Science.gov

Sample records for absorption transmission electron

  1. Minerals discovered in paleolithic black pigments by transmission electron microscopy and micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmin, E.; Vignaud, C.; Salomon, H.; Farges, F.; Susini, J.; Menu, M.

    2006-05-01

    Analysis of archeological materials aims to rediscover the know-how of prehistoric men by determining the nature of the painting matter, its preparation mode, and the geographic origin of its raw materials. The preparation mode of the painting matter of the paleolithic rock art apparently consisted of mixing, grinding, and also heat-treatment. In this study, we focus on black pigments and more particularly manganese oxides. Using the combined approach of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, we analyzed a variety of archeological black painted samples. The studied pigments arise from the caves of Ekain (Basque country, Spain), Labastide and Gargas (Hautes-Pyrénées, France). In addition, a black “crayon” (i.e., a “pen”) from the cave of Combe Saunière (Dordogne, France) was also investigated. From the analysis of these painting matters, several unusual minerals have been identified as black pigment, such as manganite, groutite, todorokite and birnessite. These conclusions enable us to estimate the technical level of paleolithic artists: they didn’t use heat-treatment to prepare black painting matter. Consequently, the unusual mineralogy found in some of these pigments suggests that some of the manganese ores are coming from geological settings that are sometimes relatively far away from the Dordogne and Basque region such as in Ariège (central-oriental Pyrénées).

  2. Transmission Electron Microscopy and Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy Studies on the Bioaccumulation and Tissue Level Absorption of TiO2 Nanoparticles in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Dongwook; Nho, Hyun Woo; Yoon, Tae Hyun

    2015-06-01

    In this study, bioaccumulation and tissue-level absorption of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) in freshwater invertebrates were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The TiO2 NPs were used to test impacts of core sizes (i.e., 5 ± 2 nm and 23 ± 7 nm for TiO2(SYN) and TiO2(P25), respectively) and agglomerations (i.e., well dispersed vs. highly agglomerated) on the uptake of TiO2 NPs in Daphnia magna (D. magna). Highly agglomerated TiO2 NPs, regardless of their core sizes, were heavily taken up into the digestive tract of D. magna and no detectable penetration of both TiO2 NPs into the gut epithelial cells of D. magna was observed in TEM and STXM images. However, significant damages involving morphological changes in the microvilli and gut epithelial cells (e.g., irregular shaped microvilli, epithelial cell protrusion, and dilatation of cytoplasmic inclusion) were observed only with the commercial TiO2 NPs (TiO2(P25)) with larger core size and mixed crystalline phase, while the laboratory synthesized TiO2 NPs (TiO2(Syn)) with smaller core size and single crystalline phase showed slight morphological changes in the gut microvilli and epithelial cells. In the case of D. magna exposed to the well dispersed synthetic TiO2 NP ((Cit)TiO2(Syn)), only a negligible amount of TiO2 NPs were found within the digestive tract of the D. magna without any significant damages in the gut microvilli and epithelial cells and any detectable penetrations of TiO2 NPs into epithelial cells of D. magna gut. These TEM and STXM observations confirmed us that uptake of NP into D. magna are strongly dependent on their agglomeration (i.e., hydrodynamic sizes), rather than their core sizes, while direct penetration of NPs into tissues of digestive tract seems unlikely without significant morphological changes (e.g., collapse of the epithelial tissue) caused by high toxicity of NPs or released metal ions.

  3. Investigation of nanoparticulate silicon as printed layers using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Unuigbe, David M.; Harting, Margit; Jonah, Emmanuel O.; ...

    2017-08-21

    The presence of native oxide on the surface of silicon nanoparticles is known to inhibit charge transport on the surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies reveal that the particles in the printed silicon network have a wide range of sizes and shapes. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the particle surfaces have mainly the (111)- and (100)-oriented planes which stabilizes against further oxidation of the particles. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements at the O 1s-edge have been utilized to study the oxidation and local atomic structure of printed layers of silicon nanoparticles which were milledmore » for different times. XANES results reveal the presence of the +4 (SiO 2) oxidation state which tends towards the +2 (SiO) state for higher milling times. Si 2pXPS results indicate that the surfaces of the silicon nanoparticles in the printed layers are only partially oxidized and that all three sub-oxide, +1 (Si 2O), +2 (SiO) and +3 (Si 2O 3), states are present. The analysis of the change in the sub-oxide peaks of the silicon nanoparticles shows the dominance of the +4 state only for lower milling times.« less

  4. In Situ Industrial Bimetallic Catalyst Characterization using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at One Atmosphere and Elevated Temperature.

    PubMed

    Prestat, Eric; Kulzick, Matthew A; Dietrich, Paul J; Smith, Mr Matthew; Tien, Mr Eu-Pin; Burke, M Grace; Haigh, Sarah J; Zaluzec, Nestor J

    2017-08-18

    We have developed a new experimental platform for in situ scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) which allows real time, nanoscale, elemental and structural changes to be studied at elevated temperature (up to 1000 °C) and pressure (up to 1 atm). Here we demonstrate the first application of this approach to understand complex structural changes occurring during reduction of a bimetallic catalyst, PdCu supported on TiO 2 , synthesized by wet impregnation. We reveal a heterogeneous evolution of nanoparticle size, distribution, and composition with large differences in reduction behavior for the two metals. We show that the data obtained is complementary to in situ STEM electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and when combined with in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) allows correlation of bulk chemical state with nanoscale changes in elemental distribution during reduction, facilitating new understanding of the catalytic behavior for this important class of materials. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  5. Frozen lattice and absorptive model for high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy: A comparison study in terms of integrated intensity and atomic column position measurement.

    PubMed

    Alania, M; Lobato, I; Van Aert, S

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, both the frozen lattice (FL) and the absorptive potential (AP) approximation models are compared in terms of the integrated intensity and the precision with which atomic columns can be located from an image acquired using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The comparison is made for atoms of Cu, Ag, and Au. The integrated intensity is computed for both an isolated atomic column and an atomic column inside an FCC structure. The precision has been computed using the so-called Cramér-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB), which provides a theoretical lower bound on the variance with which parameters can be estimated. It is shown that the AP model results into accurate measurements for the integrated intensity only for small detector ranges under relatively low angles and for small thicknesses. In terms of the attainable precision, both methods show similar results indicating picometer range precision under realistic experimental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Electron Diffraction Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bendersky, Leonid A.; Gayle, Frank W.

    2001-01-01

    Electron diffraction via the transmission electron microscope is a powerful method for characterizing the structure of materials, including perfect crystals and defect structures. The advantages of electron diffraction over other methods, e.g., x-ray or neutron, arise from the extremely short wavelength (≈2 pm), the strong atomic scattering, and the ability to examine tiny volumes of matter (≈10 nm3). The NIST Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory has a history of discovery and characterization of new structures through electron diffraction, alone or in combination with other diffraction methods. This paper provides a survey of some of this work enabled through electron microscopy. PMID:27500060

  7. The extraction of gold nanoparticles from oat and wheat biomasses using sodium citrate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and UV-visible spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Armendariz, Veronica; Parsons, Jason G; Lopez, Martha L; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2009-03-11

    Gold (Au) nanoparticles can be produced through the interaction of Au(III) ions with oat and wheat biomasses. This paper describes a procedure to recover gold nanoparticles from oat and wheat biomasses using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or sodium citrate. Extracts were analyzed using UV-visible spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The HRTEM data demonstrated that smaller nanoparticles are extracted first, followed by larger nanoparticles. In the fourth extraction, coating of chelating agents is visible on the extracted nanoparticles.

  8. Absorption-Edge-Modulated Transmission Spectra for Water Contaminant Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-31

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6390--16-9675 Absorption-Edge-Modulated Transmission Spectra for Water Contaminant ...ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Absorption-Edge-Modulated Transmission Spectra for Water Contaminant Monitoring...Unlimited Unclassified Unlimited 35 Samuel G. Lambrakos (202) 767-2601 Monitoring of contaminants associated with specific water resources using

  9. Electrochemical Dissolution of Iridium and Iridium Oxide Particles in Acidic Media: Transmission Electron Microscopy, Electrochemical Flow Cell Coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Jovanovič, Primož; Hodnik, Nejc; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Arčon, Iztok; Jozinović, Barbara; Zorko, Milena; Bele, Marjan; Šala, Martin; Šelih, Vid Simon; Hočevar, Samo; Gaberšček, Miran

    2017-09-13

    Iridium-based particles, regarded as the most promising proton exchange membrane electrolyzer electrocatalysts, were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and by coupling of an electrochemical flow cell (EFC) with online inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Additionally, studies using a thin-film rotating disc electrode, identical location transmission and scanning electron microscopy, as well as X-ray absorption spectroscopy have been performed. Extremely sensitive online time-and potential-resolved electrochemical dissolution profiles revealed that Ir particles dissolve well below oxygen evolution reaction (OER) potentials, presumably induced by Ir surface oxidation and reduction processes, also referred to as transient dissolution. Overall, thermally prepared rutile-type IrO 2 particles are substantially more stable and less active in comparison to as-prepared metallic and electrochemically pretreated (E-Ir) analogues. Interestingly, under OER-relevant conditions, E-Ir particles exhibit superior stability and activity owing to the altered corrosion mechanism, where the formation of unstable Ir(>IV) species is hindered. Due to the enhanced and lasting OER performance, electrochemically pre-oxidized E-Ir particles may be considered as the electrocatalyst of choice for an improved low-temperature electrochemical hydrogen production device, namely a proton exchange membrane electrolyzer.

  10. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    mode by collecting the EDS and EELS signals point-by-point as one scans the electron probe across the . Examples of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Capabilities Z-contrast image microphoto taken by

  11. Size dependent behavior of Fe 3O 4 crystals during electrochemical (de)lithiation: an in situ X-ray diffraction, ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and theoretical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, David C.; Pelliccione, Christopher J.; Zhang, Wei

    Here, the iron oxide magnetite, Fe 3O 4, is a promising conversion type lithium ion battery anode material due to its high natural abundance, low cost and high theoretical capacity. While the close packing of ions in the inverse spinel structure of Fe 3O 4 enables high energy density, it also limits the kinetics of lithium ion diffusion in the material. Nanosizing of Fe 3O 4 to reduce the diffusion path length is an effective strategy for overcoming this issue and results in improved rate capability. However, the impact of nanosizing on the multiple structural transformations that occur during themore » electrochemical (de)lithiation reaction in Fe 3O 4 is poorly understood. In this study, the influence of crystallite size on the lithiation-conversion mechanisms in Fe 3O 4 is investigated using complementary X-ray techniques along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and continuum level simulations on electrodes of two different Fe 3O 4 crystallite sizes. In situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were utilized to track the changes to the crystalline phases during (de)lithiation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements at multiple points during the (de)lithiation processes provided local electronic and atomic structural information. Tracking the crystalline and nanocrystalline phases during the first (de)lithiation provides experimental evidence that (1) the lithiation mechanism is non-uniform and dependent on crystallite size, where increased Li + diffusion length in larger crystals results in conversion to Fe 0 metal while insertion of Li + into spinel-Fe 3O 4 is still occurring, and (2) the disorder and size of the Fe metal domains formed when either material is fully lithiated impacts the homogeneity of the FeO phase formed during the subsequent delithiation.« less

  12. Size dependent behavior of Fe 3O 4 crystals during electrochemical (de)lithiation: an in situ X-ray diffraction, ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and theoretical investigation

    DOE PAGES

    Bock, David C.; Pelliccione, Christopher J.; Zhang, Wei; ...

    2017-07-17

    Here, the iron oxide magnetite, Fe 3O 4, is a promising conversion type lithium ion battery anode material due to its high natural abundance, low cost and high theoretical capacity. While the close packing of ions in the inverse spinel structure of Fe 3O 4 enables high energy density, it also limits the kinetics of lithium ion diffusion in the material. Nanosizing of Fe 3O 4 to reduce the diffusion path length is an effective strategy for overcoming this issue and results in improved rate capability. However, the impact of nanosizing on the multiple structural transformations that occur during themore » electrochemical (de)lithiation reaction in Fe 3O 4 is poorly understood. In this study, the influence of crystallite size on the lithiation-conversion mechanisms in Fe 3O 4 is investigated using complementary X-ray techniques along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and continuum level simulations on electrodes of two different Fe 3O 4 crystallite sizes. In situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were utilized to track the changes to the crystalline phases during (de)lithiation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements at multiple points during the (de)lithiation processes provided local electronic and atomic structural information. Tracking the crystalline and nanocrystalline phases during the first (de)lithiation provides experimental evidence that (1) the lithiation mechanism is non-uniform and dependent on crystallite size, where increased Li + diffusion length in larger crystals results in conversion to Fe 0 metal while insertion of Li + into spinel-Fe 3O 4 is still occurring, and (2) the disorder and size of the Fe metal domains formed when either material is fully lithiated impacts the homogeneity of the FeO phase formed during the subsequent delithiation.« less

  13. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    DOEpatents

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  14. Transmission electron microscope studies of extraterrestrial materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.

    1995-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray spectrometry and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy are used to analyse carbon in interplanetary dust particles. Optical micrographs are shown depicting cross sections of the dust particles embedded in sulphur. Selected-area electron diffraction patterns are shown. Transmission Electron Microscope specimens of lunar soil were prepared using two methods: ion-milling and ultramicrotomy. A combination of high resolution TEM imaging and electron diffraction is used to characterize the opaque assemblages. The opaque assemblages analyzed in this study are dominated by ilmenite with lesser rutile and spinel exsolutions, and traces of Fe metal.

  15. Transmission/Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy | Materials Science

    Science.gov Websites

    imaging such as high resolution TEM. Transmission electron diffraction patterns help to determine the microstructure of a material and its defects. Phase-contrast imaging or high-resolution (HR) TEM imaging gives high scattering angle can be collected to form high-resolution, chemically sensitive, atomic number (Z

  16. Electron transmission through a steel capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maljković, J. B.; Borka, D.; Ranković, M. Lj.; Marinković, B. P.; Milosavljević, A. R.; Lemell, C.; Tőkési, K.

    2018-05-01

    The transmission of low-energy electrons through a macroscopic steel capillary has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The length of the steel capillary was L = 19.5 mm and the inner diameter was d = 0.9 mm. The kinetic energy distribution of electrons transmitted through the steel capillary was recorded for a tilt angle of ψ = 2.6 ° of the incident electron beam with respect to the capillary axis. Accompanying simulations based on classical transport theory reproduce the experimental data to a high degree of agreement. Transmission for other tilt angles has also been simulated to investigate the influence of the tilt angle on the guiding efficiency.

  17. Management of light absorption in extraordinary optical transmission based ultra-thin-film tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mashooq, Kishwar; Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman, E-mail: anis@eee.buet.ac.bd

    2016-05-21

    Although ultra-thin-film solar cells can be attractive in reducing the cost, they suffer from low absorption as the thickness of the active layer is usually much smaller than the wavelength of incident light. Different nano-photonic techniques, including plasmonic structures, are being explored to increase the light absorption in ultra-thin-film solar cells. More than one layer of active materials with different energy bandgaps can be used in tandem to increase the light absorption as well. However, due to different amount of light absorption in different active layers, photo-generated currents in different active layers will not be the same. The current mismatchmore » between the tandem layers makes them ineffective in increasing the efficiency. In this work, we investigate the light absorption properties of tandem solar cells with two ultra-thin active layers working as two subcells and a metal layer with periodically perforated holes in-between the two subcells. While the metal layer helps to overcome the current mismatch, the periodic holes increase the absorption of incident light by helping extraordinary optical transmission of the incident light from the top to the bottom subcell, and by coupling the incident light to plasmonic and photonic modes within ultra-thin active layers. We extensively study the effects of the geometry of holes in the intermediate metal layer on the light absorption properties of tandem solar cells with ultra-thin active layers. We also study how different metals in the intermediate layer affect the light absorption; how the geometry of holes in the intermediate layer affects the absorption when the active layer materials are changed; and how the intermediate metal layer affects the collection of photo-generated electron-hole pairs at the terminals. We find that in a solar cell with 6,6-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester top subcell and copper indium gallium selenide bottom subcell, if the periodic holes in the metal layer are

  18. Demonstration of transmission high energy electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Merrill, F. E.; Goett, J.; Gibbs, J. W.; ...

    2018-04-06

    High energy electrons have been used to investigate an extension of transmission electron microscopy. This technique, transmission high energy electron microscopy (THEEM), provides two additional capabilities to electron microscopy. First, high energy electrons are more penetrating than low energy electrons, and thus, they are able to image through thicker samples. Second, the accelerating mode of a radio-frequency linear accelerator provides fast exposures, down to 1 ps, which are ideal for flash radiography, making THEEM well suited to study the evolution of fast material processes under dynamic conditions. Lastly, initial investigations with static objects and during material processing have been performedmore » to investigate the capabilities of this technique.« less

  19. Transmission electron microscopy of amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Gras, Sally L; Waddington, Lynne J; Goldie, Kenneth N

    2011-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy of negatively stained and cryo-prepared specimens allows amyloid fibrils to be visualised at high resolution in a dried or a hydrated state, and is an essential method for characterising the morphology of fibrils and pre-fibrillar species. We outline the key steps involved in the preparation and observation of samples using negative staining and cryo-electron preservation. We also discuss methods to measure fibril characteristics, such as fibril width, from electron micrographs.

  20. Microwave reflection, transmission, and absorption by human brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M. A.; Akhlaghipour, N.; Zarei, M.; Niknam, A. R.

    2018-04-01

    These days, the biological effects of electromagnetic (EM) radiations on the brain, especially in the frequency range of mobile communications, have caught the attention of many scientists. Therefore, in this paper, the propagation of mobile phone electromagnetic waves in the brain tissues is investigated analytically and numerically. The brain is modeled by three layers consisting of skull, grey and white matter. First, we have analytically calculated the microwave reflection, transmission, and absorption coefficients using signal flow graph technique. The effect of microwave frequency and variations in the thickness of layers on the propagation of microwave through brain are studied. Then, the penetration of microwave in the layers is numerically investigated by Monte Carlo method. It is shown that the analytical results are in good agreement with those obtained by Monte Carlo method. Our results indicate the absorbed microwave energy depends on microwave frequency and thickness of brain layers, and the absorption coefficient is optimized at a number of frequencies. These findings can be used for comparing the microwave absorbed energy in a child's and adult's brain.

  1. Transmission Electron Microscope Measures Lattice Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, William T.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent-beam microdiffraction (CBM) in thermionic-emission transmission electron microscope (TEM) is technique for measuring lattice parameters of nanometer-sized specimens of crystalline materials. Lattice parameters determined by use of CBM accurate to within few parts in thousand. Technique developed especially for use in quantifying lattice parameters, and thus strains, in epitaxial mismatched-crystal-lattice multilayer structures in multiple-quantum-well and other advanced semiconductor electronic devices. Ability to determine strains in indivdual layers contributes to understanding of novel electronic behaviors of devices.

  2. Ponderomotive phase plate for transmission electron microscopes

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W [Livermore, CA

    2012-07-10

    A ponderomotive phase plate system and method for controllably producing highly tunable phase contrast transfer functions in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for high resolution and biological phase contrast imaging. The system and method includes a laser source and a beam transport system to produce a focused laser crossover as a phase plate, so that a ponderomotive potential of the focused laser crossover produces a scattering-angle-dependent phase shift in the electrons of the post-sample electron beam corresponding to a desired phase contrast transfer function.

  3. Isotope analysis in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Susi, Toma; Hofer, Christoph; Argentero, Giacomo; Leuthner, Gregor T; Pennycook, Timothy J; Mangler, Clemens; Meyer, Jannik C; Kotakoski, Jani

    2016-10-10

    The Ångström-sized probe of the scanning transmission electron microscope can visualize and collect spectra from single atoms. This can unambiguously resolve the chemical structure of materials, but not their isotopic composition. Here we differentiate between two isotopes of the same element by quantifying how likely the energetic imaging electrons are to eject atoms. First, we measure the displacement probability in graphene grown from either 12 C or 13 C and describe the process using a quantum mechanical model of lattice vibrations coupled with density functional theory simulations. We then test our spatial resolution in a mixed sample by ejecting individual atoms from nanoscale areas spanning an interface region that is far from atomically sharp, mapping the isotope concentration with a precision better than 20%. Although we use a scanning instrument, our method may be applicable to any atomic resolution transmission electron microscope and to other low-dimensional materials.

  4. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Minerals and Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren, Alex C.

    1991-04-01

    Of the many techniques that have been applied to the study of crystal defects, none has contributed more to our understanding of their nature and influence on the physical and chemical properties of crystalline materials than transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM is now used extensively by an increasing number of earth scientists for direct observation of defect microstructures in minerals and rocks. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Rocks and Minerals is an introduction to the principles of the technique and is the only book to date on the subject written specifically for geologists and mineralogists. The first part of the book deals with the essential physics of the transmission electron microscope and presents the basic theoretical background required for the interpretation of images and electron diffraction patterns. The final chapters are concerned with specific applications of TEM in mineralogy and deal with such topics as planar defects, intergrowths, radiation-induced defects, dislocations and deformation-induced microstructures. The examples cover a wide range of rock-forming minerals from crustal rocks to those in the lower mantle, and also take into account the role of defects in important mineralogical and geological processes.

  5. Effective absorption correction for energy dispersive X-ray mapping in a scanning transmission electron microscope: analysing the local indium distribution in rough samples of InGaN alloy layers.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Chauvat, M-P; Ruterana, P; Walther, T

    2017-12-01

    We have applied our previous method of self-consistent k*-factors for absorption correction in energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to quantify the indium content in X-ray maps of thick compound InGaN layers. The method allows us to quantify the indium concentration without measuring the sample thickness, density or beam current, and works even if there is a drastic local thickness change due to sample roughness or preferential thinning. The method is shown to select, point-by-point in a two-dimensional spectrum image or map, the k*-factor from the local Ga K/L intensity ratio that is most appropriate for the corresponding sample geometry, demonstrating it is not the sample thickness measured along the electron beam direction but the optical path length the X-rays have to travel through the sample that is relevant for the absorption correction. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Atmospheric pressure scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Niels; Bigelow, Wilbur C; Veith, Gabriel M

    2010-03-10

    Scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images of gold nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure have been recorded through a 0.36 mm thick mixture of CO, O2, and He. This was accomplished using a reaction cell consisting of two electron-transparent silicon nitride membranes. Gold nanoparticles of a full width at half-maximum diameter of 1.0 nm were visible above the background noise, and the achieved edge resolution was 0.4 nm in accordance with calculations of the beam broadening.

  7. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy at High Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wall, J.; Langmore, J.; Isaacson, M.; Crewe, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    We have shown that a scanning transmission electron microscope with a high brightness field emission source is capable of obtaining better than 3 Å resolution using 30 to 40 keV electrons. Elastic dark field images of single atoms of uranium and mercury are shown which demonstrate this fact as determined by a modified Rayleigh criterion. Point-to-point micrograph resolution between 2.5 and 3.0 Å is found in dark field images of micro-crystallites of uranium and thorium compounds. Furthermore, adequate contrast is available to observe single atoms as light as silver. Images PMID:4521050

  8. Phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Hiroki; Tamai, Takayuki; Iijima, Hirofumi; Hosokawa, Fumio; Kondo, Yukihito

    2015-06-01

    This report introduces the first results obtained using phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (P-STEM). A carbon-film phase plate (PP) with a small center hole is placed in the condenser aperture plane so that a phase shift is introduced in the incident electron waves except those passing through the center hole. A cosine-type phase-contrast transfer function emerges when the phase-shifted scattered waves interfere with the non-phase-shifted unscattered waves, which passed through the center hole before incidence onto the specimen. The phase contrast resulting in P-STEM is optically identical to that in phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy that is used to provide high contrast for weak phase objects. Therefore, the use of PPs can enhance the phase contrast of the STEM images of specimens in principle. The phase shift resulting from the PP, whose thickness corresponds to a phase shift of π, has been confirmed using interference fringes displayed in the Ronchigram of a silicon single crystal specimen. The interference fringes were found to abruptly shift at the edge of the PP hole by π. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Kociak, M; Zagonel, L F

    2017-05-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Kociak, M; Zagonel, L F

    2016-12-19

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Simplifying Electron Beam Channeling in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM).

    PubMed

    Wu, Ryan J; Mittal, Anudha; Odlyzko, Michael L; Mkhoyan, K Andre

    2017-08-01

    Sub-angstrom scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows quantitative column-by-column analysis of crystalline specimens via annular dark-field images. The intensity of electrons scattered from a particular location in an atomic column depends on the intensity of the electron probe at that location. Electron beam channeling causes oscillations in the STEM probe intensity during specimen propagation, which leads to differences in the beam intensity incident at different depths. Understanding the parameters that control this complex behavior is critical for interpreting experimental STEM results. In this work, theoretical analysis of the STEM probe intensity reveals that intensity oscillations during specimen propagation are regulated by changes in the beam's angular distribution. Three distinct regimes of channeling behavior are observed: the high-atomic-number (Z) regime, in which atomic scattering leads to significant angular redistribution of the beam; the low-Z regime, in which the probe's initial angular distribution controls intensity oscillations; and the intermediate-Z regime, in which the behavior is mixed. These contrasting regimes are shown to exist for a wide range of probe parameters. These results provide a new understanding of the occurrence and consequences of channeling phenomena and conditions under which their influence is strengthened or weakened by characteristics of the electron probe and sample.

  12. 8 CFR 217.7 - Electronic data transmission requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electronic data transmission requirement... VISA WAIVER PROGRAM § 217.7 Electronic data transmission requirement. (a) An alien who applies for... to submit the required electronic arrival or departure manifests specified in paragraph (a) of this...

  13. 8 CFR 217.7 - Electronic data transmission requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Electronic data transmission requirement... VISA WAIVER PROGRAM § 217.7 Electronic data transmission requirement. (a) An alien who applies for... to submit the required electronic arrival or departure manifests specified in paragraph (a) of this...

  14. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Electronic transmission and receiving system. 400.209... Contract-Standards for Approval § 400.209 Electronic transmission and receiving system. Any Contractor...; (b) Maintain an electronic system which must be tested and approved by the Corporation; (c) Maintain...

  15. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Electronic transmission and receiving system. 400.209... Contract-Standards for Approval § 400.209 Electronic transmission and receiving system. Any Contractor...; (b) Maintain an electronic system which must be tested and approved by the Corporation; (c) Maintain...

  16. 8 CFR 217.7 - Electronic data transmission requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electronic data transmission requirement... VISA WAIVER PROGRAM § 217.7 Electronic data transmission requirement. (a) An alien who applies for... to submit the required electronic arrival or departure manifests specified in paragraph (a) of this...

  17. 8 CFR 217.7 - Electronic data transmission requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Electronic data transmission requirement... VISA WAIVER PROGRAM § 217.7 Electronic data transmission requirement. (a) An alien who applies for... to submit the required electronic arrival or departure manifests specified in paragraph (a) of this...

  18. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic transmission and receiving system. 400.209... Contract-Standards for Approval § 400.209 Electronic transmission and receiving system. Any Contractor...; (b) Maintain an electronic system which must be tested and approved by the Corporation; (c) Maintain...

  19. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electronic transmission and receiving system. 400.209... Contract-Standards for Approval § 400.209 Electronic transmission and receiving system. Any Contractor...; (b) Maintain an electronic system which must be tested and approved by the Corporation; (c) Maintain...

  20. Electron localization and optical absorption of polygonal quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitek, Anna; Serra, Llorenç; Gudmundsson, Vidar; Manolescu, Andrei

    2015-06-01

    We investigate theoretically polygonal quantum rings and focus mostly on the triangular geometry where the corner effects are maximal. Such rings can be seen as short core-shell nanowires, a generation of semiconductor heterostructures with multiple applications. We show how the geometry of the sample determines the electronic energy spectrum, and also the localization of electrons, with effects on the optical absorption. In particular, we show that irrespective of the ring shape low-energy electrons are always attracted by corners and are localized in their vicinity. The absorption spectrum in the presence of a magnetic field shows only two peaks within the corner-localized state domain, each associated with different circular polarization. This picture may be changed by an external electric field which allows previously forbidden transitions, and thus enables the number of corners to be determined. We show that polygonal quantum rings allow absorption of waves from distant ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum within one sample.

  1. Complex band structure and electronic transmission eigenchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Anders; Strange, Mikkel; Smidstrup, Søren; Stokbro, Kurt; Solomon, Gemma C.; Reuter, Matthew G.

    2017-12-01

    It is natural to characterize materials in transport junctions by their conductance length dependence, β. Theoretical estimations of β are made employing two primary theories: complex band structure and density functional theory (DFT) Landauer transport. It has previously been shown that the β value derived from total Landauer transmission can be related to the β value from the smallest |ki| complex band; however, it is an open question whether there is a deeper relationship between the two. Here we probe the details of the relationship between transmission and complex band structure, in this case individual eigenchannel transmissions and different complex bands. We present calculations of decay constants for the two most conductive states as determined by complex band structure and standard DFT Landauer transport calculations for one semi-conductor and two molecular junctions. The molecular junctions show that both the length dependence of the total transmission and the individual transmission eigenvalues can be, almost always, found through the complex band structure. The complex band structure of the semi-conducting material, however, does not predict the length dependence of the total transmission but only of the individual channels, at some k-points, due to multiple channels contributing to transmission. We also observe instances of vertical bands, some of which are the smallest |ki| complex bands, that do not contribute to transport. By understanding the deeper relationship between complex bands and individual transmission eigenchannels, we can make a general statement about when the previously accepted wisdom linking transmission and complex band structure will fail, namely, when multiple channels contribute significantly to the transmission.

  2. Enhancing sound absorption and transmission through flexible multi-layer micro-perforated structures.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Teresa; Maury, Cédric; Pinhède, Cédric

    2013-11-01

    Theoretical and experimental results are presented into the sound absorption and transmission properties of multi-layer structures made up of thin micro-perforated panels (ML-MPPs). The objective is to improve both the absorption and insulation performances of ML-MPPs through impedance boundary optimization. A fully coupled modal formulation is introduced that predicts the effect of the structural resonances onto the normal incidence absorption coefficient and transmission loss of ML-MPPs. This model is assessed against standing wave tube measurements and simulations based on impedance translation method for two double-layer MPP configurations of relevance in building acoustics and aeronautics. Optimal impedance relationships are proposed that ensure simultaneous maximization of both the absorption and the transmission loss under normal incidence. Exhaustive optimization of the double-layer MPPs is performed to assess the absorption and/or transmission performances with respect to the impedance criterion. It is investigated how the panel volumetric resonances modify the excess dissipation that can be achieved from non-modal optimization of ML-MPPs.

  3. Transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging of electropolished and FIB manufactured TEM specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Zieliński, W., E-mail: wiziel@inmat.pw.edu.pl; Płociński, T.; Kurzydłowski, K.J.

