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Sample records for absorption spectroscopy raman

  1. Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  2. Deep ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy: A resonance-absorption trade-off illustrated by diluted liquid benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, C. T.; Willitsford, A. H.; Philbrick, C. R.; Hallen, H. D.

    2015-12-01

    The magnitude of resonance Raman intensity, in terms of the real signal level measured on-resonance compared to the signal level measured off-resonance for the same sample, is investigated using a tunable laser source. Resonance Raman enhancements, occurring as the excitation energy is tuned through ultraviolet absorption lines, are used to examine the 1332 cm-1 vibrational mode of diamond and the 992 cm-1 ring-breathing mode of benzene. Competition between the wavelength dependent optical absorption and the magnitude of the resonance enhancement is studied using measured signal levels as a function of wavelength. Two system applications are identified where the resonance Raman significantly increases the real signal levels despite the presence of strong absorption: characterization of trace species in laser remote sensing and spectroscopy of the few molecules in the tiny working volumes of near-field optical microscopy.

  3. Speciation of aqueous gold(III) chlorides from ultraviolet/visible absorption and Raman/resonance Raman spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, J.A.; Brown, G.E. Jr. ); Tait, C.D.; Swanson, B.I. )

    1991-03-01

    Gold(III) speciation in a one molar NaCl aqueous solution at ambient temperature and pressure was determined as a function of pH using ultraviolet/visible (UV/vis) absorption and Raman/resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopies. Gold concentrations in the solutions studies by UV/vis spectroscopy were {approximately}10{sup {minus}4} M whereas those studied by Raman spectroscopy were {approximately}10{sup {minus}2} M. Changes in the intensity and positions of ligand-to-metal charge transfer bands in the UV/vis spectra of the Au(III) chloride solutions with increasing pH are consistent with replacement of chloride by hydroxide ligands. Changes in the number, position, and intensity of Raman and RR spectra of the same solutions are also consistent with successive replacement of chloride by hydroxide ligands in the first coordination sphere of four-coordinated Au(III) with increasing pH. The Raman and UV/vis data are broadly consistent with earlier speciation predictions based on a variety of chemical measurements, but demonstrate that the mixed chloro-hydroxo complexes are more stable than predicted on the basis of theoretically estimated stability constants.

  4. High-performance dispersive Raman and absorption spectroscopy as tools for drug identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawluczyk, Olga; Andrey, Sam; Nogas, Paul; Roy, Andrew; Pawluczyk, Romuald

    2009-02-01

    Due to increasing availability of pharmaceuticals from many sources, a need is growing to quickly and efficiently analyze substances in terms of the consistency and accuracy of their chemical composition. Differences in chemical composition occur at very low concentrations, so that highly sensitive analytical methods become crucial. Recent progress in dispersive spectroscopy with the use of 2-dimensional detector arrays, permits for signal integration along a long (up to 12 mm long) entrance slit of a spectrometer, thereby increasing signal to noise ratio and improving the ability to detect small concentration changes. This is achieved with a non-scanning, non-destructive system. Two different methods using P&P Optica high performance spectrometers were used. High performance optical dispersion Raman and high performance optical absorption spectroscopy were employed to differentiate various acetaminophen-containing drugs, such as Tylenol and other generic brands, which differ in their ingredients. A 785 nm excitation wavelength was used in Raman measurements and strong Raman signals were observed in the spectral range 300-1800 cm-1. Measurements with the absorption spectrometer were performed in the wavelength range 620-1020 nm. Both Raman and absorption techniques used transmission light spectrometers with volume phase holographic gratings and provided sufficient spectral differences, often structural, allowing for drug differentiation.

  5. Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrard, D.L.; Bowley, H.J.

    1986-04-01

    The period of this review is from late 1983 to late 1985. During this time over 5000 papers have appeared in the scientific literature dealing with many applications of Raman spectroscopy and extending its use to several new areas of study. As in the previous review in this series most of the applications relevant to solids are covered in one or other of the ten categories, which are the same as those used previously. However, aspects relating to solids which are not covered elsewhere include general reviews and the specific field of semiconductors. This is an area of great current interest in terms of Raman spectroscopy and the characterization of semiconductor materials and surfaces has been reported. Raman scattering also provides a new probe for the elucidation of structural properties of microcrystalline silicon and resonance Raman scattering in silicon at elevated temperatures has been studied. Many studies on carbon have also appeared in the literature including that of the various types of carbon, the use of Raman scattering to investigate disorder and crystallite formation in annealed carbon, in situ studies of intercalation kinetics, structural aspects of cokes and coals, and instrumentation for coal gasification. Raman spectroscopy has been applied to such diverse systems as organic crystals, the determination of modifications in layered crystals, the detection of explosives on silica gel or carbon, diagnostics of heterogeneous chemical processes, and a study of tungsten-halogen bulbs. Laser Raman spectroscopy has also been coupled with liquid chromatography and phase-resolved background suppression has been used to enhance Raman spectra. 397 references.

  6. Wafer-scale metasurface for total power absorption, local field enhancement and single molecule Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Best, Michael D.; Camden, Jon P.; Crozier, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to detect molecules at low concentrations is highly desired for applications that range from basic science to healthcare. Considerable interest also exists for ultrathin materials with high optical absorption, e.g. for microbolometers and thermal emitters. Metal nanostructures present opportunities to achieve both purposes. Metal nanoparticles can generate gigantic field enhancements, sufficient for the Raman spectroscopy of single molecules. Thin layers containing metal nanostructures (“metasurfaces”) can achieve near-total power absorption at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Thus far, however, both aims (i.e. single molecule Raman and total power absorption) have only been achieved using metal nanostructures produced by techniques (high resolution lithography or colloidal synthesis) that are complex and/or difficult to implement over large areas. Here, we demonstrate a metasurface that achieves the near-perfect absorption of visible-wavelength light and enables the Raman spectroscopy of single molecules. Our metasurface is fabricated using thin film depositions, and is of unprecedented (wafer-scale) extent. PMID:24091825

  7. β-Carotene Revisited by Transient Absorption and Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Quick, Martin; Kasper, Marc-André; Richter, Celin; Mahrwald, Rainer; Dobryakov, Alexander L; Kovalenko, Sergey A; Ernsting, Nikolaus P

    2015-12-21

    β-Carotene in n-hexane was examined by femtosecond transient absorption and stimulated Raman spectroscopy. Electronic change is separated from vibrational relaxation with the help of band integrals. Overlaid on the decay of S1 excited-state absorption, a picosecond process is found that is absent when the C9 -methyl group is replaced by ethyl or isopropyl. It is attributed to reorganization on the S1 potential energy surface, involving dihedral angles between C6 and C9 . In Raman studies, electronic states S2 or S1 were selected through resonance conditions. We observe a broad vibrational band at 1770 cm(-1) in S2 already. With 200 fs it decays and transforms into the well-known S1 Raman line for an asymmetric C=C stretching mode. Low-frequency activity (<800 cm(-1) ) in S2 and S1 is also seen. A dependence of solvent lines on solute dynamics implies intermolecular coupling between β-carotene and nearby n-hexane molecules. PMID:26433210

  8. Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrard, D.L.; Bowley, H.J.

    1988-06-15

    The period of this review is from late 1985 to late 1987. During this time over 6000 papers have been published in the scientific literature dealing with many applications of Raman spectroscopy and extending its use to new areas of study. This article covers only those papers that are relevant to the analytical chemist and this necessitates a highly selective approach. There are some areas that have been the subject of many papers with relatively few being of analytical interest. In such cases the reader is referred to appropriate reviews which are detailed in this section.

  9. Theory of dynamic absorption spectroscopy of nonstationary states. 4. Application to 12-fs resonant impulsive Raman spectroscopy of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, W.T.; Peteanu, L.A.; Mathies, R.A.

    1992-07-23

    A time-dependent theory for femtosecond dynamic absorption spectroscopy is used to describe the creation and observation of molecular ground-state vibrational coherence through the resonance impulsive stimulated Raman mechanism. Model calculations show that the oscillatory absorption signal that arises from this ground-state coherence is maximized for a limited range of pulse lengths and that there is a complex relationship between the probe wavelength and the strength of the spectral oscillations. The generalized time-dependent linear susceptibility of the nonstationary system created by the impulsive pump pulse is defined and used to discuss the strong dependence of the measured signals on the properties of the probe pulse. Finally, calculations are presented to analyze the high-frequency oscillations ({approximately}20-fs period) recently observed in the transient absorption spectra of light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin (BR{sub 568}) following excitation with a 12-fs optical pulse. At the probe wavelengths used in this experiment, the contribution of stimulated emission is negligible at long times because of the extremely rapid excited-state isomerization; as a result, the spectral oscillations observed after this time are due to the impulsive excitation of coherent vibrations in the ground state. The transient response observed for BR{sub 568} is calculated using a 29-mode harmonic potential surface derived from a prior resonance Raman intensity analysis. Both the oscillatory signals and their dependence on the probe wavelength are satisfactorily reproduced. 68 refs., 11 figs.

  10. High-pressure study of ScH3: Raman, infrared, and visible absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, Tetsuji; Ohura, Hiroyuki; Takeichi, Tomoo; Ohmura, Ayako; Machida, Akihiko; Watanuki, Tetsu; Aoki, Katsutoshi; Sasaki, Shigeo; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Takemura, Kenichi

    2011-08-01

    Raman, IR, and visible absorption spectra of scandium trihydride (ScH3) have been measured at high pressures up to 50 GPa, to investigate the structural and electronic phase transitions. Successive hcp-intermediate-fcc phase transitions were observed at 25 and 46 GPa by Raman and IR measurements. It was suggested that the intermediate phase of ScH3 takes the same structure as that of YH3 with a long periodicity of the stacking of the metal planes. The visible absorption spectra allowed us to determine that the energy gap of ScH3 is 1.7 eV at the ambient condition and is closed around 50 GPa, at which the crystal structure transforms to fcc.

  11. Raman and x-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization of Zr-doped MOCVD YBa2Cu2O6+delta.

    SciTech Connect

    Maroni, V. A.; Kropf, Arthur J; Aytug, Tolga; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2010-01-01

    Metal organic chemical vapor deposited YBa2Cu3O6+ (YBCO) films (about 0.9 m thick) containing varying amounts of added zirconium were examined by Raman microscopy and synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The self-field and in-field (1 T, B c) Jc performance of the YBCO films at 77 K (reported by the group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that fabricated the samples) exhibited an increase on going from 0 mol% (m/o) Zr-added to 2.5 m/o Zr-added but then decreased sharply with increasing Zr content. Raman measurements on these films showed that the added Zr had little effect on YBCO cation disorder up to about 7.5 m/o Zr-added. Cation disorder increased while Ba Cu O content remained relatively constant for Zr additions 7.5 m/o. In the region of sharpest descent of Jc with increasing Zr content (2.5 7.5 m/o Zr-added) neither the cation disorder nor the Ba Cu O content showed a systematic variation with Jc. Zirconium K edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy revealed that virtually all of the added Zr in each sample was present as a BaZrO3-like phase (BZO). The Jc performance of the Zr-added films showed a high correlation with the variations in the next-nearest-neighbor Zr M (M = Zr, Y) scattering path amplitude from the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and the critical temperature over the full range of Zr additions and with cation disorder at the higher Zr-added levels (>7.5 m/o). There was no obvious correlation with the amount of residual barium cuprate or CuO. Approximate ranges for the BZO particle dimensions estimated from the EXAFS data indicated that the mean particle size gets larger with increasing Zr addition.

  12. Theoretical study of Raman chirped adiabatic passage by X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Highly excited electronic states and rotational effects

    SciTech Connect

    Engin, Selma; Sisourat, Nicolas Selles, Patricia; Taïeb, Richard; Carniato, Stéphane

    2014-06-21

    Raman Chirped Adiabatic Passage (RCAP) is an efficient method to climb the vibrational ladder of molecules. It was shown on the example of fixed-in-space HCl molecule that selective vibrational excitation can thus be achieved by RCAP and that population transfer can be followed by X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy [S. Engin, N. Sisourat, P. Selles, R. Taïeb, and S. Carniato, Chem. Phys. Lett. 535, 192–195 (2012)]. Here, in a more detailed analysis of the process, we investigate the effects of highly excited electronic states and of molecular rotation on the efficiency of RCAP. Furthermore, we propose an alternative spectroscopic way to monitor the transfer by means of X-ray absorption spectra.

  13. Auger resonant Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Y.; LeBrun, T.; MacDonald, M.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    As noted above, traditional spectroscopy of the electronic structure of the inner shells of atoms, molecules, and solids is limited by the lifetime broadening of the core-excited states. This limitation can also be avoided with the non-radiative analog of X-ray Raman scattering - resonant Auger Raman spectroscopy. We have used this technique to study the K-shell excitation spectrum of argon as the photon energy is continuously scanned across threshold.

  14. X-ray absorption study of octafluorodirhenate(III): EXAFS structures and resonance raman spectroscopy of octahalodirhenates

    SciTech Connect

    Conradson, S.D.; Sattelberger, A.P.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1988-02-17

    The structure, bonding, spectroscopy, and photophysics of transition-metal complexes containing quadruple metal-metal bonds are subjects of intense and general interest. For both historic and fundamental reasons, the octahalodirhenate(III) ions have become the paradigms of this field. Extensive spectroscopic and photophysical studies exist for the entire Re/sub 2/X/sub 8//sup 2 -/ series (X = F, Cl, Br, and I). However, while excellent structural data exist for X = Cl and Br, the structures of Re/sub 2/Fe/sub 8//sup 2 -/ and Re/sub 2/I/sub 8//sup 2 -/ have not been determined. These structures are essential for complete understanding of the bonding and physical and chemical behavior in these systems. Toward this end, the authors report structural features of Re/sub 2/F/sub 8//sup 2 -/ determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. They also report X-ray absorption near-edge spectra (XANES); resonance Raman (RR) spectra have been determined previously by others and subsequently by the authors. They find that in Re/sub 2/F/sub 8//sup 2 -/ the Re-Re distance is 2.20 Angstrom and the Re-F distance is 1.95 A. Both of these distances are unexpected considering the corresponding stretching frequencies in the RR spectra.

  15. A new on-axis micro-spectrophotometer for combining Raman, fluorescence and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy with macromolecular crystallography at the Swiss Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian S. N.; Thominet, Vincent; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Fuchs, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of X-ray diffraction experiments with optical methods such as Raman, UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy greatly enhances and complements the specificity of the obtained information. The upgraded version of the in situ on-axis micro-spectrophotometer, MS2, at the macromolecular crystallography beamline X10SA of the Swiss Light Source is presented. The instrument newly supports Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy, in addition to the previously available UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence modes. With the recent upgrades of the spectral bandwidth, instrument stability, detection efficiency and control software, the application range of the instrument and its ease of operation were greatly improved. Its on-axis geometry with collinear X-ray and optical axes to ensure optimal control of the overlap of sample volumes probed by each technique is still unique amongst comparable facilities worldwide and the instrument has now been in general user operation for over two years. PMID:23955041

  16. Raman spectroscopy of composites

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.J.; Andrews, M.C.; Yang, X.; Huang, Y.L.; Gu, X.; Day, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    It is demonstrated that Raman Spectroscopy can be used to follow the micromechanics of the deformation of high-performance fibers within composites. The technique can be applied to a wide range of fiber systems including aramids, carbon and ceramic (using fluorescence spectroscopy) fibers. Well-defined Raman spectra are obtained and the position of the Raman bands shift on the application of stress or strain. It is possible to determine the point-to-point variation of strain along an individual fiber inside a transparent matrix under any general state of stress or strain. Examples are given of the use of the technique to study a variety of phenomena in a wide range of composite systems. The phenomena investigated include thermal stresses, fiber/matrix adhesion, matrix yielding for both fragmentation and pull-out tests. The systems studied include aramid/epoxy, carbon/epoxy and ceramic-fiber/glass composites.

  17. Raman spectroscopy in astrobiology.

    PubMed

    Jorge Villar, Susana E; Edwards, Howell G M

    2006-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is proposed as a valuable analytical technique for planetary exploration because it is sensitive to organic and inorganic compounds and able to unambiguously identify key spectral markers in a mixture of biological and geological components; furthermore, sample manipulation is not required and any size of sample can be studied without chemical or mechanical pretreatment. NASA and ESA are considering the adoption of miniaturised Raman spectrometers for inclusion in suites of analytical instrumentation to be placed on robotic landers on Mars in the near future to search for extinct or extant life signals. In this paper we review the advantages and limitations of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of complex specimens with relevance to the detection of bio- and geomarkers in extremophilic organisms which are considered to be terrestrial analogues of possible extraterrestial life that could have developed on planetary surfaces. PMID:16456933

  18. Fiber enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frosch, T.; Yan, D.; Hanf, S.; Popp, J.

    2014-05-01

    Fiber enhanced Raman sensing is presented for versatile and extremely sensitive analysis of pharmaceutical drugs and biogenic gases. Elaborated micro-structured optical fibers guide the light with very low losses within their hollow core and provide at the same time a miniaturized sample container for the analytes. Thus, fiber enhanced Raman spectroscopy (FERS) allows for chemically selective detection of minimal sample amounts with high sensitivity. Two examples are presented in this contribution: (i) the detection of picomolar concentrations of pharmaceutical drugs; and (ii) the analysis of biogenic gases within a complex mixture of gases with analytical sensitivities in the ppm range.

  19. Aqueous Cr(VI) reduction by pyrite: Speciation and characterisation of the solid phases by X-ray photoelectron, Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullet, Martine; Demoisson, Frédéric; Humbert, Bernard; Michot, Laurent J.; Vantelon, Delphine

    2007-07-01

    Optical microscopy, confocal Raman micro-spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron micro-spectroscopy (XPS) and synchrotron based micro-X-ray fluorescence (XRF), micro-X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and micro-extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were used to investigate the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) by pyrite. Special emphasis was placed on the characterisation of the solid phase formed during the reaction process. Cr(III) and Fe(III) species were identified by XPS analyses in addition to non-oxidised pyrite. Optical microscopy images and the corresponding Raman spectra reveal a strong heterogeneity of the samples with three different types of zones. (i) Reflective areas with Eg and Ag Raman wavenumbers relative to non-oxidised pyrite are the most frequently observed. (ii) Orange areas that display a drift of the Eg and Ag pyrite vibration modes of -3 and -6 cm -1, respectively. Such areas are only observed in the presence of Cr(VI) but are not specifically due to this oxidant. (iii) Bluish areas with vibration modes relative to a corundum-like structure that can be assigned to a solid solution Fe 2- xCr xO 3, x varying between 0.2 and 1.5. The heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of chromium observed by optical microscopy and associated Raman microspectroscopy is confirmed by μ-XRF. In agreement with both solution and XPS analyses, these spectroscopies clearly confirm that chromium is in the trivalent state. XANES spectra in the iron K-edge pre-edge region obtained in rich chromium areas reveal the presence of ferric ion thus revealing a systematic association between Cr(III) and Fe(III). In agreement with Raman analyses, Cr K-edge EXAFS can be interpreted as corresponding to Cr atoms involved in a substituted-type hematite structure Fe 2- xCr xO 3.

  20. Identification of different forms of cocaine and substances used in adulteration using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Penido, Ciro A F O; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu T; Zângaro, Renato A; Silveira, Landulfo

    2015-01-01

    Identification of cocaine and subsequent quantification immediately after seizure are problems for the police in developing countries such as Brazil. This work proposes a comparison between the Raman and FT-IR techniques as methods to identify cocaine, the adulterants used to increase volume, and possible degradation products in samples seized by the police. Near-infrared Raman spectra (785 nm excitation, 10 sec exposure time) and FT-IR-ATR spectra were obtained from different samples of street cocaine and some substances commonly used as adulterants. Freebase powder, hydrochloride powder, and crack rock can be distinguished by both Raman and FT-IR spectroscopies, revealing differences in their chemical structure. Most of the samples showed characteristic peaks of degradation products such as benzoylecgonine and benzoic acid, and some presented evidence of adulteration with aluminum sulfate and sodium carbonate. Raman spectroscopy is better than FT-IR for identifying benzoic acid and inorganic adulterants in cocaine. PMID:25428273

  1. Coordination of Fe, Ga and Ge in high pressure glasses by Moessbauer, Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and geological implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleet, M. E.; Henderson, G. S.; Herzberg, C. T.; Crozier, E. D.; Osborne, M. D.; Scarfe, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    For some time, it has been recognized that the structure of silicate liquids has a great bearing on such magma properties as viscosity, diffusivity, and thermal expansion and on the extrapolation of thermodynamic quantities outside of the experimentally measurable range. In this connection it is vital to know if pressure imposes changes in melt structure similar to the pressure-induced reconstructive transformations in crystals. In the present study on 1 bar and high pressure glasses, an investigation is conducted regarding the coordination of Fe(3+) in Fe silicate glasses by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy is employed to explore the coordinations of Ge(4+) in GeO2 glasses and of Ga(3+) in NaGa silicate glasses, while the coordination of Ga(3+) in NaGaSiO4 glasses is studied with the aid of methods of X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  2. Raman Spectroscopy of Cocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Frank; Reardon, Paul; Ochoa, Romulo; Abourahma, Heba; Marti, Marcus; Dimeo, Rachel

    2010-02-01

    Cocrystals are a class of compounds that consist of two or more molecules that are held together by hydrogen bonding. Pharmaceutical cocrystals are those that contain an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) as one of the components. Pharmaceutical cocrystals are of particular interest and have gained a lot of attention in recent years because they offer the ability to modify the physical properties of the API, like solubility and bioavailability, without altering the chemical structure of the API. The APIs that we targeted for our studies are theophylline (Tp) and indomethacin (Ind). These compounds have been mixed with complementary coformers (cocrystal former) that include acetamide (AcONH2), melamine (MLM), nicotinic acid (Nic-COOH), 4-cyanopyridine (4-CNPy) and 4-aminopyridine (4-NH2Py). Raman spectroscopy has been used to characterize these cocrystals. Spectra of the cocrystals were compared to those of the coformers to analyze for peak shifts, specifically those corresponding to hydrogen bonding. A 0.5 m CCD Spex spectrometer was used, in a micro-Raman setup, for spectral analysis. An Argon ion Coherent laser at 514.5 nm was used as the excitation source. )

  3. Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dietze, Daniel R; Mathies, Richard A

    2016-05-01

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is an ultrafast nonlinear optical technique that provides vibrational structural information with high temporal (sub-50 fs) precision and high spectral (10 cm(-1) ) resolution. Since the first full demonstration of its capabilities ≈15 years ago, FSRS has evolved into a mature technique, giving deep insights into chemical and biochemical reaction dynamics that would be inaccessible with any other technique. It is now being routinely applied to virtually all possible photochemical reactions and systems spanning from single molecules in solution to thin films, bulk crystals and macromolecular proteins. This review starts with an historic overview and discusses the theoretical and experimental concepts behind this technology. Emphasis is put on the current state-of-the-art experimental realization and several variations of FSRS that have been developed. The unique capabilities of FSRS are illustrated through a comprehensive presentation of experiments to date followed by prospects. PMID:26919612

  4. Pressure effects on the proximal heme pocket in myoglobin probed by Raman and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Galkin, O; Buchter, S; Tabirian, A; Schulte, A

    1997-01-01

    The influence of high pressure on the heme protein conformation of myoglobin in different ligation states is studied using Raman spectroscopy over the temperature range from 30 to 295 K. Photostationary experiments monitoring the oxidation state marker bands demonstrate the change of rebinding rate with pressure. While frequency changes of vibrational modes associated with rigid bonds of the porphyrin ring are <1 cm(-1), we investigate a significant shift of the iron-histidine mode to higher frequency with increasing pressure (approximately 3 cm(-1) for deltaP = 190 MPa in Mb). The observed frequency shift is interpreted structurally as a conformational change affecting the tilt angle between the heme plane and the proximal histidine and the out-of-plane iron position. Independent evidence for iron motion comes from measurements of the redshift of band III in the near-infrared with pressure. This suggests that at high pressure the proximal heme pocket and the protein are altered toward the bound state conformation, which contributes to the rate increase for CO binding. Raman spectra of Mb and photodissociated MbCO measured at low temperature and variable pressure further support changes in protein conformation and are consistent with glasslike properties of myoglobin below 160 K. PMID:9370469

  5. Solidlike coherent vibronic dynamics in a room temperature liquid: Resonant Raman and absorption spectroscopy of liquid bromine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branigan, Edward T.; van Staveren, Marie N.; Apkarian, V. Ara

    2010-01-01

    UV-visible absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of liquid bromine are presented and rigorously interpreted. The RR spectra, which show an anharmonic vibrational progression of up to 30 overtones, define the ground state potential in the range 2.05 Åabsorption spectrum. The spectrum is first inverted under assumption of the classical reflection approximation, then corrected by forward simulations through quantum time correlations. The extrapolated B and C potentials are used to simulate RR spectra. Their validity is cross-checked by the interference pattern of the polarized spectra due to two-channel RR scattering. The discrepancy between calculated and observed intensities can be entirely assigned to vibrational dephasing, which is observed to follow the exponential energy gap law—dephasing rates perfectly trace the Birge-Sponer plot of the vibrational progression—suggesting that vibrational dissipation controls the decay of coherence. Despite strong intermolecular electronic interactions and vibrational energy gaps of ˜kT, vibrational coherences are long lived: Coherence times range from ≥25 to ≥2.4 ps between v =1 and v =25. Remarkably, the RR line shapes are skewed toward the red, indicating upchirp in frequencies that develop over a period of 400 fs. Evidently, the molecular vibrations adiabatically follow the solvent cage, which is impulsively driven into expansion during the ˜20 fs evolution on the electronically excited state. Liquid bromine retains coherence in ordered sluggish local cages with quadrupolar interactions—dynamics akin to molecules isolated in structured cryogenic rare gas solids.

  6. Raman spectroscopy in halophile research

    PubMed Central

    Jehlička, Jan; Oren, Aharon

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy plays a major role in robust detection of biomolecules and mineral signatures in halophile research. An overview of Raman spectroscopic investigations in halophile research of the last decade is given here to show advantages of the approach, progress made as well as limits of the technique. Raman spectroscopy is an excellent tool to monitor and identify microbial pigments and other biomolecules in extant and extinct halophile biomass. Studies of bottom gypsum crusts from salterns, native evaporitic sediments, halite inclusions, and endoliths as well as cultures of halophilic microorganisms permitted to understand the content, distribution, and behavior of important molecular species. The first papers describing Raman spectroscopic detection of microbiological and geochemical key markers using portable instruments are highlighted as well. PMID:24339823

  7. Raman spectroscopy in halophile research.

    PubMed

    Jehlička, Jan; Oren, Aharon

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy plays a major role in robust detection of biomolecules and mineral signatures in halophile research. An overview of Raman spectroscopic investigations in halophile research of the last decade is given here to show advantages of the approach, progress made as well as limits of the technique. Raman spectroscopy is an excellent tool to monitor and identify microbial pigments and other biomolecules in extant and extinct halophile biomass. Studies of bottom gypsum crusts from salterns, native evaporitic sediments, halite inclusions, and endoliths as well as cultures of halophilic microorganisms permitted to understand the content, distribution, and behavior of important molecular species. The first papers describing Raman spectroscopic detection of microbiological and geochemical key markers using portable instruments are highlighted as well. PMID:24339823

  8. Raman spectroscopy of shocked water

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, N.C.; Mitchell, A.C.; Nellis, W.J.; Graham, W.B.; Walrafen, G.E.

    1983-07-01

    Raman scattering has been used extensively to study the vibrational and rotational properties of molecules under a variety of conditions. Here, interest is in the behavior of water molecules shocked to high pressures and temperatures. Behind the shock front the water molecules undergo changes in bonding and the molecules may become ionized. Raman spectroscopy can be used to determine the molecular species behind the shock front. In addition, changes in Raman spectra can yield information regarding inter- and intramolecular potentials and the temperature behind the shock front.

  9. Raman Spectroscopy of Microbial Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid nondestructive technique providing spectroscopic and structural information on both organic and inorganic molecular compounds. Extensive applications for the method in the characterization of pigments have been found. Due to the high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for the detection of chlorophylls, carotenoids, scytonemin, and a range of other pigments found in the microbial world, it is an excellent technique to monitor the presence of such pigments, both in pure cultures and in environmental samples. Miniaturized portable handheld instruments are available; these instruments can be used to detect pigments in microbiological samples of different types and origins under field conditions. PMID:24682303

  10. Raman spectroscopy of white wines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Coralie; Bruneel, Jean-Luc; Guyon, François; Médina, Bernard; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Guillaume, François

    2015-08-15

    The feasibility of exploiting Raman scattering to analyze white wines has been investigated using 3 different wavelengths of the incoming laser radiation in the near-UV (325 nm), visible (532 nm) and near infrared (785 nm). To help in the interpretation of the Raman spectra, the absorption properties in the UV-visible range of two wine samples as well as their laser induced fluorescence have also been investigated. Thanks to the strong intensity enhancement of the Raman scattered light due to electronic resonance with 325 nm laser excitation, hydroxycinnamic acids may be detected and analyzed selectively. Fructose and glucose may also be easily detected below ca. 1000 cm(-1). This feasibility study demonstrates the potential of the Raman spectroscopic technique for the analysis of white wines. PMID:25794745

  11. Raman and x-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization of Zr-doped MOCVD YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+{delta}}.

    SciTech Connect

    Maroni, V. A.; Kropf, A. J.; Aytung, T.; Paranthaman, M.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Metal-organic chemical vapor deposited YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+{delta}} (YBCO) films (about 0.9 {micro}m thick) containing varying amounts of added zirconium were examined by Raman microscopy and synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The self-field and in-field (1 T, B {parallel} c)J{sub c} performance of the YBCO films at 77 K (reported by the group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that fabricated the samples) exhibited an increase on going from 0 mol% (m/o) Zr-added to 2.5 m/o Zr-added but then decreased sharply with increasing Zr content. Raman measurements on these films showed that the added Zr had little effect on YBCO cation disorder up to about 7.5 m/o Zr-added. Cation disorder increased while Ba-Cu-O content remained relatively constant for Zr additions {ge} 7.5 m/o. In the region of sharpest descent of J{sub c} with increasing Zr content (2.5-7.5 m/o Zr-added) neither the cation disorder nor the Ba-Cu-O content showed a systematic variation with J{sub c}. Zirconium K edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy revealed that virtually all of the added Zr in each sample was present as a BaZrO{sub 3}-like phase (BZO). The J{sub c} performance of the Zr-added films showed a high correlation with the variations in the next-nearest-neighbor Zr-M (M = Zr, Y) scattering path amplitude from the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and the critical temperature over the full range of Zr additions and with cation disorder at the higher Zr-added levels (>7.5 m/o). There was no obvious correlation with the amount of residual barium cuprate or CuO. Approximate ranges for the BZO particle dimensions estimated from the EXAFS data indicated that the mean particle size gets larger with increasing Zr addition.

  12. Raman Spectroscopy of Amorphous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Friedmann, T.A.; Missert, N.A.; Siegal, M.P.; Sullivan, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Amorphous carbon is an elemental form of carbon with low hydrogen content, which may be deposited in thin films by the impact of high energy carbon atoms or ions. It is structurally distinct from the more well-known elemental forms of carbon, diamond and graphite. It is distinct in physical and chemical properties from the material known as diamond-like carbon, a form which is also amorphous but which has a higher hydrogen content, typically near 40 atomic percent. Amorphous carbon also has distinctive Raman spectra, whose patterns depend, through resonance enhancement effects, not only on deposition conditions but also on the wavelength selected for Raman excitation. This paper provides an overview of the Raman spectroscopy of amorphous carbon and describes how Raman spectral patterns correlate to film deposition conditions, physical properties and molecular level structure.

  13. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrell, Robin L.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the basis for the technique and its experimental requirements. Describes a few examples of the analytical problems to which surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been and can be applied. Provides a perspective on the current limitations and frontiers in developing SERS as an analytical technique. (MVL)

  14. Raman spectroscopy of illicit substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Robert J.; Faulds, Karen; Smith, W. Ewen

    2007-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy provides a very effective method of identifying an illicit substance in situ without separation or contact other than with a laser beam. The equipment required is steadily improving and is now reliable and simple to operate. Costs are also coming down and hand held portable spectrometers are proving very effective. The main limitations on the use of the technique are that it is insensitive in terms of the number of incident photons converted into Raman scattered photons and fluorescence produced in the sample by the incident radiation interferes. Newer methods, still largely in the development phase, will increase the potential for selected applications. The use of picosecond pulsed lasers can discriminate between fluorescence and Raman scattering and this has been used in the laboratory to examine street samples of illicit drugs. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering, in which the analyte requires to be adsorbed onto a roughened metal surface, creates a sensitivity to compete with fluorescence and quenches fluorescence for molecules on a surface. This provides the ability to detect trace amounts of substances in some cases. The improving optics, detection capability and the reliability of the new methods indicate that the potential for the use of Raman spectroscopy for security purposes will increase with time.

  15. Multiferroic Materials Bi1-xSmxFeO3:. a Study of Raman and Absorption Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, Nguyen Van; Thang, Dao Viet

    Multiferroic Bi1-xSmxFeO3 (x = 0.00, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2) ceramics were prepared by conventional solid state reaction method. X-ray diffraction measurement was carried out to characterize the crystal structure and to detect the impurities existing in these ceramics. The substitution of rare earth Sm for Bi was found to decrease the impurity phase in BiFeO3 ceramics. There is strong evidence that both lattice constants a and c of the unit cell become smaller as the Sm3+ content is increased. The effect of introducing Sm3+ is shown to decrease the optical band gap for doped sample Bi1-xSmxFeO3. Additionally, the temperature-dependent Raman measurement performed for the lattice dynamics study of Bi1-xSmxFeO3 samples reveals a strong band centered at around 1000-1300 cm-1 which is associated with the resonant enhancement of two-phonon Raman scattering in the multiferroic Bi1-xSmxFeO3 samples. This two-phonon signal is shown to broaden with increasing x. The Raman spectra at low wavenumbers are suggested to be related with magnon in this system.

  16. Raman spectroscopy of bone metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Sottnik, Joseph; Morris, Michael; Keller, Evan

    2012-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy of bone has been used to characterize chemical changes occurring in diseases such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and osteomyelitis. Metastasis of cancer into bone causes changes to bone quality that are similar to those observed in osteoporosis, such as decreased bone strength, but with an accelerated timeframe. In particular, osteolytic (bone degrading) lesions in bone metastasis have a marked effect on patient quality of life because of increased risk of fractures, pain, and hypercalcemia. We use Raman spectroscopy to examine bone from two different mouse models of osteolytic bone metastasis. Raman spectroscopy measures physicochemical information which cannot be obtained through standard biochemical and histological measurements. This study was reviewed and approved by the University of Michigan University Committee on the Care and Use of Animals. Two mouse models of prostate cancer bone metastasis, RM1 (n=3) and PC3-luc (n=4) were examined. Tibiae were injected with RM1 or PC3-luc cancer cells, while the contralateral tibiae received a placebo injection for use as controls. After 2 weeks of incubation, the mice were sacrificed and the tibiae were examined by Raman microspectroscopy (λ=785 nm). Spectroscopic markers corresponding to mineral stoichiometry, bone mineralization, and mineral crystallinity were compared in spectra from the cancerous and control tibiae. X-ray imaging of the tibia confirmed extensive osteolysis in the RM1 mice, with tumor invasion into adjoining soft tissue and moderate osteolysis in the PC3-luc mice. Raman spectroscopic markers indicate that osteolytic lesions are less mineralized than normal bone tissue, with an altered mineral stoichiometry and crystallinity.

  17. Raman spectroscopy application to analyses of components in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Guoping

    2006-09-01

    The characterization of species in aqueous solutions has presented a challenge to analytical and physical chemist, because the JR absorption of the aqueous solvent is so intense that it becomes difficult to observe the solute in the water by JR absorption. In contrast, Raman spectrum of the solute is unaffected by the water, so the weak scattering of water makes the technique well suited to aqueous samples, and the Raman spectrum exhibits well-defined bands corresponding to fundamental modes of vibration. In addition, Raman spectroscopy has some inherent advantages in aqueous solution analysis, because the spectral features of signals from different species are much more distinct, and it provides characteristic signatures for samples, such as blood, protein and cholesterol. All the advantages make Raman spectroscopy be a potential alternative for the study of aqueous solutions. Now, Raman spectroscopy has been applied to studying samples in aqueous solutions, blood serum, intracellular protein levels. Now, industrial wasted water contains many organic contaminants, and it is necessary to determine and monitor these contaminants. The paper first introduces Raman spectroscopy, and then describes its applications to determining the components in aqueous solutions, analyzes and assignes the Raman spectra of o-dichlorobenzene, o-xylene, m-xyiene and p-xylene in detail. The experimental results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy is a particularly powerful technique for aqueous solutions analyses.

  18. FT-Raman Spectroscopy: A Catalyst for the Raman Explosion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The limitations of Fourier transform (FT) Raman spectroscopy, which is used to detect and analyze the scattered radiation, are discussed. FT-Raman has served to revitalize a field that was lagging and the presence of Raman instrumentation as a routine analytical tool is established for the foreseeable future.

  19. Transcutaneous Raman Spectroscopy of Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Jason R.

    Clinical diagnoses of bone health and fracture risk typically rely upon measurements of bone density or structure, but the strength of a bone is also dependent upon its chemical composition. One technology that has been used extensively in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies to measure the chemical composition of bone is Raman spectroscopy. This spectroscopic technique provides chemical information about a sample by probing its molecular vibrations. In the case of bone tissue, Raman spectra provide chemical information about both the inorganic mineral and organic matrix components, which each contribute to bone strength. To explore the relationship between bone strength and chemical composition, our laboratory has contributed to ex vivo, exposed-bone animal studies of rheumatoid arthritis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, and prolonged lead exposure. All of these studies suggest that Raman-based predictions of biomechanical strength may be more accurate than those produced by the clinically-used parameter of bone mineral density. The utility of Raman spectroscopy in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies has inspired attempts to perform bone spectroscopy transcutaneously. Although the results are promising, further advancements are necessary to make non-invasive, in vivo measurements of bone that are of sufficient quality to generate accurate predictions of fracture risk. In order to separate the signals from bone and soft tissue that contribute to a transcutaneous measurement, we developed an overconstrained extraction algorithm that is based upon fitting with spectral libraries derived from separately-acquired measurements of the underlying tissue components. This approach allows for accurate spectral unmixing despite the fact that similar chemical components (e.g., type I collagen) are present in both soft tissue and bone and was applied to experimental data in order to transcutaneously detect, to our knowledge for the first time, age- and disease-related spectral

  20. Raman Spectroscopy of Ocular Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Gellermann, Warner

    The optically transparent nature of the human eye has motivated numerous Raman studies aimed at the non-invasive optical probing of ocular tissue components critical to healthy vision. Investigations include the qualitative and quantitative detection of tissue-specific molecular constituents, compositional changes occurring with development of ocular pathology, and the detection and tracking of ocular drugs and nutritional supplements. Motivated by a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cataract formation in the aging human lens, a great deal of work has centered on the Raman detection of proteins and water content in the lens. Several protein groups and the hydroxyl response are readily detectable. Changes of protein compositions can be studied in excised noncataractous tissue versus aged tissue preparations as well as in tissue samples with artificially induced cataracts. Most of these studies are carried out in vitro using suitable animal models and conventional Raman techniques. Tissue water content plays an important role in optimum light transmission of the outermost transparent ocular structure, the cornea. Using confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to non-invasively measure the water to protein ratio as a measure of hydration status and to track drug-induced changes of the hydration levels in the rabbit cornea at various depths. The aqueous humor, normally supplying nutrients to cornea and lens, has an advantageous anterior location for Raman studies. Increasing efforts are pursued to non-invasively detect the presence of glucose and therapeutic concentrations of antibiotic drugs in this medium. In retinal tissue, Raman spectroscopy proves to be an important tool for research into the causes of macular degeneration, the leading cause of irreversible vision disorders and blindness in the elderly. It has been possible to detect the spectral features of advanced glycation and advanced lipooxydation end products in

  1. Raman and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy in Mineral Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, J. W.

    2014-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is particularly useful for rapid identification of minerals and gemstones. Raman spectrometers also allow PL studies for authentication of samples and geological provenance, diamond type screening and detection of HPHT treatments.

  2. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  3. Correlation between Active Center Structure and Enhanced Dioxygen Binding in Co(salen) Nanoparticles: Characterization by In Situ Infrared, Raman, and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson,C.; Long, B.; Nguyen, J.; Day, V.; Borovik, A.; Subramaniam, B.; Guzman, J.

    2008-01-01

    The structure and ligand environment of Co(salen) nanoparticles and unprocessed Co(salen) have been determined by the combined application of infrared, Raman, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments before and during interaction with O2. The Co(salen) nanoparticles were prepared by the precipitation with compressed antisolvent (PCA) technique using commercially obtained Co(salen) [denoted as unprocessed Co(salen)] as the parent compound. The unprocessed Co(salen) particles exist as dimer species with a square-pyramidal coordination geometry that display no measurable O2 binding at room temperature. In sharp contrast, the Co(salen) nanoparticles show near-stoichiometric O2 adsorption, as demonstrated by microbalance gas binding experiments. The spectroscopy results indicate the presence of CoII centers with distorted tetrahedral geometry in the Co(salen) nanoparticles with no evidence of metallic Co clusters, confirmed by the lack of Co-Co contributions at bonding distances in the EXAFS spectra and the presence of characteristic features of CoII in the XANES spectra. The EXAFS data also indicate that there are on average two Co-N and two Co-O bonds with a distance of 1.81 {+-} 0.02 and 1.90 {+-} 0.02 Angstroms, respectively, consistent with typical metal salen structures. Upon O2 binding on the Co(salen) nanoparticles, the XANES results indicate oxidation of the CoII to CoIII, consistent with the vibrational data showing new bands associated with oxygen species bonded to Co centers and the increase in the oxygen coordination number from 1.8 to 2.9 in the EXAFS data. The results indicate that the enhanced O2 binding properties of Co(salen) nanoparticles are related to the unique distorted tetrahedral geometry, which is not observed in the unprocessed samples that contain mainly dimers with square planar geometry. The results presented here provide a

  4. Raman spectroscopies in shock-compressed materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.; Shaner, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering have been used to measure temperatures and changes in molecular vibrational frequencies for detonating and shocked materials. Inverse Raman and Raman induced Kerr effect spectroscopies have been suggested as diagnostic probes for determining and phenomenology of shock-induced chemical reactions. The practicality, advantages, and disadvantages of using Raman scattering techniques as diagnostic probes of microscopic phenomenology through and immediately behind the shock front of shock-compressed molecular systems are discussed.

  5. Local disorder investigation in NiS(2-x)Se(x) using Raman and Ni K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Marini, C; Joseph, B; Caramazza, S; Capitani, F; Bendele, M; Mitrano, M; Chermisi, D; Mangialardo, S; Pal, B; Goyal, M; Iadecola, A; Mathon, O; Pascarelli, S; Sarma, D D; Postorino, P

    2014-11-12

    We report on Raman and Ni K-edge x-ray absorption investigations of a NiS(2-x)Se(x) (with x = 0.00, 0.50/0.55, 0.60, and 1.20) pyrite family. The Ni K-edge absorption edge shows a systematic shift going from an insulating phase (x = 0.00 and 0.50) to a metallic phase (x = 0.60 and 1.20). The near-edge absorption features show a clear evolution with Se doping. The extended x-ray absorption fine structure data reveal the evolution of the local structure with Se doping which mainly governs the local disorder. We also describe the decomposition of the NiS(2-x)Se(x) Raman spectra and investigate the weights of various phonon modes using Gaussian and Lorentzian profiles. The effectiveness of the fitting models in describing the data is evaluated by means of Bayes factor estimation. The Raman analysis clearly demonstrates the disorder effects due to Se alloying in describing the phonon spectra of NiS(2-x)Se(x) pyrites. PMID:25320052

  6. Local disorder investigation in NiS2-xSex using Raman and Ni K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, C.; Joseph, B.; Caramazza, S.; Capitani, F.; Bendele, M.; Mitrano, M.; Chermisi, D.; Mangialardo, S.; Pal, B.; Goyal, M.; Iadecola, A.; Mathon, O.; Pascarelli, S.; Sarma, D. D.; Postorino, P.

    2014-11-01

    We report on Raman and Ni K-edge x-ray absorption investigations of a NiS2-xSex (with x = 0.00, 0.50/0.55, 0.60, and 1.20) pyrite family. The Ni K-edge absorption edge shows a systematic shift going from an insulating phase (x = 0.00 and 0.50) to a metallic phase (x = 0.60 and 1.20). The near-edge absorption features show a clear evolution with Se doping. The extended x-ray absorption fine structure data reveal the evolution of the local structure with Se doping which mainly governs the local disorder. We also describe the decomposition of the NiS2-xSex Raman spectra and investigate the weights of various phonon modes using Gaussian and Lorentzian profiles. The effectiveness of the fitting models in describing the data is evaluated by means of Bayes factor estimation. The Raman analysis clearly demonstrates the disorder effects due to Se alloying in describing the phonon spectra of NiS2-xSex pyrites.

  7. Wavelength dependent resonance Raman band intensity of broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy of malachite green in ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Qiongyan; He, Yuhan; Xu, Mei; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zhaohui

    2015-03-01

    Resonance broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy of malachite green in ethanol has been performed. With a tuning picosecond visible laser source and a broadband Raman probe, the Raman gain and loss spectra have been measured simultaneously. By scanning the Raman pump across the first absorption band of the molecule, we found that the resonant Raman bands could be only seen when the pump laser tuned in the range of the red edge of the S1←S0 transition. Dispersive lineshapes of resonant Raman bands have been observed in the Raman loss spectra, while the line shape is normal (same as spontaneous Raman) in the Raman gain spectra. Although, the resonant bands in the loss spectrum are usually stronger than that in the gain spectrum, the band intensities of both loss and gain linearly increase with the pump energy. The relative magnitude of each corresponding resonant band in the Raman loss and gain varies with the pump wavelength. Mode specified Raman excitation profiles have been obtained through broadband stimulated Raman measurement.

  8. Relationship between ferroelectric properties and local structure of Pb1-xBaxZr0.40Ti0.60O3 ceramic materials studied by X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesquita, Alexandre; Michalowicz, Alain; Moscovici, Jacques; Pizani, Paulo Sergio; Mastelaro, Valmor Roberto

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports on the structural characterization of Pb1-xBaxZr0.40Ti0.60O3 (PBZT) ferroelectric ceramic compositions prepared by the conventional solid state reaction method. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and Raman spectroscopy were used in the probing of the local structure of PBZT samples that exhibit a normal or relaxor ferroelectric behavior. They showed a considerable local disorder around Zr and Pb atoms in the samples of tetragonal or cubic long-range order symmetry. The intensity of the E(TO3) mode in the Raman spectra of PBZT relaxor samples remains constant at temperatures lower than Tm, which has proven the stabilization of the correlation process between nanodomains.

  9. Applications of Raman scattering spectroscopy to halide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendow, B.; Banerjee, P. K.; Drexhage, M. G.

    1983-04-01

    Polarized Raman scattering spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigating fundamental vibrational properties, structure and bonding, origins of IR edge absorption, and dispersion of the IR refractive index. In this paper, the application of Raman spectroscopy to halide glasses and, in particular, heavy metal fluoride glasses, is described. The spectra of the latter differ substantially from those of simple oxide, halide or chalcogenide glasses and, moreover, display a wide range of vibrational characteristics, depending on composition. In combination with infrared spectroscopy, useful guidelines can be developed for tailoring glass compositions for specific applications.

  10. Raman Spectroscopy and Related Techniques in Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Downes, Andrew; Elfick, Alistair

    2010-01-01

    In this review we describe label-free optical spectroscopy techniques which are able to non-invasively measure the (bio)chemistry in biological systems. Raman spectroscopy uses visible or near-infrared light to measure a spectrum of vibrational bonds in seconds. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) microscopy and stimulated Raman loss (SRL) microscopy are orders of magnitude more efficient than Raman spectroscopy, and are able to acquire high quality chemically-specific images in seconds. We discuss the benefits and limitations of all techniques, with particular emphasis on applications in biomedicine—both in vivo (using fiber endoscopes) and in vitro (in optical microscopes). PMID:21151763

  11. Raman spectroscopy of 'Bisphenol A'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Ramzan; Zheng, Yuxiang

    2016-03-01

    Raman spectra (95 - 3000 cm-1) of 'Bisphenol A' are presented. Absorption peaks have been assigned by Density Functional Theory (DFT) with B3LYP 6 - 311 ++ G (3df, 3pd) and wB97XD 6 - 311 ++ G (3df, 3pd). B3LYP 6 - 311 ++ G (3df, 3pd) gives frequencies which are nearer to experimental frequencies than wB97XD 6 - 311 ++ G (3df, 3pd) which involves empirical dispersion. Scale factor for wB97XD 6 - 311 ++ G (3df, 3pd) is found out to be 0.95008 by least squares fit.

  12. Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Saito, R; Tatsumi, Y; Huang, S; Ling, X; Dresselhaus, M S

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is reviewed based on our recent theoretical and experimental works. First, we discuss the semi-classical and quantum mechanical description for the polarization dependence of Raman spectra of TMDs in which the optical dipole transition matrix elements as a function of laser excitation energy are important for understanding the polarization dependence of the Raman intensity and Raman tensor. Overviewing the symmetry of TMDs, we discuss the dependence of the Raman spectra of TMDs on layer thickness, polarization, laser energy and the structural phase. Furthermore, we discuss the Raman spectra of twisted bilayer and heterostructures of TMDs. Finally, we give our perspectives on the Raman spectroscopy of TMDs. PMID:27388703

  13. Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, R.; Tatsumi, Y.; Huang, S.; Ling, X.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is reviewed based on our recent theoretical and experimental works. First, we discuss the semi-classical and quantum mechanical description for the polarization dependence of Raman spectra of TMDs in which the optical dipole transition matrix elements as a function of laser excitation energy are important for understanding the polarization dependence of the Raman intensity and Raman tensor. Overviewing the symmetry of TMDs, we discuss the dependence of the Raman spectra of TMDs on layer thickness, polarization, laser energy and the structural phase. Furthermore, we discuss the Raman spectra of twisted bilayer and heterostructures of TMDs. Finally, we give our perspectives on the Raman spectroscopy of TMDs.

  14. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in life science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Airton A.; T. Soto, Cláudio A.; Ali, Syed M.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Canevari, Renata A.; Pereira, Liliane; Fávero, Priscila P.

    2015-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been applied to the analysis of biological samples for the last 12 years providing detection of changes occurring at the molecular level during the pathological transformation of the tissue. The potential use of this technology in cancer diagnosis has shown encouraging results for the in vivo, real-time and minimally invasive diagnosis. Confocal Raman technics has also been successfully applied in the analysis of skin aging process providing new insights in this field. In this paper it is presented the latest biomedical applications of Raman spectroscopy in our laboratory. It is shown that Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been used for biochemical and molecular characterization of thyroid tissue by micro-Raman spectroscopy and gene expression analysis. This study aimed to improve the discrimination between different thyroid pathologies by Raman analysis. A total of 35 thyroid tissues samples including normal tissue (n=10), goiter (n=10), papillary (n=10) and follicular carcinomas (n=5) were analyzed. The confocal Raman spectroscopy allowed a maximum discrimination of 91.1% between normal and tumor tissues, 84.8% between benign and malignant pathologies and 84.6% among carcinomas analyzed. It will be also report the application of in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy as an important sensor for detecting advanced glycation products (AGEs) on human skin.

  15. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  16. Cross-polarized optical absorption of single-walled carbon nanotubes probed by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy, UV-Vis-IR and polarized Raman Scatterings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    2008-03-01

    Because of the depolarization effect, or so-called antenna effect, optical absorption of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is weak when excited by light polarized perpendicular to the nanotube axis. However, in photoluminescence (PL) excitation spectra of isolated SWNTs, PL peaks due to cross-polarized excitation can be clearly identified. By decomposing the cross-polarized component, the optical transition energy of E12 or E21 can be? measured, and the smaller exciton binding energy for perpendicular excitations is concluded [1]. Cross-polarized absorption is dominant in the absorption of a vertically aligned film of SWNTs [2] when excited from the top of the film. In our previous study, a pi-plasmon absorption at 5.25 eV was revealed in contrast to 4.5 eV for parallel excitation [3]. Resonant Raman scattering from such a film is also influenced by the cross-polarized excitation [4]. Even though a Kataura plot for the E33 and E44 range has been proposed by using such a vertically aligned film [5], polarized Raman scattering spectra reveal more complicated features in the system because of the small bundle size, typically 5-8 nanotubes [6]. References: [1] Y. Miyauchi, M. Oba, S. Maruyama, Phys. Rev. B 74 (2006) 205440. [2] Y. Murakami, S. Chiashi, Y. Miyauchi, M. Hu, M. Ogura, T. Okubo, S. Maruyama, Chem. Phys. Lett. 385 (2004) 298. [3] Y. Murakami, E. Einarsson, T. Edamura, S. Maruyama, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 087402. [4] Y. Murakami, S. Chiashi, E. Einarsson, S. Maruyama, Phys. Rev. B 71 (2005) 085403. [5] P. T. Araujo, S. K. Doorn, S. Kilina, S. Tretiak, E. Einarsson, S. Maruyama, H. Chacham, M. A. Pimenta, A. Jorio, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 (2007) 067401. [6] E. Einarsson, H. Shiozawa, C. Kramberger, M. H. Ruemmeli, A. Gruneis, T. Pichler, S. Maruyama, J. Phys. Chem. C (2007) published on Web.

  17. Detection and Quantitative Analysis of Chemical Species in Hanford Tank Materials Using Raman Spectroscopy Technology: FY94Florida State University Raman Spectroscopy Report

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, F.R.

    1997-08-11

    This report provides a summary of work completed in FY-94 by FSU to develop and investigate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy with Hanford tank waste materials. Raman performance impacts from sample morphology, including the effects of absorption, particle size, density, color and refractive index, are discussed. An algorithm for relative species concentration measurement from Raman data is presented. An Algorithm for applying Raman to tank waste core screening is presented and discussed. A library of absorption and Raman spectra are presented that support this work.

  18. Two-Dimensional Heterospectral Correlation Analysis of the Redox-Induced Conformational Transition in Cytochrome c Using Surface-Enhanced Raman and Infrared Absorption Spectroscopies on a Two-Layer Gold Surface

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The heme protein cytochrome c adsorbed to a two-layer gold surface modified with a self-assembled monolayer of 2-mercaptoethanol was analyzed using a two-dimensional (2D) heterospectral correlation analysis that combined surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Stepwise increasing electric potentials were applied to alter the redox state of the protein and to induce conformational changes within the protein backbone. We demonstrate herein that 2D heterospectral correlation analysis is a particularly suitable and useful technique for the study of heme-containing proteins as the two spectroscopies address different portions of the protein. Thus, by correlating SERS and SEIRAS data in a 2D plot, we can obtain a deeper understanding of the conformational changes occurring at the redox center and in the supporting protein backbone during the electron transfer process. The correlation analyses are complemented by molecular dynamics calculations to explore the intramolecular interactions. PMID:23930980

  19. Raman spectroscopy: the gateway into tomorrow's virology.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Phelps J; Whitman, Audy G; Dyson, Ossie F; Akula, Shaw M

    2006-01-01

    In the molecular world, researchers act as detectives working hard to unravel the mysteries surrounding cells. One of the researchers' greatest tools in this endeavor has been Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy is a spectroscopic technique that measures the unique Raman spectra for every type of biological molecule. As such, Raman spectroscopy has the potential to provide scientists with a library of spectra that can be used to unravel the makeup of an unknown molecule. However, this technique is limited in that it is not able to manipulate particular structures without disturbing their unique environment. Recently, a novel technology that combines Raman spectroscopy with optical tweezers, termed Raman tweezers, evades this problem due to its ability to manipulate a sample without physical contact. As such, Raman tweezers has the potential to become an incredibly effective diagnostic tool for differentially distinguishing tissue, and therefore holds great promise in the field of virology for distinguishing between various virally infected cells. This review provides an introduction for a virologist into the world of spectroscopy and explores many of the potential applications of Raman tweezers in virology. PMID:16805914

  20. Raman spectroscopy: the gateway into tomorrow's virology

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Phelps J; Whitman, Audy G; Dyson, Ossie F; Akula, Shaw M

    2006-01-01

    In the molecular world, researchers act as detectives working hard to unravel the mysteries surrounding cells. One of the researchers' greatest tools in this endeavor has been Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy is a spectroscopic technique that measures the unique Raman spectra for every type of biological molecule. As such, Raman spectroscopy has the potential to provide scientists with a library of spectra that can be used to unravel the makeup of an unknown molecule. However, this technique is limited in that it is not able to manipulate particular structures without disturbing their unique environment. Recently, a novel technology that combines Raman spectroscopy with optical tweezers, termed Raman tweezers, evades this problem due to its ability to manipulate a sample without physical contact. As such, Raman tweezers has the potential to become an incredibly effective diagnostic tool for differentially distinguishing tissue, and therefore holds great promise in the field of virology for distinguishing between various virally infected cells. This review provides an introduction for a virologist into the world of spectroscopy and explores many of the potential applications of Raman tweezers in virology. PMID:16805914

  1. Coronagraphic Notch Filter for Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, David; Stirbl, Robert

    2004-01-01

    A modified coronagraph has been proposed as a prototype of improved notch filters in Raman spectrometers. Coronagraphic notch filters could offer alternatives to both (1) the large and expensive double or triple monochromators in older Raman spectrometers and (2) holographic notch filters, which are less expensive but are subject to environmental degradation as well as to limitations of geometry and spectral range. Measurement of a Raman spectrum is an exercise in measuring and resolving faint spectral lines close to a bright peak: In Raman spectroscopy, a monochromatic beam of light (the pump beam) excites a sample of material that one seeks to analyze. The pump beam generates a small flux of scattered light at wavelengths slightly greater than that of the pump beam. The shift in wavelength of the scattered light from the pump wavelength is known in the art as the Stokes shift. Typically, the flux of scattered light is of the order of 10 7 that of the pump beam and the Stokes shift lies in the wave-number range of 100 to 3,000 cm 1. A notch filter can be used to suppress the pump-beam spectral peak while passing the nearby faint Raman spectral lines. The basic principles of design and operation of a coronagraph offer an opportunity for engineering the spectral transmittance of the optics in a Raman spectrometer. A classical coronagraph may be understood as two imaging systems placed end to end, such that the first system forms an intermediate real image of a nominally infinitely distant object and the second system forms a final real image of the intermediate real image. If the light incident on the first telescope is collimated, then the intermediate image is a point-spread function (PSF). If an appropriately tailored occulting spot (e.g., a Gaussian-apodized spot with maximum absorption on axis) is placed on the intermediate image plane, then the instrument inhibits transmission of light from an on-axis source. However, the PSFs of off-axis light sources are

  2. Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy of Pyridine under High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, K.; Traikov, K; Dong, Z; Xie, S; Song, Y; Liu, Z

    2010-01-01

    We report the structural transitions of pyridine as a function of pressure up to 26 GPa using in situ Raman spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy. By monitoring changes in the Raman shifts in the lattice region as well as the band profiles in both Raman and IR spectra, a liquid-to-solid transition at 1 GPa followed by solid-to-solid transitions at 2, 8, 11, and 16 GPa were observed upon compression. These transitions were found to be reversible upon decompression from 22 GPa. A further chemical transformation was observed when compressed beyond 22 GPa as evidenced by the substantial and irreversible changes in the Raman and infrared spectra, which could be attributed to the destruction of the ring structure. The observed transformations in pyridine were also compared to those for benzene. The similar transition sequence with well-aligned transition pressures suggests that these isoelectronic aromatics may have similar structures and stabilities under high pressure.

  3. Study of virus by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moor, K.; Kitamura, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Sawa, M.; Andriana, B. B.; Ohtani, K.; Yagura, T.; Sato, H.

    2013-02-01

    Problem of viruses is very actual for nowadays. Some viruses, which are responsible for human of all tumors, are about 15 %. Main purposes this study, early detection virus in live cell without labeling and in the real time by Raman spectroscopy. Micro Raman spectroscopy (mRs) is a technique that uses a Raman spectrometer to measure the spectra of microscopic samples. According to the Raman spectroscopy, it becomes possible to study the metabolites of a live cultured cell without labeling. We used mRs to detect the virus via HEK 293 cell line-infected adenovirus. We obtained raman specters of lives cells with viruses in 24 hours and 7 days after the infection. As the result, there is some biochemical changing after the treatment of cell with virus. One of biochemical alteration is at 1081 cm-1. For the clarification result, we use confocal fluorescent microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  4. Inverse Raman bands in ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xueqiong; Li, Xiuting; Niu, Kai; Lee, Soo-Y.

    2011-10-01

    Ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy (URLS) is equivalent to anti-Stokes femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS), using a broadband probe pulse that extends to the blue of the narrow bandwidth Raman pump, and can be described as inverse Raman scattering (IRS). Using the Feynman dual time-line diagram, the third-order polarization for IRS with finite pulses can be written down in terms of a four-time correlation function. An analytic expression is obtained for the latter in the harmonic approximation which facilitates computation. We simulated the URLS of crystal violet (CV) for various resonance Raman pump excitation wavelengths using the IRS polarization expression with finite pulses. The calculated results agreed well with the experimental results of S. Umapathy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 133, 024505 (2010). In the limit of monochromatic Raman pump and probe pulses, we obtain the third-order susceptibility for multi-modes, and for a single mode we recover the well-known expression for the third-order susceptibility, χ _{IRS}^{(3)}, for IRS. The latter is used to understand the mode dependent phase changes as a function of Raman pump excitation in the URLS of CV.

