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Sample records for absorption spectrum measurement

  1. [Gas Concentration Measurement Based on the Integral Value of Absorptance Spectrum].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-jun; Tao, Shao-hua; Yang, Bing-chu; Deng, Hong-gui

    2015-12-01

    The absorptance spectrum of a gas is the basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the gas by the law of the Lambert-Beer. The integral value of the absorptance spectrum is an important parameter to describe the characteristics of the gas absorption. Based on the measured absorptance spectrum of a gas, we collected the required data from the database of HIT-RAN, and chose one of the spectral lines and calculated the integral value of the absorptance spectrum in the frequency domain, and then substituted the integral value into Lambert-Beer's law to obtain the concentration of the detected gas. By calculating the integral value of the absorptance spectrum we can avoid the more complicated calculation of the spectral line function and a series of standard gases for calibration, so the gas concentration measurement will be simpler and faster. We studied the changing trends of the integral values of the absorptance spectrums versus temperature. Since temperature variation would cause the corresponding variation in pressure, we studied the changing trends of the integral values of the absorptance spectrums versus both the pressure not changed with temperature and changed with the temperature variation. Based on the two cases, we found that the integral values of the absorptance spectrums both would firstly increase, then decrease, and finally stabilize with temperature increasing, but the ranges of specific changing trend were different in the two cases. In the experiments, we found that the relative errors of the integrated values of the absorptance spectrum were much higher than 1% and still increased with temperature when we only considered the change of temperature and completely ignored the pressure affected by the temperature variation, and the relative errors of the integrated values of the absorptance spectrum were almost constant at about only 1% when we considered that the pressure were affected by the temperature variation. As the integral value

  2. The visible absorption spectrum of NO3 measured by high-resolution Fourier transform spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orphal, J.; Fellows, C. E.; Flaud, P.-M.

    2003-02-01

    The visible absorption spectrum of the nitrate radical NO3 has been measured using high-resolution Fourier transform spectroscopy. The spectrum was recorded at 294 K using a resolution of 0.6 cm-1 (corresponding to 0.026 nm at 662 nm) and covers the 12600-21500 cm-1 region (465-794 nm). Compared to absorption spectra of NO3 recorded previously, the new data show improvements concerning absolute wavelength calibration (uncertainty 0.02 cm-1), and spectral resolution. A new interpretation and model of the temperature dependence of the strong (0-0) band around 662 nm are proposed. The results are important for long-path tropospheric absorption measurements of NO3 and optical remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere from space.

  3. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HOCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The room temperature UV absorption spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range 200 to 380 nm with a diode array spectrometer. The absorption spectrum was identified from UV absorption spectra recorded following UV photolysis of equilibrium mixtures of Cl2O/H2O/HOCl. The HOCl spectrum is continuous with a maximum at 242 nm and a secondary peak at 304 nm. The measured absorption cross section at 242 nm was (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -19/sq cm (2 sigma error limits). These results are in excellent agreement with the work of Knauth et al. (1979) but in poor agreement with the more recent measurements of Mishalanie et al. (1986) and Permien et al. (1988). An HOCl nu2 infrared band intensity of 230 +/- 35/sq cm atm was determined based on this UV absorption cross section. The present results are compared with these previous measurements and the discrepancies are discussed.

  4. Simultaneous measurements of absorption spectrum and refractive index in a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Helseth, Lars Egil

    2012-02-13

    The characterization of dyes in various solvents requires determination of the absorption spectrum of the dye as well as the refractive index of the solvent. Typically, the refractive index of the solvent and the absorption spectrum of the solute are measured using separate experimental setups where significant liquid volumes are required. In this work the first optical measurement system that is able to do simultaneous measurements of the refractive index of the solvent and the spectral properties of the solute in a microscopic volume is presented. The laser dye Rhodamine 6G in glycerol is investigated, and the refractive index of the solution is monitored using the interference pattern of the light scattered off the channel, while its spectral properties is found by monitoring reflected light from the channel.

  5. Continuous optical measurement system of hemolysis during a photosensitization reaction using absorption spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, R.; Ogawa, E.; Arai, T.

    2018-02-01

    To investigate hemolysis phenomena during a photosensitization reaction with the reaction condition continuously and simultaneously for a safety assessment of hemolysis side effect, we constructed an optical system to measure blood sample absorption spectrum during the reaction. Hemolysis degree might be under estimated in general evaluation methods because there is a constant oxygen pressure assumption in spite of oxygen depression take place. By investigating hemoglobin oxidation and oxygen desorption dynamics obtained from the contribution of the visible absorption spectrum and multiple regression analysis, both the hemolysis phenomena and its oxygen environment might be obtained with time. A 664 nm wavelength laser beam for the reaction excitation and 475-650 nm light beam for measuring the absorbance spectrum were arranged perpendicularly crossing. A quartz glass cuvette with 1×10 mm in dimensions for the spectrum measurement was located at this crossing point. A red blood cells suspension medium was arranged with low hematocrit containing 30 μg/ml talaporfin sodium. This medium was irradiated up to 40 J/cm2 . The met-hemoglobin, oxygenatedhemoglobin, and deoxygenated-hemoglobin concentrations were calculated by a multiple regression analysis from the measured spectra. We confirmed the met-hemoglobin concentration increased and oxygen saturation decreased with the irradiation time, which seems to indicate the hemolysis progression and oxygen consumption, respectively. By using our measuring system, the hemolysis progression seems to be obtained with oxygen environment information.

  6. Frequency-domain method for measuring spectral properties in multiple-scattering media: methemoglobin absorption spectrum in a tissuelike phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishkin, Joshua B.; So, Peter T. C.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    1995-03-01

    We have measured the optical absorption and scattering coefficient spectra of a multiple-scattering medium (i.e., a biological tissue-simulating phantom comprising a lipid colloid) containing methemoglobin by using frequency-domain techniques. The methemoglobin absorption spectrum determined in the multiple-scattering medium is in excellent agreement with a corrected methemoglobin absorption spectrum obtained from a steady-state spectrophotometer measurement of the optical density of a minimally scattering medium. The determination of the corrected methemoglobin absorption spectrum takes into account the scattering from impurities in the methemoglobin solution containing no lipid colloid. Frequency-domain techniques allow for the separation of the absorbing from the scattering properties of multiple-scattering media, and these techniques thus provide an absolute

  7. CFCI3 (CFC-11): UV Absorption Spectrum Temperature Dependence Measurements and the Impact on Atmospheric Lifetime and Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2014-01-01

    CFCl3 (CFC-11) is both an atmospheric ozone-depleting and potent greenhouse gas that is removed primarily via stratospheric UV photolysis. Uncertainty in the temperature dependence of its UV absorption spectrum is a significant contributing factor to the overall uncertainty in its global lifetime and, thus, model calculations of stratospheric ozone recovery and climate change. In this work, the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum was measured over a range of wavelength (184.95 - 230 nm) and temperature (216 - 296 K). We report a spectrum temperature dependence that is less than currently recommended for use in atmospheric models. The impact on its atmospheric lifetime was quantified using a 2-D model and the spectrum parameterization developed in this work. The obtained global annually averaged lifetime was 58.1 +- 0.7 years (2 sigma uncertainty due solely to the spectrum uncertainty). The lifetime is slightly reduced and the uncertainty significantly reduced from that obtained using current spectrum recommendations

  8. Direct measurement of the absolute absorption spectrum of individual semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Paillet, Matthieu; Tran, Huy Nam; Than, Xuan Tinh; Guebrou, Samuel Aberra; Ayari, Anthony; Miguel, Alfonso San; Phan, Ngoc-Minh; Zahab, Ahmed-Azmi; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Fatti, Natalia Del; Vallée, Fabrice

    2013-09-01

    The optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes are very promising for developing novel opto-electronic components and sensors with applications in many fields. Despite numerous studies performed using photoluminescence or Raman and Rayleigh scattering, knowledge of their optical response is still partial. Here we determine using spatial modulation spectroscopy, over a broad optical spectral range, the spectrum and amplitude of the absorption cross-section of individual semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes. These quantitative measurements permit determination of the oscillator strength of the different excitonic resonances and their dependencies on the excitonic transition and type of semiconducting nanotube. A non-resonant background is also identified and its cross-section comparable to the ideal graphene optical absorbance. Furthermore, investigation of the same single-wall nanotube either free standing or lying on a substrate shows large broadening of the excitonic resonances with increase of oscillator strength, as well as stark weakening of polarization-dependent antenna effects, due to nanotube-substrate interaction.

  9. A Near-Infrared Spectrometer to Measure Zodiacal Light Absorption Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutyrev, A. S.; Arendt, R.; Dwek, E.; Kimble, R.; Moseley, S. H.; Rapchun, D.; Silverberg, R. F.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a high throughput infrared spectrometer for zodiacal light fraunhofer lines measurements. The instrument is based on a cryogenic dual silicon Fabry-Perot etalon which is designed to achieve high signal to noise Fraunhofer line profile measurements. Very large aperture silicon Fabry-Perot etalons and fast camera optics make these measurements possible. The results of the absorption line profile measurements will provide a model free measure of the zodiacal Light intensity in the near infrared. The knowledge of the zodiacal light brightness is crucial for accurate subtraction of zodiacal light foreground for accurate measure of the extragalactic background light after the subtraction of zodiacal light foreground. We present the final design of the instrument and the first results of its performance.

  10. MULTIMAGNON ABSORPTION IN MNF2-OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTRUM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The absorption spectrum of MnF2 at 4.2K in the 3900A region was measured in zero external fields and in high fields. Exciton lines with magnon ...sidebands are observed, accompanied by a large number of weak satellite lines. Results on the exciton and magnon absorptions are similar to those of...McClure et al. The satellite lines are interpreted as being multi- magnon absorptions, and it is possible to fit the energy of all the absorptions with

  11. [Measurements of IR absorption across section and spectrum simulation of lewisite].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-peng; Wang, Hai-tao; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Liu; Guo, Xiao-di; Bai, Yun; Sun, Hao

    2015-02-01

    The vapor infrared transmission spectra of varied concentration of lewisite-1 were measured by a long-path FT-IR spectrometer, and its characteristic frequencies are 814, 930, 1563 cm(-1); their infrared absorption cross section (a) were determined using Beer-Lambert law. The corresponding sigma values are 3.89 +/- 0.01, 1.43 +/- 0.06, 4.47 +/- 0.05 ( X 10(-20) cm2 x molecule(-1)). Two little teeny peaks, 1158, 1288 cm(-1) were found in the measured spectra. Density Functional Theory (DFT) was applied to calculated the infrared spectra of lewisite-1, -2, -3 on a b3lyp/6-311+g(d, p) level by Gauss09 package. The vibration modes were assigned by Gaussview5. 08. The calculated spectra and experimental spectra are in good agreement with each other in 600-1600 cm(-1) range, for the Person's r is 0.9991. The calculated spectra also showed three characteristic frequencies (293, 360, 374 cm(-1)) related to As atom. 0.977 was a scaling factor we determined for lewisite-1 through least-square error and its performance to scale lewisite-1, -2, -3 was acceptable. The results of this work are useful for monitoring environmental atmospheric concentrations of lewisite.

  12. Measurement of the vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of low-k dielectrics using X-ray reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, F. A.; Nguyen, H. M.; King, S. W.; Lee, C. H.; Lin, Y. H.; Fung, H. S.; Chen, C. C.; Li, W.; Benjamin, D.; Blatz, J. M.; Nishi, Y.; Shohet, J. L.

    2018-02-01

    During plasma processing, low-k dielectrics are exposed to high levels of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation that can cause severe damage to dielectric materials. The degree and nature of VUV-induced damage depend on the VUV photon energies and fluence. In this work, we examine the VUV-absorption spectrum of low-k organosilicate glass using specular X-ray reflectivity (XRR). Low-k SiCOH films were exposed to synchrotron VUV radiation with energies ranging from 7 to 21 eV, and the density vs. depth profile of the VUV-irradiated films was extracted from fitting the XRR experimental data. The results show that the depth of the VUV-induced damage layer is a function of the photon energy. Between 7 and 11 eV, the depth of the damaged layer decreases sharply from 110 nm to 60 nm and then gradually increases to 85 nm at 21 eV. The maximum VUV absorption in low-k films occurs between 11 and 15 eV. The depth of the damaged layer was found to increase with film porosity.

  13. Measurement of absorption spectrum of deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O) and its application to signal enhancement in multiphoton microscopy at the 1700-nm window

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuxin; Wen, Wenhui; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-11

    1700-nm window has been demonstrated to be a promising excitation window for deep-tissue multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Long working-distance water immersion objective lenses are typically used for deep-tissue imaging. However, absorption due to immersion water at 1700 nm is still high and leads to dramatic decrease in signals. In this paper, we demonstrate measurement of absorption spectrum of deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O) from 1200 nm to 2600 nm, covering the three low water-absorption windows potentially applicable for deep-tissue imaging (1300 nm, 1700 nm, and 2200 nm). We apply this measured result to signal enhancement in MPM at the 1700-nm window. Compared with water immersion, D{sub 2}O immersionmore » enhances signal levels in second-harmonic generation imaging, 3-photon fluorescence imaging, and third-harmonic generation imaging by 8.1, 24.8, and 24.7 times with 1662-nm excitation, in good agreement with theoretical calculation based on our absorption measurement. This suggests D{sub 2}O a promising immersion medium for deep-tissue imaging.« less

  14. Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator (QE-MASS) is a computer program for simulating two photon molecular-absorption spectroscopy using quantum-entangled photons. More specifically, QE-MASS simulates the molecular absorption of two quantum-entangled photons generated by the spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) of a fixed-frequency photon from a laser. The two-photon absorption process is modeled via a combination of rovibrational and electronic single-photon transitions, using a wave-function formalism. A two-photon absorption cross section as a function of the entanglement delay time between the two photons is computed, then subjected to a fast Fourier transform to produce an energy spectrum. The program then detects peaks in the Fourier spectrum and displays the energy levels of very short-lived intermediate quantum states (or virtual states) of the molecule. Such virtual states were only previously accessible using ultra-fast (femtosecond) laser systems. However, with the use of a single-frequency continuous wave laser to produce SPDC photons, and QEMASS program, these short-lived molecular states can now be studied using much simpler laser systems. QE-MASS can also show the dependence of the Fourier spectrum on the tuning range of the entanglement time of any externally introduced optical-path delay time. QE-MASS can be extended to any molecule for which an appropriate spectroscopic database is available. It is a means of performing an a priori parametric analysis of entangled photon spectroscopy for development and implementation of emerging quantum-spectroscopic sensing techniques. QE-MASS is currently implemented using the Mathcad software package.

  15. Temperature dependence of the NO3 absorption spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, Stanley P.

    1986-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of the gas-phase NO3 radical has been studied between 220 and 700 nm by using both flash photolysis and discharge flow reactors for the production of NO3. In the flash photolysis method, cross sections at the peak of the (0,0) band at 661.9 nm were measured relative to the cross section of ClONO2 at several different wavelengths. From the best current measurements of the ClONO2 spectrum, the NO3 cross section at 661.9 nm was determined to be (2.28 + or 0.34) x 10 to the -17th sq cm/molecule at 298 K. Measurements at 230 K indicated that the cross section increases by a factor of 1.18 at the peak of the (0,0) band. The discharge flow method was used both to obtain absolute cross sections at 661.9 nm and to obtain relative absorption spectra between 300 and 700 nm at 298 and 230 K. A value of (1.83 + or - 0.27) x 10 to the -17th sq cm/molecule was obtained for sigma NO3 at 661.9 nm at 298 K. Upper limits to the NO3 cross sections were also measured between 220 and 260 nm with the discharge flow method.

  16. The Absorption Spectrum of Iodine Vapour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetlow, K. S.

    1972-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described which presents some molecular parameters of iodine molecule by studying iodine spectrum. Points out this experiment can be conducted by sixth form students in high school laboratories. (PS)

  17. Theoretical modeling of the absorption spectrum of aqueous riboflavin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti-Polzi, Laura; Aschi, Massimiliano; Daidone, Isabella; Amadei, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    In this study we report the modeling of the absorption spectrum of riboflavin in water using a hybrid quantum/classical mechanical approach, the MD-PMM methodology. By means of MD-PMM calculations, with which the effect of riboflavin internal motions and of solvent interactions on the spectroscopic properties can be explicitly taken into account, we obtain an absorption spectrum in very good agreement with the experimental spectrum. In particular, the calculated peak maxima show a consistent improvement with respect to previous computational approaches. Moreover, the calculations show that the interaction with the environment may cause a relevant recombination of the gas-phase electronic states.

  18. Temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} UV absorption spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Burkholder, J.B.; Talukdar, R.K.; Ravishankara, A.R.

    1994-04-01

    The temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} absorption spectrum has been measured between 220 and 298 K and between 195 and 430 nm using a diode array spectrometer. The absorption cross sections were determined using both: (1) absolute pressure measurements at 296 K and (2) measurements at various temperatures relative to 296 K using a dual absorption cell arrangement. The temperature dependence of the ClONO{sub 2} absorption spectrum shows very broad structure. The amplitude of the temperature dependence relative to that at 296 K is weak at short wavelengths, < 2% at 215 nm and 220 K, but significant atmore » the wavelengths important in the stratosphere, {approximately} 30% at 325 nm and 220 K. The authors ClONO{sub 2} absorption cross section data are in good general agreement with the previous measurements of Molina and Molina.« less

  19. Temperature dependence of the ClONO2 UV absorption spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the ClONO2 absorption spectrum has been measured between 220 and 298 K and between 195 and 430 nm using a diode array spectrometer. The absorption cross sections were determined using both: (1) absolute pressure measurements at 296 K and (2) measurements at various temperatures relative to 296 K using a dual absorption cell arrangement. The temperature dependence of the ClONO2 absorption spectrum shows very broad structure. The amplitude of the temperature dependence relative to that at 296 K is weak at short wavelengths, less than 2% at 215 nm and 220 K, but significant at the wavelengths important in the stratosphere, about 30% at 325 nm and 220 K. Our ClONO2 absorption cross section data are in good general agreement with the previous measurements of Molina and Molina (1979).

  20. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  1. Plant Growth Absorption Spectrum Mimicking Light Sources

    PubMed Central

    Jou, Jwo-Huei; Lin, Ching-Chiao; Li, Tsung-Han; Li, Chieh-Ju; Peng, Shiang-Hau; Yang, Fu-Chin; Justin Thomas, K. R.; Kumar, Dhirendra; Chi, Yun; Hsu, Ban-Dar

    2015-01-01

    Plant factories have attracted increasing attention because they can produce fresh fruits and vegetables free from pesticides in all weather. However, the emission spectra from current light sources significantly mismatch the spectra absorbed by plants. We demonstrate a concept of using multiple broad-band as well as narrow-band solid-state lighting technologies to design plant-growth light sources. Take an organic light-emitting diode (OLED), for example; the resulting light source shows an 84% resemblance with the photosynthetic action spectrum as a twin-peak blue dye and a diffused mono-peak red dye are employed. This OLED can also show a greater than 90% resemblance as an additional deeper red emitter is added. For a typical LED, the resemblance can be improved to 91% if two additional blue and red LEDs are incorporated. The approach may facilitate either an ideal use of the energy applied for plant growth and/or the design of better light sources for growing different plants. PMID:28793503

  2. ABSORPTION MEASURE DISTRIBUTION IN Mrk 509

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, T. P.; Różańska, A.; Sobolewska, M.

    2015-12-20

    In this paper we model the observed absorption measure distribution (AMD) in Mrk 509, which spans three orders of magnitude in ionization level with a single-zone absorber in pressure equilibrium. AMD is usually constructed from observations of narrow absorption lines in radio-quiet active galaxies with warm absorbers. We study the properties of the warm absorber in Mrk 509 using recently published broadband spectral energy distribution observed with different instruments. This spectrum is an input in radiative transfer computations with full photoionization treatment using the titan code. We show that the simplest way to fully reproduce the shape of AMD is tomore » assume that the warm absorber is a single zone under constant total pressure. With this assumption, we found theoretical AMD that matches the observed AMD determined on the basis of the 600 ks reflection grating spectrometer XMM-Newton spectrum of Mrk 509. The softness of the source spectrum and the important role of the free–free emission breaks the usual degeneracy in the ionization state calculations, and the explicit dependence of the depths of AMD dips on density open a new path to the density diagnostic for the warm absorber. In Mrk 509, the implied density is of the order of 10{sup 8} cm{sup −3}.« less

  3. [Extracting THz absorption coefficient spectrum based on accurate determination of sample thickness].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Zhang, Zhao-hui; Zhao, Xiao-yan; Su, Hai-xia; Yan, Fang

    2012-04-01

    Extracting absorption spectrum in THz band is one of the important aspects in THz applications. Sample's absorption coefficient has a complex nonlinear relationship with its thickness. However, as it is not convenient to measure the thickness directly, absorption spectrum is usually determined incorrectly. Based on the method proposed by Duvillaret which was used to precisely determine the thickness of LiNbO3, the approach to measuring the absorption coefficient spectra of glutamine and histidine in frequency range from 0.3 to 2.6 THz(1 THz = 10(12) Hz) was improved in this paper. In order to validate the correctness of this absorption spectrum, we designed a series of experiments to compare the linearity of absorption coefficient belonging to one kind amino acid in different concentrations. The results indicate that as agreed by Lambert-Beer's Law, absorption coefficient spectrum of amino acid from the improved algorithm performs better linearity with its concentration than that from the common algorithm, which can be the basis of quantitative analysis in further researches.

  4. Solvatochromic Effects on the Absorption Spectrum of 2-Thiocytosine

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The solvatochromic effects of six different solvents on the UV absorption spectrum of 2-thiocytosine have been studied by a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques. The steady-state absorption spectra show significant shifts of the absorption bands, where in more polar solvents the first absorption maximum shifts to higher transition energies and the second maximum to lower energies. The observed solvatochromic shifts have been rationalized using three popular solvatochromic scales and with high-level multireference quantum chemistry calculations including implicit and explicit solvent effects. It has been found that the dipole moments of the excited states account for some general shifts in the excitation energies, whereas the explicit solvent interactions explain the differences in the spectra recorded in the different solvents. PMID:28452483

  5. UV absorption spectrum of allene radical cations in solid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Chih-Hao; Lin, Meng-Yeh; Huang, Tzu-Ping; Wu, Yu-Jong

    2018-05-01

    Electron bombardment during deposition of an Ar matrix containing a small proportion of allene generated allene cations. Further irradiation of the matrix sample at 385 nm destroyed the allene cations and formed propyne cations in solid Ar. Both cations were identified according to previously reported IR absorption bands. Using a similar technique, we recorded the ultraviolet absorption spectrum of allene cations in solid Ar. The vibrationally resolved progression recorded in the range of 266-237 nm with intervals of about 800 cm-1 was assigned to the A2E ← X2E transition of allene cations, and the broad continuum absorption recorded in the region of 229-214 nm was assigned to their B2A1 ← X2E transition. These assignments were made based on the observed photolytic behavior of the progressions and the vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths calculated using time-dependent density functional theory.

  6. Femtosecond time-domain observation of atmospheric absorption in the near-infrared spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, T. J.; Monchocé, Sylvain; Zhang, Chunmei; Brown, Graham G.; Corkum, P. B.; Villeneuve, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    As light propagates through a medium, absorption caused by electronic or rovibrational transitions is evident in the transmitted spectrum. The incident electromagnetic field polarizes the medium and the absorption is due to the imaginary part of the linear susceptibility. In the time domain, the field establishes a coherence in the medium that radiates out of phase with the initial field. This coherence can persist for tens of picoseconds in atmospheric molecules such as H2O . We propagate a few-cycle laser pulse centered at 1.8 μ m through the atmosphere and measure the long-lasting molecular coherence in the time domain by high-order harmonic cross correlation. The measured optical free-induction decay of the pulse is compared with a calculation based on the calculated rovibrational spectrum of H2O absorption.

  7. Two-photon absorption spectrum of the photoinitiator Lucirin TPO-L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonca, C. R.; Correa, D. S.; Baldacchini, T.; Tayalia, P.; Mazur, E.

    2008-03-01

    Two-photon absorption induced polymerization provides a powerful method for the fabrication of intricate three-dimensional microstructures. Recently, Lucirin TPO-L was shown to be a photoinitiator with several advantageous properties for two-photon induced polymerization. Here we measure the two-photon absorption cross-section spectrum of Lucirin TPO-L, which presents a maximum of 1.2 GM at 610 nm. Despite its small two-photon absorption cross-section, it is possible to fabricate excellent microstructures by two-photon polymerization due to the high polymerization quantum yield of Lucirin TPO-L. These results indicate that optimization of the two-photon absorption cross-section is not the only material parameter to be considered when searching for new photoinitiators for microfabrication via two-photon absorption.

  8. [Signal analysis and spectrum distortion correction for tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy system].

    PubMed

    Bao, Wei-Yi; Zhu, Yong; Chen, Jun; Chen, Jun-Qing; Liang, Bo

    2011-04-01

    In the present paper, the signal of a tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) trace gas sensing system, which has a wavelength modulation with a wide range of modulation amplitudes, is studied based on Fourier analysis method. Theory explanation of spectrum distortion induced by laser intensity amplitude modulation is given. In order to rectify the spectrum distortion, a method of synchronous amplitude modulation suppression by a variable optical attenuator is proposed. To validate the method, an experimental setup is designed. Absorption spectrum measurement experiments on CO2 gas were carried out. The results show that the residual laser intensity modulation amplitude of the experimental system is reduced to -0.1% of its original value and the spectrum distortion improvement is 92% with the synchronous amplitude modulation suppression. The modulation amplitude of laser intensity can be effectively reduced and the spectrum distortion can be well corrected by using the given correction method and system. By using a variable optical attenuator in the TDLAS (tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy) system, the dynamic range requirements of photoelectric detector, digital to analog converter, filters and other aspects of the TDLAS system are reduced. This spectrum distortion correction method can be used for online trace gas analyzing in process industry.

  9. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of the half-filled bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apinyan, V.; Kopeć, T. K.

    2018-07-01

    We consider the optical properties of the half-filled AB-stacked bilayer graphene with the excitonic pairing and condensation between the layers. Both intra and interlayer local Coulomb interaction effects have been taken into account and the role of the exact Fermi energy has been discussed in details. We have calculated the absorption coefficient, refractive index, dielectric response functions and the electron energy loss spectrum for different interlayer Coulomb interaction regimes and for different temperatures. Considering the full four-band model for the interacting AB bilayer graphene, a good agreement is achieved with other theoretical and experimental works on the subject, in particular, limiting cases of the theory. The calculations, presented here, permit to estimate accurately the effects of excitonic pairing and condensation on the optical properties of the bilayer graphene. The modifications of the plasmon excitation spectrum are discussed in details for a very large interval of the interlayer interaction parameter.

  10. Excitonic Effects and Optical Absorption Spectrum of Doped Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jornada, Felipe; Deslippe, Jack; Louie, Steven

    2012-02-01

    First-principles calculations based on the GW-Bethe-Salpeter Equation (GW-BSE) approach and subsequent experiments have shown large excitonic effects in the optical absorbance of graphene. Here we employ the GW-BSE formalism to probe the effects of charge carrier doping and of having an external electric field on the absorption spectrum of graphene. We show that the absorbance peak due to the resonant exciton exhibits systematic changes in both its position and profile when graphene is gate doped by carriers, in excellent agreement to very recent measurementsootnotetextTony F. Heinz, private communications.. We analyze the various contributions to these changes in the absorption spectrum, such as the effects of screening by carriers to the quasiparticle energies and electron-hole interactions. This work was supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR10-1006184, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, and the U.S. DOD - Office of Naval Research under RTC Grant No. N00014-09-1-1066. Computer time was provided by NERSC.

  11. Model Order Reduction Algorithm for Estimating the Absorption Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Van Beeumen, Roel; Williams-Young, David B.; Kasper, Joseph M.

    The ab initio description of the spectral interior of the absorption spectrum poses both a theoretical and computational challenge for modern electronic structure theory. Due to the often spectrally dense character of this domain in the quantum propagator’s eigenspectrum for medium-to-large sized systems, traditional approaches based on the partial diagonalization of the propagator often encounter oscillatory and stagnating convergence. Electronic structure methods which solve the molecular response problem through the solution of spectrally shifted linear systems, such as the complex polarization propagator, offer an alternative approach which is agnostic to the underlying spectral density or domain location. This generality comesmore » at a seemingly high computational cost associated with solving a large linear system for each spectral shift in some discretization of the spectral domain of interest. In this work, we present a novel, adaptive solution to this high computational overhead based on model order reduction techniques via interpolation. Model order reduction reduces the computational complexity of mathematical models and is ubiquitous in the simulation of dynamical systems and control theory. The efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in the ab initio prediction of X-ray absorption spectra is demonstrated using a test set of challenging water clusters which are spectrally dense in the neighborhood of the oxygen K-edge. On the basis of a single, user defined tolerance we automatically determine the order of the reduced models and approximate the absorption spectrum up to the given tolerance. We also illustrate that, for the systems studied, the automatically determined model order increases logarithmically with the problem dimension, compared to a linear increase of the number of eigenvalues within the energy window. Furthermore, we observed that the computational cost of the proposed algorithm only scales quadratically with respect

  12. The energy spectrum and the optical absorption spectrum of C{sub 60} fullerene within the Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Silant’ev, A. V., E-mail: kvvant@rambler.ru

    2015-10-15

    Anticommutator Green’s functions and the energy spectrum of C{sub 60} fullerene are calculated in the approximation of static fluctuations within the Hubbard model. On the basis of this spectrum, an interpretation is proposed for the experimentally observed optical absorption bands of C{sub 60} fullerene. The parameters of C{sub 60} fullerene that characterize it within the Hubbard model are calculated by the optical absorption spectrum.

  13. High-resolution discrete absorption spectrum of α-methallyl free radical in the vapor phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakçeken, Fuat; Telatar, Ziya; Arı, Fikret; Tunçyürek, Lale; Karaaslan, İpek; Yaman, Ali

    2006-09-01

    The α-methallyl free radical is formed in the flash photolysis of 3-methylbut-1-ene, and cis-pent-2-ene in the vapor phase, and then subsequent reactions have been investigated by kinetic spectroscopy and gas-liquid chromatography. The photolysis flash was of short duration and it was possible to follow the kinetics of the radicals' decay, which occurred predominantly by bimolecular recombination. The measured rate constant for the α-methallyl recombination was (3.5 ± 0.3) × 10 10 mol -1 l s -1 at 295 ± 2 K. The absolute extinction coefficients of the α-methallyl radical are calculated from the optical densities of the absorption bands. Detailed analysis of related absorption bands and lifetime measurements in the original α-methallyl high-resolution discrete absorption spectrum image were also carried out by image processing techniques.

  14. In vivo and in vitro absorption spectrum of disulphonated aluminum phthalocyanine in tumor-bearing mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Canti, Gianfranco L.; Pifferi, Antonio; Taroni, Paola; Valentini, Gianluca

    1995-03-01

    The absorption spectrum of disulphonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AlS2Pc) between 650 nm and 695 nm was measured in vivo by means of time-resolved reflectance. The experiments were performed on mice bearing the L1210 leukemia 1, 4, and 7 hr after the i.p. administration of 2.5 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) of AlS2Pc. The absorption peak is centered at 685 nm, red-shifted of 10 - 15 nm with respect to the spectra obtained in solution in various environments. Measurements performed in vitro confirm the results in vivo and seem to suggest that the extracellular environment can cause the shift in the absorption line shape.

  15. Tunable, high-sensitive measurement of inter-dot transition via tunneling induced absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yandong; Yang, Aihong; Chen, Bing; Li, Lei; Liu, Shande; Guo, Hongju

    2016-10-01

    A tunable, narrow absorption spectrum induced by resonant tunneling is demonstrated and proposed for measuring interdot tunneling. Tunneling-induced absorption (TIA) arises from constructive interference between different transition paths, and the large nonlinear TIA significantly enhances the total absorption. The narrow nonlinear TIA spectrum is sensitive to inter-dot tunneling, and its sensor characteristics, including sensitivity and bandwidth, are investigated in weak-coupling and strong-coupling regimes, respectively.

  16. Absorption spectrum of the firefly luciferin anion isolated in vacuo.

    PubMed

    Støchkel, Kristian; Milne, Bruce F; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2011-03-24

    The excited-state physics of the firefly luciferin anion depends on its chemical environment, and it is therefore important to establish the intrinsic behavior of the bare ion. Here we report electronic absorption spectra of the anion isolated in vacuo obtained at an electrostatic ion storage ring and an accelerator mass spectrometer where ionic dissociation is monitored on a long time scale (from 33 μs and up to 3 ms) and on a short time scale (0-3 μs), respectively. In the ring experiment the yield of all neutrals (mainly CO(2)) as a function of wavelength was measured whereas in the single pass experiment, the abundance of daughter ions formed after loss of CO(2) was recorded to provide action spectra. We find maxima at 535 and 265 nm, and that the band shape is largely determined by the sampling time interval, which is due to the kinetics of the dissociation process. Calculations at the TD-B3LYP/TZVPP++ level predict maximum absorption at 533 and 275 nm for the carboxylate isomer in excellent agreement with the experimental findings. The phenolate isomer lies higher in energy by 0.22 eV, and also its absorption maximum is calculated to be at 463 nm, which is far away from the experimental value. Our data serve to benchmark future theoretical models for bioluminescence from fireflies.

  17. Chemical and spectral behavior of nitric acid in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions: Absorption spectrum and molar absorption coefficient of nitronium ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershov, Boris G.; Panich, Nadezhda M.

    2018-01-01

    The chemical species formed from nitric acid in aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid (up to 18.0 mol L- 1) were studied by optical spectroscopy method. The concentration region of nitronium ion formation was identified and NO2+ ion absorption spectrum was measured (λmax ≤ 190 nm and ε190 = 1040 ± 50 mol- 1 L cm- 1).

  18. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  19. [Analysis of UV-visible absorption spectrum on the decolorization of industrial wastewater by disinfection].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Wang, Long-Yong; Gao, Nai-Yun; Li, Wei-Guo

    2012-10-01

    The UV-Visible absorption spectrum of industrial wastewater was explored to introduce a substituting method determining the color of water, and to compare the decolorization efficacy of different disinfectants. The results show that the visible absorption spectrum(350-600 nm), instead of ultraviolet absorption spectrum, should be applied to characterize the color of wastewater. There is a good correlation between the features of visible absorption spectrum and the true color of wastewater. Both ozone and chlorine dioxide has a better decolorization performance than chlorine. However, the color of chlorine dioxide itself has a negative effect on decolorization. The changes in the features of visible absorption spectrum effectively reflect the variations in the color of wastewater after disinfection.

  20. Models of filter-based particle light absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamasha, Khadeejeh M.

    Light absorption by aerosol is very important in the visible, near UN, and near I.R region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Aerosol particles in the atmosphere have a great influence on the flux of solar energy, and also impact health in a negative sense when they are breathed into lungs. Aerosol absorption measurements are usually performed by filter-based methods that are derived from the change in light transmission through a filter where particles have been deposited. These methods suffer from interference between light-absorbing and light-scattering aerosol components. The Aethalometer is the most commonly used filter-based instrument for aerosol light absorption measurement. This dissertation describes new understanding of aerosol light absorption obtained by the filter method. The theory uses a multiple scattering model for the combination of filter and particle optics. The theory is evaluated using Aethalometer data from laboratory and ambient measurements in comparison with photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption. Two models were developed to calculate aerosol light absorption coefficients from the Aethalometer data, and were compared to the in-situ aerosol light absorption coefficients. The first is an approximate model and the second is a "full" model. In the approximate model two extreme cases of aerosol optics were used to develop a model-based calibration scheme for the 7-wavelength Aethalometer. These cases include those of very strong scattering aerosols (Ammonium sulfate sample) and very absorbing aerosols (kerosene soot sample). The exponential behavior of light absorption in the strong multiple scattering limit is shown to be the square root of the total absorption optical depth rather than linear with optical depth as is commonly assumed with Beer's law. 2-stream radiative transfer theory was used to develop the full model to calculate the aerosol light absorption coefficients from the Aethalometer data. This comprehensive model

  1. High sensitivity background absorption measurements in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannini, Nathan; Silva, Junior R.; Wang, Chengao; Albrecht, Alexander R.; Melgaard, Seth D.; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2015-03-01

    Laser cooling in InGaP|GaAs double heterostructures (DHS) has been a sought after goal. Even though very high external quantum efficiency (EQE) has been achieved, background absorption has remained a bottleneck in achieving net cooling. The purpose of this study is to gain more insight into the source of the background absorption for InGaP|GaAs DHS as well as GaAs|AlGaAs DBRs by employing an excite-probe thermal Z-scan measurement.

  2. Inapplicability of small-polaron model for the explanation of infrared absorption spectrum in acetanilide.

    PubMed

    Zeković, Slobodan; Ivić, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    The applicability of small-polaron model for the interpretation of infrared absorption spectrum in acetanilide has been critically reexamined. It is shown that the energy difference between the normal and anomalous peak, calculated by means of small-polaron theory, displays pronounced temperature dependence which is in drastic contradiction with experiment. It is demonstrated that self-trapped states, which are recently suggested to explain theoretically the experimental absorption spectrum in protein, cannot cause the appearance of the peaks in absorption spectrum for acetanilide.

  3. Aerosol Absorption Measurements from LANDSAT and CIMEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Karnieli, A.; Remer, L.; Holben, B.

    1999-01-01

    Spectral remote observations of dust properties from space and from the ground create a powerful tool for determination of dust absorption of solar radiation with an unprecedented accuracy. Absorption is a key component in understanding dust impact on climate. We use Landsat space-borne measurements at 0.47 to 2.2 micrometer over Senegal with ground-based sunphotometers to find that Saharan dust absorption of solar radiation is two to four times smaller than in models. Though dust absorbs in the blue, almost no absorption was found for wavelengths greater than 0.6 micrometer. The new finding increases by 50% recent estimated solar radiative forcing by dust and decreases the estimated dust heating of the lower troposphere. Dust transported from Asia shows slightly higher absorption probably due to the presence of black carbon from populated regions. Large-scale application of this method to satellite data from the Earth Observing System can reduce significantly the uncertainty in the dust radiative effects.

  4. NF3: UV Absorption Spectrum Temperature Dependence and the Atmospheric and Climate Forcing Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadimitriou, Vassileios C.; McGillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) is an atmospherically persistent greenhouse gas that is primarily removed by UV photolysis and reaction with O((sup 1)D) atoms. In this work, the NF3 gas-phase UV absorption spectrum, sigma(delta,T), was measured at 16 wavelengths between 184.95 and 250 nm at temperatures between 212 and 296 K. A significant spectrum temperature dependence was observed in the wavelength region most relevant to atmospheric photolysis (200-220 nm) with a decrease in sigma(210 nm,T) of approximately 45 percent between 296 and 212 K. Atmospheric photolysis rates and global annually averaged lifetimes of NF3 were calculated using the Goddard Space Flight Center 2-D model and the sigma(delta,T) parameterization developed in this work. Including the UV absorption spectrum temperature dependence increased the stratospheric photolysis lifetime from 610 to 762 years and the total global lifetime from 484 to 585 years; the NF3 global warming potentials on the 20-, 100-, and 500-year time horizons increased less than 0.3, 1.1, and 6.5 percent to 13,300, 17,700, and 19,700, respectively.

  5. Detector absorptivity measuring method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheets, R. E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the absorptivity of a radiation detector by making the detector an integral part of a cavity radiometer are described. By substituting the detector for the surface of the cavity upon which the radiation first impinges a comparison is made between the quantity of radiation incident upon the detector and the quantity reflected from the detector. The difference between the two is a measurement of the amount of radiation absorbed by the detector.

  6. The Mean Metal-line Absorption Spectrum of Damped Ly α Systems in BOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Mas-Ribas, Lluís; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Pérez-Ràfols, Ignasi

    We study the mean absorption spectrum of the Damped Ly α (DLA) population at z ∼ 2.6 by stacking normalized, rest-frame-shifted spectra of ∼27,000 DLA systems from the DR12 of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)/SDSS-III. We measure the equivalent widths of 50 individual metal absorption lines in five intervals of DLA hydrogen column density, five intervals of DLA redshift, and overall mean equivalent widths for an additional 13 absorption features from groups of strongly blended lines. The mean equivalent width of low-ionization lines increases with N {sub H} {sub i}, whereas for high-ionization lines the increase is much weaker.more » The mean metal line equivalent widths decrease by a factor ∼1.1–1.5 from z ∼ 2.1 to z ∼ 3.5, with small or no differences between low- and high-ionization species. We develop a theoretical model, inspired by the presence of multiple absorption components observed in high-resolution spectra, to infer mean metal column densities from the equivalent widths of partially saturated metal lines. We apply this model to 14 low-ionization species and to Al iii, S iii, Si iii, C iv, Si iv, N v, and O vi. We use an approximate derivation for separating the equivalent width contributions of several lines to blended absorption features, and infer mean equivalent widths and column densities from lines of the additional species N i, Zn ii, C ii*, Fe iii, and S iv. Several of these mean column densities of metal lines in DLAs are obtained for the first time; their values generally agree with measurements of individual DLAs from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra when they are available.« less

  7. Computational study of the absorption spectrum of defected ZnS nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michos, F. I.; Sigalas, M. M.

    2018-04-01

    Energy levels and absorption spectra of defected ZnS nanoparticles (NPs) were calculated with Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time Dependent DFT. Several types of defects were examined such as vacancies and substitutions. NPs with S vacancies were found to have their absorption spectra moved to lower energies well inside the visible spectrum with significantly high oscillator strength. Also, NPs with substitution of S atoms with Cl, Br, or I showed significant absorption. In general, this type of defect moves the absorption spectra in lower energies, thus bringing the absorption edge into the visible spectrum, while the unperturbed NPs have absorption edges in the UV region. In addition, ZnS NPs are made from more abundant and less toxic elements than the more commonly used CdSe NPs. For that reason, they may find significant applications in solar cells and other photonic applications, as well as in biosensing applications as biomarkers.

  8. Electronic absorption spectrum of copper-doped magnesium potassium phosphate hexahydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, S. N.; Sivaprasad, P.; Reddy, Y. P.; Rao, P. S.

    1992-04-01

    The optical absorption and EPR spectra of magnesium potassium phosphate hexahydrate (MPPH) doped with copper ions are recorded both at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. The spectrum is characteristic of Cu2+ in tetragonal symmetry. The spin-Hamiltonian parameters and molecular orbital coefficients are evaluated. A correlation between EPR and optical absorption studies is drawn.

  9. The integrated radio continuum spectrum of M33 - Evidence for free-free absorption by cool ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, F. P.; Mahoney, M. J.; Howarth, N.

    1992-01-01

    We present measurements of the integrated radio continuum flux density of M33 at frequencies between 22 and 610 MHz and discuss the radio continuum spectrum of M33 between 22 MHz and 10 GHz. This spectrum has a turnover between 500 and 900 MHz, depending on the steepness of the high frequency radio spectrum of M33. Below 500 MHz the spectrum is relatively flat. We discuss possible mechanisms to explain this spectral shape and consider efficient free-free absorption of nonthermal emission by a cool (not greater than 1000 K) ionized gas to be a very likely possibility. The surface filling factor of both the nonthermal and the thermal material appears to be small (of order 0.001), which could be explained by magnetic field/density fluctuations in the M 33 interstellar medium. We briefly speculate on the possible presence of a nuclear radio source with a steep spectrum.

  10. Using Kinect to Measure Wave Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, J.; Loose, B.; Lovely, A.

    2012-12-01

    Gas exchange at the air-sea interface is enhanced by aqueous turbulence generated by capillary-gravity waves, affecting the absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide by the ocean. The mean squared wave slope of these waves correlates strongly with the gas transfer velocity. To measure the energy in capillary-gravity waves, this project aims to use the Microsoft Xbox Kinect to measure the short period wave spectrum. Kinect is an input device for the Xbox 360 with an infrared laser and camera that can be used to map objects at high frequency and spatial resolution, similar to a LiDAR sensor. For air-sea gas exchange, we are interested in the short period gravity waves with a wavenumber of 40 to 100 radians per meter. We have successfully recorded data from Kinect at a sample rate of 30 Hz with 640x480 pixel resolution, consistent with the manufacturer specifications for its scanning capabilities. At 0.5 m distance from the surface, this yields a nominal resolution of approximately 0.7 mm with a theoretical vertical precision of 0.24 mm and a practical 1 σ noise level of 0.91 mm. We have found that Kinect has some limitations in its ability to detect the air-water interface. Clean water proved to be a weaker reflector for the Kinect IR source, whereas a relatively strong signal can be received for liquids with a high concentration of suspended solids. Colloids such as milk and Ca(OH)2 in water proved more suitable media from which height and wave spectra were detectable. Moreover, we will show results from monochromatic as well as wind-wave laboratory studies. With the wave field measurements from Kinect, gas transfer velocities at the air-sea interface can be determined.

  11. [Study of cholesterol concentration based on serum UV-visible absorption spectrum].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei-Hua; Zhao, Zhi-Min; Guo, Xin; Chen, Hui

    2009-04-01

    In the present paper, UV-visible absorption spectrum and neural network theory were used for the analysis of cholesterol concentration. Experimental investigation shows that the absorption spectrum has the following characteristics in the wave band of 350-600 nm: (1) There is a stronger absorption peak at 416 nm for the test sample with different cholesterol concentration; (2) There is a shoulder peak between 450 and 500 nm, whose central wavelength is 460 nm; (3) There is a weaker peak at 578 nm; (4) Absorption spectrums shape of different cholesterol concentration is different obviously. The absorption spectrum of serum is the synthesis result of cholesterol and other components (such as sugar), and the information is contained at each wavelength. There is no significant correlation between absorbance and cholesterol content at 416 nm, showing a random relation, so whether cholesterol content is abnormal is not determined by the absorbance peak at 416 nm. Based on the evident correlation between serum absorption spectrum and cholesterol concentration in the wave band of 455-475 nm, a neural network model was built to predict the cholesterol concentration. The correlation coefficient between predicted cholesterol content output A and objectives T reaches 0.968, which can be regarded as better prediction, and it provides a spectra test method of cholesterol concentration.

  12. Microwave measurements of the absolute values of absorption by water vapour in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Hogg, D C; Guiraud, F O

    1979-05-31

    MEASUREMENT of the absolute value of absorption by water vapour at microwave frequencies is difficult because the effect is so small. Far in the wings of the absorption lines, in the so-called 'windows' of the spectrum, it is especially difficult to achieve high accuracy in the free atmosphere. But it is in these windows that the behaviour of the absorption is important from both applied and scientific points of view. Satellite communications, remote sensing of the atmosphere, and radioastronomy, are all influenced by this behaviour. Measurements on an Earth-space path are reported here; the results indicate a nonlinear relationship between absorption and water-vapour content.

  13. Geant4 simulations of the absorption of photons in CsI and NaI produced by electrons with energies up to 4 MeV and their application to precision measurements of the β-energy spectrum with a calorimetric technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huyan, X.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Voytas, P.; Chandavar, S.; Hughes, M.; Minamisono, K.; Paulauskas, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    The yield of photons produced by electrons slowing down in CsI and NaI was studied with four electromagnetic physics constructors included in the Geant4 toolkit. The subsequent absorption of photons in detector geometries used for measurements of the β spectrum shape was also studied with a focus on the determination of the absorption fraction. For electrons with energies in the range 0.5-4 MeV, the relative photon yields determined with the four Geant4 constructors differ at the level of 10-2 in amplitude and the relative absorption fractions differ at the level of 10-4 in amplitude. The differences among constructors enabled the estimation of the sensitivity to Geant4 simulations for the measurement of the β energy spectrum shape in 6He decay using a calorimetric technique with ions implanted in the active volume of detectors. The size of the effect associated with photons escaping the detectors was quantified in terms of a slope which, on average, is respectively - 5 . 4 %/MeV and - 4 . 8 %/MeV for the CsI and NaI geometries. The corresponding relative uncertainties as determined from the spread of results obtained with the four Geant4 constructors are 0.0067 and 0.0058.

  14. The effect of Cd substitution doping on the bandgap and absorption spectrum of ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qingyu; Li, Yong; Qu, Lingfeng; Zhao, Chunwang

    2016-08-01

    Many research papers have reported that in the ultraviolet area of 290-360 nm wavelength range, blueshift and redshift in the absorption spectrum occurred in ZnO with Cd doping; however, there is no reasonable theoretical explanation to this so far. To solve this problem, this study investigates the differences of blueshift and redshift in doping system by adopting plane-wave ultrasoft pseudopotential technology based on the density functional theory and applying LDA + U method to calculate band structures, density of states and absorption spectrum distribution of the models, which is on the basis of model geometry optimization. By increasing the Cd doping concentration, the following results are obtained: increased volume of the mixed system, raised total energy, a decrease in stability, narrowed bandgaps and a significant redshift in the absorption spectrum in the ultraviolet or visible light area.

  15. On the nature of solvatochromic effect: The riboflavin absorption spectrum as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daidone, Isabella; Amadei, Andrea; Aschi, Massimiliano; Zanetti-Polzi, Laura

    2018-03-01

    We present here the calculation of the absorption spectrum of riboflavin in acetonitrile and dimethyl sulfoxide using a hybrid quantum/classical approach, namely the perturbed matrix method, based on quantum mechanical calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated spectra are compared to the absorption spectrum of riboflavin previously calculated in water and to the experimental spectra obtained in all three solvents. The experimentally observed variations in the absorption spectra upon change of the solvent environment are well reproduced by the calculated spectra. In addition, the nature of the excited states of riboflavin interacting with different solvents is investigated, showing that environment effects determine a recombination of the gas-phase electronic states and that such a recombination is strongly affected by the polarity of the solvent inducing significant changes in the absorption spectra.

  16. Complex Resonance Absorption Structure in the X-Ray Spectrum of IRAS 13349+2438

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sako, M.; Kahn, S. M.; Behar, E.; Kaastra, J. S.; Brinkman, A. C.; Boller, Th.; Puchnarewicz, E. M.; Starling, R.; Liedahl, D. A.; Clavel, J.

    2000-01-01

    The luminous infrared-loud quasar IRAS 13349+2438 was observed with the XMM - Newton Observatory as part of the Performance Verification program. The spectrum obtained by the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) exhibits broad (FWHM - 1400 km/s) absorption lines from highly ionized elements including hydrogen- and helium-like carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon, and several iron L - shell ions (Fe XVII - XX). Also shown in the spectrum is the first astrophysical detection of a broad absorption feature around lambda = 16 - 17 A identified as an unresolved transition array (UTA) of 2p - 3d inner-shell absorption by iron M-shell ions in a much cooler medium; a feature that might be misidentified as an O VII edge when observed with moderate resolution spectrometers. No absorption edges are clearly detected in the spectrum. We demonstrate that the RGS spectrum of IRAS 13349+2438 exhibits absorption lines from two distinct regions, one of which is tentatively associated with the medium that produces the optical/UV reddening.

  17. Atmospheric Measurements by Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Since the last decade, atmospheric environmental monitoring has benefited from the development of novel spectroscopic measurement techniques owing to the significant breakthroughs in photonic technology from the UV to the infrared spectral domain [1]. In this presentation, we will overview our recent development and applications of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy techniques for in situ optical monitoring of chemically reactive atmospheric species (such as HONO, NO3, NO2, N2O5) in intensive campaigns [2] and/or in smog chamber studies [3]. These field deployments demonstrated that modern photonic technologies (newly emergent light sources combined with high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques) can provide a useful tool to improve our understanding of tropospheric chemical processes which affect climate, air quality, and the spread of pollution. Experimental detail and preliminary results will be presented. Acknowledgements. The financial support from the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under the NexCILAS (ANR-11-NS09-0002) and the CaPPA (ANR-10-LABX-005) contracts is acknowledged. References [1] X. Cui, C. Lengignon, T. Wu, W. Zhao, G. Wysocki, E. Fertein, C. Coeur, A. Cassez,L. Croisé, W. Chen, et al., "Photonic Sensing of the Atmosphere by absorption spectroscopy", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 113 (2012) 1300-1316 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, "Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer for measurements of atmospheric HONO and NO2 in Hong Kong", Atmos. Environ. 95 (2014) 544-551 [3] T. Wu, C. Coeur-Tourneur, G. Dhont,A. Cassez, E. Fertein, X. He, W. Chen,"Application of IBBCEAS to kinetic study of NO3 radical formation from O3 + NO2 reaction in an atmospheric simulation chamber", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 133 (2014)199-205

  18. Anab InitioStudy of the NH2+Absorption Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmann, Gerald; Bunker, P. R.; Jensen, Per; Kraemer, W. P.

    1997-12-01

    In a previous publication (1997. P. Jensen,J. Mol. Spectrosc.181,207-214), rotation-vibration energy levels for the electronic ground stateX˜3B1of the amidogen ion, NH2+, were predicted using the MORBID Hamiltonian and computer program with anab initiopotential energy surface. In the present paper we calculate a newab initiopotential energy surface for theX˜3B1state, and we calculateab initiothe potential energy surfaces of theã1A1andb˜1B1excited singlet electronic states (which become degenerate as a1Δ state at linearity). We use the multireference configuration interaction (MR-CI) level of theory with molecular orbital bases that are optimized separately for each state by complete-active-space SCF (CASSCF) calculations. For theX˜state we use the MORBID Hamiltonian and computer program to obtain the rotation-vibration energies. For theãandb˜excited singlet electronic states we calculate the rovibronic energy levels using the RENNER Hamiltonian and computer program. We also calculateab initiothe dipole moment surfaces for theX˜,ã, andb˜electronic states, and the out-of-plane transition moment surface for theb˜←ãelectronic transition. We use this information to simulate absorption spectra withinX˜3B1andã1A1state and of theb˜1B1← ã1A1transition in order to aid in the search for them.

  19. UMTS signal measurements with digital spectrum analysers.

    PubMed

    Licitra, G; Palazzuoli, D; Ricci, A S; Silvi, A M

    2004-01-01

    The launch of the Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS), the most recent mobile telecommunications standard has imposed the requirement of updating measurement instrumentation and methodologies. In order to define the most reliable measurement procedure, which is aimed at assessing the exposure to electromagnetic fields, modern spectrum analysers' features for correct signal characterisation has been reviewed.

  20. Multi-wavelength differential absorption measurements of chemical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David M.

    The probability of accurate detection and quantification of airborne species is enhanced when several optical wavelengths are used to measure the differential absorption of molecular spectral features. Characterization of minor atmospheric constituents, biological hazards, and chemical plumes containing multiple species is difficult when using current approaches because of weak signatures and the use of a limited number of wavelengths used for identification. Current broadband systems such as Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) have either limitations for long-range propagation, or require transmitter power levels that are unsafe for operation in urban environments. Passive hyperspectral imaging systems that utilize absorption of solar scatter at visible and infrared wavelengths, or use absorption of background thermal emission, have been employed routinely for detection of airborne chemical species. Passive approaches have operational limitations at various ranges, or under adverse atmospheric conditions because the source intensity and spectrum is often an unknown variable. The work presented here describes a measurement approach that uses a known source of a low transmitted power level for an active system, while retaining the benefits of broadband and extremely long-path absorption operations. An optimized passive imaging system also is described that operates in the 3 to 4 mum window of the mid-infrared. Such active and passive instruments can be configured to optimize the detection of several hydrocarbon gases, as well as many other species of interest. Measurements have provided the incentive to develop algorithms for the calculations of atmospheric species concentrations using multiple wavelengths. These algorithms are used to prepare simulations and make comparisons with experimental results from absorption data of a supercontinuum laser source. The MODTRAN model is used in preparing the simulations, and also in developing additional

  1. Ab initio calculation of the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Martiniano, Hugo F. M. C.; Galamba, Nuno; Cabral, Benedito J. Costa, E-mail: ben@cii.fc.ul.pt

    2014-04-28

    The electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water was investigated by coupling a one-body energy decomposition scheme to configurations generated by classical and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD). A Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian formalism was adopted and the excitation energies in the liquid phase were calculated with the equation of motion coupled cluster with single and double excitations method. Molecular dynamics configurations were generated by different approaches. Classical MD were carried out with the TIP4P-Ew and AMOEBA force fields. The BLYP and BLYP-D3 exchange-correlation functionals were used in BOMD. Theoretical and experimental results for the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water are inmore » good agreement. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the structure of liquid water predicted by the different models and the electronic absorption spectrum. The theoretical gas to liquid phase blue-shift of the peak positions of the electronic absorption spectrum is in good agreement with experiment. The overall shift is determined by a competition between the O–H stretching of the water monomer in liquid water that leads to a red-shift and polarization effects that induce a blue-shift. The results illustrate the importance of coupling many-body energy decomposition schemes to molecular dynamics configurations to carry out ab initio calculations of the electronic properties in liquid phase.« less

  2. Ab initio calculation of the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiniano, Hugo F. M. C.; Galamba, Nuno; Cabral, Benedito J. Costa

    2014-04-01

    The electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water was investigated by coupling a one-body energy decomposition scheme to configurations generated by classical and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD). A Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian formalism was adopted and the excitation energies in the liquid phase were calculated with the equation of motion coupled cluster with single and double excitations method. Molecular dynamics configurations were generated by different approaches. Classical MD were carried out with the TIP4P-Ew and AMOEBA force fields. The BLYP and BLYP-D3 exchange-correlation functionals were used in BOMD. Theoretical and experimental results for the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water are in good agreement. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the structure of liquid water predicted by the different models and the electronic absorption spectrum. The theoretical gas to liquid phase blue-shift of the peak positions of the electronic absorption spectrum is in good agreement with experiment. The overall shift is determined by a competition between the O-H stretching of the water monomer in liquid water that leads to a red-shift and polarization effects that induce a blue-shift. The results illustrate the importance of coupling many-body energy decomposition schemes to molecular dynamics configurations to carry out ab initio calculations of the electronic properties in liquid phase.

  3. Absorption spectrum of a two-level system subjected to a periodic pulse sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Fotso, H. F.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    We investigate how the quantum control of a two-level system (TLS) coupled to photons can modify and tune the TLS’s photon absorption spectrum. Tuning and controlling the emission and the absorption is of much interest e.g. for the development of efficient interfaces between stationary and flying qubits in modern architectures for quantum computation and quantum communication. We consider the periodic pulse control, where the TLS is subjected to a periodic sequence of the near-resonant Rabi driving pulses, each pulse implementing a 180° rotation. For small inter-pulse delays, the absorption spectrum features a pronounced peak of stimulated emission at the pulsemore » frequency, as well as equidistant satellite peaks with smaller spectral weights. As long as the detuning between the carrier frequency of the driving and the TLS transition frequency remains moderate, this spectral shape shows little change. Therefore, the quantum control allows shifting the absorption peak to a desired position, and locks the absorption peak to the carrier frequency of the driving pulses. Detailed description of the spectrum, and its evolution as a function time, the inter-pulse spacing and the detuning, is presented.« less

  4. Absorption spectrum of a two-level system subjected to a periodic pulse sequence

    DOE PAGES

    Fotso, H. F.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate how the quantum control of a two-level system (TLS) coupled to photons can modify and tune the TLS’s photon absorption spectrum. Tuning and controlling the emission and the absorption is of much interest e.g. for the development of efficient interfaces between stationary and flying qubits in modern architectures for quantum computation and quantum communication. We consider the periodic pulse control, where the TLS is subjected to a periodic sequence of the near-resonant Rabi driving pulses, each pulse implementing a 180° rotation. For small inter-pulse delays, the absorption spectrum features a pronounced peak of stimulated emission at the pulsemore » frequency, as well as equidistant satellite peaks with smaller spectral weights. As long as the detuning between the carrier frequency of the driving and the TLS transition frequency remains moderate, this spectral shape shows little change. Therefore, the quantum control allows shifting the absorption peak to a desired position, and locks the absorption peak to the carrier frequency of the driving pulses. Detailed description of the spectrum, and its evolution as a function time, the inter-pulse spacing and the detuning, is presented.« less

  5. Research on filling process of fuel and oxidant during detonation based on absorption spectrum technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiao-Jing; Li, Ning; Weng, Chun-Sheng

    2014-12-01

    Research on detonation process is of great significance for the control optimization of pulse detonation engine. Based on absorption spectrum technology, the filling process of fresh fuel and oxidant during detonation is researched. As one of the most important products, H2O is selected as the target of detonation diagnosis. Fiber distributed detonation test system is designed to enable the detonation diagnosis under adverse conditions in detonation process. The test system is verified to be reliable. Laser signals at different working frequency (5Hz, 10Hz and 20Hz) are detected. Change of relative laser intensity in one detonation circle is analyzed. The duration of filling process is inferred from the change of laser intensity, which is about 100~110ms. The peak of absorption spectrum is used to present the concentration of H2O during the filling process of fresh fuel and oxidant. Absorption spectrum is calculated, and the change of absorption peak is analyzed. Duration of filling process calculated with absorption peak consisted with the result inferred from the change of relative laser intensity. The pulse detonation engine worked normally and obtained the maximum thrust at 10Hz under experiment conditions. The results are verified through H2O gas concentration monitoring during detonation.

  6. Quantifying creativity: can measures span the spectrum?

    PubMed

    Simonton, Dean Keith

    2012-03-01

    Because the cognitive neuroscientists have become increasingly interested in the phenomenon of creativity, the issue arises of how creativity is to be optimally measured. Unlike intelligence, which can be assessed across the full range of intellectual ability creativity measures tend to concentrate on different sections of the overall spectrum. After first defining creativity in terms of the three criteria of novelty, usefulness, and surprise, this article provides an overview of the available measures. Not only do these instruments vary according to whether they focus on the creative process, person, or product, but they differ regarding whether they tap into "little-c" versus "Big-C" creativity; only productivity and eminence measures reach into genius-level manifestations of the phenomenon. The article closes by discussing whether various alternative assessment techniques can be integrated into a single measure that quantifies creativity across the full spectrum.

  7. Quantifying creativity: can measures span the spectrum?

    PubMed Central

    Simonton, Dean Keith

    2012-01-01

    Because the cognitive neuroscientists have become increasingly interested in the phenomenon of creativity, the issue arises of how creativity is to be optimally measured. Unlike intelligence, which can be assessed across the full range of intellectual ability creativity measures tend to concentrate on different sections of the overall spectrum. After first defining creativity in terms of the three criteria of novelty, usefulness, and surprise, this article provides an overview of the available measures. Not only do these instruments vary according to whether they focus on the creative process, person, or product, but they differ regarding whether they tap into “little-c” versus “Big-C” creativity; only productivity and eminence measures reach into genius-level manifestations of the phenomenon. The article closes by discussing whether various alternative assessment techniques can be integrated into a single measure that quantifies creativity across the full spectrum. PMID:22577309

  8. Photoacoustic Monitoring of Absorption Spectrum During the Dehydration Process of pasilla Chili Pepper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendejas-Leal, Blanca Estela; Barrientos-Sotelo, Víctor Rodrigo; Cano-Casas, Rogelio; Alvarado-Noguez, Margarita Lizeth; Hernández-Rosas, Juan; Cruz-Orea, Alfredo

    2018-07-01

    In this work, the optical absorption spectrum of peppers was monitored by phase-resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy during a dehydration process based on hot-air drying, yielding simultaneous information about changes in the exocarp and mesocarp. Our results show that between all of the dehydration processes of green Capsicum annuum L. variety pasilla peppers, only very small changes occur in the different phase angles, which has been correlated with the small changes in the exocarp thickness. The phase-resolved spectra of mesocarp show more clearly the evolution of the carotenoid compounds with respect to the optical absorption spectrum without phase resolving, due to the last spectrum having a band broadening in that region with more signals convolved. We have shown that not only do the ripened chili peppers produce new carotenoid compounds, but also we are probing that the dehydration process, beginning with the green stage, preserves the nutrimental content, similar to changes that occur in the natural ripening process.

