careful operation and maintenance by technology experts. The capital and ongoing expenses of these systems is also significant. Recent advances in Raman component technologies have dramatically reduced the footprint and cost, while improving the reliability and ease of use of Raman spectroscopy systems. Such technologies are not only bringing the lab to the field, but are also protecting civilians and security personnel in the process.

  9. Discrimination of serum Raman spectroscopy between normal and colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Yang, Tianyue; Yu, Ting; Li, Siqi

    2011-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy of tissues has been widely studied for the diagnosis of various cancers, but biofluids were seldom used as the analyte because of the low concentration. Herein, serum of 30 normal people, 46 colon cancer, and 44 rectum cancer patients were measured Raman spectra and analyzed. The information of Raman peaks (intensity and width) and that of the fluorescence background (baseline function coefficients) were selected as parameters for statistical analysis. Principal component regression (PCR) and partial least square regression (PLSR) were used on the selected parameters separately to see the performance of the parameters. PCR performed better than PLSR in our spectral data. Then linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was used on the principal components (PCs) of the two regression method on the selected parameters, and a diagnostic accuracy of 88% and 83% were obtained. The conclusion is that the selected features can maintain the information of original spectra well and Raman spectroscopy of serum has the potential for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  10. Precision Saturated Absorption Spectroscopy of H3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yu-chan; Liao, Yi-Chieh; Chang, Yung-Hsiang; Peng, Jin-Long; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2016-06-01

    In our previous work on the Lamb dips of the νb{2} fundamental band of H3+, the saturated absorption spectrum was obtained by the third-derivative spectroscopy using frequency modulation [1]. However, the frequency modulation also causes error in absolute frequency determination. To solve this problem, we have built an offset-locking system to lock the OPO pump frequency to an iodine-stabilized Nd:YAG laser. With this modification, we are able to scan the OPO idler frequency precisely and obtain the profile of the Lamb dips. Double modulation (amplitude modulation of the idler power and concentration modulation of the ion) is employed to subtract the interference fringes of the signal and increase the signal-to-noise ratio effectively. To Determine the absolute frequency of the idler wave, the pump wave is offset locked on the R(56) 32-0 a10 hyperfine component of 127I2, and the signal wave is locked on a GPS disciplined fiber optical frequency comb (OFC). All references and lock systems have absolute frequency accuracy better than 10 kHz. Here, we demonstrate its performance by measuring one transition of methane and sixteen transitions of H3+. This instrument could pave the way for the high-resolution spectroscopy of a variety of molecular ions. [1] H.-C. Chen, C.-Y. Hsiao, J.-L. Peng, T. Amano, and J.-T. Shy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 263002 (2012).

  11. H2o Quantitative Analysis of Transition Zone Minerals Wadsleyite and Ringwoodite By Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novella, D.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Bureau, H.; Raepsaet, C.; Montagnac, G.

    2014-12-01

    Liquid H2O covers approximately 70% of the Earth's surface but it can also be incorporated as OH- groups in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) that constitute the Earth's mantle, as observed in peridotitic xenoliths. The presence of even trace amounts (ppm wt) of hydrogen in mantle minerals strongly affect the physical, chemical and rheological properties of the mantle. The Earth's transition zone (410 to 660 km depth) is particularly important in this regard since it can store large amounts of H2O (wt%) as shown by experiments and recently by a natural sample. Addressing the behavior of H2O at high depths and its potential concentration in mantle NAMs is therefore fundamental to fully comprehend global-scale processes such as plate tectonics and magmatism. We developed an innovative technique to measure the H2O content of main transition zone NAMs wadsleyite and ringwoodite by Raman spectroscopy. This technique allows to use a beam of 1-3 µm size to measure small samples that are typical for high pressure natural and synthetic specimens. High pressure polyphasic samples are indeed very challenging to be measured in terms of H2O content by the routinely used Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and ion probe mass spectroscopy analyses, making the Raman approach a valid alternative. High quality crystals of wadsleyite and ringwoodite were synthesized at high pressure and temperature in a multi-anvil press and analyzed by Raman and FTIR spectroscopy as well as elastic recoil detection analyses (ERDA) which is an absolute, standard-free technique. We will present experimental data that allow to apply Raman spectroscopy to the determination of H2O content of the most abundant minerals in the transition zone. The data gathered in this study will also permit to investigate the absorption coefficients of wadsleyite and ringwoodite that are employed in FTIR quantitative analyses.

  12. Challenges Analyzing Gypsum on Mars by Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Craig P; Olcott Marshall, Alison

    2015-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy can provide chemical information about organic and inorganic substances quickly and nondestructively with little to no sample preparation, thus making it an ideal instrument for Mars rover missions. The ESA ExoMars planetary mission scheduled for launch in 2018 will contain a miniaturized Raman spectrometer (RLS) as part of the Pasteur payload operating with a continuous wave (CW) laser emitting at 532 nm. In addition, NASA is independently developing two miniaturized Raman spectrometers for the upcoming Mars 2020 rover mission, one of which is a remote (stand-off) Raman spectrometer that uses a pulse-gated 532 nm excitation system (SuperCam). The other is an in situ Raman spectrometer that employs a CW excitation laser emitting at 248.6 nm (SHERLOC). Recently, it has been shown with analyses by Curiosity that Gale Crater contains significantly elevated concentrations of transition metals such as Cr and Mn. Significantly, these transition metals are known to undergo fluorescence emission in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Consequently, samples containing these metals could be problematic for the successful acquisition of fluorescence-free Raman spectra when using a CW 532 nm excitation source. Here, we investigate one analog environment, with a similar mineralogy and sedimentology to that observed in martian environments, as well as elevated Cr contents, to ascertain the best excitation wavelength to successfully collect fluorescence-free spectra from Mars-like samples. Our results clearly show that CW near-infrared laser excitation emitting at 785 nm is better suited to the collection of fluorescence-free Raman spectra than would be a CW laser emitting at 532 nm.

  13. NIR Raman spectroscopy in medicine and biology: results and aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, B.; Dippel, B.; Erb, I.; Keller, S.; Löchte, T.; Schulz, H.; Tatsch, E.; Wessel, S.

    1999-05-01

    Analyses of biomaterial by 'classical' Raman spectroscopy with excitation in the visible range has not been possible since the fluorescence of many essential constituents of all animal and plant cells and tissues overlays the Raman spectra completely. Fluorescence, however, is virtually avoided, when Raman spectra are excited with the Nd : YAG laser line at 1064 nm. Within seven dissertations we explored different fields of potential applications to medical diagnostics. Identification and qualification of tissues and cells is possible. Tumors show small but significant differences to normal tissues; in order to develop a reliable tool for tumor diagnostics more research is necessary, especially a collection of reference spectra in a data bank is needed. Raman spectra of biomineralization structures in teeth and bones show pathological tissues as well as the development of new mineralized structures. NIR Raman spectra of flowers, leaves, and fruit show, without special preparation, their constituents: alkaloids, the essential oils, natural dyes, flavors, spices and drugs. They allow application to taxonomy, optimizing plant breeding and control of food.

  14. Determining Gender by Raman Spectroscopy of a Bloodstain.

    PubMed

    Sikirzhytskaya, Aliaksandra; Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Lednev, Igor K

    2017-02-07

    The development of novel methods for forensic science is a constantly growing area of modern analytical chemistry. Raman spectroscopy is one of a few analytical techniques capable of nondestructive and nearly instantaneous analysis of a wide variety of forensic evidence, including body fluid stains, at the scene of a crime. In this proof-of-concept study, Raman microspectroscopy was utilized for gender identification based on dry bloodstains. Raman spectra were acquired in mapping mode from multiple spots on a bloodstain to account for intrinsic sample heterogeneity. The obtained Raman spectroscopic data showed highly similar spectroscopic features for female and male blood samples. Nevertheless, support vector machines (SVM) and artificial neuron network (ANN) statistical methods applied to the spectroscopic data allowed for differentiating between male and female bloodstains with high confidence. More specifically, the statistical approach based on a genetic algorithm (GA) coupled with an ANN classification showed approximately 98% gender differentiation accuracy for individual bloodstains. These results demonstrate the great potential of the developed method for forensic applications, although more work is needed for method validation. When this method is fully developed, a portable Raman instrument could be used for the infield identification of traces of body fluids and to obtain phenotypic information about the donor, including gender and race, as well as for the analysis of a variety of other types of forensic evidence.

  15. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy applied to food safety.

    PubMed

    Craig, Ana Paula; Franca, Adriana S; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is an advanced Raman technique that enhances the vibrational spectrum of molecules adsorbed on or in the vicinity of metal particles and/or surfaces. Because of its readiness, sensitivity, and minimum sample preparation requirements, SERS is being considered as a powerful technique for food inspection. Key aspects of food-safety assurance, spectroscopy methods, and SERS are briefly discussed in an extended introduction of this review. The recent and potential advances in SERS are highlighted in sections that deal with the (a) detection of food-borne pathogenic microorganisms and (b) the detection of food contaminants and adulteration, concentrated specifically on antibiotics, drugs, hormones, melamine, and pesticides. This review provides an outlook of the work done and a perspective on the future directions of SERS as a reliable tool for food-safety assessment.

  16. Identification of active fluorescence stained bacteria by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Mario; Beyer, Beatrice; Pietsch, Christian; Radt, Benno; Harz, Michaela; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2008-04-01

    Microorganisms can be found everywhere e.g. in food both as useful ingredients or harmful contaminations causing food spoilage. Therefore, a fast and easy to handle analysis method is needed to detect bacteria in different kinds of samples like meat, juice or air to decide if the sample is contaminated by harmful microorganisms. Conventional identification methods in microbiology require always cultivation and therefore are time consuming. In this contribution we present an analysis approach to identify fluorescence stained bacteria on strain level by means of Raman spectroscopy. The stained bacteria are highlighted and can be localized easier against a complex sample environment e.g. in food. The use of Raman spectroscopy in combination with chemometrical methods allows the identification of single bacteria within minutes.

  17. UV gated Raman spectroscopy for standoff detection of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaft, M.; Nagli, L.

    2008-07-01

    Real-time detection and identification of explosives at a standoff distance is a major issue in efforts to develop defense against so-called improvised explosive devices (IED). It is recognized that the only method, which is potentially capable to standoff detection of minimal amounts of explosives is laser-based spectroscopy. LDS technique belongs to trace detection, namely to its micro-particles variety. It is based on commonly held belief that surface contamination was very difficult to avoid and could be exploited for standoff detection. We have applied gated Raman spectroscopy for detection of main explosive materials, both factory and homemade. We developed and tested a Raman system for the field remote detection and identification of minimal amounts of explosives on relevant surfaces at a distance of up to 30 m.

  18. Carbon Raman Spectroscopy of 36 Inter-Planetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busemann, H.; Nittler, L. R.; Davidson, J.; Franchi, I. A.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Palma, R. L.; Pepin, R. O.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool to determine the degree of order of organic material (OM) in extra-terrestrial matter. As shown for meteoritic OM [e.g., 2], peak parameters of D and G bands are a measure of thermal alteration, causing graphitization (order), and amorphization, e.g. during protoplanetary irradiation, causing disorder. Th e most pristine interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) may come from comets. However, their exact provenance is unknown. IDP collection during Earth?s passage through comet Grigg-Skjellerup?s dust stream ("GSC" collectors) may increase the probability of collecting fresh IDPs from a known, cometary source. We used Raman spectroscopy to compare 21 GSC-IDPs with 15 IDPs collected at different periods, and found that the variation among GSC-IDPs is larger than among non-GSC IDPs, with the most primitive IDPs being mostly GSC-IDPs.

  19. Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy in Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Surface- and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS and TERS) techniques exhibit highly localized chemical sensitivity, making them ideal for studying chemical reactions, including processes at catalytic surfaces. Catalyst structures, adsorbates, and reaction intermediates can be observed in low quantities at hot spots where electromagnetic fields are the strongest, providing ample opportunities to elucidate reaction mechanisms. Moreover, under ideal measurement conditions, it can even be used to trigger chemical reactions. However, factors such as substrate instability and insufficient signal enhancement still limit the applicability of SERS and TERS in the field of catalysis. By the use of sophisticated colloidal synthesis methods and advanced techniques, such as shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, these challenges could be overcome. PMID:27075515

  20. Optimizing the Laser-Pulse Configuration for Coherent Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestov, Dmitry; Murawski, Robert K.; Ariunbold, Gombojav O.; Wang, Xi; Zhi, Miaochan; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Sautenkov, Vladimir A.; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.; Dogariu, Arthur; Huang, Yu; Scully, Marlan O.

    2007-04-01

    We introduce a hybrid technique that combines the robustness of frequency-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) with the advantages of time-resolved CARS spectroscopy. Instantaneous coherent broadband excitation of several characteristic molecular vibrations and the subsequent probing of these vibrations by an optimally shaped time-delayed narrowband laser pulse help to suppress the nonresonant background and to retrieve the species-specific signal. We used this technique for coherent Raman spectroscopy of sodium dipicolinate powder, which is similar to calcium dipicolinate (a marker molecule for bacterial endospores, such as Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus anthracis), and we demonstrated a rapid and highly specific detection scheme that works even in the presence of multiple scattering.

  1. Raman spectroscopy as a tool for ecology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Germond, Arno; Kumar, Vipin; Ichimura, Taro; Moreau, Jerome; Furusawa, Chikara; Fujita, Hideaki; Watanabe, Tomonobu M

    2017-06-01

    Scientists are always on the lookout for new modalities of information which could reveal new biological features that are useful for deciphering the complexity of biological systems. Here, we introduce Raman spectroscopy as a prime candidate for ecology and evolution. To encourage the integration of this microscopy technique in the field of ecology and evolution, it is crucial to discuss first how Raman spectroscopy fits within the conceptual, technical and pragmatic considerations of ecology and evolution. In this paper, we show that the spectral information holds reliable indicators of intra- and interspecies variations, which can be related to the environment, selective pressures and fitness. Moreover, we show how the technical and pragmatic aspects of this modality (non-destructive, non-labelling, speed, relative low cost, etc.) enable it to be combined with more conventional methodologies. With this paper, we hope to open new avenues of research and extend the scope of available methodologies used in ecology and evolution. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. Detection of liquid hazardous molecules using linearly focused Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Soo Gyeong; Chung, Jin Hyuk

    2013-05-01

    In security, it is an important issue to analyze hazardous materials in sealed bottles. Particularly, prompt nondestructive checking of sealed liquid bottles in a very short time at the checkpoints of crowded malls, stadiums, or airports is of particular importance to prevent probable terrorist attack using liquid explosives. Aiming to design and fabricate a detector for liquid explosives, we have used linearly focused Raman spectroscopy to analyze liquid materials in transparent or semi-transparent bottles without opening their caps. Continuous lasers with 532 nm wavelength and 58 mW/130 mW beam energy have been used for the Raman spectroscopy. Various hazardous materials including flammable liquids and explosive materials have successfully been distinguished and identified within a couple of seconds. We believe that our technique will be one of suitable methods for fast screening of liquid materials in sealed bottles.

  3. Application of Raman spectroscopy for cervical dysplasia diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kanter, Elizabeth M.; Vargis, Elizabeth; Majumder, Shovan; Keller, Matthew D.; Woeste, Emily; Rao, Gautam G.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy among women worldwide, with over 490000 cases diagnosed and 274000 deaths each year. Although current screening methods have dramatically reduced cervical cancer incidence and mortality in developed countries, a “See and Treat” method would be preferred, especially in developing countries. Results from our previous work have suggested that Raman spectroscopy can be used to detect cervical precancers; however, with a classification accuracy of 88%, it was not clinically applicable. In this paper, we describe how incorporating a woman's hormonal status, particularly the point in menstrual cycle and menopausal state, into our previously developed classification algorithm improves the accuracy of our method to 94%. The results of this paper bring Raman spectroscopy one step closer to being utilized in a clinical setting to diagnose cervical dysplasia. Posterior probabilities of class membership, as determined by MRDF-SMLR, for patients regardless of menopausal status, and for pre-menopausal patients only PMID:19343687

  4. Determination of butter adulteration with margarine using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Reyhan Selin; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki; Genis, Hüseyin Efe; Tamer, Ugur

    2013-12-15

    In this study, adulteration of butter with margarine was analysed using Raman spectroscopy combined with chemometric methods (principal component analysis (PCA), principal component regression (PCR), partial least squares (PLS)) and artificial neural networks (ANNs). Different butter and margarine samples were mixed at various concentrations ranging from 0% to 100% w/w. PCA analysis was applied for the classification of butters, margarines and mixtures. PCR, PLS and ANN were used for the detection of adulteration ratios of butter. Models were created using a calibration data set and developed models were evaluated using a validation data set. The coefficient of determination (R(2)) values between actual and predicted values obtained for PCR, PLS and ANN for the validation data set were 0.968, 0.987 and 0.978, respectively. In conclusion, a combination of Raman spectroscopy with chemometrics and ANN methods can be applied for testing butter adulteration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Optimizing the laser-pulse configuration for coherent Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pestov, Dmitry; Murawski, Robert K; Ariunbold, Gombojav O; Wang, Xi; Zhi, Miaochan; Sokolov, Alexei V; Sautenkov, Vladimir A; Rostovtsev, Yuri V; Dogariu, Arthur; Huang, Yu; Scully, Marlan O

    2007-04-13

    We introduce a hybrid technique that combines the robustness of frequency-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) with the advantages of time-resolved CARS spectroscopy. Instantaneous coherent broadband excitation of several characteristic molecular vibrations and the subsequent probing of these vibrations by an optimally shaped time-delayed narrowband laser pulse help to suppress the nonresonant background and to retrieve the species-specific signal. We used this technique for coherent Raman spectroscopy of sodium dipicolinate powder, which is similar to calcium dipicolinate (a marker molecule for bacterial endospores, such as Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus anthracis), and we demonstrated a rapid and highly specific detection scheme that works even in the presence of multiple scattering.

  6. Modulated Raman Spectroscopy for Enhanced Cancer Diagnosis at the Cellular Level

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Anna Chiara; Dholakia, Kishan; Mazilu, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is emerging as a promising and novel biophotonics tool for non-invasive, real-time diagnosis of tissue and cell abnormalities. However, the presence of a strong fluorescence background is a key issue that can detract from the use of Raman spectroscopy in routine clinical care. The review summarizes the state-of-the-art methods to remove the fluorescence background and explores recent achievements to address this issue obtained with modulated Raman spectroscopy. This innovative approach can be used to extract the Raman spectral component from the fluorescence background and improve the quality of the Raman signal. We describe the potential of modulated Raman spectroscopy as a rapid, inexpensive and accurate clinical tool to detect the presence of bladder cancer cells. Finally, in a broader context, we show how this approach can greatly enhance the sensitivity of integrated Raman spectroscopy and microfluidic systems, opening new prospects for portable higher throughput Raman cell sorting. PMID:26110401

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of half-mustard agent.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Douglas A; Biggs, Kevin B; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2006-04-01

    The detection and identification of chemical warfare agents is an important analytical goal. Herein, it is demonstrated that 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (half-mustard, CEES) can be successfully analysed using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). A critical component in this detection system is the fabrication of a robust, yet highly enhancing, sensor surface. Recent advances in substrate fabrication and in the fundamental understanding of the SERS phenomenon enable the development of improved substrates for practical SERS applications.

  8. Testing of Raman spectroscopy method for assessment of skin implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, E. V.; Timchenko, P. E.; Volova, L. T.; Pershutkina, S. V.; Shalkovskaya, P. Y.

    2016-11-01

    Results of studies of testing of Raman spectroscopy (RS) method for assessment of skin implants are presented. As objects of study were used samples of rat's skin material. The main spectral differences of implants using various types of their processing appear at wavenumbers 1062 cm-1, 1645 cm-1, 1553 cm-1, 851 cm-1, 863 cm-1, 814 cm-1 and 1410 cm-1. Optical coefficients for assessment of skin implants were introduced. The research results are confirmed by morphological analysis.

  9. Studies of cartilaginous tissue using Raman spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, Pavel E.; Timchenko, Elena V.; Volova, Larisa T.; Dolgyshkin, Dmitry A.; Markova, Maria D.; Kylabyhova, A. Y.; Kornilin, Dmitriy V.

    2016-10-01

    The work presents the results of studies of samples of human articular surface of the knee joint, obtained by Raman spectroscopy implementedduring endoprosthesis replacement surgery . The main spectral characteristics of articular surface areas with varying degrees of cartilage damage were detected at 956 cm-1, 1066 cm-1 wavenumbers, corresponding to phosphate and carbonate, and at 1660 cm-1, 1271 cm-1 wavenumbers, corresponding to amide I and amide III. Criteria allowing to identify the degree of articular hyaline cartilage damage were introduced.

  10. Raman spectroscopy for grading of live osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yi-Hung; Wu, Stewart H; Kuo, Yi-Chun; Chen, How-Foo; Chiou, Arthur; Lee, Oscar K

    2015-04-18

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumor, and the grading of osteosarcoma cells relies on traditional histopathology and molecular biology methods, which require RNA extraction, protein isolation and immunohistological staining. All these methods require cell isolation, lysis or fixation, which is time-consuming and requires certain amount of tumor specimen. In this study, we report the use of Raman spectroscopy for grading of malignant osteosarcoma cells. We demonstrate that, based on the detection of differential production of mineral species, Raman spectroscopy can be used as a live cell analyzer to accurately assess the grades of osteosarcoma cells by evaluating their mineralization levels. Mineralization level was assessed by measuring amount of hydroxyapatite (HA), which is highly expressed in mature osteoblasts, but not in poorly differentiated osteosarcoma cell or mesenchymal stem cells, the putative cell-of-origin of osteosarcoma. We found that under Raman spectroscopy, the level of HA production was high in MG-63 cells, which are low-grade. Moreover, hydroxyapatite production was low in high-grade osteosarcoma cells such as 143B and SaOS2 cells (p < 0.05). Matrix metalloproteinase MMP2, MMP9 were highly expressed in SaOS2, 143B and MSCs and decreased in human fetal osteoblast (FOB) and MG-63 cells as expected (p < 0.05). These results may highlight the inverse correlation between HA level and prognosis of osteosarcoma. The use of Raman spectroscopy for the measurement of HA production by the protocol reported in this study may serve as a useful tool to rapidly and accurately assess the degree of malignancy in osteosarcoma cells in a label-free manner. Such application may shorten the period of pathological diagnosis and may benefit patients who are inflicted with osteosarcoma.

  11. Evaluation of Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy and Comparison to Computational Background Correction Methods Applied to Biochemical Raman Spectra.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Eliana; Korinth, Florian; Stiebing, Clara; Krafft, Christoph; Schie, Iwan W; Popp, Jürgen

    2017-07-27

    Raman spectroscopy provides label-free biochemical information from tissue samples without complicated sample preparation. The clinical capability of Raman spectroscopy has been demonstrated in a wide range of in vitro and in vivo applications. However, a challenge for in vivo applications is the simultaneous excitation of auto-fluorescence in the majority of tissues of interest, such as liver, bladder, brain, and others. Raman bands are then superimposed on a fluorescence background, which can be several orders of magnitude larger than the Raman signal. To eliminate the disturbing fluorescence background, several approaches are available. Among instrumentational methods shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) has been widely applied and studied. Similarly, computational techniques, for instance extended multiplicative scatter correction (EMSC), have also been employed to remove undesired background contributions. Here, we present a theoretical and experimental evaluation and comparison of fluorescence background removal approaches for Raman spectra based on SERDS and EMSC.

  12. Evaluation of Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy and Comparison to Computational Background Correction Methods Applied to Biochemical Raman Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Eliana; Korinth, Florian; Stiebing, Clara; Krafft, Christoph; Schie, Iwan W.; Popp, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy provides label-free biochemical information from tissue samples without complicated sample preparation. The clinical capability of Raman spectroscopy has been demonstrated in a wide range of in vitro and in vivo applications. However, a challenge for in vivo applications is the simultaneous excitation of auto-fluorescence in the majority of tissues of interest, such as liver, bladder, brain, and others. Raman bands are then superimposed on a fluorescence background, which can be several orders of magnitude larger than the Raman signal. To eliminate the disturbing fluorescence background, several approaches are available. Among instrumentational methods shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) has been widely applied and studied. Similarly, computational techniques, for instance extended multiplicative scatter correction (EMSC), have also been employed to remove undesired background contributions. Here, we present a theoretical and experimental evaluation and comparison of fluorescence background removal approaches for Raman spectra based on SERDS and EMSC. PMID:28749450

  13. Infrared and NIR Raman spectroscopy in medical microbiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, Dieter

    1998-04-01

    FTIR and FT-NIR Raman spectra of intact microbial cells are highly specific, fingerprint-like signatures which can be used to (i) discriminate between diverse microbial species and strains, (ii) detect in situ intracellular components or structures such as inclusion bodies, storage materials or endospores, (iii) detect and quantify metabolically released CO2 in response to various different substrate, and (iv) characterize growth-dependent phenomena and cell-drug interactions. The characteristic information is extracted from the spectral contours by applying resolution enhancement techniques, difference spectroscopy, and pattern recognition methods such as factor-, cluster-, linear discriminant analysis, and artificial neural networks. Particularly interesting applications arise by means of a light microscope coupled to the spectrometer. FTIR spectra of micro-colonies containing less than 103 cells can be obtained from colony replica by a stamping technique that transfers micro-colonies growing on culture plates to a special IR-sample holder. Using a computer controlled x, y- stage together with mapping and video techniques, the fundamental tasks of microbiological analysis, namely detection, enumeration, and differentiation of micro- organisms can be integrated in one single apparatus. FTIR and NIR-FT-Raman spectroscopy can also be used in tandem to characterize medically important microorganisms. Currently novel methodologies are tested to take advantage of the complementary information of IR and Raman spectra. Representative examples on medically important microorganisms will be given that highlight the new possibilities of vibrational spectroscopies.

  14. Characterization of early dental caries by polarized Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Ko, Alex C.-T.; Hewko, Mark D.; Dong, Cecilia C.; Cleghorn, Blaine M.; Sowa, Michael G.

    2006-02-01

    The early approximal caries lesion in enamel is observed clinically as a white spot and is difficult to detect and/or monitor with current methods available to dentists. New methods with high sensitivity and specificity are required to enable improved early dental caries diagnosis. Using unpolarized Raman spectroscopy to examine unsectioned teeth, peak intensity changes in the phosphate (PO 4 3-) vibrations (ν II, ν 3 and ν 4) were observed between spectra of sound and carious enamel. However, there is little change in the ν I vibration with this approach. In contrast, when tooth sections were examined by unpolarized Raman spectroscopy, marked changes in the ν I peak at 959 cm -1 were noted between healthy and carious enamel. These differences suggest that sampling orientation play a role in understanding the spectral changes. Using polarized Raman spectroscopy to examine unsectioned samples, cross polarized measurements from sound enamel exhibited significant reduction of the ν I peak compared with parallel polarized measurements. A similar reduction was observed with carious enamel, however, the reduction was not as prominent. By calculating the depolarization ratio of the area under the ν I peak, sound enamel can be clearly distinguished from demineralized regions. The spectral changes observed are attributed to changes in the structure and/or orientation of the apatite crystals as a result of the acid demineralization process.

  15. Medical applications of atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Samjin; Jung, Gyeong Bok; Kim, Kyung Sook; Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent research and application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy techniques, which are considered the multi-functional and powerful toolkits for probing the nanostructural, biomechanical and physicochemical properties of biomedical samples in medical science. We introduce briefly the basic principles of AFM and Raman spectroscopy, followed by diagnostic assessments of some selected diseases in biomedical applications using them, including mitochondria isolated from normal and ischemic hearts, hair fibers, individual cells, and human cortical bone. Finally, AFM and Raman spectroscopy applications to investigate the effects of pharmacotherapy, surgery, and medical device therapy in various medicines from cells to soft and hard tissues are discussed, including pharmacotherapy--paclitaxel on Ishikawa and HeLa cells, telmisartan on angiotensin II, mitomycin C on strabismus surgery and eye whitening surgery, and fluoride on primary teeth--and medical device therapy--collagen cross-linking treatment for the management of progressive keratoconus, radiofrequency treatment for skin rejuvenation, physical extracorporeal shockwave therapy for healing of Achilles tendinitis, orthodontic treatment, and toothbrushing time to minimize the loss of teeth after exposure to acidic drinks.

  16. Shell-Isolated Tip-Enhanced Raman and Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Ping; Huang, Sheng-Chao; Wang, Xiang-Jie; Bodappa, Nataraju; Li, Chao-Yu; Yin, Hao; Su, Hai-Sheng; Meng, Meng; Zhang, Hua; Ren, Bin; Yang, Zhi-Lin; Zenobi, Renato; Tian, Zhong-Qun; Li, Jian-Feng

    2018-06-18

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy can provide molecular fingerprint information with ultrahigh spatial resolution, but the tip will be easily contaminated, thus leading to artifacts. It also remains a great challenge to establish tip-enhanced fluorescence because of the quenching resulting from the proximity of the metal tip. Herein, we report shell-isolated tip-enhanced Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies by employing ultrathin shell-isolated tips fabricated by atomic layer deposition. Such shell-isolated tips not only show outstanding electromagnetic field enhancement in TERS but also exclude interference by contaminants, thus greatly promoting applications in solution. Tip-enhanced fluorescence has also been achieved using these shell-isolated tips, with enhancement factors of up to 1.7×10 3 , consistent with theoretical simulations. Furthermore, tip-enhanced Raman and fluorescence signals are acquired simultaneously, and their relative intensities can be manipulated by changing the shell thickness. This work opens a new avenue for ultrahigh resolution surface analysis using plasmon-enhanced spectroscopies. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Detection of propofol concentrations in blood by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, M. S.; Gnyba, M.; UrniaŻ, R.; Myllylä, T. S.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we present a proof-of-concept of a Raman spectroscopy-based approach for measuring the content of propofol, a common anesthesia drug, in whole human blood, and plasma, which is intended for use during clinical procedures. This method utilizes the Raman spectroscopy as a chemically-sensitive method for qualitative detection of the presence of a drug and a quantitative determination of its concentration. A number of samples from different patients with added various concentrations of propofol IV solution were measured. This is most equivalent to a real in-vivo situation. Subsequent analysis of a set of spectra was carried out to extract qualitative and quantitative information. We conclude, that the changes in the spectra of blood with propofol, overlap with the most prominent lines of the propofol solution, especially at spectral regions: 1450 cm-1, 1250- 1260 cm-1, 1050 cm-1, 875-910 cm-1, 640 cm-1. Later, we have introduced a quantitative analysis program based on correlation matrix closest fit, and a LOO cross-validation. We have achieved 36.67% and 60% model precision when considering full spectra, or specified bands, respectively. These results prove the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy for quantitative detection of propofol concentrations in whole human blood.

  18. Raman spectroscopy - in situ characterization of growth and surface processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, James Robert

    The goal of this thesis is to expand on the usefulness of Raman spectroscopy as an in situ probe to aid in the growth and implementation of electronic, optical, and biodetection materials. We accomplish this goal by developing two diverse optical characterization projects. In the first project, an autoclave similar to those used in solvothermal growth which has been outfitted with an optical window is used to collect vibrational spectra of solvents and mineralizers commonly used in the ammonothermal growth of gallium nitride. Secondly, novel silver nanowires created by ferroelectric lithography are evaluated by surface enhanced micro-Raman spectroscopy for use as surface enhanced substrates for low detection limit or single molecule bio-detectors. Raman spectroscopy is already a widely accepted method to characterize and identify a wide variety of materials. Vibrational spectra can yield much information on the presence of chemical species as well as information regarding the phase and interactive properties. Because Raman spectroscopy is a generally non-intrusive technique it is ideal for analysis of hazardous or far-from-ambient liquids, gases, or solids. This technique is used in situ to characterize crystal growth and surface enhanced photochemistry. The phenomenon of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) has been observed in many systems but some fundamental understanding is still lacking and the technique has been slow to transition from the laboratory to the industry. Aggregated colloids and lithographically created islands have shown the best success as reproducible substrates for SERS detection. These techniques, however, lack control over shape, size, and position of the metal nanoparticles which leave them reliant on hotspots. Because of the potential for control of the position of aggregates, ferroelectric lithographically created silver nanowires are evaluated as a potential SERS substrate using pyridine, benzoic acid, and Rhodamine 6g. Surface

  19. Analysis of drugs-of-abuse and explosives using terahertz time-domain and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Andrew; Fan, Wenhui; Upadhya, Prashanth; Cunningham, John; Linfield, Edmund; Davies, Giles; Edwards, Howell; Munshi, Tasnim; O'Neil, Andrew

    2006-02-01

    We demonstrate that, through coherent measurement of the transmitted terahertz electric fields, broadband (0.3-8THz) time-domain spectroscopy can be used to measure far-infrared vibrational modes of a range of illegal drugs and high explosives that are of interest to the forensic and security services. Our results show that these absorption features are highly sensitive to the structural and spatial arrangement of the molecules. Terahertz frequency spectra are also compared with high-resolution low-frequency Raman spectra to assist in understanding the low frequency inter- and intra-molecular vibrational modes of the molecules.

  20. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis.

  1. Contributions of Raman spectroscopy to the understanding of bone strength.

    PubMed

    Mandair, Gurjit S; Morris, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is increasingly commonly used to understand how changes in bone composition and structure influence tissue-level bone mechanical properties. The spectroscopic technique provides information on bone mineral and matrix collagen components and on the effects of various matrix proteins on bone material properties as well. The Raman spectrum of bone not only contains information on bone mineral crystallinity that is related to bone hardness but also provides information on the orientation of mineral crystallites with respect to the collagen fibril axis. Indirect information on collagen cross-links is also available and will be discussed. After a short introduction to bone Raman spectroscopic parameters and collection methodologies, advances in in vivo Raman spectroscopic measurements for animal and human subject studies will be reviewed. A discussion on the effects of aging, osteogenesis imperfecta, osteoporosis and therapeutic agents on bone composition and mechanical properties will be highlighted, including genetic mouse models in which structure-function and exercise effects are explored. Similarly, extracellular matrix proteins, proteases and transcriptional proteins implicated in the regulation of bone material properties will be reviewed.

  2. Line-scanning Raman imaging spectroscopy for detection of fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Deng, Sunan; Liu, Le; Liu, Zhiyi; Shen, Zhiyuan; Li, Guohua; He, Yonghong

    2012-06-10

    Fingerprints are the best form of personal identification for criminal investigation purposes. We present a line-scanning Raman imaging system and use it to detect fingerprints composed of β-carotene and fish oil on different substrates. Although the line-scanning Raman system has been used to map the distribution of materials such as polystyrene spheres and minerals within geological samples, this is the first time to our knowledge that the method is used in imaging fingerprints. Two Raman peaks of β-carotene (501.2, 510.3 nm) are detected and the results demonstrate that both peaks can generate excellent images with little difference between them. The system operates at a spectra resolution of about 0.4 nm and can detect β-carotene signals in petroleum ether solution with the limit of detection of 3.4×10(-9) mol/L. The results show that the line-scanning Raman imaging spectroscopy we have built has a high accuracy and can be used in the detection of latent fingerprints in the future.

  3. Raman spectroscopy for prostate cancer detection and characterization (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubertin, Kelly; Trinh, Quoc-Huy; Jermyn, Michael; St-Pierre, Catherine; Vladoiu, Maria-Claudia; Grosset, Andrée.-Anne; Saad, Fred; Trudel, Dominique; Leblond, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent diagnosed cancers among men. When prostate cancer occurs, the cancer does not result in only one or few localized malignant tumor, but is generally spread within the whole prostate. In order to counteract the very high level of heterogeneities exhibited by prostate tissues, we developed a method for high-resolution co-registration of Raman spectroscopy with prostate cancer diagnosis. Raman spectra were acquired on fresh ex vivo prostate within 2 hours after radical prostatectomy using a multi-wavelength hand-held contact probe. After the measurements, the prostate was reintegrated to the usual pathological workflow: formalin fixated and paraffin embedded (FFPE), and prepared for microscope histopathological analyses. The precise reconstruction of the prostate slice with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) tissue allows the spatial correlation of the measured area (0.2 mm2) with the correspondent histopathological information, for point-by-point diagnosis determination. The tissue was classified into groups (normal/cancer) and subgroups according to the percentage of benign glands, stroma or cancer. Different machine learning algorithms were tested to classify the spectra with increasing levels of categorization. Preliminary results showed that Raman spectroscopy is capable of detecting prostate cancer with an accuracy >90%. In addition, high percentages of stroma (vs. glands) have been correlated with spectral signature of collagen, which is the main constituent of extracellular matrix.

  4. Detection of hazardous chemicals using field-portable Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Cherylyn W.; Harvey, Scott D.; Wright, Bob W.

    2003-07-01

    A major challenge confronting emergency response, border control, and other security-related functions is the accurate, rapid, and safe identification of potentially hazardous chemicals outside a laboratory environment. Raman spectroscopy is a rapid, non-intrusive technique that can be used to confidently identify many classes of hazardous and potentially explosive compounds based on molecular vibration information. Advances in instrumentation now allow reliable field - portable measurements to be made. Before the Raman technique can be effectively applied and be accepted within the scientific community, realistic studies must be performed to develop methods, define limitations, and rigorously evaluate its effectiveness. Examples of a variety of chemicals (including neat and diluted chemical warfare [CW] agents, a CW agent precursor, a biological warfare (BW)-related compound, an illicit drug, and explosives) identified using Raman spectroscopy in various types of containers and on surfaces are given, as well as results from a blind field test of 29 unknown samples which included CW agent precursors and/or degradation products, solvents associated with CW agent production, pesticides, explosives, and BW toxins (mostly mycotoxins). Additionally, results of experimental studies to evaluate the analysis of flammable organic solvents, propellants, military explosives, mixtures containing military explosives, shock-sensitive explosives, and gun powders are described with safety guidelines. Spectral masks for screening unknown samples for explosives and nerve agents are given.