  5. Emerging Dental Applications of Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael G.

    Until recently, the application of Raman spectroscopy to investigate dental tissues has primarily focused on using microspectroscopy to characterize dentin and enamel structures as well as to understand the adhesive interface of various resin and bonding agents used in restorative procedures. With the advent of improved laser, imaging/mapping and fibre optic technologies, the applications have expanded to investigate various biomedical problems ranging from oral cancer, bacterial identification and early dental caries detection. The overall aim of these applications is to develop Raman spectroscopy into a tool for use in the dental clinic. This chapter presents the recent dental applications of Raman spectroscopy as well as discusses the potential, strengths and limitations of the technology in comparison with alternative techniques. In addition, a discussion and rationale about combining Raman spectroscopy with other optical techniques will be included.

  6. Micro-mirror arrays for Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, W. M.

    2015-03-01

    In this research we study Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies as non-destructive and noninvasive methods for probing biological material and "living systems." Particularly for a living material any probe need be non-destructive and non-invasive, as well as provide real time measurement information and be cost effective to be generally useful. Over the past few years the components needed to measure weak and complex processes such as Raman scattering have evolved substantially with the ready availability of lasers, dichroic filters, low noise and sensitive detectors, digitizers and signal processors. A Raman spectrum consists of a wavelength or frequency spectrum that corresponds to the inelastic (Raman) photon signal that results from irradiating a "Raman active" material. Raman irradiation of a material usually and generally uses a single frequency laser. The Raman fingerprint spectrum that results from a Raman interaction can be determined from the frequencies scattered and received by an appropriate detector. Spectra are usually "digitized" and numerically matched to a reference sample or reference material spectra in performing an analysis. Fortunately today with the many "commercial off-the-shelf" components that are available, weak intensity effects such as Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy can be used for a number of analysis applications. One of the experimental limitations in Raman measurement is the spectrometer itself. The spectrometer is the section of the system that either by interference plus detection or by dispersion plus detection that "signal" amplitude versus energy/frequency signals are measured. Particularly in Raman spectroscopy, optical signals carrying desired "information" about the analyte are extraordinarily weak and require special considerations when measuring. We will discuss here the use of compact spectrometers and a micro-mirror array system (used is the digital micro-mirror device (DMD) supplied by the DLP® Products group of

  7. Quantitative Raman spectroscopy in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reble, Carina; Gersonde, Ingo; Andree, Stefan; Eichler, Hans Joachim; Helfmann, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Intrinsic Raman spectra of biological tissue are distorted by the influences of tissue absorption and scattering, which significantly challenge signal quantification. A combined Raman and spatially resolved reflectance setup is introduced to measure the absorption coefficient μa and the reduced scattering coefficient μs' of the tissue, together with the Raman signals. The influence of μa and μs' on the resonance Raman signal of β-carotene is measured at 1524 cm-1 by tissue phantom measurements and Monte Carlo simulations for μa=0.01 to 10 mm-1 and μs'=0.1 to 10 mm-1. Both methods show that the Raman signal drops roughly proportional to 1/μa for μa>0.2 mm-1 in the measurement geometry and that the influence of μs' is weaker, but not negligible. Possible correction functions dependent on the elastic diffuse reflectance are investigated to correct the Raman signal for the influence of μa and μs', provided that μa and μs' are measured as well. A correction function based on the Monte Carlo simulation of Raman signals is suggested as an alternative. Both approaches strongly reduce the turbidity-induced variation of the Raman signals and allow absolute Raman scattering coefficients to be determined.

  8. Occlusal caries detection using polarized Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, I.; Bulou, A.

    2008-02-01

    The tooth enamel, because of its hydroxyapatite composition, must present a Raman spectrum with strong polarization anisotropy. Carious lesions of the enamel will produce an alteration of local symmetry and will increase much more scattering of light. This will reduce the anisotropy of the Raman spectra. Because of the difference between high sensitivity to polarization of the 959 cm -1 Raman peak in sound enamel and low sensitivity in carried enamel, Raman polarized spectroscopy could be a useful method to early detect teeth caries.

  9. Raman spectroscopy and polarization: Selected case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossikovski, Razvigor; Picardi, Gennaro; Ndong, Gérald; Chaigneau, Marc

    2012-10-01

    We show, through several selected case studies, the potential benefits that can be obtained by controlling the polarization states of the exciting and scattered radiations in a Raman scattering experiment. When coupled with polarization control, Raman spectroscopy is thus capable of providing extra information on the structural properties of the materials under investigation. The experimental examples presented in this work are taken from the area of both conventional, i.e., far-field, as well as from near-field Raman spectroscopy. They cover topics such as the stress tensor measurement in strained semiconductor structures, the vibration mode assignment in pentacene thin films and the Raman scattering tensor determination from near-field measurements on azobenzene monolayers. The basic theory necessary for modelling the far- and near-field polarized Raman responses is also given and the model efficiency is illustrated on the experimental data.

  10. Applications of Raman spectroscopy to gemology.

    PubMed

    Bersani, Danilo; Lottici, Pier Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Being nondestructive and requiring short measurement times, a low amount of material, and no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is used for routine investigation in the study of gemstone inclusions and treatments and for the characterization of mounted gems. In this work, a review of the use of laboratory Raman and micro-Raman spectrometers and of portable Raman systems in the gemology field is given, focusing on gem identification and on the evaluation of the composition, provenance, and genesis of gems. Many examples are shown of the use of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for the identification of imitations, synthetic gems, and enhancement treatments in natural gemstones. Some recent developments are described, with particular attention being given to the semiprecious stone jade and to two important organic materials used in jewelry, i.e., pearls and corals. PMID:20419294

  11. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  12. Online fluorescence suppression in modulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Anna Chiara; Mazilu, Michael; Riches, Andrew; Herrington, C Simon; Dholakia, Kishan

    2010-01-15

    Label-free chemical characterization of single cells is an important aim for biomedical research. Standard Raman spectroscopy provides intrinsic biochemical markers for noninvasive analysis of biological samples but is often hindered by the presence of fluorescence background. In this paper, we present an innovative modulated Raman spectroscopy technique to filter out the Raman spectra from the fluorescence background. The method is based on the principle that the fluorescence background does not change whereas the Raman scattering is shifted by the periodical modulation of the laser wavelength. Exploiting this physical property and importantly the multichannel lock-in detection of the Raman signal, the modulation technique fulfills the requirements of an effective fluorescence subtraction method. Indeed, once the synchronization and calibration procedure is performed, minimal user intervention is required, making the method online and less time-consuming than the other fluorescent suppression methods. We analyze the modulated Raman signal and shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) signal of 2 mum-sized polystyrene beads suspended in a solution of fluorescent dye as a function of modulation rate. We show that the signal-to-noise ratio of the modulated Raman spectra at the highest modulation rate is 3 times higher than the SERDS one. To finally evaluate the real benefits of the modulated Raman spectroscopy, we apply our technique to Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO). Specifically, by analyzing separate spectra from the membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus of CHO cells, we demonstrate the ability of this method to obtain localized sensitive chemical information from cells, away from the interfering fluorescence background. In particular, statistical analysis of the Raman data and classification using PCA (principal component analysis) indicate that our method allows us to distinguish between different cell locations with higher sensitivity and

  13. Difference Raman spectroscopy of DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anokhin, Andrey S.; Gorelik, Vladimir S.; Dovbeshko, Galina I.; Pyatyshev, Alexander Yu; Yuzyuk, Yury I.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the micro-Raman spectra of calf DNA for different points of DNA sample have been recorded. The Raman spectra were made with help of difference Raman spectroscopy technique. Raman spectra were recorded with high spatial resolution from different points of the wet and dry samples in different spectral range (100÷4000cm-1) using two lasers: argon (514.5 nm) and helium -neon (632.8 nm). The significant differences in the Raman spectra for dry and wet DNA and for different points of DNA molecules were observed. The obtained data on difference Raman scattering spectra of DNA molecules may be used for identification of DNA types and for analysis of genetic information associated with the molecular structure of this molecule.

  14. Sensitive algorithm for multiple-excitation-wavelength resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellampalle, Balakishore; Wu, Hai-Shan; McCormick, William; Sluch, Mikhail; Martin, Robert; Ice, Robert; Lemoff, Brian E.

    2014-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a widely used spectroscopic technique with a number of applications. During the past few years, we explored the use of simultaneous multiple-excitation-wavelengths (MEW) in resonance Raman spectroscopy. This approach takes advantage of Raman band intensity variations across the Resonance Raman spectra obtained from two or more excitation wavelengths. Amplitude variations occur between corresponding Raman bands in Resonance Raman spectra due to complex interplay of resonant enhancement, self-absorption and laser penetration depth. We have developed a very sensitive algorithm to estimate concentration of an analyte from spectra obtained using the MEW technique. The algorithm uses correlations and least-square minimization approach to calculate an estimate for the concentration. For two or more excitation wavelengths, measured spectra were stacked in a two dimensional matrix. In a simple realization of the algorithm, we approximated peaks in the ideal library spectra as triangles. In this work, we present the performance of the algorithm with measurements obtained from a dual-excitation-wavelength Resonance Raman sensor. The novel sensor, developed at WVHTCF, detects explosives from a standoff distance. The algorithm was able to detect explosives with very high sensitivity even at signal-to-noise ratios as low as ~1.6. Receiver operating characteristics calculated using the algorithm showed a clear benefit in using the dual-excitation-wavelength technique over single-excitation-wavelength techniques. Variants of the algorithm that add more weight to amplitude variation information showed improved specificity to closely resembling spectra.

  15. Potential of Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy for Plant Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, H.

    2008-11-01

    Various mid-infrared (MIR) and Raman spectroscopic methods applied to the analysis of valuable plant substances or quality parameters in selected horticultural and agricultural crops are presented. Generally, both spectroscopy techniques allow to identify simultaneously characteristic key bands of individual plant components (e.g. carotenoids, alkaloids, polyacetylenes, fatty acids, amino acids, terpenoids). In contrast to MIR methods Raman spectroscopy mostly does not need any sample pre-treatment; even fresh plant material can be analysed without difficulty because water shows only weak Raman scattering properties. In some cases a significant sensivity enhancement of Raman signals can be achieved if the exciting laser wavelength is adjusted to the absorption range of particular plant chromophores such as carotenoids (Resonance Raman effect). Applying FT-IR or FT Raman micro-spectroscopy the distribution of certain plant constituents in the cell wall can be identified without the need for any physical separation. Furthermore it is also possible to analyse secondary metabolites occurring in the cell vacuoles if significant key bands do not coincide with the spectral background of the plant matrix.

  16. Mobile Raman spectroscopy in astrobiology research.

    PubMed

    Vandenabeele, Peter; Jehlička, Jan

    2014-12-13

    Raman spectroscopy has proved to be a very useful technique in astrobiology research. Especially, working with mobile instrumentation during fieldwork can provide useful experiences in this field. In this work, we provide an overview of some important aspects of this research and, apart from defining different types of mobile Raman spectrometers, we highlight different reasons for this research. These include gathering experience and testing of mobile instruments, the selection of target molecules and to develop optimal data processing techniques for the identification of the spectra. We also identify the analytical techniques that it would be most appropriate to combine with Raman spectroscopy to maximize the obtained information and the synergy that exists with Raman spectroscopy research in other research areas, such as archaeometry and forensics. PMID:25368355

  17. Raman spectroscopy at the tritium laboratory Karlsruhe

    SciTech Connect

    Schloesser, M.; Bornschein, B.; Fischer, S.; Kassel, F.; Rupp, S.; Sturm, M.; James, T.M.; Telle, H.H.

    2015-03-15

    Raman spectroscopy is employed successfully for analysis of hydrogen isotopologues at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). Raman spectroscopy is based on the inelastic scattering of photons off molecules. Energy is transferred to the molecules as rotational/vibrational excitation being characteristic for each type of molecule. Thus, qualitative analysis is possible from the Raman shifted light, while quantitative information can be obtained from the signal intensities. After years of research and development, the technique is now well-advanced providing fast (< 10 s), precise (< 0.1%) and true (< 3%) compositional analysis of gas mixtures of hydrogen isotopologues. In this paper, we summarize the recent achievements in the further development on this technique, and the various applications for which it is used at TLK. Raman spectroscopy has evolved as a versatile, highly accurate key method for quantitative analysis complementing the port-folio of analytic techniques at the TLK.

  18. Femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy: Apparatus and methods

    PubMed Central

    McCamant, David W.; Kukura, Philipp; Yoon, Sangwoon; Mathies, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    The laser, detection system, and methods that enable femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) are presented in detail. FSRS is a unique tool for obtaining high time resolution (<100 fs) vibrational spectra with an instrument response limited frequency resolution of <10 cm–1. A titanium:Sapphire-based laser system produces the three different pulses needed for FSRS: (1) A femtosecond visible actinic pump that initiates the photochemistry, (2) a narrow bandwidth picosecond Raman pump that provides the energy reservoir for amplification of the probe, and (3) a femtosecond continuum probe that is amplified at Raman resonances shifted from the Raman pump. The dependence of the stimulated Raman signal on experimental parameters is explored, demonstrating the expected exponential increase in Raman intensity with concentration, pathlength, and Raman pump power. Raman spectra collected under different electronic resonance conditions using highly fluorescent samples highlight the fluorescence rejection capabilities of FSRS. Data are also presented illustrating our ability: (i) To obtain spectra when there is a large transient absorption change by using a shifted excitation difference technique and (ii) to obtain high time resolution vibrational spectra of transient electronic states. PMID:17183413

  19. Using Raman spectroscopy to characterize biological materials.

    PubMed

    Butler, Holly J; Ashton, Lorna; Bird, Benjamin; Cinque, Gianfelice; Curtis, Kelly; Dorney, Jennifer; Esmonde-White, Karen; Fullwood, Nigel J; Gardner, Benjamin; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Walsh, Michael J; McAinsh, Martin R; Stone, Nicholas; Martin, Francis L

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the chemical composition of a sample, which can in turn be used to extract biological information. Many materials have characteristic Raman spectra, which means that Raman spectroscopy has proven to be an effective analytical approach in geology, semiconductor, materials and polymer science fields. The application of Raman spectroscopy and microscopy within biology is rapidly increasing because it can provide chemical and compositional information, but it does not typically suffer from interference from water molecules. Analysis does not conventionally require extensive sample preparation; biochemical and structural information can usually be obtained without labeling. In this protocol, we aim to standardize and bring together multiple experimental approaches from key leaders in the field for obtaining Raman spectra using a microspectrometer. As examples of the range of biological samples that can be analyzed, we provide instructions for acquiring Raman spectra, maps and images for fresh plant tissue, formalin-fixed and fresh frozen mammalian tissue, fixed cells and biofluids. We explore a robust approach for sample preparation, instrumentation, acquisition parameters and data processing. By using this approach, we expect that a typical Raman experiment can be performed by a nonspecialist user to generate high-quality data for biological materials analysis. PMID:26963630

  20. Emerging technology: applications of Raman spectroscopy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kast, Rachel E; Tucker, Stephanie C; Killian, Kevin; Trexler, Micaela; Honn, Kenneth V; Auner, Gregory W

    2014-09-01

    There is a need in prostate cancer diagnostics and research for a label-free imaging methodology that is nondestructive, rapid, objective, and uninfluenced by water. Raman spectroscopy provides a molecular signature, which can be scaled from micron-level regions of interest in cells to macroscopic areas of tissue. It can be used for applications ranging from in vivo or in vitro diagnostics to basic science laboratory testing. This work describes the fundamentals of Raman spectroscopy and complementary techniques including surface enhanced Raman scattering, resonance Raman spectroscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, confocal Raman spectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering, and spatially offset Raman spectroscopy. Clinical applications of Raman spectroscopy to prostate cancer will be discussed, including screening, biopsy, margin assessment, and monitoring of treatment efficacy. Laboratory applications including cell identification, culture monitoring, therapeutics development, and live imaging of cellular processes are discussed. Potential future avenues of research are described, with emphasis on multiplexing Raman spectroscopy with other modalities. PMID:24510129

  1. Airborne chemistry coupled to Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Santesson, Sabina; Johansson, Jonas; Taylor, Lynne S; Levander, Ia; Fox, Shannon; Sepaniak, Michael; Nilsson, Staffan

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, the use of airborne chemistry (acoustically levitated drops) in combination with Raman spectroscopy is explored. We report herein the first Raman studies of crystallization processes in levitated drops and the first demonstration of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection in this medium. Crystallization studies on the model compounds benzamide and indomethacin resulted in the formation of two crystal modifications for each compound, suggesting that this methodology may be useful for investigation of polymorphs. SERS detection resulted in a signal enhancement of 27 000 for benzoic acid and 11 000 for rhodamine 6-G. The preliminary results presented here clearly indicate that several important applications of the combination between Raman spectroscopy and acoustic drop levitation can be expected in the future. PMID:12720359

  2. Multiplex coherent raman spectroscopy detector and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Peter (Inventor); Joyner, Candace C. (Inventor); Patrick, Sheena T. (Inventor); Guyer, Dean R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A multiplex coherent Raman spectrometer (10) and spectroscopy method rapidly detects and identifies individual components of a chemical mixture separated by a separation technique, such as gas chromatography. The spectrometer (10) and method accurately identify a variety of compounds because they produce the entire gas phase vibrational Raman spectrum of the unknown gas. This is accomplished by tilting a Raman cell (20) to produce a high-intensity, backward-stimulated, coherent Raman beam of 683 nm, which drives a degenerate optical parametric oscillator (28) to produce a broadband beam of 1100-1700 nm covering a range of more than 3000 wavenumber. This broadband beam is combined with a narrowband beam of 532 nm having a bandwidth of 0.003 wavenumbers and focused into a heated windowless cell (38) that receives gases separated by a gas chromatograph (40). The Raman radiation scattered from these gases is filtered and sent to a monochromator (50) with multichannel detection.

  3. Multiplex coherent raman spectroscopy detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Peter; Joyner, Candace C.; Patrick, Sheena T.; Guyer, Dean R.

    2004-06-08

    A multiplex coherent Raman spectrometer (10) and spectroscopy method rapidly detects and identifies individual components of a chemical mixture separated by a separation technique, such as gas chromatography. The spectrometer (10) and method accurately identify a variety of compounds because they produce the entire gas phase vibrational Raman spectrum of the unknown gas. This is accomplished by tilting a Raman cell (20) to produce a high-intensity, backward-stimulated, coherent Raman beam of 683 nm, which drives a degenerate optical parametric oscillator (28) to produce a broadband beam of 1100-1700 nm covering a range of more than 3000 wavenumber. This broadband beam is combined with a narrowband beam of 532 nm having a bandwidth of 0.003 wavenumbers and focused into a heated windowless cell (38) that receives gases separated by a gas chromatograph (40). The Raman radiation scattered from these gases is filtered and sent to a monochromator (50) with multichannel detection.

  4. Identification of gemstone treatments with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefert, Lore; Haenni, Henry A.; Chalain, Jean-Pierre

    2000-09-01

    The newest gemstone treatment concerns brownish diamonds of type IIa. These can be improved to near colorless by an enhancement process developed by General Electric, USA, using high temperature and pressure. A comparison of Raman spectroscopic features in the visible area (luminescence bands) of both treated and untreated colorless diamonds is given. Finally, examples of artificially colored peals and corals and their detection with Raman spectroscopy are shown.

  5. Analysis of lipsticks using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gardner, P; Bertino, M F; Weimer, R; Hazelrigg, E

    2013-10-10

    In this study, 80 lipsticks were obtained and evaluated using Raman spectroscopy at excitation wavelengths of 532 and 780 nm. Fluorescence severely limited analysis with the 532 nm line while the 780 nm line proved useful for all samples analyzed. It was possible to differentiate 95% of the lipsticks evaluated based on one or more Raman peaks. However, there were no peak trends observed that could be used to identify a manufacturer or categorize a sample. In situ analysis of lipstick smears was found to be possible even from several Raman active substrates, but was occasionally limited by background fluorescence and in extreme cases, photodegradation. PMID:24053867

  6. Raman spectroscopy under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A F; Crowhurst, J C

    2004-11-05

    We report the results of Raman measurements of various materials under simultaneous conditions of high temperature and high pressure in the diamond anvil cell (DAC). High temperatures are generated by laser heating or internal resistive (ohmic) heating or a combination of both. We present Raman spectra of cubic boron nitride (cBN) to 40 GPa and up to 2300 K that show a continuous pressure and temperature shift of the frequency of the transverse optical mode. We have also obtained high-pressure Raman spectra from a new noble metal nitride, which we synthesized at approximately 50 GPa and 2000 K. We have obtained high-temperature spectra from pure nitrogen to 39 GPa and up to 2000 K, which show the presence of a hot band that has previously been observed in CARS measurements. These measurements have also allowed us to constrain the melting curve and to examine changes in the intramolecular potential with pressure.

  7. Raman and multichannel Raman spectroscopy of biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoluzza, Alessandro; Caramazza, R.; Fagnano, C.

    1991-05-01

    Raman and multichannel Raman spectroscopy are molecular techniques able to monitor the bulk and surface structure of a biomaterial, in a non destructive and non invasive way, giving therefore useful information on physical and chemical aspects of biocompatibility. The same techniques can also be adequately used for the characterization of the biomaterial-host tissue interface, hence providing structural information on the biochemical aspect of biocompatibility. Moreover, multichannel Raman spectroscopy can also determine "in vivo" and "in situ" the bulk and surface structure of a biomaterial and the molecular interactions between biomaterials and tissues. Useful information at a molecular level on the biomaterial-tissue system can so be deduced. In particular, the application of traditional Paman spectroscopy to bioactive glasses (glasses derived from Hench's bioglass and meta and oligophosphates of calcium by themselves and with the addition of sodium and aluminium) useful in orthopedics and the application to hydrophobic (PMMA) and hydrophilic (PHEMA and PVP) organic polymers useful in ophthalmology are shown. Instead the applications of multichannel Paman spectroscopy are elucidated in the case of intraocular lenses (lOLs) based on PMMA and contact lenses (CLs) based on hydrophi I ic polymers.

  8. Coherent Raman spectroscopy for supersonic flow measurments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.

    1986-01-01

    In collaboration with NASA/Langley Research Center, a truly nonintrusive and nonseeding method for measuring supersonic molecular flow parameters was proposed and developed at Colorado State University. The feasibility of this Raman Doppler Velocimetry (RDV), currently operated in a scanning mode, was demonstrated not only in a laboratory environment at Colorado State University, but also in a major wind tunnel at NASA/Langley Research Center. The research progress of the RDV development is summarized. In addition, methods of coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin spectroscopy and single-pulse coherent Raman spectroscopy are investigated, respectively, for measurements of high-pressure and turbulent flows.

  9. High fidelity nanohole enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Bahns, J. T.; Guo, Q.; Gray, S. K.; Jaeger, H. M.; Chen, L.; Montgomery, J. M.; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-01-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a sensitive technique that can even detect single molecules. However, in many SERS applications, the strongly inhomogeneous distribution of intense local fields makes it very difficult for a quantitive assessment of the fidelity, or reproducibility of the signal, which limits the application of SERS. Herein, we report the development of exceptionally high-fidelity hole-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HERS) from ordered, 2D hexagonal nanohole arrays. We take the fidelity f to be a measure of the percent deviation of the Raman peaks from measurement to measurement. Overall, area averaged fidelities for 12 gold array samples ranged from f {approx} 2-15% for HERS using aqueous R6G molecules. Furthermore, intensity modulations of the enhanced Raman spectra were measured for the first time as a function of polarization angle. The best of these measurements, which focus on static laser spots on the sample, could be consistent with even higher fidelities than the area-averaged results. Nanohole arrays in silver provided supporting polarization measurements and a more complete enhanced Raman fingerprint for phenylalanine molecules. We also carried out finite-difference time-domain calculations to assist in the interpretation of the experiments, identifying the polarization dependence as possibly arising from hole-hole interactions. Our results represent a step toward making quantitative and reproducible enhanced Raman measurements possible and also open new avenues for a large-scale source of highly uniform hot spots.

  10. Theory of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Y; Zhang, Donghui; McCamant, David W; Kukura, Philipp; Mathies, Richard A

    2004-08-22

    Femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is a new technique that produces high-resolution (time-resolved) vibrational spectra from either the ground or excited electronic states of molecules, free from background fluorescence. FSRS uses simultaneously a narrow bandwidth approximately 1-3 ps Raman pump pulse with a continuum approximately 30-50 fs Stokes probe pulse to produce sharp Raman gains, at positions corresponding to vibrational transitions in the sample, riding on top of the continuum Stokes probe spectrum. When FSRS is preceded by a femtosecond actinic pump pulse that initiates the photochemistry of interest, time-resolved Raman spectroscopy can be carried out. We present two theoretical approaches to FSRS: one is based on a coupling of Raman pump and probe light waves with the vibrations in the medium, and another is a quantum-mechanical description. The latter approach is used to discuss the conditions of applicability and limitations of the coupled-wave description. Extension of the quantum-mechanical description to the case where the Raman pump beam is on resonance with an excited electronic state, as well as when FSRS is used to probe a nonstationary vibrational wave packet prepared by an actinic pump pulse, is also discussed. PMID:15303930

  11. Disposable sheath that facilitates endoscopic Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenbo; Short, Michael; Tai, Isabella T.; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-02-01

    In vivo endoscopic Raman spectroscopy of human tissue using a fiber optic probe has been previously demonstrated. However, there remain several technical challenges, such as a robust control over the laser radiation dose and measurement repeatability during endoscopy. A decrease in the signal to noise was also observed due to aging of Raman probe after repeated cycles of harsh reprocessing procedures. To address these issues, we designed and tested a disposable, biocompatible, and sterile sheath for use with a fiber optic endoscopic Raman probe. The sheath effectively controls contamination of Raman probes between procedures, greatly reduces turnaround time, and slows down the aging of the Raman probes. A small optical window fitted at the sheath cap maintained the measurement distance between Raman probe end and tissue surface. To ensure that the sheath caused a minimal amount of fluorescence and Raman interference, the optical properties of materials for the sheath, optical window, and bonding agent were studied. The easy-to-use sheath can be manufactured at a moderate cost. The sheath strictly enforced a maximum permissible exposure standard of the tissue by the laser and reduced the spectral variability by 1.5 to 8.5 times within the spectral measurement range.

  12. Raman Spectroscopy Cell-based Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Notingher, Ioan

    2007-01-01

    One of the main challenges faced by biodetection systems is the ability to detect and identify a large range of toxins at low concentrations and in short times. Cell-based biosensors rely on detecting changes in cell behaviour, metabolism, or induction of cell death following exposure of live cells to toxic agents. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique for studying cellular biochemistry. Different toxic chemicals have different effects on living cells and induce different time-dependent biochemical changes related to cell death mechanisms. Cellular changes start with membrane receptor signalling leading to cytoplasmic shrinkage and nuclear fragmentation. The potential advantage of Raman spectroscopy cell-based systems is that they are not engineered to respond specifically to a single toxic agent but are free to react to many biologically active compounds. Raman spectroscopy biosensors can also provide additional information from the time-dependent changes of cellular biochemistry. Since no cell labelling or staining is required, the specific time dependent biochemical changes in the living cells can be used for the identification and quantification of the toxic agents. Thus, detection of biochemical changes of cells by Raman spectroscopy could overcome the limitations of other biosensor techniques, with respect to detection and discrimination of a large range of toxic agents. Further developments of this technique may also include integration of cellular microarrays for high throughput in vitro toxicological testing of pharmaceuticals and in situ monitoring of the growth of engineered tissues.

  13. Applications of high resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Owyoung, A.; Esherick, P.

    1980-01-01

    The use of high-power, narrow-band lasers has significantly improved the resolving power and sensitivity of inverse Raman spectroscopy of gases. In this paper we shall describe this technique, illustrate its capabilities by showing some Q-branch spectra of heavy spherical tops, and survey some possible future applications.

  14. Raman Spectroscopy of Bone and Cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Michael

    This chapter will reviews the Raman spectroscopy of the subject tissues. After a brief introduction to the structure, biology, and function of these tissues, we will describe the spectra and band assignments of the tissues and then summarize applications to studies of tissue development, mechanical function and competence, and pathology. Both metabolic diseases and genetic disorders will be covered.

  15. Raman spectroscopy of shocked water

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, N.C.; Nellis, W.J.; Graham, W.B.; Walrafen, G.E.

    1985-08-01

    We describe a new technique for recording spontaneous Raman spectra from molecules during the passage of strong shock waves. We have used this technique to study the OH-stretch band of liquid H/sub 2/O shocked to pressure up to 26 GPa and 1700 K. The shape of the band changes over the range 7.5-26 GPa, and is described well by a two-component mixture model, implying changes in the intermolecular coupling of shock compressed water molecules. We discuss the implications of the spectra on the mechanism responsible for the electrical conductivity of shocked H/sub 2/O. 22 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Raman spectroscopy of saliva as a perspective method for periodontitis diagnostics Raman spectroscopy of saliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Minaeva, S.

    2012-01-01

    In view of its potential for biological tissues analyses at a molecular level, Raman spectroscopy in optical range has been the object of biomedical research for the last years. The main aim of this work is the development of Raman spectroscopy for organic content identifying and determination of biomarkers of saliva at a molecular level for periodontitis diagnostics. Four spectral regions were determined: 1155 and 1525 cm-1, 1033 and 1611 cm-1, which can be used as biomarkers of this widespread disease.

  17. Detection Of Biochips By Raman And Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantarovich, Keren; Tsarfati, Inbal; Gheber, Levi A.; Haupt, Karsten; Bar, Ilana

    2010-08-01

    Biochips constitute a rapidly increasing research field driven by the versatility of sensing devices and the importance of their applications in the bioanalytical field, drug development, environmental monitoring, food analysis, etc. Common strategies used for creating biochips and for reading them have extensive limitations, motivating development of miniature biochips and label-free formats. To achieve these goals we combined the nano fountain pen method, for printing microscale features with Raman spectroscopy or surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for reading droplets of synthetic receptors. These receptors include molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), which are obtained by polymerization of suitable functional and cross-linking monomers around molecular templates. MIPs are characterized by higher physical and chemical stability than biomacromolecules, and therefore are potentially very suitable as recognition elements for biosensors, or biochips. The monitored bands in the Raman and SERS spectra could be related to the taken up compound, allowing direct detection of the template, i.e., the β-blocking drug propranolol in the imprinted droplets, as well as imaging of individual and multiple dots in an array. This study shows that the combination of nanolithography techniques with SERS might open the possibility of miniaturized arrayed MIP sensors with label-free, specific and quantitative detection.

  18. Raman spectroscopy of Alzheimer's diseased tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudworth, Caroline D.; Krasner, Neville

    2004-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most common forms of dementia, and causes steady memory loss and mental regression. It is also accompanied by severe atrophy of the brain. However, the pathological biomarkers of the disease can only be confirmed and examined upon the death of the patient. A commercial (Renishaw PLC, UK) Raman system with an 830 nm NIR diode laser was used to analyse brain samples, which were flash frozen at post-mortem. Ethical approval was sought for these samples. The Alzheimer's diseased samples contained a number of biomarkers, including neuritic plaques and tangles. The Raman spectra were examined by order to differentiate between normal and Alzheimer's diseased brain tissues. Preliminary results indicate that Alzheimer's diseased tissues can be differentiated from control tissues using Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra differ in terms of peak intensity, and the presence of a stronger amide I band in the 1667 cm-1 region which occurs more prominently in the Alzheimer's diseased tissue. These preliminary results indicate that the beta-amyloid protein originating from neuritic plaques can be identified with Raman spectroscopy.

  19. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Armchair Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haroz, Erik; Rice, William; Lu, Benjamin; Hauge, Robert; Magana, Donny; Doorn, Stephen; Nikolaev, Pasha; Arepalli, Sivaram; Kono, Junichiro

    2009-03-01

    We performed resonance Raman spectroscopy studies of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), including armchair SWNTs from (6,6) through (10,10). The measurements were carried out with excitation of 440-850 nm on aqueous ensemble samples of SWNTs enriched in metallic species. From this, we generated Raman excitation profiles (REPs) of the radial breathing mode and compare the REPs of armchairs and other metallic species. Additionally, we measured REPs of the G-band mode and observed how the Breit-Wigner-Fano line shape of the G^- peak evolves in peak position, width and intensity relative to the G^+ peak as different metallic nanotubes are excited. By combining these studies with absorption and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy studies, we present a comprehensive examination of the optical signatures of metallic SWNTs.

  20. Raman spectroscopy in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In recent years there has been much interest in the use of optical diagnostics in cancer detection. Early diagnosis of cancer affords early intervention and greatest chance of cure. Raman spectroscopy is based on the interaction of photons with the target material producing a highly detailed biochemical 'fingerprint' of the sample. It can be appreciated that such a sensitive biochemical detection system could confer diagnostic benefit in a clinical setting. Raman has been used successfully in key health areas such as cardiovascular diseases, and dental care but there is a paucity of literature on Raman spectroscopy in Head and Neck cancer. Following the introduction of health care targets for cancer, and with an ever-aging population the need for rapid cancer detection has never been greater. Raman spectroscopy could confer great patient benefit with early, rapid and accurate diagnosis. This technique is almost labour free without the need for sample preparation. It could reduce the need for whole pathological specimen examination, in theatre it could help to determine margin status, and finally peripheral blood diagnosis may be an achievable target. PMID:20923567

  1. Raman Spectroscopy of Soft Musculoskeletal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Esmonde-White, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Tendon, ligament, and joint tissues are important in maintaining daily function. They can be affected by disease, age, and injury. Slow tissue turnover, hierarchical structure and function, and nonlinear mechanical properties present challenges to diagnosing and treating soft musculoskeletal tissues. Understanding these tissues in health, disease, and injury is important to improving pharmacologic and surgical repair outcomes. Raman spectroscopy is an important tool in the examination of soft musculoskeletal tissues. This article highlights exciting basic science and clinical/translational Raman studies of cartilage, tendon, and ligament. PMID:25286106

  2. Candida parapsilosis Biofilm Identification by Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Samek, Ota; Mlynariková, Katarina; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Růžička, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Mahelová, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Colonies of Candida parapsilosis on culture plates were probed directly in situ using Raman spectroscopy for rapid identification of specific strains separated by a given time intervals (up to months apart). To classify the Raman spectra, data analysis was performed using the approach of principal component analysis (PCA). The analysis of the data sets generated during the scans of individual colonies reveals that despite the inhomogeneity of the biological samples unambiguous associations to individual strains (two biofilm-positive and two biofilm-negative) could be made. PMID:25535081

  3. Candida parapsilosis biofilm identification by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Samek, Ota; Mlynariková, Katarina; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Růžička, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Mahelová, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Colonies of Candida parapsilosis on culture plates were probed directly in situ using Raman spectroscopy for rapid identification of specific strains separated by a given time intervals (up to months apart). To classify the Raman spectra, data analysis was performed using the approach of principal component analysis (PCA). The analysis of the data sets generated during the scans of individual colonies reveals that despite the inhomogeneity of the biological samples unambiguous associations to individual strains (two biofilm-positive and two biofilm-negative) could be made. PMID:25535081

  4. Raman spectroscopy of triolein under high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tefelski, D. B.; Jastrzębski, C.; Wierzbicki, M.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Rostocki, A. J.; Wieja, K.; Kościesza, R.

    2010-03-01

    This article presents results of the high pressure Raman spectroscopy of triolein. Triolein, a triacylglyceride (TAG) of oleic acid, is an unsaturated fat, present in natural oils such as olive oil. As a basic food component and an energy storage molecule, it has considerable importance for food and fuel industries. To generate pressure in the experiment, we used a high-pressure cylindrical chamber with sapphire windows, presented in (R.M. Siegoczyński, R. Kościesza, D.B. Tefelski, and A. Kos, Molecular collapse - modification of the liquid structure induced by pressure in oleic acid, High Press. Res. 29 (2009), pp. 61-66). Pressure up to 750 MPa was applied. A Raman spectrometer in "macro"-configuration was employed. Raman spectroscopy provides information on changes of vibrational modes related to structural changes of triolein under pressure. Interesting changes in the triglyceride C‒H stretching region at 2650-3100 cm-1 were observed under high-pressures. Changes were also observed in the ester carbonyl (C˭ O) stretching region 1700-1780 cm-1 and the C‒C stretching region at 1050-1150 cm-1. The overall luminescence of the sample decreased under pressure, making it possible to set longer spectrum acquisition time and obtain more details of the spectrum. The registered changes suggest that the high-pressure solid phase of triolein is organized as β-polymorphic, as was reported in (C. Akita, T. Kawaguchi, and F. Kaneko, Structural study on polymorphism of cis-unsaturated triacylglycerol: Triolein, J. Phys. Chem. B 110 (2006), pp. 4346-4353; E. Da Silva and D. Rousseau, Molecular order and thermodynamics of the solid-liquid transition in triglycerides via Raman spectroscopy, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10 (2008), pp. 4606-4613) (with temperature-induced phase transitions). The research has shown that Raman spectroscopy in TAGs under pressure reveals useful information about its structural changes.

  5. Raman and optical spectroscopy of eumelanin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzi, V.; Perna, G.; Gallone, A.; Biagi, P. F.; Carmone, P.; Fratello, A.; Guida, G.; Zanna, P.; Cicero, R.

    2005-06-01

    Melanin obtained from the liver of Rana esculenta L., was isolated from melanosomes and deposited as thin film on quartz substrate, in order to perform Raman, absorption and photoluminescence measurements at room temperature. The Raman spectrum was analysed by considering the contribution of the vibrational modes from different functional groups of the melanin structure. The absorption and photoluminescence measurements support the model that melanin consists of nano-aggregates of oligomeric structures rather than extended heteropolymer. An optical gap value of about 0.6 eV was estimated by considering the Tauc model. The largest size group of clusters mainly contribute to determine the optical gap value, whereas the PL emission is due to groups of clusters which are selectively pumped.

  6. Drug Stability Analysis by Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Chetan; Smith, Wayne; Brouillette, Carl; Farquharson, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical drugs are available to astronauts to help them overcome the deleterious effects of weightlessness, sickness and injuries. Unfortunately, recent studies have shown that some of the drugs currently used may degrade more rapidly in space, losing their potency before their expiration dates. To complicate matters, the degradation products of some drugs can be toxic. Here, we present a preliminary investigation of the ability of Raman spectroscopy to quantify mixtures of four drugs; acetaminophen, azithromycin, epinephrine, and lidocaine, with their primary degradation products. The Raman spectra for the mixtures were replicated by adding the pure spectra of the drug and its degradant to determine the relative percent contributions using classical least squares. This multivariate approach allowed determining concentrations in ~10 min with a limit of detection of ~4% of the degradant. These results suggest that a Raman analyzer could be used to assess drug potency, nondestructively, at the time of use to ensure crewmember safety. PMID:25533308

  7. Characterization of diatomaceous silica by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, P; He, H P; Wu, D Q; Wang, D Q; Chen, L J

    2004-10-01

    The network characteristic of a selection of diatomaceous silica derived from China has been investigated using Raman spectroscopy. Before any thermal treatment of the sample, two prominent bands of 607 and circa 493 cm(-1) are resolved in the Raman spectra of diatomaceous silica, corresponding to the (SiO)3-ring breathing mode of D2-line and the O3SiOH tetrahedral vibration mode of D1-line, respectively. This is more similar to the pyrogenic silica rather than the silica gel. For the latter, to obtain a (SiO)3-ring, the sample must be heated between 250 and 450 degrees C. Significant difference is also found between the diatomaceous silica and other natural silicas, e.g. in the Raman spectra of sedimentary and volcanic opals, neither D1 nor D2 band is detected in previous reports. PMID:15350933

  8. Characterization of diatomaceous silica by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, P.; He, H. P.; Wu, D. Q.; Wang, D. Q.; Chen, L. J.

    2004-10-01

    The network characteristic of a selection of diatomaceous silica derived from China has been investigated using Raman spectroscopy. Before any thermal treatment of the sample, two prominent bands of 607 and circa 493 cm -1 are resolved in the Raman spectra of diatomaceous silica, corresponding to the (SiO) 3-ring breathing mode of D 2-line and the O 3SiOH tetrahedral vibration mode of D 1-line, respectively. This is more similar to the pyrogenic silica rather than the silica gel. For the latter, to obtain a (SiO) 3-ring, the sample must be heated between 250 and 450 °C. Significant difference is also found between the diatomaceous silica and other natural silicas, e.g. in the Raman spectra of sedimentary and volcanic opals, neither D 1 nor D 2 band is detected in previous reports.

  9. Characterization of Kevlar Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washer, Glenn; Brooks, Thomas; Saulsberry, Regor

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the characterization of Kevlar composite materials using Raman spectroscopy. The goal of the research is to develop and understand the Raman spectrum of Kevlar materials to provide a foundation for the development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies based on the interaction of laser light with the polymer Kevlar. The paper discusses the fundamental aspects of experimental characterization of the spectrum of Kevlar, including the effects of incident wavelength, polarization and laser power. The effects of environmental exposure of Kevlar materials on certain characteristics of its Raman spectrum are explored, as well as the effects of applied stress. This data may provide a foundation for the development of NDE technologies intended to detect the in-situ deterioration of Kevlar materials used for engineering applications that can later be extended to other materials such as carbon fiber composites.

  10. Remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe

    DOEpatents

    Schmucker, John E.; Blasi, Raymond J.; Archer, William B.

    1999-01-01

    A remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe allows for analyzing Raman scattered light from a point of interest external probe. An environmental barrier including at least one window separates the probe from the point of interest. An optical tube is disposed adjacent to the environmental barrier and includes a long working length compound lens objective next to the window. A beam splitter and a mirror are at the other end. A mechanical means is used to translated the prove body in the X, Y, and Z directions resulting in a variable focus optical apparatus. Laser light is reflected by the beam splitter and directed toward the compound lens objective, then through the window and focused on the point of interest. Raman scattered light is then collected by the compound lens objective and directed through the beam splitter to a mirror. A device for analyzing the light, such as a monochrometer, is coupled to the mirror.

  11. Drug stability analysis by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shende, Chetan; Smith, Wayne; Brouillette, Carl; Farquharson, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical drugs are available to astronauts to help them overcome the deleterious effects of weightlessness, sickness and injuries. Unfortunately, recent studies have shown that some of the drugs currently used may degrade more rapidly in space, losing their potency before their expiration dates. To complicate matters, the degradation products of some drugs can be toxic. Here, we present a preliminary investigation of the ability of Raman spectroscopy to quantify mixtures of four drugs; acetaminophen, azithromycin, epinephrine, and lidocaine, with their primary degradation products. The Raman spectra for the mixtures were replicated by adding the pure spectra of the drug and its degradant to determine the relative percent contributions using classical least squares. This multivariate approach allowed determining concentrations in ~10 min with a limit of detection of ~4% of the degradant. These results suggest that a Raman analyzer could be used to assess drug potency, nondestructively, at the time of use to ensure crewmember safety. PMID:25533308

  12. Raman and Infrared Absorption Study of Indigoid-based Pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Felicia; Durrer, William; Reza, Layra; Ramirez, Alejandra; Chianelli, Russell

    2009-04-01

    A fascinating aspect of Maya pigments is that despite the environmentally harsh humidity and high temperatures they resist fading and they have unprecedented stability. In this investigation, we address the question of how organic dye binds to inorganic palygorskite to form pigments. Our analysis by Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopies proves that different processes are taking place for the indigo-palygorskite system as compared with the thioindigo-palygorskite complex. While partial elimination of the selection rules for the centrosymmetric indigo and disappearance of the indigo N-H bonding, with conversion to dehydroindigo, is observed for the first compound, the latter shows no evident structure modification. The interaction between indigo and palygorskite is likely through oxygen and nitrogen. Only oxygen plays this role for the thioindigo-palygorskite complex.

  13. Detecting changes during pregnancy with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargis, Elizabeth; Robertson, Kesha; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Reese, Jeff; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-02-01

    Preterm labor is the second leading cause of neonatal mortality and leads to a myriad of complications like delayed development and cerebral palsy. Currently, there is no way to accurately predict preterm labor, making its prevention and treatment virtually impossible. While there are some at-risk patients, over half of all preterm births do not fall into any high-risk category. This study seeks to predict and prevent preterm labor by using Raman spectroscopy to detect changes in the cervix during pregnancy. Since Raman spectroscopy has been used to detect cancers in vivo in organs like the cervix and skin, it follows that spectra will change over the course of pregnancy. Previous studies have shown that fluorescence decreased during pregnancy and increased during post-partum exams to pre-pregnancy levels. We believe significant changes will occur in the Raman spectra obtained during the course of pregnancy. In this study, Raman spectra from the cervix of pregnant mice and women will be acquired. Specific changes that occur due to cervical softening or changes in hormonal levels will be observed to understand the likelihood that a female mouse or a woman will enter labor.

  14. Raman spectroscopy for analysis of thorium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yin-Fong; Johnson, Timothy J.; Olsen, Khris B.

    2016-05-01

    The thorium fuel cycle is an alternative to the uranium fuel cycle in that when 232Th is irradiated with neutrons it is converted to 233U, another fissile isotope. There are several chemical forms of thorium which are used in the Th fuel cycle. Recently, Raman spectroscopy has become a very portable and facile analytical technique useful for many applications, including e.g. determining the chemical composition of different materials such as for thorium compounds. The technique continues to improve with the development of ever-more sensitive instrumentation and better software. Using a laboratory Fourier-transform (FT)-Raman spectrometer with a 785 nm wavelength laser, we were able to obtain Raman spectra from a series of thorium-bearing compounds of unknown origin. These spectra were compared to the spectra of in-stock-laboratory thorium compounds including e.g. ThO2, ThF4, Th(CO3)2 and Th(C2O4)2. The unknown spectra showed very good agreement to the known standards, demonstrating the applicability of Raman spectroscopy for detection and identification of these nuclear materials.

  15. Raman spectroscopy of ion-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Tuschel, D.D.; Lavine, J.P.

    1997-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to characterize silicon implanted with boron at a dose of 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2} or less and thermally annealed. The Raman scattering strengths and band shapes of the first-order optical mode at 520 cm{sup {minus}1} and of the second-order phonon modes are investigated to determine which modes are sensitive to the boron implant. The as-implanted samples show diminishing Raman scattering strength as the boron dose increases when the incident laser beam is 60{degree} with respect to the sample normal. Thermal annealing restores some of the Raman scattering strength. Three excitation wavelengths are used and the shortest, 457.9 nm, yields the greatest spectral differences from unimplanted silicon. The backscattering geometry shows a variety of changes in the Raman spectrum upon boron implantation. These involve band shifts of the first-order optical mode, bandwidth variations of the first-order optical mode, and the intensity of the second-order mode at 620 cm{sup {minus}1}.

  16. Raman Spectroscopy of Irradiated Tissue Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexa, P.; Synytsya, A.; Volka, K.; de Boer, J.; Besserer, J.; Froschauer, S.; Loewe, M.; Moosburger, M.; Würkner, M.

    2003-06-01

    Tissue samples (skin of mice, normal and tumor, skin of a woman, normal and tumor) were irradiated by protons from the Munich tandem accelerator. The samples were analysed using Raman spectroscopy at the Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague by measuring the intensity of signals sensitive to radiation damage. Effects depending on the delivered dose were found. Proton-irradiation effects are then compared to those of gamma-irradiation.

  17. Raman and photothermal spectroscopies for explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finot, Eric; Brulé, Thibault; Rai, Padmnabh; Griffart, Aurélien; Bouhélier, Alexandre; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Detection of explosive residues using portable devices for locating landmine and terrorist weapons must sat- isfy the application criteria of high reproducibility, specificity, sensitivity and fast response time. Vibrational spectroscopies such as Raman and infrared spectroscopies have demonstrated their potential to distinguish the members of the chemical family of more than 30 explosive materials. The characteristic chemical fingerprints in the spectra of these explosives stem from the unique bond structure of each compound. However, these spectroscopies, developed in the early sixties, suffer from a poor sensitivity. On the contrary, MEMS-based chemical sensors have shown to have very high sensitivity lowering the detection limit down to less than 1 picogram, (namely 10 part per trillion) using sensor platforms based on microcantilevers, plasmonics, or surface acoustic waves. The minimum amount of molecules that can be detected depends actually on the transducer size. The selectivity in MEMS sensors is usually realized using chemical modification of the active surface. However, the lack of sufficiently selective receptors that can be immobilized on MEMS sensors remains one of the most critical issues. Microcantilever based sensors offer an excellent opportunity to combine both the infrared photothermal spectroscopy in their static mode and the unique mass sensitivity in their dynamic mode. Optical sensors based on localized plasmon resonance can also take up the challenge of addressing the selectivity by monitoring the Surface Enhanced Raman spectrum down to few molecules. The operating conditions of these promising localized spectroscopies will be discussed in terms of reliability, compactness, data analysis and potential for mass deployment.

  18. The Impact of Array Detectors on Raman Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denson, Stephen C.; Pommier, Carolyn J. S.; Denton, M. Bonner

    2007-01-01

    The impact of array detectors in the field of Raman spectroscopy and all low-light-level spectroscopic techniques is examined. The high sensitivity of array detectors has allowed Raman spectroscopy to be used to detect compounds at part per million concentrations and to perform Raman analyses at advantageous wavelengths.

  19. Raman Spectroscopy: Incorporating the Chemical Dimension into Dermatological Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Amit; Sharma, Shruti; Zarrow, Anna; Schwartz, Robert A; Lambert, W Clark

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy provides chemical analysis of tissue in vivo. By measuring the inelastic interactions of light with matter, Raman spectroscopy can determine the chemical composition of a sample. Diseases that are visually difficult to visually distinguish can be delineated based on differences in chemical composition of the affected tissue. Raman spectroscopy has successfully found spectroscopic signatures for skin cancers and differentiated those of benign skin growths. With current and on-going advances in optics and computing, inexpensive and effective Raman systems may soon be available for clinical use. Raman spectroscopy provides direct analyses of skin lesions, thereby improving both disease diagnosis and management. PMID:26955087

  20. Raman spectroscopy of C-irradiated graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Hembree, D.M. Jr.; Pedraza, D.F.; Romanoski, G.R.; Withrow, S.P.; Annis, B.K.

    1994-09-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite samples were irradiated with C{sup +} ions at 35 keV in a direction normal to the basal plane and subsequently annealed up to 1373 K. Substantial surface topography changes were observed at fluences of 5 {times} 10{sup 18} ions/m{sup 2} and higher using scanning electron and atomic force microscopies. Intricate networks of surface cracks and ridges developed after high dose implantation. A systematic study of the irradiation effects was conducted using Raman spectroscopy. Microstructural changes in irradiated regions were first detected at a dose of 1 {times} 10{sup 17} ions/m{sup 2} through the appearance of the Raman D-line at {approx}1360 cm{sup {minus}1}. The intensity of this line increases while that of the Raman G-line at 1580 cm{sup {minus}1} decreases as the irradiation dose is increased or the irradiation temperature is decreased. After irradiation at 280K to a fluence of 5 {times} 10{sup 19} ions/m{sup 2} or higher the first order spectrum exhibits one single line at a wavelength intermediate between the D- and G-lines. Damage recovery upon thermal annealing depends not only on the initial damage state but also on the annealing temperature sequence. Samples irradiated to a damage level where two distinct Raman peaks are no longer resolvable exhibited upon direct annealing at a high temperature two distinct Raman lines. By contrast, pre-annealing these highly irradiated specimens at lower temperatures produced less pronounced changes in the Raman spectra. Pre-annealing appears to stabilize damage structures that are more resistant to high-temperature annealing than those induced by irradiation.

  1. Raman spectroscopy for diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, Candace Elise

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and most fatal malignant brain tumor, is highly infiltrative and incurable. Although improved prognosis has been demonstrated by surgically resecting the bulk tumor, a lack of clear borders at the tumor margins complicates the selection decision during surgery. This dissertation investigates the potential of Raman spectroscopy for distinguishing between normal and malignant brain tissue and sets the groundwork for a surgical diagnostic guide for resection of gross malignant gliomas. These studies revealed that Raman spectroscopy was capable of discriminating between normal scid mouse brain tissue and human xenograft tumors induced in those mice. The spectra of normal and malignant tissue were normalized by dividing by the respective magnitudes of the peaks near 1440 cm -1. Spectral differences include the shape of the broad peaks near 1440 cm-1 and 1660 cm-1 and the relative magnitudes of the peaks at 1264 cm-1, 1287 cm-1, 1297 cm-1, 1556 cm -1, 1586 cm-1, 1614 cm-1, and 1683 cm-1. From these studies emerged questions regarding how to objectively normalize and compare spectra for future automation. Some differences in the Raman spectra were shown to be inherent in the disease states of the cells themselves via differences in the Raman spectra of normal human astrocytes in culture and cultured cells derived from GBM tumors. The spectra of astrocytes and glioma cells were normalized by dividing by the respective magnitudes of the peaks near 1450 cm-1. The differences between the Raman spectra of normal and transformed cells include the ratio of the 1450 cm-1/1650 cm-1 peaks and the relative magnitudes of the peaks at 1181 cm-1, 1191 cm-1, 1225 cm-1, 1263 cm -1, 1300 cm-1, 1336 cm-1, 1477 cm-1, 1494 cm-1, and 1695 cm -1. Previous Raman spectroscopic studies of biological cells have shown that the magnitude of the Raman signal decreases over time, indicating sample damage. Cells exposed to laser excitation at similar power

  2. Applications of Raman Spectroscopy to Virology and Microbial Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harz, Michaela; Stöckel, Stephan; Ciobotă, Valerian; Cialla, Dana; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    This chapter reports from the utilization of Raman spectroscopic techniques like Raman microscopy, Raman optical activity (ROA), UV-resonance Raman (UVRR)-spectroscopy, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) for the investigation of viruses and microorganisms, especially bacteria and yeasts for medical and pharmaceutical applications. The application of these Raman techniques allows for the analysis of chemical components of cells and subcellular regions, as well as the monitoring of chemical differences occurring as a result of the growth of microorganisms. In addition, the interaction of microorganisms with active pharmaceutical agents can be investigated. In combination with chemometric methods Raman spectroscopy can also be applied to identify microorganisms both in micro colonies and even on single cells.

  3. Absorption Spectroscopy in Homogeneous and Micellar Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, S. Sadiq; Henscheid, Leonard G.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment which has helped physical chemistry students learn principles of absorption spectroscopy, the effect of solvent polarity on absorption spectra, and some micellar chemistry. Background information and experimental procedures are provided. (JN)

  4. Graphene intracavity spaser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovik, Yu. E.; Nechepurenko, I. A.; Dorofeenko, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    We propose an intracavity plasmon absorption spectroscopy method based on graphene active plasmonics. It is shown that the plasmonic cavity contribution to the sensitivity is proportional to the quality factor Q of the graphene plasmonic cavity and reaches two orders of magnitude. The addition of gain medium into the cavity increases the sensitivity of method. Maximum sensitivity is reached in the vicinity of the plasmon generation threshold. The gain contribution to the sensitivity is proportional to Q1/2. The giant amplification of sensitivity in the graphene plasmon generator is associated with a huge path length, limited only by the decoherence processes. An analytical estimation of the sensitivity to loss caused by analyzed particles (molecules, nanoparticles, etc.) normalized by the single pass plasmon scheme is derived. Usage of graphene nanoflakes as plasmonic cavity allows a high spatial resolution to be reached, in addition to high sensitivity.

  5. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process. PMID:26728791

  6. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process.

  7. Noninvasive glucose sensing by transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Wei-Chuan; Bechtel, Kate L.; Rebec, Mihailo V.

    2015-05-01

    We present the development of a transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy system and analysis algorithm for noninvasive glucose sensing. The instrument and algorithm were tested in a preclinical study in which a dog model was used. To achieve a robust glucose test system, the blood levels were clamped for periods of up to 45 min. Glucose clamping and rise/fall patterns have been achieved by injecting glucose and insulin into the ear veins of the dog. Venous blood samples were drawn every 5 min and a plasma glucose concentration was obtained and used to maintain the clamps, to build the calibration model, and to evaluate the performance of the system. We evaluated the utility of the simultaneously acquired Raman spectra to be used to determine the plasma glucose values during the 8-h experiment. We obtained prediction errors in the range of ˜1.5-2 mM. These were in-line with a best-case theoretical estimate considering the limitations of the signal-to-noise ratio estimates. As expected, the transition regions of the clamp study produced larger predictive errors than the stable regions. This is related to the divergence of the interstitial fluid (ISF) and plasma glucose values during those periods. Two key contributors to error beside the ISF/plasma difference were photobleaching and detector drift. The study demonstrated the potential of Raman spectroscopy in noninvasive applications and provides areas where the technology can be improved in future studies.

  8. Noninvasive glucose sensing by transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Wei-Chuan; Bechtel, Kate L.; Rebec, Mihailo V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We present the development of a transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy system and analysis algorithm for noninvasive glucose sensing. The instrument and algorithm were tested in a preclinical study in which a dog model was used. To achieve a robust glucose test system, the blood levels were clamped for periods of up to 45 min. Glucose clamping and rise/fall patterns have been achieved by injecting glucose and insulin into the ear veins of the dog. Venous blood samples were drawn every 5 min and a plasma glucose concentration was obtained and used to maintain the clamps, to build the calibration model, and to evaluate the performance of the system. We evaluated the utility of the simultaneously acquired Raman spectra to be used to determine the plasma glucose values during the 8-h experiment. We obtained prediction errors in the range of ∼1.5−2  mM. These were in-line with a best-case theoretical estimate considering the limitations of the signal-to-noise ratio estimates. As expected, the transition regions of the clamp study produced larger predictive errors than the stable regions. This is related to the divergence of the interstitial fluid (ISF) and plasma glucose values during those periods. Two key contributors to error beside the ISF/plasma difference were photobleaching and detector drift. The study demonstrated the potential of Raman spectroscopy in noninvasive applications and provides areas where the technology can be improved in future studies. PMID:25688542

  9. Diagnosing breast cancer by using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Shafer-Peltier, Karen E.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Crowe, Joseph; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2005-08-01

    We employ Raman spectroscopy to diagnose benign and malignant lesions in human breast tissue based on chemical composition. In this study, 130 Raman spectra are acquired from ex vivo samples of human breast tissue (normal, fibrocystic change, fibroadenoma, and infiltrating carcinoma) from 58 patients. Data are fit by using a linear combination model in which nine basis spectra represent the morphologic and chemical features of breast tissue. The resulting fit coefficients provide insight into the chemical/morphological makeup of the tissue and are used to develop diagnostic algorithms. The fit coefficients for fat and collagen are the key parameters in the resulting diagnostic algorithm, which classifies samples according to their specific pathological diagnoses, attaining 94% sensitivity and 96% specificity for distinguishing cancerous tissues from normal and benign tissues. The excellent results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy has the potential to be applied in vivo to accurately classify breast lesions, thereby reducing the number of excisional breast biopsies that are performed. Author contributions: M.F., J.C., R.R.D., and M.S.F. designed research; A.S.H. and K.E.S.-P. performed research; A.S.H. and M.F. analyzed data; and A.S.H. wrote the paper.This paper was submitted directly (Track II) to the PNAS office.Abbreviations: DEH, ductal epithelial hyperplasia; ROC, receiver operating characteristic; N/C, nuclear-to-cytoplasm.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of pterins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Ciarán A.; Mirza, Inam; Lunney, James G.; McCabe, Eithne M.

    2012-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a useful technique in the identification and characterisation of compounds, but in terms of sensitivity its application is limited. With respect to this the discovery of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) phenomenon has proved monumental, and much research has been carried out over the past 30 years developing the technique. Pterins are biological compounds that are found in nature in colour pigmentation and in mammalian metabolic pathways. Moreover, they have been identified in abnormal concentrations in cancer patients, suggesting potential applications in cancer diagnostics. SERS is an ideal technique to identify these compounds, and both nanoparticle suspensions and pulsed laser deposited nanoparticle substrates have been used to examine the spectra of xanthopterin, both in aqueous solution and in different pH environments.

  11. Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, De

    Raman scattering is an inelastic collision between the vibrating molecules inside the sample and the incident photons. During this process, energy exchange takes place between the photon and the scattering molecule. By measuring the energy change of the photon, the molecular vibration mode can be probed. The vibrational spectrum contains valuable information about the disposition of atomic nuclei and chemical bonds within a molecule, the chemical compositions and the interactions between the molecule and its surroundings. In this dissertation, laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) technique is applied for the analysis of biological cells and human cells at single cell level. In LTRS, an individual cell is trapped in aqueous medium with laser tweezers, and Raman scattering spectra from the trapped cell are recorded in real-time. The Raman spectra of these cells can be used to reveal the dynamical processes of cell growth, cell response to environment changes, and can be used as the finger print for the identification of a bacterial cell species. Several biophysical experiments were carried out using LTRS: (1) the dynamic germination process of individual spores of Bacillus thuringiensis was detected via Ca-DPA, a spore-specific biomarker molecule; (2) inactivation and killing of Bacillus subtilis spores by microwave irradiation and wet heat were studied at single cell level; (3) the heat shock activation process of single B. subtilis spores were analyzed, in which the reversible transition from glass-like state at low temperature to liquid-like state at high temperature in spore was revealed at the molecular level; (4) the kinetic processes of bacterial cell lysis of E. coli by lysozyme and by temperature induction of lambda phage were detected real-time; (5) the fixation and rehydration of human platelets were quantitatively evaluated and characterized with Raman spectroscopy method, which provided a rapid way to quantify the quality of freeze-dried therapeutic

  12. Lignin analysis by FT-Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, U.P.; Obst, J.R.; Cannon, A.B.

    1996-10-01

    Traditional methods of lignin analysis, such as Klason (acid insoluble) lignin determinations, give satisfactory results, are widely accepted, and often are considered as standard analyses. However, the Klason lignin method is laborious and time consuming; it also requires a fairly large-amount of isolated analyte. FT-Raman spectroscopy offers an opportunity to simplify and speed up lignin analyses. FT-Raman data for a number of hardwoods (angiosperms) and softwoods (gymnosperms) are compared with data obtained using other analytical methods, including Klason lignin (with corrections for acid soluble lignin), acetyl bromide, and FT-IR determinations. In addition, 10 different specimens of Nothofagus dombeyii (chosen because of the widely varying syringyl:guaiacyl monomer compositions of their lignins) were also analyzed. Lignin monomer compositions were determined by thioacidolysis of by nitrobenzene oxidation.