  9. The root economics spectrum: divergence of absorptive root strategies with root diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D.; Wang, J.; Kardol, P.; Wu, H.; Zeng, H.; Deng, X.; Deng, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Plant roots usually vary along a dominant ecological axis, the root economics spectrum (RES), depicting a tradeoff between resource acquisition and conservation. For absorptive roots, which are mainly responsible for resource acquisition, we hypothesized that root strategies as predicted from the RES shift with increasing root diameter. To test this hypothesis, we used seven contrasting plant species for which we separated absorptive roots into two categories: thin roots (< 247 μm diameter) and thick roots. For each category, we analyzed a~range of root traits closely related to resource acquisition and conservation, including root tissue density, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fractions as well as root anatomical traits. The results showed that trait relationships for thin absorptive roots followed the expectations from the RES while no clear trait relationships were found in support of the RES for thick absorptive roots. Our results suggest divergence of absorptive root strategies in relation to root diameter, which runs against a single economics spectrum for absorptive roots.

  10. [Absorption spectrum of Quasi-continuous laser modulation demodulation method].

    PubMed

    Shao, Xin; Liu, Fu-Gui; Du, Zhen-Hui; Wang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    A software phase-locked amplifier demodulation method is proposed in order to demodulate the second harmonic (2f) signal of quasi-continuous laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) properly, based on the analysis of its signal characteristics. By judging the effectiveness of the measurement data, filter, phase-sensitive detection, digital filtering and other processing, the method can achieve the sensitive detection of quasi-continuous signal The method was verified by using carbon dioxide detection experiments. The WMS-2f signal obtained by the software phase-locked amplifier and the high-performance phase-locked amplifier (SR844) were compared simultaneously. The results show that the Allan variance of WMS-2f signal demodulated by the software phase-locked amplifier is one order of magnitude smaller than that demodulated by SR844, corresponding two order of magnitude lower of detection limit. And it is able to solve the unlocked problem caused by the small duty cycle of quasi-continuous modulation signal, with a small signal waveform distortion.

  11. Tunable ultranarrow spectrum selective absorption in a graphene monolayer at terahertz frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Complete absorption in a graphene monolayer at terahertz frequency through the critical coupling effect is investigated. It is achieved by sandwiching the graphene monolayer between a dielectric grating and a Bragg grating. The designed graphene absorber exhibits near-unity absorption at resonance but with an ultranarrow spectrum and antenna-like response, which is attributed to the combined effects of guided mode resonance with dielectric grating and the photonic band gap with Bragg grating. In addition to numerical simulation, the electric field distributions are also illustrated to provide a physical understanding of the perfect absorption effect. Furthermore, the absorption performance can be tuned by only changing the Fermi level of graphene, which is beneficial for real application. It is believed that this study may be useful for designing next-generation graphene-based optoelectronic devices.

  12. The widetilde{A}←widetilde{X} ABSORPTION SPECTRUM OF 2-NITROOXYBUTYL PEROXY RADICAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddingsaas, Nathan; Takematsu, Kana; Okumura, Mitchio

    2009-06-01

    The nitrate radical is an important atmospheric oxidant in the nighttime sky. Nitrate radicals react by addition to alkenes, and in the presence of oxygen form nitrooxyalkyl peroxy radicals. The peroxy radical formed from the reaction of 2-butene, nitrate radical, and oxygen was detected by cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) via its widetilde{A}←widetilde{X} electronic absorption spectrum. The widetilde{A}←widetilde{X} electronic transition is a bound-bound transition with enough structure to distinguish between different peroxy radicals as well as different conformers of the same peroxy radical. Two conformers of the nitrooxybutyl peroxy radical have been observed; the absorption features are red shifted from the same absorption features of sec-butyl peroxy radical. Calculations on the structure of nitrooxyalkyl peroxy radicals and general trends of the position of the widetilde{A}←widetilde{X} absorption transitions have also been performed and compared to those of unsubstituted peroxy radicals.

  13. Ab Initio Modeling of the Electronic Absorption Spectrum of Previtamin D in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tianyang

    To study the solvent effects of water on the previtamin D absorption spectrum, we use the quantum mechanics (QM)/molecular mechanics (MM) method combined with replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD). The QM method is applied for the previtamin D molecule and the MM method is used for the water molecules. To enhance conformational sampling of the flexible previtamin D molecule we apply REMD. Based on the REMD structures, we calculate the macroscopic ensemble of the absorption spectrum in solution by time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Comparison between the calculated spectrum in the gas phase and in the solution reveals minor influences of the solvent on the absorption spectrum. In the conventional molecule dynamics simulation, the previtamin D molecule can be trapped by local minimum and cannot overcome energetics barriers when it is calculated at the room temperature. In addition, the higher temperature calculation for the molecule in REMD allows to overcome energetics barriers and to change the structure to other rotational isomers, then switch to the lower temperature and gives a more complete result in the configuration space for the lower temperature.

  14. Tunable Spectrum Selectivity for Multiphoton Absorption with Enhanced Visible Light Trapping in ZnO Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kok Hong; Lim, Fang Sheng; Toh, Alfred Zhen Yang; Zheng, Xia-Xi; Dee, Chang Fu; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop; Chai, Siang-Piao; Chang, Wei Sea

    2018-04-17

    Observation of visible light trapping in zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) correlated to the optical and photoelectrochemical properties is reported. In this study, ZnO NR diameter and c-axis length respond primarily at two different regions, UV and visible light, respectively. ZnO NR diameter exhibits UV absorption where large ZnO NR diameter area increases light absorption ability leading to high efficient electron-hole pair separation. On the other hand, ZnO NR c-axis length has a dominant effect in visible light resulting from a multiphoton absorption mechanism due to light reflection and trapping behavior in the free space between adjacent ZnO NRs. Furthermore, oxygen vacancies and defects in ZnO NRs are associated with the broad visible emission band of different energy levels also highlighting the possibility of the multiphoton absorption mechanism. It is demonstrated that the minimum average of ZnO NR c-axis length must satisfy the linear regression model of Z p,min = 6.31d to initiate the multiphoton absorption mechanism under visible light. This work indicates the broadening of absorption spectrum from UV to visible light region by incorporating a controllable diameter and c-axis length on vertically aligned ZnO NRs, which is important in optimizing the design and functionality of electronic devices based on light absorption mechanism. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Photothermal measurement of optical surface absorption using strain transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, D. H.; Trusty, G. L.

    1981-09-01

    We discuss the measurement of small optical surface absorption coefficients. A demonstration experiment was performed using a metallurgical strain gauge to measure 488 nm absorption on the surface of a glass plate. A strain of 10 to the minus 8th power resulted from absorption of 0.3 watts. The results are interpreted and the sensitivity of a proposed fiber optic strain gauge is discussed.

  16. Single-shot measurement of nonlinear absorption and nonlinear refraction.

    PubMed

    Jayabalan, J; Singh, Asha; Oak, Shrikant M

    2006-06-01

    A single-shot method for measurement of nonlinear optical absorption and refraction is described and analyzed. A spatial intensity variation of an elliptical Gaussian beam in conjugation with an array detector is the key element of this method. The advantages of this single-shot technique were demonstrated by measuring the two-photon absorption and free-carrier absorption in GaAs as well as the nonlinear refractive index of CS2 using a modified optical Kerr setup.

  17. Absorption line profiles in a companion spectrum of a mass losing cool supergiant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, Liliya L.; Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1990-01-01

    Cool star winds can best be observed in resonance absorption lines seen in the spectrum of a hot companion, due to the wind passing in front of the blue star. We calculated absorption line profiles that would be seen in the ultraviolet part of the blue companion spectrum. Line profiles are derived for different radial dependences of the cool star wind and for different orbital phases of the binary. Bowen and Wilson find theoretically that stellar pulsations drive mass loss. We therefore apply our calculations to the Cepheid binary S Muscae which has a B5V companion. We find an upper limit for the Cepheid mass loss of M less than or equal to 7 x 10(exp -10) solar mass per year provided that the stellar wind of the companion does not influence the Cepheid wind at large distances.

  18. Integration of Semiconducting Sulfides for Full-Spectrum Solar Energy Absorption and Efficient Charge Separation.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Tao-Tao; Liu, Yan; Li, Yi; Zhao, Yuan; Wu, Liang; Jiang, Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-05-23

    The full harvest of solar energy by semiconductors requires a material that simultaneously absorbs across the whole solar spectrum and collects photogenerated electrons and holes separately. The stepwise integration of three semiconducting sulfides, namely ZnS, CdS, and Cu2-x S, into a single nanocrystal, led to a unique ternary multi-node sheath ZnS-CdS-Cu2-x S heteronanorod for full-spectrum solar energy absorption. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the nonstoichiometric copper sulfide nanostructures enables effective NIR absorption. More significantly, the construction of pn heterojunctions between Cu2-x S and CdS leads to staggered gaps, as confirmed by first-principles simulations. This band alignment causes effective electron-hole separation in the ternary system and hence enables efficient solar energy conversion. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. RETRACTED: Theoretical study of electronic properties and isotope effects in the UV absorption spectrum of disulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarka, Karolis; Danielache, Sebastian O.; Kondorskiy, Alexey; Nanbu, Shinkoh

    2017-05-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy) This article has been retracted at the request of the Authors because of a large amount of errors caused by incorrect interpretation of the potential energy curve boundaries by the data processing functions in their close-coupling algorithm, producing incorrect wavefunctions for the continuum region in the absorption spectrum. The spectrum calculated using the incorrect wavefunctions introduced periodic fluctuation in the absorption cross-section seen in the original article, which results in erroneous isotopic fractionation values. The updated spectra calculated after fixing the issues features a smooth continuum band, removing all false artifacts from isotopic effect analysis, producing significantly different results from the ones in this original article. The authors will submit the corrected data in a new article.

  20. The Surprising Absence of Absorption in the Far-ultraviolet Spectrum of Mrk 231

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veilleux, S.; Trippe, M.; Hamann, F.; Rupke, D. S. N.; Tripp, T. M.; Netzer, H.; Lutz, D.; Sembach, K. R.; Krug, H.; Teng, Stacy H.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Mrk 231, the nearest (z = 0.0422) quasar, hosts both a galactic-scale wind and a nuclear-scale iron low-ionization broad absorption line (FeLoBAL) outflow. We recently obtained a far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectrum of this object covering approx. 1150-1470A with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. This spectrum is highly peculiar, highlighted by the presence of faint (< or approx.2% of predictions based on H(alpha)), broad (> or approx.10,000 km/s at the base), and highly blueshifted (centroid at approx. 3500 km/s) Ly(aplpha) emission. The FUV continuum emission is slightly declining at shorter wavelengths (consistent with F(sub lambda) Alpha Lambda(sup 1.7)) and does not show the presence of any obvious photospheric or wind stellar features. Surprisingly, the FUV spectrum also does not show any unambiguous broad absorption features. It thus appears to be dominated by the AGN, rather than hot stars, and virtually unfiltered by the dusty FeLoBAL screen. The observed Ly(alpha) emission is best explained if it is produced in the outflowing BAL cloud system, while the Balmer lines arise primarily from the standard broad emission line region seen through the dusty (Av approx. 7 mag) broad absorption line region. Two possible geometric models are discussed in the context of these new results.

  1. A resonant absorption line in the ASCA spectrum of NGC 985?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicastro, F.; Fiore, F.; Brandt, N.; Reynolds, C. S.

    1999-01-01

    We present timing and spectral analyses of the ASCA observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 985. The 0.6-10keV spectrum of this source is complex: large residuals are evident below 1keV when fitting the spectrum with a power-law model. Fitting a warm absorber model to the 0.6-2.5keV spectrum gives α=1.12+/-0.04, LogNWAH=21.97+/-0.08 and LogU=0.06+/-0.09, but the residuals continue to show a deficit of counts between 0.9 and 1keV. Adding an absorption line improves the fit, and the energy of the line is consistent with that of Kα NeIX-X resonant absorption lines. Hence, we confirm the presence of an ionized absorber along the line of sight to this source and interpret the further 1keV spectral feature as the first detection of a strong resonant absorption line associated with this system. The extrapolation of this model above 2.5keV produces large positive residuals above 3-4keV. Fitting the data with a broken power law plus warm absorber model gives an acceptable χ2 and Δα~0.5. A narrow iron line at 6.4keV (quasar frame) of equivalent width 138+64-110eV is also present in the ASCA data.

  2. H i Absorption in the Steep-Spectrum Superluminal Quasar 3C 216.

    PubMed

    Pihlström; Vermeulen; Taylor; Conway

    1999-11-01

    The search for H i absorption in strong compact steep-spectrum sources is a natural way to probe the neutral gas contents in young radio sources. In turn, this may provide information about the evolution of powerful radio sources. The recently improved capabilities of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope have made it possible to detect a 0.31% (19 mJy) deep neutral atomic hydrogen absorption line associated with the steep-spectrum superluminal quasar 3C 216. The redshift (z=0.67) of the source shifts the frequency of the 21 cm line down to the ultra-high-frequency (UHF) band (850 MHz). The exact location of the H i-absorbing gas remains to be determined by spectral line VLBI observations at 850 MHz. We cannot exclude that the gas might be extended on galactic scales, but we think it is more likely to be located in the central kiloparsec. Constraints from the lack of X-ray absorption probably rule out obscuration of the core region, and we argue that the most plausible site for the H i absorption is in the jet-cloud interaction observed in this source.

  3. Sodium Absorption from the Exoplanetary Atmosphere of HD 189733b Detected in the Optical Transmission Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, Seth; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; Koesterke, Lars

    2008-01-01

    We present the first ground-based detection of sodium absorption in the transmission spectrum of an extrasolar planet. Absorption due to the atmosphere of the extrasolar planet HD 189733b is detected in both lines of the Na I doublet. High spectral resolution observations were taken of 11 transits with the High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS) on the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). The Na I absorption in the transmission spectrum due to HD 189733b is (- 67.2 +/- 20.7) × 10-5 deeper in the "narrow" spectral band that encompasses both lines relative to adjacent bands. The 1 σ error includes both random and systematic errors, and the detection is >3 σ. This amount of relative absorption in Na I for HD 189733b is ~3 times larger than that detected for HD 209458b by Charbonneau et al. (2002) and indicates that these two hot Jupiters may have significantly different atmospheric properties. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  4. Strong water absorption in the dayside emission spectrum of the planet HD 189733b.

    PubMed

    Grillmair, Carl J; Burrows, Adam; Charbonneau, David; Armus, Lee; Stauffer, John; Meadows, Victoria; van Cleve, Jeffrey; von Braun, Kaspar; Levine, Deborah

    2008-12-11

    Recent observations of the extrasolar planet HD 189733b did not reveal the presence of water in the emission spectrum of the planet. Yet models of such 'hot-Jupiter' planets predict an abundance of atmospheric water vapour. Validating and constraining these models is crucial to understanding the physics and chemistry of planetary atmospheres in extreme environments. Indications of the presence of water in the atmosphere of HD 189733b have recently been found in transmission spectra, where the planet's atmosphere selectively absorbs the light of the parent star, and in broadband photometry. Here we report the detection of strong water absorption in a high-signal-to-noise, mid-infrared emission spectrum of the planet itself. We find both a strong downturn in the flux ratio below 10 microm and discrete spectral features that are characteristic of strong absorption by water vapour. The differences between these and previous observations are significant and admit the possibility that predicted planetary-scale dynamical weather structures may alter the emission spectrum over time. Models that match the observed spectrum and the broadband photometry suggest that heat redistribution from the dayside to the nightside is weak. Reconciling this with the high nightside temperature will require a better understanding of atmospheric circulation or possible additional energy sources.

  5. Examination of the Measurement of Absorption Using the Reverberant Room Method for Highly Absorptive Acoustic Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; Chris Nottoli; Eric Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    The absorption coefficient for material specimens are needed to quantify the expected acoustic performance of that material in its actual usage and environment. The ASTM C423-09a standard, "Standard Test Method for Sound Absorption and Sound Absorption Coefficients by the Reverberant Room Method" is often used to measure the absorption coefficient of material test specimens. This method has its basics in the Sabine formula. Although widely used, the interpretation of these measurements are a topic of interest. For example, in certain cases the measured Sabine absorption coefficients are greater than 1.0 for highly absorptive materials. This is often attributed to the diffraction edge effect phenomenon. An investigative test program to measure the absorption properties of highly absorbent melamine foam has been performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratories. This paper will present and discuss the test results relating to the effect of the test materials' surface area, thickness and edge sealing conditions. A follow-on paper is envisioned that will present and discuss the results relating to the spacing between multiple piece specimens, and the mounting condition of the test specimen.

  6. Noninvasive hemoglobin measurement using dynamic spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xiaoqing; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2017-08-01

    Spectroscopy methods for noninvasive hemoglobin (Hgb) measurement are interfered by individual difference and particular weak signal. In order to address these problems, we have put forward a series of improvement methods based on dynamic spectrum (DS), including instrument design, spectrum extraction algorithm, and modeling approach. The instrument adopts light sources composed of eight laser diodes with the wavelength range from 600 nm to 1100 nm and records photoplethysmography signals at eight wavelengths synchronously. In order to simplify the optical design, we modulate the light sources with orthogonal square waves and design the corresponding demodulation algorithm, instead of adopting a beam-splitting system. A newly designed algorithm named difference accumulation has been proved to be effective in improving the accuracy of dynamic spectrum extraction. 220 subjects are involved in the clinical experiment. An extreme learning machine calibration model between the DS data and the Hgb levels is established. Correlation coefficient and root-mean-square error of prediction sets are 0.8645 and 8.48 g/l, respectively. The results indicate that the Hgb level can be derived by this approach noninvasively with acceptable precision and accuracy. It is expected to achieve a clinic application in the future.

  7. The temperature measurement research for high-speed flow based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Yue; Jin, Yi; Jiang, Hong-liang; Zhai, Chao

    2013-09-01

    Due to the particularity of the high-speed flow, in order to accurately obtain its' temperature, the measurement system should has some characteristics of not interfereing with the flow, non-contact measurement and high time resolution. The traditional measurement method cannot meet the above requirements, however the measurement method based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology can meet the requirements for high-speed flow temperature measurement. When the near-infared light of a specific frequency is through the media to be measured, it will be absorbed by the water vapor molecules and then the transmission light intensity is detected by the detector. The temperature of the water vapor which is also the high-speed flow temperature, can be accurately obtained by the Beer-Lambert law. This paper focused on the research of absorption spectrum method for high speed flow temperature measurement with the scope of 250K-500K. Firstly, spectral line selection method for low temperature measurement of high-speed flow is discussed. Selected absorption lines should be isolated and have a high peak absorption within the range of 250-500K, at the same time the interference of the other lines should be avoided, so that a high measurement accuracy can be obtained. According to the near-infrared absorption spectra characteristics of water vapor, four absorption lines at the near 1395 nm and 1409 nm are selected. Secondly, a system for the temperature measurement of the water vapor in the high-speed flow is established. Room temperature are measured through two methods, direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) ,the results show that this system can realize on-line measurement of the temperature and the measurement error is about 3%. Finally, the system will be used for temperature measurement of the high-speed flow in the shock tunnel, its feasibility of measurement is analyzed.

  8. Pavement sound absorption measurements in the U.S.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-08-19

    In the U.S., the topic of pavement sound absorption in regard to tire-pavement noise has shown increased interest and research over the last several years. Four types of pavement sound absorption measurements with various applications are discussed: ...

  9. Analysis of gaseous ammonia (NH3) absorption in the visible spectrum of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Patrick G. J.; Bowles, Neil; Braude, Ashwin S.; Garland, Ryan; Calcutt, Simon

    2018-03-01

    Observations of the visible/near-infrared reflectance spectrum of Jupiter have been made with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument in the spectral range 0.48-0.93 μm in support of the NASA/Juno mission. These spectra contain spectral signatures of gaseous ammonia (NH3), whose abundance above the cloud tops can be determined if we have reliable information on its absorption spectrum. While there are a number of sources of NH3 absorption data in this spectral range, they cover small sub-ranges, which do not necessarily overlap and have been determined from a variety of sources. There is thus considerable uncertainty regarding the consistency of these different sources when modelling the reflectance of the entire visible/near-IR range. In this paper we analyse the VLT/MUSE observations of Jupiter to determine which sources of ammonia absorption data are most reliable. We find that the band model coefficients of Bowles et al. (2008) provide, in general, the best combination of reliability and wavelength coverage over the MUSE range. These band data appear consistent with ExoMOL ammonia line data of Yurchenko et al. (2011), at wavelengths where they overlap, but these latter data do not cover the ammonia absorption bands at 0.79 and 0.765 μm, which are prominent in our MUSE observations. However, we find the band data of Bowles et al. (2008) are not reliable at wavelengths less than 0.758 μm. At shorter wavelengths we find the laboratory observations of Lutz and Owen (1980) provide a good indication of the position and shape of the ammonia absorptions near 0.552 μm and 0.648 μm, but their absorption strengths appear inconsistent with the band data of Bowles et al. (2008) at longer wavelengths. Finally, we find that the line data of the 0.648 μm absorption band of Giver et al. (1975) are not suitable for modelling these data as they account for only 17% of the band absorption and cannot be extended reliably to the cold

  10. Broad-spectrum enhanced absorption of graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic cells in metal-mirror microcavity.

    PubMed

    Jiang-Tao, Liu; Yun-Kai, Cao; Hong, Tong; Dai-Qiang, Wang; Zhen-Hua, Wu

    2018-04-06

    The optical absorption of graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic cells (GM-PVc) in wedge-shaped metal-mirror microcavities (w-MMCs) combined with a spectrum-splitting structure was studied. Results showed that the combination of spectrum-splitting structure and w-MMC can enable the light absorption of GM-PVcs to reach about 65% in the broad spectrum. The influence of processing errors on the absorption of GM-PVcs in w-MMCs was 3-14 times lower than that of GM-PVcs in wedge photonic crystal microcavities. The light absorption of GM-PVcs reached 60% in the broad spectrum, even with the processing errors. The proposed structure is easy to implement and may have potentially important applications in the development of ultra-thin and high-efficiency solar cells and optoelectronic devices.

  11. Broad-spectrum enhanced absorption of graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic cells in metal-mirror microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang-Tao, Liu; Yun-Kai, Cao; Hong, Tong; Dai-Qiang, Wang; Zhen-Hua, Wu

    2018-04-01

    The optical absorption of graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic cells (GM-PVc) in wedge-shaped metal-mirror microcavities (w-MMCs) combined with a spectrum-splitting structure was studied. Results showed that the combination of spectrum-splitting structure and w-MMC can enable the light absorption of GM-PVcs to reach about 65% in the broad spectrum. The influence of processing errors on the absorption of GM-PVcs in w-MMCs was 3-14 times lower than that of GM-PVcs in wedge photonic crystal microcavities. The light absorption of GM-PVcs reached 60% in the broad spectrum, even with the processing errors. The proposed structure is easy to implement and may have potentially important applications in the development of ultra-thin and high-efficiency solar cells and optoelectronic devices.

  12. Surprises from a Deep ASCA Spectrum of the Broad Absorption Line Quasar PHL 5200

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, Smita; Matt, G.; Green, P. J.; Elvis, M.; Singh, K. P.

    2002-01-01

    We present a deep (approx. 85 ks) ASCA observation of the prototype broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO) PHL 5200. This is the best X-ray spectrum of a BALQSO yet. We find the following: (1) The source is not intrinsically X-ray weak. (2) The line-of-sight absorption is very strong, with N(sub H) = 5 x 10(exp 23)/sq cm. (3) The absorber does not cover the source completely; the covering fraction is approx. 90%. This is consistent with the large optical polarization observed in this source, implying multiple lines of sight. The most surprising result of this observation is that (4) the spectrum of this BALQSO is not exactly similar to other radio-quiet quasars. The hard X-ray spectrum of PHL 5200 is steep, with the power-law spectral index alpha approx. 1.5. This is similar to the steepest hard X-ray slopes observed so far. At low redshifts, such steep slopes are observed in narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies, believed to be accreting at a high Eddington rate. This observation strengthens the analogy between BALQSOs and NLS1 galaxies and supports the hypothesis that BALQSOs represent an early evolutionary state of quasars. It is well accepted that the orientation to the line of sight determines the appearance of a quasar: age seems to play a significant role as well.

  13. Measurement of HCl absorption coefficients with a DF laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, C. H.; Allario, F.

    1977-01-01

    Absorption coefficients in the fundamental P-branch of HCl at several DF laser transitions from 2439.02/cm to 2862.87/cm have been measured experimentally. The 2-1 P(3) DF laser transition has been shown to overlap the P(6) HCl-37 absorption line within the halfwidth of an atmospherically broadened line. The absorption coefficient k was measured to be 5.64 plus or minus 0.28/(atm-cm) for a 0.27% mixture of HCl in N2 at a total pressure of 760 torr. A theoretical and experimental comparison of the pressure dependence of k showed that the 2-1 P(3) DF transition lies 1.32 plus or minus 0.15 GHz from the center of the P(6) HCl absorption line. Applications of these results to differential absorption lidar and to heterodyne detection are discussed.

  14. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The theory and methodology of using differential absorption lidar techniques for the remote measurement of atmospheric pressure profiles, surface pressure, and temperature profiles from ground, air, and space-based platforms are presented. Pressure measurements are effected by means of high resolution measurement of absorption at the edges of the oxygen A band lines where absorption is pressure dependent due to collisional line broadening. Temperature is assessed using measurements of the absorption at the center of the oxygen A band line originating from a quantum state with high ground state energy. The population of the state is temperature dependent, allowing determination of the temperature through the Boltzmann term. The results of simulations of the techniques using Voigt profile and variational analysis are reported for ground-based, airborne, and Shuttle-based systems. Accuracies in the 0.5-1.0 K and 0.1-0.3% range are projected.

  15. Measuring the Power Spectrum with Peculiar Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaulay, Edward; Feldman, H. A.; Ferreira, P. G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Agarwal, S.; Hudson, M. J.; Watkins, R.

    2012-01-01

    The peculiar velocities of galaxies are an inherently valuable cosmological probe, providing an unbiased estimate of the distribution of matter on scales much larger than the depth of the survey. Much research interest has been motivated by the high dipole moment of our local peculiar velocity field, which suggests a large scale excess in the matter power spectrum, and can appear to be in some tension with the LCDM model. We use a composite catalogue of 4,537 peculiar velocity measurements with a characteristic depth of 33 h-1 Mpc to estimate the matter power spectrum. We compare the constraints with this method, directly studying the full peculiar velocity catalogue, to results from Macaulay et al. (2011), studying minimum variance moments of the velocity field, as calculated by Watkins, Feldman & Hudson (2009) and Feldman, Watkins & Hudson (2010). We find good agreement with the LCDM model on scales of k > 0.01 h Mpc-1. We find an excess of power on scales of k < 0.01 h Mpc-1, although with a 1 sigma uncertainty which includes the LCDM model. We find that the uncertainty in the excess at these scales is larger than an alternative result studying only moments of the velocity field, which is due to the minimum variance weights used to calculate the moments. At small scales, we are able to clearly discriminate between linear and nonlinear clustering in simulated peculiar velocity catalogues, and find some evidence (although less clear) for linear clustering in the real peculiar velocity data.

  16. Mg I absorption features in the solar spectrum near 9 and 12 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenar, David A.; Reuter, Dennis C.; Deming, Drake; Chang, Edward S.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution FTS observations from the Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory and the Spacelab 3 ATMOS experiment have revealed additional infrared transitions due to Mg I in the spectra of both quiet sun and sunspot penumbra. In contrast to previous observations, these transitions are seen in absorption, not emission. Absorption intensities range from 1 to 7 percent of the continuum in the quiet sun. In the penumbra, the same features appear to show Zeeman splitting. Modeling of the line profiles in the photospheric spectrum shows evidence for a factor of three overabundance in the n = 5 or more levels of Mg I in the upper photosphere, but with no deviations from a Planck source function. It is concluded that whatever the process that produces the emission (including the Lemke and Holweger mechanism), it must occur well above the tau(5000) = 0.01 level.

  17. UV absorption spectrum and photodissociation channels of the simplest Criegee intermediate (CH2OO).

    PubMed

    Dawes, Richard; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2015-01-14

    The lowest-lying singlet states of the simplest Criegee intermediate (CH2OO) have been characterized along the O-O dissociation coordinate using explicitly correlated MRCI-F12 electronic structure theory and large active spaces. It is found that a high-level treatment of dynamic electron-correlation is essential to accurately describe these states. A significant well on the B-state is identified at the MRCI-F12 level with an equilibrium structure that differs substantially from that of the ground X-state. This well is presumably responsible for the apparent vibrational structure in some experimental UV absorption spectra, analogous to the structured Huggins band of the iso-electronic ozone. The B-state potential in the Franck-Condon region is sufficiently accurate that an absorption spectrum calculated with a one-dimensional model agrees remarkably well with experiment.

  18. Jet-cooled infrared absorption spectrum of the v4 fundamental band of HCOOH and HCOOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Zhang, Yulan; Li, Wenguang; Duan, Chuanxi

    2017-04-01

    The jet-cooled absorption spectrum of the v4 fundamental band of normal formic acid (HCOOH) and deuterated formic acid (HCOOD) was recorded in the frequency range of 1370-1392 cm-1 with distributed-feedback quantum cascade lasers (DFB-QCLs) as the tunable infrared radiations. A segmented rapid-scan data acquisition scheme was developed for pulsed supersonic jet infrared laser absorption spectroscopy based on DFB-QCLs with a moderate vacuum pumping capacity. The unperturbed band-origin and rotational constants in the excited vibrational state were determined for both HCOOH and HCOOD. The unperturbed band-origin locates at 1379.05447(11) cm-1 for HCOOH, and 1366.48430(39) cm-1 for HCOOD, respectively.

  19. An organoboron compound with a wide absorption spectrum for solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangbin; Ding, Zicheng; Liu, Jun; Wang, Lixiang

    2017-11-09

    Organoboron compounds offer new approaches to tune the electronic structures of π-conjugated molecules. In this work, an electron acceptor (M-BNBP4P-1) is developed by endcapping an organoboron core unit with two strong electron-withdrawing groups. M-BNBP4P-1 exhibits a unique wide absorption spectrum with two strong absorption bands in the long wavelength region (λ max = 771 nm) and the short wavelength region (λ max = 502 nm), which indicate superior sunlight harvesting capability. This is due to its special electronic structure, i.e. a delocalized LUMO and a localized HOMO. Prototype solution-processed organic solar cells based on M-BNBP4P-1 show a power conversion efficiency of 7.06% and a wide photoresponse from 350 nm to 880 nm.

  20. Investigations on the 1.7 micron residual absorption feature in the vegetation reflection spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdebout, J.; Jacquemoud, S.; Andreoli, G.; Hosgood, B.; Sieber, A.

    1993-01-01

    The detection and interpretation of the weak absorption features associated with the biochemical components of vegetation is of great potential interest to a variety of applications ranging from classification to global change studies. This recent subject is also challenging because the spectral signature of the biochemicals is only detectable as a small distortion of the infrared spectrum which is mainly governed by water. Furthermore, the interpretation is complicated by complexity of the molecules (lignin, cellulose, starch, proteins) which contain a large number of different and common chemical bonds. In this paper, we present investigations on the absorption feature centered at 1.7 micron; these were conducted both on AVIRIS data and laboratory reflectance spectra of leaves.

  1. Intermediate Band Material of Titanium-Doped Tin Disulfide for Wide Spectrum Solar Absorption.

    PubMed

    Hu, Keyan; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Wei; Gu, Yuhao; Bu, Kejun; Pan, Jie; Qin, Peng; Zhang, Xian; Huang, Fuqiang

    2018-04-02

    Intermediate band (IB) materials are of great significance due to their superior solar absorption properties. Here, two IBs peaking at 0.88 and 1.33 eV are reported to be present in the forbidden gap of semiconducting SnS 2 ( E g = 2.21 eV) by doping titanium up to 6 atom % into the Sn site via a solid-state reaction at 923 K. The solid solution of Sn 1- x Ti x S 2 is able to be formed, which is attributed to the isostructural structure of SnS 2 and TiS 2 . These two IBs were detected in the UV-vis-NIR absorption spectra with the appearance of two additional absorption responses at the respective regions, which in good agreement with the conclusion of first-principles calculations. The valence band maximum (VBM) consists mostly of the S 3p state, and the conduction band minimum (CBM) is the hybrid state composing of Ti 3d (e g ), S 3p, and Sn 5s, and the IBs are mainly the nondegenerate t 2g states of Ti 3d orbitals. The electronic states of Ti 3d reveal a good ability to transfer electrons between metal and S atoms. These wide-spectrum absorption IBs bring about more solar energy utilization to enhance solar thermal collection and photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange.

  2. Absorption spectrum and absorption cross sections of the 2ν1 band of HO2 between 20 and 760 Torr air in the range 6636 and 6639 cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assaf, Emmanuel; Liu, Lu; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa

    2018-05-01

    The absorption spectrum of HO2 radicals has been measured in the range 6636-6639 cm-1 at several pressures between 20 and 760 Torr of air. Absolute absorption cross sections of the strongest line at around 6638.2 cm-1 have been determined from kinetic measurements, taking advantage of the well known rate constant of the self-reaction. Peak absorption cross sections of 22.6, 19.5, 14.4, 7.88, 5.12 and 3.23 × 10-20 cm2 were obtained at 20, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 760 Torr, respectively. By fitting these data, an empirical expression has been obtained for the absorption cross section of HO2 in the range 20-760 Torr air: σ6638.2cm-1 = 1.18 × 10-20 + (2.64 × 10-19 × (1-exp (-63.1/p (Torr))) cm2.

  3. A structure preserving Lanczos algorithm for computing the optical absorption spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Meiyue; Jornada, Felipe H. da; Lin, Lin

    2016-11-16

    We present a new structure preserving Lanczos algorithm for approximating the optical absorption spectrum in the context of solving full Bethe-Salpeter equation without Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The new algorithm is based on a structure preserving Lanczos procedure, which exploits the special block structure of Bethe-Salpeter Hamiltonian matrices. A recently developed technique of generalized averaged Gauss quadrature is incorporated to accelerate the convergence. We also establish the connection between our structure preserving Lanczos procedure with several existing Lanczos procedures developed in different contexts. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of our Lanczos algorithm.

  4. Absorption of laser plasma in competition with oscillation currents for a terahertz spectrum.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolu; Bai, Ya; Li, Na; Liu, Peng

    2018-01-01

    We generate terahertz radiation in a supersonic jet of nitrogen molecules pumped by intense two-color laser pulses. The tuning of terahertz spectra from blue shift to red shift is observed by increasing laser power and stagnation pressure, and the red shift range is enlarged with the increased stagnation pressure. Our simulation reveals that the plasma absorption of the oscillation currents and expanded plasma column owing to increased laser intensity and gas number density are crucial factors in the recurrence of the red shift of terahertz spectra. The findings disclose the microscopic mechanism of terahertz radiation and present a controlling knob for the manipulation of a broadband terahertz spectrum from laser plasma.

  5. Absorption spectrum of neat liquid benzene and its concentrated solutions in n-hexane from 220 to 170 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Saik, V.O.; Lipsky, S.

    The electronic absorption spectrum of benzene has been obtained by phototransmission measurements over a concentration range from 0.005 M in n-hexane to the neat liquid at 11.2 M and over a spectral range that extends down to 170 nm. Good agreement is obtained with previously reported measurements on the neat liquid. The oscillator strength of the strongly allowed A{sub 1g} {yields} E{sub 1u} transition is maintained at ca. 1.0 as the benzene concentration increases but is accompanied by extensive redistribution of the intensity such that the optical cross section at the position of the absorption maximum (which shifts from 184{submore » .2} nm in dilute solution to 189{sub .5} nm in the neat liquid) reduces by a factor of 2.7. An explanation for these changes in terms of Lorentz field corrections to the complex dielectric constant is developed, and its implication to the assignment of the neat liquid absorption as a collective excitation is considered. 43 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.« less

  6. UV absorption spectrum of the ClO dimer (Cl2O2) between 200 and 420 nm.

    PubMed

    Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K; Papadimitriou, Vassileios C; Fahey, David W; Burkholder, James B

    2009-12-10

    The UV photolysis of Cl(2)O(2) (dichlorine peroxide) is a key step in the catalytic destruction of polar stratospheric ozone. In this study, the gas-phase UV absorption spectrum of Cl(2)O(2) was measured using diode array spectroscopy and absolute cross sections, sigma, are reported for the wavelength range 200-420 nm. Pulsed laser photolysis of Cl(2)O at 248 nm or Cl(2)/Cl(2)O mixtures at 351 nm at low temperature (200-228 K) and high pressure (approximately 700 Torr, He) was used to produce ClO radicals and subsequently Cl(2)O(2) via the termolecular ClO self-reaction. The Cl(2)O(2) spectrum was obtained from spectra recorded following the completion of the gas-phase ClO radical chemistry. The spectral analysis used observed isosbestic points at 271, 312.9, and 408.5 nm combined with reaction stoichiometry and chlorine mass balance to determine the Cl(2)O(2) spectrum. The Cl(2)O(2) UV absorption spectrum peaks at 244.5 nm with a cross section of 7.6(-0.5)(+0.8) x 10(-18) cm(2) molecule(-1) where the quoted error limits are 2sigma and include estimated systematic errors. The Cl(2)O(2) absorption cross sections obtained for wavelengths in the range 300-420 nm are in good agreement with the Cl(2)O(2) spectrum reported previously by Burkholder et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 1990, 94, 687) and significantly higher than the values reported by Pope et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 2007, 111, 4322). A possible explanation for the discrepancy in the Cl(2)O(2) cross section values with the Pope et al. study is discussed. Representative, atmospheric photolysis rate coefficients are calculated and a range of uncertainty estimated based on the determination of sigma(Cl(2)O(2))(lambda) in this work. Although improvements in our fundamental understanding of the photochemistry of Cl(2)O(2) are still desired, this work indicates that major revisions in current atmospheric chemical mechanisms are not required to simulate observed polar ozone depletion.

  7. UV Absorption Spectrum of the ClO Dimer (Cl2O2) between 200 and 420 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K.; Papadimitriou, Vassileios C.; Fahey, David W.; Burkholder, James B.

    2009-11-01

    The UV photolysis of Cl2O2 (dichlorine peroxide) is a key step in the catalytic destruction of polar stratospheric ozone. In this study, the gas-phase UV absorption spectrum of Cl2O2 was measured using diode array spectroscopy and absolute cross sections, σ, are reported for the wavelength range 200-420 nm. Pulsed laser photolysis of Cl2O at 248 nm or Cl2/Cl2O mixtures at 351 nm at low temperature (200-228 K) and high pressure (˜700 Torr, He) was used to produce ClO radicals and subsequently Cl2O2 via the termolecular ClO self-reaction. The Cl2O2 spectrum was obtained from spectra recorded following the completion of the gas-phase ClO radical chemistry. The spectral analysis used observed isosbestic points at 271, 312.9, and 408.5 nm combined with reaction stoichiometry and chlorine mass balance to determine the Cl2O2 spectrum. The Cl2O2 UV absorption spectrum peaks at 244.5 nm with a cross section of 7.6-0.5+0.8 × 10-18 cm2 molecule-1 where the quoted error limits are 2σ and include estimated systematic errors. The Cl2O2 absorption cross sections obtained for wavelengths in the range 300-420 nm are in good agreement with the Cl2O2 spectrum reported previously by Burkholder et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 1990, 94, 687) and significantly higher than the values reported by Pope et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 2007, 111, 4322). A possible explanation for the discrepancy in the Cl2O2 cross section values with the Pope et al. study is discussed. Representative, atmospheric photolysis rate coefficients are calculated and a range of uncertainty estimated based on the determination of σCl2O2(λ) in this work. Although improvements in our fundamental understanding of the photochemistry of Cl2O2 are still desired, this work indicates that major revisions in current atmospheric chemical mechanisms are not required to simulate observed polar ozone depletion.

  8. Cortisol Measures Across the Weight Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Schorr, Melanie; Lawson, Elizabeth A.; Dichtel, Laura E.; Klibanski, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Context: There are conflicting reports of increased vs decreased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activation in obesity; the most consistent finding is an inverse relationship between body mass index (BMI) and morning cortisol. In anorexia nervosa (AN), a low-BMI state, cortisol measures are elevated. Objective: This study aimed to investigate cortisol measures across the weight spectrum. Design and Setting: This was a cross-sectional study at a clinical research center. Participants: This study included 60 women, 18–45 years of age: overweight/obese (OB; N = 21); AN (N = 18); and normal-weight controls (HC; N = 21). Measures: HPA dynamics were assessed by urinary free cortisol, mean overnight serum cortisol obtained by pooled frequent sampling every 20 minutes from 2000–0800 h, 0800 h serum cortisol and cortisol-binding globulin, morning and late-night salivary cortisol, and dexamethasone-CRH testing. Body composition and bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Results: Cortisol measures demonstrated a U-shaped relationship with BMI, nadiring in the overweight-class I obese range, and were similarly associated with visceral adipose tissue and total fat mass. Mean cortisol levels were higher in AN than OB. There were weak negative linear relationships between lean mass and some cortisol measures. Most cortisol measures were negatively associated with postero-anterior spine and total hip BMD. Conclusions: Cortisol measures are lowest in overweight-class I obese women—lower than in lean women. With more significant obesity, cortisol levels increase, although not to as high as in AN. Therefore, extreme underweight and overweight states may activate the HPA axis, and hypercortisolemia may contribute to increased adiposity in the setting of caloric excess. Hypercortisolemia may also contribute to decreased BMD and muscle wasting in the setting of both caloric restriction and excess. PMID:26171799

  9. High-resolution optical measurements of atmospheric winds from space. I - Lower atmosphere molecular absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, P. B.

    1982-01-01

    A high-resolution spectroscopic technique, analogous to that used in the thermosphere to measure the vector wind fields in the upper troposphere and stratosphere, is described which uses narrow features in the spectrum of light scattered from the earth's lower atmosphere to provide Doppler information on atmospheric scattering and absorption. It is demonstrated that vector winds can be measured from a satellite throughout the lower atmosphere, using a multiple-etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer of modest aperture. It is found that molecular oxygen and water vapor absorption lines in the spectrum of sunlight scattered by the atmosphere are Doppler-shifted by the line of sight wind, so that they may be used to monitor the global wind systems in the upper troposphere and stratosphere.

  10. Invisible ink mark detection in the visible spectrum using absorption difference.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong; Kong, Seong G; Kang, Tae-Yi; Kim, Byounghyun; Jeon, Oc-Yeub

    2014-03-01

    One of popular techniques in gambling fraud involves the use of invisible ink marks printed on the back surface of playing cards. Such covert patterns are transparent in the visible spectrum and therefore invisible to unaided human eyes. Invisible patterns can be made visible with ultraviolet (UV) illumination or a CCD camera installed with an infrared (IR) filter depending on the type of ink materials used. Cheating gamers often wear contact lenses or eyeglasses made of IR or UV filters to recognize the secret marks on the playing cards. This paper presents an image processing technique to reveal invisible ink patterns in the visible spectrum without the aid of special equipment such as UV lighting or IR filters. A printed invisible ink pattern leaves a thin coating on the surface with different refractive index for different wavelengths of light, which results in color dispersion or absorption difference. The proposed method finds the differences of color components caused by absorption difference to detect invisible ink patterns on the surface. Experiment results show that the proposed scheme is effective for both UV-active and IR-active invisible ink materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficient Algorithms for Estimating the Absorption Spectrum within Linear Response TDDFT

    SciTech Connect

    Brabec, Jiri; Lin, Lin; Shao, Meiyue

    We present two iterative algorithms for approximating the absorption spectrum of molecules within linear response of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework. These methods do not attempt to compute eigenvalues or eigenvectors of the linear response matrix. They are designed to approximate the absorption spectrum as a function directly. They take advantage of the special structure of the linear response matrix. Neither method requires the linear response matrix to be constructed explicitly. They only require a procedure that performs the multiplication of the linear response matrix with a vector. These methods can also be easily modified to efficiently estimate themore » density of states (DOS) of the linear response matrix without computing the eigenvalues of this matrix. We show by computational experiments that the methods proposed in this paper can be much more efficient than methods that are based on the exact diagonalization of the linear response matrix. We show that they can also be more efficient than real-time TDDFT simulations. We compare the pros and cons of these methods in terms of their accuracy as well as their computational and storage cost.« less

  12. Efficient Algorithms for Estimating the Absorption Spectrum within Linear Response TDDFT

    SciTech Connect

    Brabec, Jiri; Lin, Lin; Shao, Meiyue

    We present a special symmetric Lanczos algorithm and a kernel polynomial method (KPM) for approximating the absorption spectrum of molecules within the linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework in the product form. In contrast to existing algorithms, the new algorithms are based on reformulating the original non-Hermitian eigenvalue problem as a product eigenvalue problem and the observation that the product eigenvalue problem is self-adjoint with respect to an appropriately chosen inner product. This allows a simple symmetric Lanczos algorithm to be used to compute the desired absorption spectrum. The use of a symmetric Lanczos algorithm only requires halfmore » of the memory compared with the nonsymmetric variant of the Lanczos algorithm. The symmetric Lanczos algorithm is also numerically more stable than the nonsymmetric version. The KPM algorithm is also presented as a low-memory alternative to the Lanczos approach, but the algorithm may require more matrix-vector multiplications in practice. We discuss the pros and cons of these methods in terms of their accuracy as well as their computational and storage cost. Applications to a set of small and medium-sized molecules are also presented.« less

  13. Efficient Algorithms for Estimating the Absorption Spectrum within Linear Response TDDFT

    DOE PAGES

    Brabec, Jiri; Lin, Lin; Shao, Meiyue; ...

    2015-10-06

    We present a special symmetric Lanczos algorithm and a kernel polynomial method (KPM) for approximating the absorption spectrum of molecules within the linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework in the product form. In contrast to existing algorithms, the new algorithms are based on reformulating the original non-Hermitian eigenvalue problem as a product eigenvalue problem and the observation that the product eigenvalue problem is self-adjoint with respect to an appropriately chosen inner product. This allows a simple symmetric Lanczos algorithm to be used to compute the desired absorption spectrum. The use of a symmetric Lanczos algorithm only requires halfmore » of the memory compared with the nonsymmetric variant of the Lanczos algorithm. The symmetric Lanczos algorithm is also numerically more stable than the nonsymmetric version. The KPM algorithm is also presented as a low-memory alternative to the Lanczos approach, but the algorithm may require more matrix-vector multiplications in practice. We discuss the pros and cons of these methods in terms of their accuracy as well as their computational and storage cost. Applications to a set of small and medium-sized molecules are also presented.« less

  14. Modeling the absorption spectrum of the permanganate ion in vacuum and in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Hedegård, Erik Donovan

    The absorption spectrum of the MnO$_{4}$$^{-}$ ion has been a test-bed for quantum-chemical methods over the last decades. Its correct description requires highly-correlated multiconfigurational methods, which are incompatible with the inclusion of finite-temperature and solvent effects due to their high computational demands. Therefore, implicit solvent models are usually employed. Here we show that implicit solvent models are not sufficiently accurate to model the solvent shift of MnO$_{4}$$^{-}$, and we analyze the origins of their failure. We obtain the correct solvent shift for MnO$_{4}$$^{-}$ in aqueous solution by employing the polarizable embedding (PE) model combined with a range-separated complete active space short-range density functional theory method (CAS-srDFT). Finite-temperature effects are taken into account by averaging over structures obtained from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The explicit treatment of finite-temperature and solvent effects facilitates the interpretation of the bands in the low-energy region of the MnO$_{4}$$^{-}$ absorption spectrum, whose assignment has been elusive.

  15. Infrared absorption spectrum of the simplest deuterated Criegee intermediate CD{sub 2}OO

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Nishimura, Yoshifumi; Witek, Henryk A., E-mail: hwitek@mail.nctu.edu.tw, E-mail: yplee@mail.nctu.edu.tw

    We report a transient infrared (IR) absorption spectrum of the simplest deuterated Criegee intermediate CD{sub 2}OO recorded using a step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer coupled with a multipass absorption cell. CD{sub 2}OO was produced from photolysis of flowing mixtures of CD{sub 2}I{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} (13 or 87 Torr) with laser light at 308 nm. The recorded spectrum shows close structural similarity with the spectrum of CH{sub 2}OO reported previously [Y.-T. Su et al., Science 340, 174 (2013)]. The four bands observed at 852, 1017, 1054, and 1318 cm{sup −1} are assigned to the OO stretching mode, two distinctmore » in-plane OCD bending modes, and the CO stretching mode of CD{sub 2}OO, respectively, according to vibrational wavenumbers, IR intensities, rotational contours, and deuterium-isotopic shifts predicted with extensive quantum-chemical calculations. The CO-stretching mode of CD{sub 2}OO at 1318 cm{sup −1} is blue shifted from the corresponding band of CH{sub 2}OO at 1286 cm{sup −1}; this can be explained by a mechanism based on mode mixing and isotope substitution. A band near 936 cm{sup −1}, observed only at higher pressure (87 Torr), is tentatively assigned to the CD{sub 2} wagging mode of CD{sub 2}IOO.« less

  16. Picosecond absorption relaxation measured with nanosecond laser photoacoustics

    PubMed Central

    Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-01-01

    Picosecond absorption relaxation—central to many disciplines—is typically measured by ultrafast (femtosecond or picosecond) pump-probe techniques, which however are restricted to optically thin and weakly scattering materials or require artificial sample preparation. Here, we developed a reflection-mode relaxation photoacoustic microscope based on a nanosecond laser and measured picosecond absorption relaxation times. The relaxation times of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin molecules, both possessing extremely low fluorescence quantum yields, were measured at 576 nm. The added advantages in dispersion susceptibility, laser-wavelength availability, reflection sensing, and expense foster the study of natural—including strongly scattering and nonfluorescent—materials. PMID:21079726

  17. Picosecond absorption relaxation measured with nanosecond laser photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V

    2010-10-18

    Picosecond absorption relaxation-central to many disciplines-is typically measured by ultrafast (femtosecond or picosecond) pump-probe techniques, which however are restricted to optically thin and weakly scattering materials or require artificial sample preparation. Here, we developed a reflection-mode relaxation photoacoustic microscope based on a nanosecond laser and measured picosecond absorption relaxation times. The relaxation times of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin molecules, both possessing extremely low fluorescence quantum yields, were measured at 576 nm. The added advantages in dispersion susceptibility, laser-wavelength availability, reflection sensing, and expense foster the study of natural-including strongly scattering and nonfluorescent-materials.

  18. Microwave Resonator Measurements of Atmospheric Absorption Coefficients: A Preliminary Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Steven J.; Spilker, Thomas R.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary design study examined the feasibility of using microwave resonator measurements to improve the accuracy of atmospheric absorption coefficients and refractivity between 18 and 35 GHz. Increased accuracies would improve the capability of water vapor radiometers to correct for radio signal delays caused by Earth's atmosphere. Calibration of delays incurred by radio signals traversing the atmosphere has applications to both deep space tracking and planetary radio science experiments. Currently, the Cassini gravity wave search requires 0.8-1.0% absorption coefficient accuracy. This study examined current atmospheric absorption models and estimated that current model accuracy ranges from 5% to 7%. The refractivity of water vapor is known to 1% accuracy, while the refractivity of many dry gases (oxygen, nitrogen, etc.) are known to better than 0.1%. Improvements to the current generation of models will require that both the functional form and absolute absorption of the water vapor spectrum be calibrated and validated. Several laboratory techniques for measuring atmospheric absorption and refractivity were investigated, including absorption cells, single and multimode rectangular cavity resonators, and Fabry-Perot resonators. Semi-confocal Fabry-Perot resonators were shown to provide the most cost-effective and accurate method of measuring atmospheric gas refractivity. The need for accurate environmental measurement and control was also addressed. A preliminary design for the environmental control and measurement system was developed to aid in identifying significant design issues. The analysis indicated that overall measurement accuracy will be limited by measurement errors and imprecise control of the gas sample's thermodynamic state, thermal expansion and vibration- induced deformation of the resonator structure, and electronic measurement error. The central problem is to identify systematic errors because random errors can be reduced by averaging

  19. Simple test of intestinal calcium absorption measured by stable strontium.

    PubMed Central

    Milsom, S; Ibbertson, K; Hannan, S; Shaw, D; Pybus, J

    1987-01-01

    A clinical test of intestinal calcium absorption has been developed using non-radioactive stable strontium as a calcium tracer. In nine elderly subjects there was a close correlation between the fractional absorption of strontium and radioactive calcium (45Ca) during a five hour period after the simultaneous oral administration of the two tracers. Comparable precision was achieved with each tracer in six subjects in whom the test was repeated after two weeks. The effect of food on strontium absorption was examined in a further 33 normal subjects (age 21-60 years), and the administration of the strontium with a standard breakfast was shown to reduce the variance at individual time points. A simplified test in which serum strontium concentration was measured four hours after the oral dose given with a standard breakfast was adopted as the routine procedure. The normal range (mean (2 SD], established over 97 tests in 53 patients, was 7.0-18.0% of the dose in the extracellular fluid. A further 30 patients with possible disorders of calcium absorption (10 with primary hyperparathyroidism and 20 with coeliac disease) were studied by this standard test. In both groups of patients the mean four hour strontium values were significantly different from normal. This standard strontium absorption test allows assessment of calcium absorption with sufficient sensitivity and precision to have a wide application in clinical practice. PMID:3115389

  20. Analysis of the red and green optical absorption spectrum of gas phase ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobov, Nikolai F.; Coles, Phillip A.; Ovsyannikov, Roman I.; Kyuberis, Aleksandra A.; Hargreaves, Robert J.; Bernath, Peter F.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Polyansky, Oleg L.

    2018-04-01

    Room temperature NH3 absorption spectra recorded at the Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory in 1980 are analyzed. The spectra cover two regions in the visible: 15,200 - 15,700 cm-1 and 17,950 - 18,250 cm-1. These high overtone rotation-vibration spectra are analyzed using both combination differences and variational line lists. Two variational line lists were computed using the TROVE nuclear motion program: one is based on an ab initio potential energy surface (PES) while the other used a semi-empirical PES. Ab initio dipole moment surfaces are used in both cases. 95 energy levels with J = 1 - 7 are determined from analysis of the experimental spectrum in the 5νNH (red) region and 46 for 6νNH (green) region. These levels span four vibrational bands in each of the two regions, associated with stretching overtones.

  1. Measurement of the aerosol absorption coefficient with the nonequilibrium process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Li, Jingxuan; Bai, Hailong; Li, Baosheng; Liu, Shanlin; Zhang, Yang

    2018-02-01

    On the basis of the conventional Jamin interferometer,the improved measuring method is proposed that using a polarization type reentrant Jamin interferometer measures atmospheric aerosol absorption coefficient under the photothermal effect.The paper studies the relationship between the absorption coefficient of atmospheric aerosol particles and the refractive index change of the atmosphere.In Matlab environment, the variation curves of the output voltage of the interferometer with different concentration aerosol samples under stimulated laser irradiation were plotted.Besides, the paper also studies the relationship between aerosol concentration and the time required for the photothermal effect to reach equilibrium.When using the photothermal interferometry the results show that the time required for the photothermal effect to reach equilibrium is also increasing with the increasing concentration of aerosol particles,the absorption coefficient and time of aerosol in the process of nonequilibrium are exponentially changing.

  2. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of C02 Column Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William E.; Rodriquez, Michael; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2 column density for an approach being developed as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. It uses a pulsed dual-wavelength lidar measurement based on the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. We demonstrated the approach using the CO2 measurement from aircraft in July and August 2009 over four locations. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and the results show approx.1 ppm random errors for 8-10 km altitudes and approx.30 sec averaging times. Airborne measurements were also made in 2010 with stronger signals and initial analysis shows approx. 0.3 ppm random errors for 80 sec averaging times for measurements at altitudes> 6 km.

  3. Techniques For Measuring Absorption Coefficients In Crystalline Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Philipp H.

    1981-10-01

    Absorption coefficients smaller than 0.001 cm-1 can, with more or less difficulty, be measured by several techniques. With diligence, all methods can be refined to permit measurement of absorption coefficients as small as 0.00001 cm-1. Spectral data are most readily obtained by transmission (spectrophotometric) methods, using multiple internal reflection to increase effective sample length. Emissivity measurements, requiring extreme care in the elimination of detector noise and stray light, nevertheless afford the most accessible spectral data in the 0.0001 to 0.00001 cm-1 range. Single-wavelength informa-tion is most readily obtained with modifications of laser calorimetry. Thermo-couple detection of energy absorbed from a laser beam is convenient, but involves dc amplification techniques and is susceptible to stray-light problems. Photoacoustic detection, using ac methods, tends to diminish errors of these types, but at some expense in experimental complexity. Laser calorimetry has been used for measurements of absorption coefficients as small as 0.000003 cm-1. Both transmission and calorimetric data, taken as functions of intensity, have been used for measurement of nonlinear absorption coefficients.

  4. Food Iron Absorption Measured by an Extrinsic Tag

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J. D.; Layrisse, M.; Martinez-Torres, C.; Walker, R.; Monsen, E.; Finch, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    The paper describes the use of an extrinsic tag of inorganic radioiron to determine the total absorption of nonheme iron from a complete meal. The method was developed by measuring the iron absorbed from vegetable foods containing biosynthetically incorporated 55Fe (intrinsic tag) and from 59Fe added as a small dose of inorganic iron to the same meal (extrinsic tag). In studies with maize, black bean, and wheat, a consistent extrinsic: intrinsic radioiron absorption ratio averaging 1.10 was observed. Similar results were obtained with either ferrous or ferric iron as the extrinsic tag, and with doses of the latter ranging from 0.001 to 0.5 mg iron added to a test meal containing 2-4 mg of food iron. Adding the radioiron at different stages in preparation of the test meal also had little effect. Separate administration of the extrinsic tag was less satisfactory when small portions of a single food were employed, but with a complete meal, the separate dose was preferable. The extrinsic tag provided a valid measure of absorption despite marked differences in the iron status of the subject, and with wide changes in absorption imposed by adding desferrioxamine or ascorbic acid to the test meal. These findings indicate that there is a common pool of nonheme iron, the absorption of which is influenced by various blocking or enhancing substances present in the meal. PMID:5062612

  5. Total Absorption Spectroscopy Study of ⁹²Rb Decay: A Major Contributor to Reactor Antineutrino Spectrum Shape

    SciTech Connect

    Sonzogni, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.

    2015-03-09

    The accurate determination of the emitted reactor antineutrino flux is still a major challenge for actual and future neutrino experiments at reactors, especially after the evidence of a disagreement between the measured antineutrino energy spectrum by Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and Reno and calculated antineutrino spectra obtained from the conversion of the unique integral beta spectra measured at the ILL reactor. Using nuclear data to compute reactor antineutrino spectra may help understanding this bias, with the study of the underlying nuclear physics. Summation calculations allow identifying a list of nuclei that contribute importantly to the antineutrino energy spectra emitted aftermore » the fission of ²³⁹ ,²⁴¹Pu and ²³⁵ ,²³⁸U, and whose beta decay properties might deserve new measurements. Among these nuclei, ⁹²Rb exhausts by itself about 16% of of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by Pressurized Water Reactors in the 5 to 8 MeV range. In this Letter, we report new Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) results for this important contributor. The obtained beta feeding from ⁹²Rb shows beta intensity unobserved before in the 4.5 to 5.5 MeV energy region and gives a ground state to ground state branch of 87.5 % ± 3%. These new data induce a dramatic change in recent summation calculations where a 51% GS to GS branch was considered for ⁹²Rb, increasing the summation antineutrino spectrum in the region nearby the observed bias.The new data still have an important impact on other summation calculations in which more recent data were considered« less

  6. [Open-path online monitoring of ambient atmospheric CO2 based on laser absorption spectrum].

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Kan, Rui-Feng; Xia, Hui; Geng, Hui; Ruan, Jun; Wang, Min; Cui, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Wen-Qing

    2009-01-01

    With the conjunction of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy technology (TDLAS) and the open long optical path technology, the system designing scheme of CO2 on-line monitoring based on near infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy technology was discussed in detail, and the instrument for large-range measurement was set up. By choosing the infrared absorption line of CO2 at 1.57 microm whose line strength is strong and suitable for measurement, the ambient atmospheric CO2 was measured continuously with a 30 s temporal resolution at an suburb site in the autumn of 2007. The diurnal atmospheric variations of CO2 and continuous monitoring results were presented. The results show that the variation in CO2 concentration has an obvious diurnal periodicity in suburb where the air is free of interference and contamination. The general characteristic of diurnal variation is that the concentration is low in the daytime and high at night, so it matches the photosynthesis trend. The instrument can detect gas concentration online with high resolution, high sensitivity, high precision, short response time and many other advantages, the monitoring requires no gas sampling, the calibration is easy, and the detection limit is about 4.2 x 10(-7). It has been proved that the system and measurement project are feasible, so it is an effective method for gas flux continuous online monitoring of large range in ecosystem based on TDLAS technology.

  7. Absorption spectrum of a two-level atom in a bad cavity with injected squeezed vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peng; Swain, S.

    1996-02-01

    We study the absorption spectrum of a coherently driven two-level atom interacting with a resonant cavity mode which is coupled to a broadband squeezed vacuum through its input-output mirror in the bad cavity limit. We study the modification of the two-photon correlation strength of the injected squeezed vacuum inside the cavity, and show that the equations describing probe absorption in the cavity environment are formally identical to these in free space, but with modified parameters describing the squeezed vacuum. The two photon correlations induced by the squeezed vacuum are always weaker than in free space. We pay particular attention to the spectral behaviour at line centre in the region of intermediate trength driving intensities, where anomalous spectral features such as hole-burning and dispersive profiles are displayed. These unusual spectral features are very sensitive to the squeezing phase and the Rabi frequency of the driving field. We also derive the threshold value of the Rabi frequency which gives rise to the transparency of the probe beam at the driving frequency. When the Rabi frequency is less than the threshold value, the probe beam is absorbed, whilst the probe beam is amplified (without population inversion under certain conditions) when the Rabi frequency is larger than this threshold. The anomalous spectral features all take place in the vicinity of the critical point dividing the different dynamical regimes, probe absorption and amplification, of the atomic radiation. The physical origin of the strong amplification without population inversion, and the feasibility of observing it, are discussed.

  8. Absorption spectrum analysis based on singular value decomposition for photoisomerization and photodegradation in organic dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabe, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Toshio; Chida, Toshifumi; Tada, Kazuhiro; Kawamoto, Masuki; Fujihara, Takashi; Sassa, Takafumi; Tsutsumi, Naoto

    2015-10-01

    In order to analyze the spectra of inseparable chemical mixtures, many mathematical methods have been developed to decompose them into the components relevant to species from series of spectral data obtained under different conditions. We formulated a method based on singular value decomposition (SVD) of linear algebra, and applied it to two example systems of organic dyes, being successful in reproducing absorption spectra assignable to cis/trans azocarbazole dyes from the spectral data after photoisomerization and to monomer/dimer of cyanine dyes from those during photodegaradation process. For the example of photoisomerization, polymer films containing the azocarbazole dyes were prepared, which have showed updatable holographic stereogram for real images with high performance. We made continuous monitoring of absorption spectrum after optical excitation and found that their spectral shapes varied slightly after the excitation and during recovery process, of which fact suggested the contribution from a generated photoisomer. Application of the method was successful to identify two spectral components due to trans and cis forms of azocarbazoles. Temporal evolution of their weight factors suggested important roles of long lifetimed cis states in azocarbazole derivatives. We also applied the method to the photodegradation of cyanine dyes doped in DNA-lipid complexes which have shown efficient and durable optical amplification and/or lasing under optical pumping. The same SVD method was successful in the extraction of two spectral components presumably due to monomer and H-type dimer. During the photodegradation process, absorption magnitude gradually decreased due to decomposition of molecules and their decaying rates strongly depended on the spectral components, suggesting that the long persistency of the dyes in DNA-complex related to weak tendency of aggregate formation.