    2015-06-15

    We present a study of the efficiency of the utility of scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based transmission methods for characterizing grain structure in thinned bulk metals. Foils of type 316 stainless steel were prepared by two methods commonly used for transmission electron microscopy — double-jet electropolishing and focused ion beam milling. A customized holder allowed positioning of the foils in a configuration appropriate for both transmission electron forward scatter diffraction, and for transmission imaging by the use of a forescatter detector with two diodes. We found that both crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field transmitted images could be obtained for specimens preparedmore » by either method. However, for both methods, preparation-induced artifacts may affect the quality or accuracy of transmission SEM data, especially those acquired by the use of transmission Kikuchi diffraction. Generally, the quality of orientation data was better for specimens prepared by electropolishing, due to the absence of ion-induced damage. - Highlights: • The transmission imaging and diffraction techniques are emerging in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as promising new field of materials characterization. • The manuscript titled: “Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction and Transmission Electron Forescatter Imaging of Electropolished and FIB Manufactured TEM Specimens” documents how different specimen thinning procedures can effect efficiency of transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging. • The abilities to make precision crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field images in transmission was studied on electropolished versus focus ion beam manufactured TEM specimens. • Depending on the need, electropolished and focused ion beam technique may produce suitable specimens for transmission imaging and diffraction in SEM.« less

  4. Acoustic contributions of a sound absorbing blanket placed in a double panel structure: absorption versus transmission.

    PubMed

    Doutres, Olivier; Atalla, Noureddine

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to propose a simple tool to estimate the absorption vs. transmission loss contributions of a multilayered blanket unbounded in a double panel structure and thus guide its optimization. The normal incidence airborne sound transmission loss of the double panel structure, without structure-borne connections, is written in terms of three main contributions; (i) sound transmission loss of the panels, (ii) sound transmission loss of the blanket and (iii) sound absorption due to multiple reflections inside the cavity. The method is applied to four different blankets frequently used in automotive and aeronautic applications: a non-symmetric multilayer made of a screen in sandwich between two porous layers and three symmetric porous layers having different pore geometries. It is shown that the absorption behavior of the blanket controls the acoustic behavior of the treatment at low and medium frequencies and its transmission loss at high frequencies. Acoustic treatment having poor sound absorption behavior can affect the performance of the double panel structure.

  5. Determination of absorption coefficient of nanofluids with unknown refractive index from reflection and transmission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joong Bae; Lee, Seungyoon; Lee, Kyungeun; Lee, Ikjin; Lee, Bong Jae

    2018-07-01

    It has been shown that the absorption coefficient of a nanofluid can be actively tuned by changing material, size, shape, and concentration of the nanoparticle suspension. In applications of engineered nanofluids for the direct absorption of solar radiation, it is important to experimentally characterize the absorption coefficient of nanofluids in the solar spectrum. If the refractive index of the base fluid (i.e., the solution without nanoparticles) is known a priori, the absorption coefficient of nanofluids can be easily determined from the transmission spectrum. However, if the refractive index of the base fluid is not known, it is not straightforward to extract the absorption coefficient solely from the transmission spectrum. The present work aims to develop an analytical method of determining the absorption coefficient of nanofluids with unknown refractive index by measuring both reflection and transmission spectra. The proposed method will be validated with deionized water, and the effect of measurement uncertainty will be carefully examined. Finally, the general applicability of the proposed method will also be demonstrated for Therminol VP-1 as well as the Therminol VP-1 - graphite nanofluid.

  6. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Itokawa Regolith Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In a remarkable engineering achievement, the JAXA space agency successfully recovered the Hayabusa space-craft in June 2010, following a non-optimal encounter and sur-face sampling mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa. These are the first direct samples ever obtained and returned from the surface of an asteroid. The Hayabusa samples thus present a special op-portunity to directly investigate the evolution of asteroidal sur-faces, from the development of the regolith to the study of the effects of space weathering. Here we report on our preliminary TEM measurements on two Itokawa samples. Methods: We were allocated particles RA-QD02-0125 and RA-QD02-0211. Both particles were embedded in low viscosity epoxy and thin sections were prepared using ultramicrotomy. High resolution images and electron diffraction data were ob-tained using a JEOL 2500SE 200 kV field-emission scanning-transmission electron microscope. Quantitative maps and anal-yses were obtained using a Thermo thin-window energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectrometer. Results: Both particles are olivine-rich (Fo70) with µm-sized inclusions of FeS and have microstructurally complex rims. Par-ticle RA-QD02-0125 is rounded and has numerous sub-µm grains attached to its surface including FeS, albite, olivine, and rare melt droplets. Solar flare tracks have not been observed, but the particle is surrounded by a continuous 50 nm thick, stuctur-ally disordered rim that is compositionally similar to the core of the grain. One of the surface adhering grains is pyrrhotite show-ing a S-depleted rim (8-10 nm thick) with nanophase Fe metal grains (<5 nm) decorating the outermost surface. The pyrrhotite displays a complex superstructure in its core that is absent in the S-depleted rim. Particle RA-QD02-0211 contains solar flare particle tracks (2x109 cm-2) and shows a structurally disordered rim 100 nm thick. The track density corresponds to a surface exposure of 103-104 years based on the track production rate

  7. Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.

    Electronic and nanostructured materials have been investigated using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques. The first topic is the microstructure of Ga and Sb-doped ZnO. Ga-doped ZnO is a candidate transparent conducting oxide material. The microstructure of GZO thin films grown by MBE under different growth conditions and different substrates were examined using various electron microscopy (EM) techniques. The microstructure, prevalent defects, and polarity in these films strongly depend on the growth conditions and substrate. Sb-doped ZnO nanowires have been shown to be the first route to stable p-type ZnO. Using Z-contrast STEM, I have showed that an unusual microstructure of Sb-decorated head-to-head inversion domain boundaries and internal voids contain all the Sb in the nanowires and cause the p-type conduction. InGaN thin films and InGaN / GaN quantum wells (QW) for light emitting diodes are the second topic. Low-dose Z-contrast STEM, PACBED, and EDS on InGaN QW LED structures grown by MOCVD show no evidence for nanoscale composition variations, contradicting previous reports. In addition, a new extended defect in GaN and InGaN was discovered. The defect consists of a faceted pyramid-shaped void that produces a threading dislocation along the [0001] growth direction, and is likely caused by carbon contamination during growth. Non-rigid registration (NRR) and high-precision STEM of nanoparticles is the final topic. NRR is a new image processing technique that corrects distortions arising from the serial nature of STEM acquisition that previously limited the precision of locating atomic columns and counting the number of atoms in images. NRR was used to demonstrate sub-picometer precision in STEM images of single crystal Si and GaN, the best achieved in EM. NRR was used to measure the atomic surface structure of Pt nanoacatalysts and Au nanoparticles, which revealed new bond length variation phenomenon of surface atoms. In

  8. Integration of transmissible organic electronic devices for sensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Hoi Lam; Wang, Xizu; Zhu, Furong

    2013-09-01

    A high performance proximity sensor that integrates a front semitransparent organic photodiode (OPD) and an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) is demonstrated. A 0.3-nm-thick plasma-polymerized fluorocarbon film (CFX)-modified thin silver interlayer, serving simultaneously as a semitransparent cathode for the OPD and an anode for OLED, is used to vertically connect the functional organic electronic components. A microcavity OLED is formed between a semitransparent Ag/CFX interlayer and the rear Al cathode enhancing the forward electroluminescence emission in the integrated device. The semitransparent-OPD/OLED stack is designed using an optical admittance analysis method. In the integrated sensor, the front semitransparent OPD component enables a high transmission of light emitted by the integrated OLED unit and a high absorption when light is reflected from objects, thereby to increase the signal/noise ratio. The design and fabrication flexibility of an integrated semitransparent-OPD/OLED device also has cost benefit, making it possible for application in organic proximity sensors.

  9. Multi-pass transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Juffmann, Thomas; Koppell, Stewart A.; Klopfer, Brannon B.; ...

    2017-05-10

    Feynman once asked physicists to build better electron microscopes to be able to watch biology at work. While electron microscopes can now provide atomic resolution, electron beam induced specimen damage precludes high resolution imaging of sensitive materials, such as single proteins or polymers. Here, we use simulations to show that an electron microscope based on a multi-pass measurement protocol enables imaging of single proteins, without averaging structures over multiple images. While we demonstrate the method for particular imaging targets, the approach is broadly applicable and is expected to improve resolution and sensitivity for a range of electron microscopy imaging modalities,more » including, for example, scanning and spectroscopic techniques. The approach implements a quantum mechanically optimal strategy which under idealized conditions can be considered interaction-free.« less

  10. Two-Photon Absorption of Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Radiation by Graphite Near the Carbon K-Absorption Edge

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Steven T; Lam, Royce K.; Raj, Sumana L.

    We have examined the transmission of soft X-ray pulses from the FERMI free electron laser through carbon films of varying thickness, quantifying nonlinear effects of pulses above and below the carbon K-edge. At typical of soft X-ray free electron laser intensities, pulses exhibit linear absorption at photon energies above and below the K-edge, ~308 and ~260 eV, respectively; whereas two-photon absorption becomes significant slightly below the K-edge, ~284.2 eV. The measured two-photon absorption cross section at 284.18 eV (~6 x 10-48 cm4 s) is 7 orders of magnitude above what is expected from a simple theory based on hydrogen-like atomsmore » - a result of resonance effects.« less

  11. Two-photon absorption of soft X-ray free electron laser radiation by graphite near the carbon K-absorption edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Royce K.; Raj, Sumana L.; Pascal, Tod A.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Foglia, Laura; Simoncig, Alberto; Fabris, Nicola; Miotti, Paolo; Hull, Christopher J.; Rizzuto, Anthony M.; Smith, Jacob W.; Mincigrucci, Riccardo; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Gessini, Alessandro; De Ninno, Giovanni; Diviacco, Bruno; Roussel, Eleonore; Spampinati, Simone; Penco, Giuseppe; Di Mitri, Simone; Trovò, Mauro; Danailov, Miltcho B.; Christensen, Steven T.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Coreno, Marcello; Poletto, Luca; Drisdell, Walter S.; Prendergast, David; Giannessi, Luca; Principi, Emiliano; Nordlund, Dennis; Saykally, Richard J.; Schwartz, Craig P.

    2018-07-01

    We have examined the transmission of soft X-ray pulses from the FERMI free electron laser through carbon films of varying thickness, quantifying nonlinear effects of pulses above and below the carbon K-edge. At typical of soft X-ray free electron laser intensities, pulses exhibit linear absorption at photon energies above and below the K-edge, ∼308 and ∼260 eV, respectively; whereas two-photon absorption becomes significant slightly below the K-edge, ∼284.2 eV. The measured two-photon absorption cross section at 284.18 eV (∼6 × 10-48 cm4 s) is 7 orders of magnitude above what is expected from a simple theory based on hydrogen-like atoms - a result of resonance effects.

  12. NASA three-laser airborne differential absorption lidar system electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. J.; Copeland, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The system control and signal conditioning electronics of the NASA three laser airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system are described. The multipurpose DIAL system was developed for the remote measurement of gas and aerosol profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. A brief description and photographs of the majority of electronics units developed under this contract are presented. The precision control system; which includes a master control unit, three combined NASA laser control interface/quantel control units, and three noise pulse discriminator/pockels cell pulser units; is described in detail. The need and design considerations for precision timing and control are discussed. Calibration procedures are included.

  13. Electron transmission through a class of anthracene aldehyde molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Petreska, Irina, E-mail: irina.petreska@pmf.ukim.mk; Ohanesjan, Vladimir, E-mail: ohanesjan.vladimir@gmail.com; Pejov, Ljupco, E-mail: ljupcop@pmf.ukim.mk

    2016-03-25

    Transmission of electrons via metal-molecule-metal junctions, involving rotor-stator anthracene aldehyde molecules is investigated. Two model barriers having input parameters evaluated from accurate ab initio calculations are proposed and the transmission coefficients are obtained by using the quasiclassical approximation. Transmission coefficients further enter in the integral for the net current, utilizing Simmons’ method. Conformational dependence of the tunneling processes is evident and the presence of the side groups enhances the functionality of the future single-molecule based electronic devices.

  14. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Rainbow-trapping absorbers: Broadband, perfect and asymmetric sound absorption by subwavelength panels for transmission problems.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Noé; Romero-García, Vicent; Pagneux, Vincent; Groby, Jean-Philippe

    2017-10-19

    Perfect, broadband and asymmetric sound absorption is theoretically, numerically and experimentally reported by using subwavelength thickness panels in a transmission problem. The panels are composed of a periodic array of varying crosssection waveguides, each of them being loaded by Helmholtz resonators (HRs) with graded dimensions. The low cut-off frequency of the absorption band is fixed by the resonance frequency of the deepest HR, that reduces drastically the transmission. The preceding HR is designed with a slightly higher resonance frequency with a geometry that allows the impedance matching to the surrounding medium. Therefore, reflection vanishes and the structure is critically coupled. This results in perfect sound absorption at a single frequency. We report perfect absorption at 300 Hz for a structure whose thickness is 40 times smaller than the wavelength. Moreover, this process is repeated by adding HRs to the waveguide, each of them with a higher resonance frequency than the preceding one. Using this frequency cascade effect, we report quasi-perfect sound absorption over almost two frequency octaves ranging from 300 to 1000 Hz for a panel composed of 9 resonators with a total thickness of 11 cm, i.e., 10 times smaller than the wavelength at 300 Hz.

  16. Absorption, Transmission and Amplification in a Double-Cavity Optomechanical System with Coulomb-Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, H.; Liu, H. D.

    2018-04-01

    We explore three interesting phenomena in a double-cavity optomechanical system: coherent perfect absorption, coherent perfect transmission and output signal amplification, and find that these phenomena can be realized and controlled by the coulomb-interaction between the dissipative oscillator locates in the cavity and the gain oscillator locates outside. They originate from the efficient hybrid coupling of optical and mechanical modes, and can be used for realizing novel photonic devices in quantum information networks.

  17. Transmission Loss and Absorption of Corrugated Core Sandwich Panels With Embedded Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Albert R.; Schiller, Noah H.; Zalewski, Bart F.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of embedded resonators on the diffuse field sound transmission loss and absorption of composite corrugated core sandwich panels has been evaluated experimentally. Two 1.219 m × 2.438 m panels with embedded resonator arrangements targeting frequencies near 100 Hz were evaluated using non-standard processing of ASTM E90-09 acoustic transmission loss and ASTM C423-09a room absorption test measurements. Each panel is comprised of two composite face sheets sandwiching a corrugated core with a trapezoidal cross section. When inlet openings are introduced in one face sheet, the chambers within the core can be used as embedded acoustic resonators. Changes to the inlet and chamber partition locations allow this type of structure to be tuned for targeted spectrum passive noise control. Because the core chambers are aligned with the plane of the panel, the resonators can be tuned for low frequencies without compromising the sandwich panel construction, which is typically sized to meet static load requirements. Absorption and transmission loss performance improvements attributed to opening the inlets were apparent for some configurations and inconclusive for others.

  18. Sodium Absorption from the Exoplanetary Atmosphere of HD 189733b Detected in the Optical Transmission Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, Seth; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; Koesterke, Lars

    2008-01-01

    We present the first ground-based detection of sodium absorption in the transmission spectrum of an extrasolar planet. Absorption due to the atmosphere of the extrasolar planet HD 189733b is detected in both lines of the Na I doublet. High spectral resolution observations were taken of 11 transits with the High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS) on the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). The Na I absorption in the transmission spectrum due to HD 189733b is (- 67.2 +/- 20.7) × 10-5 deeper in the "narrow" spectral band that encompasses both lines relative to adjacent bands. The 1 σ error includes both random and systematic errors, and the detection is >3 σ. This amount of relative absorption in Na I for HD 189733b is ~3 times larger than that detected for HD 209458b by Charbonneau et al. (2002) and indicates that these two hot Jupiters may have significantly different atmospheric properties. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  19. Analysis on electronic control unit of continuously variable transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuanggui

    Continuously variable transmission system can ensure that the engine work along the line of best fuel economy, improve fuel economy, save fuel and reduce harmful gas emissions. At the same time, continuously variable transmission allows the vehicle speed is more smooth and improves the ride comfort. Although the CVT technology has made great development, but there are many shortcomings in the CVT. The CVT system of ordinary vehicles now is still low efficiency, poor starting performance, low transmission power, and is not ideal controlling, high cost and other issues. Therefore, many scholars began to study some new type of continuously variable transmission. The transmission system with electronic systems control can achieve automatic control of power transmission, give full play to the characteristics of the engine to achieve optimal control of powertrain, so the vehicle is always traveling around the best condition. Electronic control unit is composed of the core processor, input and output circuit module and other auxiliary circuit module. Input module collects and process many signals sent by sensor and , such as throttle angle, brake signals, engine speed signal, speed signal of input and output shaft of transmission, manual shift signals, mode selection signals, gear position signal and the speed ratio signal, so as to provide its corresponding processing for the controller core.

  20. Absorption effects in electron-sulfur-dioxide collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, L. E.; Sugohara, R. T.; Santos, A. S. dos

    2011-09-15

    A joint experimental-theoretical study on electron-SO{sub 2} collisions in the low and intermediate energy range is reported. More specifically, experimental elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections in absolute scale are measured in the 100-1000 eV energy range using the relative-flow technique. Calculated elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections as well as grand-total and total absorption cross sections are also presented in the 1-1000 eV energy range. A complex optical potential is used to represent the electron-molecule interaction dynamics, whereas the Schwinger variational iterative method combined with the distorted-wave approximation is used to solve the scattering equations.more » Comparison of the present results is made with the theoretical and experimental results available in the literature.« less

  1. Cryo-scanning transmission electron tomography of vitrified cells.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Sharon Grayer; Houben, Lothar; Elbaum, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) of fully hydrated, vitrified biological specimens has emerged as a vital tool for biological research. For cellular studies, the conventional imaging modality of transmission electron microscopy places stringent constraints on sample thickness because of its dependence on phase coherence for contrast generation. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using scanning transmission electron microscopy for cryo-tomography of unstained vitrified specimens (CSTET). We compare CSTET and CET for the imaging of whole bacteria and human tissue culture cells, finding favorable contrast and detail in the CSTET reconstructions. Particularly at high sample tilts, the CSTET signals contain more informative data than energy-filtered CET phase contrast images, resulting in improved depth resolution. Careful control over dose delivery permits relatively high cumulative exposures before the onset of observable beam damage. The increase in acceptable specimen thickness broadens the applicability of electron cryo-tomography.

  2. Nanowire growth kinetics in aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chou, Yi -Chia; Panciera, Federico; Reuter, Mark C.; ...

    2016-03-15

    Here, we visualize atomic level dynamics during Si nanowire growth using aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy, and compare with lower pressure results from ultra-high vacuum microscopy. We discuss the importance of higher pressure observations for understanding growth mechanisms and describe protocols to minimize effects of the higher pressure background gas.

  3. 8 CFR 217.7 - Electronic data transmission requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... VISA WAIVER PROGRAM § 217.7 Electronic data transmission requirement. (a) An alien who applies for... will not be admitted under the Visa Waiver Program unless an appropriate official of the carrier... departure from the United States by sea or air of an alien admitted under the Visa Waiver Program, an...

  4. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Two-photon absorption measurements of deep UV transmissible materials at 213 nm

    DOE PAGES

    Patankar, S.; Yang, S. T.; Moody, J. D.; ...

    2017-09-19

    We report on two photon absorption measurements at 213nm of deep UV transmissible media including LiF, MgF 2, CaF 2, BaF 2, Sapphire (Al 2O 3) and high purity grades of fused-silica (SiO 2). A high stability 24ps Nd:YAG laser operating at the 5th harmonic (213nm) was used to generate a high intensity, long Rayleigh length Gaussian focus inside the samples. The measurements of the Fluoride crystals and Sapphire indicate two photon absorption coefficients between 0.004 and 0.82 cm/GW. We find that different grades of fused silica performed near identically for two photon absorption, however, there are differences in linearmore » losses associated with purity. A low two photon absorption cross section is measured for MgF 2 making it an ideal material for the propagation of high intensity deep UV lasers.« less

  6. Two-photon absorption measurements of deep UV transmissible materials at 213 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Patankar, S.; Yang, S. T.; Moody, J. D.

    We report on two photon absorption measurements at 213nm of deep UV transmissible media including LiF, MgF 2, CaF 2, BaF 2, Sapphire (Al 2O 3) and high purity grades of fused-silica (SiO 2). A high stability 24ps Nd:YAG laser operating at the 5th harmonic (213nm) was used to generate a high intensity, long Rayleigh length Gaussian focus inside the samples. The measurements of the Fluoride crystals and Sapphire indicate two photon absorption coefficients between 0.004 and 0.82 cm/GW. We find that different grades of fused silica performed near identically for two photon absorption, however, there are differences in linearmore » losses associated with purity. A low two photon absorption cross section is measured for MgF 2 making it an ideal material for the propagation of high intensity deep UV lasers.« less

  7. Two-photon absorption measurements of deep UV transmissible materials at 213  nm.

    PubMed

    Patankar, S; Yang, S T; Moody, J D; Swadling, G F; Erlandson, A C; Bayramian, A J; Barker, D; Datte, P; Acree, R L; Pepmeier, B; Madden, R E; Borden, M R; Ross, J S

    2017-10-20

    We report on two-photon absorption measurements at 213 nm of deep UV transmissible media, including LiF, MgF 2 , CaF 2 , BaF 2 , sapphire (Al 2 O 3 ), and high-purity grades of fused-silica (SiO 2 ). A high-stability 24 ps Nd:YAG laser operating at the 5th harmonic (213 nm) was used to generate a high-intensity, long-Rayleigh-length Gaussian focus inside the samples. The measurements of the fluoride crystals and sapphire indicate two-photon absorption coefficients between 0.004 and 0.82 cm/GW. We find that different grades of fused silica performed near identically for two-photon absorption; however, there are differences in linear losses associated with purity. A low two-photon absorption cross section is measured for MgF 2 , making it an ideal material for the propagation of high-intensity deep UV lasers.

  8. Writing silica structures in liquid with scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    van de Put, Marcel W P; Carcouët, Camille C M C; Bomans, Paul H H; Friedrich, Heiner; de Jonge, Niels; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2015-02-04

    Silica nanoparticles are imaged in solution with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using a liquid cell with silicon nitride (SiN) membrane windows. The STEM images reveal that silica structures are deposited in well-defined patches on the upper SiN membranes upon electron beam irradiation. The thickness of the deposits is linear with the applied electron dose. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrate that the deposited patches are a result of the merging of the original 20 nm-diameter nanoparticles, and that the related surface roughness depends on the electron dose rate used. Using this approach, sub-micrometer scale structures are written on the SiN in liquid by controlling the electron exposure as function of the lateral position. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  10. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-08-27

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  11. Transmission and Absorption Coefficients for Ocular Media of the Rhesus Monkey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    Report SAM-TR.78-32 @LEVtt ^ \\ TRANSMISSION AND ABSORPTION COEFFICIENTS FOR OGVLAR MEDIA OF THE RHESUS MONKEY 30 JO \\ Edward F. Maher... MONKEY 5. I il | ||| MhlHWr W PI liriTl i I III I 5" . Final Report ""■"’ 15 Sep 74 - 15 Sep 76 6 «HFORMtMO OHG REPORT KUMBE...for these calculations were performed spectrophotometrically using freshly enucleated rhesus monkey eyes and narrow-bandwidth radiation. Much of the

  12. Transmission of electrons inside the cryogenic pumps of ITER injector

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, P., E-mail: pierluigi.veltri@igi.cnr.it; Sartori, E.

    2016-02-15

    Large cryogenic pumps are installed in the vessel of large neutral beam injectors (NBIs) used to heat the plasma in nuclear fusion experiments. The operation of such pumps can be compromised by the presence of stray secondary electrons that are generated along the beam path. In this paper, we present a numerical model to analyze the propagation of the electrons inside the pump. The aim of the study is to quantify the power load on the active pump elements, via evaluation of the transmission probabilities across the domain of the pump. These are obtained starting from large datasets of particlemore » trajectories, obtained by numerical means. The transmission probability of the electrons across the domain is calculated for the NBI of the ITER and for its prototype Megavolt ITer Injector and Concept Advancement (MITICA) and the results are discussed.« less

  13. Transmission of electrons inside the cryogenic pumps of ITER injector.

    PubMed

    Veltri, P; Sartori, E

    2016-02-01

    Large cryogenic pumps are installed in the vessel of large neutral beam injectors (NBIs) used to heat the plasma in nuclear fusion experiments. The operation of such pumps can be compromised by the presence of stray secondary electrons that are generated along the beam path. In this paper, we present a numerical model to analyze the propagation of the electrons inside the pump. The aim of the study is to quantify the power load on the active pump elements, via evaluation of the transmission probabilities across the domain of the pump. These are obtained starting from large datasets of particle trajectories, obtained by numerical means. The transmission probability of the electrons across the domain is calculated for the NBI of the ITER and for its prototype Megavolt ITer Injector and Concept Advancement (MITICA) and the results are discussed.

  14. Transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with scintillation gaseous detection device.

    PubMed

    Danilatos, Gerasimos; Kollia, Mary; Dracopoulos, Vassileios

    2015-03-01

    A transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with use of a scintillation gaseous detection device has been implemented. This corresponds to a transmission scanning electron microscope but with addition of a gaseous environment acting both as environmental and detection medium. A commercial type of low vacuum machine has been employed together with appropriate modifications to the detection configuration. This involves controlled screening of various emitted signals in conjunction with a scintillation gaseous detection device already provided with the machine for regular surface imaging. Dark field and bright field imaging has been obtained along with other detection conditions. With a progressive series of modifications and tests, the theory and practice of a novel type of microscopy is briefly shown now ushering further significant improvements and developments in electron microscopy as a whole. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Multilayer thin film design for far ultraviolet polarizers using an induced transmission and absorption technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jongmin; Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    An explanation of induced transmission for spectral regions excluding the far ultraviolet (FUV) is given to better understand how induced transmission and absorption can be used to design effective polarizers in the FUV spectral region. We achieve high s-polarization reflectance and a high degree of polarization (P equals (Rs-Rp)/(Rs+Rp)) by means of a MgF2/Al/MgF2 three layer structure on an opaque thick film of Al as the substrate. For example, our polarizer designed for the Lyman-alpha line (lambda equals 121.6 nm) has 87.95 percent reflectance for the s-polarization case and 0.43 percent for the p-polarization case, with a degree of polarization of 99.03 percent. If a double reflection polarizer is made with this design, it will have a degree of polarization of 99.99 percent and s-polarization throughput of 77.35 percent.

  16. Electronic Biometric Transmission Specification. Version 1.2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-08

    Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Electronic Biometric Transmission Specification DIN: DOD_BTF_TS_EBTS_ Nov06_01.02.00 i Revision History Revision...contains: • the ORI • a Greenwich Mean (a.k.a. Zulu or UTC) date/time stamp • a code for the software used at the point of collection/transmission...long names and would generally include the tribe name. Subfield 1 Item 1 Character Type AS Characters 1 to 50 Special Characters: Any 7-bit non

  17. Signs of strong Na and K absorption in the transmission spectrum of WASP-103b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendl, M.; Cubillos, P. E.; Hagelberg, J.; Müller, A.; Juvan, I.; Fossati, L.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Transmission spectroscopy has become a prominent tool for characterizing the atmospheric properties on close-in transiting planets. Recent observations have revealed a remarkable diversity in exoplanet spectra, which show absorption signatures of Na, K and H2O, in some cases partially or fully attenuated by atmospheric aerosols. Aerosols (clouds and hazes) themselves have been detected in the transmission spectra of several planets thanks to wavelength-dependent slopes caused by the particles' scattering properties. Aims: We present an optical 550-960 nm transmission spectrum of the extremely irradiated hot Jupiter WASP-103b, one of the hottest (2500 K) and most massive (1.5 MJ) planets yet to be studied with this technique. WASP-103b orbits its star at a separation of less than 1.2 times the Roche limit and is predicted to be strongly tidally distorted. Methods: We have used Gemini/GMOS to obtain multi-object spectroscopy throughout three transits of WASP-103b. We used relative spectrophotometry and bin sizes between 20 and 2 nm to infer the planet's transmission spectrum. Results: We find that WASP-103b shows increased absorption in the cores of the alkali (Na, K) line features. We do not confirm the presence of any strong scattering slope as previously suggested, pointing towards a clear atmosphere for the highly irradiated, massive exoplanet WASP-103b. We constrain the upper boundary of any potential cloud deck to reside at pressure levels above 0.01 bar. This finding is in line with previous studies on cloud occurrence on exoplanets which find that clouds dominate the transmission spectra of cool, low surface gravity planets while hot, high surface gravity planets are either cloud-free, or possess clouds located below the altitudes probed by transmission spectra. The spectrophotometric time series data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  18. Secondary electron imaging of monolayer materials inside a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Cretu, Ovidiu, E-mail: cretu.ovidiu@nims.go.jp; Lin, Yung-Chang; Suenaga, Kazutomo

    2015-08-10

    A scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a backscattered and secondary electron detector is shown capable to image graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers. Secondary electron contrasts of the two lightest monolayer materials are clearly distinguished from the vacuum level. A signal difference between these two materials is attributed to electronic structure differences, which will influence the escape probabilities of the secondary electrons. Our results show that the secondary electron signal can be used to distinguish between the electronic structures of materials with atomic layer sensitivity, enhancing its applicability as a complementary signal in the analytical microscope.

  19. Dynamical tuning between nearly perfect reflection, absorption, and transmission of light via graphene/dielectric structures

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Jacob; Halterman, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Exerting well-defined control over the reflection (R), absorption (A), and transmission (T) of electromagnetic waves is a key objective in quantum optics. To this end, one often utilizes hybrid structures comprised of elements with different optical properties in order to achieve features such as high R or high A for incident light. A desirable goal would be the possibility to tune between all three regimes of nearly perfect reflection, absorption, and transmission within the same device, thus swapping between the cases R → 1, A → 1, and T → 1 dynamically. We here show that a dielectric interfaced with a graphene layer on each side allows for precisely this: by tuning only the Fermi level of graphene, all three regimes can be reached in the THz regime and below. Moreover, we show that the inclusion of cylindrical defects in the system offers a different type of control of the scattering of electromagnetic waves by means of the graphene layers. PMID:27917886

  20. Software electron counting for low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mittelberger, Andreas; Kramberger, Christian; Meyer, Jannik C

    2018-05-01

    The performance of the detector is of key importance for low-dose imaging in transmission electron microscopy, and counting every single electron can be considered as the ultimate goal. In scanning transmission electron microscopy, low-dose imaging can be realized by very fast scanning, however, this also introduces artifacts and a loss of resolution in the scan direction. We have developed a software approach to correct for artifacts introduced by fast scans, making use of a scintillator and photomultiplier response that extends over several pixels. The parameters for this correction can be directly extracted from the raw image. Finally, the images can be converted into electron counts. This approach enables low-dose imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope via high scan speeds while retaining the image quality of artifact-free slower scans. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A fast image simulation algorithm for scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ophus, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Image simulation for scanning transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution for samples with realistic dimensions can require very large computation times using existing simulation algorithms. We present a new algorithm named PRISM that combines features of the two most commonly used algorithms, namely the Bloch wave and multislice methods. PRISM uses a Fourier interpolation factor f that has typical values of 4-20 for atomic resolution simulations. We show that in many cases PRISM can provide a speedup that scales with f 4 compared to multislice simulations, with a negligible loss of accuracy. We demonstrate the usefulness of this method with large-scale scanning transmission electron microscopy image simulations of a crystalline nanoparticle on an amorphous carbon substrate.