  13. Laser Diode Raman Spectroscopy Without the Rayleigh Line.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbaghzadeh, Jamshid

    1995-01-01

    The intensity of Rayleigh scattering which is typically four to ten orders of magnitude larger than rotational Raman scattering sets severe limitations on the measurements of Raman intensities close to the excitation line. In order to remove this unwanted light, it is common to use either a subtractive filter stage double spectrometer or a holographic filter. These solutions carry a high price since some parts of the pure rotational spectra of the molecule very close to the Rayleigh line will be blocked. In addition, the combination of a filter stage with the spectrograph makes the device more cumbersome and prevents Raman spectroscopy from being used in many applications, where high sensitivity such as industrial continuous emission monitoring (CEM) is required. We have succeeded to suppress the Rayleigh line with a resonant atomic vapor cell which can reduce the intensity of the Rayleigh line by many orders of magnitude. Rubidium atoms, which have a resonance line at 780.027 nm, absorb the Rayleigh light very effectively if the incident laser frequency is tuned to the absorption lines of the atoms. This technique makes it possible to measure the Raman intensities of gases only a few GHz away from the Rayleigh line without loss of intensities.

  14. Simultaneous Conoscopic Holography and Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Kaiser, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    A new instrument was developed for chemical characterization of surfaces that combines the analytical power of Raman spectroscopy with the three-dimensional topographic information provided by conoscopic holography. The figure schematically depicts the proposed hybrid instrument. The output of the conoscopic holographic portion of the instrument is a topographical map of the surface; the output of the Raman portion of the instrument is hyperspectral Raman data, from which the chemical and/or biological composition of the surface would be deduced. By virtue of the basic principles of design and operation of the instrument, the hyperspectral image data would be inherently spatially registered with the topographical data. In conoscopic holography, the object and reference beams of classical holography are replaced by the ordinary and extraordinary components generated by a single beam traveling through a birefringent, uniaxial crystal. In the basic conoscopic configuration, a laser light is projected onto a specimen and the resulting illuminated spot becomes a point source of diffuse light that propagates in every direction. The laser beam is rasterscanned in two dimensions (x and y) perpendicular to the beam axis (z), and at each x,y location, the pattern of interference between the ordinary and extraordinary rays is recorded. The recorded interferogram constitutes the conoscopic hologram. Of particular significance for the proposed instrument is that the conoscopic hologram contains information on the z coordinate (height) of the illuminated surface spot. Hence, a topographical map of the specimen is constructed point-by-point by rastering the laser beam in the x and y directions and correlating the x and y coordinates with the z information obtained from the interferograms. Conoscopic imaging is an established method, and conoscopic laboratory instruments for surface metrology are commercially available. In Raman spectroscopy of a surface, one measures the spectrum

  15. Characterization of Thalidomide using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriani, Penelope; Smith, Candace Y.

    2008-02-01

    Thalidomide is a potent anticancer therapeutic drug whose mechanism of action has not yet been elucidated. In this report, experimental Raman spectroscopy is used to determine and characterize the vibrational frequencies of the drug. These normal modes are then compared to their quantum mechanical counterparts, which have been computed using density functional theory. Upon analysis of the spectra, we found that there was a high level of agreement between the wavenumbers. As such, this spectroscopic technique may be a viable tool for examining the way in which this drug interacts with its target molecules.

  16. Chemical analysis of acoustically levitated drops by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tuckermann, Rudolf; Puskar, Ljiljana; Zavabeti, Mahta; Sekine, Ryo; McNaughton, Don

    2009-07-01

    An experimental apparatus combining Raman spectroscopy with acoustic levitation, Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopy (RALS), is investigated in the field of physical and chemical analytics. Whereas acoustic levitation enables the contactless handling of microsized samples, Raman spectroscopy offers the advantage of a noninvasive method without complex sample preparation. After carrying out some systematic tests to probe the sensitivity of the technique to drop size, shape, and position, RALS has been successfully applied in monitoring sample dilution and preconcentration, evaporation, crystallization, an acid-base reaction, and analytes in a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy colloidal suspension. PMID:19418043

  17. Role of Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Cerys A; Lewis, Paul D; Dunstan, Peter R; Harris, Dean A

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cancer in the United Kingdom and is the second largest cause of cancer related death in the United Kingdom after lung cancer. Currently in the United Kingdom there is not a diagnostic test that has sufficient differentiation between patients with cancer and those without cancer so the current referral system relies on symptomatic presentation in a primary care setting. Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) are forms of vibrational spectroscopy that offer a non-destructive method to gain molecular information about biological samples. The techniques offer a wide range of applications from in vivo or in vitro diagnostics using endoscopic probes, to the use of micro-spectrometers for analysis of biofluids. The techniques have the potential to detect molecular changes prior to any morphological changes occurring in the tissue and therefore could offer many possibilities to aid the detection of CRC. The purpose of this review is to look at the current state of diagnostic technology in the United Kingdom. The development of Raman spectroscopy and SERS in clinical applications relation for CRC will then be discussed. Finally, future areas of research of Raman/SERS as a clinical tool for the diagnosis of CRC are also discussed. PMID:27190582

  18. UTI diagnosis and antibiogram using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastanos, Evdokia; Kyriakides, Alexandros; Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Pitris, Constantinos

    2009-07-01

    Urinary tract infection diagnosis and antibiogram require a 48 hour waiting period using conventional methods. This results in ineffective treatments, increased costs and most importantly in increased resistance to antibiotics. In this work, a novel method for classifying bacteria and determining their sensitivity to an antibiotic using Raman spectroscopy is described. Raman spectra of three species of gram negative Enterobacteria, most commonly responsible for urinary tract infections, were collected. The study included 25 samples each of E.coli, Klebsiella p. and Proteus spp. A novel algorithm based on spectral ratios followed by discriminant analysis resulted in classification with over 94% accuracy. Sensitivity and specificity for the three types of bacteria ranged from 88-100%. For the development of an antibiogram, bacterial samples were treated with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin to which they were all sensitive. Sensitivity to the antibiotic was evident after analysis of the Raman signatures of bacteria treated or not treated with this antibiotic as early as two hours after exposure. This technique can lead to the development of new technology for urinary tract infection diagnosis and antibiogram with same day results, bypassing urine cultures and avoiding all undesirable consequences of current practice.

  19. Disease recognition by infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krafft, Christoph; Steiner, Gerald; Beleites, Claudia; Salzer, Reiner

    2009-02-01

    Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopy are emerging biophotonic tools to recognize various diseases. The current review gives an overview of the experimental techniques, data-classification algorithms and applications to assess soft tissues, hard tissues and body fluids. The methodology section presents the principles to combine vibrational spectroscopy with microscopy, lateral information and fiber-optic probes. A crucial step is the classification of spectral data by a variety of algorithms. We discuss unsupervised algorithms such as cluster analysis or principal component analysis and supervised algorithms such as linear discriminant analysis, soft independent modeling of class analogies, artificial neural networks support vector machines, Bayesian classification, partial least-squares regression and ensemble methods. The selected topics include tumors of epithelial tissue, brain tumors, prion diseases, bone diseases, atherosclerosis, kidney stones and gallstones, skin tumors, diabetes and osteoarthritis. PMID:19343682

  20. Probing nanoscale ferroelectricity by ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenne, Dmitri

    2007-03-01

    Conventional vibrational spectroscopies operating in visible and infrared range fail to measure the phonon spectra of nanoscale ferroelectric structures because of extremely weak signals and the overwhelming substrate contribution. In this talk, application of ultraviolet (UV) Raman spectroscopy for studies of lattice dynamics and ferroelectric phase transitions in nanoscale ferroelectrics will be presented. We demonstrate that UV Raman spectroscopy is an effective technique allowing the observation of phonons and determination of the ferroelectric phase transition temperature (Tc) in nanoscale ferroelectrics, specifically, BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices having the ferroelectric BaTiO3 layers as thin as 1 unit cell, and single BaTiO3 layers as thin as 4 nm. BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices and ultrathin BaTiO3 films studied were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on SrTiO3 as well as GdScO3 and DyScO3 substrates. Excellent epitaxial quality and atomically abrupt interfaces are evidenced by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. UV Raman results show that one-unit-cell thick BaTiO3 layers in BaTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattices are ferroelectric with the Tc as high as 250 K, and induce the polarization in much thicker SrTiO3 layers adjacent to them. The Tc in superlattices was tuned by hundreds of degrees from ˜170 to 650 K by varying the thicknesses of BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 layers. Using scandate substrates enables growth of superlattices with systematically changed coherent strain, thus allowing studying the stress effect on the ferroelectric phase transitions. UV Raman data are supported by the thermodynamic calculations of polarization in superlattices as a function of temperature. The work was done in collaboration with A. Soukiassian, W. Tian, D.G. Schlom, Y.L. Li, L.-Q. Chen, X.X. Xi (Pennsylvania State University), A. Bruchhausen, A. Fainstein (Centro Atomico Bariloche & Instituto Balseiro, Argentina), R. S. Katiyar (University of Puerto Rico), A

  1. In vivo Raman spectroscopy of cervix cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubina, S.; Sathe, Priyanka; Dora, Tapas Kumar; Chopra, Supriya; Maheshwari, Amita; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Cervix-cancer is the third most common female cancer worldwide. It is the leading cancer among Indian females with more than million new diagnosed cases and 50% mortality, annually. The high mortality rates can be attributed to late diagnosis. Efficacy of Raman spectroscopy in classification of normal and pathological conditions in cervix cancers on diverse populations has already been demonstrated. Our earlier ex vivo studies have shown the feasibility of classifying normal and cancer cervix tissues as well as responders/non-responders to Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The present study was carried out to explore feasibility of in vivo Raman spectroscopic methods in classifying normal and cancerous conditions in Indian population. A total of 182 normal and 132 tumor in vivo Raman spectra, from 63 subjects, were recorded using a fiberoptic probe coupled HE-785 spectrometer, under clinical supervision. Spectra were acquired for 5 s and averaged over 3 times at 80 mW laser power. Spectra of normal conditions suggest strong collagenous features and abundance of non-collagenous proteins and DNA in case of tumors. Preprocessed spectra were subjected to Principal Component-Linear Discrimination Analysis (PCLDA) followed by leave-one-out-cross-validation. Classification efficiency of ~96.7% and 100% for normal and cancerous conditions respectively, were observed. Findings of the study corroborates earlier studies and suggest applicability of Raman spectroscopic methods in combination with appropriate multivariate tool for objective, noninvasive and rapid diagnosis of cervical cancers in Indian population. In view of encouraging results, extensive validation studies will be undertaken to confirm the findings.

  2. Resonant Raman spectroscopy of twisted multilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang-Bin; Zhang, Xin; Ijäs, Mari; Han, Wen-Peng; Qiao, Xiao-Fen; Li, Xiao-Li; Jiang, De-Sheng; Ferrari, Andrea C; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2014-01-01

    Graphene and other two-dimensional crystals can be combined to form various hybrids and heterostructures, creating materials on demand with properties determined by the interlayer interaction. This is the case even for a single material, where multilayer stacks with different relative orientation have different optical and electronic properties. Probing and understanding the interface coupling is thus of primary importance for fundamental science and applications. Here we study twisted multilayer graphene flakes with multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy. We find a significant intensity enhancement of the interlayer coupling modes (C peaks) due to resonance with new optically allowed electronic transitions, determined by the relative orientation of the layers. The interlayer coupling results in a Davydov splitting of the C peak in systems consisting of two equivalent graphene multilayers. This allows us to directly quantify the interlayer interaction, which is much smaller compared with Bernal-stacked interfaces. This paves the way to the use of Raman spectroscopy to uncover the interface coupling of two-dimensional hybrids and heterostructures. PMID:25382099

  3. Characterization and identification of contraband using UV resonant Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacey, Richard J.; Hayward, Ian P.; Sands, H. S.; Batchelder, David N.

    1997-02-01

    A range of explosives and narcotics have been examined using Raman spectroscopy with 244 nm excitation. This wavelength of excitation eliminates the fluorescence problems associated with excitation at visible wavelengths. Comparison with spectra obtained using visible excitation reveals that resonance Raman scattering is occurring. This results in simplified spectra, and enhanced Raman scattering efficiencies.

  4. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy of ultrafast biophysical reaction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCamant, David William

    2004-12-01

    I have developed the technique of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS), which enables the rapid acquisition of vibrational spectra with <100-fs time-resolution and <15-cm-1 frequency-resolution. FSRS uses three laser pulses: (1) a femtosecond visible actinic pump that initiates the photochemistry, (2) a narrow bandwidth picosecond Raman pump that provides the energy for amplification of the probe, and (3) a femtosecond continuum probe that is amplified at Raman resonances shifted from the Raman pump. FSRS has the ability to collect Raman spectra and depolarization ratios with only seconds of data averaging and negligible fluorescence interference. The capabilities of FSRS are explored through studies of the polyene beta-carotene. My initial experiments used picosecond time-resolved Stokes and anti-Stokes spontaneous resonance Raman spectroscopy to determine that vibrational relaxation in the S1 (2Ag-) electronic state is nearly complete within 2 ps and to quantify the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) processes in S0. FSRS studies on beta-carotene revealed that following optical excitation to S2 (1Bu +) the molecule relaxes to S1 in 160 fs where it undergoes rapid two-step IVR with 200- and 450-fs time constants. In later work, the FSRS spectrum of S2 beta-carotene was observed, which consists of three intense and broad bands at ˜1100, 1300 and 1650 cm-1 that exhibit kinetics matching the decay of the S2 near-infrared absorption. These data show that there is no additional intermediate 1B u- electronic state involved in the relaxation pathway of beta-carotene. FSRS was also used to study the photoisomerization dynamics in bacteriorhodopsin (bR). Spectra obtained during bR's excited state lifetime exhibit dispersive lineshapes at the ground-state frequencies that decay in 250 fs and are attributed to a nonlinear emission process. This relaxation is significantly faster than the decay of the stimulated emission (˜500 fs), indicating

  5. Combined fiber probe for fluorescence lifetime and Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dochow, Sebastian; Ma, Dinglong; Latka, Ines; Bocklitz, Thomas; Hartl, Brad; Bec, Julien; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Marple, Eric; Urmey, Kirk; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Schmitt, Michael; Marcu, Laura; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution we present a dual modality fiber optic probe combining fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) and Raman spectroscopy for in vivo endoscopic applications. The presented multi-spectroscopy probe enables efficient excitation and collection of fluorescence lifetime signals for FLIm in the UV/visible wavelength region, as well as of Raman spectra in the near-IR for simultaneous Raman/FLIm imaging. The probe was characterized in terms of its lateral resolution and distance dependency of the Raman and FLIm signals. In addition, the feasibility of the probe for in vivo FLIm and Raman spectral characterization of tissue was demonstrated. PMID:26093843

  6. Determining the Authenticity of Gemstones Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aponick, Aaron; Marchozzi, Emedio; Johnston, Cynthia R.; Wigal, Carl T.

    1998-04-01

    The benefits of laser spectroscopy in the undergraduate curriculum have been the focus of several recent articles in this journal. Raman spectroscopy has been of particular interest since the similarities of Raman to conventional infrared spectroscopy make the interpretation of spectral data well within undergraduate comprehension. In addition, the accessibility to this technology is now within the reach of most undergraduate institutions. This paper reports the development of an experiment using Raman spectroscopy which determines the authenticity of both diamonds and pearls. The resulting spectra provide an introduction to vibrational spectroscopy and can be used in a variety of laboratory courses ranging from introductory chemistry to instrumental analysis.

  7. Raman spectroscopy: an evolving technique for live cell studies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachael; Wright, Karen L; Ashton, Lorna

    2016-06-21

    One of the most exciting developments in Raman spectroscopy in the last decade has been its application to cells and tissues for diagnostic and pharmaceutical applications, and in particular its use in the analysis of cellular dynamics. Raman spectroscopy is rapidly advancing as a cell imaging method that overcomes many of the limitations of current techniques and is earning its place as a routine tool in cell biology. In this review we focus on important developments in Raman spectroscopy that have evolved into the exciting technique of live-cell Raman microscopy and highlight some of the most recent and significant applications to cell biology. PMID:27072718

  8. Molecular imaging with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy nanoparticle reporters

    PubMed Central

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Pohling, Christoph; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging scans cellular and molecular targets in living subjects through the introduction of imaging agents that bind to these targets and report their presence through a measurable signal. The picomolar sensitivity, signal stability, and high multiplexing capacity of Raman spectroscopy satisfies important needs within the field of molecular imaging, and several groups now utilize Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to image molecular targets in small animal models of human disease. This article details the role of Raman spectroscopy in molecular imaging, describes some substrates and imaging agents used in animal models, and illustrates some examples. PMID:24293809

  9. Evaluating internal maturity of tomatoes using spatially offset Raman spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy technique was investigated for evaluating internal maturity of intact tomatoes. A Raman spectroscopy system was assembled to acquire spatially offset spectra in the wavenumber range of 200–2500 cm–1. A 785-nm laser was used as the excitation source and the measure...

  10. Measurement of clathrate hydrates via Raman spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sum, A.K.; Burruss, R.C.; Sloan, E.D., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Raman spectra of clathrate hydrate guest molecules are presented for three known structures (I (sI), II (sII), and H (sH)) in the following systems: CH4 (sI), CO2 (sI), C3H8 (sII), CH4 + CO2 (sI), CD4 + C3H8 (sII), CH4 + N2 (sI), CH4 + THF-d8 (sII), and CH4 + C7D14 (sH). Relative occupancy of CH4 in the large and small cavities of sI were determined by deconvoluting the ??1 symmetric bands, resulting in hydration numbers of 6.04 ?? 0.03. The frequency of the ??1 bands for CH4 in structures I, II, and H differ statistically, so that Raman spectroscopy is a potential tool to identify hydrate crystal structure. Hydrate guest compositions were also measured for two vapor compositions of the CH4 + CO2 system, and they compared favorably with predictions. The large cavities were measured to be almost fully occupied by CH4 and CO2, whereas only a small fraction of the small cavities are occupied by CH4. No CO2 was found in the small cavities. Hydration numbers from 7.27 to 7.45 were calculated for the mixed hydrate.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrell, Robin L.; Herne, Tonya M.; Ahern, Angela M.; Sullenberger, Eve L.

    1990-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectroscopy has been used to probe the adsorption, surface interactions, and orientations of peptides on metal surfaces. Amino acids in homodipeptides give SER spectra with unique features that can be used to characterize the surface interactions of specific functional groups in more complicated peptides. In heterodipeptides, there is a hierarchy of functional group-surface interactions that prescribe their orientation and conformation on metal surfaces. By establishing this hierarchy, it is now possible to predict the interactions that occur between larger peptides and surfaces. Furthermore, the observed trends suggest that it should be possible to control these interactions by varying the solution pH, the charge on the surface, and other parameters of the measurement in order to adsorb species selectively from mixtures of peptides in solution. Potential biomedical applications of this technique will be described.

  12. Molecular velocimetry using stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J.; Hillard, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Molecular flow velocity of N2 was measured in a supersonic wind tunnel using inverse Raman spectroscopy. This technique employs the large Doppler shift exhibited by the molecules when the pump and probe laser beams are counter-propagating (backward scattering). A retrometer system is employed to yield a vibration-free optical configuration which has the additional advantage of obtaining both the forward and backward scattered spectra simultaneously. The linebreadths and their relative Doppler shift can be used to determine the static pressure, translational temperature, and molecular flow velocity. A demonstration of the concept was performed in a supersonic wind tunnel and included: (1) measurements over the Mach number range 2.50 to 4.63; (2) static pressure measurements (at Mach 2.50) corresponding to a Reynolds number per foot range of 1 to 5 x 10 to the 6th power; and (3) measurements behind the shock wave of a flat plate model.

  13. FT Raman spectroscopy of Norway spruce needles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matejka, P.; Pleserova, L.; Budinova, G.; Havirova, K.; Nahlik, J.; Skacel, F.; Volka, Karel

    2001-02-01

    12 Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] needles represent a very useful bioindicator of the air pollution. They serve not only as natural samplers of the pollutants but micromorphology of the epistomatal area can be directly correlated with an environmental stress. The needles of trees growing in polluted areas exhibit different types of injury to the epicuticular wax layer. It is evident that these changes of the morphology of the wax layers are connected also with the changes of their chemical composition and so a potential of the FT Raman spectroscopy was tested to serve as a screening method of these changes. In this work variability of the spectra with the age and with the position in the tree, in the locality, and also in the different localities of the Czech Republic was studied and evaluated in comparison with results of electron scanning microscopy.

  14. Raman spectroscopy of human saliva for acute myocardial infarction detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Maowen; Chen, Yuanxiang; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Wei; Lin, Jinyong; Weng, Guo-Xing; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapidly non-invasive technique with great potential for biomedical research. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy of human saliva for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) detection. Raman spectroscopy measurements were performed on two groups of saliva samples: one group from patients (n=30) with confirmed AMI and the other group from healthy controls (n=31). The diagnostic performance for differentiating AMI saliva from normal saliva was evaluated by multivariate statistical analysis. The combination of principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminate analysis (LDA) of the measured Raman spectra separated the spectral features of the two groups into two distinct clusters with little overlaps, rendering the sensitivity of 80.0% and specificity of 80.6%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy of human saliva can serve as a potentially clinical tool for rapid AMI detection and screening.

  15. Raman Spectroscopy of Optically Trapped Single Biological Micro-Particles

    PubMed Central

    Redding, Brandon; Schwab, Mark J.; Pan, Yong-le

    2015-01-01

    The combination of optical trapping with Raman spectroscopy provides a powerful method for the study, characterization, and identification of biological micro-particles. In essence, optical trapping helps to overcome the limitation imposed by the relative inefficiency of the Raman scattering process. This allows Raman spectroscopy to be applied to individual biological particles in air and in liquid, providing the potential for particle identification with high specificity, longitudinal studies of changes in particle composition, and characterization of the heterogeneity of individual particles in a population. In this review, we introduce the techniques used to integrate Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping in order to study individual biological particles in liquid and air. We then provide an overview of some of the most promising applications of this technique, highlighting the unique types of measurements enabled by the combination of Raman spectroscopy with optical trapping. Finally, we present a brief discussion of future research directions in the field. PMID:26247952

  16. Raman spectroscopy for optical diagnosis of laryngeal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Seng Khoon; Zheng, Wei; Lau, David P.; Huang, Zhiwei

    2008-02-01

    In this report, the diagnostic ability of near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy for identifying the malignant tumors from normal tissues in the larynx was studied. A rapid NIR Raman system was utilized. Multivariate statistical techniques were employed to develop effective diagnostic algorithms. Raman spectra in the range of 800-1,800 cm-1 differed significantly between normal and malignant tumor tissues. The diagnostic algorithms can yielded a diagnostic sensitivity of 92.9% and specificity 83.3% for separating malignant tumors from normal laryngeal tissues. NIR Raman spectroscopy with multivariate statistical techniques has a potential for the non-invasive detection of malignant tumors in the larynx.

  17. Resonance Raman spectroscopy utilizing tunable deep ultraviolet excitation for materials characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, Christopher Todd

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy offers some key benefits over other spectroscopy methods. In one facet, resonance Raman provides a level of specificity not present in non-resonant Raman scattering. In another facet, resonance Raman can provide increased scattering cross-sections that rival those associated with the intensities of species fluorescence. These features provide mechanisms for improved trace species detection in current Raman remote sensing applications; as well as signal level enhancement in tiny volume regimes, such as those typical in near-field optical microscopy. This dissertation presents three main thrusts that are not well documented in the previous resonance Raman studies. We demonstrate fine resolution (approx 0:1nm) resonance tuning of the excitation wavelength corresponding to sharp absorption bands in liquid benzene and liquid toluene. The Raman spectra for these materials show an appreciable increase in scattering intensity of fundamental vibrational modes and show significant enhancements in scattering intensities for overtone and combination vibrational modes not observed with non-resonant excitation. Resonantly excited fundamental modes are observed to be enhanced by 3 to 5 orders of magnitude over non-resonant excitation; and several resonantly excited overtone modes are observed for both liquid benzene and liquid toluene. We have observed, that for liquid benzene and liquid toluene, the maximum Raman scattering intensity is realized when the excitation wavelength corresponds to that of the vapor phase absorption maximum, not the liquid phase absorption maximum as expected. We present a simple model of the time-dependent energy accumulation in the scattering volume that suggests that the scattering medium is a highly disorganized fluid. The observed Raman scattering intensity originates from this metastable fluid observed during the liquid-vapor phase transition. Using different concentration solutions of liquid benzene in heptane, we

  18. From Femtosecond Dynamics to Breast Cancer Diagnosis by Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, H.; Placek, I.; Brozek-Pluska, B.; Kurczewski, K.; Morawiec, Z.; Tazbir, M.

    2007-12-26

    This paper presents new results based on Raman spectroscopy and demonstrates its utilisation as a diagnostic and development tool with the key advantage in breast cancer research. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in cancer research are in the early stages of development. However, research presented here as well as performed in a few other laboratories demonstrate the ability of Raman spectroscopy to accurately characterize cancer tissue and distinguish between normal, malignant and benign types. The main goals of bio-Raman spectroscopy at this stage are threefold. Firstly, the aim is to develop the diagnostic ability of Raman spectroscopy so it can be implemented in a clinical environment, producing accurate and rapid diagnoses. Secondly, the aim is to optimize the technique as a diagnostic tool for the non-invasive real time medical applications. Thirdly, the aim is to formulate some hypothesis based on Raman spectroscopy on the molecular mechanism which drives the transformation of normal human cells into highly malignant derivatives. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most statistically reliable report on Raman spectroscopy-based diagnosis of breast cancers among the world women population.

  19. From Femtosecond Dynamics to Breast Cancer Diagnosis by Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramczyk, H.; Placek, I.; BroŻek-Płuska, B.; Kurczewski, K.; Morawiec, Z.; Tazbir, M.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents new results based on Raman spectroscopy and demonstrates its utilisation as a diagnostic and development tool with the key advantage in breast cancer research. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in cancer research are in the early stages of development. However, research presented here as well as performed in a few other laboratories demonstrate the ability of Raman spectroscopy to accurately characterize cancer tissue and distinguish between normal, malignant and benign types. The main goals of bio-Raman spectroscopy at this stage are threefold. Firstly, the aim is to develop the diagnostic ability of Raman spectroscopy so it can be implemented in a clinical environment, producing accurate and rapid diagnoses. Secondly, the aim is to optimize the technique as a diagnostic tool for the non-invasive real time medical applications. Thirdly, the aim is to formulate some hypothesis based on Raman spectroscopy on the molecular mechanism which drives the transformation of normal human cells into highly malignant derivatives. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most statistically reliable report on Raman spectroscopy-based diagnosis of breast cancers among the world women population.

  20. The many facets of Raman spectroscopy for biomedical analysis.

    PubMed

    Krafft, Christoph; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    A critical review is presented on the use of linear and nonlinear Raman microspectroscopy in biomedical diagnostics of bacteria, cells, and tissues. This contribution is combined with an overview of the achievements of our research group. Linear Raman spectroscopy offers a wealth of chemical and molecular information. Its routine clinical application poses a challenge due to relatively weak signal intensities and confounding overlapping effects. Nonlinear variants of Raman spectroscopy such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) have been recognized as tools for rapid image acquisition. Imaging applications benefit from the fact that contrast is based on the chemical composition and molecular structures in a label-free and nondestructive manner. Although not label-free, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has also been recognized as a complementary biomedical tool to increase sensitivity. The current state of the art is evaluated, illustrative examples are given, future developments are pointed out, and important reviews and references from the current literature are selected. The topics are identification of bacteria and single cells, imaging of single cells, Raman activated cell sorting, diagnosis of tissue sections, fiber optic Raman spectroscopy, and progress in coherent Raman scattering in tissue diagnosis. The roles of networks-such as Raman4clinics and CLIRSPEC on a European level-and early adopters in the translation, dissemination, and validation of new methods are discussed. PMID:25428454

  1. Raman spectroscopy of gliomas: an exploratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Mahesh; Hole, Arti R.; Shridhar, E.; Moiyadi, Aliasgar V.; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Gliomas are extremely infiltrative type of brain cancers, the borders of which are difficult to locate. Gliomas largely consist of tumors of astrocytic or oligodendroglial lineage. Usually stereotactic surgery is performed to obtain tumor tissue sample. Complete excision of these tumors with preservation of uninvolved normal areas is important during brain tumor surgeries. The present study was undertaken to explore feasibility of classifying abnormal and normal glioma tissues with Raman spectroscopy (RS). RS is a nondestructive vibrational spectroscopic technique, which provides information about molecular composition, molecular structures and molecular interactions in tissue. Postoperated 33 (20-abnormal and 13-normal) gliomas tissue samples of different grades were collected under clinical supervision. Five micron section from tissue sample was used for confirmatory histopathological diagnosis while the remaining tissue was placed on CaF2 window and spectra were acquired using a fiberoptic-probe-coupled HE-785 Raman-spectrometer. Spectral acquisition parameters were laser power-80mW, integration-20s and averaged over 3 accumulations. Spectra were pre-processed and subjected to unsupervised Principal-Component Analysis (PCA) to identify trends of classification. Supervised PC-LDA (Principal-Component-Linear-Discriminant Analysis) was used to develop standard-models using spectra of 12 normal and abnormal specimens each. Leave-one-out crossvalidation yielded classification-efficiency of 90% and 80% for normal and abnormal conditions, respectively. Evaluation with an independent-test data-set comprising of 135 spectra of 9 samples provided sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 70%. Findings of this preliminary study may pave way for objective tumor margin assessment during brain surgery.

  2. Nanoparticle Based Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, C E; Huser, T R; Hollars, C W; Jusinski, L; Laurence, T; Lane, S M

    2005-01-03

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering is a powerful tool for the investigation of biological samples. Following a brief introduction to Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering, several examples of biophotonic applications of SERS are discussed. The concept of nanoparticle based sensors using SERS is introduced and the development of these sensors is discussed.

  3. Periodontitis diagnostics using resonance Raman spectroscopy on saliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Biryukova, T.; Tsvetkov, M.; Bagratashvily, V.

    2013-07-01

    In view of its wealth of molecular information, Raman spectroscopy has been the subject of active biomedical research. The aim of this work is Raman spectroscopy (RS) application for the determination of molecular biomarkers in saliva with the objective of early periodontitis detection. As was shown in our previous study, carotenoids contained in saliva can be molecular fingerprint information for the periodontitis level. It is shown here that the carotenoid RS lines at wavenumbers of 1156 and 1524 cm-1 can be easily detected and serve as reliable biomarkers of periodontitis using resonance Raman spectroscopy of dry saliva.

  4. Investigation of biomineralization by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatscher, Robert William

    Biomineralization is a process in which living organism grow composite materials consisting of inorganic and organic materials. This produces a composite material consisting of both inorganic and organic components, with superior mechanical properties. In the human body bone and dentin are both examples of biominerals. In this research Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize dentin from mice and human teeth, to determine composition. In the mouse tooth samples areas of irregular dentin were found, along the inside of the tooth, to be in the process of mineralization. By analyzing the samples along these areas we were able to determine the composition of dentin and track how it changed in these area. By analysis of the mineral to matrix ratio the areas of irregular dentin were determined to have less mineral present. Observations of other organic components and collagen in increased concentrations in this area suggested these area were in the process of biomineralization. The understanding of the structure of dentin and its biomineralization process is of crucial importance when trying reproduce dentin. Scientists and engineers are able to produce dentin minerals in vitro by culturing various dental stem cells. The ability to create dentin mineral from cells could lead to methods of repairing dentin in patients, or even lead to the creation of a completely engineered tooth. While dentin-like materials can be produced in a laboratory environment, analysis and comparison of the composition of these materials must be performed to ensure the mineral produced is consistent with dentin. Mineralized nodules from six different dental stem cell lines were cultured to produce a mineralized deposit. Utilizing Raman spectroscopy, we were able to determine cell source dependent differences in a variety of dental stem cells, and compare the mineral produced to native dentin. Orthopedic implants are implants used to replace damaged bone, examples include knee, hip and dental

  5. Sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy to normal patient variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargis, Elizabeth; Byrd, Teresa; Logan, Quinisha; Khabele, Dineo; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2011-11-01

    Many groups have used Raman spectroscopy for diagnosing cervical dysplasia; however, there have been few studies looking at the effect of normal physiological variations on Raman spectra. We assess four patient variables that may affect normal Raman spectra: Race/ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), parity, and socioeconomic status. Raman spectra were acquired from a diverse population of 75 patients undergoing routine screening for cervical dysplasia. Classification of Raman spectra from patients with a normal cervix is performed using sparse multinomial logistic regression (SMLR) to determine if any of these variables has a significant effect. Results suggest that BMI and parity have the greatest impact, whereas race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status have a limited effect. Incorporating BMI and obstetric history into classification algorithms may increase sensitivity and specificity rates of disease classification using Raman spectroscopy. Studies are underway to assess the effect of these variables on disease.

  6. Clinical instrumentation and applications of Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pence, Isaac; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2016-04-01

    Clinical diagnostic devices provide new sources of information that give insight about the state of health which can then be used to manage patient care. These tools can be as simple as an otoscope to better visualize the ear canal or as complex as a wireless capsule endoscope to monitor the gastrointestinal tract. It is with tools such as these that medical practitioners can determine when a patient is healthy and to make an appropriate diagnosis when he/she is not. The goal of diagnostic medicine then is to efficiently determine the presence and cause of disease in order to provide the most appropriate intervention. The earliest form of medical diagnostics relied on the eye - direct visual observation of the interaction of light with the sample. This technique was espoused by Hippocrates in his 5th century BCE work Epidemics, in which the pallor of a patient's skin and the coloring of the bodily fluids could be indicative of health. In the last hundred years, medical diagnosis has moved from relying on visual inspection to relying on numerous technological tools that are based on various types of interaction of the sample with different types of energy - light, ultrasound, radio waves, X-rays etc. Modern advances in science and technology have depended on enhancing technologies for the detection of these interactions for improved visualization of human health. Optical methods have been focused on providing this information in the micron to millimeter scale while ultrasound, X-ray, and radio waves have been key in aiding in the millimeter to centimeter scale. While a few optical technologies have achieved the status of medical instruments, many remain in the research and development phase despite persistent efforts by many researchers in the translation of these methods for clinical care. Of these, Raman spectroscopy has been described as a sensitive method that can provide biochemical information about tissue state while maintaining the capability of delivering

  7. Clinical instrumentation and applications of Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pence, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Clinical diagnostic devices provide new sources of information that give insight about the state of health which can then be used to manage patient care. These tools can be as simple as an otoscope to better visualize the ear canal or as complex as a wireless capsule endoscope to monitor the gastrointestinal tract. It is with tools such as these that medical practitioners can determine when a patient is healthy and to make an appropriate diagnosis when he/she is not. The goal of diagnostic medicine then is to efficiently determine the presence and cause of disease in order to provide the most appropriate intervention. The earliest form of medical diagnostics relied on the eye – direct visual observation of the interaction of light with the sample. This technique was espoused by Hippocrates in his 5th century BCE work Epidemics, in which the pallor of a patient’s skin and the coloring of the bodily fluids could be indicative of health. In the last hundred years, medical diagnosis has moved from relying on visual inspection to relying on numerous technological tools that are based on various types of interaction of the sample with different types of energy – light, ultrasound, radio waves, X-rays etc. Modern advances in science and technology have depended on enhancing technologies for the detection of these interactions for improved visualization of human health. Optical methods have been focused on providing this information in the micron to millimeter scale while ultrasound, X-ray, and radio waves have been key in aiding in the millimeter to centimeter scale. While a few optical technologies have achieved the status of medical instruments, many remain in the research and development phase despite persistent efforts by many researchers in the translation of these methods for clinical care. Of these, Raman spectroscopy has been described as a sensitive method that can provide biochemical information about tissue state while maintaining the capability of

  8. [Water Raman spectrum suppression with low-pass filter in underwater in-situ Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Jia; Liu, Zhi-Shen

    2011-09-01

    As a powerful tool for studying chemical structures, Raman spectroscopy has been used in aquatic environments in-situ measurement widely, and has been used in deep sea research recently. For underwater in-situ detection, O-H vibration Raman peak of water is inherent and strong compared with other dissolved matter's Raman signals. When the authors want to get a good SNR Raman signal of dissolved matter by increasing detection time, O-H vibration Raman peak of water will get to saturation easily, which influences other Raman signal's detection. In the present paper, a specially designed short-pass optical filter was used for suppression of water's O-H vibration Raman peak. The authors calculated the suppression effect of short-pass optical filter with linear and exponential edges. The simulation shows that exponential edge filter has better performance and can suppress water's O-H vibration Raman peak effectively. The experiment also proves the calculation results. With the suppression optical filter, the intensity of water's O-H vibration Raman signal and other dissolved matters' become similar. And the influence of suppression optical filter on other dissolved matters' Raman signal is little. So the suppression optical filter is feasible for in-situ underwater Raman spectroscopy. PMID:22097842

  9. Application of Raman Spectroscopy for Nondestructive Evaluation of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washer, Glenn A.; Brooks, Thomas M. B.; Saulsberry, Regor

    2007-01-01

    This paper will present an overview of efforts to investigate the application of Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of Kevlar materials. Raman spectroscopy is a laser technique that is sensitive to molecular interactions in materials such as Kevlar, graphite and carbon used in composite materials. The overall goal of this research reported here is to evaluate Raman spectroscopy as a potential nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tool for the detection of stress rupture in Kevlar composite over-wrapped pressure vessels (COPVs). Characterization of the Raman spectra of Kevlar yarn and strands will be presented and compared with analytical models provided in the literature. Results of testing to investigate the effects of creep and high-temperature aging on the Raman spectra will be presented.

  10. Multilayer graphene stacks grown by different methods-thickness measurements by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and optical transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarczyk, M. Kowalski, G.; Kępa, H.; Grodecki, K.; Drabińska, A.; Strupiński, W.

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Optical absorption estimates of the thickness of graphene multi layer stacks (number of graphene layers) are presented for three different growth techniques. The objective of this work was focused on comparison and reconciliation of the two already widely used methods for thickness estimates (Raman and Absorption) with the calibration of the X-ray method as far as Scherer constant K is concerned and X-ray based Wagner-Aqua extrapolation method.

  11. Infrared absorption, Raman, and SERS investigations in conjunction with theoretical simulations on a phenothiazine derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolboaca, M.; Iliescu, T.; Kiefer, W.

    2004-03-01

    The vibrational characterization of the most stable conformer of 10-isopentyl-10H-phenothiazine-5,5-dioxide (10-I-10H-P-5,5-D) was performed by means of infrared absorption, Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Hartree-Fock and density functional theory calculations were carried out to find the optimised structures and the computed vibrational wavenumbers of the title compound. The comparison of SER spectra obtained only in activated silver colloid with the corresponding Raman spectrum reveals small shifts and changes in the relative intensities proving the partial chemisorption of the molecules on the silver surface. The electromagnetic mechanism represents the main mechanism of the overall SERS enhancement. The changes observed in the SER spectra at different pH values were explained by considering the reorientation of the adsorbed molecule with respect to the metal surface.

  12. Applications of spatially offset Raman spectroscopy to defense and security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guicheteau, Jason; Hopkins, Rebecca

    2016-05-01

    Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) allows for sub-surface and through barrier detection and has applications in drug analysis, cancer detection, forensic science, as well as defense and security. This paper reviews previous efforts in SORS and other through barrier Raman techniques and presents a discussion on current research in defense and security applications.

  13. Electrochemical Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhi-Cong; Huang, Sheng-Chao; Wu, De-Yin; Meng, Ling-Yan; Li, Mao-Hua; Huang, Teng-Xiang; Zhong, Jin-Hui; Wang, Xiang; Yang, Zhi-Lin; Ren, Bin

    2015-09-23

    Interfacial properties are highly important to the performance of some energy-related systems. The in-depth understanding of the interface requires highly sensitive in situ techniques that can provide fingerprint molecular information at nanometer resolution. We developed an electrochemical tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (EC-TERS) by introduction of the light horizontally to the EC-STM cell to minimize the optical distortion and to keep the TERS measurement under a well-controlled condition. We obtained potential-dependent EC-TERS from the adsorbed aromatic molecule on a Au(111) surface and observed a substantial change in the molecule configuration with potential as a result of the protonation and deprotonation of the molecule. Such a change was not observable in EC-SERS (surface-enhanced), indicating EC-TERS can more faithfully reflect the fine interfacial structure than EC-SERS. This work will open a new era for using EC-TERS as an important nanospectroscopy tool for the molecular level and nanoscale analysis of some important electrochemical systems including solar cells, lithium ion batteries, fuel cells, and corrosion. PMID:26351986

  14. [Identification of B jade by Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zu, En-dong; Chen, Da-peng; Zhang, Peng-xiang

    2003-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been found to be a useful tool for identification of bleached and polymer-impregnated jadeites (so-called B jade). The major advantage of this system over classical methods of gem testing is the non-destructive identification of inclusions in gemstones and the determination of organic fracture filling in jade. Fissures in jadeites have been filled with oils and various resins to enhance their clarity, such as paraffin wax, paraffin oil, AB glue and epoxy resins. They show different peaks depending on their chemical composition. The characteristic spectrum ranges from 1,200-1,700 cm-1 to 2,800-3,100 cm-1. The spectra of resins show that they all have four strongest peaks related with phenyl: two C-C stretching modes at 1,116 and 1,609 cm-1, respectively, one C-H stretching mode at 3,069 cm-1, and a in-plane C-H bending mode at 1,189 cm-1. In addition, other two -CH2, -CH3 stretching modes at 2,906 and 2,869 cm-1, respectively, are very similar to paraffin. Therefore, the peaks at 1,116, 1,609, 1,189 and 3,069 cm-1 are important in distinguishing resin from paraffin, and we can identify B jade depending on them. PMID:12939970

  15. Raman Spectroscopy for the Investigation of Carbon Based Black Pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccato, A.; Jehlicka, J.; Moens, L.; Vandenabeele, P.

    2014-06-01

    Carbon based black pigments play an important role among artists' materials. The disordered structure of these materials is investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy, which helps in the comprehension of their production processes.

  16. Analysis of Arctic Carbonates Profiles by Raman Spectroscopy using Exomars Raman Laser Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansano, A.; López, G.; Medina, J.; Rull, F.

    2011-10-01

    This work details the analysis performed by Raman spectroscopy on carbonate samples from the Svalbard Islands (Norway) in the Arctic. This place is considered a potential Martian analog because the carbonate formation show close similarities with the formation in ALH84001 meteorite. The results obtained illustrate the performances of the Raman instrument included in the Exomars (ESA) mission.

  17. Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy based on a line-scan hyperspectral Raman system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) is a technique that can obtain subsurface layered information by collecting Raman spectra from a series of surface positions laterally offset from the excitation laser. The current methods of SORS measurement are typically either slow due to mechanical move...

  18. Further advancement of differential optical absorption spectroscopy: theory of orthogonal optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liudchik, Alexander M

    2014-08-10

    A modified version of the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method is presented. The technique is called orthogonal optical absorption spectroscopy (OOAS). A widespread variant of DOAS with smoothing of the registered spectrum and absorption cross sections being made employing a polynomial regression is a particular case of OOAS. The concept of OOAS provides a variety of new possibilities for constructing computational schemes and analyzing the influence of different error sources on calculated concentrations. PMID:25320931

  19. Raman and infrared spectroscopy of organic electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Y.

    2010-09-01

    We present Raman and infrared studies on the structures of organic semiconductor thin films used for electronic devices. The Raman spectra of crystalline and amorphous states of an organic semiconductor, N,N'-di-1-naphthaleyl-N,N'-diphenyl-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPD), were measured. These states give rise to slightly different peak positions and widths of each Raman band. Raman images were observed for polycrystalline pentacene films evaporated on a silicon substrate. The structural defects were found in the images of the intensity ratio I1596/I1533, which reflects the orientation of molecules i.e., crystalline domains. Photoinduced infrared absorption from the composite of regioregular poly(3-dodecylthiphene) and C60 was measured by the difference FT-IR method. The observed absorption is attributable to photogenerated carriers. The action spectra of photoinduced infrared absorption are explained by electron transfer from photogenerated excited states on a polymer chain to C60.

  20. Micro-Raman spectroscopy for meat type detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Biasio, M.; Stampfer, P.; Leitner, R.; Huck, C. W.; Wiedemair, V.; Balthasar, D.

    2015-06-01

    The recent horse meat scandal in Europe increased the demand for optical sensors that can identify meat type. Micro-Raman spectroscopy is a promising technique for the discrimination of meat types. Here, we present micro-Raman measurements of chicken, pork, turkey, mutton, beef and horse meat test samples. The data was analyzed with different combinations of data normalization and classification approaches. Our results show that Raman spectroscopy can discriminate between different meat types. Red and white meat are easily discriminated, however a sophisticated chemometric model is required to discriminate species within these groups.

  1. Coherent and spontaneous Raman spectroscopy in shocked and unshocked liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.; Schiferl, D.; Chatelet, M.; Turner, T.P.; Shaner, J.W.; Shampine, D.L.; Holt, W.T.

    1985-01-01

    Coherent and non-coherent Raman spectroscopy is being used to study the structure and energy transfer in molecular liquids at high pressures. Stimulated Raman scattering, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, and Raman induced Kerr effect scattering measurements have been performed in liquid benzene and liquid nitromethane shocked to pressures up to 11 GPa. Frequency shifts were observed for the 992 cm/sup -1/ ring stretching mode of benzene and the 920 cm/sup -1/ CN stretching mode of nitromethane. Results of these dynamic experiments are compared to spontaneous Raman scattering measurements made in a high temperature diamond anvil cell. Also, a picosecond infrared pump/spontaneous anti-Strokes Raman probe experiment is being used to measure CH stretch vibrational relaxation times in liquid halogenated methanes statically compressed to a few tenths GPa. 87 refs., 17 figs.

  2. Micro-Raman spectroscopy on oral tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenone, F.; Lepore, M.; Perna, G.; Carmone, P.; Riccio, R.; Gaeta, G. M.; Capozzi, V.

    2006-02-01

    Micro-Raman Spectroscopy (μ-RS) provides a unique tool in medicine for a not invasive and real time analysis of biological tissue for biopsy and "in vivo" investigation. Based on the evaluation of molecular vibration frequencies, the μ-RS is able to detect the main molecular bonds of protein constituents, as the C-H and C-C ones. Changes in frequency or in the relative intensity of the vibration modes revealed by μ-RS can be related to changes of chemical bond and of protein structure induced by pathology. The μ-RS has been performed on samples of oral tissue from informed patients, affected by pemphigus vulgaris (an oral pathology) in an advanced regression state. The biopsies were thin slices (about 1mm thick) with 6mm diameter. The sample was measured through a 170 μm thick cover-glass. The experimental set-up was mainly composed by a He-Ne laser and a monochromator equipped with a Peltier cell and with a grating of 1800 grooves/mm. The laser light was focused on the sample surface by means of a long focal length 50X optical objective. The main protein bonds are clearly detectable in the considered samples and this give important information on the integrity and on the state of tissue components (lipids and proteins), and consequently on the occurrence of pathology. The potential application of this method for in vivo analysis is an invaluable alternative to biopsy and pathological examinations for many medical application as screening diagnostic, therapy progress examination, and surgical support.

  3. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for renal condition monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingting; Li, Ming; Du, Yong; Santos, Greggy M.; Mohan, Chandra; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2016-03-01

    Non- and minimally-invasive techniques can provide advantages in the monitoring and clinical diagnostics in renal diseases. Although renal biopsy may be useful in establishing diagnosis in several diseases, it is an invasive approach and impractical for longitudinal disease monitoring. To address this unmet need, we have developed two techniques based on Raman spectroscopy. First, we have investigated the potential of diagnosing and staging nephritis by analyzing kidney tissue Raman spectra using multivariate techniques. Secondly, we have developed a urine creatinine sensor based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with performance near commercial assays which require relatively laborious sample preparation and longer time.

  4. Characterisation of signal enhancements achieved when utilizing a photon diode in deep Raman spectroscopy of tissue.

    PubMed

    Vardaki, Martha Z; Matousek, Pavel; Stone, Nicholas

    2016-06-01

    We characterise the performance of a beam enhancing element ('photon diode') for use in deep Raman spectroscopy (DRS) of biological tissues. The optical component enhances the number of laser photons coupled into a tissue sample by returning escaping photons back into it at the illumination zone. The method is compatible with transmission Raman spectroscopy, a deep Raman spectroscopy concept, and its implementation leads to considerable enhancement of detected Raman photon rates. In the past, the enhancement concept was demonstrated with a variety of samples (pharmaceutical tablets, tissue, etc) but it was not systematically characterized with biological tissues. In this study, we investigate the enhancing properties of the photon diode in the transmission Raman geometry as a function of: a) the depth and b) the optical properties of tissue samples. Liquid tissue phantoms were employed to facilitate systematic variation of optical properties. These were chosen to mimic optical properties of human tissues, including breast and prostate. The obtained results evidence that a photon diode can enhance Raman signals of tissues by a maximum of × 2.4, although it can also decrease the signals created towards the back of samples that exhibit high scattering or absorption properties. PMID:27375932

  5. Characterisation of signal enhancements achieved when utilizing a photon diode in deep Raman spectroscopy of tissue

    PubMed Central

    Vardaki, Martha Z.; Matousek, Pavel; Stone, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    We characterise the performance of a beam enhancing element (‘photon diode’) for use in deep Raman spectroscopy (DRS) of biological tissues. The optical component enhances the number of laser photons coupled into a tissue sample by returning escaping photons back into it at the illumination zone. The method is compatible with transmission Raman spectroscopy, a deep Raman spectroscopy concept, and its implementation leads to considerable enhancement of detected Raman photon rates. In the past, the enhancement concept was demonstrated with a variety of samples (pharmaceutical tablets, tissue, etc) but it was not systematically characterized with biological tissues. In this study, we investigate the enhancing properties of the photon diode in the transmission Raman geometry as a function of: a) the depth and b) the optical properties of tissue samples. Liquid tissue phantoms were employed to facilitate systematic variation of optical properties. These were chosen to mimic optical properties of human tissues, including breast and prostate. The obtained results evidence that a photon diode can enhance Raman signals of tissues by a maximum of × 2.4, although it can also decrease the signals created towards the back of samples that exhibit high scattering or absorption properties. PMID:27375932

  6. Isolation and identification of bacteria by means of Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pahlow, Susanne; Meisel, Susann; Cialla-May, Dana; Weber, Karina; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-07-15

    Bacterial detection is a highly topical research area, because various fields of application will benefit from the progress being made. Consequently, new and innovative strategies which enable the investigation of complex samples, like body fluids or food stuff, and improvements regarding the limit of detection are of general interest. Within this review the prospects of Raman spectroscopy as a reliable tool for identifying bacteria in complex samples are discussed. The main emphasis of this work is on important aspects of applying Raman spectroscopy for the detection of bacteria like sample preparation and the identification process. Several approaches for a Raman compatible isolation of bacterial cells have been developed and applied to different matrices. Here, an overview of the limitations and possibilities of these methods is provided. Furthermore, the utilization of Raman spectroscopy for diagnostic purposes, food safety and environmental issues is discussed under a critical view. PMID:25895619

  7. Ultrafast and nonlinear surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gruenke, Natalie L; Cardinal, M Fernanda; McAnally, Michael O; Frontiera, Renee R; Schatz, George C; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2016-04-21

    Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has the potential to study molecular dynamics near plasmonic surfaces to better understand plasmon-mediated chemical reactions such as plasmonically-enhanced photocatalytic or photovoltaic processes. This review discusses the combination of ultrafast Raman spectroscopic techniques with plasmonic substrates for high temporal resolution, high sensitivity, and high spatial resolution vibrational spectroscopy. First, we introduce background information relevant to ultrafast SERS: the mechanisms of surface enhancement in Raman scattering, the characterization of plasmonic materials with ultrafast techniques, and early complementary techniques to study molecule-plasmon interactions. We then discuss recent advances in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies with ultrafast pulses with a focus on the study of molecule-plasmon coupling and molecular dynamics with high sensitivity. We also highlight the challenges faced by this field by the potential damage caused by concentrated, highly energetic pulsed fields in plasmonic hotspots, and finally the potential for future ultrafast SERS studies. PMID:26848784

  8. Raman spectroscopy for label-free identification of calciphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, William R; Agarwal, Shailesh; Nigwekar, Sagar U; Esmonde-White, Karen; Loder, Shawn; Fagan, Shawn; Goverman, Jeremy; Olsen, Bjorn R; Jumlongras, Dolrudee; Morris, Michael D; Levi, Benjamin

    2015-08-01

    Calciphylaxis is a painful, debilitating, and premorbid condition, which presents as calcified vasculature and soft tissues. Traditional diagnosis of calciphylaxis lesions requires an invasive biopsy, which is destructive, time consuming, and often leads to exacerbation of the condition and infection. Furthermore, it is difficult to find small calcifications within a large wound bed. To address this need, a noninvasive diagnostic tool may help clinicians identify ectopic calcified mineral and determine the disease margin. We propose Raman spectroscopy as a rapid, point-of-care, noninvasive, and label-free technology to detect calciphylaxis mineral. Debrided calciphylactic tissue was collected from six patients and assessed by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). Micro-CT confirmed extensive deposits in three specimens, which were subsequently examined with Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra confirmed that deposits were consistent with carbonated apatite, consistent with the literature. Raman spectroscopy shows potential as a noninvasive technique to detect calciphylaxis in a clinical environment. PMID:26263412

  9. Raman spectroscopy for label-free identification of calciphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, William R.; Agarwal, Shailesh; Nigwekar, Sagar U.; Esmonde-White, Karen; Loder, Shawn; Fagan, Shawn; Goverman, Jeremy; Olsen, Bjorn R.; Jumlongras, Dolrudee; Morris, Michael D.; Levi, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Calciphylaxis is a painful, debilitating, and premorbid condition, which presents as calcified vasculature and soft tissues. Traditional diagnosis of calciphylaxis lesions requires an invasive biopsy, which is destructive, time consuming, and often leads to exacerbation of the condition and infection. Furthermore, it is difficult to find small calcifications within a large wound bed. To address this need, a noninvasive diagnostic tool may help clinicians identify ectopic calcified mineral and determine the disease margin. We propose Raman spectroscopy as a rapid, point-of-care, noninvasive, and label-free technology to detect calciphylaxis mineral. Debrided calciphylactic tissue was collected from six patients and assessed by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). Micro-CT confirmed extensive deposits in three specimens, which were subsequently examined with Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra confirmed that deposits were consistent with carbonated apatite, consistent with the literature. Raman spectroscopy shows potential as a noninvasive technique to detect calciphylaxis in a clinical environment. PMID:26263412

  10. In situ cell cycle phase determination using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Yusuke; Takenaka, Tatsuji; Sato, Hidetoshi; Furihata, Chie

    2010-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for analysis of the chemical composition in living tissue and cells without destructive processes such as fixation, immunostaining, and fluorescence labeling. Raman microspectroscopic technique enables us to obtain a high quality spectrum from a single living cell. We demonstrated in situ cell cycle analysis with Raman microspectroscopy with the excitation wavelength of 532 nm. Cell cycle phases, G0/G1 and G2/M were able to be identified in the present study. The result of in situ Raman analysis was evaluated with flow cytometry analysis. Although the Raman spectra of living cells showed complex patterns during cell cycle, several Raman bands could be useful as markers for the cell cycle identification. A single cell analysis using Raman microspectroscopy predicted a possibility to observe directly molecular dynamics intracellular molecules of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Our current study focused on cytoplasm region and resonant Raman signals of cytochrome c in mitochondrion, and discussed how the Raman signals from cellular components contribute to the Raman spectral changes in cell cycle change in the human living cell (lung cancer cell).

  11. Cavity Enhanced Ultrafast Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Thomas K.; Reber, Melanie Roberts; Chen, Yuning

    2015-06-01

    Ultrafast spectroscopy on gas phase systems is typically restricted to techniques involving photoionization, whereas solution phase experiments utilize the detection of light. At Stony Brook, we are developing new techniques for performing femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy using frequency combs and high-finesse optical resonators. A large detection sensitivity enhancement over traditional methods enables the extension of all-optical ultrafast spectroscopies, such as broad-band transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) and 2D spectroscopy, to dilute gas phase samples produced in molecular beams. Here, gas phase data can be directly compared to solution phase data. Initial demonstration experiments are focusing on the photodissociation of iodine in small neutral argon clusters, where cluster size strongly influences the effects solvent-caging and geminate recombination. I will discuss these initial results, our high power home-built Yb:fiber laser systems, and also extensions of the methods to the mid-IR to study the vibrational dynamics of hydrogen bonded clusters.

  12. A versatile femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy setup with tunable pulses in the visible to near infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Liangdong; Liu, Weimin; Fang, Chong

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate a versatile and efficient setup to perform femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS). Technical innovations are implemented to achieve the wavelength tunability for both the picosecond narrowband Raman pump pulse and femtosecond broadband Raman probe pulse. Using a simplified one-grating scheme in a home-built second harmonic bandwidth compressor followed by a two-stage noncollinear optical parametric amplifier, we tune the Raman pump pulse from ca. 480 to 750 nm. To generate the suitable Raman probe pulse in tandem, we rely on our recently demonstrated broadband up-converted multicolor array technique that readily provides tunable broadband laser sidebands across the visible to near-infrared range. This unique setup has unparalleled flexibility for conducting FSRS. We measure the ground-state Raman spectra of a cyclohexane standard using tunable pump-probe pairs at various wavelengths across the visible region. The best spectral resolution is ∼12 cm{sup −1}. By tuning the pump wavelength closer to the electronic absorption band of a photoacid pyranine in water, we observe the pre-resonantly enhanced Raman signal. The stimulated Raman gain of the 1627 cm{sup −1} mode is increased by over 15 times.

  13. Application of Raman spectroscopy technology to studying Sudan I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Guoping; Chen, Chen

    2006-06-01

    Being an industrial dye, the Sudan I may have a toxic effect after oral intake on the body, and has recently been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice and rabbits. Because China and some other countries have detected the Sudan I in samples of the hot chilli powder and the chilli products, it is necessary to study the characteristics of this dye. As one kind of molecule scattering spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy is characterized by the frequency excursion caused by interactions of molecules and photons. The frequency excursion reflects the margin between certain two vibrational or rotational energy states, and shows the information of the molecule. Because Raman spectroscopy can provides quick, easy, reproducible, and non-destructive analysis, both qualitative and quantitative, with no sample preparation required, Raman spectroscopy has been a particularly promising technique for analyzing the characteristics and structures of molecules, especially organic ones. Now, it has a broad application in biological, chemical, environmental and industrial applications. This paper firstly introduces Sudan I dye and the Raman spectroscopy technology, and then describes its application to the Sudan I. Secondly, the fingerprint spectra of the Sudan I are respectively assigned and analyzed in detail. Finally, the conclusion that the Raman spectroscopy technology is a powerful tool to determine the Sudan I is drawn.

  14. Raman spectroscopy of carboranes and polycarboranesiloxanes

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Raman spectra of some m-carboranesiloxane polymers are compared with each other and with the spectrum of o-carborane and boron carbide. The comparisons and additional polarization studies allow the assignment of some vibrations to the icosahedral 1,7-dicarboranyl units, siloxy polymer connecting units, and substituent groups of the silicon atoms. The Raman investigation is directed toward understanding the interaction of carborane icosahedral units of boron-carbide semiconductor materials.

  15. In situ Raman spectroscopy for growth monitoring of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes in plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Labbaye, T.; Gaillard, M.; Lecas, T.; Kovacevic, E.; Boulmer-Leborgne, Ch.; Guimbretière, G.; Canizarès, A.; Raimboux, N.; Simon, P.; Ammar, M. R.; Strunskus, T.

    2014-11-24

    Portable and highly sensitive Raman setup was associated with a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor enabling in situ growth monitoring of multi-wall carbon nanotubes despite the combination of huge working distance, high growth speed and process temperature and reactive plasma condition. Near Edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was used for ex situ sample analysis as a complementary method to in situ Raman spectroscopy. The results confirmed the fact that the “alternating” method developed here can accurately be used for in situ Raman monitoring under reactive plasma condition. The original analytic tool can be of great importance to monitor the characteristics of these nanostructured materials and readily define the ultimate conditions for targeted results.

  16. Detection and quantitative analysis of chemical species in Hanford tank materials using Raman spectroscopy technology: FY94, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Vickers, T.J.; Mann, C.

    1995-09-12

    This report provides a summary of work completed in FY-94 by FSU to develop and investigate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy with Hanford tank waste materials. Raman performance impacts from sample morphology, including the effects of absorption, particle size, density, color and refractive index, are discussed. An algorithm for relative species concentration measurement from Raman data is presented. An Algorithm for applying Raman to tank waste core screening is presented and discussed. A library of absorption and Raman spectra are presented that support this work.

  17. Evaluation of thyroid tissue by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, C. S. B.; Bitar, R. A.; Santos, A. B. O.; Kulcsar, M. A. V.; Friguglietti, C. U. M.; Martinho, H. S.; da Costa, R. B.; Martin, A. A.