  9. The effect of surface irradiance on the absorption spectrum of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, Chantal M.; Nelson, Norman B.; Siegel, David A.; Kostadinov, Tihomir S.

    2012-05-01

    The cycling pathways of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) within marine systems must be constrained to better assess the impact of CDOM on surface ocean photochemistry and remote sensing of ocean color. Photobleaching, the loss of absorption by CDOM due to light exposure, is the primary sink for marine CDOM. Herein the susceptibility of CDOM to photobleaching by sea surface-level solar radiation was examined in 15 samples collected from wide-ranging open ocean regimes. Samples from the Pacific, Atlantic, Indian and Southern Oceans were irradiated over several days with full-spectrum light under a solar simulator at in situ temperature in order to measure photobleaching rate and derive an empirical matrix, ɛsurf (m-1 μEin-1), which quantifies the effect of surface irradiance on the spectral absorption of CDOM. Irradiation responses among the ocean samples were similar within the ultraviolet (UV) region of the spectrum spanning 300-360 nm, generally exhibiting a decrease in the CDOM absorption coefficient (m-1) and concomitant increase in the CDOM spectral slope parameter, S (nm-1). However, an unexpected irradiation-induced increase in CDOM absorption between approximately 360 and 500 nm was observed for samples from high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) environments. This finding was linked to the presence of dissolved nitrate and may explain discrepancies in action spectra for dimethylsulfide (DMS) photobleaching observed between the Equatorial Pacific and Subtropical North Atlantic Oceans. The nitrate-to-phosphate ratio explained 27-70% of observed variability in ɛsurf at observation wavelengths of 330-440 nm, while the initial spectral slope of the samples explained up to 52% of variability in ɛsurf at observation wavelengths of 310-330 nm. These results suggest that the biogeochemical and solar exposure history of the water column, each of which influence the chemical character and thus the spectral quality of CDOM and its photoreactivity, are the

  10. Differential optical absorption spectrometer for measurement of tropospheric pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelisti, F.; Baroncelli, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Giovanelli, G.; Ravegnani, F.

    1995-05-01

    Our institute has recently developed a differential optical absorption spectrometry system called the gas analyzer spectrometer correlating optical absorption differences (GASCOAD), which features as a detector a linear image sensor that uses an artificial light source for long-path tropospheric-pollution monitoring. The GASCOAD, its method of eliminating interference from background sky light, and subsequent spectral analysis are reported and discussed. The spectrometer was used from 7 to 22 February 1993 in Milan, a heavily polluted metropolitan area, to measure the concentrations of SO2, NO2, O3, and HNO2 averaged over a 1.7-km horizontal light path. The findings are reported and briefly discussed.

  11. High-resolution, vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of boron trifluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Patrick P.; Thompson, Alan K.; Vest, Robert E.

    2014-11-21

    In the course of investigations of thermal neutron detection based on mixtures of {sup 10}BF{sub 3} with other gases, knowledge was required of the photoabsorption cross sections of {sup 10}BF{sub 3} for wavelengths between 135 and 205 nm. Large discrepancies in the values reported in existing literature led to the absolute measurements reported in this communication. The measurements were made at the SURF III Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The measured absorption cross sections vary from 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2} at 135 nm to less than 10{sup −21} cm{sup 2} in the regionmore » from 165 to 205 nm. Three previously unreported absorption features with resolvable structure were found in the regions 135–145 nm, 150–165 nm, and 190–205 nm. Quantum mechanical calculations, using the TD-B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ variant of time-dependent density functional theory implemented in Gaussian 09, suggest that the observed absorption features arise from symmetry-changing adiabatic transitions.« less

  12. On the high energy proton spectrum measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, R. W.; Ito, A.; Macfall, J.; Siohan, F.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Tonwar, S. C.; Vishwanath, P. R.; Yodh, G. B.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.

    1977-01-01

    The steepening of the proton spectrum beyond 1000 GeV and the rise in inelastic cross sections between 20 and 600 GeV observed by the PROTON-1-2-3 satellite experiments were explained by systematic effects of energy dependent albedo (backscatter) from the calorimeter.

  13. Towards higher stability of resonant absorption measurements in pulsed plasmas.

    PubMed

    Britun, Nikolay; Michiels, Matthieu; Snyders, Rony

    2015-12-01

    Possible ways to increase the reliability of time-resolved particle density measurements in pulsed gaseous discharges using resonant absorption spectroscopy are proposed. A special synchronization, called "dynamic source triggering," between a gated detector and two pulsed discharges, one representing the discharge of interest and another being used as a reference source, is developed. An internal digital delay generator in the intensified charge coupled device camera, used at the same time as a detector, is utilized for this purpose. According to the proposed scheme, the light pulses from the reference source follow the gates of detector, passing through the discharge of interest only when necessary. This allows for the utilization of short-pulse plasmas as reference sources, which is critical for time-resolved absorption analysis of strongly emitting pulsed discharges. In addition to dynamic source triggering, the reliability of absorption measurements can be further increased using simultaneous detection of spectra relevant for absorption method, which is also demonstrated in this work. The proposed methods are illustrated by the time-resolved measurements of the metal atom density in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge, using either a hollow cathode lamp or another HiPIMS discharge as a pulsed reference source.

  14. Low-frequency sound absorption measurements in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Meredith, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty sets of sound absorption measurements in air at a pressure of 1 atmosphere are presented at temperatures from 10 C to 50 C, relative humidities from 0 to 100 percent, and frequencies from 10 to 2500 Hz. The measurements were conducted by the method of free decay in a resonant tube having a length of 18.261 m and bore diameter of 0.152 m. Background measurements in a gas consisting of 89.5 percent N2 and 10.5 percent Ar, a mixture which has the same sound velocity as air, permitted the wall and structural losses of the tube to be separated from the constituent absorption, consisting of classical rotational and vibrational absorption, in the air samples. The data were used to evaluate the vibrational relaxation frequencies of N2 and/or O2 for each of the 30 sets of meteorological parameters. Over the full range of humidity, the measured relaxation frequencies of N2 in air lie between those specified by ANSI Standard S1.26-1978 and those measured earlier in binary N2H2O mixtures. The measured relaxation frequencies could be determined only at very low values of humidity, reveal a significant trend away from the ANSI standard, in agreement with a prior investigation.

  15. Retrieval of Black Carbon Absorption from Proposed Satellite Measurements Over the Ocean Glint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Matins, J. V.; Remer, L. A.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Yamasoe, M. A.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Haze and air pollution includes many chemicals that together form small particles suspended in the air called aerosols. One of the main ingredients found to affect climate and human health is Black Carbon. Black particles emitted from engines that do not burn the fuel completely, e.g. old trucks. Black carbon absorption of sunlight emerges as one of the key components of man-made forcing of climate. However, global characterization of black carbon emissions, distribution and pathways in which it can affect the amount of solar radiation absorbed by the atmosphere is very uncertain. A new method is proposed to measure sunlight absorption by fine aerosol particles containing black carbon over the ocean glint from a satellite mission designed for this purpose. The satellite will scan the same spot over the ocean in the glint plane and a plane 40 degrees off-glint a minute apart, collecting measurements of the reflected light across the solar spectrum. First the dark ocean off the glint is used to derive aerosol properties. Then the black carbon absorption is derived prop the attenuation of the bright glint by the aerosol layer. Such measurements if realized in a proposed future mission - COBRA are expected to produce global monthly climatology of black carbon absorption with high accuracy (110 to 15%) that can show their effect on climate.

  16. Reconstruction of the absorption spectrum of an object spot from the colour values of the corresponding pixel(s) in its digital image: the challenge of algal colours.

    PubMed

    Coltelli, Primo; Barsanti, Laura; Evangelista, Valter; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    A novel procedure for deriving the absorption spectrum of an object spot from the colour values of the corresponding pixel(s) in its image is presented. Any digital image acquired by a microscope can be used; typical applications are the analysis of cellular/subcellular metabolic processes under physiological conditions and in response to environmental stressors (e.g. heavy metals), and the measurement of chromophore composition, distribution and concentration in cells. In this paper, we challenged the procedure with images of algae, acquired by means of a CCD camera mounted onto a microscope. The many colours algae display result from the combinations of chromophores whose spectroscopic information is limited to organic solvents extracts that suffers from displacements, amplifications, and contraction/dilatation respect to spectra recorded inside the cell. Hence, preliminary processing is necessary, which consists of in vivo measurement of the absorption spectra of photosynthetic compartments of algal cells and determination of spectra of the single chromophores inside the cell. The final step of the procedure consists in the reconstruction of the absorption spectrum of the cell spot from the colour values of the corresponding pixel(s) in its digital image by minimization of a system of transcendental equations based on the absorption spectra of the chromophores under physiological conditions. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  17. Signs of strong Na and K absorption in the transmission spectrum of WASP-103b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendl, M.; Cubillos, P. E.; Hagelberg, J.; Müller, A.; Juvan, I.; Fossati, L.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Transmission spectroscopy has become a prominent tool for characterizing the atmospheric properties on close-in transiting planets. Recent observations have revealed a remarkable diversity in exoplanet spectra, which show absorption signatures of Na, K and H2O, in some cases partially or fully attenuated by atmospheric aerosols. Aerosols (clouds and hazes) themselves have been detected in the transmission spectra of several planets thanks to wavelength-dependent slopes caused by the particles' scattering properties. Aims: We present an optical 550-960 nm transmission spectrum of the extremely irradiated hot Jupiter WASP-103b, one of the hottest (2500 K) and most massive (1.5 MJ) planets yet to be studied with this technique. WASP-103b orbits its star at a separation of less than 1.2 times the Roche limit and is predicted to be strongly tidally distorted. Methods: We have used Gemini/GMOS to obtain multi-object spectroscopy throughout three transits of WASP-103b. We used relative spectrophotometry and bin sizes between 20 and 2 nm to infer the planet's transmission spectrum. Results: We find that WASP-103b shows increased absorption in the cores of the alkali (Na, K) line features. We do not confirm the presence of any strong scattering slope as previously suggested, pointing towards a clear atmosphere for the highly irradiated, massive exoplanet WASP-103b. We constrain the upper boundary of any potential cloud deck to reside at pressure levels above 0.01 bar. This finding is in line with previous studies on cloud occurrence on exoplanets which find that clouds dominate the transmission spectra of cool, low surface gravity planets while hot, high surface gravity planets are either cloud-free, or possess clouds located below the altitudes probed by transmission spectra. The spectrophotometric time series data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  18. Gas Phase Absorption Spectroscopy of C+60 and C+70 in a Cryogenic Ion Trap: Comparison with Astronomical Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, E. K.; Holz, M.; Maier, J. P.; Gerlich, D.; Walker, G. A. H.; Bohlender, D.

    2016-05-01

    Recent low-temperature laboratory measurements and astronomical observations have proved that the fullerene cation {{{C}}}60+ is responsible for four diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). These absorptions correspond to the strongest bands of the lowest electronic transition. The gas phase spectrum below 10 {{K}} is reported here for the full wavelength range encompassed by the electronic transition. The absorption spectrum of {{{C}}}70+, with its origin band at 7959.2 {{\\mathringA }}, has been obtained under similar laboratory conditions. Observations made toward the reddened star {HD} 183143 were used in a specific search for the absorption of these fullerene cations in diffuse clouds. In the case of {{{C}}}60+, one further band in the astronomical spectrum at 9348.5 \\mathringA is identified, increasing the total number of assigned DIBs to five. Numerous other {{{C}}}60+ absorptions in the laboratory spectrum are found to lie below the astronomical detection limit. Special emphasis is placed on the laboratory determination of absolute absorption cross-sections. For {{{C}}}60+ this directly yields a column density, N({{{C}}}60+), of 2× {10}13 {{{cm}}}-2 in diffuse clouds, without the need to rely on theoretical oscillator strengths. The intensity of the {{{C}}}70+ electronic transition in the range 7000-8000 Å is spread over many features of similar strength. Absorption cross-section measurements indicate that even for a similar column density, the individual absorption bands of {{{C}}}70+ will be too weak to be detected in the astronomical spectra, which is confirmed giving an upper limit of 2 {{m\\mathringA }} to the equivalent width. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l’Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  19. Measurement of absorption and dispersion from check shot surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganley, D. C.; Kanasewich, E. R.

    1980-10-01

    The spectral ratio method for measuring absorption and also dispersion from seismic data has been examined. Corrections for frequency-dependent losses due to reflections and transmissions have been shown to be an important step in the method. Synthetic examples have been used to illustrate the method, and the method has been applied to one real data case from a sedimentary basin in the Beaufort Sea. Measured Q values were 43±2 for a depth interval of 549-1193 m and 67±6 for a depth interval of 945-1311 m. Dispersion was also measured in the data and is consistent with Futterman's model.

  20. Atmospheric absorption measurements in the region of 1 mm wavelength.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, R.

    1972-01-01

    A Froome-type plasma-metal-junction device (1962) was used in high-resolution radiation transmission measurements in the atmosphere at wavelengths from 0.5 to 3.0 mm. The experimental and theoretical results for water vapor absorption lines in two submillimeter wavelength windows were compared, showing that this technique provided a much higher wavelength accuracy than more conventional optical-type spectroscopy.

  1. Aerosol absorption measurements and retrievals in shadow2 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiaoyun; Goloub, Philippe; Podvin, Thierry; Veselovskiy, Igor; Lopatin, Anton; Dubovik, Oleg; Torres, Benjamìn; Revilini, Laura; Crumeyrolle, Suzanne; Lapionak, Tatsiana; Deroo, Christine

    2018-04-01

    Dust, maritime and dust-smoke mixture events observed during SHADOW2 (SaHAran Dust Over West Africa) field campaign are selected and analyzed by using Raman and GARRLiC retrievals. The derived aerosol optical and microphysical properties will be shown. Dust absorption profile and on ground level are derived from GARRLiC retrievals and Aethalometer measurements, respectively. Our results provide a closer insight about dust absorbing properties.

  2. The Hubble Space Telescope Quasar Absorption Line Key Project: The Unusual Absorption-Line System in the Spectrum of PG 2302+029--Ejected or Intervening?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jannuzi, B. T.; Hartig, G. F.; Kirhakos, S.; Sargent, W. L. W.; Turnshek, D. A.; Weymann, R. J.; Bahcall, J. N.; Bergeron, J.; Boksenberg, A.; Savage, B. D.; hide

    1996-01-01

    We report the discovery of a high-ionization broad absorption line system at a redshift of z(sub abs) = 0.695 in the spectrum of the z(sub em) = 1.052 radio-quiet quasar PG 2302+029. Broad absorption with FWHM from 3000 to 5000 km/s is detected from C iv, N v, and O vi in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Faint Object Spectrograph spectra of the quasar. A narrow-line system (FWHM approx. 250 km/s) at z(sub abs) = 0.7016 is resolved from the broad blend and includes absorption by Ly alpha and the C iv, N v, and O vi doublets. No absorption by low-ionization metal species (e.g., Si II and Mg II) is detected in the HST or ground-based spectra for either the broad or the narrow system. The centroids of the broad system lines are displaced by approx. 56,000 km/s to the blue of the quasar's broad emission lines. The reddest extent of the broad-line absorption is more than 50,000 km/s from the quasar. The properties of this system are unprecedented, whether it is an intervening or an ejected system.

  3. Absorption spectrum and ultrafast response of monolayer and bilayer transition-metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkowski, Volodymyr; Ramirez-Torres, Alfredo; Rahman, Talat S.

    2015-03-01

    We apply a combined time-dependent density functional theory and many-body theory approach to examine the absorption spectrum and nonequilibrium response of monolayer and bilayer MoS2, MoSe2, WS2 and WSe2 systems. In particular, we evaluate the possibility of existence of bound states - excitons and trions in the undoped systems. In a previous work we have already demonstrated that the binding energies of these states in the monolayer systems are large which makes them available for room temperature applications. We analyze the possibility of ultrafast electron-hole separation in bilayer systems through inter-layer hole transfer, and show that such a possibility exists, in agreement with experimental observations. For doped systems we consider the possibility of Mahan excitonic states in monolayers and show that the binding energy for these states is of the order of 10 meV. We perform a detailed analysis of the relaxation of doped monolayers excited by ultrafast laser pulse by taking into account electron-phonon scattering effects, and demonstrate that ultrafast (10-100fs) processes, including luminescence, may be relevant for these materials. Work supported in part by DOE Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-07ER46354.

  4. Herbicidal Spectrum, Absorption and Transportation, and Physiological Effect on Bidens pilosa of the Natural Alkaloid Berberine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiao; Ma, Jing-Jing; Liu, Bo; Huang, Lun; Sang, Xiao-Qing; Zhou, Li-Juan

    2017-08-02

    Berberine is a natural herbicidal alkaloid from Coptis chinensis Franch. Here we characterized its herbicidal spectrum and absorption and transportation in the plant, along with the possible mechanism. Berberine showed no effect on the germination of the 10 tested plants. The IC 50 values of berberine on the primary root length and fresh weight of the 10 tested plants ranged from 2.91 to 9.79 mg L -1 and 5.76 to 35.07 mg L -1 , respectively. Berberine showed a similar herbicidal effect on Bidens pilosa as the commercial naturally derived herbicide cinmethylin. HPLC and fluorescence analysis revealed that berberine was mainly absorbed by B. pilosa root and transported through vascular bundle acropetally. Enzyme activity studies, GC-MS analysis, and SEM and TEM observations indicated that berberine might first function on the cell membrane indicated by variation of the IUFA percent and then cause POD, PPO, and SOD activity changes and cellular structure deformity, which was eventually expressed as the decrease of cell adaptation ability and abnormal cell function and may even result in cell death. Environmental safety evaluation tests revealed that berberine was low in toxicity to Brachydanio rerio. These indicate that berberine has the potential to be a bioherbicide and/or a lead molecule for new herbicides.

  5. A Fourier transform spectrometer for visible and near ultra-violet measurements of atmospheric absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.; Gerlach, J. C.; Whitehurst, M.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a prototype, ground-based, Sun-pointed Michelson interferometric spectrometer is described. Its intended use is to measure the atmospheric amount of various gases which absorb in the near-infrared, visible, and near-ultraviolet portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Preliminary spectra which contain the alpha, 0.8 micrometer, and rho sigma tau water vapor absorption bands in the near-infrared are presented to indicate the present capability of the system. Ultimately, the spectrometer can be used to explore the feasible applications of Fourier transform spectroscopy in the ultraviolet where grating spectrometers were used exclusively.

  6. The Importance of Optical Pathlength Control for Plasma Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, M.; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An inductively coupled GEC Cell with modified viewing ports has been used to measure in-situ absorption in CF4 plasmas via Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and the results compared to those obtained in a standard viewport configuration. The viewing ports were modified so that the window boundary is inside, rather than outside, of the GEC cell. Because the absorption obtained is a spatially integrated absorption, measurements made represent an averaging of absorbing species inside and outside of the plasma. This modification is made to reduce this spatial averaging and thus allow a more accurate estimation of neutral species concentrations and temperatures within the plasmas. By reducing this pathlength, we find that the apparent CF4 consumption increases from 65% to 95% and the apparent vibrational temperature of CF4 rises by 50-75 K. The apparent fraction of etch product SiF4 decreases from 4% to 2%. The data suggests that these density changes may be due to significant temperature gradients between the plasma and chamber viewports.

  7. Uncertainty budgets for liquid waveguide CDOM absorption measurements.

    PubMed

    Lefering, Ina; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Utschig, Christian; McKee, David

    2017-08-01

    Long path length liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC) systems using simple spectrometers to determine the spectral absorption by colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) have previously been shown to have better measurement sensitivity compared to high-end spectrophotometers using 10 cm cuvettes. Information on the magnitude of measurement uncertainties for LWCC systems, however, has remained scarce. Cross-comparison of three different LWCC systems with three different path lengths (50, 100, and 250 cm) and two different cladding materials enabled quantification of measurement precision and accuracy, revealing strong wavelength dependency in both parameters. Stable pumping of the sample through the capillary cell was found to improve measurement precision over measurements made with the sample kept stationary. Results from the 50 and 100 cm LWCC systems, with higher refractive index cladding, showed systematic artifacts including small but unphysical negative offsets and high-frequency spectral perturbations due to limited performance of the salinity correction. In comparison, the newer 250 cm LWCC with lower refractive index cladding returned small positive offsets that may be physically correct. After null correction of measurements at 700 nm, overall agreement of CDOM absorption data at 440 nm was found to be within 5% root mean square percentage error.

  8. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marynowicz, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples' surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  9. Interpreting measurements obtained with the cloud absorption radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The software developed for the analysis of data from the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) is discussed. The CAR is a multichannel radiometer designed to measure the radiation field in the middle of an optically thick cloud (the diffusion domain). It can also measure the surface albedo and escape function. The instrument currently flies on a C-131A aircraft operated by the University of Washington. Most of this data was collected during the First International satellite cloud climatology project Regional Experiment (FIRE) Marine Stratocumulus Intensive Field Observation program off San Diego during July 1987. Earlier flights of the CAR have also been studied.

  10. Demonstration That Calibration of the Instrument Response to Polarizations Parallel and Perpendicular to the Object Space Projected Slit of an Imaging Spectrometer Enable Measurement of the Atmospheric Absorption Spectrum in Region of the Weak CO2 Band for the Case of Arbitrary Polarization: Implication for the Geocarb Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumer, J. B.; Rairden, R. L.; Polonsky, I. N.; O'Brien, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Tropospheric Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (TIMS) unit rebuilt to operate in a narrow spectral region, approximately 1603 to 1615 nm, of the weak CO2 band as described by Kumer et al. (2013, Proc. SPIE 8867, doi:10.1117/12.2022668) was used to conduct the demonstration. An integrating sphere (IS), linear polarizers and quarter wave plate were used to confirm that the instrument's spectral response to unpolarized light, to 45° linearly polarized light and to circular polarized light are identical. In all these cases the intensity components Ip = Is where Ip is the component parallel to the object space projected slit and Is is perpendicular to the slit. In the circular polarized case Ip = Is in the time averaged sense. The polarizer and IS were used to characterize the ratio Rθ of the instrument response to linearly polarized light at the angle θ relative to parallel from the slit, for increments of θ from 0 to 90°, to that of the unpolarized case. Spectra of diffusely reflected sunlight passed through the polarizer in increments of θ, and divided by the respective Rθ showed identical results, within the noise limit, for solar spectrum multiplied by the atmospheric transmission and convolved by the Instrument Line Shape (ILS). These measurements demonstrate that unknown polarization in the diffusely reflected sunlight on this small spectral range affect only the slow change across the narrow band in spectral response relative to that of unpolarized light and NOT the finely structured / high contrast spectral structure of the CO2 atmospheric absorption that is used to retrieve the atmospheric content of CO2. The latter is one of the geoCARB mission objectives (Kumer et al, 2013). The situation is similar for the other three narrow geoCARB bands; O2 A band 757.9 to 768.6 nm; strong CO2 band 2045.0 to 2085.0 nm; CH4 and CO region 2300.6 to 2345.6 nm. Polonsky et al have repeated the mission simulation study doi:10.5194/amt-7-959-2014 assuming no use of a geo

  11. Determining the Uncertainty of X-Ray Absorption Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Gary S.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray absorption (or more properly, x-ray attenuation) techniques have been applied to study the moisture movement in and moisture content of materials like cement paste, mortar, and wood. An increase in the number of x-ray counts with time at a location in a specimen may indicate a decrease in moisture content. The uncertainty of measurements from an x-ray absorption system, which must be known to properly interpret the data, is often assumed to be the square root of the number of counts, as in a Poisson process. No detailed studies have heretofore been conducted to determine the uncertainty of x-ray absorption measurements or the effect of averaging data on the uncertainty. In this study, the Poisson estimate was found to adequately approximate normalized root mean square errors (a measure of uncertainty) of counts for point measurements and profile measurements of water specimens. The Poisson estimate, however, was not reliable in approximating the magnitude of the uncertainty when averaging data from paste and mortar specimens. Changes in uncertainty from differing averaging procedures were well-approximated by a Poisson process. The normalized root mean square errors decreased when the x-ray source intensity, integration time, collimator size, and number of scanning repetitions increased. Uncertainties in mean paste and mortar count profiles were kept below 2 % by averaging vertical profiles at horizontal spacings of 1 mm or larger with counts per point above 4000. Maximum normalized root mean square errors did not exceed 10 % in any of the tests conducted. PMID:27366627

  12. Aerosol Absorption Retrievals from the PACE Broad Spectrum Ocean Color Instrument (OCI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattoo, Shana; Remer, Lorraine A.; Levy, Robert C.; Gupta, Pawan; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Martins, J. Vanderlei; Lima, Adriana Rocha; Torres, Omar

    2016-01-01

    The PACE (Pre-­Aerosol, Clouds and ocean Ecosystem) mission, anticipated for launch in the early 2020s, is designed to characterize oceanic and atmospheric properties. The primary instrument on-­-board will be a moderate resolution (approximately 1 km nadir) radiometer, called the Ocean Color Instrument (OCI). OCI will provide high spectral resolution (5 nm) from the UV to NIR (350 - 800 nm), with additional spectral bands in the NIR and SWIR. The OCI itself is an excellent instrument for atmospheric objectives, providing measurements across a broad spectral range that in essence combines the capabilities of MODIS and OMI, but with the UV channels from OMI to be available at moderate resolution. (Image credit: PACE Science Definition Team Report). Objective: Can we make use of the UV-­SWIR measurements to derive information about aerosol absorption when aerosol loading is high?

  13. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Measurements from Air and Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems have been used for the measurement of ozone, water vapor, and aerosols from aircraft platforms for over 18 years, yielding new insights into atmospheric chemistry, composition, and dynamics in large-scale field experiments conducted all over the world. The successful deployment of the lidar in-space technology experiment (LITE) in September 1994 demonstrated that space-based lidars can also collect valuable information on the global atmosphere. This paper reviews some of the contributions of the NASA Langley Research Center's airborne ozone and water vapor DIAL systems and space-based LITE system to the understanding of the atmosphere and discusses the feasibility and advantages of putting DIAL systems in space for routine atmospheric measurements of ozone and/or water vapor and aerosols and clouds. The technology and applications of the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique have progressed significantly since the first DIAL measurements of Schotland, and airborne DIAL measurements of ozone and water vapor are frequently being made in a wide range of field experiments. In addition, plans are underway to develop DIAL systems for use on satellites for continuous global measurements. This paper will highlight the history of airborne lidar and DIAL systems, summarize the major accomplishments of the NASA Langley DIAL program, and discuss specifications and goals for DIAL systems in space.

  14. Measurement of Scattering and Absorption Cross Sections of Dyed Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Gaigalas, Adolfas K; Choquette, Steven; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of absorbance and fluorescence emission were carried out on aqueous suspensions of polystyrene (PS) microspheres with a diameter of 2.5 µm using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere detector. The apparatus and the principles of measurements were described in our earlier publications. Microspheres with and without green BODIPY@ dye were measured. Placing the suspension inside an integrating sphere (IS) detector of the spectrophotometer yielded (after a correction for fluorescence emission) the absorbance (called A in the text) due to absorption by BODIPY@ dye inside the microsphere. An estimate of the absorbance due to scattering alone was obtained by subtracting the corrected BODIPY@ dye absorbance (A) from the measured absorbance of a suspension placed outside the IS detector (called A1 in the text). The absorption of the BODIPY@ dye inside the microsphere was analyzed using an imaginary index of refraction parameterized with three Gaussian-Lorentz functions. The Kramer-Kronig relation was used to estimate the contribution of the BODIPY@ dye to the real part of the microsphere index of refraction. The complex index of refraction, obtained from the analysis of A, was used to analyze the absorbance due to scattering ((A1- A) in the text). In practice, the analysis of the scattering absorbance, A1-A, and the absorbance, A, was carried out in an iterative manner. It was assumed that A depended primarily on the imaginary part of the microsphere index of refraction with the other parameters playing a secondary role. Therefore A was first analyzed using values of the other parameters obtained from a fit to the absorbance due to scattering, A1-A, with the imaginary part neglected. The imaginary part obtained from the analysis of A was then used to reanalyze A1-A, and obtain better estimates of the other parameters. After a few iterations, consistent estimates were obtained of the scattering and absorption cross sections in the wavelength region 300

  15. An absorption profile centred at 78 megahertz in the sky-averaged spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Judd D.; Rogers, Alan E. E.; Monsalve, Raul A.; Mozdzen, Thomas J.; Mahesh, Nivedita

    2018-03-01

    After stars formed in the early Universe, their ultraviolet light is expected, eventually, to have penetrated the primordial hydrogen gas and altered the excitation state of its 21-centimetre hyperfine line. This alteration would cause the gas to absorb photons from the cosmic microwave background, producing a spectral distortion that should be observable today at radio frequencies of less than 200 megahertz. Here we report the detection of a flattened absorption profile in the sky-averaged radio spectrum, which is centred at a frequency of 78 megahertz and has a best-fitting full-width at half-maximum of 19 megahertz and an amplitude of 0.5 kelvin. The profile is largely consistent with expectations for the 21-centimetre signal induced by early stars; however, the best-fitting amplitude of the profile is more than a factor of two greater than the largest predictions. This discrepancy suggests that either the primordial gas was much colder than expected or the background radiation temperature was hotter than expected. Astrophysical phenomena (such as radiation from stars and stellar remnants) are unlikely to account for this discrepancy; of the proposed extensions to the standard model of cosmology and particle physics, only cooling of the gas as a result of interactions between dark matter and baryons seems to explain the observed amplitude. The low-frequency edge of the observed profile indicates that stars existed and had produced a background of Lyman-α photons by 180 million years after the Big Bang. The high-frequency edge indicates that the gas was heated to above the radiation temperature less than 100 million years later.

  16. An absorption profile centred at 78 megahertz in the sky-averaged spectrum.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Judd D; Rogers, Alan E E; Monsalve, Raul A; Mozdzen, Thomas J; Mahesh, Nivedita

    2018-02-28

    After stars formed in the early Universe, their ultraviolet light is expected, eventually, to have penetrated the primordial hydrogen gas and altered the excitation state of its 21-centimetre hyperfine line. This alteration would cause the gas to absorb photons from the cosmic microwave background, producing a spectral distortion that should be observable today at radio frequencies of less than 200 megahertz. Here we report the detection of a flattened absorption profile in the sky-averaged radio spectrum, which is centred at a frequency of 78 megahertz and has a best-fitting full-width at half-maximum of 19 megahertz and an amplitude of 0.5 kelvin. The profile is largely consistent with expectations for the 21-centimetre signal induced by early stars; however, the best-fitting amplitude of the profile is more than a factor of two greater than the largest predictions. This discrepancy suggests that either the primordial gas was much colder than expected or the background radiation temperature was hotter than expected. Astrophysical phenomena (such as radiation from stars and stellar remnants) are unlikely to account for this discrepancy; of the proposed extensions to the standard model of cosmology and particle physics, only cooling of the gas as a result of interactions between dark matter and baryons seems to explain the observed amplitude. The low-frequency edge of the observed profile indicates that stars existed and had produced a background of Lyman-α photons by 180 million years after the Big Bang. The high-frequency edge indicates that the gas was heated to above the radiation temperature less than 100 million years later.

  17. Absorptivity Measurements and Heat Source Modeling to Simulate Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Florian; Eisenbarth, Daniel; Wegener, Konrad

    The laser cladding process gains importance, as it does not only allow the application of surface coatings, but also additive manufacturing of three-dimensional parts. In both cases, process simulation can contribute to process optimization. Heat source modeling is one of the main issues for an accurate model and simulation of the laser cladding process. While the laser beam intensity distribution is readily known, the other two main effects on the process' heat input are non-trivial. Namely the measurement of the absorptivity of the applied materials as well as the powder attenuation. Therefore, calorimetry measurements were carried out. The measurement method and the measurement results for laser cladding of Stellite 6 on structural steel S 235 and for the processing of Inconel 625 are presented both using a CO2 laser as well as a high power diode laser (HPDL). Additionally, a heat source model is deduced.

  18. Measurement of glyoxal using an incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Langford, A. O.; Fuchs, H.; Brown, S. S.

    2008-08-01

    We describe an instrument for simultaneous measurements of glyoxal (CHOCHO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The output of a Xenon arc lamp is coupled into a 1 m optical cavity, and the spectrum of light exiting the cavity is recorded by a grating spectrometer with a charge-coupled device (CCD) array detector. The mirror reflectivity and effective path lengths are determined from the known Rayleigh scattering of He and dry zero air (N2+O2). Least-squares fitting, using published reference spectra, allow the simultaneous retrieval of CHOCHO, NO2, O4, and H2O in the 441 to 469 nm spectral range. For a 1-min sampling time, the minimum detectable absorption is 4×10-10 cm-1, and the precision (±1σ) on signal for measurements of CHOCHO and NO2 is 29 pptv and 20 pptv, respectively. We directly compare the incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer to 404 and 532 nm cavity ringdown instruments for CHOCHO and NO2 detection, and find linear agreement over a wide range of concentrations. The instrument has been tested in the laboratory with both synthetic and real air samples, and the demonstrated sensitivity and specificity suggest a strong potential for field measurements of both CHOCHO and NO2.

  19. Measurement of transient gas flow parameters by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bolshov, M A; Kuritsyn, Yu A; Liger, V V

    2015-04-30

    An absorption spectrometer based on diode lasers is developed for measuring two-dimension maps of temperature and water vapour concentration distributions in the combustion zones of two mixing supersonic flows of fuel and oxidiser in the single run regime. The method of measuring parameters of hot combustion zones is based on detection of transient spectra of water vapour absorption. The design of the spectrometer considerably reduces the influence of water vapour absorption along the path of a sensing laser beam outside the burning chamber. The optical scheme is developed, capable of matching measurement results in different runs of mixture burning. Amore » new algorithm is suggested for obtaining information about the mixture temperature by constructing the correlation functions of the experimental spectrum with those simulated from databases. A two-dimensional map of temperature distribution in a test chamber is obtained for the first time under the conditions of plasma-induced combusion of the ethylene – air mixture. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)« less

  20. Detection of blueshifted emission and absorption and a relativistic iron line in the X-ray spectrum of ESO323-G077

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Krongold, Y.; Bianchi, S.; Matt, G.; Santos-Lleó, M.; Piconcelli, E.; Schartel, N.

    2008-12-01

    We report on the X-ray observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy ESO323-G077 performed with XMM-Newton. The EPIC spectra show a complex spectrum with conspicuous absorption and emission features. The continuum emission can be modelled with a power law with an index of 1.99 +/- 0.02 in the whole XMM-Newton energy band, marginally consistent with typical values of type I objects. An absorption component with an uncommonly high equivalent hydrogen column (nH = 5.82+0.12-0.11 × 1022cm-2) is affecting the soft part of the spectrum. Additionally, two warm absorption components are also present in the spectrum. The lower ionized one, mainly imprinting the soft band of the spectrum, has an ionization parameter of logU = 2.14+0.06-0.07 and an outflowing velocity of v = 3200+600-200kms-1. Two absorption lines located at ~6.7 and ~7.0keV can be modelled with the highly ionized absorber. The ionization parameter and outflowing velocity of the gas measured are logU = 3.26+0.19-0.15 and v = 1700+600-400kms-1, respectively. Four emission lines were also detected in the soft energy band. The most likely explanation for these emission lines is that they are associated with an outflowing gas with a velocity of ~2000kms-1. The data suggest that the same gas which is causing the absorption could also being responsible of these emission features. Finally, the XMM-Newton spectrum shows the presence of a relativistic iron emission line likely originated in the accretion disc of a Kerr black hole with an inclination of ~25°. We propose a model to explain the observed X-ray properties which invokes the presence of a two-phase outflow with cone-like structure and a velocity of the order of 2000- 4000kms-1. The inner layer of the cone would be less ionized, or even neutral, than the outer layer. The inclination angle of the source would be lower than the opening angle of the outflowing cone. Partially based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and

  1. Measures with locally finite support and spectrum.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Yves F

    2016-03-22

    The goal of this paper is the construction of measures μ on R(n)enjoying three conflicting but fortunately compatible properties: (i) μ is a sum of weighted Dirac masses on a locally finite set, (ii) the Fourier transform μ f μ is also a sum of weighted Dirac masses on a locally finite set, and (iii) μ is not a generalized Dirac comb. We give surprisingly simple examples of such measures. These unexpected patterns strongly differ from quasicrystals, they provide us with unusual Poisson's formulas, and they might give us an unconventional insight into aperiodic order.

  2. Measures with locally finite support and spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Yves F.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is the construction of measures μ on Rn enjoying three conflicting but fortunately compatible properties: (i) μ is a sum of weighted Dirac masses on a locally finite set, (ii) the Fourier transform μ^ of μ is also a sum of weighted Dirac masses on a locally finite set, and (iii) μ is not a generalized Dirac comb. We give surprisingly simple examples of such measures. These unexpected patterns strongly differ from quasicrystals, they provide us with unusual Poisson's formulas, and they might give us an unconventional insight into aperiodic order. PMID:26929358

  3. Measures of the Glottal Source Spectrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreiman, Jody; Gerratt, Bruce R.; Antonanzas-Barroso, Norma

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Many researchers have studied the acoustics, physiology, and perceptual characteristics of the voice source, but despite significant attention, it remains unclear which aspects of the source should be quantified and how measurements should be made. In this study, the authors examined the relationships among a number of existing measures…

  4. PARTIAL REVISION: ABSORPTION SPECTRUM AND QUANTUM STATES OF THE PRASEODYMIUM ION. I. SINGLE CRYSTALS OF PRASEODYMIUM CHLORIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, E.V.; Sancier, K.M.; Freed, S.

    1958-07-01

    In an analysis of term splitting in the absorption spectrum of 24 samples of praseodymium chloride, Judd (Proc. Roy. Soc. (London) A241, 414(1957)) found all but two of the authors' results to be constant with his. A discussion of reconciliation is presentrd, and the authors point out that the error is due to a mistake in descrimination between electronic transitions and the weak vibrationally coupled lines. (J.R.D.)

  5. Concentration measurement of NO using self-absorption spectroscopy of the γ band system in a pulsed corona discharge.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xiaodong; Ding, Yanjun; Peng, Zhimin; Luo, Rui

    2012-07-10

    Nitric oxide (NO) concentrations were measured using the γ band system spectrum based on the strong self-absorption effect of NO in pulsed corona discharges. The radiative transitional intensities of the NO γ band were simulated based on the theory of molecular spectroscopy. The intensities of some bands, especially γ(0,0) and γ(1,0), are weakened by the self-absorption. The correlations between the spectral self-absorption intensities and NO concentration were validated using a modified Beer-Lambert law with a combined factor K relating the branching ratio and the NO concentration, and a nonlinear index α that is applicable to the broadband system. Optical emissive spectra in pulsed corona discharges in NO and N2/He mixtures were used to evaluate the two parameters for various conditions. Good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results verifies the self-absorption behavior seen in the UV spectra of the NO γ bands.

  6. A laboratory study of the UV Absorption Spectrum of the ClO Dimer (Cl2O2) and the Implications for Polar Stratospheric Ozone Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanastasiou, D. K.; Papadimitriou, V. C.; Fahey, D. W.; Burkholder, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    Chlorine containing species play an important role in catalytic ozone depleting cycles in the Antarctic and Arctic stratosphere. The ClO dimer (Cl2O2) catalytic ozone destruction cycle accounts for the majority of the observed polar ozone loss. A key step in this catalytic cycle is the UV photolysis of Cl2O2. The determination of the Cl2O2 UV absorption spectrum has been the subject of several studies since the late 1980’s. Recently, Pope et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A, 111, 4322, 2007) reported significantly lower absorption cross sections for Cl2O2 for the atmospherically relevant wavelength region, >300 nm, than currently recommended for use in atmospheric models. If correct, the Pope et al. results would alter our understanding of the chemistry of polar ozone depletion significantly. In this study, the UV absorption spectrum and absolute cross sections of gas-phase Cl2O2 are reported for the wavelength range 200 - 420 nm at ~200 K. Sequential pulsed laser photolysis of various precursors were used to produce the ClO radical and Cl2O2 via the subsequent ClO + ClO + M reaction under static conditions. UV absorption spectra of the reaction mixture were measured using a diode array spectrometer after completion of the gas-phase radical chemistry. The spectral analysis utilized the observed isosbestic points, reaction stoichiometry, and chlorine mass balance to determine the UV spectrum and absolute cross section of Cl2O2. A complementary experimental technique similar to that used by Pope et al. was also used in this study. We obtained consistent Cl2O2 UV absorption spectra using the two different techniques. The Cl2O2 absorption cross sections for wavelengths in the 300 - 420 nm range were found to be in very good agreement with the values reported previously by Burkholder et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A, 94, 687, 1990) and significantly greater than the Pope et al. values in this atmospherically important wavelength region. A possible explanation for the disagreement with

  7. Neutron Spectrum Measurements from Irradiations at NCERC

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, Kevin Richard; Mosby, Michelle A.; Bredeweg, Todd Allen

    2015-04-15

    Several irradiations have been conducted on assemblies (COMET/ZEUS and Flattop) at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Configurations of the assemblies and irradiated materials changed between experiments. Different metallic foils were analyzed using the radioactivation method by gamma-ray spectrometry to understand/characterize the neutron spectra. Results of MCNP calculations are shown. It was concluded that MCNP simulated spectra agree with experimental measurements, with the caveats that some data are limited by statistics at low-energies and some activation foils have low activities.

  8. Measurements of the absorption coefficient of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogren, J. A.; Ahlquist, N. C.; Clarke, A. D.; Charlson, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption coefficients of stratospheric aerosols are measured using a variation on the integrating plate method. The technique is based on the decrease in the transparency of a substrate when an absorbing aerosol is deposited on it. A Lambert scatterer is placed behind the substrate to integrate forward scattered light and minimize the effect of scattering on the measurement. The low pressure in the stratosphere is used for the direct impaction of particles onto a narrow strip of opal glass. The eight samples collected had a median value of 4 x 10 to the -9th m with an uncertainty of + or - 5 x 10 to the -9th m. If this absorption is due to graphitic carbon, then its concentration is estimated at about 0.4 ng/cu m, or about 0.25% of the total aerosol mass concentration. Estimates of the aerosol scattering coefficients based on satellite extinction inversions result in an aerosol single-scattering albedo in the range of 0.96-1.0.

  9. The origin of blueshifted absorption features in the X-ray spectrum of PG 1211+143: outflow or disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, L. C.; Fabian, A. C.

    2013-07-01

    In some radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGN), high-energy absorption features in the X-ray spectra have been interpreted as ultrafast outflows (UFOs) - highly ionized material (e.g. Fe XXV and Fe XXVI) ejected at mildly relativistic velocities. In some cases, these outflows can carry energy in excess of the binding energy of the host galaxy. Needless to say, these features demand our attention as they are strong signatures of AGN feedback and will influence galaxy evolution. For the same reason, alternative models need to be discussed and refuted or confirmed. Gallo and Fabian proposed that some of these features could arise from resonance absorption of the reflected spectrum in a layer of ionized material located above and corotating with the accretion disc. Therefore, the absorbing medium would be subjected to similar blurring effects as seen in the disc. A priori, the existence of such plasma above the disc is as plausible as a fast wind. In this work, we highlight the ambiguity by demonstrating that the absorption model can describe the ˜7.6 keV absorption feature (and possibly other features) in the quasar PG 1211+143, an AGN that is often described as a classic example of a UFO. In this model, the 2-10 keV spectrum would be largely reflection dominated (as opposed to power law dominated in the wind models) and the resonance absorption would be originating in a layer between about 6 and 60 gravitational radii. The studies of such features constitute a cornerstone for future X-ray observatories like Astro-H and Athena+. Should our model prove correct, or at least important in some cases, then absorption will provide another diagnostic tool with which to probe the inner accretion flow with future missions.

  10. Nuclear quantum effects in electronically adiabatic quantum time correlation functions: Application to the absorption spectrum of a hydrated electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turi, László; Hantal, György; Rossky, Peter J.; Borgis, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    A general formalism for introducing nuclear quantum effects in the expression of the quantum time correlation function of an operator in a multilevel electronic system is presented in the adiabatic limit. The final formula includes the nuclear quantum time correlation functions of the operator matrix elements, of the energy gap, and their cross terms. These quantities can be inferred and evaluated from their classical analogs obtained by mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations. The formalism is applied to the absorption spectrum of a hydrated electron, expressed in terms of the time correlation function of the dipole operator in the ground electronic state. We find that both static and dynamic nuclear quantum effects distinctly influence the shape of the absorption spectrum, especially its high energy tail related to transitions to delocalized electron states. Their inclusion does improve significantly the agreement between theory and experiment for both the low and high frequency edges of the spectrum. It does not appear sufficient, however, to resolve persistent deviations in the slow Lorentzian-like decay part of the spectrum in the intermediate 2-3 eV region.

  11. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Measurements of Landfill Methane Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, Fabrizio; Robinson, Rod; Gardiner, Tom; Finlayson, Andrew; Connor, Andy

    2017-04-01

    DIFFERENTIAL ABSORPTION LIDAR (DIAL) MEASURMENTS OF LANDFILL METHANE EMISSIONS F. INNOCENTI *, R.A. ROBINSON *, T.D. GARDINER, A. FINLAYSON *, A. CONNOR* * National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW, United Kingdom Methane is one of the most important gaseous hydrocarbon species for both industrial and environmental reasons. Understanding and quantifying methane emissions to atmosphere is an important element of climate change research. Range-resolved infrared Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements provide the means to map and quantify a wide range of different methane sources. DIAL is a powerful technique that can be used to track and quantify plumes emitted from area emission sources such as landfill sites, waste water treatment plants and petrochemical plants. By using lidar (light detection and ranging), the DIAL technique is able to make remote range-resolved single-ended measurements of the actual distribution of target gases in the atmosphere, with no disruption to normal site operational activities. DIAL provides 3D mapping of emission concentrations and quantification of emission rates for a wide range of target gases such as methane. The NPL DIAL laser source is operated alternately at two similar wavelengths. One of these, termed the "on-resonant wavelength", is chosen to be at a wavelength which is absorbed by the target species. The other, the "off-resonant wavelength", is chosen to be at a nearby wavelength which is not absorbed significantly by the target species. The two wavelengths are chosen to be close, so that the atmospheric scattering properties are the same for both wavelengths. They are also chosen so that any differential absorption due to other atmospheric species are minimised. Any measured difference in the returned signals is therefore due to absorption by the target gas. In the typical DIAL measurement configuration the mobile DIAL facility is positioned downwind of the area being

  12. DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) urban pollution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Robert K.; Vossler, T. L.

    1991-05-01

    During July and August of 1990, a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) made by OPSIS Inc. was used to measure gaseous air pollutants over three separate open paths in Atlanta, GA. Over path 1 (1099 m) and path 2 (1824 m), ozone (03), sulfur dioxide (SO2) nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrous acid (HNO2) formaldehyde (HCHO), benzene, toluene, and o-xylene were measured. Nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia (NH3) were monitored over path 3 (143 m). The data quality and data capture depended on the compound being measured and the path over which it was measured. Data quality criteria for each compound were chosen such that the average relative standard deviation would be less than 25%. Data capture ranged from 43% for o-xylene for path 1 to 95% for ozone for path 2. Benzene, toluene, and o-xylene concentrations measured over path 2, which crossed over an interstate highway, were higher than concentrations measured over path 1, implicating emissions from vehicles on the highway as a significant source of these compounds. Federal Reference Method (FRN) instruments were located near the DOAS light receivers and measurements of 03, NO2, and NO were made concurrently with the DOAS. Correlation coefficients greater than 0.85 were obtained between the DOAS and FRM's; however, there was a difference between the mean values obtained by the two methods for 03 and NO. A gas chromatograph for measuring volatile organic compounds was operated next to the FRN's. Correlation coefficients of about 0.66 were obtained between the DOAS and GC measurements of benzene and o- xylene. However, the correlation coefficient between the DOAS and GC measurements of toluene averaged only 0.15 for the two DOAS measurement paths. The lack of correlation and other factors indicate the possibility of a localized source of toluene near the GC. In general, disagreements between the two measurement methods could be caused by atmospheric inhomogeneities or interferences in the DOAS and other methods.

  13. Measurements of atmospheric ethene by solar absorption FTIR spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toon, Geoffrey C.; Blavier, Jean-Francois L.; Sung, Keeyoon

    2018-04-01

    Atmospheric ethene (C2H4; ethylene) amounts have been retrieved from high-resolution solar absorption spectra measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) MkIV interferometer. Data recorded from 1985 to 2016 from a dozen ground-based sites have been analyzed, mostly between 30 and 67° N. At clean-air sites such as Alaska, Sweden, New Mexico, or the mountains of California, the ethene columns were always less than 1 × 1015 molec cm-2 and therefore undetectable. In urban sites such as JPL, California, ethene was measurable with column amounts of 20 × 1015 molec cm-2 observed in the 1990s. Despite the increasing population and traffic in southern California, a factor 3 decrease in ethene column density is observed over JPL over the past 25 years, accompanied by a decrease in CO. This is likely due to southern California's increasingly stringent vehicle exhaust regulations and tighter enforcement over this period.

  14. Ultra sound absorption measurements in rock samples at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herminghaus, C.; Berckhemer, H.

    1974-01-01

    A new technique, comparable with the reverberation method in room acoustics, is described. It allows Q-measurements at rock samples of arbitrary shape in the frequency range of 50 to 600 kHz in vacuum (.1 mtorr) and at low temperatures (+20 to -180 C). The method was developed in particular to investigate rock samples under lunar conditions. Ultrasound absorption has been measured at volcanics, breccia, gabbros, feldspar and quartz of different grain size and texture yielding the following results: evacuation raises Q mainly through lowering the humidity in the rock. In a dry compact rock, the effect of evacuation is small. With decreasing temperature, Q generally increases. Between +20 and -30 C, Q does not change much. With further decrease of temperature in many cases distinct anomalies appear, where Q becomes frequency dependent.

  15. Ultraviolet absorption: Experiment MA-059. [measurement of atmospheric species concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, T. M.; Hudson, R. D.; Rawlins, W. T.; Anderson, J.; Kaufman, F.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1977-01-01

    A technique devised to permit the measurement of atmospheric species concentrations is described. This technique involves the application of atomic absorption spectroscopy and the quantitative observation of resonance fluorescence in which atomic or molecular species scatter resonance radiation from a light source into a detector. A beam of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen resonance radiation, strong unabsorbable oxygen and nitrogen radiation, and visual radiation was sent from Apollo to Soyuz. The density of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen between the two spacecraft was measured by observing the amount of resonance radiation absorbed when the line joining Apollo and Soyuz was perpendicular to their velocity with respect to the ambient atmosphere. Results of postflight analysis of the resonance fluorescence data are discussed.

  16. The gas-phase absorption spectrum of a neutral GFP model chromophore.

    PubMed

    Lammich, L; Petersen, M Axman; Nielsen, M Brøndsted; Andersen, L H

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the gas-phase absorption properties of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore in its neutral (protonated) charge state in a heavy-ion storage ring. To accomplish this we synthesized a new molecular chromophore with a charged NH(3) group attached to a neutral model chromophore of GFP. The gas-phase absorption cross section of this chromophore molecule as a function of the wavelength is compared to the well-known absorption profile of GFP. The chromophore has a maximum absorption at 415 +/- 5 nm. When corrected for the presence of the charged group attached to the GFP model chromophore, the unperturbed neutral chromophore is predicted to have an absorption maximum at 399 nm in vacuum. This is very close to the corresponding absorption peak of the protein at 397 nm. Together with previous data obtained with an anionic GFP model chromophore, the present data show that the absorption of GFP is primarily determined by intrinsic chromophore properties. In other words, there is strong experimental evidence that, in terms of absorption, the conditions in the hydrophobic interior of this protein are very close to those in vacuum.

  17. Measurement of glyoxal using an incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Langford, A. O.; Fuchs, H.; Brown, S. S.

    2008-12-01

    We describe an instrument for simultaneous measurements of glyoxal (CHOCHO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The output of a Xenon arc lamp is coupled into a 1 m optical cavity, and the spectrum of light exiting the cavity is recorded by a grating spectrometer with a charge-coupled device (CCD) array detector. The mirror reflectivity and effective path lengths are determined from the known Rayleigh scattering of He and dry zero air (N2+O2). Least-squares fitting, using published reference spectra, allow the simultaneous retrieval of CHOCHO, NO2, O4, and H2O in the 441 to 469 nm spectral range. For a 1-min sampling time, the precision (±1σ) on signal for measurements of CHOCHO and NO2 is 29 pptv and 20 pptv, respectively. We directly compare measurements made with the incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer with those from cavity ringdown instruments detecting CHOCHO and NO2 at 404 and 532 nm, respectively, and find linear agreement over a wide range of concentrations. The instrument has been tested in the laboratory with both synthetic and real air samples, and the demonstrated sensitivity and specificity suggest a strong potential for field measurements of both CHOCHO and NO2.

  18. Analyses of Impact of Needle Surface Properties on Estimation of Needle Absorption Spectrum: Case Study with Coniferous Needle and Shoot Samples

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Lin, Yi; Yan, Kai; Chen, Chi; Park, Taejin; Choi, Sungho; Mõttus, Matti; Rautiainen, Miina; Myneni, Ranga B.; Yan, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Leaf scattering spectrum is the key optical variable that conveys information about leaf absorbing constituents from remote sensing. It cannot be directly measured from space because the radiation scattered from leaves is affected by the 3D canopy structure. In addition, some radiation is specularly reflected at the surface of leaves. This portion of reflected radiation is partly polarized, does not interact with pigments inside the leaf and therefore contains no information about its interior. Very little empirical data are available on the spectral and angular scattering properties of leaf surfaces. Whereas canopy-structure effects are well understood, the impact of the leaf surface reflectance on estimation of leaf absorption spectra remains uncertain. This paper presents empirical and theoretical analyses of angular, spectral, and polarimetric measurements of light reflected by needles and shoots of Pinus koraiensis and Picea koraiensis species. Our results suggest that ignoring the leaf surface reflected radiation can result in an inaccurate estimation of the leaf absorption spectrum. Polarization measurements may be useful to account for leaf surface effects because radiation reflected from the leaf surface is partly polarized, whereas that from the leaf interior is not. PMID:28868160

  19. Purification of electron-transferring flavoprotein from Megasphaera elsdenii and binding of additional FAD with an unusual absorption spectrum.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kyosuke; Nishina, Yasuzo; Shiga, Kiyoshi

    2003-11-01

    Electron-transferring flavoprotein (ETF), its redox partner flavoproteins, i.e., D-lactate dehydrogenase and butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, and another well-known flavoprotein, flavodoxin, were purified from the same starting cell paste of an anaerobic bacterium, Megasphaera elsdenii. The purified ETF contained one mol FAD/mol ETF as the sole non-protein component and bound almost one mol of additional FAD. This preparation is a better subject for investigations of M. elsdenii ETF than the previously isolated ETF, which contains varying amounts of FAD and varying percentages of modified flavins such as 6-OH-FAD and 8-OH-FAD. The additionally bound FAD shows an anomalous absorption spectrum with strong absorption around 400 nm. This spectral change is not due to a chemical modification of the flavin ring because the flavin released by KBr or guanidine hydrochloride is normal FAD. It is also not due to unknown small molecules because the same spectrum appears when ETF is reconstituted from its guanidine-denatured subunits and FAD. A similar anomalous spectrum was observed for AMP-free pig ETF under acidic conditions, suggesting a common flavin environment between pig and M. elsdenii ETFs.

  20. Experimental and Ab Initio Studies of the HDO Absorption Spectrum in the 13165-13500 1/cm Spectral Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David; Naumenko, Olga; Bertseva, Elena; Campargue, Alain; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The HDO absorption spectrum has been recorded in the 13165 - 13500 cm(exp-1) spectral region by Intracavity Laser Absorption Spectroscopy. The spectrum (615 lines), dominated by the 2n2 + 3n3 and n1+3n3 bands was assigned and modeled leading to the derivation of 196 accurate energy levels of the (103) and (023) vibrational states. Finally, 150 of these levels have been reproduced by an effective Hamiltonian involving two vibrational dark states interacting with the (023) and ( 103) bright states. The rms deviation achieved by variation of 28 parameters is 0.05-1 cm, compared to an averaged experimental uncertainty of 0.007-1 cm, indicating the limit of validity of the effective Hamiltonian approach for HDO at high vibrational excitation. The predictions of previous ab initio calculations of the HDO spectrum were extensively used in the assignment process. The particular spectral region under consideration has been used to test and discuss the improvements of new ab initio calculations recently performed on the basis of the same potential energy surface but with an improved dipole moment surface. The improvements concern both the energy levels and the line intensities. In particular, the strong hybrid character of the n1+3n3 band is very well accounted for by the the new ab initio calculations.

  1. Atmospheric extinction in solar tower plants: the Absorption and Broadband Correction for MOR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanrieder, N.; Wilbert, S.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Emde, C.; Gasteiger, J.; Mayer, B.; Polo, J.

    2015-05-01

    Losses of reflected Direct Normal Irradiance due to atmospheric extinction in concentrating solar tower plants can vary significantly with site and time. The losses of the direct normal irradiance between the heliostat field and receiver in a solar tower plant are mainly caused by atmospheric scattering and absorption by aerosol and water vapor concentration in the atmospheric boundary layer. Due to a high aerosol particle number, radiation losses can be significantly larger in desert environments compared to the standard atmospheric conditions which are usually considered in raytracing or plant optimization tools. Information about on-site atmospheric extinction is only rarely available. To measure these radiation losses, two different commercially available instruments were tested and more than 19 months of measurements were collected at the Plataforma Solar de Almería and compared. Both instruments are primarily used to determine the meteorological optical range (MOR). The Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is based on a monochromatic near-infrared light source emission and measures the strength of scattering processes in a small air volume mainly caused by aerosol particles. The Optec LPV4 long-path visibility transmissometer determines the monochromatic attenuation between a light-emitting diode (LED) light source at 532 nm and a receiver and therefore also accounts for absorption processes. As the broadband solar attenuation is of interest for solar resource assessment for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP), a correction procedure for these two instruments is developed and tested. This procedure includes a spectral correction of both instruments from monochromatic to broadband attenuation. That means the attenuation is corrected for the actual, time-dependent by the collector reflected solar spectrum. Further, an absorption correction for the Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is implemented. To optimize the Absorption and Broadband Correction (ABC) procedure, additional

  2. Measurements of liquid film thickness, concentration, and temperature of aqueous urea solution by NIR absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, R.; Jeffries, J. B.; Dreier, T.; Schulz, C.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-wavelength near-infrared (NIR) diode laser absorption sensor has been developed and demonstrated for real-time monitoring of the thickness, solute concentration, and temperature of thin films of urea-water solutions. The sensor monitors the transmittance of three near-infrared diode lasers through the thin liquid film. Film thickness, urea mass fraction, and liquid temperature were determined from measured transmittance ratios of suitable combinations of lasers. Available laser wavelengths were selected depending on the variation of the NIR absorption spectrum of the solution with temperature and solute concentration. The spectral database was measured by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer in the range 5500-8000 cm-1 for urea solutions between 5 and 40 wt% and temperatures between 298 and 338 K. A prototype sensor was constructed, and the sensor concept was first validated with measurements using a calibration cell providing liquid layers of variable thickness (200-1500 µm), urea mass fraction (5-40 wt%) and temperature (298-318 K). Temporal variations of film thickness and urea concentration were captured during the constant-temperature evaporation of a liquid film deposited on an optically polished heated quartz flat.

  3. Contact sponge water absorption test implemented for in situ measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggero, Laura; Scrivano, Simona

    2016-04-01

    The contact sponge method is a non-destructive in-situ methodology used to estimate a water uptake coefficient. The procedure, unlike other in-situ measurement was proven to be directly comparable to the water uptake laboratory measurements, and was registered as UNI 11432:2011. The UNI Normal procedure requires to use a sponge with known density, soaked in water, weighed, placed on the material for 1 minute (UNI 11432, 2011; Pardini & Tiano, 2004), then weighed again. Difficulties arise in operating on test samples or on materials with porosity varied for decay. While carrying on the test, fluctuations in the bearing of the environmental parameters were negligible, but not the pressure applied to the surface, that induced the release of different water amounts towards the material. For this reason we designed a metal piece of the same diameter of the plate carrying the sponge, to be screwed at the tip of a pocket penetrometer. With this instrument the sponge was kept in contact with the surface for 1 minute applying two different loads, at first pushed with 0.3 kg/cm2 in order to press the sponge, but not its holder, against the surface. Then, a load of 1.1 kg/ cm2 was applied, still avoiding deviating the load to the sponge holder. We applied both the current and our implemented method to determine the water absorption by contact sponge on 5 fresh rock types (4 limestones: Fine - and Coarse grained Pietra di Vicenza, Rosso Verona, Breccia Aurora, and the silicoclastic Macigno sandstone). The results show that 1) the current methodology imply manual skill and experience to produce a coherent set of data; the variable involved are in fact not only the imposed pressure but also the compression mechanics. 2) The control on the applied pressure allowed reproducible measurements. Moreover, 3) the use of a thicker sponge enabled to apply the method even on rougher surfaces, as the device holding the sponge is not in contact with the tested object. Finally, 4) the

  4. Phenomenology and Measurement of Circumscribed Interests in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner-Brown, Lauren M.; Lam, Kristen S. L.; Holtzclaw, Tia N.; Dichter, Gabriel S.; Bodfish, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Circumscribed interests (CI) are important and understudied symptoms that affect individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The present study sought to develop quantitative measures of the content, intensity and functional impairment of CI in 50 children with high-functioning ASD compared to an age-, IQ-, and gender-matched sample of 50…

  5. Measuring Theory of Mind in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Neil; Young, Robyn L.; Barnett, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Deficits in Theory of Mind (ToM)--the ability to interpret others' beliefs, intentions and emotions--undermine the ability of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to interact in socially normative ways. This study provides psychometric data for the Adult-Theory of Mind (A-ToM) measure using video-scenarios based in part on Happé's…

  6. NO2 trace measurements by optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventrillard-Courtillot, I.; Foldes, T.; Romanini, D.

    2009-04-01

    absorption loss is estimated by considering the standard deviation of the spectra. We achieved better than 2x10-10 cm-1 for a single spectrum recorded in less than 100ms at 100mbar. This limit constitutes an improved of more than one order of magnitude as compare to the previous measurements reported in [4]. It leads to a detection limit of 3x108 molecules/cm3, corresponding to about 150pptv at 100mbar. At atmospheric pressure the same measurement would yield a detection limit of 15pptv assuming we can maintain the same level of sensitivity. But currently, works are under development to transfer the low minimum detectable absorption limit, already obtained for one spectrum, to a set of real time measurements. These are now limited by amplitude fluctuations of a few ppb from one spectrum to another one. [1] J. Morville, S. Kassi, M. Chenevier, and D. Romanini, Appl. Phys. B, 80, 1027 (2005). [2] D. Romanini, M. Chenevrier, S. Kassi, M. Schmidt, C. Valant, M. Ramonet, J. Lopez, and H.-J. Jost, Appl. Phys. B, 83, 659 (2006). [2] E.R.T. Kerstel, R.Q. Iannone, M. Chenevrier, S. Kassi, H.-J. Jost and D. Romanini, Appl. Phys. B, 84, 343 (2006). [4] I. Courtillot, J. Morville, V. Motto-Ros, and D. Romanini, Appl. Phys. B, 85, 407 (2006).