  2. A fast image simulation algorithm for scanning transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Ophus, Colin

    2017-05-10

    Image simulation for scanning transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution for samples with realistic dimensions can require very large computation times using existing simulation algorithms. Here, we present a new algorithm named PRISM that combines features of the two most commonly used algorithms, namely the Bloch wave and multislice methods. PRISM uses a Fourier interpolation factor f that has typical values of 4-20 for atomic resolution simulations. We show that in many cases PRISM can provide a speedup that scales with f 4 compared to multislice simulations, with a negligible loss of accuracy. We demonstrate the usefulness of this methodmore » with large-scale scanning transmission electron microscopy image simulations of a crystalline nanoparticle on an amorphous carbon substrate.« less

  3. Absorption/Transmission Measurements of PSAP Particle-Laden Filters from the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) Field Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Presser, Cary; Nazarian, Ashot; Conny, Joseph M.; Chand, Duli; Sedlacek, Arthur; Hubbe, John M.

    2017-01-01

    Absorptivity measurements with a laser-heating approach, referred to as the laser-driven thermal reactor (LDTR), were carried out in the infrared and applied at ambient (laboratory) non-reacting conditions to particle-laden filters from a three-wavelength (visible) particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP). The particles were obtained during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign. The focus of this study was to determine the particle absorption coefficient from field-campaign filter samples using the LDTR approach, and compare results with other commercially available instrumentation (in this case with the PSAP, which has been compared with numerous other optical techniques). Advantages of the LDTR approach include 1) direct estimation of material absorption from temperature measurements (as opposed to resolving the difference between the measured reflection/scattering and transmission), 2) information on the filter optical properties, and 3) identification of the filter material effects on particle absorption (e.g., leading to particle absorption enhancement or shadowing). For measurements carried out under ambient conditions, the particle absorptivity is obtained with a thermocouple placed flush with the filter back surface and the laser probe beam impinging normal to the filter particle-laden surface. Thus, in principle one can employ a simple experimental arrangement to measure simultaneously both the transmissivity and absorptivity (at different discrete wavelengths) and ascertain the particle absorption coefficient. For this investigation, LDTR measurements were carried out with PSAP filters (pairs with both blank and exposed filters) from eight different days during the campaign, having relatively light but different particle loadings. The observed particles coating the filters were found to be carbonaceous (having broadband absorption characteristics). The LDTR absorption coefficient compared well with results from the PSAP. The

  4. Absorption/Transmission Measurements of PSAP Particle-Laden Filters from the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) Field Campaign.

    PubMed

    Presser, Cary; Nazarian, Ashot; Conny, Joseph M; Chand, Duli; Sedlacek, Arthur; Hubbe, John M

    2017-01-01

    Absorptivity measurements with a laser-heating approach, referred to as the laser-driven thermal reactor (LDTR), were carried out in the infrared and applied at ambient (laboratory) non-reacting conditions to particle-laden filters from a three-wavelength (visible) particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP). The particles were obtained during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign. The focus of this study was to determine the particle absorption coefficient from field-campaign filter samples using the LDTR approach, and compare results with other commercially available instrumentation (in this case with the PSAP, which has been compared with numerous other optical techniques). Advantages of the LDTR approach include 1) direct estimation of material absorption from temperature measurements (as opposed to resolving the difference between the measured reflection/scattering and transmission), 2) information on the filter optical properties, and 3) identification of the filter material effects on particle absorption (e.g., leading to particle absorption enhancement or shadowing). For measurements carried out under ambient conditions, the particle absorptivity is obtained with a thermocouple placed flush with the filter back surface and the laser probe beam impinging normal to the filter particle-laden surface. Thus, in principle one can employ a simple experimental arrangement to measure simultaneously both the transmissivity and absorptivity (at different discrete wavelengths) and ascertain the particle absorption coefficient. For this investigation, LDTR measurements were carried out with PSAP filters (pairs with both blank and exposed filters) from eight different days during the campaign, having relatively light but different particle loadings. The observed particles coating the filters were found to be carbonaceous (having broadband absorption characteristics). The LDTR absorption coefficient compared well with results from the PSAP. The

  5. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; ...

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au + ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  6. Reciprocity relations in transmission electron microscopy: A rigorous derivation.

    PubMed

    Krause, Florian F; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    A concise derivation of the principle of reciprocity applied to realistic transmission electron microscopy setups is presented making use of the multislice formalism. The equivalence of images acquired in conventional and scanning mode is thereby rigorously shown. The conditions for the applicability of the found reciprocity relations is discussed. Furthermore the positions of apertures in relation to the corresponding lenses are considered, a subject which scarcely has been addressed in previous publications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Practical aspects of monochromators developed for transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kimoto, Koji

    2014-01-01

    A few practical aspects of monochromators recently developed for transmission electron microscopy are briefly reviewed. The basic structures and properties of four monochromators, a single Wien filter monochromator, a double Wien filter monochromator, an omega-shaped electrostatic monochromator and an alpha-shaped magnetic monochromator, are outlined. The advantages and side effects of these monochromators in spectroscopy and imaging are pointed out. A few properties of the monochromators in imaging, such as spatial or angular chromaticity, are also discussed. PMID:25125333

  8. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond.

    PubMed

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Chisholm, Matthew F; Murfitt, Matthew F; Dellby, Niklas

    2012-12-01

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5Å resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Concurrent in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Hattar, K.; Bufford, D. C.; Buller, D. L.

    2014-08-29

    An in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope has been developed and is operational at Sandia National Laboratories. This facility permits high spatial resolution, real time observation of electron transparent samples under ion irradiation, implantation, mechanical loading, corrosive environments, and combinations thereof. This includes the simultaneous implantation of low-energy gas ions (0.8–30 keV) during high-energy heavy ion irradiation (0.8–48 MeV). In addition, initial results in polycrystalline gold foils are provided to demonstrate the range of capabilities.

  10. Quantitative Cryo-Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Biological Materials.

    PubMed

    Elbaum, Michael

    2018-05-11

    Electron tomography provides a detailed view into the 3D structure of biological cells and tissues. Physical fixation by vitrification of the aqueous medium provides the most faithful preservation of biological specimens in the native, fully hydrated state. Cryo-microscopy is challenging, however, because of the sensitivity to electron irradiation and due to the weak electron scattering of organic material. Tomography is even more challenging because of the dependence on multiple exposures of the same area. Tomographic imaging is typically performed in wide-field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) mode with phase contrast generated by defocus. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is an alternative mode based on detection of scattering from a focused probe beam, without imaging optics following the specimen. While careful configuration of the illumination and detectors is required to generate useful contrast, STEM circumvents the major restrictions of phase contrast TEM to very thin specimens and provides a signal that is more simply interpreted in terms of local composition and density. STEM has gained popularity in recent years for materials science. The extension of STEM to cryomicroscopy and tomography of cells and macromolecules is summarized herein. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy of the preclinical phase of experimental phytophotodermatitis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Sotto, Miriam Nakagami; Castro, Luis Antonio Suita de; Rocha, Nara Moreira

    2008-06-01

    To examine the epidermis in induced phytophotodermatitis using transmission electron microscopy in order to detect histologic changes even before lesions are visible by light microscopy. In the first six hours after the experimental induction of phytophotodermatitis, no changes are detectable by light microscopy. Only after 24 hours can keratinocyte necrosis and epidermal vacuolization be detected histologically, and blisters form by 48 hours. The dorsum of four adult rats (Rattus norvegicus) was manually epilated. After painting the right half of the rat with the peel juice of Tahiti lemon, they were exposed to sunlight for eight minutes under general anesthesia. The left side was used as the control and exposed to sunlight only. Biopsies were performed immediately after photoinduction and one and two hours later, and the tissue was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. No histological changes were seen on the control side. Immediately after induction, vacuolization in keratinocytes was observed. After one hour, desmosomal changes were also observed in addition to vacuolization. Keratin filaments were not attached to the desmosomal plaque. Free desmosomes and membrane ruptures were also seen. At two hours after induction, similar changes were found, and granular degeneration of keratin was also observed. The interaction of sunlight and psoralens generates a photoproduct that damages keratinocyte proteins, leading to keratinocyte necrosis and blister formation. Transmission electron microscopy can detect vacuolization, lesions of the membrane, and desmosomes in the first two hours after experimental induction of phytophotodermatitis.

  12. Photocathode Optimization for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P; Flom, Z; Heinselman, K

    2011-08-04

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) team at Harvey Mudd College has been sponsored by LLNL to design and build a test setup for optimizing the performance of the DTEM's electron source. Unlike a traditional TEM, the DTEM achieves much faster exposure times by using photoemission from a photocathode to produce electrons for imaging. The DTEM team's work is motivated by the need to improve the coherence and current density of the electron cloud produced by the electron gun in order to increase the image resolution and contrast achievable by DTEM. The photoemission test setup is nearly complete and themore » team will soon complete baseline tests of electron gun performance. The photoemission laser and high voltage power supply have been repaired; the optics path for relaying the laser to the photocathode has been finalized, assembled, and aligned; the internal setup of the vacuum chamber has been finalized and mostly implemented; and system control, synchronization, and data acquisition has been implemented in LabVIEW. Immediate future work includes determining a consistent alignment procedure to place the laser waist on the photocathode, and taking baseline performance measurements of the tantalum photocathode. Future research will examine the performance of the electron gun as a function of the photoemission laser profile, the photocathode material, and the geometry and voltages of the accelerating and focusing components in the electron gun. This report presents the team's progress and outlines the work that remains.« less

  13. Development of a secondary electron energy analyzer for a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Magara, Hideyuki; Tomita, Takeshi; Kondo, Yukihito; Sato, Takafumi; Akase, Zentaro; Shindo, Daisuke

    2018-04-01

    A secondary electron (SE) energy analyzer was developed for a transmission electron microscope. The analyzer comprises a microchannel plate (MCP) for detecting electrons, a coil for collecting SEs emitted from the specimen, a tube for reducing the number of backscattered electrons incident on the MCP, and a retarding mesh for selecting the energy of SEs incident on the MCP. The detection of the SEs associated with charging phenomena around a charged specimen was attempted by performing electron holography and SE spectroscopy using the energy analyzer. The results suggest that it is possible to obtain the energy spectra of SEs using the analyzer and the charging states of a specimen by electron holography simultaneously.

  14. Electronic properties and optical absorption of a phosphorene quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, F. X.; Ren, Y. H.; Zhang, X. D.; Jiang, Z. T.

    2018-03-01

    Using the tight-binding Hamiltonian approach, we theoretically study the electronic and optical properties of a triangular phosphorene quantum dot (PQD) including one normal zigzag edge and two skewed armchair edges (ZAA-PQD). It is shown that the energy spectrum can be classified into the filled band (FB), the zero-energy band (ZB), and the unfilled band (UB). Numerical calculations of the FB, ZB, and UB probability distributions show that the FB and the UB correspond to the bulk states, while the ZB corresponds to the edge states, which appear on all of the three edges of the ZAA-PQD sharply different from the other PQDs. We also find that the strains and the electric fields can affect the energy levels inhomogeneously. Then the optical properties of the ZAA-PQD are investigated. There appear some strong low-energy optical absorption peaks indicating its sensitive low-energy optical response that is absent in other PQDs. Moreover, the strains and the electric fields can make inhomogeneous influences on the optical spectrum of the ZAA-PQD. This work may provide a useful reference for designing the electrical, mechanical, and optical PQD devices.

  15. In-situ electrochemical transmission electron microscopy for battery research.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, B Layla; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R; Xu, Wu; Nasybulin, Eduard N; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David A; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong-Min; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James; Browning, Nigel D

    2014-04-01

    The recent development of in-situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in-situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in-situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  16. Effects of instrument imperfections on quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krause, Florian F; Schowalter, Marco; Grieb, Tim; Müller-Caspary, Knut; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Several instrumental imperfections of transmission electron microscopes are characterized and their effects on the results of quantitative scanning electron microscopy (STEM) are investigated and quantified using simulations. Methods to either avoid influences of these imperfections during acquisition or to include them in reference calculations are proposed. Particularly, distortions inflicted on the diffraction pattern by an image-aberration corrector can cause severe errors of more than 20% if not accounted for. A procedure for their measurement is proposed here. Furthermore, afterglow phenomena and nonlinear behavior of the detector itself can lead to incorrect normalization of measured intensities. Single electrons accidentally impinging on the detector are another source of error but can also be exploited for threshold-less calibration of STEM images to absolute dose, incident beam current determination and measurement of the detector sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. In situ transmission electron microscopy of transistor operation and failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baoming; Islam, Zahabul; Haque, Aman; Chabak, Kelson; Snure, Michael; Heller, Eric; Glavin, Nicholas

    2018-08-03

    Microscopy is typically used as a post-mortem analytical tool in performance and reliability studies on nanoscale materials and devices. In this study, we demonstrate real time microscopy of the operation and failure of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors inside the transmission electron microscope. Loading until failure was performed on the electron transparent transistors to visualize the failure mechanisms caused by self-heating. At lower drain voltages, thermo-mechanical stresses induce irreversible microstructural deformation, mostly along the AlGaN/GaN interface, to initiate the damage process. At higher biasing, the self-heating deteriorates the gate and catastrophic failure takes place through metal/semiconductor inter-diffusion and/or buffer layer breakdown. This study indicates that the current trend of recreating the events, from damage nucleation to catastrophic failure, can be replaced by in situ microscopy for a quick and accurate account of the failure mechanisms.

  18. On the Progress of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) Imaging in a Scanning Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng; Müller, Erich; Meffert, Matthias; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2018-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with low-energy electrons has been recognized as an important addition to the family of electron microscopies as it may avoid knock-on damage and increase the contrast of weakly scattering objects. Scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) are well suited for low-energy electron microscopy with maximum electron energies of 30 keV, but they are mainly used for topography imaging of bulk samples. Implementation of a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detector and a charge-coupled-device camera for the acquisition of on-axis transmission electron diffraction (TED) patterns, in combination with recent resolution improvements, make SEMs highly interesting for structure analysis of some electron-transparent specimens which are traditionally investigated by TEM. A new aspect is correlative SEM, STEM, and TED imaging from the same specimen region in a SEM which leads to a wealth of information. Simultaneous image acquisition gives information on surface topography, inner structure including crystal defects and qualitative material contrast. Lattice-fringe resolution is obtained in bright-field STEM imaging. The benefits of correlative SEM/STEM/TED imaging in a SEM are exemplified by structure analyses from representative sample classes such as nanoparticulates and bulk materials.

  19. Electron and proton absorption calculations for a graphite/epoxy composite model. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, E. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The Bethe-Bloch stopping power relations for inelastic collisions were used to determine the absorption of electron and proton energy in cured neat epoxy resin and the absorption of electron energy in a graphite/epoxy composite. Absorption of electron energy due to bremsstrahlung was determined. Electron energies from 0.2 to 4.0 MeV and proton energies from 0.3 to 1.75 MeV were used. Monoenergetic electron energy absorption profiles for models of pure graphite, cured neat epoxy resin, and graphite/epoxy composites are reported. A relation is determined for depth of uniform energy absorption in a composite as a function of fiber volume fraction and initial electron energy. Monoenergetic proton energy absorption profiles are reported for the neat resin model. A relation for total proton penetration in the epoxy resin as a function of initial proton energy is determined. Electron energy absorption in the composite due to bremsstrahlung is reported. Electron and proton energy absorption profiles in cured neat epoxy resin are reported for environments approximating geosynchronous earth orbit.

  20. Three-dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Niels; Sougrat, Rachid; Northan, Brian M; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-02-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2-3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset.

  1. Three-Dimensional Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Biological Specimens

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Niels; Sougrat, Rachid; Northan, Brian M.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2–3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. PMID:20082729

  2. Structural Fingerprinting of Nanocrystals in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvimov, Sergei; Plachinda, Pavel; Moeck, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Three novel strategies for the structurally identification of nanocrystals in a transmission electron microscope are presented. Either a single high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image [1] or a single precession electron diffractogram (PED) [2] may be employed. PEDs from fine-grained crystal powders may also be utilized. Automation of the former two strategies is in progress and shall lead to statistically significant results on ensembles of nanocrystals. Open-access databases such as the Crystallography Open Database which provides more than 81,500 crystal structure data sets [3] or its mainly inorganic and educational subsets [4] may be utilized. [1] http://www.scientificjournals.org/journals 2007/j/of/dissertation.htm [2] P. Moeck and S. Rouvimov, in: {Drugs and the Pharmaceutical Sciences}, Vol. 191, 2009, 270-313 [3] http://cod.ibt.lt, http://www.crystallography.net, http://cod.ensicaen.fr, http://nanocrystallography.org, http://nanocrystallography.net, http://journals.iucr.org/j/issues/2009/04/00/kk5039/kk5039.pdf [4] http://nanocrystallography.research.pdx.edu/CIF-searchable

  3. Transmission loss of orthogonally rib-stiffened double-panel structures with cavity absorption.

    PubMed

    Xin, F X; Lu, T J

    2011-04-01

    The transmission loss of sound through infinite orthogonally rib-stiffened double-panel structures having cavity-filling fibrous sound absorptive materials is theoretically investigated. The propagation of sound across the fibrous material is characterized using an equivalent fluid model, and the motions of the rib-stiffeners are described by including all possible vibrations, i.e., flexural displacements, bending, and torsional rotations. The effects of fluid-structure coupling are account for by enforcing velocity continuity conditions at fluid-panel interfaces. By taking full advantage of the periodic nature of the double-panel, the space-harmonic approach and virtual work principle are applied to solve the sets of resultant governing equations, which are eventually truncated as a finite system of simultaneous algebraic equations and numerically solved insofar as the solution converges. To validate the proposed model, a comparison between the present model predictions and existing numerical and experimental results for a simplified version of the double-panel structure is carried out, with overall agreement achieved. The model is subsequently employed to explore the influence of the fluid-structure coupling between fluid in the cavity and the two panels on sound transmission across the orthogonally rib-stiffened double-panel structure. Obtained results demonstrate that this fluid-structure coupling affects significantly sound transmission loss (STL) at low frequencies and cannot be ignored when the rib-stiffeners are sparsely distributed. As a highlight of this research, an integrated optimal algorithm toward lightweight, high-stiffness and superior sound insulation capability is proposed, based on which a preliminary optimal design of the double-panel structure is performed.

  4. Metallocarbohedrenes: Transmission Electron Microscopy of Mass Gated Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castleman, M. E. Lyn, Jr.

    2002-03-01

    Titanium and zirconium Met-Car cluster ions have been detected from the direct laser vaporization of metal-graphite mixtures using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Optimization of the production conditions enabled sufficient intensities to mass select and deposit Met-Cars on surfaces. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of mass gated Met-Car species reveals deposited nanocrystals 2 nm in diameter. Diffraction patterns indicate the presence of multiple species and shows that the deposits have spatial orientation. Lattice parameters have been extracted. The implication of the findings will be discussed. Support for the work has been from the AFOSR F49620-01-1-0122.

  5. Fabrication and electric measurements of nanostructures inside transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2011-06-01

    Using manipulation holders specially designed for transmission electron microscope (TEM), nanostructures can be characterized, measured, modified and even fabricated in-situ. In-situ TEM techniques not only enable real-time study of structure-property relationships of materials at atomic scale, but also provide the ability to control and manipulate materials and structures at nanoscale. This review highlights in-situ electric measurements and in-situ fabrication and structure modification using manipulation holder inside TEM. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Simulation of transmission electron microscope images of biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Rullgård, H; Ofverstedt, L-G; Masich, S; Daneholt, B; Oktem, O

    2011-09-01

    We present a new approach to simulate electron cryo-microscope images of biological specimens. The framework for simulation consists of two parts; the first is a phantom generator that generates a model of a specimen suitable for simulation, the second is a transmission electron microscope simulator. The phantom generator calculates the scattering potential of an atomic structure in aqueous buffer and allows the user to define the distribution of molecules in the simulated image. The simulator includes a well defined electron-specimen interaction model based on the scalar Schrödinger equation, the contrast transfer function for optics, and a noise model that includes shot noise as well as detector noise including detector blurring. To enable optimal performance, the simulation framework also includes a calibration protocol for setting simulation parameters. To test the accuracy of the new framework for simulation, we compare simulated images to experimental images recorded of the Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) in vitreous ice. The simulated and experimental images show good agreement with respect to contrast variations depending on dose and defocus. Furthermore, random fluctuations present in experimental and simulated images exhibit similar statistical properties. The simulator has been designed to provide a platform for development of new instrumentation and image processing procedures in single particle electron microscopy, two-dimensional crystallography and electron tomography with well documented protocols and an open source code into which new improvements and extensions are easily incorporated. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2011 Royal Microscopical Society.

  7. High current nonlinear transmission line based electron beam driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, B. W.; French, D. M.; Simon, D. S.; Lepell, P. D.; Montoya, T.; Heidger, S. L.

    2017-10-01

    A gigawatt-class nonlinear transmission line based electron beam driver is experimentally demonstrated. Four experimental series, each with a different Marx bank charge voltage (15, 20, 25, and 30 kV), were completed. Within each experimental series, shots at peak frequencies ranging from 950 MHz to 1.45 GHz were performed. Peak amplitude modulations of the NLTL output voltage signal were found to range between 18% and 35% for the lowest frequency shots and between 5% and 20% for the highest frequency shots (higher modulation at higher Marx charge voltage). Peak amplitude modulations of the electron beam current were found to range between 10% and 20% for the lowest frequency shots and between 2% and 7% for the highest frequency shots (higher modulation at higher Marx charge voltage).

  8. Transmission effects in unfolding electronic-vibrational electron-molecule energy-loss spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shiyang; Khakoo, Murtadha A.; Johnson, Paul V.

    2006-03-15

    The results of an investigation concerning the sensitivity of conventional unfolding methods applied to electronic-vibrational electron-energy-loss spectra to the transmission efficiency of electron spectrometers are presented. This investigation was made in an effort to understand differences in the differential cross sections for excitation of low-lying electronic states determined experimentally by various groups using electronic-vibrational energy-loss spectra of N{sub 2}. In these experiments, very similar spectral unfolding methods were used, which relied on similar Franck-Condon factors. However, the overall analyses of the electron scattering spectra (by the individual groups) resulted in large differences among the differential cross sections determined from thesemore » energy-loss spectra. The transmission response of the experimental apparatus to different-energy scattered electrons has often been discussed as a key factor that caused these disagreements. The present investigation shows in contrast that the effect of transmission is smaller than that required to independently explain such differences, implying that other systematic effects are responsible for the existing differences between measurements.« less

  9. Hot electron inelastic scattering and transmission across graphene surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Byoung Don; Champlain, James G.; Boos, J. Brad

    2017-06-01

    Inelastic scattering and transmission of externally injected hot carriers across graphene layers are considered as a function of graphene carrier density, temperature, and surrounding dielectric media. A finite temperature dynamic dielectric function for graphene for an arbitrary momentum q and frequency ω is found under the random phase approximation and a generalized scattering lifetime formalism is used to calculate the scattering and transmission rates. Unusual trends in scattering are found, including declining rates as graphene carrier density increases and interband transition excitations, which highlights the difference with out-of-plane as compared to in-plane transport. The results also show strong temperature dependence with a drastic increase in scattering at room temperature. The calculated scattering rate at T = 300 K shows a wide variation from 0.2 to 10 fs-1 depending on graphene carrier density, incident carrier momentum, and surrounding dielectrics. The analysis suggests that a transmission rate greater than 0.9 for a carrier with kinetic energy over 1 eV is achievable by carefully controlling the graphene carrier density in conjunction with the use of high-κ dielectric materials. Potential applications to electronic and electro-optical devices are also discussed.

  10. Design And Construction of an Impedance Tube for Measuring Sound Absorptivity and Transmissibility of Materials Using Transfer Function Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowda, Haarish Kapaninaikappa

    Noise is defined as unwanted sound, when perceived in excess can cause many harmful effects such as annoyance, interference with speech, and hearing loss, hence there is a need to control noise in practical situations. Noise can be controlled actively and/or passively, here we discuss the passive noise control techniques. Passive noise control involves using energy dissipating or reflecting materials such as absorbers or barriers respectively. Damping and isolating materials are also used in eliminating structure-borne noise. These materials exhibit properties such as reflection, absorption and transmission loss when incidence is by a sound source. Thus, there is a need to characterize the acoustical properties of these materials for practical use. The theoretical background of the random incident sound absorption with reverberation room and normal incident sound absorption using impedance tube are well documented. The Transfer Matrix method for measuring transmission loss and absorption coefficient using impedance tube is very attractive since it is rather inexpensive and fast. In this research, a low-cost Impedance Tube is constructed using transfer function method to measure both absorption and transmissibility of materials. Equipment and measurement instruments available in the laboratory were used in the construction of the tube, adhering to cost-effectiveness. Care has been taken for precise construction of tube to ensure better measurement results. Further various samples varying from hard non-porous to soft porous materials were tested for absorption and sound transmission loss. Absorption values were also compared with reverberation room method with the available samples further ensuring the reliability of the newly constructed tube for future measurements.

  11. Interaction of electrons with light metal hydrides in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongming; Wakasugi, Takenobu; Isobe, Shigehito; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-12-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of light metal hydrides is complicated by the instability of these materials under electron irradiation. In this study, the electron kinetic energy dependences of the interactions of incident electrons with lithium, sodium and magnesium hydrides, as well as the constituting element effect on the interactions, were theoretically discussed, and electron irradiation damage to these hydrides was examined using in situ TEM. The results indicate that high incident electron kinetic energy helps alleviate the irradiation damage resulting from inelastic or elastic scattering of the incident electrons in the TEM. Therefore, observations and characterizations of these materials would benefit from increased, instead decreased, TEM operating voltage. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Accurate Virus Quantitation Using a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) Detector in a Scanning Electron Microscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-29

    Accurate Virus Quantitation Using a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) Detector in a Scanning Electron Microscope Candace D Blancett1...L Norris2, Cynthia A Rossi4 , Pamela J Glass3, Mei G Sun1,* 1 Pathology Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious...Diseases (USAMRIID), 1425 Porter Street, Fort Detrick, Maryland, 21702 2Biostatistics Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of

  13. Contamination mitigation strategies for scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D R G

    2015-06-01

    Modern scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) enables imaging and microanalysis at very high magnification. In the case of aberration-corrected STEM, atomic resolution is readily achieved. However, the electron fluxes used may be up to three orders of magnitude greater than those typically employed in conventional STEM. Since specimen contamination often increases with electron flux, specimen cleanliness is a critical factor in obtaining meaningful data when carrying out high magnification STEM. A range of different specimen cleaning methods have been applied to a variety of specimen types. The contamination rate has been measured quantitatively to assess the effectiveness of cleaning. The methods studied include: baking, cooling, plasma cleaning, beam showering and UV/ozone exposure. Of the methods tested, beam showering is rapid, experimentally convenient and very effective on a wide range of specimens. Oxidative plasma cleaning is also very effective and can be applied to specimens on carbon support films, albeit with some care. For electron beam-sensitive materials, cooling may be the method of choice. In most cases, preliminary removal of the bulk of the contamination by methods such as baking or plasma cleaning, followed by beam showering, where necessary, can result in a contamination-free specimen suitable for extended atomic scale imaging and analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Investigating the use of in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nguy, Amanda

    2016-02-19

    Engineering nanoparticles with desired shape-dependent properties is the key to many applications in nanotechnology. Although many synthetic procedures exist to produce anisotropic gold nanoparticles, the dynamics of growth are typically unknown or hypothetical. In the case of seed-mediated growth in the presence of DNA into anisotropic nanoparticles, it is not known exactly how DNA directs growth into specific morphologies. A series of preliminary experiments were carried out to contribute to the investigation of the possible mechanism of DNA-mediated growth of gold nanoprisms into gold nanostars using liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Imaging in the liquid phase was achievedmore » through the use of a liquid cell platform and liquid cell holder that allow the sample to be contained within a “chip sandwich” between two electron transparent windows. Ex situ growth experiments were performed using Au-T30 NPrisms (30-base thymine oligonucleotide-coated gold nanoprisms) that are expected to grow into gold nanostars. Growth to form these nanostars were imaged using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and liquid cell STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy). An attempt to perform in situ growth experiments with the same Au-T30 nanoprisms revealed challenges in obtaining desired morphology results due to the environmental differences within the liquid cell compared to the ex situ environment. Different parameters in the experimental method were explored including fluid line set up, simultaneous and alternating reagent addition, and the effect of different liquid cell volumes to ensure adequate flow of reagents into the liquid cell. Lastly, the binding affinities were compared for T30 and A30 DNA incubated with gold nanoparticles using zeta potential measurements, absorption spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was previously reported thymine bases have a lower binding affinity to gold surfaces than

  15. Electron Source Brightness and Illumination Semi-Angle Distribution Measurement in a Transmission Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Börrnert, Felix; Renner, Julian; Kaiser, Ute

    2018-05-21

    The electron source brightness is an important parameter in an electron microscope. Reliable and easy brightness measurement routes are not easily found. A determination method for the illumination semi-angle distribution in transmission electron microscopy is even less well documented. Herein, we report a simple measurement route for both entities and demonstrate it on a state-of-the-art instrument. The reduced axial brightness of the FEI X-FEG with a monochromator was determined to be larger than 108 A/(m2 sr V).

  16. Multilayer Thin Film Polarizer Design for Far Ultraviolet using Induced Transmission and Absorption Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jongmin; Zukic, Muamer; Wilson, Michele M.; Park, Jung Ho; Torr, Douglas G.

    1994-01-01

    Good theoretical designs of far ultraviolet polarizers have been reported using a MgF2/Al/MgF2 three layer structure on a thick Al layer as a substrate. The thicknesses were determined to induce transmission and absorption of p-polarized light. In these designs Al optical constants were used from films produced in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV: 10(exp -10) torr). Reflectance values for polarizers fabricated in a conventional high vacuum (p approx. 10(exp -6 torr)) using the UHV design parameters differed dramatically from the design predictions. Al is a highly reactive material and is oxidized even in a high vacuum chamber. In order to solve the problem other metals have been studied. It is found that a larger reflectance difference is closely related to higher amplitude and larger phase difference of Fresnel reflection coefficients between two polarizations at the boundary of MgF2/metal. It is also found that for one material a larger angle of incidence from the surface normal brings larger amplitude and phase difference. Be and Mo are found good materials to replace Al. Polarizers designed for 121.6 nm with Be at 60 deg and with Mo at 70 deg are shown as examples.