  5. Localized magnetoplasmons in quantum dots: Magneto-optical absorption, Raman scattering, and inelastic electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, M. S.

    We investigate a one-component, quasi-zero dimensional, quantum plasma exposed to a parabolic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. If the size of such a system as can be realized in the semiconducting quantum dots is on the order of the de-Broglie wavelength, the electronic and optical properties become highly tunable. Then the quantum size effects challenge the observation of many-particle phenomena such as the magneto-optical absorption, Raman intensity, and electron-energy-loss spectrum. An exact analytical solution of the problem leads us to infer that these many-particle phenomena are, in fact, dictated by the generalized Kohn's theorem in the long-wavelength limit. Maneuvering the confinement and/or the magnetic field furnishes the resonance energy capable of being explored with the FIR, Raman, or electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. This implies that either of these probes should be competent in observing the localized magnetoplasmons in the system. A deeper insight into the physics of quantum dots is paving the way for their implementation in such diverse fields as quantum computing and medical imaging.

  6. Rapid Classification of Ordinary Chondrites Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fries, M.; Welzenbach, L.

    2014-01-01

    Classification of ordinary chondrites is typically done through measurements of the composition of olivine and pyroxenes. Historically, this measurement has usually been performed via electron microprobe, oil immersion or other methods which can be costly through lost sample material during thin section preparation. Raman microscopy can perform the same measurements but considerably faster and with much less sample preparation allowing for faster classification. Raman spectroscopy can facilitate more rapid classification of large amounts of chondrites such as those retrieved from North Africa and potentially Antarctica, are present in large collections, or are submitted to a curation facility by the public. With development, this approach may provide a completely automated classification method of all chondrite types.

  7. Controlling protected designation of origin of wine by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mandrile, Luisa; Zeppa, Giuseppe; Giovannozzi, Andrea Mario; Rossi, Andrea Mario

    2016-11-15

    In this paper, a Fourier Transform Raman spectroscopy method, to authenticate the provenience of wine, for food traceability applications was developed. In particular, due to the specific chemical fingerprint of the Raman spectrum, it was possible to discriminate different wines produced in the Piedmont area (North West Italy) in accordance with i) grape varieties, ii) production area and iii) ageing time. In order to create a consistent training set, more than 300 samples from tens of different producers were analyzed, and a chemometric treatment of raw spectra was applied. A discriminant analysis method was employed in the classification procedures, providing a classification capability (percentage of correct answers) of 90% for validation of grape analysis and geographical area provenance, and a classification capability of 84% for ageing time classification. The present methodology was applied successfully to raw materials without any preliminary treatment of the sample, providing a response in a very short time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cavity-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for Food Chain Management

    PubMed Central

    Sandfort, Vincenz; Goldschmidt, Jens; Wöllenstein, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    Comprehensive food chain management requires the monitoring of many parameters including temperature, humidity, and multiple gases. The latter is highly challenging because no low-cost technology for the simultaneous chemical analysis of multiple gaseous components currently exists. This contribution proposes the use of cavity enhanced Raman spectroscopy to enable online monitoring of all relevant components using a single laser source. A laboratory scale setup is presented and characterized in detail. Power enhancement of the pump light is achieved in an optical resonator with a Finesse exceeding 2500. A simulation for the light scattering behavior shows the influence of polarization on the spatial distribution of the Raman scattered light. The setup is also used to measure three relevant showcase gases to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach, including carbon dioxide, oxygen and ethene. PMID:29495501

  9. Towards field malaria diagnosis using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Keren; Xiong, Aoli; Yuen, Clement; Preiser, Peter; Liu, Quan

    2016-04-01

    We report three strategies of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for β-hematin and hemozoin detection in malaria infected human blood, which can be potentially developed for field malaria diagnosis. In the first strategy, we used silver coated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@Ag) in combination with an external magnetic field to enhance the Raman signal of β-hematin. Then we developed two SERS methods without the requirement of magnetic field for malaria infection diagnosis. In Method 1, silver nanoparticles were synthesized separately and then mixed with lysed blood just like in traditional SERS measurements; while in Method 2, we developed an ultrasensitive SERS method by synthesizing silver nanoparticles directly inside the parasites of Plasmodium falciparum. Method 2 can be also used to detect single parasites in the ring stage.

  10. The assessment of human skin biomatrixes using raman spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, E. V.; Timchenko, P. E.; Volova, L. T.; Dolgushkin, D. A.; Shalkovskaya, P. Y.; Pershutkina, S. V.; Nefedova, I. F.

    2017-01-01

    There are presented the results of the analysis of the implants made of human skin by Raman scattering method. The main spectral distinctions of bioimplants by using various methods for their manufacture are shown at wavenumbers 1062 cm-1, 1645 cm-1, 1260 cm-1, 850 cm-1, 863 cm-1, corresponding to components that are important for the quality of implant: glycosaminoglycans, amide type I, amide type III, asymmetrical association C-O-S of vibration of glycosaminoglycans GAGs, tyrosine and a C-C stretching of proline ring, ribose. Has been carried out two-dimensional analysis of optical coefficients providing an opportunity to control the quality of cutaneous implants in the process of manufacturing it, and detailed analysis of Raman scattering spectroscopy.

  11. Can Raman spectroscopy identify the origin of Paget disease?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. A.; Marcelo, Moreno; Bitar, R.; Martinho, H., .; Santos, E. A. P.; Arisawa, E. A. L.

    2008-02-01

    The histogenesis of the breast Paget's disease was investigated by the optical diagnosis technique using Raman spectroscopy. A total of 15 spectra of the associated breast lesion, 21 spectra of the eczematoid skin lesion and 396 spectra of invasive breast cancer not otherwise specified were compared by clustering the spectral data between 800 - 1800 cm -1 at level of similarity of 95%, using a correlation distance measurement by computing the covariance matrix. The Raman spectral-biochemical characterization of invasive breast cancer and breast Paget's disease with eczematoid skin lesion associated with underlying invasive breast lesion tissues enabled one concludes that the parenchymal disease had similar characteristics to the skin's Paget lesion. This could indicate a similar histogenesis for both. Thus, the findings of the present work adds a relevant experimental evidence that agrees with the epidermotropic theory of Paget's disease, that states that the cells originate in the breast ducts and migrate to the nipple's skin.

  12. Stochastic Liouville equations for femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Ando, Hideo; Dorfman, Konstantin E.

    2015-01-14

    Electron and vibrational dynamics of molecules are commonly studied by subjecting them to two interactions with a fast actinic pulse that prepares them in a nonstationary state and after a variable delay period T, probing them with a Raman process induced by a combination of a broadband and a narrowband pulse. This technique, known as femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS), can effectively probe time resolved vibrational resonances. We show how FSRS signals can be modeled and interpreted using the stochastic Liouville equations (SLE), originally developed for NMR lineshapes. The SLE provide a convenient simulation protocol that can describe complex dynamicsmore » caused by coupling to collective bath coordinates at much lower cost than a full dynamical simulation. The origin of the dispersive features that appear when there is no separation of timescales between vibrational variations and the dephasing time is clarified.« less

  13. Discrimination of wine lactic acid bacteria by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Susan B; Thornton, Mark A; Thornton, Roy J

    2017-08-01

    Species of Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Oenococcus, and Leuconostoc play an important role in winemaking, as either inoculants or contaminants. The metabolic products of these lactic acid bacteria have considerable effects on the flavor, aroma, and texture of a wine. However, analysis of a wine's microflora, especially the bacteria, is rarely done unless spoilage becomes evident, and identification at the species or strain level is uncommon as the methods required are technically difficult and expensive. In this work, we used Raman spectral fingerprints to discriminate 19 strains of Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, and Oenococcus. Species of Lactobacillus and Pediococcus and strains of O. oeni and P. damnosus were classified with high sensitivity: 86-90 and 84-85%, respectively. Our results demonstrate that a simple, inexpensive method utilizing Raman spectroscopy can be used to accurately identify lactic acid bacteria isolated from wine.

  14. Advances in tumor diagnosis using OCT and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. P.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.; Kornilin, D. V.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.

    2014-05-01

    Complex investigation of malignant tumors was performed with combined optical coherence tomography (OCT) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) setup: 22 ex vivo lung tissue samples and 23 in vivo experiments with skin tumors. It was shown that combined RS-OCT unit may be used for precise tissue morphology visualization with simultaneous tumor type determination (BCC, malignant melanoma of skin tissues, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of lung). Fast RS phase method for skin and lung tumors identification was proposed. It is based on alteration of Raman spectral intensity in 1300-1340, 1440-1460 and 1640-1680 cm-1 bands for healthy and malignant tissue. Complex method could identify: malignant melanoma with 88.9% sensitivity and 87.8% specificity; adenocarcinoma with 100% sensitivity and 81.5% specificity; squamous cell carcinomas with 90.9% sensitivity and 77.8% specificity.

  15. Raman Spectroscopy: an essential tool for future IODP expeditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andò, Sergio; Garzanti, Eduardo; Kulhanek, Denise K.

    2016-04-01

    The scientific drilling of oceanic sedimentary sequences plays a fundamental part in provenance studies, paleoclimate recostructions, and source-to-sink investigations (e.g., France-Lanord et al., 2015; Pandey et al., 2015). When studying oceanic deposits, Raman spectroscopy can and does represent an essential flexible tool for the multidisciplinary approach necessary to integrate the insight provided by different disciplines. This new user-friendly technique opens up an innovative avenue to study in real time the composition of detrital mineral grains of any origin, complementing traditional methods of provenance analysis (e.g., sedimentary petrography, heavy minerals; Andò and Garzanti, 2014). Raman spectra can readily reveal the chemistry of foraminiferal tests, nannofossils and other biogenic debris for the study of ecosystem evolution and paleoclimate, or the Ca/Mg ratio in biogenic or terrigenous carbonates for geological or marine biological applications and oil exploration (Borromeo et al., 2015). For the study of pelagic or turbiditic muds, which represent the bulk of the deep-marine sedimentary record, Raman spectroscopy allows us to identify silt-sized grains down to the size of a few microns with the same precision level required in quantitative provenance analysis of sand-sized sediments (Andò et al., 2011). Silt and siltstone also represent a very conspicuous part of the stratigraphic record onshore and usually preserve original mineralogical assemblages better than more permeable interbedded sand and sandstone (Blatt, 1985). Raman spectra can be obtained on sample volumes of only a few cubic microns by a confocal micro-Raman coupled with a standard polarizing light microscope using a 50× objective. The size of this apparatus can be easily placed onboard an IODP vessel to provide crucial information and quickly solve identification problems for the benefit of a wide range of scientists during future expeditions. Cited references Andò, S., Vignola

  16. Novel Electrochemical Raman Spectroscopy Enabled by Water Immersion Objective.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhi-Cong; Hu, Shu; Huang, Sheng-Chao; Zhang, Yue-Jiao; Zhao, Wei-Xing; Li, Jian-Feng; Jiang, Chaoyang; Ren, Bin

    2016-10-04

    Electrochemical Raman spectroscopy is a powerful molecular level diagnostic technique for in situ investigation of adsorption and reactions on various material surfaces. However, there is still a big room to improve the optical path to meet the increasing request of higher detection sensitivity and spatial resolution. Herein, we proposed a novel electrochemical Raman setup based on a water immersion objective. It dramatically reduces mismatch of the refractive index in the light path. Consequently, significant improvement in detection sensitivity and spatial resolution has been achieved from both Zemax simulation and the experimental results. Furthermore, the thickness of electrolyte layer could be expanded to 2 mm without any influence on the signal collection. Such a thick electrolyte layer allows a much normal electrochemical response during the spectroelectrochemical investigations of the methanol oxidation.

  17. Raman spectroscopy for DNA quantification in cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Okotrub, K A; Surovtsev, N V; Semeshin, V F; Omelyanchuk, L V

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the feasibility of a novel approach to quantify DNA in cell nuclei. This approach is based on spectroscopy analysis of Raman light scattering, and avoids the problem of nonstoichiometric binding of dyes to DNA, as it directly measures the signal from DNA. Quantitative analysis of nuclear DNA contribution to Raman spectrum could be reliably performed using intensity of a phosphate mode at 1096 cm(-1) . When compared to the known DNA standards from cells of different animals, our results matched those values at error of 10%. We therefore suggest that this approach will be useful to expand the list of DNA standards, to properly adjust the duration of hydrolysis in Feulgen staining, to assay the applicability of fuchsines for DNA quantification, as well as to measure DNA content in cells with complex hydrolysis patterns, when Feulgen densitometry is inappropriate. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  18. Confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy of black soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecourt, B.; Capelle, F.; Adamietz, F.; Malaplate, A.; Blaudez, D.; Kellay, H.; Turlet, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Black soap films from aqueous solutions of sodium dodecyl sulphate are studied by micro-Raman confocal spectroscopy. At the end of the draining process films of different thicknesses are obtained depending on the experimental conditions: Working in a closed humidified chamber leads to common black films while, under evaporation or in the presence of electrolyte, Newton black films are observed. From the Raman spectra of these films, quantitative information is deduced about the conformational and lateral order of the aliphatic surfactant chains, as well as the thickness of the residual water layer. More accurate measurements of the thickness of these ultimate films have been carried out by transmission ellipsometry and their effective refractive index measured by Brewster angle reflectivity. The thinner films present higher molecular organization and their aqueous core exhibits unusual spectral features.

  19. UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy: Lambert-Beer reloaded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäntele, Werner; Deniz, Erhan

    2017-02-01

    UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy is used in almost every spectroscopy laboratory for routine analysis or research. All spectroscopists rely on the Lambert-Beer Law but many of them are less aware of its limitations. This tutorial discusses typical problems in routine spectroscopy that come along with technical limitations or careless selection of experimental parameters. Simple rules are provided to avoid these problems.

  20. Resonance Raman spectroscopy and the preterm infant carotenoid status.

    PubMed

    Chan, Gary M; Chan, Melissa M; Gellermann, Werner; Ermakov, Igor; Ermakova, Maia; Bhosale, Prakash; Bernstein, Paul; Rau, Carrie

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the study was to validate the noninvasive resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) method in infants in comparison with the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method, and to evaluate the carotenoid status in preterm infants fed with mother's milk or formula. In the first phase of the study, resonance Raman measurements were made on male term infants' skin and correlated with tissue harvested at the time of circumcision. Each baby's foreskin was weighed, enzymatically digested, and the total carotenoids were extracted and quantitated by the HPLC. Next, to evaluate the carotenoid status of preterm infants (BW <1500 g), the skin and serum carotenoids in infants fed with either human milk or preterm formula were studied from the start of feedings and every 2 weeks until hospital discharge. Skin carotenoids were measured by RRS and the serum total carotenoids by HPLC. Foreskin carotenoid levels measured by RRS correlated with HPLC measurements of total serum carotenoids (R = 0.52, P < 0.01, n = 16). Forty preterm infants were studied for their carotenoid status. Thirty-two infants were fed mother's milk, whereas 8 were fed a preterm infant formula that was not enriched with carotenoids. The gestation and birth weight of the 2 feeding groups were similar. The infants fed human milk had a higher serum total carotenoid concentration and skin Raman counts than formula-fed infants. The skin Raman counts and total serum carotenoid correlated (R = 0.44, P = 0.01). The human milk-fed infants' serum total carotenoid concentrations and Raman values did not change during the study period; however, the formula-fed group's total serum and skin carotenoid decreased significantly during the study. RRS of infant's skin reliably assesses total carotenoid status noninvasively. Human milk-fed preterm infants have higher serum and skin carotenoids than formula-fed infants suggesting that formula-fed infants may benefit from carotenoid supplementation.

  1. Coral calcifying fluid aragonite saturation states derived from Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCarlo, Thomas M.; D'Olivo, Juan P.; Foster, Taryn; Holcomb, Michael; Becker, Thomas; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2017-11-01

    Quantifying the saturation state of aragonite (ΩAr) within the calcifying fluid of corals is critical for understanding their biomineralization process and sensitivity to environmental changes including ocean acidification. Recent advances in microscopy, microprobes, and isotope geochemistry enable the determination of calcifying fluid pH and [CO32-], but direct quantification of ΩAr (where ΩAr = [CO32-][Ca2+]/Ksp) has proved elusive. Here we test a new technique for deriving ΩAr based on Raman spectroscopy. First, we analysed abiogenic aragonite crystals precipitated under a range of ΩAr from 10 to 34, and we found a strong dependence of Raman peak width on ΩAr with no significant effects of other factors including pH, Mg/Ca partitioning, and temperature. Validation of our Raman technique for corals is difficult because there are presently no direct measurements of calcifying fluid ΩAr available for comparison. However, Raman analysis of the international coral standard JCp-1 produced ΩAr of 12.3 ± 0.3, which we demonstrate is consistent with published skeletal Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, B/Ca, δ11B, and δ44Ca data. Raman measurements are rapid ( ≤ 1 s), high-resolution ( ≤ 1 µm), precise (derived ΩAr ± 1 to 2 per spectrum depending on instrument configuration), accurate ( ±2 if ΩAr < 20), and require minimal sample preparation, making the technique well suited for testing the sensitivity of coral calcifying fluid ΩAr to ocean acidification and warming using samples from natural and laboratory settings. To demonstrate this, we also show a high-resolution time series of ΩAr over multiple years of growth in a Porites skeleton from the Great Barrier Reef, and we evaluate the response of ΩAr in juvenile Acropora cultured under elevated CO2 and temperature.

  2. Raman spectroscopy and imaging of whole functional cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNaughton, Don; Lim, Janelle; Hammer, Larissa; Langford, Steven J.; Collie, Jocelyn; Wood, Bayden R.

    2005-02-01

    With the advent of Raman spectrometers based on CCD array detectors, instruments have been coupled to optical microscopes leading to all the advantages of bright field microscopy with the added advantage of a direct chemical probe. The primary biological solvent, water, is a weak Raman scatterer and so these instruments can now be used to investigate the chemistry of living systems at spatial resolutions of 1 μm and below. We have developed techniques that allow us to study functional red blood cells and monitor the exchange of ligands and the development and chemistry of disease processes. These techniques take advantage of Aggregated Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, which enables us to use the haem group of the haemoglobins and related haem pigments, such as the malarial pigment haemozoin, as a sensitive probe for changes in oxidation state, spin state and electronic structure. We have used the Raman microprobe to investigate the effect of drugs such as quinoline on the food vacuole of the malarial parasite in vivo. Sickle cell disease affects 1 out of 600 African American births and is caused by a mutant form (β6 glu-->val) of haemoglobin (HbS). HbS polymerizes and forms higher order aggregates under hypoxic conditions, leading to distortion and rigidity of the erythrocyte. These rigid cells can block the microvasculature resulting in tissue ischaemia, organ damage, and ultimately death. The sensitivity of the Raman technique to haem aggregation provides a tool with which we can analyse the changes that occur between normal and sickle cells.

  3. In vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy of the human cornea.

    PubMed

    Bauer, N J; Hendrikse, F; March, W F

    1999-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of a confocal Raman spectroscopic technique for the noninvasive assessment of corneal hydration in vivo in two legally blind subjects. A laser beam (632.8 nm; 15 mJ) was maintained on the cornea by using a microscope objective lens (x25 magnification, NA = 0.5, f = 10 mm) both for focusing the incident light as well as collecting the Raman backscattered light, in a 180 degrees backscatter configuration. An optical fiber, acting as the confocal pinhole for elimination of light from out-of-focus places, was coupled to a spectrometer that dispersed the collected light onto a sensitive array detector for rapid spectral data acquisition over a range from 2,890 to 3,590/cm(-1). Raman spectra were recorded from the anterior 100-150 microm of the cornea over a period before and after topical application of a mild dehydrating solution. The ratio between the amplitudes of the signals at 3,400/cm(-1) (OH-vibrational mode of water) and 2,940/cm(-1) (CH-vibrational mode of proteins) was used as a measure for corneal hydration. High signal-to-noise ratio (SNR = 25) Raman spectra were obtained from the human corneas by using 15 mJ of laser light energy. Qualitative changes in the hydration of the anteriormost part of the corneas could be observed as a result of the dehydrating agent. With adequate improvements in system safety, confocal Raman spectroscopy could potentially be applied clinically as a noninvasive tool for the assessment of corneal hydration in vivo.

  4. Applications of Raman Spectroscopy in Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing: A Short Review.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Kevin; Ryder, Alan G

    2017-06-01

    The production of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) is currently undergoing its biggest transformation in a century. The changes are based on the rapid and dramatic introduction of protein- and macromolecule-based drugs (collectively known as biopharmaceuticals) and can be traced back to the huge investment in biomedical science (in particular in genomics and proteomics) that has been ongoing since the 1970s. Biopharmaceuticals (or biologics) are manufactured using biological-expression systems (such as mammalian, bacterial, insect cells, etc.) and have spawned a large (>€35 billion sales annually in Europe) and growing biopharmaceutical industry (BioPharma). The structural and chemical complexity of biologics, combined with the intricacy of cell-based manufacturing, imposes a huge analytical burden to correctly characterize and quantify both processes (upstream) and products (downstream). In small molecule manufacturing, advances in analytical and computational methods have been extensively exploited to generate process analytical technologies (PAT) that are now used for routine process control, leading to more efficient processes and safer medicines. In the analytical domain, biologic manufacturing is considerably behind and there is both a huge scope and need to produce relevant PAT tools with which to better control processes, and better characterize product macromolecules. Raman spectroscopy, a vibrational spectroscopy with a number of useful properties (nondestructive, non-contact, robustness) has significant potential advantages in BioPharma. Key among them are intrinsically high molecular specificity, the ability to measure in water, the requirement for minimal (or no) sample pre-treatment, the flexibility of sampling configurations, and suitability for automation. Here, we review and discuss a representative selection of the more important Raman applications in BioPharma (with particular emphasis on mammalian cell culture). The review shows that

  5. Plasmonic nanostructures for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ruiqian

    In the last three decades, a large number of different plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention due to their unique optical properties. Those plasmonic nanostructures include nanoparticles, nanoholes and metal nanovoids. They have been widely utilized in optical devices and sensors. When the plasmonic nanostructures interact with the electromagnetic wave and their surface plasmon frequency match with the light frequency, the electrons in plasmonic nanostructures will resonate with the same oscillation as incident light. In this case, the plasmonic nanostructures can absorb light and enhance the light scattering. Therefore, the plasmonic nanostructures can be used as substrate for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to enhance the Raman signal. Using plasmonic nanostructures can significantly enhance Raman scattering of molecules with very low concentrations. In this thesis, two different plasmonic nanostructures Ag dendrites and Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles are investigated. Simple methods were used to produce these two plasmonic nanostructures. Then, their applications in surface enhanced Raman scattering have been explored. Ag dendrites were produced by galvanic replacement reaction, which was conducted using Ag nitrate aqueous solution and copper metal. Metal copper layer was deposited at the bottom side of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane. Silver wires formed inside AAO channels connected Ag nitrate on the top of AAO membrane and copper layer at the bottom side of AAO. Silver dendrites were formed on the top side of AAO. The second plasmonic nanostructure is Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles. They were fabricated by electroless plating (galvanic replacement) reaction in a silver plating solution. First, electrochemically evolved hydrogen bubbles were used as template through electroless deposition to produce hollow Au nanoparticles. Then, the Au nanoparticles were coated with Cu shells in a Cu plating solution. In the following step, a Ag

  6. Size dependent Raman and absorption studies of single walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by pulse laser deposition at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Saurabh; Singhal, Sonal; Vankar, V. D.; Shukla, A. K.

    2017-10-01

    In this article, size dependent correlation of acoustic states is established for radial breathing mode (RBM). Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are synthesized along with carbon encapsulated iron nanoparticles by pulse laser deposition at room temperature. Ferrocene is used as a catalyst for growth of SWCNTs. Various studies such as HR-TEM, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and NIR-Absorption spectroscopy are utilized to confirm the presence of SWCNTs in the as-synthesized and purified samples. RBM of SWCNTs can be differentiated here from Raman modes of carbon encapsulated iron nanoparticles by comparing their line shape asymmetry as well as oscillator strength. Furthermore, a quantum confinement model is proposed for RBM. It is invoked here that RBM is manifestation of quantum confinement of acoustic phonons. Well reported analytical relation of RBM is utilized to explore the nature of phonons responsible for RBM on the basis of quantum confinement model. Diameters of SWCNTs estimated by Raman studies are found to be in reasonably good agreement with that of NIR-absorption studies.

  7. Electromagnetic field enhancement effects in group IV semiconductor nanowires. A Raman spectroscopy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pura, J. L.; Anaya, J.; Souto, J.; Prieto, A. C.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, T.; Periwal, P.; Baron, T.; Jiménez, J.

    2018-03-01

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) are the building blocks of future nanoelectronic devices. Furthermore, their large refractive index and reduced dimension make them suitable for nanophotonics. The study of the interaction between nanowires and visible light reveals resonances that promise light absorption/scattering engineering for photonic applications. Micro-Raman spectroscopy has been used as a characterization tool for semiconductor nanowires. The light/nanowire interaction can be experimentally assessed through the micro-Raman spectra of individual nanowires. As compared to both metallic and dielectric nanowires, semiconductor nanowires add additional tools for photon engineering. In particular, one can grow heterostructured nanowires, both axial and radial, and also one could modulate the doping level and the surface condition among other factors than can affect the light/NW interaction. We present herein a study of the optical response of group IV semiconductor nanowires to visible photons. The study is experimentally carried out through micro-Raman spectroscopy of different group IV nanowires, both homogeneous and axially heterostructured (SiGe/Si). The results are analyzed in terms of the electromagnetic modelling of the light/nanowire interaction using finite element methods. The presence of axial heterostructures is shown to produce electromagnetic resonances promising new photon engineering capabilities of semiconductor nanowires.

  8. Determining conformational order and crystallinity in polycaprolactone via Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kotula, Anthony P.; Snyder, Chad R.; Migler, Kalman B.

    2017-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a popular method for non-invasive analysis of biomaterials containing polycaprolactone in applications such as tissue engineering and drug delivery. However there remain fundamental challenges in interpretation of such spectra in the context of existing dielectric spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry results in both the melt and semi-crystalline states. In this work, we develop a thermodynamically informed analysis method which utilizes basis spectra – ideal spectra of the polymer chain conformers comprising the measured Raman spectrum. In polycaprolactone we identify three basis spectra in the carbonyl region; measurement of their temperature dependence shows that one is linearly proportional to crystallinity, a second correlates with dipole-dipole interactions that are observed in dielectric spectroscopy and a third which correlates with amorphous chain behavior. For other spectral regions, e.g. C-COO stretch, a comparison of the basis spectra to those from density functional theory calculations in the all-trans configuration allows us to indicate whether sharp spectral peaks can be attributed to single chain modes in the all-trans state or to crystalline order. Our analysis method is general and should provide important insights to other polymeric materials. PMID:28824207

  9. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy detection of polybrominated diphenylethers using a portable Raman spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Lai, Yongchao; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Wei; Zhan, Jinhua

    2013-11-15

    Polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), one of the most common brominated flame retardants, are toxic and persistent, generally detected by the chromatographic method. In this work, qualitative and quantitative detection of PBDEs were explored based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique using a portable Raman spectrometer. Alkanethiol modified silver nanoparticle aggregates were used as the substrate and PBDEs could be pre-concentrated close to the substrate surface through their hydrophobic interactions with alkanethiol. The effect of alkanethiols with different chain length on the SERS detection of PBDEs was evaluated. It was shown that 1-hexanethiol (HT) modified substrate has higher sensitivity, good stability and reusability. Qualitative and quantitative SERS detection of PBDEs in real sea water was accomplished, with the measured detection limits at 1.2×10(2) μg L(-1). These results illustrate SERS could be used as an effective method for the detection of PBDEs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigation of Ferroelectric Domain Walls by Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Gregory A.

    Ferroelectric materials are characterized by an intrinsic spontaneous electric dipole moment that can be manipulated by the application of an electric field. Regions inside the crystal, known as domains, can have the spontaneous dipole moments oriented in a different direction than the surrounding crystal. Due to favorable piezoelectric, pyroelectric, electro-optic, and nonlinear optical properties, ferroelectric materials are attractive for commercial applications. Many devices, such as nonlinear frequency converters, require precisely engineered domain patterns. The properties of domains and their boundaries, known as domain walls, are vital to the performance and limitations of these devices. As a result, ferroelectric domains and the domain walls have been the focus of many scientific studies. Despite all this work, questions remain regarding their properties. This work is aimed at developing a better understanding of the properties of the domain wall using confocal Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra taken from domain walls in Lithium Niobate and Lithium Tantalate reveal two distinct changes in the Raman spectra: (1) Shifts in frequency of the bulk Raman modes, which persists over a range of 0.2-0.5 mu m from the domain wall. The absence of this effect in defect free stoichiometric Lithium Tantalate indicates that the shifts are related to defects inside the crystal. (2) The presence of Raman modes corresponding to phonons propagating orthogonal to the laser beam axis, which are not collected in the bulk crystal. The phonons also preferential propagate normal to the domain wall. These modes are detected up to 0.35 mum from the domain wall. The observation and separation of these effects was made possible by the optimized spatial resolution (0.23 mum) of a home-built scanning confocal microscope and the fact that degeneracy of the transverse and longitudinal phonon polarization is lifted by polar phonons in Lithium Niobate and Lithium Tantalate. Raman

  11. Transcutaneous Measurement of Blood Analyte Concentration Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Ishan; Singh, Gajendra P.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2008-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder, affecting nearly 200 million people worldwide. Acute complications, such as hypoglycemia, cardiovascular disease and retinal damage, may occur if the disease is not adequately controlled. As diabetes has no known cure, tight control of glucose levels is critical for the prevention of such complications. Given the necessity for regular monitoring of blood glucose, development of non-invasive glucose detection devices is essential to improve the quality of life in diabetic patients. The commercially available glucose sensors measure the interstitial fluid glucose by electrochemical detection. However, these sensors have severe limitations, primarily related to their invasive nature and lack of stability. This necessitates the development of a truly non-invasive glucose detection technique. NIR Raman Spectroscopy, which combines the substantial penetration depth of NIR light with the excellent chemical specificity of Raman spectroscopy, provides an excellent tool to meet the challenges involved. Additionally, it enables simultaneous determination of multiple blood analytes. Our laboratory has pioneered the use of Raman spectroscopy for blood analytes' detection in biological media. The preliminary success of our non-invasive glucose measurements both in vitro (such as in serum and blood) and in vivo has provided the foundation for the development of feasible clinical systems. However, successful application of this technology still faces a few hurdles, highlighted by the problems of tissue luminescence and selection of appropriate reference concentration. In this article we explore possible avenues to overcome these challenges so that prospective prediction accuracy of blood analytes can be brought to clinically acceptable levels.

  12. Spectroscopic characterization of biological agents using FTIR, normal Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Pineda, Tatiana; Soto-Feliciano, Kristina; De La Cruz-Montoya, Edwin; Pacheco Londoño, Leonardo C.; Ríos-Velázquez, Carlos; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2007-04-01

    FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) requires a minimum of sample allows fast identification of microorganisms. The use of this technique for characterizing the spectroscopic signatures of these agents and their stimulants has recently gained considerable attention due to the fact that these techniques can be easily adapted for standoff detection from considerable distances. The techniques also show high sensitivity and selectivity and offer near real time detection duty cycles. This research focuses in laying the grounds for the spectroscopic differentiation of Staphylococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp., Salmonella spp., Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and E. coli, together with identification of their subspecies. In order to achieve the proponed objective, protocols to handle, cultivate and analyze the strains have been developed. Spectroscopic similarities and marked differences have been found for Spontaneous or Normal Raman spectra and for SERS using silver nanoparticles have been found. The use of principal component analysis (PCA), discriminate factor analysis (DFA) and a cluster analysis were used to evaluate the efficacy of identifying potential threat bacterial from their spectra collected on single bacteria. The DFA from the bacteria Raman spectra show a little discrimination between the diverse bacterial species however the results obtained from the SERS demonstrate to be high discrimination technique. The spectroscopic study will be extended to examine the spores produced by selected strains since these are more prone to be used as Biological Warfare Agents due to their increased mobility and possibility of airborne transport. Micro infrared spectroscopy as well as fiber coupled FTIR will also be used as possible sensors of target compounds.

  13. Near-infrared-excited confocal Raman spectroscopy advances in vivo diagnosis of cervical precancer.

    PubMed

    Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Ng, Joseph; Low, Jeffrey J H; Ilancheran, Arunachalam; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a unique optical technique that can probe the changes of vibrational modes of biomolecules associated with tissue premalignant transformation. This study evaluates the clinical utility of confocal Raman spectroscopy over near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence (AF) spectroscopy and composite NIR AF/Raman spectroscopy for improving early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo at colposcopy. A rapid NIR Raman system coupled with a ball-lens fiber-optic confocal Raman probe was utilized for in vivo NIR AF/Raman spectral measurements of the cervix. A total of 1240 in vivo Raman spectra [normal (n=993), dysplasia (n=247)] were acquired from 84 cervical patients. Principal components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) together with a leave-one-patient-out, cross-validation method were used to extract the diagnostic information associated with distinctive spectroscopic modalities. The diagnostic ability of confocal Raman spectroscopy was evaluated using the PCA-LDA model developed from the significant principal components (PCs) [i.e., PC4, 0.0023%; PC5, 0.00095%; PC8, 0.00022%, (p<0.05)], representing the primary tissue Raman features (e.g., 854, 937, 1095, 1253, 1311, 1445, and 1654 cm(-1)). Confocal Raman spectroscopy coupled with PCA-LDA modeling yielded the diagnostic accuracy of 84.1% (a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 87.1%) for in vivo discrimination of dysplastic cervix. The receiver operating characteristic curves further confirmed that the best classification was achieved using confocal Raman spectroscopy compared to the composite NIR AF/Raman spectroscopy or NIR AF spectroscopy alone. This study illustrates that confocal Raman spectroscopy has great potential to improve early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo during clinical colposcopy.

  14. Vibrational structure of the S 2 (1B u) excited state of diphenyloctatetraene observed by femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukura, Philipp; McCamant, David W.; Davis, Paul H.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2003-11-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is used to study the vibrational structure and dynamics of the S 2 state of diphenyloctatetraene. Strong vibrational features at 1184, 1259 and 1578 cm -1 whose linewidths are determined by the S 2 electronic lifetime are observed at early times after photoexcitation at 397 nm. Kinetic analysis of the integrated Raman intensities as well as the transient absorption reveals an exponential decay of the S 2 state on the order of 100 fs. These results demonstrate the ability of FSRS to study the vibrational structure of excited state and chemical reaction dynamics on the femtosecond timescale.

  15. Ultrasensitive detection of phenolic antioxidants by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornelas-Soto, N.; Aguilar-Hernández, I. A.; Afseth, N.; López-Luke, T.; Contreras-Torres, F. F.; Wold, J. P.

    2017-08-01

    Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful surface-sensitive technique to study the vibrational properties of analytes at very low concentrations. In this study, ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid and sinapic acid were analyzed by SERS using Ag colloids. Analytes were detected up to 2.5x10-9M. For caffeic acid and coumaric acid, this detection limit has been reached for the first time, as well as the SERS analysis of sinapic acid using silver colloids.

  16. Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensors on Raman and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiangcai; Lin, Weihua; Cao, En; Xu, Xuefeng; Liang, Wenjie; Zhang, Xiaofang

    2017-01-01

    The performance of chemical reactions has been enhanced immensely with surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based sensors. In this review, the principle and application of SPR sensors are introduced and summarized thoroughly. We introduce the mechanism of the SPR sensors and present a thorough summary about the optical design, including the substrate and excitation modes of the surface plasmons. Additionally, the applications based on SPR sensors are described by the Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy in plasmon-driven surface catalytic reactions and the measurement of refractive index sensing, especially. PMID:29212139

  17. Transcutaneous monitoring of steroid-induced osteoporosis with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Jason R.; Inzana, Jason; Takahata, Masahiko; Awad, Hani A.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Although glucocorticoids are among the most frequently prescribed anti-inflammatory agents used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, extended exposure to this steroid hormone is the leading cause of iatrogenic osteoporosis. Recently, Raman spectroscopy has been utilized to exploit biochemical differences between osteoporotic and normal bones in order to predict fracture risk. In this presentation, we report the results of ongoing research in our laboratory towards the clinical translation of this technique. We will discuss strategies for the transcutaneous acquisition of spectra from the tibiae of mice that are of sufficient quality to generate accurate predictions of fracture risk.

  18. Raman spectroscopy for the control of the atmospheric bioindicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, E. V.; Timchenko, P. E.; Shamina, L. A.; Zherdeva, L. A.