  7. Measuring Food Intake and Nutrient Absorption in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Amaro, Rafael L; Valentine, Elizabeth R; Carretero, Maria; LeBoeuf, Sarah E; Rangaraju, Sunitha; Broaddus, Caroline D; Solis, Gregory M; Williamson, James R; Petrascheck, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as a powerful model to study the genetics of feeding, food-related behaviors, and metabolism. Despite the many advantages of C. elegans as a model organism, direct measurement of its bacterial food intake remains challenging. Here, we describe two complementary methods that measure the food intake of C. elegans. The first method is a microtiter plate-based bacterial clearing assay that measures food intake by quantifying the change in the optical density of bacteria over time. The second method, termed pulse feeding, measures the absorption of food by tracking de novo protein synthesis using a novel metabolic pulse-labeling strategy. Using the bacterial clearance assay, we compare the bacterial food intake of various C. elegans strains and show that long-lived eat mutants eat substantially more than previous estimates. To demonstrate the applicability of the pulse-feeding assay, we compare the assimilation of food for two C. elegans strains in response to serotonin. We show that serotonin-increased feeding leads to increased protein synthesis in a SER-7-dependent manner, including proteins known to promote aging. Protein content in the food has recently emerged as critical factor in determining how food composition affects aging and health. The pulse-feeding assay, by measuring de novo protein synthesis, represents an ideal method to unequivocally establish how the composition of food dictates protein synthesis. In combination, these two assays provide new and powerful tools for C. elegans research to investigate feeding and how food intake affects the proteome and thus the physiology and health of an organism. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. Measuring Food Intake and Nutrient Absorption in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Amaro, Rafael L.; Valentine, Elizabeth R.; Carretero, Maria; LeBoeuf, Sarah E.; Rangaraju, Sunitha; Broaddus, Caroline D.; Solis, Gregory M.; Williamson, James R.; Petrascheck, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as a powerful model to study the genetics of feeding, food-related behaviors, and metabolism. Despite the many advantages of C. elegans as a model organism, direct measurement of its bacterial food intake remains challenging. Here, we describe two complementary methods that measure the food intake of C. elegans. The first method is a microtiter plate-based bacterial clearing assay that measures food intake by quantifying the change in the optical density of bacteria over time. The second method, termed pulse feeding, measures the absorption of food by tracking de novo protein synthesis using a novel metabolic pulse-labeling strategy. Using the bacterial clearance assay, we compare the bacterial food intake of various C. elegans strains and show that long-lived eat mutants eat substantially more than previous estimates. To demonstrate the applicability of the pulse-feeding assay, we compare the assimilation of food for two C. elegans strains in response to serotonin. We show that serotonin-increased feeding leads to increased protein synthesis in a SER-7-dependent manner, including proteins known to promote aging. Protein content in the food has recently emerged as critical factor in determining how food composition affects aging and health. The pulse-feeding assay, by measuring de novo protein synthesis, represents an ideal method to unequivocally establish how the composition of food dictates protein synthesis. In combination, these two assays provide new and powerful tools for C. elegans research to investigate feeding and how food intake affects the proteome and thus the physiology and health of an organism. PMID:25903497

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo for the x-ray absorption spectrum of pyrrole at the nitrogen K-edge

    SciTech Connect

    Zubarev, Dmitry Yu.; Austin, Brian M.; Lester, William A. Jr.

    Fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo (FNDMC) is used to simulate the x-ray absorption spectrum of a gas-phase pyrrole molecule at the nitrogen K-edge. Trial wave functions for core-excited states are constructed from ground-state Kohn-Sham determinants substituted with singly occupied natural orbitals from configuration interaction with single excitations calculations of the five lowest valence-excited triplet states. The FNDMC ionization potential (IP) is found to lie within 0.3 eV of the experimental value of 406.1 {+-} 0.1 eV. The transition energies to anti-bonding virtual orbitals match the experimental spectrum after alignment of IP values and agree with the existing assignments.

  10. [Study on transient absorption spectrum of tungsten nanoparticle with HepG2 tumor cell].

    PubMed

    Cao, Lin; Shu, Xiao-Ning; Liang, Dong; Wang, Cong

    2014-07-01

    Significance of this study lies in tungsten nano materials can be used as a preliminary innovative medicines applied basic research. This paper investigated the inhibition of tungsten nanoparticles which effected on human hepatoma HepG2 cells by MTT. The authors use transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) technology absorption and emission spectra characterization of charge transfer between nanoparticles and tumor cell. The authors discussed the role of the tungsten nanoparticles in the tumor early detection of the disease and its anti-tumor properties. In the HepG2 experiments system, 100-150 microg x mL(-1) is the best drug concentration of anti-tumor activity which recact violently within 6 hours and basically completed in 24 hours. The results showed that transient absorption spectroscopy can be used as tumor detection methods and characterization of charge transfer between nano-biosensors and tumor cells. Tungsten nanoparticles have potential applications as anticancer drugs.

  11. Selection of NIR H2O absorption transitions for in-cylinder measurement of temperature in IC engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xiang; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2005-12-01

    The water vapour spectrum in the 1.25-1.65 µm region is systematically analysed to find the best absorption transitions for sensitive measurement of in-cylinder gas temperature over short paths in an internal combustion engine. The strategy to select the optimum wavelength regions and absorption line combinations is developed for the time-varying pressures and temperatures expected during the compression portion of an engine cycle. We have identified 14 transitions of water vapour in this spectral region as promising for this application. From these transitions, 16 potential line pairs were considered for a wavelength-modulated absorption sensor for in-cylinder gas temperature during the compression stroke. Expected performance is modelled for the intake portion of two engine cycles that produce extreme temperature and pressure variations during compression.

  12. The CO2 absorption spectrum in the 2.3 μm transparency window by high sensitivity CRDS: (II) Self-absorption continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondelain, D.; Vasilchenko, S.; Čermák, P.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A.

    2017-01-01

    The CO2 absorption continuum near 2.3 μm is determined for a series of sub atmospheric pressures (250-750 Torr) by high sensitivity Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy. An experimental procedure consisting in injecting successively a gas flow of CO2 and synthetic air, keeping constant the gas pressure in the CRDS cell, has been developed. This procedure insures a high stability of the spectra baseline by avoiding changes of the optical alignment due to pressure changes. The CO2 continuum was obtained as the difference between the CO2 absorption coefficient and a local lines simulation using a Voigt profile truncated at ±25 cm-1. Following the results of the preceding analysis of the CO2 rovibrational lines (Vasilchenko S et al. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2016.07.002, a CO2 line list with intensities obtained by variational calculations and empirical line positions was preferred to the HITRAN line list. A quadratic pressure dependence of the absorption continuum is observed, with an average binary absorption coefficient increasing from 2 to 4×10-8 cm-1 amagat-2 between 4320 and 4380 cm-1. The obtained continuum is found in good agreement with a previous measurement using much higher densities (20 amagat) and a low resolution grating spectrograph and is consistent with values currently used in the analysis of Venus spectra.

  13. Nitryl chloride (ClNO2): UV/vis absorption spectrum between 210 and 296 K and O(3P) quantum yield at 193 and 248 nm.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Buddhadeb; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K; Talukdar, Ranajit K; Roberts, James M; Burkholder, James B

    2012-06-21

    Recent studies have shown that the UV/vis photolysis of nitryl chloride (ClNO2) can be a major source of reactive chlorine in the troposphere. The present work reports measurements of the ClNO2 absorption spectrum and its temperature dependence between 210 and 296 K over the wavelength range 200–475 nm using diode array spectroscopy. The room temperature spectrum obtained in this work was found to be in good agreement with the results from Ganske et al. (J. Geophys. Res. 1992, 97, 7651) over the wavelength range common to both studies (200–370 nm) but differs systematically from the currently recommended spectrum for use in atmospheric models. The present results lead to a decrease in the calculated atmospheric ClNO2 photolysis rate by 30%. Including the temperature dependence of the ClNO2 spectrum decreases the calculated atmospheric photolysis rate at lower temperatures (higher altitudes) even further. A parametrization of the wavelength and temperature dependence of the ClNO2 spectrum is presented. O(3P) quantum yields, Φ(ClNO2)(O), in the photolysis of ClNO2 at 193 and 248 nm were measured at 296 K using pulsed laser photolysis combined with atomic resonance fluorescence detection of O(3P) atoms. Φ(ClNO2)(O)(λ) was found to be 0.67 ± 0.12 and 0.15 ± 0.03 (2σ error limits, including estimated systematic errors) at 193 and 248 nm, respectively, indicating that multiple dissociation channels are active in the photolysis of ClNO2 at these wavelengths. The Φ(ClNO2)(O)(λ) values obtained in this work are discussed in light of previous ClNO2 photodissociation studies and the differences are discussed.

  14. Identification and measurement of atmospheric ethane (C2H6) from a 1951 infrared solar spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Levine, Joel S.

    1986-01-01

    C2H6 absorption features in the 2980/cm spectral region of the solar spectrum recorded in April, 1951 were analyzed to determine the total vertical column amount and average free tropospheric mixing ratio of C2H6 above Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps. The PQ1 subbranch is the best isolated of the three C2H6 features in the 1951 spectrum, with an equivalent width of 0.0099 + or - 0.0025/cm. Results give a total vertical column amount of 9.7 x 10 to the 15th C2H6 molecules/sq cm, with an accuracy of + or - 30 percent. March 1981 measurements from this region give a mixing ratio of about 2.0 ppbv, 2.2 times larger than the 1951 value, suggesting a long-term increase in the free tropospheric C2H6 concentration over western Europe.

  15. Would the solvent effect be the main cause of band shift in the theoretical absorption spectrum of large lanthanide complexes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Ricardo O.; Rodrigues, Nailton M.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Gimenez, Iara F.; da Costa Junior, Nivan B.

    2011-06-01

    As most reactions take place in solution, the study of solvent effects on relevant molecular properties - either by experimental or theoretical methods - is crucial for the design of new processes and prediction of technological properties. In spite of this, only few works focusing the influence of the solvent nature specifically on the spectroscopic properties of lanthanide complexes can be found in the literature. The present work describes a theoretical study of the solvent effect on the prediction of the absorption spectra for lanthanide complexes, but other possible relevant factors have been also considered such as the molecular geometry and the excitation window used for interaction configuration (CI) calculations. The [Eu(ETA) 2· nH 2O] +1 complex has been chosen as an ideal candidate for this type of study due to its small number of atoms (only 49) and also because the absorption spectrum exhibits a single band. Two Monte Carlo simulations were performed, the first one considering the [Eu(ETA) 2] +1 complex in 400 water molecules, evidencing that the complex presents four coordinated water molecules. The second simulation considered the [Eu(ETA) 2·4H 2O] +1 complex in 400 ethanol molecules, in order to evaluate the solvent effect on the shift of the maximum absorption in calculated spectra, compared to the experimental one. Quantum chemical studies were also performed in order to evaluate the effect of the accuracy of calculated ground state geometry on the prediction of absorption spectra. The influence of the excitation window used for CI calculations on the spectral shift was also evaluated. No significant solvent effect was found on the prediction of the absorption spectrum for [Eu(ETA) 2·4H 2O] +1 complex. A small but significant effect of the ground state geometry on the transition energy and oscillator strength was also observed. Finally it must be emphasized that the absorption spectra of lanthanide complexes can be predicted with great accuracy

  16. Improved determination of particulate absorption from combined filter pad and PSICAM measurements.

    PubMed

    Lefering, Ina; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Weeks, Rebecca; Connor, Derek; Utschig, Christian; Heymann, Kerstin; McKee, David

    2016-10-31

    Filter pad light absorption measurements are subject to two major sources of experimental uncertainty: the so-called pathlength amplification factor, β, and scattering offsets, o, for which previous null-correction approaches are limited by recent observations of non-zero absorption in the near infrared (NIR). A new filter pad absorption correction method is presented here which uses linear regression against point-source integrating cavity absorption meter (PSICAM) absorption data to simultaneously resolve both β and the scattering offset. The PSICAM has previously been shown to provide accurate absorption data, even in highly scattering waters. Comparisons of PSICAM and filter pad particulate absorption data reveal linear relationships that vary on a sample by sample basis. This regression approach provides significantly improved agreement with PSICAM data (3.2% RMS%E) than previously published filter pad absorption corrections. Results show that direct transmittance (T-method) filter pad absorption measurements perform effectively at the same level as more complex geometrical configurations based on integrating cavity measurements (IS-method and QFT-ICAM) because the linear regression correction compensates for the sensitivity to scattering errors in the T-method. This approach produces accurate filter pad particulate absorption data for wavelengths in the blue/UV and in the NIR where sensitivity issues with PSICAM measurements limit performance. The combination of the filter pad absorption and PSICAM is therefore recommended for generating full spectral, best quality particulate absorption data as it enables correction of multiple errors sources across both measurements.

  17. Improved Measurement of Reactor Flux and Spectrum at Daya Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Liang; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    A new measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and energy spectrum by the Daya Bay experiment is reported. With a live time of 621 days, more than 1.2 million inverse beta decay (IBD) candidates were collected by eight antineutrino detectors (ADs) deployed in two near (560 m and 600 m flux-weighted baselines) and one far (16400 m flux-weighted baseline) underground experimental halls. The IBD yield was measured and the ratio to the predicted flux using the Huber+Mueller (ILL+Vogel) model was determined to be 0.946 ± 0.020 (0.992 ± 0.021). A 2.9 σ deviation was found in the measured IBD positron energy spectrum compared to the predictions. In particular, an excess of events in the region of 4-6 MeV was found with a local significance of 4.4 σ.

  18. Cross-spectrum measurement of thermal-noise limited oscillators.

    PubMed

    Hati, A; Nelson, C W; Howe, D A

    2016-03-01

    Cross-spectrum analysis is a commonly used technique for the detection of phase and amplitude noise of a signal in the presence of interfering uncorrelated noise. Recently, we demonstrated that the phase-inversion (anti-correlation) effect due to amplitude noise leakage can cause complete or partial collapse of the cross-spectral function. In this paper, we discuss the newly discovered effect of anti-correlated thermal noise that originates from the common-mode power divider (splitter), an essential component in a cross-spectrum noise measurement system. We studied this effect for different power splitters and discuss its influence on the measurement of thermal-noise limited oscillators. We provide theory, simulation and experimental results. In addition, we expand this study to reveal how the presence of ferrite-isolators and amplifiers at the output ports of the power splitters can affect the oscillator noise measurements. Finally, we discuss a possible solution to overcome this problem.

  19. Energy Spectrum and Optical Absorption of Isomer No. 11 of C84 Fullerene of C 2 Symmetry Within the Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murzashev, A. I.; Rumyantsev, I. A.

    2018-05-01

    Energy spectrum of isomer No. 11 of C84 fullerene of C2 symmetry is calculated within the Hubbard model. Based on the obtained energy spectrum, the optical absorption spectrum is modeled taking into account not only allowed, but also forbidden symmetry transitions. Good qualitative agreement with the experimental data is obtained. This suggests that when studying fullerenes, the intra-site Coulomb interaction of electrons must be taken into account.

  20. Differential Absorption Lidar Measurements of Fugitive Benzene Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, R. A.; Innocenti, F.; Helmore, J.; Gardiner, T.; Finlayson, A.; Connor, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique is based on the optical analogue of radar; lidar (light detection and ranging). It provides the capability to remotely measure the concentration and spatial distribution of compounds in the atmosphere. The ability to scan the optical measurement beam throughout the atmosphere enables pollutant concentrations to be mapped, and emission fluxes to be determined when combined with wind data. The NPL DIAL systems can operate in the UV and infrared spectral, enabling the measurement of a range of air pollutants and GHGs including hazardous air pollutants such as benzene. The mobile ground based DIAL systems developed at NPL for pollution monitoring have been used for over 25 years. They have been deployed for routine monitoring, emission factor studies, research investigations and targeted monitoring campaigns. More recently the NPL DIAL has been used in studies to validate other monitoring techniques. In support of this capability, NPL have developed a portable, configurable controlled release system (CRF) able to simulate emissions from typical sources. This has been developed to enable the validation and assessment of fugitive emission monitoring techniques. Following a brief summary of the technique, we outline recent developments in the use of DIAL for monitoring fugitive and diffuse emissions, including the development of a European Standard Method for fugitive emission monitoring. We will present the results of a number of validation exercises using the CRF presenting an update on the performance of DIAL for emission quantification and discuss the wider validation of novel technologies. We will report on recent measurements of the emissions of benzene from industrial sites including a large scale emissions monitoring study carried out by the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) and will report on the measurement of emissions from petrochemical facilities and examine an example of the identification

  1. Cl2O photochemistry: ultraviolet/vis absorption spectrum temperature dependence and O(3P) quantum yield at 193 and 248 nm.

    PubMed

    Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K; Feierabend, Karl J; Burkholder, James B

    2011-05-28

    The photochemistry of Cl(2)O (dichlorine monoxide) was studied using measurements of its UV/vis absorption spectrum temperature dependence and the O((3)P) atom quantum yield, Φ(Cl(2)O)(O)(λ), in its photolysis at 193 and 248 nm. The Cl(2)O UV/vis absorption spectrum was measured over the temperature range 201-296 K between 200 and 500 nm using diode array spectroscopy. Cl(2)O absorption cross sections, σ(Cl(2)O)(λ,T), at temperatures <296 K were determined relative to its well established room temperature values. A wavelength and temperature dependent parameterization of the Cl(2)O spectrum using the sum of six Gaussian functions, which empirically represent transitions from the ground (1)A(1) electronic state to excited states, is presented. The Gaussian functions are found to correlate well with published theoretically calculated vertical excitation energies. O((3)P) quantum yields in the photolysis of Cl(2)O at 193 and 248 nm were measured using pulsed laser photolysis combined with atomic resonance fluorescence detection of O((3)P) atoms. O((3)P) quantum yields were measured to be 0.85 ± 0.15 for 193 nm photolysis at 296 K and 0.20 ± 0.03 at 248 nm, which was also found to be independent of temperature (220-352 K) and pressure (17 and 28 Torr, N(2)). The quoted uncertainties are at the 2σ (95% confidence) level and include estimated systematic errors. ClO radical temporal profiles obtained following the photolysis of Cl(2)O at 248 nm, as reported previously in Feierabend et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 12052, (2010)], were interpreted to establish a <5% upper-limit for the O + Cl(2) photodissociation channel, which indicates that O((3)P) is primarily formed in the three-body, O + 2Cl, photodissociation channel at 248 nm. The analysis also indirectly provided a Cl atom quantum yield of 1.2 ± 0.1 at 248 nm. The results from this work are compared with previous studies where possible. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  2. Absorption Spectrum of Phytoplankton Pigments Derived from Hyperspectral Remote-Sensing Reflectance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    For a data set collected around Baja California with chlorophyll-a concentration ((chl-a)) ranging from 0.16 to 11.3 mg/cubic meter, hyperspectral absorption spectra of phytoplankton pigments were independently inverted from hyperspectral remote - sensing reflectance using a newly...potential of using hyperspectral remote sensing to retrieve both chlorophyll-a and other accessory pigments. (7 figures, 47 refs.)

  3. Measurement of two-photon-absorption spectra through nonlinear fluorescence produced by a line-shaped excitation beam.

    PubMed

    Hasani, E; Parravicini, J; Tartara, L; Tomaselli, A; Tomassini, D

    2018-05-01

    We propose an innovative experimental approach to estimate the two-photon absorption (TPA) spectrum of a fluorescent material. Our method develops the standard indirect fluorescence-based method for the TPA measurement by employing a line-shaped excitation beam, generating a line-shaped fluorescence emission. Such a configuration, which requires a relatively high amount of optical power, permits to have a greatly increased fluorescence signal, thus avoiding the photon counterdetection devices usually used in these measurements, and allowing to employ detectors such as charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras. The method is finally tested on a fluorescent isothiocyanate sample, whose TPA spectrum, which is measured with the proposed technique, is compared with the TPA spectra reported in the literature, confirming the validity of our experimental approach. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2018 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. Development of the surface-sensitive soft x-ray absorption fine structure measurement technique for the bulk insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Yonemura, Takumi, E-mail: yonemura-takumi@sei.co.jp; Iihara, Junji; Uemura, Shigeaki

    We have succeeded in measuring X-ray absorption fine structure (TEY-XAFS) spectra of insulating plate samples by total electron yield. The biggest problem is how to suppress the charge-up. We have attempted to deposit a gold stripe electrode on the surface and obtained a TEY-XAFS spectrum. This indicates that the metal stripe electrode is very useful in the TEY-XAFS measurement of the insulating plate samples. In the detailed analysis, we have found that the effective area for suppressing charge-up was approximately 120 μm from the edge of the electrode.

  5. Low-temperature high-resolution absorption spectrum of 14NH3 in the ν1+ν3 band region (1.51 μm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Földes, T.; Golebiowski, D.; Herman, M.; Softley, T. P.; Di Lonardo, G.; Fusina, L.

    2014-09-01

    Jet-cooled spectra of 14NH3 and 15NH3 in natural abundance were recorded using cavity ring-down (CRDS, 6584-6670 cm-1) and cavity enhanced absorption (CEAS, 6530-6700 cm-1) spectroscopy. Line broadening effects in the CRDS spectrum allowed lines with J″-values between 0 and 3 to be identified. Intensity ratios in 14NH3 between the jet-cooled CRDS and literature room-temperature data from Sung et al. (J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, 113 (2012), 1066) further assisted the line assignments. Ground state combination differences were extensively used to support the assignments, providing reliable values for J, K and inversion symmetry of the ground state vibrational levels. CEAS data helped in this respect for the lowest J lines, some of which are saturated in the CRDS spectrum. Further information on a/s doublets arose from the observed spectral structures. Thirty-two transitions of 14NH3 were assigned in this way and a limited but significant number (19) of changes in the assignments results, compared to Sung et al. or to Cacciani et al. (J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, 113 (2012), 1084). Sixteen known and 25 new low-J transitions were identified for 15NH3 in the CRDS spectrum but the much scarcer literature information did not allow for any more refined assignment. The present line position measurements improve on literature values published for 15NH3 and on some line positions for 14NH3.

  6. Line identifications, line strengths, and continuum flux measurements in the ultraviolet spectrum of Arcturus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K. G.; Wing, R. F.; Stencel, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The ultraviolet spectrum of Arcturus has been observed at high resolution with the IUE satellite. Line identifications, mean absolute 'continuum' flux measurements, integrated absolute emission-line fluxes, and measurements of selected absorption line strengths are presented for the 2250-2930 A region. In the 1150-2000 A region, identifications are given primarily on the basis of low-resolution spectra. Chromospheric emission lines have been identified with low-excitation species including H I, C I, C II, O I, Mg I, Mg II, Al II, Si I, Si II, S I, and Fe II; there is no evidence for lines of C IV, N V, or other species requiring high temperatures. A search for molecular absorption features in the 2500-2930 A interval has led to several tentative identifications, but only OH could be established as definitely present. Iron lines strongly dominate the identifications in the 2250-2930 A region, Fe II accounting for about 86 percent of the emission features and Fe I for 43 percent of the identified absorption features.

  7. Measurement of Glyoxal Using an Incoherent Broadband Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Langford, A. O.; Fuchs, H.; Brown, S. S.

    2008-12-01

    Glyoxal (CHOCHO) is the simplest alpha-dicarbonyl and one of the most prevalent dicarbonyls in the atmosphere. It is formed from the photooxidation of anthropogenic hydrocarbons (e.g. aromatics and acetylene), and is a minor oxidation product of isoprene and other biogenic species. Photolysis of glyoxal is a significant source of HOx (OH + HO2), and there is growing evidence that heterogeneous reactions of glyoxal play an important role in the formation of secondary organic aerosol. We present a novel technique for measurement of glyoxal using cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a broadband light source (IBBCEAS). The output of a Xenon arc lamp is coupled into a 1 m optical cavity, and the spectrum of light exiting the cavity is recorded by a grating spectrometer with a charge- coupled device (CCD) array detector. The mirror reflectivity and effective path lengths are determined from the known Rayleigh scattering of He and dry zero air (N2 + O2). We use least-squares fitting with published reference spectra to simultaneous retrieve glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), oxygen dimer (O4) and water (H2O) in the 441 to 469 nm spectral range. For a 1-min sampling time, the precision (±1σ) on signal for measurements of CHOCHO and NO2 is 29 pptv and 20 pptv respectively. We directly compare the incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer to 404 and 532 nm cavity ringdown instruments for CHOCHO and NO2 detection, and find linear agreement over a wide range of concentrations. We present laboratory measurements of synthetic and real air samples containing CHOCHO and NO2, and discuss the potential for field measurements.

  8. Cesium Absorption Spectrum Perturbed by Argon: Observation of Non-Lorentzian Wing Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    vapor phase Cs contained in a heat pipe in order to observe the absorption lines. Two lenses were used to collimate the light through the heat pipe...After passing through the heat pipe, a mirror was used to direct light around a 90 degree turn and then through an f/# matched lens into a monochromator...pipe used here was built by Charles Fox as part of [19]. Brewster’s angle windows were attached to either end of a pipe approximately 1 inch in diameter

  9. Midinfrared absorption measured at a lambda/400 resolution with an atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Houel, Julien; Homeyer, Estelle; Sauvage, Sébastien; Boucaud, Philippe; Dazzi, Alexandre; Prazeres, Rui; Ortéga, Jean-Michel

    2009-06-22

    Midinfrared absorption can be locally measured using a detection combining an atomic force microscope and a pulsed excitation. This is illustrated for the midinfrared bulk GaAs phonon absorption and for the midinfrared absorption of thin SiO(2) microdisks. We show that the signal given by the cantilever oscillation amplitude of the atomic force microscope follows the spectral dependence of the bulk material absorption. The absorption spatial resolution achieved with microdisks is around 50 nanometer for an optical excitation around 22 micrometer wavelength.

  10. Measurements of the Absorption by Auditorium SEATING—A Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BARRON, M.; COLEMAN, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of several problems with seat absorption is that only small numbers of seats can be tested in standard reverberation chambers. One method proposed for reverberation chamber measurements involves extrapolation when the absorption coefficient results are applied to actual auditoria. Model seat measurements in an effectively large model reverberation chamber have allowed the validity of this extrapolation to be checked. The alternative barrier method for reverberation chamber measurements was also tested and the two methods were compared. The effect on the absorption of row-row spacing as well as absorption by small numbers of seating rows was also investigated with model seats.

  11. Water absorption tests for measuring permeability of field concrete.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-09-01

    The research results from CFIRE Project 04-06 were communicated to engineers and researchers in this project. : Specifically, the water absorption of concrete samples (i.e., 2-in. thick, 4-in. diameter discs cut from concrete : cylinders) was found s...

  12. Optical absorption and scattering properties of bulk porcine muscle phantoms from interstitial radiance measurements in 650-900 nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabtchak, Serge; Montgomery, Logan G.; Whelan, William M.

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrated the application of relative radiance-based continuous wave (cw) measurements for recovering absorption and scattering properties (the effective attenuation coefficient, the diffusion coefficient, the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient) of bulk porcine muscle phantoms in the 650-900 nm spectral range. Both the side-firing fiber (the detector) and the fiber with a spherical diffuser at the end (the source) were inserted interstitially at predetermined locations in the phantom. The porcine phantoms were prostate-shaped with ˜4 cm in diameter and ˜3 cm thickness and made from porcine loin or tenderloin muscles. The described method was previously validated using the diffusion approximation on simulated and experimental radiance data obtained for homogenous Intralipid-1% liquid phantom. The approach required performing measurements in two locations in the tissue with different distances to the source. Measurements were performed on 21 porcine phantoms. Spectral dependences of the effective attenuation and absorption coefficients for the loin phantom deviated from corresponding dependences for the tenderloin phantom for wavelengths <750 nm. The diffusion constant and the reduced scattering coefficient were very close for both phantom types. To quantify chromophore presence, the plot for the absorption coefficient was matched with a synthetic absorption spectrum constructed from deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin and water. The closest match for the porcine loin spectrum was obtained with the following concentrations: 15.5 µM (±30% s.d.) Hb, 21 µM (±30% s.d.) HbO2 and 0.3 (±30% s.d.) fractional volume of water. The tenderloin absorption spectrum was best described by 30 µM Hb (±30% s.d), 19 µM (±30% s.d.) HbO2 and 0.3 (±30% s.d.) fractional volume of water. The higher concentration of Hb in tenderloin was consistent with a dark-red appearance of the tenderloin phantom. The method can be applied to a number of biological

  13. Improvement in Suppression of Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Light With Iodine Absorption Cells for Filtered Rayleigh Scattering Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Buggele, Alvin E

    1997-01-01

    Filtered Rayleigh scattering using iodine absorption cells is an effective technique for obtaining density, temperature, and velocity measurements in high speed confined flows. By tuning a single frequency laser to a strong iodine absorption line, stray scattered laser light can be greatly suppressed. For example, the minimum transmission predicted by an iodine absorption model calculation is less than 10(exp -5) at the 18788.44/cm line using a 200 mm absorption cell containing iodine vapor at 0.46 T. Measurements obtained by other researches using a CW Nd:YAG laser agree with the model calculations. However, measurements made by us and by others using Q-switched, injection-seeded, frequency doubled Nd:YAG lasers only show minimum transmission of about 3 x 10(exp -3). This greatly reduces the applicability of the filtered Rayleigh scattering technique using these lasers in experiments having large amounts of stray scattered laser light. The purposes of the present study are to characterize the spectrum of the excess light transmitted by the iodine cell and to make changes to the laser to reduce the transmitted laser light. Transmission data as a function of laser frequency for the iodine absorption line at 18788.44/cm are presented. A planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer was used to characterize the frequency spectrum of the light passed through the cell. Measurements taken with the laser tuned to the center of the iodine absorption line show the light transmitted through the iodine cell to have a component with a bandwidth of about 40 GHz. This is probably caused by other modes in the laser that exist in spite of the single frequency injection beam. A second broadband component was also observed, possibly caused by the laser flash lamps or by fluorescence. An intracavity etalon was installed in the laser oscillator cavity to suppress the 40 GHz component. Measurements taken with the etalon tuned to the injection frequency showed a reduction in the transmitted

  14. Linearized spectrum correlation analysis for line emission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, T.; Nornberg, M. D.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Sarff, J. S.

    2017-08-01

    A new spectral analysis method, Linearized Spectrum Correlation Analysis (LSCA), for charge exchange and passive ion Doppler spectroscopy is introduced to provide a means of measuring fast spectral line shape changes associated with ion-scale micro-instabilities. This analysis method is designed to resolve the fluctuations in the emission line shape from a stationary ion-scale wave. The method linearizes the fluctuations around a time-averaged line shape (e.g., Gaussian) and subdivides the spectral output channels into two sets to reduce contributions from uncorrelated fluctuations without averaging over the fast time dynamics. In principle, small fluctuations in the parameters used for a line shape model can be measured by evaluating the cross spectrum between different channel groupings to isolate a particular fluctuating quantity. High-frequency ion velocity measurements (100-200 kHz) were made by using this method. We also conducted simulations to compare LSCA with a moment analysis technique under a low photon count condition. Both experimental and synthetic measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of LSCA.

  15. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  16. Detection of a deep 3-microm absorption feature in the spectrum of Amalthea (JV).

    PubMed

    Takato, Naruhisa; Bus, Schelte J; Terada, Hiroshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Kobayashi, Naoto

    2004-12-24

    Near-infrared spectra of Jupiter's small inner satellites Amalthea and Thebe are similar to those of D-type asteroids in the 0.8- to 2.5-micrometer wavelength range. A deep absorption feature is detected at 3 micrometers in the spectra of the trailing side of Amalthea, which is similar to that of the non-ice components of Callisto and can be attributed to hydrous minerals. These surface materials cannot be explained if the satellite formed at its present orbit by accreting from a circumjovian nebula. Amalthea and Thebe may be the remnants of Jupiter's inflowing building blocks that formed in the outer part or outside of the circumjovian nebula.

  17. Noninvasive photoacoustic measurement of absorption coefficient using internal light irradiation of cylindrical diffusing fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dong-qing; Zhu, Li-li; Li, Zhi-fang; Li, Hui

    2017-09-01

    Absorption coefficient of biological tissue is an important parameter in biomedicine, but its determination remains a challenge. In this paper, we propose a method using focusing photoacoustic imaging technique and internal light irradiation of cylindrical diffusing fiber (CDF) to quantify the target optical absorption coefficient. Absorption coefficients for ink absorbers are firstly determined through photoacoustic and spectrophotometric measurements at the same excitation, which demonstrates the feasibility of this method. Also, the optical absorption coefficients of ink absorbers with several concentrations are measured. Finally, the two-dimensional scanning photoacoustic image is obtained. Optical absorption coefficient measurement and simultaneous photoacoustic imaging of absorber non-invasively are the typical characteristics of the method. This method can play a significant role for non-invasive determination of blood oxygen saturation, the absorption-based imaging and therapy.

  18. 2MTF - VI. Measuring the velocity power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howlett, Cullan; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Elahi, Pascal J.; Hong, Tao; Jarrett, Tom H.; Jones, D. Heath; Koribalski, Bärbel S.; Macri, Lucas M.; Masters, Karen L.; Springob, Christopher M.

    2017-11-01

    We present measurements of the velocity power spectrum and constraints on the growth rate of structure fσ8, at redshift zero, using the peculiar motions of 2062 galaxies in the completed 2MASS Tully-Fisher survey (2MTF). To accomplish this we introduce a model for fitting the velocity power spectrum including the effects of non-linear redshift space distortions (RSD), allowing us to recover unbiased fits down to scales k = 0.2 h Mpc-1 without the need to smooth or grid the data. Our fitting methods are validated using a set of simulated 2MTF surveys. Using these simulations we also identify that the Gaussian distributed estimator for peculiar velocities of Watkins & Feldman is suitable for measuring the velocity power spectrum, but sub-optimal for the 2MTF data compared to using magnitude fluctuations δm, and that, whilst our fits are robust to a change in fiducial cosmology, future peculiar velocity surveys with more constraining power may have to marginalize over this. We obtain scale-dependent constraints on the growth rate of structure in two bins, finding fσ 8 = [0.55^{+0.16}_{-0.13},0.40^{+0.16}_{-0.17}] in the ranges k = [0.007-0.055, 0.55-0.150] h Mpc-1. We also find consistent results using four bins. Assuming scale-independence we find a value fσ 8 = 0.51^{+0.09}_{-0.08}, a ˜16 per cent measurement of the growth rate. Performing a consistency check of general relativity (GR) and combining our results with cosmic microwave background data only we find γ = 0.45^{+0.10}_{-0.11}, a remarkable constraint considering the small number of galaxies. All of our results are completely independent of the effects of galaxy bias, and fully consistent with the predictions of GR (scale-independent fσ8 and γ ≈ 0.55).

  19. Substituent and solvent effects on the UV-vis absorption spectrum of the photoactive yellow protein chromophore.

    PubMed

    García-Prieto, F Fernández; Aguilar, M A; Galván, I Fdez; Muñoz-Losa, A; Olivares del Valle, F J; Sánchez, M L; Martín, M E

    2015-05-28

    Solvent effects on the UV-vis absorption spectra and molecular properties of four models of the photoactive yellow protein (PYP) chromophore have been studied with ASEP/MD, a sequential quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method. The anionic trans-p-coumaric acid (pCA(-)), thioacid (pCTA(-)), methyl ester (pCMe(-)), and methyl thioester (pCTMe(-)) derivatives have been studied in gas phase and in water solution. We analyze the modifications introduced by the substitution of sulfur by oxygen atoms and hydrogen by methyl in the coumaryl tail. We have found some differences in the absorption spectra of oxy and thio derivatives that could shed light on the different photoisomerization paths followed by these compounds. In solution, the spectrum substantially changes with respect to that obtained in the gas phase. The n → π1* state is destabilized by a polar solvent like water, and it becomes the third excited state in solution displaying an important blue shift. Now, the π → π1* and π → π2* states mix, and we find contributions from both transitions in S1 and S2. The presence of the sulfur atom modulates the solvent effect and the first two excited states become practically degenerate for pCA(-) and pCMe(-) but moderately well-separated for pCTA(-) and pCTMe(-).

  20. Atmospheric extinction in solar tower plants: absorption and broadband correction for MOR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanrieder, N.; Wilbert, S.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Emde, C.; Gasteiger, J.; Mayer, B.; Polo, J.

    2015-08-01

    Losses of reflected Direct Normal Irradiance due to atmospheric extinction in concentrated solar tower plants can vary significantly with site and time. The losses of the direct normal irradiance between the heliostat field and receiver in a solar tower plant are mainly caused by atmospheric scattering and absorption by aerosol and water vapor concentration in the atmospheric boundary layer. Due to a high aerosol particle number, radiation losses can be significantly larger in desert environments compared to the standard atmospheric conditions which are usually considered in ray-tracing or plant optimization tools. Information about on-site atmospheric extinction is only rarely available. To measure these radiation losses, two different commercially available instruments were tested, and more than 19 months of measurements were collected and compared at the Plataforma Solar de Almería. Both instruments are primarily used to determine the meteorological optical range (MOR). The Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is based on a monochromatic near-infrared light source emission and measures the strength of scattering processes in a small air volume mainly caused by aerosol particles. The Optec LPV4 long-path visibility transmissometer determines the monochromatic attenuation between a light-emitting diode (LED) light source at 532 nm and a receiver and therefore also accounts for absorption processes. As the broadband solar attenuation is of interest for solar resource assessment for concentrated solar power (CSP), a correction procedure for these two instruments is developed and tested. This procedure includes a spectral correction of both instruments from monochromatic to broadband attenuation. That means the attenuation is corrected for the time-dependent solar spectrum which is reflected by the collector. Further, an absorption correction for the Vaisala FS11 scatterometer is implemented. To optimize the absorption and broadband correction (ABC) procedure, additional

  1. Radial measurements of IMF-sensitive absorption features in two massive ETGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Sam P.; Davies, Roger L.; Zieleniewski, Simon; Houghton, Ryan C. W.

    2018-03-01

    We make radial measurements of stellar initial mass function (IMF) sensitive absorption features in the two massive early-type galaxies NGC 1277 and IC 843. Using the Oxford Short Wavelength Integral Field specTrogaph (SWIFT), we obtain resolved measurements of the Na I 0.82 and FeH 0.99 indices, amongst others, finding both galaxies show strong gradients in Na I absorption combined with flat FeH profiles at ˜0.4 Å. We find these measurements may be explained by radial gradients in the IMF, appropriate abundance gradients in [Na/Fe] and [Fe/H], or a combination of the two, and our data are unable to break this degeneracy. We also use full spectral fitting to infer global properties from an integrated spectrum of each object, deriving a unimodal IMF slope consistent with Salpeter in IC 843 (x = 2.27 ± 0.17) but steeper than Salpeter in NGC 1277 (x = 2.69 ± 0.11), despite their similar FeH equivalent widths. Independently, we fit the strength of the FeH feature and compare to the E-MILES and CvD12 stellar population libraries, finding agreement between the models. The IMF values derived in this way are in close agreement with those from spectral fitting in NGC 1277 (x_{CvD}=2.59^{+0.25}_{-0.48}, x_{E-MILES}=2.77± 0.31), but are less consistent in IC 843, with the IMF derived from FeH alone leading to steeper slopes than when fitting the full spectrum (x_{CvD}=2.57^{+0.30}_{-0.41}, x_{E-MILES}=2.72± 0.25). This work highlights the importance of a large wavelength coverage for breaking the degeneracy between abundance and IMF variations, and may bring into doubt the use of the Wing-Ford band as an IMF index if used without other spectral information.

  2. Tracing Acetylene Dissolved in Transformer Oil by Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guo-Ming; Zhao, Shu-Jing; Jiang, Jun; Song, Hong-Tu; Li, Cheng-Rong; Luo, Ying-Ting; Wu, Hao

    2017-11-02

    Dissolved gas analysis (DGA) is widely used in monitoring and diagnosing of power transformer, since the insulation material in the power transformer decomposes gases under abnormal operation condition. Among the gases, acetylene, as a symbol of low energy spark discharge and high energy electrical faults (arc discharge) of power transformer, is an important monitoring parameter. The current gas detection method used by the online DGA equipment suffers from problems such as cross sensitivity, electromagnetic compatibility and reliability. In this paper, an optical gas detection system based on TDLAS technology is proposed to detect acetylene dissolved in transformer oil. We selected a 1530.370 nm laser in the near infrared wavelength range to correspond to the absorption peak of acetylene, while using the wavelength modulation strategy and Herriott cell to improve the detection precision. Results show that the limit of detection reaches 0.49 ppm. The detection system responds quickly to changes of gas concentration and is easily to maintenance while has no electromagnetic interference, cross-sensitivity, or carrier gas. In addition, a complete detection process of the system takes only 8 minutes, implying a practical prospect of online monitoring technology.

  3. Atomic-level molybdenum oxide nanorings with full-spectrum absorption and photoresponsive properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Yang, Yang; Chen, Shuangming; Lu, Qichen; Song, Li; Wei, Yen; Wang, Xun

    2017-11-16

    Superthin nanostructures, particularly with atomic-level thicknesses, typically display unique optical properties because of their exceptional light-matter interactions. Here, we report a facile strategy for the synthesis of sulfur-doped molybdenum oxide nanorings with an atomic-level size (thickness of 0.5 nm) and a tunable ring-in-ring architecture. These atomic-level nanorings displayed strong photo-absorption in both the visible and infrared-light ranges and acted as a photothermal agent. Under irradiation with an 808 nm laser with an intensity of 1 W/cm 2 , a composite of the nanorings embedded in polydimethylsiloxane showed an ultrafast photothermal effect, delivering a local temperature of up to 400 °C within 20 s, which to the best of our knowledge is the highest temperature by light irradiation reported to date. Meanwhile, the resulting nanorings were also employed as a photoinitiator to remotely induce a visible-light shape memory response, self-healing, reshaping performance and reversible actuation of dynamic three-dimensional structures. This study demonstrates an advancement towards controlling atomic-level-sized nanostructures and achieving greatly enhanced optical performances for optoelectronics.

  4. Laboratory absorption spectra of molecules at interstellar cloud temperatures - First measurements on CO at about 97 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.; Yoshino, K.; Stark, G.; Ito, K.; Stevens, M. H.

    1991-01-01

    In the 91-100 nm spectral region, where absorption of photons by interstellar CO usually leads to dissociation, laboratory spectra obtained at 295 K show that most CO bands are both overlapped and perturbed. Reliable band oscillator strengths cannot be extracted from such spectra. As a consequence, synthetic extreme-ultraviolet absorption spectra for CO at the low temperatures that prevail in interstellar clouds are uncertain. A supersonic expansion technique has been used to cool CO to 30 K and three bands in the 97-nm region have been studied with high spectral resolution. The measured spectrum at 30 K is in reasonable agreement with some published modeled spectra, but the ratios of integrated cross sections are somewhat different from those determined from low resolution spectra obtained at 295 K, in which the bands are blended.

  5. Unbiased contaminant removal for 3D galaxy power spectrum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalus, B.; Percival, W. J.; Bacon, D. J.; Samushia, L.

    2016-11-01

    We assess and develop techniques to remove contaminants when calculating the 3D galaxy power spectrum. We separate the process into three separate stages: (I) removing the contaminant signal, (II) estimating the uncontaminated cosmological power spectrum and (III) debiasing the resulting estimates. For (I), we show that removing the best-fitting contaminant (mode subtraction) and setting the contaminated components of the covariance to be infinite (mode deprojection) are mathematically equivalent. For (II), performing a quadratic maximum likelihood (QML) estimate after mode deprojection gives an optimal unbiased solution, although it requires the manipulation of large N_mode^2 matrices (Nmode being the total number of modes), which is unfeasible for recent 3D galaxy surveys. Measuring a binned average of the modes for (II) as proposed by Feldman, Kaiser & Peacock (FKP) is faster and simpler, but is sub-optimal and gives rise to a biased solution. We present a method to debias the resulting FKP measurements that does not require any large matrix calculations. We argue that the sub-optimality of the FKP estimator compared with the QML estimator, caused by contaminants, is less severe than that commonly ignored due to the survey window.

  6. New laboratory measurements on ammonia's inversion spectrum, with implications for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, Thomas R.

    1993-01-01

    Microwave spectral measurements have been performed on pure room-temperature gaseous ammonia at frequencies from 1.75 to 18 GHz (1.7-17 cm), at 50-, 100-, and 300-torr pressures. These measurements are part of a laboratory program to measure the microwave absorption spectrum of ammonia, under conditions applicable to giant planet atmospheres, now in progress at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The pure ammonia data reported here agree well with previous data by Bleaney and Loubser (1950) at 100 and 300 torrs, and with predictions of the absorptivity formalism published by Berge and Gulkis. Success with pure ammonia but failure with mixtures of ammonia in hydrogen and helium (Spilker, 1990) indicates that the Berge and Gulkis formalism does not correctly handle foreign-gas effects on ammonia inversion lines. This may require modifying conclusions of radio astronomical and radio occultation studies that used this formalism. Notably, a suggested depletion of ammonia and superabundance of hydrogen sulfide may have been exaggerated as a result of inaccuracies in the Berge and Gulkis formalism.

  7. Measurement of the absorption coefficient using the sound-intensity technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M.; Bernhard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of using the sound intensity technique to measure the absorption coefficient of a material is investigated. This technique measures the absorption coefficient by measuring the intensity incident on the sample and the net intensity reflected by the sample. Results obtained by this technique are compared with the standard techniques of measuring the change in the reverberation time and the standing wave ratio in a tube, thereby, calculating the random incident and the normal incident adsorption coefficient.

  8. Measuring Theory of Mind in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Neil; Young, Robyn L; Barnett, Emily

    2017-07-01

    Deficits in Theory of Mind (ToM)-the ability to interpret others' beliefs, intentions and emotions-undermine the ability of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to interact in socially normative ways. This study provides psychometric data for the Adult-Theory of Mind (A-ToM) measure using video-scenarios based in part on Happé's (Instructions for theory of mind story task, 1999) Strange Stories test. The final items discriminated IQ-matched adults with ASD from controls on the social but not the physical items. Additional validity data included a two-component principal components solution, correlations with existing ToM scales, and the absence of correlations with self-report measures of empathy and social anxiety (not requiring inferences about the intent of others). The expected group differences in ToM were accompanied by marked variability in the ASD sample.

  9. Measurements of trace constituents from atmospheric infrared emission and absorption spectra, a feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Williams, W. J.; Murcray, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of detecting eight trace constituents (CH4, HCl, HF, HNO3, NH3, NO, NO2 and SO2) against the rest of the atmospheric background at various altitudes from infrared emission and absorption atmospheric spectra was studied. Line-by-line calculations and observational data were used to establish features that can be observed in the atmospheric spectrum due to each trace constituent. Model calculations were made for experimental conditions which approximately represent state of the art emission and absorption spectrometers.

  10. NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY MEASUREMENT OF SALT SOLUTION ABSORPTION IN MORTAR

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Catherine L.; Spragg, Robert P.; Bentz, Dale P.; Hussey, Daniel S.; Jacobson, David L.; Weiss, W. Jason

    2017-01-01

    Some concrete pavements in the US have recently exhibited premature joint deterioration. It is hypothesized that one component of this damage can be attributed to a reaction that occurs when salt-laden water is absorbed in the concrete and reacts with the matrix. This study examines the absorption of CaCl2 solution in mortar via neutron imaging. Mortar specimens were prepared with water to cement ratios, (w/c), of 0.36, 0.42 and 0.50 by mass and exposed to chloride solutions with concentrations ranging from 0 % to 29.8 % by mass. Depth of fluid penetration and moisture content along the specimen length were determined for 96 h after exposure. At high salt concentration (29.8 %), the sorption rate decreased by over 80 % in all samples. Along with changes in surface tension and viscosity, CaCl2 reacts with the cement paste to produce products (Friedel’s salt, Kuzel’s salt, or calcium oxychloride) that block pores and reduce absorption. PMID:28626299

  11. NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY MEASUREMENT OF SALT SOLUTION ABSORPTION IN MORTAR.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Catherine L; Spragg, Robert P; Bentz, Dale P; Hussey, Daniel S; Jacobson, David L; Weiss, W Jason

    2017-01-01

    Some concrete pavements in the US have recently exhibited premature joint deterioration. It is hypothesized that one component of this damage can be attributed to a reaction that occurs when salt-laden water is absorbed in the concrete and reacts with the matrix. This study examines the absorption of CaCl 2 solution in mortar via neutron imaging. Mortar specimens were prepared with water to cement ratios, ( w/c ), of 0.36, 0.42 and 0.50 by mass and exposed to chloride solutions with concentrations ranging from 0 % to 29.8 % by mass. Depth of fluid penetration and moisture content along the specimen length were determined for 96 h after exposure. At high salt concentration (29.8 %), the sorption rate decreased by over 80 % in all samples. Along with changes in surface tension and viscosity, CaCl 2 reacts with the cement paste to produce products (Friedel's salt, Kuzel's salt, or calcium oxychloride) that block pores and reduce absorption.

  12. A study of the H2O absorption line shifts in the visible spectrum region due to air pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossmann, B. E.; Browell, E. V.; Bykov, A. D.; Kapitanov, V. A.; Korotchenko, E. A.

    1990-01-01

    Results of measured and calculated shift coefficients are presented for 170 absorption lines of H2O in five vibrational-rotational bands. The measurements have been carried out using highly sensitive laser spectrometers with a resolution of at least 0.01/cm; the calculations are based on the Anderson-Tsao-Curnutte-Frost method. Good agreement is obtained between the theoretical and experimental values of the shift coefficients of H2O lines due to N2, O2, and air pressure.

  13. Direct measurements of nonlinear absorption and refraction in solutions of phthalocyanines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, T. H.; Hagan, D. J.; Sence, M. J.; Van Stryland, E. W.; Perry, J. W.; Coulter, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    Direct measurements are reported of the excited singlet-state absorption cross section and the associated nonlinear refractive cross section using picosecond pulses at 532 nm in solutions of phthalocyanine and naphthalocyanine dyes. By monitoring the transmittance and far-field spatial beam distortion for different pulsewidths in the picosecond regime, it is shown that both the nonlinear absorption and refraction are fluence (energy-per-unit-area) rather than irradiance dependent. Thus, excited-state absorption is the dominant nonlinear absorption process, and the observed nonlinear refraction is also due to real population excitation.

  14. Sensitivity of EAS measurements to the energy spectrum of muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espadanal, J.; Cazon, L.; Conceição, R.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied how the energy spectrum of muons at production affects some of the most common measurements related to muons in extensive air shower studies, namely, the number of muons at the ground, the slope of the lateral distribution of muons, the apparent muon production depth, and the arrival time delay of muons at ground. We found that by changing the energy spectrum by an amount consistent with the difference between current models (namely EPOS-LHC and QGSJET-II.04), the muon surface density at ground increases 5% at 20° zenith angle and 17% at 60° zenith angle. This effect introduces a zenith angle dependence on the reconstructed number of muons which might be experimentally observed. The maximum of the muon production depth distribution at 40° increases ∼ 10 g/cm2 and ∼ 0 g/cm2 at 60°, which, from pure geometrical considerations, increases the arrival time delay of muons. There is an extra contribution to the delay due to the subluminal velocities of muons of the order of ∼ 3 ns at all zenith angles. Finally, changes introduced in the logarithmic slope of the lateral density function are less than 2%.

  15. Bidirectional reflectance measurement of zinc oxide in 0.25 to 2.5 microns spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental apparatus was designed and used to measure the bidirectional reflectance of zinc oxide in the spectrum 0.25 to 2.5 microns. The nonspecular reflectance is essentially Lambert for wavelengths above 0.40 microns with the most deviation occuring for large source zenith angles. Below 0.400 microns the nonspecular reflectance is greater than Lambert in all directions and is greatest in the forward and backscatter directions. The ratio of the specular component to the nonspecular component at a zenith of 0 degrees was found to increase with source zenith and wavelength for wavelengths above 0.400 microns. Below 0.400 microns this ratio increases as wavelengths decrease. The variation of bidirectional reflectance with wavelength was found to have the characteristics absorption for Zn0 for wavelength below 0.400 microns.

  16. The UV Spectrum of Phobos as measured by MAVEN/IUVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaffin, M.; Deighan, J.; Schneider, N. M.; Thiemann, E.; Stewart, I. F.; Jain, S.; Lo, D.; Crismani, M. M. J.; Stiepen, A.; Clarke, J. T.; Mayyasi, M.; Montmessin, F.; Holsclaw, G.; McClintock, B.; Epavier, F.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2017-12-01

    In late 2015, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission apoapsis was near the orbit of Phobos and the spacecraft had several close encounters with the moon. Using a specially designed imaging sequence, MAVEN's Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) was able to gather the first spectral images of the moon in the mid-ultraviolet. IUVS observed the trailing hemisphere of the moon, producing spectra useful for comparison with the leading hemisphere measurements of the Mariner 9 UV spectrometer and Mars Express SPICAM observations. IUVS shows the trailing side to be bluer than the leading side, potentially revealing differences in the space weathering history of the hemispheres. In addition, there is marginal evidence for an absorption feature longward of 300 nm, potentially produced by organic compounds. Due to short integration times, the FUV spectrum of the moon is limited to some reflectance signal at Lyman alpha, constraining the albedo at this wavelength and placing an upper limit on it elsewhere.

  17. Measurement of Absorption Coefficient of Paraformaldehyde and Metaldehyde with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Xia, T.; Chen, Q.; Sun, Q.; Deng, Y.; Wang, C.

    2018-03-01

    The characteristic absorption spectra of paraformaldehyde and metaldehyde in the terahertz frequency region are obtained by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). In order to reduce the absorption of terahertz (THz) wave by water vapor in the air and the background noise, the measurement system was filled with dry air and the measurements were conducted at the temperature of 24°C. Meanwhile, the humidity was controlled within 10% RH. The THz frequency domain spectra of samples and their references from 0 to 2.5 THz were analyzed via Fourier transform. The refractive index and absorption coefficients of the two aldehydes were calculated by the model formulas. From 0.1 to 2.5 THz, there appear two weak absorption peaks at 1.20 and 1.66 THz in the absorption spectra of paraformaldehyde. Only one distinct absorption peak emerges at 1.83 THz for metaldehyde. There are significant differences between the terahertz absorption coefficients of paraformaldehyde and metaldehyde, which can be used as "fingerprints" to identify these substances. Furthermore, the relationship between the average absorption coefficients and mass concentrations was investigated and the average absorption coefficient-mass concentration diagrams of paraformaldehyde and metaldehyde were shown. For paraformaldehyde, there is a linear relationship between the average absorption coefficient and the natural logarithm of mass concentration. For metaldehyde, there exists a simpler linear relationship between the average absorption coefficient and the mass concentration. Because of the characteristics of THz absorption of paraformaldehyde and metaldehyde, the THz-TDS can be applied to the qualitative and quantitative detection of the two aldehydes to reduce the unpredictable hazards due to these substances.

  18. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Blake, Thomas A.; Guenther, Alex B.

    2014-11-19

    The OH- and O 3- initiated oxidations of isoprene, which is one of the primary volatile organic compounds produced by vegetation, are a major source of atmospheric formaldehyde and other oxygenated organics, yet little quantitative IR data exists for isoprene. We thus report absorption coefficients and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600 - 6500 cm -1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N 2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298 and 323 K in a 19.96 cm path length cell at 0.112 cm -1 resolution, using a Bruker 66V FTIR. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of sevenmore » pressures at each temperature.« less

  19. Sound absorption by suspensions of nonspherical particles: Measurements compared with predictions using various particle sizing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Simon D.; Leighton, Timothy G.; Brown, Niven R.

    2003-10-01

    Knowledge of the particle size distribution is required in order to predict ultrasonic absorption in polydisperse particulate suspensions. This paper shows that the method used to measure the particle size distribution can lead to important differences in the predicted absorption. A reverberation technique developed for measuring ultrasonic absorption by suspended particles is used to measure the absorption in suspensions of nonspherical particles. Two types of particulates are studied: (i) kaolin (china clay) particles which are platelike in form; and (ii) calcium carbonate particles which are more granular. Results are compared to theoretical predictions of visco-inertial absorption by suspensions of spherical particles. The particle size distributions, which are required for these predictions, are measured by laser diffraction, gravitational sedimentation and centrifugal sedimentation, all of which assume spherical particles. For a given sample, each sizing technique yields a different size distribution, leading to differences in the predicted absorption. The particle size distributions obtained by gravitational and centrifugal sedimentation are reinterpreted to yield a representative size distribution of oblate spheroids, and predictions for absorption by these spheroids are compared with the measurements. Good agreement between theory and measurement for the flat kaolin particles is obtained, demonstrating that these particles can be adequately represented by oblate spheroids.

  20. Development of optical coatings for 157-nm lithography. II. Reflectance, absorption, and scatter measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, Minoru; Biro, Ryuji; Ouchi, Chidane; Hasegawa, Masanobu; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Sone, Kazuho; Niisaka, Shunsuke; Saito, Tadahiko; Saito, Jun; Tanaka, Akira

    2002-06-01

    The total loss that can be suffered by an antireflection (AR) coating consists of reflectance loss, absorption loss, and scatter loss. To separate these losses we developed a calorimetric absorption measurement apparatus and an ellipsoidal Coblentz hemisphere based scatterometer for 157-nm optics. Reflectance, absorption, and scatter of AR coatings were measured with these apparatuses. The AR coating samples were supplied by Japanese vendors. Each AR coating as supplied was coated with the vendor's coating design by that vendor's coating process. Our measurement apparatuses, methods, and results for these AR coatings are presented here.

  1. Tunable diode laser measurements of HO2NO2 absorption coefficients near 12.5 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, R. D.; Molina, L. T.; Webster, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    A tunable diode laser spectrometer has been used to measure absorption coefficients of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) near the 803/cm Q branch. HO2NO2 concentrations in a low-pressure flowing gas mixture were determined from chemical titration procedures and UV absorption spectroscopy. The diode laser measured absorption coefficients, at a spectral resolution of better than 0.001/cm, are about 10 percent larger than previous Fourier transform infrared measurements made at a spectral resolution of 0.06/cm.

  2. Spectral- and size-resolved mass absorption efficiency of mineral dust aerosols in the shortwave spectrum: a simulation chamber study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caponi, Lorenzo; Formenti, Paola; Massabó, Dario; Di Biagio, Claudia; Cazaunau, Mathieu; Pangui, Edouard; Chevaillier, Servanne; Landrot, Gautier; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Kandler, Konrad; Piketh, Stuart; Saeed, Thuraya; Seibert, Dave; Williams, Earle; Balkanski, Yves; Prati, Paolo; Doussin, Jean-François

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents new laboratory measurements of the mass absorption efficiency (MAE) between 375 and 850 nm for 12 individual samples of mineral dust from different source areas worldwide and in two size classes: PM10. 6 (mass fraction of particles of aerodynamic diameter lower than 10.6 µm) and PM2. 5 (mass fraction of particles of aerodynamic diameter lower than 2.5 µm). The experiments were performed in the CESAM simulation chamber using mineral dust generated from natural parent soils and included optical and gravimetric analyses. The results show that the MAE values are lower for the PM10. 6 mass fraction (range 37-135 × 10-3 m2 g-1 at 375 nm) than for the PM2. 5 (range 95-711 × 10-3 m2 g-1 at 375 nm) and decrease with increasing wavelength as λ-AAE, where the Ångström absorption exponent (AAE) averages between 3.3 and 3.5, regardless of size. The size independence of AAE suggests that, for a given size distribution, the dust composition did not vary with size for this set of samples. Because of its high atmospheric concentration, light absorption by mineral dust can be competitive with black and brown carbon even during atmospheric transport over heavy polluted regions, when dust concentrations are significantly lower than at emission. The AAE values of mineral dust are higher than for black carbon (˜ 1) but in the same range as light-absorbing organic (brown) carbon. As a result, depending on the environment, there can be some ambiguity in apportioning the aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) based on spectral dependence, which is relevant to the development of remote sensing of light-absorbing aerosols and their assimilation in climate models. We suggest that the sample-to-sample variability in our dataset of MAE values is related to regional differences in the mineralogical composition of the parent soils. Particularly in the PM2. 5 fraction, we found a strong linear correlation between the dust light-absorption properties and

  3. Spectrum of excess partial molar absorptivity. Part II: a near infrared spectroscopic study of aqueous Na-halides.

    PubMed

    Sebe, Fumie; Nishikawa, Keiko; Koga, Yoshikata

    2012-04-07

    Our earlier thermodynamic studies suggested that F(-) and Cl(-) form hydration shells with the hydration number 14 ± 2 and 2.3 ± 0.6, respectively, and leave the bulk H(2)O away from hydration shells unperturbed. Br(-) and I(-), on the other hand, form hydrogen bonds directly with the momentarily existing hydrogen bond network of H(2)O, and retard the degree of entropy-volume cross fluctuation inherent in liquid H(2)O. The effect of the latter is stronger for I(-) than Br(-). Here we seek additional information about this qualitative difference between Cl(-) and (Br(-) and I(-)) pair by near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. We analyze the ν(2) + ν(3) band of H(2)O in the range 4600-5500 cm(-1) of aqueous solutions of NaCl, NaBr and NaI, by a new approach. From observed absorbance, we calculate excess molar absorptivity, ε(E), excess over the additive contributions of solute and solvent. ε(E) thus contains information about the effect of inter-molecular interactions in the ν(2) + ν(3) spectrum. The spectrum of ε(E) shows three bands; two negative ones at 5263 and 4873 cm(-1), and the positive band at 5123 cm(-1). We then define and calculate the excess partial molar absorptivity of each salt, ε(E)(salt). From the behaviour of ε(E)(salt) we suggest that the negative band at 5263 cm(-1) represents free H(2)O without much hydrogen bonding under the influence of local electric field of ions. Furthermore, from a sudden change in the x(salt) (mole fraction of salt) dependence of ε(E)(salt), we suggest that there is an ion-pairing in x(salt) > 0.032, 0.036, and 0.04 for NaCl, NaBr and NaI respectively. The positive band of ε(E) at 5123 cm(-1) is attributed to a modestly organized hydrogen bond network of H(2)O (or liquid-likeness), and the x(salt) dependence of ε indicated a qualitative difference in the effect of Cl(-) from those of Br(-) and I(-). Namely, the values of ε(E)(salt) stay constant for Cl(-) but those for Br(-) and I(-) decrease smoothly on

  4. Measuring the orbital angular momentum spectrum of an electron beam

    PubMed Central

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Tavabi, Amir H.; Venturi, Federico; Larocque, Hugo; Balboni, Roberto; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Frabboni, Stefano; Lu, Peng-Han; Mafakheri, Erfan; Bouchard, Frédéric; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Boyd, Robert W.; Lavery, Martin P. J.; Padgett, Miles J.; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Electron waves that carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) are characterized by a quantized and unbounded magnetic dipole moment parallel to their propagation direction. When interacting with magnetic materials, the wavefunctions of such electrons are inherently modified. Such variations therefore motivate the need to analyse electron wavefunctions, especially their wavefronts, to obtain information regarding the material's structure. Here, we propose, design and demonstrate the performance of a device based on nanoscale holograms for measuring an electron's OAM components by spatially separating them. We sort pure and superposed OAM states of electrons with OAM values of between −10 and 10. We employ the device to analyse the OAM spectrum of electrons that have been affected by a micron-scale magnetic dipole, thus establishing that our sorter can be an instrument for nanoscale magnetic spectroscopy. PMID:28537248

  5. The Hyperspectral Absorption Sensor - Advantages and challenges of continuous, in situ absorption coefficient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollschläger, J.; Röttgers, R.; Petersen, W.; Zielinski, O.