    2010-02-01

    Thyroid gland is a small gland in the neck consisting of two lobes connected by an isthmus. Thyroid's main function is to produce the hormones thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3) and calcitonin. Thyroid disorders can disturb the production of these hormones, which will affect numerous processes within the body such as: regulating metabolism and increasing utilization of cholesterol, fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. The gland itself can also be injured; for example, neoplasias, which have been considered the most important, causing damage of to the gland and are difficult to diagnose. There are several types of thyroid cancer: Papillary, Follicular, Medullary, and Anaplastic. The occurrence rate, in general is between 4 and 7%; which is on the increase (30%), probably due to new technology that is able to find small thyroid cancers that may not have been found previously. The most common method used for thyroid diagnoses are: anamnesis, ultrasonography, and laboratory exams (Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy- FNAB). However, the sensitivity of those test are rather poor, with a high rate of false-negative results, therefore there is an urgent need to develop new diagnostic techniques. Raman spectroscopy has been presented as a valuable tool for cancer diagnosis in many different tissues. In this work, 27 fragments of the thyroid were collected from 18 patients, comprising the following histologic groups: goitre adjacent tissue, goitre nodular tissue, follicular adenoma, follicular carcinoma, and papillary carcinoma. Spectral collection was done with a commercial FTRaman Spectrometer (Bruker RFS100/S) using a 1064 nm laser excitation and Ge detector. Principal Component Analysis, Cluster Analysis, and Linear Discriminant Analysis with cross-validation were applied as spectral classification algorithm. Comparing the goitre adjacent tissue with the goitre nodular region, an index of 58.3% of correct classification was obtained. Between goitre (nodular region and

  18. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and near-field polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yuika; Mino, Toshihiro; Verma, Prabhat

    2015-12-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is a powerful tool for High-resolution Raman spectroscopy. In this method, a metal coated nano-tip acts as a plasmonic antenna to enhance the originally weak Raman scattering from a nanometric volume of a sample. The technique enables to detect Raman scattering light from nano-scale area and also enhance the light intensity with combination of near-filed light and localized surface plasmon generated at a metallized tip apex. Nowadays TERS is used to investigate various nano-scale samples, for examples, carbon nanotubes, graphenes DNA and biomaterials. As the TERS developed, there is high demand to investigate the properties of near-field light e.g. polarization properties. We have analyzed the polarization properties of near-field light in TERS and successfully realized the quantitative nano-imaging by visible light.

  19. Anisotropic Raman Spectroscopy of Few-Layer Phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yuchen; Wu, Wangran; Maassen, Jesse; Luo, Zhe; Lundstrom, Mark; Xu, Xianfan; Ye, Peide

    Much recent research of black phosphorus (BP) and phosphorene has been focused on their unique anisotropy of this novel 2D material in terms of electrical, optical and thermal properties. Here we report the emerging Raman spectroscopy measurements of BP with respect to its isolation from bulk BP down to single layer phosphorene. The found frequency shift of BP in Raman spectra is to be correlated with atomic motion of modes, which can be explained by applying classical model of coupled harmonic oscillators. Raman intensity of different modes has also been included in our studies, which is confirmed as a solid strategy to quickly determine BP layer thickness. In addition, more information of their mechanical properties can also be obtained from Raman spectroscopy. The work was supported in part by NSF ECCS-1449270, NSF/AFOSR EFRI 2DARE Program, and ARO W911NF-15-1-0574.

  20. Remote cure monitoring of polymeric resins by laser Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, K.C.; Vess, T.M.; Lyon, R.E.; Myrick, M.L.

    1993-05-01

    The validity of using Raman spectroscopy to monitor the cure chemistries of amine-cured epoxy is demonstrated by correlating NIR absorbance measurements with Raman measurements for a concentration series of bisphenol-A diglycidylether in its own reaction product with diethylamine. The intensity of a normalized Raman peak at 1240 cm{sup {minus}l}, assigned to the epoxide functionality, was found to be linearly related to the concentration of epoxide groups in the resin mixtures. Also, it is shown that the Ciba-Geigy Matrimid 5292 system can be monitored by ex-situ FT-Raman spectroscopy by observing changes in the carbonyl stretching (1773 cm{sup {minus}1}) or the C=C stretching of maleimide (1587 cm{sup {minus}1}) during the cure reaction.

  1. Monitoring the influence of antibiotic exposure using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samek, Ota; Zemanek, Pavel; Bernatova, Silvie; Jezek, Jan; Sery, Mojmir; Jakl, Petr; Siler, Martin; Ruzicka, Filip

    2014-03-01

    Here we report on combination of the data obtained from MICs (minimum inhibitory concentrations) with infor- mation of microoragnisms fingerprint provided by Raman spectroscopy. In our feasibility study we could follow mechanisms of the bacteriostatic versus bactericidal action on biofilm-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis simply by monitoring Raman bands corresponding to DNA translating the changes introduced by selected antibiotics. The Raman spectra of Staphylococcus epidermidis treated with a bacteriostatic agent show little effect on DNA which is in contrast with the action of a bactericidal agent where decreased in dedicated Raman spectra signal strength suggests DNA fragmentation. Moreover, we demonstrate that Raman tweezers are indeed able to distinguish strains of biofilm-forming (biofilm-positive) and biofilm-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis strains using principal component analysis (PCA).

  2. Proximal and point detection of contaminated surfaces using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guicheteau, Jason A.; Christesen, Steven D.; Tripathi, Ashish; Emmons, Erik D.; Wilcox, Phillip G.; Emge, Darren K.; Pardoe, Ian J.; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-11-01

    We are actively investigating the use of Raman spectroscopy for proximal standoff detection of chemicals and explosive materials on surfaces. These studies include Raman Chemical Imaging of contaminated fingerprints for forensic attribution and the assessments of commercial handheld or portable Raman instruments operating with near-infrared (IR) as well as ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation specifically developed for on-the-move reconnaissance of chemical contamination. As part of these efforts, we have measured the Raman cross sections of chemical agents, toxic industrial chemicals, and explosives from the UV to NIR. We have also measured and modeled the effect interrogation angle has on the Raman return from droplets on man-made surfaces. Realistic droplet distributions have been modeled and tested against variations in surface scan patterns and laser spot size for determining the optimum scan characteristics for detection of relevant surface contamination.

  3. Quantitative detection of astaxanthin and cantaxanthin in Atlantic salmon by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2006-02-01

    Two major carotenoids species found in salmonids muscle tissues are astaxanthin and cantaxanthin. They are taken up from fish food and are responsible for the attractive red-orange color of salmon filet. Since carotenoids are powerful antioxidants and biomarkers of nutrient consumption, they are thought to indicate fish health and resistance to diseases in fish farm environments. Therefore, a rapid, accurate, quantitative optical technique for measuring carotenoid content in salmon tissues is of economic interest. We demonstrate the possibility of using fast, selective, quantitative detection of astaxanthin and cantaxanthin in salmon muscle tissues, employing resonance Raman spectroscopy. Analyzing strong Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the carotenoid molecules under blue laser excitation, we are able to characterize quantitatively the concentrations of carotenoids in salmon muscle tissue. To validate the technique, we compared Raman data with absorption measurements of carotenoid extracts in acetone. A close correspondence was observed in absorption spectra for tissue extract in acetone and a pure astaxanthin solution. Raman results show a linear dependence between Raman and absorption data. The proposed technique holds promise as a method of rapid screening of carotenoid levels in fish muscle tissues and may be attractive for the fish farm industry to assess the dietary status of salmon, risk for infective diseases, and product quality control.

  4. Single bacteria identification by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Strola, Samy Andrea; Baritaux, Jean-Charles; Schultz, Emmanuelle; Simon, Anne Catherine; Allier, Cédric; Espagnon, Isabelle; Jary, Dorothée; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    We report on rapid identification of single bacteria using a low-cost, compact, Raman spectroscope. We demonstrate that a 60-s procedure is sufficient to acquire a comprehensive Raman spectrum in the range of 600 to 3300 cm⁻¹. This time includes localization of small bacteria aggregates, alignment on a single individual, and spontaneous Raman scattering signal collection. Fast localization of small bacteria aggregates, typically composed of less than a dozen individuals, is achieved by lensfree imaging over a large field of view of 24 mm². The lensfree image also allows precise alignment of a single bacteria with the probing beam without the need for a standard microscope. Raman scattered light from a 34-mW continuous laser at 532 nm was fed to a customized spectrometer (prototype Tornado Spectral Systems). Owing to the high light throughput of this spectrometer, integration times as low as 10 s were found acceptable. We have recorded a total of 1200 spectra over seven bacterial species. Using this database and an optimized preprocessing, classification rates of ~90% were obtained. The speed and sensitivity of our Raman spectrometer pave the way for high-throughput and nondestructive real-time bacteria identification assays. This compact and low-cost technology can benefit biomedical, clinical diagnostic, and environmental applications. PMID:25028774

  5. Single Molecule Raman Spectroscopy Under High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuanxi; Dlott, Dana

    2014-06-01

    Pressure effects on surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra of Rhdoamine 6G adsorbed on silver nanoparticle surfaces was studied using a confocal Raman microscope. Colloidal silver nanoparticles were treated with Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and its isotopically substituted partner, R6G-d4. Mixed isotopomers let us identify single-molecule spectra, since multiple-molecule spectra would show vibrational transitions from both species. The nanoparticles were embedded into a poly vinyl alcohol film, and loaded into a diamond anvil cell for the high-pressure Raman scattering measurement. Argon was the pressure medium. Ambient pressure Raman scattering spectra showed few single-molecule spectra. At moderately high pressure ( 1GPa), a surprising effect was observed. The number of sites with observable spectra decreased dramatically, and most of the spectra that could be observed were due to single molecules. The effects of high pressure suppressed the multiple-molecule Raman sites, leaving only the single-molecule sites to be observed.

  6. Laser Thomson Scattering, Raman Scattering and laser-absorption diagnostics of high pressure microdischarges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Vincent M.; Belostotskiy, Sergey G.; Economou, Demetre J.; Sadeghi, Nader

    2010-05-01

    Laser scattering experiments were performed in high pressure (100s of Torr) parallel-plate, slot-type DC microdischarges operating in argon or nitrogen. Laser Thomson Scattering (LTS) and Rotational Raman Scattering were employed in a novel, backscattering, confocal configuration. LTS allows direct and simultaneous measurement of both electron density (ne) and electron temperature (Te). For 50 mA current and over the pressure range of 300 - 700 Torr, LTS yielded Te = 0.9 ± 0.3 eV and ne = (6 ± 3)·1013 cm-3, in reasonable agreement with the predictions of a mathematical model. Rotational Raman spectroscopy (RRS) was employed for absolute calibration of the LTS signal. RRS was also applied to measure the 3D gas temperature (Tg) in nitrogen DC microdischarges. In addition, diode laser absorption spectroscopy was employed to measure the density of argon metastables (1s5 in Paschen notations) in argon microdischarges. The gas temperature, extracted from the width of the absorption profile, was compared with Tg values obtained by optical emission spectroscopy.

  7. Identification and discrimination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutis, Edward; Szymanski, Paul; Applin, Daniel; Goltz, Douglas

    2016-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely present throughout the Solar System and beyond. They have been implicated as a contributor to unidentified infrared emission bands in the interstellar medium, comprise a substantial portion of the insoluble organic matter in carbonaceous chondrites, are expected stable components of organic matter on Mars, and are present in a wide range of terrestrial hydrocarbons and as components of biomolecules. However, PAH structures can be very complicated, making their identification challenging. Raman spectroscopy is known to be especially sensitive to the highly polarizable C-C and C=C bonds found in PAHs, and therefore, can be a powerful tool for PAH structural and compositional elucidation. This study examined Raman spectra of 48 different PAHs to determine the degree to which Raman spectroscopy could be used to uniquely identify different species, factors that control the positions of major Raman peaks, the degree to which induced fluorescence affects the intensity of Raman peaks, its usefulness for PAH discrimination, and the effects of varying excitation wavelength on some PAH Raman spectra. It was found that the arrangement and composition of phenyl (benzene) rings, and the type and position of functional groups can greatly affect fluorescence, positions and intensities of Raman peaks associated with the PAH backbone, and the introduction of new Raman peaks. Among the functional groups found on many of the PAHs that were analyzed, only a few Raman peaks corresponding to the molecular vibrations of these groups could be clearly distinguished. Comparison of the PAH Raman spectra that were acquired with both 532 and 785 nm excitation found that the longer wavelength resulted in reduced fluorescence, consistent with previous studies.

  8. Raman Spectroscopy Analysis Of Mechanical Stress Near Cu-TSVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Wolf, Ingrid

    2011-09-01

    This paper discusses Raman spectroscopy measurements of stress near Cu-TSVs (Through Silicon Vias) used in 3D stacking of thinned chips. It discusses the resolution and penetration depth of the technique and the relation between the measured Raman shift and stress. Using a simple model, the various stress components near TSVs are discussed and the relation between the measured Raman shift and these stress components is analyzed. Results obtained on TSVs with nearby shallow-trench isolation, with different Cu chemistry, with and without SiO2 layer on top, and with different aspect ratio are discussed and analyzed using the simple model.

  9. Pharmaceutical Analysis from Start to Finish by Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Michael; Smith, Wayne; Patient, Michael; Farquharson, Stuart

    2010-08-01

    During the past decade Raman spectroscopy has become a widely used analytical tool in the laboratory, process environment and on-line. This is largely due to the fact that virtually every chemical produces a unique Raman signature, sample preparation is generally not required, and analyses can be performed in 1 minute or less. This presentation will describe the value of fluorescent free and x-axis stable Raman spectra in confirming the identity of raw materials, tracking reaction kinetics during drug discovery and product synthesis, monitoring and controlling batch and continuous feed reactors, and determining product properties using chemometrics.

  10. Raman spectroscopy of polyhedral carbon nano-onions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codorniu Pujals, Daniel; Arias de Fuentes, Olimpia; Desdín García, Luis F.; Cazzanelli, Enzo; Caputi, Lorenzo S.

    2015-09-01

    The Raman spectra of polyhedral carbon nano-onions (PCO), obtained by underwater arc discharge of graphite electrodes, are studied. While the general Raman spectrum of PCO is very similar to those of other carbon nanostructures, including spherical nano-onions, the fine structure of the G and 2D bands gives valuable information that allows using Raman spectroscopy for differentiating the PCO from other carbon structures. The interpretation of the features of the fine structure of the spectra is supported by evidences obtained by TEM.

  11. Raman spectroscopy of blood in-vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva-Luna, A. E.; Castro-Ramos, J.; Vazquez-Montiel, S.; Flores-Gil, A.; Ortiz-Lima, C. M.; Delgado-Atencio, J. A.

    2012-03-01

    We present Raman spectra from a sample of 8 volunteers that have different type of blood. The experimental data were carried out using a 785 nm excitation laser and an ocean optics spectrometer of 6 cm-1 resolution, with a used spectral region from 1000 to 1800 cm-1. We find Raman features at 1000 and 1542 cm-1 regarded with hemoglobin and its derivatives. Also we find Raman features at 1248 and 1342 cm-1 that are now regarded with pure fibrin. In this work, we use Principal Component analysis (PCA) to determine all variations of our samples, which allows us to define a classification of the influence of the blood type. Finally, we found vibrational lines of cholesterol, glucose and triglycerides that are reported in literature.

  12. Raman spectroscopy of vapors at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laane, Jaan; Haller, Kristjan; Sakurai, Sachie; Morris, Kevin; Autrey, Daniel; Arp, Zane; Chiang, Whe-Yi; Combs, Amanda

    2003-05-01

    The most effective way to obtain high quality vapor-phase Raman spectra is to heat the samples to increase their vapor pressure. Many samples can be heated to 350 °C and higher without decomposition. We have designed a simple Raman cell to allow these high temperature studies to be carried out. The high-temperature Raman spectra of nine molecules will be presented and discussed. Most of these are non-rigid molecules containing aromatic rings for which vibrational potential energy surfaces have been determined from their spectra. Two molecules ( p-cresol and 3-methylindole) are model compounds for amino acids and their vapor-phase spectra are characteristic of environments with no hydrogen bonding.

  13. Differentiation of lipsticks by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Salahioglu, Fatma; Went, Michael J

    2012-11-30

    Dispersive Raman spectra have been obtained using a Raman microscope and an excitation wavelength of 632.8 nm from 69 lipsticks of various colours and from a range of manufacturers without any pre-treatment of the samples. 10% of the samples were too fluorescent to give Raman spectra. 22% of the samples gave spectra which were unique to the brand and colour within the collected sample set. The remaining 68% of the samples gave spectra which could be classified into seven distinct groups. Discrimination of red lipsticks by this technique was the most difficult. The spectra of deposited lipstick samples remained unchanged over a period of a least a year. PMID:22959771

  14. Detection of Sphingomyelin Clusters by Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shirota, Koichiro; Yagi, Kiyoshi; Inaba, Takehiko; Li, Pai-Chi; Murata, Michio; Sugita, Yuji; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2016-09-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM) is a major sphingolipid in mammalian cells that forms specific lipid domains in combination with cholesterol (Chol). Using molecular-dynamics simulation and density functional theory calculation, we identified a characteristic Raman band of SM at ∼1643 cm(-1) as amide I of the SM cluster. Experimental results indicate that this band is sensitive to the hydration of SM and the presence of Chol. We showed that this amide I Raman band can be utilized to examine the membrane distribution of SM. Similarly to SM, ceramide phosphoethanolamine (CerPE) exhibited an amide I Raman band in almost the same region, although CerPE lacks three methyl groups in the phosphocholine moiety of SM. In contrast to SM, the amide I band of CerPE was not affected by Chol, suggesting the importance of the methyl groups of SM in the SM-Chol interaction. PMID:27602727

  15. Power Budget Analysis for Waveguide-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zilong; Pearce, Stuart J; Lin, Yung-Chun; Zervas, Michalis N; Bartlett, Philip N; Wilkinson, James S

    2016-08-01

    Waveguide-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (WERS) is emerging as an attractive alternative to plasmonic surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy approaches as it can provide more reproducible quantitative spectra on a robust chip without the need for nanostructured plasmonic materials. Realizing portable WERS systems with high sensitivity using low-cost laser diodes and compact spectrometers requires a detailed analysis of the power budget from laser to spectrometer chip. In this paper, we describe theoretical optimization of planar waveguides for maximum Raman excitation efficiency, demonstrate WERS for toluene on a silicon process compatible high index contrast tantalum pentoxide waveguide, measure the absolute conversion efficiency from pump power to received power in an individual Raman line, and compare this with a power budget analysis of the complete system including collection with an optical fiber and interfacing to a compact spectrometer. Optimized 110 nm thick Ta2O5 waveguides on silica substrates excited at a wavelength of 637 nm are shown experimentally to yield overall system power conversion efficiency of ∼0.5 × 10(-12) from the pump power in the waveguide to the collected Raman power in the 1002 cm(-1) Raman line of toluene, in comparison with a calculated efficiency of 3.9 × 10(-12) Collection efficiency is dictated by the numerical and physical apertures of the spectral detection system but may be improved by further engineering the spatial and angular Raman scattering distributions. PMID:27301326

  16. Fiber-optic Raman Spectroscopy of Joint Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Esmonde-White, Francis W.L.; Morris, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we report adaptation of Raman spectroscopy for arthroscopy of joint tissues using a custom-built fiber optic probe. Differentiation of healthy and damaged tissue or examination of subsurface tissue, such as subchondral bone, is a challenge in arthroscopy because visual inspection may not provide sufficient contrast. Discrimination of healthy versus damaged tissue may be improved by incorporating point spectroscopy or hyperspectral imaging into arthroscopy where contrast is based on molecular structure or chemical composition. Articular joint surfaces of knee cadaveric human tissue and tissue phantoms were examined using a custom-designed Raman fiber optic probe. Fiber-optic Raman spectra were compared against reference spectra of cartilage, subchondral bone and cancellous bone collected using Raman microspectroscopy. In fiber-optic Raman spectra of the articular surface, there was an effect of cartilage thickness on recovery of signal from subchondral bone. At sites with intact cartilage, the bone mineralization ratio decreased but there was a minimal effect in the bone mineral chemistry ratios. Tissue phantoms were prepared as experimental models of the osteochondral interface. Raman spectra of tissue phantoms suggested that optical scattering of cartilage has a large effect on the relative cartilage and bone signal. Finite element analysis modeling of light fluence in the osteochondral interface confirmed experimental findings in human cadaveric tissue and tissue phantoms. These first studies demonstrate proof of principle for Raman arthroscopic measurement of joint tissues and provide a basis for future clinical or animal model studies. PMID:21359366

  17. Surface and waveguide collection of Raman emission in waveguide-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zilong; Zervas, Michalis N; Bartlett, Philip N; Wilkinson, James S

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate Raman spectroscopy on a high index thin film tantalum pentoxide waveguide and compare collection of Raman emission from the waveguide end with that from the waveguide surface. Toluene was used as a convenient model analyte, and a 40-fold greater signal was collected from the waveguide end. Simulations of angular and spatial Raman emission distributions showed good agreement with experiments, with the enhancement resulting from efficient collection of power from dipoles near the surface into the high-index waveguide film and substrate, combined with long interaction length. The waveguide employed was optimized at the excitation wavelength but not at emission wavelengths, and full optimization is expected to lead to enhancements comparable to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in robust low-cost metal-free and nanostructure-free chips. PMID:27607994

  18. The substrate matters in the Raman spectroscopy analysis of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikoliunaite, Lina; Rodriguez, Raul D.; Sheremet, Evgeniya; Kolchuzhin, Vladimir; Mehner, Jan; Ramanavicius, Arunas; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful analytical method that allows deposited and/or immobilized cells to be evaluated without complex sample preparation or labeling. However, a main limitation of Raman spectroscopy in cell analysis is the extremely weak Raman intensity that results in low signal to noise ratios. Therefore, it is important to seize any opportunity that increases the intensity of the Raman signal and to understand whether and how the signal enhancement changes with respect to the substrate used. Our experimental results show clear differences in the spectroscopic response from cells on different surfaces. This result is partly due to the difference in spatial distribution of electric field at the substrate/cell interface as shown by numerical simulations. We found that the substrate also changes the spatial location of maximum field enhancement around the cells. Moreover, beyond conventional flat surfaces, we introduce an efficient nanostructured silver substrate that largely enhances the Raman signal intensity from a single yeast cell. This work contributes to the field of vibrational spectroscopy analysis by providing a fresh look at the significance of the substrate for Raman investigations in cell research.

  19. The substrate matters in the Raman spectroscopy analysis of cells

    PubMed Central

    Mikoliunaite, Lina; Rodriguez, Raul D.; Sheremet, Evgeniya; Kolchuzhin, Vladimir; Mehner, Jan; Ramanavicius, Arunas; Zahn, Dietrich R.T.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful analytical method that allows deposited and/or immobilized cells to be evaluated without complex sample preparation or labeling. However, a main limitation of Raman spectroscopy in cell analysis is the extremely weak Raman intensity that results in low signal to noise ratios. Therefore, it is important to seize any opportunity that increases the intensity of the Raman signal and to understand whether and how the signal enhancement changes with respect to the substrate used. Our experimental results show clear differences in the spectroscopic response from cells on different surfaces. This result is partly due to the difference in spatial distribution of electric field at the substrate/cell interface as shown by numerical simulations. We found that the substrate also changes the spatial location of maximum field enhancement around the cells. Moreover, beyond conventional flat surfaces, we introduce an efficient nanostructured silver substrate that largely enhances the Raman signal intensity from a single yeast cell. This work contributes to the field of vibrational spectroscopy analysis by providing a fresh look at the significance of the substrate for Raman investigations in cell research. PMID:26310910

  20. Biomedical Tissue Phantoms with Controlled Geometric and Optical Properties for Raman Spectroscopy and Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Esmonde-White, Francis W.L.; Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Kole, Matthew R.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    To support the translation of Raman spectroscopy into clinical applications, synthetic models are needed to accurately test, optimize and validate prototype fiber optic instrumentation. Synthetic models (also called tissue phantoms) are widely used for developing and testing optical instrumentation for diffuse reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopies. While existing tissue phantoms accurately model tissue optical scattering and absorption, they do not typically model the anatomic shapes and chemical composition of tissue. Because Raman spectroscopy is sensitive to molecular composition, Raman tissue phantoms should also approximate the bulk tissue composition. We describe the fabrication and characterization of tissue phantoms for Raman tomography and spectroscopy. These phantoms have controlled chemical and optical properties, and also multilayer morphologies which approximate the appropriate anatomic shapes. Tissue phantoms were fabricated to support on-going Raman studies by simulating human wrist and rat leg. Surface meshes (triangle patch models) were generated from computed tomography (CT) images of a human arm and rat leg. Rapid prototyping was used to print mold templates with complex geometric patterns. Plastic casting techniques used for movie special effects were adapted to fabricate molds from the rapid prototypes, and finally to cast multilayer gelatin tissue phantoms. The gelatin base was enriched with additives to model the approximate chemistry and optical properties of individual tissue layers. Additional studies were performed to determine optimal casting conditions, phantom stability, layer delamination and chemical diffusion between layers. Recovery of diffuse reflectance and Raman spectra in tissue phantoms varied with probe placement. These phantoms enable optimization of probe placement for human or rat studies. These multilayer tissue phantoms with complex geometries are shown to be stable, with minimal layer delamination and

  1. Dengue blood analysis by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, A.; Anwar, S.; Firdous, S.; Ahmed, M.; Rasheed, R.; Nawaz, M.

    2012-06-01

    In this work Raman spectra of normal and dengue infected serum and whole blood were analyzed. In normal whole blood and serum characteristic peaks were observed when excited at 442 and 532 nm. In dengue whole blood and serum all peaks found to be blue shifted with reduced Raman intensity. Dengue whole blood and serum shows two peaks at 1614 and 1750 cm-1 which are due to presence of Immunoglobulin antibodies IgG and IgM. Whole study provides a route of information for diagnosis of dengue viral infection.

  2. Metallized Capillaries as Probes for Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, Michael

    2003-01-01

    A class of miniature probes has been proposed to supplant the fiber-optic probes used heretofore in some Raman and fluorescence spectroscopic systems. A probe according to the proposal would include a capillary tube coated with metal on its inside to make it reflective. A microlens would be hermetically sealed onto one end of the tube. A spectroscopic probe head would contain a single such probe, which would both deliver laser light to a sample and collect Raman or fluorescent light emitted by the sample.

  3. Two-dimensional Raman-terahertz spectroscopy of water

    PubMed Central

    Savolainen, Janne; Ahmed, Saima; Hamm, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional Raman-terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is presented as a multidimensional spectroscopy directly in the far-IR regime. The method is used to explore the dynamics of the collective intermolecular modes of liquid water at ambient temperatures that emerge from the hydrogen-bond networks water forming. Two-dimensional Raman-THz spectroscopy interrogates these modes twice and as such can elucidate couplings and inhomogeneities of the various degrees of freedoms. An echo in the 2D Raman-THz response is indeed identified, indicating that a heterogeneous distribution of hydrogen-bond networks exists, albeit only on a very short 100-fs timescale. This timescale appears to be too short to be compatible with more extended, persistent structures assumed within a two-state model of water. PMID:24297930

  4. Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) As Next Generation Nonlinear LIDAR Spectroscopy and Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2009-07-10

    Nonlinear spectroscopy using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and femtosecond laser pulses has been successfully developed as powerful tools for chemical analysis and biological imaging. Recent developments show promising possibilities of incorporating CARS into LIDAR system for remote detection of molecular species in airborne particles. The corresponding theory is being developed to describe nonlinear scattering of a mesoscopic particle composed of complex molecules by laser pulses with arbitrary shape and spectral content. Microscopic many-body transform theory is used to compute the third order susceptibility for CARS in molecules with known absorption spectrum and vibrational modes. The theory is combined with an integral scattering formula and Mie-Lorentz formulae, giving a rigorous formalism which provides powerful numerical experimentation of CARS spectra, particularly on the variations with the laser parameters and the direction of detection.

  5. Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) As Next Generation Nonlinear LIDAR Spectroscopy and Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2009-07-01

    Nonlinear spectroscopy using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and femtosecond laser pulses has been successfully developed as powerful tools for chemical analysis and biological imaging. Recent developments show promising possibilities of incorporating CARS into LIDAR system for remote detection of molecular species in airborne particles. The corresponding theory is being developed to describe nonlinear scattering of a mesoscopic particle composed of complex molecules by laser pulses with arbitrary shape and spectral content. Microscopic many-body transform theory is used to compute the third order susceptibility for CARS in molecules with known absorption spectrum and vibrational modes. The theory is combined with an integral scattering formula and Mie-Lorentz formulae, giving a rigorous formalism which provides powerful numerical experimentation of CARS spectra, particularly on the variations with the laser parameters and the direction of detection.

  6. Development of a biofluid chemical measurement system using liquid core optical fiber Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dahu

    Near Infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy can provide compositional information about chemicals dissolved in biological fluids. The Raman intensity is proportional to the amount of chemicals. It has been developed for years as a tool to measure biofluid chemical concentrations by illuminating sample and collecting Raman intensity holding the sample in a cuvette geometry. It has been found that the Raman intensity can be enhanced by increasing the excitation and collection sample volume in a liquid core optical fiber (LCOF) geometry. In this thesis, we present a biofluid chemical concentration measurement system using LCOF Raman spectroscopy. A home-built LCOF Raman spectroscopy system designed for this purpose using 830 nm illumination is described in the thesis. The system is switchable between LCOF and traditional cuvette geometry. The system was characterized using aqueous solutions. The Raman intensities of aqueous solutions from the two geometries were compared in both theory and experiment. The results agreed well with each other. As high as 15 fold Raman enhancement was observed. The Raman spectra of biological chemicals in aqueous solution and spiked urine samples were acquired from LCOF and cuvette geometries. The concentrations were predicted using partial least squares (PLS) leave one out cross validation. The results from the two geometries were compared. Concentrations of creatinine were measured in both setups. The LCOF geometry had an advantage at shorter integration times because of Raman enhancement while the cuvette geometry gave better results at longer integration times due to a better system reproducibility. The LCOF Raman intensity varies from sample to sample with sample absorption coefficient as well as the chemical concentration. This effect can add uncertainty to the concentration measurement. Biofluid samples from multiple patients vary a lot in absorption coefficient, which could cause as much as 20% uncertainty in concentration measurement

  7. Shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy: a potential tool for outdoor measurements in precision agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiwald, Martin; Müller, André; Selbeck, Jörn; Käthner, Jana; Zude, Manuela; Fleury, Dominique; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Tränkle, Günther

    2015-06-01

    In this work we present Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy (SERDS) as a potential spectroscopic tool for outdoor measurements in precision agriculture. A dual-wavelength diode laser at 785 nm is used as an excitation light source which provides an optical power up to 100 mW in cw-operation. Both emission lines for SERDS show single mode operation with a spectral width of <= 11 pm and a spectral distance of about 10 cm-1 over the whole power range. Raman experiments on apples are carried out and show Raman signals from wax layer and β-carotene. Raman investigations under daylight conditions are performed to simulate outdoor measurements. Here, polystyrene (PS) is used as test sample. A broadband signal together with narrow absorption lines of water vapor and Fraunhofer lines of singly ionized calcium (Ca II) mask the Raman lines of PS. Only the strong Raman signal at 999 cm-1 is visible. SERDS efficiently separates the Raman signals of PS from the background signals and a 14-fold improvement of the signal-tobackground noise ratio is achieved.

  8. Characterization of uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) with Raman spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Wellons, Matthew S.

    2016-03-22

    The Raman spectrum of uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) is unambiguously characterized with multiple Raman excitation laser sources for the first time. Across different laser excitation wavelengths, UF4 demonstrates 16 distinct Raman bands within the 50-400 cm-1 region. The observed Raman bands are representative of various F-F vibrational modes. UF4 also shows intense fluorescent bands in the 325 – 750 nm spectral region. Comparison of the UF4 spectrum with the ZrF4 spectrum, its crystalline analog, demonstrates a similar Raman band structure consistent with group theory predictions for expected Raman bands. Additionally, a demonstration of combined scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and in situmore » Raman spectroscopy microanalytical measurements of UF4 particulates shows that despite the inherent weak intensity of Raman bands, identification and characterization are possible for micron-sized particulates with modern instrumentation. The published well characterized UF4 spectrum is extremely relevant to nuclear materials and nuclear safeguard applications.« less

  9. Characterization of uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) with Raman spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Wellons, Matthew S.

    2016-03-22

    The Raman spectrum of uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) is unambiguously characterized with multiple Raman excitation laser sources for the first time. Across different laser excitation wavelengths, UF4 demonstrates 16 distinct Raman bands within the 50-400 cm-1 region. The observed Raman bands are representative of various F-F vibrational modes. UF4 also shows intense fluorescent bands in the 325 – 750 nm spectral region. Comparison of the UF4 spectrum with the ZrF4 spectrum, its crystalline analog, demonstrates a similar Raman band structure consistent with group theory predictions for expected Raman bands. Additionally, a demonstration of combined scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and in situmore » Raman spectroscopy microanalytical measurements of UF4 particulates shows that despite the inherent weak intensity of Raman bands, identification and characterization are possible for micron-sized particulates with modern instrumentation. The published well characterized UF4 spectrum is extremely relevant to nuclear materials and nuclear safeguard applications.« less

  10. Absorption spectroscopy with quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosterev, A. A.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Gmachl, C.; Capasso, F.; Sivco, D. L.; Baillargeon, J. N.; Hutchinson, A. L.; Cho, A. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Novel pulsed and cw quantum cascade distributed feedback (QC-DFB) lasers operating near lambda=8 micrometers were used for detection and quantification of trace gases in ambient air by means of sensitive absorption spectroscopy. N2O, 12CH4, 13CH4, and different isotopic species of H2O were detected. Also, a highly selective detection of ethanol vapor in air with a sensitivity of 125 parts per billion by volume (ppb) was demonstrated.

  11. Raman spectroscopy of garnet-group minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mingsheng, P.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Dien, L.; Chao, E.C.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Raman spectra of the natural end members of the garnet-group minerals, which include pyrope, almandine and spessarite of Fe-Al garnet series and grossularite, andradite and uvarovite of Ca-Fe garnet series, have been studied. Measured Raman spectra of these minerals are reasonably and qualitatively assigned to the internal modes, translational and rotatory modes of SiO4 tetrahedra, as well as the translational motion of bivalent cations in the X site. The stretch and rotatory Alg modes for the Fe-Al garnet series show obvious Raman shifts as compared with those for the Ca-Fe garnet series, owing to the cations residing in the X site connected with SiO4 tetrahedra by sharing the two edges. The Raman shifts of all members within either of the series are attributed mainly to the properties of cations in the X site for the Fe-Al garnet series and in the Y site for the Ca-Fe garnet series. ?? 1994 Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  12. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlashen, Michael L.; Davis, Kevin L.; Morris, Michael D.

    1989-10-01

    The surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of neurotransmitters in biological matrices and synthetic solutions are described. The effects of protein adsorption on cathecholamine SERS intensity are discussed. Techniques for obtaining dopamine SERS spectra in cerebrospinal fluid and rat brain dialysate are demonstrated. Preliminary SERS of histamine and tel-methylhistamine are presented.

  13. Cavity-Enhanced Ultrafast Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuning; Reber, Melanie Roberts; Keleher, Kevin; Allison, Thomas K.

    2014-06-01

    We introduce cavity enhanced ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy, which employs frequency combs and high-finesse optical cavities. % The schematic of apparatus is shown in Figure 1. Sub-100 fs pulses with a repetition rate of 90 MHz are generated by a home-built Ytterbium fiber laser. The amplified light has a power up to 10 W, which is used to pump an optical parametric oscillator, followed by second-harmonic generation(SHG) that converts the wavelength from near-IR to visible. A pump comb at 530 nm is separately generated by SHG. Both pump and probe combs are coupled into high-finesse cavities. Compared to the conventional transient absorption spectroscopy method, the detection sensitivity can be improved by a factor of (F/π)^2 ˜ 10^5, where F is the finesse of cavity. This ultrasensitive technology enables the direct all-optical dynamics study in molecular beams. We will apply the cavity enhanced ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy to investigate the dynamics of visible chromophores and then extend the wavelength to mid-IR to study vibrational dynamics of small hydrogen-bonded clusters.

  14. Phase Fluctuation Absorption Spectroscopy of Small Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluckiger, David Ulrich

    The purpose of this dissertation is to establish a viable mass measurement technique for in situ aerosol. Adaptation of the photothermal effect in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer provided high mass sensitivity in an instrument employing Phase Fluctuation Laser Optical Heterodyne (PFLOH) absorption spectroscopy. The theory of aerosol absorption of electromagnetic energy and subsequent thermalization in continuum, Rayleigh regime region is presented. From this theory the general behavior of PFLOH detection of aerosol is described and shown to give a signal proportional to the absorption species mass. Furthermore the signal is shown to be linear in excitation energy and modulation frequency, and scalable. The instrument is calibrated and shown to behave as predicted. PFLOH detection is then used in determining the mass size distribution of the aerosol component of the ozone-isoprene and ozone -(alpha)-pinene products as a function of isoprene and (alpha) -pinene concentration.

  15. Trace vapour detection at room temperature using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chou, Alison; Radi, Babak; Jaatinen, Esa; Juodkazis, Saulius; Fredericks, Peter M

    2014-04-21

    A miniaturized flow-through system consisting of a gold coated silicon substrate based on enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the detection of vapour from model explosive compounds. The measurements show that the detectability of the vapour molecules at room temperature depends sensitively on the interaction between the molecule and the substrate. The results highlight the capability of a flow system combined with Raman spectroscopy for detecting low vapour pressure compounds with a limit of detection of 0.2 ppb as demonstrated by the detection of bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, a common polymer additive emitted from a commercial polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing at room temperature. PMID:24588003

  16. CO2 Absorption Spectroscopy and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Daniel; Mlawer, Eli; Mlynczak, Martin; Gero, Jon; Collins, William; Torn, Margaret

    2014-03-01

    Most of the absorption, and therefore radiative forcing, due to increased atmospheric CO2 occurs in line wings, so utilizing an accurate line shape is necessary for climate science. Recent advances in CO2 absorption spectroscopy have been incorporated into benchmark line-by-line radiative transfer models. These updates include the Energy Corrected Sudden Approximation to represent isolated line profiles, line mixing, and line clusters. The CO2 line profiles are sub-Lorentzian and are explicitly modeled up to 25 cm-1 from each line's center. Consistent continuum absorption is implemented over the remainder of the profile except for modest empirical adjustments based on observations. Thus, line-by-line models calculate the absorption effects of CO2 that agree with theory and measurements. This is validated with long-term spectroscopic measurements from the ARM program's AERI instrument. This spectroscopy trains computationally-efficient correlated-k methods for climate model radiative transfer, but they overpredict instantaneous radiative forcing from doubled CO2 by approximately 7% in part because they have larger errors handling the impact of increased CO2 in the stratosphere than the troposphere. The implications of this can be tested with supercomputers. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Biol. & Env. Res., Clim. & Env. Sci. Div., of the U.S. D.O.E., Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 as part of the Atmos. Sys. Res.

  17. Condition Assessment of Kevlar Composite Materials Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washer, Glenn; Brooks, Thomas; Saulsberry, Regor

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation includes the following main concepts. Goal: To evaluate Raman spectroscopy as a potential NDE tool for the detection of stress rupture in Kevlar. Objective: Test a series of strand samples that have been aged under various conditions and evaluate differences and trends in the Raman response. Hypothesis: Reduction in strength associated with stress rupture may manifest from changes in the polymer at a molecular level. If so, than these changes may effect the vibrational characteristics of the material, and consequently the Raman spectra produced from the material. Problem Statement: Kevlar composite over-wrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) on the space shuttles are greater than 25 years old. Stress rupture phenomena is not well understood for COPVs. Other COPVs are planned for hydrogen-fueled vehicles using Carbon composite material. Raman spectroscopy is being explored as an non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique to predict the onset of stress rupture in Kevlar composite materials. Test aged Kevlar strands to discover trends in the Raman response. Strength reduction in Kevlar polymer will manifest itself on the Raman spectra. Conclusions: Raman spectroscopy has shown relative changes in the intensity and FWHM of the 1613 cm(exp -1) peak. Reduction in relative intensity for creep, fleet leader, and SIM specimens compared to the virgin strands. Increase in FWHM has been observed for the creep and fleet leader specimens compared to the virgin strands. Changes in the Raman spectra may result from redistributing loads within the material due to the disruption of hydrogen bonding between crystallites or defects in the crystallites from aging the Kevlar strands. Peak shifting has not been observed to date. Analysis is ongoing. Stress measurements may provide a tool in the short term.

  18. Kerr-gated picosecond Raman spectroscopy and Raman photon migration of equine bone tissue with 400-nm excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Michael D.; Goodship, Allen E.; Draper, Edward R. C.; Matousek, Pavel; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W.

    2004-07-01

    We show that Raman spectroscopy with visible lasers, even in the deep blue is possible with time-gated Raman spectroscopy. A 4 picosec time gate allows efficient fluorescence rejection, up to 1000X, and provides almost background-free Raman spectra with low incident laser power. The technology enables spectroscopy with better than 10X higher scattering efficiency than is possible with the NIR (785 nm and 830 nm) lasers that are conventionally used. Raman photon migration is shown to allow depth penetration. We show for the first time that Kerr-gated Raman spectra of bone tissue with blue laser excitation enables both fluorescence rejection and depth penetration.

  19. Dual Comb Raman Spectroscopy on Cesium Hyperfine Transitions-Toward a Stimulate Raman Spectrum on CF4 Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tze-Wei; Hsu, Yen-Chu; Cheng, Wang-Yau

    2015-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an important spectroscopic technique used in chemistry to provide a fingerprint by which molecules can be identified. It helps us to observe vibration- rotation, and other low-frequency modes in a system. Dual comb Raman spectroscopy allows measuring a wide bandwidth with high resolution in microseconds. The stimulate Raman spectroscopy had been performed in early days where the nonlinear conversion efficiency depended on laser peak power. Hence we propose an approach for rapidly resolving the Raman spectroscopy of CF4 molecule by two Ti:sapphire comb lasers. Our progress on this proposal will be presented in the conference. First, we have realized a compact dual Ti:sapphire comb laser system where the dual Ti:sapphire laser system possesses the specification of 1 GHz repetition rate. In our dual comb system, 1 GHz repetition rate, 100 kHz Δfrep and 2.4 THz optical filter are chosen according to the demands of our future works on spectroscopy. Therefore, the maximum mode number within free spectral range is 5*103, and the widest range of dual-comb based spectra in that each spectrum could be uniquely identified is 5 THz. The actual bandwidth is determined by the employed optical filter and is set to be 2.4 THz here, so that the corresponding data acquisition time is 10 μs. Secondly, since the identification of the tremendous spectral lines of CF4 molecule relies on a stable reference and a reliable data-retrieving system, we propose a first-step experiment on atomic system where the direct 6S-8S 822-nm two-photon absorption and 8S-6P3/2 (794 nm) enhanced stimulate Raman would be realized directly by using Ti:sapphire laser. We have successfully performed direct comb laser two-photon spectroscopy for both with and without middle-level enhanced. For the level enhanced two-photon spectrum, our experimental setup achieves Doppler-free spectrum and a record narrow linewidth (1 MHz). T.-W. Liu, C.-M. Wu, Y.-C. Hsu and W.-Y. Cheng, Appl. Phys. B

  20. Raman spectroscopy for bacterial identification and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatová, Silvie; Samek, Ota; Pilát, Zdeněk.; Šerý, Mojmír.; Ježek, Jan; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Zemánek, Pavel; Ružička, Filip

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of our investigation is to use Raman tweezers technique so that the responce of Raman scattering on microorganisms suspended in liquid media (bacteria, algae and yeast cells in microfluidic chips) can be used to identify different species. The investigations presented here include identification of different bacteria strains (biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative) and yeast cells by using principal component analysis (PCA). The main driving force behind our investigation was a common problem in the clinical microbiology laboratory - how to distinguish between contaminant and invasive isolates. Invasive bacterial/yeast isolates can be assumed to form a biofilm, while isolates which do not form a biofilm can be treated as contaminant. Thus, the latter do not represent an important virulence factor.

  1. Novel developments in laser diode Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claps, Ricardo Javier

    2000-11-01

    This thesis presents the last developments of a laser diode Raman spectrometer for gases, gas flows and vapors, at medium-low pressures. Results are shown for atmospheric gases under STP conditions, and also gas flows from nozzles in subsonic-sonic regimes. The system is unique in that it uses a high power laser diode passively locked by an external grating cavity in Littman/Metcalf configuration, with side-band modes suppressed by 1:10-5, and a reduced bandwidth of <500MHz. The use of Rb vapor cells as notch filters with unprecedented narrow bandwidth (<7 cm-1), allow to collect Stokes and a-Stokes rotational Raman spectra simultaneously. The spectrometer is used to perform studies of thermodynamic equilibrium of gas flows; further studies of samples seeded in the flow (alkali- halides) are discussed, together with potential applications for environmental and industrial monitoring.

  2. Vibrational characterization of pheomelanin and trichochrome F by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Galván, Ismael; Jorge, Alberto; Solano, Francisco; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2013-06-01

    We characterize for the first time the vibrational state of natural pheomelanin using Raman spectroscopy and model pigment synthesized from 5-S-cysteinyldopa. The shape of the Raman spectrum was very different from that of eumelanin. Four Raman bands were visible in the 500-2000 cm(-1) wavenumber region about 500, 1150, 1490 and 2000 cm(-1), which we assigned to the out-of-plane deformation and the stretching vibration of the phenyl rings, to the stretching vibration of C-N bonds or the stretching and wagging vibration of CH2, and to overtone or combination bands. Interestingly, we also show that the Raman spectrum of synthetic trichochrome F, a pigment that may be produced along with pheomelanin during pheomelanogenesis, is different from that of pheomelanin and similar to the spectrum of eumelanin. We could detect Raman signal of both eumelanin and pheomelanin in feathers and hairs where both pigments simultaneously occur without the need of isolating the pigment. This indicates that Raman spectroscopy represents a non-invasive method to detect pheomelanin and distinguish it from other pigments. This may be especially relevant to detect pheomelanin in animal skin including humans, where it has been associated with animal appearance and classification, human phototypes, prevention of skin diseases and cancer risk. PMID:23563634

  3. [Study on the treatment turquoise using Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan-li; Yuan, Xin-qiang; Chen, Jing-zhong; Qi, Li-jian

    2010-07-01

    Due to a variety of the enhancement and treatment turquoises discovered in gem markets, the identification of turquoise is becoming more and more difficult. By using laser Raman spectroscopy analysis, the characteristics of Raman spectra of the pressed and filled turquoises were studied. The results show that laser Raman spectroscopy is an effective technique to identify the enhancement and treatment turquoises and the natural ones, moreover, it's a non-destructive testing method. The Raman spectra of the enhancement and treatment turquoises are resulted mainly from the vibrational mode and frequency of water, hydroxyl units, PO4 tetrahedron and CH2 units. Besides, they have the characteristic Raman spectra peaks at 2,937, 2,883 and 1,451 cm(-1) which are attributed to the stretching vibration and the bending vibration of CH2, respectively. These characteristic Raman vibration bands, it will help to distinguish the natural turquoises and the treatment ones. The study provides a new train of thought on the rapid, accurate, and non-destructive identification of turquoise. PMID:20827971

  4. Vibrational characterization of pheomelanin and trichochrome F by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván, Ismael; Jorge, Alberto; Solano, Francisco; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2013-06-01

    We characterize for the first time the vibrational state of natural pheomelanin using Raman spectroscopy and model pigment synthesized from 5-S-cysteinyldopa. The shape of the Raman spectrum was very different from that of eumelanin. Four Raman bands were visible in the 500-2000 cm-1 wavenumber region about 500, 1150, 1490 and 2000 cm-1, which we assigned to the out-of-plane deformation and the stretching vibration of the phenyl rings, to the stretching vibration of C-N bonds or the stretching and wagging vibration of CH2, and to overtone or combination bands. Interestingly, we also show that the Raman spectrum of synthetic trichochrome F, a pigment that may be produced along with pheomelanin during pheomelanogenesis, is different from that of pheomelanin and similar to the spectrum of eumelanin. We could detect Raman signal of both eumelanin and pheomelanin in feathers and hairs where both pigments simultaneously occur without the need of isolating the pigment. This indicates that Raman spectroscopy represents a non-invasive method to detect pheomelanin and distinguish it from other pigments. This may be especially relevant to detect pheomelanin in animal skin including humans, where it has been associated with animal appearance and classification, human phototypes, prevention of skin diseases and cancer risk.

  5. Absorption effects in diffusing wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento-Gomez, Erick; Morales-Cruzado, Beatriz; Castillo, Rolando

    2014-07-20

    The effect of absorption in diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) was studied using an absorption-dependent diffusive equation for describing the light propagation within a turbid liquid where dielectric microspheres have been embedded. Here, we propose an expression for the time-averaged light intensity autocorrelation function that correctly describes the time fluctuations for the scattered light, in the regime where the diffusion approximation accurately describes the light propagation. This correction was suspected previously, but it was not formally derived from a light diffusive equation. As in the case of no absorption, we obtained that time fluctuations of the scattered light can be related to the mean square displacement of the embedded particles. However, if a correction for absorption is not taken into account, the colloidal dynamics can be misinterpreted. Experimental results show that this new formulation correctly describes the time fluctuations of scattered light. This new procedure extends the applicability of DWS, and it opens the possibility of doing microrheology with this optical method in systems where absorption cannot be avoided. PMID:25090203

  6. Methane overtone absorption by intracavity laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, James J.

    1990-01-01

    Interpretation of planetary methane (CH4) visible-near IR spectra, used to develop models of planetary atmospheres, has been hampered by a lack of suitable laboratory spectroscopic data. The particular CH4 spectral bands are due to intrinsically weak, high overtone-combination transitions too complex for classical spectroscopic analysis. The traditional multipass cell approach to measuring spectra of weakly absorbing species is insufficiently sensitive to yield reliable results for some of the weakest CH4 absorption features and is difficult to apply at the temperatures of the planetary environments. A time modulated form of intracavity laser spectroscopy (ILS), has been shown to provide effective absorption pathlengths of 100 to 200 km with sample cells less than 1 m long. The optical physics governing this technique and the experimental parameters important for obtaining reliable, quantitative results are now well understood. Quantitative data for CH4 absorption obtained by ILS have been reported recently. Illustrative ILS data for CH4 absorption in the 619.7 nm and 681.9 nm bands are presented. New ILS facilities at UM-St. Louis will be used to measure CH4 absorption in the 700 to 1000 nm region under conditions appropriate to the planetary atmospheres.

  7. OH absorption spectroscopy in a flame using spatial heterodyne spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bartula, Renata J; Ghandhi, Jaal B; Sanders, Scott T; Mierkiewicz, Edwin J; Roesler, Fred L; Harlander, John M

    2007-12-20

    We demonstrate measurements of OH absorption spectra in the post-flame zone of a McKenna burner using spatial heterodyne spectroscopy (SHS). SHS permits high-resolution, high-throughput measurements. In this case the spectra span approximately 308-310 nm with a resolution of 0.03 nm, even though an extended source (extent of approximately 2x10(-7) m(2) rad(2)) was used. The high spectral resolution is important for interpreting spectra when multiple absorbers are present for inferring accurate gas temperatures from measured spectra and for monitoring weak absorbers. The present measurement paves the way for absorption spectroscopy by SHS in practical combustion devices, such as reciprocating and gas-turbine engines. PMID:18091974

  8. OH absorption spectroscopy in a flame using spatial heterodyne spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartula, Renata J.; Ghandhi, Jaal B.; Sanders, Scott T.; Mierkiewicz, Edwin J.; Roesler, Fred L.; Harlander, John M.

    2007-12-01

    We demonstrate measurements of OH absorption spectra in the post-flame zone of a McKenna burner using spatial heterodyne spectroscopy (SHS). SHS permits high-resolution, high-throughput measurements. In this case the spectra span ~308-310 nm with a resolution of 0.03 nm, even though an extended source (extent of ~2×10-7 m2 rad2) was used. The high spectral resolution is important for interpreting spectra when multiple absorbers are present for inferring accurate gas temperatures from measured spectra and for monitoring weak absorbers. The present measurement paves the way for absorption spectroscopy by SHS in practical combustion devices, such as reciprocating and gas-turbine engines.

  9. Raman spectroscopy and oral exfoliative cytology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Aditi; Shah, Nupur; Mahimkar, Manoj; Garud, Mandavi; Pagare, Sandeep; Nair, Sudhir; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Early detection of oral cancers can substantially improve disease-free survival rates. Ex vivo and in vivo Raman spectroscopic (RS) studies on oral cancer have demonstrated the applicability of RS in identifying not only malignant and premalignant conditions but also cancer-field-effects: the earliest events in oral carcinogenesis. RS has also been explored for cervical exfoliated cells analysis. Exfoliated cells are associated with several advantages like non-invasive sampling, higher patient compliance, transportation and analysis at a central facility: obviating need for on-site instrumentation. Thus, oral exfoliative cytology coupled with RS may serve as a useful adjunct for oral cancer screening. In this study, exfoliated cells from healthy controls with and without tobacco habits, premalignant lesions (leukoplakia and tobacco-pouch-keratosis) and their contralateral mucosa were collected using a Cytobrush. Cells were harvested by vortexing and centrifugation at 6000 rpm. The cellular yield was ascertained using Neubauer's chamber. Cell pellets were placed on a CaF2 window and Raman spectra were acquired using a Raman microprobe (40X objective) coupled HE-785 Raman spectrometer. Approximately 7 spectra were recorded from each pellet, following which pellet was smeared onto a glass slide, fixed in 95% ethanol and subjected to Pap staining for cytological diagnosis (gold standard). Preliminary PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out cross validation indicate delineation of cells from healthy and all pathological conditions. A tendency of classification was also seen between cells from contralateral, healthy tobacco and site of premalignant lesions. These results will be validated by cytological findings, which will serve as the basis for building standard models of each condition.

  10. X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, P.L.; LeBrun, T.; Deslattes, R.D.

    1995-08-01

    X-ray resonant Raman scattering presents great promise as a high-resolution spectroscopic probe of the electronic structure of matter. Unlike other methods, the technique avoids the loss of energy resolution resulting from the lifetime broadening of short-lived core-excited states. In addition, measurements of polarization and angular anisotropies yield information on the symmetries of electronic states of atoms and molecules. We studied the L{sub 3} edge of xenon, where the lifetime broadening is a major feature of the spectra recorded previously. X-ray fluorescence spectra were taken of both the L{alpha}{sub l,2} and L{beta}{sub 2,15} peaks over a range of energies from 10 eV below the edge to 40 eV above. These spectra show the evolution of resonant Raman scattering into characteristic fluorescence as the photon energy is scanned across the edge, and confirm several features of these spectra such as asymmetries in resonant peak shapes due to the onset of the ionization continuum. These results constitute the most comprehensive study of X-ray resonant Raman scattering to date, and were submitted for publication. Studies of other cases are under way, and new instruments that would match the unique characteristics of the APS - and thus render a new range of experiments possible - are under consideration.

  11. Raman spectroscopy: Caution when interpreting organic carbon from oxidising environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brolly, Connor; Parnell, John; Bowden, Stephen

    2016-02-01

    Oxidation on Mars is primarily caused by the high influx of cosmic and solar radiation which interacts with the Martian surface. The evidence of this can be seen in the ubiquitous red colouration of the Martian sediment. This radiation will destroy most signals of life in the top few metres of the Martian surface. If organic carbon (one of the building blocks of life) is present within the accessible Martian sediments, it is very likely that it will have experienced some oxidation. ESA's ExoMars mission set to fly in 2018, has on board a miniaturised Raman spectrometer. As Raman spectroscopy is sensitive to carbonaceous material and will be primarily used to characterise organics, it is essential that the effect oxidation has on the Raman carbon signal is assessed. Oxidised carbonaceous shales were analysed using Raman spectroscopy to assess this issue. Results show that haematite has a band which occurs in the same frequency as the carbon D band, which cannot be distinguished from each other. This can lead to a misidentification of the carbon D band and a misinterpretation of the carbon order. Consequently, caution must be taken when applying Raman spectroscopy for organic carbon analysis in oxidised terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments, including on Mars.

  12. Remote sensing of subsurface water temperature by laser Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, D. A.; Caputo, B.; Guagliardo, J. L.; Hoge, F. E.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes experimental remote sensing of subsurface water temperature using the Raman spectroscopic technique. By the use of a pulsed laser and range gating detection techniques, Raman scattering is analyzed as a function of depth in a radar-like echo mode, and thus subsurface profiles of temperature and transmission are obtained. Experiments are described in which Raman data using polarization spectroscopy has been obtained from a ship as a function of depth in ocean water near Grand Bahama Island. A spectral temperature accuracy of + or - 1 C has been obtained from this data in the first two optical attenuation lengths. Raman data obtained from ocean water using the NASA airborne oceanographic lidar is also presented.

  13. Fluorescence suppression using micro-scale spatially offset Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Conti, Claudia; Botteon, Alessandra; Colombo, Chiara; Realini, Marco; Matousek, Pavel

    2016-09-21

    We present a new concept of fluorescence suppression in Raman microscopy based on micro-spatially offset Raman spectroscopy which is applicable to thin stratified turbid (diffusely scattering) matrices permitting the retrieval of the Raman signals of sublayers below intensely fluorescing turbid over-layers. The method is demonstrated to yield good quality Raman spectra with dramatically suppressed fluorescence backgrounds enabling the retrieval of Raman sublayer signals even in situations where conventional Raman microscopy spectra are fully overwhelmed by intense fluorescence. The concept performance was studied theoretically using Monte Carlo simulations indicating the potential of up to an order or two of magnitude suppression of overlayer fluorescence backgrounds relative to the Raman sublayer signals. The technique applicability was conceptually demonstrated on layered samples involving paints, polymers and stones yielding fluorescence suppression factors between 12 to above 430. The technique has potential applications in a number of analytical areas including cultural heritage, archaeology, polymers, food, pharmaceutical, biological, biomedical, forensics and catalytic sciences and quality control in manufacture. PMID:27338230

  14. [Measurement of nasopharyngeal carcinoma tissue ex vivo by Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Pan, Jian-ji; Chen, Rong; Li, Yong-zeng; Feng, Shang-yuan; Xie, Shu-sen; Zeng, Hai-shan

    2009-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy has shown its potential and advantages in detecting molecular changes associated with tissue pathology, which makes it possible to diagnose with optical methods non-invasively and real-time. A compact and rapid near-infrared (NIR)Raman system was developed using 785 nm diode laser, volume phase technology (VPT)holographic grating system and NIR intensified charge-coupled device (CCD)with a specially designed Raman fibre probe which can effectively reduce the interference of fluorescence and Rayleigh scattering, maximize the ability of Raman collection as well as correct the image aberration of a planar grating diffraction. Adopting this method, signal-to-noise ratio has been greatly improved and human tissue signals can be acquired in a short time. Raman signals from fat and musculature of fresh pork were measured and referenced for further optimization, then Raman spectra of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in vitro and the effect of storage time on them were measured in 1-5 s and discussed. The sensitivities and performance of the system will be further enhanced and more Raman data will be acquired and compared between normal and cancerous nasopharyngeal tissue, expecting to discover the statistical characteristics, which will benefit the diagnosis and treatment of early nasopharyngeal carcinoma or other tumors. PMID:19650477

  15. Gradient temperature Raman spectroscopy identifies flexible sites in proline and alanine peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous thermo dynamic Raman spectroscopy (TDRS) applies the temperature gradients utilized in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to Raman spectroscopy, providing a straightforward technique to identify molecular rearrangements that occur just prior to phase transitions. Herein we apply TDRS...

  16. Raman-spectroscopy-based biosensing for applications in ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusciano, Giulia; Capriglione, Paola; Pesce, Giuseppe; Zito, Gianluigi; Del Prete, Antonio; Cennamo, Giovanni; Sasso, Antonio

    2013-05-01

    Cell-based biosensors rely on the detection and identification of single cells as well as monitoring of changes induced by interaction with drugs and/or toxic agents. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool to reach this goal, being non-destructive analytical technique, allowing also measurements of samples in aqueous environment. In addition, micro-Raman measurements do not require preliminary sample preparation (as in fluorescence spectroscopy), show a finger-print spectral response, allow a spatial resolution below typical cell sizes, and are relatively fast (few s or even less). All these properties make micro-Raman technique particularly promising for high-throughput on-line analysis integrated in lab-on-a-chip devices. Herein, we demonstrate some applications of Raman analysis in ophthalmology. In particular, we demonstrate that Raman analysis can provide useful information for the therapeutic treatment of keratitis caused by Acanthamoeba Castellanii (A.), an opportunistic protozoan that is widely distributed in the environment and is known to produce blinding keratitis and fatal encephalitis. In particular, by combining Raman analysis with Principal Component Analysis (PCA), we have demonstrated that is possible to distinguish between live and dead cells, enabling, therefore to establish the effectiveness of therapeutic strategies to vanquish the protozoa. As final step, we have analyzed the presence of biochemical differences in the conjunctival epithelial tissues of patients affected by keratitis with respect to healthy people. As a matter of facts, it is possible to speculate some biochemical alterations of the epithelial tissues, rendering more favorable the binding of the protozoan. The epithelial cells were obtained by impression cytology from eyes of both healthy and keratitis-affected individuals. All the samples were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy within a few hours from cells removal from eyes. The results of this analysis are discussed.

  17. Cone penetrometer fiber optic raman spectroscopy probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kyle, Kevin R.; Brown, Steven B.

    2000-01-01

    A chemically and mechanically robust optical Raman spectroscopy probe assembly that can be incorporated in a cone penetrometer (CPT) for subsurface deployment. This assembly consists of an optical Raman probe and a penetrometer compatible optical probe housing. The probe is intended for in-situ chemical analysis of chemical constituents in the surrounding environment. The probe is optically linked via fiber optics to the light source and the detection system at the surface. A built-in broadband light source provides a strobe method for direct measurement of sample optical density. A mechanically stable sapphire window is sealed directly into the side-wall of the housing using a metallic, chemically resistant, hermetic seal design. This window permits transmission of the interrogation light beam and the resultant signal. The spectroscopy probe assembly is capable of accepting Raman, Laser induced Fluorescence, reflectance, and other optical probes with collimated output for CPT deployment.