    2015-09-01

    Experimental studies of optical parameters of different atmospheric bioindicators (arboreous and terricolous types of plants) have been performed with Raman spectroscopy. The change in the optical parameters has been explored for the objects under direct light exposure, as well as for the objects placed in the shade. The age peculiarities of the bioindicators have also been taken into consideration. It was established that the statistical variability of optical parameters for arboreous bioindicators was from 9% to 15% and for plants from 4% to 8.7%. On the basis of these results dandelion (Taraxacum) was chosen as a bioindicator of atmospheric emissions.

  19. UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy of amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhl, Martin; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Schmitt, Heike; Lenarz, Thomas; Morgner, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Resonant enhancement of Raman signals is a useful method to increase sensitivity in samples with low concentration such as biological tissue. The investigation of resonance profiles shows the optimal excitation wavelength and yields valuable information about the molecules themselves. However careful characterization and calibration of all experimental parameters affecting quantum yield is required in order to achieve comparability of the single spectra recorded. We present an experimental technique for measuring the resonance profiles of different amino acids. The absorption lines of these molecules are located in the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range. One limitation for broadband measurement of resonance profiles is the limited availability of Raman filters in certain regions of the UV for blocking the Rayleigh scattered light. Here, a wavelength range from 244.8 nm to 266.0 nm was chosen. The profiles reveal the optimal wavelength for recording the Raman spectra of amino acids in aqueous solutions in this range. This study provides the basis for measurements on more complex molecules such as proteins in the human perilymph. The composition of this liquid in the inner ear is essential for hearing and cannot be analyzed non-invasively so far. The long term aim is to implement this technique as a fiber based endoscope for non-invasive measurements during surgeries (e. g. cochlear implants) making it available as a diagnostic tool for physicians. This project is embedded in the interdisciplinary cluster of excellence "Hearing for all" (H4A).

  20. Combination of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy for multivariate classification of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, D.; Mazura, M.; Samek, O.; Rebrošová, K.; Pořízka, P.; Klus, J.; Prochazková, P.; Novotný, J.; Novotný, K.; Kaiser, J.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the impact of data provided by complementary laser-based spectroscopic methods on multivariate classification accuracy. Discrimination and classification of five Staphylococcus bacterial strains and one strain of Escherichia coli is presented. The technique that we used for measurements is a combination of Raman spectroscopy and Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). Obtained spectroscopic data were then processed using Multivariate Data Analysis algorithms. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was selected as the most suitable technique for visualization of bacterial strains data. To classify the bacterial strains, we used Neural Networks, namely a supervised version of Kohonen's self-organizing maps (SOM). We were processing results in three different ways - separately from LIBS measurements, from Raman measurements, and we also merged data from both mentioned methods. The three types of results were then compared. By applying the PCA to Raman spectroscopy data, we observed that two bacterial strains were fully distinguished from the rest of the data set. In the case of LIBS data, three bacterial strains were fully discriminated. Using a combination of data from both methods, we achieved the complete discrimination of all bacterial strains. All the data were classified with a high success rate using SOM algorithm. The most accurate classification was obtained using a combination of data from both techniques. The classification accuracy varied, depending on specific samples and techniques. As for LIBS, the classification accuracy ranged from 45% to 100%, as for Raman Spectroscopy from 50% to 100% and in case of merged data, all samples were classified correctly. Based on the results of the experiments presented in this work, we can assume that the combination of Raman spectroscopy and LIBS significantly enhances discrimination and classification accuracy of bacterial species and strains. The reason is the complementarity in

  1. Raman spectroscopy as a process analytical technology for pharmaceutical manufacturing and bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Esmonde-White, Karen A; Cuellar, Maryann; Uerpmann, Carsten; Lenain, Bruno; Lewis, Ian R

    2017-01-01

    Adoption of Quality by Design (QbD) principles, regulatory support of QbD, process analytical technology (PAT), and continuous manufacturing are major factors effecting new approaches to pharmaceutical manufacturing and bioprocessing. In this review, we highlight new technology developments, data analysis models, and applications of Raman spectroscopy, which have expanded the scope of Raman spectroscopy as a process analytical technology. Emerging technologies such as transmission and enhanced reflection Raman, and new approaches to using available technologies, expand the scope of Raman spectroscopy in pharmaceutical manufacturing, and now Raman spectroscopy is successfully integrated into real-time release testing, continuous manufacturing, and statistical process control. Since the last major review of Raman as a pharmaceutical PAT in 2010, many new Raman applications in bioprocessing have emerged. Exciting reports of in situ Raman spectroscopy in bioprocesses complement a growing scientific field of biological and biomedical Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy has made a positive impact as a process analytical and control tool for pharmaceutical manufacturing and bioprocessing, with demonstrated scientific and financial benefits throughout a product's lifecycle.

  2. In vivo Raman spectroscopy for oral cancers diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Deshmukh, Atul; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Krishna, C. Murali

    2012-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is sixth among the major malignancies worldwide. Tobacco habits are known as major causative factor in tumor carcinogenesis in oral cancer. Optical spectroscopy methods, including Raman, are being actively pursued as alternative/adjunct for cancer diagnosis. Earlier studies have demonstrated the feasibility of classifying normal, premalignant and malignant oral ex-vivo tissues. In the present study we have recorded in vivo spectra from contralateral normal and diseased sites of 50 subjects with pathologically confirmed lesions of buccal mucosa using fiber-optic-probe-coupled HE-785 Raman spectrometer. Spectra were recorded on similar points as per teeth positions with an average acquisition time of 8 seconds. A total of 215 and 225 spectra from normal and tumor sites, respectively, were recorded. Finger print region (1200-1800 cm-1) was utilized for classification using LDA. Standard-model was developed using 125 normal and 139 tumor spectra from 27 subjects. Two separate clusters with an efficiency of ~95% were obtained. Cross-validation with leave-one-out yielded ~90% efficiency. Remaining 90 normal and 86 tumor spectra were used as test data and predication efficiency of model was evaluated. Findings of the study indicate that Raman spectroscopic methods in combination with appropriate multivariate tool can be used for objective, noninvasive and rapid diagnosis.

  3. Identification of microbial pigments in evaporitic matrices using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vítek, Petr; Jehlička, Jan; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Wierzchos, Jacek

    2010-05-01

    An evaporitic environment is considered as one of the possible habitats for life on Mars. From terrestrial geological scenarios we know that microorganisms inhabiting such an extreme environment (halophiles) are rich in protective pigments, depending on the metabolic pathways and specific adaptation to the harsh environmental conditions. Carotenoids typically occur within the cells of halophiles (bacteria, archaea as well as eukaryotic algae) in large amounts as part of their photosystem and protective adaptation to high doses of UV radiation that are typical for most recent evaporitic environments. Chlorophyll occurs in halophilic cyanobacteria together with carotenoids and possibly other pigments which are synthetised in response to the high UV radiation insolation. Here we present the results of Raman spectroscopic investigations of a) beta-carotene in experimentally prepared mixtures with halite, gypsum and epsomite; and b) cyanobacterial colonies inhabiting real halite and gypsum matrices in the Atacama Desert. Our results demonstrate the possibility of detection of beta-carotene - a typical carotenoid - in relatively low concentrations within the evaporitic powdered mixtures; the lowest concentration of carotenoid signal detected was 0,1 mg kg-1, which represents 100 ppb. Raman spectroscopic analyses of natural specimens (endolithic cyanobacteria) from the Atacama desert revealed the presence of scytonemin, an extremely efficient UV protective pigment, carotenoids of various types and chlorophyll. The detection potential as well as limitations of Raman spectroscopy as a part of a payload within future robotic space missions focused on the search for life on Mars is discussed.

  4. Cryoprotectant redistribution along the frozen straw probed by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karpegina, Yu A; Okotrub, K A; Brusentsev, E Yu; Amstislavsky, S Ya; Surovtsev, N V

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of cryoprotectant (10% glycerol) and ice along the frozen plastic straw (the most useful container for freezing mammalian semen, oocytes and embryos) was studied by Raman scattering technique. Raman spectroscopy being a contactless, non-invasive tool was applied for the straws filled with the cryoprotectant solution and frozen by controlled rate programs commonly used for mammalian embryos freezing. Analysis of Raman spectra measured at different points along the straw reveals a non-uniform distribution of the cryoprotectant. The ratio between non-crystalline solution and ice was found to be increased by several times at the bottom side of the solution column frozen by the standard freezing program. The increase of the cryoprotectant fraction occurs in the area where embryos or oocytes are normally placed during their freezing. Possible effects of the cooling rate and the ice nucleation temperature on the cryoprotectant fraction at the bottom side of the solution column were considered. Our findings highlight that the ice fraction around cryopreserved embryos or oocytes can differ significantly from the averaged one in the frozen plastic straws. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Water monitoring by optofluidic Raman spectroscopy for in situ applications.

    PubMed

    Persichetti, Gianluca; Bernini, Romeo

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of water monitoring by Raman spectroscopy with a portable optofluidic system for in-situ applications has been successfully demonstrated. In the proposed approach, the sample under analysis is injected into a capillary nozzle in order to produce a liquid jet that acts as an optical waveguide. This jet waveguide provides an effective strategy to excite and collect the Raman signals arising from water contaminants due to the high refractive index difference between air and water. The proposed approach avoids any necessity of liquid container or flow cell and removes any background signal coming from the sample container commonly affects Raman measurements. Furthermore, this absence is a significant advantage for in situ measurements where fouling problems can be relevant and cleaning procedures are troublesome. The extreme simplicity and efficiency of the optical scheme adopted in our approach result in highly sensitive and rapid measurements that have been performed on different representative water pollutants. The experimental results demonstrate the high potentiality of our device in water quality monitoring and analysis. In particular, nitrate and sulfate are detected below the maximum contamination level allowed for drinking water, whereas a limit of detection of 40mg/l has been found for benzene. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Terahertz mechanical vibrations in lysozyme: Raman spectroscopy vs modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Piana, Gianfranco; Bassani, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    The mechanical behaviour of proteins is receiving an increasing attention from the scientific community. Recently it has been suggested that mechanical vibrations play a crucial role in controlling structural configuration changes (folding) which govern proteins biological function. The mechanism behind protein folding is still not completely understood, and many efforts are being made to investigate this phenomenon. Complex molecular dynamics simulations and sophisticated experimental measurements are conducted to investigate protein dynamics and to perform protein structure predictions; however, these are two related, although quite distinct, approaches. Here we investigate mechanical vibrations of lysozyme by Raman spectroscopy and linear normal mode calculations (modal analysis). The input mechanical parameters to the numerical computations are taken from the literature. We first give an estimate of the order of magnitude of protein vibration frequencies by considering both classical wave mechanics and structural dynamics formulas. Afterwards, we perform modal analyses of some relevant chemical groups and of the full lysozyme protein. The numerical results are compared to experimental data, obtained from both in-house and literature Raman measurements. In particular, the attention is focused on a large peak at 0.84 THz (29.3 cm-1) in the Raman spectrum obtained analyzing a lyophilized powder sample.

  7. Detection of Scopolamine Hydrobromide via Surface-enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lin; Sha, Xuan-Yu; Zhao, Hang; Han, Si-Qin-Gao-Wa; Hasi, Wu-Li-Ji

    2017-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was used to measure scopolamine hydrobromide. First, the Raman characteristic peaks of scopolamine hydrobromide were assigned, and the characteristic peaks were determined. The optimal aggregation agent was potassium iodide based on a comparative experimental study. Finally, the SERS spectrum of scopolamine hydrobromide was detected in aqueous solution, and the semi-quantitative analysis and the recovery rate were determined via a linear fitting. The detection limit of scopolamine hydrobromide in aqueous solution was 0.5 μg/mL. From 0 - 10 μg/mL, the curve of the intensity of the Raman characteristic peak of scopolamine hydrobromide at 1002 cm -1 is y = 4017.76 + 642.47x. The correlation coefficient was R 2 = 0.983, the recovery was 98.5 - 109.7%, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was about 5.5%. This method is fast, accurate, non-destructive and simple for the detection of scopolamine hydrobromide.

  8. A novel extremophile strategy studied by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Howell G. M.

    2007-12-01

    A case is made for the classification of the colonisation by Dirina massiliensis forma sorediata of pigments on ancient wall-paintings as extremophilic behaviour. The lichen encrustations studied using FT-Raman spectroscopy have yielded important molecular information which has assisted in the identification of the survival strategy of the organism in the presence of significant levels of heavy metal toxins. The production of a carotenoid, probably astaxanthin, at the surface of the lichen thalli is identified from its characteristic biomolecular signatures in the Raman spectrum, whereas the presence of calcium oxalate dihydrate (weddellite) has been identified at both the upper and lower surfaces of the thalli and in core samples taken from depths of up to 10 mm through the encrustation into the rock substrate. The latter observation explains the significant disintegrative biodeteriorative effect of the colonisation upon the integrity of the wall-paintings and can be used to direct conservatorial and preservation efforts of the art work. A surprising result proved to be the absence of Raman spectroscopic evidence for the complexation of the metal pigments by the oxalic acid produced by the metabolic action of the organisms, unlike several cases that have been reported in the literature.

  9. Surface-sensitive Raman spectroscopy of collagen I fibrils.

    PubMed

    Gullekson, Corinne; Lucas, Leanne; Hewitt, Kevin; Kreplak, Laurent

    2011-04-06

    Collagen fibrils are the main constituent of the extracellular matrix surrounding eukaryotic cells. Although the assembly and structure of collagen fibrils is well characterized, very little appears to be known about one of the key determinants of their biological function-namely, the physico-chemical properties of their surface. One way to obtain surface-sensitive structural and chemical data is to take advantage of the near-field nature of surface- and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Using Ag and Au nanoparticles bound to Collagen type-I fibrils, as well as tips coated with a thin layer of Ag, we obtained Raman spectra characteristic to the first layer of collagen molecules at the surface of the fibrils. The most frequent Raman peaks were attributed to aromatic residues such as phenylalanine and tyrosine. In several instances, we also observed Amide I bands with a full width at half-maximum of 10-30 cm(-1). The assignment of these Amide I band positions suggests the presence of 3(10)-helices as well as α- and β-sheets at the fibril's surface. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Feasibility of Raman spectroscopy as PAT tool in active coating.

    PubMed

    Müller, Joshua; Knop, Klaus; Thies, Jochen; Uerpmann, Carsten; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Active coating is a specific application of film coating where the active ingredient is comprised in the coating layer. This implementation is a challenging operation regarding the achievement of desired amount of coating and coating uniformity. To guarantee the quality of such dosage forms it is desirable to develop a tool that is able to monitor the coating operation and detect the end of the process. Coating experiments were performed at which the model drug diprophylline is coated in a pan coater on placebo tablets and tablets containing the active ingredient itself. During the active coating Raman spectra were recorded in-line. The spectral measurements were correlated with the average weight gain and the amount of coated active ingredient at each time point. The developed chemometric model was tested by monitoring further coated batches. Furthermore, the effects of pan rotation speed and working distance on the acquired Raman signal and, hence, resulting effect of the chemometric model were examined. Besides coating on placebo cores it was possible to determine the amount of active ingredient in the film when coated onto cores containing the same active ingredient. In addition, the method is even applicable when varying the process parameters and measurement conditions within a restricted range. Raman spectroscopy is an appropriate process analytical technology too.

  11. Plasmon-Induced Magnetic Resonance Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu; Zhang, Yuejiao; Shih, Tien-Mo; Yang, Weimin; Hu, Shu; Hu, Xiaoyan; Li, Jianfeng; Ren, Bin; Mao, Bingwei; Yang, Zhilin; Tian, Zhongqun

    2018-04-11

    Plasmon-induced magnetic resonance has shown great potentials in optical metamaterials, chemical (bio)-sensing, and surface-enhanced spectroscopies. Here, we have theoretically and experimentally revealed (1) a correspondence of the strongest near-field response to the far-field scattering valley and (2) a significant improvement in Raman signals of probing molecules by the plasmon-induced magnetic resonance. These revelations are accomplished by designing a simple and practical metallic nanoparticle-film plasmonic system that generates magnetic resonances at visible-near-infrared frequencies. Our work may provide new insights for understanding the enhancement mechanism of various plasmon-enhanced spectroscopies and also helps further explore light-matter interactions at the nanoscale.

  12. Characterization of Uranium Ore Concentrate Chemical Composition via Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yin-Fong; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Sweet, Lucas E.

    Uranium Ore Concentrate (UOC, often called yellowcake) is a generic term that describes the initial product resulting from the mining and subsequent milling of uranium ores en route to production of the U-compounds used in the fuel cycle. Depending on the mine, the ore, the chemical process, and the treatment parameters, UOC composition can vary greatly. With the recent advent of handheld spectrometers, we have chosen to investigate whether either commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) handheld devices or laboratory-grade Raman instruments might be able to i) identify UOC materials, and ii) differentiate UOC samples based on chemical composition and thus suggest themore » mining or milling process. Twenty-eight UOC samples were analyzed via FT-Raman spectroscopy using both 1064 nm and 785 nm excitation wavelengths. These data were also compared with results from a newly developed handheld COTS Raman spectrometer using a technique that lowers background fluorescence signal. Initial chemometric analysis was able to differentiate UOC samples based on mine location. Additional compositional information was obtained from the samples by performing XRD analysis on a subset of samples. The compositional information was integrated with chemometric analysis of the spectroscopic dataset allowing confirmation that class identification is possible based on compositional differences between the UOC samples, typically involving species such as U3O8, α-UO2(OH)2, UO4•2H2O (metastudtite), K(UO2)2O3, etc. While there are clearly excitation λ sensitivities, especially for dark samples, Raman analysis coupled with chemometric data treatment can nicely differentiate UOC samples based on composition and even mine origin.« less

  13. THE ROLE OF RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY IN THE ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY OF POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in instrumentation are making Raman spectroscopy the tool of choice for an increasing number of chemical applications. For example, many recalcitrant industrial-process monitoring problems have been solved in recent years with in-line Raman spectrometers. Raman is attr...

  14. THE ROLE OF RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY IN THE ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY OF POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in instrumentation are making Raman spectroscopy the tool of choice for an increasing number of chemical applications. For example, many recalcitrant industrial process monitoring problems have been solved in recent years with in-line Raman spectrometers. Raman is attr...

  15. Dielectric and Raman spectroscopy of TlSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozel, Aysen E.; Deger, Deniz; Celik, Sefa; Yakut, Sahin; Karabak, Binnur; Akyüz, Sevim; Ulutas, Kemal

    2017-12-01

    In this report, the results of Dielectric and Raman spectroscopy of TlSe thin films are presented. The films were deposited in different thicknesses ranging from 290 Å to 3200 Å by thermal evaporation method. The relative permittivity (dielectric constant εr‧) and dielectric loss (εr″) of TlSe thin films were calculated by measuring capacitance (C) and dielectric loss factor (tan δ) in the frequencies ranging between 10-2 Hz-107 Hz and in the temperature ranging between 173 K and 433 K. In the given intervals, both the dielectric constant and the dielectric loss of TlSe thin films decrease with increasing frequency, but increase with increasing temperature. This behavior can be explained as multicomponent polarization in the structure. The ac conductivity obeys the ωs law when s (s < 1). The dielectric constant of TlSe thin films is determined from Dielectric and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The results obtained by two different methods are in agreement with each other.

  16. Raman Spectroscopy of Poly-Urea Formaldehyde Microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espino, Omar; Chipara, Dorina; Chipara, Mircea; Martinez, Melissa

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this research project was to add self-healing capabilities to polymeric nanocomposites. We used the ``classical'' method to obtain self-healing polymers with the addition of TiO2 nanoparticles in the self-healing system. Self-healing polymers are obtained by dispersion of first generation Grubbs catalysts and microcapsules filled with monomers (typically DCPD). These kind of ``smart materials'' are able to survive to high mechanical stress via the ignition of the so called ``autonomous self-healing mechanism'' which is actually a ring opening methatesis polymerization (ROMP) reaction triggered by mechanical stresses in excess over a threshold limit through the rupture of microcapsules and the release of the monomeric content. As a preliminary step for adding self-healing capabilities in nanocomposites, the synthesis of microcapsules filled with dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) is vital for the addition of self-healing capabilities to polymeric matrices. We synthesized polyurea-formaldehyde (PUF) microcapsules filled with monomer (DCPD) using the in-situ polymerization. The synthesis was monitored by Raman spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and pH measurements that has been extensively used as a non-invasive techniques in the characterization of polymers and monitoring of organic reactions. The goal of this research was to assess the formation of the microcapsules during synthesis and the presence of the DCPD in the microcapsules. Samples were taken during the synthesis every 30 minutes and analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, and optical microscopy keeping a control over the pH of the solution.

  17. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of solid particles.

    PubMed

    Rkiouak, L; Tang, M J; Camp, J C J; McGregor, J; Watson, I M; Cox, R A; Kalberer, M; Ward, A D; Pope, F D

    2014-06-21

    The heterogeneous interactions of gas molecules on solid particles are crucial in many areas of science, engineering and technology. Such interactions play a critical role in atmospheric chemistry and in heterogeneous catalysis, a key technology in the energy and chemical industries. Investigating heterogeneous interactions upon single levitated particles can provide significant insight into these important processes. Various methodologies exist for levitating micron sized particles including: optical, electrical and acoustic techniques. Prior to this study, the optical levitation of solid micron scale particles has proved difficult to achieve over timescales relevant to the above applications. In this work, a new vertically configured counter propagating dual beam optical trap was optimized to levitate a range of solid particles in air. Silica (SiO2), α-alumina (Al2O3), titania (TiO2) and polystyrene were stably trapped with a high trapping efficiency (Q = 0.42). The longest stable trapping experiment was conducted continuously for 24 hours, and there are no obvious constraints on trapping time beyond this period. Therefore, the methodology described in this paper should be of major benefit to various research communities. The strength of the new technique is demonstrated by the simultaneous levitation and spectroscopic interrogation of silica particles by Raman spectroscopy. In particular, the adsorption of water upon silica was investigated under controlled relative humidity environments. Furthermore, the collision and coagulation behaviour of silica particles with microdroplets of sulphuric acid was followed using both optical imaging and Raman spectroscopy.

  18. UV photostability of insect repellents evaluated through Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bório, Viviane G.; Fernandes, Adjaci U.; Silveira, Landulfo

    2016-02-01

    The use of insect repellents either indoors or at places with incidence of solar radiation has been common due to dengue epidemics in Brazil. The lack of studies on the photostability of these substances has motivated this study, where the main goal was to verify the photostability and photodegradation of some of the commercially insect repellents available under the simulated ultraviolet (UV) radiation, by evaluating the molecular changes using dispersive Raman spectroscopy (830 nm excitation). A laboratory-made chamber was used for irradiating the repellents, where UV-A + UV-B radiations (UV-A: 5.5 mW/cm2 and UV-B 1.5 mW/cm2) can be obtained. The chamber internal temperature did not exceed 31 °C during experiments. The compounds n,n-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET), IR-3535, andiroba and citronella oils, used as active ingredients in insect repellents, and commercial formula containing DEET (14.5% in ethanol and isopropyl myristate) and IR-3535 (16% in carbopol) were continuously irradiated for 8 h. The Raman spectrum of each sample was obtained before and after UV exposure. The compounds and the commercial formula containing IR-3535 showed photo-stability when irradiated, since no changes in the peaks were found. The commercial formula containing DEET showed spectral decrease at 524, 690, 1003 and 1606 cm-1, assigned to the DEET, and increase at 884 cm-1, assigned to the ethanol. These results indicate that the excipient could influence the photostability of the active ingredient. The Raman spectroscopy can be suitable to monitor the photodegradation under UV irradiation rapidly and reliably.

  19. Cytochrome c at charged interfaces studied by resonance Raman and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, Peter

    1991-05-01

    The effect of electrostatic fields on the structure of cytochrome c bound to charged interfaces was studied by resonance Raman and surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy. Binding of this heme protein to the Ag electrode or heteropolytungstates which may be regarded as simple model systems for biological interfaces establishes an equilibrium between two conformational states (I II). In state I the structure and the redox potential are the same as for the uncomplexed cytochrome c. In state II however the heme pocket assumes an open structure and the axial iron Met80 bond is weakened leading to thennal coordination equilibrium between the fivecoordinated high spin and the sixcoordinated low spin configuration. These structural changes are accompanied by a decrease of the redox potential by 420 mV. The structural rearrangement of the heme pocket in state II is presumably initiated by the dissociation of the internal salt bridge of Lys13 due to electrostatic interactions with the negatively charged surfaces of the model systems. From detailed Raman spectroscopic studies characteristic spectral properties of the states I and II were identified. Based on these findings the interactions of cytochrome c with phospholipid vesicles as well as with its physiological reaction partner cytocbrome c oxidase were analysed. A systematic study of the cytochmme c/phospholipid system by varying the lipid composition and the temperature revealed mutual structural changes in both the lipid and the protein structure.

  20. Noninvasive authentication of pharmaceutical products through packaging using spatially offset Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Charlotte; Matousek, Pavel

    2007-02-15

    We demonstrate the use of spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) in the identification of counterfeit pharmaceutical tablets and capsules through different types of packaging. The technique offers a substantially higher sensitivity than that available from conventional backscattering Raman spectroscopy. The approach is particularly beneficial in situations where the conventional Raman backscattering method is hampered or fails because of excessive surface Raman or fluorescence signals emanating from the packaging, capsule shell, or tablet coating contaminating the much weaker subsurface Raman signals of the active pharmaceutical ingredients and excipients held in the product. It is demonstrated that such interfering signals can be effectively suppressed by SORS.

  1. Evaluation of bone quality in osteoporosis model mice by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, Yasumitsu; Oshima, Yusuke; Imai, Yuuki; Iimura, Tadahiro; Takanezawa, Sota; Hino, Kazunori; Miura, Hiromasa

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the bone quality in the osteoporosis, we generated sciatic nerve resection (NX) mice as an osteoporosis model and analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra were measured in anterior cortical surface of the proximal tibia at 5 points in each bone. After that, the samples were fixed with 70% ethanol. We then performed DXA and μCT measurement. Raman peak intensity ratios were significantly different between NX and Control. Those changes in the Raman peak intensity ratios may reflect loss of bone quality in the osteoporosis model. Raman spectroscopy is a promising technique for measuring the bone quality and bone strength.

  2. [Application of Raman Spectroscopy Technique to Agricultural Products Quality and Safety Determination].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-de; Jin, Tan-tan

    2015-09-01

    The quality and safety of agricultural products and people health are inseparable. Using the conventional chemical methods which have so many defects, such as sample pretreatment, complicated operation process and destroying the samples. Raman spectroscopy as a powerful tool of analysing and testing molecular structure, can implement samples quickly without damage, qualitative and quantitative detection analysis. With the continuous improvement and the scope of the application of Raman spectroscopy technology gradually widen, Raman spectroscopy technique plays an important role in agricultural products quality and safety determination, and has wide application prospects. There have been a lot of related research reports based on Raman spectroscopy detection on agricultural product quality safety at present. For the understanding of the principle of detection and the current development situation of Raman spectroscopy, as well as tracking the latest research progress both at home and abroad, the basic principles and the development of Raman spectroscopy as well as the detection device were introduced briefly. The latest research progress of quality and safety determination in fruits and vegetables, livestock and grain by Raman spectroscopy technique were reviewed deeply. Its technical problems for agricultural products quality and safety determination were pointed out. In addition, the text also briefly introduces some information of Raman spectrometer and the application for patent of the portable Raman spectrometer, prospects the future research and application.

  3. Integrated Raman spectroscopy and trimodal wide-field imaging techniques for real-time in vivo tissue Raman measurements at endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiwei; Teh, Seng Khoon; Zheng, Wei; Mo, Jianhua; Lin, Kan; Shao, Xiaozhuo; Ho, Khek Yu; Teh, Ming; Yeoh, Khay Guan

    2009-03-15

    We report an integrated Raman spectroscopy and trimodal (white-light reflectance, autofluorescence, and narrow-band) imaging techniques for real-time in vivo tissue Raman measurements at endoscopy. A special 1.8 mm endoscopic Raman probe with filtering modules is developed, permitting effective elimination of interference of fluorescence background and silica Raman in fibers while maximizing tissue Raman collections. We demonstrate that high-quality in vivo Raman spectra of upper gastrointestinal tract can be acquired within 1 s or subseconds under the guidance of wide-field endoscopic imaging modalities, greatly facilitating the adoption of Raman spectroscopy into clinical research and practice during routine endoscopic inspections.

  4. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy: A review of recent applications in forensic science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fikiet, Marisia A.; Khandasammy, Shelby R.; Mistek, Ewelina; Ahmed, Yasmine; Halámková, Lenka; Bueno, Justin; Lednev, Igor K.

    2018-05-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy has many advantages over its parent technique of Raman spectroscopy. Some of these advantages such as increased sensitivity and selectivity and therefore the possibility of small sample sizes and detection of small concentrations are invaluable in the field of forensics. A variety of new SERS surfaces and novel approaches are presented here on a wide range of forensically relevant topics.

  5. The 14th Annual James L. Waters Symposium at Pittcon: Raman Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy was the main topic of the 14th Annual James L. Waters Symposium, which was held in March 2003 at Pittcon. The development of the enabling technologies that have made Raman spectroscopy a routine analysis tool in many laboratories worldwide is discussed.

  6. Detecting Kerogen as a Biosignature Using Colocated UV Time-Gated Raman and Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shkolyar, Svetlana; Eshelman, Evan J; Farmer, Jack D; Hamilton, David; Daly, Michael G; Youngbull, Cody

    2018-04-01

    The Mars 2020 mission will analyze samples in situ and identify any that could have preserved biosignatures in ancient habitable environments for later return to Earth. Highest priority targeted samples include aqueously formed sedimentary lithologies. On Earth, such lithologies can contain fossil biosignatures as aromatic carbon (kerogen). In this study, we analyzed nonextracted kerogen in a diverse suite of natural, complex samples using colocated UV excitation (266 nm) time-gated (UV-TG) Raman and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopies. We interrogated kerogen and its host matrix in samples to (1) explore the capabilities of UV-TG Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies for detecting kerogen in high-priority targets in the search for possible biosignatures on Mars; (2) assess the effectiveness of time gating and UV laser wavelength in reducing fluorescence in Raman spectra; and (3) identify sample-specific issues that could challenge rover-based identifications of kerogen using UV-TG Raman spectroscopy. We found that ungated UV Raman spectroscopy is suited to identify diagnostic kerogen Raman bands without interfering fluorescence and that UV fluorescence spectroscopy is suited to identify kerogen. These results highlight the value of combining colocated Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies, similar to those obtainable by SHERLOC on Mars 2020, to strengthen the confidence of kerogen detection as a potential biosignature in complex natural samples. Key Words: Raman spectroscopy-Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy-Mars Sample Return-Mars 2020 mission-Kerogen-Biosignatures. Astrobiology 18, 431-453.

  7. [Research Progress of Raman Spectroscopy on Dyestuff Identification of Ancient Relics and Artifacts].

    PubMed

    He, Qiu-ju; Wang, Li-qin

    2016-02-01

    As the birthplace of Silk Road, China has a long dyeing history. The valuable information about the production time, the source of dyeing material, dyeing process and preservation status were existed in organic dyestuff deriving from cultural relics and artifacts. However, because of the low contents, complex compositions and easily degraded of dyestuff, it is always a challenging task to identify the dyestuff in relics analyzing field. As a finger-print spectrum, Raman spectroscopy owns unique superiorities in dyestuff identification. Thus, the principle, characteristic, limitation, progress and development direction of micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS/µ-Raman), near infrared reflection and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (NIR-FT-Raman), surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonance raman spectroscopy (RRS) have been introduced in this paper. Furthermore, the features of Raman spectra of gardenia, curcumin and other natural dyestuffs were classified by MRS technology, and then the fluorescence phenomena of purpurin excitated with different wavelength laser was compared and analyzed. At last, gray green silver colloidal particles were made as the base, then the colorant of madder was identified combining with thin layer chromatography (TLC) separation technology and SERS, the result showed that the surface enhancement effect of silver colloidal particles could significantly reduce fluorescence background of the Raman spectra. It is pointed out that Raman spectroscopy is a rapid and convenient molecular structure qualitative methodology, which has broad application prospect in dyestuff analysis of cultural relics and artifacts. We propose that the combination of multi-Raman spectroscopy, separation technology and long distance transmission technology are the development trends of Raman spectroscopy.

  8. Process spectroscopy in microemulsions—Raman spectroscopy for online monitoring of a homogeneous hydroformylation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Andrea; Meyer, Klas; Ruiken, Jan-Paul; Illner, Markus; Müller, David-Nicolas; Esche, Erik; Wozny, Günther; Westad, Frank; Maiwald, Michael

    2017-03-01

    A major industrial reaction based on homogeneous catalysis is hydroformylation for the production of aldehydes from alkenes and syngas. Hydroformylation in microemulsions, which is currently under investigation at Technische Universität Berlin on a mini-plant scale, was identified as a cost efficient approach which also enhances product selectivity. Herein, we present the application of online Raman spectroscopy on the reaction of 1-dodecene to 1-tridecanal within a microemulsion. To achieve a good representation of the operation range in the mini-plant with regard to concentrations of the reactants a design of experiments was used. Based on initial Raman spectra partial least squares regression (PLSR) models were calibrated for the prediction of 1-dodecene and 1-tridecanal. Limits of predictions arise from nonlinear correlations between Raman intensity and mass fractions of compounds in the microemulsion system. Furthermore, the prediction power of PLSR models becomes limited due to unexpected by-product formation. Application of the lab-scale derived calibration spectra and PLSR models on online spectra from a mini-plant operation yielded promising estimations of 1-tridecanal and acceptable predictions of 1-dodecene mass fractions suggesting Raman spectroscopy as a suitable technique for process analytics in microemulsions.

  9. Negative refraction with low absorption using Raman transitions with magnetoelectric coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Sikes, D. E.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2010-07-15

    We suggest a scheme for obtaining negative refraction that does not require the simultaneous presence of an electric-dipole and a magnetic-dipole transition near the same transition frequency. The key idea of the scheme is to obtain a strong electric response by using far-off-resonant Raman transitions. We propose to use a pair of electric-dipole Raman transitions and utilize magneto-electric cross coupling to achieve a negative index of refraction without requiring negative permeability. The interference of the two Raman transitions allows tunable negative refraction with low absorption.

  10. Shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: principle and applications (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Feng; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2015-08-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful technique that yields fingerprint vibrational information with ultra-high sensitivity. However, only roughened Ag, Au and Cu surfaces can generate strong SERS effect. The lack of materials and morphology generality has severely limited the breadth of SERS practical applications on surface science, electrochemistry and catalysis. Shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) was therefore invented to break the long-standing limitation of SERS. In SHINERS, Au@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles were rationally designed. The gold core acts as plasmonic antenna and encapsulated by an ultra-thin, uniform and pinhole-free silica shell, can provide high electromagnetic field to enhance the Raman signals of probed molecules. The inert silica shell acts as tunneling barrier prevents the core from interacting with the environment. SHINERS has already been applied to a number of challenging systems, such as hydrogen and CO on Pt(hkl) and Rh(hkl), which can't be realized by traditional SERS. Combining with electrochemical methods, we has investigated the adsorption processes of pyridine at the Au(hkl) single crystal/solution interface, and in-situ monitored the surface electro-oxidation at Au(hkl) electrodes. These pioneering studies demonstrate convincingly the ability of SHINERS in exploring correlations between structure and reactivity as well as in monitoring intermediates at the interfaces. SHINERS was also explored from semiconductor surface for industry, to living bacteria for life science, and to pesticide residue detection for food safety. The concept of shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhancement is being applied to other spectroscopies such as infrared absorption, sum frequency generation and fluorescence. Jian-Feng Li et al., Nature, 2010, 464, 392-395.

  11. Multiplexed absorption tomography with calibration-free wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Weiwei; Kaminski, Clemens F., E-mail: cfk23@cam.ac.uk

    2014-04-14

    We propose a multiplexed absorption tomography technique, which uses calibration-free wavelength modulation spectroscopy with tunable semiconductor lasers for the simultaneous imaging of temperature and species concentration in harsh combustion environments. Compared with the commonly used direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) counterpart, the present variant enjoys better signal-to-noise ratios and requires no baseline fitting, a particularly desirable feature for high-pressure applications, where adjacent absorption features overlap and interfere severely. We present proof-of-concept numerical demonstrations of the technique using realistic phantom models of harsh combustion environments and prove that the proposed techniques outperform currently available tomography techniques based on DAS.

  12. UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy: Lambert-Beer reloaded.

    PubMed

    Mäntele, Werner; Deniz, Erhan

    2017-02-15

    UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy is used in almost every spectroscopy laboratory for routine analysis or research. All spectroscopists rely on the Lambert-Beer Law but many of them are less aware of its limitations. This tutorial discusses typical problems in routine spectroscopy that come along with technical limitations or careless selection of experimental parameters. Simple rules are provided to avoid these problems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. In-situ Raman spectroscopy and high-speed photography of a shocked triaminotrinitrobenzene based explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Saint-Amans, C.; Hébert, P., E-mail: philippe.hebert@cea.fr; Doucet, M.