  17. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A simple way to obtain backscattered electron images in a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Hiroki; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Tanji, Takayoshi; Morita, Chiaki

    2014-08-01

    We have fabricated a simple detector for backscattered electrons (BSEs) and incorporated the detector into a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) sample holder. Our detector was made from a 4-mm(2) Si chip. The fabrication procedure was easy, and similar to a standard transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample thinning process based on ion milling. A TEM grid containing particle objects was fixed to the detector with a silver paste. Observations were carried out using samples of Au and latex particles at 75 and 200 kV. Such a detector provides an easy way to obtain BSE images in an STEM. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Secondary Electron Emission Materials for Transmission Dynodes in Novel Photomultipliers: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shu Xia; Chan, Hong Wah; van der Graaf, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Secondary electron emission materials are reviewed with the aim of providing guidelines for the future development of novel transmission dynodes. Materials with reflection secondary electron yield higher than three and transmission secondary electron yield higher than one are tabulated for easy reference. Generations of transmission dynodes are listed in the order of the invention time with a special focus on the most recent atomic-layer-deposition synthesized transmission dynodes. Based on the knowledge gained from the survey of secondary election emission materials with high secondary electron yield, an outlook of possible improvements upon the state-of-the-art transmission dynodes is provided. PMID:28774137

  20. First transmission of electrons and ions through the KATRIN beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, M.; Baek, W.-J.; Beck, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behrens, J.; Bergmann, T.; Berlev, A.; Besserer, U.; Blaum, K.; Bode, T.; Bornschein, B.; Bornschein, L.; Brunst, T.; Buzinsky, N.; Chilingaryan, S.; Choi, W. Q.; Deffert, M.; Doe, P. J.; Dragoun, O.; Drexlin, G.; Dyba, S.; Edzards, F.; Eitel, K.; Ellinger, E.; Engel, R.; Enomoto, S.; Erhard, M.; Eversheim, D.; Fedkevych, M.; Fischer, S.; Formaggio, J. A.; Fränkle, F. M.; Franklin, G. B.; Friedel, F.; Fulst, A.; Gil, W.; Glück, F.; Gonzalez Ureña, A.; Grohmann, S.; Grössle, R.; Gumbsheimer, R.; Hackenjos, M.; Hannen, V.; Harms, F.; Haußmann, N.; Heizmann, F.; Helbing, K.; Herz, W.; Hickford, S.; Hilk, D.; Hillesheimer, D.; Howe, M. A.; Huber, A.; Jansen, A.; Kellerer, J.; Kernert, N.; Kippenbrock, L.; Kleesiek, M.; Klein, M.; Kopmann, A.; Korzeczek, M.; Kovalík, A.; Krasch, B.; Kraus, M.; Kuckert, L.; Lasserre, T.; Lebeda, O.; Letnev, J.; Lokhov, A.; Machatschek, M.; Marsteller, A.; Martin, E. L.; Mertens, S.; Mirz, S.; Monreal, B.; Naumann, U.; Neumann, H.; Niemes, S.; Off, A.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Osipowicz, A.; Otten, E.; Parno, D. S.; Pollithy, A.; Poon, A. W. P.; Priester, F.; Ranitzsch, P. C.-O.; Rest, O.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Roccati, F.; Rodenbeck, C.; Röllig, M.; Röttele, C.; Ryšavý, M.; Sack, R.; Saenz, A.; Schimpf, L.; Schlösser, K.; Schlösser, M.; Schönung, K.; Schrank, M.; Seitz-Moskaliuk, H.; Sentkerestiová, J.; Sibille, V.; Slezák, M.; Steidl, M.; Steinbrink, N.; Sturm, M.; Suchopar, M.; Suesser, M.; Telle, H. H.; Thorne, L. A.; Thümmler, T.; Titov, N.; Tkachev, I.; Trost, N.; Valerius, K.; Vénos, D.; Vianden, R.; Vizcaya Hernández, A. P.; Weber, M.; Weinheimer, C.; Weiss, C.; Welte, S.; Wendel, J.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolf, J.; Wüstling, S.; Zadoroghny, S.

    2018-04-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment is a large-scale effort to probe the absolute neutrino mass scale with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV (90% confidence level), via a precise measurement of the endpoint spectrum of tritium β-decay. This work documents several KATRIN commissioning milestones: the complete assembly of the experimental beamline, the successful transmission of electrons from three sources through the beamline to the primary detector, and tests of ion transport and retention. In the First Light commissioning campaign of autumn 2016, photoelectrons were generated at the rear wall and ions were created by a dedicated ion source attached to the rear section; in July 2017, gaseous 83mKr was injected into the KATRIN source section, and a condensed 83mKr source was deployed in the transport section. In this paper we describe the technical details of the apparatus and the configuration for each measurement, and give first results on source and system performance. We have successfully achieved transmission from all four sources, established system stability, and characterized many aspects of the apparatus.

  1. Transmission electron microscope sample holder with optical features

    DOEpatents

    Milas, Mirko [Port Jefferson, NY; Zhu, Yimei [Stony Brook, NY; Rameau, Jonathan David [Coram, NY

    2012-03-27

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  2. Transmission electron microscope cells for use with liquid samples

    DOEpatents

    Khalid, Waqas; Alivisatos, Paul A.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-08-09

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and devices related to transmission electron microscopy cells for use with liquids. In one aspect a device includes a substrate, a first graphene layer, and a second graphene layer. The substrate has a first surface and a second surface. The first surface defines a first channel, a second channel, and an outlet channel. The first channel and the second channel are joined to the outlet channel. The outlet channel defines a viewport region forming a though hole in the substrate. The first graphene layer overlays the first surface of the substrate, including an interior area of the first channel, the second channel, and the outlet channel. The second graphene layer overlays the first surface of the substrate, including open regions defined by the first channel, the second channel, and the outlet channel.

  3. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and comparedmore » to those of other techniques available.« less

  4. Visualization of bacterial polysaccharides by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wolanski, B S; McAleer, W J; Hilleman, M R

    1983-04-01

    Highly purified capsular polysaccharides of Neisseria meningitidis groups A, B, and C have been visualized by high resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM). Spheroidal macromolecules approximately 200 A in diameter are characteristic of the Meningococcus A and C polysaccharides whereas filaments that are 400-600 A in length are found in Meningococcus B polysaccharide preparations. Filaments are occasionally found associated with the spheroidal Meningococcus A and C polysaccharides and it is proposed that these structures are composed of a long (1-4 microns) filament or filaments that are arranged in spheroidal molecules or micelles of high molecular weight. The Meningococcus B polysaccharide, by contrast, is a short flexuous filament or strand of relatively low molecular weight. A relationship between morphology and antigenicity is proposed.

  5. A Transmission Electron Microscope Study of Experimentally Shocked Pregraphitic Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1995-01-01

    A transmission electron microscope study of experimental shock metamorphism in natural pre-graphitic carbon simulates the response of the most common natural carbons to increased shock pressure. The d-spacings of this carbon are insensitive to the shock pressure and have no apparent diagnostic value, but progressive comminution occurs in response to increased shock pressure up to 59.6 GPa. The function, P = 869.1 x (size(sub minimum )(exp -0.83), describes the relationship between the minimum root-mean-square subgrain size (nm) and shock pressure (GPa). While a subgrain texture of natural pregraphitic carbons carries little information when pre-shock textures are unknown, this texture may go unnoticed as a shock metamorphic feature.

  6. High quality ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using resonant microwave cavities.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, W; van Rens, J F M; Kieft, E R; Mutsaers, P H A; Luiten, O J

    2018-05-01

    Ultrashort, low-emittance electron pulses can be created at a high repetition rate by using a TM 110 deflection cavity to sweep a continuous beam across an aperture. These pulses can be used for time-resolved electron microscopy with atomic spatial and temporal resolution at relatively large average currents. In order to demonstrate this, a cavity has been inserted in a transmission electron microscope, and picosecond pulses have been created. No significant increase of either emittance or energy spread has been measured for these pulses. At a peak current of 814 ± 2 pA, the root-mean-square transverse normalized emittance of the electron pulses is ɛ n,x =(2.7±0.1)·10 -12  m rad in the direction parallel to the streak of the cavity, and ɛ n,y =(2.5±0.1)·10 -12  m rad in the perpendicular direction for pulses with a pulse length of 1.1-1.3 ps. Under the same conditions, the emittance of the continuous beam is ɛ n,x =ɛ n,y =(2.5±0.1)·10 -12  m rad. Furthermore, for both the pulsed and the continuous beam a full width at half maximum energy spread of 0.95 ± 0.05 eV has been measured. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sound absorption and transmission through flexible micro-perforated panels backed by an air layer and a thin plate.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Teresa; Maury, Cédric; Pinhède, Cédric

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes theoretical and experimental investigations into the sound absorption and transmission properties of micro-perforated panels (MPP) backed by an air cavity and a thin plate. A fully coupled modal approach is proposed to calculate the absorption coefficient and the transmission loss of finite-sized micro-perforated panels-cavity-panel (MPPCP) partitions with conservative boundary conditions. It is validated against infinite partition models and experimental data. A practical methodology is proposed using collocated pressure-velocity sensors to evaluate in an anechoic environment the transmission and absorption properties of conventional MPPCPs. Results show under which conditions edge scattering effects should be accounted for at low frequencies. Coupled mode analysis is also performed and analytical approximations are derived from the resonance frequencies and mode shapes of a flexible MPPCP. It is found that the Helmholtz-type resonance frequency is deduced from the one associated to the rigidly backed MPPCP absorber shifted up by the mass-air mass resonance of the flexible non-perforated double-panel. Moreover, it is shown analytically and experimentally that the absorption mechanisms at the resonances are governed by a large air-frame relative velocity over the MPP surface, with either in-phase or out-of-phase relationships, depending on the MPPCP parameters.

  8. The electronic states of cyclopropane studied by VUV absorption and electron energy-loss spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingell, M.; Mason, N. J.; Walker, I. C.; Marston, G.; Zhao, H.; Siggel, M. R. F.

    1999-06-01

    Absolute optical (VUV) absorption cross sections for cyclopropane have been measured from 5.0 to 11.2 and 20-40 eV using synchrotron radiation. Also, electron energy-loss (EEL) spectra have been obtained using incident electrons of (a) 150 eV energy scattered through small angles (energy loss 5.0-15 eV) and (b) near-threshold energies scattered through large angles (energy loss 0-10.5 eV). Taken together these confirm that the low-lying excited electronic states of cyclopropane are of Rydberg type and, although spectral bands are diffuse, a known Rydberg series has been extended. Recent computations (Galasso V 1996 Chem. Phys. 206 289) appear to give a good account of the experimental spectrum from threshold to about 11 eV, but these must be extended if valence-excited states are to be characterized. Particular attention has been directed at the evaluation of absolute optical cross sections. These are now believed to be established over the energy ranges 5-15 and 20-40 eV. In the gap region (15-20 eV) second-order radiation may affect the optical measurements. From consideration of second-order effects, and comparison of the present studies with earlier measurements, we propose a best-estimate cross section in this energy region also.

  9. Combined scanning transmission electron microscopy tilt- and focal series.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Tim; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Lupini, Andrew R; Kübel, Christian; Slusallek, Philipp; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a combined tilt- and focal series is proposed as a new recording scheme for high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Three-dimensional (3D) data were acquired by mechanically tilting the specimen, and recording a through-focal series at each tilt direction. The sample was a whole-mount macrophage cell with embedded gold nanoparticles. The tilt-focal algebraic reconstruction technique (TF-ART) is introduced as a new algorithm to reconstruct tomograms from such combined tilt- and focal series. The feasibility of TF-ART was demonstrated by 3D reconstruction of the experimental 3D data. The results were compared with a conventional STEM tilt series of a similar sample. The combined tilt- and focal series led to smaller "missing wedge" artifacts, and a higher axial resolution than obtained for the STEM tilt series, thus improving on one of the main issues of tilt series-based electron tomography.

  10. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Levin, Barnaby D. A.; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; ...

    2016-06-07

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co 2 P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbonmore » nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data.« less

  11. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Levin, Barnaby D A; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M C; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D; Robinson, Richard D; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A; Hovden, Robert

    2016-06-07

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data.

  12. Materials characterisation by angle-resolved scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Müller-Caspary, Knut; Oppermann, Oliver; Grieb, Tim; Krause, Florian F; Rosenauer, Andreas; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Beyer, Andreas; Volz, Kerstin; Potapov, Pavel

    2016-11-16

    Solid-state properties such as strain or chemical composition often leave characteristic fingerprints in the angular dependence of electron scattering. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is dedicated to probe scattered intensity with atomic resolution, but it drastically lacks angular resolution. Here we report both a setup to exploit the explicit angular dependence of scattered intensity and applications of angle-resolved STEM to semiconductor nanostructures. Our method is applied to measure nitrogen content and specimen thickness in a GaN x As 1-x layer independently at atomic resolution by evaluating two dedicated angular intervals. We demonstrate contrast formation due to strain and composition in a Si- based metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) with Ge x Si 1-x stressors as a function of the angles used for imaging. To shed light on the validity of current theoretical approaches this data is compared with theory, namely the Rutherford approach and contemporary multislice simulations. Inconsistency is found for the Rutherford model in the whole angular range of 16-255 mrad. Contrary, the multislice simulations are applicable for angles larger than 35 mrad whereas a significant mismatch is observed at lower angles. This limitation of established simulations is discussed particularly on the basis of inelastic scattering.

  13. High cycle fatigue in the transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Stauffer, Douglas; Mook, William M.

    One of the most common causes of structural failure in metals is fatigue induced by cyclic loading. Historically, microstructure-level analysis of fatigue cracks has primarily been performed post mortem. However, such investigations do not directly reveal the internal structural processes at work near micro- and nanoscale fatigue cracks and thus do not provide direct evidence of active microstructural mechanisms. In this paper, the tension–tension fatigue behavior of nanocrystalline Cu was monitored in real time at the nanoscale by utilizing a new capability for quantitative cyclic mechanical loading performed in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Controllable loads were appliedmore » at frequencies from one to several hundred hertz, enabling accumulations of 10 6 cycles within 1 h. The nanometer-scale spatial resolution of the TEM allows quantitative fatigue crack growth studies at very slow crack growth rates, measured here at ~10 –12 m·cycle –1. This represents an incipient threshold regime that is well below the tensile yield stress and near the minimum conditions for fatigue crack growth. Evidence of localized deformation and grain growth within 150 nm of the crack tip was observed by both standard imaging and precession electron diffraction orientation mapping. Finally, these observations begin to reveal with unprecedented detail the local microstructural processes that govern damage accumulation, crack nucleation, and crack propagation during fatigue loading in nanocrystalline Cu.« less

  14. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Barnaby D.A.; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M.C.; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D.; Robinson, Richard D.; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A.; Hovden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data. PMID:27272459

  15. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Goldsbury, Claire; Baxa, Ulrich; Simon, Martha N.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Engel, Andreas; Wall, Joseph S.; Aebi, Ueli; Müller, Shirley A.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies like Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). PMID:20868754

  16. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) of nanophase ferric oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Iron oxide minerals are the prime candidates for Fe(III) signatures in remotely sensed Martian surface spectra. Magnetic, Mossbauer, and reflectance spectroscopy have been carried out in the laboratory in order to understand the mineralogical nature of Martian analog ferric oxide minerals of submicron or nanometer size range. Out of the iron oxide minerals studied, nanometer sized ferric oxides are promising candidates for possible Martian spectral analogs. 'Nanophase ferric oxide (np-Ox)' is a generic term for ferric oxide/oxihydroxide particles having nanoscale (less than 10 nm) particle dimensions. Ferrihydrite, superparamagnetic particles of hematite, maghemite and goethite, and nanometer sized particles of inherently paramagnetic lepidocrocite are all examples of nanophase ferric oxides. np-Ox particles in general do not give X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with well defined peaks and would often be classified as X-ray amorphous. Therefore, different np-Oxs preparations should be characterized using a more sensitive technique e.g., high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The purpose of this study is to report the particle size, morphology and crystalline order, of five np-Ox samples by HRTEM imaging and electron diffraction (ED).

  17. High cycle fatigue in the transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Stauffer, Douglas; Mook, William M.; ...

    2016-06-28

    One of the most common causes of structural failure in metals is fatigue induced by cyclic loading. Historically, microstructure-level analysis of fatigue cracks has primarily been performed post mortem. However, such investigations do not directly reveal the internal structural processes at work near micro- and nanoscale fatigue cracks and thus do not provide direct evidence of active microstructural mechanisms. In this paper, the tension–tension fatigue behavior of nanocrystalline Cu was monitored in real time at the nanoscale by utilizing a new capability for quantitative cyclic mechanical loading performed in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Controllable loads were appliedmore » at frequencies from one to several hundred hertz, enabling accumulations of 10 6 cycles within 1 h. The nanometer-scale spatial resolution of the TEM allows quantitative fatigue crack growth studies at very slow crack growth rates, measured here at ~10 –12 m·cycle –1. This represents an incipient threshold regime that is well below the tensile yield stress and near the minimum conditions for fatigue crack growth. Evidence of localized deformation and grain growth within 150 nm of the crack tip was observed by both standard imaging and precession electron diffraction orientation mapping. Finally, these observations begin to reveal with unprecedented detail the local microstructural processes that govern damage accumulation, crack nucleation, and crack propagation during fatigue loading in nanocrystalline Cu.« less

  18. Absorption of infrared radiation by electrons in the field of a neutral hydrogen atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical expression for the absorption coefficient is developed from a relationship between the cross-section for inverse bremsstrahlung absorption and the cross-section for electron-atom momentum transfer; it is accurate for those photon frequencies v and temperatures such that hv/kT is small. The determination of the absorption of infrared radiation by free-free transitions of the negative hydrogen ion has been extended to higher temperatures. A simple analytical expression for the absorption coefficient has been derived.

  19. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Magnetite Plaquettes in Orgueil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Han, J.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite sometimes takes the form of a plaquette - barrel-shaped stack of magnetite disks - in carbonaceous chondrites (CC) that show evidence of aqueous alteration. The asymmetric nature of the plaquettes caused Pizzarello and Groy to propose magnetite plaquettes as a naturally asymmetric mineral that can indroduce symmetry-breaking in organic molecules. Our previous synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (SXRCT) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of the magnetite plaquettes in fifteen CCs indicate that magnetite plaquettes are composed of nearly parallel discs, and the crystallographic orientations of the discs change around a rotational axis normal to the discs surfaces. In order to further investigate the nanostructures of magnetite plaquettes, we made two focused ion beam (FIB) sections of nine magnetite plaquettes from a thin section of CI Orgueil for transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. The X-ray spectrum imaging shows that the magnetite discs are purely iron oxide Fe3O4 (42.9 at% Fe and 57.1 at% O), which suggest that the plaquettes are of aqueous origin as it is difficult to form pure magnetite as a nebular condensate. The selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns acquired across the plaquettes show that the magnetite discs are single crystals. SEM and EBSD analyses suggest that the planar surfaces of the magnetite discs belong to the {100} planes of the cubic inverse spinel structure, which are supported by our TEM observations. Kerridge et al. suggested that the epitaxial relationship between magnetite plaquette and carbonate determines the magnetite face. However, according to our TEM observation, the association of magnetite with porous networks of phyllosilicate indicates that the epitaxial relationship with carbonate is not essential to the formation of magnetite plaquettes. It was difficult to determine the preferred rotational orientation of the plaquettes due to the symmetry of the cubic structure

  20. Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy of electron beam–sensitive crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Daliang; Zhu, Yihan; Liu, Lingmei; Ying, Xiangrong; Hsiung, Chia-En; Sougrat, Rachid; Li, Kun; Han, Yu

    2018-02-01

    High-resolution imaging of electron beam–sensitive materials is one of the most difficult applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The challenges are manifold, including the acquisition of images with extremely low beam doses, the time-constrained search for crystal zone axes, the precise image alignment, and the accurate determination of the defocus value. We develop a suite of methods to fulfill these requirements and acquire atomic-resolution TEM images of several metal organic frameworks that are generally recognized as highly sensitive to electron beams. The high image resolution allows us to identify individual metal atomic columns, various types of surface termination, and benzene rings in the organic linkers. We also apply our methods to other electron beam–sensitive materials, including the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbBr3.

  1. A study on transmission characteristics and specific absorption rate using impedance-matched electrodes for various human body communication.

    PubMed

    Machida, Yuta; Yamamoto, Takahiko; Koshiji, Kohji

    2013-01-01

    Human body communication (HBC) is a new communication technology that has presented potential applications in health care and elderly support systems in recent years. In this study, which is focused on a wearable transmitter and receiver for HBC in a body area network (BAN), we performed electromagnetic field analysis and simulation using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method with various models of the human body. Further we redesigned a number of impedance-matched electrodes to allow transmission without stubs or transformers. The specific absorption rate (SAR) and transmission characteristics S21 of these electrode structures were compared for several models.

  2. Transmission electron microscopy of polymer blends and block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of soft matter is a field that warrants further investigation. Developments in sample preparation, imaging and spectroscopic techniques could lead to novel experiments that may further our understanding of the structure and the role structure plays in the functionality of various organic materials. Unlike most hard materials, TEM of organic molecules is limited by the amount of radiation damage the material can withstand without changing its structure. Despite this limitation, TEM has been and will be a powerful tool to study polymeric materials and other soft matter. In this dissertation, an introduction of TEM for polymer scientists is presented. The fundamentals of interactions of electrons with matter are described using the Schrodinger wave equation and scattering cross-sections to fully encompass coherent and incoherent scattering. The intensity, which is the product of the wave function and its complex conjugate, shows no perceptible change due to the sample. Instead, contrast is generated through the optical system of the microscope by removing scattered electrons or by generating interference due to material-induced phase changes. Perhaps the most challenging aspect of taking TEM images, however, is sample preparation, because TEM experiments require materials with approximately 50 nm thickness. Although ultramicrotomy is a well-established powerful tool for preparing biological and polymeric sections for TEM, the development of cryogenic Focused Ion Beam may enable unprecedented cross-sectional TEM studies of polymer thin films on arbitrary substrates with nanometer precision. Two examples of TEM experiments of polymeric materials are presented. The first involves quantifying the composition profile across a lamellar phase obtained in a multicomponent blend of saturated poly(butadiene) and poly(isobutylene), stabilized by a saturated poly(butadiene) copolymer serving as a surfactant, using TEM and self

  3. Electron beam dynamics in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope with Wehnelt electrode.

    PubMed

    Bücker, K; Picher, M; Crégut, O; LaGrange, T; Reed, B W; Park, S T; Masiel, D J; Banhart, F

    2016-12-01

    High temporal resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques have shown significant progress in recent years. Using photoelectron pulses induced by ultrashort laser pulses on the cathode, these methods can probe ultrafast materials processes and have revealed numerous dynamic phenomena at the nanoscale. Most recently, the technique has been implemented in standard thermionic electron microscopes that provide a flexible platform for studying material's dynamics over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In this study, the electron pulses in such an ultrafast transmission electron microscope are characterized in detail. The microscope is based on a thermionic gun with a Wehnelt electrode and is operated in a stroboscopic photoelectron mode. It is shown that the Wehnelt bias has a decisive influence on the temporal and energy spread of the picosecond electron pulses. Depending on the shape of the cathode and the cathode-Wehnelt distance, different emission patterns with different pulse parameters are obtained. The energy spread of the pulses is determined by space charge and Boersch effects, given by the number of electrons in a pulse. However, filtering effects due to the chromatic aberrations of the Wehnelt electrode allow the extraction of pulses with narrow energy spreads. The temporal spread is governed by electron trajectories of different length and in different electrostatic potentials. High temporal resolution is obtained by excluding shank emission from the cathode and aberration-induced halos in the emission pattern. By varying the cathode-Wehnelt gap, the Wehnelt bias, and the number of photoelectrons in a pulse, tradeoffs between energy and temporal resolution as well as beam intensity can be made as needed for experiments. Based on the characterization of the electron pulses, the optimal conditions for the operation of ultrafast TEMs with thermionic gun assembly are elaborated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spatial Resolution in Scanning Electron Microscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Without a Specimen Vacuum Chamber.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kayla X; Holtz, Megan E; Richmond-Decker, Justin; Muller, David A

    2016-08-01

    A long-standing goal of electron microscopy has been the high-resolution characterization of specimens in their native environment. However, electron optics require high vacuum to maintain an unscattered and focused probe, a challenge for specimens requiring atmospheric or liquid environments. Here, we use an electron-transparent window at the base of a scanning electron microscope's objective lens to separate column vacuum from the specimen, enabling imaging under ambient conditions, without a specimen vacuum chamber. We demonstrate in-air imaging of specimens at nanoscale resolution using backscattered scanning electron microscopy (airSEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy. We explore resolution and contrast using Monte Carlo simulations and analytical models. We find that nanometer-scale resolution can be obtained at gas path lengths up to 400 μm, although contrast drops with increasing gas path length. As the electron-transparent window scatters considerably more than gas at our operating conditions, we observe that the densities and thicknesses of the electron-transparent window are the dominant limiting factors for image contrast at lower operating voltages. By enabling a variety of detector configurations, the airSEM is applicable to a wide range of environmental experiments including the imaging of hydrated biological specimens and in situ chemical and electrochemical processes.

  5. Spatial Resolution in Scanning Electron Microscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Without a Specimen Vacuum Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Kayla X.; Holtz, Megan E.; Richmond-Decker, Justin

    2016-07-25

    Abstract A long-standing goal of electron microscopy has been the high-resolution characterization of specimens in their native environment. However, electron optics require high vacuum to maintain an unscattered and focused probe, a challenge for specimens requiring atmospheric or liquid environments. Here, we use an electron-transparent window at the base of a scanning electron microscope’s objective lens to separate column vacuum from the specimen, enabling imaging under ambient conditions, without a specimen vacuum chamber. We demonstrate in-air imaging of specimens at nanoscale resolution using backscattered scanning electron microscopy (airSEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy. We explore resolution and contrast using Montemore » Carlo simulations and analytical models. We find that nanometer-scale resolution can be obtained at gas path lengths up to 400μm, although contrast drops with increasing gas path length. As the electron-transparent window scatters considerably more than gas at our operating conditions, we observe that the densities and thicknesses of the electron-transparent window are the dominant limiting factors for image contrast at lower operating voltages. By enabling a variety of detector configurations, the airSEM is applicable to a wide range of environmental experiments including the imaging of hydrated biological specimens andin situchemical and electrochemical processes.« less

  6. The absorption of energetic electrons by molecular hydrogen gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravens, T. E.; Victor, G. A.; Dalgarno, A.

    1975-01-01

    The processes by which energetic electrons lose energy in a weakly ionized gas of molecular hydrogen are analyzed, and calculations are carried out taking into account the discrete nature of the excitation processes. The excitation, ionization, and heating efficiencies are computed for electrons with energies up to 100 eV absorbed in a gas with fractional ionizations up to 0.01, and the mean energy per pair of neutral hydrogen atoms is calculated.

  7. Effect of in-material losses on terahertz absorption, transmission, and reflection in photonic crystals made of polar dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Serebryannikov, Andriy E., E-mail: andser@amu.edu.pl; Nanotechnology Research Center—NANOTAM, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara; Nojima, S.

    2015-10-07

    The effect of the material absorption factor on terahertz absorption (A), transmittance (T), and reflectance (R) for slabs of PhC that comprise rods made of GaAs, a polar dielectric, is studied. The main goal was to illustrate how critical a choice of the absorption factor for simulations is and to indicate the importance of the possible modification of the absorption ability by using either active or lossy impurities. The spectra of A, T, and R are strongly sensitive to the location of the polaritonic gap with respect to the photonic pass and stop bands connected with periodicity that enables themore » efficient combination of the effects of material and structural parameters. It will be shown that the spectra can strongly depend on the utilized value of the material absorption factor. In particular, both narrow and wide absorption bands may appear owing to a variation of the material parameters with a frequency in the vicinity of the polaritonic gap. The latter are often achieved at wideband suppression of transmission, so that an ultra-wide stop band can appear as a result of adjustment of the stop bands having different origin. The results obtained at simultaneous variation of the absorption factor and frequency, and angle of incidence and frequency, indicate the possibility of the existence of wide ranges of tolerance, in which the basic features do remain. This allows for mitigating the accuracy requirements for the absorption factor in simulations and promises the efficient absorption of nonmonochromatic waves and beams with a wide angular spectrum. Suppression of narrowband effects in transmission is demonstrated at rather large values of the absorption factor, when they appear due to either the defect modes related to structural defects or dispersion inspired variations of the material parameters in the vicinity of the polaritonic gap. Comparison with auxiliary structures helps one to detect the common features and differences of homogeneous slabs and

  8. Scanning transmission electron microscopy methods for the analysis of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Arturo; Mejía-Rosales, Sergio; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Here we review the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) characterization technique and STEM imaging methods. We describe applications of STEM for studying inorganic nanoparticles, and other uses of STEM in biological and health sciences and discuss how to interpret STEM results. The STEM imaging mode has certain benefits compared with the broad-beam illumination mode; the main advantage is the collection of the information about the specimen using a high angular annular dark field (HAADF) detector, in which the images registered have different levels of contrast related to the chemical composition of the sample. Another advantage of its use in the analysis of biological samples is its contrast for thick stained sections, since HAADF images of samples with thickness of 100-120 nm have notoriously better contrast than those obtained by other techniques. Combining the HAADF-STEM imaging with the new aberration correction era, the STEM technique reaches a direct way to imaging the atomistic structure and composition of nanostructures at a sub-angstrom resolution. Thus, alloying in metallic nanoparticles is directly resolved at atomic scale by the HAADF-STEM imaging, and the comparison of the STEM images with results from simulations gives a very powerful way of analysis of structure and composition. The use of X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy attached to the electron microscope for STEM mode is also described. In issues where characterization at the atomic scale of the interaction between metallic nanoparticles and biological systems is needed, all the associated techniques to STEM become powerful tools for the best understanding on how to use these particles in biomedical applications.