  18. Cone penetrometer fiber optic Raman spectroscopy probe assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, K.R.; Brown, S.B.

    2000-01-25

    A chemically and mechanically robust optical Raman spectroscopy probe assembly is described that can be incorporated in a cone penetrometer (CPT) for subsurface deployment. This assembly consists of an optical Raman probe and a penetrometer compatible optical probe housing. The probe is intended for in-situ chemical analysis of chemical constituents in the surrounding environment. The probe is optically linked via fiber optics to the light source and the detection system at the surface. A built-in broadband light source provides a strobe method for direct measurement of sample optical density. A mechanically stable sapphire window is sealed directly into the side-wall of the housing using a metallic, chemically resistant, hermetic seal design. This window permits transmission of the interrogation light beam and the resultant signal. The spectroscopy probe assembly is capable of accepting Raman, Laser induced Fluorescence, reflectance, and other optical probes with collimated output for CPT deployment.

  19. Monitoring lignocellulosic bioethanol production processes using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Jens A; Ahring, Birgitte K

    2014-11-01

    Process control automation in the emerging biorefinery industry may be achieved by applying effective methods for monitoring compound concentrations during the production processes. This study examines the application of Raman spectroscopy with an excitation wavelength of 785nm and an immersion probe for in situ monitoring the progression of pretreatment, hydrolysis and fermentation processes in the production of lignocellulosic ethanol. Raman signals were attenuated by light scattering cells and lignocellulosic particulates, which the quantification method to some degree could correct for by using an internal standard in the spectra. Allowing particulates to settle by using a slow stirring speed further improved results, suggesting that Raman spectroscopy should be used in combination with continuous separation when used to monitor process mixtures with large amounts of particulates. The root mean square error of prediction (RMSE) of ethanol and glucose measured in real-time was determined to be 0.98g/L and 1.91g/L respectively. PMID:25255187

  20. Imaging EGFR distribution using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, L.; Chen, X. K.; Smith, A.; Korbelik, M.; Zeng, H.; Lee, P. W. K.; Hewitt, K. C.

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the feasibility of using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) to image the distribution of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) in cells. To accomplish this task, 30 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) tagged with antibodies to EGFR (1012 per ml) are incubated with cells (106 per ml) of the A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cell line and normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. Using the 632.8 nm excitation line of a He-Ne laser, Raman spectroscopy measurements are performed using a point mapping scheme. SERS signals are observed with an overall enhancement of 4-7 orders of magnitude. Raman intensity maps of the 1480 and 1583 cm-1 peaks correlate well with the expected distribution of AuNPs and EGFR. Normal cells show little to no enhancement. The results therefore present a simple yet effective means to image EGFR over-expression.

  1. Raman spectroscopy for in-situ monitoring of electrode processes

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, R; Cook, G M; Yao, N P

    1982-04-01

    The theoretical and experimental applications of Raman spectroscopic techniques to the study of battery electrode processes are described. In particular, the potential of Raman spectroscopy as an in-situ analytical tool for the characterization of the structure and composition of electrode surface layers at electrode-electrolyte interfaces during electrolysis is examined. It is anticipated that this understanding of the battery electrode processes will be helpful in designing battery active material with improved performance. The applications of Raman spectroscopy to the in-situ study of electrode processes has been demonstrated in a few selected areas, including: (1) the anodic corrosion of lead in sulfuric acid and (2) the anodization and sulfation of tetrabasicleadsulfate in sulfuric acid. Preliminary results on the anodization of iron and on the electrochemical behavior of nickel positive-electrode active material in potassium hydroxide electrolytes are presented in the Appendix.

  2. Principle, system, and applications of tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, MingQian; Wang, Rui; Wu, XiaoBin; Wang, Jia

    2012-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique in chemical information characterization. However, this spectral method is subject to two obstacles in nano-material detection. One is diffraction limited spatial resolution, and the other is its inherent small Raman cross section and weak signaling. To resolve these problems, a new approach has been developed, denoted as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). TERS is capable of high-resolution and high-sensitivity detection and demonstrated to be a promising spectroscopic and micro-topographic method to characterize nano-materials and nanostructures. In this paper, the principle and experimental system of TERS are discussed. The latest application of TERS in molecule detection, biological specimen identification, nanao-material characterization, and semi-conductor material determination with some specific experimental examples are presented.

  3. Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy - GASMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, Sune

    2008-09-01

    An overview of the new field of Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy (GASMAS) is presented. GASMAS combines narrow-band diode-laser spectroscopy with diffuse media optical propagation. While solids and liquids have broad absorption features, free gas in pores and cavities in the material is characterized by sharp spectral signatures, typically 10,000 times sharper than those of the host material. Many applications in materials science, food packaging, pharmaceutics and medicine have been demonstrated. So far molecular oxygen and water vapour have been studied around 760 and 935 nm, respectively. Liquid water, an important constituent in many natural materials, such as tissue, has a low absorption at such wavelengths, allowing propagation. Polystyrene foam, wood, fruits, food-stuffs, pharmaceutical tablets, and human sinus cavities have been studied. Transport of gas in porous media can readily be studied by first immersing the material in, e.g., pure nitrogen, and then observing the rate at which normal air, containing oxygen, reinvades the material. The conductance of the sinus connective passages can be measured in this way by flushing the nasal cavity with nitrogen. Also other dynamic processes such as drying of materials can be studied. The techniques have also been extended to remote-sensing applications (LIDAR-GASMAS).

  4. FT-Raman spectroscopy of lichen species from the Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, J. M.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Wynn-Williams, D. D.

    1998-06-01

    In this investigation, FT-Raman spectroscopy has been utilized to characterize pigments and chemicals produced by Antarctic lichens, which have been exposed to increasing levels of UV-B radiation and other environmental conditions. The presence of calcium oxalate in some lichen species has also been confirmed spectroscopically.

  5. Analysis of scorpion venom composition by Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Zérega, Brenda E.; González-Solís, José L.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we study the venom of two Centruroides scorpion species using Raman spectroscopy. The spectra analysis allows to determine the venoms chemical composition and to establish the main differences and similarities among the species. It is also shown that the use of Principal Component Analysis may help to tell apart between the scorpion species.

  6. Stress Analysis of SiC MEMS Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, Stanley J.; Marciniak, M. A.; Lott, J. A.; Starman, L. A.; Busbee, J. D.; Melzak, J. M.

    2003-03-01

    During the fabrication of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), residual stress is often induced in the thin films that are deposited to create these systems. These stresses can cause the device to fail due to buckling, curling, or fracture. Industry is looking for ways to characterize the stress during the deposition of thin films in order to reduce or eliminate device failure. Micro-Raman spectroscopy has been successfully used to characterize poly-Si MEMS devices made with the MUMPS® process. Raman spectroscopy was selected because it is nondestructive, fast and has the potential for in situ stress monitoring. This research attempts to use Raman spectroscopy to analyze the stress in SiC MEMS made with the MUSiC® process. Raman spectroscopy is performed on 1-2-micron-thick SiC thin films deposited on silicon, silicon nitride, and silicon oxide substrates. The most common poly-type of SiC found in thin film MEMS made with the MUSiC® process is 3C-SiC. Research also includes baseline spectra of 6H, 4H, and 15R poly-types of bulk SiC.

  7. THz-Raman: accessing molecular structure with Raman spectroscopy for enhanced chemical identification, analysis, and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyler, Randy A.; Carriere, James T. A.; Havermeyer, Frank

    2013-05-01

    Structural analysis via spectroscopic measurement of rotational and vibrational modes is of increasing interest for many applications, since these spectra can reveal unique and important structural and behavioral information about a wide range of materials. However these modes correspond to very low frequency (~5cm-1 - 200cm-1, or 150 GHz-6 THz) emissions, which have been traditionally difficult and/or expensive to access through conventional Raman and Terahertz spectroscopy techniques. We report on a new, inexpensive, and highly efficient approach to gathering ultra-low-frequency Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra (referred to as "THz-Raman") on a broad range of materials, opening potential new applications and analytical tools for chemical and trace detection, identification, and forensics analysis. Results are presented on explosives, pharmaceuticals, and common elements that show strong THz-Raman spectra, leading to clear discrimination of polymorphs, and improved sensitivity and reliability for chemical identification.

  8. The role of absorption in Raman amplification in warm plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ersfeld, B.; Farmer, J.; Raj, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2010-08-15

    Raman backscattering in plasma is subject to--collisional and collisionless--absorption of the interacting waves. A model for studying its role over a wide parameter range is developed by coupling the envelope equations for pump, probe, and plasma waves with those describing heating of the plasma. The latter is treated as a warm fluid, making the model useful for moderate temperatures and field amplitudes. The main effect is the time-dependent Bohm-Gross shift of the Langmuir resonance frequency, which can either enhance or suppress amplification; this can be further controlled by varying the frequency of the pump. Anisotropy in the collisional processes for longitudinal and transverse waves leads to temperature anisotropy at high field amplitudes. Direct Landau damping of the plasma wave, as well as its contribution to the frequency shift, can be neglected due to rapid saturation.

  9. Remote detection of explosives using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, Jack

    2011-05-01

    Stand-off detection of potentially hazardous small molecules at distances that allow the user to be safe has many applications, including explosives and chemical threats. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, with EYZtek, Inc. of Ohio, developed a prototype stand-off, eye-safe Raman spectrometer. With a stand-off distance greater than twenty meters and scanning optics, this system has the potential of addressing particularly difficult challenges in small molecule detection. An overview of the system design and desired application space is presented.

  10. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  11. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using a picosecond UV laser as a light source was developed in our institute. Tropospheric OH radicals are measured by their rotational absorption lines around 308 nm. The spectra are obtained using a high resolution spectrograph. The detection system has been improved over the formerly used optomechanical scanning device by application of a photodiode array which increased the observed spectral range by a factor of 6 and which utilizes the light much more effectively leading to a considerable reduction of the measurement time. This technique provides direct measurements of OH because the signal is given by the product of the absorption coefficient and the OH concentration along the light path according to Lambert-Beers law. No calibration is needed. Since the integrated absorption coefficient is well known the accuracy of the measurement essentially depends on the extent to which the OH absorption pattern can be detected in the spectra. No interference by self generated OH radicals in the detection lightpath has been observed. The large bandwidth (greater than 0.15 nm) and the high spectral resolution (1.5 pm) allows absolute determination of interferences by other trace gas absorptions. The measurement error is directly accessible from the absorption-signal to baseline-noise ratio in the spectra. The applicability of the method strongly depends on visibility. Elevated concentrations of aerosols lead to considerable attenuation of the laser light which reduces the S/N-ratio. In the moderately polluted air of Julich, where we performed a number of OH measurement spectra. In addition absorption features of unidentified species were frequently detected. A quantitative deconvolution even of the known species is not easy to achieve and can leave residual structures in the spectra. Thus interferences usually increase the noise and deteriorate the OH detection sensitivity. Using diode arrays for sensitive

  12. A line-scan hyperspectral Raman system for spatially offset Raman spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional methods of spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) typically use single-fiber optical measurement probes to slowly and incrementally collect a series of spatially offset point measurements moving away from the laser excitation point on the sample surface, or arrays of multiple fiber ...

  13. Coherent Raman dual-comb spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ideguchi, Takuro; Holzner, Simon; Bernhardt, Birgitta; Guelachvili, Guy; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2014-11-01

    The invention of the optical frequency comb technique has revolutionized the field of precision spectroscopy, providing a way to measure the absolute frequency of any optical transition. Since, frequency combs have become common equipment for frequency metrology. In the last decade, novel applications for the optical frequency comb have been demonstrated beyond its original purpose. Broadband molecular spectroscopy is one of those. One such technique of molecular spectroscopy with frequency combs, dual-comb Fourier transform spectroscopy provides short measurement times with resolution and accuracy. Two laser frequency combs with slightly different repetition frequencies generate pairs of pulses with a linearly-scanned delay between pulses in a pair. The system without moving parts mimics a fast scanning Fourier transform interferometer. The measurement speed may be several orders of magnitude faster than that of a Michelson-based Fourier transform spectrometer, which opens up new opportunities for broadband molecular spectroscopy. Recently, dual-comb spectroscopy has been extended to nonlinear phenomena. A broadband Raman spectrum of molecular fingerprints may be measured within a few tens of microseconds with coherent Raman dual-comb spectroscopy. Raster scanning the sample leads to hyperspectral images. This rapid and broadband label-free vibrational spectroscopy and imaging technique might provide new diagnostic methods in a variety of scientific and industrial fields.

  14. Micro spatial analysis of seashell surface using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuan; Li, Yuandong; Li, Ying; Wang, Yangfan; Wang, Shi; Bao, Zhenmin; Zheng, Ronger

    2015-08-01

    The seashell has been studied as a proxy for the marine researches since it is the biomineralization product recording the growth development and the ocean ecosystem evolution. In this work a hybrid of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman spectroscopy was introduced to the composition analysis of seashell (scallop, bivalve, Zhikong). Without any sample treatment, the compositional distribution of the shell was obtained using LIBS for the element detection and Raman for the molecule recognition respectively. The elements Ca, K, Li, Mg, Mn and Sr were recognized by LIBS; the molecule carotene and carbonate were identified with Raman. It was found that the LIBS detection result was more related to the shell growth than the detection result of Raman. The obtained result suggested the shell growth might be developing in both horizontal and vertical directions. It was indicated that the LIBS-Raman combination could be an alternative way for the shell researches.

  15. Distinguishing Cancerous Liver Cells Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Liu, Shupeng; Chen, Zhenyi; Chen, Na; Pang, Fufei; Wang, Tingyun

    2016-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been widely used in biomedical research and clinical diagnostics. It possesses great potential for the analysis of biochemical processes in cell studies. In this article, the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of normal and cancerous liver cells incubated with SERS active substrates (gold nanoparticle) was measured using confocal Raman microspectroscopy technology. The chemical components of the cells were analyzed through statistical methods for the SERS spectrum. Both the relative intensity ratio and principal component analysis (PCA) were used for distinguishing the normal liver cells (QSG-7701) from the hepatoma cells (SMMC-7721). The relative intensity ratio of the Raman spectra peaks such as I937/I1209, I1276/I1308, I1342/I1375, and I1402/I1435 was set as the judge boundary, and the sensitivity and the specificity using PCA method were calculated. The results indicated that the surface-enhanced Raman spectrum could provide the chemical information for distinguishing the normal cells from the cancerous liver cells and demonstrated that SERS technology possessed the possible applied potential for the diagnosis of liver cancer. PMID:25432931

  16. Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of algal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samek, Ota; Jonáš, Alexandr; Pilát, Zdeněk; Zemánek, Pavel; Nedbal, Ladislav; Tříska, Jan; Kotas, Petr; Trtílek, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy can elucidate fundamental questions about intercellular variability and what governs it. Moreover, knowing the metabolic response on single cell level this can significantly contribute to the study and use of microalgae in systems biology and biofuel technology. Raman spectroscopy is capable to measure nutrient dynamics and metabolism in vivo, in real-time, label free making it possible to monitor/evaluate population variability. Also, degree of unsaturation of the algae oil (iodine value) can be measured using Raman spectra obtained from single microalgae. The iodine value is the determination of the amount of unsaturation contained in fatty acids (in the form of double bonds). Here we demonstrate the capacity of the spatially resolved Raman microspectroscopy to determine the effective iodine value in lipid storage bodies of individual living algal cells. We employed the characteristic peaks in the Raman scattering spectra at 1,656 cm-1 (cis C=C stretching mode) and 1,445 cm-1 (CH2 scissoring mode) as the markers defining the ratio of unsaturated-to-saturated carbon-carbon bonds of the fatty acids in the algal lipids.

  17. Raman spectroscopy of Bacillus thuringiensis physiology and inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, J. B.; Almeida, J.; Cole, K. D.; Reipa, V.

    2012-12-01

    The ability to detect spore contamination and inactivation is relevant to developing and determining decontamination strategy success for food and water safety. This study was conducted to develop a systematic comparison of nondestructive vibrational spectroscopy techniques (Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, SERS, and normal Raman) to determine indicators of Bacillus thuringiensis physiology (spore, vegetative, outgrown, germinated and inactivated spore forms). SERS was found to provide better resolution of commonly utilized signatures of spore physiology (dipicolinic acid at 1006 cm-1 and 1387 cm-1) compared to normal Raman and native fluorescence indigenous to vegetative and outgrown cell samples was quenched in SERS experiment. New features including carotenoid pigments (Raman features at 1142 cm-1, 1512 cm-1) were identified for spore cell forms. Pronounced changes in the low frequency region (300 cm-1 to 500 cm-1) in spore spectra occurred upon germination and inactivation (with both free chlorine and by autoclaving) which is relevant to guiding decontamination and detection strategies using Raman techniques.

  18. Spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) for liquid screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffen, Paul W.; Maskall, Guy; Bonthron, Stuart; Bloomfield, Matthew; Tombling, Craig; Matousek, Pavel

    2011-11-01

    Recently, Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) has been discussed as a novel method for the screening of liquids, aerosols and gels (LAGs) at airports and for other security applications. SORS is an optical spectroscopic method which enables the precise chemical identification of substances from a reference list and, due to the rich spectral information, has an inherently high probability of detection and low false alarm rate. The method is generally capable of screening substances inside non-metallic containers such as plastic and glass bottles. SORS is typically successful through opaque plastic and coloured glass, which are often challenging for conventional backscatter Raman spectroscopy. SORS is performed in just a few seconds by shining a laser light onto the container and then measuring the Raman signal at the excitation point but also at one or more offset positions. Each measurement has different relative orthogonal contributions from the container and contents Raman spectra, so that, with no prior knowledge, the pure Raman spectra of both the container and contents can be extracted - either by scaled subtraction or via multivariate statistical methods in an automated process. In this paper, the latest results will be described from a prototype SORS device designed for aviation security and the advantages and limitations of SORS will be discussed.

  19. Characterization of a superlubricity nanometer interface by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunsheng; Yang, Xing; Liu, Bingqi; Dong, Hualai; Zheng, Quanshui

    2016-08-01

    Despite being known for almost two decades, the use of micro-/nano-electromechanical systems in commercial applications remains a challenge because of stiction, friction, and the wear of the interface. Superlubricity may be the solution to these challenges. In this paper, we study factors affecting the realization of superlubricity. Raman spectroscopy and other methods were used to characterize a graphite interface which can realize superlubricity and another graphite interface which cannot realize superlubricity. Raman spectra of the interfaces were obtained with the mapping mode and then processed to obtain the Raman images of the characteristic peaks. The Raman spectra provided the distribution of the surface defects and probed defects. Combined with atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the Raman spectra show that the sp3 carbons and carbon–oxygen bond stuck at the edge of the graphite mesa are some of the determinants of large-area superlubricity realization. The characterization results can also be used to understand the friction and wear of large-area superlubricity, which are important for development and application of superlubricity. Furthermore, the methods used in this study are useful techniques and tools for the mechanism analysis of other nanometer interfaces.

  20. Bladder cancer diagnosis during cystoscopy using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimbergen, M. C. M.; van Swol, C. F. P.; Draga, R. O. P.; van Diest, P.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Stone, N.; Bosch, J. H. L. R.

    2009-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique that can be used to obtain specific molecular information of biological tissues. It has been used successfully to differentiate normal and pre-malignant tissue in many organs. The goal of this study is to determine the possibility to distinguish normal tissue from bladder cancer using this system. The endoscopic Raman system consists of a 6 Fr endoscopic probe connected to a 785nm diode laser and a spectral recording system. A total of 107 tissue samples were obtained from 54 patients with known bladder cancer during transurethral tumor resection. Immediately after surgical removal the samples were placed under the Raman probe and spectra were collected and stored for further analysis. The collected spectra were analyzed using multivariate statistical methods. In total 2949 Raman spectra were recorded ex vivo from cold cup biopsy samples with 2 seconds integration time. A multivariate algorithm allowed differentiation of normal and malignant tissue with a sensitivity and specificity of 78,5% and 78,9% respectively. The results show the possibility of discerning normal from malignant bladder tissue by means of Raman spectroscopy using a small fiber based system. Despite the low number of samples the results indicate that it might be possible to use this technique to grade identified bladder wall lesions during endoscopy.

  1. Characterization of a superlubricity nanometer interface by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yunsheng; Yang, Xing; Liu, Bingqi; Dong, Hualai; Zheng, Quanshui

    2016-08-12

    Despite being known for almost two decades, the use of micro-/nano-electromechanical systems in commercial applications remains a challenge because of stiction, friction, and the wear of the interface. Superlubricity may be the solution to these challenges. In this paper, we study factors affecting the realization of superlubricity. Raman spectroscopy and other methods were used to characterize a graphite interface which can realize superlubricity and another graphite interface which cannot realize superlubricity. Raman spectra of the interfaces were obtained with the mapping mode and then processed to obtain the Raman images of the characteristic peaks. The Raman spectra provided the distribution of the surface defects and probed defects. Combined with atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the Raman spectra show that the sp(3) carbons and carbon-oxygen bond stuck at the edge of the graphite mesa are some of the determinants of large-area superlubricity realization. The characterization results can also be used to understand the friction and wear of large-area superlubricity, which are important for development and application of superlubricity. Furthermore, the methods used in this study are useful techniques and tools for the mechanism analysis of other nanometer interfaces. PMID:27348089

  2. Measuring Rocket Engine Temperatures with Hydrogen Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.; Osborne, Robin J.; Trinh, Huu P.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Optically accessible, high pressure, hot fire test articles are available at NASA Marshall for use in development of advanced rocket engine propellant injectors. Single laser-pulse ultraviolet (UV) Raman spectroscopy has been used in the past in these devices for analysis of high pressure H2- and CH4-fueled combustion, but relies on an independent pressure measurement in order to provide temperature information. A variation of UV Raman (High Resolution Hydrogen Raman Spectroscopy) is under development and will allow temperature measurement without the need for an independent pressure measurement, useful for flows where local pressure may not be accurately known. The technique involves the use of a spectrometer with good spectral resolution, requiring a small entrance slit for the spectrometer. The H2 Raman spectrum, when created by a narrow linewidth laser source and obtained from a good spectral resolution spectrograph, has a spectral shape related to temperature. By best-fit matching an experimental spectrum to theoretical spectra at various temperatures, a temperature measurement is obtained. The spectral model accounts for collisional narrowing, collisional broadening, Doppler broadening, and collisional line shifting of each Raman line making up the H2 Stokes vibrational Q-branch spectrum. At pressures from atmospheric up to those associated with advanced preburner components (5500 psia), collisional broadening though present does not cause significant overlap of the Raman lines, allowing high resolution H2 Raman to be used for temperature measurements in plumes and in high pressure test articles. Experimental demonstrations of the technique are performed for rich H2-air flames at atmospheric pressure and for high pressure, 300 K H2-He mixtures. Spectrometer imaging quality is identified as being critical for successful implementation of technique.

  3. FT-Raman spectroscopy study of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitar Carter, Renata A.; Martin, Airton A.; Netto, Mario M.; Soares, Fernando A.

    2004-07-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been extensively studied as a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to provide information about the chemical and morphologic structure of tissue. Raman Spectroscpy is an inelastic scattering process that can provide a wealth of spectral features that can be related to the specific molecular structure of the sample. This article reports results of an in vitro study of the FT-Raman human breast tissue spectra. An Nd:YAG laser at 1064nm was used as the excitation source in the FT-Raman Spectrometer. The neoplastic human breast samples, both Fibroadenoma and ICD, were obtained during therapeutical routine medical procedures required by the primary disease, and the non-diseased human tissue was obtained in plastic surgery. No sample preparation was needed for the FT-Raman spectra collection. The FT-Raman spectra were recorded from normal, benign (Fibroadenomas) and malignant (IDC-Intraductal Carcinoma) samples, adding up 51 different areas. The main spectral differences of a typical FT-Raman spectra of a Normal (Non-diseased), Fibroadenoma, and Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) breast tissue at the interval of 600 to 1800cm-1, which may differentiate diagnostically the sample, were found in the bands of 1230 to 1295cm-1, 1440 to 1460 cm-1 and 1650 to 1680 cm-1, assigned to the vibrational bands of the carbohydrate-amide III, proteins and lipids, and carbohydrate-amide I, respectively.

  4. Standoff detection of explosive molecules using nanosecond gated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jin Hyuk; Cho, Soo Gyeong

    2013-06-01

    Recently, improvised explosive device (IED) has been a serious threat for many countries. One of the approaches to alleviate this threat is standoff detection of explosive molecules used in IEDs. Raman spectroscopy is a prospective method among many technologies under research to achieve this goal. It provides unique information of the target materials, through which the ingredients used in IEDs can be analyzed and identified. The main problem of standoff Raman spectroscopic detection is the large background noise hindering weak Raman signals from the target samples. Typical background noise comes from both ambient fluorescent lights indoor and sunlight outdoor whose intensities are usually much larger than that of Raman scattering from the sample. Under the proper condition using pulse laser and ICCD camera with nanosecond pulse width and gating technology, we succeed to separate and remove these background noises from Raman signals. For this experiment, we build an optical system for standoff detection of explosive molecules. We use 532 nm, 10 Hz, Q-switching Nd:YAG laser as light source, and ICCD camera triggered by laser Qswitching time with proper gate delay regarding the flight time of Raman from target materials. Our detection system is successfully applied to detect and identify more than 20 ingredients of IEDs including TNT, RDX, and HMX which are located 10 to 54 meters away from the system.

  5. Thin Film Substrates from the Raman spectroscopy point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparov, Lev; Jegorel, Theo; Loetgering, Lars; Middey, Srimanta; Chakhalian, Jak

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated ten standard single crystal substrates of complex oxides on the account of their applicability in the Raman spectroscopy based thin film research. In this study we suggest a spectra normalization procedure that utilises a comparison of the substrate's Raman spectra to those of well-established Raman reference materials. We demonstrate that MgO, LaGaO3, (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2AlTaO6)0.7 (LSAT), DyScO3, YAlO3, and LaAlO3 can be of potential use for a Raman based thin film research. At the same time TiO2 (rutile), NdGaO3, SrLaAlO4, and SrTiO3 single crystals exhibit multiple phonon modes accompanied by strong Raman background that substantially hinder the Raman based thin film experiments. L.G. acknowledges the support from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Grants DMR-0805073, DMR-0958349, Office of Naval Research award N00014-06-1-0133 and the UNF Terry Presidential Professorship. J. C. was supported by DOD-ARO under Grant No. 0402-172.

  6. Tissue measurement using 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieber, Chad A.; Wu, Huawen; Yang, William

    2013-03-01

    The use of Raman spectroscopy to provide characterization and diagnosis of biological tissues has shown increasing success in recent years. Most of this work has been performed using near-infrared laser sources such as 785 or 830 nm, in a balance of reduced intrinsic fluorescence in the tissues and quantum efficiency in the silicon detectors often used. However, even at these wavelengths, many tissues still exhibit strong or prohibitive fluorescence, and these wavelengths still cause autofluorescence in many common sampling materials, such as glass. In this study, we demonstrate the use of 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy for the study of biological tissues. A number of tissues are evaluated using the 1064 nm system and compared with the spectra obtained from a 785 nm system. Sampling materials are similarly compared. These results show that 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy provides a viable solution for measurement of highly fluorescent biological tissues such as liver and kidney, which are difficult or impossible to extract Raman at 785 nm.

  7. Raman spectroscopy and immunohistochemistry for schwannoma characterization: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Lazaro P. M.; das Chagas, Maurilio J.; Carvalho, Luis Felipe C. S.; Ferreira, Isabelle; dos Santos, Laurita; Haddad, Marcelo; Loddi, Vinicius; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    The schwannomas is a tumour of the tissue that covers nerves, called the nerve sheath. Schwannomas are often benign tumors of the Schwan cells, which are the principal glia of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Preoperative diagnosis of this lesion usually is difficult, therefore, new techniques are being studied as pre surgical evaluation. Among these, Raman spectroscopy, that enables the biochemical identification of the tissue analyzed by their optical properties, may be used as a tool for schwannomas diagnosis. The aim of this study was to discriminate between normal nervous tissue and schwannoma through the confocal Raman spectroscopy and Raman optical fiber-based techniques combined with immunohistochemical analysis. Twenty spectra were analyzed from a normal nerve tissue sample (10) and schwannoma (10) by Holospec f / 1.8 (Kayser Optical Systems) coupled to an optical fiber with a 785nm laser line source. The data were pre-processed and vector normalized. The average analysis and standard deviation was performed associated with cluster analysis. AML, 1A4, CD34, Desmin and S-100 protein markers were used for immunohistochemical analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis was positive only for protein S-100 marker which confirmed the neural schwanomma originality. The immunohistochemistry analysis were important to determine the source of the injury, whereas Raman spectroscopy were able to differentiated tissues types indicating important biochemical changes between normal and benign neoplasia.

  8. Raman spectroscopy for cytopathology of exfoliated cervical cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, I R; Meade, A D; Ibrahim, O; Byrne, H J; McMenamin, M; McKenna, M; Malkin, A; Lyng, F M

    2016-06-23

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer affecting women worldwide but mortality can be decreased by early detection of pre-malignant lesions. The Pap smear test is the most commonly used method in cervical cancer screening programmes. Although specificity is high for this test, it is widely acknowledged that sensitivity can be poor mainly due to the subjective nature of the test. There is a need for new objective tests for the early detection of pre-malignant cervical lesions. Over the past two decades, Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising new technology for cancer screening and diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of Raman spectroscopy for cervical cancer screening using both Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) and Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion (SIL) classification terminology. ThinPrep® Pap samples were recruited from a cervical screening population. Raman spectra were recorded from single cell nuclei and subjected to multivariate statistical analysis. Normal and abnormal ThinPrep® samples were discriminated based on the biochemical fingerprint of the cells using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Principal Component Analysis - Linear Discriminant Analysis (PCA-LDA) was employed to build classification models based on either CIN or SIL terminology. This study has shown that Raman spectroscopy can be successfully applied to the study of routine cervical cytology samples from a cervical screening programme and that the use of CIN terminology resulted in improved sensitivity for high grade cases. PMID:27032537

  9. Polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy study of pentacene thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, Ingrid; Frigout, Alexandre; Tondelier, Denis; Geffroy, Bernard; Ossikovski, Razvigor; Bonnassieux, Yvan

    2009-03-01

    We report on polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy study of two pentacene thin films exhibiting different microstructures: a well-ordered sample and a more disordered one. We have investigated the frequency range of the intramolecular C-H bending modes in the plane of the pentacene molecule and proposed an interpretation of the Raman spectra. The use of symmetry properties of the two intramolecular (uncoupled) modes allowed us to unambiguously identify it among the five main contributions observed in this spectral range. The three other modes were assumed to be resulting from molecular coupling effect owing to their different behavior upon the samples microstructure.

  10. [Laser Raman Spectroscopy and Its Application in Gas Hydrate Studies].

    PubMed

    Fu, Juan; Wu, Neng-you; Lu, Hai-long; Wu, Dai-dai; Su, Qiu-cheng

    2015-11-01

    Gas hydrates are important potential energy resources. Microstructural characterization of gas hydrate can provide information to study the mechanism of gas hydrate formation and to support the exploitation and application of gas hydrate technology. This article systemly introduces the basic principle of laser Raman spectroscopy and summarizes its application in gas hydrate studies. Based on Raman results, not only can the information about gas composition and structural type be deduced, but also the occupancies of large and small cages and even hydration number can be calculated from the relative intensities of Raman peaks. By using the in-situ analytical technology, laser Raman specstropy can be applied to characterize the formation and decomposition processes of gas hydrate at microscale, for example the enclathration and leaving of gas molecules into/from its cages, to monitor the changes in gas concentration and gas solubility during hydrate formation and decomposition, and to identify phase changes in the study system. Laser Raman in-situ analytical technology has also been used in determination of hydrate structure and understanding its changing process under the conditions of ultra high pressure. Deep-sea in-situ Raman spectrometer can be employed for the in-situ analysis of the structures of natural gas hydrate and their formation environment. Raman imaging technology can be applied to specify the characteristics of crystallization and gas distribution over hydrate surface. With the development of laser Raman technology and its combination with other instruments, it will become more powerful and play a more significant role in the microscopic study of gas hydrate. PMID:26978895

  11. Tomographic laser absorption spectroscopy using Tikhonov regularization.

    PubMed

    Guha, Avishek; Schoegl, Ingmar

    2014-12-01

    The application of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) to flames with nonhomogeneous temperature and concentration fields is an area where only few studies exist. Experimental work explores the performance of tomographic reconstructions of species concentration and temperature profiles from wavelength-modulated TDLAS measurements within the plume of an axisymmetric McKenna burner. Water vapor transitions at 1391.67 and 1442.67 nm are probed using calibration-free wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second harmonic detection (WMS-2f). A single collimated laser beam is swept parallel to the burner surface, where scans yield pairs of line-of-sight (LOS) data at multiple radial locations. Radial profiles of absorption data are reconstructed using Tikhonov regularized Abel inversion, which suppresses the amplification of experimental noise that is typically observed for reconstructions with high spatial resolution. Based on spectral data reconstructions, temperatures and mole fractions are calculated point-by-point. Here, a least-squares approach addresses difficulties due to modulation depths that cannot be universally optimized due to a nonuniform domain. Experimental results show successful reconstructions of temperature and mole fraction profiles based on two-transition, nonoptimally modulated WMS-2f and Tikhonov regularized Abel inversion, and thus validate the technique as a viable diagnostic tool for flame measurements. PMID:25607968

  12. Noninvasive identification of materials inside USP vials with Raman spectroscopy and a Raman spectral library.

    PubMed

    McCreery, R L; Horn, A J; Spencer, J; Jefferson, E

    1998-01-01

    A commercial dispersive Raman spectrometer operating at 785 nm with a CCD detector was used to acquire spectra of USP reference materials inside amber USP vials. The laser and collection beams were directed through the bottom of the vials, resulting in a 60% loss of signal. The Raman shift was calibrated with a 4-acetamidophenol standard, and spectral response was corrected with a luminescent standard. After these corrections, the Raman spectra obtained inside the USP vial and on open powders differed by less than 5%. A spectral library of 309 reference materials was constructed, with spectral acquisition times ranging from 1 to 60 s. Of these, 8% had significant fluorescent background but observable Raman features, while 3% showed only fluorescence. A blind test of 26 unknowns revealed the accuracy of the library search to be 88-96%, depending on search algorithm, and 100% if operator discretion was permitted. The tolerance of the library search to degraded signal-to-noise ratio, resolution, and Raman shift accuracy were tested, and the search was very robust. The results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy provides a rapid, noninvasive technique for compound identification. PMID:9452960

  13. Chemical concentration measurement in blood serum and urine samples using liquid-core optical fiber Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dahu; Berger, Andrew J.

    2007-04-01

    We report measurements of chemical concentrations in clinical blood serum and urine samples using liquid-core optical fiber (LCOF) Raman spectroscopy to increase the collected signal strength. Both Raman and absorption spectra were acquired in the near-infrared region using the LCOF geometry. Spectra of 71 blood serum and 61 urine samples were regressed via partial least squares against reference analyzer values. Significant correlation was found between predicted and reference concentrations for 13 chemicals. Using absorption data to normalize the LCOF enhancement made the results more accurate. The experimental geometry is well suited for high-volume and automated chemical analysis of clear biofluids.

  14. Raman spectroscopy investigation of magnetite nanoparticles in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavov, L.; Abrashev, M. V.; Merodiiska, T.; Gelev, Ch.; Vandenberghe, R. E.; Markova-Deneva, I.; Nedkov, I.

    2010-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to investigate magnetite nanoparticles dispersed in two types of β-cyclodextrin suspensions. An approach is presented for characterization of the magnetic core in liquid surrounding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The effect of elevating laser power on the structural stability and chemical composition of magnetite in the ferrofluids is discussed. The data are compared with data from dry by-products from the fluids. Powder samples undergo total phase transition from magnetite to hematite at laser power of 1.95 mW. The same nanoparticles in the fluid undergo transformation at 9 mW, but no hematite positions appear throughout that investigation. The Raman spectra revealed that the main phase of the magnetic core in the fluids is magnetite. That is indicated by a strong and non-diminishing in intensity peak at 670 cm -1. A second phase is present at the nanoparticle's surface with Raman spectroscopy unveiling maghemite-like and small fractions of goethite-like structures. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy investigations confirm deviations in the surface structure and also point to the fact that the oxidation process starts at an early stage after formation of the nanoparticles. The analyses of the infrared data also show that β-cyclodextrin molecules retain their cyclic character and the coating does not affect the oxidation process once the particles are evicted from the fluids. A Mössbauer spectroscopy measurement on a ferrofluidic sample is also presented.

  15. [Joint Analyses of Na2SO4 Solution by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Raman Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-jia; Lu, Yuan; Liu, Chun-hao; Zheng, Rong-er

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic sensor is becoming an important issue for the deep-sea exploration due to the advantages of multi-specie, multi-phases and stand-off detection. Different approach have been developing in recent years based on LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) and Raman spectroscopy since Raman-LIBS are complementary techniques with the similar components and the capability of molecular and elementary analysis. In this work, we built a LIBS-Raman system and detected Na2SO4 in aqueous solution to evaluate the potential ocean application. With the same laser, spectrometer and detector, a hybrid of Raman and LIBS system was developed to realize the detection of anions and cations in the seawater. The optics was composed by two parts. Raman channel and LIBS channel, and the signal was collected by a Y type optical fiber bundle. The signal from two channels was separated by imaging on different arrays of the CCD detector. The Raman spectra of SO4(2-) and LIBS spectra of Na was successfully detected simultaneously when the pulse energy was above 3.6 mJ. However, due to the strong bremsstrahlung radiation of LIBS, the signal to noise ratio of Raman was significantly decreased as the laser energy increasing. The results manifested the great potential of Raman-LIBS combination for the underwater detection. PMID:27228778

  16. Optical Coherence Tomography and Raman Spectroscopy of the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J W; Zawadzki, R J; Liu, R; Chan, J; Lane, S; Werner, J S

    2009-01-16

    Imaging the structure and correlating it with the biochemical content of the retina holds promise for fundamental research and for clinical applications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is commonly used to image the 3D structure of the retina and while the added functionality of biochemical analysis afforded by Raman scattering could provide critical molecular signatures for clinicians and researchers, there are many technical challenges to combining these imaging modalities. We present an ex vivo OCT microscope combined with Raman spectroscopy capable of collecting morphological and molecular information about a sample simultaneously. The combined instrument will be used to investigate remaining technical challenges to combine these imaging modalities, such as the laser power levels needed to achieve a Raman signal above the noise level without damaging the sample.

  17. Comparison of Raman spectroscopy equipment for tissues and biofluids analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khristoforova, Yu. A.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    In this study we demonstrate a comparative analysis of blood serum and normal human skin by Raman spectroscopy with application of different spectroscopic equipment. For serum analysis we measure a total concentration of proteins and compared it with intensity of 1002 cm-1 Raman peak. Standard deviation for protein control in blood serum differed from 7.4% to 19% for different spectroscopic setups. For human skin control we used three Raman peaks near 1340, 1450 and 1650 cm-1. Measurements of different skin samples were analyzed on the phase plane to find areas corresponding to the normal skin. Taking into account the different sensitivities of the detected signal with different detectors in the spectral range 810-950 nm we calculated correction coefficients allowed for making comparison of spectral measurements made on different spectrometers with ranging not exceeding 21%.

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of creatinine in silver colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Chen, Jiesi; Wu, Yanan; Chen, Yanping; Pan, Jianji; Lei, Jinping; Chen, Yongjian; Sun, Liqing; Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong

    2011-11-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technology has already made great progress in bio-molecule detection. It can make the target molecules strongly absorbed onto the surface of metal nanoparticles, and then the Raman signal of its own has been greatly enhanced through physical and chemical enhancement mechanisms. We report the SERS spectra of creatinine in silver colloid, and study the silver colloid enhanced effects on the Raman scattering of creatinine. We can also find that creatinine concentration is linearly related to its SERS peak intensity and the detection limit of creatinine silver sol is found to be 10 mg/dl. In conclusion, we can observe that the silver colloid has very good enhanced effects for the creatinine. The potential applications of SERS in quantitative measurement of the creatinine liquor are demonstrated. The result shows that the SERS approach would provide a unique and fast test method for creatinine detection.

  19. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of creatinine in silver colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Chen, Jiesi; Wu, Yanan; Chen, Yanping; Pan, Jianji; Lei, Jinping; Chen, Yongjian; Sun, Liqing; Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong

    2012-03-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technology has already made great progress in bio-molecule detection. It can make the target molecules strongly absorbed onto the surface of metal nanoparticles, and then the Raman signal of its own has been greatly enhanced through physical and chemical enhancement mechanisms. We report the SERS spectra of creatinine in silver colloid, and study the silver colloid enhanced effects on the Raman scattering of creatinine. We can also find that creatinine concentration is linearly related to its SERS peak intensity and the detection limit of creatinine silver sol is found to be 10 mg/dl. In conclusion, we can observe that the silver colloid has very good enhanced effects for the creatinine. The potential applications of SERS in quantitative measurement of the creatinine liquor are demonstrated. The result shows that the SERS approach would provide a unique and fast test method for creatinine detection.

  20. Influence of Culture Media on Microbial Fingerprints Using Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mlynáriková, Katarína; Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Růžička, Filip; Ježek, Jan; Hároniková, Andrea; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has a broad range of applications across numerous scientific fields, including microbiology. Our work here monitors the influence of culture media on the Raman spectra of clinically important microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans). Choosing an adequate medium may enhance the reproducibility of the method as well as simplifying the data processing and the evaluation. We tested four different media per organism depending on the nutritional requirements and clinical usage directly on a Petri dish. Some of the media have a significant influence on the microbial fingerprint (Roosvelt-Park Institute Medium, CHROMagar) and should not be used for the acquisition of Raman spectra. It was found that the most suitable medium for microbiological experiments regarding these organisms was Mueller-Hinton agar. PMID:26610516

  1. Influence of Culture Media on Microbial Fingerprints Using Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mlynáriková, Katarína; Samek, Ota; Bernatová, Silvie; Růžička, Filip; Ježek, Jan; Hároniková, Andrea; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Holá, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has a broad range of applications across numerous scientific fields, including microbiology. Our work here monitors the influence of culture media on the Raman spectra of clinically important microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans). Choosing an adequate medium may enhance the reproducibility of the method as well as simplifying the data processing and the evaluation. We tested four different media per organism depending on the nutritional requirements and clinical usage directly on a Petri dish. Some of the media have a significant influence on the microbial fingerprint (Roosvelt-Park Institute Medium, CHROMagar) and should not be used for the acquisition of Raman spectra. It was found that the most suitable medium for microbiological experiments regarding these organisms was Mueller-Hinton agar. PMID:26610516

  2. On optical depth profiling using confocal Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Freebody, N A; Vaughan, A S; Macdonald, A M

    2010-04-01

    Until 2006 the performance of confocal Raman spectroscopy depth profiling was typically described and modeled through the application of geometrical optics, including refraction at the surface, to explain the degree of resolution and the precise form of the depth profile obtained from transparent and semicrystalline materials. Consequently a range of techniques, physical and analytical, was suggested to avoid the errors thus encountered in order to improve the practice of Raman spectroscopy, if not the understanding of the underlying mechanisms. These approaches were completely unsuccessful in accounting for the precise form of the depth profile, the fact that spectra obtained from laminated samples always contain characteristic peaks from all materials present both well above and below the focal point and that spectra can be obtained when focused some 40 mum above the sample surface. This paper provides further evidence that the physical processes underlying Raman spectroscopy are better modeled and explained through the concept of an extended illuminated volume contributing to the final Raman spectrum and modeled through a photon scattering approach rather than a point focus ray optics approach. The power of this numerical model lies in its ability to incorporate, simultaneously, the effects of degree of refraction at the surface (whether using a dry or oil objective lens), the degree of attenuation due to scatter by the bulk of the material, the Raman scattering efficiency of the material, and surface roughness effects. Through this we are now able to explain why even removing surface aberration and refraction effects through the use of oil immersion objective lenses cannot reliably ensure that the material sampled is only that at or close to the point of focus of the laser. Furthermore we show that the precise form of the depth profile is affected by the degree of flatness of the surface of the sample. Perhaps surprisingly, we show that the degree of flatness

  3. [Studies on nano-diamond prepared by explosive detonation by Raman and infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wen, Chao; Jin, Zhi-Hao; Liu, Xiao-Xin; Li, Xun; Guan, Jin-Qing; Sun, De-Yu; Lin, Ying-Rui; Tang, Shi-Ying; Zhou, Gang; Lin, Jun-De

    2005-05-01

    Nano-diamond was synthesized by TNT/RDX explosives detonation in a steel chamber and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), laser Raman spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. XRD results indicate that nano-diamond has cubic diamond structure. The parameter of unit cell of nano-diamond is 0.359 23 nm and is 0.72% larger than that of the bulk diamond. The high-density defects and other impurity atoms in the nano-diamond structure may lead to the large lattice constant. The examination results of Raman spectra show that the Raman band is broader and shifts to l ow frequency by 3 cm(-1), because the size of nano-diamond reaches nanometer order. There is little graphite in the nano-diamond. There are two peaks in FTIR of the nano-diamond, which are characteristic peaks of diamond at 1 262 and 1 134 cm(-1). Besides these two peaks, there are six peaks at 3 422, 1 643, 2 971, 2 930, 2 857 and 1 788 cm(-1) respectively. The FTIR bands at 2 930 and 2 857 cm(-1) are the antisymmetrical and symmetrical stretch vibration absorption spectra of CH2 respectively. The 3 422 cm(-1) is the stretch vibration absorption peak of O-H. The 1 634 cm(-1) confirms that there are H2O in the nano-diamond. The 2 971 cm(-1) is the antisymmetrical stretch vibration absorption peak of CH3. The 1 788 cm(-1) is the stretch vibration absorption peak of C=O. These indicate that there are H and O elements in the nano-diamond. From the mechanism of the nano-diamond, the authors discuss the reason for the vibration absorption peaks of O-H, CH2, CH3, and C=O, existing in the FTIR of the nano-diamond. PMID:16128062

  4. Far- and near-field properties of gold nanoshells studied by photoacoustic and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Weber, V; Feis, A; Gellini, C; Pilot, R; Salvi, P R; Signorini, R

    2015-09-01

    Gold nanoshells, with a silica core and different core and shell dimensions, have been extensively investigated. Optical far-field properties, namely extinction and absorption, have been separately determined by means of spectrophotometry and photoacoustic spectroscopy, respectively, in the 440-900 nm range. The enhancement factor for surface-enhanced Raman scattering, which is related to near-field effects, has been measured from 568 to 920 nm. The absorption contribution to extinction decreases as the overall diameter increases. Moreover, absorption and scattering display different spectral distributions, the latter being red shifted. The Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering enhancement profile, measured using thiobenzoic acid as a Raman probe, is further shifted to the red. The latter result suggests that the enhancement is dominated by the presence of hot spots, which are possibly related to the surface roughness of gold nanoshell particles. PMID:25559555

  5. Raman Spectroscopy-Compatible Inactivation Method for Pathogenic Endospores▿

    PubMed Central

    Stöckel, S.; Schumacher, W.; Meisel, S.; Elschner, M.; Rösch, P.; Popp, J.

    2010-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is a fast and sensitive tool for the detection, classification, and identification of biological organisms. The vibrational spectrum inherently serves as a fingerprint of the biochemical composition of each bacterium and thus makes identification at the species level, or even the subspecies level, possible. Therefore, microorganisms in areas susceptible to bacterial contamination, e.g., clinical environments or food-processing technology, can be sensed. Within the scope of point-of-care-testing also, detection of intentionally released biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) agents, such as Bacillus anthracis endospores, or their products is attainable. However, no Raman spectroscopy-compatible inactivation method for the notoriously resistant Bacillus endospores has been elaborated so far. In this work we present an inactivation protocol for endospores that permits, on the one hand, sufficient microbial inactivation and, on the other hand, the recording of Raman spectroscopic signatures of single endospores, making species-specific identification by means of highly sophisticated chemometrical methods possible. Several physical and chemical inactivation methods were assessed, and eventually treatment with 20% formaldehyde proved to be superior to the other methods in terms of sporicidal capacity and information conservation in the Raman spectra. The latter fact has been verified by successfully using self-learning machines (such as support vector machines or artificial neural networks) to identify inactivated B. anthracis-related endospores with adequate accuracies within the range of the limited model database employed. PMID:20208030

  6. Screening and classification of ordinary chondrites by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittarello, Lidia; Baert, Kitty; Debaille, Vinciane; Claeys, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Classification of ordinary chondrite meteorites generally implies (1) determining the chemical group by the composition in endmembers of olivine and pyroxene, and (2) identifying the petrologic group by microstructural features. The composition of olivine and pyroxene is commonly obtained by microprobe analyses or oil immersion of mineral separates. We propose Raman spectroscopy as an alternative technique to determine the endmember content of olivine and pyroxene in ordinary chondrites, by using the link between the wavelength shift of selected characteristic peaks in the spectra of olivine and pyroxene and the Mg/Fe ratio in these phases. The existing correlation curve has been recalculated from the Raman spectrum of reference minerals of known composition and further refined for the range of chondritic compositions. Although the technique is not as accurate as the microprobe for determining the composition of olivine and pyroxene, for most of the samples the chemical group can be easily determined by Raman spectroscopy. Blind tests with ordinary chondrites of different provenance, weathering, and shock stages have confirmed the potential of the method. Therefore, we suggest that a preliminary screening and the classification of most of the equilibrated ordinary chondrites can be carried out using an optical microscope equipped with a Raman spectrometer.

  7. Advances in Raman spectroscopy for explosive identification in aviation security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, Javier D.; Brown, Christopher D.; Jalenak, Wayne

    2007-04-01

    In the operational airport environment, the rapid identification of potentially hazardous materials such as improvised explosive devices, chemical warfare agents and flammable and explosive liquids is increasingly critical. Peroxide-based explosives pose a particularly insidious threat because they can be made from commonly available and relatively innocuous household chemicals, such as bleach and hydrogen peroxide. Raman spectroscopy has been validated as a valuable tool for rapid identification of chemicals, explosives, and narcotics and their precursors while allowing "line-of-sight" interrogation through bottles or other translucent containers. This enables safe identification of both precursor substances, such as acetone, and end-products, such as TATP, without direct sampling, contamination and exposure by security personnel. To date, Raman systems have been laboratory-based, requiring careful operation and maintenance by technology experts. The capital and ongoing expenses of these systems is also significant. Recent advances in Raman component technologies have dramatically reduced the footprint and cost, while improving the reliability and ease of use of Raman spectroscopy systems. Such technologies are not only bringing the lab to the field, but are also protecting civilians and security personnel in the process.

  8. Raman spectroscopy of ball-milled TiO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajović, A.; Stubičar, M.; Ivanda, M.; Furić, K.

    2001-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy was applied to study structural and dimensional changes during high-energy ball milling of TiO 2 anatase. Milling was performed for up to 10 h using two different sets of grinding tools (wolfram carbide (WC) and agate). The diminution of the TiO 2 particle to nanometric size was monitoring by low-frequency Raman spectroscopy. The nanometric sizes were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After short milling time by WC the bands of high-pressure TiO 2 II phase (α-PbO 2 structure) were detected in Raman spectrum. Prolonged milling time was needed for transformation to rutil. When milling was performed by agate, the time necessary for both phase transitions was longer, presumably because of lower ball-to-powder weight ratio. The low-frequency Raman band of the prolonged milled samples was broad, which suggests the wide dispersion in nano-particle dimensions. The position of the low-frequency band in longer-milled samples indicated dimensions smaller than 20 nm, since the diameter of the particle is inversely proportional to the low-frequency mode of the spherical particles. These results were in agreement with the TEM results.

  9. Breast cancer diagnosis using FT-RAMAN spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitar, Renata A.; Martin, Airton A.; Criollo, Carlos J. T.; Ramalho, Leandra N. Z.

    2005-04-01

    In this study FT-RAMAN spectra of breast tissue from 35 patients were obtained and separated into nine groups for histopathologic analysis, which are as follows: normal breast tissue, fibrocystic condition, in situ ductal carcinoma, in situ ductal carcinoma with necrosis, infiltrate ductal carcinoma, infiltrate inflammatory ductal carcinoma, infiltrate medullar ductal carcinoma, infiltrate colloid ductal carcinoma, and infiltrate lobular carcinoma. Using spectrum averages taken from each group a qualitative analysis was performed to compare these molecular compositions to those known to be present in abnormal concentrations in pathological situations, e.g. the development of desmoplastic lesions with a stroma of dense collagen in tumoral breast tissues which substitute adipose stroma of non-diseased breast tissue. The band identified as amino acids, offered basis for observation in the existence of alterations in the proteins, thus proving Raman Spectroscopic capacity in identification of primary structures of proteins; secondary protein structure was also identified through the peptic links, Amide I and Amide III, which have also been identified by various authors. Alterations were also identified in the peaks and bandwidths of nucleic acids demonstrating the utilization of Raman Spectroscopy in the analysis of the cells nucleus manifestations. All studies involving Raman Spectroscopy and breast cancer have shown excellent result reliability and therefore a basis for the technical theory.

  10. Challenges Analyzing Gypsum on Mars by Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Craig P; Olcott Marshall, Alison

    2015-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy can provide chemical information about organic and inorganic substances quickly and nondestructively with little to no sample preparation, thus making it an ideal instrument for Mars rover missions. The ESA ExoMars planetary mission scheduled for launch in 2018 will contain a miniaturized Raman spectrometer (RLS) as part of the Pasteur payload operating with a continuous wave (CW) laser emitting at 532 nm. In addition, NASA is independently developing two miniaturized Raman spectrometers for the upcoming Mars 2020 rover mission, one of which is a remote (stand-off) Raman spectrometer that uses a pulse-gated 532 nm excitation system (SuperCam). The other is an in situ Raman spectrometer that employs a CW excitation laser emitting at 248.6 nm (SHERLOC). Recently, it has been shown with analyses by Curiosity that Gale Crater contains significantly elevated concentrations of transition metals such as Cr and Mn. Significantly, these transition metals are known to undergo fluorescence emission in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Consequently, samples containing these metals could be problematic for the successful acquisition of fluorescence-free Raman spectra when using a CW 532 nm excitation source. Here, we investigate one analog environment, with a similar mineralogy and sedimentology to that observed in martian environments, as well as elevated Cr contents, to ascertain the best excitation wavelength to successfully collect fluorescence-free spectra from Mars-like samples. Our results clearly show that CW near-infrared laser excitation emitting at 785 nm is better suited to the collection of fluorescence-free Raman spectra than would be a CW laser emitting at 532 nm. PMID:26317670

  11. In Vivo Blood Glucose Quantification Using Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jingwei; Lin, Manman; Li, Yongqing; Li, Xue; Liu, Junxian; Liang, Jianpin; Yao, Huilu

    2012-01-01

    We here propose a novel Raman spectroscopy method that permits the noninvasive measurement of blood glucose concentration. To reduce the effects of the strong background signals produced by surrounding tissue and to obtain the fingerprint Raman lines formed by blood analytes, a laser was focused on the blood in vessels in the skin. The Raman spectra were collected transcutaneously. Characteristic peaks of glucose (1125 cm-1) and hemoglobin (1549 cm-1) were observed. Hemoglobin concentration served as an internal standard, and the ratio of the peaks that appeared at 1125 cm-1 and 1549 cm-1 peaks was used to calculate the concentration of blood glucose. We studied three mouse subjects whose blood glucose levels became elevated over a period of 2 hours using a glucose test assay. During the test, 25 Raman spectra were collected transcutaneously and glucose reference values were provided by a blood glucose meter. Results clearly showed the relationship between Raman intensity and concentration. The release curves were approximately linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.91. This noninvasive methodology may be useful for the study of blood glucose in vivo. PMID:23133555

  12. NIR Raman spectroscopy in medicine and biology: results and aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, B.; Dippel, B.; Erb, I.; Keller, S.; Löchte, T.; Schulz, H.; Tatsch, E.; Wessel, S.

    1999-05-01

    Analyses of biomaterial by 'classical' Raman spectroscopy with excitation in the visible range has not been possible since the fluorescence of many essential constituents of all animal and plant cells and tissues overlays the Raman spectra completely. Fluorescence, however, is virtually avoided, when Raman spectra are excited with the Nd : YAG laser line at 1064 nm. Within seven dissertations we explored different fields of potential applications to medical diagnostics. Identification and qualification of tissues and cells is possible. Tumors show small but significant differences to normal tissues; in order to develop a reliable tool for tumor diagnostics more research is necessary, especially a collection of reference spectra in a data bank is needed. Raman spectra of biomineralization structures in teeth and bones show pathological tissues as well as the development of new mineralized structures. NIR Raman spectra of flowers, leaves, and fruit show, without special preparation, their constituents: alkaloids, the essential oils, natural dyes, flavors, spices and drugs. They allow application to taxonomy, optimizing plant breeding and control of food.

  13. Biophysical basis for noninvasive skin cancer detection using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xu; Moy, Austin J.; Markey, Mia K.; Fox, Matthew C.; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) is proving to be a valuable tool for real time noninvasive skin cancer detection via optical fiber probe. However, current methods utilizing RS for skin cancer diagnosis rely on statistically based algorithms to provide tissue classification and do not elucidate the underlying biophysical changes of skin tissue. Therefore, we aim to use RS to explore skin biochemical and structural characteristics and then correlate the Raman spectrum of skin tissue with its disease state. We have built a custom confocal micro-Raman spectrometer system with an 830nm laser light. The high resolution capability of the system allows us to measure spectroscopic features from individual tissue components in situ. Raman images were collected from human skin samples from Mohs surgical biopsy, which were then compared with confocal laser scanning, two-photon fluorescence and hematoxylin and eosin-stained images to develop a linear model of skin tissue Raman spectra. In this model, macroscopic tissue spectra obtained from RS fiber probe were fit into a linear combination of individual basis spectra of primary skin constituents. The fit coefficient of the model explains the biophysical changes spanning a range of normal and various disease states. The model allows for determining parameters similar to that a pathologist is familiar reading and will be a significant guidance in developing RS diagnostic decision schemes.

  14. Exploitation of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a remote chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Chen, C.L.

    1995-08-01

    We have discussed recent experimental results using a resonance-Raman-based LIDAR system as a remote chemical sensor. This spectroscopy has the fundamental advantage that it is based on optical fingerprints that are insensitive to environmental perturbations. By taking advantage of resonance enhancement, which 6 orders-of-magnitude, can be as large as 4 to an increased sensing range for a given chemical concentration or lower detection limit for a given stand-off distance can be realized. The success discussed above can in part be traced back to the use of new state-of-the-art technologies which, only recently, have allowed the phenomenon of resonance-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to be fully exploited as a remote chemical sensor platform. Since many chemicals have electronic transitions in the UV/IS, it is expected that many will have pronounced resonance enhancements.

  15. Carbon Raman Spectroscopy of 36 Inter-Planetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busemann, H.; Nittler, L. R.; Davidson, J.; Franchi, I. A.; Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Palma, R. L.; Pepin, R. O.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool to determine the degree of order of organic material (OM) in extra-terrestrial matter. As shown for meteoritic OM [e.g., 2], peak parameters of D and G bands are a measure of thermal alteration, causing graphitization (order), and amorphization, e.g. during protoplanetary irradiation, causing disorder. Th e most pristine interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) may come from comets. However, their exact provenance is unknown. IDP collection during Earth?s passage through comet Grigg-Skjellerup?s dust stream ("GSC" collectors) may increase the probability of collecting fresh IDPs from a known, cometary source. We used Raman spectroscopy to compare 21 GSC-IDPs with 15 IDPs collected at different periods, and found that the variation among GSC-IDPs is larger than among non-GSC IDPs, with the most primitive IDPs being mostly GSC-IDPs.

  16. In Ovo Sexing of Domestic Chicken Eggs by Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Galli, Roberta; Preusse, Grit; Uckermann, Ortrud; Bartels, Thomas; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald

    2016-09-01

    Male birds of egg-laying hen strains have no commercial value and are culled immediately after hatching, raising concerns for animal welfare. Existing experimental methods for in ovo sexing require taking samples and are applicable after embryos' sexual differentiation. We demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy enables contactless in ovo sex determination of the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus f. dom.) already at day 3.5 of egg incubation. A sexing accuracy of 90% was obtained by analyzing the spectra of blood circulating in the extraembryonic vessels. The measurement is damage-free and barely affects the hatching rate. Sex recognition is achieved before the onset of sensitivity. Therefore, Raman spectroscopy provides an alternative to the culling of 1-day-old male chicks in laying hen production. PMID:27512829

  17. Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy in Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Thomas; Wondergem, Caterina S; Kumar, Naresh; van den Berg, Albert; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-04-21

    Surface- and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS and TERS) techniques exhibit highly localized chemical sensitivity, making them ideal for studying chemical reactions, including processes at catalytic surfaces. Catalyst structures, adsorbates, and reaction intermediates can be observed in low quantities at hot spots where electromagnetic fields are the strongest, providing ample opportunities to elucidate reaction mechanisms. Moreover, under ideal measurement conditions, it can even be used to trigger chemical reactions. However, factors such as substrate instability and insufficient signal enhancement still limit the applicability of SERS and TERS in the field of catalysis. By the use of sophisticated colloidal synthesis methods and advanced techniques, such as shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, these challenges could be overcome. PMID:27075515

  18. Detection of liquid hazardous molecules using linearly focused Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Soo Gyeong; Chung, Jin Hyuk

    2013-05-01

    In security, it is an important issue to analyze hazardous materials in sealed bottles. Particularly, prompt nondestructive checking of sealed liquid bottles in a very short time at the checkpoints of crowded malls, stadiums, or airports is of particular importance to prevent probable terrorist attack using liquid explosives. Aiming to design and fabricate a detector for liquid explosives, we have used linearly focused Raman spectroscopy to analyze liquid materials in transparent or semi-transparent bottles without opening their caps. Continuous lasers with 532 nm wavelength and 58 mW/130 mW beam energy have been used for the Raman spectroscopy. Various hazardous materials including flammable liquids and explosive materials have successfully been distinguished and identified within a couple of seconds. We believe that our technique will be one of suitable methods for fast screening of liquid materials in sealed bottles.