    2016-12-01

    A free-water mass balance-based study was conducted to address the rate of metabolism and net carbon exchange for the tidal wetland and estuarine portion of the coastal ocean and the uncertainties associated with this approach were assessed. Open water diurnal O2 and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were measured seasonally in a salt marsh-estuary in Georgia, U.S.A. with a focus on the marsh-estuary linkage associated with tidal flooding. We observed that the overall estuarine system was a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere and coastal ocean and a net sink for oceanic and atmospheric O2. Rates of metabolism were extremely high, with respiration (43 mol m-2 yr-1) greatly exceeding gross primary production (28 mol m-2 yr-1), such that the overall system was net heterotrophic. Metabolism measured with DIC were higher than with O2, which we attribute to high rates of anaerobic respiration and reduced sulfur storage in salt marsh sediments, and we assume substantial levels of anoxygenic photosynthesis. We found gas exchange from a flooded marsh is substantial, accounting for about 28% of total O2 and CO2 air-water exchange. A significant percentage of the overall estuarine aquatic metabolism is attributable to metabolism of marsh organisms during inundation. Our study suggests not rely on oceanographic stoichiometry to convert from O2to C based measurements when constructing C balances for the coastal ocean. We also suggest eddy covariance measurements of salt marsh net ecosystem exchange underestimate net ecosystem production as they do not account for lateral DIC exchange associated with marsh tidal inundation. With the increase of global temperature and sea level rise, salt marshes are likely to export more inorganic carbon to the atmosphere and the coastal ocean due to the decrease of solubility, the increase of aquatic and benthic metabolic activities and the longer marsh inundation.

  6. Thermal Boundary Layer Effects on Line-of-Sight Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) Gas Concentration Measurements.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhechao; Werhahn, Olav; Ebert, Volker

    2018-06-01

    The effects of thermal boundary layers on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) measurement results must be quantified when using the line-of-sight (LOS) TDLAS under conditions with spatial temperature gradient. In this paper, a new methodology based on spectral simulation is presented quantifying the LOS TDLAS measurement deviation under conditions with thermal boundary layers. The effects of different temperature gradients and thermal boundary layer thickness on spectral collisional widths and gas concentration measurements are quantified. A CO 2 TDLAS spectrometer, which has two gas cells to generate the spatial temperature gradients, was employed to validate the simulation results. The measured deviations and LOS averaged collisional widths are in very good agreement with the simulated results for conditions with different temperature gradients. We demonstrate quantification of thermal boundary layers' thickness with proposed method by exploitation of the LOS averaged the collisional width of the path-integrated spectrum.

  7. Laboratory Measurements of Single-Particle Polarimetric Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsevich, M.; Penttila, A.; Maconi, G.; Kassamakov, I.; Helander, P.; Puranen, T.; Salmi, A.; Hæggström, E.; Muinonen, K.

    2017-12-01

    Measuring scattering properties of different targets is important for material characterization, remote sensing applications, and for verifying theoretical results. Furthermore, there are usually simplifications made when we model targets and compute the scattering properties, e.g., ideal shape or constant optical parameters throughout the target material. Experimental studies help in understanding the link between the observed properties and computed results. Experimentally derived Mueller matrices of studied particles can be used as input for larger-scale scattering simulations, e.g., radiative transfer computations. This method allows to bypass the problem of using an idealized model for single-particle optical properties. While existing approaches offer ensemble- and orientation-averaged particle properties, our aim is to measure individual particles with controlled or known orientation. With the newly developed scatterometer, we aim to offer novel possibility to measure single, small (down to μm-scale) targets and their polarimetric spectra. This work presents an experimental setup that measures light scattered by a fixed small particle with dimensions ranging between micrometer and millimeter sizes. The goal of our setup is nondestructive characterization of such particles by measuring light of multiple wavelengths scattered in 360° in a horizontal plane by an ultrasonically levitating sample, whilst simultaneously controlling its 3D position and orientation. We describe the principles and design of our instrument and its calibration. We also present example measurements of real samples. This study was conducted under the support from the European Research Council, in the frame of the Advanced Grant project No. 320773 `Scattering and Absorption of Electromagnetic Waves in Particulate Media' (SAEMPL).

  8. Measurements of zinc absorption: application and interpretation in research designed to improve human zinc nutriture.

    PubMed

    Hambidge, K Michael; Miller, Leland V; Tran, Cuong D; Krebs, Nancy F

    2005-11-01

    The focus of this paper is on the application of measurements of zinc absorption in human research, especially studies designed to assess the efficacy of intervention strategies to prevent and manage zinc deficiency in populations. Emphasis is given to the measurement of quantities of zinc absorbed rather than restricting investigations to measurements of fractional absorption of zinc. This is especially important when determining absorption of zinc from the diet, whether it be the habitual diet or an intervention diet under evaluation. Moreover, measurements should encompass all meals for a minimum of one day with the exception of some pilot studies. Zinc absorption is primarily via an active saturable transport process into the enterocytes of the proximal small intestine. The relationship between quantity of zinc absorbed and the quantity ingested is best characterized by saturable binding models. When applied to human studies that have sufficient data to examine dose-response relationships, efficiency of absorption is high until approximately 50-60% maximal absorption is achieved, even with moderate phytate intakes. This also coincides approximately with the quantity of absorbed zinc necessary to meet physiologic requirements. Efficiency of absorption with intakes that exceed this level is low or very low. These observations have important practical implications for the design and interpretation of intervention studies to prevent zinc deficiency. They also suggest the potential utility of measurements of the quantity of zinc absorbed when evaluating the zinc status of populations.

  9. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Brauer, C. S.; Blake, T. A.; Guenther, A. B.; ...

    2014-11-19

    Isoprene (C 5H 8, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is a volatile organic compound (VOC) and is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. Isoprene is produced primarily by vegetation as well as anthropogenic sources, and its OH- and O 3-initiated oxidations are a major source of atmospheric oxygenated organics. Few quantitative infrared studies have been reported for isoprene, limiting the ability to quantify isoprene emissions via remote or in situ infrared detection. We thus report absorption cross sections and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600–6500 cm -1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N 2) spectra were recorded atmore » 278, 298, and 323 K in a 19.94 cm path-length cell at 0.112 cm -1 resolution, using a Bruker IFS 66v/S Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven isoprene sample pressures, each at one of three temperatures, and the number densities are normalized to 296 K and 1 atm.« less

  10. Quantitative infrared absorption cross sections of isoprene for atmospheric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, C. S.; Blake, T. A.; Guenther, A. B.; Sharpe, S. W.; Sams, R. L.; Johnson, T. J.

    2014-11-01

    Isoprene (C5H8, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) is a volatile organic compound (VOC) and is one of the primary contributors to annual global VOC emissions. Isoprene is produced primarily by vegetation as well as anthropogenic sources, and its OH- and O3-initiated oxidations are a major source of atmospheric oxygenated organics. Few quantitative infrared studies have been reported for isoprene, limiting the ability to quantify isoprene emissions via remote or in situ infrared detection. We thus report absorption cross sections and integrated band intensities for isoprene in the 600-6500 cm-1 region. The pressure-broadened (1 atmosphere N2) spectra were recorded at 278, 298, and 323 K in a 19.94 cm path-length cell at 0.112 cm-1 resolution, using a Bruker IFS 66v/S Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Composite spectra are derived from a minimum of seven isoprene sample pressures, each at one of three temperatures, and the number densities are normalized to 296 K and 1 atm.

  11. Absorption of Solar Radiation by the Cloudy Atmosphere Interpretations of Collocated Aircraft Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.; Cess, Robert D.; Zhang, Minghua; Pope, Shelly K.; Bucholtz, Anthony; Bush, Brett; Vitko, John, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE), we have obtained and analyzed measurements made from collocated aircraft of the absorption of solar radiation within the atmospheric column between the two aircraft. The measurements were taken during October 1995 at the ARM site in Oklahoma. Relative to a theoretical radiative transfer model, we find no evidence for excess solar absorption in the clear atmosphere and significant evidence for its existence in the cloudy atmosphere. This excess cloud solar absorption appears to occur in both visible (0.224-0.68 microns) and near-infrared (0.68-3.30 microns) spectral regions, although not at 0.5 microns for the visible contribution, and it is shown to be true absorption rather than an artifact of sampling errors caused by measuring three-dimensional clouds.

  12. Precise methane absorption measurements in the 1.64 μm spectral region for the MERLIN mission.

    PubMed

    Delahaye, T; Maxwell, S E; Reed, Z D; Lin, H; Hodges, J T; Sung, K; Devi, V M; Warneke, T; Spietz, P; Tran, H

    2016-06-27

    In this article we describe a high-precision laboratory measurement targeting the R(6) manifold of the 2 ν 3 band of 12 CH 4 . Accurate physical models of this absorption spectrum will be required by the Franco-German, Methane Remote Sensing LIDAR (MERLIN) space mission for retrievals of atmospheric methane. The analysis uses the Hartmann-Tran profile for modeling line shape and also includes line-mixing effects. To this end, six high-resolution and high signal-to-noise absorption spectra of air-broadened methane were recorded using a frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy apparatus. Sample conditions corresponded to room temperature and spanned total sample pressures of 40 hPa - 1013 hPa with methane molar fractions between 1 μmol mol -1 and 12 μmol mol -1 . All spectroscopic model parameters were simultaneously adjusted in a multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fit to the six measured spectra. Comparison of the fitted model to the measured spectra reveals the ability to calculate the room-temperature, methane absorption coefficient to better than 0.1% at the on-line position of the MERLIN mission. This is the first time that such fidelity has been reached in modeling methane absorption in the investigated spectral region, fulfilling the accuracy requirements of the MERLIN mission. We also found excellent agreement when comparing the present results with measurements obtained over different pressure conditions and using other laboratory techniques. Finally, we also evaluated the impact of these new spectral parameters on atmospheric transmissions spectra calculations.

  13. Precise methane absorption measurements in the 1.64 μm spectral region for the MERLIN mission

    PubMed Central

    Delahaye, T.; Maxwell, S.E.; Reed, Z.D.; Lin, H.; Hodges, J.T.; Sung, K.; Devi, V.M.; Warneke, T.; Spietz, P.; Tran, H.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we describe a high-precision laboratory measurement targeting the R(6) manifold of the 2ν3 band of 12CH4. Accurate physical models of this absorption spectrum will be required by the Franco-German, Methane Remote Sensing LIDAR (MERLIN) space mission for retrievals of atmospheric methane. The analysis uses the Hartmann-Tran profile for modeling line shape and also includes line-mixing effects. To this end, six high-resolution and high signal-to-noise absorption spectra of air-broadened methane were recorded using a frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy apparatus. Sample conditions corresponded to room temperature and spanned total sample pressures of 40 hPa – 1013 hPa with methane molar fractions between 1 μmol mol−1 and 12 μmol mol−1. All spectroscopic model parameters were simultaneously adjusted in a multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fit to the six measured spectra. Comparison of the fitted model to the measured spectra reveals the ability to calculate the room-temperature, methane absorption coefficient to better than 0.1% at the on-line position of the MERLIN mission. This is the first time that such fidelity has been reached in modeling methane absorption in the investigated spectral region, fulfilling the accuracy requirements of the MERLIN mission. We also found excellent agreement when comparing the present results with measurements obtained over different pressure conditions and using other laboratory techniques. Finally, we also evaluated the impact of these new spectral parameters on atmospheric transmissions spectra calculations. PMID:27551656

  14. Upper limits on the 21 cm power spectrum at z = 5.9 from quasar absorption line spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pober, Jonathan C.; Greig, Bradley; Mesinger, Andrei

    2016-11-01

    We present upper limits on the 21 cm power spectrum at z = 5.9 calculated from the model-independent limit on the neutral fraction of the intergalactic medium of x_{H I} < 0.06 + 0.05 (1σ ) derived from dark pixel statistics of quasar absorption spectra. Using 21CMMC, a Markov chain Monte Carlo Epoch of Reionization analysis code, we explore the probability distribution of 21 cm power spectra consistent with this constraint on the neutral fraction. We present 99 per cent confidence upper limits of Δ2(k) < 10-20 mK2 over a range of k from 0.5 to 2.0 h Mpc-1, with the exact limit dependent on the sampled k mode. This limit can be used as a null test for 21 cm experiments: a detection of power at z = 5.9 in excess of this value is highly suggestive of residual foreground contamination or other systematic errors affecting the analysis.

  15. Shock tube measurements of the optical absorption of triatomic carbon, C3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The spectral absorption of C3 has been measured in a shock tube using a test gas mixture of acetylene diluted with argon. The absorption of a pulsed xenon light source was measured by means of eight photomultiplier channels to a spectrograph and an accompanying drum camera. The postshock test gas temperature and pressure were varied over the range 3300-4300 K and 0.36 to 2.13 atmospheres, respectively. The results showed appreciable absorption from C3 for the wavelength range 300 to 540 nanometers. The computed electronic oscillator strength varied from 0.12 to 0.06 as a function of temperature.

  16. Temperature measurement using ultraviolet laser absorption of carbon dioxide behind shock waves.

    PubMed

    Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B

    2005-11-01

    A diagnostic for microsecond time-resolved temperature measurements behind shock waves, using ultraviolet laser absorption of vibrationally hot carbon dioxide, is demonstrated. Continuous-wave laser radiation at 244 and 266 nm was employed to probe the spectrally smooth CO2 ultraviolet absorption, and an absorbance ratio technique was used to determine temperature. Measurements behind shock waves in both nonreacting and reacting (ignition) systems were made, and comparisons with isentropic and constant-volume calculations are reported.

  17. Measurements of Soot Mass Absorption Coefficients from 300 to 660 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Fisher, Al; Helgestad, Taylor; Lambe, Andrew; Sedlacek, Arthur; Smith, Geoffrey; Cappa, Christopher; Davidovits, Paul; Onasch, Timothy; Freedman, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Soot, a product of incomplete combustion, plays an important role in the earth's climate system through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. In particular, the assumed mass absorption coefficient (MAC) of soot and its variation with wavelength presents a significant uncertainty in the calculation of radiative forcing in global climate change models. As part of the fourth Boston College/Aerodyne soot properties measurement campaign, we have measured the mass absorption coefficient of soot produced by an inverted methane diffusion flame over a spectral range of 300-660 nm using a variety of optical absorption techniques. Extinction and absorption were measured using a dual cavity ringdown photoacoustic spectrometer (CRD-PAS, UC Davis) at 405 nm and 532 nm. Scattering and extinction were measured using a CAPS PMssa single scattering albedo monitor (Aerodyne) at 630 nm; the absorption coefficient was determined by subtraction. In addition, the absorption coefficients in 8 wavelength bands from 300 to 660 nm were measured using a new broadband photoacoustic absorption monitor (UGA). Soot particle mass was quantified using a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA, Cambustion), mobility size with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, TSI) and soot concentration with a CPC (Brechtel). The contribution of doubly charged particles to the sample mass was determined using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (DMT). Over a mass range of 1-8 fg, corresponding to differential mobility diameters of ~150 nm to 550 nm, the value of the soot MAC proved to be independent of mass for all wavelengths. The wavelength dependence of the MAC was best fit to a power law with an Absorption Ångstrom Coefficient slightly greater than 1.

  18. Technical note: Aerosol light absorption measurements with a carbon analyser - Calibration and precision estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammerlaan, B. A. J.; Holzinger, R.; Jedynska, A. D.; Henzing, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    Equivalent Black Carbon (EBC) and Elemental Carbon (EC) are different mass metrics to quantify the amount of combustion aerosol. Both metrics have their own measurement technique. In state-of-the-art carbon analysers, optical measurements are used to correct for organic carbon that is not evolving because of pyrolysis. These optical measurements are sometimes used to apply the technique of absorption photometers. Here, we use the transmission measurements of our carbon analyser for simultaneous determination of the elemental carbon concentration and the absorption coefficient. We use MAAP data from the CESAR observatory, the Netherlands, to correct for aerosol-filter interactions by linking the attenuation coefficient from the carbon analyser to the absorption coefficient measured by the MAAP. Application of the calibration to an independent data set of MAAP and OC/EC observations for the same location shows that the calibration is applicable to other observation periods. Because of simultaneous measurements of light absorption properties of the aerosol and elemental carbon, variation in the mass absorption efficiency (MAE) can be studied. We further show that the absorption coefficients and MAE in this set-up are determined within a precision of 10% and 12%, respectively. The precisions could be improved to 4% and 8% when the light transmission signal in the carbon analyser is very stable.

  19. Absorption spectra measurements of the x-ray radiation heated SiO2 aerogel plasma in 'dog-bone' targets irradiated by high power laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Dong, Q.-L.; Wang, S.-J.; Li, Y.-T.; Zhang, J.; Wei, H.-G.; Shi, J.-R.; Zhao, G.; Zhang, J.-Y.; Wen, T.-S.; Zhang, W.-H.; Hu, X.; Liu, S.-Y.; Ding, Y.-K.; Zhang, L.; Tang, Y.-J.; Zhang, B.-H.; Zheng, Z.-J.; Nishimura, H.; Fujioka, S.; Takabe, H.

    2008-05-01

    We studied the opacity effect of the SiO2 aerogel plasma heated by x-ray radiation produced by high power laser pulses irradiating the inner surface of golden 'dog-bone' targets. The PET crystal spectrometer was used to measure the absorption spectra of the plasmas in the range from 6.4 Å to 7.4 Å, among which the line emissions involving the K shell of Si ions from He-like to neutral atom were located. The experimental results were analyzed with Detailed-Level-Accounting method. As the plasma temperature increased, the characteristic lines of highly ionized ions gradually dominated the absorption spectrum.

  20. Re-Evaluation of Dust Radiative Forcing Using Remote Measurements of Dust Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Karnieli, Arnon; Remer, Lorraine A.

    1998-01-01

    Spectral remote observations of dust properties from space and from the ground creates a powerful tool for determination of dust absorption of solar radiation with an unprecedented accuracy. Absorption is a key component in understanding dust impact on climate. We use Landsat spaceborne measurements at 0.47 to 2.2 microns over Senegal with ground based sunphotometers to find that Saharan dust absorption of solar radiation is two to four times smaller than in models. Though dust absorbs in the blue, almost no absorption was found for wavelengths greater 0.6 microns. The new finding increases by 50% recent estimated solar radiative forcing by dust and decreases the estimated dust heating of the lower troposphere. Dust transported from Asia shows slightly higher absorption probably due to the presence of black carbon from populated regions. Large scale application of this method to satellite data from the Earth Observing System can reduce significantly the uncertainty in the dust radiative effects.

  1. Multidimensional analysis of fast-spectrum material replacement measurements for systematic estimation of cross section uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, P. G.; Lantz, E.; Mayo, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    A series of central core and core-reflector interface sample replacement experiments for 16 materials performed in the NASA heavy-metal-reflected, fast spectrum critical assembly (NCA) were analyzed in four and 13 groups using the GAM 2 cross-section set. The individual worths obtained by TDSN and DOT multidimensional transport theory calculations showed significant differences from the experimental results. These were attributed to cross-section uncertainties in the GAM 2 cross sections. Simultaneous analysis of the measured and calculated sample worths permitted separation of the worths into capture and scattering components which systematically provided fast spectrum averaged correction factors to the magnitudes of the GAM 2 absorption and scattering cross sections. Several Los Alamos clean critical assemblies containing Oy, Ta, and Mo as well as one of the NCA compositions were reanalyzed using the corrected cross sections. In all cases the eigenvalues were significantly improved and were recomputed to within 1 percent of the experimental eigenvalue. A comparable procedure may be used for ENDF cross sections when these are available.

  2. Empirical wind retrieval model based on SAR spectrum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panfilova, Maria; Karaev, Vladimir; Balandina, Galina; Kanevsky, Mikhail; Portabella, Marcos; Stoffelen, Ad

    The present paper considers polarimetric SAR wind vector applications. Remote-sensing measurements of the near-surface wind over the ocean are of great importance for the understanding of atmosphere-ocean interaction. In recent years investigations for wind vector retrieval using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data have been performed. In contrast with scatterometers, a SAR has a finer spatial resolution that makes it a more suitable microwave instrument to explore wind conditions in the marginal ice zones, coastal regions and lakes. The wind speed retrieval procedure from scatterometer data matches the measured radar backscattering signal with the geophysical model function (GMF). The GMF determines the radar cross section dependence on the wind speed and direction with respect to the azimuthal angle of the radar beam. Scatterometers provide information on wind speed and direction simultaneously due to the fact that each wind vector cell (WVC) is observed at several azimuth angles. However, SAR is not designed to be used as a high resolution scatterometer. In this case, each WVC is observed at only one single azimuth angle. That is why for wind vector determination additional information such as wind streak orientation over the sea surface is required. It is shown that the wind vector can be obtained using polarimetric SAR without additional information. The main idea is to analyze the spectrum of a homogeneous SAR image area instead of the backscattering normalized radar cross section. Preliminary numerical simulations revealed that SAR image spectral maxima positions depend on the wind vector. Thus the following method for wind speed retrieval is proposed. In the first stage of the algorithm, the SAR spectrum maxima are determined. This procedure is carried out to estimate the wind speed and direction with ambiguities separated by 180 degrees due to the SAR spectrum symmetry. The second stage of the algorithm allows us to select the correct wind direction

  3. Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Column via Space Borne Laser Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, WIlliam S.

    2007-01-01

    In order to better understand the budget of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere it is necessary to develop a global high precision understanding of the carbon dioxide column. In order to uncover the 'missing sink that is responsible for the large discrepancies in the budget as we presently understand it calculation has indicated that measurement accuracy on the order of 1 ppm is necessary. Because typical column average CO2 has now reached 380 ppm this represents a precision on the order of .25% for these column measurements. No species has ever been measured from space at such a precision. In recognition of the importance of understanding the CO2 budget in order to evaluate its impact on global warming the National Research Council in its decadal survey report to NASA recommended planning for a laser based total CO2 mapping mission in the near future. The extreme measurement accuracy requirements on this mission places very strong requirements on the laser system used for the measurement. This work presents an analysis of the characteristics necessary in a laser system used to make this measurement. Consideration is given to the temperature dependence, pressure broadening, and pressure shift of the CO2 lines themselves and how these impact the laser system characteristics Several systems for meeting these requirements that are under investigation at various institutions in the US as well as Europe will be discussed.

  4. Portable Instrument to Measure CDOM Light Absorption in Aquatic Systems: WPI Success Story

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    World Precision Instruments, Inc. (WPI), of Sarasota, FL, in collaboration with NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, has developed an innovative instrument to accurately measure Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) absorption in the field. This successful collaboration has culminated in an exciting new device, called the UltraPath, now commercially available through WPI. Traditional methods of measuring absorption of dissolved materials require special handling and storage prior to measurement. Use of laboratory spectrophotometers as the measuring devices have proven time consuming, cumbersome, and delicate to handle. The UltraPath provides a low-cost, highly sensitive, rugged, portable system that is capable of high sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters.

  5. The absorption spectrum of the QSO PKS 2126-158 (z_em =3.27) at high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, V.; Cristiani, S.; D'Odorico, S.; Fontana, A.; Giallongo, E.

    1998-01-01

    Spectra of the z_em = 3.268 quasar PKS 2126-158 have been obtained in the range lambda lambda 4300-6620 Angstroms with a resolution Rsmallimeq27000 and an average signal-to-noise ratio s/nsmallimeq 25 per resolution element. The list of the identified absorption lines is given together with their fitted column densities and Doppler widths. The modal value of the Doppler parameter distribution for the Lyalpha lines is smallimeq 25 km s(-1) . The column density distribution can be described by a power-law dn / dN ~ N(-beta ) with beta smallimeq 1.5. 12 metal systems have been identified, two of which were previously unknown. In order to make the column densities of the intervening systems compatible with realistic assumptions about the cloud sizes and the silicon to carbon overabundance, it is necessary to assume a jump beyond the He II edge in the spectrum of the UV ionizing background at z smallim 3 a factor 10 larger than the standard predictions for the integrated quasar contribution. An enlarged sample of C IV absorptions (71 doublets) has been used to analyze the statistical properties of this class of absorbers strictly related to galaxies. The column density distribution is well described by a single power-law, with beta =1.64 and the Doppler parameter distribution shows a modal value b_CIV smallimeq 14 km s(-1) . The two point correlation function has been computed in the velocity space for the individual components of C IV features. A significant signal is obtained for scales smaller than 200- 300 km s(-1) , xi (30< Delta v < 90 km\\ s(-1) ) = 33 +/- 3. A trend of decreasing clustering amplitude with decreasing column density is apparent, analogously to what has been observed for Lyalpha lines. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile (ESO No. 2-013-49K). Table 2 is only available in electronic from via anonymous ftp 130.79.128.5 or http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  6. Pseudopotential calculations and photothermal lensing measurements of two-photon absorption in solids

    SciTech Connect

    White, W.T. III

    1985-11-04

    We have studied two-photon absorption in solids theoretically and experimentally. We have shown that it is possible to use accurate band structure techniques to compute two-photon absorption spectra within 15% of measured values in a wide band-gap material, ZnS. The empirical pseudopotential technique that we used is significantly more accurate than previous models of two-photon absorption in zinc blende materials, including present tunneling theories (which are essentially parabolic-band results in disguise) and the nonparabolic-band formalism of Pidgeon et al. and Weiler. The agreement between our predictions and previous measurements allowed us to use ZnS as a reference material in ordermore » to validate a technique for measuring two-photon absorption that was previously untried in solids, pulsed dual-beam thermal lensing. With the validated technique, we examined nonlinear absorption in one other crystal (rutile) and in several glasses, including silicates, borosilicates, and one phosphate glass. Initially, we believed that the absorption edges of all the materials were comparable; however, subsequent evidence suggested that the effective band-gap energies of the glasses were above the energy of two photons in our measurement. Therefore, we attribute the nonlinear absorption that we observed in glasses to impurities or defects. The measured nonlinear absorption coefficients were of the order of a few cm/TW in the glasses and of the order of 10 cm/GW in the crystals, four orders of magnitude higher than in glasses. 292 refs.« less

  7. X-Ray Absorption Measured in the Resonant Auger Scattering Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Hikosaka, Y.; Shigemasa, E.; Kaneyasu, T.

    2008-08-15

    We report both experimental and theoretical studies on x-ray absorption measured in the resonant Auger scattering mode of gas phase carbon monoxide near the O1s{yields}2{pi} region. Both experiment and theory display a crucial difference between the x-ray absorption profiles obtained in the conventional and resonant scattering modes. Lifetime vibrational interference is the main source of the difference. It is demonstrated that such interference, which arises from a coherent excitation to overlapping intermediate levels, ruins the idea for obtaining x-ray absorption spectra in a lifetime broadening free regime.

  8. Deriving brown carbon from multiwavelength absorption measurements: Method and application to AERONET and Aethalometer observations

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, X.; Heald, C. L.; Sedlacek, A.; ...

    2016-10-13

    The radiative impact of organic aerosols (OA) is a large source of uncertainty in estimating the global direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols. This radiative impact includes not only light scattering but also light absorption from a subclass of OA referred to as brown carbon (BrC). However the absorption properties of BrC are poorly understood leading to large uncertainties in modelling studies. To obtain observational constraints from measurements, a simple Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) method is often used to separate the contribution of BrC absorption from that of black carbon (BC). However, this attribution method is based on assumptions regardingmore » the spectral dependence of BC that are often violated in the ambient atmosphere. Here we develop a new method that decreases the uncertainties associated with estimating BrC absorption. By applying this method to multi-wavelength absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) measurements at AERONET sites worldwide and surface aerosol absorption measurements at multiple ambient sites, we estimate that BrC globally contributes 6-40% of the absorption at 440nm. We find that the mass absorption coefficient of OA (OA-MAC) is positively correlated with BC/OA mass ratio. Based on the variability of BC properties and BC/OA emission ratio, we estimate a range of 0.05-1.2 m 2/g for OA-MAC at 440nm. Using the combination of AERONET and OMI UV absorption observations we estimate that the AAE 388/440nm for BrC is generally ~4 world-wide, with a smaller value in Europe (< 2). Our analyses of two surface sites (Cape Cod, to the southeast of Boston, and the GoAmazon2014/5 T3 site, to the west of Manaus, Brazil) reveal no significant relationship between BrC absorptivity and photochemical aging in typical urban influenced conditions. However, the absorption of BrC measured during the biomass burning season near Manaus is found to decrease with photochemical aging with a lifetime of ~1 day. This lifetime is comparable to

  9. Optoacoustic measurements of water vapor absorption at selected CO laser wavelengths in the 5-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption were taken with a resonant optoacoustical detector (cylindrical pyrex detector, two BaF2 windows fitted into end plates at slight tilt to suppress Fabry-Perot resonances), for lack of confidence in existing spectral tabular data for the 5-7 micron region, as line shapes in the wing regions of water vapor lines are difficult to characterize. The measurements are required for air pollution studies using a CO laser, to find the differential absorption at the wavelengths in question due to atmospheric constituents other than water vapor. The design and performance of the optoacoustical detector are presented. Effects of absorption by ambient NO are considered, and the fixed-frequency discretely tunable CO laser is found suitable for monitoring urban NO concentrations in a fairly dry climate, using the water vapor absorption data obtained in the study.

  10. Method for measuring changes in light absorption of highly scattering media

    DOEpatents

    Bigio, Irving J.; Johnson, Tamara M.; Mourant, Judith R.

    2002-01-01

    The noninvasive measurement of variations in absorption that are due to changes in concentrations of biochemically relevant compounds in tissue is important in many clinical settings. One problem with such measurements is that the pathlength traveled by the collected light through the tissue depends on the scattering properties of the tissue. It is demonstrated, using both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements, that for an appropriate separation between light-delivery and light-collection fibers, the pathlength of the collected photons is insensitive to scattering parameters for the range of parameters typically found in tissue. This is important for developing rapid, noninvasive, inexpensive, and accurate methods for measuring absorption changes in tissue.

  11. The effect of ISM absorption on stellar activity measurements and its relevance for exoplanet studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; Marcelja, S. E.; Staab, D.; Cubillos, P. E.; France, K.; Haswell, C. A.; Ingrassia, S.; Jenkins, J. S.; Koskinen, T.; Lanza, A. F.; Redfield, S.; Youngblood, A.; Pelzmann, G.

    2017-05-01

    Past ultraviolet and optical observations of stars hosting close-in Jupiter-mass planets have shown that some of these stars present an anomalously low chromospheric activity, significantly below the basal level. For the hot Jupiter planet host WASP-13, observations have shown that the apparent lack of activity is possibly caused by absorption from the intervening interstellar medium (ISM). Inspired by this result, we study the effect of ISM absorption on activity measurements (S and log R 'HK indices) for main-sequence late-type stars. To this end, we employ synthetic stellar photospheric spectra combined with varying amounts of chromospheric emission and ISM absorption. We present the effect of ISM absorption on activity measurements by varying several instrumental (spectral resolution), stellar (projected rotational velocity, effective temperature, and chromospheric emission flux), and ISM parameters (relative velocity between stellar and ISM Ca II lines, broadening b-parameter, and Ca II column density). We find that for relative velocities between the stellar and ISM lines smaller than 30-40 km s-1 and for ISM Ca II column densities log NCaII ⪆ 12, the ISM absorption has a significant influence on activity measurements. Direct measurements and three dimensional maps of the Galactic ISM absorption indicate that an ISM Ca II column density of log NCaII = 12 is typically reached by a distance of about 100 pc along most sight lines. In particular, for a Sun-like star lying at a distance greater than 100 pc, we expect a depression (bias) in the log R'HK value larger than 0.05-0.1 dex, about the same size as the typical measurement and calibration uncertainties on this parameter. This work shows that the bias introduced by ISM absorption must always be considered when measuring activity for stars lying beyond 100 pc. We also consider the effect of multiple ISM absorption components. We discuss the relevance of this result for exoplanet studies and revise the

  12. Biological tissue component evaluation by measuring photoacoustic spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namita, Takeshi; Murata, Yuya; Tokuyama, Junji; Kondo, Kengo; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has garnered constant attention as a non-invasive modality for visualizing details of the neovascularization structure of tumors, or the distribution of oxygen saturation, which is related to the tumor grade. However, photoacoustic imaging is applicable not only for vascular imaging but also for diagnosing properties of various tissues such as skin or muscle diseases, fat related to arteriosclerosis or fatty liver, cartilage related to arthritis, and fibrous tissues related to hepatitis. The photoacoustic signal intensity is wavelength-dependent and proportional to the absorption coefficient and thermal acoustic conversion efficiency (i.e. Grüneisen parameter) of the target biological tissue. To ascertain the appropriate wavelength range for biological tissue imaging and to evaluate tissue properties, photoacoustic spectra of various tissues (e.g., skin, muscle, and adipose tissue) were measured using a hydrophone (9 mm diameter) at 680-1600 nm wavelengths. Results confirmed that respective tissues have unique photoacoustic spectra. However, almost all samples have peaks around 1200 nm and 1400-1500 nm for wavelengths where the light absorbance of lipid or water is high. The main components of biological tissues are water, protein, and lipid. Results confirmed that photoacoustic spectra reflect the tissue components well. To evaluate the feasibility of the tissue characterization using photoacoustic methods, the photoacoustic signal intensity ratio between two wavelength regions was calculated as described above. Signal intensity ratios agreed well with the composition ratio between water and lipid in samples. These analyses verified the feasibility of evaluating tissue properties using photoacoustic methods.

  13. Scattering and absorption measurements of cervical tissues measures using low cost multi-spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernat, Amir S.; Bar-Am, Kfir; Cataldo, Leigh; Bolton, Frank J.; Kahn, Bruce S.; Levitz, David

    2018-02-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of death for women in low resource settings. In order to better detect cervical dysplasia, a low cost multi-spectral colposcope was developed utilizing low costs LEDs and an area scan camera. The device is capable of both traditional colposcopic imaging and multi-spectral image capture. Following initial bench testing, the device was deployed to a gynecology clinic where it was used to image patients in a colposcopy setting. Both traditional colposcopic images and spectral data from patients were uploaded to a cloud server for remote analysis. Multi-spectral imaging ( 30 second capture) took place before any clinical procedure; the standard of care was followed thereafter. If acetic acid was used in the standard of care, a post-acetowhitening colposcopic image was also captured. In analyzing the data, normal and abnormal regions were identified in the colposcopic images by an expert clinician. Spectral data were fit to a theoretical model based on diffusion theory, yielding information on scattering and absorption parameters. Data were grouped according to clinician labeling of the tissue, as well as any additional clinical test results available (Pap, HPV, biopsy). Altogether, N=20 patients were imaged in this study, with 9 of them abnormal. In comparing normal and abnormal regions of interest from patients, substantial differences were measured in blood content, while differences in oxygen saturation parameters were more subtle. These results suggest that optical measurements made using low cost spectral imaging systems can distinguish between normal and pathological tissues.

  14. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17)/cu cm. The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  15. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  16. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3x10(exp 17) and 9x10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  17. Laboratory Measurement of the Temperature Dependence of Gaseous Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Microwave Absorption with Application to the Venus Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suleiman, Shady H.; Kolodner, Marc A.; Steffes, Paul G.

    1996-01-01

    High-accuracy laboratory measurements of the temperature dependence of the opacity from gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO2) in a carbon dioxide (CO2) atmosphere at temperatures from 290 to 505 K and at pressures from 1 to 4 atm have been conducted at frequencies of 2.25 GHz (13.3 cm), 8.5 GHz (3.5 cm), and 21.7 GHz (1.4 cm). Based on these absorptivity measurements, a Ben-Reuven (BR) line shape model has been developed that provides a more accurate characterization of the microwave absorption of gaseous S02 in the Venus atmosphere as compared with other formalisms. The developed BR formalism is incorporated into a radiative transfer model. The resulting microwave emission spectrum of Venus is then used to set an upper limit on the disk-averaged abundance of gaseous S02 below the main cloud layer. It is found that gaseous S02 has an upper limit of 150 ppm, which compares well with previous spacecraft in situ measurements and Earth-based radio astronomical observations.

  18. Multifractal spectrum and lacunarity as measures of complexity of osseointegration.

    PubMed

    de Souza Santos, Daniel; Dos Santos, Leonardo Cavalcanti Bezerra; de Albuquerque Tavares Carvalho, Alessandra; Leão, Jair Carneiro; Delrieux, Claudio; Stosic, Tatijana; Stosic, Borko

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this study is to contribute to a better quantitative description of the early stages of osseointegration, by application of fractal, multifractal, and lacunarity analysis. Fractal, multifractal, and lacunarity analysis are performed on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of titanium implants that were first subjected to different treatment combinations of i) sand blasting, ii) acid etching, and iii) exposition to calcium phosphate, and were then submersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF) for 30 days. All the three numerical techniques are applied to the implant SEM images before and after SBF immersion, in order to provide a comprehensive set of common quantitative descriptors. It is found that implants subjected to different physicochemical treatments before submersion in SBF exhibit a rather similar level of complexity, while the great variety of crystal forms after SBF submersion reveals rather different quantitative measures (reflecting complexity), for different treatments. In particular, it is found that acid treatment, in most combinations with the other considered treatments, leads to a higher fractal dimension (more uniform distribution of crystals), lower lacunarity (lesser variation in gap sizes), and narrowing of the multifractal spectrum (smaller fluctuations on different scales). The current quantitative description has shown the capacity to capture the main features of complex images of implant surfaces, for several different treatments. Such quantitative description should provide a fundamental tool for future large scale systematic studies, considering the large variety of possible implant treatments and their combinations. Quantitative description of early stages of osseointegration on titanium implants with different treatments should help develop a better understanding of this phenomenon, in general, and provide basis for further systematic experimental studies. Clinical practice should benefit from such studies in the long

  19. Energy spectrum measured by the telescope array surface detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dmitri

    2012-05-01

    Two conflicting measurements of the ultra high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) flux have been reported by the Akeno Giant Air Shower Array (AGASA) and the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) experiments. HiRes observes a ˜5sigma suppression at E = 1019.75 eV, which is in agreement with the prediction of Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min (GZK) theory. AGASA, in contrast, sees the flux extended well beyond E = 1020 eV with no visible break, suggesting that the flux is limited only by the rate at which the sources can produce the UHECR and not by interaction of energetic particles with the cosmic microwave background, thus challenging the relativistic invariance principle. In response to this discrepancy, a new experiment named the Telescope Array (TA) has been deployed, which combines the detection elements used separately by HiRes and AGASA. We describe the TA surface detector (SD) analysis using a technique new to the field, which consists of a detailed Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation of the SD response to the natural cosmic rays, validating the MC by comparing its distributions with the data, and calculation of the SD aperture from the MC. We will also describe our reconstruction procedure, based solely upon the data, and its application to both data and the MC. Finally, we will describe the energy spectrum resulting from this analysis, which is found to be in excellent agreement with the HiRes result, and as such, is the first confirmation of the GZK effect by a ground array of scintillation counters.

  20. Careful measurement of first hyperpolarizability spectrum by hyper-Rayleigh scattering (HRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing; Lu, Changgui; Cui, Yiping

    2008-01-01

    The first hyperpolarizability (β) spectrum of an azobenzene derivative around its two-photon resonance region is detected carefully by hyper-Rayleigh scattering. The present work uses a fluorescence spectrometer (Edinburgh instruments, F900) as the detector instead of interference filter and photoelectric multiplier tube (PMT). For each wavelength, HRS emission spectrum accompanied with two-photon fluorescence (TPF) is carefully detected by changing the detection wavelength around half of the incident wavelength. Full width to half maximum (FWHM) of the spectrum is about 0.4nm, which is similar to that of the laser. When the incident wavelength moves into the two-photon resonance region, TPF signal increases quickly and should be eliminated. In order to receive accurate β spectrum, the data detected by the oscillograph should be made some emendations, such as TPF, incident energy, absorption and pulse width. Compared with the β spectrum detected in previous works, the spectrum received in this work presents a clearer profile. The β spectrum exhibits a similar profile as its UV-visible spectrum just with blue-shift of wavelength. It could be explained that the electronic vibration structure in two-photon progress is different from that in one-photon progress, while the broadening mechanism may be similar, considering the resonant two-state model (RTSM).

  1. The methane absorption spectrum near 1.73 μm (5695-5850 cm-1): Empirical line lists at 80 K and 296 K and rovibrational assignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghysels, M.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Nikitin, A. V.; Rey, M.; Campargue, A.

    2018-07-01

    The methane absorption spectrum is studied at 297 K and 80 K in the center of the Tetradecad between 5695 and 5850 cm-1. The spectra are recorded by differential absorption spectroscopy (DAS) with a noise equivalent absorption of about αmin≈ 1.5 × 10-7 cm-1. Two empirical line lists are constructed including about 4000 and 2300 lines at 297 K and 80 K, respectively. Lines due to 13CH4 present in natural abundance were identified by comparison with a spectrum of pure 13CH4 recorded in the same temperature conditions. About 1700 empirical values of the lower state energy level, Eemp, were derived from the ratios of the line intensities at 80 K and 296 K. They provide accurate temperature dependence for most of the absorption in the region (93% and 82% at 80 K and 296 K, respectively). The quality of the derived empirical values is illustrated by the clear propensity of the corresponding lower state rotational quantum number, Jemp, to be close to integer values. Using an effective Hamiltonian model derived from a previously published ab initio potential energy surface, about 2060 lines are rovibrationnally assigned, adding about 1660 new assignments to those provided in the HITRAN database for 12CH4 in the region.

  2. Solvent effects on the absorption spectrum and first hyperpolarizability of keto-enol tautomeric forms of anil derivatives: A Monte Carlo/quantum mechanics study

    SciTech Connect

    Adriano Junior, L.; Fonseca, T. L.; Castro, M. A.

    2016-06-21

    Theoretical results for the absorption spectrum and electric properties of the enol and keto tautomeric forms of anil derivatives in the gas-phase and in solution are presented. The electronic properties in chloroform, acetonitrile, methanol, and water were determined by carrying out sequential Monte Carlo simulations and quantum mechanics calculations based on the time dependent density functional theory and on the second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory method. The results illustrate the role played by electrostatic interactions in the electronic properties of anil derivatives in a liquid environment. There is a significant increase of the dipole moment in solution (20%-100%) relative to themore » gas-phase value. Solvent effects are mild for the absorption spectrum and linear polarizability but they can be particularly important for first hyperpolarizability. A large first hyperpolarizability contrast between the enol and keto forms is observed when absorption spectra present intense lowest-energy absorption bands. Dynamic results for the first hyperpolarizability are in qualitative agreement with the available experimental results.« less

  3. Direct measurements of temperature-dependent laser absorptivity of metal powders

    DOE PAGES

    Rubenchik, A.; Wu, S.; Mitchell, S.; ...

    2015-08-12

    Here, a compact system is developed to measure laser absorptivity for a variety of powder materials (metals, ceramics, etc.) with different powder size distributions and thicknesses. The measured results for several metal powders are presented. The results are consistent with those from ray tracing calculations.

  4. Direct measurements of temperature-dependent laser absorptivity of metal powders

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, A.; Wu, S.; Mitchell, S.

    Here, a compact system is developed to measure laser absorptivity for a variety of powder materials (metals, ceramics, etc.) with different powder size distributions and thicknesses. The measured results for several metal powders are presented. The results are consistent with those from ray tracing calculations.

  5. Photodissociation dynamics in the first absorption band of pyrrole. I. Molecular Hamiltonian and the Herzberg-Teller absorption spectrum for the A12(π σ* ) ←X˜ 1 A1(π π ) transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picconi, David; Grebenshchikov, Sergy Yu.

    2018-03-01

    This paper opens a series in which the photochemistry of the two lowest πσ* states of pyrrole and their interaction with each other and with the ground electronic state X ˜ are studied using ab initio quantum mechanics. New 24-dimensional potential energy surfaces for the photodissociation of the N-H bond and the formation of the pyrrolyl radical are calculated using the multiconfigurational perturbation theory (CASPT2) for the electronic states X ˜ (π π ) , 11A2(πσ*), and 11B1(πσ*) and locally diabatized. In this paper, the ab initio calculations are described and the photodissociation in the state 11A2(πσ*) is analyzed. The excitation 11 A2←X ˜ is mediated by the coordinate dependent transition dipole moment functions constructed using the Herzberg-Teller expansion. Nuclear dynamics, including 6, 11, and 15 active degrees of freedom, are studied using the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method. The focus is on the frequency resolved absorption spectrum as well as on the dissociation time scales and the resonance lifetimes. Calculations are compared with available experimental data. An approximate convolution method is developed and validated, with which absorption spectra can be calculated and assigned in terms of vibrational quantum numbers. The method represents the total absorption spectrum as a convolution of the diffuse spectrum of the detaching H-atom and the Franck-Condon spectrum of the heteroaromatic ring. Convolution calculation requires a minimal quantum chemical input and is a promising tool for studying the πσ* photodissociation in model biochromophores.

  6. [Using ultraviolet-visible ( UV-Vis) absorption spectrum to estimate the dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration in water, soils and sediments of typical water-level fluctuation zones of the Three Gorges Reservoir areas].

    PubMed

    Li, Lu-lu; Jiang, Tao; Lu, Song; Yan, Jin-long; Gao, Jie; Wei, Shi-qiang; Wang, Ding-yong; Guo, Nian; Zhao, Zhena

    2014-09-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a very important component in terrestrial ecosystem. Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is a significant constituent of DOM, which can be measured by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectrum. Thus the relationship between CDOM and DOM was investigated and established by several types of models including single-wavelength model, double-wavelength model, absorption spectrum slope (S value) model and three-wavelength model, based on the UV-Vis absorption coefficients of soil and sediment samples (sampled in July of 2012) and water samples (sampled in November of 2012) respectively. The results suggested that the three-wavelength model was the best for fitting, and the determination coefficients of water, soil and sediment data were 0. 788, 0. 933 and 0. 856, respectively. Meanwhile, the nominal best model was validated with the UV-Vis data of 32 soil samples and 36 water samples randomly collected in 2013, showing the RRMSE and MRE were 16. 5% and 16. 9% respectively for soil DOM samples, 10. 32% and 9. 06% respectively for water DOM samples, which further suggested the prediction accuracy was higher in water DOM samples as compared with that in soil DOM samples.

  7. Agnostic stacking of intergalactic doublet absorption: measuring the Ne VIII population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stephan; Pieri, Matthew M.; Mathur, Smita; Danforth, Charles W.; Shull, J. Michael

    2018-05-01

    We present a blind search for doublet intergalactic metal absorption with a method dubbed `agnostic stacking'. Using a forward-modelling framework, we combine this with direct detections in the literature to measure the overall metal population. We apply this novel approach to the search for Ne VIII absorption in a set of 26 high-quality COS spectra. We probe to an unprecedented low limit of log N>12.3 at 0.47≤z ≤1.34 over a path-length Δz = 7.36. This method selects apparent absorption without requiring knowledge of its source. Stacking this mixed population dilutes doublet features in composite spectra in a deterministic manner, allowing us to measure the proportion corresponding to Ne VIII absorption. We stack potential Ne VIII absorption in two regimes: absorption too weak to be significant in direct line studies (12.3 < log N < 13.7), and strong absorbers (log N > 13.7). We do not detect Ne VIII absorption in either regime. Combining our measurements with direct detections, we find that the Ne VIII population is reproduced with a power-law column density distribution function with slope β = -1.86 ^{+0.18 }_{ -0.26} and normalization log f_{13.7} = -13.99 ^{+0.20 }_{ -0.23}, leading to an incidence rate of strong Ne VIII absorbers dn/dz =1.38 ^{+0.97 }_{ -0.82}. We infer a cosmic mass density for Ne VIII gas with 12.3 < log N < 15.0 of Ω _{{{Ne {VIII}}}} = 2.2 ^{+1.6 }_{ _-1.2} × 10^{-8}, a value significantly lower that than predicted by recent simulations. We translate this density into an estimate of the baryon density Ωb ≈ 1.8 × 10-3, constituting 4 per cent of the total baryonic mass.

  8. In situ absorptivity measurements of metallic powders during laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Trapp, Johannes; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Guss, Gabe; ...

    2017-09-17

    Here, the effective absorptivity of continuous wave 1070 nm laser light has been studied for bare and metal powder-coated discs of 316L stainless steel as well as for aluminum alloy 1100 and tungsten by use of direct calorimetric measurements. After carefully validating the applicability of the method, the effective absorptivity is plotted as a function of incident laser power from 30 up to ≈540 W for scanning speeds of 100, 500 and 1500 mm s –1. The effective absorptivity versus power curves of the bulk materials typically show a slight change in effective absorptivity from 30 W until the onsetmore » of the formation of a recoil pressure-induced surface depression. As observed using high-speed video, this change in surface morphology leads to an increase in absorption of the laser light. At the higher powers beyond the keyhole transition, a saturation value is reached for both bare discs and powder-coated disks. For ≈100 μm thick powder layers, the measured absorptivity was found to be two times that of the bare polished discs for low-laser power. There is a sharp decrease when full melting of the powder tracks is achieved, followed by a keyhole-driven increase at higher powers, similar to the bare disc case. It is shown that, under conditions associated with laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing, absorptivity values can vary greatly, and differ from both powder-layer measurements and liquid metal estimates from the literature.« less

  9. In situ absorptivity measurements of metallic powders during laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Trapp, Johannes; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Guss, Gabe

    Here, the effective absorptivity of continuous wave 1070 nm laser light has been studied for bare and metal powder-coated discs of 316L stainless steel as well as for aluminum alloy 1100 and tungsten by use of direct calorimetric measurements. After carefully validating the applicability of the method, the effective absorptivity is plotted as a function of incident laser power from 30 up to ≈540 W for scanning speeds of 100, 500 and 1500 mm s –1. The effective absorptivity versus power curves of the bulk materials typically show a slight change in effective absorptivity from 30 W until the onsetmore » of the formation of a recoil pressure-induced surface depression. As observed using high-speed video, this change in surface morphology leads to an increase in absorption of the laser light. At the higher powers beyond the keyhole transition, a saturation value is reached for both bare discs and powder-coated disks. For ≈100 μm thick powder layers, the measured absorptivity was found to be two times that of the bare polished discs for low-laser power. There is a sharp decrease when full melting of the powder tracks is achieved, followed by a keyhole-driven increase at higher powers, similar to the bare disc case. It is shown that, under conditions associated with laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing, absorptivity values can vary greatly, and differ from both powder-layer measurements and liquid metal estimates from the literature.« less

  10. A Measurement of the Rotational Spectrum of the CH Radical in the Far-Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Steven A.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Brown, John M.

    2001-01-01

    Rotational and fine-structure transitions between the lower rotational levels of the CH radical in its X2Π state have been observed in absorption in the laboratory with a tunable far-infrared (TuFIR) spectrometer. The molecules were generated in an electric discharge through a mixture of methane and carbon monoxide in helium. The experimental line widths were limited by Doppler broadening and the measurements have a 1 σ experimental uncertainty of 100 kHz. The frequencies have been used together with all previous measurements of CH in the v=0 level of the X2Π electronic state to determine its molecular parameters and to predict an accurate set of rotational transition frequencies. ID="FN1">1We wish to dedicate this paper to our good friend and colleague, Harry Radford, who died on 2000 May 5. His name will live on in association with many groundbreaking pieces of work on the spectroscopy of small molecules, not least with the first detection of the far-infrared spectrum of the CH radical in 1970 March.

  11. High quality x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements with long energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X.; Newville, M.; Prakapenka, V.B.

    We describe an approach for acquiring high quality x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy spectra with wide energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC). Overcoming the serious interference of diamond Bragg peaks is essential for combining XAFS and DAC techniques in high pressure research, yet an effective method to obtain accurate XAFS spectrum free from DAC induced glitches has been lacking. It was found that these glitches, whose energy positions are very sensitive to the relative orientation between DAC and incident x-ray beam, can be effectively eliminated using an iterative algorithm based on repeated measurements over amore » small angular range of DAC orientation, e.g., within {+-}3{sup o} relative to the x-ray beam direction. Demonstration XAFS spectra are reported for rutile-type GeO{sub 2} recorded by traditional ambient pressure and high pressure DAC methods, showing similar quality at 440 eV above the absorption edge. Accurate XAFS spectra of GeO{sub 2} glass were obtained at high pressure up to 53 GPa, providing important insight into the structural polymorphism of GeO{sub 2} glass at high pressure. This method is expected be applicable for in situ XAFS measurements using a diamond anvil cell up to ultrahigh pressures.« less

  12. High quality x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements with long energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xinguo; Newville, Matthew; Prakapenka, Vitali B; Rivers, Mark L; Sutton, Stephen R

    2009-07-01

    We describe an approach for acquiring high quality x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy spectra with wide energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC). Overcoming the serious interference of diamond Bragg peaks is essential for combining XAFS and DAC techniques in high pressure research, yet an effective method to obtain accurate XAFS spectrum free from DAC induced glitches has been lacking. It was found that these glitches, whose energy positions are very sensitive to the relative orientation between DAC and incident x-ray beam, can be effectively eliminated using an iterative algorithm based on repeated measurements over a small angular range of DAC orientation, e.g., within +/-3 degrees relative to the x-ray beam direction. Demonstration XAFS spectra are reported for rutile-type GeO2 recorded by traditional ambient pressure and high pressure DAC methods, showing similar quality at 440 eV above the absorption edge. Accurate XAFS spectra of GeO2 glass were obtained at high pressure up to 53 GPa, providing important insight into the structural polymorphism of GeO2 glass at high pressure. This method is expected be applicable for in situ XAFS measurements using a diamond anvil cell up to ultrahigh pressures.

  13. Tunable diode-laser absorption measurements of methane at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagali, V.; Chou, S. I.; Baer, D. S.; Hanson, R. K.; Segall, J.

    1996-07-01

    A diode-laser sensor system based on absorption spectroscopy techniques has been developed to monitor CH4 nonintrusively in high-temperature environments. Fundamental spectroscopic parameters, including the line strengths of the transitions in the R(6) manifold of the 2 nu 3 band near 1.646 mu m, have been determined from high-resolution absorption measurements in a heated static cell. In addition, a corrected expression for the CH 4 partition function has been validated experimentally over the temperature range from 400 to 915 K. Potential applications of the diode-laser sensor system include process control, combustion measurements, and atmospheric monitoring.

  14. Measurement of total-body cobalt-57 vitamin B12 absorption with a gamma camera.

    PubMed

    Cardarelli, J A; Slingerland, D W; Burrows, B A; Miller, A

    1985-08-01

    Previously described techniques for the measurement of the absorption of [57Co]vitamin B12 by total-body counting have required an iron room equipped with scanning or multiple detectors. The present study uses simplifying modifications which make the technique more available and include the use of static geometry, the measurement of body thickness to correct for attenuation, a simple formula to convert the capsule-in-air count to a 100% absorption count, and finally the use of an adequately shielded gamma camera obviating the need of an iron room.

  15. Pressure Measurements Using an Airborne Differential Absorption Lidar. Part 1; Analysis of the Systematic Error Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamant, Cyrille N.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Korb, C. Laurence; Evans, Keith D.; Palm, Stephen P.

    1999-01-01

    Remote airborne measurements of the vertical and horizontal structure of the atmospheric pressure field in the lower troposphere are made with an oxygen differential absorption lidar (DIAL). A detailed analysis of this measurement technique is provided which includes corrections for imprecise knowledge of the detector background level, the oxygen absorption fine parameters, and variations in the laser output energy. In addition, we analyze other possible sources of systematic errors including spectral effects related to aerosol and molecular scattering interference by rotational Raman scattering and interference by isotopic oxygen fines.

  16. Diode laser differential absorption spectrometry for measurements of some parameters of condensed media.

    PubMed

    Liger, V V; Bolshov, M A; Kuritsyn, Yu A; Krivtsun, V M; Zybin, A V; Niemax, K

    2007-04-01

    A method of diode laser differential absorption spectrometry (DLDAS) is proposed. The method is based on the detection of absorption spectra variations caused by the changes of a parameter of a condensed media (temperature, composition of the components of a mixture, pH, etc.). Some simple theoretical background of the proposed technique is presented. The potentialities of the method are demonstrated in the experiments on remote contactless measurement of the temperature of aqueous solutions and measurement of the deviations of the composition of a mixture of dyes from the equilibrium state.

  17. A photophonic instrument concept to measure atmospheric aerosol absorption. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engle, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    A laboratory model of an instrument to measure the absorption of atmospheric aerosols was designed, built, and tested. The design was based on the photophonic phenomenon discovered by Bell and an acoustic resonator developed by Helmholtz. Experiments were done to show ways the signal amplitude could be improved and the noise reduced and to confirm the instrument was sensitive enough to be practical. The research was undertaken to develop concepts which show promise of being improvements on the instruments that are presently used to measure the absorption of the Sun's radiation by the Earth's atmospheric aerosols.

  18. Cryogenic Thermal Absorptance Measurements on Small-Diameter Stainless Steel Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, James; Jahromi, Amir; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI) on the James Webb Space Telescope includes a mechanical cryocooler which cools its detectors to their 6 Kelvin operating temperature. The coolant gas flows through several meters of small-diameter stainless steel tubing, which is exposed to thermal radiation from its environment. Over much of its length this tubing is gold-plated to minimize the absorption of this radiant heat. In order to confirm that the cryocooler will meet MIRI's requirements, the thermal absorptance of this tubing was measured as a function of its environment temperature. We describe the measurement technique and present the results.

  19. Measuring high spectral resolution specific absorption coefficients for use with hyperspectral imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, M.; Bostater, C.

    1997-06-01

    A portable, long path length (50 cm), flow through, absorption tube system is utilized to obtain in-situ specific absorption coefficients from various water environments consisting of both clear and turbid water conditions from an underway ship or vessel. The high spectral resolution absorption signatures can be obtained and correlated with measured water quality parameters along a ship track. The long path cuvette system is capable of measuring important water quality parameters such as chlorophyll-a, seston or total suspended matter, tannins, humics, fulvic acids, or dissolved organic matter (dissolved organic carbon, DOC). The various concentrations of these substances can be determinedmore » and correlated with laboratory measurements using the double inflection ratio (DIR) of the spectra based upon derivative spectroscopy. The DIR is determined for all of the possible combinations of the bands ranging from 362-1115 nm using 252 channels, as described previously by Bostater. The information gathered from this system can be utilized in conjunction with hyperspectral imagery that allows one to relate reflectance and absorption to water quality of a particular environment. A comparison is made between absorption signatures and reflectance obtained from the Banana River, Florida.« less

  20. A benchmarking method to measure dietary absorption efficiency of chemicals by fish.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ruiyang; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha; Åkerman, Gun; McLachlan, Michael S; MacLeod, Matthew

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the dietary absorption efficiency of chemicals in the gastrointestinal tract of fish is important from both a scientific and a regulatory point of view. However, reported fish absorption efficiencies for well-studied chemicals are highly variable. In the present study, the authors developed and exploited an internal chemical benchmarking method that has the potential to reduce uncertainty and variability and, thus, to improve the precision of measurements of fish absorption efficiency. The authors applied the benchmarking method to measure the gross absorption efficiency for 15 chemicals with a wide range of physicochemical properties and structures. They selected 2,2',5,6'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB53) and decabromodiphenyl ethane as absorbable and nonabsorbable benchmarks, respectively. Quantities of chemicals determined in fish were benchmarked to the fraction of PCB53 recovered in fish, and quantities of chemicals determined in feces were benchmarked to the fraction of decabromodiphenyl ethane recovered in feces. The performance of the benchmarking procedure was evaluated based on the recovery of the test chemicals and precision of absorption efficiency from repeated tests. Benchmarking did not improve the precision of the measurements; after benchmarking, however, the median recovery for 15 chemicals was 106%, and variability of recoveries was reduced compared with before benchmarking, suggesting that benchmarking could account for incomplete extraction of chemical in fish and incomplete collection of feces from different tests. © 2013 SETAC.

  1. Developments in Methods for Measuring the Intestinal Absorption of Nanoparticle-Bound Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Pan, Hao; Zhang, Caiyun; Zhao, Liling; Zhao, Ruixia; Zhu, Yongtao; Pan, Weisan

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, novel drug delivery systems comprising orally administered nanoparticles (NPs) have been paid increasing attention in recent years. The bioavailability of orally administered drugs has significant influence on drug efficacy and therapeutic dosage, and it is therefore imperative that the intestinal absorption of oral NPs be investigated. This review examines the various literature on the oral absorption of polymeric NPs, and provides an overview of the intestinal absorption models that have been developed for the study of oral nanoparticles. Three major categories of models including a total of eight measurement methods are described in detail (in vitro: dialysis bag, rat gut sac, Ussing chamber, cell culture model; in situ: intestinal perfusion, intestinal loops, intestinal vascular cannulation; in vivo: the blood/urine drug concentration method), and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are contrasted and elucidated. In general, in vitro and in situ methods are relatively convenient but lack accuracy, while the in vivo method is troublesome but can provide a true reflection of drug absorption in vivo. This review summarizes the development of intestinal absorption experiments in recent years and provides a reference for the systematic study of the intestinal absorption of nanoparticle-bound drugs. PMID:27455239

  2. Measurement of water absorption capacity in wheat flour by a headspace gas chromatographic technique.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei-Qi; Yu, Kong-Xian; Gong, Yi-Xian

    2018-04-17

    The purpose of this work is to introduce a new method for quantitatively analyzing water absorption capacity in wheat flour by a headspace gas chromatographic technique. This headspace gas chromatographic technique was based on measuring the water vapor released from a series of wheat flour samples with different contents of water addition. According to the different trends between the vapor and wheat flour phase before and after the water absorption capacity in wheat flour, a turning point (corresponding to water absorption capacity in wheat flour) can be obtained by fitting the data of the water gas chromatography peak area from different wheat flour samples. The data showed that the phase equilibrium in the vial can be achieved in 25 min at desired temperature (35°C). The relative standard deviation of the reaction headspace gas chromatographic technique in water absorption capacity determination was within 3.48%, the relative differences has been determined by comparing the water absorption capacity obtained from this new analytical technique with the data from the reference technique (i.e., the filtration method), which are less than 8.92%. The new headspace gas chromatographic method is automated, accurate and be a reliable tool for quantifying water absorption capacity in wheat flour in both laboratory research and mill applications. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross section measurement (theory, experiment and results) for small environmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Czubek, J.A.; Drozdowicz, K.; Gabanska, B.

    Czubek`s method of measurement of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross section of small samples has been developed at the Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics in Krakow, Poland. Theoretical principles of the method have been elaborated in the one-velocity diffusion approach in which the thermal neutron parameters used have been averaged over a modified Maxwellian. In consecutive measurements the investigated sample is enveloped in shells of a known moderator of varying thickness and irradiated with a pulsed beam of fast neutrons. The neutrons are slowed-down in the system and a die-away rate of escaping thermal neutrons is measured. Themore » decay constant vs. thickness of the moderator creates the experimental curve. The absorption cross section of the unknown sample is found from the intersection of this curve with the theoretical one. The theoretical curve is calculated for the case when the dynamic material buckling of the inner sample is zero. The method does not use any reference absorption standard and is independent of the transport cross section of the measured sample. The volume of the sample is form of fluid or crushed material is about 170 cm{sup 3}. The standard deviation for the measured mass absorption cross section of rock samples is in the range of 4 divided by 20% of the measured value and for brines is of the order of 0.5%.« less

  4. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Arlen F.; Allen, Robert J.; Mayo, M. Neale; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Mayor, Shane D.; hide

    1994-01-01

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and greater than 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H2O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H2O absorption-line parameters were performed to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H2O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H2O radiosondes. The H2O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by less than 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  5. Measurements of near-IR water vapor absorption at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieker, G. B.; Liu, X.; Li, H.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    2007-03-01

    Tunable diode lasers (TDLs) are used to measure high resolution (0.1 cm-1), near-infrared (NIR) water vapor absorption spectra at 700 K and pressures up to 30 atm within a high-pressure and -temperature optical cell in a high-uniformity tube furnace. Both direct absorption and wavelength modulation with second harmonic detection (WMS-2f) spectra are obtained for 6 cm-1 regions near 7204 cm-1 and 7435 cm-1. Direct absorption measurements at 700 K and 10 atm are compared with simulations using spectral parameters from HITRAN and a hybrid database combining HITRAN with measured spectral constants for transitions in the two target spectral regions. The hybrid database reduces RMS error between the simulation and the measurements by 45% for the 7204 cm-1 region and 28% for the 7435 cm-1 region. At pressures above 10 atm, the breakdown of the impact approximation inherent to the Lorentzian line shape model becomes apparent in the direct absorption spectra, and measured results are in agreement with model results and trends at elevated temperatures reported in the literature. The wavelength-modulation spectra are shown to be less affected by the breakdown of the impact approximation and measurements agree well with the hybrid database predictions to higher pressures (30 atm).