  9. Electron-beam broadening in amorphous carbon films in low-energy scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Drees, H; Müller, E; Dries, M; Gerthsen, D

    2018-02-01

    Resolution in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is ultimately limited by the diameter of the electron beam. The electron beam diameter is not only determined by the properties of the condenser lens system but also by electron scattering in the specimen which leads to electron-beam broadening and degradation of the resolution with increasing specimen thickness. In this work we introduce a new method to measure electron-beam broadening which is based on STEM imaging with a multi-segmented STEM detector. We focus on STEM at low electron energies between 10 and 30 keV and use an amorphous carbon film with known thickness as test object. The experimental results are compared with calculated beam diameters using different analytical models and Monte-Carlo simulations. We find excellent agreement of the experimental data with the recently published model by Gauvin and Rudinsky [1] for small t/λ el (thickness to elastic mean free path) values which are considered in our study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of paired helical filaments by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ksiezak-Reding, Hanna; Wall, Joseph S

    2005-07-01

    Paired helical filaments (PHFs) are abnormal twisted filaments composed of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. They are found in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders designated as tauopathies. They are a major component of intracellular inclusions known as neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). The objective of this review is to summarize various structural studies of PHFs in which using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has been particularly informative. STEM provides shape and mass per unit length measurements important for studying ultrastructural aspects of filaments. These include quantitative comparisons between dispersed and aggregated populations of PHFs as well as comparative studies of PHFs in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Other approaches are also discussed if relevant or complementary to studies using STEM, e.g., application of a novel staining reagent, Nanovan. Our understanding of the PHF structure and the development of PHFs into NFTs is presented from a historical perspective. Others goals are to describe the biochemical and ultrastructural complexity of authentic PHFs, to assess similarities between authentic and synthetic PHFs, and to discuss recent advances in PHF modeling.

  11. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF HELIUM BEARING FUSION WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tosten, M; Michael Morgan, M

    2008-12-12

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was conducted to characterize the helium bubble distributions in tritium-charged-and-aged 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel fusion welds containing approximately 150 appm helium-3. TEM foils were prepared from C-shaped fracture toughness test specimens containing {delta} ferrite levels ranging from 4 to 33 volume percent. The weld microstructures in the low ferrite welds consisted mostly of austenite and discontinuous, skeletal {delta} ferrite. In welds with higher levels of {delta} ferrite, the ferrite was more continuous and, in some areas of the 33 volume percent sample, was the matrix/majority phase. The helium bubble microstructures observed were similarmore » in all samples. Bubbles were found in the austenite but not in the {delta} ferrite. In the austenite, bubbles had nucleated homogeneously in the grain interiors and heterogeneously on dislocations. Bubbles were not found on any austenite/austenite grain boundaries or at the austenite/{delta} ferrite interphase interfaces. Bubbles were not observed in the {delta} ferrite because of the combined effects of the low solubility and rapid diffusion of tritium through the {delta} ferrite which limited the amount of helium present to form visible bubbles.« less

  12. Testicular cellular toxicity of cadmium : transmission electron microscopy examination.

    PubMed

    Haffor, A S; Abou-Tarboush, F M

    2004-07-01

    It is clear that environmental heavy metals influence life systems and reproductive system. In the present study histological investigation revealed that cadmium was testicular toxicant in mice. Here we compared the fine-structure of spermatogenesis in two groups of mice (SWR), experimental and control. The experimental group underwent cadmium ingestion at 1 mg/kg daily for 4 weeks. The control group underwent ingestion of distilled water with equal dosages, using the same type of injectors, for 4-weeks. After cadmium exposure period both control and experimental groups were killed and samples of the testes were processed for microscopic examination. Ultra sections were examined and photographed by Transmission Electron Microscope (JEOL- 100SX) at 80KV. Ultrastructure examination revealed, vascular endothelial, interstitial, and sertoli cells damages. Early impairments of germinal cellular differentiation resulted in deformations in all parts of late spermatid. There were dislocation of accrosomal granules, nuclear damage associated with chromatin heterogeneity, detached spermatid from the apical process of sertoli cell, disarrangement of the mitochondria, abnormal oriented tail piece, and abnormal microtubules complex. These ultra morphological abnormalities relate to cell injury and to the resulting physiological abnormality, necrobiosis. Based on the results of this investigation it can be concluded that cadmium ingestion at 1000 microg/kg caused testicular toxicity and abnormalities in early sperm development.

  13. Optical absorption in fused silica at elevated temperatures during 1.5-MeV electron irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. B.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental determination of the optical transmission of Corning 7940 UV and Suprasil 1 and 2 fused silica has been made during 1.5-MeV electron bombardment. The fused silica reached temperatures ranging from 150 to 1000 C. The Lewis Research Center dynamitron provided electron current densities which corresponded to a dose rate of 2.6 to 20 Mrad/sec. The irradiation induced absorption was measured at 215.0, 270.0, and 450.0 nm (2150, 2700, 4500 A). The length of each irradiation was sufficient so that an equilibrium between radiation induced coloration and high temperature annealing was reached. The experimental results indicate a significant optical absorption, with values of the induced absorption coefficient at 215.0 nm (2150 A) of 14.5 to 2.2/cm, at 270.0 nm (2700 A) of 9.7 to 3.0/cm and at 450.0 nm (4500 A) of 3.7 to 0.5/cm. This would make the use of fused silica as the separating wall material in the nuclear light bulb propulsion concept questionable.

  14. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1355 - Electronic Data Transmission Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electronic Data Transmission Format C Appendix C to Part 1355 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN.... 1355, App. C Appendix C to Part 1355—Electronic Data Transmission Format All AFCARS data to be sent...

  15. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Iron Metal in Almahata Sitta Ureilite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Yubuta, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Aoyagi, Y.; Yasuhara, A.; Mihira, T.; Zolensky, M. E.; Goodrich, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Almahata Sitta (AS) is a polymict breccia mainly composed of variable ureilite lithologies with small amounts of chondritic lithologies [1]. Fe metal is a common accessory phase in ureilites, but our earlier study on Fe metals in one of AS fragments (#44) revealed a unique mineralogy never seen in other ureilites [2,3]. In this abstract we report detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on these metal grains to better understand the thermal history of ureilites. We prepared FIB sections of AS#44 by JEOL JIB-4000 from the PTS that was well characterized by SEM-EBSD in our earlier study [2]. The sections were then observed by STEM (JEOL JEM- 2100F). One of the FIB sections shows a submicron-sized symplectic intergrown texture composed of Fe metal (kamacite), Fe carbide (cohenite), Fe phosphide (schreibersite), and Fe sulfide (troilite). Each phase has an identical SAED pattern in spite of its complex texture, suggesting co-crystallization of all phases. This is probably caused by shock re-melting of pre-existing metal + graphite to form a eutectic-looking texture. The other FIB section is mostly composed of homogeneous Fe metal (93 wt% Fe, 5 wt% Ni, and 2 wt% Si), but BF-STEM images exhibited the presence of elongated lathy grains (approx. 2 microns long) embedded in the interstitial matrix. The SAED patterns from these lath grains could be indexed by alpha-Fe (bcc) while interstitial areas are gamma-Fe (fcc). The elongated alpha-Fe grains show tweed-like structures suggesting martensite transformation. Such a texture can be formed by rapid cooling from high temperature where gamma-Fe was stable. Subsequently alpha-Fe crystallized, but gamma-Fe remained in the interstitial matrix due to quenching from high temperature. This scenario is consistent with very rapid cooling history of ureilites suggested by silicate mineralogy.

  16. Experimental shock deformation in zircon: a transmission electron microscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, H.; Reimold, W. U.; Koeberl, C.; Hornemann, U.; Doukhan, J.-C.

    1999-06-01

    In recent years, apparently shock-induced and, thus, impact-characteristic microdeformations, in the form of planar microdeformation features and so-called strawberry (granular) texture, have been observed in zircons in rocks from confirmed impact structures and from the K/ T boundary. The nature of the planar microdeformations in this mineral is, however, still unknown, and critical information is needed regarding the shock pressure range in which these deformation effects are produced. We experimentally shock deformed two series of thin zircon (ZrSiO 4) target plates, cut perpendicular to the c-axis, at shock pressures of 20, 40, and 60 GPa. The recovered samples were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, one sample series was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Microdeformation effects observed at 20 GPa include pervasive micro-cleavage and dislocation patterns. Plastic deformation is indicated by a high density of straight dislocations in glide configuration. The dominant glide systems are <100>{010}. Micro-cleavages, induced by shear stresses during the compression stage, occur mostly in the {100} planes. The large density of dislocations at crack tips shows that plastic deformation was initiated by the micro-cracking processs. At 40 GPa, the sample was partly transformed from the zircon (z) to a scheelite (CaWO 4)-type (s) structure. Planar deformation features (PDFs) containing an amorphous phase of zircon composition are present in the not yet transformed zircon relics. The phase with scheelite structure, initiated in the {100} planes of zircon, consists of thin (0.1 to several μm) bands that crosscut the zircon matrix. The phase transformation is displacive (martensitic) and can be related by {100} z // {112} s and [001] z // <110> s. The scheelite structure phase is densely twinned, with twins in the (112) plane. The 60-GPa sample consists completely of the scheelite structure phase. Crosscutting and

  17. Electron tomography of whole cultured cells using novel transmission electron imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Taiga; Shoji, Minami; Hisada, Akiko; Ominami, Yusuke; Ito, Sukehiro; Ushiki, Tatsuo; Nakajima, Masato; Ohshima, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Since a three-dimensional (3D) cellular ultrastructure is significant for biological functions, it has been investigated using various electron microscopic techniques. Although transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-based techniques are traditionally used, cells must be embedded in resin and sliced into ultrathin sections in sample preparation processes. Block-face observation using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) has also been recently applied to 3D observation of cellular components, but this is a destructive inspection and does not allow re-examination. Therefore, we developed electron tomography using a transmission electron imaging technique called Plate-TEM. With Plate-TEM, the cells cultured directly on a scintillator plate are inserted into a conventional SEM equipped with a Plate-TEM observation system, and their internal structures are observed by detecting scintillation light produced by electrons passing through the cells. This technology has the following four advantages. First, the cells cultured on the plate can be observed at electron-microscopic resolution since they remain on the plate. Second, both surface and internal information can be obtained simultaneously by using electron- and photo-detectors, respectively, because a Plate-TEM detector is installed in an SEM. Third, the cells on the scintillator plate can also be inspected using light microscopy because the plate has transparent features. Finally, correlative observation with other techniques, such as conventional TEM, is possible after Plate-TEM observation because Plate-TEM is a non-destructive analysis technique. We also designed a sample stage to tilt the samples for tomography with Plate-TEM, by which 3D organization of cellular structures can be visualized as a whole cell. In the present study, Mm2T cells were investigated using our tomography system, resulting in 3D visualization of cell organelles such as mitochondria, lipid droplets, and microvilli. Correlative observations

  18. A Simple Transmission Electron Microscopy Method for Fast Thickness Characterization of Suspended Graphene and Graphite Flakes.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Stefano; Akhtar, Sultan; Leifer, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    We present a simple, fast method for thickness characterization of suspended graphene/graphite flakes that is based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We derive an analytical expression for the intensity of the transmitted electron beam I 0(t), as a function of the specimen thickness t (t<λ; where λ is the absorption constant for graphite). We show that in thin graphite crystals the transmitted intensity is a linear function of t. Furthermore, high-resolution (HR) TEM simulations are performed to obtain λ for a 001 zone axis orientation, in a two-beam case and in a low symmetry orientation. Subsequently, HR (used to determine t) and bright-field (to measure I 0(0) and I 0(t)) images were acquired to experimentally determine λ. The experimental value measured in low symmetry orientation matches the calculated value (i.e., λ=225±9 nm). The simulations also show that the linear approximation is valid up to a sample thickness of 3-4 nm regardless of the orientation and up to several ten nanometers for a low symmetry orientation. When compared with standard techniques for thickness determination of graphene/graphite, the method we propose has the advantage of being simple and fast, requiring only the acquisition of bright-field images.

  19. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I; Nellist, Peter D; Cosgriff, Eireann C; D'Alfonso, Adrian J; Morgan, Andrew J; Allen, Leslie J; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Electronic absorption spectra of chromium-bearing sapphirine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, K.; Platonov, A. N.; Matsuk, S. S.; Andrut, M.

    1994-05-01

    Violet, non-pleochroic and greenish-blue, pleochroic chromium-substituted sapphirines were found in corundum-bearing spinel-websterite xenolites from the Yakutian kimberlite pipes Noyabrskaya (N) and Sludyanka (Sl), respectively. The crystallochemical formulae of sapphirine crystals from such xenolites were determined by EMP to be (Mg3.40Fe0.23Al3.25Cr0.16)[6] Al{1.00/[6]}[O2/Al4.53Si1.47O18] (N) and (Mg2.53Fe0.55 Mn0.04Ti{0.03/4+}Al3.55Cr{0.08/3+})[6]Al{1.00/[16]}[O2/Al4.28Si1.73O18] (Sl). Single crystal spectra in the range 35000 6000 cm1- showed a slightly polarization dependent absorption edge near 3200 cm1- (N) or 30000 cm1- (Sl) and unpolarized bands at 25300 and 17300 cm1-, typical of spin-allowed transitions, derived from 4A2g→4T1g and 4A2g→4T2g, of Cr3+ in octahedral sites, with point symmetry C1, of the structure. Another weak band at 23000 cm-1 in the sapphirine-N spectra is attributed to low symmetry splitting of the excited 4T1 (F)-State of Cr3+. These assignments lead to crystal field parameters Dq=1730cm-1 and B= 685cm-1 of Cr3+ in sapphirine. Crystallochemical and spectroscopic arguments suggest that Cr3+ subsitutes for Al in the M(1) or M(8) sites of the sapphirine structure. In addition to Cr3+-transitions, spectra of Sl exhibit weak dd-bands of Fe2+ at 10000 and 7700 cm1-, which are unpolarized in consistency with the C1 site symmetry of the octahedra in the structure. Spectra of Sl show also prominent, broad bands (Δv1/2˜-5000 cm1-) at 15000 and 11000 cm1-, which occur in E//Y(//b) and E//Z(//c=12°) only and exhibit an intensity ratio αY∶αz close to 1∶3. This result, the large half width, as well as band energy — MM distance considerations suggest that these bands originate from Fe2+[6]-Fe3+[6] charge-transfer transitions in wall octahedra M(1)M(2), M(6)M(7) etc., forming MM vectors of 30° with the c-axis. The lack of Fe2+-Fe3+ charge-transfer bands in sapphirine N might indicate a lower oxygen fugacity during the formation of

  1. Theoretical calculations on the electron absorption spectra of selected Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) and derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Ping

    1993-01-01

    As a theoretical component of the joint effort with the laboratory of Dr. Lou Allamandola to search for potential candidates for interstellar organic carbon compound that are responsible for the visible diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIB's), quantum mechanical calculations were performed on the electron absorption spectra of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and derivatives. In the completed project, 15 different species of naphthalene, its hydrogen abstraction and addition derivatives, and corresponding cations and anions were studied. Using semiempirical quantum mechanical method INDO/S, the ground electronic state of each species was evaluated with restricted Hartree-Fock scheme and limited configuration interaction. The lowest energy spin state for each species was used for electron absorption calculations. Results indicate that these calculations are accurate enough to reproduce the spectra of naphthalene cation and anion observed in neon matrix. The spectral pattern of the hydrogen abstraction and addition derivatives predicted based on these results indicate that the electron configuration of the pi orbitals of these species is the dominant determinant. A combined list of 19 absorptions calculated from 4500 A to 10,400 A were compiled and suggested as potential candidates that are relevant for the DIB's absorptions. Continued studies on pyrene and derivatives revealed the ground state symmetries and multiplicities of its neutral, anionic, and cationic species. Spectral calculations show that the cation (B(sub 3g)-2) and the anion (A(sub u)-2) are more likely to have low energy absorptions in the regions between 10 kK and 20 kK, similar to naphthalene. These absorptions, together with those to be determined from the hydrogen abstraction and addition derivatives of pyrene, can be used to provide additional candidates and suggest experimental work in the search for interstellar compounds that are responsible for DIB's.

  2. The role of electron irradiation history in liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Hardeep

    2018-01-01

    In situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LC-TEM) allows dynamic nanoscale characterization of systems in a hydrated state. Although powerful, this technique remains impaired by issues of repeatability that limit experimental fidelity and hinder the identification and control of some variables underlying observed dynamics. We detail new LC-TEM devices that improve experimental reproducibility by expanding available imaging area and providing a platform for investigating electron flux history on the sample. Irradiation history is an important factor influencing LC-TEM results that has, to this point, been largely qualitatively and not quantitatively described. We use these devices to highlight the role of cumulative electron flux history on samples from both nanoparticle growth and biological imaging experiments and demonstrate capture of time zero, low-dose images on beam-sensitive samples. In particular, the ability to capture pristine images of biological samples, where the acquired image is the first time that the cell experiences significant electron flux, allowed us to determine that nanoparticle movement compared to the cell membrane was a function of cell damage and therefore an artifact rather than visualizing cell dynamics in action. These results highlight just a subset of the new science that is accessible with LC-TEM through the new multiwindow devices with patterned focusing aides. PMID:29725619

  3. The role of electron irradiation history in liquid cell transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Moser, Trevor H; Mehta, Hardeep; Park, Chiwoo; Kelly, Ryan T; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Evans, James E

    2018-04-01

    In situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LC-TEM) allows dynamic nanoscale characterization of systems in a hydrated state. Although powerful, this technique remains impaired by issues of repeatability that limit experimental fidelity and hinder the identification and control of some variables underlying observed dynamics. We detail new LC-TEM devices that improve experimental reproducibility by expanding available imaging area and providing a platform for investigating electron flux history on the sample. Irradiation history is an important factor influencing LC-TEM results that has, to this point, been largely qualitatively and not quantitatively described. We use these devices to highlight the role of cumulative electron flux history on samples from both nanoparticle growth and biological imaging experiments and demonstrate capture of time zero, low-dose images on beam-sensitive samples. In particular, the ability to capture pristine images of biological samples, where the acquired image is the first time that the cell experiences significant electron flux, allowed us to determine that nanoparticle movement compared to the cell membrane was a function of cell damage and therefore an artifact rather than visualizing cell dynamics in action. These results highlight just a subset of the new science that is accessible with LC-TEM through the new multiwindow devices with patterned focusing aides.

  4. The role of electron irradiation history in liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Trevor H.; Mehta, Hardeep; Park, Chiwoo

    In situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LC-TEM) allows dynamic nanoscale characterization of systems in a hydrated state. Although powerful, this technique remains impaired by issues of repeatability that limit experimental fidelity and hinder the identification and control of some variables underlying observed dynamics. We detail new LC- TEM devices that improve experimental reproducibility by expanding available imaging area and providing a platform for investigating electron flux history on the sample. Irradiation history is an important factor influencing LC-TEM results that has, to this point, been largely qualitatively and not quantitatively described. We use these devices to highlight the rolemore » of cumulative electron flux history on samples from both nanoparticle growth and biological imaging experiments and demonstrate capture of time zero, low-dose images on beam-sensitive samples. In particular, the ability to capture pristine images of biological samples, where the acquired image is the first time that the cell experiences significant electron flux, allowed us to determine that nanoparticle movement compared to the cell membrane was a function of cell damage and therefore an artifact rather than visualizing cell dynamics in action. These results highlight just a subset of the new science that is accessible with LC-TEM through the new multiwindow devices with patterned focusing aides.« less

  5. The role of electron irradiation history in liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Trevor H.; Mehta, Hardeep; Park, Chiwoo

    In situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LC-TEM) allows dynamic nanoscale characterization of systems in a hydrated state. Although powerful, this technique remains impaired by issues of repeatability that limit experimental fidelity and hinder the identification and control of some variables underlying observed dynamics. We detail new LC-TEM devices that improve experimental reproducibility by expanding available imaging area and providing a platform for investigating electron flux history on the sample. Irradiation history is an important factor influencing LC-TEM results that has, to this point, been largely qualitatively and not quantitatively described. We use these devices to highlight the role ofmore » cumulative electron flux history on samples from both nanoparticle growth and biological imaging experiments and demonstrate capture of time zero, low-dose images on beam-sensitive samples. In particular, the ability to capture pristine images of biological samples, where the acquired image is the first time that the cell experiences significant electron flux, allowed us to determine that nanoparticle movement compared to the cell membrane was a function of cell damage and therefore an artifact rather than visualizing cell dynamics in action. Lastly, these results highlight just a subset of the new science that is accessible with LC-TEM through the new multiwindow devices with patterned focusing aides.« less

  6. Path-separated electron interferometry in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Fehmi S.; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan J.; Pierce, Jordan S.; McMorran, Benjamin J.

    2018-05-01

    We report a path-separated electron interferometer within a scanning transmission electron microscope. In this setup, we use a nanofabricated grating as an amplitude-division beamsplitter to prepare multiple spatially separated, coherent electron probe beams. We achieve path separations of 30 nm. We pass the  +1 diffraction order probe through amorphous carbon while passing the 0th and  ‑1 orders through vacuum. The probes are then made to interfere via imaging optics, and we observe an interference pattern at the CCD detector with up to 39.7% fringe visibility. We show preliminary experimental results in which the interference pattern was recorded during a 1D scan of the diffracted probes across a test phase object. These results qualitatively agree with a modeled interference predicted by an independent measurement of the specimen thickness. This experimental design can potentially be applied to phase contrast imaging and fundamental physics experiments, such as an exploration of electron wave packet coherence length.

  7. The role of electron irradiation history in liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Moser, Trevor H.; Mehta, Hardeep; Park, Chiwoo; ...

    2018-04-20

    In situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LC-TEM) allows dynamic nanoscale characterization of systems in a hydrated state. Although powerful, this technique remains impaired by issues of repeatability that limit experimental fidelity and hinder the identification and control of some variables underlying observed dynamics. We detail new LC-TEM devices that improve experimental reproducibility by expanding available imaging area and providing a platform for investigating electron flux history on the sample. Irradiation history is an important factor influencing LC-TEM results that has, to this point, been largely qualitatively and not quantitatively described. We use these devices to highlight the role ofmore » cumulative electron flux history on samples from both nanoparticle growth and biological imaging experiments and demonstrate capture of time zero, low-dose images on beam-sensitive samples. In particular, the ability to capture pristine images of biological samples, where the acquired image is the first time that the cell experiences significant electron flux, allowed us to determine that nanoparticle movement compared to the cell membrane was a function of cell damage and therefore an artifact rather than visualizing cell dynamics in action. Lastly, these results highlight just a subset of the new science that is accessible with LC-TEM through the new multiwindow devices with patterned focusing aides.« less

  8. Ab initio calculation of the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Martiniano, Hugo F. M. C.; Galamba, Nuno; Cabral, Benedito J. Costa, E-mail: ben@cii.fc.ul.pt

    2014-04-28

    The electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water was investigated by coupling a one-body energy decomposition scheme to configurations generated by classical and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD). A Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian formalism was adopted and the excitation energies in the liquid phase were calculated with the equation of motion coupled cluster with single and double excitations method. Molecular dynamics configurations were generated by different approaches. Classical MD were carried out with the TIP4P-Ew and AMOEBA force fields. The BLYP and BLYP-D3 exchange-correlation functionals were used in BOMD. Theoretical and experimental results for the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water are inmore » good agreement. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the structure of liquid water predicted by the different models and the electronic absorption spectrum. The theoretical gas to liquid phase blue-shift of the peak positions of the electronic absorption spectrum is in good agreement with experiment. The overall shift is determined by a competition between the O–H stretching of the water monomer in liquid water that leads to a red-shift and polarization effects that induce a blue-shift. The results illustrate the importance of coupling many-body energy decomposition schemes to molecular dynamics configurations to carry out ab initio calculations of the electronic properties in liquid phase.« less

  9. Ab initio calculation of the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiniano, Hugo F. M. C.; Galamba, Nuno; Cabral, Benedito J. Costa

    2014-04-01

    The electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water was investigated by coupling a one-body energy decomposition scheme to configurations generated by classical and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD). A Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian formalism was adopted and the excitation energies in the liquid phase were calculated with the equation of motion coupled cluster with single and double excitations method. Molecular dynamics configurations were generated by different approaches. Classical MD were carried out with the TIP4P-Ew and AMOEBA force fields. The BLYP and BLYP-D3 exchange-correlation functionals were used in BOMD. Theoretical and experimental results for the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water are in good agreement. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the structure of liquid water predicted by the different models and the electronic absorption spectrum. The theoretical gas to liquid phase blue-shift of the peak positions of the electronic absorption spectrum is in good agreement with experiment. The overall shift is determined by a competition between the O-H stretching of the water monomer in liquid water that leads to a red-shift and polarization effects that induce a blue-shift. The results illustrate the importance of coupling many-body energy decomposition schemes to molecular dynamics configurations to carry out ab initio calculations of the electronic properties in liquid phase.

  10. Isotope effects in liquid water probed by transmission mode x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the oxygen K-edge.

    PubMed

    Schreck, Simon; Wernet, Philippe

    2016-09-14

    The effects of isotope substitution in liquid water are probed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the O K-edge as measured in transmission mode. Confirming earlier x-ray Raman scattering experiments, the D2O spectrum is found to be blue shifted with respect to H2O, and the D2O spectrum to be less broadened. Following the earlier interpretations of UV and x-ray Raman spectra, the shift is related to the difference in ground-state zero-point energies between D2O and H2O, while the difference in broadening is related to the difference in ground-state vibrational zero-point distributions. We demonstrate that the transmission-mode measurements allow for determining the spectral shapes with unprecedented accuracy. Owing in addition to the increased spectral resolution and signal to noise ratio compared to the earlier measurements, the new data enable the stringent determination of blue shift and broadening in the O K-edge x-ray absorption spectrum of liquid water upon isotope substitution. The results are compared to UV absorption data, and it is discussed to which extent they reflect the differences in zero-point energies and vibrational zero-point distributions in the ground-states of the liquids. The influence of the shape of the final-state potential, inclusion of the Franck-Condon structure, and differences between liquid H2O and D2O resulting from different hydrogen-bond environments in the liquids are addressed. The differences between the O K-edge absorption spectra of water from our transmission-mode measurements and from the state-of-the-art x-ray Raman scattering experiments are discussed in addition. The experimentally extracted values of blue shift and broadening are proposed to serve as a test for calculations of ground-state zero-point energies and vibrational zero-point distributions in liquid H2O and D2O. This clearly motivates the need for new calculations of the O K-edge x-ray absorption spectrum of liquid water.

  11. Nanometres-resolution Kikuchi patterns from materials science specimens with transmission electron forward scatter diffraction in the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Brodusch, N; Demers, H; Gauvin, R

    2013-04-01

    A charge-coupled device camera of an electron backscattered diffraction system in a scanning electron microscope was positioned below a thin specimen and transmission Kikuchi patterns were collected. Contrary to electron backscattered diffraction, transmission electron forward scatter diffraction provides phase identification and orientation mapping at the nanoscale. The minimum Pd particle size for which a Kikuchi diffraction pattern was detected and indexed reliably was 5.6 nm. An orientation mapping resolution of 5 nm was measured at 30 kV. The resolution obtained with transmission electron forward scatter diffraction was of the same order of magnitude than that reported in electron nanodiffraction in the transmission electron microscope. An energy dispersive spectrometer X-ray map and a transmission electron forward scatter diffraction orientation map were acquired simultaneously. The high-resolution chemical, phase and orientation maps provided at once information on the chemical form, orientation and coherency of precipitates in an aluminium-lithium 2099 alloy. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  12. Electron photodetachment from gas phase peptide dianions. Relation with optical absorption properties.

    PubMed

    Joly, Laure; Antoine, Rodolphe; Broyer, Michel; Lemoine, Jérôme; Dugourd, Philippe

    2008-02-07

    Electron detachment from peptide dianions is studied as a function of the laser wavelength. The first step for the detachment is a resonant electronic excitation of the dianions. Electronic excitation spectra are reported for three peptides, including gramicidin. A comparative study of the detachment yield for 13 peptides was performed at 260 nm and at 220 nm. At 260 nm, the detachment yield is mainly driven by the sum of the absorption coefficients of the aromatic amino acids that are contained in the peptide. At 220 nm, no direct relation is observed between the electron photodetachement yields and the sum of absorption efficiencies. At this wavelength, the sequence and the structure of the peptide may have an influence on the photodetachment process.

  13. Investigation of Diode Pumped Alkali Laser Atmospheric Transmission Using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    atmosphere”. Applied Physics B: Lasers and Optics, 82(1):133–140, 2006. 11. Barrass, S., Y. Grard, R.J. Holdsworth, and P.A. Martin . “Near-infrared tun...15. Brown, M. S., S. Williams, C. D. Lindstrom , and D. L. Barone. Progress in Applying Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy to Scramjet

  14. Improvements to water vapor transmission and capillary absorption measurements in porous materials

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Samuel V. Glass; Charles R. Boardman

    2016-01-01

    The vapor permeability (or equivalently the vapor diffusion resistance factor) and the capillary absorption coefficient are frequently used as inputs to hygrothermal or heat, air, and moisture (HAM) models. However, it has been well documented that the methods used to determine these properties are sensitive to the operator, and wide variations in the properties have...

  15. Tuning of few-electron states and optical absorption anisotropy in GaAs quantum rings.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenhua; Li, Jian; Li, Jun; Yin, Huaxiang; Liu, Yu

    2017-11-15

    The electronic and optical properties of a GaAs quantum ring (QR) with few electrons in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) and the Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction (DSOI) have been investigated theoretically. The configuration interaction (CI) method is employed to calculate the eigenvalues and eigenstates of the multiple-electron QR accurately. Our numerical results demonstrate that the symmetry breaking induced by the RSOI and DSOI leads to an anisotropic distribution of multi-electron states. The Coulomb interaction offers additional modulation of the electron distribution and thus the optical absorption indices in the quantum rings. By tuning the magnetic/electric fields and/or electron numbers in a quantum ring, one can change its optical properties significantly. Our theory provides a new way to control the multi-electron states and optical properties of a QR by hybrid modulations or by electrical means only.

  16. Demonstration of 4×100 Gbps discrete multitone transmission using electric absorption modulated laser at 1550-nm for dense wavelength division multiplexing intradata center connect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuming; Yu, Jianjun; Li, Xinying

    2017-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate 4 lanes up to 400 Gbps discrete multitone transmission using an electric absorption modulated laser (EML) at 1550-nm for dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) intradata center connects. This is the first demonstration of 4×100 Gb/s transmission using EML at 1550-nm, and it is compatible with the DWDM system at C-band.

  17. Accurate virus quantitation using a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) detector in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Blancett, Candace D; Fetterer, David P; Koistinen, Keith A; Morazzani, Elaine M; Monninger, Mitchell K; Piper, Ashley E; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Kearney, Brian J; Norris, Sarah L; Rossi, Cynthia A; Glass, Pamela J; Sun, Mei G

    2017-10-01

    A method for accurate quantitation of virus particles has long been sought, but a perfect method still eludes the scientific community. Electron Microscopy (EM) quantitation is a valuable technique because it provides direct morphology information and counts of all viral particles, whether or not they are infectious. In the past, EM negative stain quantitation methods have been cited as inaccurate, non-reproducible, and with detection limits that were too high to be useful. To improve accuracy and reproducibility, we have developed a method termed Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy - Virus Quantitation (STEM-VQ), which simplifies sample preparation and uses a high throughput STEM detector in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled with commercially available software. In this paper, we demonstrate STEM-VQ with an alphavirus stock preparation to present the method's accuracy and reproducibility, including a comparison of STEM-VQ to viral plaque assay and the ViroCyt Virus Counter. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: experimental observations and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Inada, H; Su, D; Egerton, R F; Konno, M; Wu, L; Ciston, J; Wall, J; Zhu, Y

    2011-06-01

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 21 CFR 1311.05 - Standards for technologies for electronic transmission of orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Standards for technologies for electronic... JUSTICE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS General § 1311.05 Standards for technologies for electronic transmission of orders. (a) A registrant or a person with power of attorney to sign...