    2015-01-14

    We have developed a single-shot Raman spectroscopy experiment to study at the molecular level the initiation mechanisms that can lead to sustained detonation of a triaminotrinitrobenzene-based explosive. Shocks up to 30 GPa were generated using a two-stage laser-driven flyer plate generator. The samples were confined by an optical window and shock pressure was maintained for at least 30 ns. Photon Doppler Velocimetry measurements were performed at the explosive/window interface to determine the shock pressure profile. Raman spectra were recorded as a function of shock pressure and the shifts of the principal modes were compared to static high-pressure measurements performed in a diamondmore » anvil cell. Our shock data indicate the role of temperature effects. Our Raman spectra also show a progressive extinction of the signal which disappears around 9 GPa. High-speed photography images reveal a simultaneous progressive darkening of the sample surface up to total opacity at 9 GPa. Reflectivity measurements under shock compression show that this opacity is due to a broadening of the absorption spectrum over the entire visible region.« less

  14. Development characteristics of polymethyl methacrylate in alcohol/water mixtures. A lithography and Raman spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Ocola, Leonidas E.; Costales, Maya; Gosztola, David J.

    2015-12-10

    Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) is the most widely used resist in electron beam lithography. This paper reports on a lithography and Raman spectroscopy study of development characteristics of PMMA in methanol, ethanol and isopropanol mixtures with water as developers. We have found that ethanol/water mixtures at a 4:1 volume ratio are an excellent, high resolution, non-toxic, developer for exposed PMMA. We also have found that the proper methodology to use so that contrast data can be compared to techniques used in polymer science is not to rinse the developed resist but to immediately dry with nitrogen. Our results show howmore » powerful simple lithographic techniques can be used to study ternary polymer solvent solutions when compared to other techniques used in the literature. Raman data shows that there both tightly bonded –OH groups and non-hydrogen bonded –OH groups play a role in the development of PMMA. Tightly hydrogen bonded –OH groups show pure Lorentzian Raman absorption only in the concentration ranges where ethanol/water and IPA/water mixtures are effective developers of PMMA. The impact of the understanding these interactions may open doors to a new developers of other electron beam resists that can reduce the toxicity of the waste stream.« less

  15. Identification of anisodamine tablets by Raman and near-infrared spectroscopy with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Li, Lian; Zang, Hengchang; Li, Jun; Chen, Dejun; Li, Tao; Wang, Fengshan

    2014-06-05

    Vibrational spectroscopy including Raman and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has become an attractive tool for pharmaceutical analysis. In this study, effective calibration models for the identification of anisodamine tablet and its counterfeit and the distinguishment of manufacturing plants, based on Raman and NIR spectroscopy, were built, respectively. Anisodamine counterfeit tablets were identified by Raman spectroscopy with correlation coefficient method, and the results showed that the predictive accuracy was 100%. The genuine anisodamine tablets from 5 different manufacturing plants were distinguished by NIR spectroscopy using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models based on interval principal component analysis (iPCA) method. And the results showed the recognition rate and rejection rate were 100% respectively. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopy and NIR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics are feasible and potential tools for rapid pharmaceutical tablet discrimination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of glucose and ethanol after enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of biomass using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chien-Ju; Smith, Emily A

    2009-10-27

    Raman spectroscopy has been used for the quantitative determination of the conversion efficiency at each step in the production of ethanol from biomass. The method requires little sample preparation; therefore, it is suitable for screening large numbers of biomass samples and reaction conditions in a complex sample matrix. Dilute acid or ammonia-pretreated corn stover was used as a model biomass for these studies. Ammonia pretreatment was suitable for subsequent measurements with Raman spectroscopy, but dilute acid-pretreated corn stover generated a large background signal that surpassed the Raman signal. The background signal is attributed to lignin, which remains in the plant tissue after dilute acid pretreatment. A commercial enzyme mixture was used for the enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover, and glucose levels were measured with a dispersive 785 nm Raman spectrometer. The glucose detection limit in hydrolysis liquor by Raman spectroscopy was 8 g L(-1). The mean hydrolysis efficiency for three replicate measurements obtained with Raman spectroscopy (86+/-4%) was compared to the result obtained using an enzymatic reaction with UV-vis spectrophotometry detection (78+/-8%). The results indicate good accuracy, as determined using a Student's t-test, and better precision for the Raman spectroscopy measurement relative to the enzymatic detection assay. The detection of glucose in hydrolysis broth by Raman spectroscopy showed no spectral interference, provided the sample was filtered to remove insoluble cellulose prior to analysis. The hydrolysate was further subjected to fermentation to yield ethanol. The detection limit for ethanol in fermentation broth by Raman spectroscopy was found to be 6 g L(-1). Comparison of the fermentation efficiencies measured by Raman spectroscopy (80+/-10%) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (87+/-9%) were statistically the same. The work demonstrates the utility of Raman spectroscopy for screening the entire conversion process to

  17. Continuous gradient temperature Raman spectroscopy of oleic and linoleic acids from -100 to 50°C

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gradient Temperature Raman spectroscopy (GTRS) applies the temperature gradients utilized in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to Raman spectroscopy, providing a straightforward technique to identify molecular rearrangements that occur near and at phase transitions. Herein we apply GTRS and DS...

  18. Doping, Strain, Orientation and Disorder of Graphene by Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Andrea C.

    2009-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a fast and non-destructive method for the characterization of carbons [1]. These show two features: the G and D peaks, around 1580 and 1350cm-1 respectively. The G peak corresponds to the doubly degenerate E2g phonon at the Brillouin zone centre. The D peak is due to the breathing modes of sp^2 atoms and requires a defect for its activation [1-5]. It is common for as-prepared graphene not to have enough structural defects for the D peak to be seen [4,6], so that it can only be detected at the edges [6]. The most prominent feature in graphene is the second order 2D peak [6]. This is always seen, since no defects are required for its activation. Its shape distinguishes single and multi-layers [6]. Raman spectroscopy also monitors doping [7-9]. We report the evolution of the Raman spectra of single [7,8] and bi-layer [9] graphene as a function of doping. A Fermi level shift is induced either by applying a bottom gate [7], or by a polymeric top gate [8,9], or naturally happens as a result of charged impurities [10]. This induces a stiffening of the Raman G peak for both hole and electron doping [7]. This is explained including dynamic corrections to the adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approximation [7]. The phonon renormalization of bilayer graphene has characteristic features compared to single layer. This allows a direct estimation of the interlayer coupling [7-9]. We then consider the effects strain. Uniaxial strain lifts the E2g degeneracy and splits the G peak in two: G^+ and G^-. The peaks downshift as a function of strain allows a direct measurement of the Gruneisen parameter [10]. The polarization dependence of the G^+/G^- modes is a probe of the crystallographic orientation of the sample [10]. Finally, we consider the effect of disorder [3,4,11] and show how to discriminate between disorder, strain and doping [11]. We will also discuss how the D peak is a signature of π electron localisation, and, thus, of gap opening in chemically modified

  19. Raman spectroscopy reveals biophysical markers in skin cancer surgical margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xu; Moy, Austin J.; Nguyen, Hieu T. M.; Zhang, Yao; Fox, Matthew C.; Sebastian, Katherine R.; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Markey, Mia K.; Tunnell, James W.

    2018-02-01

    The recurrence rate of nonmelanoma skin cancer is highly related to the residual tumor after surgery. Although tissueconserving surgery, such as Mohs surgery, is a standard method for the treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer, they are limited by lengthy and costly frozen-section histopathology. Raman spectroscopy (RS) is proving to be an objective, sensitive, and non-destructive tool for detecting skin cancer. Previous studies demonstrated the high sensitivity of RS in detecting tumor margins of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). However, those studies rely on statistical classification models and do not elucidate the skin biophysical composition. As a result, we aim to discover the biophysical differences between BCC and primary normal skin structures (including epidermis, dermis, hair follicle, sebaceous gland and fat). We obtained freshly resected ex vivo skin samples from fresh resection specimens from 14 patients undergoing Mohs surgery. Raman images were acquired from regions containing one or more structures using a custom built 830nm confocal Raman microscope. The spectra were grouped using K-means clustering analysis and annotated as either BCC or each of the five normal structures by comparing with the histopathology image of the serial section. The spectral data were then fit by a previously established biophysical model with eight primary skin constituents. Our results show that BCC has significant differences in the fit coefficients of nucleus, collagen, triolein, keratin and elastin compared with normal structures. Our study reveals RS has the potential to detect biophysical changes in resection margins, and supports the development of diagnostic algorithms for future intraoperative implementation of RS during Mohs surgery.

  20. Classification of oral cancers using Raman spectroscopy of serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Aditi; Talathi, Sneha; Sawant, Sharada; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Oral cancers are the sixth most common malignancy worldwide, with low 5-year disease free survival rates, attributable to late detection due to lack of reliable screening modalities. Our in vivo Raman spectroscopy studies have demonstrated classification of normal and tumor as well as cancer field effects (CFE), the earliest events in oral cancers. In view of limitations such as requirement of on-site instrumentation and stringent experimental conditions of this approach, feasibility of classification of normal and cancer using serum was explored using 532 nm excitation. In this study, strong resonance features of β-carotenes, present differentially in normal and pathological conditions, were observed. In the present study, Raman spectra of sera of 36 buccal mucosa, 33 tongue cancers and 17 healthy subjects were recorded using Raman microprobe coupled with 40X objective using 785 nm excitation, a known source of excitation for biomedical applications. To eliminate heterogeneity, average of 3 spectra recorded from each sample was subjected to PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out-cross-validation. Findings indicate average classification efficiency of ~70% for normal and cancer. Buccal mucosa and tongue cancer serum could also be classified with an efficiency of ~68%. Of the two cancers, buccal mucosa cancer and normal could be classified with a higher efficiency. Findings of the study are quite comparable to that of our earlier study, which suggest that there exist significant differences, other than β- carotenes, between normal and cancerous samples which can be exploited for the classification. Prospectively, extensive validation studies will be undertaken to confirm the findings.

  1. Femtosecond coherent nuclear dynamics of excited tetraphenylethylene: Ultrafast transient absorption and ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayal, Surajit; Roy, Khokan; Umapathy, Siva

    2018-01-01

    Ultrafast torsional dynamics plays an important role in the photoinduced excited state dynamics. Tetraphenylethylene (TPE), a model system for the molecular motor, executes interesting torsional dynamics upon photoexcitation. The photoreaction of TPE involves ultrafast internal conversion via a nearly planar intermediate state (relaxed state) that further leads to a twisted zwitterionic state. Here, we report the photoinduced structural dynamics of excited TPE during the course of photoisomerization in the condensed phase by ultrafast Raman loss (URLS) and femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. TA measurements on the S1 state reveal step-wise population relaxation from the Franck-Condon (FC) state → relaxed state → twisted state, while the URLS study provides insights on the vibrational dynamics during the course of the reaction. The TA spectral dynamics and vibrational Raman amplitudes within 1 ps reveal vibrational wave packet propagating from the FC state to the relaxed state. Fourier transformation of this oscillation leads to a ˜130 cm-1 low-frequency phenyl torsional mode. Two vibrational marker bands, Cet=Cet stretching (˜1512 cm-1) and Cph=Cph stretching (˜1584 cm-1) modes, appear immediately after photoexcitation in the URLS spectra. The initial red-shift of the Cph=Cph stretching mode with a time constant of ˜400 fs (in butyronitrile) is assigned to the rate of planarization of excited TPE. In addition, the Cet=Cet stretching mode shows initial blue-shift within 1 ps followed by frequency red-shift, suggesting that on the sub-picosecond time scale, structural relaxation is dominated by phenyl torsion rather than the central Cet=Cet twist. Furthermore, the effect of the solvent on the structural dynamics is discussed in the context of ultrafast nuclear dynamics and solute-solvent coupling.

  2. Femtosecond coherent nuclear dynamics of excited tetraphenylethylene: Ultrafast transient absorption and ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Kayal, Surajit; Roy, Khokan; Umapathy, Siva

    2018-01-14

    Ultrafast torsional dynamics plays an important role in the photoinduced excited state dynamics. Tetraphenylethylene (TPE), a model system for the molecular motor, executes interesting torsional dynamics upon photoexcitation. The photoreaction of TPE involves ultrafast internal conversion via a nearly planar intermediate state (relaxed state) that further leads to a twisted zwitterionic state. Here, we report the photoinduced structural dynamics of excited TPE during the course of photoisomerization in the condensed phase by ultrafast Raman loss (URLS) and femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. TA measurements on the S 1 state reveal step-wise population relaxation from the Franck-Condon (FC) state → relaxed state → twisted state, while the URLS study provides insights on the vibrational dynamics during the course of the reaction. The TA spectral dynamics and vibrational Raman amplitudes within 1 ps reveal vibrational wave packet propagating from the FC state to the relaxed state. Fourier transformation of this oscillation leads to a ∼130 cm -1 low-frequency phenyl torsional mode. Two vibrational marker bands, C et =C et stretching (∼1512 cm -1 ) and C ph =C ph stretching (∼1584 cm -1 ) modes, appear immediately after photoexcitation in the URLS spectra. The initial red-shift of the C ph =C ph stretching mode with a time constant of ∼400 fs (in butyronitrile) is assigned to the rate of planarization of excited TPE. In addition, the C et =C et stretching mode shows initial blue-shift within 1 ps followed by frequency red-shift, suggesting that on the sub-picosecond time scale, structural relaxation is dominated by phenyl torsion rather than the central C et =C et twist. Furthermore, the effect of the solvent on the structural dynamics is discussed in the context of ultrafast nuclear dynamics and solute-solvent coupling.

  3. Study of carotenoids in cyanobacteria by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Vanessa End; Neves Miranda, Marcela A C; Soares, Maria Carolina Silva; Edwards, Howell G M; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando Cappa

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have established dominant aquatic populations around the world, generally in aggressive environments and under severe stress conditions, e.g., intense solar radiation. Several marine strains make use of compounds such as the polyenic molecules for their damage protection justifying the range of colours observed for these species. The peridinin/chlorophyll-a/protein complex is an excellent example of essential structures used for self-prevention; their systems allow to them surviving under aggressive environments. In our simulations, few protective dyes are required to the initial specimen defense; this is an important data concern the synthetic priority in order to supply adequate damage protection. Raman measurements obtained with 1064 and 514.5 nm excitations for Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and Microcystis aeruginosa strains shows bands assignable to the carotenoid peridinin. It was characterized by bands at 1940, 1650, 1515, 1449, 1185, 1155 and 1000 cm(-1) assigned to ν(C=C=C) (allenic vibration), ν(C=C/CO), ν(C=C), δ(C-H, C-18/19), δ(C-H), ν(C-C), and ρ(C-CH3), respectively. Recognition by Raman spectroscopy proved to be an important tool for preliminaries detections and characterization of polyene molecules in several algae, besides initiate an interesting discussion about their synthetic priority. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Fast discrimination of edible vegetable oil based on Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiu-Jun; Dai, Lian-Kui; Li, Sheng

    2012-07-01

    A novel method to fast discriminate edible vegetable oils by Raman spectroscopy is presented. The training set is composed of different edible vegetable oils with known classes. Based on their original Raman spectra, baseline correction and normalization were applied to obtain standard spectra. Two characteristic peaks describing the unsaturated degree of vegetable oil were selected as feature vectors; then the centers of all classes were calculated. For an edible vegetable oil with unknown class, the same pretreatment and feature extraction methods were used. The Euclidian distances between the feature vector of the unknown sample and the center of each class were calculated, and the class of the unknown sample was finally determined by the minimum distance. For 43 edible vegetable oil samples from seven different classes, experimental results show that the clustering effect of each class was more obvious and the class distance was much larger with the new feature extraction method compared with PCA. The above classification model can be applied to discriminate unknown edible vegetable oils rapidly and accurately.

  5. Diagnostic potential of Raman spectroscopy in Barrett's esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong Kee Song, Louis-Michel; Molckovsky, Andrea; Wang, Kenneth K.; Burgart, Lawrence J.; Dolenko, Brion; Somorjai, Rajmund L.; Wilson, Brian C.

    2005-04-01

    Patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) undergo periodic endoscopic surveillance with random biopsies in an effort to detect dysplastic or early cancerous lesions. Surveillance may be enhanced by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy (NIRS), which has the potential to identify endoscopically-occult dysplastic lesions within the Barrett's segment and allow for targeted biopsies. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of NIRS for identifying dysplastic lesions in BE in vivo. Raman spectra (Pexc=70 mW; t=5 s) were collected from Barrett's mucosa at endoscopy using a custom-built NIRS system (λexc=785 nm) equipped with a filtered fiber-optic probe. Each probed site was biopsied for matching histological diagnosis as assessed by an expert pathologist. Diagnostic algorithms were developed using genetic algorithm-based feature selection and linear discriminant analysis, and classification was performed on all spectra with a bootstrap-based cross-validation scheme. The analysis comprised 192 samples (112 non-dysplastic, 54 low-grade dysplasia and 26 high-grade dysplasia/early adenocarcinoma) from 65 patients. Compared with histology, NIRS differentiated dysplastic from non-dysplastic Barrett's samples with 86% sensitivity, 88% specificity and 87% accuracy. NIRS identified 'high-risk' lesions (high-grade dysplasia/early adenocarcinoma) with 88% sensitivity, 89% specificity and 89% accuracy. In the present study, NIRS classified Barrett's epithelia with high and clinically-useful diagnostic accuracy.

  6. Two-step Raman spectroscopy method for tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. P.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.

    2014-05-01

    Two-step Raman spectroscopy phase method was proposed for differential diagnosis of malignant tumor in skin and lung tissue. It includes detection of malignant tumor in healthy tissue on first step with identification of concrete cancer type on the second step. Proposed phase method analyze spectral intensity alteration in 1300-1340 and 1640-1680 cm-1 Raman bands in relation to the intensity of the 1450 cm-1 band on first step, and relative differences between RS intensities for tumor area and healthy skin closely adjacent to the lesion on the second step. It was tested more than 40 ex vivo samples of lung tissue and more than 50 in vivo skin tumors. Linear Discriminant Analysis, Quadratic Discriminant Analysis and Support Vector Machine were used for tumors type classification on phase planes. It is shown that two-step phase method allows to reach 88.9% sensitivity and 87.8% specificity for malignant melanoma diagnosis (skin cancer); 100% sensitivity and 81.5% specificity for adenocarcinoma diagnosis (lung cancer); 90.9% sensitivity and 77.8% specificity for squamous cell carcinoma diagnosis (lung cancer).

  7. Diagnosing breast cancer using Raman spectroscopy: prospective analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Volynskaya, Zoya; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Nazemi, Jon; Shenk, Robert; Wang, Nancy; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Feld, Michael S.

    2009-09-01

    We present the first prospective test of Raman spectroscopy in diagnosing normal, benign, and malignant human breast tissues. Prospective testing of spectral diagnostic algorithms allows clinicians to accurately assess the diagnostic information contained in, and any bias of, the spectroscopic measurement. In previous work, we developed an accurate, internally validated algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis based on analysis of Raman spectra acquired from fresh-frozen in vitro tissue samples. We currently evaluate the performance of this algorithm prospectively on a large ex vivo clinical data set that closely mimics the in vivo environment. Spectroscopic data were collected from freshly excised surgical specimens, and 129 tissue sites from 21 patients were examined. Prospective application of the algorithm to the clinical data set resulted in a sensitivity of 83%, a specificity of 93%, a positive predictive value of 36%, and a negative predictive value of 99% for distinguishing cancerous from normal and benign tissues. The performance of the algorithm in different patient populations is discussed. Sources of bias in the in vitro calibration and ex vivo prospective data sets, including disease prevalence and disease spectrum, are examined and analytical methods for comparison provided.

  8. Single-shot time stretch stimulated Raman spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltarelli, Francesco; Kumar, Vikas; Viola, Daniele; Crisafi, Francesco; Preda, Fabrizio; Cerullo, Giulio; Polli, Dario

    2017-02-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering spectroscopy is a powerful technique for label-free molecular identification, but its broadband implementation is technically challenging. We introduce and experimentally demonstrate a novel approach based on photonic time stretch. The broadband femtosecond Stokes pulse, after interacting with the sample, is stretched by a telecom fiber to 15ns, mapping its spectrum in time. The signal is sampled through a fast analog-to-digital converter, providing single-shot spectra at 80-kHz rate. We demonstrate 10^-5 sensitivity over 500 cm-1 in the C-H region. Our results pave the way to high-speed broadband vibrational imaging for materials science and biophotonics.

  9. Characterization of biomaterials using FT-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderholm, S.; Roos, Y. H.; Meinander, N.; Hotokka, M.

    1998-06-01

    Carbohydrates play an important role in the quality and preservation of pharmaceutical and food materials. The storage temperature and water content is very critical in storage and, therefore, it is very important to understand how the physical state of carbohydrates is affected by water. Carbohydrates in foods and pharmaceuticals are usually present in the amorphous form even if other substances present affect the physical properties of carbohydrates it is mainly temperature and water content that determine the physical state. Amorphous carbohydrates show a second order phase transition, the glass transition, that is critical for stability. When carbohydrates are stored above their glass transition temperature they loose stability. Crystallization above the glass transition temperature may result in loss of quality. Raman spectroscopy offers a useful tool in the characterization of phase transitions and effects of temperature and water content on material properties at a molecular level.

  10. Horizontal silicon nanowires for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebavi, Hrvoje; Ristić, Davor; Baran, Nikola; Mikac, Lara; Mohaček-Grošev, Vlasta; Gotić, Marijan; Šikić, Mile; Ivanda, Mile

    2018-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to focus on details of the fabrication process of horizontally and vertically oriented silicon nanowires (SiNWs) substrates for the application of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The fabrication process is based on the vapor-liquid-solid method and electroless-assisted chemical etching, which, as the major benefit, resulting in the development of economical, easy-to-prepare SERS substrates. Furthermore, we examined the fabrication of Au coated Ag nanoparticles (NPs) on the SiNWs substrates in such a way as to diminish the influence of silver NPs corrosion, which, in turn, enhanced the SERS time stability, thus allowing for wider commercial applications. The substances on which high SERS sensitivity was proved are rhodamine (R6G) and 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA), with the detection limits of 10-8 M and 10-6 M, respectively.

  11. Coherent two-dimensional terahertz-terahertz-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Finneran, Ian A; Welsch, Ralph; Allodi, Marco A; Miller, Thomas F; Blake, Geoffrey A

    2016-06-21

    We present 2D terahertz-terahertz-Raman (2D TTR) spectroscopy, the first technique, to our knowledge, to interrogate a liquid with multiple pulses of terahertz (THz) light. This hybrid approach isolates nonlinear signatures in isotropic media, and is sensitive to the coupling and anharmonicity of thermally activated THz modes that play a central role in liquid-phase chemistry. Specifically, by varying the timing between two intense THz pulses, we control the orientational alignment of molecules in a liquid, and nonlinearly excite vibrational coherences. A comparison of experimental and simulated 2D TTR spectra of bromoform (CHBr3), carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and dibromodichloromethane (CBr2Cl2) shows previously unobserved off-diagonal anharmonic coupling between thermally populated vibrational modes.

  12. Towards ultrasensitive malaria diagnosis using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Keren; Yuen, Clement; Aniweh, Yaw; Preiser, Peter; Liu, Quan

    2016-02-01

    We report two methods of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for hemozoin detection in malaria infected human blood. In the first method, silver nanoparticles were synthesized separately and then mixed with lysed blood; while in the second method, silver nanoparticles were synthesized directly inside the parasites of Plasmodium falciparum. It was observed that the first method yields a smaller variation in SERS measurements and stronger correlation between the estimated contribution of hemozoin and the parasitemia level, which is preferred for the quantification of the parasitemia level. In contrast, the second method yields a higher sensitivity to a low parasitemia level thus could be more effective in the early malaria diagnosis to determine whether a given blood sample is positive.

  13. Confocal mapping of myelin figures with micro-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jung-Ren; Cheng, Yu-Che; Huang, Hung Ji; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2018-01-01

    We employ confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy (CMRS) with submicron spatial resolution to study the myelin structures (cylindrical lamellae) composed of nested surfactant C12E3 or lipid DMPC bilayers. The CMRS mapping indicates that for a straight C12E3 myelin, the surfactant concentration increases with the myelin width and is higher in the center region than in the peripheral region. For a curved C12E3 myelin, the convex side has a higher surfactant concentration than the corresponding concave side. The spectrum of DMPC myelins undergoes a qualitative change as the temperature increases above 60 °C, suggesting that the surfactant molecules may be damaged. Our work demonstrates the utility of CMRS in bio-soft material research.

  14. Monitoring the healing process of rat bones using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamulin, O.; Serec, K.; Bilić, V.; Balarin, M.; Kosović, M.; Drmić, D.; Brčić, L.; Seiwerth, S.; Sikirić, P.

    2013-07-01

    The healing effect of BPC 157 on rat femoral head osteonecrosis was monitored by Raman spectroscopy. Three groups of rats were defined: an injured group treated with BPC 157 (10 μg/kg/daily ip), an injured control group (treated with saline, 5 ml/kg/daily ip), and an uninjured healthy group. The spectra were recorded and the healing effect assessed on samples harvested from animals which were sacrificed 3 and 6 weeks after being injured. The statistical analysis of the recorded spectra showed statistical differences between the BPC 157-treated, control, and healthy groups of animals. In particular, after 6 weeks the spectral resemblance between the healthy and BPC 157 samples indicated a positive BPC 157 influence on the healing process of rat femoral head.

  15. Combining hyperspectral imaging and Raman spectroscopy for remote chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, John M.; Lo, Edsanter

    2008-04-01

    The Photonics Research Center at the United States Military Academy is conducting research to demonstrate the feasibility of combining hyperspectral imaging and Raman spectroscopy for remote chemical detection over a broad area of interest. One limitation of future trace detection systems is their ability to analyze large areas of view. Hyperspectral imaging provides a balance between fast spectral analysis and scanning area. Integration of a hyperspectral system capable of remote chemical detection will greatly enhance our soldiers' ability to see the battlefield to make threat related decisions. It can also queue the trace detection systems onto the correct interrogation area saving time and reconnaissance/surveillance resources. This research develops both the sensor design and the detection/discrimination algorithms. The one meter remote detection without background radiation is a simple proof of concept.

  16. Detecting Chemically Modified DNA Bases Using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Barhoumi, Aoune; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of DNA- changes in the chemical structure of individual bases that occur without changes in the DNA sequence- are known to alter gene expression. They are believed to result in frequently deleterious phenotypic changes, such as cancer. Methylation of adenine, methylation and hydroxymethylation of cytosine, and guanine oxidation are the primary DNA base modifications identified to date. Here we show it is possible to use surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect these primary DNA base modifications. SERS detection of modified DNA bases is label-free and requires minimal additional sample preparation, reducing the possibility of additional chemical modifications induced prior to measurement. This approach shows the feasibility of DNA base modification assessment as a potentially routine analysis that may be further developed for clinical diagnostics. PMID:24427449

  17. Detecting Chemically Modified DNA Bases Using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Barhoumi, Aoune; Halas, Naomi J

    2011-12-15

    Post-translational modifications of DNA- changes in the chemical structure of individual bases that occur without changes in the DNA sequence- are known to alter gene expression. They are believed to result in frequently deleterious phenotypic changes, such as cancer. Methylation of adenine, methylation and hydroxymethylation of cytosine, and guanine oxidation are the primary DNA base modifications identified to date. Here we show it is possible to use surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect these primary DNA base modifications. SERS detection of modified DNA bases is label-free and requires minimal additional sample preparation, reducing the possibility of additional chemical modifications induced prior to measurement. This approach shows the feasibility of DNA base modification assessment as a potentially routine analysis that may be further developed for clinical diagnostics.

  18. Analysis of spreadable cheese by Raman spectroscopy and chemometric tools.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Kamila de Sá; Callegaro, Layce de Souza; Stephani, Rodrigo; Almeida, Mariana Ramos; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando Cappa

    2016-03-01

    In this work, FT-Raman spectroscopy was explored to evaluate spreadable cheese samples. A partial least squares discriminant analysis was employed to identify the spreadable cheese samples containing starch. To build the models, two types of samples were used: commercial samples and samples manufactured in local industries. The method of supervised classification PLS-DA was employed to classify the samples as adulterated or without starch. Multivariate regression was performed using the partial least squares method to quantify the starch in the spreadable cheese. The limit of detection obtained for the model was 0.34% (w/w) and the limit of quantification was 1.14% (w/w). The reliability of the models was evaluated by determining the confidence interval, which was calculated using the bootstrap re-sampling technique. The results show that the classification models can be used to complement classical analysis and as screening methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Glucose determination in human aqueous humor with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L.; Pelletier, Christine C.; Borchert, Mark

    2005-01-01

    It has been suggested that spectroscopic analysis of the aqueous humor of the eye could be used to indirectly predict blood glucose levels in diabetics noninvasively. We have been investigating this potential using Raman spectroscopy in combination with partial least squares (PLS) analysis. We have determined that glucose at clinically relevant concentrations can be accurately predicted in human aqueous humor in vitro using a PLS model based on artificial aqueous humor. We have further determined that with proper instrument design, the light energy necessary to achieve clinically acceptable prediction of glucose does not damage the retinas of rabbits and can be delivered at powers below internationally acceptable safety limits. Herein we summarize our current results and address our strategies to improve instrument design. 2005 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  20. High-pressure polymorphism of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin): Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, Ethan L.; Dreger, Zbigniew A.; Gupta, Yogendra M.

    2015-02-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to elucidate the high-pressure polymorphic behavior of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), an important pharmaceutical compound known as aspirin. Using a diamond anvil cell (DAC), single crystals of the two polymorphic phases of aspirin existing at ambient conditions (ASA-I and ASA-II) were compressed to 10 GPa. We found that ASA-I does not transform to ASA-II, but instead transforms to a new phase (ASA-III) above ∼2 GPa. It is demonstrated that this transformation primarily introduces structural changes in the bonding and arrangement of the acetyl groups and is reversible upon the release of pressure. In contrast, a less dense ASA-II shows no transition in the pressure range studied, though it appears to exhibit a disordered structure above 7 GPa. Our results suggest that ASA-III is the most stable polymorph of aspirin at high pressures.

  1. Advances in Raman spectroscopy for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudworth, Caroline D.; Archer, John K. J.; Black, Richard A.; Mann, David

    2006-02-01

    Within the next 50 years Alzheimer's disease is expected to affect 100 million people worldwide. The progressive decline in the mental health of the patient is caused by severe brain atrophy generated by the breakdown and aggregation of proteins, resulting in β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The greatest challenge to Alzheimer's disease lies in the pursuit of an early and definitive diagnosis, in order that suitable treatment can be administered. At the present time, definitive diagnosis is restricted to post-mortem examination. Alzheimer's disease also remains without a long-term cure. This research demonstrates the potential role of Raman spectroscopy, combined with principle components analysis (PCA), as a diagnostic method. Analyses of ethically approved ex vivo post-mortem brain tissues (originating from frontal and occipital lobes) from control (3 normal elderly subjects and 3 Huntingdon's disease subjects) and Alzheimer's disease (12 subjects) brain sections, and a further set of 12 blinded samples are presented. Spectra originating from these tissues are highly reproducible, and initial results indicate a vital difference in protein content and conformation, relating to the abnormally high levels of aggregated proteins in the diseased tissues. Further examination of these spectra using PCA allows for the separation of control from diseased tissues. The validation of the PCA models using blinded samples also displays promise for the identification of Alzheimer's disease, in conjunction with secondary information regarding other brain diseases and dementias. These results provide a route for Raman spectroscopy as a possible non-invasive, non-destructive tool for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Requirements for Calibration in Noninvasive Glucose Monitoring by Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, Jan; Bernhardt, Jeff; Block, Ueyn; Freeman, William R.; Hofmeister, Rudy; Hristakeva, Maya; Lenosky, Thomas; McNamara, Robert; Petrasek, Danny; Veltkamp, David; Waydo, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Background In the development of noninvasive glucose monitoring technology, it is highly desirable to derive a calibration that relies on neither person-dependent calibration information nor supplementary calibration points furnished by an existing invasive measurement technique (universal calibration). Method By appropriate experimental design and associated analytical methods, we establish the sufficiency of multiple factors required to permit such a calibration. Factors considered are the discrimination of the measurement technique, stabilization of the experimental apparatus, physics–physiology-based measurement techniques for normalization, the sufficiency of the size of the data set, and appropriate exit criteria to establish the predictive value of the algorithm. Results For noninvasive glucose measurements, using Raman spectroscopy, the sufficiency of the scale of data was demonstrated by adding new data into an existing calibration algorithm and requiring that (a) the prediction error should be preserved or improved without significant re-optimization, (b) the complexity of the model for optimum estimation not rise with the addition of subjects, and (c) the estimation for persons whose data were removed entirely from the training set should be no worse than the estimates on the remainder of the population. Using these criteria, we established guidelines empirically for the number of subjects (30) and skin sites (387) for a preliminary universal calibration. We obtained a median absolute relative difference for our entire data set of 30 mg/dl, with 92% of the data in the Clarke A and B ranges. Conclusions Because Raman spectroscopy has high discrimination for glucose, a data set of practical dimensions appears to be sufficient for universal calibration. Improvements based on reducing the variance of blood perfusion are expected to reduce the prediction errors substantially, and the inclusion of supplementary calibration points for the wearable device

  3. Optimization of Sample Preparation processes of Bone Material for Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chikhani, Madelen; Wuhrer, Richard; Green, Hayley

    2018-03-30

    Raman spectroscopy has recently been investigated for use in the calculation of postmortem interval from skeletal material. The fluorescence generated by samples, which affects the interpretation of Raman data, is a major limitation. This study compares the effectiveness of two sample preparation techniques, chemical bleaching and scraping, in the reduction of fluorescence from bone samples during testing with Raman spectroscopy. Visual assessment of Raman spectra obtained at 1064 nm excitation following the preparation protocols indicates an overall reduction in fluorescence. Results demonstrate that scraping is more effective at resolving fluorescence than chemical bleaching. The scraping of skeletonized remains prior to Raman analysis is a less destructive method and allows for the preservation of a bone sample in a state closest to its original form, which is beneficial in forensic investigations. It is recommended that bone scraping supersedes chemical bleaching as the preferred method for sample preparation prior to Raman spectroscopy. © 2018 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. Analysis of 2-ethylhexyl-p-methoxycinnamate in sunscreen products by HPLC and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J; Li, Y S; L Roberts, R; Walker, G

    1997-10-01

    The analyses of 2-ethylhexyl-p-methoxycinnamate (EHMC) using HPLC and Raman spectroscopy have been undertaken and compared. EHMC, which is one of the most widely used sunscreen agents in suncare products in the US, exhibits a strong Raman signal. This signal clearly appears in both ethanol solutions of EHMC as well as in commercial sunscreen lotions containing this sun screen agent. A method for the direct detection and analysis of EHMC has been developed using Raman spectroscopy. This was accomplished by correlating the Raman intensities with the HPLC assays for a series of prototype suncare formulations. Based upon this information, it would be possible to employ Raman spectroscopy as an in-process control method in the commercial production of suncare products containing EHMC. The possibility of applying surface-enhanced Raman scattering for trace analysis was discussed.

  5. Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Characterizing a CW Raman Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    .A relatively simple technique for characterizing an all-resonant intracavity continuous-wave (CW) solid-state Raman laser involves the use of ring-down spectroscopy. As used here, characterizing signifies determining such parameters as threshold pump power, Raman gain, conversion efficiency, and quality factors (Q values) of the pump and Stokes cavity modes. Heretofore, in order to characterize resonant-cavity-based Raman lasers, it has usually been necessary to manipulate the frequencies and power levels of pump lasers and, in each case, to take several sets of measurements. In cases involving ultra-high-Q resonators, it also has been desirable to lock pump lasers to resonator modes to ensure the quality of measurement data. Simpler techniques could be useful. In the present ring-down spectroscopic technique, one infers the parameters of interest from the decay of the laser out of its steady state. This technique does not require changing the power or frequency of the pump laser or locking the pump laser to the resonator mode. The technique is based on a theoretical analysis of what happens when the pump laser is abruptly switched off after the Raman generation reaches the steady state. The analysis starts with differential equations for the evolution of the amplitudes of the pump and Stokes electric fields, leading to solutions for the power levels of the pump and Stokes fields as functions of time and of the aforementioned parameters. Among other things, these solutions show how the ring-down time depends, to some extent, on the electromagnetic energy accumulated in the cavity. The solutions are readily converted to relatively simple equations for the parameters as functions of quantities that can be determined from measurements of the time-dependent power levels. For example, the steady-state intracavity conversion efficiency is given by G1/G2 1 and the threshold power is given by Pin(G2/G1)2, where Pin is the steady-state input pump power immediately prior to

  6. Raman gain and nonlinear optical absorption measurements in a low-loss silicon waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Haisheng; Liu, Ansheng; Nicolaescu, Remus; Paniccia, Mario; Cohen, Oded; Hak, Dani

    2004-09-01

    We fabricated a low-loss (˜0.22dB/cm) rib waveguide (WG) in silicon-on-insulator with a small effective core area of ˜1.57μm2 and measured the stimulated Raman scattering gain in the WG. We obtained 2.3dB Raman gain in a 4.8-cm-long S-shaped WG using a 1455nm pump laser with a cw power of 0.9W measured before the WG. In addition, we observed nonlinear dependence of Raman gain and optical propagation loss as a function of the pump power. Our study shows that this mainly is due to two-photon absorption (TPA) induced free carrier absorption in the silicon WG. We experimentally determined the TPA induced free carrier lifetime of 25ns, which agrees well with our modeling.