  6. A full-dimensional multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree study on the ultraviolet absorption spectrum of formaldehyde oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Qingyong, E-mail: mengqingyong@dicp.ac.cn; Meyer, Hans-Dieter, E-mail: hans-dieter.meyer@pci.uni-heidelberg.de

    2014-09-28

    Employing the multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (ML-MCTDH) method in conjunction with the multistate multimode vibronic coupling Hamiltonian (MMVCH) model, we perform a full dimensional (9D) quantum dynamical study on the simplest Criegee intermediate, formaldehyde oxide, in five lower-lying singlet electronic states. The ultraviolet (UV) spectrum is then simulated by a Fourier transform of the auto-correlation function. The MMVCH model is built based on extensive MRCI(8e,8o)/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations. To ensure a fast convergence of the final calculations, a large number of ML-MCTDH test calculations is performed to find an appropriate multilayer separations (ML-trees) of the ML-MCTDH nuclear wave functions, and the dynamicalmore » calculations are carefully checked to ensure that the calculations are well converged. To compare the computational efficiency, standard MCTDH simulations using the same Hamiltonian are also performed. A comparison of the MCTDH and ML-MCTDH calculations shows that even for the present not-too-large system (9D here) the ML-MCTDH calculations can save a considerable amount of computational resources while producing identical spectra as the MCTDH calculations. Furthermore, the present theoretical B{sup ~} {sup 1}A{sup ′}←X{sup ~} {sup 1}A{sup ′} UV spectral band and the corresponding experimental measurements [J. M. Beames, F. Liu, L. Lu, and M. I. Lester, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134, 20045–20048 (2012); L. Sheps, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4201–4205 (2013); W.-L. Ting, Y.-H. Chen, W. Chao, M. C. Smith, and J. J.-M. Lin, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 16, 10438–10443 (2014)] are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first theoretical UV spectrum simulated for this molecule including nuclear motion beyond an adiabatic harmonic approximation.« less

  7. Measurements of the intrinsic quantum efficiency and absorption length of tetraphenyl butadiene thin films in the vacuum ultraviolet regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Christopher; Gann, Gabriel Orebi; Gehman, Victor

    2018-04-01

    A key enabling technology for many liquid noble gas (LNG) detectors is the use of the common wavelength shifting medium tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB). TPB thin films are used to shift ultraviolet scintillation light into the visible spectrum for detection and event reconstruction. Understanding the wavelength shifting efficiency and optical properties of these films are critical aspects in detector performance and modeling and hence in the ultimate physics sensitivity of such experiments. This article presents the first measurements of the room-temperature microphysical quantum efficiency for vacuum-deposited TPB thin films - a result that is independent of the optics of the TPB or substrate. Also presented are measurements of the absorption length in the vacuum ultraviolet regime, the secondary re-emission efficiency, and more precise results for the "black-box" efficiency across a broader spectrum of wavelengths than previous results. The low-wavelength sensitivity, in particular, would allow construction of LNG scintillator detectors with lighter elements (Ne, He) to target light mass WIMPs.

  8. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric mercury using differential absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, A.; Obrist, D.; Moosmuller, H.; Moore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric elemental mercury (Hg0) is a globally pervasive element that can be transported and deposited to remote ecosystems where it poses — particularly in its methylated form — harm to many organisms including humans. Current techniques for measurement of atmospheric Hg0 require several liters of sample air and several minutes for each analysis. Fast-response (i.e., 1 second or faster) measurements would improve our ability to understand and track chemical cycling of mercury in the atmosphere, including high frequency Hg0 fluctuations, sources and sinks, and chemical transformation processes. We present theory, design, challenges, and current results of our new prototype sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for fast-response measurement of Hg0 mass concentrations. CRDS is a direct absorption technique that implements path-lengths of multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell using high-reflectivity mirrors, thereby improving sensitivity and reducing sample volume compared to conventional absorption spectroscopy. Our sensor includes a frequency-doubled, dye-laser emitting laser pulses tunable from 215 to 280 nm, pumped by a Q-switched, frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser with a pulse repetition rate of 50 Hz. We present how we successfully perform automated wavelength locking and stabilization of the laser to the peak Hg0 absorption line at 253.65 nm using an external isotopically-enriched mercury (202Hg0) cell. An emphasis of this presentation will be on the implementation of differential absorption measurement whereby measurements are alternated between the peak Hg0 absorption wavelength and a nearby wavelength "off" the absorption line. This can be achieved using a piezo electric tuning element that allows for pulse-by-pulse tuning and detuning of the laser "online" and "offline" of the Hg absorption line, and thereby allows for continuous correction of baseline extinction losses. Unexpected challenges with this approach included

  9. Absorption spectroscopy of microalgae, cyanobacteria, and dissolved organic matter: Measurements in an integrating sphere cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogosyan, S. I.; Durgaryan, A. M.; Konyukhov, I. V.; Chivkunova, O. B.; Merzlyak, M. N.

    2009-12-01

    A device for integrating cavity absorption measurements (ICAM) with an internal diameter of 80 mm suitable for field research is described. The spectral features of the light absorption by some cyanobacteria, green algae, and diatoms in the integrating sphere were studied and the dependences of the absorption on the cell concentration were determined in comparison with the conventional measurements in a 1-cm cuvette. The sensitivity of the chlorophyll estimation with the ICAM reached 0.2-0.5 mg m-3. The results of the ICAM application for the direct analysis of the natural phytoplankton and dissolved organic (“yellow“) matter in the Black Sea and the Sea of Japan are described.

  10. Airborne Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer for IPDA Measurements of Tropospheric CO2: Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    The National Research Council's decadal survey on Earth Science and Applications from Space[1] recommended the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission for launch in 2013-2016 as a logical follow-on to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) which is scheduled for launch in late 2008 [2]. The use of a laser absorption measurement technique provides the required ability to make day and night measurements of CO2 over all latitudes and seasons. As a demonstrator for an approach to meeting the instrument needs for the ASCENDS mission we have developed the airborne Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) which uses the Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) Spectrometer [3] technique operating in the 2 micron wavelength region.. During 2006 a short engineering checkout flight of the CO2LAS was conducted and the results presented previously [4]. Several short flight campaigns were conducted during 2007 and we report results from these campaigns.

  11. Water vapour foreign-continuum absorption in near-infrared windows from laboratory measurements.

    PubMed

    Ptashnik, Igor V; McPheat, Robert A; Shine, Keith P; Smith, Kevin M; Williams, R Gary

    2012-06-13

    For a long time, it has been believed that atmospheric absorption of radiation within wavelength regions of relatively high infrared transmittance (so-called 'windows') was dominated by the water vapour self-continuum, that is, spectrally smooth absorption caused by H(2)O--H(2)O pair interaction. Absorption due to the foreign continuum (i.e. caused mostly by H(2)O--N(2) bimolecular absorption in the Earth's atmosphere) was considered to be negligible in the windows. We report new retrievals of the water vapour foreign continuum from high-resolution laboratory measurements at temperatures between 350 and 430 K in four near-infrared windows between 1.1 and 5 μm (9000-2000 cm(-1)). Our results indicate that the foreign continuum in these windows has a very weak temperature dependence and is typically between one and two orders of magnitude stronger than that given in representations of the continuum currently used in many climate and weather prediction models. This indicates that absorption owing to the foreign continuum may be comparable to the self-continuum under atmospheric conditions in the investigated windows. The calculated global-average clear-sky atmospheric absorption of solar radiation is increased by approximately 0.46 W m(-2) (or 0.6% of the total clear-sky absorption) by using these new measurements when compared with calculations applying the widely used MTCKD (Mlawer-Tobin-Clough-Kneizys-Davies) foreign-continuum model.

  12. O absorption measurements in an engineering-scale high-pressure coal gasifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kai; Sur, Ritobrata; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Clark, Tommy; Anthony, Justin; Machovec, Scott; Northington, John

    2014-10-01

    A real-time, in situ water vapor (H2O) sensor using a tunable diode laser near 1,352 nm was developed to continuously monitor water vapor in the synthesis gas of an engineering-scale high-pressure coal gasifier. Wavelength-scanned wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second harmonic detection (WMS-2 f) was used to determine the absorption magnitude. The 1 f-normalized, WMS-2 f signal (WMS-2 f/1 f) was insensitive to non-absorption transmission losses including beam steering and light scattering by the particulate in the synthesis gas. A fitting strategy was used to simultaneously determine the water vapor mole fraction and the collisional-broadening width of the transition from the scanned 1 f-normalized WMS-2 f waveform at pressures up to 15 atm, which can be used for large absorbance values. This strategy is analogous to the fitting strategy for wavelength-scanned direct absorption measurements. In a test campaign at the US National Carbon Capture Center, the sensor demonstrated a water vapor detection limit of ~800 ppm (25 Hz bandwidth) at conditions with more than 99.99 % non-absorption transmission losses. Successful unattended monitoring was demonstrated over a 435 h period. Strong correlations between the sensor measurements and transient gasifier operation conditions were observed, demonstrating the capability of laser absorption to monitor the gasification process.

  13. Measurements and Modeling of Aerosol Absorption and Single Scattering Albedo at Ambient Relative Hum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Hamill, P.

    2000-01-01

    Uncertainties in the aerosol single scattering albedo have been identified to be an important source of errors in current large-scale model estimates of the direct aerosol radiative forcing of climate. A number of investigators have obtained estimates of the single scattering albedo from a variety of remote sensing and in situ measurements during aerosol field experiments. During the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX, 1996) for example, estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo were obtained (1) as a best-fit parameter in comparing radiative flux changes measured by airborne pyranometer to those computed from independently measured aerosol properties; (2) from estimates of the aerosol complex index of refraction derived using a combination of airborne sunphotometer, lidar backscatter and in situ size distribution measurements; and (3) from airborne measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption using nephelometers and absorption photometers. In this paper, we briefly compare the results of the latter two methods for two TARFOX case studies, since those techniques provide height-resolved information about the aerosol single scattering albedo. Estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo from nephelometer and absorption photometer measurements require knowledge of the scattering and absorption humidification (i.e., the increase in these properties in response to an increase in ambient relative humidity), since both measurements are usually carried out at a relative humidity different from the ambient atmosphere. In principle, the scattering humidification factor can be measured, but there is currently no technique widely available to measure the absorption of an aerosol sample as a function of relative humidity. Frequently, for lack of better knowledge, the absorption humidification is assumed to be unity (meaning that there is no change in aerosol absorption due to an increase in ambient relative humidity). This

  14. Developing and Validating Field Measurement Scales for Absorptive Capacity and Experienced Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadiz, David; Sawyer, John E.; Griffith, Terri L.

    2009-01-01

    Research on knowledge transfer in organizations has been hampered by the lack of tools yielding valid scores for studying critical constructs in concert. The authors developed survey measures of absorptive capacity (the ability to transform new knowledge into usable knowledge) and experienced community of practice (the extent to which a person is…

  15. [Study of high temperature water vapor concentration measurement method based on absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiu-ying; Liu, Jian-guo; He, Jun-feng; He, Ya-bai; Zhang, Guang-le; Xu, Zhen-yu; Gang, Qiang; Wang, Liao; Yao, Lu; Yuan, Song; Ruan, Jun; Dai, Yun-hai; Kan, Rui-feng

    2014-12-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) has been developed to realize the real-time and dynamic measurement of the combustion temperature, gas component concentration, velocity and other flow parameters, owing to its high sensitivity, fast time response, non-invasive character and robust nature. In order to obtain accurate water vapor concentration at high temperature, several absorption spectra of water vapor near 1.39 μm from 773 to 1273 K under ordinary pressure were recorded in a high temperature experiment setup using a narrow band diode laser. The absorbance of high temperature absorption spectra was calculated by combined multi-line nonlinear least squares fitting method. Two water vapor absorption lines near 7154.35 and 7157.73 cm(-1) were selected for measurement of water vapor at high temperature. A model method for high temperature water vapor concentration was first proposed. Water vapor concentration from the model method at high temperature is in accordance with theoretical reasoning, concentration measurement standard error is less than 0.2%, and the relative error is less than 6%. The feasibility of this measuring method is verified by experiment.

  16. Laboratory Measurements of SO2 and N2 Absorption Spectra for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, Glenn

    2003-01-01

    This laboratory project focuses on the following topics: 1) Measurement of SO2 ultraviolet absorption cross sections; and 2) N2 band and Line Oscillator Strengths and Line Widths in the 80 to 100 nm region. Accomplishments for these projects are summarized.

  17. Microwave resonance lamp absorption technique for measuring temperature and OH number density in combustion environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lempert, Walter R.

    1988-01-01

    A simple technique for simultaneous determination of temperature and OH number density is described, along with characteristic results obtained from measurements using a premixed, hydrogen air flat flame burner. The instrumentation is based upon absorption of resonant radiation from a flowing microwave discharge lamp, and is rugged, relatively inexpensive, and very simple to operate.

  18. Supersonic Mass Flux Measurements via Tunable Diode Laser Absorption and Non-Uniform Flow Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Leyen S.; Strand, Christopher L.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Gaffney, Richard L.; Capriotti, Diego P.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of mass flux are obtained in a vitiated supersonic ground test facility using a sensor based on line-of-sight (LOS) diode laser absorption of water vapor. Mass flux is determined from the product of measured velocity and density. The relative Doppler shift of an absorption transition for beams directed upstream and downstream in the flow is used to measure velocity. Temperature is determined from the ratio of absorption signals of two transitions (lambda(sub 1)=1349 nm and lambda(sub 2)=1341.5 nm) and is coupled with a facility pressure measurement to obtain density. The sensor exploits wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection (WMS-2f) for large signal-to-noise ratios and normalization with the 1f signal for rejection of non-absorption related transmission fluctuations. The sensor line-of-sight is translated both vertically and horizontally across the test section for spatially-resolved measurements. Time-resolved measurements of mass flux are used to assess the stability of flow conditions produced by the facility. Measurements of mass flux are within 1.5% of the value obtained using a facility predictive code. The distortion of the WMS lineshape caused by boundary layers along the laser line-of-sight is examined and the subsequent effect on the measured velocity is discussed. A method for correcting measured velocities for flow non-uniformities is introduced and application of this correction brings measured velocities within 4 m/s of the predicted value in a 1630 m/s flow.

  19. Error Reduction Methods for Integrated-path Differential-absorption Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jeffrey R.; Numata, Kenji; Wu, Stewart T.

    2012-01-01

    We report new modeling and error reduction methods for differential-absorption optical-depth (DAOD) measurements of atmospheric constituents using direct-detection integrated-path differential-absorption lidars. Errors from laser frequency noise are quantified in terms of the line center fluctuation and spectral line shape of the laser pulses, revealing relationships verified experimentally. A significant DAOD bias is removed by introducing a correction factor. Errors from surface height and reflectance variations can be reduced to tolerable levels by incorporating altimetry knowledge and "log after averaging", or by pointing the laser and receiver to a fixed surface spot during each wavelength cycle to shorten the time of "averaging before log".

  20. Apparatus and method for measurement of weak optical absorptions by thermally induced laser pulsing

    DOEpatents

    Cremers, David A.; Keller, Richard A.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal lensing phenomenon is used as the basis for measurement of weak optical absorptions when a cell containing the sample to be investigated is inserted into a normally continuous-wave operation laser-pumped dye laser cavity for which the output coupler is deliberately tilted relative to intracavity circulating laser light, and pulsed laser output ensues, the pulsewidth of which can be related to the sample absorptivity by a simple algorithm or calibration curve. A minimum detection limit of less than 10.sup.-5 cm.sup.-1 has been demonstrated using this technique.

  1. Apparatus and method for measurement of weak optical absorptions by thermally induced laser pulsing

    DOEpatents

    Cremers, D.A.; Keller, R.A.

    1982-06-08

    The thermal lensing phenomenon is used as the basis for measurement of weak optical absorptions when a cell containing the sample to be investigated is inserted into a normally continuous-wave operation laser-pumped dye laser cavity for which the output coupler is deliberately tilted relative to intracavity circulating laser light, and pulsed laser output ensues, the pulsewidth of which can be rlated to the sample absorptivity by a simple algorithm or calibration curve. A minimum detection limit of less than 10/sup -5/ cm/sup -1/ has been demonstrated using this technique.

  2. Apparatus and method for measurement of weak optical absorptions by thermally induced laser pulsing

    DOEpatents

    Cremers, D.A.; Keller, R.A.

    1985-10-01

    The thermal lensing phenomenon is used as the basis for measurement of weak optical absorptions when a cell containing the sample to be investigated is inserted into a normally continuous-wave operation laser-pumped dye laser cavity for which the output coupler is deliberately tilted relative to intracavity circulating laser light, and pulsed laser output ensues, the pulsewidth of which can be related to the sample absorptivity by a simple algorithm or calibration curve. A minimum detection limit of less than 10[sup [minus]5] cm[sup [minus]1] has been demonstrated using this technique. 6 figs.

  3. Photothermal measurement of absorption and scattering losses in thin films excited by surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Domené, Esteban A; Balzarotti, Francisco; Bragas, Andrea V; Martínez, Oscar E

    2009-12-15

    We present a novel noncontact, photothermal technique, based on the focus error signal of a commercial CD pickup head that allows direct determination of absorption in thin films. Combined with extinction methods, this technique yields the scattering contribution to the losses. Surface plasmon polaritons are excited using the Kretschmann configuration in thin Au films of varying thickness. By measuring the extinction and absorption simultaneously, it is shown that dielectric constants and thickness retrieval leads to inconsistencies if the model does not account for scattering.

  4. Quantitative Measurement of Protease-Activity with Correction of Probe Delivery and Tissue Absorption Effects

    PubMed Central

    Salthouse, Christopher D.; Reynolds, Fred; Tam, Jenny M.; Josephson, Lee; Mahmood, Umar

    2009-01-01

    Proteases play important roles in a variety of pathologies from heart disease to cancer. Quantitative measurement of protease activity is possible using a novel spectrally matched dual fluorophore probe and a small animal lifetime imager. The recorded fluorescence from an activatable fluorophore, one that changes its fluorescent amplitude after biological target interaction, is also influenced by other factors including imaging probe delivery and optical tissue absorption of excitation and emission light. Fluorescence from a second spectrally matched constant (non-activatable) fluorophore on each nanoparticle platform can be used to correct for both probe delivery and tissue absorption. The fluorescence from each fluorophore is separated using fluorescence lifetime methods. PMID:20161242

  5. Aerosol Absorption in the Atmosphere: Perspectives from Global Model, Ground-Based Measurements, and Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Torres, Omar; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia; Ginoux, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol absorption in the atmosphere poses a major uncertainty in assessing the aerosol climate effects. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, and our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt. We compare the model calculated total aerosol optical thickness, extinction, and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET, satellite retrievals from the TOMS instrument, and field observations from ACE-Asia. We will examine the most sensitive factors in determining the aerosol absorption. and the consequences of assessing the aerosol radiative forcing and atmospheric heating associated with those factors.

  6. Aerosol Absorption in the Atmosphere: Perspectives from Global Model, Ground-Based Measurements, and Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia; Duncan, Bryan; Ginoux, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol absorption in the atmosphere poses a major uncertainty in assessing the aerosol climate effects. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, and our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt. We compare the model calculated total aerosol optical thickness, extinction, and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia. We will examine what are the most sensitive factors in determining the aerosol absorption, and the consequences of assessing the aerosol radiative forcing and atmospheric heating associated with those factors.

  7. Aerosol Absorption in the Atmosphere: Perspectives from Global Model, Ground-Based Measurements, and Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Main; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia; Duncan, Bryan; Ginoux, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol absorption in the atmosphere poses a major uncertainty in assessing the aerosol climate effects. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, and our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt. We compare the model calculated total aerosol optical thickness, extinction, and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia. We will examine the most sensitive factors in determining the aerosol absorption, and the consequences of assessing the aerosol radiative forcing and atmospheric heating associated with those factors.

  8. Measurement of prompt fission neutron spectrum for spontaneous fission of 252Cf using γ multiplicity tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, E.; Daskalakis, A.; Block, R. C.; Danon, Y.

    2017-06-01

    The prompt fission neutron spectrum from spontaneous fission of 252Cf is an integral part of several aspects of nuclear data. Not only is the spectrum itself of interest, but neutron detectors often use the spectrum for calibration, and other prompt fission neutron spectra are measured as a ratio to 252Cf. Therefore, reducing the uncertainties in this spectrum will allow for more accurate nuclear data to be available across a wide range of fields. The prompt fission neutron spectrum for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf was measured at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute using the multiple γ tagging method with a 18.4-ng fission sample. An EJ-301 liquid scintillator fast neutron detector was used to measure the high energy portion of the spectrum, 0.5-7 MeV, and a thin EJ-204 plastic scintillator was used to measure the low energy portion of the spectrum, from 50 keV to 2 MeV. These spectra both show good agreement with the current evaluation of 252Cf and have low associated uncertainties providing a new high precision measurement that helps reduce the uncertainties in the prompt fission neutron spectrum for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf.

  9. Absorption/Transmission Measurements of PSAP Particle-Laden Filters from the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) Field Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Presser, Cary; Nazarian, Ashot; Conny, Joseph M.; Chand, Duli; Sedlacek, Arthur; Hubbe, John M.

    2017-01-01

    Absorptivity measurements with a laser-heating approach, referred to as the laser-driven thermal reactor (LDTR), were carried out in the infrared and applied at ambient (laboratory) non-reacting conditions to particle-laden filters from a three-wavelength (visible) particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP). The particles were obtained during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign. The focus of this study was to determine the particle absorption coefficient from field-campaign filter samples using the LDTR approach, and compare results with other commercially available instrumentation (in this case with the PSAP, which has been compared with numerous other optical techniques). Advantages of the LDTR approach include 1) direct estimation of material absorption from temperature measurements (as opposed to resolving the difference between the measured reflection/scattering and transmission), 2) information on the filter optical properties, and 3) identification of the filter material effects on particle absorption (e.g., leading to particle absorption enhancement or shadowing). For measurements carried out under ambient conditions, the particle absorptivity is obtained with a thermocouple placed flush with the filter back surface and the laser probe beam impinging normal to the filter particle-laden surface. Thus, in principle one can employ a simple experimental arrangement to measure simultaneously both the transmissivity and absorptivity (at different discrete wavelengths) and ascertain the particle absorption coefficient. For this investigation, LDTR measurements were carried out with PSAP filters (pairs with both blank and exposed filters) from eight different days during the campaign, having relatively light but different particle loadings. The observed particles coating the filters were found to be carbonaceous (having broadband absorption characteristics). The LDTR absorption coefficient compared well with results from the PSAP. The

  10. Absorption/Transmission Measurements of PSAP Particle-Laden Filters from the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) Field Campaign.

    PubMed

    Presser, Cary; Nazarian, Ashot; Conny, Joseph M; Chand, Duli; Sedlacek, Arthur; Hubbe, John M

    2017-01-01

    Absorptivity measurements with a laser-heating approach, referred to as the laser-driven thermal reactor (LDTR), were carried out in the infrared and applied at ambient (laboratory) non-reacting conditions to particle-laden filters from a three-wavelength (visible) particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP). The particles were obtained during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign. The focus of this study was to determine the particle absorption coefficient from field-campaign filter samples using the LDTR approach, and compare results with other commercially available instrumentation (in this case with the PSAP, which has been compared with numerous other optical techniques). Advantages of the LDTR approach include 1) direct estimation of material absorption from temperature measurements (as opposed to resolving the difference between the measured reflection/scattering and transmission), 2) information on the filter optical properties, and 3) identification of the filter material effects on particle absorption (e.g., leading to particle absorption enhancement or shadowing). For measurements carried out under ambient conditions, the particle absorptivity is obtained with a thermocouple placed flush with the filter back surface and the laser probe beam impinging normal to the filter particle-laden surface. Thus, in principle one can employ a simple experimental arrangement to measure simultaneously both the transmissivity and absorptivity (at different discrete wavelengths) and ascertain the particle absorption coefficient. For this investigation, LDTR measurements were carried out with PSAP filters (pairs with both blank and exposed filters) from eight different days during the campaign, having relatively light but different particle loadings. The observed particles coating the filters were found to be carbonaceous (having broadband absorption characteristics). The LDTR absorption coefficient compared well with results from the PSAP. The

  11. Two-photon absorption measurements of deep UV transmissible materials at 213 nm

    DOE PAGES

    Patankar, S.; Yang, S. T.; Moody, J. D.; ...

    2017-09-19

    We report on two photon absorption measurements at 213nm of deep UV transmissible media including LiF, MgF 2, CaF 2, BaF 2, Sapphire (Al 2O 3) and high purity grades of fused-silica (SiO 2). A high stability 24ps Nd:YAG laser operating at the 5th harmonic (213nm) was used to generate a high intensity, long Rayleigh length Gaussian focus inside the samples. The measurements of the Fluoride crystals and Sapphire indicate two photon absorption coefficients between 0.004 and 0.82 cm/GW. We find that different grades of fused silica performed near identically for two photon absorption, however, there are differences in linearmore » losses associated with purity. A low two photon absorption cross section is measured for MgF 2 making it an ideal material for the propagation of high intensity deep UV lasers.« less

  12. Weak absorptions in high density planetary atmospheres measured by the cavity ring down technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snels, M.; Stefani, S.; Piccioni, G.

    2014-04-01

    High density planetary atmospheres are characterized by a high opacity due to the strong absorbers. Howevere usually several transparency windows exist which allow to study the lower part of the atmosphere as well as the surface emission. The weak absorptions occurring in these transparency windows are mostly due to trace species and to continuum absorption of the major absorber(s). A good example is the atmosphere of Venus, where carbondioxide causes a high opacity throughout most of the infrared wavelengths, but also has some transparency spectral windows in the near infrared, allowing the study of low lying clouds , trace species such as water vapor and in some cases the surface emission. The cavity ring down (CRD) technique has shown to be a good tool for studying weak absorptions. Here we present a CRD apparatus which can be operated at high pressures (up to 40 bar) with a sensitivity which allows to measure attenuations up to 2x10-8 cm-1. This instrument has been used to measure the carbon dioxide absorption at pressures up to 40 bar and has been also used to measure attenuation due to Rayleigh scattering at 1.18 μm.

  13. Two-photon absorption measurements of deep UV transmissible materials at 213 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Patankar, S.; Yang, S. T.; Moody, J. D.

    We report on two photon absorption measurements at 213nm of deep UV transmissible media including LiF, MgF 2, CaF 2, BaF 2, Sapphire (Al 2O 3) and high purity grades of fused-silica (SiO 2). A high stability 24ps Nd:YAG laser operating at the 5th harmonic (213nm) was used to generate a high intensity, long Rayleigh length Gaussian focus inside the samples. The measurements of the Fluoride crystals and Sapphire indicate two photon absorption coefficients between 0.004 and 0.82 cm/GW. We find that different grades of fused silica performed near identically for two photon absorption, however, there are differences in linearmore » losses associated with purity. A low two photon absorption cross section is measured for MgF 2 making it an ideal material for the propagation of high intensity deep UV lasers.« less

  14. Two-photon absorption measurements of deep UV transmissible materials at 213  nm.

    PubMed

    Patankar, S; Yang, S T; Moody, J D; Swadling, G F; Erlandson, A C; Bayramian, A J; Barker, D; Datte, P; Acree, R L; Pepmeier, B; Madden, R E; Borden, M R; Ross, J S

    2017-10-20

    We report on two-photon absorption measurements at 213 nm of deep UV transmissible media, including LiF, MgF 2 , CaF 2 , BaF 2 , sapphire (Al 2 O 3 ), and high-purity grades of fused-silica (SiO 2 ). A high-stability 24 ps Nd:YAG laser operating at the 5th harmonic (213 nm) was used to generate a high-intensity, long-Rayleigh-length Gaussian focus inside the samples. The measurements of the fluoride crystals and sapphire indicate two-photon absorption coefficients between 0.004 and 0.82 cm/GW. We find that different grades of fused silica performed near identically for two-photon absorption; however, there are differences in linear losses associated with purity. A low two-photon absorption cross section is measured for MgF 2 , making it an ideal material for the propagation of high-intensity deep UV lasers.

  15. Absorption of Solar Radiation by the Cloudy Atmosphere: Further Interpretations of Collocated Aircraft Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Zhang, Minghua; Valero, Francisco P. J.; Pope, Shelly K.; Bucholtz, Anthony; Bush, Brett; Zender, Charles S.

    1998-01-01

    We have extended the interpretations made in two prior studies of the aircraft shortwave radiation measurements that were obtained as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Enhanced Shortwave Experiments (ARESE). These extended interpretations use the 500 nm (10 nm bandwidth) measurements to minimize sampling errors in the broadband measurements. It is indicated that the clouds present during this experiment absorb more shortwave radiation than predicted by clear skies and thus by theoretical models, that at least some (less than or equal to 20%) of this enhanced cloud absorption occurs at wavelengths less than 680 nm, and that the observed cloud absorption does not appear to be an artifact of sampling errors nor of instrument calibration errors.

  16. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using Targets: SO2 and NO2 Measurements in Montevideo City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louban, Ilia; Píriz, Gustavo; Platt, Ulrich; Frins, Erna

    2008-04-01

    SO2 and NO2 were remotely measured in a main street of Montevideo city using Multiaxis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) combined with on-field selected targets. Target-based measurements are the basis of a new experimental procedure called Topographic Target Light scattering-DOAS (TOTAL-DOAS) that provides a well define absorption path to measure the near surface distribution of trace gases in the boundary layer. It combines the measurement principles of the long-path DOAS and zenith-scattered sunlight DOAS, within the near UV and VIS spectral range. We give a general description of the procedure and present first results of the 2006 campaign at Montevideo.

  17. VHF Omnidirectional Radio Range (VOR) Electromagnetic Spectrum Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-18

    MAINTENANCE AND INSPECTION OF VOR, DVOR FACILITIES. 9-42 mouce & Io 10/18/78 Page 9-1 VHF OMNI-DIRECTIONAL RADIO RANGE (VOR) ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM...developed by the rotating sideband pattern 0r Pattern shown at North 00 North position Reference30 R--Variable ....uRlerent Cardioid-shaped Field Pattern...to their respective antenna pairs (which are 1800 out of phase with each other). This combination creates a two lobe field pattern rotating at 30 rps

  18. High Resolution Millimeter Wave Absorption Spectroscopy of Flexi- Ble Complex Organic Molecules: Laboratory Spectrum of 1, 2-Butanediol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris, Assimo

    2017-11-01

    and centrifugal distortion constants up to the forth- or sixth-order. The experimental spectroscopic constants and theoretical electric dipole moment components were used to predict the rotational spectrum of each of the observed conformers up to 163 GHz. Making use of the training received by the ALMA Regional Center in Bologna, selected lines of the most stable conformer of BD were searched toward the IRAS 16293-2422 A source exploiting Band 3 observations performed during the ALMA-project 2012.1.00712.S. No match was found, however further observations, aimed specifically to its search, could be more successful. Moreover considering that the maximum spectral signal of heavy molecules is predicted at higher frequencies, additional laboratory measurements at sub-millimeter wavelengths can be performed, starting from the present assignments. The new data could be used to attempt new observations in COMs-reach sources.

  19. Simultaneous measurement of displacement current and absorption spectra of Langmuir film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Kubota, Tohru; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    1995-07-01

    A Maxwell-displacement-current measuring system coupled with the system used for the measurement of absorption spectra of monolayers on a water surface has been developed. Using this system, the displacement current and the absorbance across monolayers of squarylium dye at the air/water surface were detected. It was found that the change in J aggregate in the monolayers with monolayer compression was detectable using the system.

  20. Measuring Social Communication Behaviors as a Treatment Endpoint in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anagnostou, Evdokia; Jones, Nancy; Huerta, Marisela; Halladay, Alycia K.; Wang, Paul; Scahill, Lawrence; Horrigan, Joseph P.; Kasari, Connie; Lord, Cathy; Choi, Dennis; Sullivan, Katherine; Dawson, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    Social communication impairments are a core deficit in autism spectrum disorder. Social communication deficit is also an early indicator of autism spectrum disorder and a factor in long-term outcomes. Thus, this symptom domain represents a critical treatment target. Identifying reliable and valid outcome measures for social communication across a…

  1. Cavity-enhanced measurements of hydrogen peroxide absorption cross sections from 353 to 410 nm.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Tara F; Washenfelder, Rebecca A; Vaida, Veronica; Brown, Steven S

    2012-06-21

    We report near-ultraviolet and visible absorption cross sections of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) using incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS), a recently developed, high-sensitivity technique. The measurements reported here span the range of 353-410 nm and extend published electronic absorption cross sections by 60 nm to absorption cross sections below 1 × 10(-23) cm(2) molecule(-1). We have calculated photolysis rate constants for H(2)O(2) in the lower troposphere at a range of solar zenith angles by combining the new measurements with previously reported data at wavelengths shorter than 350 nm. We predict that photolysis at wavelengths longer than those included in the current JPL recommendation may account for up to 28% of the total hydroxyl radical (OH) production from H(2)O(2) photolysis under some conditions. Loss of H(2)O(2) via photolysis may be of the same order of magnitude as reaction with OH and dry deposition in the lower atmosphere; these processes have very different impacts on HO(x) loss and regeneration.

  2. Measurement of temperature profiles in flames by emission-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, F. S.; Arnold, C. B.; Lindquist, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to explore the use of infrared and ultraviolet emission-absorption spectroscopy for determination of temperature profiles in flames. Spectral radiances and absorptances were measured in the 2.7-micron H2O band and the 3064-A OH band in H2/O2 flames for several temperature profiles which were directly measured by a sodium line-reversal technique. The temperature profiles, determined by inversion of the infrared and ultraviolet spectra, showed an average disagreement with line-reversal measurements of 50 K for the infrared and 200 K for the ultraviolet at a temperature of 2600 K. The reasons for these discrepancies are discussed in some detail.

  3. Resonant tube for measurement of sound absorption in gases at low frequency/pressure ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Griffin, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes a resonant tube for measuring sound absorption in gases, with specific emphasis on the vibrational relaxation peak of N2, over a range of frequency/pressure ratios from 0.1 to 2500 Hz/atm. The experimental background losses measured in argon agree with the theoretical wall losses except at few isolated frequencies. Rigid cavity terminations, external excitation, and a differential technique of background evaluation were used to minimize spurious contributions to the background losses. Room temperature measurements of sound absorption in binary mixtures of N2-CO2 in which both components are excitable resulted in the maximum frequency/pressure ratio in Hz/atm of 0.063 + 123m for the N2 vibrational relaxation peak, where m is mole percent of added CO2; the maximum ratio for the CO2 peak was 34,500 268m where m is mole percent of added N2.

  4. Measurement of He neutral temperature in detached plasmas using laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramaki, M.; Tsujihara, T.; Kajita, S.; Tanaka, H.; Ohno, N.

    2018-01-01

    The reduction of the heat load onto plasma-facing components by plasma detachment is an inevitable scheme in future nuclear fusion reactors. Since the control of the plasma and neutral temperatures is a key issue to the detached plasma generation, we have developed a laser absorption spectroscopy system for the metastable helium temperature measurements and used together with a previously developed laser Thomson scattering system for the electron temperature and density measurements. The thermal relaxation process between the neutral and the electron in the detached plasma generated in the linear plasma device, NAGDIS-II was studied. It is shown that the electron temperature gets close to the neutral temperature by increasing the electron density. On the other hand, the pressure dependence of electron and neutral temperatures shows the cooling effect by the neutrals. The possibility of the plasma fluctuation measurement using the fluctuation in the absorption signal is also shown.

  5. Measurements of K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios using EDXRF technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacal, Mustafa Recep; Han, İbrahim; Akman, Ferdi

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, the K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios for 30 elements between Ti ( Z = 22) and Er ( Z = 68) were measured by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique. The jump factors and jump ratios for these elements were determined by measuring the K shell fluorescence parameters such as the Kα X-ray production cross-sections, K shell fluorescence yields, Kβ-to- Kα X-rays intensity ratios, total atomic absorption cross sections and mass attenuation coefficients. The measurements were performed using an Am-241 radioactive point source and a Si (Li) detector in direct excitation and transmission experimental geometry. The results for jump factors and jump ratios were compared with theoretically calculated and the ones available in the literature.

  6. Laboratory measurement of the absorption coefficient of riboflavin for ultraviolet light (365 nm).

    PubMed

    Iseli, Hans Peter; Popp, Max; Seiler, Theo; Spoerl, Eberhard; Mrochen, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Corneal cross-linking (CXL) is an increasingly used treatment technique for stabilizing the cornea in keratoconus. Cross-linking (polymerization) between collagen fibrils is induced by riboflavin (vitamin B2) and ultraviolet light (365 nm). Although reported to reach a constant value at higher riboflavin concentrations, the Lambert-Beer law predicts a linear increase in the absorption coefficient. This work was carried out to determine absorption behavior at different riboflavin concentrations and to further investigate the purported plateau absorption coefficient value of riboflavin and to identify possible bleaching effects. The Lambert-Beer law was used to calculate the absorption coefficient at various riboflavin concentrations. The following investigated concentrations of riboflavin solutions were prepared using a mixture of 0.5% riboflavin and 20% Dextran T500 dissolved in 0.9% sodium chloride solution: 0%, 0.02%, 0.03%, 0.04%, 0.05%, 0.06%, 0.08%, 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%, 0.4%, and 0.5%, and were investigated with and without aperture plate implementation. An additional test series measured the transmitted power at selected riboflavin concentrations over time. In diluted solutions, a linear correlation exists between the absorption coefficient and riboflavin concentration. The absorption coefficient reaches a plateau, but this occurs at a higher riboflavin concentration (0.1%) than previously reported (just above 0.04%). Transmitted light power increases over time, indicating a bleaching effect of riboflavin. The riboflavin concentration can be effectively varied as a treatment parameter in a considerably broader range than previously thought. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Temperature sensitivity of differential absorption lidar measurements of water vapor in the 720-nm region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed; Grossmann, Benoist E.

    1991-01-01

    Recently measured properties of water vapor (H2O) absorption lines have been used in calculations to evalute the temperature sensitivity of differential absorption lidar (Dial) H2O measurements. This paper estimates the temperature sensitivity of H2O lines in the 717-733-nm region for both H2O mixing ratio and number density measurements, and discusses the influence of the H2O line ground state energies E-double-prime, the H2O absorption linewidths, the linewidth temperature dependence parameter, and the atmospheric temperature and pressure variations with altitude and location on the temperature sensitivity calculations. Line parameters and temperature sensitivity calculations for 67 H2O lines in the 720-nm band are given which can be directly used in field experiments. Water vapor lines with E-double-prime values in the 100-300/cm range were found to be optimum for Dial measurements of H2O number densities, while E-double-prime values in the 250-500/cm range were found to be optimum for H2O mixing ratio measurements.

  8. All-Particle Spectrum Measured by the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, H. S.; Adams, J. H.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Batkov, K. E.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Guzik, T. G.; hide

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC), a balloon-borne experiment, is designed to investigate the composition and energy spectra of cosmic rays of charge Z = 1 to 26 over the energy range - 10(exp 11) - 10(exp 14) ev. The instrument consists of a silicon matrix charge detector, plastic-scintillator strip hodoscopes interleaved with graphite interaction targets, and an 18 radiation length deep, fully active bismuth germanate (BGO) calorimeter. ATIC has had two successful long duration balloon (LDB) flights launched from McMurdo Station, Antarc't'ica in 2000 and 2002. In this paper, we present the all-particle spectrum extracted from data collected during the ATIC flights, and compare it with results from other experiments at both lower and higher energies.

  9. Validation of double-pulse 1572 nm integrated path differential absorption lidar measurement of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Juan; Liu, Jiqiao; Bi, Decang; Ma, Xiuhua; Hou, Xia; Zhu, Xiaolei; Chen, Weibiao

    2018-04-01

    A ground-based double-pulse 1572 nm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar was developed for carbon dioxide (CO2) column concentrations measurement. The lidar measured the CO2 concentrations continuously by receiving the scattered echo signal from a building about 1300 m away. The other two instruments of TDLAS and in-situ CO2 analyzer measured the CO2 concentrations on the same time. A CO2 concentration measurement of 430 ppm with 1.637 ppm standard error was achieved.

  10. Computed tomography measurement of gaseous fuel concentration by infrared laser light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazoe, Hiromitsu; Inagaki, Kazuhisa; Emi, Y.; Yoshino, Fumio

    1997-11-01

    A system to measure gaseous hydrocarbon distributions was devised, which is based on IR light absorption by C-H stretch mode of vibration and computed tomography method. It is called IR-CT method in the paper. Affection of laser light power fluctuation was diminished by monitoring source light intensity by the second IR light detector. Calibration test for methane fuel was carried out to convert spatial data of line absorption coefficient into quantitative methane concentration. This system was applied to three flow fields. The first is methane flow with lifted flame which is generated by a gourd-shaped fuel nozzle. Feasibility of the IR-CT method was confirmed through the measurement. The second application is combustion field with diffusion flame. Calibration to determine absorptivity was undertaken, and measured line absorption coefficient was converted spatial fuel concentration using corresponding temperature data. The last case is modeled in cylinder gas flow of internal combustion engine, where gaseous methane was led to the intake valve in steady flow state. The fuel gas flow simulates behavior of gaseous gasoline which is evaporated at intake valve tulip. Computed tomography measurement of inner flow is essentially difficult because of existence of surrounding wall. In this experiment, IR laser beam was led to planed portion by IR light fiber. It is found that fuel convection by airflow takes great part in air-fuel mixture formation and the developed IR-CT system to measure fuel concentration is useful to analyze air-fuel mixture formation process and to develop new combustors.

  11. Method and apparatus for measuring butterfat and protein content using microwave absorption techniques

    DOEpatents

    Fryer, Michael O.; Hills, Andrea J.; Morrison, John L.

    2000-01-01

    A self calibrating method and apparatus for measuring butterfat and protein content based on measuring the microwave absorption of a sample of milk at several microwave frequencies. A microwave energy source injects microwave energy into the resonant cavity for absorption and reflection by the sample undergoing evaluation. A sample tube is centrally located in the resonant cavity passing therethrough and exposing the sample to the microwave energy. A portion of the energy is absorbed by the sample while another portion of the microwave energy is reflected back to an evaluation device such as a network analyzer. The frequency at which the reflected radiation is at a minimum within the cavity is combined with the scatter coefficient S.sub.11 as well as a phase change to calculate the butterfat content in the sample. The protein located within the sample may also be calculated in a likewise manner using the frequency, S.sub.11 and phase variables. A differential technique using a second resonant cavity containing a reference standard as a sample will normalize the measurements from the unknown sample and thus be self-calibrating. A shuttered mechanism will switch the microwave excitation between the unknown and the reference cavities. An integrated apparatus for measuring the butterfat content in milk using microwave absorption techniques is also presented.

  12. Measured Wavelength-Dependent Absorption Enhancement of Internally Mixed Black Carbon with Absorbing and Nonabsorbing Materials.

    PubMed

    You, Rian; Radney, James G; Zachariah, Michael R; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2016-08-02

    Optical absorption spectra of laboratory generated aerosols consisting of black carbon (BC) internally mixed with nonabsorbing materials (ammonium sulfate, AS, and sodium chloride, NaCl) and BC with a weakly absorbing brown carbon surrogate derived from humic acid (HA) were measured across the visible to near-IR (550 to 840 nm). Spectra were measured in situ using a photoacoustic spectrometer and step-scanning a supercontinuum laser source with a tunable wavelength and bandwidth filter. BC had a mass-specific absorption cross section (MAC) of 7.89 ± 0.25 m(2) g(-1) at λ = 550 nm and an absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) of 1.03 ± 0.09 (2σ). For internally mixed BC, the ratio of BC mass to the total mass of the mixture was chosen as 0.13 to mimic particles observed in the terrestrial atmosphere. The manner in which BC mixed with each material was determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). AS/BC and HA/BC particles were fully internally mixed, and the BC was both internally and externally mixed for NaCl/BC particles. The AS/BC, NaCl/BC, and HA/BC particles had AAEs of 1.43 ± 0.05, 1.34 ± 0.06, and 1.91 ± 0.05, respectively. The observed absorption enhancement of mixed BC relative to the pure BC was wavelength dependent for AS/BC and decreased from 1.5 at λ = 550 nm with increasing wavelength while the NaCl/BC enhancement was essentially wavelength independent. For HA/BC, the enhancement ranged from 2 to 3 and was strongly wavelength dependent. Removal of the HA absorption contribution to enhancement revealed that the enhancement was ≈1.5 and independent of wavelength.

  13. Design and measure of a tunable double-band metamaterial absorber in the THz spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiming, Han

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate and measure a hybrid double-band tunable metamaterial absorber in the terahertz region. The measured metamaterial absorber contains of a hybrid dielectric layer structure: a SU-8 layer and a VO2 layer. Near perfect double-band absorption performances are achieved by optimizing the SU-8 layer thickness at room temperature 25 °C. Measured results show that the phase transition can be observed when the measured temperature reaches 68 °C. Further measured results indicate that the resonance frequency and absorption amplitude of the proposed metamaterial absorber are tunable through increasing the measured temperature, while structural parameters unchanged. The proposed hybrid metamaterial absorber shows many advantages, such as frequency agility, absorption amplitude tunable, and simple fabrication.

  14. Optical measurements of absorption changes in two-layered diffusive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Francesco; Sassaroli, Angelo; Henry, Michael E.; Fantini, Sergio

    2004-04-01

    We have used Monte Carlo simulations for a two-layered diffusive medium to investigate the effect of a superficial layer on the measurement of absorption variations from optical diffuse reflectance data processed by using: (a) a multidistance, frequency-domain method based on diffusion theory for a semi-infinite homogeneous medium; (b) a differential-pathlength-factor method based on a modified Lambert-Beer law for a homogeneous medium and (c) a two-distance, partial-pathlength method based on a modified Lambert-Beer law for a two-layered medium. Methods (a) and (b) lead to a single value for the absorption variation, whereas method (c) yields absorption variations for each layer. In the simulations, the optical coefficients of the medium were representative of those of biological tissue in the near-infrared. The thickness of the first layer was in the range 0.3-1.4 cm, and the source-detector distances were in the range 1-5 cm, which is typical of near-infrared diffuse reflectance measurements in tissue. The simulations have shown that (1) method (a) is mostly sensitive to absorption changes in the underlying layer, provided that the thickness of the superficial layer is ~0.6 cm or less; (2) method (b) is significantly affected by absorption changes in the superficial layer and (3) method (c) yields the absorption changes for both layers with a relatively good accuracy of ~4% for the superficial layer and ~10% for the underlying layer (provided that the absorption changes are less than 20-30% of the baseline value). We have applied all three methods of data analysis to near-infrared data collected on the forehead of a human subject during electroconvulsive therapy. Our results suggest that the multidistance method (a) and the two-distance partial-pathlength method (c) may better decouple the contributions to the optical signals that originate in deeper tissue (brain) from those that originate in more superficial tissue layers.

  15. Absorption of Solar Radiation by Clouds: A Second Look at Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; King, Michael D.; Cahalan, Robert F.; Lau, William K.-M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A decade ago, Stephens and Tsay provided an overview of the subject of absorption of solar radiation by clouds in the earth's atmosphere. They summarized the available evidence that pointed to disagreements between theoretical and observed values of cloud absorption (and reflection). At that time, a theoretician's approach (assuming perfect flux measurements) was adopted to test the model uncertainty under various hypotheses, such as the omitted large drops, excess absorbing aerosols, enhanced water vapor continuum absorption, and cloud inhomogeneity. Since then, several advances in theoretical work have been made, but a satisfactory answer for the discrepancy is still lacking. Now, we offer an experimentalist's approach (focusing on field, not laboratory) to examine the observational uncertainty under numerous field factors, such as the temperature dependence, attitude control, and sampling strategy in the spatial and spectral domain. Examples from recent field campaigns have pointed out that these sources of error may be responsible for the unacceptable level of uncertainty (e.g., as large as 20 W/square m). We give examples of each, discuss their contribution to overall uncertainty in shortwave absorption, and suggest a coordinated approach to their solution.

  16. Measurement of laser absorptivity for operating parameters characteristic of laser drilling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M.; Berthe, L.; Fabbro, R.; Muller, M.

    2008-08-01

    Laser drilling in the percussion regime is commonly used in the aircraft industry to drill sub-millimetre holes in metallic targets. Characteristic laser intensities in the range of 10 MW cm-2 are typically employed for drilling metallic targets. With these intensities the temperature of the irradiated matter is above the vaporization temperature and the drilling process is led by hydrodynamic effects. Although the main physical processes involved are identified, this process is not correctly understood or completely controlled. A major characteristic coefficient of laser-matter interaction for this regime, which is the absorptivity of the laser on the irradiated surface, is still unknown, because of the perturbing effects due to laser beam geometrical trapping inside the drilled hole. So, by using time resolved experiments, this study deals with the direct measurement of the variation of the intrinsic absorption of aluminium, nickel and steel materials, as a function of the incident laser intensity up to 20 MW cm-2. We observe that for this incident intensity, the absorptivity can reach up to 80%. This very high and unexpected value is discussed by considering the microscopic behaviour of the heated matter near the vapour-liquid interface that undergoes possible Rayleigh-Taylor instability or volume absorption.

  17. Measurement and calculation of the sound absorption coefficient of pine wood charcoal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Jae Gap; Baik, Kyung min; Kim, Yong Tae; Jung, Sung Soo

    2013-10-01

    Although charcoal has been widely utilized for physical therapy and as a deodorant, water purifier, etc. due to its porous features, research on its role as a sound-absorbing material is rarely found. Thus, the sound absorption coefficients of pine wood charcoal were measured using an impedance tube and were compared with the theoretical predictions in the frequency range of 500˜ 5000 Hz. The theory developed in the current study only considers the lowest possible mode propagating along the air channels of the charcoal and shows good agreements with the measurements. As the frequency is increased, the sound absorption coefficients of pine wood charcoals also increase, but are lower than those of other commonly-used sound-absorbing materials.

  18. Raman gain and nonlinear optical absorption measurements in a low-loss silicon waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Haisheng; Liu, Ansheng; Nicolaescu, Remus; Paniccia, Mario; Cohen, Oded; Hak, Dani

    2004-09-01

    We fabricated a low-loss (˜0.22dB/cm) rib waveguide (WG) in silicon-on-insulator with a small effective core area of ˜1.57μm2 and measured the stimulated Raman scattering gain in the WG. We obtained 2.3dB Raman gain in a 4.8-cm-long S-shaped WG using a 1455nm pump laser with a cw power of 0.9W measured before the WG. In addition, we observed nonlinear dependence of Raman gain and optical propagation loss as a function of the pump power. Our study shows that this mainly is due to two-photon absorption (TPA) induced free carrier absorption in the silicon WG. We experimentally determined the TPA induced free carrier lifetime of 25ns, which agrees well with our modeling.

  19. Evanescent Wave Absorption Based Fiber Sensor for Measuring Glucose Solution Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki, Ahmad; Candra Pratiwi, Arni; Suryanti, Venty

    2018-03-01

    An optical fiber sensor based on evanescent wave absorption designed for measuring glucose solution consentration was proposed. The sensor was made to detect absorbance of various wavelength in the glucose solution. The sensing element was fabricated by side polishing of multimode polymer optical fiber to form a D-shape. The sensing element was immersed in different concentration of glucoce solution. As light propagated through the optical fiber, the evanescent wave interacted with the glucose solution. Light was absorbed by the glucose solution. The larger concentration the glucose solution has, the more the evanescent wave was absorbed in particular wavelenght. Here in this paper, light absorbtion as function of glucose concentration was measured as function of wavelength (the color of LED). We have shown that the proposed sensor can demonstrated an increase of light absorption as function of glucose concentration.

  20. Absorption and Scattering of Aerosol measured onboard R/V Gisang1 over the Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inae, K.; Lee, M.; Shin, B.; Ryoo, S.; Jung, J.; Kim, S. W.

    2017-12-01

    Absorption and scattering coefficient were measured onboard RV Gisang 1 over the Yellow Sea (covering 124° 127°E, 31° 38°N) during May June, 2016. BC concentration was analyzed at seven wavelengths (370, 470, 520, 590, 660, 880, and 950nm) every 1 minute by Aethalometer. Scattering coefficient was measured at three wavelengths (450, 550, and 750nm) every 5 minutes with Nephelometer. The mean absorption coefficient was 1.2 Mm-1 at 880nm and the mean scattering coefficient was 116Mm-1 at 550nm. Single scattering albedo(SSA) reached the maximum value of 3.0 at 700nm. The calculated mean scattering angstrom exponent(SAE) was 1.6 and absorbing angstrom exponent(AAE) was 1.1. The AAE and SAE were higher in aged Chinese plume.

  1. Multi-wavelength aerosol light absorption measurements in the Amazon rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saturno, Jorge; Chi, Xuguang; Pöhlker, Christopher; Morán, Daniel; Ditas, Florian; Massabò, Dario; Prati, Paolo; Rizzo, Luciana; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat

    2015-04-01

    The most important light-absorbing aerosol is black carbon (BC), which is emitted by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass. BC is considered the second anthropogenic contributor to global warming. Beyond BC, other aerosols like some organics, dust, and primary biological aerosol particles are able to absorb radiation. In contrast to BC, the light absorption coefficient of these aerosols is wavelength dependent. Therefore, multi-wavelength measurements become important in environments where BC is not the predominant light-absorbing aerosol like in the Amazon. The Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO) site is located in the remote Amazon rainforest, one of the most pristine continental sites in the world during the wet season. In the dry season, winds coming from the southern hemisphere are loaded with biomass burning aerosol particles originated by farming-related deforestation. BC and aerosol number concentration data from the last two years indicate this is the most polluted period. Two different techniques have been implemented to measure the light absorption at different wavelengths; one of them is the 7-wavelengths Aethalometer, model AE30, an instrument that measures the light attenuation on a filter substrate and requires multiple scattering and filter-loading corrections to retrieve the light absorption coefficient. The other method is an offline technique, the Multi-Wavelength Absorbance Analysis (MWAA), which is able to measure reflectance and absorbance by aerosols collected on a filter and, by means of a radiative model, can retrieve the light absorption coefficient. Filters collected during May-September 2014, comprehending wet-to-dry transition and most of the dry season, were analyzed. The results indicate that the Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE), a parameter that is directly proportional to the wavelength dependence of the aerosol light absorption, is close to 1.0 during the transition period and slightly decreases in the beginning of

  2. Resonance lamp absorption measurement of OH number density and temperature in expansion tube scramjet engine tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lempert, Walter R.; Trucco, Richard E.; Bittner, Robert D.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we report results of hydroxyl radical and static temperature measurements performed in the General Applied Science Laboratories-NASA HYPULSE expansion tube facility using the microwave resonance lamp absorption technique. Data were obtained as part of a series of hydrogen/air and hydrogen/oxygen combustion tests at stagnation enthalpies corresponding to Mach 17 flight speeds. Data from a representative injector configuration is compared to a full Navier-Stokes CFD solution.

  3. A QM/MM study of the absorption spectrum of harmane in water solution and interacting with DNA: the crucial role of dynamic effects.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Thibaud; Very, Thibaut; Perpète, Eric A; Monari, Antonio; Assfeld, Xavier

    2013-05-02

    We present a time-dependent density functional theory computation of the absorption spectra of one β-carboline system: the harmane molecule in its neutral and cationic forms. The spectra are computed in aqueous solution. The interaction of cationic harmane with DNA is also studied. In particular, the use of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods is discussed, together with its coupling to a molecular dynamics strategy to take into account dynamic effects of the environment and the vibrational degrees of freedom of the chromophore. Different levels of treatment of the environment are addressed starting from purely mechanical embedding to electrostatic and polarizable embedding. We show that a static description of the spectrum based on equilibrium geometry only is unable to give a correct agreement with experimental results, and dynamic effects need to be taken into account. The presence of two stable noncovalent interaction modes between harmane and DNA is also presented, as well as the associated absorption spectrum of harmane cation.

  4. Dynamic Optoelectronic Properties in Perovskite Oxide Thin Films Measured with Ultrafast Transient Absorption & Reflectance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolin, Sergey Y.

    -dependent, variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry and time-resolved ultrafast optical spectroscopy on a type I heterostructure, we clarify thermal and electronic contributions to spectral transients in LaFeO3. Upon comparison to thermally-derived static spectra of LaFeO3, we find that thermal contributions dominate the transient absorption and reflectance spectra above the band gap. A transient photoinduced absorption feature below the band gap at 1.9 eV is not reproduced in the thermally derived spectra and has significantly longer decay kinetics from the thermallyinduced features; therefore, this long lived photoinduced absorption is likely derived, at least partially, from photoexcited carriers with lifetimes much longer than 3 nanoseconds. LaFeO3 has a wide band gap of 2.4 eV but its absorption can be decreased with chemical substitution of Sr for Fe to make it more suitable for various applications. This type of A-site substitution is a common route to change static optical absorption in perovskite oxides, but there are no systematic studies looking at how A-site substitution changes dynamic optoelectronic properties. To understand the relationship between composition and static and dynamic optical properties we worked with the model system of La1-xSrxFeO 3-delta epitaxial films grown on LSAT, uncovering the effects of A-site cation substitution and oxygen stoichiometry. Variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to measure static optical properties, revealing a linear increase in absorption coefficient at 1.25 eV and a red-shifting of the optical absorption edge with increasing Sr fraction. The absorption spectra can be similarly tuned through the introduction of oxygen vacancies, indicating the critical role that nominal Fe valence plays in optical absorption. Dynamic optoelectronic properties were studied with ultrafast transient reflectance spectroscopy with broadband visible (1.6 eV to 4 eV) and near-infrared (0.9 eV to 1.5 eV) probes. The sign of the reflectance

  5. Measurement of absorption rates of HFC single and blended refrigerants in POE oils

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, M.; Jotshi, C.K.; Goswami, D.Y.

    1999-07-01

    Thermophysical properties of refrigerant/lubricant mixtures play an important role in refrigeration and air-conditioning system design. Therefore it is important to have a good understanding of the mixture composition in each system component such as the compressor or evaporator. Because the system operation is dynamic the rates of absorption and desorption become significant parameters. In this paper measured absorption rates of alternative refrigerants in polyolester (POE) oils are reported. An effective online mass gain method was designed and constructed to measure the absorption rates and solubility of refrigerants in lubricants. HFC single refrigerants (R-32, R-125, R-134a, and R-143a), and blended refrigerantsmore » (R-404A, R-407C, and R-410A) were tested with POE ISO 68 lubricant under various conditions. The experimental results showed that, at room temperature, R-134a is the most soluble in POE ISO 68 oil among all the refrigerants tested at pressures of 239 kPa (20 psig) to 446 kPa (70 psig). Among the blended refrigerants tested, R-407C was found to be the most soluble at room temperature and pressures of 239 kPa and 446 kPa. Experimental solubility data from this new measurement method were compared with data available in the literature. Good agreement between the two indicates the feasibility of the new method employed in this investigation.« less

  6. Measuring the Spectral Expression of Carbon Dioxide in the Solar Reflected Spectrum with AVIRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is a low-concentration, but important, component of the Earth's atmosphere. This gas absorbs electromagnetic radiation (EMR) in several regions of the spectrum. Absorption of energy by carbon dioxide adds heat to the atmosphere. In the world today, the burning of fossil fuels and other anthropogenic processes adds carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Other natural processes in the Earth's system both add and remove carbon dioxide. Overall, measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide at selected sites around the globe show an increased carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. A figure shows the measured carbon dioxide from Mauna Loa, Hawaii, from 1958 to 2000. Overall, the concentration has increased from 315 to 365 ppm at this site over this period. (There is also a yearly cycle to the concentration that is timed with and hypothesized to be related to the vegetation growing season in the Northern Hemisphere.) The overall expected effect of this increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide is trapping of heat in the atmosphere and global warming. While this overall relationship between carbon dioxide and global warming seems straightforward, many of the specific details relating to regional and local sources and sinks and gradients of carbon dioxide are not well understood. A remote sensing capability to measure carbon dioxide could provide important inputs for scientific research to better understand the distribution and change in atmospheric carbon dioxide at detailed spatial and temporal levels. In pursuit of this remote sensing of carbon dioxide objective, this paper analyzes the expression of carbon dioxide in the spectral range measured by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imagery Spectrometer (AVIRIS). Based on these analyses, a spectral-fitting algorithm that uses AVIRIS measured spectra and MODTRAN radiative-transfer code modeled spectra to derive total column carbon dioxide abundance has been developed. This algorithm has been applied to an AVIRIS

  7. An Examination of the Reliability of a New Observation Measure for Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Autism Spectrum Disorder Observation for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Daniene; Matson, Johnny L.; Belva, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    The "autism spectrum disorder observation for children" ("ASD-OC") is a newly created 54-item observation measure for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Due to the fact that many of the ASD observation measures currently available do not have established psychometric properties and require extensive time and training to administer, the "ASD-OC"…

  8. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: A Measurement of the Primordial Power Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlozek, Renee; Dunkley, Joanna; Addison, Graeme; Appel, John William; Bond, J. Richard; Carvalho, C. Sofia; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Duenner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; hide

    2011-01-01

    We present constraints on the primordial power spectrum of adiabatic fluctuations using data from the 2008 Southern Survey of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The angular resolution of ACT provides sensitivity to scales beyond l = 1000 for resolution of multiple peaks in the primordial temperature power spectrum, which enables us to probe the primordial power spectrum of adiabatic scalar perturbations with wavenumbers up to k approx. = 0.2 Mp/c. We find no evidence for deviation from power-law fluctuations over two decades in scale. Matter fluctuations inferred from the primordial temperature power spectrum evolve over cosmic time and can be used to predict the matter power spectrum at late times; we illustrate the overlap of the matter power inferred from CMB measurements (which probe the power spectrum in thc linear regime) with existing probes of galaxy clustering, cluster abundances and weak lensing constraints on the primordial power. This highlights the range of scales probed by current measurement.s of the matter power spectrum.

  9. A refractory metamaterial absorber for ultra-broadband, omnidirectional and polarization-independent absorption in the UV-NIR spectrum.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yijia; Liu, Ling; Pu, Mingbo; Li, Xiong; Ma, Xiaoliang; Luo, Xiangang

    2018-05-03

    In this paper, efficient ultra-broadband absorption from ultraviolet (UV) to near infrared (NIR) is achieved using a metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA) with refractory constituents. Both simulated and experimental results indicate that this proposed MPA exhibits an average absorption over 95% at wavelengths ranging from 200 nm to 900 nm. Besides, owing to the ultrathin thickness and symmetrical topology of this device, it exhibits great angular tolerance up to 60° independent of the incident polarizations. Excellent thermal stability is also demonstrated at high operation temperatures. The physical origin of the ultra-broadband characteristics is mainly based on diffraction/interference engineering at short wavelengths and the anti-reflection effect at long wavelengths. We believe that such a device may find potential applications ranging from photodetection and photothermal energy conversion to ultraviolet protection and thermophotovoltaics.

  10. The molecular structure and absorption spectrum of hydroxy substituted dibenzoylmethanatoboron difluoride in solution: A theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, Natalia; Freidzon, Alexandra; Fedorenko, Elena

    2018-01-01

    Electronic spectroscopy and quantum chemistry are used to study the structure and absorption spectra of the hydroxy substituted dibenzoylmethanatoboron difluoride (OHDBMBF2) in solutions. Introducing a hydroxy group in the diketonate moiety allows the dye to form intermolecular complexes with proton acceptors, such as solvents or analytes, thus making it a promising chemical sensor. Our calculations show that donor oxygen-containing solvents break the intramolecular hydrogen bond Osbnd H···Odik and form an intermolecular Osbnd H···Osolv bond thus disrupting the coplanarity of the dye and affecting the position and shape of its absorption bands. The spectra calculated with explicit solvent combined with polarizable continuum model (PCM) better agree with the experiment than those calculated only within PCM.