  19. Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy in Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Surface- and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS and TERS) techniques exhibit highly localized chemical sensitivity, making them ideal for studying chemical reactions, including processes at catalytic surfaces. Catalyst structures, adsorbates, and reaction intermediates can be observed in low quantities at hot spots where electromagnetic fields are the strongest, providing ample opportunities to elucidate reaction mechanisms. Moreover, under ideal measurement conditions, it can even be used to trigger chemical reactions. However, factors such as substrate instability and insufficient signal enhancement still limit the applicability of SERS and TERS in the field of catalysis. By the use of sophisticated colloidal synthesis methods and advanced techniques, such as shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, these challenges could be overcome. PMID:27075515

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy applied to food safety.

    PubMed

    Craig, Ana Paula; Franca, Adriana S; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is an advanced Raman technique that enhances the vibrational spectrum of molecules adsorbed on or in the vicinity of metal particles and/or surfaces. Because of its readiness, sensitivity, and minimum sample preparation requirements, SERS is being considered as a powerful technique for food inspection. Key aspects of food-safety assurance, spectroscopy methods, and SERS are briefly discussed in an extended introduction of this review. The recent and potential advances in SERS are highlighted in sections that deal with the (a) detection of food-borne pathogenic microorganisms and (b) the detection of food contaminants and adulteration, concentrated specifically on antibiotics, drugs, hormones, melamine, and pesticides. This review provides an outlook of the work done and a perspective on the future directions of SERS as a reliable tool for food-safety assessment. PMID:23297774

  1. Optimizing the Laser-Pulse Configuration for Coherent Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestov, Dmitry; Murawski, Robert K.; Ariunbold, Gombojav O.; Wang, Xi; Zhi, Miaochan; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Sautenkov, Vladimir A.; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.; Dogariu, Arthur; Huang, Yu; Scully, Marlan O.

    2007-04-01

    We introduce a hybrid technique that combines the robustness of frequency-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) with the advantages of time-resolved CARS spectroscopy. Instantaneous coherent broadband excitation of several characteristic molecular vibrations and the subsequent probing of these vibrations by an optimally shaped time-delayed narrowband laser pulse help to suppress the nonresonant background and to retrieve the species-specific signal. We used this technique for coherent Raman spectroscopy of sodium dipicolinate powder, which is similar to calcium dipicolinate (a marker molecule for bacterial endospores, such as Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus anthracis), and we demonstrated a rapid and highly specific detection scheme that works even in the presence of multiple scattering.

  2. Optimizing the laser-pulse configuration for coherent Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pestov, Dmitry; Murawski, Robert K; Ariunbold, Gombojav O; Wang, Xi; Zhi, Miaochan; Sokolov, Alexei V; Sautenkov, Vladimir A; Rostovtsev, Yuri V; Dogariu, Arthur; Huang, Yu; Scully, Marlan O

    2007-04-13

    We introduce a hybrid technique that combines the robustness of frequency-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) with the advantages of time-resolved CARS spectroscopy. Instantaneous coherent broadband excitation of several characteristic molecular vibrations and the subsequent probing of these vibrations by an optimally shaped time-delayed narrowband laser pulse help to suppress the nonresonant background and to retrieve the species-specific signal. We used this technique for coherent Raman spectroscopy of sodium dipicolinate powder, which is similar to calcium dipicolinate (a marker molecule for bacterial endospores, such as Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus anthracis), and we demonstrated a rapid and highly specific detection scheme that works even in the presence of multiple scattering. PMID:17431177

  3. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: From concepts to practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Kurouski, Dmitry; Pozzi, Eric A.; Chiang, Naihao; Hersam, Mark C.; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2016-08-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is a powerful technique that integrates the vibrational fingerprinting of Raman spectroscopy and the sub-nanometer resolution of scanning probe microscopy (SPM). As a result, TERS is capable of obtaining chemical maps of analyzed specimens with exceptional lateral resolution. This is extremely valuable for the study of interactions between molecules and substrates, in addition to structural characterization of biological objects, such as viruses and amyloid fibrils, 2D polymeric materials, and monitoring electrochemical and photo-catalytic processes. In this mini-review, we discuss the most significant advances of TERS, including: super high resolution chemical imaging, monitoring of catalytic processes, incorporation of pulsed-excitation techniques, single-site electrochemistry, biosensing, and art conservation. We begin with a short overview of TERS, comparing it with other surface analytical techniques, followed by an overview of recent developments and future applications in TERS.

  4. Raman/FTIR spectroscopy of oil shale retort gases

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J H; Monaco, S B; Sanborn, R H; Hirschfeld, T B; Taylor, J R

    1982-08-01

    A Raman facility was assembled in order to aid in the evaluation of the feasibility of using Raman or FTIR spectroscopy for analyzing gas mixtures of interest in oil shale. Applications considered in oil shale research included both retort monitoring and laboratory kinetic studies. Both techniques gave limits of detection between 10 and 1000 ppM for ten representative pertinent gases. Both techniques are inferior as a general analytical technique for oil shale gas analysis in comparison with mass spectroscopy, which had detection limits between 1 and 50 ppM for the same gases. The conclusion of the feasibility study was to recommend that mass spectroscopic techniques be used for analyzing gases of interest to oil shale.

  5. Identification of active fluorescence stained bacteria by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Mario; Beyer, Beatrice; Pietsch, Christian; Radt, Benno; Harz, Michaela; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2008-04-01

    Microorganisms can be found everywhere e.g. in food both as useful ingredients or harmful contaminations causing food spoilage. Therefore, a fast and easy to handle analysis method is needed to detect bacteria in different kinds of samples like meat, juice or air to decide if the sample is contaminated by harmful microorganisms. Conventional identification methods in microbiology require always cultivation and therefore are time consuming. In this contribution we present an analysis approach to identify fluorescence stained bacteria on strain level by means of Raman spectroscopy. The stained bacteria are highlighted and can be localized easier against a complex sample environment e.g. in food. The use of Raman spectroscopy in combination with chemometrical methods allows the identification of single bacteria within minutes.

  6. Modulated Raman Spectroscopy for Enhanced Cancer Diagnosis at the Cellular Level

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Anna Chiara; Dholakia, Kishan; Mazilu, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is emerging as a promising and novel biophotonics tool for non-invasive, real-time diagnosis of tissue and cell abnormalities. However, the presence of a strong fluorescence background is a key issue that can detract from the use of Raman spectroscopy in routine clinical care. The review summarizes the state-of-the-art methods to remove the fluorescence background and explores recent achievements to address this issue obtained with modulated Raman spectroscopy. This innovative approach can be used to extract the Raman spectral component from the fluorescence background and improve the quality of the Raman signal. We describe the potential of modulated Raman spectroscopy as a rapid, inexpensive and accurate clinical tool to detect the presence of bladder cancer cells. Finally, in a broader context, we show how this approach can greatly enhance the sensitivity of integrated Raman spectroscopy and microfluidic systems, opening new prospects for portable higher throughput Raman cell sorting. PMID:26110401

  7. Detection of drugs of abuse by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    West, Matthew J; Went, Michael J

    2011-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy can provide rapid, sensitive, non-destructive analysis of a variety of drug types (e.g. amphetamines, alkaloids, designer drugs, and date rape drugs). This review concentrates on developments in the past 15 years. It considers identification and quantification of drugs of abuse in different types of forensic evidence, including bulk street drugs as well as traces found in drinks, on fibres/clothing, in fingerprints, on fingernails, on bank notes, and in body fluids. PMID:21960539

  8. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of surfactants on silver electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Soncheng; Birke, R.L.; Lombardi, J.R. )

    1990-03-08

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been used to study different kinds of surfactants (cationic, anionic, and nonionic surfactants) adsorbed on a roughened Ag electrode. Spectral assignments are made for the SERS spectrum of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), and it is shown that the molecule is oriented with its pyridinium ring end-on at the electrode surface at potentials positive to the point of zero charge (pzc) on Ag.

  9. Assessment of Raman Spectroscopy as a Silicone Pad Production Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Saab, A P; Balazs, G B; Maxwell, R S

    2005-05-05

    Silicone pressure pads are currently deployed in the W80. The mechanical properties of these pads are largely based on the degree of crosslinking between the polymer components that comprise the raw gumstock from which they are formed. Therefore, it is desirable for purposes of both production and systematic study of these materials to have a rapid, reliable means of assaying the extent of crosslinking. The present report describes the evaluation of Raman spectroscopy in this capacity.

  10. Profiling an electrospray plume using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Douglas; Portelius, Erik; Zhu, Yu; Feigerle, Charles; Cook, Kelsey D

    2005-12-15

    We report the use of silver nanoparticles to obtain surface-enhanced Raman spectra of Crystal Violet in an electrospray plume. Surface enhancement allowed detection at low concentrations with the high specificity afforded by vibrational spectroscopy. SERS spectra were used to obtain an axial concentration profile closely matching that obtained in previous fluorescence experiments. SERS can provide more analyte structural information than has been obtainable from fluorescence studies of the plume. PMID:16351168

  11. Atmospheric Measurements by Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Since the last decade, atmospheric environmental monitoring has benefited from the development of novel spectroscopic measurement techniques owing to the significant breakthroughs in photonic technology from the UV to the infrared spectral domain [1]. In this presentation, we will overview our recent development and applications of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy techniques for in situ optical monitoring of chemically reactive atmospheric species (such as HONO, NO3, NO2, N2O5) in intensive campaigns [2] and/or in smog chamber studies [3]. These field deployments demonstrated that modern photonic technologies (newly emergent light sources combined with high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques) can provide a useful tool to improve our understanding of tropospheric chemical processes which affect climate, air quality, and the spread of pollution. Experimental detail and preliminary results will be presented. Acknowledgements. The financial support from the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under the NexCILAS (ANR-11-NS09-0002) and the CaPPA (ANR-10-LABX-005) contracts is acknowledged. References [1] X. Cui, C. Lengignon, T. Wu, W. Zhao, G. Wysocki, E. Fertein, C. Coeur, A. Cassez,L. Croisé, W. Chen, et al., "Photonic Sensing of the Atmosphere by absorption spectroscopy", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 113 (2012) 1300-1316 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, "Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer for measurements of atmospheric HONO and NO2 in Hong Kong", Atmos. Environ. 95 (2014) 544-551 [3] T. Wu, C. Coeur-Tourneur, G. Dhont,A. Cassez, E. Fertein, X. He, W. Chen,"Application of IBBCEAS to kinetic study of NO3 radical formation from O3 + NO2 reaction in an atmospheric simulation chamber", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 133 (2014)199-205

  12. Infrared and NIR Raman spectroscopy in medical microbiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, Dieter

    1998-04-01

    FTIR and FT-NIR Raman spectra of intact microbial cells are highly specific, fingerprint-like signatures which can be used to (i) discriminate between diverse microbial species and strains, (ii) detect in situ intracellular components or structures such as inclusion bodies, storage materials or endospores, (iii) detect and quantify metabolically released CO2 in response to various different substrate, and (iv) characterize growth-dependent phenomena and cell-drug interactions. The characteristic information is extracted from the spectral contours by applying resolution enhancement techniques, difference spectroscopy, and pattern recognition methods such as factor-, cluster-, linear discriminant analysis, and artificial neural networks. Particularly interesting applications arise by means of a light microscope coupled to the spectrometer. FTIR spectra of micro-colonies containing less than 103 cells can be obtained from colony replica by a stamping technique that transfers micro-colonies growing on culture plates to a special IR-sample holder. Using a computer controlled x, y- stage together with mapping and video techniques, the fundamental tasks of microbiological analysis, namely detection, enumeration, and differentiation of micro- organisms can be integrated in one single apparatus. FTIR and NIR-FT-Raman spectroscopy can also be used in tandem to characterize medically important microorganisms. Currently novel methodologies are tested to take advantage of the complementary information of IR and Raman spectra. Representative examples on medically important microorganisms will be given that highlight the new possibilities of vibrational spectroscopies.

  13. Detection of propofol concentrations in blood by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, M. S.; Gnyba, M.; UrniaŻ, R.; Myllylä, T. S.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we present a proof-of-concept of a Raman spectroscopy-based approach for measuring the content of propofol, a common anesthesia drug, in whole human blood, and plasma, which is intended for use during clinical procedures. This method utilizes the Raman spectroscopy as a chemically-sensitive method for qualitative detection of the presence of a drug and a quantitative determination of its concentration. A number of samples from different patients with added various concentrations of propofol IV solution were measured. This is most equivalent to a real in-vivo situation. Subsequent analysis of a set of spectra was carried out to extract qualitative and quantitative information. We conclude, that the changes in the spectra of blood with propofol, overlap with the most prominent lines of the propofol solution, especially at spectral regions: 1450 cm-1, 1250- 1260 cm-1, 1050 cm-1, 875-910 cm-1, 640 cm-1. Later, we have introduced a quantitative analysis program based on correlation matrix closest fit, and a LOO cross-validation. We have achieved 36.67% and 60% model precision when considering full spectra, or specified bands, respectively. These results prove the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy for quantitative detection of propofol concentrations in whole human blood.

  14. Raman spectroscopy for screening and diagnosis of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lyng, Fiona M; Traynor, Damien; Ramos, Inês R M; Bonnier, Franck; Byrne, Hugh J

    2015-11-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide and mainly affects younger women. The mortality associated with cervical cancer can be reduced if the disease is detected at the pre-cancer stage. Current best-practice methods include cytopathology, HPV testing, and histopathology, but these methods are limited in terms of subjectivity, cost, and time. There is an unmet clinical need for new methods to aid clinicians in the early detection of cervical pre-cancer. These methods should be objective and rapid and require minimal sample preparation. Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational spectroscopic technique by which incident radiation is used to induce vibrations in the molecules of a sample and the scattered radiation may be used to characterise the sample in a rapid and non-destructive manner. Raman spectroscopy is sensitive to subtle biochemical changes occurring at the molecular level, enabling spectral variations corresponding to disease onset to be detected. Over the past 15 years, there have been numerous reports revealing the potential of Raman spectroscopy together with multivariate statistical analysis for the detection of a variety of cancers. This paper discusses the recent advances and challenges for cervical-cancer screening and diagnosis and offers some perspectives for the future. PMID:26277185

  15. Summary report of FY 1995 Raman spectroscopy technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, J.G.

    1995-11-01

    US DOE is sponsoring development of remote, fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy for rapid chemical characterization of Hanford high-level radioactive tank waste. Deployment targets for this technology are analytical hot cells and, via the Light-Duty Utility Arm and cone penetrometer, the waste tanks themselves. Perceived benefits of fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy are (1) rapid generation of tank-waste safety-related data, (2) reduced personnel exposure to highly radioactive waste, (3) reduced tank-waste sampling and analysis costs, and (4) reduced radioactive analytical waste. This document presents the results from the investigation of two dispersive, transmission-grating Raman systems and four fiber-optic Raman probe designs with non-radioactive tank waste simulants. One Raman system used a 532-nm, 400 mW, solid-state laser; the other used a 785-nm, 500 mW, solid-state diode laser. We found (1) the transmission-grating systems had better wavelength stability than previously tried Czerny-Turner-Based systems and (2) the 785-nm system`s specie detection limits in the spectral fingerprint regiion were at least as good as those for the 532-nm system. Based on these results, and the fact that some tank wastes luminesce with 514.5nm excitation, we selected the 785-nm system for hot-cell use. Of the four probes tested, three had a ``six-around-on`` fiber probe design; the fourth probe was a one-fiber-in-one-fiber-out, diffuse-relectance design. Comparison of the four probes` signal-to-noise rations, rations, transmission/collection efficiencies, and probe-silica Raman backgrounds showed that the best probe for use with Hanford-Site tank waste should (1) be filtered as close to the probe tip as possible to reduce the probe-silica Raman background and (2) have multiple collection fibers. The responses of all the probes tested showed a strong dependence on probe-sample distance, and the presence of a probe window appeared to increase the probe`s silica Raman background.

  16. Cervical cancer detection based on serum sample Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    González-Solís, José Luis; Martínez-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Torres-González, Luis Adolfo; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Palomares-Anda, Pascual

    2014-05-01

    The use of Raman spectroscopy to analyze the biochemical composition of serum samples and hence distinguish between normal and cervical cancer serum samples was investigated. The serum samples were obtained from 19 patients who were clinically diagnosed with cervical cancer, 3 precancer, and 20 healthy volunteer controls. The imprint was put under an Olympus microscope, and around points were chosen for Raman measurement.All spectra were collected at a Horiba Jobin-Yvon LabRAM HR800 Raman Spectrometer with a laser of 830-nm wavelength and 17-mW power irradiation. Raw spectra were processed by carrying out baseline correction, smoothing, and normalization to remove noise, florescence, and shot noise and then analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). The control serum spectrum showed the presence of higher amounts of carotenoids indicated by peaks at 1,002, 1,160, and 1,523 cm(-1)and intense peaks associated with protein components at 754, 853, 938, 1,002, 1,300-1,345, 1,447, 1,523, 1,550, 1,620, and 1,654 cm(-1). The Raman bands assigned to glutathione (446, 828, and 1,404 cm(-1)) and tryptophan (509, 1,208, 1,556, 1,603, and 1,620 cm(-1)) in cervical cancer were higher than those of control samples, suggesting that their presence may also play a role in cervical cancer. Furthermore, weak bands in the control samples attributed to tryptophan (545, 760, and 1,174 cm(-1)) and amide III (1,234-1,290 cm(-1)) seem to disappear and decrease in the cervical cancer samples, respectively. It is shown that the serum samples from patients with cervical cancer and from the control group can be discriminated with high sensitivity and specificity when the multivariate statistical methods of PCA is applied to Raman spectra. PCA allowed us to define the wavelength differences between the spectral bands of the control and cervical cancer groups by confirming that the main molecular differences among the control and cervical cancer samples were glutathione, tryptophan,

  17. Raman Spectroscopy and instrumentation for monitoring soil carbon systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, D.L.

    2003-12-08

    This work describes developments in the application of Raman scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) towards the assessment/characterization of carbon in soil. In the past, the nonspecific total carbon mass content of soil samples has generally been determined through mass loss techniques and elemental analysis. However, because of the concern over CO{sub 2} buildup in the atmosphere and its possible role in the ''Greenhouse Effect,'' there is a need for better-defined models of global cycling of carbon. As a means towards this end, there is a need to know more about the structure and functionality of organic materials in soil. Raman spectroscopy may therefore prove to be an exceptional tool in soil carbon analysis. Based on vibrational transitions of irradiated molecules, it provides structural information that is often suitable for sample identification. Furthermore, Raman scattering yields very fine spectral features which offer the potential for multicomponent sample analysis with minimal or no sample pretreatment. Although the intensity of Raman scattering is generally extremely low, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect can greatly enhance Raman signals (10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} range) through the adsorption of compounds on specially roughened metal surfaces. In our laboratory, we have investigated copper, gold and silver as possible substrate metals in the fabrication of SERS substrates. These substrates have included metal-coated microparticles, metal island films, and redox-roughened metal foils. We have evaluated several laser excitation sources spanning the 515-785 nm range for both Raman and SERS analysis. For this particular study, we have selected fulvic and humic acids as models for establishing the feasibility of using Raman and SERS in soil carbon analysis. Our studies thus far have demonstrated that copper substrates perform best in the SERS detection of humic and fulvic acids, particularly when coupled to electrochemical

  18. Application of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy to intramolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Schoonover, J.R.; Strouse, G.F.; Chen, P.; Bates, D.; Meyer, T.J. )

    1993-06-09

    Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy has been applied for the first time to the study of intramolecular electron transfer in a chromophore-quencher complex, based on a metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) excited state. These measurements allow for (1) the identification of redox sites that are reached following excitation and (2) the inferring of structural information in short-lived intermediates. This technique is a more sensitive probe than transient absorption as shown by its application to the redox-separated complex shown below involving a pyridinium acceptor and a phenothiazine donor.

  19. Analysis of drugs-of-abuse and explosives using terahertz time-domain and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Andrew; Fan, Wenhui; Upadhya, Prashanth; Cunningham, John; Linfield, Edmund; Davies, Giles; Edwards, Howell; Munshi, Tasnim; O'Neil, Andrew

    2006-02-01

    We demonstrate that, through coherent measurement of the transmitted terahertz electric fields, broadband (0.3-8THz) time-domain spectroscopy can be used to measure far-infrared vibrational modes of a range of illegal drugs and high explosives that are of interest to the forensic and security services. Our results show that these absorption features are highly sensitive to the structural and spatial arrangement of the molecules. Terahertz frequency spectra are also compared with high-resolution low-frequency Raman spectra to assist in understanding the low frequency inter- and intra-molecular vibrational modes of the molecules.

  20. Photonic-Crystal-Fiber Raman Spectroscopy for Real-Time, Gas-Composition Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Buric, M.P.; Chen, K.P.; Falk, J.; Woodruff, S.D.

    2008-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy in a hollow-core, photonic crystal fiber is reported. The fiber is used as the sample cell and the Stokes light collector. Raman signals were observed for major species in air and natural gas.

  1. Laser Raman Spectroscopy in studies of corrosion and electrocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Melendres, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Laser Raman Spectroscopy (LRS) has become an important tool for the in-situ structural study of electrochemical systems and processes in recent years. Following a brief introduction of the experimental techniques involved in applying LRS to electrochemical systems, we survey the literature for examples of studies in the inhibition of electrode reactions by surface films (e.g., corrosion and passivation phenomena) as well as the acceleration of reactions by electro-sorbates (electrocatalysis). We deal mostly with both normal and resonance Raman effects on fairly thick surface films in contrast to surface-enhanced Raman investigations of monolayer adsorbates, which is covered in another lecture. Laser Raman spectroelectrochemical studies of corrosion and film formation on such metals as Pb, Ag, Fe, Ni, Co, Cr, Au, stainless steel, etc. in various solution conditions are discussed. Further extension of the technique to studies in high-temperature and high-pressure aqueous environments is demonstrated. Results of studies of the structure of corrosion inhibitors are also presented. As applications of the LRS technique in the area of electrocatalysis, we cite studies of the structure of transition metal macrocyclic compounds, i.e., phthalocyanines and porphyrins, used for catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. 104 refs., 20 figs.

  2. Nanofluidic channel based biosensor using surface enhanced raman spectroscopy (SERS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, I.-Hsien; Beier, Hope T.; Wang, Maio; Jing, Nan; Kameoka, Jun; Coté, Gerard L.

    2007-02-01

    The Raman scattering signature of molecules has been demonstrated to be greatly enhanced, on the order of 10 6-10 12 times, on roughened metal surfaces and clustered structures such as aggregated colloidal gold. Here we describe a method that improves reproducibility and sensitivity of the substrate for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) by using a nanofluidic trapping device. This nanofluidic device has a bottle neck shape composed of a microchannel leading into a nano channel that causes size-dependent trapping of nanoparticles. The analyte and Au nanoparticles, 60 nm in diameter, in aqueous solution was pumped into the channel. The nanoparticles which were larger than the narrow channel are trapped at the edge of the channel to render an enhancement of the Raman signal. We have demonstrated that the Raman scattering signal enhancement on a nanochannel-based colloidal gold cluster is able to detect 10 pM of adenine, the test analyte, without chemical modification. The efficiency and robustness of the device suggests potential for single molecule detection and multicomponent detection for biological applications and/or biotoxins.

  3. Genomic DNA characterization of pork spleen by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Embús, D. A.; Orrego Cardozo, M.; Vargas-Hernández, C.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the study of Raman signal enhancement due to interaction between ZnO rods and pork spleen DNA is reported. ZnO microstructures were synthesized by the Sol-Gel method and afterward combined with porcine spleen DNA extracted in the previous stages, following standardized cell lysis, deproteinization, and precipitation processes. Raman spectroscopy was used for the characterization of structures of ZnO and ZnO-DNA complex, and the results show the respective bands of ZnO wurtzite hexagonal phase for modes E2 (M), A1(TO), E2(High), E1(LO), and 2LO. Due to the SERS effect in the spectral range from 200 to 1800 cm,-1 Raman bands caused by vibrations of the deoxyribose C-O-C binding were also observed, producing deformation of the ring as shown in the 559 cm-1 peak. The broad band at 782 cm-1, together with the complex vibration of the string 5'-COPO-C3', is over a wide band of thymine (790 cm-1) or cytosine (780 cm-1). A prominent band near 1098 cm-1 assigned to symmetric stretching vibration phosphodioxy group (PO2-) DNA backbone is most favoured in intensity by the addition of ZnO particles originated by the SERS effect. This effect suggests a possible mechanism for enhancing the Raman signal due to the electromagnetic interaction between a DNA molecule and the flat surface of the ZnO rod.

  4. Contributions of Raman spectroscopy to the understanding of bone strength

    PubMed Central

    Mandair, Gurjit S; Morris, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is increasingly commonly used to understand how changes in bone composition and structure influence tissue-level bone mechanical properties. The spectroscopic technique provides information on bone mineral and matrix collagen components and on the effects of various matrix proteins on bone material properties as well. The Raman spectrum of bone not only contains information on bone mineral crystallinity that is related to bone hardness but also provides information on the orientation of mineral crystallites with respect to the collagen fibril axis. Indirect information on collagen cross-links is also available and will be discussed. After a short introduction to bone Raman spectroscopic parameters and collection methodologies, advances in in vivo Raman spectroscopic measurements for animal and human subject studies will be reviewed. A discussion on the effects of aging, osteogenesis imperfecta, osteoporosis and therapeutic agents on bone composition and mechanical properties will be highlighted, including genetic mouse models in which structure–function and exercise effects are explored. Similarly, extracellular matrix proteins, proteases and transcriptional proteins implicated in the regulation of bone material properties will be reviewed. PMID:25628882

  5. Development of Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy as a Probe of Photoisomerization Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieda, Ryan D.; Dunkelberger, Adam D.; Shin, Jaeyoon; Oudenhoven, Tracy; Crim, F. Fleming

    2012-06-01

    Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) has proven to be a reliable probe of condensed phase dynamics by simultaneously achieving both exceptional temporal and frequency resolution. We report on preliminary attempts to utilize FSRS as a probe of the photoisomerization of dMe-OMe-NAIP (N-alkylated indanylidene pyrroline Schiff base) which is a mimic of the chromophore in Rhodopsin. We implement a 400 nm Raman pump/continuum probe process following a 400 nm actinic pump pulse which initiates photoisomerization. This initial work appears to corroborate previous transient absorption studies of NAIP while granting a vibrational mode specific look at the dynamics involved in relaxation from its excited state and subsequent vibrational relaxation.

  6. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27324288

  7. Raman spectroscopy study of calcium oxalate extracted from cacti stems.

    PubMed

    Frausto-Reyes, Claudio; Loza-Cornejo, Sofia; Terrazas, Teresa; Terrazas, Tania; Miranda-Beltrán, María de la Luz; Aparicio-Fernández, Xóchitl; López-Macías, Brenda M; Morales-Martínez, Sandra E; Ortiz-Morales, Martín

    2014-01-01

    To find markers that distinguish the different Cactaceae species, by using near infrared Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we studied the occurrence, in the stem, of solid deposits in five Cactaceae species (Coryphantha clavata, Ferocactus latispinus, Opuntia ficus-indica, O. robusta, and O. strepthacantha) collected from their natural habitats from a region of México. The deposits in the tissues usually occurred as spheroidal aggregates, druses, or prismatic crystals. From the Raman spectra, the crystals were identified either as calcium oxalate monohydrate (CaC2O4·H2O) or calcium oxalate dihydrate (CaC2O4·2H2O). Opuntia species (subfamily Opuntioideae) showed the presence of CaC2O4·H2O, and the deposition of CaC2O4·2H2O was present in C. clavata and F. latispinus (subfamily Cactoideae, Cacteae tribe). As a punctual technique, Raman spectroscopy seems to be a useful tool to identify crystal composition. In addition to allowing the analysis of crystal morphology, this spectroscopic technique can be used to identify Cactaceae species and their chemotaxonomy. PMID:25280368

  8. Raman spectroscopy of hot desert, high altitude epilithic lichens.

    PubMed

    Villar, Susana E Jorge; Edwards, Howell G M; Seaward, Mark R D

    2005-05-01

    Twenty-three highly-coloured lichen specimens belonging to the genera Candelariella, Aspicilia and Xanthoria from high altitude sites in the Atacama Desert, Chile, 2300-4500 metres, have been analysed non-destructively by Raman spectroscopy. The vibrational band assignments in the spectra of the specimens, which were still attached to their limestone or sandstone substrata, were accomplished by comparison with the chemical compositions obtained from wet chemical extraction methods. Carotenoids and chlorophyll were found in all specimens as major components and the characteristic spectral signatures of calcium oxalate monohydrate (whewellite) and dihydrate (weddellite) could be identified; chemical signatures were found for these materials even in lichen thalli growing on the non-calcareous substrata, indicating probably that the calcium was provided here from wind- or rain-borne sources. The Raman spectral biomarkers for a variety of protective biomolecules and accessory pigments such as usnic acid, calycin, pulvinic acid dilactone and rhizocarpic acid have been identified in the lichens, in broad agreement with the chemical extraction profiles. The present study indicates that some form of non-destructive taxonomic identification based on Raman spectroscopy was also possible. PMID:15852144

  9. A method for determining nutritional facts with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustakas, Christos; Pitris, Constantinos

    2009-07-01

    The estimation of the nutritional parameters of food products is a difficult and laborious process. Many companies spend considerable financial and other resources to frequently check the nutritional facts of their products. In addition, current methods are unsuitable for day-to-day, restaurant or home use. A new device, that would automatically estimate the nutritional facts of any edible product, could prove very useful in all of the above situations. To achieve that goal, Raman Spectroscopy was used to examine a wide variety of commonly available food products. There was minimal sample preparation, mainly homogenization and dilution. Raman spectra were collected with 785 nm excitation and 4.5 cm-1 resolution. The spectra were analyzed and solutions to linear differential equations resulted in estimates of nutritional facts. When the analysis techniques were optimized, several nutritional parameters could be estimated, such as calories, fat, protein, carbohydrates, sugars, and fiber, with an error between 2.9 % and 6.7 %. The results imply that Raman spectroscopy can be used for the estimation of the nutritional facts of food products with an error less than what is required for labeling. A device based on this technique could prove to be a very useful tool for dieticians, hospitals, food companies, health care organizations, restaurants and even home users, who want to be informed about the content of the food that they consume.

  10. Raman spectroscopy of PIN hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keya, Kimitaka; Torigoe, Yoshihiro; Toko, Susumu; Yamashita, Daisuke; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Light-induced degradation of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a key issue for enhancing competitiveness in solar cell market. A-Si:H films with a lower density of Si-H2 bonds shows higher stability. Here we identified Si-H2 bonds in PIN a-Si:H solar cells fabricated by plasma CVD using Raman spectroscopy. A-Si:H solar cell has a structure of B-doped μc-SiC:H (12.5 nm)/ non-doped a-Si:H (250nm)/ P-doped μc-Si:H (40 nm) on glass substrates (Asahi-VU). By irradiating HeNe laser light from N-layer, peaks correspond to Si-H2 bonds (2100 cm-1) and Si-H bonds (2000 cm-1) have been identified in Raman scattering spectra. The intensity ratio of Si-H2 and Si-H ISiH2/ISiH is found to correlate well to light induced degradation of the cells Therefore, Raman spectroscopy is a promising method for studying origin of light-induced degradation of PIN solar cells.

  11. Detection of hazardous chemicals using field-portable Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Cherylyn W.; Harvey, Scott D.; Wright, Bob W.

    2003-07-01

    A major challenge confronting emergency response, border control, and other security-related functions is the accurate, rapid, and safe identification of potentially hazardous chemicals outside a laboratory environment. Raman spectroscopy is a rapid, non-intrusive technique that can be used to confidently identify many classes of hazardous and potentially explosive compounds based on molecular vibration information. Advances in instrumentation now allow reliable field - portable measurements to be made. Before the Raman technique can be effectively applied and be accepted within the scientific community, realistic studies must be performed to develop methods, define limitations, and rigorously evaluate its effectiveness. Examples of a variety of chemicals (including neat and diluted chemical warfare [CW] agents, a CW agent precursor, a biological warfare (BW)-related compound, an illicit drug, and explosives) identified using Raman spectroscopy in various types of containers and on surfaces are given, as well as results from a blind field test of 29 unknown samples which included CW agent precursors and/or degradation products, solvents associated with CW agent production, pesticides, explosives, and BW toxins (mostly mycotoxins). Additionally, results of experimental studies to evaluate the analysis of flammable organic solvents, propellants, military explosives, mixtures containing military explosives, shock-sensitive explosives, and gun powders are described with safety guidelines. Spectral masks for screening unknown samples for explosives and nerve agents are given.

  12. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-06-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy.

  13. In vivo lipidomics using single-cell Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huawen; Volponi, Joanne V.; Oliver, Ann E.; Parikh, Atul N.; Simmons, Blake A.; Singh, Seema

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for direct, quantitative, in vivo lipid profiling of oil-producing microalgae using single-cell laser-trapping Raman spectroscopy. This approach is demonstrated in the quantitative determination of the degree of unsaturation and transition temperatures of constituent lipids within microalgae. These properties are important markers for determining engine compatibility and performance metrics of algal biodiesel. We show that these factors can be directly measured from a single living microalgal cell held in place with an optical trap while simultaneously collecting Raman data. Cellular response to different growth conditions is monitored in real time. Our approach circumvents the need for lipid extraction and analysis that is both slow and invasive. Furthermore, this technique yields real-time chemical information in a label-free manner, thus eliminating the limitations of impermeability, toxicity, and specificity of the fluorescent probes common in currently used protocols. Although the single-cell Raman spectroscopy demonstrated here is focused on the study of the microalgal lipids with biofuel applications, the analytical capability and quantitation algorithms demonstrated are applicable to many different organisms and should prove useful for a diverse range of applications in lipidomics. PMID:21310969

  14. Study of antibacterial mechanism of graphene oxide using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; Yi, Dong Kee; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is extensively proposed as an effective antibacterial agent in commercial product packaging and for various biomedical applications. However, the antibacterial mode of action of GO is yet hypothetical and unclear. Here we developed a new and sensitive fingerprint approach to study the antibacterial activity of GO and underlying mechanism, using Raman spectroscopy. Spectroscopic signatures obtained from biomolecules such as Adenine and proteins from bacterial cultures with different concentrations of GO, allowed us to probe the antibacterial activity of GO with its mechanism at the molecular level. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) were used as model micro-organisms for all the experiments performed. The observation of higher intensity Raman peaks from Adenine and proteins in GO treated E. coli and E. faecalis; correlated with induced death, confirmed by Scanning electron Microscopy (SEM) and Biological Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Our findings open the way for future investigations of the antibacterial properties of different nanomaterial/GO composites using Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27324288

  15. Two dimensional spectroscopy of Liquids in THz-domain: THz analogue of 2D Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, K.; Tanimura, Y.

    1998-03-01

    After the initial proposal(Y. Tanimura and S. Mukamel, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 9496 (1993)), the two dimensional Raman spectroscopy in the liquid phase has been received a considerable attention. Both experimental and theoretical activity of this field has been quite high. Since we have two controllable delay times, we can obtain more information than the lower-order experiments such as OKE. The new information includes that on heterogeneous distribution in liquids. Recently, it is found that the coupling between the modes in liquids can be investigated by the technique, both experimentally and theoretically(A. Tokmakoff, M.J. Lang, D.S. Larsen, G.R. Fleming, V. Chernyak, and S. Mukamel, Phys. Rev. Lett. (in press))^,(K. Okumura and Y. Tanimura, Chem. Phys. Lett. 278, 175 (1997)) In this talk, we will emphasize that we can perform the THz analogue of the 2D Raman spectroscopy if the THz short-pulse laser becomes available, which may not be in the far future. Theoretically, we can formulate this novel THz spectroscopy on the same footing as the 2D Raman spectroscopy. We will clarify new aspects of this technique comparing with the 2D Raman spectroscopy--- the reason it worth trying the tough experiment. See

  16. Endoscopic Raman Spectroscopy for Molecular Fingerprinting of Gastric Cancer: Principle to Implementation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Currently, positive endoscopic biopsy is the standard criterion for gastric cancer diagnosis but is invasive, often inconsistent, and delayed although early detection and early treatment is the most important policy. Raman spectroscopy is a spectroscopic technique based on inelastic scattering of monochromatic light. Raman spectrum represents molecular composition of the interrogated volume providing a direct molecular fingerprint. Several investigations revealed that Raman spectroscopy can differentiate normal, dysplastic, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissue with high sensitivity and specificity. Moreover, this technique can indentify malignant ulcer and showed the capability to analyze the carcinogenesis process. Automated on-line Raman spectral diagnostic system raised possibility to use Raman spectroscopy in clinical field. Raman spectroscopy can be applied in many fields such as guiding a target biopsy, optical biopsy in bleeding prone situation, and delineating the margin of the lesion. With wide field technology, Raman spectroscopy is expected to have specific role in our future clinical field. PMID:26106612

  17. Identifying bacterial spores and anthrax hoax materials by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Brouillette, Carl R.; Smith, Wayne

    2004-12-01

    The distribution of Bacillus anthracis spores through the US postal system in the autumn of 2001, initiated a secondary form of terror, the mailing of hoax materials. In the past three years nearly 20,000 letters containing harmless powders have been mailed, creating additional anxiety. Thus, there is a need for analyzers that can not only identify anthrax-causing spores to save lives, but also identify hoax materials to eliminate time-consuming and costly shutdowns. Recently, we established that Raman spectroscopy has the ability to identify both Bacilli endospores and hoax materials. Here we present Raman spectra of several Bacilli spores along with the dipicolinate salts, to further define the abilities of this technology to not only identify hoax materials, but also identify spores at the genus and species level.

  18. Raman spectroscopy of ripple formation in suspended graphene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chung; Bao, Wenzhong; Theiss, Jesse; Dames, Chris; Lau, Chun Ning; Cronin, Stephen B

    2009-12-01

    Using Raman spectroscopy, we measure the optical phonon energies of suspended graphene before, during, and after thermal cycling between 300 and 700 K. After cycling, we observe large upshifts ( approximately 25 cm(-1)) of the G band frequency in the graphene on the substrate region due to compression induced by the thermal contraction of the underlying substrate, while the G band in the suspended region remains unchanged. From these large upshifts, we estimate the compression in the substrate region to be approximately 0.4%. The large mismatch in compression between the substrate and suspended regions causes a rippling of the suspended graphene, which compensates for the change in lattice constant due to the compression. The amplitude (A) and wavelength (lambda) of the ripples, as measured by atomic force microscopy, correspond to an effective change in length Deltal/l that is consistent with the compression values determined from the Raman data. PMID:19807131

  19. Stochastic Liouville equations for femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Ando, Hideo; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-01-01

    Electron and vibrational dynamics of molecules are commonly studied by subjecting them to two interactions with a fast actinic pulse that prepares them in a nonstationary state and after a variable delay period T, probing them with a Raman process induced by a combination of a broadband and a narrowband pulse. This technique, known as femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS), can effectively probe time resolved vibrational resonances. We show how FSRS signals can be modeled and interpreted using the stochastic Liouville equations (SLE), originally developed for NMR lineshapes. The SLE provide a convenient simulation protocol that can describe complex dynamics caused by coupling to collective bath coordinates at much lower cost than a full dynamical simulation. The origin of the dispersive features that appear when there is no separation of timescales between vibrational variations and the dephasing time is clarified. PMID:25591346

  20. Rapid Classification of Ordinary Chondrites Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fries, M.; Welzenbach, L.

    2014-01-01

    Classification of ordinary chondrites is typically done through measurements of the composition of olivine and pyroxenes. Historically, this measurement has usually been performed via electron microprobe, oil immersion or other methods which can be costly through lost sample material during thin section preparation. Raman microscopy can perform the same measurements but considerably faster and with much less sample preparation allowing for faster classification. Raman spectroscopy can facilitate more rapid classification of large amounts of chondrites such as those retrieved from North Africa and potentially Antarctica, are present in large collections, or are submitted to a curation facility by the public. With development, this approach may provide a completely automated classification method of all chondrite types.

  1. Advances in tumor diagnosis using OCT and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. P.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.; Kornilin, D. V.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.

    2014-05-01

    Complex investigation of malignant tumors was performed with combined optical coherence tomography (OCT) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) setup: 22 ex vivo lung tissue samples and 23 in vivo experiments with skin tumors. It was shown that combined RS-OCT unit may be used for precise tissue morphology visualization with simultaneous tumor type determination (BCC, malignant melanoma of skin tissues, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of lung). Fast RS phase method for skin and lung tumors identification was proposed. It is based on alteration of Raman spectral intensity in 1300-1340, 1440-1460 and 1640-1680 cm-1 bands for healthy and malignant tissue. Complex method could identify: malignant melanoma with 88.9% sensitivity and 87.8% specificity; adenocarcinoma with 100% sensitivity and 81.5% specificity; squamous cell carcinomas with 90.9% sensitivity and 77.8% specificity.

  2. [Comparison of discriminative methods of hypoglycemic drugs by Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Gao, Qun; Zhang, Zhong-Hu; Lu, Feng

    2012-12-01

    In the present paper, four kinds of cluster analysis methods were used in rapid, non-destructive discrimination of hypoglycemic tablets by the Raman spectroscopy technology. Nine kinds of hypoglycemic tablets, including 48 samples, were determined using a Raman spectrometer. The sample data were pretreated with the methods of frequency range cutting, baseline correction, smoothing and vector normalization, then were analyzed by K-means, hierachical cluster, self-organizing maps (SOM) and PCA-SOM respectively. The results demonstrated that SOM was better than K-means and hierachical cluster, and it provided the best discrimination when combined with PCA. The research offers a new approach to the rapid discrimination of different kinds of hypoglycemic tablets. PMID:23427547

  3. Raman Spectroscopy: an essential tool for future IODP expeditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andò, Sergio; Garzanti, Eduardo; Kulhanek, Denise K.

    2016-04-01

    The scientific drilling of oceanic sedimentary sequences plays a fundamental part in provenance studies, paleoclimate recostructions, and source-to-sink investigations (e.g., France-Lanord et al., 2015; Pandey et al., 2015). When studying oceanic deposits, Raman spectroscopy can and does represent an essential flexible tool for the multidisciplinary approach necessary to integrate the insight provided by different disciplines. This new user-friendly technique opens up an innovative avenue to study in real time the composition of detrital mineral grains of any origin, complementing traditional methods of provenance analysis (e.g., sedimentary petrography, heavy minerals; Andò and Garzanti, 2014). Raman spectra can readily reveal the chemistry of foraminiferal tests, nannofossils and other biogenic debris for the study of ecosystem evolution and paleoclimate, or the Ca/Mg ratio in biogenic or terrigenous carbonates for geological or marine biological applications and oil exploration (Borromeo et al., 2015). For the study of pelagic or turbiditic muds, which represent the bulk of the deep-marine sedimentary record, Raman spectroscopy allows us to identify silt-sized grains down to the size of a few microns with the same precision level required in quantitative provenance analysis of sand-sized sediments (Andò et al., 2011). Silt and siltstone also represent a very conspicuous part of the stratigraphic record onshore and usually preserve original mineralogical assemblages better than more permeable interbedded sand and sandstone (Blatt, 1985). Raman spectra can be obtained on sample volumes of only a few cubic microns by a confocal micro-Raman coupled with a standard polarizing light microscope using a 50× objective. The size of this apparatus can be easily placed onboard an IODP vessel to provide crucial information and quickly solve identification problems for the benefit of a wide range of scientists during future expeditions. Cited references Andò, S., Vignola

  4. Controlling protected designation of origin of wine by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mandrile, Luisa; Zeppa, Giuseppe; Giovannozzi, Andrea Mario; Rossi, Andrea Mario

    2016-11-15

    In this paper, a Fourier Transform Raman spectroscopy method, to authenticate the provenience of wine, for food traceability applications was developed. In particular, due to the specific chemical fingerprint of the Raman spectrum, it was possible to discriminate different wines produced in the Piedmont area (North West Italy) in accordance with i) grape varieties, ii) production area and iii) ageing time. In order to create a consistent training set, more than 300 samples from tens of different producers were analyzed, and a chemometric treatment of raw spectra was applied. A discriminant analysis method was employed in the classification procedures, providing a classification capability (percentage of correct answers) of 90% for validation of grape analysis and geographical area provenance, and a classification capability of 84% for ageing time classification. The present methodology was applied successfully to raw materials without any preliminary treatment of the sample, providing a response in a very short time. PMID:27283630

  5. Stochastic Liouville equations for femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Ando, Hideo; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-01-14

    Electron and vibrational dynamics of molecules are commonly studied by subjecting them to two interactions with a fast actinic pulse that prepares them in a nonstationary state and after a variable delay period T, probing them with a Raman process induced by a combination of a broadband and a narrowband pulse. This technique, known as femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS), can effectively probe time resolved vibrational resonances. We show how FSRS signals can be modeled and interpreted using the stochastic Liouville equations (SLE), originally developed for NMR lineshapes. The SLE provide a convenient simulation protocol that can describe complex dynamics caused by coupling to collective bath coordinates at much lower cost than a full dynamical simulation. The origin of the dispersive features that appear when there is no separation of timescales between vibrational variations and the dephasing time is clarified.

  6. Towards field malaria diagnosis using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Keren; Xiong, Aoli; Yuen, Clement; Preiser, Peter; Liu, Quan

    2016-04-01

    We report three strategies of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for β-hematin and hemozoin detection in malaria infected human blood, which can be potentially developed for field malaria diagnosis. In the first strategy, we used silver coated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@Ag) in combination with an external magnetic field to enhance the Raman signal of β-hematin. Then we developed two SERS methods without the requirement of magnetic field for malaria infection diagnosis. In Method 1, silver nanoparticles were synthesized separately and then mixed with lysed blood just like in traditional SERS measurements; while in Method 2, we developed an ultrasensitive SERS method by synthesizing silver nanoparticles directly inside the parasites of Plasmodium falciparum. Method 2 can be also used to detect single parasites in the ring stage.

  7. Raman spectroscopy for DNA quantification in cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Okotrub, K A; Surovtsev, N V; Semeshin, V F; Omelyanchuk, L V

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the feasibility of a novel approach to quantify DNA in cell nuclei. This approach is based on spectroscopy analysis of Raman light scattering, and avoids the problem of nonstoichiometric binding of dyes to DNA, as it directly measures the signal from DNA. Quantitative analysis of nuclear DNA contribution to Raman spectrum could be reliably performed using intensity of a phosphate mode at 1096 cm(-1) . When compared to the known DNA standards from cells of different animals, our results matched those values at error of 10%. We therefore suggest that this approach will be useful to expand the list of DNA standards, to properly adjust the duration of hydrolysis in Feulgen staining, to assay the applicability of fuchsines for DNA quantification, as well as to measure DNA content in cells with complex hydrolysis patterns, when Feulgen densitometry is inappropriate. PMID:25355529

  8. Raman spectroscopy and imaging of whole functional cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNaughton, Don; Lim, Janelle; Hammer, Larissa; Langford, Steven J.; Collie, Jocelyn; Wood, Bayden R.

    2005-02-01

    With the advent of Raman spectrometers based on CCD array detectors, instruments have been coupled to optical microscopes leading to all the advantages of bright field microscopy with the added advantage of a direct chemical probe. The primary biological solvent, water, is a weak Raman scatterer and so these instruments can now be used to investigate the chemistry of living systems at spatial resolutions of 1 μm and below. We have developed techniques that allow us to study functional red blood cells and monitor the exchange of ligands and the development and chemistry of disease processes. These techniques take advantage of Aggregated Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, which enables us to use the haem group of the haemoglobins and related haem pigments, such as the malarial pigment haemozoin, as a sensitive probe for changes in oxidation state, spin state and electronic structure. We have used the Raman microprobe to investigate the effect of drugs such as quinoline on the food vacuole of the malarial parasite in vivo. Sickle cell disease affects 1 out of 600 African American births and is caused by a mutant form (β6 glu-->val) of haemoglobin (HbS). HbS polymerizes and forms higher order aggregates under hypoxic conditions, leading to distortion and rigidity of the erythrocyte. These rigid cells can block the microvasculature resulting in tissue ischaemia, organ damage, and ultimately death. The sensitivity of the Raman technique to haem aggregation provides a tool with which we can analyse the changes that occur between normal and sickle cells.

  9. Two-photon vibrational spectroscopy for biosciences based on surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kneipp, Janina; Kneipp, Harald; Kneipp, Katrin

    2006-01-01

    Two-photon excitation is gaining rapidly in interest and significance in spectroscopy and microscopy. Here we introduce a new approach that suggests versatile optical labels suitable for both one- and two-photon excitation and also two-photon-excited ultrasensitive, nondestructive chemical probing. The underlying spectroscopic effect is the incoherent inelastic scattering of two photons on the vibrational quantum states called hyper-Raman scattering (HRS). The rather weak effect can be strengthened greatly if HRS takes place in the local optical fields of gold and silver nanostructures. This so-called surface-enhanced HRS (SEHRS) is the two-photon analogue to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). SEHRS provides structurally sensitive vibrational information complementary to those obtained by SERS. SEHRS combines the advantages of two-photon spectroscopy with the structural information of vibrational spectroscopy and the high-sensitivity and nanometer-scale local confinement of plasmonics-based spectroscopy. We infer effective two-photon cross-sections for SEHRS on the order of 10−46 to 10−45 cm4·s, similar to or higher than the best “action” cross-sections (product of the two-photon absorption cross-section and fluorescence quantum yield) for two-photon fluorescence, and we demonstrate HRS on biological structures such as single cells after incubation with gold nanoparticles. PMID:17088534

  10. Plasmonic nanostructures for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ruiqian

    In the last three decades, a large number of different plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention due to their unique optical properties. Those plasmonic nanostructures include nanoparticles, nanoholes and metal nanovoids. They have been widely utilized in optical devices and sensors. When the plasmonic nanostructures interact with the electromagnetic wave and their surface plasmon frequency match with the light frequency, the electrons in plasmonic nanostructures will resonate with the same oscillation as incident light. In this case, the plasmonic nanostructures can absorb light and enhance the light scattering. Therefore, the plasmonic nanostructures can be used as substrate for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to enhance the Raman signal. Using plasmonic nanostructures can significantly enhance Raman scattering of molecules with very low concentrations. In this thesis, two different plasmonic nanostructures Ag dendrites and Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles are investigated. Simple methods were used to produce these two plasmonic nanostructures. Then, their applications in surface enhanced Raman scattering have been explored. Ag dendrites were produced by galvanic replacement reaction, which was conducted using Ag nitrate aqueous solution and copper metal. Metal copper layer was deposited at the bottom side of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane. Silver wires formed inside AAO channels connected Ag nitrate on the top of AAO membrane and copper layer at the bottom side of AAO. Silver dendrites were formed on the top side of AAO. The second plasmonic nanostructure is Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles. They were fabricated by electroless plating (galvanic replacement) reaction in a silver plating solution. First, electrochemically evolved hydrogen bubbles were used as template through electroless deposition to produce hollow Au nanoparticles. Then, the Au nanoparticles were coated with Cu shells in a Cu plating solution. In the following step, a Ag

  11. Photoacoustic imaging and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using dual modal contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungjo; Lee, Seunghyun; Cha, Myeonggeun; Jeong, Cheolhwan; Kang, Homan; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Yoon-sik; Jeong, Daehong; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Recently, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has emerged as a remarkable non-invasive imaging modality that provides a strong optical absorption contrast, high ultrasonic resolution, and great penetration depth. Thus, PAT has been widely used as an in vivo preclinical imaging tool. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is another attractive sensing technology in biological research because it offers highly sensitive chemical analyses and multiplexed detection. By performing dual-modal imaging of SERS and PAT, high-resolution structural PAT imaging and high-sensitivity SERS sensing can be achieved. At the same time, it is equally important to develop a dual modal contrast agent for this purpose. To perform both PAT and SERS, we synthesized PEGylated silver bumpy nanoshells (AgBSs). The AgBSs generate strong PA signals owing to their strong optical absorption properties as well as sensitive SERS signals because of the surface plasmon resonance effect. Then, multiplexed Raman chemicals were synthesized to enhance the sensitivity of Raman. We have photoacoustically imaged the sentinel lymph nodes of small animals after intradermal injection of multiplexed agents. Furthermore, the chemical composition of each agent has been distinguished through SERS.

  12. FT-Raman, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and theoretical investigations of diclofenac sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliescu, T.; Baia, M.; Kiefer, W.

    2004-03-01

    Raman and surface-enhanced Raman (SER) spectroscopies have been applied to the vibrational characterization of diclofenac sodium (DCF-Na). Theoretical calculations (DFT and ab initio) of two DCF-Na conformers have been performed to find the optimized structure and computed vibrational wavenumbers of the most stable one. SER spectra in silver colloid at different pH values have been also recorded and analyzed. Good SER spectra have been obtained in acidic and neutral environments, proving the chemisorption of the DCF-Na molecule on the silver surface. In the investigated pH range the carboxylate anion has been bonded to the silver surface through the lone pair oxygen electrons. The phenyl rings' orientation with respect to the silver surface changed on passing from acidic to neutral pH from a tilted close to flat to a more perpendicular one.

  13. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy evidence for oxidation-induced decomposition of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Frank J.

    2015-06-01

    It has been proposed that reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide could be a potential method for producing large quantities of graphene. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy are used to show that oxidation of graphite and exfoliated graphite significantly increases the defect structure of both materials. This would likely lead to a heavily defected graphene structure when oxygen is removed. To insure the observed decomposition is not due to the laser light, the effect of laser intensity on the materials was investigated. It was found that at the highest laser intensity (1.4 × 108 W/M2) there was a significant increase in defects. However, lower laser intensity was found which did not produce defects and was used in the studies of the effect of oxidation on the spectra.

  14. Rapid chemical agent identification by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yuan-Hsiang; Farquharson, Stuart

    2001-08-01

    Although the Chemical Weapons Convention prohibits the development, production, stockpiling, and use of chemical warfare agents (CWAs), the use of these agents persists due to their low cost, simplicity in manufacturing and ease of deployment. These attributes make these weapons especially attractive to low technology countries and terrorists. The military and the public at large require portable, fast, sensitive, and accurate analyzers to provide early warning of the use of chemical weapons. Traditional laboratory analyzers such as the combination of gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy, although sensitive and accurate, are large and require up to an hour per analysis. New, chemical specific analyzers, such as immunoassays and molecular recognition sensors, are portable, fast, and sensitive, but are plagued by false-positives (response to interferents). To overcome these limitations, we have been investigating the potential of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to identify and quantify chemical warfare agents in either the gas or liquid phase. The approach is based on the extreme sensitivity of SERS demonstrated by single molecule detection, a new SERS material that we have developed to allow reproducible and reversible measurements, and the molecular specific information provided by Raman spectroscopy. Here we present SER spectra of chemical agent simulants in both the liquid and gas phase, as well as CWA hydrolysis phase.

  15. Laser flash-Raman spectroscopy method for the measurement of the thermal properties of micro/nano wires.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinhui; Wang, Haidong; Hu, Yudong; Ma, Weigang; Zhang, Xing

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a new method for measuring the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of individual micro/nano wires using Raman spectroscopy. This method uses a focused short pulsed laser and a continuous-wave laser in a Raman spectroscopy system as the local heater, Raman signal excitation source, and temperature sensor. Unsteady and steady thermal conduction models are used to get two independent equations for the thermal diffusivity (α) and laser absorptivity (η). This new method is verified by comparing experimental results for graphite carbon fiber with measurement using the 3ω method. The method was then used to measure the temperature dependent thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of individual carbon nanotubes. PMID:25638107

  16. Spectroscopic characterization of biological agents using FTIR, normal Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Pineda, Tatiana; Soto-Feliciano, Kristina; De La Cruz-Montoya, Edwin; Pacheco Londoño, Leonardo C.; Ríos-Velázquez, Carlos; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2007-04-01

    FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) requires a minimum of sample allows fast identification of microorganisms. The use of this technique for characterizing the spectroscopic signatures of these agents and their stimulants has recently gained considerable attention due to the fact that these techniques can be easily adapted for standoff detection from considerable distances. The techniques also show high sensitivity and selectivity and offer near real time detection duty cycles. This research focuses in laying the grounds for the spectroscopic differentiation of Staphylococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Bacillus spp., Salmonella spp., Enterobacter aerogenes, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and E. coli, together with identification of their subspecies. In order to achieve the proponed objective, protocols to handle, cultivate and analyze the strains have been developed. Spectroscopic similarities and marked differences have been found for Spontaneous or Normal Raman spectra and for SERS using silver nanoparticles have been found. The use of principal component analysis (PCA), discriminate factor analysis (DFA) and a cluster analysis were used to evaluate the efficacy of identifying potential threat bacterial from their spectra collected on single bacteria. The DFA from the bacteria Raman spectra show a little discrimination between the diverse bacterial species however the results obtained from the SERS demonstrate to be high discrimination technique. The spectroscopic study will be extended to examine the spores produced by selected strains since these are more prone to be used as Biological Warfare Agents due to their increased mobility and possibility of airborne transport. Micro infrared spectroscopy as well as fiber coupled FTIR will also be used as possible sensors of target compounds.

  17. Transcutaneous Measurement of Blood Analyte Concentration Using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Ishan; Singh, Gajendra P.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2008-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder, affecting nearly 200 million people worldwide. Acute complications, such as hypoglycemia, cardiovascular disease and retinal damage, may occur if the disease is not adequately controlled. As diabetes has no known cure, tight control of glucose levels is critical for the prevention of such complications. Given the necessity for regular monitoring of blood glucose, development of non-invasive glucose detection devices is essential to improve the quality of life in diabetic patients. The commercially available glucose sensors measure the interstitial fluid glucose by electrochemical detection. However, these sensors have severe limitations, primarily related to their invasive nature and lack of stability. This necessitates the development of a truly non-invasive glucose detection technique. NIR Raman Spectroscopy, which combines the substantial penetration depth of NIR light with the excellent chemical specificity of Raman spectroscopy, provides an excellent tool to meet the challenges involved. Additionally, it enables simultaneous determination of multiple blood analytes. Our laboratory has pioneered the use of Raman spectroscopy for blood analytes' detection in biological media. The preliminary success of our non-invasive glucose measurements both in vitro (such as in serum and blood) and in vivo has provided the foundation for the development of feasible clinical systems. However, successful application of this technology still faces a few hurdles, highlighted by the problems of tissue luminescence and selection of appropriate reference concentration. In this article we explore possible avenues to overcome these challenges so that prospective prediction accuracy of blood analytes can be brought to clinically acceptable levels.

  18. Near-infrared-excited confocal Raman spectroscopy advances in vivo diagnosis of cervical precancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Ng, Joseph; Low, Jeffrey J. H.; Ilancheran, Arunachalam; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a unique optical technique that can probe the changes of vibrational modes of biomolecules associated with tissue premalignant transformation. This study evaluates the clinical utility of confocal Raman spectroscopy over near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence (AF) spectroscopy and composite NIR AF/Raman spectroscopy for improving early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo at colposcopy. A rapid NIR Raman system coupled with a ball-lens fiber-optic confocal Raman probe was utilized for in vivo NIR AF/Raman spectral measurements of the cervix. A total of 1240 in vivo Raman spectra [normal (n=993), dysplasia (n=247)] were acquired from 84 cervical patients. Principal components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) together with a leave-one-patient-out, cross-validation method were used to extract the diagnostic information associated with distinctive spectroscopic modalities. The diagnostic ability of confocal Raman spectroscopy was evaluated using the PCA-LDA model developed from the significant principal components (PCs) [i.e., PC4, 0.0023% PC5, 0.00095% PC8, 0.00022%, (p<0.05)], representing the primary tissue Raman features (e.g., 854, 937, 1095, 1253, 1311, 1445, and 1654 cm-1). Confocal Raman spectroscopy coupled with PCA-LDA modeling yielded the diagnostic accuracy of 84.1% (a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 87.1%) for in vivo discrimination of dysplastic cervix. The receiver operating characteristic curves further confirmed that the best classification was achieved using confocal Raman spectroscopy compared to the composite NIR AF/Raman spectroscopy or NIR AF spectroscopy alone. This study illustrates that confocal Raman spectroscopy has great potential to improve early diagnosis of cervical precancer in vivo during clinical colposcopy.

  19. Transcutaneous monitoring of steroid-induced osteoporosis with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Jason R.; Inzana, Jason; Takahata, Masahiko; Awad, Hani A.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Although glucocorticoids are among the most frequently prescribed anti-inflammatory agents used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, extended exposure to this steroid hormone is the leading cause of iatrogenic osteoporosis. Recently, Raman spectroscopy has been utilized to exploit biochemical differences between osteoporotic and normal bones in order to predict fracture risk. In this presentation, we report the results of ongoing research in our laboratory towards the clinical translation of this technique. We will discuss strategies for the transcutaneous acquisition of spectra from the tibiae of mice that are of sufficient quality to generate accurate predictions of fracture risk.

  20. Raman and infrared reflection spectroscopy in black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, S.; Shirotani, I.