  7. Broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy in the deep ultraviolet region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramochi, Hikaru; Fujisawa, Tomotsumi; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei

    2017-09-01

    We report broadband stimulated Raman measurements in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) region, which enables selective probing of the aromatic amino acid residues inside proteins through the resonance enhancement. We combine the narrowband DUV Raman pump pulse (<10 cm-1) at wavelengths as short as 240 nm and the broadband DUV probe pulse (>1000 cm-1) to realize stimulated Raman measurements covering a >1500 cm-1 spectral window. The stimulated Raman measurements for neat solvents, tryptophan, tyrosine, and glucose oxidase are performed using 240- and 290-nm Raman pump, highlighting the high potential of the DUV stimulated Raman probe for femtosecond time-resolved study of proteins.

  8. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Spectroscopy of Single Molecules in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sunney Xie, Wei Min, Chris Freudiger, Sijia Lu

    2012-01-18

    During this funding period, we have developed two breakthrough techniques. The first is stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, providing label-free chemical contrast for chemical and biomedical imaging based on vibrational spectroscopy. Spontaneous Raman microscopy provides specific vibrational signatures of chemical bonds, but is often hindered by low sensitivity. We developed a three-dimensional multiphoton vibrational imaging technique based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). The sensitivity of SRS imaging is significantly greater than that of spontaneous Raman microscopy, which is achieved by implementing high-frequency (megahertz) phase-sensitive detection. SRS microscopy has a major advantage over previous coherent Raman techniques in that it offers background-freemore » and readily interpretable chemical contrast. We demonstrated a variety of biomedical applications, such as differentiating distributions of omega-3 fatty acids and saturated lipids in living cells, imaging of brain and skin tissues based on intrinsic lipid contrast, and monitoring drug delivery through the epidermis. This technology offers exciting prospect for medical imaging. The second technology we developed is stimulated emission microscopy. Many chromophores, such as haemoglobin and cytochromes, absorb but have undetectable fluorescence because the spontaneous emission is dominated by their fast non-radiative decay. Yet the detection of their absorption is difficult under a microscope. We use stimulated emission, which competes effectively with the nonradiative decay, to make the chromophores detectable, as a new contrast mechanism for optical microscopy. We demonstrate a variety of applications of stimulated emission microscopy, such as visualizing chromoproteins, non-fluorescent variants of the green fluorescent protein, monitoring lacZ gene expression with a chromogenic reporter, mapping transdermal drug distribu- tions without histological sectioning, and label

  9. Resonance raman spectroscopy of an ultraviolet-sensitive insect rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, C.; Deng, H.; Rath, P.

    1987-11-17

    The authors present the first visual pigment resonance Raman spectra from the UV-sensitive eyes of an insect, Ascalaphus macaronius (owlfly). This pigment contains 11-cis-retinal as the chromophore. Raman data have been obtained for the acid metarhodopsin at 10/sup 0/C in both H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O. The C=N stretching mode at 1660 cm/sup -1/ in H/sub 2/O shifts to 1631 cm/sup -1/ upon deuteriation of the sample, clearly showing a protonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein. The structure-sensitive fingerprint region shows similarities to the all-trans-protonated Schiff base of model retinal chromophores, as well as to themore » octopus acid metarhodopsin and bovine metarhodopsin I. Although spectra measured at -100/sup 0/C with 406.7-nm excitation, to enhance scattering from rhodopsin (lambda/sub max/ 345 nm), contain a significant contribution from a small amount of contaminants (cytochrome(s) and/or accessory pigment) in the sample, the C=N stretch at 1664 cm/sup -1/ suggests a protonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein in rhodopsin as well. For comparison, this mode also appears at approx. 1660 cm/sup -1/ in both the vertebrate (bovine) and the invertebrate (octopus) rhodopsins. These data are particularly interesting since the absorption maximum of 345 nm for rhodopsin might be expected to originate from an unprotonated Schiff base linkage. That the Schiff base linkage in the owlfly rhodopsin, like in bovine and in octopus, is protonated suggests that a charged chromophore is essential to visual transduction.« less

  10. QSO absorption spectroscopy and baryonic dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirković, Milan M.

    2005-04-01

    The present book should serve a double purpose: first, as an introduction into the host of tightly related topics in astrophysics and cosmology all dealing with the history and evolution of the baryonic matter in the universe. Secondly, it gives argument for still somewhat controversial view that large baryonic reservoirs are present (at least in the low-redshift regime) in form of huge gaseous galactic haloes surrounding normal luminous galaxies, and manifesting through the Lyman-α absorption lines in spectra of background sources. If accepted, this view would profoundly impact our understanding of the galactic structure and evolution, and will deeply influence our views of the future evolution of galactic systems. After an introduction into cosmological jargon and symbols used throughout, and other important introductory material given in Chapter 1, the bulk of the argumentation is given in Chapter 2, which exposes phenomenology of Lyα absorption systems and various theories advanced to account for their physical origin. Chapter 3 deals with models of absorbing gas in the extended haloes of normal galaxies, and Chapter 4 gives a global discussion of main candidates for the reservoirs of the still elusive baryonic dark matter. A set of closely related technical issues which are used at several places in the main narrative are given in the appendices.

  11. Composition profiling of seized ecstasy tablets by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bell, S E; Burns, D T; Dennis, A C; Matchett, L J; Speers, J S

    2000-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy with far-red excitation has been investigated as a simple and rapid technique for composition profiling of seized ecstasy (MDMA, N-methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine) tablets. The spectra obtained are rich in vibrational bands and allow the active drug and excipient used to bulk the tablets to be identified. Relative band heights can be used to determine drug/excipient ratios and the degree of hydration of the drug while the fact that 50 tablets per hour can be analysed allows large numbers of spectra to be recorded. The ability of Raman spectroscopy to distinguish between ecstasy tablets on the basis of their chemical composition is illustrated here by a sample set of 400 tablets taken from a large seizure of > 50,000 tablets that were found in eight large bags. The tablets are all similar in appearance and carry the same logo. Conventional analysis by GC-MS showed they contained MDMA. Initial Raman studies of samples from each of the eight bags showed that despite some tablet-to-tablet variation within each bag the contents could be classified on the basis of the excipients used. The tablets in five of the bags were sorbitol-based, two were cellulose-based and one bag contained tablets with a glucose excipient. More extensive analysis of 50 tablets from each of a representative series of sample bags have distribution profiles that showed the contents of each bag were approximately normally distributed about a mean value, rather than being mixtures of several discrete types. Two of the sorbitol-containing sample sets were indistinguishable while a third was similar but not identical to these, in that it contained the same excipient and MDMA with the same degree of hydration but had a slightly different MDMA/sorbitol ratio. The cellulose-based samples were badly manufactured and showed considerable tablet-to-tablet variation in their drug/excipient ratio while the glucose-based tablets had a tight distribution in their drug/excipient ratios

  12. Dual-modal cancer detection based on optical pH sensing and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soogeun; Lee, Seung Ho; Min, Sun Young; Byun, Kyung Min; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-10-01

    A dual-modal approach using Raman spectroscopy and optical pH sensing was investigated to discriminate between normal and cancerous tissues. Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated the potential for in vivo cancer detection. However, Raman spectroscopy has suffered from strong fluorescence background of biological samples and subtle spectral differences between normal and disease tissues. To overcome those issues, pH sensing is adopted to Raman spectroscopy as a dual-modal approach. Based on the fact that the pH level in cancerous tissues is lower than that in normal tissues due to insufficient vasculature formation, the dual-modal approach combining the chemical information of Raman spectrum and the metabolic information of pH level can improve the specificity of cancer diagnosis. From human breast tissue samples, Raman spectra and pH levels are measured using fiber-optic-based Raman and pH probes, respectively. The pH sensing is based on the dependence of pH level on optical transmission spectrum. Multivariate statistical analysis is performed to evaluate the classification capability of the dual-modal method. The analytical results show that the dual-modal method based on Raman spectroscopy and optical pH sensing can improve the performance of cancer classification.

  13. Dual-modal cancer detection based on optical pH sensing and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soogeun; Lee, Seung Ho; Min, Sun Young; Byun, Kyung Min; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-10-01

    A dual-modal approach using Raman spectroscopy and optical pH sensing was investigated to discriminate between normal and cancerous tissues. Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated the potential for in vivo cancer detection. However, Raman spectroscopy has suffered from strong fluorescence background of biological samples and subtle spectral differences between normal and disease tissues. To overcome those issues, pH sensing is adopted to Raman spectroscopy as a dual-modal approach. Based on the fact that the pH level in cancerous tissues is lower than that in normal tissues due to insufficient vasculature formation, the dual-modal approach combining the chemical information of Raman spectrum and the metabolic information of pH level can improve the specificity of cancer diagnosis. From human breast tissue samples, Raman spectra and pH levels are measured using fiber-optic-based Raman and pH probes, respectively. The pH sensing is based on the dependence of pH level on optical transmission spectrum. Multivariate statistical analysis is performed to evaluate the classification capability of the dual-modal method. The analytical results show that the dual-modal method based on Raman spectroscopy and optical pH sensing can improve the performance of cancer classification. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  14. Analysis of Individual Cells and Endospores by Micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Anthony; Huser, Thomas; Talley, Chad; Hollars, Christopher; Balhorn, Rod; Lane, Stephen

    2003-03-01

    We have collected Raman spectra of individual sperm cells by confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy. The high spatial resolution of this technique allows for compositional analysis of different sections of the sperm cells. The relative intensities of protein and DNA Raman transitions allow one to define a protein-DNA ratio. We have also collected the Raman spectra of individual bacterial endospores from four species in the genus Bacillus. The spectra were generally dominated by scattering from calcium dipicolinate, although scattering assignable to protein bands was also observed. A small fraction of the spores did not exhibit Raman scattering from CaDPA, possibly due to incomplete sporulation. These examples demonstrate the applicability of micro-Raman spectroscopy as a non-invasive method for addressing variability in the composition of cells.* *This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-Eng-48.

  15. Flameless Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: Effects of Nitrates and Sulfates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    ATTACHED DDJ~P 1413 EDITION 01 INO, 6 5 IabSoLEr J UjN!LbAa~ A- i SELU 0 IONOF I tG 651 J Flameless Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: Effects of Nitrates...analytical techniques, flameless atomic absorption is subject to matrix or interference effects. Upon heating, nitrate and sulfate salts decompose to...Eklund and J.E. Smith, Anal Chem, 51, 1205 (1979) R.H. Eklund and J.A. Holcombe, Anal Chim. Acta, 109, 97 (1979) FLAMELESS ATOMIC ABSORPTION

  16. Accuracy Enhancement of Raman Spectroscopy Using Complementary Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) with Geologically Mixed Samples.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soojin; Kim, Dongyoung; Yang, Junho; Yoh, Jack J

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative Raman analysis was carried out with geologically mixed samples that have various matrices. In order to compensate the matrix effect in Raman shift, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis was performed. Raman spectroscopy revealed the geological materials contained in the mixed samples. However, the analysis of a mixture containing different matrices was inaccurate due to the weak signal of the Raman shift, interference, and the strong matrix effect. On the other hand, the LIBS quantitative analysis of atomic carbon and calcium in mixed samples showed high accuracy. In the case of the calcite and gypsum mixture, the coefficient of determination of atomic carbon using LIBS was 0.99, while the signal using Raman was less than 0.9. Therefore, the geological composition of the mixed samples is first obtained using Raman and the LIBS-based quantitative analysis is then applied to the Raman outcome in order to construct highly accurate univariate calibration curves. The study also focuses on a method to overcome matrix effects through the two complementary spectroscopic techniques of Raman spectroscopy and LIBS.

  17. Theoretical studies on absorption, emission, and resonance Raman spectra of Coumarin 343 isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenpeng; Cao, Zexing; Zhao, Yi

    2012-03-01

    The vibrationally resolved spectral method and quantum chemical calculations are employed to reveal the structural and spectral properties of Coumarin 343 (C343), an ideal candidate for organic dye photosensitizers, in vacuum and solution. The results manifest that the ground-state energies are dominantly determined by different placements of hydrogen atom in carboxylic group of C343 conformations. Compared to those in vacuum, the electronic absorption spectra in methanol solvent show a hyperchromic property together with the redshift and blueshift for the neutral C343 isomers and their deprotonated anions, respectively. From the absorption, emission, and resonance Raman spectra, it is found that the maximal absorption and emission come from low-frequency modes whereas the high-frequency modes have high Raman activities. The detailed spectra are further analyzed for the identification of the conformers and understanding the potential charge transfer mechanism in their photovoltaic applications.

  18. [The study of CO2 cavity enhanced absorption and highly sensitive absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Pei, Shi-Xin; Gao, Xiao-Ming; Cui, Fen-Ping; Huang, Wei; Shao, Jie; Fan, Hong; Zhang, Wei-Jun

    2005-12-01

    Cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) is a new spectral technology that is based on the cavity ring down absorption spectroscopy. In the present paper, a DFB encapsulation narrow line width tunable diode laser (TDL) was used as the light source. At the center output, the TDL radiation wavelength was 1.573 microm, and an optical cavity, which consisted of two high reflectivity mirrors (near 1.573 microm, the mirror reflectivity was about 0.994%), was used as a sample cell. A wavemeter was used to record the accurate frequency of the laser radiation. In the experiment, the method of scanning the optical cavity to change the cavity mode was used, when the laser frequency was coincident with one of the cavity mode; the laser radiation was coupled into the optical cavity and the detector could receive the light signals that escaped the optical cavity. As a result, the absorption spectrum of carbon dioxide weak absorption at low pressure was obtained with an absorption intensity of 1.816 x 10(-23) cm(-1) x (molecule x cm(-2)(-1) in a sample cell with a length of only 33.5 cm. An absorption sensitivity of about 3.62 x 10(-7) cm(-1) has been achieved. The experiment result indicated that the cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy has the advantage of high sensivity, simple experimental setup, and easy operation.

  19. Calibration Transfer in LIBS and Raman Spectroscopy for Planetary Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. D.; Thomas, B. F.; Parente, M.; Gemp, I.; Mullen, T. H.

    2017-12-01

    Planetary scientists rely on spectral libraries and instrument reproducibility to interpret results from missions. Major investments have been made into assembling libraries, but they often naively assume that spectra of single crystals versus powders and from varying instruments will be the same. Calibration transfer (CT) seeks to algorithmically resolve discrepancies among datasets from different instruments or conditions. It offers the ability to align suites of spectra with a small number of common samples, allowing better models to be built with combined data sets. LIBS and Raman data present different challenges for CT. Quantitative geochemical analyses by LIBS spectroscopy are limited by lack of consistency among repeated laser shots and across instruments. Many different factors affect the presence/absence of emission lines and their intensities, such as laser power/plasma temperature, angle of incidence, detector sensitivity/resolution. To overcome these, models in which disparate datasets are projected into a joint low-dimensional subspace where all data can be aligned before quantitative analysis, such as Correlation Analysis for Domain Adaptation (CADA), have proven very effective. They require some overlap between the populations of spectra to be aligned. For example, prediction of SiO2 on 80 samples from two different LIBS labs show errors of ±16-29 wt.% when the training and test sets have no overlap, and ±4.94 wt% SiO2 when CADA is used. Uncorrected Earth-Mars spectral differences are likely to cause errors with the same order of magnitude. As with other types of reflectance spectroscopy, Raman data are plagued by differences among single crystal/powder samples and laser wavelength that affect peak intensities, and by spectral offsets from instruments with varying resolution and wavenumber alignment schemes. These problems persist even within the archetypal RRUFF database. Pre-processing transformation functions such as optimized baseline removal

  20. Deep Raman spectroscopy for the non-invasive standoff detection of concealed chemical threat agents.

    PubMed

    Izake, Emad L; Cletus, Biju; Olds, William; Sundarajoo, Shankaran; Fredericks, Peter M; Jaatinen, Esa

    2012-05-30

    Deep Raman spectroscopy has been utilized for the standoff detection of concealed chemical threat agents from a distance of 15 m under real life background illumination conditions. By using combined time and space resolved measurements, various explosive precursors hidden in opaque plastic containers were identified non-invasively. Our results confirm that combined time and space resolved Raman spectroscopy leads to higher selectivity towards the sub-layer over the surface layer as well as enhanced rejection of fluorescence from the container surface when compared to standoff spatially offset Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra that have minimal interference from the packaging material and good signal-to-noise ratio were acquired within 5 s of measurement time. A new combined time and space resolved Raman spectrometer has been designed with nanosecond laser excitation and gated detection, making it of lower cost and complexity than picosecond-based laboratory systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Rayleigh rejection filters for 193-nm ArF laser Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Selected organic absorbers and their solvents are evaluated as spectral filters for the rejection of 193-nm Rayleigh light associated with the use of an ArF excimer laser for Raman spectroscopy. A simply constructed filter cell filled with 0.5 percent acetone in water and an optical path of 7 mm is shown effectively to eliminate stray Rayleigh light underlying the Raman spectrum from air while transmitting 60 percent of the Raman light scattered by O2.

  2. Proposal for the measuring molecular velocity vector with single-pulse coherent Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Methods for simultaneous measurements of more than one flow velocity component using coherent Raman spectroscopy are proposed. It is demonstrated that using a kilowatt broad-band probe pulse (3-30 GHz) along with a megawatt narrow-band pump pulse (approximately 100 MHz), coherent Raman signal resulting from a single laser pulse is sufficient to produce a high-resolution Raman spectrum for a velocity measurement.

  3. [Detection of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles by tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Jia; Wang, Rui; Xu, Ji-Ying; Tian, Qian; Yu, Jian-Yuan

    2009-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique in the characterization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). However, this spectral method is subject to two obstacles. One is spatial resolution, namely the diffraction limits of light, and the other is its inherent small Raman cross section and weak signal. To resolve these problems, a new approach has been developed, denoted tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). TERS has been demonstrated to be a powerful spectroscopic and microscopic technique to characterize nanomaterial or nanostructures. Excited by a focused laser beam, an enhanced electric field is generated in the vicinity of a metallic tip because of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) and lightening rod effect. Consequently, Raman signal from the sample area illuminated by the enhanced field nearby the tip is enhanced. At the same time, the topography is obtained in the nanometer scale. The exact corresponding relationship between the localized Raman and the topography makes the Raman identification at the nanometer scale to be feasible. In the present paper, based on an inverted microscope and a metallic AFM tip, a tip-enhanced Raman system was set up. The radius of the Au-coated metallic tip is about 30 nm. The 532 nm laser passes through a high numerical objective (NA0.95) from the bottom to illuminate the tip to excite the enhanced electric field. Corresponding with the AFM image, the tip-enhanced near-field Raman of a 100 nm diameter single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles was obtained. The SWNTs were prepared by arc method. Furthermore, the near-field Raman of about 3 SWNTs of the bundles was received with the spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit. Compared with the far-field Raman, the enhancement factor of the tip-enhanced Raman is more than 230. With the super-diffraction spatial resolution and the tip-enhanced Raman ability, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy will play an important role in the nano-material and nano-structure characterization.

  4. Characterization of anisotropic thermal conductivity of suspended nm-thick black phosphorus with frequency-resolved Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianyu; Han, Meng; Wang, Ridong; Yuan, Pengyu; Xu, Shen; Wang, Xinwei

    2018-04-01

    Frequency-resolved Raman spectroscopy (FR-Raman) is a new technique for nondestructive thermal characterization. Here, we apply this new technique to measure the anisotropic thermal conductivity of suspended nm-thick black phosphorus samples without the need of optical absorption and temperature coefficient. Four samples with thicknesses between 99.8 and 157.6 nm are studied. Based on steady state laser heating and Raman measurement of samples with a specifically designed thermal transport path, the thermal conductivity ratio (κZZ/κAC) is determined to be 1.86-3.06. Based on the FR-Raman measurements, the armchair thermal conductivity is measured as 14-22 W m-1 K-1, while the zigzag thermal conductivity is 40-63 W m-1 K-1. FR-Raman has great potential for studying the thermal properties of various nanomaterials. This study significantly advances our understanding of thermal transport in black phosphorus and facilitates the application of black phosphorus in novel devices.

  5. Developing a Transdisciplinary Teaching Implement for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explain why I wrote the set of teaching notes on Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and why they look the way they do. The notes were intended as a student reference to question, highlight and write over as much as they wish during an initial practical demonstration of the threshold concept being introduced, in this case…

  6. Visualizing the Solute Vaporization Interference in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockery, Christopher R.; Blew, Michael J.; Goode, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Every day, tens of thousands of chemists use analytical atomic spectroscopy in their work, often without knowledge of possible interferences. We present a unique approach to study these interferences by using modern response surface methods to visualize an interference in which aluminum depresses the calcium atomic absorption signal. Calcium…

  7. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Walter

    1982-01-01

    The status of current techniques and methods of atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy (flame, hybrid, and furnace AA) is discussed, including limitations. Technological opportunities and how they may be used in AA are also discussed, focusing on automation, microprocessors, continuum AA, hybrid analyses, and others. (Author/JN)

  8. Cellulose I crystallinity determination using FT-Raman spectroscopy : univariate and multivariate methods

    Treesearch

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Richard S. Reiner; Sally A. Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Two new methods based on FT–Raman spectroscopy, one simple, based on band intensity ratio, and the other using a partial least squares (PLS) regression model, are proposed to determine cellulose I crystallinity. In the simple method, crystallinity in cellulose I samples was determined based on univariate regression that was first developed using the Raman band...

  9. DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN SOME FERTILIZERS AND PLANT TISSUE BY RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have successfully used Raman spectroscopy for the direct qualitative and quantitative analysis of perchlorate in fertilizer extracts without the need for chromatographic separation. This approach is attractive because Raman is not hindered by the presence of water or of high ...

  10. Time-Gated Raman Spectroscopy for Quantitative Determination of Solid-State Forms of Fluorescent Pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Lipiäinen, Tiina; Pessi, Jenni; Movahedi, Parisa; Koivistoinen, Juha; Kurki, Lauri; Tenhunen, Mari; Yliruusi, Jouko; Juppo, Anne M; Heikkonen, Jukka; Pahikkala, Tapio; Strachan, Clare J

    2018-04-03

    Raman spectroscopy is widely used for quantitative pharmaceutical analysis, but a common obstacle to its use is sample fluorescence masking the Raman signal. Time-gating provides an instrument-based method for rejecting fluorescence through temporal resolution of the spectral signal and allows Raman spectra of fluorescent materials to be obtained. An additional practical advantage is that analysis is possible in ambient lighting. This study assesses the efficacy of time-gated Raman spectroscopy for the quantitative measurement of fluorescent pharmaceuticals. Time-gated Raman spectroscopy with a 128 × (2) × 4 CMOS SPAD detector was applied for quantitative analysis of ternary mixtures of solid-state forms of the model drug, piroxicam (PRX). Partial least-squares (PLS) regression allowed quantification, with Raman-active time domain selection (based on visual inspection) improving performance. Model performance was further improved by using kernel-based regularized least-squares (RLS) regression with greedy feature selection in which the data use in both the Raman shift and time dimensions was statistically optimized. Overall, time-gated Raman spectroscopy, especially with optimized data analysis in both the spectral and time dimensions, shows potential for sensitive and relatively routine quantitative analysis of photoluminescent pharmaceuticals during drug development and manufacturing.

  11. Line-scan spatially offset Raman spectroscopy for inspecting subsurface food safety and quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper presented a method for subsurface food inspection using a newly developed line-scan spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) technique. A 785 nm laser was used as a Raman excitation source. The line-shape SORS data was collected in a wavenumber range of 0–2815 cm-1 using a detection mod...

  12. Development of a drug assay using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, S. M.; Roe, Jeffrey N.; Andresen, Brian D.; Myrick, Michael L.; Milanovich, Fred P.

    1990-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been used to detect low levels of several chemical compounds, including the drugs of abuse -cocaine hydrochloride and methamphetamme hydrochloride. Raman spectra of these substances have also been taken over optical fibers using red-wavelength excitation. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of the remote determination of various target chemicals using diode laser excitation and diode array detection.

  13. 1064nm FT-Raman spectroscopy for investigations of plant cell walls and other biomass materials

    Treesearch

    Umesh P. Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy with its various special techniques and methods has been applied to study plant biomass for about 30 years. Such investigations have been performed at both macro- and micro-levels. However, with the availability of the Near Infrared (NIR) (1064 nm) Fourier Transform (FT)-Raman instruments where, in most materials, successful fluorescence suppression...

  14. Determination of ethylenic residues in wood and TMP of spruce by FT-Raman spectroscopy

    Treesearch

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Sally A. Ralph

    2008-01-01

    A method based on FT-Raman spectroscopy is proposed for determining in situ concentrations of ethylenic residues in softwood lignin. Raman contributions at 1133 and 1654 cm-1, representing coniferaldehyde and coniferyl alcohol structures, respectively, were used in quantifying these units in spruce wood with subsequent conversion to concentrations in lignin. For...

  15. IR absorption and surface-enhanced Raman spectra of the isoquinoline alkaloid berberine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strekal', N. D.; Motevich, I. G.; Nowicky, J. W.; Maskevich, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    We present the IR absorption and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of the isoquinoline alkaloid berberine adsorbed on a silver hydrosol and on the surface of a silver electrode for different potentials. Based on quantum chemical calculations, for the first time we have assigned the vibrations in the berberine molecule according to vibrational mode. The effect of the potential of the silver electrode on the geometry of sorption of the molecule on the surface is considered, assuming a short-range mechanism for enhancement of Raman scattering.

  16. Comparison of fluorescence rejection methods of baseline correction and shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhijian; Zou, Wenlong; Wu, Jianhong

    2017-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been extensively used in biochemical tests, explosive detection, food additive and environmental pollutants. However, fluorescence disturbance brings a big trouble to the applications of portable Raman spectrometer. Currently, baseline correction and shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) methods are the most prevailing fluorescence suppressing methods. In this paper, we compared the performances of baseline correction and SERDS methods, experimentally and simulatively. Through the comparison, it demonstrates that the baseline correction can get acceptable fluorescence-removed Raman spectrum if the original Raman signal has good signal-to-noise ratio, but it cannot recover the small Raman signals out of large noise background. By using SERDS method, the Raman signals, even very weak compared to fluorescence intensity and noise level, can be clearly extracted, and the fluorescence background can be completely rejected. The Raman spectrum recovered by SERDS has good signal to noise ratio. It's proved that baseline correction is more suitable for large bench-top Raman system with better quality or signal-to-noise ratio, while the SERDS method is more suitable for noisy devices, especially the portable Raman spectrometers.

  17. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy as a Probe of the Surface Chemistry of Nanostructured Materials.

    PubMed

    Dick, Susan; Konrad, Magdalena P; Lee, Wendy W Y; McCabe, Hannah; McCracken, John N; Rahman, Taifur M D; Stewart, Alan; Xu, Yikai; Bell, Steven E J

    2016-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is now widely used as a rapid and inexpensive tool for chemical/biochemical analysis. The method can give enormous increases in the intensities of the Raman signals of low-concentration molecular targets if they are adsorbed on suitable enhancing substrates, which are typically composed of nanostructured Ag or Au. However, the features of SERS that allow it to be used as a chemical sensor also mean that it can be used as a powerful probe of the surface chemistry of any nanostructured material that can provide SERS enhancement. This is important because it is the surface chemistry that controls how these materials interact with their local environment and, in real applications, this interaction can be more important than more commonly measured properties such as morphology or plasmonic absorption. Here, the opportunity that this approach to SERS provides is illustrated with examples where the surface chemistry is both characterized and controlled in order to create functional nanomaterials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Stand-off detection of explosives vapors by resonance-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Ida; Ceco, Ema; Ehlerding, Anneli; Östmark, Henric

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes a system for stand-off vapor detection based on Resonant Raman spectroscopy, RRS. The system is a step towards a RRS LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) system, capable of detecting vapors from explosives and explosives precursors at long distances. The current system was used to detect the vapor of nitromethane and mononitrotoluene outdoors in the open air, at a stand-off distance of 11-13 meters. Also, the signal dependence upon irradiation wavelength and sample concentration was studied in controlled laboratory conditions. A tunable Optical Parametric Oscillator pumped by an Nd:YAG laser, with a pulse length of 6 ns, was operated in the UV range of interest, 210-400 nm, illuminating the sample vapor. The backscattered Raman signal was collected by a telescope and a roundto- slit optical fiber was used to transmit collected light to the spectrometer with minimum losses. A gated intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) registered the spectra. The nitromethane cross section was resonance enhanced more than a factor 30 700, when measured at 220 nm, compared to the 532 nm value. The results show that a decrease in concentration can have a positive effect on the sensitivity of the system, due to a decrease in absorption and selfabsorption in the sample.

  19. “Self-absorption” phenomenon in near-infrared Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy of cellulosic and lignocellulosic materials

    Treesearch

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Nancy Kawai

    2005-01-01

    While cellulosic and lignocellulosic materials have been studied using conventional Raman spectroscopy, availability of near-infrared (NIR) Fourier transform (FT) Raman instrumentation has made studying these materials much more convenient. This is especially true because the problem of laser-induced fluorescence can be avoided or minimized in FT- Raman (NIR Raman)...

  20. Inkjet Printed Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Array on Cellulose Paper

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei W.; White, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel, ultra low-cost surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate has been developed by modifying the surface chemistry of cellulose paper and patterning nanoparticle arrays, all with a consumer inkjet printer. Micro/nanofabrication of SERS substrates for on-chip chemical and biomolecular analysis has been under intense investigation. However, the high cost of producing these substrates and the limited shelf life severely limit their use, especially for routine laboratory analysis and for point-of-sample analysis in the field. Paper-based microfluidic biosensing systems have shown great potential as low-cost disposable analysis tools. In this work, this concept is extended to SERS-based detection. Using an inexpensive consumer inkjet printer, cellulose paper substrates are modified to be hydrophobic in the sensing regions. Synthesized silver nanoparticles are printed onto this hydrophobic paper substrate with microscale precision to form sensing arrays. The hydrophobic surface prevents the aqueous sample from spreading throughout the paper and thus concentrates the analyte within the sensing region. A SERS fingerprint signal for Rhodamine 6G dye was observed for samples with as low as 10 femtomoles of analyte in a total sample volume of 1 μL. This extraordinarily simple technique can be used to construct SERS microarrays immediately before sample analysis, enabling ultra low-cost chemical and biomolecular detection in the lab as well as in the field at the point of sample collection. PMID:21058689

  1. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy on litographically constructed microelectrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhelyaskov, V.R.; Milne, E.T.; Weldon, M.K.

    1995-12-31

    A novel silicon substrate microelectrode array has been demonstrated to function as a surface-enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) microelectrode. SERS from adenosine and pyridine down to 10 mM concentration on silver coated iridium and gold microelectrode arrays have been observed with excitation at 532 nm and 633 nm correspondingly. Ag/AgCl reference electrode and platinum or integrated on the microelectrode iridium counter electrodes were used. Owing to the small area of the activated sites on the microelectrode (10 mm x 15 mm) the SERS signal exhibited a strong laser power dependence. The optimal laser power on the activated site was shown tomore » be in the order of x 100 mW. Good quality SERS spectra were recorded with exposure times of 10s and less. The small size of the electrodes makes them promising for studies in confined spaces. This includes potential applications as capillary electrophoreses detectors and probes of chemistry of biological organisms. A work on detection of lipids adhered to self-organized monolayers (SAM)s of alkanethiols on the activated microelectrodes is in progress.« less

  2. Chemical agent detection by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Gift, Alan; Maksymiuk, Paul; Inscore, Frank E.; Smith, Wayne W.; Morrisey, Kevin; Christesen, Steven D.

    2004-03-01

    In the past decade, the Unites States and its allies have been challenged by a different kind of warfare, exemplified by the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Although suicide bombings are the most often used form of terror, military personnel must consider a wide range of attack scenarios. Among these is the intentional poisoning of water supplies to obstruct military operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. To counter such attacks, the military is developing portable analyzers that can identify and quantify potential chemical agents in water supplies at microgram per liter concentrations within 10 minutes. To aid this effort we have been investigating the value of a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy based portable analyzer. In particular we have been developing silver-doped sol-gels to generate SER spectra of chemical agents and their hydrolysis products. Here we present SER spectra of several chemical agents measured in a generic tap water. Repeat measurements were performed to establish statistical error associated with SERS obtained using the sol-gel coated vials.

  3. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residualmore » stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.« less

  4. Diagnostic Imaging in Flames with Instantaneous Planar Coherent Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bohlin, A; Kliewer, C J

    2014-04-03

    Spatial mapping of temperature and molecular species concentrations is vitally important in studies of gaseous chemically reacting flows. Temperature marks the evolution of heat release and energy transfer, while species concentration gradients provide critical information on mixing and chemical reaction. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) was pioneered in measurements of such processes almost 40 years ago and is authoritative in terms of the accuracy and precision it may provide. While a reacting flow is fully characterized in three-dimensional space, a limitation of CARS has been its applicability as a point-wise measurement technique, motivating advancement toward CARS imaging, and attempts have been made considering one-dimensional probing. Here, we report development of two-dimensional CARS, with the first diagnostics of a planar field in a combusting flow within a single laser pulse, resulting in measured isotherms ranging from 450 K up to typical hydrocarbon flame temperatures of about 2000 K with chemical mapping of O2 and N2.

  5. Monitoring multiple components in vinegar fermentation using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Reyhan Selin; Soykut, Esra Acar; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki; Topcu, Ali

    2013-12-15

    In this study, the utility of Raman spectroscopy (RS) with chemometric methods for quantification of multiple components in the fermentation process was investigated. Vinegar, the product of a two stage fermentation, was used as a model and glucose and fructose consumption, ethanol production and consumption and acetic acid production were followed using RS and the partial least squares (PLS) method. Calibration of the PLS method was performed using model solutions. The prediction capability of the method was then investigated with both model and real samples. HPLC was used as a reference method. The results from comparing RS-PLS and HPLC with each other showed good correlations were obtained between predicted and actual sample values for glucose (R(2)=0.973), fructose (R(2)=0.988), ethanol (R(2)=0.996) and acetic acid (R(2)=0.983). In conclusion, a combination of RS with chemometric methods can be applied to monitor multiple components of the fermentation process from start to finish with a single measurement in a short time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY-BASED METABOLOMICS FOR DIFFERENTIATING EXPOSURES TO TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES USING RAT URINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Normal Raman spectroscopy was evaluated as a metabolomic tool for assessing the impacts of exposure to environmental contaminants, using rat urine collected during the course of a toxicological study. Specifically, one of three triazole fungicides, myclobutanil, propiconazole or ...

  7. Structure-property study of the Raman spectroscopy detection of fusaric acid and analogs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Food security can benefit from the development of selective methods to detect toxins. Fusaric acid is a mycotoxin produced by certain fungi occasionally found in agricultural commodities. Raman spectroscopy allows selective detection of analytes associated with certain spectral characteristics relat...

  8. Elucidation of chemical reactions by two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molesky, Brian Paul

    It has been shown for many systems, including photosynthetic complexes, molecule-semiconductor interfaces, and bulk heterojunctions, that interaction between electronic and nuclear dynamics may heavily influence chemical mechanisms. Four-wave-mixing spectroscopies (i.e. transient absorption, two-dimensional spectroscopy) provide some insight into such non-equilibrium processes but are limited by the single "population time" available in these types of experiments. In this dissertation, two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy (2DRR) is developed to obtain new information regarding chemical reactions that possess time coincident electronic and nuclear evolution. These new insights can only be acquired through higher-order techniques possessing two "population times". Specifically, the coherent reaction mechanism in triiodide photodissociation and structural heterogeneity in myoglobin are investigated. All multidimensional spectroscopies have roots in the off-resonant multidimensional Raman techniques developed from the late 1980's to the early 2000's. Throughout their development these experiments were plagued with technical challenges that eventually halted further use. In this dissertation it is shown through rigorous experimental tests that the technical challenges of the past are obviated for 2DRR, which is done under electronically resonant conditions. The key is that under electronic resonance the harmonic character of vibrational modes contributes to the signal. Under off-resonant conditions signal generation depends on much weaker effects. Upon absorption of light ranging from 250 to 500 nm triiodide photodissociates into diiodide and radical iodine on the same time scale as the period of triiodide's symmetric stretch, impulsively initiating coherence in the stretching coordinate of diiodide. In this dissertation, the sensitivity of 2DRR to coherent reaction mechanisms is shown by directly measuring, for the first time, how the nonequilibrium geometry of

  9. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy: A review of recent applications in forensic science.