  11. Solar Spectrum (SOLSPEC) measurement from 180 to 3000 nanometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuiller, G.; Simon, P. C.

    1988-01-01

    The SOLSPEC experiment, planned for the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission, is described. The purpose of this experiment is the measurement of the absolute solar irradiances in the wavelength range from 180 to 3000 nm and the variabilities of the solar irradiances in this wavelength range. Measurements of the irradiances and variabilities are used in: (1) solar-terrestrial/planetary relationships, in particular aeronomy of the stratosphere and mesosphere; (2) climatoglogy; and (3) solar physics.

  12. In Situ Density Measurement of Basaltic Melts at High Pressure by X-ray Absorption Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, R.; Ohtani, E.; Suzuki, A.; Urakawa, S.; Katayama, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Density of silicate melt at high pressure is one of the most important properties to understand magma migration in the planetary interior. However, because of experimental difficulties, the density of magma at high pressure is poorly known. Katayama et al. (1996) recently developed a new in situ density measurement method for metallic melts, based on the density dependency of X-ray absorption in the sample. In this study, we tried to measure the density of basaltic melt by this absorption method. When X-ray is transmitted to the sample, the intensity of the transmitted X-ray beam (I) is expressed as follows; I=I0exp(-μ ρ t), where I0 is the intensity of incident X-ray beam, μ is the mass absorption coefficient, ρ is the density of the sample, and t is the thickness of the sample. If t and μ are known, we can determine the density of the sample by measuring I and I0. This is the principle of the absorption method for density measurement. In this study, in order to determine t, we used a single crystalline diamond cylinder as a sample capsule, diamond is less compressive and less deformable so that even at high pressure t (thickness of the sample at the point x) is expressed as follows; t = 2*(R02-x2)1/2, R0 is the inner radius of cylinder at the ambient condition, and x is distance from a center of the capsule. And diamond also shows less absorption so that this make it possible to measure the density of silicate melt with smaller absorption coefficient than metallic melts. In order to know the μ of the sample, we measured both densities (ρ ) and absorptions (I/I0) for some glasses and crystals with same composition of the sample at the ambient condition, and calculated as fallows; μ =ln(I/I0)/ρ . Experiments were made at the beamline (BL22XU) of SPring-8. For generation of high pressure and high temperature, we used DIA-type cubic anvil apparatus (SMAP180) there. We used tungsten carbide anvils with the edge-length of 6 mm. The energy of monochromatic X

  13. Retrieval of profile information from airborne multiaxis UV-visible skylight absorption measurements.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Marco; Buehler, Stefan A; Burrows, John P; Heue, Klaus-Peter; Platt, Ulrich; Pundt, Irene; Richter, Andreas; Rozanov, Alexej; Wagner, Thomas; Wang, Ping

    2004-08-01

    A recent development in ground-based remote sensing of atmospheric constituents by UV-visible absorption measurements of scattered light is the simultaneous use of several horizon viewing directions in addition to the traditional zenith-sky pointing. The different light paths through the atmosphere enable the vertical distribution of some atmospheric absorbers, such as NO2, BrO, or O3, to be retrieved. This approach has recently been implemented on an airborne platform. This novel instrument, the airborne multiaxis differential optical absorption spectrometer (AMAXDOAS), has been flown for the first time. In this study, the amount of profile information that can be retrieved from such measurements is investigated for the trace gas NO2. Sensitivity studies on synthetic data are performed for a variety of representative measurement conditions including two wavelengths, one in the UV and one in the visible, two different surface spectral reflectances, various lines of sight (LOSs), and for two different flight altitudes. The results demonstrate that the AMAXDOAS measurements contain useful profile information, mainly at flight altitude and below the aircraft. Depending on wavelength and LOS used, the vertical resolution of the retrieved profiles is as good as 2 km near flight altitude. Above 14 km the profile information content of AMAXDOAS measurements is sparse. Airborne multiaxis measurements are thus a promising tool for atmospheric studies in the troposphere and the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere region.

  14. Impact of Tropospheric Aerosol Absorption on Ozone Retrieval from buv Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Bhartia, P. K.

    1998-01-01

    The impact of tropospheric aerosols on the retrieval of column ozone amounts using spaceborne measurements of backscattered ultraviolet radiation is examined. Using radiative transfer calculations, we show that uv-absorbing desert dust may introduce errors as large as 10% in ozone column amount, depending on the aerosol layer height and optical depth. Smaller errors are produced by carbonaceous aerosols that result from biomass burning. Though the error is produced by complex interactions between ozone absorption (both stratospheric and tropospheric), aerosol scattering, and aerosol absorption, a surprisingly simple correction procedure reduces the error to about 1%, for a variety of aerosols and for a wide range of aerosol loading. Comparison of the corrected TOMS data with operational data indicates that though the zonal mean total ozone derived from TOMS are not significantly affected by these errors, localized affects in the tropics can be large enough to seriously affect the studies of tropospheric ozone that are currently undergoing using the TOMS data.

  15. First total-absorption spectroscopy measurement on the neutron-rich Cu isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, F.; Spyrou, A.; Liddick, S. N.; Larsen, A. C.; Guttormsen, M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Campo, L. C.; Couture, A.; Crider, B. P.; Dombos, A. C.; Ginter, T.; Lewis, R.; Mosby, S.; Perdikakis, G.; Prokop, C. P.; Quinn, S. J.; Renstrom, T.; Rubio, B.; Siem, S.

    2015-10-01

    The first beta-decay studies of 73-71Cu isotopes using the Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) will be reported. The Cu isotopes have one proton outside the Z = 28 shell and hence are good candidates to probe the single-particle structure in the region.Theories predict weakening of the Z = 28 shell gap due to the tensor interaction between the valence πν single-particle orbitals. Comparing the beta-decay strength distributions in the daughter Zn isotopes to the theoretical calculations will provide a stringent test of the predictions. The experiment was performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) employing the TAS technique with the Summing NaI(Tl) detector, while beta decays were measured in the NSCL beta-counting system. The experimentally obtained total absorption spectra for the neutron-rich Cu isotopes will be presented and the implications of the extracted beta-feeding intensities will be discussed.

  16. Pressure measurement in supersonic air flow by differential absorptive laser-induced thermal acoustics.

    PubMed

    Hart, Roger C; Herring, G C; Balla, R Jeffrey

    2007-06-15

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach 2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, the streamwise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature, and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  17. Pressure Measurement in Supersonic Air Flow by Differential Absorptive Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, Gregory C.; Balla, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach-2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, stream-wise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially-resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  18. Differential absorption and Raman lidar for water vapor profile measurements - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar and Raman lidar have been applied to the range-resolved measurements of water vapor density for more than 20 years. Results have been obtained using both lidar techniques that have led to improved understanding of water vapor distributions in the atmosphere. This paper reviews the theory of the measurements, including the sources of systematic and random error; the progress in lidar technology and techniques during that period, including a brief look at some of the lidar systems in development or proposed; and the steps being taken to improve such lidar systems.

  19. Model studies of laser absorption computed tomography for remote air pollution measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, D. C., Jr.; Byer, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Model studies of the potential of laser absorption-computed tomography are presented which demonstrate the possibility of sensitive remote atmospheric pollutant measurements, over kilometer-sized areas, with two-dimensional resolution, at modest laser source powers. An analysis of this tomographic reconstruction process as a function of measurement SNR, laser power, range, and system geometry, shows that the system is able to yield two-dimensional maps of pollutant concentrations at ranges and resolutions superior to those attainable with existing, direct-detection laser radars.

  20. Application of the laser induced deflection (LID) technique for low absorption measurements in bulk materials and coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triebel, W.; Mühlig, C.; Kufert, S.

    2005-10-01

    Precise absorption measurements of bulk materials and coatings upon pulsed ArF laser irradiation are presented using a compact experimental setup based on the laser induced deflection technique (LID). For absorption measurements of bulk materials the influence of pure bulk and pure surface absorption on the temperature and refractive index profile and thus for the probe beam deflection is analyzed in detail. The separation of bulk and surface absorption via the commonly used variation of the sample thickness is carried out for fused silica and calcium fluoride. The experimental results show that for the given surface polishing quality the bulk absorption coefficient of fused silica can be obtained by investigating only one sample. To avoid the drawback of different bulk and surface properties amongst a thickness series, we propose a strategy based on the LID technique to generally obtain surface and bulk absorption separately by investigating only one sample. Apart from measuring bulk absorption coefficients the LID technique is applied to determine the absorption of highly reflecting (HR) coatings on CaF2 substrates. Beside the measuring strategy the experimental results of a AlF3/LaF3 based HR coating are presented. In order to investigate a larger variety of coatings, including high transmitting coatings, a general measuring strategy based on the LID technique is proposed.

  1. Quantification of sauter mean diameter in diesel sprays using scattering-absorption extinction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Gabrielle L; Magnotti, Gina M; Knox, Benjamin W

    Quantitative measurements of the primary breakup process in diesel sprays are lacking due to a range of experimental and diagnostic challenges, including: high droplet number density environments, very small characteristic drop size scales (~1-10 μm), and high characteristic velocities in the primary breakup region (~600 m/s). Due to these challenges, existing measurement techniques have failed to resolve a sufficient range of the temporal and spatial scales involved and much remains unknown about the primary atomization process in practical diesel sprays. To gain a better insight into this process, we have developed a joint visible and x-ray extinction measurement technique tomore » quantify axial and radial distributions of the path-integrated Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) and Liquid Volume Fraction (LVF) for diesel-like sprays. This technique enables measurement of the SMD in regions of moderate droplet number density, enabling construction of the temporal history of drop size development within practical diesel sprays. The experimental campaign was conducted jointly at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Argonne National Laboratory using the Engine Combustion Network “Spray D” injector. X-ray radiography liquid absorption measurements, conducted at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne, quantify the liquid-fuel mass and volume distribution in the spray. Diffused back-illumination liquid scattering measurements were conducted at Georgia Tech to quantify the optical thickness throughout the spray. By application of Mie-scatter equations, the ratio of the absorption and scattering extinction measurements is demonstrated to yield solutions for the SMD. This work introduces the newly developed scattering-absorption measurement technique and highlights the important considerations that must be taken into account when jointly processing these measurements to extract the SMD. These considerations include co-alignment of measurements taken at different

  2. A Measurement of the Angular Power Spectrum of the CMB from l = 100 to 400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. D.; Caldwell, R.; Devlin, M. J.; Dorwart, W. B.; Herbig, T.; Nolta, M. R.; Page, L. A.; Puchalla, J.; Torbet, E.; Tran, H. T.

    2000-05-01

    We report on a measurement of the angular spectrum of the CMB between l 100 and l 400 made at 144 GHz from Cerro Toco in the Chilean altiplano. When the new data are combined with previous data at 30 and 40 GHz, taken with the same instrument observing the same section of sky, we find: 1) a rise in the angular spectrum to a maximum with δ Tl 85 μ K at l 200 and a fall at l>300, thereby localizing the peak near l 200; and 2) that the anisotropy at l 200 has the spectrum of the CMB. Cosmological implications are discussed.

  3. A Measurement of the Angular Power Spectrum of the CMB from l = 100 to 400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlin, M. J.; Caldwell, R.; Dorwart, W. B.; Herbig, T.; Miller, A. D.; Nolta, M. R.; Page, L. A.; Puchalla, J.; Torbet, E.; Tran, R. T.

    1999-12-01

    We report on a measurement of the angular spectrum of the CMB between l 100 and l 400 made at 144 GHz from Cerro Toco in the Chilean altiplano. When the new data are combined with previous data at 30 and 40 GHz, taken with the same instrument observing the same section of sky, we find: 1) a rise in the angular spectrum to a maximum with δ Tl 85 μ K at l 200 and a fall at l>300, thereby localizing the peak near l 200; and 2) that the anisotropy at l 200 has the spectrum of the CMB.

  4. Laboratory Measurements of the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm Water Vapor Absorption Band Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Gore, Warren J.; Pilewskie, P.; Freedman, R. S.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Varanasi, P.

    2001-01-01

    We have used the solar spectral flux radiometer (SSFR) flight instrument with the Ames 25 meter base-path White cell to obtain about 20 moderate resolution (8 nm) pure water vapor spectra from 650 to 1650 nm, with absorbing paths from 806 to 1506 meters and pressures up to 14 torr. We also obtained a set at 806 meters with several different air-broadening pressures. Model simulations were made for the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm absorption bands for some of these laboratory conditions using the Rothman, et al HITRAN-2000 linelist. This new compilation of HITRAN includes new intensity measurements for the 940 nm region. We compared simulations for our spectra of this band using HITRAN-2000 with simulations using the prior HITRAN-1996. The simulations of the 1130 nm band show about 10% less absorption than we measured. There is some evidence that the total intensity of this band is about 38% stronger than the sum of the HITRAN line intensities in this region. In our laboratory conditions the absorption depends approximately on the square root of the intensity. Thus, our measurements agree that the band is stronger than tabulated in HITRAN, but by about 20%, substantially less than the published value. Significant differences have been shown between Doppler-limited resolution spectra of the 1370 nm band obtained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and HITRAN simulations. Additional new intensity measurements in this region are continuing to be made. We expect the simulations of our SSFR lab data of this band will show the relative importance of improving the HITRAN line intensities of this band for atmospheric measurements.

  5. Development of a Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Refaat, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to the carbon cycle and global radiation budget on Earth. Active remote sensing of CO2 is important to address several limitations that contend with passive sensors. A 2-micron double-pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This active remote sensing instrument will provide an alternate approach of measuring atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise ratio level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. Commercial, on the shelf, components are implemented for the detection system. Instrument integration will be presented in this paper as well as a background for CO2 measurement at NASA Langley research Center

  6. Temperature dependence of the HNO3 UV absorption cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Solomon, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the HNO3 absorption cross sections between 240 and 360 K over the wavelength range 195 to 350 nm has been measured using a diode array spectrometer. Absorption cross sections were determined using both (1) absolute pressure measurements at 298 K and (2) a dual absorption cell arrangement in which the absorption spectrum at various temperatures is measured relative to the room temperature absorption spectrum. The HNO3 absorption spectrum showed a temperature dependence which is weak at short wavelengths but stronger at longer wavelengths which are important for photolysis in the lower stratosphere. The 298 K absorption cross sections were found to be larger than the values currently recommended for atmospheric modeling (DeMore et al., 1992). Our absorption cross section data are critically compared with the previous measurements of both room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption cross sections. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections of HNO3 are recommended for use in atmospheric modeling. These temperature dependent HNO3 absorption cross sections were used in a two-dimensional dynamical-photochemical model to demonstrate the effects of the revised absorption cross sections on loss rate of HNO3 and the abundance of NO2 in the stratosphere.

  7. The airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer - A new instrument of remote measurement of atmospheric trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S.; Menzies, R. T.

    1978-01-01

    The Laser Absorption Spectrometer is a portable instrument developed by JPL for remote measurement of trace gases from an aircraft platform. It contains two carbon dioxide lasers, two optical heterodyne receivers, appropriate optics to aim the lasers at the ground and detect the backscattered energy, and signal processing and recording electronics. Operating in the differential-absorption mode, it is possible to monitor one atmospheric gas at a time and record the data in real time. The system can presently measure ozone, ethylene, water vapor, and chlorofluoromethanes with high sensitivity. Airborne measurements were made in early 1977 from the NASA/JPL twin-engine Beechcraft and in May 1977 from the NASA Convair 990 during the ASSESS-II Shuttle Simulation Study. These flights resulted in measurements of ozone concentrations in the lower troposphere which were compared with ground-based values provided by the Air Pollution Control District. This paper describes the details of the instrument and results of the airborne measurements.

  8. New in situ Aerosol Spectral Optical Measurements over 300-700 nm, Extinction and Total Absorption, Paired with Absorption from Water- and Methanol-soluble Aerosol Extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Stauffer, R. M.; Lamb, B.; Novak, M. G.; Mannino, A.; Hudgins, C.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Crosbie, E.; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B.; Martin, R.; Shook, M.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Corr, C.

    2017-12-01

    A new in situ spectral aerosol extinction instrument (custom built, SpEx) built to cover the 300-700 nm range at 1 nm spectral resolution and temporal resolution of 4 minutes was deployed on the top deck ( 10 m above the water surface) of the R/V Onnuri during the KORUS-OC research cruise around South Korea in spring 2016. This new instrument was one component of a suite of in situ aerosol optical measurements that included 3-visible-wavelength scattering (Airphoton IN101 Nephelometer, at 450, 532, & 632 nm) and absorption (Brechtel Tricolor Absorption Photometer Model 2901, at 467, 528, & 652 nm) with sub-minute temporal resolution; two sets of filters (Teflon and glass fiber, both collected over 3 hour daytime and 12 hour overnight intervals) to provide aerosol absorption spectra over the same wavelength range as SpEx. The glass fiber filters were placed in the center of an integrating sphere (Labsphere DRA-CA-30) attached to a dual beam spectrophotometer (Cary 100 Bio UV-Visible Spectrophotometer) to measure total aerosol absorption spectra via an established method used by the ocean color community to obtain absorption spectra from particles suspended in sea water. Adapting this methodology for atmospheric aerosol measurements provides a new avenue to obtain spectral total aerosol absorption, particularly useful for expanding in situ measurement capabilities into the UV range. The Teflon filters were cut in half with one half extracted in deionized water and the other half extracted in methanol. The solutions were filtered and injected into a liquid waveguide capillary cell (World Precision Instruments LWCC-3100, 100 cm pathlength) to measure the absorption spectra for each solution. In addition, the water extracts were measured via ion chromatography (Dionex ICS-3000 Ion Chromatography System) to obtain water-soluble inorganic ion concentrations, as well as via aerosol mass spectrometry (Aerodyne Research, Inc. HR-ToF High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

  9. Wideband propagation measurement system using spread spectrum signaling and TDRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jeffrey D.; Fan, Yiping; Osborne, William P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, a wideband propagation measurement system, which consisted of a ground-based transmitter, a mobile receiver, and a data acquisition system, was constructed. This system has been employed in a study of the characteristics of different propagation environments, such as urban, suburban and rural areas, by using a pseudonoise spreading sequence transmitted over NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System. The hardware and software tests showed that it met overall system requirements and it was very robust during a 3-month-long outdoor data collection experiment.

  10. Measurements of Man-Made Spectrum Noise Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enge, Per; Akos, Dennis; Do, Juyong; Simoneau, Joel B.; Pearson, L. Wilson; Seetharam, Venkatesh; Oria, A. J. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    This report consolidates research carried out at Clemson University and Stanford University where a series of measurements were undertaken to identify the man-made radiation present in four bands used by rather different services, namely, L1 Band (1563.42 1587.42 MHz), the Unified S-Band (2025 2110 MHz), the 2.4 GHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) Band (2400 2482.50 MHz), and the 23.6-24.0 GHz Passive Sensing Band. Results show that there were distinctive differences in the measurement data in the frequency bands, which should be expected based on the function/regulation associated with each. The GPS L1 Band had little to none terrestrial man-made sources, but the ISM 2.4 GHz Band had a large number of man-made sources regardless of the site and the time. The Unified S Band showed mixed results depending on the sites. The Passive Sensing Band does not contain appreciable man-made radiation.

  11. In vivo measurement of human skin absorption of topically applied substances by a photoacoustic technique.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Juárez, G; Vargas-Luna, M; Córdova, T; Varela, J B; Bernal-Alvarado, J J; Sosa, M

    2002-08-01

    A photoacoustic technique is used for studying topically applied substance absorption in human skin. The proposed method utilizes a double-chamber PA cell. The absorption determination was obtained through the measurement of the thermal effusivity of the binary system substance-skin. The theoretical model assumes that the effective thermal effusivity of the binary system corresponds to that of a two-phase system. Experimental applications of the method employed different substances of topical application in different parts of the body of a volunteer. The method is demonstrated to be an easily used non-invasive technique for dermatology research. The relative concentrations as a function of time of substances such as ketoconazol and sunscreen were determined by fitting a sigmoidal function to the data, while an exponential function corresponds to the best fit for the set of data for nitrofurazona, vaseline and vaporub. The time constants associated with the rates of absorption, were found to vary in the range between 10 and 58 min, depending on the substance and the part of the body.

  12. The effect of interstellar absorption on measurements of the baryon acoustic peak in the Lyman α forest

    SciTech Connect

    Vadai, Yishay; Poznanski, Dovi; Baron, Dalya

    In recent years, the autocorrelation of the hydrogen Lyman α forest has been used to observe the baryon acoustic peak at redshift 2 < z < 3.5 using tens of thousands of QSO spectra from the BOSS survey. However, the interstellar medium of the Milky Way introduces absorption lines into the spectrum of any extragalactic source. These lines, while weak and undetectable in a single BOSS spectrum, could potentially bias the cosmological signal. In order to examine this, we generate absorption line maps by stacking over a million spectra of galaxies and QSOs. Here, we find that the systematics introducedmore » are too small to affect the current accuracy of the baryon acoustic peak, but might be relevant to future surveys such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI). We outline a method to account for this with future data sets.« less

  13. The effect of interstellar absorption on measurements of the baryon acoustic peak in the Lyman α forest

    DOE PAGES

    Vadai, Yishay; Poznanski, Dovi; Baron, Dalya; ...

    2017-08-14

    In recent years, the autocorrelation of the hydrogen Lyman α forest has been used to observe the baryon acoustic peak at redshift 2 < z < 3.5 using tens of thousands of QSO spectra from the BOSS survey. However, the interstellar medium of the Milky Way introduces absorption lines into the spectrum of any extragalactic source. These lines, while weak and undetectable in a single BOSS spectrum, could potentially bias the cosmological signal. In order to examine this, we generate absorption line maps by stacking over a million spectra of galaxies and QSOs. Here, we find that the systematics introducedmore » are too small to affect the current accuracy of the baryon acoustic peak, but might be relevant to future surveys such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI). We outline a method to account for this with future data sets.« less

  14. Quantitative filter technique measurements of spectral light absorption by aquatic particles using a portable integrating cavity absorption meter (QFT-ICAM).

    PubMed

    Röttgers, Rüdiger; Doxaran, David; Dupouy, Cecile

    2016-01-25

    The accurate determination of light absorption coefficients of particles in water, especially in very oligotrophic oceanic areas, is still a challenging task. Concentrating aquatic particles on a glass fiber filter and using the Quantitative Filter Technique (QFT) is a common practice. Its routine application is limited by the necessary use of high performance spectrophotometers, distinct problems induced by the strong scattering of the filters and artifacts induced by freezing and storing samples. Measurements of the sample inside a large integrating sphere reduce scattering effects and direct field measurements avoid artifacts due to sample preservation. A small, portable, Integrating Cavity Absorption Meter setup (QFT-ICAM) is presented, that allows rapid measurements of a sample filter. The measurement technique takes into account artifacts due to chlorophyll-a fluorescence. The QFT-ICAM is shown to be highly comparable to similar measurements in laboratory spectrophotometers, in terms of accuracy, precision, and path length amplification effects. No spectral artifacts were observed when compared to measurement of samples in suspension, whereas freezing and storing of sample filters induced small losses of water-soluble pigments (probably phycoerythrins). Remaining problems in determining the particulate absorption coefficient with the QFT-ICAM are strong sample-to-sample variations of the path length amplification, as well as fluorescence by pigments that is emitted in a different spectral region than that of chlorophyll-a.

  15. Absolute high spectral resolution measurements of surface solar radiation for detection of water vapour continuum absorption.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, T D; Coleman, M; Browning, H; Tallis, L; Ptashnik, I V; Shine, K P

    2012-06-13

    Solar-pointing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy offers the capability to measure both the fine scale and broadband spectral structure of atmospheric transmission simultaneously across wide spectral regions. It is therefore suited to the study of both water vapour monomer and continuum absorption behaviours. However, in order to properly address this issue, it is necessary to radiatively calibrate the FTIR instrument response. A solar-pointing high-resolution FTIR spectrometer was deployed as part of the 'Continuum Absorption by Visible and Infrared radiation and its Atmospheric Relevance' (CAVIAR) consortium project. This paper describes the radiative calibration process using an ultra-high-temperature blackbody and the consideration of the related influence factors. The result is a radiatively calibrated measurement of the solar irradiation at the ground across the IR region from 2000 to 10 000 cm(-1) with an uncertainty of between 3.3 and 5.9 per cent. This measurement is shown to be in good general agreement with a radiative-transfer model. The results from the CAVIAR field measurements are being used in ongoing studies of atmospheric absorbers, in particular the water vapour continuum.

  16. Development of a Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar for Range Resolved Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulgueta; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo. C.; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffery J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    A pulsed, 2-m coherent Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) / Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) transceiver, developed under the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) at NASA, is integrated into a fully functional lidar instrument. This instrument will measure atmospheric CO2 profiles (by DIAL) initially from a ground platform, and then be prepared for aircraft installation to measure the atmospheric CO2 column densities in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and lower troposphere. The airborne prototype CO2 lidar can measure atmospheric CO2 column density in a range bin of 1km with better than 1.5% precision at horizontal resolution of less than 50km. It can provide the image of the pooling of CO2 in lowlying areas and performs nighttime mass balance measurements at landscape scale. This sensor is unique in its capability to study the vertical ABL-free troposphere exchange of CO2 directly. It will allow the investigators to pursue subsequent in science-driven deployments, and provides a unique tool for Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Night, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) validation that was strongly advocated in the recent ASCENDS Workshop.

  17. Pitfalls in gastrointestinal permeability measurement in ICU patients with multiple organ failure using differential sugar absorption.

    PubMed

    Oudemans-van Straaten, Heleen M; van der Voort, Peter J; Hoek, Frans J; Bosman, Rob J; van der Spoel, Johan I; Zandstra, Durk F

    2002-02-01

    To assess whether gastrointestinal permeability (GIP) at intensive care unit (ICU) admission, measured by differential sugar absorption, is related to severity of disease and multiple organ failure (MOF). Post hoc, to analyse the relation between the urinary sugar recovery and renal function. Prospective observational cohort study. Eighteen-bed general ICU of a teaching hospital. Sixty-four ventilated patients admitted with MOF. GIP was assessed within 24 h using cellobiose (C), sucrose (S) and mannitol (M) absorption. Severity of disease: APACHE II and III, SAPS II and MPM II systems. Organ failure: SOFA, MODS and Goris score. The median urinary recovery of C was 0.147% (range 0.004-2.145%), of S 0.249% (0.001-3.656%) and of M 10.7% (0.6-270%). In 16 patients, M recovery was over 100% of the oral dose. They received red blood cell transfusion (RBC). In the non-transfused, the median cellobiose/mannitol (CM) ratio was 0.015 (0.0004-0.550). CM ratio was not related to severity of disease and inversely related to the SOFA score ( r=-0.30, p=0.04). Post hoc regression analysis showed that recoveries of C, S and M were positively related to urinary volume. Recoveries of C and S, but not of M, were positively related to creatinine clearance. The CM ratio corrected for diuresis, but was inversely related to creatinine clearance. Differential C, S and M absorption testing is unreliable after RBC transfusion, since bank blood contains mannitol. The excretion of C and S, but not of M, is limited by renal dysfunction. Differential sugar absorption is not reliable to test GIP in MOF patients, since non-permeability related factors act as confounders.

  18. Two-Photon Excitation, Fluorescence Microscopy, and Quantitative Measurement of Two-Photon Absorption Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeArmond, Fredrick Michael

    As optical microscopy techniques continue to improve, most notably the development of super-resolution optical microscopy which garnered the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2014, renewed emphasis has been placed on the development and use of fluorescence microscopy techniques. Of particular note is a renewed interest in multiphoton excitation due to a number of inherent properties of the technique including simplified optical filtering, increased sample penetration, and inherently confocal operation. With this renewed interest in multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, comes an increased demand for robust non-linear fluorescent markers, and characterization of the associated tool set. These factors have led to an experimental setup to allow a systematized approach for identifying and characterizing properties of fluorescent probes in the hopes that the tool set will provide researchers with additional information to guide their efforts in developing novel fluorophores suitable for use in advanced optical microscopy techniques as well as identifying trends for their synthesis. Hardware was setup around a software control system previously developed. Three experimental tool sets were set up, characterized, and applied over the course of this work. These tools include scanning multiphoton fluorescence microscope with single molecule sensitivity, an interferometric autocorrelator for precise determination of the bandwidth and pulse width of the ultrafast Titanium Sapphire excitation source, and a simplified fluorescence microscope for the measurement of two-photon absorption cross sections. Resulting values for two-photon absorption cross sections and two-photon absorption action cross sections for two standardized fluorophores, four commercially available fluorophores, and ten novel fluorophores are presented as well as absorption and emission spectra.

  19. Spectral absorption of marine stratocumulus clouds derived from in situ cloud radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Radke, Lawrence F.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    1990-01-01

    A multiwavelength scanning radiometer was used to measure the angular distribution of scattered radiation deep within a cloud layer at discrete wavelengths between 0.5 and 2.3 microns. The relative angular distribution of the intensity field at each wavelength is used to determine the similarity parameter, and hence single scattering albedo, of the cloud at that wavelength using the diffusion domain method. In addition to the spectral similarity parameter, the analysis provides a good estimate of the optical thickness of the cloud beneath the aircraft. In addition to the radiation measurements, microphysical and thermodynamic measurements were obtained from which the expected similarity parameter spectrum was calculated using accepted values of the refractive index of liquid water and the transmission function of water vapor. An analysis is presented for the results obtained for a 50 km section of clean marine stratocumulus clouds on 10 July 1987. These observations were obtained off the coast of California from the University of Washington Convair C-131A aircraft as part of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE). A comparison of the experimentally-derived similarity parameter spectrum with that expected theoretically from the cloud droplet size distribution measured simultaneously from the aircraft is presented. The measurements and theory are in very close agreement for this case of clean maritime clouds.

  20. Scattered light and accuracy of the cross-section measurements of weak absorptions: Gas and liquid phase UV absorption cross sections of CH3CFCl2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahr, A.; Braun, W.; Kurylo, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of CH3CFCl2(HCFC-141b) were determined in the gas phase (190-260 nm) and liquid phase (230-260 mm) at 298 K. The liquid phase absorption cross sections were then converted into accurate gas phase values using a previously described procedure. It has been demonstrated that scattered light from the shorter-wavelength region (as little as several parts per thousand) can seriously compromise the absorption cross-section measurement, particularly at longer wavelengths where cross sections are low, and can be a source of discrepancies in the cross sections of weakly absorbing halocarbons reported in the literature. A modeling procedure was developed to assess the effect of scattered light on the measured absorption cross section in our experiments, thereby permitting appropriate corrections to be made on the experimental values. Modeled and experimental results were found to be in good agreement. Experimental results from this study were compared with other available determinations and provide accurate input for calculating the atmospheric lifetime of HCFC-141b.

  1. FE K EMISSION AND ABSORPTION FEATURES IN THE XMM-EPIC SPECTRUM OF THE SEYFERT GALAXY IC 4329A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, A.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.

    2001-01-01

    We present a re-analysis of the XMM-Newton long-look of the X-ray bright Seyfert galaxy IC 4329a. The Fe K bandpass is dominated by two peaks, consistent with emission from neutral or near-neutral Fe Ka and KP. A relativistic diskline model whereby both peaks are the result of one doubly-peaked diskline profile is found to be a poor description of the data. Models using two relativistic disklines are found to describe the emission profile well. A low-inclination, moderately-relativistic dual-diskline model is possible if the contribution from narrow components, due to distant material, is small or absent. A high-inclination, moderately relativistic profile for each peak is possible if there are roughly equal contributions from both the broad and narrow components. Upper limits on Fe XXV and Fe XXVI emission and absorption at the systemic velocity of IC 4329a are obtained. We also present the results of RXTE monitoring of this source obtained so far; the combined XMM-Newton and RXTE data sets allow us to explore the time-resolved spectral behavior of this source on time scales ranging from hours to 2 years. We find no strong evidence for variability of the Fe Ka emission line on any time scale probed, likely due to the minimal level of continuum variability. We detect a narrow absorption line, at a energy of 7.68 keV in the rest frame of the source; its significance has been confirmed using Monte Carlo simulations. This feature is most likely due to absorption from Fe XXVI blueshifted to approximately 0.1c relative to the systemic velocity, making IC 4329a the lowest-redshift AGN known with a high-velocity, highly-ionized outflow component. As is often the case with similar outflows seen in high-luminosity quasars, the estimated mass outflow rate is larger than the inflow accretion rate, signaling that the outflow represents a substantial portion of the total energy budget of the AGN. The outflow could arise from a radiatively-driven disk wind, or it may be in the

  2. Measurement and analysis of x-ray absorption in Al and MgF2 plasmas heated by Z-pinch radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, Joseph John; Rochau, Gregory Alan; Bailey, James E.

    2005-06-01

    High-power Z pinches on Sandia National Laboratories Z facility can be used in a variety of experiments to radiatively heat samples placed some distance away from the Z-pinch plasma. In such experiments, the heating radiation spectrum is influenced by both the Z-pinch emission and the re-emission of radiation from the high-Z surfaces that make up the Z-pinch diode. To test the understanding of the amplitude and spectral distribution of the heating radiation, thin foils containing both Al and MgF{sub 2} were heated by a 100-130 TW Z pinch. The heating of these samples was studied through the ionization distribution inmore » each material as measured by x-ray absorption spectra. The resulting plasma conditions are inferred from a least-squares comparison between the measured spectra and calculations of the Al and Mg 1s {yields} 2p absorption over a large range of temperatures and densities. These plasma conditions are then compared to radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the sample dynamics and are found to agree within 1{sigma} to the best-fit conditions. This agreement indicates that both the driving radiation spectrum and the heating of the Al and MgF{sub 2} samples is understood within the accuracy of the spectroscopic method.« less

  3. Measurement and analysis of x-ray absorption in Al and MgF2 plasmas heated by Z-pinch radiation.

    PubMed

    Rochau, Gregory A; Bailey, J E; Macfarlane, J J

    2005-12-01

    High-power Z pinches on Sandia National Laboratories' Z facility can be used in a variety of experiments to radiatively heat samples placed some distance away from the Z-pinch plasma. In such experiments, the heating radiation spectrum is influenced by both the Z-pinch emission and the re-emission of radiation from the high-Z surfaces that make up the Z-pinch diode. To test the understanding of the amplitude and spectral distribution of the heating radiation, thin foils containing both Al and MgF2 were heated by a 100-130 TW Z pinch. The heating of these samples was studied through the ionization distribution in each material as measured by x-ray absorption spectra. The resulting plasma conditions are inferred from a least-squares comparison between the measured spectra and calculations of the Al and Mg 1s-->2p absorption over a large range of temperatures and densities. These plasma conditions are then compared to radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the sample dynamics and are found to agree within 1sigma to the best-fit conditions. This agreement indicates that both the driving radiation spectrum and the heating of the Al and MgF2 samples is understood within the accuracy of the spectroscopic method.

  4. Discovery of a cyclotron absorption line in the spectrum of the binary X-ray pulsar 4U 1538 - 52 observed by Ginga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, George W.; Woo, Jonathan W.; Nagase, Fumiaki; Makishima, Kazuo; Sakao, Taro

    1990-01-01

    A cyclotron absorption line near 20 keV has been found in the spectrum of the massive eclipsing binary X-ray pulsar 4U 1538 - 52 in observations with the Ginga observatory. The line is detected throughout the 529 s pulse cycle with a variable equivalent width that has its maximum value during the smaller peak of the two-peak pulse profile. It is found that the profile of the pulse and the phase-dependence of the cyclotron line can be explained qualitatively by a pulsar model based on recent theoretical results on the properties of pencil beams emitted by accretion-heated slabs of magnetized plasma at the magnetic poles of a neutron star. The indicated field at the surface of the neutron star is 1.7 (1 + z) x 10 to the 12th G, where z is the gravitational redshift.

  5. Towards a standard for the dynamic measurement of pressure based on laser absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Douglass, K O; Olson, D A

    2016-01-01

    We describe an approach for creating a standard for the dynamic measurement of pressure based on the measurement of fundamental quantum properties of molecular systems. From the linewidth and intensities of ro-vibrational transitions we plan on making an accurate determination of pressure and temperature. The goal is to achieve an absolute uncertainty for time-varying pressure of 5 % with a measurement rate of 100 kHz, which will in the future serve as a method for the traceable calibration of pressure sensors used in transient processes. To illustrate this concept we have used wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS), due to inherent advantages over direct absorption spectroscopy, to perform rapid measurements of carbon dioxide in order to determine the pressure. The system records the full lineshape profile of a single ro-vibrational transition of CO2 at a repetition rate of 4 kHz and with a systematic measurement uncertainty of 12 % for the linewidth measurement. A series of pressures were measured at a rate of 400 Hz (10 averages) and from these measurements the linewidth was determined with a relative uncertainty of about 0.5 % on average. The pressures measured using WMS have an average difference of 0.6 % from the absolute pressure measured with a capacitance diaphragm sensor. PMID:27881884

  6. High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements Using an I2 Absorption Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, E. W.; Piironen, P.

    1996-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) measures optical properties of the atmosphere by separating the Doppler-broadened molecular backscatter return from the unbroadened aerosol return. The HSRL was modified to use an I2 absorption cell The modified HSRL transmitter uses a continuously pumped, Q-switched, injection seeded, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at a 4 kHz pulse repetition rate. This laser is tunable over a 124 GHz frequency range by temperature tuning the seed laser under computer control.

  7. Measurements of sulfur compounds in CO 2 by diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzke, J.; Stancu, D. G.; Niemax, K.

    2003-07-01

    Two simple methods for the analysis of the total concentration of sulfur in CO 2 by diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry of excited, metastable sulfur atoms in a direct current discharge are presented. In the first method, the CO 2 sample gas is mixed with the plasma gas (Ar or He) while the second is based on reproducible measurements of the sulfur released from the walls in a helium discharge after being deposited as a result of operating the discharge in pure CO 2 sample gas. The detection limits obtained satisfy the requirements for the control of sulfur compounds in CO 2 used in the food and beverage industry.

  8. Laser annealing and in situ absorption measurement of float glass implanted with Ag ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okur, I.; Townsend, P. D.

    2004-08-01

    In this paper in situ pulsed laser annealing and absorption measurements results of Ag-implanted float glass are reported. A Nd:YAG laser harmonic at 266 nm was used to anneal the target area by coupling energy to the glass host, whilst an argon laser at 488 nm was used as a probe beam of changes in nanoparticle size. The equilibrium conditions show a third order power dependence on the laser pulse energy, which is attributed to the volume in which ion migration can occur during excitation.

  9. Measuring Anxiety as a Treatment Endpoint in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lecavalier, Luc; Wood, Jeffrey J.; Halladay, Alycia K.; Jones, Nancy E.; Aman, Michael G.; Cook, Edwin H.; Handen, Benjamin L.; King, Bryan H.; Pearson, Deborah A.; Hallett, Victoria; Sullivan, Katherine Anne; Grondhuis, Sabrina; Bishop, Somer L.; Horrigan, Joseph P.; Dawson, Geraldine; Scahill, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high rate of anxiety in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), measuring anxiety in ASD is fraught with uncertainty. This is due, in part, to incomplete consensus on the manifestations of anxiety in this population. Autism Speaks assembled a panel of experts to conduct a systematic review of available measures for anxiety in…

  10. A New Search for Carbon Monoxide Absorption in the Transmission Spectrum of the Extrasolar Planet HD 209458b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Drake; Brown, Timothy M.; Charbonneau, David; Harrington, Joseph; Richardson, L. Jeremy

    2005-04-01

    We have revisited the search for carbon monoxide absorption features in transmission during the transit of the extrasolar planet HD 209458b. In 2002 August-September we acquired a total of 1077 high-resolution spectra (λ/δλ~25,000) in the K-band (2 μm) wavelength region using NIRSPEC on the Keck II telescope during three transits. These data are more numerous and of better quality than the data analyzed in an initial search by Brown et al. Our analysis achieves a sensitivity sufficient to test the degree of CO absorption in the first-overtone bands during transit on the basis of plausible models of the planetary atmosphere. We analyze our observations by comparison with theoretical tangent geometry absorption spectra, computed by adding height-invariant ad hoc temperature perturbations to the model atmosphere of Sudarsky et al. and by treating cloud height as an adjustable parameter. We do not detect CO absorption. The strong 2-0 R-branch lines between 4320 and 4330 cm-1 have depths during transit less than 1.6 parts in 104 in units of the stellar continuum (3 σ limit) at a spectral resolving power of 25,000. Our analysis indicates a weakening similar to that found in the case of sodium, suggesting that a general masking mechanism is at work in the planetary atmosphere. Under the interpretation that this masking is provided by high clouds, our analysis defines the maximum cloud-top pressure (i.e., minimum height) as a function of the model atmospheric temperature. For the relatively hot model used by Charbonneau et al. to interpret their sodium detection, our CO limit requires cloud tops at or above 3.3 mbar, and these clouds must be opaque at a wavelength of 2 μm. High clouds comprised of submicron-sized particles are already present in some models but may not provide sufficient opacity to account for our CO result. Cooler model atmospheres, having smaller atmospheric scale heights and lower CO mixing ratios, may alleviate this problem to some extent

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine originating depth of electrons that form an inelastic background of Auger electron spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Noritake; Cui, Yi-Tao; Murai, Takaaki; Oji, Hiroshi; Kimoto, Yasuji

    2017-07-01

    In Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), the spectral background is mainly due to inelastic scattering of Auger electrons that lose their kinetic energy in a sample bulk. To investigate the spectral components within this background for SiO2(19.3 nm)/Si(100) with known layer thickness, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used in the partial-electron-yield (PEY) mode at several electron kinetic energies to probe the background of the Si KLL Auger peak. The Si K-edge PEY-XAS spectra constituted of both Si and SiO2 components at each kinetic energy, and their component fractions were approximately the same as those derived from the simulated AES background for the same sample structure. The contributions of Auger electrons originating from layers at different depths to the inelastic background could thus be identified experimentally.

  12. The spectrum of high-energy cosmic rays measured with KASCADE-Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, W. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Buchholz, P.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Ghia, P. L.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Klages, H. O.; Link, K.; Łuczak, P.; Ludwig, M.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Melissas, M.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Over, S.; Palmieri, N.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F. G.; Sima, O.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.

    2012-08-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic rays between 1016 eV and 1018 eV, derived from measurements of the shower size (total number of charged particles) and the total muon number of extensive air showers by the KASCADE-Grande experiment, is described. The resulting all-particle energy spectrum exhibits strong hints for a hardening of the spectrum at approximately 2 · 1016 eV and a significant steepening at ≈8 · 1016 eV. These observations challenge the view that the spectrum is a single power law between knee and ankle. Possible scenarios generating such features are discussed in terms of astrophysical processes that may explain the transition region from galactic to extragalactic origin of cosmic rays.

  13. Optical Measurement of Radiocarbon below Unity Fraction Modern by Linear Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, Adam J; Long, David A; Liu, Qingnan; Gameson, Lyn; Hodges, Joseph T

    2017-09-21

    High-precision measurements of radiocarbon ( 14 C) near or below a fraction modern 14 C of 1 (F 14 C ≤ 1) are challenging and costly. An accurate, ultrasensitive linear absorption approach to detecting 14 C would provide a simple and robust benchtop alternative to off-site accelerator mass spectrometry facilities. Here we report the quantitative measurement of 14 C in gas-phase samples of CO 2 with F 14 C < 1 using cavity ring-down spectroscopy in the linear absorption regime. Repeated analysis of CO 2 derived from the combustion of either biogenic or petrogenic sources revealed a robust ability to differentiate samples with F 14 C < 1. With a combined uncertainty of 14 C/ 12 C = 130 fmol/mol (F 14 C = 0.11), initial performance of the calibration-free instrument is sufficient to investigate a variety of applications in radiocarbon measurement science including the study of biofuels and bioplastics, illicitly traded specimens, bomb dating, and atmospheric transport.

  14. NASA multipurpose airborne DIAL system and measurements of ozone and aerosol profiles. [DIfferential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Carter, A. F.; Shipley, S. T.; Siviter, J. H., Jr.; Hall, W. M.; Allen, R. J.; Butler, C. F.; Mayo, M. N.

    1983-01-01

    The hardware, operational characteristics, data processing system, and applications of the NASA airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system are described. DIAL functions by assessing the average gas concentration over a specified range interval by analyzing the difference in lidar backscatter signals for laser wavelengths tuned on and off of the molecular absorption line of a gas under investigation. The system comprises two frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers pumping two high conversion efficiency tunable dye lasers emitting pulses separated by 100 microsec or less. The return signals are digitized and stored on magnetic tape. The signal collector consists of photomultiplier tubes implanted in a cassegrain telescope. Flight tests of the system involved on-measurements at 285.95 nm and off-measurements at 299.40 nm, which yielded a differential cross section of 1.74 x 10 to the -16th sq cm. In situ measurements with another plane at a nominal altitude of 3.2 km for comparison purposes showed accuracy to within 10% in and above the boundary layer. The system is considered as a test apparatus for more developed versions to be flown on the Shuttle

  15. absorption sensor for sensitive temperature and species measurements in high-temperature gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spearrin, R. M.; Ren, W.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    2014-09-01

    A continuous-wave laser absorption diagnostic, based on the infrared CO2 bands near 4.2 and 2.7 μm, was developed for sensitive temperature and concentration measurements in high-temperature gas systems using fixed-wavelength methods. Transitions in the respective R-branches of both the fundamental υ 3 band (~2,350 cm-1) and combination υ 1 + υ 3 band (~3,610 cm-1) were chosen based on absorption line-strength, spectral isolation, and temperature sensitivity. The R(76) line near 2,390.52 cm-1 was selected for sensitive CO2 concentration measurements, and a detection limit of <5 ppm was achieved in shock tube kinetics experiments (~1,300 K). A cross-band, two-line thermometry technique was also established utilizing the R(96) line near 2,395.14 cm-1, paired with the R(28) line near 3,633.08 cm-1. This combination yields high temperature sensitivity (ΔE" = 3,305 cm-1) and expanded range compared with previous intra-band CO2 sensors. Thermometry performance was validated in a shock tube over a range of temperatures (600-1,800 K) important for combustion. Measured temperature accuracy was demonstrated to be better than 1 % over the entire range of conditions, with a standard error of ~0.5 % and µs temporal resolution.

  16. Nonscanning Moiré deflectometry for measurement of nonlinear refractive index and absorption coefficient of liquids.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Shahrzad Shahrabi; Madanipour, Khosro; Koohian, Ata

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a nonscanning measurement technique is presented for determining the nonlinear refractive index and absorption coefficient of liquid media based on Moiré deflectometry. In the proposed method two lasers are used: a low power, wide beam as probe and a high power with specific wavelength as a pump. Interaction of the pump laser beam with the nonlinear sample changes the refractive index, which leads to change in convergence/divergence of the collimated incident probe laser beam. The induced deflection is monitored by Moiré deflectometry. If the pump laser has a Gaussian intensity profile, the refractive index profile of the sample is Gaussian, too. Measuring the deflection angle of the probe beam by Moiré fringes deflection, and by using the inverse Abel transform integral, the refractive index profile and nonlinear refractive index can be determined. This method is fast, easy, and insensitive to environmental noise and allows real-time measurement. Also, the refractive index profile of the interacted medium with pump laser can be achieved by this technique. As a liquid sample, a DCJ dye in water solution was studied. The value of nonlinear refractive index, n2, and absorption coefficient, α, were obtained -2.54×10-4  cm2 w-1 and 1.368  cm-1, respectively.

  17. Density Measurement for MORB Melts by X-ray Absorption Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamaki, T.; Urakawa, S.; Suzuki, A.; Ohtani, E.; Katayama, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Density of silicate melts at high pressure is one of the most important properties to understand magma migration in the planetary interior and the differentiation of the terrestrial planets. The density measurements of silicate melts have been carried out by several methods (shock compression experiments and sink-float method in static experiments, etc.). However, since these methods have difficulties in acquisition of data at a desired pressure and temperature, the density of the silicate melt have been measured under only a few conditions. Recently a new density measurement was developed by the X-ray absorption method. Advantage of this method is to measure density of liquids at a desired pressure and temperature. In the present study we measured the density of MORB melt by X-ray absorption method. Experiments were carried out at the BL22XU beamline at SPring-8. A DIA-type cubic anvil apparatus was used for generation of high pressure and temperature. We used tungsten carbide anvils with the top anvil sizes of 6 mm and 4 mm. The energy of monochromateized X-ray beam was 23 keV. The intensities of incident and transmitted X-ray were measured by ion chambers. The density of the melt was calculated on the basis of Beer-Lambert law. The starting material was a glass with the MORB composition. Experiments were made from 1 atm to 5 GPa, from 300 to 2000 K. We compared the density of MORB melt with the compression curve of the melt in previous works. The density measured by this study is lower than that expected from the compression curve determined at higher pressures by the sink-float method. Structural change of the MORB melt with increasing pressure might be attributed to this discrepancy.

  18. Density Measurement for MORB Melts by X-ray Absorption Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamaki, T.; Urakawa, S.; Ohtani, E.; Suzuki, A.; Katayama, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Density of silicate melts at high pressure is one of the most important properties to understand magma migration in the planetary interior and the differentiation of the terrestrial planets. The density measurements of silicate melts have been carried out by several methods (shock compression experiments and sink-float method in static experiments, etc.). However, since these methods have difficulties in acquisition of data at a desired pressure and temperature, the density of the silicate melt have been measured under only a few conditions. Recently a new density measurement was developed by the X-ray absorption method. Advantage of this method is to measure density of liquids at a desired pressure and temperature. In the present study we measured the density of MORB melt by X-ray absorption method. Experiments were carried out at the BL22XU beamline at SPring-8. A DIA-type cubic anvil apparatus was used for generation of high pressure and temperature. We used tungsten carbide anvils with the edge-length of 6 mm. The energy of monochromateized X-ray beam was 23 keV. The intensities of incident and transmitted X-ray were measured by ion chambers. The density of the melt was calculated on the basis of Beer-Lambert law. The starting material was a glass with the MORB composition. Experiments were made from 1 atm to 4 GPa, from 300 to 2200 K. We compared the density of MORB melt with the compression curve of the melt in previous works. The density measured by this study is lower than that expected from the compression curve determined at higher pressures by the sink-float method. Structural change of the MORB melt with increasing pressure might be attributed to this discrepancy.

  19. Absorption of Solar Radiation by Clouds: Interpretations of Satellite, Surface, and Aircraft Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Zhang, M. H.; Zhou, Y.; Jing, X.; Dvortsov, V.

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the absorption of shortwave radiation by clouds, we have collocated satellite and surface measurements of shortwave radiation at several locations. Considerable effort has been directed toward understanding and minimizing sampling errors caused by the satellite measurements being instantaneous and over a grid that is much larger than the field of view of an upward facing surface pyranometer. The collocated data indicate that clouds absorb considerably more shortwave radiation than is predicted by theoretical models. This is consistent with the finding from both satellite and aircraft measurements that observed clouds are darker than model clouds. In the limit of thick clouds, observed top-of-the-atmosphere albedos do not exceed a value of 0.7, whereas in models the maximum albedo can be 0.8.

  20. Apparatus and Methods for Photoacoustic Measurement of Light Absorption of Particulate and Gaseous Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, William (Inventor); Yu, Zhenhong (Inventor); Kebabian, Paul L. (Inventor); Assif, James (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    In one embodiment, a photoacoustic effect measurement instrument for measuring a species (e.g., a species of PM) in a gas employs a pair of differential acoustic cells including a sample cell that receives sample gas including the species, and a reference cell that receives a filtered version of the sample gas from which the species has been substantially removed. An excitation light source provides an amplitude modulated beam to each of the acoustic cells. An array of multiple microphones is mounted to each of the differential acoustic cells, and measures an acoustic wave generated in the respective acoustic cell by absorption of light by sample gas therein to produce a respective signal. The microphones are isolated from sample gas internal to the acoustic cell by a film. A preamplifier determines a differential signal and a controller calculates concentration of the species based on the differential signal.

  1. High-resolution absorption measurements of NH3 at high temperatures: 500-2100 cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Emma J.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Clausen, Sønnik; Fateev, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution absorption spectra of NH3 in the region 500-2100 cm-1 at temperatures up to 1027 °C and approximately atmospheric pressure (1013±20 mbar) are measured. NH3 concentrations of 1000 ppm, 0.5% and 1% in volume fraction were used in the measurements. Spectra are recorded in high temperature gas flow cells using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer at a nominal resolution of 0.09 cm-1. Measurements at 22.7 °C are compared to high-resolution cross sections available from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The higher temperature spectra are analysed by comparison to a variational line list, BYTe, and experimental energy levels determined using the MARVEL procedure. Approximately 2000 lines have been assigned, of which 851 are newly assigned to mainly hot bands involving vibrational states as high as v2=5.

  2. [Measurement of atomic number of alkali vapor and pressure of buffer gas based on atomic absorption].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui-jie; Quan, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi

    2015-02-01

    High sensitivitymagnetic measurementscanbe achieved by utilizing atomic spinmanipulation in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) regime, which uses an alkali cell as a sensing element. The atomic number density of the alkali vapor and the pressure of the buffer gasare among the most important parameters of the cell andrequire accurate measurement. A method has been proposed and developedto measure the atomic number density and the pressure based on absorption spectroscopy, by sweeping the absorption line and fittingthe experiment data with a Lorentzian profile to obtainboth parameters. Due to Doppler broadening and pressure broadening, which is mainly dominated by the temperature of the cell and the pressure of buffer gas respectively, this work demonstrates a simulation of the errorbetween the peaks of the Lorentzian profile and the Voigt profile caused by bothfactors. The results indicates that the Doppler broadening contribution is insignificant with an error less than 0.015% at 313-513 K for a 4He density of 2 amg, and an error of 0.1% in the presence of 0.6-5 amg at 393 K. We conclude that the Doppler broadening could be ignored under above conditions, and that the Lorentzianprofile is suitably applied to fit the absorption spectrumobtainingboth parameters simultaneously. In addition we discuss the resolution and the instability due to thelight source, wavelength and the temperature of the cell. We find that the cell temperature, whose uncertainty is two orders of magnitude larger than the instability of the light source and the wavelength, is one of the main factors which contributes to the error.

  3. An Fe XXIV Absorption Line in the Persistent Spectrum of the Dipping Low-mass X-Ray Binary 1A 1744-361

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2012-07-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (Chandra) High Energy Transmission Grating spectra of the dipping low-mass X-ray binary 1A 1744-361 during its 2008 July outburst. We find that its persistent emission is well modeled by a blackbody (kT ~ 1.0 keV) plus power law (Γ ~ 1.7) with an absorption edge. In the residuals of the combined spectrum, we find a significant absorption line at 6.961 ± 0.002 keV, consistent with the Fe XXVI (hydrogen-like Fe) 2-1 transition. We place an upper limit on the velocity of a redshifted flow of v < 221 km s-1. We find an equivalent width for the line of 27+2 - 3 eV, from which we determine a column density of (7 ± 1) × 1017 cm-2 via a curve-of-growth analysis. Using XSTAR simulations, we place a lower limit on the ionization parameter of >103.6 erg cm s-1. We discuss what implications the feature has on the system and its geometry. We also present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data accumulated during this latest outburst and, via an updated color-color diagram, clearly show that 1A 1744-361 is an "atoll" source.

  4. Probing Lewis Acid-Base Interactions with Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics: The Electronic Absorption Spectrum of p-Nitroaniline in Supercritical CO2.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Benedito J Costa; Rivelino, Roberto; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio

    2015-07-02

    The structure and dynamics of p-nitroaniline (PNA) in supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at T = 315 K and ρ = 0.81 g cm(-3) are investigated by carrying out Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, and the electronic absorption spectrum in scCO2 is determined by time dependent density functional theory. The structure of the PNA-scCO2 solution illustrates the role played by Lewis acid-base (LA-LB) interactions. In comparison with isolated PNA, the ν(N-O) symmetric and asymmetric stretching modes of PNA in scCO2 are red-shifted by -17 and -29 cm(-1), respectively. The maximum of the charge transfer (CT) absorption band of PNA in scSCO2 is at 3.9 eV, and the predicted red-shift of the π → π* electronic transition relative to the isolated gas-phase PNA molecule reproduces the experimental value of -0.35 eV. An analysis of the relationship between geometry distortions and excitation energies of PNA in scCO2 shows that the π → π* CT transition is very sensitive to changes of the N-O bond distance, strongly indicating a correlation between vibrational and electronic solvatochromism driven by LA-LB interactions. Despite the importance of LA-LB interactions to explain the solvation of PNA in scCO2, the red-shift of the CT band is mainly determined by electrostatic interactions.

  5. An Fe XXIV Absorption Line in the Persistent Spectrum of the Dipping Low-Mass X-Ray Binary 1A 1744-361

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2012-01-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (Chandra) High Energy Transmission Grating spectra of the dipping low-mass X-ray binary 1A 1744-361 during its 2008 July outburst. We find that its persistent emission is well modeled by a blackbody (kT approx. 1.0 keV) plus power law (Gamma approx. 1.7) with an absorption edge. In the residuals of the combined spectrum, we find a significant absorption line at 6.961 +/- 0.002 keV, consistent with the Fe xxvi (hydrogen-like Fe) 2-1 transition.We place an upper limit on the velocity of a redshifted flow of nu < 221 km/s. We find an equivalent width for the line of 27+2/-3 eV, from which we determine a column density of (7 +/- 1)×10(exp 17) /sq. cm via a curve-of-growth analysis. Using XSTAR simulations, we place a lower limit on the ionization parameter of >103.6 erg cm/s. We discuss what implications the feature has on the system and its geometry. We also present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data accumulated during this latest outburst and, via an updated color-color diagram, clearly show that 1A 1744-361 is an "atoll" source

  6. Aerosol column absorption measurements using co-located UV-MFRSR and AERONET CIMEL instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, N.; Labow, G.; Herman, J.; Slusser, J.; Tree, R.; Janson, G.; Durham, B.; Eck, T.; Holben, B.

    2009-08-01

    Column aerosol absorption properties in the visible wavelengths are measured routinely in worldwide locations by NASA AERONET network (http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov), while similar optical properties in UV can be derived from diffuse and global irradiance measurements measured with Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) instruments of the USDA UV-MFRSR network (http://uvb.nrel.colostate.edu). To enable direct comparisons between the two techniques, we have modified our UV-MFRSR by replacing standard 300nm filter with 440nm filter used in AERONET network. The modified UV/VIS-MFRSR has been mostly deployed at AERONET calibration site at NASA GSFC in Greenbelt, MD, but also at number of field campaigns. While the UV-MSFRSR instrument is highly susceptible to calibration drifts, these drifts can be accurately assessed using co-located AERONET direct-sun AOT data. In 2006 quartz dome has been installed atop the MFRSR diffuser, which stabilized calibration drifts in 2007-2009. After correcting for remaining calibration changes, the AOT and single scattering albedo (SSA) at the UV wavelengths can be accurately inferred by fitting the measurements of global and diffuse atmospheric transmittances with the forward RT model at each UV-MFRSR spectral channel. Derived AOT and SSA at common wavelength 440nm by two different techniques are generally in good agreement. We also found that SSA becomes smaller in the UV wavelengths and has strong wavelength dependence across blue and near-UV spectral range. The measured enhanced UV absorption might suggest the presence of selectively UV absorbing aerosols. High spectral resolution SSA measurements in UV-VIS wavelengths are called for.

  7. A high-resolution extraterrestrial solar spectrum and water vapour continuum at near infrared wavelengths from ground-based spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menang, K. P.

    A high resolution extraterrestrial solar spectrum (CAVIAR solar spectrum) and water vapour continuum have been derived in near infrared windows from 2000-10000 cm-1 (105μm), by applying the Langley technique to calibrated ground-based high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer measurements, made under clear-sky conditions. The effect of the choice of an extraterrestrial solar spectrum for radiative transfer calculations of clear-sky absorption and heating rates in the near infrared was also studied. There is a good agreement between the solar lines strengths and positions of the CAVIAR solar spectrum and those from both high-resolution satellite and ground-based measurements in their regions of spectral overlap. However, there are significant differences between the structure of the CAVIAR solar spectrum and spectra from models. Many of the detected lines are missing from widely-used modelled extraterrestrial solar spectrum. The absolute level and hence wavenumber-integrated solar irradiance of the CAVIAR solar spectrum was also found to be 8% lower than the satellite-based Thuillier et al spectra from 5200-10000 cm-1. Using different extraterrestrial solar spectra for radiative transfer calculations in the near infrared led to differences of up to about 11 W m-2 (8.2%) in the absorbed solar irradiance while the tropospheric and stratospheric heating rates could respectively differ by up to about 0.13K day-1 (8.1%) and 0.19 K day-1 (7.6%) for an overhead Sun and mid-latitude summer atmosphere. This work has shown that the widely-used empirically modelled continuum may be underestimating the strength of the water vapour continuum from 2000-10000 cm-1, with the derived continuum up to more than 2 orders of magnitude stronger at some wavenumbers in the windows. The derived continuum is also stronger than that implied by laboratory measurements, by a factor of up to 40 in some spectral regions.

  8. Study on the effects of Ga-2N high co-doping and preferred orientation on the stability, bandgap and absorption spectrum of ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qing-Yu; Li, Wen-Cai; Qu, Ling-Feng; Zhao, Chun-Wang

    2017-06-01

    Currently, the stability and visible light properties of Ga-2N co-doped ZnO systems have been studied extensively by experimental analysis and theoretical calculations. However, previous theoretical calculations arbitrarily assigned Ga- and 2N-doped sites in ZnO. In addition, the most stable and possible doping orientations of doped systems have not been fully and systematically considered. Therefore, in this paper, the electron structure and absorption spectra of the unit cells of doped and pure systems were calculated by first-principles plane-wave ultrasoft pseudopotential with the GGA+U method. Calculations were performed for pure ZnO, Ga-2N supercells heavily co-doped with Zn1-xGaxO1-yNy (x = 0.03125 - 0.0625, y = 0.0625 - 0.125) under different co-doping orientations and conditions, and the Zn16GaN2O14 interstitial model. The results indicated that under different orientations and constant Ga-2N co-doping concentrations, the systems co-doped with Ga-N atoms vertically oriented to the c-axis and with another N atom located in the nearest-neighboring site exhibited higher stability over the others, thus lowering formation energy and facilitating doping. Moreover, Ga-interstitial- and 2N-co-doped ZnO systems easily formed chemical compounds. Increasing co-doping concentration while the co-doping method remained constant decreased doped system volume and lowered formation energies. Meantime, co-doped systems were more stable and doping was facilitated. The bandgap was also narrower and red shifting of the absorption spectrum was more significant. These results agreed with previously reported experimental results. In addition, the absorption spectra of Ga-interstitial- and 2N-co-doped ZnO both blue shifted in the UV region compared with that of the pure ZnO system.

  9. Nitrogen dioxide and kerosene-flame soot calibration of photoacoustic instruments for measurement of light absorption by aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Arnott, W. Patrick; Moosmu''ller, Hans; Walker, John W.