    1985-03-01

    The symmetry and energies of all optically active phonon modes in black phosphorous are determined by polarized Raman scattering and infrared reflection spectroscopy at room temperature. The obtained energies are; 365 and 470 cm -1 for A g modes, 197 for B lg, 442 for B 2g, 223 and 440 for B 3g, 136 (TO) and 138 (LO) for B lu, and 468 (TO) and 470 (LO) for B 2u, respectively. The small TO-LO splitting is related to the charge transfer between phosphorus atoms induced by the atomic displacement.

  1. Raman spectroscopy for the control of the atmospheric bioindicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timchenko, E. V.; Timchenko, P. E.; Shamina, L. A.; Zherdeva, L. A.

    2015-09-01

    Experimental studies of optical parameters of different atmospheric bioindicators (arboreous and terricolous types of plants) have been performed with Raman spectroscopy. The change in the optical parameters has been explored for the objects under direct light exposure, as well as for the objects placed in the shade. The age peculiarities of the bioindicators have also been taken into consideration. It was established that the statistical variability of optical parameters for arboreous bioindicators was from 9% to 15% and for plants from 4% to 8.7%. On the basis of these results dandelion (Taraxacum) was chosen as a bioindicator of atmospheric emissions.

  2. Nanotextured surfaces for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balčytis, Armandas; JuodkazytÄ--, Jurga; Seniutinas, Gediminas; Li, Xijun; Niaura, Gediminas; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2016-03-01

    Nanotextured surfaces which have surface features spanning 10-100 nm in length and height scales are among the most promising for surface enhanced Raman scattering/spectroscopy (SERS). Randomness of the feature sizes and surface morphology of such sensors brings an added benefit of spectrally broadband action and, consequently, augmented SERS intensity. Surfaces which are most promising for high sensitivity yet cost efficient for large scale production are overviewed with black CuO, which is made by chemical oxidation of Cu foil, as a representative example. Application potential and challenges to establishing quantitative SERS measurements are outlined.

  3. Polarized Raman spectroscopy unravels the biomolecular structural changes in cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Amuthachelvi; Prakasarao, Aruna; Dornadula, Koteeswaran; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-01-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising technique giving a wealth of information about the orientation and symmetry of bond vibrations in addition to the general chemical information from the conventional Raman spectroscopy. In this regard, polarized Raman Spectroscopic technique was employed to study the changes in the orientation of biomolecules in normal and cancerous conditions. This technique was compared to the conventional Raman spectroscopic technique and was found to yield additional information about the orientation of tyrosine, collagen and DNA. The statistically analyzed depolarization ratios by Linear Discriminant Analysis yielded better accuracy than the statistical results of conventional Raman spectroscopy. Thus, this study reveals that polarized Raman spectroscopy has better diagnostic potential than the conventional Raman spectroscopic technique.

  4. Plasmonic lens focused longitudinal field excitation for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingqian; Wang, Jia

    2015-04-01

    A novel tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy setup with longitudinal field excitation generated by a plasmonic lens is investigated. A symmetry-breaking structure plasmonic lens that is expected to realize a strong longitudinal electric field focus has been designed to generate suitable excitation for enhancement in a tip antenna. The focusing performance of the plasmonic lens is theoretically simulated by the finite-difference time-domain method and experimentally verified by the detection of optical near-field distribution. A plasmonic lens assisted tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy setup has been constructed and used to investigate specimens of carbon nanotubes. Tip-enhanced Raman spectra with distinct excitation wavelengths show similar Raman shifts but different intensities. Experimental results presented in this paper demonstrate that the Raman signal is considerably enhanced. It indicates that the novel tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy configuration is feasible and is a promising technique for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy measurements and characterizations.

  5. Plasmonic lens focused longitudinal field excitation for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingqian; Wang, Jia

    2015-01-01

    A novel tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy setup with longitudinal field excitation generated by a plasmonic lens is investigated. A symmetry-breaking structure plasmonic lens that is expected to realize a strong longitudinal electric field focus has been designed to generate suitable excitation for enhancement in a tip antenna. The focusing performance of the plasmonic lens is theoretically simulated by the finite-difference time-domain method and experimentally verified by the detection of optical near-field distribution. A plasmonic lens assisted tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy setup has been constructed and used to investigate specimens of carbon nanotubes. Tip-enhanced Raman spectra with distinct excitation wavelengths show similar Raman shifts but different intensities. Experimental results presented in this paper demonstrate that the Raman signal is considerably enhanced. It indicates that the novel tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy configuration is feasible and is a promising technique for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy measurements and characterizations. PMID:25977661

  6. UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy of amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhl, Martin; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Schmitt, Heike; Lenarz, Thomas; Morgner, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Resonant enhancement of Raman signals is a useful method to increase sensitivity in samples with low concentration such as biological tissue. The investigation of resonance profiles shows the optimal excitation wavelength and yields valuable information about the molecules themselves. However careful characterization and calibration of all experimental parameters affecting quantum yield is required in order to achieve comparability of the single spectra recorded. We present an experimental technique for measuring the resonance profiles of different amino acids. The absorption lines of these molecules are located in the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range. One limitation for broadband measurement of resonance profiles is the limited availability of Raman filters in certain regions of the UV for blocking the Rayleigh scattered light. Here, a wavelength range from 244.8 nm to 266.0 nm was chosen. The profiles reveal the optimal wavelength for recording the Raman spectra of amino acids in aqueous solutions in this range. This study provides the basis for measurements on more complex molecules such as proteins in the human perilymph. The composition of this liquid in the inner ear is essential for hearing and cannot be analyzed non-invasively so far. The long term aim is to implement this technique as a fiber based endoscope for non-invasive measurements during surgeries (e. g. cochlear implants) making it available as a diagnostic tool for physicians. This project is embedded in the interdisciplinary cluster of excellence "Hearing for all" (H4A).

  7. Development of deep subsurface Raman spectroscopy for medical diagnosis and disease monitoring.

    PubMed

    Matousek, Pavel; Stone, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    The recently developed array of Raman spectroscopy techniques for deep subsurface analysis of biological tissues unlocks new prospects for medical diagnosis and monitoring of various biological conditions. The central pillars of these methods comprise spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) and Transmission Raman Spectroscopy facilitating penetration depths into tissue up to two orders of magnitude greater than those achievable with conventional Raman spectroscopy. This article reviews these concepts and discusses their emerging medical applications including non-invasive breast cancer diagnosis, cancer margin evaluation, bone disorder detection and glucose level determination. PMID:26455315

  8. Vibrational structure of the S 2 (1B u) excited state of diphenyloctatetraene observed by femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukura, Philipp; McCamant, David W.; Davis, Paul H.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2003-11-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is used to study the vibrational structure and dynamics of the S 2 state of diphenyloctatetraene. Strong vibrational features at 1184, 1259 and 1578 cm -1 whose linewidths are determined by the S 2 electronic lifetime are observed at early times after photoexcitation at 397 nm. Kinetic analysis of the integrated Raman intensities as well as the transient absorption reveals an exponential decay of the S 2 state on the order of 100 fs. These results demonstrate the ability of FSRS to study the vibrational structure of excited state and chemical reaction dynamics on the femtosecond timescale.

  9. Tackling field-portable Raman spectroscopy of real world samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shand, Neil C.

    2008-10-01

    A major challenge confronting first responders, customs authorities and other security-related organisations is the accurate, rapid, and safe identification of potentially hazardous chemicals outside a laboratory environment. Currently, a range of hand portable Raman equipment is commercially available that is low cost and increasingly more sophisticated. These systems are generally based on the 785nm Stokes shifted Raman technique with many using dispersive grating spectrometers. This technique offers a broad range of capabilities including the ability to analyse illicit drugs, explosives, chemical weapons and pre-cursors but still has some fundamental constraints. 'Real world' samples, such as those found at a crime scene, will often not be presented in the most accessible manner. Simple issues such as glass fluorescence can make an otherwise tractable sample impossible to analyse in-situ. A new generation of portable Raman equipment is currently being developed to address these issues. Consideration is given to the use of longer wavelength for fluorescence reduction. Alternative optical designs are being tested to compensate for the signal reduction incurred by moving to longer wavelengths. Furthermore, the use of anti-Stokes spectroscopy is being considered as well as investigating the robustness and portability of traditional Fourier Transform interferometer designs along with future advances in detector technology and ultra small spectrometers.

  10. Discrimination of liver malignancies with 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pence, Isaac J; Patil, Chetan A; Lieber, Chad A; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been widely demonstrated for tissue characterization and disease discrimination, however current implementations with either 785 or 830 nm near-infrared (NIR) excitation have been ineffectual in tissues with intense autofluorescence such as the liver. Here we report the use of a dispersive 1064 nm Raman system using a low-noise Indium-Gallium-Arsenide (InGaAs) array to discriminate highly autofluorescent bulk tissue ex vivo specimens from healthy liver, adenocarcinoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma (N = 5 per group). The resulting spectra have been combined with a multivariate discrimination algorithm, sparse multinomial logistic regression (SMLR), to predict class membership of healthy and diseased tissues, and spectral bands selected for robust classification have been extracted. A quantitative metric called feature importance is defined based on classification outputs and is used to guide the association of spectral features with biological indicators of healthy and diseased liver tissue. Spectral bands with high feature importance for healthy and liver tumor specimens include retinol, heme, biliverdin, or quinones (1595 cm(-1)); lactic acid (838 cm(-1)); collagen (873 cm(-1)); and nucleic acids (1485 cm(-1)). Classification performance in both binary (normal versus tumor, 100% sensitivity and 89% specificity) and three-group cases (classification accuracy: normal 89%, adenocarcinoma 74%, hepatocellular carcinoma 64%) indicates the potential for accurately separating healthy and cancerous tissues and suggests implications for utilizing Raman techniques during surgical guidance in liver resection. PMID:26309739

  11. Cryoprotectant redistribution along the frozen straw probed by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karpegina, Yu A; Okotrub, K A; Brusentsev, E Yu; Amstislavsky, S Ya; Surovtsev, N V

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of cryoprotectant (10% glycerol) and ice along the frozen plastic straw (the most useful container for freezing mammalian semen, oocytes and embryos) was studied by Raman scattering technique. Raman spectroscopy being a contactless, non-invasive tool was applied for the straws filled with the cryoprotectant solution and frozen by controlled rate programs commonly used for mammalian embryos freezing. Analysis of Raman spectra measured at different points along the straw reveals a non-uniform distribution of the cryoprotectant. The ratio between non-crystalline solution and ice was found to be increased by several times at the bottom side of the solution column frozen by the standard freezing program. The increase of the cryoprotectant fraction occurs in the area where embryos or oocytes are normally placed during their freezing. Possible effects of the cooling rate and the ice nucleation temperature on the cryoprotectant fraction at the bottom side of the solution column were considered. Our findings highlight that the ice fraction around cryopreserved embryos or oocytes can differ significantly from the averaged one in the frozen plastic straws. PMID:26794460

  12. Characterization of decavanadate and decaniobate solutions by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Aureliano, Manuel; Ohlin, C André; Vieira, Michele O; Marques, M Paula M; Casey, William H; Batista de Carvalho, Luís A E

    2016-04-25

    The decaniobate ion, (Nb10 = [Nb10O28](6-)) being isoelectronic and isostructural with the decavanadate ion (V10 = [V10O28](6-)), but chemically and electrochemically more inert, has been useful in advancing the understanding of V10 toxicology and pharmacological activities. In the present study, the solution chemistry of Nb10 and V10 between pH 4 and 12 is studied by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra of V10 show that this vanadate species dominates up to pH 6.45 whereas it remains detectable until pH 8.59, which is an important range for biochemistry. Similarly, Nb10 is present between pH 5.49 and 9.90 and this species remains detectable in solution up to pH 10.80. V10 dissociates at most pH values into smaller tetrahedral vanadate oligomers such as V1 and V2, whereas Nb10 dissociates into Nb6 under mildly (10 > pH > 7.6) or highly alkaline conditions. Solutions of V10 and Nb10 are both kinetically stable under basic pH conditions for at least two weeks and at moderate temperature. The Raman method provides a means of establishing speciation in the difficult niobate system and these findings have important consequences for toxicology activities and pharmacological applications of vanadate and niobate polyoxometalates. PMID:27031764

  13. Discrimination of liver malignancies with 1064 nm dispersive Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pence, Isaac J.; Patil, Chetan A.; Lieber, Chad A.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been widely demonstrated for tissue characterization and disease discrimination, however current implementations with either 785 or 830 nm near-infrared (NIR) excitation have been ineffectual in tissues with intense autofluorescence such as the liver. Here we report the use of a dispersive 1064 nm Raman system using a low-noise Indium-Gallium-Arsenide (InGaAs) array to discriminate highly autofluorescent bulk tissue ex vivo specimens from healthy liver, adenocarcinoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma (N = 5 per group). The resulting spectra have been combined with a multivariate discrimination algorithm, sparse multinomial logistic regression (SMLR), to predict class membership of healthy and diseased tissues, and spectral bands selected for robust classification have been extracted. A quantitative metric called feature importance is defined based on classification outputs and is used to guide the association of spectral features with biological indicators of healthy and diseased liver tissue. Spectral bands with high feature importance for healthy and liver tumor specimens include retinol, heme, biliverdin, or quinones (1595 cm−1); lactic acid (838 cm−1); collagen (873 cm−1); and nucleic acids (1485 cm−1). Classification performance in both binary (normal versus tumor, 100% sensitivity and 89% specificity) and three-group cases (classification accuracy: normal 89%, adenocarcinoma 74%, hepatocellular carcinoma 64%) indicates the potential for accurately separating healthy and cancerous tissues and suggests implications for utilizing Raman techniques during surgical guidance in liver resection. PMID:26309739

  14. Surface-Sensitive Raman Spectroscopy of Collagen I Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Gullekson, Corinne; Lucas, Leanne; Hewitt, Kevin; Kreplak, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Collagen fibrils are the main constituent of the extracellular matrix surrounding eukaryotic cells. Although the assembly and structure of collagen fibrils is well characterized, very little appears to be known about one of the key determinants of their biological function—namely, the physico-chemical properties of their surface. One way to obtain surface-sensitive structural and chemical data is to take advantage of the near-field nature of surface- and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Using Ag and Au nanoparticles bound to Collagen type-I fibrils, as well as tips coated with a thin layer of Ag, we obtained Raman spectra characteristic to the first layer of collagen molecules at the surface of the fibrils. The most frequent Raman peaks were attributed to aromatic residues such as phenylalanine and tyrosine. In several instances, we also observed Amide I bands with a full width at half-maximum of 10–30 cm−1. The assignment of these Amide I band positions suggests the presence of 310-helices as well as α- and β-sheets at the fibril's surface. PMID:21463598

  15. Probing Spin Excitations Using Magneto-Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunavukkuarasu, K.; Lu, Z.; Simpson, J.; Walker, A.; Sears, J.; Kim, Y.-J.; Burch, K.; Smirnov, D.

    The presence of a 2D quantum spin liquid state was recently suggested for the spin-orbit coupled Mott insulator α-RuCl3 with a honeycomb lattice.[Phys. Rev. 90, 041112 (2014)] Optical spectroscopy, Raman scattering, specific heat as well as magnetic susceptibility measurements on α-RuCl3 identified elementary excitations due to electronic correlations and spin-orbit coupling.[arXiv:1503.07593, Phys. Rev. Letters 114, 147201 (2015), and Phys. Rev. 91, 144420 (2015)] These observations appear to be consistent with theoretical expectations for Heisenberg-Kitaev model for QSL.[Phys. Rev. 91, 241110 (2015)] The underlying mechanism for the unconventional magnetism in α-RuCl3 was further investigated by probing the effect of external magnetic field on the Raman spectroscopic signatures. Raman scattering experiments were performed at temperatures down to 5 K and magnetic fields up to 10 T. The intensity of strongest A1g phonon was found to decrease with increasing magnetic field strength suggesting the presence of strong magnetic interactions. The experimental observations and its implications will be presented. Current Affiliation: Florida A and M University.

  16. Water monitoring by optofluidic Raman spectroscopy for in situ applications.

    PubMed

    Persichetti, Gianluca; Bernini, Romeo

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of water monitoring by Raman spectroscopy with a portable optofluidic system for in-situ applications has been successfully demonstrated. In the proposed approach, the sample under analysis is injected into a capillary nozzle in order to produce a liquid jet that acts as an optical waveguide. This jet waveguide provides an effective strategy to excite and collect the Raman signals arising from water contaminants due to the high refractive index difference between air and water. The proposed approach avoids any necessity of liquid container or flow cell and removes any background signal coming from the sample container commonly affects Raman measurements. Furthermore, this absence is a significant advantage for in situ measurements where fouling problems can be relevant and cleaning procedures are troublesome. The extreme simplicity and efficiency of the optical scheme adopted in our approach result in highly sensitive and rapid measurements that have been performed on different representative water pollutants. The experimental results demonstrate the high potentiality of our device in water quality monitoring and analysis. In particular, nitrate and sulfate are detected below the maximum contamination level allowed for drinking water, whereas a limit of detection of 40mg/l has been found for benzene. PMID:27216667

  17. Identification of microbial pigments in evaporitic matrices using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vítek, Petr; Jehlička, Jan; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Wierzchos, Jacek

    2010-05-01

    An evaporitic environment is considered as one of the possible habitats for life on Mars. From terrestrial geological scenarios we know that microorganisms inhabiting such an extreme environment (halophiles) are rich in protective pigments, depending on the metabolic pathways and specific adaptation to the harsh environmental conditions. Carotenoids typically occur within the cells of halophiles (bacteria, archaea as well as eukaryotic algae) in large amounts as part of their photosystem and protective adaptation to high doses of UV radiation that are typical for most recent evaporitic environments. Chlorophyll occurs in halophilic cyanobacteria together with carotenoids and possibly other pigments which are synthetised in response to the high UV radiation insolation. Here we present the results of Raman spectroscopic investigations of a) beta-carotene in experimentally prepared mixtures with halite, gypsum and epsomite; and b) cyanobacterial colonies inhabiting real halite and gypsum matrices in the Atacama Desert. Our results demonstrate the possibility of detection of beta-carotene - a typical carotenoid - in relatively low concentrations within the evaporitic powdered mixtures; the lowest concentration of carotenoid signal detected was 0,1 mg kg-1, which represents 100 ppb. Raman spectroscopic analyses of natural specimens (endolithic cyanobacteria) from the Atacama desert revealed the presence of scytonemin, an extremely efficient UV protective pigment, carotenoids of various types and chlorophyll. The detection potential as well as limitations of Raman spectroscopy as a part of a payload within future robotic space missions focused on the search for life on Mars is discussed.

  18. In vivo Raman spectroscopy for oral cancers diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Deshmukh, Atul; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Krishna, C. Murali

    2012-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is sixth among the major malignancies worldwide. Tobacco habits are known as major causative factor in tumor carcinogenesis in oral cancer. Optical spectroscopy methods, including Raman, are being actively pursued as alternative/adjunct for cancer diagnosis. Earlier studies have demonstrated the feasibility of classifying normal, premalignant and malignant oral ex-vivo tissues. In the present study we have recorded in vivo spectra from contralateral normal and diseased sites of 50 subjects with pathologically confirmed lesions of buccal mucosa using fiber-optic-probe-coupled HE-785 Raman spectrometer. Spectra were recorded on similar points as per teeth positions with an average acquisition time of 8 seconds. A total of 215 and 225 spectra from normal and tumor sites, respectively, were recorded. Finger print region (1200-1800 cm-1) was utilized for classification using LDA. Standard-model was developed using 125 normal and 139 tumor spectra from 27 subjects. Two separate clusters with an efficiency of ~95% were obtained. Cross-validation with leave-one-out yielded ~90% efficiency. Remaining 90 normal and 86 tumor spectra were used as test data and predication efficiency of model was evaluated. Findings of the study indicate that Raman spectroscopic methods in combination with appropriate multivariate tool can be used for objective, noninvasive and rapid diagnosis.

  19. A novel extremophile strategy studied by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Howell G. M.

    2007-12-01

    A case is made for the classification of the colonisation by Dirina massiliensis forma sorediata of pigments on ancient wall-paintings as extremophilic behaviour. The lichen encrustations studied using FT-Raman spectroscopy have yielded important molecular information which has assisted in the identification of the survival strategy of the organism in the presence of significant levels of heavy metal toxins. The production of a carotenoid, probably astaxanthin, at the surface of the lichen thalli is identified from its characteristic biomolecular signatures in the Raman spectrum, whereas the presence of calcium oxalate dihydrate (weddellite) has been identified at both the upper and lower surfaces of the thalli and in core samples taken from depths of up to 10 mm through the encrustation into the rock substrate. The latter observation explains the significant disintegrative biodeteriorative effect of the colonisation upon the integrity of the wall-paintings and can be used to direct conservatorial and preservation efforts of the art work. A surprising result proved to be the absence of Raman spectroscopic evidence for the complexation of the metal pigments by the oxalic acid produced by the metabolic action of the organisms, unlike several cases that have been reported in the literature.

  20. In situ identification and analysis of automotive paint pigments using line segment excitation Raman spectroscopy: I. Inorganic topcoat pigments.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, E M; Carrabba, M

    2001-09-01

    Several applications of Raman spectroscopy in the forensic sciences have recently been demonstrated, but few have involved the analysis of paints. Undoubtedly, this is a reflection of the sample degradation problems often encountered when a visible or near-infrared laser is focused on a light-absorbing matrix. In this study, a dispersive CCD Raman spectrometer (785 nm) was used in a configuration which collected scattered light from an excitation region 3 mm long and 80 microm wide, instead of from a focused spot. Sample degradation was not observed, and Raman spectra of automotive paints of all colors were readily obtained. Most of the paints analyzed were U.S. automobile original finishes (1974 to 1989) from the Reference Collection of Automotive Paints, and the inorganic pigments examined were those which had been identified previously by infrared spectroscopy in finishes from this collection. Prominent peaks of rutile were observed in Raman spectra of light-colored nonmetallic finishes for both monocoats and basecoat/clearcoat systems, and the rutile peaks are readily distinguished from those of anatase. The lead chromates (Chrome Yellow, Molybdate Orange, and silica-encapsulated versions of the two) are the strongest Raman scatterers among the pigments examined, and Chrome Yellow was identified by Raman spectroscopy in several yellow and orange nonmetallic monocoats for which infrared absorptions of this pigment were not observed. Raman spectroscopy also provides an unequivocal means to distinguish Chrome Yellow from Molybdate Orange. This is particularly helpful for the analysis of paints containing light pigment loads or encapsulated pigments since the two formulations cannot be differentiated by infrared spectroscopy in such cases. The iron-containing pigments, ferric oxide, hydrous ferric oxide, and Prussian Blue, are relatively weak Raman scatterers, but peaks of hydrous ferric oxide and Prussian Blue were observed in spectra of paints containing heavy

  1. Adiabatic Tip-Plasmon Focusing for Nano-Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Berweger, Samuel; Atkin, Joanna M.; Olmon, Robert L.; Raschke, Markus Bernd

    2010-12-16

    True nanoscale optical spectroscopy requires the efficient delivery of light for a spatially nanoconfined excitation. We utilize adiabatic plasmon focusing to concentrate an optical field into the apex of a scanning probe tip of {approx}10 nm in radius. The conical tips with the ability for two-stage optical mode matching of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) grating-coupling and the adiabatic propagating SPP conversion into a localized SPP at the tip apex represent a special optical antenna concept for far-field transduction into nanoscale excitation. The resulting high nanofocusing efficiency and the spatial separation of the plasmonic grating coupling element on the tip shaft from the near-field apex probe region allows for true background-free nanospectroscopy. As an application, we demonstrate tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) of surface molecules with enhanced contrast and its extension into the near-IR with 800 nm excitation.

  2. Characterization of Phyllosilicates by LIBS and Laser Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A.; Sobron, P.

    2011-12-01

    NIR spectral signatures of phyllosilicates were recognized on Mars with wide distributions from orbit by OMEGA (on Mars Express orbiter) and CRISM (on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter) observations. On the ground, geochemical and spectral features related to phyllosilicates were identified in rocks at two locations on Columbia Hill at Gusev crater using the data obtained by the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit. Furthermore, Opportunity rover is currently approaching the Cap of York at Endeavour crater on Meridiani Planum, where the signatures of phyllosilicates (and hydrous sulfates) were seen by CRISM. Laser-Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser Raman spectroscopy will be used for the first time in rover missions in ChemCam on the NASA-MSL (Mars Science Laboratory) and in RLS on the ESA-ExoMars, respectively. As demonstrated by our previous studies, they are very powerful tools for characterizing the geochemistry and mineralogy aspects of the secondary minerals from aqueous alterations, especially hydrous sulfates. This study investigates the potential of LIBS and Raman spectroscopy for identifying and characterizing a variety of phyllosilicates, especially clays. Clay standards from the Clay Mineral Society were used. The LIBS measurements were made in a Planetary Environment and Analysis Chamber (PEACh) under Mars atmospheric pressure and composition, using 1064 nm as the excitation laser wavelength, same as ChemCam. The Raman measurements were made in ordinary laboratory environment using 532 nm as the excitation wavelength, same as RLS. The LIBS data were processed using custom automated software. We performed quantitative analysis of the spectra in order to evaluate the effectiveness of our method in: (a) discriminating between phyllosilicates and other silicates; (b) classifying different types of phyllosilicates (i.e., serpentine, chlorites, clays); and (c) correlating the LIBS-derived elemental abundances with the real chemical compositions of

  3. Study of the processes of carbonization and oxidation of porous silicon by Raman and IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vasin, A. V.; Okholin, P. N.; Verovsky, I. N.; Nazarov, A. N.; Lysenko, V. S.; Kholostov, K. I. Bondarenko, V. P.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2011-03-15

    Porous silicon layers were produced by electrochemical etching of single-crystal silicon wafers with the resistivity 10 {Omega} cm in the aqueous-alcohol solution of hydrofluoric acid. Raman spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy are used to study the processes of interaction of porous silicon with undiluted acetylene at low temperatures and the processes of oxidation of carbonized porous silicon by water vapors. It is established that, even at the temperature 550 Degree-Sign C, the silicon-carbon bonds are formed at the pore surface and the graphite-like carbon condensate emerges. It is shown that the carbon condensate inhibits oxidation of porous silicon by water vapors and contributes to quenching of white photoluminescence in the oxidized carbonized porous silicon nanocomposite layer.

  4. Machine learning methods for quantitative analysis of Raman spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Michael G.; Ryder, Alan G.

    2003-03-01

    The automated identification and quantification of illicit materials using Raman spectroscopy is of significant importance for law enforcement agencies. This paper explores the use of Machine Learning (ML) methods in comparison with standard statistical regression techniques for developing automated identification methods. In this work, the ML task is broken into two sub-tasks, data reduction and prediction. In well-conditioned data, the number of samples should be much larger than the number of attributes per sample, to limit the degrees of freedom in predictive models. In this spectroscopy data, the opposite is normally true. Predictive models based on such data have a high number of degrees of freedom, which increases the risk of models over-fitting to the sample data and having poor predictive power. In the work described here, an approach to data reduction based on Genetic Algorithms is described. For the prediction sub-task, the objective is to estimate the concentration of a component in a mixture, based on its Raman spectrum and the known concentrations of previously seen mixtures. Here, Neural Networks and k-Nearest Neighbours are used for prediction. Preliminary results are presented for the problem of estimating the concentration of cocaine in solid mixtures, and compared with previously published results in which statistical analysis of the same dataset was performed. Finally, this paper demonstrates how more accurate results may be achieved by using an ensemble of prediction techniques.

  5. Raman Spectroscopy Applied to Mars Water Cycle Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakakos, G.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    One of the key findings during the Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory landed Mars missions has been the detection of perchlorate, a highly deliquescent salt. Perchlorates are of great interest on Mars due to their high affinity for water vapour as well as their ability to greatly depress the freezing point of water when in solution. This has intriguing biological implications as resulting brines could potentially provide a habitable environment for living organisms. Additionally, it has been speculated that these salts may play a significant role in influencing the hydrological cycle on Mars. In order to experimentally study brine formation on Mars and assess the feasibility of a future landed detection tool, a stand-off Raman spectroscopy instrument and environmental simulation chamber have been developed at York University. A sample of magnesium perchlorate has been subjected to the water vapour pressure, background pressure and temperatures found at polar Martian latitudes. Results indicate that at a water vapour pressure of ~20 Pa, Raman spectroscopy is able to detect the onset of brine formation and provide an estimate of the quantity of water taken up by the sample. At the lower water vapour pressures typically found on Mars ( ~1 Pa), it appears that slower dynamics inhibit the onset of water uptake over relevant time scales. The experimental setup and current results will be presented.

  6. Raman Spectroscopy of Poly-Urea Formaldehyde Microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espino, Omar; Chipara, Dorina; Chipara, Mircea; Martinez, Melissa

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this research project was to add self-healing capabilities to polymeric nanocomposites. We used the ``classical'' method to obtain self-healing polymers with the addition of TiO2 nanoparticles in the self-healing system. Self-healing polymers are obtained by dispersion of first generation Grubbs catalysts and microcapsules filled with monomers (typically DCPD). These kind of ``smart materials'' are able to survive to high mechanical stress via the ignition of the so called ``autonomous self-healing mechanism'' which is actually a ring opening methatesis polymerization (ROMP) reaction triggered by mechanical stresses in excess over a threshold limit through the rupture of microcapsules and the release of the monomeric content. As a preliminary step for adding self-healing capabilities in nanocomposites, the synthesis of microcapsules filled with dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) is vital for the addition of self-healing capabilities to polymeric matrices. We synthesized polyurea-formaldehyde (PUF) microcapsules filled with monomer (DCPD) using the in-situ polymerization. The synthesis was monitored by Raman spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and pH measurements that has been extensively used as a non-invasive techniques in the characterization of polymers and monitoring of organic reactions. The goal of this research was to assess the formation of the microcapsules during synthesis and the presence of the DCPD in the microcapsules. Samples were taken during the synthesis every 30 minutes and analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, and optical microscopy keeping a control over the pH of the solution.

  7. Femtosecond laser induced nanostructuring for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messaoudi, H.; Das, S. K.; Lange, J.; Heinrich, F.; Schrader, S.; Frohme, M.; Grunwald, R.

    2014-03-01

    The formation of periodical nanostructures with femtosecond laser pulses was used to create highly efficient substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). We report about the structuring of silver and copper substrates and their application to the SERS of DNA (herring sperm) and protein molecules (egg albumen). The maximum enhancement factors were found on Ag substrates processed with the second harmonic generation (SHG) of a 1-kHz Ti:sapphire laser and structure periods near the SHG wavelength. In the case of copper, however, the highest enhancement was obtained with long-period ripples induced with at fundamental wavelength. This is explained by an additional significant influence of nanoparticles on the surface. Nanostructured areas in the range of 1.25 mm2 were obtained in 10 s. The surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fast Fourier Transform and Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, the role of the chemical modification of the metal structures is addressed. Thin oxide layers resulting from working in atmosphere which improve the biocompatibility were indicated by vibration spectra. It is expected that the detailed study of the mechanisms of laser-induced nanostructure formation will stimulate further applications of functionalized surfaces like photocatalysis, selective chemistry and nano-biology.

  8. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of solid particles.

    PubMed

    Rkiouak, L; Tang, M J; Camp, J C J; McGregor, J; Watson, I M; Cox, R A; Kalberer, M; Ward, A D; Pope, F D

    2014-06-21

    The heterogeneous interactions of gas molecules on solid particles are crucial in many areas of science, engineering and technology. Such interactions play a critical role in atmospheric chemistry and in heterogeneous catalysis, a key technology in the energy and chemical industries. Investigating heterogeneous interactions upon single levitated particles can provide significant insight into these important processes. Various methodologies exist for levitating micron sized particles including: optical, electrical and acoustic techniques. Prior to this study, the optical levitation of solid micron scale particles has proved difficult to achieve over timescales relevant to the above applications. In this work, a new vertically configured counter propagating dual beam optical trap was optimized to levitate a range of solid particles in air. Silica (SiO2), α-alumina (Al2O3), titania (TiO2) and polystyrene were stably trapped with a high trapping efficiency (Q = 0.42). The longest stable trapping experiment was conducted continuously for 24 hours, and there are no obvious constraints on trapping time beyond this period. Therefore, the methodology described in this paper should be of major benefit to various research communities. The strength of the new technique is demonstrated by the simultaneous levitation and spectroscopic interrogation of silica particles by Raman spectroscopy. In particular, the adsorption of water upon silica was investigated under controlled relative humidity environments. Furthermore, the collision and coagulation behaviour of silica particles with microdroplets of sulphuric acid was followed using both optical imaging and Raman spectroscopy. PMID:24803083

  9. Nanogap structures: combining enhanced Raman spectroscopy and electronic transport.

    PubMed

    Natelson, Douglas; Li, Yajing; Herzog, Joseph B

    2013-04-21

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is an experimental tool for accessing vibrational and chemical information, down to the single molecule level. SERS typically relies on plasmon excitations in metal nanostructures to concentrate the incident radiation and to provide an enhanced photon density of states to couple emitted radiation to the far field. Many common SERS platforms involve metal nanoparticles to generate the required electromagnetic enhancements. Here we concentrate on an alternative approach, in which the relevant plasmon excitations are supported at a truly nanoscale gap between extended electrodes, rather than discrete subwavelength nanoparticles. The ability to fabricate precise gaps on demand, and in some cases to tune the gap size in situ, combined with the additional capability of simultaneous electronic transport measurements of the nanogap, provides access to information not previously available in standard SERS. We summarize the rich plasmonic physics at work in these extended systems and highlight the recent state of the art including tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and the application of mechanical break junctions and electromigrated junctions. We describe in detail how we have performed in situ gap-enhanced Raman measurements of molecular-scale junctions while simultaneously subjecting these structures to electronic transport. These extended electrode structures allow us to study the pumping of vibrational modes by the flow of tunneling electrons, as well as the shifting of vibrational energies due to the applied bias. These experiments extend SERS into a tool for examining fundamental processes of dissipation, and provide insight into the mechanisms behind SERS spectral diffusion. We conclude with a brief discussion of future directions. PMID:23385304

  10. UV photostability of insect repellents evaluated through Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bório, Viviane G.; Fernandes, Adjaci U.; Silveira, Landulfo

    2016-02-01

    The use of insect repellents either indoors or at places with incidence of solar radiation has been common due to dengue epidemics in Brazil. The lack of studies on the photostability of these substances has motivated this study, where the main goal was to verify the photostability and photodegradation of some of the commercially insect repellents available under the simulated ultraviolet (UV) radiation, by evaluating the molecular changes using dispersive Raman spectroscopy (830 nm excitation). A laboratory-made chamber was used for irradiating the repellents, where UV-A + UV-B radiations (UV-A: 5.5 mW/cm2 and UV-B 1.5 mW/cm2) can be obtained. The chamber internal temperature did not exceed 31 °C during experiments. The compounds n,n-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET), IR-3535, andiroba and citronella oils, used as active ingredients in insect repellents, and commercial formula containing DEET (14.5% in ethanol and isopropyl myristate) and IR-3535 (16% in carbopol) were continuously irradiated for 8 h. The Raman spectrum of each sample was obtained before and after UV exposure. The compounds and the commercial formula containing IR-3535 showed photo-stability when irradiated, since no changes in the peaks were found. The commercial formula containing DEET showed spectral decrease at 524, 690, 1003 and 1606 cm-1, assigned to the DEET, and increase at 884 cm-1, assigned to the ethanol. These results indicate that the excipient could influence the photostability of the active ingredient. The Raman spectroscopy can be suitable to monitor the photodegradation under UV irradiation rapidly and reliably.

  11. Electrochemical tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhicong; Huang, Shengchao; Huang, Tengxiang; Li, Maohua; Ren, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) can not only provide very high sensitivity but also high spatial resolution, and has found applications in various fields, including surface science, materials, and biology. Most of previous TERS studies were performed in air or in the ultrahigh vacuum. If TERS study can be performed in the electrochemical environment, the electronic properties of the surface can be well controlled so that the interaction of the molecules with the substrate and the configuration of the molecules on the surface can also be well controlled. However, the EC-TERS is not just a simple combination of electrochemistry with TERS, or the combination of EC-STM with Raman. It is a merge of STM, electrochemistry and Raman spectroscopy, and the mutual interference among these techniques makes the EC-TERS particularly challenge: the light distortion in EC system, the sensitivity, the tip coating to work under EC-STM and retain the TERS activity and cleanliness. We designed a special spectroelectrochemical cell to eliminate the distortion of the liquid layer to the optical path and obtain TER spectra of reasonably good signal to noise ratio for surface adsorbed molecules under electrochemical potential control. For example, potential dependent TERS signal have been obtained for adsorbed aromatic thiol molecule, and much obvious signal change compared with SERS has been found, manifesting the importance of EC-TERS to reveal the interfacial structure of an electrochemical system. We further extended EC-TERS to electrochemical redox system, and clear dependence of the species during redox reaction can be identified.

  12. THE ROLE OF RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY IN THE ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY OF POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in instrumentation are making Raman spectroscopy the tool of choice for an increasing number of chemical applications. For example, many recalcitrant industrial process monitoring problems have been solved in recent years with in-line Raman spectrometers. Raman is attr...

  13. Measurement of sex steroids and analogs with a fiber optic probe using pulsed ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, H. Georg; Greek, L. Shane; Blades, Michael W.; Bree, Alan V.; Gorzalka, Boris B.; Turner, Robin F. B.

    1997-05-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy, performed via an optical fiber probe, can be used in aqueous samples to detect a wide variety of chemical species in situ. It offers a potentially rapid, on-site alternative to the high performance chromatography/mass spectrometry methods currently considered definitive for the detection of sex steroids in human urine. As a first step in the development of a resonance Raman instrument for the rapid detection of sex steroids in biological samples, it had to be shown that these substances, their analogs, and the major components of human urine can be differentiated on the basis of their resonance Raman spectra. A fiber-optic linked Raman and tunable ultraviolet resonance Raman system was assembled with custom designed optical fiber probes. The ultraviolet absorption spectra of some sex steroids, analogs, and components of human urine were measured in order to determine feasible excitation light frequencies. We present here for the first time the UV resonance Raman spectra of these substances obtained via our novel fiber probes. These results indicate that some of the steroids tested can be differentiated from each other and from the major components of human urine on the basis of their resonance Raman spectra.

  14. Multi-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy based on modified multi-energy constrained iterative deconvolution algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Wenlong; Cai, Zhijian; Zhou, Hongwu; Wu, Jianhong

    2013-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy is fast and nondestructive, and it is widely used in chemistry, biomedicine, food safety and other areas. However, Raman spectroscopy is often hampered by strong fluorescence background, especially in food additives detection and biomedicine researching. In this paper, one efficient technique was the multi-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (MERDS) which incorporated a series of small wavelength-shift wavelengths as excitation sources. A modified multi-energy constrained iterative deconvolution (MMECID) algorithm was proposed to reconstruct the Raman Spectroscopy. Computer simulation and experiments both demonstrated that the Raman spectrum can be well reconstructed from large fluorescence background. The more excitation sources used, the better signal to noise ratio got. However, many excitation sources were equipped on the Raman spectrometer, which increased the complexity of the experimental system. Thus, a trade-off should be made between the number of excitation frequencies and experimental complexity.

  15. The study of interaction between graphene and metals by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Liang, S. H.; Yu, T.; Han, X. F.; Li, D. H.; Li, Y. B.

    2011-04-01

    Different metal films (Co, Ni, Au, and Ag) were deposited on graphene and the interactions between these metals and graphene were studied by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman peaks were shifted after the deposition of metal films. The electron doping of graphene with cobalt contacts and the hole doping with the nickel contacts are the main reasons for Raman peak shift. However, for gold contacts and silver contacts with graphene, strain effect dominates Raman peak shift instead of charge transfer.

  16. Nondestructive evaluation of internal maturity of tomatoes using spatially offset Raman spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research explored the use of spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) for nondestructive evaluation of internal maturity of tomatoes. A Raman spectroscopy system using a 785 nm laser was developed to collect spatially-offset spectra in the wavenumber range of 200 – 2500. The SORS measuremen...

  17. The 14th Annual James L. Waters Symposium at Pittcon: Raman Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy was the main topic of the 14th Annual James L. Waters Symposium, which was held in March 2003 at Pittcon. The development of the enabling technologies that have made Raman spectroscopy a routine analysis tool in many laboratories worldwide is discussed.

  18. [Research Progress of Raman Spectroscopy on Dyestuff Identification of Ancient Relics and Artifacts].

    PubMed

    He, Qiu-ju; Wang, Li-qin

    2016-02-01

    As the birthplace of Silk Road, China has a long dyeing history. The valuable information about the production time, the source of dyeing material, dyeing process and preservation status were existed in organic dyestuff deriving from cultural relics and artifacts. However, because of the low contents, complex compositions and easily degraded of dyestuff, it is always a challenging task to identify the dyestuff in relics analyzing field. As a finger-print spectrum, Raman spectroscopy owns unique superiorities in dyestuff identification. Thus, the principle, characteristic, limitation, progress and development direction of micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS/µ-Raman), near infrared reflection and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (NIR-FT-Raman), surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonance raman spectroscopy (RRS) have been introduced in this paper. Furthermore, the features of Raman spectra of gardenia, curcumin and other natural dyestuffs were classified by MRS technology, and then the fluorescence phenomena of purpurin excitated with different wavelength laser was compared and analyzed. At last, gray green silver colloidal particles were made as the base, then the colorant of madder was identified combining with thin layer chromatography (TLC) separation technology and SERS, the result showed that the surface enhancement effect of silver colloidal particles could significantly reduce fluorescence background of the Raman spectra. It is pointed out that Raman spectroscopy is a rapid and convenient molecular structure qualitative methodology, which has broad application prospect in dyestuff analysis of cultural relics and artifacts. We propose that the combination of multi-Raman spectroscopy, separation technology and long distance transmission technology are the development trends of Raman spectroscopy. PMID:27209739

  19. Characterization and differentiation of normal and abnormal semen samples using micro-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zufang; Chen, Xiwen; Chen, Jinhua; Li, Yongzeng; Lei, Jinping; Chen, Rong

    2012-12-01

    Growth in the percentage of male infertility has caused extensive concerns. The fast and reliable method is urgently required for diagnosis of semen samples. In our study, micro-Raman spectroscopy was employed to characterize and differentiate the normal and abnormal semen samples based on the differences of their specific Raman spectra which originated from biochemical components. Our preliminary results demonstrate that micro-Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis methods has the potential of being used to detect and differentiate semen samples.

  20. Shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: principle and applications (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Feng; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2015-08-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful technique that yields fingerprint vibrational information with ultra-high sensitivity. However, only roughened Ag, Au and Cu surfaces can generate strong SERS effect. The lack of materials and morphology generality has severely limited the breadth of SERS practical applications on surface science, electrochemistry and catalysis. Shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) was therefore invented to break the long-standing limitation of SERS. In SHINERS, Au@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles were rationally designed. The gold core acts as plasmonic antenna and encapsulated by an ultra-thin, uniform and pinhole-free silica shell, can provide high electromagnetic field to enhance the Raman signals of probed molecules. The inert silica shell acts as tunneling barrier prevents the core from interacting with the environment. SHINERS has already been applied to a number of challenging systems, such as hydrogen and CO on Pt(hkl) and Rh(hkl), which can't be realized by traditional SERS. Combining with electrochemical methods, we has investigated the adsorption processes of pyridine at the Au(hkl) single crystal/solution interface, and in-situ monitored the surface electro-oxidation at Au(hkl) electrodes. These pioneering studies demonstrate convincingly the ability of SHINERS in exploring correlations between structure and reactivity as well as in monitoring intermediates at the interfaces. SHINERS was also explored from semiconductor surface for industry, to living bacteria for life science, and to pesticide residue detection for food safety. The concept of shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhancement is being applied to other spectroscopies such as infrared absorption, sum frequency generation and fluorescence. Jian-Feng Li et al., Nature, 2010, 464, 392-395.

  1. Development characteristics of polymethyl methacrylate in alcohol/water mixtures: a lithography and Raman spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Ocola, Leonidas E; Costales, Maya; Gosztola, David J

    2016-01-22

    Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) is the most widely used resist in electron beam lithography. This paper reports on a lithography and Raman spectroscopy study of development characteristics of PMMA in methanol, ethanol and isopropanol mixtures with water as developers. We have found that ethanol/water mixtures at a 4:1 volume ratio are an excellent, high resolution, non-toxic developer for exposed PMMA. We have also found that the proper methodology to use so that contrast data can be compared to techniques used in polymer science is not to rinse the developed resist but to immediately dry with nitrogen. Our results show how powerful simple lithographic techniques can be used to study ternary polymer solvent solutions when compared to other techniques used in the literature. Raman data show that both tightly bonded -OH groups and non-hydrogen bonded -OH groups play a role in the development of PMMA. Tightly hydrogen bonded -OH groups show pure Lorentzian Raman absorption only in the concentration ranges where ethanol/water and IPA/water mixtures are effective developers of PMMA, pointing to possible ordering or reduced amorphization due to the liquid state. The impact of understanding these interactions may open doors to a new developers of other electron beam resists that can reduce the toxicity of the waste stream. PMID:26656030

  2. Development characteristics of polymethyl methacrylate in alcohol/water mixtures: a lithography and Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocola, Leonidas E.; Costales, Maya; Gosztola, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) is the most widely used resist in electron beam lithography. This paper reports on a lithography and Raman spectroscopy study of development characteristics of PMMA in methanol, ethanol and isopropanol mixtures with water as developers. We have found that ethanol/water mixtures at a 4:1 volume ratio are an excellent, high resolution, non-toxic developer for exposed PMMA. We have also found that the proper methodology to use so that contrast data can be compared to techniques used in polymer science is not to rinse the developed resist but to immediately dry with nitrogen. Our results show how powerful simple lithographic techniques can be used to study ternary polymer solvent solutions when compared to other techniques used in the literature. Raman data show that both tightly bonded -OH groups and non-hydrogen bonded -OH groups play a role in the development of PMMA. Tightly hydrogen bonded -OH groups show pure Lorentzian Raman absorption only in the concentration ranges where ethanol/water and IPA/water mixtures are effective developers of PMMA, pointing to possible ordering or reduced amorphization due to the liquid state. The impact of understanding these interactions may open doors to a new developers of other electron beam resists that can reduce the toxicity of the waste stream.

  3. In-situ Raman spectroscopy and high-speed photography of a shocked triaminotrinitrobenzene based explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Saint-Amans, C.; Hébert, P. Doucet, M.; Resseguier, T. de

    2015-01-14

    We have developed a single-shot Raman spectroscopy experiment to study at the molecular level the initiation mechanisms that can lead to sustained detonation of a triaminotrinitrobenzene-based explosive. Shocks up to 30 GPa were generated using a two-stage laser-driven flyer plate generator. The samples were confined by an optical window and shock pressure was maintained for at least 30 ns. Photon Doppler Velocimetry measurements were performed at the explosive/window interface to determine the shock pressure profile. Raman spectra were recorded as a function of shock pressure and the shifts of the principal modes were compared to static high-pressure measurements performed in a diamond anvil cell. Our shock data indicate the role of temperature effects. Our Raman spectra also show a progressive extinction of the signal which disappears around 9 GPa. High-speed photography images reveal a simultaneous progressive darkening of the sample surface up to total opacity at 9 GPa. Reflectivity measurements under shock compression show that this opacity is due to a broadening of the absorption spectrum over the entire visible region.

  4. Development characteristics of polymethyl methacrylate in alcohol/water mixtures. A lithography and Raman spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Ocola, Leonidas E.; Costales, Maya; Gosztola, David J.

    2015-12-10

    Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) is the most widely used resist in electron beam lithography. This paper reports on a lithography and Raman spectroscopy study of development characteristics of PMMA in methanol, ethanol and isopropanol mixtures with water as developers. We have found that ethanol/water mixtures at a 4:1 volume ratio are an excellent, high resolution, non-toxic, developer for exposed PMMA. We also have found that the proper methodology to use so that contrast data can be compared to techniques used in polymer science is not to rinse the developed resist but to immediately dry with nitrogen. Our results show how powerful simple lithographic techniques can be used to study ternary polymer solvent solutions when compared to other techniques used in the literature. Raman data shows that there both tightly bonded –OH groups and non-hydrogen bonded –OH groups play a role in the development of PMMA. Tightly hydrogen bonded –OH groups show pure Lorentzian Raman absorption only in the concentration ranges where ethanol/water and IPA/water mixtures are effective developers of PMMA. The impact of the understanding these interactions may open doors to a new developers of other electron beam resists that can reduce the toxicity of the waste stream.

  5. In-situ Raman spectroscopy and high-speed photography of a shocked triaminotrinitrobenzene based explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Amans, C.; Hébert, P.; Doucet, M.; de Resseguier, T.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a single-shot Raman spectroscopy experiment to study at the molecular level the initiation mechanisms that can lead to sustained detonation of a triaminotrinitrobenzene-based explosive. Shocks up to 30 GPa were generated using a two-stage laser-driven flyer plate generator. The samples were confined by an optical window and shock pressure was maintained for at least 30 ns. Photon Doppler Velocimetry measurements were performed at the explosive/window interface to determine the shock pressure profile. Raman spectra were recorded as a function of shock pressure and the shifts of the principal modes were compared to static high-pressure measurements performed in a diamond anvil cell. Our shock data indicate the role of temperature effects. Our Raman spectra also show a progressive extinction of the signal which disappears around 9 GPa. High-speed photography images reveal a simultaneous progressive darkening of the sample surface up to total opacity at 9 GPa. Reflectivity measurements under shock compression show that this opacity is due to a broadening of the absorption spectrum over the entire visible region.

  6. Identification of anisodamine tablets by Raman and near-infrared spectroscopy with chemometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lian; Zang, Hengchang; Li, Jun; Chen, Dejun; Li, Tao; Wang, Fengshan

    2014-06-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy including Raman and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has become an attractive tool for pharmaceutical analysis. In this study, effective calibration models for the identification of anisodamine tablet and its counterfeit and the distinguishment of manufacturing plants, based on Raman and NIR spectroscopy, were built, respectively. Anisodamine counterfeit tablets were identified by Raman spectroscopy with correlation coefficient method, and the results showed that the predictive accuracy was 100%. The genuine anisodamine tablets from 5 different manufacturing plants were distinguished by NIR spectroscopy using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models based on interval principal component analysis (iPCA) method. And the results showed the recognition rate and rejection rate were 100% respectively. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopy and NIR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics are feasible and potential tools for rapid pharmaceutical tablet discrimination.

  7. Negative refraction with low absorption using Raman transitions with magnetoelectric coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Sikes, D. E.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2010-07-15

    We suggest a scheme for obtaining negative refraction that does not require the simultaneous presence of an electric-dipole and a magnetic-dipole transition near the same transition frequency. The key idea of the scheme is to obtain a strong electric response by using far-off-resonant Raman transitions. We propose to use a pair of electric-dipole Raman transitions and utilize magneto-electric cross coupling to achieve a negative index of refraction without requiring negative permeability. The interference of the two Raman transitions allows tunable negative refraction with low absorption.

  8. Application of Raman spectroscopy in Andrology: non-invasive analysis of tissue and single cell

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yufei; Zhu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    As a fast, label-free and non-invasive detection method, Raman spectroscopy has been widely used for the interrogation of biological tissues, any alterations of molecular structure and chemical components during pathological processes would be identified and revealed via the differences on Raman spectrum. In clinics, the Raman spectroscopy has great potentials to provide real-time scanning of living tissues and fast diagnosis of diseases, just like discrimination of various carcinomas. A portable Raman spectroscopy which combined Raman system with an optical fiber probe has also been developed and proved to be able to provide intraoperative assistance in both human study and animal models. In Andrology, interests in Raman spectroscopy had just emerged. In this review, we summarized the progress about the utility of Raman spectroscopy in Andrology, the literatures were gathered from PubMed and Ovid database using MeSH terms associated with prostate, testis, seminal plasma and single sperm cell. We also highlighted the serious challenges as to the final clinical application of Raman technique. In conclusion, research in Raman spectroscopy may herald a new era for Andrology. PMID:26816760

  9. Classification of oral cancers using Raman spectroscopy of serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Aditi; Talathi, Sneha; Sawant, Sharada; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Oral cancers are the sixth most common malignancy worldwide, with low 5-year disease free survival rates, attributable to late detection due to lack of reliable screening modalities. Our in vivo Raman spectroscopy studies have demonstrated classification of normal and tumor as well as cancer field effects (CFE), the earliest events in oral cancers. In view of limitations such as requirement of on-site instrumentation and stringent experimental conditions of this approach, feasibility of classification of normal and cancer using serum was explored using 532 nm excitation. In this study, strong resonance features of β-carotenes, present differentially in normal and pathological conditions, were observed. In the present study, Raman spectra of sera of 36 buccal mucosa, 33 tongue cancers and 17 healthy subjects were recorded using Raman microprobe coupled with 40X objective using 785 nm excitation, a known source of excitation for biomedical applications. To eliminate heterogeneity, average of 3 spectra recorded from each sample was subjected to PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out-cross-validation. Findings indicate average classification efficiency of ~70% for normal and cancer. Buccal mucosa and tongue cancer serum could also be classified with an efficiency of ~68%. Of the two cancers, buccal mucosa cancer and normal could be classified with a higher efficiency. Findings of the study are quite comparable to that of our earlier study, which suggest that there exist significant differences, other than β- carotenes, between normal and cancerous samples which can be exploited for the classification. Prospectively, extensive validation studies will be undertaken to confirm the findings.

  10. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy on a flat graphene surface

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weigao; Ling, Xi; Xiao, Jiaqi; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Kong, Jing; Xu, Hongxing; Liu, Zhongfan; Zhang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is an attractive analytical technique, which enables single-molecule sensitive detection and provides its special chemical fingerprints. During the past decades, researchers have made great efforts towards an ideal SERS substrate, mainly including pioneering works on the preparation of uniform metal nanostructure arrays by various nanoassembly and nanotailoring methods, which give better uniformity and reproducibility. Recently, nanoparticles coated with an inert shell were used to make the enhanced Raman signals cleaner. By depositing SERS-active metal nanoislands on an atomically flat graphene layer, here we designed a new kind of SERS substrate referred to as a graphene-mediated SERS (G-SERS) substrate. In the graphene/metal combined structure, the electromagnetic “hot” spots (which is the origin of a huge SERS enhancement) created by the gapped metal nanoislands through the localized surface plasmon resonance effect are supposed to pass through the monolayer graphene, resulting in an atomically flat hot surface for Raman enhancement. Signals from a G-SERS substrate were also demonstrated to have interesting advantages over normal SERS, in terms of cleaner vibrational information free from various metal-molecule interactions and being more stable against photo-induced damage, but with a comparable enhancement factor. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of a freestanding, transparent and flexible “G-SERS tape” (consisting of a polymer-layer-supported monolayer graphene with sandwiched metal nanoislands) to enable direct, real time and reliable detection of trace amounts of analytes in various systems, which imparts high efficiency and universality of analyses with G-SERS substrates. PMID:22623525

  11. Resonance Raman spectroscopy of volatile organics -- Carbon tetrachloride

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, R.E.; Veligdan, J.T.

    1994-09-01

    Volatile organic chemicals are a class of pollutants which are regulated at very low levels by the EPA. Consequently a need exists as a part of site remediation efforts within DOE to develop technologies which will allow for the in situ monitoring of these chemicals. Resonance Raman spectroscopy is a potential technique to accomplish this if the resonance enhancement is sufficiently high. Carbon tetrachloride was selected as a test case. Measurements under resonance conditions at 248 nm showed an enhancement factor of 2 {times} 10{sup 4}. Using this value an estimate of the sensitivity for both in situ and remote monitoring of CCl{sup 4} was made. It was concluded that resonance Raman could be used to detect these chemicals at levels of regulatory interest. Future effort directed towards the development of a suitable probe as well as a field-portable system would be desirable. Such effort could be directed towards the solution of a particular monitoring problem within a DOE waste remediation project. Once developed, however, it should be easily generalized to the analysis of other VOC`s in other environments.

  12. Diagnosing breast cancer using Raman spectroscopy: prospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haka, Abigail S.; Volynskaya, Zoya; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Nazemi, Jon; Shenk, Robert; Wang, Nancy; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Feld, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    We present the first prospective test of Raman spectroscopy in diagnosing normal, benign, and malignant human breast tissues. Prospective testing of spectral diagnostic algorithms allows clinicians to accurately assess the diagnostic information contained in, and any bias of, the spectroscopic measurement. In previous work, we developed an accurate, internally validated algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis based on analysis of Raman spectra acquired from fresh-frozen in vitro tissue samples. We currently evaluate the performance of this algorithm prospectively on a large ex vivo clinical data set that closely mimics the in vivo environment. Spectroscopic data were collected from freshly excised surgical specimens, and 129 tissue sites from 21 patients were examined. Prospective application of the algorithm to the clinical data set resulted in a sensitivity of 83%, a specificity of 93%, a positive predictive value of 36%, and a negative predictive value of 99% for distinguishing cancerous from normal and benign tissues. The performance of the algorithm in different patient populations is discussed. Sources of bias in the in vitro calibration and ex vivo prospective data sets, including disease prevalence and disease spectrum, are examined and analytical methods for comparison provided. PMID:19895125

  13. Probing of different conformations of piperazine using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SenGupta, Sumana; Maiti, Nandita; Chadha, Ridhima; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2014-06-01

    Piperazine exists in a number of energetically close structural conformations, and here, we investigated the dependence of their relative abundance on the surrounding conditions by using Raman and SERS spectroscopy in pure solid, aqueous solution and Ag hydrosol. The experimental results were interpreted by DFT calculations using B3LYP functional with aug-cc-pvdz/LANL2DZ basis sets. In the chair form of piperazine, which is more stable than the skewed boat by ∼8 kcal mol-1, the two N-H bonds can remain equatorial or axial, leading to three different conformations, eq-eq, eq-ax and ax-ax. The calculated Raman spectrum of the lowest energy eq-eq conformation corresponds well with the experimental spectrum in pure solid, indicating eq-eq to be predominant. But, the contribution of the eq-ax conformation was found to be maximum in aqueous solution. The SERS spectrum revealed that eq-ax conformation was preferably adopted as piperazine was adsorbed vertically through its axial N-atom over silver nanoparticle surface.

  14. Diagnosing breast cancer using Raman spectroscopy: prospective analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Volynskaya, Zoya; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Nazemi, Jon; Shenk, Robert; Wang, Nancy; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Fitzmaurice, Maryann; Feld, Michael S.

    2009-09-01

    We present the first prospective test of Raman spectroscopy in diagnosing normal, benign, and malignant human breast tissues. Prospective testing of spectral diagnostic algorithms allows clinicians to accurately assess the diagnostic information contained in, and any bias of, the spectroscopic measurement. In previous work, we developed an accurate, internally validated algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis based on analysis of Raman spectra acquired from fresh-frozen in vitro tissue samples. We currently evaluate the performance of this algorithm prospectively on a large ex vivo clinical data set that closely mimics the in vivo environment. Spectroscopic data were collected from freshly excised surgical specimens, and 129 tissue sites from 21 patients were examined. Prospective application of the algorithm to the clinical data set resulted in a sensitivity of 83%, a specificity of 93%, a positive predictive value of 36%, and a negative predictive value of 99% for distinguishing cancerous from normal and benign tissues. The performance of the algorithm in different patient populations is discussed. Sources of bias in the in vitro calibration and ex vivo prospective data sets, including disease prevalence and disease spectrum, are examined and analytical methods for comparison provided.

  15. Two-step Raman spectroscopy method for tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. P.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.

    2014-05-01

    Two-step Raman spectroscopy phase method was proposed for differential diagnosis of malignant tumor in skin and lung tissue. It includes detection of malignant tumor in healthy tissue on first step with identification of concrete cancer type on the second step. Proposed phase method analyze spectral intensity alteration in 1300-1340 and 1640-1680 cm-1 Raman bands in relation to the intensity of the 1450 cm-1 band on first step, and relative differences between RS intensities for tumor area and healthy skin closely adjacent to the lesion on the second step. It was tested more than 40 ex vivo samples of lung tissue and more than 50 in vivo skin tumors. Linear Discriminant Analysis, Quadratic Discriminant Analysis and Support Vector Machine were used for tumors type classification on phase planes. It is shown that two-step phase method allows to reach 88.9% sensitivity and 87.8% specificity for malignant melanoma diagnosis (skin cancer); 100% sensitivity and 81.5% specificity for adenocarcinoma diagnosis (lung cancer); 90.9% sensitivity and 77.8% specificity for squamous cell carcinoma diagnosis (lung cancer).