  20. 21 CFR 1311.05 - Standards for technologies for electronic transmission of orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... technologies for electronic transmission of orders. (a) A registrant or a person with power of attorney to sign orders for Schedule I and II controlled substances may use any technology to sign and electronically... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standards for technologies for electronic...

  1. Automated grain mapping using wide angle convergent beam electron diffraction in transmission electron microscope for nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vineet

    2011-12-01

    The grain size statistics, commonly derived from the grain map of a material sample, are important microstructure characteristics that greatly influence its properties. The grain map for nanomaterials is usually obtained manually by visual inspection of the transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographs because automated methods do not perform satisfactorily. While the visual inspection method provides reliable results, it is a labor intensive process and is often prone to human errors. In this article, an automated grain mapping method is developed using TEM diffraction patterns. The presented method uses wide angle convergent beam diffraction in the TEM. The automated technique was applied on a platinum thin film sample to obtain the grain map and subsequently derive grain size statistics from it. The grain size statistics obtained with the automated method were found in good agreement with the visual inspection method.

  2. Peptide adsorption to cyanine dye aggregates revealed by cryo-transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    von Berlepsch, Hans; Brandenburg, Enrico; Koksch, Beate; Böttcher, Christoph

    2010-07-06

    The binding interaction between aggregates of the 5-chloro-2-[[5-chloro-3-(3-sulfopropyl)-3H-benzothiazol-2-ylidene]methyl]-3-(3-sulfopropyl)benzothiazolium hydroxide inner salt ammonium salt (CD-1) and alpha-helix, as well as beta-sheet forming de novo designed peptides, was investigated by absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. Both pure dye and pure peptides self-assembled into well-defined supramolecular assemblies in acetate buffer at pH = 4. The dye formed sheetlike and tubular H- and J-aggregates and the peptides alpha-helical coiled-coil assemblies or beta-sheet rich fibrils. After mixing dye and peptide solutions, tubular aggregates with an unusual ultrastructure were found, most likely due to the decoration of dye tubes with monolayers of peptide assemblies based on the strong electrostatic attraction between the oppositely charged species. There was neither indication of a transfer of chirality from the peptides to the dye aggregates nor the opposite effect of a structural transfer from dye aggregates onto the peptides secondary structure.

  3. X-ray absorption spectroscopy to determine originating depth of electrons that form an inelastic background of Auger electron spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Noritake; Cui, Yi-Tao; Murai, Takaaki; Oji, Hiroshi; Kimoto, Yasuji

    2017-07-01

    In Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), the spectral background is mainly due to inelastic scattering of Auger electrons that lose their kinetic energy in a sample bulk. To investigate the spectral components within this background for SiO2(19.3 nm)/Si(100) with known layer thickness, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used in the partial-electron-yield (PEY) mode at several electron kinetic energies to probe the background of the Si KLL Auger peak. The Si K-edge PEY-XAS spectra constituted of both Si and SiO2 components at each kinetic energy, and their component fractions were approximately the same as those derived from the simulated AES background for the same sample structure. The contributions of Auger electrons originating from layers at different depths to the inelastic background could thus be identified experimentally.

  4. Imaging Plasmon Hybridization of Fano Resonances via Hot-Electron-Mediated Absorption Mapping.

    PubMed

    Simoncelli, Sabrina; Li, Yi; Cortés, Emiliano; Maier, Stefan A

    2018-06-13

    The inhibition of radiative losses in dark plasmon modes allows storing electromagnetic energy more efficiently than in far-field excitable bright-plasmon modes. As such, processes benefiting from the enhanced absorption of light in plasmonic materials could also take profit of dark plasmon modes to boost and control nanoscale energy collection, storage, and transfer. We experimentally probe this process by imaging with nanoscale precision the hot-electron driven desorption of thiolated molecules from the surface of gold Fano nanostructures, investigating the effect of wavelength and polarization of the incident light. Spatially resolved absorption maps allow us to show the contribution of each element of the nanoantenna in the hot-electron driven process and their interplay in exciting a dark plasmon mode. Plasmon-mode engineering allows control of nanoscale reactivity and offers a route to further enhance and manipulate hot-electron driven chemical reactions and energy-conversion and transfer at the nanoscale.

  5. Evaluation of anterior lenticonus in alport syndrome using tracey wavefront aberrometry and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwan Soo; Kim, Mo Sae; Kim, Joon Mo; Choi, Chul Young

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of Tracey wavefront aberrometry (Tracey Technologies, Houston, TX) and transmission electron microscopy for the detection of anterior lenticonus in Alport syndrome. Tracey wavefront aberrometry was used to treat a patient with bilateral anterior lenticonus who had a history of Alport syndrome. For transmission electron microscopic examination, anterior lens capsules were obtained during clear lens phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation. Spherical aberrations were the predominant higher-order aberrations in the internal optics of both eyes. The Tracey wavefront aberrometer showed that most of the irregular astigmatism originated from the lenticular portion. Transmission electron microscopy of the specimens showed anterior lens capsules with decreased thickness and multiple dehiscences. Tracey wavefront aberrometry and transmission electron microscopy are effective tools for evaluation of anterior lenticonus in Alport syndrome. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Disentangling atomic-layer-specific x-ray absorption spectra by Auger electron diffraction spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Kato, Yukako; Hashimoto, Mie; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    In order to investigate the electronic and magnetic structures of each atomic layer at subsurface, we have proposed a new method, Auger electron diffraction spectroscopy, which is the combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and Auger electron diffraction (AED) techniques. We have measured a series of Ni LMM AED patterns of the Ni film grown on Cu(001) surface for various thicknesses. Then we deduced a set of atomic-layer-specific AED patterns in a numerical way. Furthermore, we developed an algorithm to disentangle XANES spectra from different atomic layers using these atomic-layer-specific AED patterns. Surface and subsurface core level shift were determined for each atomic layer.

  7. The temperature-dependency of the optical band gap of ZnO measured by electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granerød, Cecilie S.; Galeckas, Augustinas; Johansen, Klaus Magnus; Vines, Lasse; Prytz, Øystein

    2018-04-01

    The optical band gap of ZnO has been measured as a function of temperature using Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) in a (Scanning) Transmission Electron Microscope ((S)TEM) from approximately 100 K up towards 1000 K. The band gap narrowing shows a close to linear dependency for temperatures above 250 K and is accurately described by Varshni, Bose-Einstein, Pässler and Manoogian-Woolley models. Additionally, the measured band gap is compared with both optical absorption measurements and photoluminescence data. STEM-EELS is here shown to be a viable technique to measure optical band gaps at elevated temperatures, with an available temperature range up to 1500 K and the benefit of superior spatial resolution.

  8. Potential benefits of triethylamine as n-electron donor in the estimation of forskolin by electronic absorption and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Gajula; Ram Reddy, A.

    2016-02-01

    Diterpenoid forskolin was isolated from Coleus forskolii. The electronic absorption and emission studies of forskolin were investigated in various solvents with an aim to improve its detection limits. The two chromophores present in the diterpenoid are not conjugated leading to the poor absorption and emission of UV light. The absorption and fluorescence spectra were solvent specific. In the presence of a monodentate ligand, triethylamine the detection of forskolin is improved by 3.63 times in ethanol with the fluorescence method and 3.36 times in DMSO by the absorption spectral method. The longer wavelength absorption maximum is blue shifted while the lower energy fluorescence maximum is red shifted in the presence of triethylamine. From the wavelength of fluorescence maxima of the exciplex formed between excited forskolin and triethylamine it is concluded that the order of reactivity of hydroxyl groups in the excited state forskolin is in the reverse order to that of the order of the reactivity of hydroxyl groups in its ground state.

  9. Potential benefits of triethylamine as n-electron donor in the estimation of forskolin by electronic absorption and emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Raju, Gajula; Ram Reddy, A

    2016-02-05

    Diterpenoid forskolin was isolated from Coleus forskolii. The electronic absorption and emission studies of forskolin were investigated in various solvents with an aim to improve its detection limits. The two chromophores present in the diterpenoid are not conjugated leading to the poor absorption and emission of UV light. The absorption and fluorescence spectra were solvent specific. In the presence of a monodentate ligand, triethylamine the detection of forskolin is improved by 3.63 times in ethanol with the fluorescence method and 3.36 times in DMSO by the absorption spectral method. The longer wavelength absorption maximum is blue shifted while the lower energy fluorescence maximum is red shifted in the presence of triethylamine. From the wavelength of fluorescence maxima of the exciplex formed between excited forskolin and triethylamine it is concluded that the order of reactivity of hydroxyl groups in the excited state forskolin is in the reverse order to that of the order of the reactivity of hydroxyl groups in its ground state. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Deciphering the physics and chemistry of perovskites with transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Polking, Mark J

    2016-03-28

    Perovskite oxides exhibit rich structural complexity and a broad range of functional properties, including ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism, and superconductivity. The development of aberration correction for the transmission electron microscope and concurrent progress in electron spectroscopy, electron holography, and other techniques has fueled rapid progress in the understanding of the physics and chemistry of these materials. New techniques based on the transmission electron microscope are first surveyed, and the applications of these techniques for the study of the structure, chemistry, electrostatics, and dynamics of perovskite oxides are then explored in detail, with a particular focus on ferroelectric materials.

  11. Electron tomography of HEK293T cells using scanning electron microscope-based scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    You, Yun-Wen; Chang, Hsun-Yun; Liao, Hua-Yang; Kao, Wei-Lun; Yen, Guo-Ji; Chang, Chi-Jen; Tsai, Meng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2012-10-01

    Based on a scanning electron microscope operated at 30 kV with a homemade specimen holder and a multiangle solid-state detector behind the sample, low-kV scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is presented with subsequent electron tomography for three-dimensional (3D) volume structure. Because of the low acceleration voltage, the stronger electron-atom scattering leads to a stronger contrast in the resulting image than standard TEM, especially for light elements. Furthermore, the low-kV STEM yields less radiation damage to the specimen, hence the structure can be preserved. In this work, two-dimensional STEM images of a 1-μm-thick cell section with projection angles between ±50° were collected, and the 3D volume structure was reconstructed using the simultaneous iterative reconstructive technique algorithm with the TomoJ plugin for ImageJ, which are both public domain software. Furthermore, the cross-sectional structure was obtained with the Volume Viewer plugin in ImageJ. Although the tilting angle is constrained and limits the resulting structural resolution, slicing the reconstructed volume generated the depth profile of the thick specimen with sufficient resolution to examine cellular uptake of Au nanoparticles, and the final position of these nanoparticles inside the cell was imaged.

  12. Carbon contamination in scanning transmission electron microscopy and its impact on phase-plate applications.

    PubMed

    Hettler, Simon; Dries, Manuel; Hermann, Peter; Obermair, Martin; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Malac, Marek

    2017-05-01

    We analyze electron-beam induced carbon contamination in a transmission electron microscope. The study is performed on thin films potentially suitable as phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and phase-plate imaging is utilized to analyze the contamination. The deposited contamination layer is identified as a graphitic carbon layer which is not prone to electrostatic charging whereas a non-conductive underlying substrate charges. Several methods that inhibit contamination are evaluated and the impact of carbon contamination on phase-plate imaging is discussed. The findings are in general interesting for scanning transmission electron microscopy applications. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Collisionless absorption, hot electron generation, and energy scaling in intense laser-target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liseykina, T., E-mail: tatyana.tiseykina@uni-rostock.de; Institute of Computational Technologies SD RAS, Acad. Lavrentjev Ave. 6, 630090 Novosibirsk; Mulser, P.

    2015-03-15

    Among the various attempts to understand collisionless absorption of intense and superintense ultrashort laser pulses, a whole variety of models and hypotheses has been invented to describe the laser beam target interaction. In terms of basic physics, collisionless absorption is understood now as the interplay of the oscillating laser field with the space charge field produced by it in the plasma. A first approach to this idea is realized in Brunel's model the essence of which consists in the formation of an oscillating charge cloud in the vacuum in front of the target, therefore frequently addressed by the vague termmore » “vacuum heating.” The investigation of statistical ensembles of orbits shows that the absorption process is localized at the ion-vacuum interface and in the skin layer: Single electrons enter into resonance with the laser field thereby undergoing a phase shift which causes orbit crossing and braking of Brunel's laminar flow. This anharmonic resonance acts like an attractor for the electrons and leads to the formation of a Maxwellian tail in the electron energy spectrum. Most remarkable results of our investigations are the Brunel like spectral hot electron distribution at the relativistic threshold, the minimum of absorption at Iλ{sup 2}≅(0.3−1.2)×10{sup 21} Wcm{sup −2}μm{sup 2} in the plasma target with the electron density of n{sub e}λ{sup 2}∼10{sup 23}cm{sup −3}μm{sup 2}, the drastic reduction of the number of hot electrons in this domain and their reappearance in the highly relativistic domain, and strong coupling, beyond expectation, of the fast electron jets with the return current through Cherenkov emission of plasmons. The hot electron energy scaling shows a strong dependence on intensity in the moderately relativistic domain Iλ{sup 2}≅(10{sup 18}−10{sup 20}) Wcm{sup −2}μm{sup 2}, a scaling in vague accordance with current published estimates in the range Iλ{sup 2}≅(0.14−3.5)×10{sup 21} Wcm{sup

  14. Electronically tunable extraordinary optical transmission in graphene plasmonic ribbons coupled to subwavelength metallic slit arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Seyoon; Jang, Min Seok; Brar, Victor W.; ...

    2016-08-08

    In this paper, subwavelength metallic slit arrays have been shown to exhibit extraordinary optical transmission, whereby tunneling surface plasmonic waves constructively interfere to create large forward light propagation. The intricate balancing needed for this interference to occur allows for resonant transmission to be highly sensitive to changes in the environment. Here we demonstrate that extraordinary optical transmission resonance can be coupled to electrostatically tunable graphene plasmonic ribbons to create electrostatic modulation of mid-infrared light. Absorption in graphene plasmonic ribbons situated inside metallic slits can efficiently block the coupling channel for resonant transmission, leading to a suppression of transmission. Full-wave simulationsmore » predict a transmission modulation of 95.7% via this mechanism. Experimental measurements reveal a modulation efficiency of 28.6% in transmission at 1,397 cm –1, corresponding to a 2.67-fold improvement over transmission without a metallic slit array. This work paves the way for enhancing light modulation in graphene plasmonics by employing noble metal plasmonic structures.« less

  15. UV-Vis absorption spectra and electronic structure of merocyanines in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Kulinich, Andrii V.; Bondarev, Stanislav L.; Raichenok, Tamara F.

    2018-02-01

    Gas-phase absorption spectra of a merocyanine vinylogous series have been studied for the first time. In vapour, their long-wavelength absorption bands were found to be considerably shifted hypsochromically, broader, more symmetrical, less intense, and their vinylene shift much smaller than even in low-polarity n-hexane. This indicates that in the gas phase their electronic structure closely approaches the nonpolar polyene limiting structure. The TDDFT calculations of the long-wavelength electronic transitions in the studied merocyanines in vacuo demonstrated good-to-excellent correlation - depending on the functional used - with the obtained experimental data. For comparison, the solvent effects was accounted for using the polarizable continuum model (PCM) with n-hexane and ethanol as low-polarity and high-polarity media, and compared with the UV-Vis spectral data in these solvents. In this case, the discrepancy between theory and experiment was much greater, increasing at that with the polymethine chain length.

  16. Imaging electronic trap states in perovskite thin films with combined fluorescence and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; ...

    2016-04-22

    Charge carrier trapping degrades the performance of organometallic halide perovskite solar cells. To characterize the locations of electronic trap states in a heterogeneous photoactive layer, a spatially resolved approach is essential. Here, we report a comparative study on methylammonium lead tri-iodide perovskite thin films subject to different thermal annealing times using a combined photoluminescence (PL) and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy (TAM) approach to spatially map trap states. This approach coregisters the initially populated electronic excited states with the regions that recombine radiatively. Although the TAM images are relatively homogeneous for both samples, the corresponding PL images are highly structured. Themore » remarkable variation in the PL intensities as compared to transient absorption signal amplitude suggests spatially dependent PL quantum efficiency, indicative of trapping events. Furthermore, detailed analysis enables identification of two trapping regimes: a densely packed trapping region and a sparse trapping area that appear as unique spatial features in scaled PL maps.« less

  17. Investigating the use of in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy to explore DNA-mediated gold nanoparticle growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguy, Amanda

    Engineering nanoparticles with desired shape-dependent properties is the key to many applications in nanotechnology. Although many synthetic procedures exist to produce anisotropic gold nanoparticles, the dynamics of growth are typically unknown or hypothetical. In the case of seed-mediated growth in the presence of DNA into anisotropic nanoparticles, it is not known exactly how DNA directs growth into specific morphologies. A series of preliminary experiments were carried out to contribute to the investigation of the possible mechanism of DNA-mediated growth of gold nanoprisms into gold nanostars using liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Imaging in the liquid phase was achieved through the use of a liquid cell platform and liquid cell holder that allow the sample to be contained within a “chip sandwich” between two electron transparent windows. Ex situ growth experiments were performed using Au-T30 NPrisms (30-base thymine oligonucleotide-coated gold nanoprisms) that are expected to grow into gold nanostars. Growth to form these nanostars were imaged using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and liquid cell STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy). An attempt to perform in situ growth experiments with the same Au-T30 nanoprisms revealed challenges in obtaining desired morphology results due to the environmental differences within the liquid cell compared to the ex situ environment. Different parameters in the experimental method were explored including fluid line set up, simultaneous and alternating reagent addition, and the effect of different liquid cell volumes to ensure adequate flow of reagents into the liquid cell. Lastly, the binding affinities were compared for T30 and A30 DNA incubated with gold nanoparticles using zeta potential measurements, absorption spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was previously reported thymine bases have a lower binding affinity to gold surfaces than

  18. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  19. Convenient determination of luminescence quantum yield using a combined electronic absorption and emission spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, John; Mishra, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-15

    It is possible to measure luminescence quantum yield in a facile way, by designing an optical spectrometer capable of obtaining electronic absorption as well as luminescence spectra, with a setup that uses the same light source and detector for both the spectral measurements. Employment of a single light source and single detector enables use of the same correction factor profile for spectral corrections. A suitable instrumental scaling factor is used for adjusting spectral losses.

  20. STEM VQ Method, Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) for Accurate Virus Quantification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-02

    Corresponding Author Abstract Accurate virus quantification is sought, but a perfect method still eludes the scientific community. Electron...unlimited. UNCLASSIFIED 2 provides morphology data and counts all viral particles, including partial or noninfectious particles; however, EM methods ...consistent, reproducible virus quantification method called Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy – Virus Quantification (STEM-VQ) which simplifies

  1. The Design and Construction of a Simple Transmission Electron Microscope for Educational Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearsey, Paul K.

    This document presents a model for a simple transmission electron microscope for educational purposes. This microscope could demonstrate thermonic emission, particle acceleration, electron deflection, and flourescence. It is designed to be used in high school science courses, particularly physics, taking into account the size, weight, complexity…

  2. 29 CFR 1926.1420 - Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals. 1926.1420 Section 1926.1420 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1420 Signals—radio, telephone or other electronic...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.1420 - Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals. 1926.1420 Section 1926.1420 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1420 Signals—radio, telephone or other electronic...

  4. Chemical Reactions of Molecules Promoted and Simultaneously Imaged by the Electron Beam in Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Skowron, Stephen T; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Besley, Elena; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2017-08-15

    The main objective of this Account is to assess the challenges of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of molecules, based on over 15 years of our work in this field, and to outline the opportunities in studying chemical reactions under the electron beam (e-beam). During TEM imaging of an individual molecule adsorbed on an atomically thin substrate, such as graphene or a carbon nanotube, the e-beam transfers kinetic energy to atoms of the molecule, displacing them from equilibrium positions. Impact of the e-beam triggers bond dissociation and various chemical reactions which can be imaged concurrently with their activation by the e-beam and can be presented as stop-frame movies. This experimental approach, which we term ChemTEM, harnesses energy transferred from the e-beam to the molecule via direct interactions with the atomic nuclei, enabling accurate predictions of bond dissociation events and control of the type and rate of chemical reactions. Elemental composition and structure of the reactant molecules as well as the operating conditions of TEM (particularly the energy of the e-beam) determine the product formed in ChemTEM processes, while the e-beam dose rate controls the reaction rate. Because the e-beam of TEM acts simultaneously as a source of energy for the reaction and as an imaging tool monitoring the same reaction, ChemTEM reveals atomic-level chemical information, such as pathways of reactions imaged for individual molecules, step-by-step and in real time; structures of illusive reaction intermediates; and direct comparison of catalytic activity of different transition metals filmed with atomic resolution. Chemical transformations in ChemTEM often lead to previously unforeseen products, demonstrating the potential of this method to become not only an analytical tool for studying reactions, but also a powerful instrument for discovery of materials that can be synthesized on preparative scale.

  5. Excited state X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Probing both electronic and structural dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Simon P.; Averbukh, Vitali; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of X-ray absorption spectra, simulated using a general method, to properties of molecular excited states. Recently, Averbukh and co-workers [M. Ruberti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 184107 (2014)] introduced an efficient and accurate L 2 method for the calculation of excited state valence photoionization cross-sections based on the application of Stieltjes imaging to the Lanczos pseudo-spectrum of the algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) representation of the electronic Hamiltonian. In this paper, we report an extension of this method to the calculation of excited state core photoionization cross-sections. We demonstrate that, at the ADC(2)x level of theory, ground state X-ray absorption spectra may be accurately reproduced, validating the method. Significantly, the calculated X-ray absorption spectra of the excited states are found to be sensitive to both geometric distortions (structural dynamics) and the electronic character (electronic dynamics) of the initial state, suggesting that core excitation spectroscopies will be useful probes of excited state non-adiabatic dynamics. We anticipate that the method presented here can be combined with ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to simulate the time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of excited state molecular wavepacket dynamics.

  6. The origin of absorptive features in the two-dimensional electronic spectra of rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Farag, Marwa H; Jansen, Thomas L C; Knoester, Jasper

    2018-05-09

    In rhodopsin, the absorption of a photon causes the isomerization of the 11-cis isomer of the retinal chromophore to its all-trans isomer. This isomerization is known to occur through a conical intersection (CI) and the internal conversion through the CI is known to be vibrationally coherent. Recently measured two-dimensional electronic spectra (2DES) showed dramatic absorptive spectral features at early waiting times associated with the transition through the CI. The common two-state two-mode model Hamiltonian was unable to elucidate the origin of these features. To rationalize the source of these features, we employ a three-state three-mode model Hamiltonian where the hydrogen out-of plane (HOOP) mode and a higher-lying electronic state are included. The 2DES of the retinal chromophore in rhodopsin are calculated and compared with the experiment. Our analysis shows that the source of the observed features in the measured 2DES is the excited state absorption to a higher-lying electronic state and not the HOOP mode.

  7. Nuclear quantum effects in electronically adiabatic quantum time correlation functions: Application to the absorption spectrum of a hydrated electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turi, László; Hantal, György; Rossky, Peter J.; Borgis, Daniel

    2009-07-01

    A general formalism for introducing nuclear quantum effects in the expression of the quantum time correlation function of an operator in a multilevel electronic system is presented in the adiabatic limit. The final formula includes the nuclear quantum time correlation functions of the operator matrix elements, of the energy gap, and their cross terms. These quantities can be inferred and evaluated from their classical analogs obtained by mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations. The formalism is applied to the absorption spectrum of a hydrated electron, expressed in terms of the time correlation function of the dipole operator in the ground electronic state. We find that both static and dynamic nuclear quantum effects distinctly influence the shape of the absorption spectrum, especially its high energy tail related to transitions to delocalized electron states. Their inclusion does improve significantly the agreement between theory and experiment for both the low and high frequency edges of the spectrum. It does not appear sufficient, however, to resolve persistent deviations in the slow Lorentzian-like decay part of the spectrum in the intermediate 2-3 eV region.

  8. Theoretical modeling of low-energy electronic absorption bands in reduced cobaloximes

    DOE PAGES

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L.; ...

    2014-08-11

    Here, we report that the reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we have analyzed the low energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and using a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task.

  9. Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-03

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6390--16-9681 Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra...NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using...Unclassified Unlimited Unclassified Unlimited 59 Samuel G. Lambrakos (202) 767-2601 Calculations are presented of vibrational and electronic excited-state

  10. Robust image alignment for cryogenic transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Robert A; Kowal, Julia; Ringler, Philippe; Stahlberg, Henning

    2017-03-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy recently experienced great improvements in structure resolution due to direct electron detectors with improved contrast and fast read-out leading to single electron counting. High frames rates enabled dose fractionation, where a long exposure is broken into a movie, permitting specimen drift to be registered and corrected. The typical approach for image registration, with high shot noise and low contrast, is multi-reference (MR) cross-correlation. Here we present the software package Zorro, which provides robust drift correction for dose fractionation by use of an intensity-normalized cross-correlation and logistic noise model to weight each cross-correlation in the MR model and filter each cross-correlation optimally. Frames are reliably registered by Zorro with low dose and defocus. Methods to evaluate performance are presented, by use of independently-evaluated even- and odd-frame stacks by trajectory comparison and Fourier ring correlation. Alignment of tiled sub-frames is also introduced, and demonstrated on an example dataset. Zorro source code is available at github.com/CINA/zorro. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Charge deposition dependence of electron transmission through PET nanocapillaries and a tapered glass microcapillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanis, J. A.; Keerthisinghe, D.; Wickramarachchi, S. J.; Ikeda, T.; Stolterfoht, N.

    2018-05-01

    Charge deposition dependences of electron transmission through insulating PET nanocapillaries and a tapered glass microcapillary are reported and differences with HCI transmission are noted. Investigations were conducted for electrons with incident energies 500-1000 eV, corresponding to energies per charge similar to those used for HCI studies, incident on (1) an array of PET nanocapillaries (density ∼5 × 108/cm2) with diameters 100 nm in a foil of thickness 12 μm, and (2) on a tapered glass microcapillary with inlet/outlet diameters of 800/100 μm and a length of ∼35 mm. The transmission was measured for incident electrons at small sample tilt angles ranging from 0° to 5° with respect to the beam direction. For most angles, including those near zero degrees, there was an initial quiet period during which essentially no transmission was observed, followed by large rises in the transmission during relatively short periods of charge deposition before equilibrium of the transmission was reached. The resulting equilibrium was stable, blocked or had frequent oscillations depending on the incident energy and the capillary used. Observations for both capillaries show that a negative charge patch is needed to guide incident electrons through the capillaries similar to the manner in which HCIs are guided through capillaries.

  12. Parallel transmission pulse design with explicit control for the specific absorption rate in the presence of radiofrequency errors.

    PubMed

    Martin, Adrian; Schiavi, Emanuele; Eryaman, Yigitcan; Herraiz, Joaquin L; Gagoski, Borjan; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Wald, Lawrence L; Guerin, Bastien

    2016-06-01

    A new framework for the design of parallel transmit (pTx) pulses is presented introducing constraints for local and global specific absorption rate (SAR) in the presence of errors in the radiofrequency (RF) transmit chain. The first step is the design of a pTx RF pulse with explicit constraints for global and local SAR. Then, the worst possible SAR associated with that pulse due to RF transmission errors ("worst-case SAR") is calculated. Finally, this information is used to re-calculate the pulse with lower SAR constraints, iterating this procedure until its worst-case SAR is within safety limits. Analysis of an actual pTx RF transmit chain revealed amplitude errors as high as 8% (20%) and phase errors above 3° (15°) for spokes (spiral) pulses. Simulations show that using the proposed framework, pulses can be designed with controlled "worst-case SAR" in the presence of errors of this magnitude at minor cost of the excitation profile quality. Our worst-case SAR-constrained pTx design strategy yields pulses with local and global SAR within the safety limits even in the presence of RF transmission errors. This strategy is a natural way to incorporate SAR safety factors in the design of pTx pulses. Magn Reson Med 75:2493-2504, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Elucidating ultrafast electron dynamics at surfaces using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) reflection-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Somnath; Husek, Jakub; Baker, L Robert

    2018-04-24

    Here we review the recent development of extreme ultraviolet reflection-absorption (XUV-RA) spectroscopy. This method combines the benefits of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, such as element, oxidation, and spin state specificity, with surface sensitivity and ultrafast time resolution, having a probe depth of only a few nm and an instrument response less than 100 fs. Using this technique we investigated the ultrafast electron dynamics at a hematite (α-Fe2O3) surface. Surface electron trapping and small polaron formation both occur in 660 fs following photoexcitation. These kinetics are independent of surface morphology indicating that electron trapping is not mediated by defects. Instead, small polaron formation is proposed as the likely driving force for surface electron trapping. We also show that in Fe2O3, Co3O4, and NiO, band gap excitation promotes electron transfer from O 2p valence band states to metal 3d conduction band states. In addition to detecting the photoexcited electron at the metal M2,3-edge, the valence band hole is directly observed as transient signal at the O L1-edge. The size of the resulting charge transfer exciton is on the order of a single metal-oxygen bond length. Spectral shifts at the O L1-edge correlate with metal-oxygen bond covalency, confirming the relationship between valence band hybridization and the overpotential for water oxidation. These examples demonstrate the unique ability to measure ultrafast electron dynamics with element and chemical state resolution using XUV-RA spectroscopy. Accordingly, this method is poised to play an important role to reveal chemical details of previously unseen surface electron dynamics.

  14. A transmission-grating-modulated pump-probe absorption spectroscopy and demonstration of diffusion dynamics of photoexcited carriers in bulk intrinsic GaAs film.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Wang, Wenfang; Chen, Jianming; Wen, Jinhui; Lai, Tianshu

    2012-02-13

    A transmission-grating-modulated time-resolved pump-probe absorption spectroscopy is developed and formularized. The spectroscopy combines normal time-resolved pump-probe absorption spectroscopy with a binary transmission grating, is sensitive to the spatiotemporal evolution of photoinjected carriers, and has extensive applicability in the study of diffusion transport dynamics of photoinjected carriers. This spectroscopy has many advantages over reported optical methods to measure diffusion dynamics, such as simple experimental setup and operation, and high detection sensitivity. The measurement of diffusion dynamics is demonstrated on bulk intrinsic GaAs films. A carrier density dependence of carrier diffusion coefficient is obtained and agrees well with reported results.

  15. Thermal magnetic field noise limits resolution in transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Uhlemann, Stephan; Müller, Heiko; Hartel, Peter; Zach, Joachim; Haider, Max

    2013-07-26

    The resolving power of an electron microscope is determined by the optics and the stability of the instrument. Recently, progress has been obtained towards subångström resolution at beam energies of 80 kV and below but a discrepancy between the expected and achieved instrumental information limit has been observed. Here we show that magnetic field noise from thermally driven currents in the conductive parts of the instrument is the root cause for this hitherto unexplained decoherence phenomenon. We demonstrate that the deleterious effect depends on temperature and at least weakly on the type of material.