    PubMed

    Fikiet, Marisia A; Khandasammy, Shelby R; Mistek, Ewelina; Ahmed, Yasmine; Halámková, Lenka; Bueno, Justin; Lednev, Igor K

    2018-05-15

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy has many advantages over its parent technique of Raman spectroscopy. Some of these advantages such as increased sensitivity and selectivity and therefore the possibility of small sample sizes and detection of small concentrations are invaluable in the field of forensics. A variety of new SERS surfaces and novel approaches are presented here on a wide range of forensically relevant topics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of Raman Spectroscopy and Infrared Spectroscopy in the Identification of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Depciuch, Joanna; Kaznowska, Ewa; Zawlik, Izabela; Wojnarowska, Renata; Cholewa, Marian; Heraud, Philip; Cebulski, Józef

    2016-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are both techniques that allow for the investigation of vibrating chemical particles. These techniques provide information not only about chemical particles through the identification of functional groups and spectral analysis of so-called "fingerprints", these methods allow for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of chemical substances in the sample. Both of these spectral techniques are frequently being used in biology and medicine in diagnosing illnesses and monitoring methods of therapy. The type of breast cancer found in woman is often a malignant tumor, causing 1.38 million new cases of breast cancer and 458 000 deaths in the world in 2013. The most important risk factors for breast cancer development are: sex, age, family history, specific benign breast conditions in the breast, ionizing radiation, and lifestyle. The main purpose of breast cancer screening tests is to establish early diagnostics and to apply proper treatment. Diagnoses of breast cancer are based on: (1) physical techniques (e.g., ultrasonography, mammography, elastography, magnetic resonance, positron emission tomography [PET]); (2) histopathological techniques; (3) biological techniques; and (4) optical techniques (e.g., photo acoustic imaging, fluorescence tomography). However, none of these techniques provides unique or especially revealing answers. The aim of our study is comparative spectroscopic measurements on patients with the following: normal non-cancerous breast tissue; breast cancer tissues before chemotherapy; breast cancer tissues after chemotherapy; and normal breast tissues received around the cancerous breast region. Spectra collected from breast cancer patients shows changes in amounts of carotenoids and fats. We also observed changes in carbohydrate and protein levels (e.g., lack of amino acids, changes in the concentration of amino acids, structural changes) in comparison with normal breast tissues. This fact

  11. Analyte-induced spectral filtering in femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, Baxter; Nieto-Pescador, Jesus; Gundlach, Lars

    Here, we discuss the influence of spectral filtering by samples in femtosecond transient absorption measurements. Commercial instruments for transient absorption spectroscopy (TA) have become increasingly available to scientists in recent years and TA is becoming an established technique to measure the dynamics of photoexcited systems. Furthermore, we show that absorption of the excitation pulse by the sample can severely alter the spectrum and consequently the temporal pulse shape. This “spectral self-filtering” effect can lead to systematic errors and misinterpretation of data, most notably in concentration dependent measurements. Finally, the combination of narrow absorption peaks in the sample with ultrafast broadbandmore » excitation pulses is especially prone to this effect.« less

  12. Analyte-induced spectral filtering in femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Abraham, Baxter; Nieto-Pescador, Jesus; Gundlach, Lars

    2017-03-06

    Here, we discuss the influence of spectral filtering by samples in femtosecond transient absorption measurements. Commercial instruments for transient absorption spectroscopy (TA) have become increasingly available to scientists in recent years and TA is becoming an established technique to measure the dynamics of photoexcited systems. Furthermore, we show that absorption of the excitation pulse by the sample can severely alter the spectrum and consequently the temporal pulse shape. This “spectral self-filtering” effect can lead to systematic errors and misinterpretation of data, most notably in concentration dependent measurements. Finally, the combination of narrow absorption peaks in the sample with ultrafast broadbandmore » excitation pulses is especially prone to this effect.« less

  13. Investigation of Skin Cancers Using MicroRaman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, M. A.; Chen, X. K.; Zeng, H.; Ajlan, A. A.; McLean, D. I.; Hui, H.

    2004-03-01

    We have measured the Raman spectra of skin cancers, including melanoma and basal cell carcinoma, using a confocal microRaman spectrograph. In an attempt to identify the origin of the observed Raman modes, we investigated the spectra obtained from different locations of the samples, compared the observed spectra with those measured from normal human skin and pig skin, and studied the polarization dependence of the spectra. In addition, we will discuss the effects of fluorescence in the measurement of Raman spectra of skin samples.

  14. Micro-Raman Spectroscopy of Silver Nanoparticle Induced Stress on Optically-Trapped Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bankapur, Aseefhali; Krishnamurthy, R. Sagar; Zachariah, Elsa; Santhosh, Chidangil; Chougule, Basavaraj; Praveen, Bhavishna; Valiathan, Manna; Mathur, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    We report here results of a single-cell Raman spectroscopy study of stress effects induced by silver nanoparticles in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). A high-sensitivity, high-resolution Raman Tweezers set-up has been used to monitor nanoparticle-induced biochemical changes in optically-trapped single cells. Our micro-Raman spectroscopic study reveals that hMSCs treated with silver nanoparticles undergo oxidative stress at doping levels in excess of 2 µg/ml, with results of a statistical analysis of Raman spectra suggesting that the induced stress becomes more dominant at nanoparticle concentration levels above 3 µg/ml. PMID:22514708

  15. From near-infrared and Raman to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: progress, limitations and perspectives in bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Elodie; De Bleye, Charlotte; Sacré, Pierre-Yves; Netchacovitch, Lauranne; Hubert, Philippe; Ziemons, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Over recent decades, spreading environmental concern entailed the expansion of green chemistry analytical tools. Vibrational spectroscopy, belonging to this class of analytical tool, is particularly interesting taking into account its numerous advantages such as fast data acquisition and no sample preparation. In this context, near-infrared, Raman and mainly surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) have thus gained interest in many fields including bioanalysis. The two former techniques only ensure the analysis of concentrated compounds in simple matrices, whereas the emergence of SERS improved the performances of vibrational spectroscopy to very sensitive and selective analyses. Complex SERS substrates were also developed enabling biomarker measurements, paving the way for SERS immunoassays. Therefore, in this paper, the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques will be highlighted with a focus on recent progress.

  16. [Rapid identification of potato cultivars using NIR-excited fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Dai, Fen; Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Benjamin, Arnold Julian Vinoj; Hong, Tian-Sheng; Zhiwei, Huang

    2014-03-01

    Potato is one of the most important food in the world. Rapid and noninvasive identification of potato cultivars plays a important role in the better use of varieties. In this study, The identification ability of optical spectroscopy techniques, including near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy and NIR fluorescence spectroscopy, for invasive detection of potato cultivars was evaluated. A rapid NIR Raman spectroscopy system was applied to measure the composite Raman and NIR fluorescence spectroscopy of 3 different species of potatoes (98 samples in total) under 785 nm laser light excitation. Then pure Raman and NIR fluorescence spectroscopy were abstracted from the composite spectroscopy, respectively. At last, the partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was utilized to analyze and classify Raman spectra of 3 different types of potatoes. All the samples were divided into two sets at random: the calibration set (74samples) and prediction set (24 samples), the model was validated using a leave-one-out, cross-validation method. The results showed that both the NIR-excited fluorescence spectra and pure Raman spectra could be used to identify three cultivars of potatoes. The fluorescence spectrum could distinguish the Favorita variety well (sensitivity: 1, specificity: 0.86 and accuracy: 0.92), but the result for Diamant (sensitivity: 0.75, specificity: 0.75 and accuracy: 0. 75) and Granola (sensitivity: 0.16, specificity: 0.89 and accuracy: 0.71) cultivars identification were a bit poorer. We demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy uncovered the main biochemical compositions contained in potato species, and provided a better classification sensitivity, specificity and accuracy (sensitivity: 1, specificity: 1 and accuracy: 1 for all 3 potato cultivars identification) among the three types of potatoes as compared to fluorescence spectroscopy.

  17. Low-lying singlet states of carotenoids having 8-13 conjugated double bonds as determined by electronic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kanematsu, Yasuo; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi; Nishio, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Hideki; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2005-07-01

    Electronic absorption spectra were recorded at room temperature in solutions of carotenoids having different numbers of conjugated double bonds, n = 8-13, including a spheroidene derivatives, neurosporene, spheroidene, lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin and spirilloxanthin. The vibronic states of 1Bu+(v=0-4), 2Ag-(v=0-3), 3Ag- (0) and 1Bu- (0) were clearly identified. The arrangement of the four electronic states determined by electronic absorption spectroscopy was identical to that determined by measurement of resonance Raman excitation profiles [K. Furuichi et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 356 (2002) 547] for carotenoids in crystals.

  18. Determination of the concentration of a Bryonia Dioica tincture by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milea, Irimie; Culea, E.; Iliescu, T.; Milea, Janetta

    1995-03-01

    It was established a method based on Raman spectroscopy in order to control the content and concentration of homeopathic dilutions. Dilutions of a tincture of Bryonia Dioica in ethanol were prepared and investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman line at 881 cm-1 was found to depend linearly versus the concentration of Bryonia Dioica. This permits to obtain a calibration curve that may be used to determine the concentration of Bryonia Dioica in ethanol. The method may be extended to determine the concentration of various homeopathic dilutions.

  19. New Applications of Portable Raman Spectroscopy in Agri-Bio-Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronine, Dmitri; Scully, Rob; Sanders, Virgil

    2014-03-01

    Modern optical techniques based on Raman spectroscopy are being used to monitor and analyze the health of cattle, crops and their natural environment. These optical tools are now available to perform fast, noninvasive analysis of live animals and plants in situ. We will report new applications of a portable handheld Raman spectroscopy to identification and taxonomy of plants. In addition, detection of organic food residues will be demonstrated. Advantages and limitations of current portable instruments will be discussed with suggestions for improved performance by applying enhanced Raman spectroscopic schemes.

  20. Real time near-infrared Raman spectroscopy for the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ming, Lim Chwee; Gangodu, Nagaraja Rao; Loh, Thomas; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Jianfeng; Lin, Kan; Zhiwei, Huang

    2017-07-25

    Near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy has been investigated as a tool to differentiate nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) from normal nasopharyngeal tissue in an ex-vivo setting. Recently, we have miniaturized the fiber-optic Raman probe to investigate its utility in real time in-vivo surveillance of NPC patients. A posterior probability model using partial linear square (PLS) mathematical technique was constructed to verify the sensitivity and specificity of Raman spectroscopy in diagnosing NPC from post-irradiated and normal tissue using a diagnostic algorithm from three significant latent variables. NIR-Raman signals of 135 sites were measured from 79 patients with either newly diagnosed NPC (N = 12), post irradiated nasopharynx (N = 37) and normal nasopharynx (N = 30). The mean Raman spectra peaks identified differences at several Raman peaks at 853 cm-1, 940 cm-1, 1078 cm-1, 1335 cm-1, 1554 cm-1, 2885 cm-1 and 2940 cm-1 in the three different nasopharyngeal conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of distinguishing Raman signatures among normal nasopharynx versus NPC and post-irradiated nasopharynx versus NPC were 91% and 95%; and 77% and 96% respectively. Real time near-infrared Raman spectroscopy has a high specificity in distinguishing malignant from normal nasopharyngeal tissue in vivo, and may be investigated as a novel non-invasive surveillance tool in patients with nasopharyngeal cancer.

  1. Using Raman Spectroscopy and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering to Identify Colorants in Art: An Experiment for an Upper-Division Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayhew, Hannah E.; Frano, Kristen A.; Svoboda, Shelley A.; Wustholz, Kristin L.

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of art represent an attractive way to introduce undergraduate students to concepts in nanoscience, vibrational spectroscopy, and instrumental analysis. Here, we present an undergraduate analytical or physical chemistry laboratory wherein a combination of normal Raman and SERS spectroscopy is used to…

  2. New Material for Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Nelson, Chad; Lee, Yuan

    2004-01-01

    A chemical method of synthesis and application of coating materials that are especially suitable for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been developed. The purpose of this development is to facilitate the utilization of the inherently high sensitivity of SERS to detect chemicals of interest (analytes) in trace amounts, without need for lengthy sample preparation. Up to now, the use of SERS has not become routine because the methods available have not been able to reproduce sampling conditions and provide quantitative measurements. In contrast, the coating materials of the present method enable analysis with minimum preparation of samples, and SERS measurements made using these materials are reproducible and reversible. Moreover, unlike in methods investigated in prior efforts to implement SERS, sampling is not restricted to such specific environments as electrolytes or specific solvents. The coating materials of this method are porous glasses, formed in sol-gel processes, that contain small particles of gold or silver metal. Materials of this type can be applied to the sample-contact surfaces of a variety of sampling and sensing devices, including glass slides, glass vials, fiber-optic probes, and glass tubes. Glass vials with their insides coated according to this method are particularly convenient for SERS to detect trace chemicals in solutions: One simply puts a sample solution containing the analyte(s) into a vial, then puts the vial into a Raman spectrometer for analysis. The chemical ingredients and the physical conditions of the sol-gel process have been selected so that the porous glass formed incorporates particles of the desired metal with size(s) to match the wavelength(s) of the SERS excitation laser in order to optimize the generation of surface plasmons. The ingredients and processing conditions have further been chosen to tailor the porosity and polarity of the glass to optimize the sample flow and the interaction between the analyte

  3. Quantitative determination of the human breast milk macronutrients by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Edlene d. C. M.; Zângaro, Renato A.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    This work proposes the evaluation of the macronutrient constitution of human breast milk based on the spectral information provided by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Human breast milk (5 mL) from a subject was collected during the first two weeks of breastfeeding and stocked in -20°C freezer. Raman spectra were measured using a Raman spectrometer (830 nm excitation) coupled to a fiber based Raman probe. Spectra of human milk were dominated by bands of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates in the 600-1800 cm-1 spectral region. Raman spectroscopy revealed differences in the biochemical constitution of human milk depending on the time of breastfeeding startup. This technique could be employed to develop a classification routine for the milk in Human Milk Banking (HMB) depending on the nutritional facts.

  4. Excited-state Raman spectroscopy with and without actinic excitation: S{sub 1} Raman spectra of trans-azobenzene

    SciTech Connect

    Dobryakov, A. L.; Quick, M.; Ioffe, I. N.

    We show that femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy can record excited-state spectra in the absence of actinic excitation, if the Raman pump is in resonance with an electronic transition. The approach is illustrated by recording S{sub 1} and S{sub 0} spectra of trans-azobenzene in n-hexane. The S{sub 1} spectra were also measured conventionally, upon nπ* (S{sub 0} → S{sub 1}) actinic excitation. The results are discussed and compared to earlier reports.

  5. Dispersive Raman spectroscopy allows the identification and quantification of melanin types

    PubMed Central

    Galván, Ismael; Jorge, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Melanins are the most prevalent pigments in animals and are involved in visual communication by producing colored traits that often evolve as intraspecific signals of quality. Identifying and quantifying melanins are therefore essential to understand the function and evolution of melanin-based signals. However, the analysis of melanins is difficult due to their insolubility and the lack of simple methods that allow the identification of their chemical forms. We recently proposed the use of Raman spectroscopy as a simple, noninvasive technique that can be used to identify and quantify melanins in feathers and hairs. Contrarily, other authors later stated that melanins are characterized by a lack of defined Raman signals. Here, we use confocal Raman microscopy to confirm previous analyses showing that the two main chemical forms of melanins (eumelanin and pheomelanin) exhibit distinct Raman signal and compare different excitation wavelengths to analyze synthetic pheomelanin and natural melanins in feathers of different species of birds. Our analyses indicate that only laser excitation wavelengths below 1064 nm are useful for the analysis of melanins by Raman spectroscopy, and only 780-nm laser in the case of melanins in feathers. These findings show that the capacity of Raman spectroscopy to distinguish different chemical forms of melanins depends on laser power and integration time. As a consequence, Raman spectroscopy should be applied after preliminar analyses using a range of these parameters, especially in fragile biological tissues such as feathers. PMID:25897382

  6. Direct Absorption Spectroscopy with Electro-Optic Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleisher, Adam J.; Long, David A.; Plusquellic, David F.; Hodges, Joseph T.

    2017-06-01

    The application of electro-optic frequency combs to direct absorption spectroscopy has increased research interest in high-agility, modulator-based comb generation. This talk will review common architectures for electro-optic frequency comb generators as well as describe common self-heterodyne and multi-heterodyne (i.e., dual-comb) detection approaches. In order to achieve a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio on the recorded interferogram while allowing for manageable data volumes, broadband electro-optic frequency combs require deep coherent averaging, preferably in real-time. Applications such as cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, precision atomic and molecular spectroscopy, as well as time-resolved spectroscopy will be introduced. D.A. Long et al., Opt. Lett. 39, 2688 (2014) A.J. Fleisher et al., Opt. Express 24, 10424 (2016)

  7. Joint analyses by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman spectroscopy at stand-off distances.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Roger C; Sharma, Shiv K; Thompson, Justin; Misra, Anupam; Lucey, Paul G

    2005-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of solid samples have both been shown to be feasible with sample-to-instrument distances of many meters. The two techniques are very useful together, as the combination of elemental compositions from LIBS and molecular vibrational information from Raman spectroscopy strongly complement each other. Remote LIBS and Raman spectroscopy spectra were taken together on a number of mineral samples including sulfates, carbonates and silicates at a distance of 8.3 m. The complementary nature of these spectra is highlighted and discussed. A factor of approximately 20 difference in intensity was observed between the brightest Raman line of calcite, at optimal laser power, and the brighter Ca I LIBS emission line measured with 55 mJ/pulse laser power. LIBS and Raman spectroscopy have several obstacles to devising a single instrument capable of both techniques. These include the differing spectral ranges and required detection sensitivity. The current state of technology in these areas is discussed.

  8. Differentiating the growth phases of single bacteria using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strola, S. A.; Marcoux, P. R.; Schultz, E.; Perenon, R.; Simon, A.-C.; Espagnon, I.; Allier, C. P.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a longitudinal study of bacteria metabolism performed with a novel Raman spectrometer system. Longitudinal study is possible with our Raman setup since the overall procedure to localize a single bacterium and collect a Raman spectrum lasts only 1 minute. Localization and detection of single bacteria are performed by means of lensfree imaging, whereas Raman signal (from 600 to 3200 cm-1) is collected into a prototype spectrometer that allows high light throughput (HTVS technology, Tornado Spectral System). Accomplishing time-lapse Raman spectrometry during growth of bacteria, we observed variation in the net intensities for some band groups, e.g. amides and proteins. The obtained results on two different bacteria species, i.e. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis clearly indicate that growth affects the Raman chemical signature. We performed a first analysis to check spectral differences and similarities. It allows distinguishing between lag, exponential and stationary growth phases. And the assignment of interest bands to vibration modes of covalent bonds enables the monitoring of metabolic changes in bacteria caused by growth and aging. Following the spectra analysis, a SVM (support vector machine) classification of the different growth phases is presented. In sum this longitudinal study by means of a compact and low-cost Raman setup is a proof of principle for routine analysis of bacteria, in a real-time and non-destructive way. Real-time Raman studies on metabolism and viability of bacteria pave the way for future antibiotic susceptibility testing.

  9. Influence of polarity of solvents on IR absorption and Raman spectra of ascorbic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsenko, S. A.; Danyaeva, Y. S.; Maximova, S. V.

    2018-04-01

    The results of numerical calculations of IR absorption and Raman spectra of ascorbic acid in polar and nonpolar solutions are presented. The dependence of the change in the total energy and the dipole moment of the molecule on the characteristics of the solvents was investigated using the two solvation models. Spectral bands and the corresponding structural groups of the molecule are found, the characteristics of which are most vulnerable to solvents.

  10. [Raman spectroscopy fluorescence background correction and its application in clustering analysis of medicines].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan; Li, Xiao-ning; Liang, Yi-zeng; Zhang, Zhi-min; Liu, Zhao-xia; Zhang, Qi-ming; Ding, Li-xia; Ye, Fei

    2010-08-01

    During Raman spectroscopy analysis, the organic molecules and contaminations will obscure or swamp Raman signals. The present study starts from Raman spectra of prednisone acetate tablets and glibenclamide tables, which are acquired from the BWTek i-Raman spectrometer. The background is corrected by R package baselineWavelet. Then principle component analysis and random forests are used to perform clustering analysis. Through analyzing the Raman spectra of two medicines, the accurate and validity of this background-correction algorithm is checked and the influences of fluorescence background on Raman spectra clustering analysis is discussed. Thus, it is concluded that it is important to correct fluorescence background for further analysis, and an effective background correction solution is provided for clustering or other analysis.

  11. Dental caries detection by optical spectroscopy: a polarized Raman approach with fibre-optic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, A. C.-T.; Choo-Smith, L.-P.; Werner, J.; Hewko, M.; Sowa, M. G.; Dong, C.; Cleghorn, B.

    2006-09-01

    Incipient dental caries lesions appear as white spots on the tooth surface; however, accurate detection of early approximal lesions is difficult due to limited sensitivity of dental radiography and other traditional diagnostic tools. A new fibre-optic coupled spectroscopic method based on polarized Raman spectroscopy (P-RS) with near-IR laser excitation is introduced which provides contrast for detecting and characterizing incipient caries. Changes in polarized Raman spectra are observed in PO 4 3- vibrations arising from hydroxyapatite of mineralized tooth tissue. Demineralization-induced morphological/orientational alteration of enamel crystallites is believed to be responsible for the reduction of Raman polarization anisotropy observed in the polarized Raman spectra of caries lesions. Supporting evidence obtained by polarized Raman spectral imaging is presented. A specially designed fibre-optic coupled setup for simultaneous measurement of parallel- and cross-polarized tooth Raman spectra is demonstrated in this study.

  12. The characterization of photographic materials as substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, J.; Hortin, N.; Christie, S.; Kvasnik, F.; Scully, P. J.

    2005-06-01

    In this study, five types of photographic materials were obtained from commercial sources and characterized for use as substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The substrates are photographic emulsions coated on glass or paper support. The emulsions were developed to maximize the amount of metallic silver aggregated into clusters. The test analyte, Cresyl Violet, was deposited directly onto the substrate surface. The permeable nature of the supporting gelatin matrix enables the interaction between the target analyte and the solid silver clusters. The surface enhanced Raman spectra of a 2.75 × 10-7 M concentration of Cresyl Violet in ethanol were obtained using these photographic substrates. The Raman and resonant Raman enhancement of Cresyl Violet varies from substrate to substrate, as does the ratio of Raman to resonant Raman peak heights.

  13. Rich variety of substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Bich Ha; Hieu Nguyen, Van; Nhung Tran, Hong

    2016-09-01

    The efficiency of the application of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique to each specified purpose significantly depends on the choice of the SERS substrate with an appropriate structure as well as on its performance. Until the present time a rich variety of SERS substrates was fabricated. They can be classified according to their structures. The present work is a review of main types of SERS substrates for using in the trace analysis application. They can be classified into 4 groups: (1) Substrates using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with spherical shape such as colloidal AuNPs, AuNPs fabricated by pulsed laser deposition, by sputtering or by capillary force assembly (CFA), substrates fabricated by electrospinning technique, substrates using metallic nanoparticle arrays fabricated by electron beam lithography combined with CFA method, substrates using silver nanoparticle (AgNP) arrays grain by chemical seeded method, substrates with tunable surface plasmon resonance, substrates based on precies subnanometer plasmonic junctions within AuNP assemblies, substrates fabricated by simultaneously immobilizing both AuNPs and AgNPs on the same glass sides etc. (2) Substrates using nanostructures with non-spherical shapes such as gold nanowire (NW), or highly anisotropic nickel NW together with large area, free-standing carpets, substrates with obviously angular, quasi-vertically aligned cuboid-shaped TiO2 NW arrays decorated with AgNPs, substrates using gold nanoprism monolayer films, substrates using silver nanocube dimmers or monodisperse close-packed gold nanotriangle monolayers. (3) Substrates using multiparticle complex nanostructure such as nanoparticle cluster arrays, gold nanoflowers and nanodendrites. (4) Flexible substrate such as paper-based swab with gold nanorods, adhesive polymer tapes fabricated by inkjet printing method and flexible and adhesive SERS tapes fabricated by decorating AuNPs via the conventional drop-dry method.

  14. Photochemical cycle of bacteriorhodopsin studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stockburger, M; Klusmann, W; Gattermann, H; Massig, G; Peters, R

    1979-10-30

    Individual species of the photochemical cycle of bacteriorhodopsin, a retinal-protein complex of Halobacteria, were studied in aqueous suspensions of the "purple membrane" at room temperature by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy with flow systems. Two pronounced deuterium shifts were found in the RR spectra of the all-trans complex BR-570 in H2O-D2O suspensions. The first is ascribed to C=NH+ (C=ND+) stretching vibrations of the protonated Schiff base which links retinal to opsin. The second is assigned tentatively to an "X-H" ("X-D") bending mode, where "X" is an atom which carries an exchangeable proton. A RR spectrum of the 13-cis-retinal complex "BR-548" could be deduced from spectra of the dark-adapted purple membrane. The RR spectrum of the M-412 intermediate was monitored in a double-beam pump-probe experiment. The main vibrational features of the intermediate M' in the reaction M-412 in equilibrium hv M' leads to delta BR-570 could be deduced from a photostationary mixture of M-412 and M'. Difference procedures were applied to obtain RR spectra of the L-550 intermediate and of two new long-lived species, R1'-590 and R2-550. From kinetic data it is suggested that T1'-590 links the proton-translocating cycle to the "13-cis" cycle of BR-548. The protonation and isomeric states of the different species are discussed in light of the new spectroscopic and kinetic data. It is found that conformational changes during the photochemical cycle play an important role.

  15. Integrated fingerprint and high wavenumber confocal Raman spectroscopy for in vivo diagnosis of cervical precancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Ng, Joseph; Low, Jeffrey J. H.; Ilancheran, A.; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational spectroscopic technique capable of optically probing the compositional, conformational, and structural changes in the tissue associated with disease progression. The main goal of this work is to develop an integrated fingerprint (FP) and high wavenumber (HW) in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy for simultaneous FP/HW tissue Raman spectral measurements. This work further explores the potential of integrated FP/HW Raman spectroscopy developed as a diagnostic tool for in vivo detection of cervical precancer. A total of 473 in vivo integrated FP/HW Raman spectra (340 normal and 133 precancer) were acquired from 35 patients within 1 s during clinical colposcopy. The major tissue Raman peaks are noticed around 854, 937, 1001, 1095, 1253, 1313, 1445, 1654, 2946 and 3400 cm-1, related to the molecular changes (e.g., proteins, lipids, glycogen, nucleic acids, water, etc.) that accompany the dysplastic transformation of tissue. The FP (800 - 1800 cm-1), HW (2800 - 3800 cm-1) and the integrated FP/HW Raman spectra were analyzed using partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) together with the leave-one patient-out, cross-validation. The developed PLS-DA classification models and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves for the FP, HW and integrated FP/HW spectroscopy further discloses that the performance of integrated FP/HW Raman spectroscopy is superior to that of all others in discriminating the dysplastic cervix. The results of this work indicate that the co-contributions of underlying rich biochemical information revealed by the complementary spectral modalities (FP and HW Raman) can improve the in vivo early diagnosis of cervical precancer at clinical colposcopy

  16. Combined autofluorescence and Raman spectroscopy method for skin tumor detection in visible and near infrared regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. P.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Artemyev, D. N.; Myakinin, O. O.; Khristoforova, Y. A.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    The combined application of Raman and autofluorescence spectroscopy in visible and near infrared regions for the analysis of malignant neoplasms of human skin was demonstrated. Ex vivo experiments were performed for 130 skin tissue samples: 28 malignant melanomas, 19 basal cell carcinomas, 15 benign tumors, 9 nevi and 59 normal tissues. Proposed method of Raman spectra analysis allows for malignant melanoma differentiating from other skin tissues with accuracy of 84% (sensitivity of 97%, specificity of 72%). Autofluorescence analysis in near infrared and visible regions helped us to increase the diagnostic accuracy by 5-10%. Registration of autofluorescence in near infrared region is realized in one optical unit with Raman spectroscopy. Thus, the proposed method of combined skin tissues study makes possible simultaneous large skin area study with autofluorescence spectra analysis and precise neoplasm type determination with Raman spectroscopy.

  17. Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy of single optically trapped biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changan; Dinno, Mumtaz A.; Li, Yong-Qing

    2002-02-01

    We report on the development and testing of a compact laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) system. The system combines optical trapping and near-infrared Raman spectroscopy for manipulation and identification of single biological cells in solution. A low-power diode laser at 785 nm was used for both trapping and excitation for Raman spectroscopy of the suspended microscopic particles. The design of the LTRS system provides high sensitivity and permits real-time spectroscopic measurements of the biological sample. The system was calibrated by use of polystyrene microbeads and tested on living blood cells and on both living and dead yeast cells. As expected, different images and Raman spectra were observed for the different cells. The LTRS system may provide a valuable tool for the study of fundamental cellular processes and the diagnosis of cellular disorders.

  18. Study on the echinococcosis blood serum detection based on Raman spectroscopy combined with neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jin-ying; Xu, Liang; Lü, Guo-dong; Tang, Jun; Mo, Jia-qing; Lü, Xiao-yi; Gao, Zhi-xian

    2017-01-01

    A Raman spectroscopy method combined with neural network is used for the invasive and rapid detection of echinococcosis. The Raman spectroscopy measurements are performed on two groups of blood serum samples, which are from 28 echinococcosis patients and 38 healthy persons, respectively. The normalized Raman reflection spectra show that the reflectivity of the echinococcosis blood serum is higher than that of the normal human blood serum in the wavelength ranges of 101—175 nm and 1 801—2 701 nm. Then the principal component analysis (PCA) and back propagation neural network (BPNN) model are used to obtain the diagnosis results. The diagnosis rates for healthy persons and echinococcosis persons are 93.333 3% and 90.909 1%, respectively, so the average final diagnosis rate is 92.121 2%. The results demonstrate that the Raman spectroscopy analysis of blood serum combined with PCA-BPNN has considerable potential for the non-invasive and rapid detection of echinococcosis.

  19. Probing Pharmaceutical Mixtures during Milling: The Potency of Low-Frequency Raman Spectroscopy in Identifying Disorder.

    PubMed

    Walker, Greg; Römann, Philipp; Poller, Bettina; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger; Rooney, Jeremy S; Huff, Gregory S; Smith, Geoffrey P S; Rades, Thomas; Gordon, Keith C; Strachan, Clare J; Fraser-Miller, Sara J

    2017-12-04

    This study uses a multimodal analytical approach to evaluate the rates of (co)amorphization of milled drug and excipient and the effectiveness of different analytical methods in detecting these changes. Indomethacin and tryptophan were the model substances, and the analytical methods included low-frequency Raman spectroscopy (785 nm excitation and capable of measuring both low- (10 to 250 cm -1 ) and midfrequency (450 to 1800 cm -1 ) regimes, and a 830 nm system (5 to 250 cm -1 )), conventional (200-3000 cm -1 ) Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The kinetics of amorphization were found to be faster for the mixture, and indeed, for indomethacin, only partial amorphization occurred (after 360 min of milling). Each technique was capable of identifying the transformations, but some, such as low-frequency Raman spectroscopy and XRPD, provided less ambiguous signatures than the midvibrational frequency techniques (conventional Raman and FTIR). The low-frequency Raman spectra showed intense phonon mode bands for the crystalline and cocrystalline samples that could be used as a sensitive probe of order. Multivariate analysis has been used to further interpret the spectral changes. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential of low-frequency Raman spectroscopy, which has several practical advantages over XRPD, for probing (dis-)order during pharmaceutical processing, showcasing its potential for future development, and implementation as an in-line process monitoring method.

  20. [Application of in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy to analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Lin, Cheng-yan; Yu, Wen-quan; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Ai-guo

    2010-01-01

    Identification of salts is a principal problem for analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs. The fluid inclusions from deep natural gas reservoirs in Minfeng sub-sag were analyzed by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy. The type of fluid inclusions was identified by Raman spectroscopy at room temperature. The Raman spectra show that the inclusions contain methane-bearing brine aqueous liquids. The fluid inclusions were analyzed at -180 degrees C by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy. The spectra show that inclusions contain three salts, namely NaCl2, CaCl2 and MgCl2. Sodium chloride is most salt component, coexisting with small calcium chloride and little magnesium chloride. The origin of fluids in inclusions was explained by analysis of the process of sedimentation and diagenesis. The mechanism of diagenesis in reservoirs was also given in this paper. The results of this study indicate that in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy is an available method to get the composition of fluid inclusions in reservoirs. Based on the analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy with combination of the history of sedimentation and diagenesis, the authors can give important evidence for the type and mechanism of diagenesis in reservoirs.

  1. Synthesizing and Characterizing Graphene via Raman Spectroscopy: An Upper-Level Undergraduate Experiment That Exposes Students to Raman Spectroscopy and a 2D Nanomaterial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parobek, David; Shenoy, Ganesh; Zhou, Feng; Peng, Zhenbo; Ward, Michelle; Liu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    In this upper-level undergraduate experiment, students utilize micro-Raman spectroscopy to characterize graphene prepared by mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The mechanically exfoliated samples are prepared by the students while CVD graphene can be purchased or obtained through outside sources. Owing to the intense Raman…

  2. Thermal transport of carbon nanotubes and graphene under optical and electrical heating measured by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, I.-Kai

    This thesis presents systematic studies of thermal transport in individual single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene by optical and electrical approaches using Raman spectroscopy. In the work presented from Chapter 2 to Chapter 6, individual suspended CNTs are preferentially measured in order to explore their intrinsic thermal properties. Moreover, the Raman thermometry is developed to detect the temperature of the carbon nanotube (CNT). A parabolic temperature profile is observed in the suspended region of the CNT while a heating laser scans across it, providing a direct evidence of diffusive thermal transport in an individual suspended CNT. Based on the curvature of the temperature profile, we can solve for the ratio of thermal contact resistance to the thermal resistance of the CNT, which spans the range from 0.02 to 17. The influence of thermal contact resistance on the thermal transport in an individual suspended CNT is also studied. The Raman thermometry is carried out in the center of a CNT, while its contact length is successively shortened by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip cutting technique. By investigating the dependence of the CNT temperature on its thermal contact length, the temperature of a CNT is found to increase dramatically as the contact length is made shorter. This work reveals the importance of manipulating the CNT thermal contact length when adopting CNT as a thermal management material. In using a focused laser to induce heating in a suspended CNT, one open question that remains unanswered is how many of the incident photons are absorbed by the CNT of interest. To address this question, micro-fabricated platinum thermometers, together with micro-Raman spectroscopy are used to quantify the optical absorption of an individual CNT. The absorbed power in the CNT is equal to the power detected by two thermometers at the end of the CNT. Our result shows that the optical absorption lies in the range between 0.03 to 0.44%. In

  3. Raman Spectra of High-κ Dielectric Layers Investigated with Micro-Raman Spectroscopy Comparison with Silicon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Borowicz, P.; Taube, A.; Rzodkiewicz, W.; Latek, M.; Gierałtowska, S.

    2013-01-01

    Three samples with dielectric layers from high-κ dielectrics, hafnium oxide, gadolinium-silicon oxide, and lanthanum-lutetium oxide on silicon substrate were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained for high-κ dielectrics were compared with spectra recorded for silicon dioxide. Raman spectra suggest the similarity of gadolinium-silicon oxide and lanthanum-lutetium oxide to the bulk nondensified silicon dioxide. The temperature treatment of hafnium oxide shows the evolution of the structure of this material. Raman spectra recorded for as-deposited hafnium oxide are similar to the results obtained for silicon dioxide layer. After thermal treatment especially at higher temperatures (600°C and above), the structure of hafnium oxide becomes similar to the bulk non-densified silicon dioxide. PMID:24072982

  4. Characterizing caged molecules through flash photolysis and transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kao, Joseph P Y; Muralidharan, Sukumaran

    2013-01-01

    Caged molecules are photosensitive molecules with latent biological activity. Upon exposure to light, they are rapidly transformed into bioactive molecules such as neurotransmitters or second messengers. They are thus valuable tools for using light to manipulate biology with exceptional spatial and temporal resolution. Since the temporal performance of the caged molecule depends critically on the rate at which bioactive molecules are generated by light, it is important to characterize the kinetics of the photorelease process. This is accomplished by initiating the photoreaction with a very brief but intense pulse of light (i.e., flash photolysis) and monitoring the course of the ensuing reactions through various means, the most common of which is absorption spectroscopy. Practical guidelines for performing flash photolysis and transient absorption spectroscopy are described in this chapter.

  5. Sensitive Detection and Identification of Isovanillin Aerosol Particles at the pg/cm3 Mass Concentration Level using Raman Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-24

    Spectroscopy * R. L. Aggarwal1, S. Di Cecca, L. W. Farrar, Shabshelowitz, A...Public Release A compact Raman spectroscopy system with high sensitivity to chemical aerosols has been developed. This system has been used to...this represents the lowest chemical aerosol concentration and signal integration period product ever reported for a Raman spectroscopy system.