    2000-12-01

    A nitrogen dioxide calibration method is developed to evaluate the theoretical calibration for a photoacoustic instrument used to measure light absorption by atmospheric aerosols at a laser wavelength of 532.0 nm. This method uses high concentrations of nitrogen dioxide so that both a simple extinction and the photoacoustically obtained absorption measurement may be performed simultaneously. Since Rayleigh scattering is much less than absorption for the gas, the agreement between the extinction and absorption coefficients can be used to evaluate the theoretical calibration, so that the laser gas spectra are not needed. Photoacoustic theory is developed to account for strong absorptionmore » of the laser beam power in passage through the resonator. Findings are that the photoacoustic absorption based on heat-balance theory for the instrument compares well with absorption inferred from the extinction measurement, and that both are well within values represented by published spectra of nitrogen dioxide. Photodissociation of nitrogen dioxide limits the calibration method to wavelengths longer than 398 nm. Extinction and absorption at 532 and 1047 nm were measured for kerosene-flame soot to evaluate the calibration method, and the single scattering albedo was found to be 0.31 and 0.20 at these wavelengths, respectively.« less

  10. Z-Scan Measurement of the Nonlinear Absorption of a Thin Gold Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Yoon, Youngkwon; Boyd, Robert W.; Campbell, Joseph K.; Baker, Lane A.; Crooks, Richard M.; George, Michael

    1999-01-01

    We have used the z-scan technique at a wavelength (532 nm) near the transmission window of bulk gold to measure the nonlinear absorption coefficient of continuous approximately 50-Angstrom-thick gold films, deposited onto surface-modified quartz substrates. For highly absorbing media such as metals, we demonstrate that determination of either the real or imaginary part of the third-order susceptibility requires a measurement of both nonlinear absorption and nonlinear refraction, i.e. both open- and closed-aperture z-scans must be performed. Closed-aperture z-scans did not yield a sufficient signal for the determination of the nonlinear refraction. However, open-aperture z-scans yielded values ranging from Beta = 1.9 x 10(exp -3) to 5.3 x 10(exp -3) cm/W in good agreement with predictions which ascribe the nonlinear response to a Fermi smearing mechanism. We note that the sign of the nonlinearity is reversed from that of gold nanoparticle composites, in accordance with the predictions of mean field theories.

  11. Improvement of the tetrachloromercurate absorption technique for measuring low atmospheric SO2 mixing ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, W.; Beltz, N.; Haunold, W.; Krischke, U.

    1997-07-01

    During the Gas-Phase Sulfur Intercomparison Experiment (GASIE) in 1994 an analytical system for measuring sulfur dioxide mixing ratios at low parts per trillion (pptv) levels was employed. It is based on the absorption of SO2 on a tetrachloromercurate(II)-impregnated filter. The subsequent analysis uses a chemiluminescence reaction by treating the resulting disulfitomercurate(II) complex with an acidic cerium sulfate solution. An improved sampling device has been introduced that increases the maximum sampling volume from 200 L to 500 L. It is also possible to determine the blank value accurately for each sample. The absorption efficiency of the sampling system is 98.7±6.4% at a nominal flow rate of 10 L/min. The calculated (3σ) detection limit is 3±1 pptv SO2. The sample solution is stable for up to 30 days, which allows the samples to be safely stored or shipped before analysis. This permits the use of a sensitive, compact, and reliable sampling system in the field with subsequent analysis under optimal conditions in the laboratory. A continuous flow chemiluminescence (CFCL) analyzer for on-line measurements is also presented. The system is based on the same chemical principles as the described filter technique.

  12. Optical spectrum measurement of a cell-adhered microcavity for the cell-cycle analysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Ryusuke; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2015-03-01

    We build a setup and demonstrate successful measurement of the transmittance spectrum of a whispering gallery mode silica optical microcavity in which NIH 3T3 cells adhered on the top surface to achieve real-time and label-free measurement of the cell cycle. Label-free measurement is expected to prevent the cells to exhibit secondary effect. We build a system that enables the control of the gap distance between the microcavity and the tapered fiber, both of which are placed in the cell culture medium. The optimization of the tapered fiber diameter is the key to measure the spectrum of a microcavity in liquid. A swept wavelength laser light at a wavelength of 766 to 780 nm is used for the measurement. The cavity exhibit a Q of 1 . 0 ×106 in air, where the value is 1 . 0 ×105 in the medium and drops to 3 . 1 ×104 after the cell-adhesion. Still the Q of the microcavity is sufficiently high to detect the change at the cavity surface. Indeed we observe slight spectrum shift toward a longer wavelength, which we believe is due to the adherence of NIH 3T3 cells on the silica microcavity.The successful measurement of the transmittance spectrum of a microcavity in cell culture medium is the first step to realize the analysis of the cell-cycle based on microcavity system.

  13. Influence of electrically induced refraction and absorption on the measurement of spin current by pockels effect in GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Houquan; She, Weilong, E-mail: shewl@mail.sysu.edu.cn

    2015-03-14

    The pockels effect could be utilized to measure spin current in semiconductors for linear electro-optic coefficient can be induced by spin current. When dc electric field is applied, the carriers will shift in k space, which could lead to the change of refraction and absorption coefficients. In this paper, we investigate the influence of the induced change of the refraction and absorption coefficients on the measurement of spin current by pockels effect in GaAs.

  14. Hysteresis losses and specific absorption rate measurements in magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia applications.

    PubMed

    Coïsson, Marco; Barrera, Gabriele; Celegato, Federica; Martino, Luca; Kane, Shashank N; Raghuvanshi, Saroj; Vinai, Franco; Tiberto, Paola

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic hysteresis loops areas and hyperthermia on magnetic nanoparticles have been studied with the aim of providing reliable and reproducible methods of measuring the specific absorption rate (SAR). The SAR of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles with two different mean sizes, and Ni 1-x Zn x Fe 2 O 4 ferrites with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.8 has been measured with three approaches: static hysteresis loops areas, dynamic hysteresis loops areas and hyperthermia of a water solution. For dynamic loops and thermometric measurements, specific experimental setups have been developed, that operate at comparable frequencies (≈ 69kHz and ≈ 100kHz respectively) and rf magnetic field peak values (up to 100mT). The hyperthermia setup has been fully modelled to provide a direct measurement of the SAR of the magnetic nanoparticles by taking into account the heat exchange with the surrounding environment in non-adiabatic conditions and the parasitic heating of the water due to ionic currents. Dynamic hysteresis loops are shown to provide an accurate determination of the SAR except for superparamagnetic samples, where the boundary with a blocked regime could be crossed in dynamic conditions. Static hysteresis loops consistently underestimate the specific absorption rate but can be used to select the most promising samples. A means of reliably measure SAR of magnetic nanoparticles by different approaches for hyperthermia applications is presented and its validity discussed by comparing different methods. This work fits within the general subject of metrological traceability in medicine with a specific focus on magnetic hyperthermia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Recent Advances in Bionanomaterials" Guest Editor: Dr. Marie-Louise Saboungi and Dr. Samuel D. Bader. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Red shift of the SF6 vibration spectrum induced by the electron absorption: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bin; Zhang, Long-Fei; Han, Fang-Yuan; Luo, Zong-Chang; Liang, Qin-Qin; Liu, Chen-Yao; Zhu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Jie-Ming

    2018-01-01

    As a widely used gas insulator, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) has a large cross section for electron absorption, which may make the molecule ionized to the -1 charge state in the high-voltage environment. Using ab initio calculations, we show that the absorbed electron is located averagely on the six F atoms, occupying the antibonding level of the s-p σ bonds and increasing the S-F bond length. The ionized SF6- molecule decreases its decomposition energy to only 1.5 eV, much lower than that of the neutral molecule (4.8 eV), which can be understood according to the occupying of the antibonding orbital and thus weakening of the s-p σ bonds. The weakening of the bonds results in an obvious red shift in the vibrational modes of the ionized SF6- molecule by 120-270 cm-1, compared to those of the neutral molecule. The detailed origin of these vibrational modes is analyzed. Since the appearance of the ionized SF6- molecules is before the decomposition reaction of the SF6- molecule into low-fluoride sulfides, this method may improve the sensitivity of the defection of the partial discharge and save more time for the prevention of the insulation failure in advance.

  16. A Combination of Chemometrics and Quantum Mechanics Methods Applied to Analysis of Femtosecond Transient Absorption Spectrum of Ortho-Nitroaniline

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jing; Xiong, Ying; Cheng, Kemei; Li, Menglong; Chu, Genbai; Pu, Xuemei; Xu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    A combination of the advanced chemometrics method with quantum mechanics calculation was for the first time applied to explore a facile yet efficient analysis strategy to thoroughly resolve femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy of ortho-nitroaniline (ONA), served as a model compound of important nitroaromatics and explosives. The result revealed that the ONA molecule is primarily excited to S3 excited state from the ground state and then ultrafast relaxes to S2 state. The internal conversion from S2 to S1 occurs within 0.9 ps. One intermediate state S* was identified in the intersystem crossing (ISC) process, which is different from the specific upper triplet receiver state proposed in some other nitroaromatics systems. The S1 state decays to the S* one within 6.4 ps and then intersystem crossing to the lowest triplet state within 19.6 ps. T1 was estimated to have a lifetime up to 2 ns. The relatively long S* state and very long-lived T1 one should play a vital role as precursors to various nitroaromatic and explosive photoproducts. PMID:26781083

  17. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  18. Airborne Measurements of Formaldehyde Employing a Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer During TRACE-P

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, Alan; Drummond, James

    2003-01-01

    This final report summarizes the progress achieved over the entire 3-year proposal period including two extensions spanning 1 year. These activities include: 1) Preparation for and participation in the NASA 2001 TRACE-P campaign using our airborne tunable diode laser system to acquire measurements of formaldehyde (CH2O); 2) Comprehensive data analysis and data submittal to the NASA archive; 3) Follow up data interpretation working with NASA modelers to place our ambient CH2O measurements into a broader photochemical context; 4) Publication of numerous JGR papers using this data; 5) Extensive follow up laboratory tests on the selectivity and efficiency of our CH20 scrubbing system; and 6) An extensive follow up effort to assess and study the mechanical stability of our entire optical system, particularly the multipass absorption cell, with aircraft changes in cabin pressure.

  19. Investigations of Baikal Lake water absorption with ASP-15 device: measurement method and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhanenko, Grigorii P.; Tarashchansky, Boris A.; Budnev, Nikolai M.; Mirgazov, Rashid R.

    2006-02-01

    Operation of the device ASP-15 is analyzed in the paper. The device is arranged in the south part of Lake Baikal, and it is capable of all-the-year-round measurements of hydro-optical characteristics at the depths down to 1300 m. The method for determining the absorption coefficient is based on measurement of the rate of decrease of the irradiance from an isotropic source with the distance between the source and the receiver. Possible reasons of appearance of anomalous dependences of the irradiance with the distance are revealed on the basis of numerical simulation, and the errors of the applied method are estimated. The experimental data obtained by means of the device ASP-15 last years are presented.

  20. High-resolution absorption measurements of NH3 at high temperatures: 2100-5500 cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Emma J.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Clausen, Sønnik; Fateev, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    High-resolution absorption spectra of NH3 in the region 2100-5500 cm-1 at 1027 °C and approximately atmospheric pressure (1045±3 mbar) are measured. An NH3 concentration of 10% in volume fraction is used in the measurements. Spectra are recorded in a high-temperature gas-flow cell using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer at a nominal resolution of 0.09 cm-1. The spectra are analysed by comparison to a variational line list, BYTe, and experimental energy levels determined using the MARVEL procedure. 2308 lines have been assigned to 45 different bands, of which 1755 and 15 have been assigned or observed for the first time in this work.

  1. Method for Direct Measurement of Cosmic Acceleration by 21-cm Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao-Ran; Zhang, Tong-Jie; Pen, Ue-Li

    2014-07-01

    So far there is only indirect evidence that the Universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The evidence for cosmic acceleration is based on the observation of different objects at different distances and requires invoking the Copernican cosmological principle and Einstein's equations of motion. We examine the direct observability using recession velocity drifts (Sandage-Loeb effect) of 21-cm hydrogen absorption systems in upcoming radio surveys. This measures the change in velocity of the same objects separated by a time interval and is a model-independent measure of acceleration. We forecast that for a CHIME-like survey with a decade time span, we can detect the acceleration of a ΛCDM universe with 5σ confidence. This acceleration test requires modest data analysis and storage changes from the normal processing and cannot be recovered retroactively.

  2. Laser absorption spectroscopy for measurement of He metastable atoms of a microhollow cathode plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Keisuke; Kamebuchi, Kenta; Kakutani, Jiro; Matsuoka, Leo; Namba, Shinichi; Fujii, Keisuke; Shikama, Taiichi; Hasuo, Masahiro

    2018-01-01

    We generated a 0.3-mm-diameter DC, hollow-cathode helium discharge in a gas pressure range of 10-80 kPa. In discharge plasmas, we measured position-dependent laser absorption spectra for helium 23S1-23P0 transition with a spatial resolution of 55 µm. From the results of the analysis of the measured spectra using Voigt functions and including both the Doppler and collision broadening, we produced two-dimensional maps of the metastable 23S1 atomic densities and gas temperatures of the plasmas. We found that, at all pressures, the gas temperatures were approximately uniform in space with values in the range of 400-1500 K and the 23S1 atomic densities were ˜1019 m-3. We also found that the two-dimensional density distribution profiles became ring-shaped at high gas pressures, which is qualitatively consistent with the two-dimensional fluid simulation results.

  3. Electromagnetic resonance modes on a two-dimensional tandem grating and its application for broadband absorption in the visible spectrum.

    PubMed

    Han, Sunwoo; Lee, Bong Jae

    2016-01-25

    In this work, we numerically investigate the electromagnetic resonances on two-dimensional tandem grating structures. The base of a tandem grating consists of an opaque Au substrate, a SiO(2) spacer, and a Au grating (concave type); that is, a well-known fishnet structure forming Au/SiO(2)/Au stack. A convex-type Au grating (i.e., topmost grating) is then attached on top of the base fishnet structure with or without additional SiO(2) spacer, resulting in two types of tandem grating structures. In order to calculate the spectral reflectance and local magnetic field distribution, the finite-difference time-domain method is employed. When the topmost Au grating is directly added onto the base fishnet structure, the surface plasmon and magnetic polariton in the base structure are branched out due to the geometric asymmetry with respect to the SiO(2) spacer. If additional SiO(2) spacer is added between the topmost Au grating and the base fishnet structure, new magnetic resonance modes appear due to coupling between two vertically aligned Au/SiO(2)/Au stacks. With the understanding of multiple electromagnetic resonance modes on the proposed tandem grating structures, we successfully design a broadband absorber made of Au and SiO(2) in the visible spectrum.

  4. Measurement of the Reactor Antineutrino Flux and Spectrum at Daya Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Butorov, I.; Cao, D.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, Y. X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M. C.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, X. F.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Dove, J.; Draeger, E.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Ely, S. R.; Gill, R.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Grassi, M.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, L.; Guo, X. H.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; He, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Higuera, A.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, L. M.; Hu, L. J.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Hussain, G.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jen, K. L.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. P.; Ji, X. L.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Kang, L.; Kettell, S. H.; Kohn, S.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Langford, T. J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, K. Y.; Leung, J. K. C.; Lewis, C. A.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. C.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, P. Y.; Lin, S. K.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, S. S.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Lu, J. S.; Luk, K. B.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, Y. Q.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McDonald, K. T.; McKeown, R. D.; Meng, Y.; Mitchell, I.; Monari Kebwaro, J.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevski, A.; Pan, H.-R.; Park, J.; Patton, S.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, B.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Shao, B. B.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tang, W.; Taychenachev, D.; Tsang, K. V.; Tull, C. E.; Tung, Y. C.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, Q.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xia, X.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, J.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yan, J.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Yeh, M.; Young, B. L.; Yu, G. Y.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zang, S. L.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. F.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zheng, L.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    This Letter reports a measurement of the flux and energy spectrum of electron antineutrinos from six 2.9 GWt h nuclear reactors with six detectors deployed in two near (effective baselines 512 and 561 m) and one far (1579 m) underground experimental halls in the Daya Bay experiment. Using 217 days of data, 296 721 and 41 589 inverse β decay (IBD) candidates were detected in the near and far halls, respectively. The measured IBD yield is (1.55 ±0.04 ) ×10-18 cm2 GW-1 day-1 or (5.92 ±0.14 ) ×10-43 cm2 fission-1 . This flux measurement is consistent with previous short-baseline reactor antineutrino experiments and is 0.946 ±0.022 (0.991 ±0.023 ) relative to the flux predicted with the Huber -Mueller (ILL -Vogel ) fissile antineutrino model. The measured IBD positron energy spectrum deviates from both spectral predictions by more than 2 σ over the full energy range with a local significance of up to ˜4 σ between 4-6 MeV. A reactor antineutrino spectrum of IBD reactions is extracted from the measured positron energy spectrum for model-independent predictions.

  5. Measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum at Daya Bay

    DOE PAGES

    D. E. Jaffe; Bishai, M; Diwan, M.; ...

    2016-02-12

    This Letter reports a measurement of the flux and energy spectrum of electron antineutrinos from six 2.9~GW th nuclear reactors with six detectors deployed in two near (effective baselines 512~m and 561~m) and one far (1,579 m) underground experimental halls in the Daya Bay experiment. Using 217 days of data, 296,721 and 41,589 inverse beta decay (IBD) candidates were detected in the near and far halls, respectively. The measured IBD yield is (1.55 ± 0.04) × 10 –18 cm 2/GW/day or (5.92 ± 0.14) × 10 –43 cm 2/fission. This flux measurement is consistent with previous short-baseline reactor antineutrino experimentsmore » and is 0.946 ± 0.022 (0.991 ± 0.023) relative to the flux predicted with the Huber+Mueller (ILL+Vogel) fissile antineutrino model. The measured IBD positron energy spectrum deviates from both spectral predictions by more than 2σ over the full energy range with a local significance of up to ~4σ between 4-6 MeV. Furthermore, a reactor antineutrino spectrum of IBD reactions is extracted from the measured positron energy spectrum for model-independent predictions.« less

  6. Improved measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum at Daya Bay

    DOE PAGES

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; ...

    2017-01-01

    Here, a new measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and energy spectrum by the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment is reported. The antineutrinos were generated by six 2.9 GW th nuclear reactors and detected by eight antineutrino detectors deployed in two near (560 m and 600 m flux-weighted baselines) and one far (1640 m flux-weighted baseline) underground experimental halls. With 621 days of data, more than 1.2 million inverse beta decay (IBD) candidates were detected. The IBD yield in the eight detectors was measured, and the ratio of measured to predicted flux was found to be 0.946 ± 0.020 (0.992more » ± 0.021) for the Huber+Mueller (ILL+Vogel) model. A 2.9σ deviation was found in the measured IBD positron energy spectrum compared to the predictions. In particular, an excess of events in the region of 4$-$6 MeV was found in the measured spectrum, with a local significance of 4.4σ. Finally, a reactor antineutrino spectrum weighted by the IBD cross section is extracted for model-independent predictions.« less

  7. Compressional Wave Speed and Absorption Measurements in a Saturated Kaolinite-Water Artificial Sediment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    OCEAN BOTTOM, ULTRASONIC PROPERTIES), (*UNDERWATER SOUND, SOUND TRANSMISSION), KAOLINITE , ABSORPTION, COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES, POROSITY, VELOCITY, VISCOELASTICITY, MATHEMATICAL MODELS, THESES, SEDIMENTATION

  8. General relativistic description of the observed galaxy power spectrum: Do we understand what we measure?

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jaiyul

    2010-10-15

    We extend the general relativistic description of galaxy clustering developed in Yoo, Fitzpatrick, and Zaldarriaga (2009). For the first time we provide a fully general relativistic description of the observed matter power spectrum and the observed galaxy power spectrum with the linear bias ansatz. It is significantly different from the standard Newtonian description on large scales and especially its measurements on large scales can be misinterpreted as the detection of the primordial non-Gaussianity even in the absence thereof. The key difference in the observed galaxy power spectrum arises from the real-space matter fluctuation defined as the matter fluctuation at themore » hypersurface of the observed redshift. As opposed to the standard description, the shape of the observed galaxy power spectrum evolves in redshift, providing additional cosmological information. While the systematic errors in the standard Newtonian description are negligible in the current galaxy surveys at low redshift, correct general relativistic description is essential for understanding the galaxy power spectrum measurements on large scales in future surveys with redshift depth z{>=}3. We discuss ways to improve the detection significance in the current galaxy surveys and comment on applications of our general relativistic formalism in future surveys.« less

  9. All-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum measured with 26 IceTop stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Bell, M.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Brown, A. M.; Buitink, S.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carson, M.; Casier, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; De Clercq, C.; Degner, T.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Heereman, D.; Heimann, P.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, B.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Klepser, S.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lauer, R.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Naumann, U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; O'Murchadha, A.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pieloth, D.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Rutledge, D.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheel, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schultes, A.; Schulz, O.; Schunck, M.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Smith, M. W. E.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Stüer, M.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Wasserman, R.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zoll, M.

    2013-04-01

    We report on a measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum with the IceTop air shower array, the surface component of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The data used in this analysis were taken between June and October, 2007, with 26 surface stations operational at that time, corresponding to about one third of the final array. The fiducial area used in this analysis was 0.122 km2. The analysis investigated the energy spectrum from 1 to 100 PeV measured for three different zenith angle ranges between 0° and 46°. Because of the isotropy of cosmic rays in this energy range the spectra from all zenith angle intervals have to agree. The cosmic-ray energy spectrum was determined under different assumptions on the primary mass composition. Good agreement of spectra in the three zenith angle ranges was found for the assumption of pure proton and a simple two-component model. For zenith angles θ < 30°, where the mass dependence is smallest, the knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrum was observed at about 4 PeV, with a spectral index above the knee of about -3.1. Moreover, an indication of a flattening of the spectrum above 22 PeV was observed.

  10. In situ measurements of the optical absorption of dioxythiophene-based conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J.; Schwendeman, I.; Ihas, B. C.; Clark, R. J.; Cornick, M.; Nikolou, M.; Argun, A.; Reynolds, J. R.; Tanner, D. B.

    2011-05-01

    Conjugated polymers can be reversibly doped by electrochemical means. This doping introduces new subband-gap optical absorption bands in the polymer while decreasing the band-gap absorption. To study this behavior, we have prepared an electrochemical cell allowing in situ measurements of the optical properties of the polymer. The cell consists of a thin polymer film deposited on gold-coated Mylar behind which is another polymer that serves as a counterelectrode. An infrared transparent window protects the upper polymer from ambient air. By adding a gel electrolyte and making electrical connections to the polymer-on-gold films, one may study electrochromism in a wide spectral range. As the cell voltage (the potential difference between the two electrodes) changes, the doping level of the conjugated polymer films is changed reversibly. Our experiments address electrochromism in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and poly(3,4-dimethylpropylenedioxythiophene) (PProDOT-Me2). This closed electrochemical cell allows the study of the doping induced subband-gap features (polaronic and bipolaronic modes) in these easily oxidized and highly redox switchable polymers. We also study the changes in cell spectra as a function of polymer thickness and investigate strategies to obtain cleaner spectra, minimizing the contributions of water and gel electrolyte features.

  11. O2 absorption cross sections /187-225 nm/ from stratospheric solar flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Mentall, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The absorption cross sections of molecular oxygen are calculated in the wavelength range from 187 to 230 nm from solar flux measurements obtained within the stratosphere. Within the Herzberg continuum wavelength region the molecular oxygen cross sections are found to be about 30% smaller than the laboratory results of Shardanand and Rao (1977) from 200 to 210 nm and about 50% smaller than those of Hasson and Nicholls (1971). At wavelengths longer than 210 nm the cross sections agree with those of Shardanand and Rao. The effective absorption cross sections of O2 in the Schumann-Runge band region from 187 to 200 nm are calculated and compared to the empirical fit given by Allen and Frederick (1982). The calculated cross sections indicate that the transmissivity of the atmosphere may be underestimated by the use of the Allen and Frederic cross sections between 195 and 200 nm. The ozone column content between 30 and 40 km and the relative ozone cross sections are determined from the same solar flux data set.

  12. Temperature dependent absorption measurement of various transition metal doped laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horackova, Lucie; Šulc, Jan; Jelinkova, Helena; Jambunathan, Venkatesan; Lucianetti, Antonio; Mocek, Tomás.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a vast development of high energy class lasers of the order of 100 J to kJ level which have potential applications in the field of science and technology. Many such systems use the gain media cooled at cryogenic temperatures which will help in enhancing the spectroscopic and thermo-optical properties. Nevertheless, parasitic effects like amplified spontaneous emission enhance and affect the overall efficiency. The best way to suppress this effect is to use cladding element attached to the gain material. Based on these facts, this work was focused on the systematic investigation of temperature dependent absorption of several materials doped with transition metals, which can be used as cladding, as laser gain material, or as passive Q-switching element. The Ti:sapphire, Cr:YAG, V:YAG, and Co:MALO samples were measured in temperature range from 80 K to 330 K by step of 50 K. Using Beer-Lambert law we estimated the absorption coefficient of these materials.

  13. Energy absorption as a measure of intestinal failure in the short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, C A; Lennard-Jones, J E; Thompson, D G; Farthing, M J

    1989-01-01

    Energy absorption from a liquid test meal, intestinal transit rate and water and sodium output over a six hour period were measured in five patients with an ileostomy and 12 patients with the short bowel syndrome, five of whom were on longterm parenteral nutrition. The proportion of total energy absorbed was greatest in the ileostomists (median 87%, range 82-92%), less in short bowel patients not on parenteral nutrition (median 67%, range 59-78%, p less than 0.01) and least in the short bowel group who needed it (median 27%, range 2-63%, p less than 0.01). Transit rate was more rapid in the short bowel patients compared with the ileostomists. A close correlation was observed between percentage energy absorption and the dry weight of the stools/stoma effluent collected during the six hour test period (r = -0.99, p less than 0.001). This simple non-invasive test quantitates the degree of intestinal failure and may be of practical help in management. PMID:2495238

  14. Energy absorption as a measure of intestinal failure in the short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, C A; Lennard-Jones, J E; Thompson, D G; Farthing, M J

    1989-02-01

    Energy absorption from a liquid test meal, intestinal transit rate and water and sodium output over a six hour period were measured in five patients with an ileostomy and 12 patients with the short bowel syndrome, five of whom were on longterm parenteral nutrition. The proportion of total energy absorbed was greatest in the ileostomists (median 87%, range 82-92%), less in short bowel patients not on parenteral nutrition (median 67%, range 59-78%, p less than 0.01) and least in the short bowel group who needed it (median 27%, range 2-63%, p less than 0.01). Transit rate was more rapid in the short bowel patients compared with the ileostomists. A close correlation was observed between percentage energy absorption and the dry weight of the stools/stoma effluent collected during the six hour test period (r = -0.99, p less than 0.001). This simple non-invasive test quantitates the degree of intestinal failure and may be of practical help in management.

  15. Measuring Reciprocity in High Functioning Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ommeren, Tineke Backer; Begeer, Sander; Scheeren, Anke M.; Koot, Hans M.

    2012-01-01

    Few instruments have been developed that measure impairments in reciprocity, a defining feature of autism. We introduce a new test assessing the quality of reciprocal behaviour: the interactive drawing test (IDT). Children and adolescents (n = 49) with and without high functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFASD) were invited to collaborate with…

  16. Validating the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire as a Measure of Parent Perceptions of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mire, Sarah S.; Tolar, Tammy D.; Brewton, Christie M.; Raff, Natalie S.; McKee, Shannon L.

    2018-01-01

    The illness perception questionnaire (IPQ) and its revision (IPQ-R) measure perceptions about health-related diagnoses and the influence of cognitions on coping. In this study, the factor structure of a version revised for use with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was investigated with a sample of parents (n = 361) whose children have ASD.…

  17. Measuring the power spectrum of dark matter substructure using strong gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Hezaveh, Yashar; Dalal, Neal; Holder, Gilbert

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, it has become possible to detect individual dark matter subhalos near images of strongly lensed extended background galaxies. Typically, only the most massive subhalos in the strong lensing region may be detected this way. In this work, we show that strong lenses may also be used to constrain the much more numerous population of lower mass subhalos that are too small to be detected individually. In particular, we show that the power spectrum of projected density fluctuations in galaxy halos can be measured using strong gravitational lensing. We develop the mathematical framework of power spectrum estimation, andmore » test our method on mock observations. We use our results to determine the types of observations required to measure the substructure power spectrum with high significance. We predict that deep observations (∼10 hours on a single target) with current facilities can measure this power spectrum at the 3σ level, with no apparent degeneracy with unknown clumpiness in the background source structure or fluctuations from detector noise. Upcoming ALMA measurements of strong lenses are capable of placing strong constraints on the abundance of dark matter subhalos and the underlying particle nature of dark matter.« less

  18. Depression and Its Measurement in Verbal Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gotham, Katherine; Unruh, Kathryn; Lord, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    In a sample of 50 verbally fluent adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorders (age: 16-31 years; verbal IQ: 72-140), we examined the pattern of response and associations between scores on common measures of depressive symptoms, participant characteristics, and clinical diagnosis of depressive disorders. Beck Depression Inventory--Second…

  19. Autism Spectrum Traits Linked with Reduced Performance on Self-Report Behavioural Measures of Cognitive Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albein-Urios, Natalia; Youssef, George J.; Kirkovski, Melissa; Enticott, Peter G.

    2018-01-01

    Deficits in cognitive flexibility are thought to underpin the core symptom of repetitive and restricted patterns of behaviour in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Studies investigating this relationship, however, report inconsistent results. This is partly due to the variable nature of measures used to assess the construct of flexibility. The main…

  20. Advanced Sine Wave Modulation of Continuous Wave Laser System for Atmospheric CO2 Differential Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with ITT Exelis have been experimenting with Continuous Wave (CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) as a means of performing atmospheric CO2 column measurements from space to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission.Because range resolving Intensity Modulated (IM) CW lidar techniques presented here rely on matched filter correlations, autocorrelation properties without side lobes or other artifacts are highly desirable since the autocorrelation function is critical for the measurements of lidar return powers, laser path lengths, and CO2 column amounts. In this paper modulation techniques are investigated that improve autocorrelation properties. The modulation techniques investigated in this paper include sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) sequences in various hardware configurations. A CW lidar system using sine waves modulated by ML pseudo random noise codes is described, which uses a time shifting approach to separate channels and make multiple, simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Unlike the pure ML sequence, this technique is useful in hardware that is band pass filtered as the IM sine wave carrier shifts the main power band. Both amplitude and Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated IM carriers are investigated that exibit perfect autocorrelation properties down to one cycle per code bit. In addition, a method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a Gaussian filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions that does not seriously degrade the resolution or introduce side lobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth.

  1. High-temperature measurements of methane and acetylene using quantum cascade laser absorption near 8 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid, M. B.; Javed, T.; Farooq, A.

    2015-04-01

    The mid-infrared wavelength region near 8 μm contains absorption bands of several molecules such as water vapor, hydrogen peroxide, nitrous oxide, methane and acetylene. A new laser absorption sensor based on the ν4 band of methane and the ν4+ν5 band of acetylene is reported for interference-free, time-resolved measurements under combustion-relevant conditions. A detailed line-selection procedure was used to identify optimum transitions. Methane and acetylene were measured at the line centers of Q12 (1303.5 cm-1) and P23 (1275.5 cm-1) transitions, respectively. High-temperature absorption cross sections of methane and acetylene were measured at peaks (on-line) and valleys (off-line) of the selected absorption transitions. The differential absorption strategy was employed to eliminate interference absorption from large hydrocarbons. Experiments were performed behind reflected shock waves over a temperature range of 1200-2200 K, between pressures of 1-4 atm. The diagnostics were then applied to measure the respective species time-history profiles during the shock-heated pyrolysis of n-pentane.

  2. Precise dielectric property measurements and E-field probe calibration for specific absorption rate measurements using a rectangular waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, B M; Beard, B B; Davis, C C

    2018-01-01

    Specific absorption rate (SAR) measurements require accurate calculations of the dielectric properties of tissue-equivalent liquids and associated calibration of E-field probes. We developed a precise tissue-equivalent dielectric measurement and E-field probe calibration system. The system consists of a rectangular waveguide, electric field probe, and data control and acquisition system. Dielectric properties are calculated using the field attenuation factor inside the tissue-equivalent liquid and power reflectance inside the waveguide at the air/dielectric-slab interface. Calibration factors were calculated using isotropicity measurements of the E-field probe. The frequencies used are 900 MHz and 1800 MHz. The uncertainties of the measured values are within ±3%, at the 95% confidence level. Using the same waveguide for dielectric measurements as well as calibrating E-field probes used in SAR assessments eliminates a source of uncertainty. Moreover, we clearly identified the system parameters that affect the overall uncertainty of the measurement system. PMID:29520129

  3. Absorption/transmission measurements of PSAP particle-laden filters from the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Presser, Cary; Nazarian, Ashot; Conny, Joseph M.

    Absorptivity measurements with a laser-heating approach, referred to as the laser-driven thermal reactor (LDTR), were carried out in the infrared and applied at ambient (laboratory) nonreacting conditions to particle-laden filters from a three-wavelength (visible) particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP). Here, the particles were obtained during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign. The focus of this study was to determine the particle absorption coefficient from field-campaign filter samples using the LDTR approach, and compare results with other commercially available instrumentation (in this case with the PSAP, which has been compared with numerous other optical techniques).

  4. Absorption/transmission measurements of PSAP particle-laden filters from the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign

    DOE PAGES

    Presser, Cary; Nazarian, Ashot; Conny, Joseph M.; ...

    2016-12-02

    Absorptivity measurements with a laser-heating approach, referred to as the laser-driven thermal reactor (LDTR), were carried out in the infrared and applied at ambient (laboratory) nonreacting conditions to particle-laden filters from a three-wavelength (visible) particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP). Here, the particles were obtained during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign. The focus of this study was to determine the particle absorption coefficient from field-campaign filter samples using the LDTR approach, and compare results with other commercially available instrumentation (in this case with the PSAP, which has been compared with numerous other optical techniques).

  5. Is the Autism-Spectrum Quotient a Valid Measure of Traits Associated with the Autism Spectrum? A Rasch Validation in Adults with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov; Lindner, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) is among the most widely used scales assessing autistic traits in the general population. However, some aspects of the AQ are questionable. To test its scale properties, the AQ was translated into Swedish, and data were collected from 349 adults, 130 with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 219 without ASD, and…

  6. Are Autistic Traits Measured Equivalently in Individuals with and without an Autism Spectrum Disorder? An Invariance Analysis of the Autism Spectrum Quotient Short Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Aja L.; Booth, Tom; McKenzie, Karen; Kuenssberg, Renate; O'Donnell, Michael

    2014-01-01

    It is common to administer measures of autistic traits to those without autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) with, for example, the aim of understanding autistic personality characteristics in non-autistic individuals. Little research has examined the extent to which measures of autistic traits actually measure the same traits in the same way across…

  7. [Achievement of the noninvasive measurement for human blood glucose with NIR diffusion reflectance spectrum method].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-yan; Ding, Dong; Song, Li-qiang; Gu, Lin-na; Yang, Peng; Tang, Yu-guo

    2005-06-01

    The noninvasive measurement of human blood glucose was achieved with NIR diffusion reflectance spectrum method. The thumb fingertip NIR diffusion reflectance spectra of six different age healthy volunteers were collected using Nexus-870 and its NIR fiber port smart accessory. The test was implemented with changing the blood glucose concentration for the limosis and satiation of every volunteer. The calibration model was set up using PLS method with the smoothing, baseline correction and first derivatives pretreatment spectrum in the 7500-8500 cm(-1) region for single volunteer, the same age combination and that of different age. When the spectrum was obtained, the actual blood glucose value of every spectrun sample was demarcated using ultraviolet spectrophotometer. The correlation between the calibration value and true value for single volunteer is better than that for the combination of volunteers, the correlative coefficients are all over 0.90471, RMSECs are all less than 0.171.

  8. The coefficient of bond thermal expansion measured by extended x-ray absorption fine structure.

    PubMed

    Fornasini, P; Grisenti, R

    2014-10-28

    The bond thermal expansion is in principle different from the lattice expansion and can be measured by correlation sensitive probes such as extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and diffuse scattering. The temperature dependence of the coefficient α(bond)(T) of bond thermal expansion has been obtained from EXAFS for CdTe and for Cu. A coefficient α(tens)(T) of negative expansion due to tension effects has been calculated from the comparison of bond and lattice expansions. Negative lattice expansion is present in temperature intervals where α(bond) prevails over α(tens); this real-space approach is complementary but not equivalent to the Grüneisen theory. The relevance of taking into account the asymmetry of the nearest-neighbours distribution of distances in order to get reliable bond expansion values and the physical meaning of the third cumulant are thoroughly discussed.

  9. An induction heater device for studies of magnetic hyperthermia and specific absorption ratio measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, M. E.; Barrera, A.; Estrada, J. C.; Hernandez, A.; Cordova, T.

    2011-11-01

    The development of a device for generating ac magnetic fields based on a resonant inverter is presented, which has been specially designed to carry out experiments of magnetic hyperthermia. By determining the electric current in the LC resonant circuit, a maximum intensity of magnetic field around of 15 mT is calculated, with a frequency around of 206 kHz. This ac magnetic field is able to heat powdered magnetic materials embedded in biological systems to be used in biomedical applications. Indeed, in order to evaluate the sensitivity of the device we also present the measurements of the specific absorption rate in phantoms performed with commercially prepared Fe3O4 and distilled water at different concentrations.

  10. Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Subhourly Variation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve; Long, Stephania

    2011-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar system, developed jointly by The University of Alabama in Huntsville and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is making regular observations of ozone vertical distributions between 1 and 8 km with two receivers under both daytime and nighttime conditions using lasers at 285 and 291 nm. This paper describes the lidar system and analysis technique with some measurement examples. An iterative aerosol correction procedure reduces the retrieval error arising from differential aerosol backscatter in the lower troposphere. Lidar observations with coincident ozonesonde flights demonstrate that the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 10% below 4 km to better than 20% below 8 km with 750-m vertical resolution and 10-min 17 temporal integration.

  11. Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Sub-Hourly Variation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve; Long, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, developed jointly by the University of Alabama at Huntsville and NASA, is making regular observations of ozone vertical distributions between 1 and 8 km with two receivers under both daytime and nighttime conditions using lasers at 285 and 291 nm. This paper describes the lidar system and analysis technique with some measurement examples. An iterative aerosol correction procedure reduces the retrieval error arising from differential aerosol backscatter in the lower troposphere. Lidar observations with coincident ozonesonde flights demonstrate that the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 10% below 4 km to better than 20% below 8 km with 750-m vertical resolution and 10-min temporal integration

  12. Mid-infrared laser absorption tomography for quantitative 2D thermochemistry measurements in premixed jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chuyu; Pineda, Daniel I.; Paxton, Laurel; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Spearrin, R. Mitchell

    2018-06-01

    A tomographic laser absorption spectroscopy technique, utilizing mid-infrared light sources, is presented as a quantitative method to spatially resolve species and temperature profiles in small-diameter reacting flows relevant to combustion systems. Here, tunable quantum and interband cascade lasers are used to spectrally resolve select rovibrational transitions near 4.98 and 4.19 μm to measure CO and {CO2}, respectively, as well as their vibrational temperatures, in piloted premixed jet flames. Signal processing methods are detailed for the reconstruction of axial and radial profiles of thermochemical structure in a canonical ethylene-air jet flame. The method is further demonstrated to quantitatively distinguish between different turbulent flow conditions.

  13. Aerosol Sources, Absorption, and Intercontinental Transport: Synergies among Models, Remote Sensing, and Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Kaufman, Yoram; chu, Allen; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol climate forcing is one of the largest uncertainties in assessing the anthropogenic impact on the global climate system. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties, and the consequences of intercontinental transport of aerosols and their precursors. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt, from anthropogenic, biomass burning, and natural sources. We compare the model calculated aerosol extinction and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia, and model calculated total aerosol optical depth and fine mode fractions with the MODIS satellite retrieval. We will also estimate the intercontinental transport of pollution and dust aerosols from their source regions to other areas in different seasons.

  14. Aerosol Sources, Absorption, and Intercontinental Transport: Synergies Among Models, Remote Sensing, and Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Chu, Allen; Levy, Robert; Remer, Lorraine; Kaufman, Yoram; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Eck, Tom; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol climate forcing is one of the largest uncertainties in assessing the anthropogenic impact on the global climate system. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties, and the consequences of intercontinental transport of aerosols and their precursors. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt, from anthropogenic, .biomass burning, and natural sources. We compare the model calculated aerosol extinction and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERON" at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia, and model calculated total aerosol optical depth and fine mode fractions with the MODIS satellite retrieval. We will also estimate the intercontinental transport of pollution and dust aerosols from their source regions to other areas in different seasons.

  15. Measurement of absolute laser energy absorption by nano-structured targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaebum; Tommasini, R.; London, R.; Bargsten, C.; Hollinger, R.; Capeluto, M. G.; Shlyaptsev, V. N.; Rocca, J. J.

    2017-10-01

    Nano-structured targets have been reported to allow the realization of extreme plasma conditions using table top lasers, and have gained much interest as a platform to investigate the ultra-high energy density plasmas (>100 MJ/cm3) . One reason for these targets to achieve extreme conditions is increased laser energy absorption (LEA). The absolute LEA by nano-structured targets has been measured for the first time and compared to that by foil targets. The experimental results, including the effects of target parameters on the LEA, will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52097NA27344, and funded by LDRD (#15-ERD-054).

  16. Two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements of neutral density in a helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Galante, M. E.; Magee, R. M.; Scime, E. E.

    2014-05-15

    We have developed a new diagnostic based on two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). We use a high intensity (5 MW/cm{sup 2}), narrow bandwidth (0.1 cm{sup −1}) laser to probe the ground state of neutral hydrogen, deuterium and krypton with spatial resolution better than 0.2 cm, a time resolution of 10 ns, and a measurement cadence of 20 Hz. Here, we describe proof-of-principle measurements in a helicon plasma source that demonstrate the TALIF diagnostic is capable of measuring neutral densities spanning four orders of magnitude; comparable to the edge neutral gradients predicted in the DIII-D tokamak pedestal. The measurements are performed in hydrogen and deuteriummore » plasmas and absolute calibration is accomplished through TALIF measurements in neutral krypton. The optical configuration employed is confocal, i.e., both light injection and collection are accomplished with a single lens through a single optical port in the vacuum vessel. The wavelength resolution of the diagnostic is sufficient to separate hydrogen and deuterium spectra and we present measurements from mixed hydrogen and deuterium plasmas that demonstrate isotopic abundance measurements are feasible. Time resolved measurements also allow us to explore the evolution of the neutral hydrogen density and temperature and effects of wall recycling. We find that the atomic neutral density grows rapidly at the initiation of the discharge, reaching the steady-state value within 1 ms. Additionally, we find that neutral hydrogen atoms are born with 0.08 eV temperatures, not 2 eV as is typically assumed.« less

  17. Measurement of the prompt fissionγ-ray spectrum of 242Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urlass, Sebastian; Beyer, Roland; Junghans, Arnd Rudolf; Kögler, Toni; Schwengner, Ronald; Wagner, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    The prompt γ-ray spectrum of fission fragments is important in understanding the dynamics of the fission process, as well as for nuclear engineering in terms of predicting the γ-ray heating in nuclear reactors. The γ-ray spectrum measured from the fission fragments of the spontaneous fission of 242Pu will be presented here. A fission chamber containing in total 37mg of 242Pu was used as active sample. The γ-quanta were detected with high time- and energy-resolution using LaBr3 and HPGe detectors, respectively, in coincidence with spontaneous fission events detected by the fission chamber. The acquired γ-ray spectra were corrected for the detector response using the spectrum stripping method. About 70 million fission events were detected which results in a very low statistical uncertainty and a wider energy range covered compared to previous measurements. The prompt fission γ-ray spectrum measured with the HPGe detectors shows structures that allow conclusions about the nature of γ-ray transitions in the fission fragments. The average photon multiplicity of 8.2 and the average total energy release by prompt photons per fission event of about 6.8 MeV were determined for both detector types.

  18. Measuring the activity of a {sup 51}Cr neutrino source based on the gamma-radiation spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbachev, V. V., E-mail: vvgor-gfb1@mail.ru; Gavrin, V. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.

    A technique for the measurement of activities of intense β sources by measuring the continuous gamma-radiation (internal bremsstrahlung) spectra is developed. A method for reconstructing the spectrum recorded by a germanium semiconductor detector is described. A method for the absolute measurement of the internal bremsstrahlung spectrum of {sup 51}Cr is presented.

  19. The valence and Rydberg states of difluoromethane: A combined experimental vacuum ultraviolet spectrum absorption and theoretical study by ab initio configuration interaction and density functional computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Michael H.; Vrønning Hoffmann, Søren; Jones, Nykola C.; Coreno, Marcello; de Simone, Monica; Grazioli, Cesare

    2018-06-01

    The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrum for CH2F2 from a new synchrotron study has been combined with earlier data and subjected to detailed scrutiny. The onset of absorption, band I and also band IV, is resolved into broad vibrational peaks, which contrast with the continuous absorption previously claimed. A new theoretical analysis, using a combination of time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations and complete active space self-consistent field, leads to a major new interpretation. Adiabatic excitation energies (AEEs) and vertical excitation energies, evaluated by these methods, are used to interpret the spectra in unprecedented detail using theoretical vibronic analysis. This includes both Franck-Condon (FC) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) effects on cold and hot bands. These results lead to the re-assignment of several known excited states and the identification of new ones. The lowest calculated AEE sequence for singlet states is 11B1 ˜ 11A2 < 21B1 < 11A1 < 21A1 < 11B2 < 31A1 < 31B1. These, together with calculated higher energy states, give a satisfactory account of the principal maxima observed in the VUV spectrum. Basis sets up to quadruple zeta valence with extensive polarization are used. The diffuse functions within this type of basis generate both valence and low-lying Rydberg excited states. The optimum position for the site of further diffuse functions in the calculations of Rydberg states is shown to lie on the H-atoms. The routine choice on the F-atoms is shown to be inadequate for both CHF3 and CH2F2. The lowest excitation energy region has mixed valence and Rydberg character. TDDFT calculations show that the unusual structure of the onset arises from the near degeneracy of 11B1 and 11A2 valence states, which mix in symmetric and antisymmetric combinations. The absence of fluorescence in the 10.8-11 eV region contrasts with strong absorption. This is interpreted by the 21B1 and 11A1 states where no fluorescence is calculated for these

  20. Atmospheric solar absorption measurements in the 9 to 11 mu m region using a diode laser heterodyne spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harward, C. N.; Hoell, J. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A tunable diode laser heterodyne radiometer was developed for ground-based measurements of atmospheric solar absorption spectra in the 8 to 12 microns spectral range. The performance and operating characteristics of this Tunable Infrared Heterodyne Radiometer (TIHR) are discussed along with atmospheric solar absorption spectra of HNO3, O3, CO2, and H2O in the 9 to 11 microns spectral region.

  1. Measurement of electromagnetic fields generated by air traffic control radar systems with spectrum analysers.

    PubMed

    Barellini, A; Bogi, L; Licitra, G; Silvi, A M; Zari, A

    2009-12-01

    Air traffic control (ATC) primary radars are 'classical' radars that use echoes of radiofrequency (RF) pulses from aircraft to determine their position. High-power RF pulses radiated from radar antennas may produce high electromagnetic field levels in the surrounding area. Measurement of electromagnetic fields produced by RF-pulsed radar by means of a swept-tuned spectrum analyser are investigated here. Measurements have been carried out both in the laboratory and in situ on signals generated by an ATC primary radar.

  2. Low Frequency Measurement of the Spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smoot, G. F.; De Amici, G.; Friedman, S. D.; Witebsky, C.; Mandolesi, N.; Partridge, R. B.; Sironi, G.; Danese, L.; De Zotti, G.

    1983-06-01

    We have made measurements of the cosmic background radiation spectrum at 5 wavelengths (0.33, 0.9, 3, 6.3, and 12 cm) using radiometers with wavelength-scaled corrugated horn antennas having very low sidelobes. A single large-mouth (0.7 m diameter) liquid-helium-cooled absolute reference load was used for all five radiometers. The results of the observations are consistent with previous measurements and represent a significant improvement in accuracy.

  3. On the reliable measurement of specific absorption rates and intrinsic loss parameters in magnetic hyperthermia materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildeboer, R. R.; Southern, P.; Pankhurst, Q. A.

    2014-12-01

    In the clinical application of magnetic hyperthermia, the heat generated by magnetic nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field is used as a cancer treatment. The heating ability of the particles is quantified by the specific absorption rate (SAR), an extrinsic parameter based on the clinical response characteristic of power delivered per unit mass, and by the intrinsic loss parameter (ILP), an intrinsic parameter based on the heating capacity of the material. Even though both the SAR and ILP are widely used as comparative design parameters, they are almost always measured in non-adiabatic systems that make accurate measurements difficult. We present here the results of a systematic review of measurement methods for both SAR and ILP, leading to recommendations for a standardised, simple and reliable method for measurements using non-adiabatic systems. In a representative survey of 50 retrieved datasets taken from published papers, the derived SAR or ILP was found to be more than 5% overestimated in 24% of cases and more than 5% underestimated in 52% of cases.

  4. A mid-infrared laser absorption sensor for carbon monoxide and temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderover, Jeremy

    A mid-infrared (mid-IR) absorption sensor based on quantum cascade laser (QCL) technology has been developed and demonstrated for high-temperature thermometry and carbon monoxide (CO) measurements in combustion environments. The sensor probes the high-intensity fundamental CO ro-vibrational band at 4.6 mum enabling sensitive measurement of CO and temperature at kHz acquisition rates. Because the sensor operates in the mid-IR CO fundamental band it is several orders of magnitude more sensitive than most of the previously developed CO combustion sensors which utilized absorption in the near-IR overtone bands and mature traditional telecommunications-based diode lasers. The sensor has been demonstrated and validated under operation in both scanned-wavelength absorption and wavelength-modulation spectroscopy (WMS) modes in room-temperature gas cell and high-temperature shock tube experiments with known and specified gas conditions. The sensor has also been demonstrated for CO and temperature measurements in an atmospheric premixed ethylene/air McKenna burner flat flame for a range of equivalence ratios (phi = 0.7-1.4). Demonstration of the sensor under scanned-wavelength direct absorption operation was performed in a room-temperature gas cell (297 K and 0.001-1 atm) allowing validation of the line strengths and line shapes predicted by the HITRAN 2004 spectroscopic database. Application of the sensor in scanned-wavelength mode, at 1-2 kHz acquisition bandwidths, to specified high-temperature shock-heated gases (950-3400 K, 1 atm) provided validation of the sensor for measurements under the high-temperature conditions found in combustion devices. The scanned-wavelength shock tube measurements yielded temperature determinations that deviated by only +/-1.2% (1-sigma deviation) with the reflected shock temperatures and CO mole fraction determinations that deviated by that specified CO mole fraction by only +/-1.5% (1-sigma deviation). These deviations are in fact smaller

  5. Measuring the molecular second hyperpolarizability in absorptive solutions by the third harmonic generation ratio technique.

    PubMed

    Tokarz, Danielle; Cisek, Richard; Prent, Nicole; Fekl, Ulrich; Barzda, Virginijus

    2012-11-28

    Measurement of the second hyperpolarizability (γ) values of compounds can provide insight into the molecular structural requirements for enhancement of third harmonic generation (THG) signal. A convenient method for measuring the γ of compounds in solutions was developed by implementing the THG ratio method which is based on measuring the THG intensity from two interfaces using a nonlinear optical microscope while accounting for the refractive index of solutions at the fundamental and third harmonic wavelengths. We demonstrated that the difference in refractive index at both wavelengths strongly influenced the calculation of γ values when compounds have absorption near the third harmonic or fundamental wavelength. To this end, a refractometer with the wavelength tuning range from UV to near IR was constructed, and the measured refractive indices were used to extract the γ values. The γ values of carotenoids and chlorophylls found in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes were explored. Large differences in the refractive index at third harmonic and fundamental wavelengths for chlorophylls result in γ values that are more than two orders of magnitude larger than γ values for carotenoids as well as the sign of chlorophylls'γ values is negative while carotenoids have positive γ values. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. In-Line Capacitance Sensor for Real-Time Water Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark A.; Perusich, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    A capacitance/dielectric sensor was designed, constructed, and used to measure in real time the in-situ water concentration in a desiccant water bed. Measurements were carried out with two experimental setups: (1) passing nitrogen through a humidity generator and allowing the gas stream to become saturated at a measured temperature and pressure, and (2) injecting water via a syringe pump into a nitrogen stream. Both water vapor generating devices were attached to a downstream vertically-mounted water capture bed filled with 19.5 g of Moisture Gone desiccant. The sensor consisted of two electrodes: (1) a 1/8" dia stainless steel rod placed in the middle of the bed and (2) the outer shell of the stainless steel bed concentric with the rod. All phases of the water capture process (background, heating, absorption, desorption, and cooling) were monitored with capacitance. The measured capacitance was found to vary linearly with the water content in the bed at frequencies above 100 kHz indicating dipolar motion dominated the signal; below this frequency, ionic motion caused nonlinearities in the water concentration/capacitance relationship. The desiccant exhibited a dielectric relaxation whose activation energy was lowered upon addition of water indicating either a less hindered rotational motion or crystal reorientation.

  7. The enhancement of 21.2%-power conversion efficiency in polymer photovoltaic cells by using mixed Au nanoparticles with a wide absorption spectrum of 400 nm-1000 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jing-Yu; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Yu-Pei; Chen, Shu-Fen; Li, Xing-Ao; Wang, Lian-Hui; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Au nanoparticles (NPs) mixed with a majority of bone-like, rod, and cube shapes and a minority of irregular spheres, which can generate a wide absorption spectrum of 400 nm-1000 nm and three localized surface plasmon resonance peaks, respectively, at 525, 575, and 775 nm, are introduced into the hole extraction layer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) to improve optical-to-electrical conversion performances in polymer photovoltaic cells. With the doping concentration of Au NPs optimized, the cell performance is significantly improved: the short-circuit current density and power conversion efficiency of the poly(3-hexylthiophene): [6,6]-phenyl-C60-butyric acid methyl ester cell are increased by 20.54% and 21.2%, reaching 11.15 mA·cm-2 and 4.23%. The variations of optical, electrical, and morphology with the incorporation of Au NPs in the cells are analyzed in detail, and our results demonstrate that the cell performance improvement can be attributed to a synergistic reaction, including: 1) both the localized surface plasmon resonance- and scattering-induced absorption enhancement of the active layer, 2) Au doping-induced hole transport/extraction ability enhancement, and 3) large interface roughness-induced efficient exciton dissociation and hole collection. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2015CB932202 and 2012CB933301), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274065, 51173081, 61136003, BZ2010043, 51372119, and 51172110), the Science Fund from the Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. IRT1148), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20113223110005), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Provincial Higher Education Institutions (Grant No. YX03001), and the National Synergistic Innovation Center for Advanced Materials and the Synergetic Innovation Center for Organic Electronics and

  8. An Fe XXVI Absorption Line in the Persistent Spectrum of the Dipping Low Mass X-ray Binary 1A 1744-361

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2009-01-01

    We report on Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) spectra of the dipping Low Mass X-ray Binary (LMXB) 1A 1744-361 during its July 2008 outburst. We find that its persistent emission is well modeled by a blackbody (kT approx. 1.0 keV) plus power-law (Gamma approx. 1.7) with an absorption edge at 7.6 keV. In the residuals of the combined spectrum we find a significant absorption line at 6.961+/-0.002 keV, consistent with the Fe XXVI (hydrogen-like Fe) 2 - 1 transition. We place an upper limit on the velocity of a redshifted flow of v < 221 km/s. We find an equivalent width for the line of 27+2/-3 eV, from which we determine a column density of 7+/-1 x 10(exp 17)/sq cm via a curve-of-growth analysis. Using XSTAR simulations, we place a lower limit on the ionization parameter of > 10(exp 3.6) erg cm/s. The properties of this line are consistent with those observed in other dipping LMXBs. Using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data accumulated during this latest outburst we present an updated color-color diagram which clearly shows that IA 1744-361 is an "atoll" source. Finally, using additional dips found in the RXTE and CXO data we provide an updated orbital period estimate of 52+/-5 minutes.

  9. Eddy covariance carbonyl sulfide flux measurements with a quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdel, Katharina; Spielmann, Felix M.; Hammerle, Albin; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant sulfur containing trace gas present in the troposphere at concentrations of around 500 ppt. Recent interest in COS by the ecosystem-physiological community has been sparked by the fact that COS co-diffuses into plant leaves pretty much the same way as carbon dioxide (CO2) does, but in contrast to CO2, COS is not known to be emitted by plants. Thus uptake of COS by vegetation has the potential to be used as a tracer for canopy gross photosynthesis, which cannot be measured directly, however represents a key term in the global carbon cycle. Since a few years, quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometers (QCLAS) are commercially available with the precision, sensitivity and time response suitable for eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements. While there exist a handful of published reports on EC flux measurements in the recent literature, no rigorous investigation of the applicability of QCLAS for EC COS flux measurements has been carried out so far, nor have been EC processing and QA/QC steps developed for carbon dioxide and water vapor flux measurements within FLUXNET been assessed for COS. The aim of this study is to close this knowledge gap, to discuss critical steps in the post-processing chain of COS EC flux measurements and to devise best-practice guidelines for COS EC flux data processing. To this end we collected EC COS (and CO2, H2O and CO) flux measurements above a temperate mountain grassland in Austria over the vegetation period 2015 with a commercially available QCLAS. We discuss various aspects of EC data post-processing, in particular issues with the time-lag estimation between sonic anemometer and QCLAS signals and QCLAS time series detrending, as well as QA/QC, in particular flux detection limits, random flux uncertainty, the interaction of various processing steps with common EC QA/QC filters (e.g. detrending and stationarity tests), u*-filtering, etc.

  10. Measurement of the noise power spectrum in digital x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufrichtig, Richard; Su, Yu; Cheng, Yu; Granfors, Paul R.

    2001-06-01

    The noise power spectrum, NPS, is a key imaging property of a detector and one of the principle quantities needed to compute the detective quantum efficiency. NPS is measured by computing the Fourier transform of flat field images. Different measurement methods are investigated and evaluated with images obtained from an amorphous silicon flat panel x-ray imaging detector. First, the influence of fixed pattern structures is minimized by appropriate background corrections. For a given data set the effect of using different types of windowing functions is studied. Also different window sizes and amounts of overlap between windows are evaluated and compared to theoretical predictions. Results indicate that measurement error is minimized when applying overlapping Hanning windows on the raw data. Finally it is shown that radial averaging is a useful method of reducing the two-dimensional noise power spectrum to one dimension.

  11. Balloon measurements of the energy spectrum of cosmic electrons between 1 and 25 GeV.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, J. A.; Neely, D. E.; Rygg, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    During three balloon flights made in 1966 and 1967, cosmic electrons were investigated with the aid of a hodoscope detector that provided extensive and detailed information on each cosmic-ray event triggering the apparatus. Similar information obtained during calibration exposures to protons and pions as well as to electrons was used to provide identification of cosmic electrons and to determine their energies. Differential primary electron intensities measured in the range from 1 to 25 GeV were substantially larger than some earlier measurements. In conjunction with existing measurements at energies above 100 GeV, this finding indicates that the energy spectrum of cosmic electrons is steeper than that of cosmic-ray nuclei and consequently suggests that Compton/synchrotron energy loss plays a significant role in shaping the electron spectrum.

  12. All-Particle Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum Measured with 26 Icetop Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We report on a measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum with the IceTop air shower array, thesurface component of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The data used in this analysiswere taken between June and October, 2007, with 26 surface stations operational at that time, corresponding to about one third of the final array. The fiducial area used in this analysis was 0.122 square kilometers.The analysis investigated the energy spectrum from 1 to 100 PeV measured for three different zenithangle ranges between 0 and 46. Because of the isotropy of cosmic rays in this energy range the spectrafrom all zenith angle intervals have to agree. The cosmic-ray energy spectrum was determined under differentassumptions on the primary mass composition. Good agreement of spectra in the three zenithangle ranges was found for the assumption of pure proton and a simple two-component model. Forzenith angles theta less than 30 deg., where the mass dependence is smallest, the knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrumwas observed at about 4 PeV, with a spectral index above the knee of about -3.1. Moreover, an indicationof a flattening of the spectrum above 22 PeV was observed.

  13. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: temperature and gravitational lensing power spectrum measurements from three seasons of data

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sudeep; Louis, Thibaut; Calabrese, Erminia

    2014-04-01

    We present the temperature power spectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) derived from the three seasons of data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 GHz and 218 GHz, as well as the cross-frequency spectrum between the two channels. We detect and correct for contamination due to the Galactic cirrus in our equatorial maps. We present the results of a number of tests for possible systematic error and conclude that any effects are not significant compared to the statistical errors we quote. Where they overlap, we cross-correlate the ACT and the South Pole Telescope (SPT) maps and showmore » they are consistent. The measurements of higher-order peaks in the CMB power spectrum provide an additional test of the ΛCDM cosmological model, and help constrain extensions beyond the standard model. The small angular scale power spectrum also provides constraining power on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects and extragalactic foregrounds. We also present a measurement of the CMB gravitational lensing convergence power spectrum at 4.6σ detection significance.« less

  14. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Temperature and Gravitational Lensing Power Spectrum Measurements from Three Seasons of Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Sudeep; Louis, Thibaut; Nolta, Michael R.; Addison, Graeme E.; Battisetti, Elia S.; Bond, J. Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Crichton, Devin; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present the temperature power spectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) derived from the three seasons of data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 GHz and 218 GHz, as well as the cross-frequency spectrum between the two channels. We detect and correct for contamination due to the Galactic cirrus in our equatorial maps. We present the results of a number of tests for possible systematic error and conclude that any effects are not significant compared to the statistical errors we quote. Where they overlap, we cross-correlate the ACT and the South Pole Telescope (SPT) maps and show they are consistent. The measurements of higher-order peaks in the CMB power spectrum provide an additional test of the ?CDM cosmological model, and help constrain extensions beyond the standard model. The small angular scale power spectrum also provides constraining power on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects and extragalactic foregrounds. We also present a measurement of the CMB gravitational lensing convergence power spectrum at 4.6s detection significance.

  15. Calculation of color difference and measurement of the spectrum of aerosol based on human visual system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Mengyan; Liu, Jianghai; Cui, Jianlin; Chen, Chunsheng; Jia, Peng

    2017-10-01

    In order to solve the problem of the quantitative test of spectrum and color of aerosol, the measurement method of spectrum of aerosol based on human visual system was proposed. The spectrum characteristics and color parameters of three different aerosols were tested, and the color differences were calculated according to the CIE1976-L*a*b* color difference formula. Three tested powders (No 1# No 2# and No 3# ) were dispersed in a plexglass box and turned into aerosol. The powder sample was released by an injector with different dosages in each experiment. The spectrum and color of aerosol were measured by the PRO 6500 Fiber Optic Spectrometer. The experimental results showed that the extinction performance of aerosol became stronger and stronger with the increase of concentration of aerosol. While the chromaticity value differences of aerosols in the experiment were so small, luminance was verified to be the main influence factor of human eye visual perception and contributed most in the three factors of the color difference calculation. The extinction effect of No 3# aerosol was the strongest of all and caused the biggest change of luminance and color difference which would arouse the strongest human visual perception. According to the sensation level of chromatic color by Chinese, recognition color difference would be produced when the dosage of No 1# powder was more than 0.10 gram, the dosage of No 2# powder was more than 0.15 gram, and the dosage of No 3# powder was more than 0.05 gram.

  16. Acid effects on the measurement of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Adeloju, S.B.; Mann, T.F.

    1987-07-01

    The influence of nitric, hydrochloric and sulfuric acids on the measurement of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry has been investigated. Small pre-reduction peaks associated with the instability of mercury were observed in solutions containing less than or equal to 12.5, < 2 and less than or equal to 12.5% v/v of each acid, respectively. Mercury was found to be most stable in greater than or equal to 2% v/v hydrochloric acid and the measured absorbance was not greatly influenced by varying concentration of the acid. The mercury absorbance measurements were more sensitive in solutions containing less than ormore » equal to 6.3% v/v hydrochloric acid than in similar concentrations of nitric and sulfuric acids. The use of the three acids as a digestion mixture result in serious interference from nitrogen oxides. The interference was removed by use of expelling agents such as urea and sulfamic acid or overcome by use of excess stannous chloride, prior to the reduction of mercury(II) ions. The determination of mercury in NBS albacore tuna using both of these approaches to overcome the interference problem proved to be successful.« less