  16. Applications of emerging transmission electron microscopy technology in PCD research and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Shoemark, Amelia

    2017-01-01

    Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD) is a heterogeneous genetic condition characterized by dysfunction of motile cilia. Patients suffer from chronic infection and inflammation of the upper and lower respiratory tract. Diagnosis of PCD is confirmed by identification of a hallmark defect of ciliary ultrastructure or by identification of biallelic pathogenic mutations in a known PCD gene. Since the first description of PCD in 1976, assessment of ciliary ultrastructure by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been central to diagnosis and research. Electron tomography is a technique whereby a series of transmission electron micrographs are collected at different angles and reconstructed into a single 3D model of a specimen. Electron tomography provides improved spatial information and resolution compared to a single micrograph. Research by electron tomography has revealed new insight into ciliary ultrastructure and consequently ciliary function at a molecular and cellular level. Gene discovery studies in PCD have utilized electron tomography to define the structural consequences of variants in cilia genes. Modern transmission electron microscopes capable of electron tomography are increasingly being installed in clinical laboratories. This presents the possibility for the use of tomography technique in a diagnostic setting. This review describes the electron tomography technique, the contribution tomography has made to the understanding of basic cilia structure and function and finally the potential of the technique for use in PCD diagnosis.

  17. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  18. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. In this paper, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO 3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in naturemore » and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. Finally, however, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.« less

  19. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    DOE PAGES

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; ...

    2016-05-23

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. In this paper, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO 3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in naturemore » and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. Finally, however, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.« less

  20. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    PubMed Central

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy. PMID:27211523

  1. In situ transmission electron microscopy of cadmium selenide nanorod sublimation

    DOE PAGES

    Hellebusch, Daniel J.; Manthiram, Karthish; Beberwyck, Brandon J.; ...

    2015-01-23

    In situ electron microscopy is used to observe the morphological evolution of cadmium selenide nanorods as they sublime under vacuum at a series of elevated temperatures. Mass loss occurs anisotropically along the nanorod’s long axis. At temperatures close to the sublimation threshold, the phase change occurs from both tips of the nanorods and proceeds unevenly with periods of rapid mass loss punctuated by periods of relative stability. At higher temperatures, the nanorods sublime at a faster, more uniform rate, but mass loss occurs from only a single end of the rod. Furthermore, we propose a mechanism that accounts for themore » observed sublimation behavior based on the terrace–ledge–kink (TLK) model and how the nanorod surface chemical environment influences the kinetic barrier of sublimation.« less

  2. Nanocuvette: A Functional Ultrathin Liquid Container for Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wadell, Carl; Inagaki, Satoshi; Nakamura, Tomiro; Shi, Ji; Nakamura, Yoshio; Sannomiya, Takumi

    2017-02-28

    Advances in TEM techniques have spurred a renewed interest in a wide variety of research fields. A rather recent track within these endeavors is the use of TEM for in situ imaging in liquids. In this article, we show the fabrication of a liquid cell for TEM observations which we call the nanocuvette. The structure consists of a nanohole film sandwiched by carbon films, sealing liquid in the holes. The hole film can be produced using a variety of materials, tailored for the desired application. Since the fabrication is based on self-assembly, it is both cheap and straightforward. Compared to previously reported liquid cells, this structure allows for thinner liquid layers with better controlled cell structures, making it possible to achieve a high resolution even at lower acceleration voltages and electron doses. We demonstrate a resolution corresponding to an information transfer up to ∼2 nm at 100 kV for molecular imaging. Apart from the advantages arising from the thin liquid layer, the nanocuvette also enables the possibility to study liquid-solid interfaces at the side walls of the nanoholes. We illustrate the possibilities of the nanocuvette by studying several model systems: electron beam induced growth dynamics of silver nanoparticles in salt solution, polymer deposition from solution, and imaging of nonstained antibodies in solution. Finally, we show how the inclusion of a plasmonically active gold layer in the nanocuvette structure enables optical confirmation of successful liquid encapsulation prior to TEM studies. The nanocuvette provides an easily fabricated and flexible platform which can help further the understanding of reactions, processes, and conformation of molecules and atoms in liquid environments.

  3. The spatial coherence function in scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D T; Findlay, S D; Etheridge, J

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the implications of the form of the spatial coherence function, also referred to as the effective source distribution, for quantitative analysis in scanning transmission electron microscopy, and in particular for interpreting the spatial origin of imaging and spectroscopy signals. These questions are explored using three different source distribution models applied to a GaAs crystal case study. The shape of the effective source distribution was found to have a strong influence not only on the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) image contrast, but also on the distribution of the scattered electron wavefield and hence on the spatial origin of the detected electron intensities. The implications this has for measuring structure, composition and bonding at atomic resolution via annular dark field, X-ray and electron energy loss STEM imaging are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Application of high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy to the characterization of nanoparticles in the environment.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Ewing, Rodney C

    2003-02-15

    A major challenge to the development of a fundamental understanding of transport and retardation mechanisms of trace metal contaminants (<10 ppm) is their identification and characterization at the nanoscale. Atomic-scale techniques, such as conventional transmission electron microscopy, although powerful, are limited by the extremely small amounts of material that are examined. However, recent advances in electron microscopy provide a number of new analytical techniques that expand its application in environmental studies, particularly those concerning heavy metals on airborne particulates or water-borne colloids. High-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), STEM-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), and energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) can be effectively used to identify and characterize nanoparticles. The image contrast in HAADF-STEM is strongly correlated to the atomic mass: heavier elements contribute to brighter contrast. Gold nanocrystals in pyrite and uranium nanocrystals in atmospheric aerosols have been identified by HAADF-STEM and STEM-EDX mapping and subsequently characterized by high-resolution TEM (HRTEM). EFTEM was used to identify U and Fe nanocrystals embedded in an aluminosilicate. A rare, As-bearing nanophase, westerveldite (FeAs), was identified by STEM-EDX and HRTEM. The combined use of these techniques greatly expands the effective application of electron microscopy in environmental studies, especially when applied to metals of very low concentrations. This paper describes examples of how these electron microbeam techniques can be used in combination to characterize a low concentration of heavy metals (a few ppm) on nanoscale particles.

  5. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy of High Temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Software and hardware updates to further extend the capability of the electron microscope were carried out. A range of materials such as intermetallics, metal-matrix composites, ceramic-matrix composites, ceramics and intermetallic compounds, based on refractory elements were examined under this research. Crystal structure, size, shape and volume fraction distribution of various phases which constitute the microstructures were examined. Deformed materials were studied to understand the effect of interfacial microstructure on the deformation and fracture behavior of these materials. Specimens tested for a range of mechanical property requirements, such as stress rupture, creep, low cycle fatigue, high cycle fatigue, thermomechanical fatigue, etc. were examined. Microstructural and microchemical stability of these materials exposed to simulated operating environments were investigated. The EOIM Shuttle post-flight samples were also examined to understand the influence of low gravity processing on microstructure. In addition, fractographic analyses of Nb-Zr-W, titanium aluminide, molybdenum silicide and silicon carbide samples were carried out. Extensive characterization of sapphire fibers in the fiber-reinforced composites made by powder cloth processing was made. Finally, pressure infiltration casting of metal-matrix composites was carried out.

  6. Strain measurement in semiconductor heterostructures by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Müller, Knut; Rosenauer, Andreas; Schowalter, Marco; Zweck, Josef; Fritz, Rafael; Volz, Kerstin

    2012-10-01

    This article deals with the measurement of strain in semiconductor heterostructures from convergent beam electron diffraction patterns. In particular, three different algorithms in the field of (circular) pattern recognition are presented that are able to detect diffracted disc positions accurately, from which the strain in growth direction is calculated. Although the three approaches are very different as one is based on edge detection, one on rotational averages, and one on cross correlation with masks, it is found that identical strain profiles result for an In x Ga1-x N y As1-y /GaAs heterostructure consisting of five compressively and tensile strained layers. We achieve a precision of strain measurements of 7-9·10-4 and a spatial resolution of 0.5-0.7 nm over the whole width of the layer stack which was 350 nm. Being already very applicable to strain measurements in contemporary nanostructures, we additionally suggest future hardware and software designs optimized for fast and direct acquisition of strain distributions, motivated by the present studies.

  7. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Bombyx Mori Silk Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Y.; Martin, D. C.

    1997-03-01

    The microstructure of B. Mori silk fibers before and after degumming was examined by TEM, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), WAXS and low voltage SEM. SEM micrographs of the neat cocoon revealed a network of pairs of twisting filaments. After degumming, there were only individual filaments showing a surface texture consistent with an oriented fibrillar structure in the fiber interior. WAXS patterns confirmed the oriented beta-sheet crystal structure common to silkworm and spider silks. Low dose SAED results were fully consistent with the WAXS data, and revealed that the crystallographic texture did not vary significantly across the fiber diameter. TEM observations of microtomed fiber cross sections indicated a somewhat irregular shape, and also revealed a 0.5-2 micron sericin coating which was removed by the degumming process. TEM observations of the degummed silk fiber showed banded features with a characteristic spacing of nominally 600 nm along the fiber axis. These bands were oriented in a roughly parabolic or V-shape pointing along one axis within a given fiber. We hypothesize that this orientation is induced by the extrusion during the spinning process. Equatorial DF images revealed that axial and lateral sizes of the β-sheet crystallites in silk fibroin ranged from 20 to 170 nm and from 1 to 24 nm, respectively. Crazes developed in the degummed silk fiber parallel to the fiber direction. The formation of these crazes suggests that there are significant lateral interactions between fibrils in silk fibers.

  8. Visualization of newt aragonitic otoconial matrices using transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyger, P. S.; Wiederhold, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    Otoconia are calcified protein matrices within the gravity-sensing organs of the vertebrate vestibular system. These protein matrices are thought to originate from the supporting or hair cells in the macula during development. Previous studies of mammalian calcitic, barrel-shaped otoconia revealed an organized protein matrix consisting of a thin peripheral layer, a well-defined organic core and a flocculent matrix inbetween. No studies have reported the microscopic organization of the aragonitic otoconial matrix, despite its protein characterization. Pote et al. (1993b) used densitometric methods and inferred that prismatic (aragonitic) otoconia have a peripheral protein distribution, compared to that described for the barrel-shaped, calcitic otoconia of birds, mammals, and the amphibian utricle. By using tannic acid as a negative stain, we observed three kinds of organic matrices in preparations of fixed, decalcified saccular otoconia from the adult newt: (1) fusiform shapes with a homogenous electron-dense matrix; (2) singular and multiple strands of matrix; and (3) more significantly, prismatic shapes outlined by a peripheral organic matrix. These prismatic shapes remain following removal of the gelatinous matrix, revealing an internal array of organic matter. We conclude that prismatic otoconia have a largely peripheral otoconial matrix, as inferred by densitometry.

  9. Unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from experimental transmission data, with direct independent validation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, E. S. M.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: In a recent computational study, an improved physics-based approach was proposed for unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data. In this approach, energy differentiation is improved by simultaneously using transmission data for multiple attenuators and detectors, and the unfolding robustness is improved by using a four-parameter functional form to describe the photon spectrum. The purpose of the current study is to validate this approach experimentally, and to demonstrate its application on a typical clinical linac. Methods: The validation makes use of the recent transmission measurements performed on the Vickers research linac of National Research Councilmore » Canada. For this linac, the photon spectra were previously measured using a NaI detector, and the incident electron parameters are independently known. The transmission data are for eight beams in the range 10-30 MV using thick Be, Al and Pb bremsstrahlung targets. To demonstrate the approach on a typical clinical linac, new measurements are performed on an Elekta Precise linac for 6, 10 and 25 MV beams. The different experimental setups are modeled using EGSnrc, with the newly added photonuclear attenuation included. Results: For the validation on the research linac, the 95% confidence bounds of the unfolded spectra fall within the noise of the NaI data. The unfolded spectra agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using independently known electron parameters) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 4.5%. The accuracy of unfolding the incident electron energy is shown to be {approx}3%. A transmission cutoff of only 10% is suitable for accurate unfolding, provided that the other components of the proposed approach are implemented. For the demonstration on a clinical linac, the unfolded incident electron energies and their 68% confidence bounds for the 6, 10 and 25 MV beams are 6.1 {+-} 0.1, 9.3 {+-} 0.1, and 19.3 {+-} 0.2 MeV, respectively. The unfolded

  10. Electronic structure of some adenosine receptor antagonists. III. Quantitative investigation of the electronic absorption spectra of alkyl xanthines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, H.; Shalaby, Samia H.; El-sawy, K. M.; Hilal, Rifaat

    2002-07-01

    Quantitative and comparative investigation of the electronic absorption spectra of theophylline, caffeine and their derivatives is reported. The spectra of theophylline, caffeine and theobromine were compared to establish the predominant tautomeric species in solution. This comparison, analysis of solvent effects and assignments of the observed transitions via MO computations indicate the exits of only one tautomeric species in solution that is the N7 form. A low-lying triplet state was identified which corresponds to a HOMO-LUMO transition. This relatively long-lived T 1 state is always less polar than the ground state and may very well underlie the photochemical reactivity of alkyl xanthines. Substituents of different electron donating or withdrawing strengths and solvent effects are investigated and analyzed. The present analysis is facilitated via computer deconvolution of the observed spectra and MO computation.

  11. Understanding materials challenges for rechargeable ion batteries with in situ transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yifei; Amine, Khalil; Lu, Jun; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2017-08-01

    An in-depth understanding of material behaviours under complex electrochemical environment is critical for the development of advanced materials for the next-generation rechargeable ion batteries. The dynamic conditions inside a working battery had not been intensively explored until the advent of various in situ characterization techniques. Real-time transmission electron microscopy of electrochemical reactions is one of the most significant breakthroughs poised to enable radical shift in our knowledge on how materials behave in the electrochemical environment. This review, therefore, summarizes the scientific discoveries enabled by in situ transmission electron microscopy, and specifically emphasizes the applicability of this technique to address the critical challenges in the rechargeable ion battery electrodes, electrolyte and their interfaces. New electrochemical systems such as lithium-oxygen, lithium-sulfur and sodium ion batteries are included, considering the rapidly increasing application of in situ transmission electron microscopy in these areas. A systematic comparison between lithium ion-based electrochemistry and sodium ion-based electrochemistry is also given in terms of their thermodynamic and kinetic differences. The effect of the electron beam on the validity of in situ observation is also covered. This review concludes by providing a renewed perspective for the future directions of in situ transmission electron microscopy in rechargeable ion batteries.

  12. Understanding materials challenges for rechargeable ion batteries with in situ transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yifei; Amine, Khalil; Lu, Jun; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2017-01-01

    An in-depth understanding of material behaviours under complex electrochemical environment is critical for the development of advanced materials for the next-generation rechargeable ion batteries. The dynamic conditions inside a working battery had not been intensively explored until the advent of various in situ characterization techniques. Real-time transmission electron microscopy of electrochemical reactions is one of the most significant breakthroughs poised to enable radical shift in our knowledge on how materials behave in the electrochemical environment. This review, therefore, summarizes the scientific discoveries enabled by in situ transmission electron microscopy, and specifically emphasizes the applicability of this technique to address the critical challenges in the rechargeable ion battery electrodes, electrolyte and their interfaces. New electrochemical systems such as lithium–oxygen, lithium–sulfur and sodium ion batteries are included, considering the rapidly increasing application of in situ transmission electron microscopy in these areas. A systematic comparison between lithium ion-based electrochemistry and sodium ion-based electrochemistry is also given in terms of their thermodynamic and kinetic differences. The effect of the electron beam on the validity of in situ observation is also covered. This review concludes by providing a renewed perspective for the future directions of in situ transmission electron microscopy in rechargeable ion batteries.

  13. Electronic structure of barium strontium titanate by soft-x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Y.; Underwood, J.H.; Gullikson, E.M.

    1997-04-01

    Perovskite-type titanates, such as Strontium Titanate (STO), Barium Titanate (BTO), and Lead Titanate (PTO) have been widely studied because they show good electric and optical properties. In recent years, thin films of Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) have been paid much attention as dielectrics of dynamic random access memory (DRAM) capacitors. BST is a better insulator with a higher dielectric constant than STO and can be controlled in a paraelectric phase with an appropriate ratio of Ba/Sr composition, however, few studies have been done on the electronic structure of the material. Studies of the electronic structure of such materials can bemore » beneficial, both for fundamental physics research and for improving technological applications. BTO is a famous ferroelectric material with a tetragonal structure, in which Ti and Ba atoms are slightly displaced from the lattice points. On the other hand, BST keeps a paraelectric phase, which means that the atoms are still at the cubic lattice points. It should be of great interest to see how this difference of the local structure around Ti atoms between BTO and BST effects the electronic structure of these two materials. In this report, the authors present the Ti L{sub 2,3} absorption spectra of STO, BTO, and BST measured with very high accuracy in energy of the absorption features.« less

  14. Enhanced thermal stability of a polymer solar cell blend induced by electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Bäcke, Olof; Lindqvist, Camilla; de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia Diaz; Gustafsson, Stefan; Wang, Ergang; Andersson, Mats R; Müller, Christian; Kristiansen, Per Magnus; Olsson, Eva

    2017-05-01

    We show by in situ microscopy that the effects of electron beam irradiation during transmission electron microscopy can be used to lock microstructural features and enhance the structural thermal stability of a nanostructured polymer:fullerene blend. Polymer:fullerene bulk-heterojunction thin films show great promise for use as active layers in organic solar cells but their low thermal stability is a hindrance. Lack of thermal stability complicates manufacturing and influences the lifetime of devices. To investigate how electron irradiation affects the thermal stability of polymer:fullerene films, a model bulk-heterojunction film based on a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer and a fullerene derivative was heat-treated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope. In areas of the film that exposed to the electron beam the nanostructure of the film remained stable, while the nanostructure in areas not exposed to the electron beam underwent large phase separation and nucleation of fullerene crystals. UV-vis spectroscopy shows that the polymer:fullerene films are stable for electron doses up to 2000kGy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tomography experiment of an integrated circuit specimen using 3 MeV electrons in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Xiang-Liang; Wang, Yong; Takaoka, Akio

    2007-01-01

    The possibility of utilizing high-energy electron tomography to characterize the micron-scale three dimensional (3D) structures of integrated circuits has been demonstrated experimentally. First, electron transmission through a tilted SiO(2) film was measured with an ultrahigh-voltage electron microscope (ultra-HVEM) and analyzed from the point of view of elastic scattering of electrons, showing that linear attenuation of the logarithmic electron transmission still holds valid for effective specimen thicknesses up to 5 microm under 2 MV accelerating voltages. Electron tomography of a micron-order thick integrated circuit specimen including the Cu/via interconnect was then tried with 3 MeV electrons in the ultra-HVEM. Serial projection images of the specimen tilted at different angles over the range of +/-90 degrees were acquired, and 3D reconstruction was performed with the images by means of the IMOD software package. Consequently, the 3D structures of the Cu lines, via and void, were revealed by cross sections and surface rendering.

  16. Enhanced thermal stability of a polymer solar cell blend induced by electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Bäcke, Olof; Lindqvist, Camilla; de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia Diaz; Gustafsson, Stefan; Wang, Ergang; Andersson, Mats R; Müller, Christian; Kristiansen, Per Magnus; Olsson, Eva

    2017-02-01

    We show by in situ microscopy that the effects of electron beam irradiation during transmission electron microscopy can be used to lock microstructural features and enhance the structural thermal stability of a nanostructured polymer:fullerene blend. Polymer:fullerene bulk-heterojunction thin films show great promise for use as active layers in organic solar cells but their low thermal stability is a hindrance. Lack of thermal stability complicates manufacturing and influences the lifetime of devices. To investigate how electron irradiation affects the thermal stability of polymer:fullerene films, a model bulk-heterojunction film based on a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer and a fullerene derivative was heat-treated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope. In areas of the film that exposed to the electron beam the nanostructure of the film remained stable, while the nanostructure in areas not exposed to the electron beam underwent large phase separation and nucleation of fullerene crystals. UV-vis spectroscopy shows that the polymer:fullerene films are stable for electron doses up to 2000kGy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. eV-TEM: Transmission electron microscopy in a low energy cathode lens instrument.

    PubMed

    Geelen, Daniël; Thete, Aniket; Schaff, Oliver; Kaiser, Alexander; van der Molen, Sense Jan; Tromp, Rudolf

    2015-12-01

    We are developing a transmission electron microscope that operates at extremely low electron energies, 0-40 eV. We call this technique eV-TEM. Its feasibility is based on the fact that at very low electron energies the number of energy loss pathways decreases. Hence, the electron inelastic mean free path increases dramatically. eV-TEM will enable us to study elastic and inelastic interactions of electrons with thin samples. With the recent development of aberration correction in cathode lens instruments, a spatial resolution of a few nm appears within range, even for these very low electron energies. Such resolution will be highly relevant to study biological samples such as proteins and cell membranes. The low electron energies minimize adverse effects due to radiation damage. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Fabrication and In Situ Transmission Electron Microscope Characterization of Free-Standing Graphene Nanoribbon Devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Kitaura, Ryo; Suzuki, Shoji; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Matsuda, Kazunari; Yamamoto, Yuta; Arai, Shigeo; Shinohara, Hisanori

    2016-01-26

    Edge-dependent electronic properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) have attracted intense interests. To fully understand the electronic properties of GNRs, the combination of precise structural characterization and electronic property measurement is essential. For this purpose, two experimental techniques using free-standing GNR devices have been developed, which leads to the simultaneous characterization of electronic properties and structures of GNRs. Free-standing graphene has been sculpted by a focused electron beam in transmission electron microscope (TEM) and then purified and narrowed by Joule heating down to several nanometer width. Structure-dependent electronic properties are observed in TEM, and significant increase in sheet resistance and semiconducting behavior become more salient as the width of GNR decreases. The narrowest GNR width we obtained with the present method is about 1.6 nm with a large transport gap of 400 meV.

  19. Black Box Real-Time Transient Absorption Spectroscopy and Electron Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhill, John

    2017-06-01

    We introduce an atomistic, all-electron, black-box electronic structure code to simulate transient absorption (TA) spectra and apply it to simulate pyrazole and a GFP- chromophore derivative1. The method is an application of OSCF2, our dissipative exten- sion of time-dependent density-functional theory. We compare our simulated spectra directly with recent ultra-fast spectroscopic experiments. We identify features in the TA spectra to Pauli-blocking which may be missed without a first-principles model. An important ingredient in this method is the stationary-TDDFT correction scheme recently put forwards by Fischer, Govind, and Cramer which allows us to overcome a limitation of adiabatic TDDFT. We demonstrate that OSCF2 is able to reproduce the energies of bleaches and induced absorptions, as well as the decay of the transient spectrum, with only the molecular structure as input. We show that the treatment of electron correlation is the biggest hurdle for TA simulations, which motivates the second half of the talk a new method for realtime electron correlation. We continue to derive and propagate self-consistent electronic dynamics. Extending our derivation of OSCF2 to include electron correlation we obtain a non-linear correlated one-body equation of motion which corrects TDHF. Similar equations are known in quantum kinetic theory, but rare in electronic structure. We introduce approximations that stabilize the theory and reduce its computational cost. We compare the resulting dynamics with well-known exact and approximate theories showing improvements over TDHF. When propagated EE2 changes occupation numbers like exact theory, an important feature missing from TDHF or TDDFT. We introduce a rotating wave approximation to reduce the scaling of the model to O(N^4), and enable propagation on realistically large systems. The equation-of-motion does not rely on a pure-state model for the electronic state, and could be used to study the relationship between electron

  20. Solid-state nanopores of controlled geometry fabricated in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hui; Egerton, Ray F.

    2017-11-01

    Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography were applied to in situ studies of the formation, shape, and diameter of nanopores formed in a silicon nitride membrane in a transmission electron microscope. The nanopore geometry was observed in three dimensions by electron tomography. Drilling conditions, such as probe current, beam convergence angle, and probe position, affect the formation rate and the geometry of the pores. With a beam convergence semi-angle of α = 22 mrad, a conical shaped nanopore is formed but at α = 45 mrad, double-cone (hourglass-shaped) nanopores were produced. Nanopores with an effective diameter between 10 nm and 1.8 nm were fabricated by controlling the drilling time.

  1. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals. PMID:26923483

  2. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-29

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.

  3. High yield production of long branched Au nanoparticles characterized by atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mayoral, Alvaro; Magen, Cesar; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Long multi-branched gold nanoparticles have been synthesized in a very high yield through a facile synthesis combining two different capping agents. The stability of these materials with the time has been tested and their characterization have been performed by diverse advanced electron microscopy techniques, paying special attention to aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy in order to unambiguously analyze the surface structure of the branches and provide insights for the formation of stellated gold nanoparticles. PMID:22125420

  4. Purchase of a Transmission Electron Microscope for Xavier University of Louisiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-15

    imaging facility on the second floor of the Pharmacy Addition at Xavier University that already includes two scanning electron microscopes. The new TEM...is now in use. Xavier University has formally pledged to provide funds for the 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY...for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Purchase of a Transmission Electron Microscope for Xavier University of Louisiana The views

  5. Electronic absorption band broadening and surface roughening of phthalocyanine double layers by saturated solvent vapor treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jinhyun; Yim, Sanggyu, E-mail: sgyim@kookmin.ac.kr

    2012-10-15

    Variations in the electronic absorption (EA) and surface morphology of three types of phthalocyanine (Pc) thin film systems, i.e. copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) single layer, zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) single layer, and ZnPc on CuPc (CuPc/ZnPc) double layer film, treated with saturated acetone vapor were investigated. For the treated CuPc single layer film, the surface roughness slightly increased and bundles of nanorods were formed, while the EA varied little. In contrast, for the ZnPc single layer film, the relatively high solubility of ZnPc led to a considerable shift in the absorption bands as well as a large increase in the surface roughnessmore » and formation of long and wide nano-beams, indicating a part of the ZnPc molecules dissolved in acetone, which altered their molecular stacking. For the CuPc/ZnPc film, the saturated acetone vapor treatment resulted in morphological changes in mainly the upper ZnPc layer due to the significantly low solubility of the underlying CuPc layer. The treatment also broadened the EA band, which involved a combination of unchanged CuPc and changed ZnPc absorption.« less

  6. Electron Spin Resonance and optical absorption spectroscopic studies of manganese centers in aluminium lead borate glasses.

    PubMed

    SivaRamaiah, G; LakshmanaRao, J

    2012-12-01

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and optical absorption studies of 5Al(2)O(3)+75H(3)BO(3)+(20-x)PbO+xMnSO(4) (where x=0.5, 1,1.5 and 2 mol% of MnSO(4)) glasses at room temperature have been studied. The ESR spectrum of all the glasses exhibits resonance signals with effective isotropic g values at ≈2.0, 3.3 and 4.3. The ESR resonance signal at isotropic g≈2.0 has been attributed to Mn(2+) centers in an octahedral symmetry. The ESR resonance signals at isotropic g≈3.3 and 4.3 have been attributed to the rhombic symmetry of the Mn(2+) ions. The zero-field splitting parameter (zfs) has been calculated from the intensities of the allowed hyperfine lines. The optical absorption spectrum exhibits an intense band in the visible region and it has been attributed to (5)E(g)→(5)T(2g) transition of Mn(3+)centers in an octahedral environment. The optical band gap and the Urbach energies have been calculated from the ultraviolet absorption edges. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Energy transmission transformer for a wireless capsule endoscope: analysis of specific absorption rate and current density in biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kenji; Nagato, Tomohiro; Tsuji, Toshio; Koshiji, Kohji

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports on the electromagnetic influences on the analysis of biological tissue surrounding a prototype energy transmission system for a wireless capsule endoscope. Specific absorption rate (SAR) and current density were analyzed by electromagnetic simulator in a model consisting of primary coil and a human trunk including the skin, fat, muscle, small intestine, backbone, and blood. First, electric and magnetic strength in the same conditions as the analytical model were measured and compared to the analytical values to confirm the validity of the analysis. Then, SAR and current density as a function of frequency and output power were analyzed. The validity of the analysis was confirmed by comparing the analytical values with the measured ones. The SAR was below the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). At the same time, the results for current density show that the influence on biological tissue was lowest in the 300-400 kHz range, indicating that it was possible to transmit energy safely up to 160 mW. In addition, we confirmed that the current density has decreased by reducing the primary coil's current.

  8. Consecutive light microscopy, scanning-transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy of traumatic human brain oedema and ischaemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Castejon, O J; Castejon, H V; Diaz, M; Castellano, A

    2001-10-01

    Cortical biopsies of 11 patients with traumatic brain oedema were consecutively studied by light microscopy (LM) using thick plastic sections, scanning-transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) using semithin plastic sections and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using ultrathin sections. Samples were glutaraldehyde-osmium fixed and embedded in Araldite or Epon. Thick sections were stained with toluidine-blue for light microscopy. Semithin sections were examined unstained and uncoated for (S)TEM. Ultrathin sections were stained with uranyl and lead. Perivascular haemorrhages and perivascular extravasation of proteinaceous oedema fluid were observed in both moderate and severe oedema. Ischaemic pyramidal and non-pyramidal nerve cells appeared shrunken, electron dense and with enlargement of intracytoplasmic membrane compartment. Notably swollen astrocytes were observed in all samples examined. Glycogen-rich and glycogen-depleted astrocytes were identified in anoxic-ischaemic regions. Dark and hydropic satellite, interfascicular and perivascular oligodendrocytes were also found. The status spongiosus of severely oedematous brain parenchyma observed by LM and (S)TEM was correlated with the enlarged extracellular space and disrupted neuropil observed by TEM. The (S)TEM is recommended as a suitable technique for studying pathological processes in the central nervous system and as an informative adjunct to LM and TEM.

  9. Electronic structure measurements of metal-organic solar cell dyes using x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Phillip S.