  6. In situ monitoring of cocrystals in formulation development using low-frequency Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Otaki, Takashi; Tanabe, Yuta; Kojima, Takashi; Miura, Masaru; Ikeda, Yukihiro; Koide, Tatsuo; Fukami, Toshiro

    2018-05-05

    In recent years, to guarantee a quality-by-design approach to the development of pharmaceutical products, it is important to identify properties of raw materials and excipients in order to determine critical process parameters and critical quality attributes. Feedback obtained from real-time analyses using various process analytical technology (PAT) tools has been actively investigated. In this study, in situ monitoring using low-frequency (LF) Raman spectroscopy (10-200 cm -1 ), which may have higher discriminative ability among polymorphs than near-infrared spectroscopy and conventional Raman spectroscopy (200-1800 cm -1 ), was investigated as a possible application to PAT. This is because LF-Raman spectroscopy obtains information about intermolecular and/or lattice vibrations in the solid state. The monitoring results obtained from Furosemide/Nicotinamide cocrystal indicate that LF-Raman spectroscopy is applicable to in situ monitoring of suspension and fluidized bed granulation processes, and is an effective technique as a PAT tool to detect the conversion risk of cocrystals. LF-Raman spectroscopy is also used as a PAT tool to monitor reactions, crystallizations, and manufacturing processes of drug substances and products. In addition, a sequence of conversion behaviors of Furosemide/Nicotinamide cocrystals was determined by performing in situ monitoring for the first time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantitative analysis of essential oils of Thymus daenensis using laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Khoshroo, H; Khadem, H; Bahreini, M; Tavassoli, S H; Hadian, J

    2015-11-10

    Laser-induced fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy are used for the investigation of different genotypes of Thymus daenensis native to the Ilam province of Iran. Different genotypes of T. daenensis essential oils, labeled T1 through T7, possess slight differences with regard to the composition of the thymol. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method is performed to determine the concentration of each constituent as a reference method. The Raman spectra of different concentrations of pure thymol dissolved in hexane as standard samples are obtained via a laboratory prototype Raman spectroscopy setup for the calculation of the calibration curve. The regression coefficient and limit of detection are calculated. The possibility of the differentiation of different genotypes of T. daenensis is also examined by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, although we do not know the exact amounts of their components. All the fluorescence spectral information is used jointly by cluster analysis to differentiate between 7 genotypes. Our results demonstrate the acceptable precision of Raman spectroscopy with GC-MS and corroborate the capacity of Raman spectroscopy in applications in the quantitative analysis field. Furthermore, the cluster analysis results show that laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy is an acceptable technique for the rapid classification of different genotypes of T. daenensis without having any previous information of their exact amount of constituents. So, the ability to rapidly and nondestructively differentiate between genotypes makes it possible to efficiently select high-quality herbs from many samples.

  8. Potential drug - nanosensor conjugates: Raman, infrared absorption, surface - enhanced Raman, and density functional theory investigations of indolic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pięta, Ewa; Paluszkiewicz, Czesława; Oćwieja, Magdalena; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.

    2017-05-01

    An extremely important aspect of planning cancer treatment is not only the drug efficiency but also a number of challenges associated with the side effects and control of this process. That is why it is worth paying attention to the promising potential of the gold nanoparticles combined with a compound treated as a potential drug. This work presents Raman (RS), infrared absorption (IR) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopic investigations of N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine (melatonin) and α-methyl-DL-tryptophan, regarding as anti breast cancer agents. The experimental spectroscopic analysis was supported by the quantum-chemical calculations based on the B3LYP hybrid density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP 6-311G(d,p) level of theory. The studied compounds were adsorbed onto two colloidal gold nanosensors synthesized by a chemical reduction method using sodium borohydride (SB) and trisodium citrate (TC), respectively. Its morphology characteristics were obtained using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It has been suggested that the NH moiety from the aromatic ring, a well-known proton donor, causes the formation of hydrogen bonds with the negatively charged gold surface.

  9. Use of Raman spectroscopy in the analysis of nickel allergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alda, Javier; Castillo-Martinez, Claudio; Valdes-Rodriguez, Rodrigo; Hernández-Blanco, Diana; Moncada, Benjamin; González, Francisco J.

    2013-06-01

    Raman spectra of the skin of subjects with nickel allergy are analyzed and compared to the spectra of healthy subjects to detect possible biochemical differences in the structure of the skin that could help diagnose metal allergies in a noninvasive manner. Results show differences between the two groups of Raman spectra. These spectral differences can be classified using principal component analysis. Based on these findings, a novel computational technique to make a fast evaluation and classification of the Raman spectra of the skin is presented and proposed as a noninvasive technique for the detection of nickel allergy.

  10. Modulated Fourier Transform Raman Fiber-Optic Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Cooper, John B. (Inventor); Wise, Kent L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A modification to a commercial Fourier Transform (FT) Raman spectrometer is presented for the elimination of thermal backgrounds in the FT Raman spectra. The modification involves the use of a mechanical optical chopper to modulate the continuous wave laser, remote collection of the signal via fiber optics, and connection of a dual-phase digital-signal-processor (DSP) lock-in amplifier between the detector and the spectrometer's collection electronics to demodulate and filter the optical signals. The resulting Modulated Fourier Transform Raman Fiber-Optic Spectrometer is capable of completely eliminating thermal backgrounds at temperatures exceeding 300 C.

  11. Fourier transfer Raman spectroscopy of pyridine adsorbed onto Y-zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferwerda, R.; van der Maas, John H.

    1994-01-01

    FT near-infrared excited Raman spectroscopy is used to get a better insight in the adsorption of pyridine onto NaxHyY zeolites. It appears that five different adsorption sites can be monitored; `physisorbed,' OH bonded, Lewis and two distinct Bronsted sites. Comparison to infrared spectroscopy reveals better understanding of the vibrational spectra.

  12. Label free detection of phospholipids by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Tahsin; Foster, Erick; Vigil, Genevieve; Khan, Aamir A.; Bohn, Paul; Howard, Scott S.

    2014-08-01

    We present our study on compact, label-free dissolved lipid sensing by combining capillary electrophoresis separation in a PDMS microfluidic chip online with mid-infrared (MIR) absorption spectroscopy for biomarker detection. On-chip capillary electrophoresis is used to separate the biomarkers without introducing any extrinsic contrast agent, which reduces both cost and complexity. The label free biomarker detection could be done by interrogating separated biomarkers in the channel by MIR absorption spectroscopy. Phospholipids biomarkers of degenerative neurological, kidney, and bone diseases are detectable using this label free technique. These phospholipids exhibit strong absorption resonances in the MIR and are present in biofluids including urine, blood plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid. MIR spectroscopy of a 12-carbon chain phosphatidic acid (PA) (1,2-dilauroyl-snglycero- 3-phosphate (sodium salt)) dissolved in N-methylformamide, exhibits a strong amide peak near wavenumber 1660 cm-1 (wavelength 6 μm), arising from the phosphate headgroup vibrations within a low-loss window of the solvent. PA has a similar structure to many important phospholipids molecules like phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and phosphatidylserine (PS), making it an ideal molecule for initial proof-of-concept studies. This newly proposed detection technique can lead us to minimal sample preparation and is capable of identifying several biomarkers from the same sample simultaneously.

  13. Transient Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of a Light-Driven Sodium-Ion-Pump Rhodopsin from Indibacter alkaliphilus.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Kousuke; Kikukawa, Takashi; Nakashima, Hiroki; Yamaryo, Haruki; Saito, Yuta; Fujisawa, Tomotsumi; Demura, Makoto; Unno, Masashi

    2017-05-04

    Sodium-ion-pump rhodopsin (NaR) is a microbial rhodopsin that transports Na + during its photocycle. Here we explore the photocycle mechanism of NaR from Indibacter alkaliphilus with transient absorption and transient resonance Raman spectroscopy. The transient absorption data indicate that the photocycle of NaR is K (545 nm) → L (490 nm)/M (420 nm) → O 1 (590 nm) → O 2 (560 nm) → NaR, where the L and M are formed as equilibrium states. The presence of K, L, M, and O intermediates was confirmed by the resonance Raman spectra with 442 and 532 nm excitation. The main component of the transient resonance Raman spectra was due to L which contains a 13-cis retinal protonated Schiff base. The presence of an enhanced hydrogen out-of-plane band as well as its sensitivity to the H/D exchange indicate that the retinal chromophore is distorted near the Schiff base region in L. Moreover, the retinal Schiff base of the L state forms a hydrogen bond that is stronger than that of the dark state. These observations are consistent with a Na + pumping mechanism that involves a proton transfer from the retinal Schiff base to a key aspartate residue (Asp116 in Krokinobacter eikastus rhodopsin 2) in the L/M states.

  14. A novel non-imaging optics based Raman spectroscopy device for transdermal blood analyte measurement

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Chae-Ryon; Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Kang, Jeon Woong; Galindo, Luis; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Due to its high chemical specificity, Raman spectroscopy has been considered to be a promising technique for non-invasive disease diagnosis. However, during Raman excitation, less than one out of a million photons undergo spontaneous Raman scattering and such weakness in Raman scattered light often require highly efficient collection of Raman scattered light for the analysis of biological tissues. We present a novel non-imaging optics based portable Raman spectroscopy instrument designed for enhanced light collection. While the instrument was demonstrated on transdermal blood glucose measurement, it can also be used for detection of other clinically relevant blood analytes such as creatinine, urea and cholesterol, as well as other tissue diagnosis applications. For enhanced light collection, a non-imaging optical element called compound hyperbolic concentrator (CHC) converts the wide angular range of scattered photons (numerical aperture (NA) of 1.0) from the tissue into a limited range of angles accommodated by the acceptance angles of the collection system (e.g., an optical fiber with NA of 0.22). A CHC enables collimation of scattered light directions to within extremely narrow range of angles while also maintaining practical physical dimensions. Such a design allows for the development of a very efficient and compact spectroscopy system for analyzing highly scattering biological tissues. Using the CHC-based portable Raman instrument in a clinical research setting, we demonstrate successful transdermal blood glucose predictions in human subjects undergoing oral glucose tolerance tests. PMID:22125761

  15. Combining Raman and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy by double pulse lasing.

    PubMed

    Lednev, Vasily N; Pershin, Sergey M; Sdvizhenskii, Pavel A; Grishin, Mikhail Ya; Fedorov, Alexander N; Bukin, Vladimir V; Oshurko, Vadim B; Shchegolikhin, Alexander N

    2018-01-01

    A new approach combining Raman spectrometry and laser induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) within a single laser event was suggested. A pulsed solid state Nd:YAG laser running in double pulse mode (two frequency-doubled sequential nanosecond laser pulses with dozens microseconds delay) was used to combine two spectrometry methods within a single instrument (Raman/LIBS spectrometer). First, a low-energy laser pulse (power density far below ablation threshold) was used for Raman measurements while a second powerful laser pulse created the plasma suitable for LIBS analysis. A short time delay between two successive pulses allows measuring LIBS and Raman spectra at different moments but within a single laser flash-lamp pumping. Principal advantages of the developed instrument include high quality Raman/LIBS spectra acquisition (due to optimal gating for Raman/LIBS independently) and absence of target thermal alteration during Raman measurements. A series of high quality Raman and LIBS spectra were acquired for inorganic salts (gypsum, anhydrite) as well as for pharmaceutical samples (acetylsalicylic acid). To the best of our knowledge, the quantitative analysis feasibility by combined Raman/LIBS instrument was demonstrated for the first time by calibration curves construction for acetylsalicylic acid (Raman) and copper (LIBS) in gypsum matrix. Combining ablation pulses and Raman measurements (LIBS/Raman measurements) within a single instrument makes it an efficient tool for identification of samples hidden by non-transparent covering or performing depth profiling analysis including remote sensing. Graphical abstract Combining Raman and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy by double pulse lasing.

  16. Multi-fiber strains measured by micro-Raman spectroscopy: Principles and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhenkun; Wang, Yunfeng; Qin, Fuyong; Qiu, Wei; Bai, Ruixiang; Chen, Xiaogang

    2016-02-01

    Based on widely used axial strain measurement method of Kevlar single fiber, an original theoretical model and measurement principle of application of micro-Raman spectroscopy to multi-fiber strains in a fiber bundle were established. The relationship between the nominal Raman shift of fiber bundle and the multi-fiber strains was deduced. The proposed principle for multi-fiber strains measurement is consistent with two special cases: single fiber deformation and multi-fiber deformation under equal strain. It is found experimentally that the distribution of Raman scattering intensity of a Kevlar 49 fiber as a function of distance between a fiber and the laser spot center follows a Gaussian function. Combining the Raman-shift/strain relationship of the Kevlar 49 single fiber and the uniaxial tension measured by micro-Raman spectroscopy, the Raman shift as a function of strain was obtained. Then the Raman peak at 1610 cm-1 for the Kevlar 49 fiber was fitted to a Lorentzian function and the FWHM showed a quadratic increase with the fiber strain. Finally, a dual-fiber tensile experiment was performed to verify the adequacy of the Raman technique for the measurement of multi-fiber strains.

  17. [Study of alkaline lignin from Arundo donax linn based on FT Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    You, Ting-ting; Ma, Jian-feng; Guo, Si-qin; Xu, Feng

    2014-08-01

    Arundo donax linn, as a perennial energy crop, has promising application prospect. In the present study, Fourier transform Raman (FT Raman) spectroscopy was applied to determine the structural information of materials, milled wood lignin (MWL), and alkaline lignins (AL, under different treated time) from A. donax stem nondestructively. The results indicated that, extractable compounds in A. donax had negative contribution to the Raman spectra without rising new Raman peaks. FT Raman spectrum of MWL indicated that MWL from A. donax was HGS type lignins. Compared with the spectra of MWL from wood materials, the peak at 1173 cm(-1) was much higher in intensity for the MWL from A. donax stem, which may be assigned to hydroxycinnamic acid by analyzing the standard. With respect to FT Raman spectra of ALs, the relatively highest intensity of 1173 cm(-1) was found in alkaline lignin (AL2), which was treated for 40 min by alkaline. Moreover, the peak of coniferaldehyde/sinapaldehyde (1630 cm(-1)) was lowest in intensity while the band attributed to coniferyl alcohol/sinapyl alcohol (1660 cm(-1)) was almost disappeared in AL2. It could be inferred that AL2 demonstrated a highest content of phenolic acid, which may improve its potential application, such as for antioxidant activity. Furthermore, the results obtained by FT Raman spectra were verified by two dimensional heteronuclear singlequantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. Above all, FT Raman spectroscopy provided alternative safe, rapid, accurate, and nondestructive technology for lignin structure determination.

  18. Blood identification and discrimination between human and nonhuman blood using portable Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, J; Fujita, Y; Yamamoto, T; Nishimoto, N; Kimura-Kataoka, K; Kurata, S; Takinami, Y; Yasuda, T; Takeshita, H

    2017-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is commonly used in chemistry to identify molecular structure. This technique is a nondestructive analysis and needs no sample preparation. Recently, Raman spectroscopy has been shown to be effective as a multipurpose analytical method for forensic applications. In the present study, blood identification and discrimination between human and nonhuman blood were performed by a portable Raman spectrometer, which can be used at a crime scene. To identify the blood and to discriminate between human and nonhuman blood, Raman spectra of bloodstains from 11 species (human, rat, mouse, cow, horse, sheep, pig, rabbit, cat, dog, and chicken) were taken using a portable Raman spectrometer. Raman peaks for blood (742, 1001, 1123, 1247, 1341, 1368, 1446, 1576, and 1619 cm -1 ) could be observed by the portable Raman spectrometer in all 11 species, and the human bloodstain could be distinguished from the nonhuman ones by using a principal component analysis. This analysis can be performed on a bloodstain sample of at least 3 months old. The portable Raman spectrometer can be used at a crime scene, and this analysis is useful for forensic examination.

  19. Characterization method for relative Raman enhancement for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using gold nanoparticle dimer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugano, Koji; Ikegami, Kohei; Isono, Yoshitada

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a characterization method for Raman enhancement for highly sensitive and quantitative surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is reported. A particle dimer shows a marked electromagnetic enhancement when the particle connection direction is matched to the polarization direction of incident light. In this study, dimers were arrayed by nanotrench-guided self-assembly for a marked total Raman enhancement. By measuring acetonedicarboxylic acid, the fabricated structures were characterized for SERS depending on the polarization angle against the particle connection direction. This indicates that the fabricated structures cause an effective SERS enhancement, which is dominated by the electromagnetic enhancement. Then, we measured 4,4‧-bipyridine, which is a pesticide material, for quantitative analysis. In advance, we evaluated the enhancement of the particle structure by the Raman measurement of acetonedicarboxylic acid. Finally, we compared the Raman intensities of acetonedicarboxylic acid and 4,4‧-bipyridine. Their intensities showed good correlation. The advantage of this method for previously evaluating the enhancement of the substrate was demonstrated. This developed SERS characterization method is expected to be applied to various quantitative trace analyses of molecules with high sensitivity.

  20. In situ intracellular spectroscopy with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-enabled nanopipettes.

    PubMed

    Vitol, Elina A; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Bouchard, Michael J; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2009-11-24

    We report on a new analytical approach to intracellular chemical sensing that utilizes a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-enabled nanopipette. The probe is comprised of a glass capillary with a 100-500 nm tip coated with gold nanoparticles. The fixed geometry of the gold nanoparticles allows us to overcome the limitations of the traditional approach for intracellular SERS using metal colloids. We demonstrate that the SERS-enabled nanopipettes can be used for in situ analysis of living cell function in real time. In addition, SERS functionality of these probes allows tracking of their localization in a cell. The developed probes can also be applied for highly sensitive chemical analysis of nanoliter volumes of chemicals in a variety of environmental and analytical applications.

  1. Bioanalytical applications of SERS (surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy).

    PubMed

    Hudson, Stephen D; Chumanov, George

    2009-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful technique for analyzing biological samples as it can rapidly and nondestructively provide chemical and, in some cases, structural information about molecules in aqueous environments. In the Raman scattering process, both visible and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths of light can be used to induce polarization of Raman-active molecules, leading to inelastic light scattering that yields specific molecular vibrational information. The development of surface enhancement has enabled Raman scattering to be an effective tool for qualitative as well as quantitative measurements with high sensitivity and specificity. Recent advances have led to many novel applications of SERS for biological analyses, resulting in new insights for biochemistry and molecular biology, the detection of biological warfare agents, and medical diagnostics for cancer, diabetes, and other diseases. This trend article highlights many of these recent investigations and provides a brief outlook in order to assess possible future directions of SERS as a bioanalytical tool.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS OF RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY TO AQUEOUS SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aim of this chapter is to demonstrate the great potential that the Raman spectroscopic technique offers for environmental applications, particularly to aqueous systems. We demonstrate the benefits of the technique relative to other information-rich spectroscopic techniques, i...

  3. Raman spectroscopy applied to identify metabolites in urine of physically active subjects.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Letícia Parada; Silveira, Landulfo; da Silva, Alexandre Galvão; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu Tavares; Rocco, Débora Dias Ferraretto Moura

    2017-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid and non-destructive technique suitable for biological fluids analysis. In this work, dispersive Raman spectroscopy has been employed as a rapid and nondestructive technique to detect the metabolites in urine of physically active subjects before and after vigorous 30min pedaling or running compared to sedentary subjects. For so, urine samples from 9 subjects were obtained before and immediately after physical activities and submitted to Raman spectroscopy (830nm excitation, 250mW laser power, 20s integration time) and compared to urine from 5 sedentary subjects. The Raman spectra of urine from sedentary showed peaks related to urea, creatinine, ketone bodies, phosphate and other nitrogenous compounds. These metabolic biomarkers presented peaks with different intensities in the urine of physically active individuals after exercises compared to before, measured by the intensity of selected peaks the Raman spectra, which means different concentrations after training. These peaks presented different intensity values for each subject before physical activity, also behaving differently compared to the post-training: some subjects presented increase while others decrease the intensity. Raman spectroscopy may allow the development of a rapid and non-destructive test for metabolic evaluation of the physical training in active and trained subjects using urine samples, allowing nutrition adjustment with the sport's performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Subframe Burst Gating for Raman Spectroscopy in Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Jun; Fischer, David; Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2010-01-01

    We describe an architecture for spontaneous Raman scattering utilizing a frame-transfer CCD sensor operating in a subframe burst-gating mode to realize time-resolved combustion diagnostics. The technique permits all-electronic optical gating with microsecond shutter speeds 5 J.Ls) without compromising optical throughput or image fidelity. When used in conjunction with a pair of orthogonally polarized excitation lasers, the technique measures single-shot vibrational Raman scattering that is minimally contaminated by problematic optical background noise.

  5. Monitoring of aqueous humor metabolites using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicksted, James P.; Erckens, Roel J.; Motamedi, Massoud; March, Wayne F.

    1994-05-01

    Laser Raman scattering has been used to monitor glucose and lactate metabolites within aqueous humor specimens obtained from nine human eyes during cataract surgery. Nine postmortem rabbit eyes were also investigated. Raman measurements were obtained using a single grating Raman spectrometer with a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD. A 514.5 nm line from an argon laser was used to illuminate capillaries containing several microliters of aqueous humor. A water background was subtracted from each of the aqueous humor Raman spectra. This experimental system was calibrated so that each metabolite in water could be measured down to 0.1 weight percent. Raman peaks indicative of the stretching vibrations of methylene and methyl groups associated with glucose and lactate, respectively, were observed in the human specimens. A second stretching mode characteristic of lactate between the carbon atom and either the carboxylic acid group or carboxylate ion group was also observed providing a distinguishing feature between the glucose and lactate Raman peaks. Similar structure was observed from the rabbit specimens, but these samples have recently been found to have been contaminated during euthanasia.

  6. Studying the distribution of deep Raman spectroscopy signals using liquid tissue phantoms with varying optical properties.

    PubMed

    Vardaki, Martha Z; Gardner, Benjamin; Stone, Nicholas; Matousek, Pavel

    2015-08-07

    In this study we employed large volume liquid tissue phantoms, consisting of a scattering agent (Intralipid), an absorption agent (Indian ink) and a synthesized calcification powder (calcium hydroxyapatite (HAP)) similar to that found in cancerous tissues (e.g. breast and prostate), to simulate human tissues. We studied experimentally the magnitude and origin of Raman signals in a transmission Raman geometry as a function of optical properties of the medium and the location of calcifications within the phantom. The goal was to inform the development of future noninvasive cancer screening applications in vivo. The results provide insight into light propagation and Raman scattering distribution in deep Raman measurements, exploring also the effect of the variation of relative absorbance of laser and Raman photons within the phantoms. Most notably when modeling breast and prostate tissues it follows that maximum signals is obtained from the front and back faces of the tissue with the central region contributing less to the measured spectrum.

  7. Understanding the application of Raman spectroscopy to the detection of traces of life.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Craig P; Edwards, Howell G M; Jehlicka, Jan

    2010-03-01

    Investigating carbonaceous microstructures and material in Earth's oldest sedimentary rocks is an essential part of tracing the origins of life on our planet; furthermore, it is important for developing techniques to search for traces of life on other planets, for example, Mars. NASA and ESA are considering the adoption of miniaturized Raman spectrometers for inclusion in suites of analytical instrumentation to be placed on robotic landers on Mars in the near future to search for fossil or extant biomolecules. Recently, Raman spectroscopy has been used to infer a biological origin of putative carbonaceous microfossils in Early Archean rocks. However, it has been demonstrated that the spectral signature obtained from kerogen (of known biological origin) is similar to spectra obtained from many poorly ordered carbonaceous materials that arise through abiotic processes. Yet there is still confusion in the literature as to whether the Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous materials can indeed delineate a signature of ancient life. Despite the similar nature in spectra, rigorous structural interrogation between the thermal alteration products of biological and nonbiological organic materials has not been undertaken. Therefore, we propose a new way forward by investigating the second derivative, deconvolution, and chemometrics of the carbon first-order spectra to build a database of structural parameters that may yield distinguishable characteristics between biogenic and abiogenic carbonaceous material. To place Raman spectroscopy as a technique to delineate a biological origin for samples in context, we will discuss what is currently accepted as a spectral signature for life; review Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material; and provide a historical overview of Raman spectroscopy applied to Archean carbonaceous materials, interpretations of the origin of the ancient carbonaceous material, and a future way forward for Raman spectroscopy.

  8. Monitoring spacecraft atmosphere contaminants by laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.

    1976-01-01

    Laser-based spectrophotometric methods which have been proposed for the detection of trace concentrations of gaseous contaminants include Raman backscattering (LIDAR) and passive radiometry (LOPAIR). Remote sensing techniques using laser spectrometry are presented and in particular a simple long-path laser absorption method (LOLA), which is capable of resolving complex mixtures of closely related trace contaminants at ppm levels is discussed. A number of species were selected for study which are representative of those most likely to accumulate in closed environments, such as submarines or long-duration manned space flights. Computer programs were developed which will permit a real-time analysis of the monitored atmosphere. Estimates of the dynamic range of this monitoring technique for various system configurations, and comparison with other methods of analysis, are given.

  9. Measuring binding kinetics of aromatic thiolated molecules with nanoparticles via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devetter, Brent M.; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Murphy, Catherine J.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-05-01

    Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this study, we report the development of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a method to monitor the kinetics of gold-thiolate bond formation on colloidal gold nanoparticles. A theoretical model combining SERS enhancement with the Beer-Lambert law is proposed to explain ensemble scattering and absorption effects in colloids during chemisorption. In order to maximize biological relevance and signal reproducibility, experiments used to validate the model focused on maintaining nanoparticle stability after the addition of water-soluble aromatic thiolated molecules. Our results indicate that ligand exchange on gold nanoparticles follow a first-order Langmuir adsorption model with rate constants on the order of 0.01 min-1. This study demonstrates an experimental spectroscopic method and theoretical model for monitoring binding kinetics that may prove useful for designing novel probes.Colloidal plasmonic nanomaterials, consisting of metals such as gold and silver, are excellent candidates for advanced optical probes and devices, but precise control over surface chemistry is essential for realizing their full potential. Coupling thiolated (R-SH) molecules to nanoprobe surfaces is a convenient and established route to tailor surface properties. The ability to dynamically probe and monitor the surface chemistry of nanoparticles in solution is essential for rapidly manufacturing spectroscopically tunable nanoparticles. In this

  10. Raman Spectroscopy: An Emerging Tool in Neurodegenerative Disease Research and Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Devitt, George; Howard, Kelly; Mudher, Amrit; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2018-03-21

    The pathogenesis underlining many neurodegenerative diseases remains incompletely understood. The lack of effective biomarkers and disease preventative medicine demands the development of new techniques to efficiently probe the mechanisms of disease and to detect early biomarkers predictive of disease onset. Raman spectroscopy is an established technique that allows the label-free fingerprinting and imaging of molecules based on their chemical constitution and structure. While analysis of isolated biological molecules has been widespread in the chemical community, applications of Raman spectroscopy to study clinically relevant biological species, disease pathogenesis, and diagnosis have been rapidly increasing since the past decade. The growing number of biomedical applications has shown the potential of Raman spectroscopy for detection of novel biomarkers that could enable the rapid and accurate screening of disease susceptibility and onset. Here we provide an overview of Raman spectroscopy and related techniques and their application to neurodegenerative diseases. We further discuss their potential utility in research, biomarker detection, and diagnosis. Challenges to routine use of Raman spectroscopy in the context of neuroscience research are also presented.

  11. Accuracy of Raman spectroscopy in differentiating brain tumor from normal brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Fan, Yimeng; He, Min; Ma, Xuelei; Song, Yanlin; Liu, Ming; Xu, Jianguo

    2017-05-30

    Raman spectroscopy could be applied to distinguish tumor from normal tissues. This meta-analysis was conducted to assess the accuracy of Raman spectroscopy in differentiating brain tumor from normal brain tissue. PubMed and Embase were searched to identify suitable studies prior to Jan 1st, 2016. We estimated the pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR), diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and constructed summary receiver operating characteristics (SROC) curves to identity the accuracy of Raman spectroscopy in differentiating brain tumor from normal brain tissue. A total of six studies with 1951 spectra were included. For glioma, the pooled sensitivity and specificity of Raman spectroscopy were 0.96 (95% CI 0.94-0.97) and 0.99 (95% CI 0.98-0.99), respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.9831. For meningioma, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.98 (95% CI 0.94-1.00) and 1.00 (95% CI 0.98-1.00), respectively. The AUC was 0.9955. This meta-analysis suggested that Raman spectroscopy could be an effective and accurate tool for differentiating glioma and meningioma from normal brain tissue, which would help us both avoid removal of normal tissue and minimize the volume of residual tumor.

  12. MicroRaman Spectroscopy and Raman Imaging of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, M. A.; Zeng, H.; Lui, H.

    2005-03-01

    We have measured the Raman spectra of normal and cancerous skin tissues using a confocal microRaman spectrograph with a sub-micron spatial resolution. We found that the Raman spectrum of a cell nucleolus is different from the spectra measured outside the nucleolus and considerably different from those measured outside the nucleus. In addition, we found significant spectroscopic differences between normal and cancer-bearing sites in the dermis region. In order to utilize these differences for non-invasive skin cancer diagnosis, we have developed a Raman imaging system that clearly demonstrates the structure, location and distribution of cells in unstained skin biopsy samples. Our method is expected to be useful for the detection and characterization of skin cancer based on the known distinct cellular differences between normal and malignant skin.

  13. Multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy study of supported vanadia catalysts: Structure identification and quantification

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Zili

    2014-10-20

    Revealing the structure of supported metal oxide catalysts is a prerequisite for establishing the structure - catalysis relationship. Among a variety of characterization techniques, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, combining resonance Raman and non-resonance Raman with different excitation wavelengths, has recently emerged as a particularly powerful tool in not only identifying but also quantifying the structure of supported metal oxide clusters. In our review, we make use of two supported vanadia systems, VO x/SiO 2 and VO x/CeO 2, as examples to showcase how one can employ this technique to investigate the heterogeneous structure of active oxide clusters and to understand themore » complex interaction between the oxide clusters and the support. Moreover, the qualitative and quantitative structural information gained from the multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy can be utilized to provide fundamental insights for designing more efficient supported metal oxide catalysts.« less

  14. Carbon Isotopic Compositions in Carbon Dioxide Measured By Micro-Laser Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.-J.; Li, R.-X.; Dong, H.; Wang, Zh.-H.; Zhao, B.-S.; Wang, N.; Cheng, J.-H.

    2017-05-01

    We have prepared a series of 12CO2/13CO2 binary mixtures as standard samples at room temperature. Using microlaser Raman spectroscopy, it was found that the relationship between the 12CO2 mole fractions and the peak area ratios of 12CO2/13CO2 in the Raman spectra of CO2 binary mixtures showed a polynomial correlation. The establishment of the experimental working curve paves the way for estimating the mole fractions of each individual fluid inclusion and determining 13C/12C and δ13C u sing micro-Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra of 12CO2 and 13CO2 showed a characteristic peak at 1348 cm-1 with an argon laser at 785 nm, which is perhaps due to the formation of dimers.

  15. Diagnostic Raman spectroscopy for the forensic detection of biomaterials and the preservation of cultural heritage.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Howell G M; Munshi, Tasnim

    2005-07-01

    This paper reviews the contributions of analytical Raman spectroscopy to the non-destructive characterisation of biological materials of relevance to forensic science investigations, including the sourcing of resins and the identification of the biodegradation of art and archaeological artefacts. The advantages of Raman spectroscopy for non-destructive analysis are well-appreciated; however, the ability to record molecular information about organic and inorganic species present in a heterogeneous specimen at the same time, the insensitivity of the Raman scattering process to water and hydroxyl groups, which removes the necessity for sample desiccation, and the ease of illumination for samples of very small and very large sizes and unusual shapes are also apparent. Several examples are used to illustrate the application of Raman spectroscopic techniques to the characterisation of forensic biomaterials and for the preservation of cultural heritage through case studies in the following areas: wall-paintings and rock art, human and animal tissues and skeletal remains, fabrics, resins and ivories.

  16. Remote sensing capacity of Raman spectroscopy in identification of mineral and organic constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Stoker, Carol; Cabrol, Nathalie; McKay, Christopher P.

    2007-09-01

    We present design, integration and test results for a field Raman spectrometer science payload, integrated into the Mars Analog Research and Technology (MARTE) drilling platform. During the drilling operation, the subsurface Raman spectroscopy inspection system has obtained signatures of organic and mineral compositions. We also performed ground truth studies using both this field unit and a laboratory micro Raman spectrometer equipped with multiple laser excitation wavelengths on series of field samples including Mojave rocks, Laguna Verde salty sediment and Rio Tinto topsoil. We have evaluated laser excitation conditions and optical probe designs for further improvement. We have demonstrated promising potential for Raman spectroscopy as a non-destructive in situ, high throughput, subsurface detection technique, as well as a desirable active remote sensing tool for future planetary and space missions.

  17. Non-invasive sex assessment in bovine semen by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, A. C.; Managó, S.; Ferrara, M. A.; Rendina, I.; Sirleto, L.; Puglisi, R.; Balduzzi, D.; Galli, A.; Ferraro, P.; Coppola, G.

    2014-05-01

    X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm cell sorting is of great interest, especially for animal production management systems and genetic improvement programs. Here, we demonstrate an optical method based on Raman spectroscopy to separate X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm cells, overcoming many of the limitations associated with current sex-sorting protocols. A priori Raman imaging of bull spermatozoa was utilized to select the sampling points (head-neck region), which were then used to discriminate cells based on a spectral classification model. Main variations of Raman peaks associated with the DNA content were observed together with a variation due to the sex membrane proteins. Next, we used principal component analysis to determine the efficiency of our device as a cell sorting method. The results (>90% accuracy) demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy is a powerful candidate for the development of a highly efficient, non-invasive, and non-destructive tool for sperm sexing.

  18. Study of spin-ordering and spin-reorientation transitions in hexagonal manganites through Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang-Bai; Hien, Nguyen Thi Minh; Han, Kiok; Nam, Ji-Yeon; Huyen, Nguyen Thi; Shin, Seong-Il; Wang, Xueyun; Cheong, S. W.; Lee, D.; Noh, T. W.; Sung, N. H.; Cho, B. K.; Yang, In-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Spin-wave (magnon) scattering, when clearly observed by Raman spectroscopy, can be simple and powerful for studying magnetic phase transitions. In this paper, we present how to observe magnon scattering clearly by Raman spectroscopy, then apply the Raman method to study spin-ordering and spin-reorientation transitions of hexagonal manganite single crystal and thin films and compare directly with the results of magnetization measurements. Our results show that by choosing strong resonance condition and appropriate polarization configuration, magnon scattering can be clearly observed, and the temperature dependence of magnon scattering can be simple and powerful quantity for investigating spin-ordering as well as spin-reorientation transitions. Especially, the Raman method would be very helpful for investigating the weak spin-reorientation transitions by selectively probing the magnons in the Mn3+ sublattices, while leaving out the strong effects of paramagnetic moments of the rare earth ions. PMID:26300075

  19. Application of NIR Raman spectroscopy for detecting and characterizing early dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, A. C.; Choo-Smith, L.-P.; Zhu, R.; Hewko, M.; Dong, C.; Cleghorn, B.; Sowa, M. G.

    2006-02-01

    Early dental caries detection facilitates implementation of non-surgical methods for arresting caries progression and promoting tooth remineralization. We present a method based on Raman spectroscopy with near-IR laser excitation to provide biochemical contrast for detecting and characterizing incipient carious lesions found in extracted human teeth. Changes in Raman spectra are observed in PO 4 3- vibrations arising from hydroxyapatite of mineralized tooth tissue. Examination of various intensities of the PO 4 3- ν2, ν3, ν4 vibrations showed consistent increased intensities in spectra of carious lesions compared to sound enamel. The spectral changes are attributed to demineralization-induced alterations of enamel crystallite morphology and/or orientation. This hypothesis is supported by reduced Raman polarization anisotropy derived from polarized Raman spectra of carious lesions. Polarized Raman spectral imaging of carious lesions found on whole (i.e. un-sectioned) tooth samples will also be presented.

  20. Real-time Raman spectroscopy of optically trapped living cells and organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changan; Goodman, Charles; Dinno, Mumtaz A.; Li, Yong-Qing

    2004-12-01

    We report on real-time Raman spectroscopic studies of optically trapped living cells and organelles using an inverted confocal laser-tweezers-Raman-spectroscopy (LTRS) system. The LTRS system was used to hold a single living cell in a physiological solution or to hold a functional organelle within a living cell and consequently measured its Raman spectra. We have measured the changes in Raman spectra of a trapped yeast cell as the function of the temperature of the bathing solution and studied the irreversible cell degeneration during the heat denaturation. In addition, we measured the in-vitro Raman spectra of the nuclei within living pine cells and B. sporeformer, Strep. salivarius, and E. coli bacteria suspended in solution and showed the possibility of using LTRS system as a sensor for rapid identification of microbes in a fluid.

  1. Hollow Core Bragg Waveguide Design and Fabrication for Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanan, Janahan

    Raman spectroscopy is a widely used technique to unambiguously ascertain the chemical composition of a sample. The caveat with this technique is its extremely weak optical cross-section, making it difficult to measure Raman signal with standard optical setups. In this thesis, a novel hollow core Bragg Reflection Waveguide was designed to simultaneously increase the generation and collection of Raman scattered photons. A robust fabrication process of this waveguide was developed employing flip-chip bonding methods to securely seal the hollow core channel. The waveguide air-core propagation loss was experimentally measured to be 0.17 dB/cm, and the Raman sensitivity limit was measured to be 3 mmol/L for glycerol solution. The waveguide was also shown to enhance Raman modes of standard household aerosols that could not be seen with other devices.