  16. Raman spectroscopy of natron: shedding light on ancient Egyptian mummification.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Howell G M; Currie, Katherine J; Ali, Hassan R H; Jorge Villar, Susana E; David, A Rosalie; Denton, John

    2007-06-01

    The mummification ritual in ancient Egypt involved the evisceration of the corpse and its desiccation using natron, a naturally occurring evaporitic mineral deposit from the Wadi Natrun, Egypt. The deposit typically contains sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate and impurities of chloride and sulfate as its major elemental components. It is believed that the function of the natron was to rapidly remove the water from the cadaver to prevent microbial attack associated with subsequent biological tissue degradation and putrefaction. Several specimens of natron that were recently collected from the Wadi Natrun contained coloured zones interspersed with the mineral matrix that are superficially reminiscent of extremophilic cyanobacterial colonisation found elsewhere in hot and cold deserts. Raman spectroscopy of these specimens using visible and near-infrared laser excitation has revealed not only the mineral composition of the natron, but also evidence for the presence of cyanobacterial colonies in several coloured zones observed in the mineral matrix. Key Raman biosignatures of carotenoids, scytonemin and chlorophyll have been identified. PMID:17404715

  17. [Fast discrimination of edible vegetable oil based on Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiu-Jun; Dai, Lian-Kui; Li, Sheng

    2012-07-01

    A novel method to fast discriminate edible vegetable oils by Raman spectroscopy is presented. The training set is composed of different edible vegetable oils with known classes. Based on their original Raman spectra, baseline correction and normalization were applied to obtain standard spectra. Two characteristic peaks describing the unsaturated degree of vegetable oil were selected as feature vectors; then the centers of all classes were calculated. For an edible vegetable oil with unknown class, the same pretreatment and feature extraction methods were used. The Euclidian distances between the feature vector of the unknown sample and the center of each class were calculated, and the class of the unknown sample was finally determined by the minimum distance. For 43 edible vegetable oil samples from seven different classes, experimental results show that the clustering effect of each class was more obvious and the class distance was much larger with the new feature extraction method compared with PCA. The above classification model can be applied to discriminate unknown edible vegetable oils rapidly and accurately. PMID:23016334

  18. Photoelectron and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Of Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J; Chung, B; Schulze, R; Farr, J; Shuh, D

    2003-11-12

    We have performed Photoelectron Spectroscopy and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy upon highly radioactive samples of Plutonium at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, CA, USA. First results from alpha and delta Plutonium are reported as well as plans for future studies of actinide studies.

  19. Resonance Raman and vibronic absorption spectra with Duschinsky rotation from a time-dependent perspective: Application to β-carotene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Kröner, Dominik; Saalfrank, Peter

    2012-12-01

    The time-dependent approach to electronic spectroscopy, as popularized by Heller and co-workers in the 1980s, is applied here in conjunction with linear-response, time-dependent density functional theory to study vibronic absorption and resonance Raman spectra of β-carotene, with and without a solvent. Two-state models, the harmonic and the Condon approximations are used in order to do so. A new code has been developed which includes excited state displacements, vibrational frequency shifts, and Duschinsky rotation, i.e., mode mixing, for both non-adiabatic spectroscopies. It is shown that Duschinsky rotation has a pronounced effect on the resonance Raman spectra of β-carotene. In particular, it can explain a recently found anomalous behaviour of the so-called ν1 peak in resonance Raman spectra [N. Tschirner, M. Schenderlein, K. Brose, E. Schlodder, M. A. Mroginski, C. Thomsen, and P. Hildebrandt, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11, 11471 (2009)], 10.1039/b917341b, which shifts with the change in excitation wavelength.

  20. Coherent two-dimensional terahertz-terahertz-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Finneran, Ian A; Welsch, Ralph; Allodi, Marco A; Miller, Thomas F; Blake, Geoffrey A

    2016-06-21

    We present 2D terahertz-terahertz-Raman (2D TTR) spectroscopy, the first technique, to our knowledge, to interrogate a liquid with multiple pulses of terahertz (THz) light. This hybrid approach isolates nonlinear signatures in isotropic media, and is sensitive to the coupling and anharmonicity of thermally activated THz modes that play a central role in liquid-phase chemistry. Specifically, by varying the timing between two intense THz pulses, we control the orientational alignment of molecules in a liquid, and nonlinearly excite vibrational coherences. A comparison of experimental and simulated 2D TTR spectra of bromoform (CHBr3), carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and dibromodichloromethane (CBr2Cl2) shows previously unobserved off-diagonal anharmonic coupling between thermally populated vibrational modes. PMID:27274067

  1. Raman spectroscopy of hot hydrogen above 200 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howie, Ross T.; Dalladay-Simpson, Philip; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2015-05-01

    It has been theorized that at high pressure the increased energy of the zero-point oscillations in hydrogen would destabilize the lattice and form a ground fluid state at 0 K (ref. ). Theory has also suggested that this fluid state, representing a new state of matter, might have unusual properties governed by quantum effects, such as superfluidity or superconductivity. Here, by combining Raman spectroscopy and in situ high-temperature, high-pressure techniques, we demonstrate that above 200 GPa a new phase transition occurs as temperature is increased, for example 480 K at 255 GPa. If the transformation is interpreted as melting, it would be the lowest melting temperature of any material at these high pressures. We also find a new triple point between phases I and IV and the new phase, and demonstrate that hydrogen retains its molecular character around this point. These data may require a significant revision of the phase diagram of hydrogen above 200 GPa.

  2. Analysis of spreadable cheese by Raman spectroscopy and chemometric tools.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Kamila de Sá; Callegaro, Layce de Souza; Stephani, Rodrigo; Almeida, Mariana Ramos; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando Cappa

    2016-03-01

    In this work, FT-Raman spectroscopy was explored to evaluate spreadable cheese samples. A partial least squares discriminant analysis was employed to identify the spreadable cheese samples containing starch. To build the models, two types of samples were used: commercial samples and samples manufactured in local industries. The method of supervised classification PLS-DA was employed to classify the samples as adulterated or without starch. Multivariate regression was performed using the partial least squares method to quantify the starch in the spreadable cheese. The limit of detection obtained for the model was 0.34% (w/w) and the limit of quantification was 1.14% (w/w). The reliability of the models was evaluated by determining the confidence interval, which was calculated using the bootstrap re-sampling technique. The results show that the classification models can be used to complement classical analysis and as screening methods. PMID:26471577

  3. The microscopic structure of liquid methanol from Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ke; Zhou, Xiaoguo; Luo, Yi; Liu, Shilin

    2010-03-18

    The microscopic structure of liquid methanol has been systematically investigated with Raman spectroscopy in a temperature range of 15-55 degrees C. The unbonded free -OH stretching vibrational band has been observed at approximately 3660 cm(-1) in pure liquid. With the aid of depolarization measurements and theoretical calculations, four featured spectral components have been unambiguously identified and assigned to four well-defined vibrational modes of clusters in chain or ring forms. Furthermore, the cluster size distribution and its temperature dependence have been derived from the spectral fittings for the first time, which lead to the conclusion that the trimer, tetramer, and pentamer are the dominant clusters in liquid methanol, taking up more than 50% of total clusters. PMID:20178325

  4. Monitoring the healing process of rat bones using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamulin, O.; Serec, K.; Bilić, V.; Balarin, M.; Kosović, M.; Drmić, D.; Brčić, L.; Seiwerth, S.; Sikirić, P.

    2013-07-01

    The healing effect of BPC 157 on rat femoral head osteonecrosis was monitored by Raman spectroscopy. Three groups of rats were defined: an injured group treated with BPC 157 (10 μg/kg/daily ip), an injured control group (treated with saline, 5 ml/kg/daily ip), and an uninjured healthy group. The spectra were recorded and the healing effect assessed on samples harvested from animals which were sacrificed 3 and 6 weeks after being injured. The statistical analysis of the recorded spectra showed statistical differences between the BPC 157-treated, control, and healthy groups of animals. In particular, after 6 weeks the spectral resemblance between the healthy and BPC 157 samples indicated a positive BPC 157 influence on the healing process of rat femoral head.

  5. Towards ultrasensitive malaria diagnosis using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Keren; Yuen, Clement; Aniweh, Yaw; Preiser, Peter; Liu, Quan

    2016-01-01

    We report two methods of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for hemozoin detection in malaria infected human blood. In the first method, silver nanoparticles were synthesized separately and then mixed with lysed blood; while in the second method, silver nanoparticles were synthesized directly inside the parasites of Plasmodium falciparum. It was observed that the first method yields a smaller variation in SERS measurements and stronger correlation between the estimated contribution of hemozoin and the parasitemia level, which is preferred for the quantification of the parasitemia level. In contrast, the second method yields a higher sensitivity to a low parasitemia level thus could be more effective in the early malaria diagnosis to determine whether a given blood sample is positive. PMID:26858127

  6. High-pressure polymorphism of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin): Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, Ethan L.; Dreger, Zbigniew A.; Gupta, Yogendra M.

    2015-02-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to elucidate the high-pressure polymorphic behavior of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), an important pharmaceutical compound known as aspirin. Using a diamond anvil cell (DAC), single crystals of the two polymorphic phases of aspirin existing at ambient conditions (ASA-I and ASA-II) were compressed to 10 GPa. We found that ASA-I does not transform to ASA-II, but instead transforms to a new phase (ASA-III) above ∼2 GPa. It is demonstrated that this transformation primarily introduces structural changes in the bonding and arrangement of the acetyl groups and is reversible upon the release of pressure. In contrast, a less dense ASA-II shows no transition in the pressure range studied, though it appears to exhibit a disordered structure above 7 GPa. Our results suggest that ASA-III is the most stable polymorph of aspirin at high pressures.

  7. Raman spectroscopy of fluoropolymer conformal coatings on electronic boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodošek, Mirjana; Perše, Lidija Slemenik; Mihelčič, Mohor; Koželj, Matjaž; Orel, Boris; Bengű, Başak; Sunetci, Onder; Pori, Pauli; Vuk, Angela Šurca

    2014-09-01

    Fluoropolymer conformal coatings were applied to electronic boards (EBs) and cured at room temperature or 80°C. The coatings were first deposited on model substrate, i.e. aluminium alloy AA 2024 and tested for their anticorrosion properties with a potentiodynamic polarisation technique. The cathodic current densities ranged from 10-9-10-10 A/cm2, approaching the lower current limit after the addition of TiO2 nanoparticles into the formulation. Application of fluoropolymer-based formulation was performed via spray-coating deposition. Examination of the coverage of EBs under UV light, which is commonly used in industry, revealed that some components might not be entirely covered. In the search for other possible analytical tools of coverage with protective coatings, optical microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy were investigated.

  8. Glucose determination in human aqueous humor with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, James L.; Pelletier, Christine C.; Borchert, Mark

    2005-01-01

    It has been suggested that spectroscopic analysis of the aqueous humor of the eye could be used to indirectly predict blood glucose levels in diabetics noninvasively. We have been investigating this potential using Raman spectroscopy in combination with partial least squares (PLS) analysis. We have determined that glucose at clinically relevant concentrations can be accurately predicted in human aqueous humor in vitro using a PLS model based on artificial aqueous humor. We have further determined that with proper instrument design, the light energy necessary to achieve clinically acceptable prediction of glucose does not damage the retinas of rabbits and can be delivered at powers below internationally acceptable safety limits. Herein we summarize our current results and address our strategies to improve instrument design. 2005 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  9. Towards ultrasensitive malaria diagnosis using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Keren; Yuen, Clement; Aniweh, Yaw; Preiser, Peter; Liu, Quan

    2016-02-01

    We report two methods of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for hemozoin detection in malaria infected human blood. In the first method, silver nanoparticles were synthesized separately and then mixed with lysed blood; while in the second method, silver nanoparticles were synthesized directly inside the parasites of Plasmodium falciparum. It was observed that the first method yields a smaller variation in SERS measurements and stronger correlation between the estimated contribution of hemozoin and the parasitemia level, which is preferred for the quantification of the parasitemia level. In contrast, the second method yields a higher sensitivity to a low parasitemia level thus could be more effective in the early malaria diagnosis to determine whether a given blood sample is positive.

  10. Combining hyperspectral imaging and Raman spectroscopy for remote chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, John M.; Lo, Edsanter

    2008-04-01

    The Photonics Research Center at the United States Military Academy is conducting research to demonstrate the feasibility of combining hyperspectral imaging and Raman spectroscopy for remote chemical detection over a broad area of interest. One limitation of future trace detection systems is their ability to analyze large areas of view. Hyperspectral imaging provides a balance between fast spectral analysis and scanning area. Integration of a hyperspectral system capable of remote chemical detection will greatly enhance our soldiers' ability to see the battlefield to make threat related decisions. It can also queue the trace detection systems onto the correct interrogation area saving time and reconnaissance/surveillance resources. This research develops both the sensor design and the detection/discrimination algorithms. The one meter remote detection without background radiation is a simple proof of concept.

  11. Composition of Uranium Oxide Surface Layers Analyzed by m-Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Siekhaus, W J

    2003-11-24

    Oxide thickness and composition averaged over a few square millimeter has been measured with nm thickness resolution by diffuse reflectance fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. {mu}-Raman spectroscopy has been done on powders and bulk samples in the past, and can now be done on surfaces layers with {micro}m lateral and depth resolution using con-focal microscopy. Here we apply con-focal-microscopy-based {mu}-Raman spectroscopy to a freshly polished/lightly oxidized and to heavily oxidized uranium to determine its sensitivity. The spectra show that {mu}-Raman spectroscopy does detect oxide thickness and oxide composition with high sensitivity.

  12. Raman spectroscopy and in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry of isotopically engineered graphene systems.

    PubMed

    Frank, Otakar; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Kalbac, Martin

    2015-01-20

    CONSPECTUS: The special properties of graphene offer immense opportunities for applications to many scientific fields, as well as societal needs, beyond our present imagination. One of the important features of graphene is the relatively simple tunability of its electronic structure, an asset that extends the usability of graphene even further beyond present experience. A direct injection of charge carriers into the conduction or valence bands, that is, doping, represents a viable way of shifting the Fermi level. In particular, electrochemical doping should be the method of choice, when higher doping levels are desired and when a firm control of experimental conditions is needed. In this Account, we focus on the electrochemistry of graphene in combination with in situ Raman spectroscopy, that is, in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry. Such a combination of methods is indeed very powerful, since Raman spectroscopy not only can readily monitor the changes in the doping level but also can give information on eventual stress or disorder in the material. However, when Raman spectroscopy is employed, one of its main strengths lies in the utilization of isotope engineering during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of the graphene samples. The in situ Raman spectroelectrochemical study of multilayered systems with smartly designed isotope compositions in individual layers can provide a plethora of knowledge about the mutual interactions (i) between the graphene layers themselves, (ii) between graphene layers and their directly adjacent environment (e.g., substrate or electrolyte), and (iii) between graphene layers and their extended environment, which is separated from the layer by a certain number of additional graphene layers. In this Account, we show a few examples of such studies, from monolayer to two-layer and three-layer specimens and considering both turbostratic and AB interlayer ordering. Furthermore, the concept and the method can be extended further

  13. Advances in Raman spectroscopy for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudworth, Caroline D.; Archer, John K. J.; Black, Richard A.; Mann, David

    2006-02-01

    Within the next 50 years Alzheimer's disease is expected to affect 100 million people worldwide. The progressive decline in the mental health of the patient is caused by severe brain atrophy generated by the breakdown and aggregation of proteins, resulting in β-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The greatest challenge to Alzheimer's disease lies in the pursuit of an early and definitive diagnosis, in order that suitable treatment can be administered. At the present time, definitive diagnosis is restricted to post-mortem examination. Alzheimer's disease also remains without a long-term cure. This research demonstrates the potential role of Raman spectroscopy, combined with principle components analysis (PCA), as a diagnostic method. Analyses of ethically approved ex vivo post-mortem brain tissues (originating from frontal and occipital lobes) from control (3 normal elderly subjects and 3 Huntingdon's disease subjects) and Alzheimer's disease (12 subjects) brain sections, and a further set of 12 blinded samples are presented. Spectra originating from these tissues are highly reproducible, and initial results indicate a vital difference in protein content and conformation, relating to the abnormally high levels of aggregated proteins in the diseased tissues. Further examination of these spectra using PCA allows for the separation of control from diseased tissues. The validation of the PCA models using blinded samples also displays promise for the identification of Alzheimer's disease, in conjunction with secondary information regarding other brain diseases and dementias. These results provide a route for Raman spectroscopy as a possible non-invasive, non-destructive tool for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Multiplexed absorption tomography with calibration-free wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Weiwei; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2014-04-14

    We propose a multiplexed absorption tomography technique, which uses calibration-free wavelength modulation spectroscopy with tunable semiconductor lasers for the simultaneous imaging of temperature and species concentration in harsh combustion environments. Compared with the commonly used direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) counterpart, the present variant enjoys better signal-to-noise ratios and requires no baseline fitting, a particularly desirable feature for high-pressure applications, where adjacent absorption features overlap and interfere severely. We present proof-of-concept numerical demonstrations of the technique using realistic phantom models of harsh combustion environments and prove that the proposed techniques outperform currently available tomography techniques based on DAS.

  15. Label-free analysis of cellular biochemistry by Raman spectroscopy and microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schie, Iwan W; Huser, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    We review the biomedical applications of Raman spectroscopy at the single cell and tissue level. Raman scattering is the inelastic scattering of light by molecular bonds resulting in a wealth of spectral bands, which enable the identification of biological materials and the nondestructive analysis of dynamic changes in their biochemistry. We briefly review the basics behind highly sensitive Raman spectroscopy and highlight recent applications to biomedical research. We discuss advanced chemometrics methods that are utilized to analyze Raman spectral data and which permit one, for example, to distinguish between normal and diseased cells or which enable one to follow the differentiation of stem cells without perturbing the cellular biochemistry. We also discuss advanced coherent Raman scattering techniques, such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and stimulated Raman scattering, which allow for the molecularly specific imaging of cells, tissues, and entire organisms in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23720335

  16. Ultra-broadband plasmonic super absorbers for universal surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrate (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Liu, Kai; Song, Haomin; Zeng, Xie; Ji, Dengxin; Gan, Qiaoqiang

    2015-08-01

    Although Raman spectroscopy has been commercialized, low-cost and large-area surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates with localized enhanced field are heavily required. However, currently dominant manufacturing techniques are expensive and complicated for large-area fabrication. Furthermore, most SERS substrates can only be used for individual excitation wavelengths. In this work, we will report an ultra-broadband super absorbing metasurface to enhance SERS signals in a broadband region (i.e. from 450 nm to 1000 nm). The design consisting of an Ag ground plate, a SiO2 spacer, and a layer of Ag nanoparticles was fabricated using simple film deposition and thermal annealing techniques. A broadband absorption over 80% from 414 nm to 956 nm was obtained, resulting in localized field enhancement between adjacent nanoparticles. We employed this metasurface to test its broadband SERS signal by adsorbing 1,2-Bis(4-pyridyl)-ethylene (BPE) molecules on top of it. We employed 5 laser lines (i.e., 514, 532, 633, 671 and 785 nm) to excite the sample and observed fingerprint signature of BPE molecules under all 5 excitation wavelengths with the average enhancement factor up to 5.3×107. Therefore, the designed SERS substrate can work for almost "all" available excitation wavelengths over a broadband, which is particularly useful for sensing a broad spectrum of chemicals on the same chip.

  17. Dielectric shell isolated and graphene shell isolated nanoparticle enhanced Raman spectroscopies and their applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Feng; Anema, Jason R; Wandlowski, Thomas; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2015-12-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful technique that provides fingerprint vibrational information with ultrahigh sensitivity. However, only a few metals (gold, silver and copper) yield a large SERS effect, and they must be rough at the nanoscale. Shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS) was developed to overcome the long-standing materials and morphological limitations of SERS. It has already been applied in a variety of fields such as materials science, electrochemistry, surface science, catalysis, food safety and the life sciences. Here, the principles and applications of SHINERS are highlighted. To provide an understanding of the plasmonics involved, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations and single nanoparticle SHINERS experiments are reviewed. Next, various shell-isolated nanoparticle (SHIN) types are described. Then a number of applications are discussed. In the first application, SHINERS is used to characterize the adsorption processes of pyridine on Au(hkl) single-crystal electrode surfaces. Then, SHINERS' applicability to food inspection and cultural heritage science is demonstrated by the detection of parathion and fenthion pesticides, and Lauth's violet (thionine dye). Finally, graphene-isolated Au nanoparticles (GIANs) are shown to be effective for multimodal cell imaging, photothermal cancer therapy and photothermally-enhanced chemotherapy. SHINERS is a fast, simple and reliable method, suitable for application to many areas of science and technology. The concept of shell-isolation can also be applied to other surface-enhanced spectroscopies such as fluorescence, infrared absorption and sum frequency generation. PMID:26426491

  18. Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Characterizing a CW Raman Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    .A relatively simple technique for characterizing an all-resonant intracavity continuous-wave (CW) solid-state Raman laser involves the use of ring-down spectroscopy. As used here, characterizing signifies determining such parameters as threshold pump power, Raman gain, conversion efficiency, and quality factors (Q values) of the pump and Stokes cavity modes. Heretofore, in order to characterize resonant-cavity-based Raman lasers, it has usually been necessary to manipulate the frequencies and power levels of pump lasers and, in each case, to take several sets of measurements. In cases involving ultra-high-Q resonators, it also has been desirable to lock pump lasers to resonator modes to ensure the quality of measurement data. Simpler techniques could be useful. In the present ring-down spectroscopic technique, one infers the parameters of interest from the decay of the laser out of its steady state. This technique does not require changing the power or frequency of the pump laser or locking the pump laser to the resonator mode. The technique is based on a theoretical analysis of what happens when the pump laser is abruptly switched off after the Raman generation reaches the steady state. The analysis starts with differential equations for the evolution of the amplitudes of the pump and Stokes electric fields, leading to solutions for the power levels of the pump and Stokes fields as functions of time and of the aforementioned parameters. Among other things, these solutions show how the ring-down time depends, to some extent, on the electromagnetic energy accumulated in the cavity. The solutions are readily converted to relatively simple equations for the parameters as functions of quantities that can be determined from measurements of the time-dependent power levels. For example, the steady-state intracavity conversion efficiency is given by G1/G2 1 and the threshold power is given by Pin(G2/G1)2, where Pin is the steady-state input pump power immediately prior to

  19. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy on a smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Ast, Sandra; Rutledge, Peter J.; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    A self-powered smartphone-based field-portable "dual" spectrometer has been developed for both absorption and fluorescence measurements. The smartphone's existing flash LED has sufficient optical irradiance to undertake absorption measurements within a 3D-printed case containing a low cost nano-imprinted polymer diffraction grating. A UV (λex ~ 370 nm) and VIS (λex ~ 450 nm) LED are wired into the circuit of the flash LED to provide an excitation source for fluorescence measurements. Using a customized app on the smartphone, measurements of absorption and fluorescence spectra are demonstrated using pH-sensitive and Zn2+-responsive probes. Detection over a 300 nm span with 0.42 nm/pixel spectral resolution is demonstrated. Despite the low cost and small size of the portable spectrometer, the results compare well with bench top instruments.

  20. Identification and characterization of colorectal cancer using Raman spectroscopy and feature selection techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoxin; Chen, Gong; Zhang, Yanjiao; Guo, Zhouyi; Liu, Zhiming; Xu, Junfa; Li, Xueqiang; Lin, Lin

    2014-10-20

    This study aims to detect colorectal cancer with near-infrared Raman spectroscopy and feature selection techniques. A total of 306 Raman spectra of colorectal cancer tissues and normal tissues are acquired from 44 colorectal cancer patients. Five diagnostically important Raman bands in the regions of 815-830, 935-945, 1131-1141, 1447-1457 and 1665-1675 cm(-1) related to proteins, nucleic acids and lipids of tissues are identified with the ant colony optimization (ACO) and support vector machine (SVM). The diagnostic models built with the identified Raman bands provide a diagnostic accuracy of 93.2% for identifying colorectal cancer from normal Raman spectroscopy. The study demonstrates that the Raman spectroscopy associated with ACO-SVM diagnostic algorithms has great potential to characterize and diagnose colorectal cancer. PMID:25401621

  1. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of amino acids and nucleotide bases for target bacterial vibrational mode identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guicheteau, Jason; Argue, Leanne; Hyre, Aaron; Jacobson, Michele; Christesen, Steven D.

    2006-05-01

    Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) studies of bacteria have reported a wide range of vibrational mode assignments associated with biological material. We present Raman and SER spectra of the amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, glutamine, cysteine, alanine, proline, methionine, asparagine, threonine, valine, glycine, serine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartic acid and glutamic acid and the nucleic acid bases adenosine, guanosine, thymidine, and uridine to better characterize biological vibrational mode assignments for bacterial target identification. We also report spectra of the bacteria Bacillus globigii, Pantoea agglomerans, and Yersinia rhodei along with band assignments determined from the reference spectra obtained.

  2. Analysis of hydrocarbon fuel properties by means of Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatley, Martin W.

    The project is focused on the determination of Raman spectra of hydrocarbon fuel samples using a spectrometer employing a silicon linear array detector which has a spectral range of 400 nm to 1.1 mum. The spectra are processed using chemometric techniques in order to determine the concentrations of the tracked blend components and analytical values that are used to ensure that desired specifications are achieved. The verification is based on the American Standard Testing Methods procedures for the determination of the motor, research, and road octane numbers, simulated distillation and Reid vapour pressure. Blending is one of the most important steps in the final production of hydrocarbon fuels; as many as ten complex components are mixed to achieve the desired properties of the final product. Traditionally, blending relies on well-established analytical methods such as gas chromatography for component and simulated distillation analysis, knock engines and near infrared spectroscopy for octane analysis. All of these methods are reliable and accurate, but their results are not available in real time but rather with a substantial delay, since it is in the nature of the methods that the sample must be transported from a test site to the site where the instrument is located. Additional time is required for performing the analytical procedure; e.g. the results of a gas chromatography analysis are only available from minutes to hours after the sample has been introduced into the instrument. Consequently, the results, although accurate, become only available after the process of blending has been completed. The thesis describes an implementation of a Raman spectroscopic method, which is novel in the given context, since it allows monitoring and control of the blending process online, in real time. A Raman spectrometer was designed, using a solid state laser for excitation (785 nm, 800 mW), a blazed grating for the diffraction (600 lines-per-millimeter, 750 nm blaze, 635

  3. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis. PMID:25239063

  4. Compact acousto-optic modulator operatingin the purely Raman - Nath diffraction regime as a phase modulator in FM spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, Vyacheslav N; Epikhin, V M

    2010-08-03

    We report fabrication of a new acousto-optic modulator (AOM-RN) operating purely in the Raman - Nath diffraction regime. This device can be used as an external phase modulator in frequency-modulation (FM) optical heterodyne spectroscopy for fast and broadband frequency control of diode lasers. The AOM-RN design is significantly simplified, and its dimensions are minimised due to a decrease (by almost an order of magnitude in comparison with the existing AOMs) in the acousto-optic interaction length and the absence of impedance matching circuit. The FM spectroscopy based on AOM-RN makes it possible to analyse both absorption and dispersion properties of optical resonances under study; this possibility is shown by the example of saturated-absorption resonances in cesium vapour. The possibility of detecting coherent population trapping resonances using FM spectroscopy with AOM-RN as an external phase modulator is experimentally demonstrated.

  5. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy Measurement of SOx using Tunable Infrared Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, Tetsuo

    The absorption characteristics of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) in the infrared region were measured using a quantum cascade laser and an absorption cell of length 1 m heated to 150°C. The laser was scanned over the wavelength range 6.9-7.4 μm, which included the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3. Measurement results showed that the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3 partially overlapped, with peaks at 7.28 μm and 7.35 μm for SO2 and 7.14 μm and 7.25 μm for SO3. These results showed the possbility of using infrared laser absorption spectroscopy for measurement of sulfur oxides (SOx) in flue gas. For SO3 measurement, infrared absorption spectroscopy was shown to be more suitable than ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The absorption characteristics of open air in the same wavelength region showed that the interference due to water vapor must be efficiently removed to perform SOx measurement in flue gas.

  6. Electronic relaxation dynamics of PCDA-PDA studied by transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Joung, Joonyoung F; Baek, Junwoo; Kim, Youngseo; Lee, Songyi; Kim, Myung Hwa; Yoon, Juyoung; Park, Sungnam

    2016-08-17

    Photo-curable polymers originating from 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA-PDA) are commonly used polydiacetylenes (PDAs). PCDA-PDA exhibits thermochromic properties undergoing a unique colorimetric transition from blue to red as the temperature is increased from low to high. In this work, we have carefully studied the temperature-dependent optical properties of PCDA-PDA by using UV-visible absorption, FTIR, Raman, and transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations. Temperature-dependent UV-visible absorption spectra indicate that PCDA-PDA exhibits reversible thermochromic properties up to 60 °C and its thermochromic properties become irreversible above 60 °C. Such distinct thermochromic properties are also manifested in TA signals so that the electronically excited PCDA-PDA relaxes to the ground state via an intermediate state at 20 °C (blue form) but it relaxes directly back to the ground state at 80 °C (red form). The electronic relaxation dynamics of PCDA-PDA are comprehensively analyzed based on different kinetic models by using the global fitting analysis method. The intermediate state in the blue form of PCDA-PDA is clearly found to be responsible for fluorescence quenching. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations confirm that the H-bonds between the carboxylic acid groups in PCDA-PDA are broken at high temperatures leading to an irreversible structural change of PCDA-PDA. PMID:27492212

  7. IR absorption and Raman spectra of single crystals of stable germanium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavva, V. A.; Kotereva, T. V.; Lipskiy, V. A.; Nezhdanov, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    The Raman and IR absorption spectra of single crystals of germanium isotopes 72Ge, 73Ge, 74Ge, and 76Ge in the region of phonon absorption and interband electronic transitions are studied at room temperature. The dependence of the Raman peak position on the atomic mass has the form ν ~ M -1/2. The shifts of the phonon absorption peaks of individual isotopes with respect to germanium of natural isotopic composition natGe are determined. With increasing average atomic mass of germanium, these peaks shift to longer wavelengths. In the region of interband electronic transitions, the intrinsic absorption edge of 76Ge is observed to shift by 1 meV to higher energies with respect to Ge of natural isotopic composition. For isotopes with atomic masses close to that of natural germanium (72Ge,73Ge, 74Ge), we found no significant difference in the band gap width at room temperature.

  8. Electronically tunable coherent Raman spectroscopy using acousto-optics tunable filter.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Georgi I; Meng, Zhaokai; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-09-21

    Fast and sensitive Raman spectroscopy measurements are imperative for a large number of applications in biomedical imaging, remote sensing and material characterization. In this report, by introducing an electronically-tunable acousto-optical filter as a wavelength selector, we demonstrated a novel instrumentation to the broadband coherent Raman spectroscopy. System's tunability allows assessing Raman transitions ranging from <400 cm(-1) to 4500 cm(-1). We validated the use of the new instrumentation by collecting coherent anti-Stokes spectra and stimulated Raman spectra of various samples. PMID:26406668

  9. Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy by Six-Wave Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Knowledge of the structural changes that accompany photochemical reactions has motivated the development of a wide variety of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopies. For example, a technique known as femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) has yielded important insights into numerous photochemical processes in the past 10-15 years. Simultaneous probing of all resonances in the fingerprint region of the vibrational spectrum and sensitivity to dynamics on the 100-fs time scale are the primary selling points for the FSRS technique. Despite its utility, FSRS is challenged by a large background of residual laser light and lower-order nonlinearities. In this talk, I will introduce a newly developed FSRS experiment in which five laser beams are used eliminate the background of residual laser light and lower-order nonlinearities present in the traditional three-beam FSRS geometry. Applications to photodissociation reactions in triiodide and heme proteins will be discussed. It is envisioned that this approach will be useful for investigating photoinduced dynamics in a wide variety of condensed phase systems.

  10. [Research on Early Diagnosis of Gastric Cancer by the Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Human Hemoglobin].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Pan, Zhi-feng; Tang, Wei-yue; Li, Yun-tao; Fan, Chun-zhen

    2015-12-01

    Early diagnosis have great positive effect on the treatment of gastric cancer patients. Raman spectroscopy can provide a useful monitor for hemoglobin dynamics. Besides, Raman spectroscopy has notable advantages in the fields of abnormal hemoglobin diagnosis, hemoglobin oxygen saturation deter mination and blood methemoglobin analysis. In this paper, novel silver colloid was synthesized by microwave heated method. The surface enhanced Raman spectrums of hemoglobin from 11 normal persons and 20 gastric cancer patients are measured and analyzed in order to obtain spectrums which are high repeatability and characteristic peaks protruding. By analyzing the assignations of the SERS bands, it found that the content of asparagine, tyrosine and phenylalanine in the hemoglobin are significantly lower than healthy people. Discussing the structure of hemoglobin, when hemoglobin combines with oxygen, Fe²⁺ is in a low spin state, ionic radius shrinks and moves 0. 075 nm and fall into the pore in the middle of the heme porphyrin ring plane. This spatial variation affects F8His connected with the iron, will narrow the gap between the globin in the two strands of the helix, as a result, HC2 tyrosine pushed out of the void. Using this mechanism, the absorption peak of 1 560 cm⁻¹ confirmed that the tyrosine content in patients with gastric cancer was lower than that of normal people. Principal component analysis(PCA) is employed to get a three-dimensional scatter plot of PC scores for the health and cancer groups, and it can be learned that they are distributed in separate areas. By using the method of discriminate analysis, it is found that the diagnostic algorithm separates the two groups with sensitivity of 90.0% and diagnostic specificity of 90.9%, the overall diagnostic accuracy was 90.3%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrate that, SERS detection of oxyhemoglobin combined with multivariate analysis would be an effective method for early diagnosis of gastric

  11. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Spectroscopy of Single Molecules in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sunney Xie, Wei Min, Chris Freudiger, Sijia Lu

    2012-01-18

    During this funding period, we have developed two breakthrough techniques. The first is stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, providing label-free chemical contrast for chemical and biomedical imaging based on vibrational spectroscopy. Spontaneous Raman microscopy provides specific vibrational signatures of chemical bonds, but is often hindered by low sensitivity. We developed a three-dimensional multiphoton vibrational imaging technique based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). The sensitivity of SRS imaging is significantly greater than that of spontaneous Raman microscopy, which is achieved by implementing high-frequency (megahertz) phase-sensitive detection. SRS microscopy has a major advantage over previous coherent Raman techniques in that it offers background-free and readily interpretable chemical contrast. We demonstrated a variety of biomedical applications, such as differentiating distributions of omega-3 fatty acids and saturated lipids in living cells, imaging of brain and skin tissues based on intrinsic lipid contrast, and monitoring drug delivery through the epidermis. This technology offers exciting prospect for medical imaging. The second technology we developed is stimulated emission microscopy. Many chromophores, such as haemoglobin and cytochromes, absorb but have undetectable fluorescence because the spontaneous emission is dominated by their fast non-radiative decay. Yet the detection of their absorption is difficult under a microscope. We use stimulated emission, which competes effectively with the nonradiative decay, to make the chromophores detectable, as a new contrast mechanism for optical microscopy. We demonstrate a variety of applications of stimulated emission microscopy, such as visualizing chromoproteins, non-fluorescent variants of the green fluorescent protein, monitoring lacZ gene expression with a chromogenic reporter, mapping transdermal drug distribu- tions without histological sectioning, and label-free microvascular

  12. Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of radiation-chemical processes. [Pulsed irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, G.N.R.

    1983-01-01

    A tunable pulsed laser Raman spectrometer for time resolved Raman studies of radiation-chemical processes is described. This apparatus utilizes the state of art optical multichannel detection and analysis techniques for data acquisition and electron pulse radiolysis for initiating the reactions. By using this technique the resonance Raman spectra of intermediates with absorption spectra in the 248-900 nm region, and mean lifetimes > 30 ns can be examined. This apparatus can be used to time resolve the vibrational spectral overlap between transients absorbing in the same region, and to follow their decay kinetics by monitoring the well resolved Raman peaks. For kinetic measurements at millisecond time scale, the Raman technique is preferable over optical absorption method where low frequency noise is quite bothersome. A time resolved Raman study of the pulse radiolytic oxidation of aqueous tetrafluorohydroquinone and p-methoxyphenol is briefly discussed. 15 references, 5 figures.

  13. Resonance raman spectroscopy of an ultraviolet-sensitive insect rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pande, C.; Deng, H.; Rath, P.; Callender, R.H.; Schwemer, J.

    1987-11-17

    The authors present the first visual pigment resonance Raman spectra from the UV-sensitive eyes of an insect, Ascalaphus macaronius (owlfly). This pigment contains 11-cis-retinal as the chromophore. Raman data have been obtained for the acid metarhodopsin at 10/sup 0/C in both H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O. The C=N stretching mode at 1660 cm/sup -1/ in H/sub 2/O shifts to 1631 cm/sup -1/ upon deuteriation of the sample, clearly showing a protonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein. The structure-sensitive fingerprint region shows similarities to the all-trans-protonated Schiff base of model retinal chromophores, as well as to the octopus acid metarhodopsin and bovine metarhodopsin I. Although spectra measured at -100/sup 0/C with 406.7-nm excitation, to enhance scattering from rhodopsin (lambda/sub max/ 345 nm), contain a significant contribution from a small amount of contaminants (cytochrome(s) and/or accessory pigment) in the sample, the C=N stretch at 1664 cm/sup -1/ suggests a protonated Schiff base linkage between the chromophore and the protein in rhodopsin as well. For comparison, this mode also appears at approx. 1660 cm/sup -1/ in both the vertebrate (bovine) and the invertebrate (octopus) rhodopsins. These data are particularly interesting since the absorption maximum of 345 nm for rhodopsin might be expected to originate from an unprotonated Schiff base linkage. That the Schiff base linkage in the owlfly rhodopsin, like in bovine and in octopus, is protonated suggests that a charged chromophore is essential to visual transduction.

  14. [Study of retrieving formaldehyde with differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Jin; Xie, Pin-Hua; Qin, Min; Qu, Xiao-Ying; Hu, Lin

    2009-01-01

    The present paper introduces the method of retrieving the concentration of HCHO with differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). The authors measured ambient HCHO in Beijing region with the help of differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument made by ourself, and discussed numerous factors in retrieving the concentration of HCHO with differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), especially, the choice of HCHO wave band, how to avoid absorption of ambient SO2, NO2 and O3, and the influence of the Xenon lamp spectrum structure on the absorption of ambient HCHO. The authors achieved the HCHO concentration by simultaneously retrieving the concentrations of HCHO, SO2, NO2 and O3 with non-linear least square fitting method, avoiding the effect of choosing narrow wave of HCHO and the residual of SO2, NO2, O3 and the Xenon lamp spectrum structure in retrieving process to attain the concentration of HCHO, Finally the authors analyzed the origin of error in retrieving the concentration of HCHO with differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), and the total error is within 13.7% in this method. PMID:19385238

  15. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy of iron-dopamine complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalchyk, Will K.; Davis, Kevin L.; Morris, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) at silver colloids is used to detect the catecholamines, 3-hydroxytyramine (dopamine) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), in a modified Ringer's solution. Catecholamines form very strong complexes with iron(III) in solution ( Kf > 10 40) and exhibit a broad ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT) absorption in the visible (˜ 500 nm). Resonance enhancement is achieved by excitation at 532 nm from a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser with high quality spectra attainable in 1 s. Maximum SERRS signal is observed when basic buffer is added to a dopamine sample containing 50 × 10 -6 M ferric ion. Dopamine concentrations in the nanomolar (resting level) range are obtained using this technique.

  16. Superhydrophobicity, plasmonics and Raman spectroscopy for few/single molecule detection down to attomolar concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, G.; Gentile, F.; De Angelis, F.; Coluccio, M. L.; Liberale, C.; Proietti Zaccaria, R.; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2012-10-01

    Few/single molecule detection is of great importance in fields including biomedicine, safety and eco-pollution in relation to rare and dangerous chemicals. Superhydrophobic surfaces incorporated with the nanoplasmonic structure enable this device to overcome the diffusion limit of molecules dissolved in water with the concentration down to 10 attomolar. In this paper demonstrated the fabrication of hydrophobic surfaces using optical lithography/reactive ion etching and its application to overcome the diffusion limit. Various experiments such as contact angle measurements, SEM, fluorescence, Raman and FTIR absorption spectroscopy were performed which indicate that utilizing this device it could be possible to perform the measurements for the sample with extremely low dilution. The major application of this novel family of devices would be the early detection of tumors or other important pathologies, with incredible advances in medicine.

  17. Graphene-catalyzed photoreduction of dye molecules revealed by graphene enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bora; Kang, Jin Hyoun; Jo, Insu; Shin, Dongha; Hong, Byung Hee

    2016-02-01

    The unique electrical and optical properties of graphene have enabled its application in various photocatalysis reactions. However, graphene needs to be combined with photosensitizing co-catalysts such as TiO2 due to its negligible visible light absorption. Here, we report that the single layer graphene by itself is capable of catalyzing the photoreduction of dye molecules, which has been revealed by graphene-enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies. The proposed mechanism involves the electron transfer from graphene to temporarily empty HOMO states of photoexcited dye molecules, which can be interpreted as ultrafast hole transfer from dyes to graphene. We also confirm that graphene-encapsulated nitrobenzene dyes show less photoreduction, implying that the ambient hydrogen molecules are the important source of photoreduction into aniline dyes. The photocatalytic reactivity of graphene would find numerous energy and environmental applications in the future. PMID:26784530

  18. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy by six-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molesky, Brian P.; Guo, Zhenkun; Moran, Andrew M.

    2015-06-01

    Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) is motivated by the knowledge of the molecular geometry changes that accompany sub-picosecond chemical reactions. The detection of vibrational resonances throughout the entire fingerprint region of the spectrum with sub-100-fs delay precision is fairly straightforward to accomplish with the FSRS technique. Despite its utility, FSRS must contend with substantial technical challenges that stem from a large background of residual laser light and lower-order nonlinearities when all laser pulses are electronically resonant with the equilibrium system. In this work, a geometry based on five incident laser beams is used to eliminate much of this undesired background in experiments conducted on metmyoglobin. Compared to a three-beam FSRS geometry with all electronically resonant laser pulses, the five-beam approach described here offers major improvements in the data acquisition rate, sensitivity, and background suppression. The susceptibility of the five-beam geometry to experimental artifacts is investigated using control experiments and model calculations. Of particular concern are undesired cascades of third-order nonlinearities, which are known to challenge FSRS measurements carried out on electronically off-resonant systems. It is generally understood that "forbidden" steps in the desired nonlinear optical processes are the origin of the problems encountered under off-resonant conditions. In contrast, the present experiments are carried out under electronically resonant conditions, where such unfortunate selection rules do not apply. Nonetheless, control experiments based on spectroscopic line shapes, signal phases, and sample concentrations are conducted to rule out significant contributions from cascades of third-order processes. Theoretical calculations are further used to estimate the relative intensities of the direct and cascaded responses. Overall, the control experiments and model calculations presented in this

  19. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy by six-wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Molesky, Brian P.; Guo, Zhenkun; Moran, Andrew M.

    2015-06-07

    Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy (FSRS) is motivated by the knowledge of the molecular geometry changes that accompany sub-picosecond chemical reactions. The detection of vibrational resonances throughout the entire fingerprint region of the spectrum with sub-100-fs delay precision is fairly straightforward to accomplish with the FSRS technique. Despite its utility, FSRS must contend with substantial technical challenges that stem from a large background of residual laser light and lower-order nonlinearities when all laser pulses are electronically resonant with the equilibrium system. In this work, a geometry based on five incident laser beams is used to eliminate much of this undesired background in experiments conducted on metmyoglobin. Compared to a three-beam FSRS geometry with all electronically resonant laser pulses, the five-beam approach described here offers major improvements in the data acquisition rate, sensitivity, and background suppression. The susceptibility of the five-beam geometry to experimental artifacts is investigated using control experiments and model calculations. Of particular concern are undesired cascades of third-order nonlinearities, which are known to challenge FSRS measurements carried out on electronically off-resonant systems. It is generally understood that “forbidden” steps in the desired nonlinear optical processes are the origin of the problems encountered under off-resonant conditions. In contrast, the present experiments are carried out under electronically resonant conditions, where such unfortunate selection rules do not apply. Nonetheless, control experiments based on spectroscopic line shapes, signal phases, and sample concentrations are conducted to rule out significant contributions from cascades of third-order processes. Theoretical calculations are further used to estimate the relative intensities of the direct and cascaded responses. Overall, the control experiments and model calculations presented in

  20. Coherent Raman spectroscopy: From statics to dynamics and kinetics, progress in nonlinear methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmanov, S. A.

    1987-12-01

    In spite of its 60-year history Raman spectroscopy is still progressing nowadays. Highly stable lasers and short pulse oscillators, perfect electronic data acquisition systems, new nonlinear optical approaches created new exciting perspectives for Raman spectroscopy. One of the most important tendencies is Raman spectroscopy application for studying nonequilibrium states, fast dynamics and kinetics of atoms, molecules and condensed matter. All these problems were until recently regarded as inaccessible for optical spectroscopy. Nonlinear optical techniques of Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) and modulation spectroscopy appeared to be most effective and provided important real-time information on molecular excitation and dissociation dynamics, deep cooling of molecules in a supersonic jet, short laser pulse induced phase transitions at semiconductor interface and so on. Problems yet to be solved include direct measurement of intramolecular vibrational relaxation, conformations in biomolecules, optical “oscilloscopy” of molecular vibrations.

  1. Combined fiber probe for fluorescence lifetime and Raman spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dochow, Sebastian; Ma, Dinglong; Latka, Ines; Bocklitz, Thomas; Hartl, Brad; Bec, Julien; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Marple, Eric; Urmey, Kirk; Schmitt, Michael; Marcu, Laura; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been proven to have tremendous potential as biomedical analytical tool for spectroscopic disease diagnostics. The use of fiberoptic coupled Raman spectroscopy systems can enable in-vivo characterization of suspicious lesions. However, Raman spectroscopy has the drawback of rather long acquisition times of several hundreds of milliseconds which makes scanning of larger regions quite challenging. By combining Raman spectroscopy with a fast imaging technique this problem can be alleviate in part. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) offers a great potential for such a combination. FLIm can allow for fast tissue area pre-segmentation and location of the points for Raman spectra acquisition. Here, we introduce an optical fiber probe combining FLIm and Raman spectroscopy with an outer diameter of 2 mm. Fluorescence is generated via excitation with a fiber laser at 355 nm. The fluorescence emission is spectrally resolved using a custom-made wavelength-selection module (WSM). The Raman excitation power at 785 nm was set to 50 mW for the in-vivo measurements to prevent sample drying. The lateral probe resolution was determined to be <250 μm for both modalities. This value was taken as step size for several raster scans of different tissue types which were conducted to show the overlap of both modalities under realistic conditions. Finally the probe was used for in vivo raster scans of a rat's brain and subsequently to acquire FLIm guided Raman spectra of several tissues in and around the craniotomy.

  2. Recent advances in laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) for label-free analysis of single cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, James W

    2013-01-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS), a technique that integrates optical tweezers with confocal Raman spectroscopy, is a variation of micro-Raman spectroscopy that enables the manipulation and biochemical analysis of single biological particles in suspension. This article provides an overview of the LTRS method, with an emphasis on highlighting recent advances over the past several years in the development of the technology and several new biological and biomedical applications that have been demonstrated. A perspective on the future developments of this powerful cytometric technology will also be presented. PMID:23175434

  3. Atomic absorption spectroscopy with high temperature flames.

    PubMed

    Willis, J B

    1968-07-01

    An account is given of the history of the development of high temperature flames for the atomic absorption measurement of metals forming refractory oxides. The principles governing the design of premix burners for such flames, and the relative merits of different types of nebulizer burner systems are described. After a brief account of the structure and emission characteristics of the premixed oxygen-acetylene and nitrous oxide-acetylene flames, the scope and limitations of the latter flame in chemical analysis are discussed. PMID:20068790

  4. Analysis of Individual Cells and Endospores by Micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Anthony; Huser, Thomas; Talley, Chad; Hollars, Christopher; Balhorn, Rod; Lane, Stephen

    2003-03-01

    We have collected Raman spectra of individual sperm cells by confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy. The high spatial resolution of this technique allows for compositional analysis of different sections of the sperm cells. The relative intensities of protein and DNA Raman transitions allow one to define a protein-DNA ratio. We have also collected the Raman spectra of individual bacterial endospores from four species in the genus Bacillus. The spectra were generally dominated by scattering from calcium dipicolinate, although scattering assignable to protein bands was also observed. A small fraction of the spores did not exhibit Raman scattering from CaDPA, possibly due to incomplete sporulation. These examples demonstrate the applicability of micro-Raman spectroscopy as a non-invasive method for addressing variability in the composition of cells.* *This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-Eng-48.

  5. Characterization of polysilicon films by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Headley, T.J.; Medernach, J.W.; Geyling, F.

    1993-11-12

    Samples of chemically-vapor-deposited micrometer and sub-micrometer-thick films of polysilicon were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in cross-section and by Raman spectroscopy with illumination at their surface. TEM and Raman spectroscopy both find varying amounts of polycrystalline and amorphous silicon in the wafers. Raman spectra obtained using blue, green and red excitation wavelengths to vary the Raman sampling depth are compared with TEM cross-sections of these films. Films showing crystalline columnar structures in their TEM micrographs have Raman spectra with a band near 497 cm{sup {minus}1} in addition to the dominant polycrystalline silicon band (521 cm{sup {minus}1}). The TEM micrographs of these films have numerous faulted regions and fringes indicative of nanometer-scale silicon structures, which are believed to correspond to the 497cm{sup {minus}1} Raman band.

  6. Single-particle absorption spectroscopy by photothermal contrast.

    PubMed

    Yorulmaz, Mustafa; Nizzero, Sara; Hoggard, Anneli; Wang, Lin-Yung; Cai, Yi-Yu; Su, Man-Nung; Chang, Wei-Shun; Link, Stephan

    2015-05-13

    Removing effects of sample heterogeneity through single-molecule and single-particle techniques has advanced many fields. While background free luminescence and scattering spectroscopy is widely used, recording the absorption spectrum only is rather difficult. Here we present an approach capable of recording pure absorption spectra of individual nanostructures. We demonstrate the implementation of single-particle absorption spectroscopy on strongly scattering plasmonic nanoparticles by combining photothermal microscopy with a supercontinuum laser and an innovative calibration procedure that accounts for chromatic aberrations and wavelength-dependent excitation powers. Comparison of the absorption spectra to the scattering spectra of the same individual gold nanoparticles reveals the blueshift of the absorption spectra, as predicted by Mie theory but previously not detectable in extinction measurements that measure the sum of absorption and scattering. By covering a wavelength range of 300 nm, we are furthermore able to record absorption spectra of single gold nanorods with different aspect ratios. We find that the spectral shift between absorption and scattering for the longitudinal plasmon resonance decreases as a function of nanorod aspect ratio, which is in agreement with simulations. PMID:25849105

  7. Exploring the potential of Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy for quantitative analysis of duplex DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, H. G.; Bass, A.; Addison, C.; Hughesman, C.; So, A. P.; Haynes, C. A.; Blades, M. W.; Turner, R. F. B.

    2005-09-01

    Advances in DNA microarray fabrication technologies, expanding probe libraries, and new bioinformatics methods and resources have firmly established array-based techniques as mainstream bioanalytical tools and the application space is proliferating rapidly. However, the capability of these tools to yield truly quantitative information remains limited, primarily due to problems inherent to the use of fluorescence imaging for reading the hybridized arrays. The obvious advantages of fluorescence are the unrivaled sensitivity and simplicity of the instrumentation. There are disadvantages of this approach, however, such as difficulties in achieving optimal labeling of targets and reproducible signals (due to quenching, resonance energy transfer, photobleaching effects, etc.) that undermine precision. We are exploring alternative approaches, based mainly on Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy, that in principle permit direct analysis of structural differences between hybridized and unhybridized probes, thereby eliminating the need for labeling the target analytes. We report here on the status of efforts to evaluate the potential of these methods based on a combination of measured data and simulated experiments involving short (12-mer) ssDNA oligomer probes with varying degrees of hybridized target DNA. Preliminary results suggest that it may be possible to determine the fraction of duplex probes within a single register on a DNA microarray from 100% down to 10% (or possibly less) with a precision of +/-2 5%. Details of the methods used, their implementation, and their potential advantages and limitations are presented, along with discussion of the utility of using 2DCOS methods to emphasize small spectral changes sensitive to interstrand H bonding, backbone flexibility, hypochromicity due to base-stacking in duplex structures and solvation effects.

  8. Direct molecule-specific glucose detection by Raman spectroscopy based on photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuan; Zhang, Alissa Y; Wheeler, Damon A; Bond, Tiziana C; Gu, Claire; Li, Yat

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the first step toward the development of a glucose biosensor based on Raman spectroscopy and a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) probe. Historically, it has been very challenging to detect glucose directly by Raman spectroscopy due to its inherently small Raman scattering cross-section. In this work, we report the first quantitative glucose Raman detection in the physiological concentration range (0-25 mM) with a low laser power (2 mW), a short integration time (30 s), and an extremely small sampling volume (~50 nL) using the highly sensitive liquid-filled PCF probe. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate the molecular specificity of this technique in the presence of a competing sugar, such as fructose. High sensitivity, flexibility, reproducibility, low cost, small sampling volume, and in situ remote sensing capability make PCF a very powerful platform for potential glucose detection based on Raman spectroscopy. PMID:22120042

  9. Deep Raman spectroscopy for the non-invasive standoff detection of concealed chemical threat agents.

    PubMed

    Izake, Emad L; Cletus, Biju; Olds, William; Sundarajoo, Shankaran; Fredericks, Peter M; Jaatinen, Esa

    2012-05-30

    Deep Raman spectroscopy has been utilized for the standoff detection of concealed chemical threat agents from a distance of 15 m under real life background illumination conditions. By using combined time and space resolved measurements, various explosive precursors hidden in opaque plastic containers were identified non-invasively. Our results confirm that combined time and space resolved Raman spectroscopy leads to higher selectivity towards the sub-layer over the surface layer as well as enhanced rejection of fluorescence from the container surface when compared to standoff spatially offset Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra that have minimal interference from the packaging material and good signal-to-noise ratio were acquired within 5 s of measurement time. A new combined time and space resolved Raman spectrometer has been designed with nanosecond laser excitation and gated detection, making it of lower cost and complexity than picosecond-based laboratory systems. PMID:22608458

  10. Resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical gallium arsenide nanowires studied using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walia, Jaspreet; Boulanger, Jonathan; Dhindsa, Navneet; LaPierre, Ray; (Shirley Tang, Xiaowu; Saini, Simarjeet S.

    2016-06-01

    Gallium arsenide nanowires have shown considerable promise for use in applications in which the absorption of light is required. When the nanowires are oriented vertically, a considerable amount of light can be absorbed, leading to significant heating effects. Thus, it is important to understand the threshold power densities that vertical GaAs nanowires can support, and how the nanowire morphology is altered under these conditions. Here, resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical GaAs nanowires was studied using both Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques. Resonant waveguiding, and subsequent absorption of the excited optical mode reduces the irradiance vertical GaAs nanowires can support relative to horizontal ones, by three orders of magnitude before the onset of structural changes occur. A power density of only 20 W mm‑2 was sufficient to induce local heating in the nanowires, resulting in the formation of arsenic species. Upon further increasing the power, a hollow nanowire morphology was realized. These findings are pertinent to all optical applications and spectroscopic measurements involving vertically oriented GaAs nanowires. Understanding the optical absorption limitations, and the effects of exceeding these limitations will help improve the development of all III–V nanowire devices.

  11. Rayleigh rejection filters for 193-nm ArF laser Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Selected organic absorbers and their solvents are evaluated as spectral filters for the rejection of 193-nm Rayleigh light associated with the use of an ArF excimer laser for Raman spectroscopy. A simply constructed filter cell filled with 0.5 percent acetone in water and an optical path of 7 mm is shown effectively to eliminate stray Rayleigh light underlying the Raman spectrum from air while transmitting 60 percent of the Raman light scattered by O2.

  12. Proposal for the measuring molecular velocity vector with single-pulse coherent Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Methods for simultaneous measurements of more than one flow velocity component using coherent Raman spectroscopy are proposed. It is demonstrated that using a kilowatt broad-band probe pulse (3-30 GHz) along with a megawatt narrow-band pump pulse (approximately 100 MHz), coherent Raman signal resulting from a single laser pulse is sufficient to produce a high-resolution Raman spectrum for a velocity measurement.

  13. Correlated Single-Crystal Electronic Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Crystallography at NSLS Beamline X26-C

    SciTech Connect

    A Orville; R Buono; M Cowan; A Heroux; G Shea-McCarthy; D Schneider; J Skinner; M Skinner; D Stoner-Ma; R Sweet

    2011-12-31

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

  14. Correlated single-crystal electronic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography at NSLS beamline X26-C

    SciTech Connect

    Orville, A.M.; Buono, R.; Cowan, M.; Heroux, A.; Shea-McCarthy, G.; Schneider, D. K.; Skinner, J. M.; Skinner, M. J.; Stoner-Ma, D.; Sweet, R. M.

    2011-05-01

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

  15. Correlated single-crystal electronic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography at NSLS beamline X26-C

    PubMed Central

    Orville, Allen M.; Buono, Richard; Cowan, Matt; Héroux, Annie; Shea-McCarthy, Grace; Schneider, Dieter K.; Skinner, John M.; Skinner, Michael J.; Stoner-Ma, Deborah; Sweet, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population. PMID:21525643

  16. Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging: prospective tools for monitoring skeletal cells and skeletal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Catarina Costa; Tare, Rahul S.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    The use of skeletal stem cells (SSCs) for cell-based therapies is currently one of the most promising areas for skeletal disease treatment and skeletal tissue repair. The ability for controlled modification of SSCs could provide significant therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine, with the prospect to permanently repopulate a host with stem cells and their progeny. Currently, SSC differentiation into the stromal lineages of bone, fat and cartilage is assessed using different approaches that typically require cell fixation or lysis, which are invasive or even destructive. Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy present an exciting alternative for studying biological systems in their natural state, without any perturbation. Here we review the applications of Raman spectroscopy and CARS imaging in stem-cell research, and discuss the potential of these two techniques for evaluating SSCs, skeletal tissues and skeletal regeneration as an exemplar. PMID:27170652

  17. Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging: prospective tools for monitoring skeletal cells and skeletal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Moura, Catarina Costa; Tare, Rahul S; Oreffo, Richard O C; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2016-05-01

    The use of skeletal stem cells (SSCs) for cell-based therapies is currently one of the most promising areas for skeletal disease treatment and skeletal tissue repair. The ability for controlled modification of SSCs could provide significant therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine, with the prospect to permanently repopulate a host with stem cells and their progeny. Currently, SSC differentiation into the stromal lineages of bone, fat and cartilage is assessed using different approaches that typically require cell fixation or lysis, which are invasive or even destructive. Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy present an exciting alternative for studying biological systems in their natural state, without any perturbation. Here we review the applications of Raman spectroscopy and CARS imaging in stem-cell research, and discuss the potential of these two techniques for evaluating SSCs, skeletal tissues and skeletal regeneration as an exemplar. PMID:27170652

  18. [The Quantitative Analysis of Raman Spectroscopy to Sulfate Ion in Aqueous Solution].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian-qian; Sun, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    As a non-destructive and non-contact method, Raman spectroscopy has been widely applied in many research fields. Based on vibrational wavenumber, Raman spectroscopy is usually applied to determine the molecular species. Therefore, Raman quantitative analysis is necessary. In this study, according to the theoretical analysis of Raman intensity, Raman quantitative measurement should be fulfilled by relative intensity ratio, which can be divided into internal and external standards. This eliminates the influence of the measurement conditions. For aqueous solution, it is reasonable to treat the OH stretching band of water as an internal standard to determine the solute concentrations in aqueous solution. The Raman spectra of Na₂SO₄-H₂O, K₂SO₄-H₂O and NaCl-Na₂SO₄-H₂O are recorded in the paper. In addition, the Raman OH stretching band of water can be fitted into two Gaussian sub-bands. The intensity proportion I(SO₄²⁻)/I(W) is used to determine the molarity of sulfate in aqueous solution, where I(SO₄²⁻) represents the intensity of sulfate band and I(W) represents the sum of the two sub-bands of Raman OH stretching bands of water. Therefore, Raman spectroscopy can be utilized to measure the SO₄²⁻concentrations in aqueous solutions. PMID:27209744

  19. Natural and synthetic gas hydrates studied by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savy, Jean-Philippe; Bigalke, Nikolaus; Aloisi, Giovanni; Kossel, Elke; Pansegrau, Moritz; Haeckel, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Over the past decade, the interest in using CH4-hydrates as an energy resource and CO2-hydrates as a storage option for anthropogenic CO2 has grown in the scientific community as well as in the oil and gas industry. Among all the techniques used to characterize gas hydrates, the non-destructive, non-invasive Raman spectroscopy provides significant insights into the structure and composition of hydrates. In this study, we compare gas hydrates synthetically produced in the laboratory with natural hydrate samples collected from marine sediments. CO2 and CH4 gas hydrates were investigated with a high-resolution Raman microscope at in-situ p-T conditions. A water-filled glass capillary (inner diameter: 1.7 mm) was placed in a stainless steel cell, which was sealed, cooled down to 3.6 ° C and pressurized to 60 bar with liquid CO2. Video images taken after 1 h revealed droplets (~10 μm in diameter) trapped in the ice-like solid. The two Fermi dyads of CO2 in the liquid and hydrate phase at 1274 & 1381 cm1 and 1280 & 1384 cm-1, respectively, confirm the presence of liquid CO2 droplets trapped in a CO2-hydrate matrix. Equivalent experiments were conducted with CH4 gas at 1 ° C and 90 bar. The nucleation of CH4-hydrate was followed in the Raman spectral region of the C-H stretching mode. At the early stage of the nucleation, the peak at 2915 cm-1 (CH4 in small cages) was stronger than the one at 2904 cm-1 (CH4 in large cages) indicating that methane starts to populate the small 512 cages of the s-I hydrate structure first and then, as nucleation continues, the large cages are stabilized leading to a quickly growing peak at 2904 cm-1 until a final peak intensity ratio of 3.7 is established. In contrast to other studies, intermediate stabilization of the s-II structure was not observed. Video images confirmed the absence of gas inclusions. The hydrate density, 1.1 & 0.9 for CO2-hydrate and CH4-hydrate respectively, compared to the one of water may explain the formation of

  20. DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN SOME FERTILIZERS AND PLANT TISSUE BY RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have successfully used Raman spectroscopy for the direct qualitative and quantitative analysis of perchlorate in fertilizer extracts without the need for chromatographic separation. This approach is attractive because Raman is not hindered by the presence of water or of high ...