  2. Noninvasive Raman spectroscopy of rat tibiae: approach to in vivo assessment of bone quality

    PubMed Central

    Okagbare, Paul I.; Begun, Dana; Tecklenburg, Mary; Awonusi, Ayorinde; Goldstein, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We report on in vivo noninvasive Raman spectroscopy of rat tibiae using robust fiber-optic Raman probes and holders designed for transcutaneous Raman measurements in small animals. The configuration allows placement of multiple fibers around a rat leg, maintaining contact with the skin. Bone Raman data are presented for three regions of the rat tibia diaphysis with different thicknesses of overlying soft tissue. The ability to perform in vivo noninvasive Raman measurement and evaluation of subtle changes in bone composition is demonstrated with rat leg phantoms in which the tibia has carbonated hydroxylapatite, with different carbonate contents. Our data provide proof of the principle that small changes in bone composition can be monitored through soft tissue at anatomical sites of interest in biomedical studies. PMID:23085899

  3. Noninvasive Raman spectroscopy of rat tibiae: approach to in vivo assessment of bone quality.

    PubMed

    Okagbare, Paul I; Begun, Dana; Tecklenburg, Mary; Awonusi, Ayorinde; Goldstein, Steven A; Morris, Michael D

    2012-09-01

    We report on in vivo noninvasive Raman spectroscopy of rat tibiae using robust fiber-optic Raman probes and holders designed for transcutaneous Raman measurements in small animals. The configuration allows placement of multiple fibers around a rat leg, maintaining contact with the skin. Bone Raman data are presented for three regions of the rat tibia diaphysis with different thicknesses of overlying soft tissue. The ability to perform in vivo noninvasive Raman measurement and evaluation of subtle changes in bone composition is demonstrated with rat leg phantoms in which the tibia has carbonated hydroxylapatite, with different carbonate contents. Our data provide proof of the principle that small changes in bone composition can be monitored through soft tissue at anatomical sites of interest in biomedical studies.

  4. Dual modal endoscopic cancer detection based on optical pH sensing and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soogeun; Kim, ByungHyun; Sohn, Won Bum; Byun, Kyung Min; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-02-01

    To discriminate between normal and cancerous tissue, a dual modal approach using Raman spectroscopy and pH sensor was designed and applied. Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated the possibility of using as diagnostic method for the early detection of precancerous and cancerous lesions in vivo. It also can be used in identifying markers associated with malignant change. However, Raman spectroscopy lacks sufficient sensitivity due to very weak Raman scattering signal or less distinctive spectral pattern. A dual modal approach could be one of the solutions to solve this issue. The level of extracellular pH in cancer tissue is lower than that in normal tissue due to increased lactic acid production, decreased interstitial fluid buffering and decreased perfusion. High sensitivity and specificity required for accurate cancer diagnosis could be achieved by combining the chemical information from Raman spectrum with metabolic information from pH level. Raman spectra were acquired by using a fiber optic Raman probe, a cooled CCD camera connected to a spectrograph and 785 nm laser source. Different transmission spectra depending on tissue pH were measured by a lossy-mode resonance sensor based on fiber optic. The discriminative capability of pH-Raman dual modal method was evaluated using principal component analysis (PCA). The obtained results showed that the pH-Raman dual modal approach can improve discriminative capability between normal and cancerous tissue, which can lead to very high sensitivity and specificity. The proposed method for cancer detection is expected to be used in endoscopic diagnosis later.

  5. Raman Spectroscopy of Novel UHMW Polyethylene-Based Nanocomposites with Nanographite and Nanoclay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, K. A.; Sagitova, E. A.; Averin, A. A.; Nikolaeva, G. Yu; Baimova, A. V.; Novokshonova, L. A.; Brevnov, P. N.; Pashinin, P. P.

    2018-04-01

    We analyze the Raman spectra of nanocomposites based on ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene with nanoclay, thermoexpanded graphite, and reduced graphite oxide fillers. We discuss the potential of Raman spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of the nanocomposite structure, the influence of the fillers on the phase and conformation compositions of the polymer matrix, as well as for the monitoring of dispersion of the nanographite fillers in the nanocomposites.

  6. Ricin, ricin agglutinin, and the ricin binding subunit structural comparison by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, N. N.; Chikishev, A. Yu.; Sotnikov, A. I.; Savochkina, Yu. A.; Agapov, I. I.; Tonevitsky, A. G.

    2005-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to study conformation-sensitive vibrational bands of the plant toxins ricin and ricin agglutinin and the ricin binding subunit in aqueous solution. The analysis of the Raman data yields the conformational state of the protein molecules differing from that predicted by the X-ray data. The differences and similarities in the conformational state of ricin, ricin agglutinin, and ricin binding subunit are discussed.

  7. Applications of Fourier transform Raman and infrared spectroscopy in forensic sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuptsov, Albert N.

    2000-02-01

    First in the world literature comprehensive digital complementary vibrational spectra collection of polymer materials and search system was developed. Non-destructive combined analysis using complementary FT-Raman and FTIR spectra followed by cross-parallel searching on digital spectral libraries, was applied in different fields of forensic sciences. Some unique possibilities of Raman spectroscopy has been shown in the fields of examination of questioned documents, paper, paints, polymer materials, gemstones and other physical evidences.

  8. Development of a drug assay using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, S.M.; Roe, J.N.; Andresen, B.D.

    1990-05-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been used to detect low levels of several chemical compounds, including the drugs of abuse -- cocaine hydrochloride and methamphetamine hydrochloride. Raman spectra of these substances have also been taken over optical fibers using red-wavelength excitation. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of the remote red-wavelength excitation. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of the remote determination of various target chemicals using diode excitation and diode array detection. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Conservation laws, vertex corrections, and screening in Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Saurabh; Chubukov, Andrey V.; Hirschfeld, P. J.

    2017-07-01

    We present a microscopic theory for the Raman response of a clean multiband superconductor, with emphasis on the effects of vertex corrections and long-range Coulomb interaction. The measured Raman intensity, R (Ω ) , is proportional to the imaginary part of the fully renormalized particle-hole correlator with Raman form factors γ (k ⃗) . In a BCS superconductor, a bare Raman bubble is nonzero for any γ (k ⃗) and diverges at Ω =2 Δmax , where Δmax is the largest gap along the Fermi surface. However, for γ (k ⃗) = constant, the full R (Ω ) is expected to vanish due to particle number conservation. It was sometimes stated that this vanishing is due to the singular screening by long-range Coulomb interaction. In our general approach, we show diagrammatically that this vanishing actually holds due to vertex corrections from the same short-range interaction that gives rise to superconductivity. We further argue that long-range Coulomb interaction does not affect the Raman signal for any γ (k ⃗) . We argue that vertex corrections eliminate the divergence at 2 Δmax . We also argue that vertex corrections give rise to sharp peaks in R (Ω ) at Ω <2 Δmin (the minimum gap along the Fermi surface), when Ω coincides with the frequency of one of the collective modes in a superconductor, e.g., Leggett and Bardasis-Schrieffer modes in the particle-particle channel, and an excitonic mode in the particle-hole channel.

  10. Characterization of Barium Borate Frameworks Using Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gharavi-Naeini, Jafar; Yoo, Kyung W; Stump, Nathan A

    2018-04-01

    Systematic micro-Raman scattering investigations have been carried out on Sm +2 doped 2(BaO)-n(B 2 O 3 ) matrices for n = 4, 5, 8, and 2(BaO)-(Na 2 O)-9(B 2 O 3 ) using the 364 nm excitation of an Ar + laser. The Raman results have been compared with the known structures of barium tetraborate, barium pentaborate, barium octaborate, and barium sodium nonaborate. An excellent correlation has been found between the BO 4 /BO 3 composition ratios for each product and intensity ratios of the designated BO 4 and BO 3 Raman peaks. Furthermore, the Raman frequencies of both BO 4 and BO 3 groups undergo a systematic blueshift as n increases from four to nine. The shift results from a decrease of the B-O bond lengths for both BO 4 and BO 3 groups as the samples transition from the tetraborate to nonaborate structures. Linear relations (with negative slopes) have been determined between the measured Raman frequencies and B-O bond lengths in the frameworks.

  11. Raman spectroscopy for characterizing and determining the pozzolanic reactivity of fly ashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Nishant

    The efficacy and potential of Raman spectroscopy in characterization of a commercial Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and three fly ashes (FA's), and their evolving hydration products were studied in this Master's thesis work. While there have been several studies focusing on the application of Raman spectroscopy to synthetic, pure samples, work on commercial cementitious systems is scarce. This work covers this gap by evaluating mixtures containing cements and fly ashes. The study first involved determination followed by establishment of instrumental configuration and testing parameters optimum for studying cementitious materials both in the dry and wet form. It was found that by tweaking several parameters, collection methodologies and analysis techniques, improved, representative and reproducible data could be obtained. Mapping a representative area to determine the spatial distribution and concentration of sulfates and hydroxides on sample surfaces was found to be the most effective way to study these complex and heterogeneous systems. The Raman dry analysis of OPC and three different FA's of varying calcium contents and reactivity was able to identify the major mineralogical phases in these binders and the results were in correlation with the X-ray diffraction data. The observed calcium and sulfate phases and their relative concentration also agreed well with the supplementary compositional data obtained from X-ray fluorescence and Atomic absorption spectrometry. The wet analysis of pastes prepared with 100% OPC and 50%OPC+50%FA(1,2,3) followed the hydration process of the systems for 56 days (0, 0.2, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 48, 72 hours, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 56 days). Consistency of trends in the hydration mechanism of such pastes was only obtained when studies were focused on narrow wavenumber ranges: 950--1050 cm-1 for evolution of sulfates and 3600--3700cm-1 for evolution of hydroxides. Gradual disappearance of Gypsum with a parallel formation of Ettringite

  12. Polarization-controlled optimal scatter suppression in transient absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Malý, Pavel; Ravensbergen, Janneke; Kennis, John T. M.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Croce, Roberta; Mančal, Tomáš; van Oort, Bart

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique to study fast photo-induced processes, such as electron, proton and energy transfer, isomerization and molecular dynamics, in a diverse range of samples, including solid state materials and proteins. Many such experiments suffer from signal distortion by scattered excitation light, in particular close to the excitation (pump) frequency. Scattered light can be effectively suppressed by a polarizer oriented perpendicular to the excitation polarization and positioned behind the sample in the optical path of the probe beam. However, this introduces anisotropic polarization contributions into the recorded signal. We present an approach based on setting specific polarizations of the pump and probe pulses, combined with a polarizer behind the sample. Together, this controls the signal-to-scatter ratio (SSR), while maintaining isotropic signal. We present SSR for the full range of polarizations and analytically derive the optimal configuration at angles of 40.5° between probe and pump and of 66.9° between polarizer and pump polarizations. This improves SSR by (or compared to polarizer parallel to probe). The calculations are validated by transient absorption experiments on the common fluorescent dye Rhodamine B. This approach provides a simple method to considerably improve the SSR in transient absorption spectroscopy. PMID:28262765

  13. Pathlength Determination for Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Liang; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Svanberg, Sune

    2014-01-01

    Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy (GASMAS) has been extensively studied and applied during recent years in, e.g., food packaging, human sinus monitoring, gas diffusion studies, and pharmaceutical tablet characterization. The focus has been on the evaluation of the gas absorption pathlength in porous media, which a priori is unknown due to heavy light scattering. In this paper, three different approaches are summarized. One possibility is to simultaneously monitor another gas with known concentration (e.g., water vapor), the pathlength of which can then be obtained and used for the target gas (e.g., oxygen) to retrieve its concentration. The second approach is to measure the mean optical pathlength or physical pathlength with other methods, including time-of-flight spectroscopy, frequency-modulated light scattering interferometry and the frequency domain photon migration method. By utilizing these methods, an average concentration can be obtained and the porosities of the material are studied. The last method retrieves the gas concentration without knowing its pathlength by analyzing the gas absorption line shape, which depends upon the concentration of buffer gases due to intermolecular collisions. The pathlength enhancement effect due to multiple scattering enables also the use of porous media as multipass gas cells for trace gas monitoring. All these efforts open up a multitude of different applications for the GASMAS technique. PMID:24573311

  14. Observation of laser-driven shock propagation by nanosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guoyang; Zheng, Xianxu; Song, Yunfei; Zeng, Yangyang; Guo, Wencan; Zhao, Jun; Yang, Yanqiang

    2015-01-01

    An improved nanosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy is performed to observe laser-driven shock propagation in the anthracene/epoxy glue layer. The digital delay instead of optical delay line is introduced for sake of unlimited time range of detection, which enables the ability to observe both shock loading and shock unloading that always lasts several hundred nanoseconds. In this experiment, the peak pressure of shock wave, the pressure distribution, and the position of shock front in gauge layer were determined by fitting Raman spectra of anthracene using the Raman peak shift simulation. And, the velocity of shock wave was calculated by the time-dependent position of shock front.

  15. Erythrocyte membrane analysis for type II diabetes detection using Raman spectroscopy in high-wavenumber region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinyong; Zeng, Yongyi; Lin, Juqiang; Wang, Jing; Li, Ling; Huang, Zufang; Li, Buhong; Zeng, Haishan; Chen, Rong

    2014-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy was employed to detect lipid variation occurring in type II diabetic erythrocyte membrane (EM) without using exogenous reagents. In high-wavenumber (HW) region, significant Raman spectral differences between diabetic and normal EM are observed at 2850, 2873, 2885, 2935, and 2965 cm-1, which are mainly related to lipid in EM. Based on principal component analysis, the diagnostic accuracy of HW region for diabetes detection is 98.8%, which is much higher than that of low-wavenumber region (82.9%). The results suggest that EM HW Raman region has great promise for the reagent-free and non-invasive detection of type II diabetes.

  16. Raman spectroscopy of the organic and mineral structure of bone grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, E. V.; Timchenko, P. E.; Volova, L. T.; Ponomareva, Yu V.; Taskina, L. A.

    2014-07-01

    We report the results of experimental Raman spectroscopy of donor bone samples (rat, rabbit and human) with varying degrees of mineralisation. Raman spectra are obtained for the Raman bands of 950 - 962 cm-1 (PO4)3-, 1065 - 1070 cm-1 (CO3)2- and 1665 cm-1 (amide I). In demineralised bone, a sharp (98%) decrease in the intensities of 950 - 962 and 1065 - 1070 cm-1 bands is observed, which is accompanied by the emergence of the 1079 - 1090 cm-1 band corresponding to the hydrated amorphous state CO3-3.

  17. Raman spectroscopy for monitoring of organic and mineral structure of bone grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, Elena V.; Timchenko, Pavel E.; Volova, Larisa T.; Ponomareva, Julia V.; Taskina, Larisa A.; Pershutkina, Svetlana V.

    2014-09-01

    The results of experimental studies of donor bone samples (rat, rabbit and human) with varying degrees of mineralisation by Raman spectroscopy were presented. Raman spectra were obtained for the Raman bands 950-962 (РО4)3-, 1065-1070 (СО3)2- and 1665 cm-1 (Amide I). In demineralized bone a sharp decline (to 98 %) in the range of 950-962 cm-1 (РО4)3- and 1065 - 1070 cm-1 was observed. This decrease was accompanied by the emergence of the 1079-1090 cm-1 band corresponding to the hydrated state СО3 2-.

  18. Bare and protected sputtered-noble-metal films for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talaga, David; Bonhommeau, Sébastien

    2014-11-01

    Sputtered silver and gold films with different surface morphologies have been prepared and coated with a benzenethiol self-assembled monolayer. Rough noble metal films showed strong Raman features assigned to adsorbed benzenethiol molecules upon irradiation over a wide energy range in the visible spectrum, which disclosed the occurrence of a significant surface-enhanced Raman scattering with maximal enhancement factors as high as 6 × 106. In addition, the adsorption of ethanethiol onto silver surfaces hinders their corrosion over days while preserving mostly intact enhancement properties of naked silver. This study may be applied to develop stable and efficient metalized probes for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

  19. Label-free characterization of degenerative changes in articular cartilage by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Yusuke; Akehi, Mayu; Kiyomatsu, Hiroshi; Miura, Hiromasa

    2017-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is very common joint disease in the aging population. Main symptom of OA is accompanied by degenerative changes of articular cartilage. Raman spectroscopy is a label-free technique which enables to analyze molecular composition in degenerative cartilage. We generated an animal OA model surgically induced by knee joint instability and performed Raman spectroscopic analysis for the articular cartilage. In the result, Raman spectral data of the articular cartilage showed drastic changes in comparison between OA and control side. The relative intensity of phosphate band increases in the degenerative cartilage.

  20. Discrimination of normal and colorectal cancer using Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Wang, Deli; Wang, Yue

    2007-07-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIF) and Raman spectrum of serum for diagnosis of colon cancer and rectum cancer were investigated in this paper. The aim of this study was that using Raman spectrum and LIF analysis the serum of colon cancer and rectum cancer for found the difference compared to normal, the difference was found. For example: the intensity and red shift both different In this paper we investigated 82 colon cancers, 69 rectum cancers and obtained 80.7%, 82.5% accuracy to rectum cancer and colon cancer separately compared to clinical diagnostic. It is exploring that use Raman spectrum and LIF to detection of cancer.

  1. Extracting interface locations in multilayer polymer waveguide films using scanning angle Raman spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Bobbitt, Jonathan M.; Smith, Emily A.

    2017-11-09

    There is an increasing demand for nondestructive in situ techniques that measure chemical content, total thickness, and interface locations for multilayer polymer films, and SA Raman spectroscopy in combination with appropriate data models can provide this information. A scanning angle (SA) Raman spectroscopy method was developed to measure the chemical composition of multilayer polymer waveguide films and to extract the location of buried interfaces between polymer layers with 7–80-nm axial spatial resolution. The SA Raman method measures Raman spectra as the incident angle of light upon a prism-coupled thin film is scanned. Six multilayer films consisting of poly(methyl methacrylate)/polystyrene ormore » poly(methyl methacrylate)/polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate) were prepared with total thicknesses ranging from 330-1260 nm. The interface locations were varied by altering the individual layer thicknesses between 140-680 nm. The Raman amplitude ratio of the 1605 cm -1 peak for PS and 812 cm -1 peak for PMMA was used in calculations of the electric field intensity within the polymer layers to model the SA Raman data and extract the total thickness and interface locations. There is an average 8% and 7% difference in the measured thickness between the SA Raman and profilometry measurements for bilayer and trilayer films, respectively.« less

  2. Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy for assessing biochemical changes of cervical tissue associated with precarcinogenic transformation.

    PubMed

    Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Mo, Jianhua; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2014-11-07

    Raman spectroscopy measures the inelastically scattered light from tissue that is capable of identifying native tissue biochemical constituents and their changes associated with disease transformation. This study aims to characterize the Raman spectroscopic properties of cervical tissue associated with the multi-stage progression of cervical precarcinogenic sequence. A rapid-acquisition fiber-optic near-infrared (NIR) Raman diagnostic system was employed for tissue Raman spectral measurements at 785 nm excitation. A total of 68 Raman spectra (23 benign, 29 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and 16 high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL)) were measured from 25 cervical tissue biopsy specimens, as confirmed by colposcopy-histopathology. The semi-quantitative biochemical modeling based on the major biochemicals (i.e., DNA, proteins (histone, collagen), lipid (triolein) and carbohydrates (glycogen)) in cervical tissue uncovers the stepwise accumulation of biomolecular changes associated with progressive cervical precarcinogenesis. Multi-class partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) together with leave-one tissue site-out, cross-validation yielded the diagnostic sensitivities of 95.7%, 82.8% and 81.3%; specificities of 100.0%, 92.3% and 88.5%,for discrimination among benign, LSIL and HSIL cervical tissues, respectively. This work suggests that the Raman spectral biomarkers have identified the potential to be used for monitoring the multi-stage cervical precarcinogenesis, forming the foundation of applying NIR Raman spectroscopy for the early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo at the molecular level.

  3. Osteoarthritis screening using Raman spectroscopy of dried human synovial fluid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Esmonde-White, Francis W. L.; Raaii, Farhang; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-02-01

    We describe the use of Raman spectroscopy to investigate synovial fluid drops deposited onto fused silica microscope slides. This spectral information can be used to identify chemical changes in synovial fluid associated with osteoarthritis (OA) damage to knee joints. The chemical composition of synovial fluid is predominately proteins (enzymes, cytokines, or collagen fragments), glycosaminoglycans, and a mixture of minor components such as inorganic phosphate crystals. During osteoarthritis, the chemical, viscoelastic and biological properties of synovial fluid are altered. A pilot study was conducted to determine if Raman spectra of synovial fluid correlated with radiological scoring of knee joint damage. After informed consent, synovial fluid was drawn and x-rays were collected from the knee joints of 40 patients. Raman spectra and microscope images were obtained from the dried synovial fluid drops using a Raman microprobe and indicate a coarse separation of synovial fluid components. Individual protein signatures could not be identified; Raman spectra were useful as a general marker of overall protein content and secondary structure. Band intensity ratios used to describe protein and glycosaminoglycan structure were used in synovial fluid spectra. Band intensity ratios of Raman spectra indicate that there is less ordered protein secondary structure in synovial fluid from the damage group. Combination of drop deposition with Raman spectroscopy is a powerful approach to examining synovial fluid for the purposes of assessing osteoarthritis damage.

  4. Extracting interface locations in multilayer polymer waveguide films using scanning angle Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bobbitt, Jonathan M.; Smith, Emily A.

    There is an increasing demand for nondestructive in situ techniques that measure chemical content, total thickness, and interface locations for multilayer polymer films, and SA Raman spectroscopy in combination with appropriate data models can provide this information. A scanning angle (SA) Raman spectroscopy method was developed to measure the chemical composition of multilayer polymer waveguide films and to extract the location of buried interfaces between polymer layers with 7–80-nm axial spatial resolution. The SA Raman method measures Raman spectra as the incident angle of light upon a prism-coupled thin film is scanned. Six multilayer films consisting of poly(methyl methacrylate)/polystyrene ormore » poly(methyl methacrylate)/polystyrene/poly(methyl methacrylate) were prepared with total thicknesses ranging from 330-1260 nm. The interface locations were varied by altering the individual layer thicknesses between 140-680 nm. The Raman amplitude ratio of the 1605 cm -1 peak for PS and 812 cm -1 peak for PMMA was used in calculations of the electric field intensity within the polymer layers to model the SA Raman data and extract the total thickness and interface locations. There is an average 8% and 7% difference in the measured thickness between the SA Raman and profilometry measurements for bilayer and trilayer films, respectively.« less

  5. Fluorescence suppression using wavelength modulated Raman spectroscopy in fiber-probe-based tissue analysis.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Bavishna B; Ashok, Praveen C; Mazilu, Michael; Riches, Andrew; Herrington, Simon; Dholakia, Kishan

    2012-07-01

    In the field of biomedical optics, Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for probing the chemical composition of biological samples. In particular, fiber Raman probes play a crucial role for in vivo and ex vivo tissue analysis. However, the high-fluorescence background typically contributed by the auto fluorescence from both a tissue sample and the fiber-probe interferes strongly with the relatively weak Raman signal. Here we demonstrate the implementation of wavelength-modulated Raman spectroscopy (WMRS) to suppress the fluorescence background while analyzing tissues using fiber Raman probes. We have observed a significant signal-to-noise ratio enhancement in the Raman bands of bone tissue, which have a relatively high fluorescence background. Implementation of WMRS in fiber-probe-based bone tissue study yielded usable Raman spectra in a relatively short acquisition time (∼30  s), notably without any special sample preparation stage. Finally, we have validated its capability to suppress fluorescence on other tissue samples such as adipose tissue derived from four different species.

  6. Raman spectroscopy of different types of Mexican copal resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenabeele, Peter; Grimaldi, Dulce Maria; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Moens, Luc

    2003-08-01

    Dispersive Raman spectra of six copal resins, that were purchased in local markets in Mexico, are presented. The spectra were interpreted and compared with each other. For all these spectra, the relative intensity of the Raman band at approximately 1645 cm -1, attributed to the exomethylene ν(CC) stretching vibration, was rather low, especially as fresh samples are involved. In one resin, viz. Incienso, CaCO 3 was detected. Probably this inorganic pigment was added as a whitener. In the spectrum of Lágrima a starch fraction was present. Raman spectra of a sample from an Aztec figurine were recorded. It was shown that its composition was inhomogeneous at the micrometer level. Here, too, CaCO 3 was observed. It was not possible to identify the resin applied in the antique figurine due to material degradation by age and environmental exposure.

  7. Identification of strained black phosphorous by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jiawei; Guo, Junhong; Hu, Fangren

    2017-04-01

    Phosphorene has a very high hole mobility and can be a tuned band structure, and has become an ideal material for electronic devices. For this new type of two-dimensional material, in the applied strain, black phosphorus (BP) can be changed into an indirect band gap and metallic materials from the direct band gap semiconductor material, which greatly affect its inherent physical characteristics. How to identify strained microstructure changes becomes an important problem. The calculated Raman spectra disclose that the A{}{{g}}2 mode and B{}2{{g}} mode will split and the Raman spectra appear, while the A{}{{g}}1 mode is shifted to low-frequency region. The deformation induced by strain will effectively change the Raman mode position and intensity, this can be used to identify phosphorus changes. Project supported by the National Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61505085, 61574080, 61274127) and the Innovation Project of Jiangsu Graduate Student, China (No. SJLX15_0379).

  8. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy study of aliovalent doped ceria to correlate local structural changes with oxygen vacancies clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Shirbhate, S. C.; Acharya, S. A., E-mail: saha275@yahoo.com; Yadav, A. K.

    2016-04-04

    This study provides atomic scale insight to understand the role of aliovalent dopants on oxygen vacancies clustering and dissociation mechanism in ceria system in order to enhance the performance of oxy-ion conductor. Dopants induced microscale changes in ceria are probed by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near edge spectra, and Raman spectroscopy. The results are explored to establish a correlation between atomic level structural changes (coordination number, interatomic spacing) → formation of dimer and trimer type cation-oxygen vacancies defect complex (intrinsic and extrinsic) → dissociation of oxygen vacancies from defect cluster → ionic conductivity temperature. It ismore » a strategic approach to understand key physics of ionic conductivity mechanism in order to reduce operating temperature of electrolytes for intermediate temperature (300–450 °C) electrochemical devices for the first time.« less

  9. Development of a multiplexing fingerprint and high wavenumber Raman spectroscopy technique for real-time in vivo tissue Raman measurements at endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-03-01

    We report on the development of a novel multiplexing Raman spectroscopy technique using a single laser light together with a volume phase holographic (VPH) grating that simultaneously acquires both fingerprint (FP) and high wavenumber (HW) tissue Raman spectra at endoscopy. We utilize a customized VPH dual-transmission grating, which disperses the incident Raman scattered light vertically onto two separate segments (i.e., -150 to 1950  cm⁻¹; 1750 to 3600  cm⁻¹) of a charge-coupled device camera. We demonstrate that the multiplexing Raman technique can acquire high quality in vivo tissue Raman spectra ranging from 800 to 3600  cm⁻¹ within 1.0 s with a spectral resolution of 3 to 6  cm⁻¹ during clinical endoscopy. The rapid multiplexing Raman spectroscopy technique covering both FP and HW ranges developed in this work has potential for improving in vivo tissue diagnosis and characterization at endoscopy.

  10. Development of a multiplexing fingerprint and high wavenumber Raman spectroscopy technique for real-time in vivo tissue Raman measurements at endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-03-01

    We report on the development of a novel multiplexing Raman spectroscopy technique using a single laser light together with a volume phase holographic (VPH) grating that simultaneously acquires both fingerprint (FP) and high wavenumber (HW) tissue Raman spectra at endoscopy. We utilize a customized VPH dual-transmission grating, which disperses the incident Raman scattered light vertically onto two separate segments (i.e., -150 to 1950 cm-1 1750 to 3600 cm-1) of a charge-coupled device camera. We demonstrate that the multiplexing Raman technique can acquire high quality in vivo tissue Raman spectra ranging from 800 to 3600 cm-1 within 1.0 s with a spectral resolution of 3 to 6 cm-1 during clinical endoscopy. The rapid multiplexing Raman spectroscopy technique covering both FP and HW ranges developed in this work has potential for improving in vivo tissue diagnosis and characterization at endoscopy.

  11. Metal-dielectric-CNT nanowires for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Altun, Ali; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2017-10-03

    A sensor with a substrate includes nanowires extending vertically from the substrate, a hafnia coating on the nanowires that provides hafnia coated nanowires, and a noble metal coating on the hafnia coated nanowires. The top of the hafnia and noble metal coated nanowires bent onto one another to create a canopy forest structure. There are numerous randomly arranged holes that let through scattered light. The many points of contact, hot spots, amplify signals. The methods include the steps of providing a Raman spectroscopy substrate, introducing nano crystals to the Raman spectroscopy substrate, growing a forest of nanowires from the nano crystals on the Raman spectroscopy substrate, coating the nanowires with hafnia providing hafnia coated nanowires, and coating the hafnia coated nanowires with a noble metal or other metal.

  12. Quantitative Detection of Pharmaceuticals Using a Combination of Paper Microfluidics and Wavelength Modulated Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Derek; Mazilu, Michael; Dholakia, Kishan

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has proven to be an indispensable technique for the identification of various types of analytes due to the fingerprint vibration spectrum obtained. Paper microfluidics has also emerged as a low cost, easy to fabricate and portable approach for point of care testing. However, due to inherent background fluorescence, combining Raman spectroscopy with paper microfluidics is to date an unmet challenge in the absence of using surface enhanced mechanisms. We describe the first use of wavelength modulated Raman spectroscopy (WMRS) for analysis on a paper microfluidics platform. This study demonstrates the ability to suppress the background fluorescence of the paper using WMRS and the subsequent implementation of this technique for pharmaceutical analysis. The results of this study demonstrate that it is possible to discriminate between both paracetamol and ibuprofen, whilst, also being able to detect the presence of each analyte quantitatively at nanomolar concentrations. PMID:25938464

  13. Stand-off laser Raman spectroscopy and its advancement in explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sheng-run; Xue, Bin; Li, Yi-zhe; Wang, Hui

    2017-10-01

    The explosives detection has been a hot and difficult issue in the field of security it is particularly important to detect explosives quickly and reliably. There are many methods to detect explosives currently, stand-off Raman spectroscopy is one of the most promising and practical technologies, this technique can be used for non-contact and nondestructive detection, ensure the safety of attendants, at the same time the precision and speed of detection are also very high and be characterized by rapid response. This paper mainly gives an account of the fundamental principle of Raman spectroscopy, as well as recount major challenges of Standoff Laser Raman Spectroscopy applied in explosives detection and corresponding solutions. From the perspective of the system, this paper sums up related theories and techniques of the excitation laser and telescopic system etc.. Ultimately, a brief analysis and summary of the development trend of this technology is given.

  14. Current Advances in the Application of Raman Spectroscopy for Molecular Diagnosis of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Inês Raquel Martins; Malkin, Alison; Lyng, Fiona Mary

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy provides a unique biochemical fingerprint capable of identifying and characterizing the structure of molecules, cells, and tissues. In cervical cancer, it is acknowledged as a promising biochemical tool due to its ability to detect premalignancy and early malignancy stages. This review summarizes the key research in the area and the evidence compiled is very encouraging for ongoing and further research. In addition to the diagnostic potential, promising results for HPV detection and monitoring treatment response suggest more than just a diagnosis prospective. A greater body of evidence is however necessary before Raman spectroscopy is fully validated for clinical use and larger comprehensive studies are required to fully establish the role of Raman spectroscopy in the molecular diagnostics of cervical cancer. PMID:26180802

  15. Evaluation of Raman spectroscopy in comparison to commonly performed dengue diagnostic tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saranjam; Ullah, Rahat; Khurram, Muhammad; Ali, Hina; Mahmood, Arshad; Khan, Ajmal; Ahmed, Mushtaq

    2016-09-01

    This study demonstrates the evaluation of Raman spectroscopy as a rapid diagnostic test in comparison to commonly performed tests for an accurate detection of dengue fever in human blood sera. Blood samples of 104 suspected dengue patients collected from Holy Family Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, have been used in this study. Out of 104 samples, 52 (50%) were positive based on immunoglobulin G (IgG), whereas 54 (52%) were positive based on immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody tests. For the determination of the diagnostic capabilities of Raman spectroscopy, accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and false positive rate have been calculated in comparison to normally performed IgM and IgG captured enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay tests. Accuracy, precision, specificity, and sensitivity for Raman spectroscopy in comparison to IgM were found to be 66%, 70%, 72%, and 61%, whereas based on IgG they were 47%, 46%, 52%, and 43%, respectively.

  16. Quantitative Raman spectroscopy as a tool to study the kinetics and formation mechanism of carbonates.

    PubMed

    Bonales, L J; Muñoz-Iglesias, V; Santamaría-Pérez, D; Caceres, M; Fernandez-Remolar, D; Prieto-Ballesteros, O

    2013-12-01

    We have carried out a systematic study of abiotic precipitation at different temperatures of several Mg and Ca carbonates (calcite, nesquehonite, hydrocalcite) present in carbonaceous chondrites. This study highlights the capability of Raman spectroscopy as a primary tool for performing full mineralogical analysis. The precipitation reaction and the structure of the resulting carbonates were monitored and identified with Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy enabled us to confirm that the precipitation reaction is very fast (minutes) when Ca(II) is present in the solution, whereas for Mg(II) such reactions developed at rather slow rates (weeks). We also observed that both the composition and the reaction mechanisms depended on temperature, which might help to clarify several issues in the fields of planetology and geology, because of the environmental implications of these carbonates on both terrestrial and extraterrestrial objects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Interference-free optical detection for Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, David G (Inventor); Kojima, Jun (Inventor); Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An architecture for spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS) that utilizes a frame-transfer charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor operating in a subframe burst gating mode to realize time-resolved combustion diagnostics is disclosed. The technique permits all-electronic optical gating with microsecond shutter speeds (<5 .mu.s), without compromising optical throughput or image fidelity. When used in conjunction with a pair of orthogonally-polarized excitation lasers, the technique measures time-resolved vibrational Raman scattering that is minimally contaminated by problematic optical background noise.

  18. Raman scattering or fluorescence emission? Raman spectroscopy study on lime-based building and conservation materials.

    PubMed

    Kaszowska, Zofia; Malek, Kamilla; Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Niedzielska, Karina

    2016-12-05

    This work presents an in-depth study on Raman spectra excited with 1064 and 532nm lasers of lime binders employed in the past as building materials and revealed today as valuable conservation materials. We focus our interest on the bands of strong intensity, which are present in the spectra of all binders acquired with laser excitation at 1064nm, but absent in the corresponding spectra acquired with laser excitation at 532nm. We suggest, that the first group of spectra represents fluorescence phenomena of unknown origin and the second true Raman scattering. In our studies, we also include two other phases of lime cycle, i.e. calcium carbonate (a few samples of calcite of various origins) and calcium oxide (quicklime) to assess how structural and chemical transformations of lime phases affect the NIR-Raman spectral profile. Furthermore, we analyse a set of carbonated limewashes and lime binders derived from old plasters to give an insight into their spectral characteristics after excitation with the 1064nm laser line. NIR-Raman micro-mapping results are also presented to reveal the spatial distribution of building materials and fluorescent species in the cross-section of plaster samples taken from a 15th century chapel. Our study shows that the Raman analysis can help identify lime-based building and conservation materials, however, a caution is advised in the interpretation of the spectra acquired using 1064nm excitation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of amino acids and peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaojuan; Gu, Huaimin; Wu, Jiwei; Kang, Jian; Dong, Xiao

    2009-08-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is potentially tool in the characterization of biomolecules such as amino acids, complicated peptides and proteins, and even tissues or living cells. Amino acids and short peptides contain different functional groups. Therefore, they are suitable for the investigations of the competitive-interactions of these functional groups with colloidal silver surfaces. In this paper, Normal Raman and SERS of amino acids Leucine and Isoleucine and short peptide Leu-Leu were measured on the silver colloidal substrate. Raman shifts that stem from different vibrational mode in the molecular inner structure, and the variations of SERS of the samples were analyzed in this study. The results show that different connection of one methyl to the main chains of the isomer amino acids resulted in different vibration modes in the Normal Raman spectra of Leucine and Isoleucine. In the SERS spectra of the isomer amino acids, all frequency shifts are expressed more differently than those in Normal Raman spectra of solid state. Orientation of this isomer amino acids, as well as specific-competitive interactions of their functional groups with the colloidal silver surface, were speculated by detailed spectral analysis of the obtained SERS spectra. In addition, the dipeptide Leu-Leu, as the corresponding homodipeptide of Leucine, was also measured adsorbed on the colloidal silver surface. The SERS spectrum of Leu-Leu is different from its corresponding amino acid Leucine but both of them are adsorbed on the silver surface through the carboxylate moiety.

  20. Determination of HER2 amplification status in breast cancer cells using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Xiaohong; Rexer, Brent; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Guo, Mingsheng; Li, Ming; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-02-01

    The overexpression of HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) in breast cancer is associated with increased disease recurrence and worse prognosis. Current diagnosis of HER2 positive breast cancer is time consuming with an estimated 20% inaccuracy. Raman spectroscopy is a proven method for pathological diagnosis based on the molecular composition of tissues. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of Raman spectroscopy to differentially identify the amplification of HER2 in cells. Three cell lines including BT474 (HER2 overexpressing breast cancer cell), MCF-10A (human breast epithelial cell), and MCF-10A with overexpressing HER2, were investigated using a bench top confocal Raman system. A diagnostic algorithm based on generalized linear model (GLM) with elastic-net penalties was established to discriminate 318 spectra collected from the cells, and to identify the spectra regions that differentiate the cell lines. The algorithm was able to differentially identify BT474 breast cancer cells with an overall sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 99%. The results demonstrate the capability of Raman spectroscopy to determine HER2 status in cells. Raman spectroscopy shows promise for application in the diagnosis of HER2 positive breast cancer in clinical practice.