    The focus of this thesis is twofold: to report the results of X-ray absorption studies of metal-organic dye molecules for dye-sensitized solar cells and to provide a basic training manual on X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques and data analysis. The purpose of our research on solar cell dyes is to work toward an understanding of the factors influencing the electronic structure of the dye: the choice of the metal, its oxidation state, ligands, and cage structure. First we study the effect of replacing Ru in several common dye structures by Fe. First-principles calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the C 1s and N 1s edges are combined to investigate transition metal dyes in octahedral and square planar N cages. Octahedral molecules are found to have a downward shift in the N 1s-to-pi* transition energy and an upward shift in C 1s-to-pi* transition energy when Ru is replaced by Fe, explained by an extra transfer of negative charge from Fe to the N ligands compared to Ru. For the square planar molecules, the behavior is more complex because of the influence of axial ligands and oxidation state. Next the crystal field parameters for a series of phthalocyanine and porphyrins dyes are systematically determined using density functional calculations and atomic multiplet calculations with polarization-dependent X-ray absorption spectra. The polarization dependence of the spectra provides information on orbital symmetries which ensures the determination of the crystal field parameters is unique. A uniform downward scaling of the calculated crystal field parameters by 5-30% is found to be necessary to best fit the spectra. This work is a part of the ongoing effort to design and test new solar cell dyes. Replacing the rare metal Ru with abundant metals like Fe would be a significant advance for dye-sensitized solar cells. Understanding the effects of changing the metal centers in these dyes in terms of optical absorption, charge transfer, and electronic

  10. Transmission electron microscopy: direct observation of crystal structure in refractory ceramics.

    PubMed

    Shaw, T M; Thomas, G

    1978-11-10

    Using high-resolution multibeam interference techniques in the transmission electron microscope, images have been obtained that make possible a real-space structure analysis of a beryllium-silicon-nitrogen compound. The results illustrate the usefulness of lattice imaging in the analysis of local crystal structure in these technologically promising ceramic materials.

  11. 46 CFR 531.8 - Amendment, correction, cancellation, and electronic transmission errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., cancellation, and electronic transmission errors. (a) Amendment. (1) NSAs may be amended by mutual agreement of... § 531.5 and Appendix A to this part. (i) Where feasible, NSAs should be amended by amending only the affected specific term(s) or subterms. (ii) Each time any part of an NSA is amended, the filer shall assign...

  12. 46 CFR 531.8 - Amendment, correction, cancellation, and electronic transmission errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., cancellation, and electronic transmission errors. (a) Amendment. (1) NSAs may be amended by mutual agreement of... § 531.5 and Appendix A to this part. (i) Where feasible, NSAs should be amended by amending only the affected specific term(s) or subterms. (ii) Each time any part of an NSA is amended, the filer shall assign...

  13. 46 CFR 531.8 - Amendment, correction, cancellation, and electronic transmission errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., cancellation, and electronic transmission errors. (a) Amendment. (1) NSAs may be amended by mutual agreement of... § 531.5 and Appendix A to this part. (i) Where feasible, NSAs should be amended by amending only the affected specific term(s) or subterms. (ii) Each time any part of an NSA is amended, the filer shall assign...

  14. 46 CFR 531.8 - Amendment, correction, cancellation, and electronic transmission errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., cancellation, and electronic transmission errors. (a) Amendment. (1) NSAs may be amended by mutual agreement of... § 531.5 and Appendix A to this part. (i) Where feasible, NSAs should be amended by amending only the affected specific term(s) or subterms. (ii) Each time any part of an NSA is amended, the filer shall assign...

  15. 46 CFR 531.8 - Amendment, correction, cancellation, and electronic transmission errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., cancellation, and electronic transmission errors. (a) Amendment. (1) NSAs may be amended by mutual agreement of... § 531.5 and Appendix A to this part. (i) Where feasible, NSAs should be amended by amending only the affected specific term(s) or subterms. (ii) Each time any part of an NSA is amended, the filer shall assign...

  16. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1355 - Electronic Data Transmission Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electronic Data Transmission Format C Appendix C to Part 1355 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN... FAMILIES, FOSTER CARE MAINTENANCE PAYMENTS, ADOPTION ASSISTANCE, AND CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES GENERAL Pt...

  17. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1355 - Electronic Data Transmission Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electronic Data Transmission Format C Appendix C to Part 1355 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN... FAMILIES, FOSTER CARE MAINTENANCE PAYMENTS, ADOPTION ASSISTANCE, AND CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES GENERAL Pt...

  18. Keggin-type polyoxometalate nanosheets: synthesis and characterization via scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hiyoshi, Norihito

    2018-05-17

    Polyoxometalate nanosheets were synthesized at the gas/liquid interface of an aqueous solution of Keggin-type silicotungstic acid, cesium chloride, and n-octylamine. The structure of the nanosheets was elucidated via aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy at the atomic and molecular levels.

  19. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1355 - Electronic Data Transmission Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... mainframe-to-mainframe data exchange system using the Sterling Software data transfer package called “SUPERTRACS.” This package will allow data exchange between most computer platforms (both mini and mainframe... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic Data Transmission Format C Appendix C...

  20. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1355 - Electronic Data Transmission Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... mainframe-to-mainframe data exchange system using the Sterling Software data transfer package called “SUPERTRACS.” This package will allow data exchange between most computer platforms (both mini and mainframe... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electronic Data Transmission Format C Appendix C...

  1. Time-resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Electron Transport Study in Warm Dense Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Bae, Leejin; Engelhorn, Kyle; Heimann, Philip; Ping, Yuan; Barbrel, Ben; Fernandez, Amalia; Beckwith, Martha Anne; Cho, Byoung-Ick; GIST Team; IBS Team; LBNL Collaboration; SLAC Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The warm dense Matter represents states of which the temperature is comparable to Fermi energy and ions are strongly coupled. One of the experimental techniques to create such state in the laboratory condition is the isochoric heating of thin metal foil with femtosecond laser pulses. This concept largely relies on the ballistic transport of electrons near the Fermi-level, which were mainly studied for the metals in ambient conditions. However, they were barely investigated in warm dense conditions. We present a time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy measured for the Au/Cu dual layered sample. The front Au layer was isochorically heated with a femtosecond laser pulse, and the x-ray absorption changes around L-edge of Cu, which was attached on the backside of Au, was measured with a picosecond resolution. Time delays between the heating of the `front surface' of Au layer and the alternation of x-ray spectrum of Cu attached on the `rear surface' of Au indicate the energetic electron transport mechanism through Au in the warm dense conditions. IBS (IBS-R012-D1) and the NRF (No. 2013R1A1A1007084) of Korea.

  2. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  3. Scanning transmission X-ray, laser scanning, and transmission electron microscopy mapping of the exopolymeric matrix of microbial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J R; Swerhone, G D W; Leppard, G G; Araki, T; Zhang, X; West, M M; Hitchcock, A P

    2003-09-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) were used to map the distribution of macromolecular subcomponents (e.g., polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids) of biofilm cells and matrix. The biofilms were developed from river water supplemented with methanol, and although they comprised a complex microbial community, the biofilms were dominated by heterotrophic bacteria. TEM provided the highest-resolution structural imaging, CLSM provided detailed compositional information when used in conjunction with molecular probes, and STXM provided compositional mapping of macromolecule distributions without the addition of probes. By examining exactly the same region of a sample with combinations of these techniques (STXM with CLSM and STXM with TEM), we demonstrate that this combination of multimicroscopy analysis can be used to create a detailed correlative map of biofilm structure and composition. We are using these correlative techniques to improve our understanding of the biochemical basis for biofilm organization and to assist studies intended to investigate and optimize biofilms for environmental remediation applications.

  4. A New Search for Carbon Monoxide Absorption in the Transmission Spectrum of the Extrasolar Planet HD 209458b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Drake; Brown, Timothy M.; Charbonneau, David; Harrington, Joseph; Richardson, L. Jeremy

    2005-04-01

    We have revisited the search for carbon monoxide absorption features in transmission during the transit of the extrasolar planet HD 209458b. In 2002 August-September we acquired a total of 1077 high-resolution spectra (λ/δλ~25,000) in the K-band (2 μm) wavelength region using NIRSPEC on the Keck II telescope during three transits. These data are more numerous and of better quality than the data analyzed in an initial search by Brown et al. Our analysis achieves a sensitivity sufficient to test the degree of CO absorption in the first-overtone bands during transit on the basis of plausible models of the planetary atmosphere. We analyze our observations by comparison with theoretical tangent geometry absorption spectra, computed by adding height-invariant ad hoc temperature perturbations to the model atmosphere of Sudarsky et al. and by treating cloud height as an adjustable parameter. We do not detect CO absorption. The strong 2-0 R-branch lines between 4320 and 4330 cm-1 have depths during transit less than 1.6 parts in 104 in units of the stellar continuum (3 σ limit) at a spectral resolving power of 25,000. Our analysis indicates a weakening similar to that found in the case of sodium, suggesting that a general masking mechanism is at work in the planetary atmosphere. Under the interpretation that this masking is provided by high clouds, our analysis defines the maximum cloud-top pressure (i.e., minimum height) as a function of the model atmospheric temperature. For the relatively hot model used by Charbonneau et al. to interpret their sodium detection, our CO limit requires cloud tops at or above 3.3 mbar, and these clouds must be opaque at a wavelength of 2 μm. High clouds comprised of submicron-sized particles are already present in some models but may not provide sufficient opacity to account for our CO result. Cooler model atmospheres, having smaller atmospheric scale heights and lower CO mixing ratios, may alleviate this problem to some extent

  5. Achromatic elemental mapping beyond the nanoscale in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Urban, K W; Mayer, J; Jinschek, J R; Neish, M J; Lugg, N R; Allen, L J

    2013-05-03

    Newly developed achromatic electron optics allows the use of wide energy windows and makes feasible energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) at atomic resolution. In this Letter we present EFTEM images formed using electrons that have undergone a silicon L(2,3) core-shell energy loss, exhibiting a resolution in EFTEM of 1.35 Å. This permits elemental mapping beyond the nanoscale provided that quantum mechanical calculations from first principles are done in tandem with the experiment to understand the physical information encoded in the images.

  6. The importance of transmission electron microscopy analysis of spermatozoa: Diagnostic applications and basic research.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Elena; Sutera, Gaetano; Collodel, Giulia

    2016-06-01

    This review is aimed at discussing the role of ultrastructural studies on human spermatozoa and evaluating transmission electron microscopy as a diagnostic tool that can complete andrology protocols. It is clear that morphological sperm defects may explain decreased fertilizing potential and acquire particular value in the field of male infertility. Electron microscopy is the best method to identify systematic or monomorphic and non-systematic or polymorphic sperm defects. The systematic defects are characterized by a particular anomaly that affects the vast majority of spermatozoa in a semen sample, whereas a heterogeneous combination of head and tail defects found in variable percentages are typically non-systematic or polymorphic sperm defects. A correct diagnosis of these specific sperm alterations is important for choosing the male infertility's therapy and for deciding to turn to assisted reproduction techniques. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) also represents a valuable method to explore the in vitro effects of different compounds (for example drugs with potential spermicidal activity) on the morphology of human spermatozoa. Finally, TEM used in combination with immunohistochemical techniques, integrates structural and functional aspects that provide a wide horizon in the understanding of sperm physiology and pathology. transmission electron microscopy: TEM; World Health Organization: WHO; light microscopy: LM; motile sperm organelle morphology examination: MSOME; intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection: IMSI; intracytoplasmic sperm injection: ICSI; dysplasia of fibrous sheath: DFS; primary ciliary dyskinesia: PCD; outer dense fibers: ODF; assisted reproduction technologies: ART; scanning electron microscopy: SEM; polyvinylpirrolidone: PVP; tert-butylhydroperoxide: TBHP.

  7. High-pressure freezing for scanning transmission electron tomography analysis of cellular organelles.

    PubMed

    Walther, Paul; Schmid, Eberhard; Höhn, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Using an electron microscope's scanning transmission mode (STEM) for collection of tomographic datasets is advantageous compared to bright field transmission electron microscopic (TEM). For image formation, inelastic scattering does not cause chromatic aberration, since in STEM mode no image forming lenses are used after the beam has passed the sample, in contrast to regular TEM. Therefore, thicker samples can be imaged. It has been experimentally demonstrated that STEM is superior to TEM and energy filtered TEM for tomography of samples as thick as 1 μm. Even when using the best electron microscope, adequate sample preparation is the key for interpretable results. We adapted protocols for high-pressure freezing of cultivated cells from a physiological state. In this chapter, we describe optimized high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution protocols for STEM tomography in order to obtain high membrane contrast.

  8. Attosecond electron pulse trains and quantum state reconstruction in ultrafast transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priebe, Katharina E.; Rathje, Christopher; Yalunin, Sergey V.; Hohage, Thorsten; Feist, Armin; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2017-12-01

    Ultrafast electron and X-ray imaging and spectroscopy are the basis for an ongoing revolution in the understanding of dynamical atomic-scale processes in matter. The underlying technology relies heavily on laser science for the generation and characterization of ever shorter pulses. Recent findings suggest that ultrafast electron microscopy with attosecond-structured wavefunctions may be feasible. However, such future technologies call for means to both prepare and fully analyse the corresponding free-electron quantum states. Here, we introduce a framework for the preparation, coherent manipulation and characterization of free-electron quantum states, experimentally demonstrating attosecond electron pulse trains. Phase-locked optical fields coherently control the electron wavefunction along the beam direction. We establish a new variant of quantum state tomography—`SQUIRRELS'—for free-electron ensembles. The ability to tailor and quantitatively map electron quantum states will promote the nanoscale study of electron-matter entanglement and new forms of ultrafast electron microscopy down to the attosecond regime.

  9. X-ray absorption investigation of the electronic structure of the CuI@SWCNT nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Generalov, A. V.; Brzhezinskaya, M. M.; Vinogradov, A. S.; Püttner, R.; Chernysheva, M. V.; Lukashin, A. V.; Eliseev, A. A.

    2011-03-01

    The Cu 2 p, I 3 d, and C 1 sX-ray absorption spectra of the CuI@SWCNT nanocomposite prepared by filling single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with the CuI melt by the capillary technique have been measured with a high-energy resolution using the equipment of the Russian-German beamline at the BESSY electron storage ring. In order to characterize the electronic structure of the nanocomposite and possible changes in the atomic and electronic structures of CuI and SWCNTs in the CuI@SWCNT nanocomposite, the spectra obtained have been analyzed in the framework of the quasi-molecular approach by comparing with the spectra of the pristine (CuI and SWCNT) and reference (CuO) systems. It has been revealed that the encapsulation of the CuI compound inside SWCNTs is accompanied by changes in the electronic structure of CuI and SWCNTs due to the chemical interaction between the filler and carbon nanotubes and the change in the atomic structure of CuI.

  10. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using a laser-driven field emitter: Femtosecond resolution with a high coherence electron beam.

    PubMed

    Feist, Armin; Bach, Nora; Rubiano da Silva, Nara; Danz, Thomas; Möller, Marcel; Priebe, Katharina E; Domröse, Till; Gatzmann, J Gregor; Rost, Stefan; Schauss, Jakob; Strauch, Stefanie; Bormann, Reiner; Sivis, Murat; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2017-05-01

    We present the development of the first ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UTEM) driven by localized photoemission from a field emitter cathode. We describe the implementation of the instrument, the photoemitter concept and the quantitative electron beam parameters achieved. Establishing a new source for ultrafast TEM, the Göttingen UTEM employs nano-localized linear photoemission from a Schottky emitter, which enables operation with freely tunable temporal structure, from continuous wave to femtosecond pulsed mode. Using this emission mechanism, we achieve record pulse properties in ultrafast electron microscopy of 9Å focused beam diameter, 200fs pulse duration and 0.6eV energy width. We illustrate the possibility to conduct ultrafast imaging, diffraction, holography and spectroscopy with this instrument and also discuss opportunities to harness quantum coherent interactions between intense laser fields and free-electron beams. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Absorption spectra and nonlinear transmission (at λ = 2940 nm) of a diffusion-doped Fe{sup 2+}:ZnSe single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Bufetova, G A; Gulyamova, E S; Il'ichev, N N

    2015-06-30

    Transmission spectra of a ZnSe sample diffusion-doped with Fe{sup 2+} ions have been measured in the wavelength range 500 – 7000 nm. A broad absorption band in the range 500 – 1500 nm has been observed in both doped and undoped regions of the sample. This band is possibly due to deviations from stoichiometry in the course of diffusion doping. The transmission of the Fe{sup 2+}:ZnSe sample at a wavelength of 2940 nm has been measured at various dopant concentrations and high peak pulse intensities (up to 8 MW cm{sup -2}). The samples have been shown to be incompletely bleached:more » during a laser pulse, the transmission first increases, reaches a maximum, and then falls off. Our results suggest that the incomplete bleaching cannot be accounted for by excited-state absorption. The incomplete bleaching (as well as the transmission maximum) is due to the heating of the sample, which leads to a reduction in upper level lifetime and, accordingly, to an increase in absorption saturation intensity. (nonlinear optical phenomena)« less

  12. Dose-rate-dependent damage of cerium dioxide in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; DuChene, Joseph S.; Roberts, Alan D.; Wei, Wei David; Herzing, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    Beam damage caused by energetic electrons in the transmission electron microscope is a fundamental constraint limiting the collection of artifact-free information. Through understanding the influence of the electron beam, experimental routines may be adjusted to improve the data collection process. Investigations of CeO2 indicate that there is not a critical dose required for the accumulation of electron beam damage. Instead, measurements using annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy demonstrate that the onset of measurable damage occurs when a critical dose rate is exceeded. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is that oxygen vacancies created by exposure to a 300 keV electron beam are actively annihilated as the sample re-oxidizes in the microscope environment. As a result, only when the rate of vacancy creation exceeds the recovery rate will beam damage begin to accumulate. This observation suggests that dose-intensive experiments can be accomplished without disrupting the native structure of the sample when executed using dose rates below the appropriate threshold. Furthermore, the presence of an encapsulating carbonaceous layer inhibits processes that cause beam damage, markedly increasing the dose rate threshold for the accumulation of damage. PMID:27469265

  13. Dose-rate-dependent damage of cerium dioxide in the scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Johnston-Peck, Aaron C; DuChene, Joseph S; Roberts, Alan D; Wei, Wei David; Herzing, Andrew A

    2016-11-01

    Beam damage caused by energetic electrons in the transmission electron microscope is a fundamental constraint limiting the collection of artifact-free information. Through understanding the influence of the electron beam, experimental routines may be adjusted to improve the data collection process. Investigations of CeO 2 indicate that there is not a critical dose required for the accumulation of electron beam damage. Instead, measurements using annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy demonstrate that the onset of measurable damage occurs when a critical dose rate is exceeded. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is that oxygen vacancies created by exposure to a 300keV electron beam are actively annihilated as the sample re-oxidizes in the microscope environment. As a result, only when the rate of vacancy creation exceeds the recovery rate will beam damage begin to accumulate. This observation suggests that dose-intensive experiments can be accomplished without disrupting the native structure of the sample when executed using dose rates below the appropriate threshold. Furthermore, the presence of an encapsulating carbonaceous layer inhibits processes that cause beam damage, markedly increasing the dose rate threshold for the accumulation of damage. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Shortwave Radiative Fluxes, Solar-Beam Transmissions, and Aerosol Properties: TARFOX and ACE-2 Find More Absorption from Flux Radiometry than from Other Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) made simultaneous measurements of shortwave radiative fluxes, solar-beam transmissions, and the aerosols affecting those fluxes and transmissions. Besides the measured fluxes and transmissions, other obtained properties include aerosol scattering and absorption measured in situ at the surface and aloft; aerosol single scattering albedo retrieved from skylight radiances; and aerosol complex refractive index derived by combining profiles of backscatter, extinction, and size distribution. These measurements of North Atlantic boundary layer aerosols impacted by anthropogenic pollution revealed the following characteristic results: (1) Better agreement among different types of remote measurements of aerosols (e.g., optical depth, extinction, and backscattering from sunphotometers, satellites, and lidars) than between remote and in situ measurements; 2) More extinction derived from transmission measurements than from in situ measurements; (3) Larger aerosol absorption inferred from flux radiometry than from other measurements. When the measured relationships between downwelling flux and optical depth (or beam transmission) are used to derive best-fit single scattering albedos for the polluted boundary layer aerosol, both TARFOX and ACE-2 yield midvisible values of 0.90 +/- 0.04. The other techniques give larger single scattering albedos (i.e. less absorption) for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of 0.95 +/- 0.04. Although the flux-based results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and other uncertainties (e.g., unknown gas absorption). Current uncertainties in aerosol single scattering albedo are large in terms of climate effects. They also have an important influence on aerosol optical depths retrieved from satellite radiances

  15. Low-lying singlet states of carotenoids having 8-13 conjugated double bonds as determined by electronic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kanematsu, Yasuo; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi; Nishio, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Hideki; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2005-07-01

    Electronic absorption spectra were recorded at room temperature in solutions of carotenoids having different numbers of conjugated double bonds, n = 8-13, including a spheroidene derivatives, neurosporene, spheroidene, lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin and spirilloxanthin. The vibronic states of 1Bu+(v=0-4), 2Ag-(v=0-3), 3Ag- (0) and 1Bu- (0) were clearly identified. The arrangement of the four electronic states determined by electronic absorption spectroscopy was identical to that determined by measurement of resonance Raman excitation profiles [K. Furuichi et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 356 (2002) 547] for carotenoids in crystals.

  16. Silver Colloids in Bacteria: A Study by Transmission Electron Microscopy, Absorption Spectroscopy and Elemental Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    study concentrates on other available techniques to elucidate the association of the inorganic colloids and the bacterial components in order to further...the treated bacteria. This is consistent with the strong attraction expected between the silvered cells (with a large Hamaker constant) and their

  17. Note on in situ (scanning) transmission electron microscopy study of liquid samples.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan

    2017-08-01

    Liquid cell (scanning) transmission electron microscopy has been developed rapidly, using amorphous SiN x membranes as electron transparent windows. The current interpretations of electron beam effects are mainly based on radiolytic processes. In this note, additional effects of the electric field due to electron-beam irradiation are discussed. The electric field can be produced by the charge accumulation due to the emission of secondary and Auger electrons. Besides various beam-induced phenomena, such as nanoparticle precipitation and gas bubble formation and motion, two other effects need to be considered; one is the change of Gibbs free energy of nucleation and the other is the violation of Brownian motion due to ion drifting driven by the electric field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Spherical aberration correction in a scanning transmission electron microscope using a sculpted thin film.

    PubMed

    Shiloh, Roy; Remez, Roei; Lu, Peng-Han; Jin, Lei; Lereah, Yossi; Tavabi, Amir H; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Arie, Ady

    2018-06-01

    Nearly eighty years ago, Scherzer showed that rotationally symmetric, charge-free, static electron lenses are limited by an unavoidable, positive spherical aberration. Following a long struggle, a major breakthrough in the spatial resolution of electron microscopes was reached two decades ago by abandoning the first of these conditions, with the successful development of multipole aberration correctors. Here, we use a refractive silicon nitride thin film to tackle the second of Scherzer's constraints and demonstrate an alternative method for correcting spherical aberration in a scanning transmission electron microscope. We reveal features in Si and Cu samples that cannot be resolved in an uncorrected microscope. Our thin film corrector can be implemented as an immediate low cost upgrade to existing electron microscopes without re-engineering of the electron column or complicated operation protocols and can be extended to the correction of additional aberrations. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Weak-beam scanning transmission electron microscopy for quantitative dislocation density measurement in steels.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenta; Shimodaira, Masaki; Toyama, Takeshi; Shimizu, Yasuo; Inoue, Koji; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Milan, Konstantinovic J; Gerard, Robert; Nagai, Yasuyoshi

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate dislocations induced by neutron irradiation, we developed a weak-beam scanning transmission electron microscopy (WB-STEM) system by installing a novel beam selector, an annular detector, a high-speed CCD camera and an imaging filter in the camera chamber of a spherical aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The capabilities of the WB-STEM with respect to wide-view imaging, real-time diffraction monitoring and multi-contrast imaging are demonstrated using typical reactor pressure vessel steel that had been used in an European nuclear reactor for 30 years as a surveillance test piece with a fluence of 1.09 × 1020 neutrons cm-2. The quantitatively measured size distribution (average loop size = 3.6 ± 2.1 nm), number density of the dislocation loops (3.6 × 1022 m-3) and dislocation density (7.8 × 1013 m m-3) were carefully compared with the values obtained via conventional weak-beam transmission electron microscopy studies. In addition, cluster analysis using atom probe tomography (APT) further demonstrated the potential of the WB-STEM for correlative electron tomography/APT experiments. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Structural analysis of ion-implanted chemical-vapor-deposited diamond by transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, N.; Deguchi, M.; Wang, C. L.; Won, J. H.; Jeon, H. M.; Mori, Y.; Hatta, A.; Kitabatake, M.; Ito, T.; Hirao, T.; Sasaki, T.; Hiraki, A.

    1997-04-01

    A transmission electron microscope (TEM) study of ion-implanted chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond is presented. CVD diamond used for transmission electron microscope observation was directly deposited onto Mo TEM grids. As-deposited specimens were irradiated by C (100 keV) ions at room temperature with a wide range of implantation doses (10 12-10 17/cm 2). Transmission electron diffraction (TED) patterns indicate that there exists a critical dose ( Dc) for the onset of amorphization of CVD diamond as a result of ion induced damage and the value of critical dose is confirmed to be about 3 × 10 15/cm 2. The ion-induced transformation process is clearly revealed by high resolution electron microscope (HREM) images. For a higher dose implantation (7 × 10 15/cm 2) a large amount of diamond phase is transformed into amorphous carbon and many tiny misoriented diamond blocks are found to be left in the amorphous solid. The average size of these misoriented diamond blocks is only about 1-2 nm. Further bombardment (10 17/cm 2) almost kills all of the diamond phase within the irradiated volume and moreover leads to local formation of micropolycrystalline graphite.

  1. Localized magnetoplasmons in quantum dots: Magneto-optical absorption, Raman scattering, and inelastic electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, M. S.

    We investigate a one-component, quasi-zero dimensional, quantum plasma exposed to a parabolic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. If the size of such a system as can be realized in the semiconducting quantum dots is on the order of the de-Broglie wavelength, the electronic and optical properties become highly tunable. Then the quantum size effects challenge the observation of many-particle phenomena such as the magneto-optical absorption, Raman intensity, and electron-energy-loss spectrum. An exact analytical solution of the problem leads us to infer that these many-particle phenomena are, in fact, dictated by the generalized Kohn's theorem in the long-wavelength limit. Maneuvering the confinement and/or the magnetic field furnishes the resonance energy capable of being explored with the FIR, Raman, or electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. This implies that either of these probes should be competent in observing the localized magnetoplasmons in the system. A deeper insight into the physics of quantum dots is paving the way for their implementation in such diverse fields as quantum computing and medical imaging.

  2. Floquet theory of microwave absorption by an impurity in the two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepelianskii, Alexei D.; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) under circular polarized microwave radiation in the presence of dilute localized impurities. Inspired by recent developments on Floquet topological insulators we obtain the Floquet wave functions of this system which allow us to predict the microwave absorption and charge density responses of the electron gas; we demonstrate how these properties can be understood from the underlying semiclassical dynamics even for impurities with a size of around a magnetic length. The charge density response takes the form of a rotating charge density vortex around the impurity that can lead to a significant renormalization of the external microwave field which becomes strongly inhomogeneous on the scale of a cyclotron radius around the impurity. We show that this inhomogeneity can suppress the circular polarization dependence which is theoretically expected for microwave induced resistance oscillations but which was not observed in experiments on semiconducting 2DEGs. Our explanation for this so far unexplained polarization independence has close similarities with the Azbel'-Kaner effect in metals where the interaction length between the microwave field and conduction electrons is much smaller than the cyclotron radius due to skin effect generating harmonics of the cyclotron resonance.

  3. In-situ straining and time-resolved electron tomography data acquisition in a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hata, S; Miyazaki, S; Gondo, T; Kawamoto, K; Horii, N; Sato, K; Furukawa, H; Kudo, H; Miyazaki, H; Murayama, M

    2017-04-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results of a new in-situ three-dimensional (3D) imaging system for observing plastic deformation behavior in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) as a directly relevant development of the recently reported straining-and-tomography holder [Sato K et al. (2015) Development of a novel straining holder for transmission electron microscopy compatible with single tilt-axis electron tomography. Microsc. 64: 369-375]. We designed an integrated system using the holder and newly developed straining and image-acquisition software and then developed an experimental procedure for in-situ straining and time-resolved electron tomography (ET) data acquisition. The software for image acquisition and 3D visualization was developed based on the commercially available ET software TEMographyTM. We achieved time-resolved 3D visualization of nanometer-scale plastic deformation behavior in a Pb-Sn alloy sample, thus demonstrating the capability of this system for potential applications in materials science. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Change In The Electronic Structure And Optical Absorption Of Cuprate Delafossites Via B-site Alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beesley, Ramon; Panapitiya, Gihan; Lewis, James; Lewis Group Team

    Delafossite oxides are a family of materials with the form ABO2 , where the A-site is a monovalent cation (Cu , Ag , Au) and the B-site is a trivalent cation (Ga , Al , In). Delafossites typically have a wide optical band gap, this band gap may be tuned by adding a second B-site element forming an AB(1- x) 1B(x)2O2 alloy. We investigate changes in the electronic structure of CuAlO2 , CuGaO2 , and CuInO2 when alloyed with CuFeO2 . Using the FIREBALL program to optimize the atomic structure, calculate the total and partial density of states, calculate the valence band edge for each alloy level, and investigate the clustering factor of the second B-site atom, it is found that alloying with Fe creates midgap states caused by Fe - O interactions. From the partial density of state, each type of atoms contribution to the change in the valence band edge can be seen. Observed changes to the materials include increased optical absorption in the visible range, and symmetry breaking because of the deformation in the crystal structure. The CuFeO2 alloying percentages range from 0-5%. We are synthesizing these alloys to experimentally verify the changes in the optical absorption spectra.

  5. Electron-cyclotron wave propagation, absorption and current drive in the presence of neoclassical tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isliker, Heinz; Chatziantonaki, Ioanna; Tsironis, Christos; Vlahos, Loukas

    2012-09-01

    We analyze the propagation of electron-cyclotron waves, their absorption and current drive when neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs), in the form of magnetic islands, are present in a tokamak plasma. So far, the analysis of the wave propagation and power deposition in the presence of NTMs has been performed mainly in the frame of an axisymmetric magnetic field, ignoring any effects from the island topology. Our analysis starts from an axisymmetric magnetic equilibrium, which is perturbed such as to exhibit magnetic islands. In this geometry, we compute the wave evolution with a ray-tracing code, focusing on the effect of the island topology on the efficiency of the absorption and current drive. To increase the precision in the calculation of the power deposition, the standard analytical flux-surface labeling for the island region has been adjusted from the usual cylindrical to toroidal geometry. The propagation up to the O-point is found to be little affected by the island topology, whereas the power absorbed and the driven current are significantly enhanced, because the resonant particles are bound to the small volumes in between the flux surfaces of the island. The consequences of these effects on the NTM evolution are investigated in terms of the modified Rutherford equation.

  6. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF ABSORPTION OF TRACER MATERIALS BY TOAD URINARY BLADDER EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Kwon

    1965-01-01

    The absorption of Thorotrast and saccharated iron oxide by the epithelium of the toad urinary bladder was studied by electron microscopy. Whether the toads were hydrated, dehydrated, or given Pitressin, no significant differences in transport of colloidal particles by epithelial cells were observed. This implies that these physiological factors had little effect on the transport of the tracer particles. Tracer particles were encountered in three types of epithelial cells which line the bladder lumen, but most frequently in the mitochondria-rich cells. Tracer materials were incorporated into the cytoplasm of epithelial cells after being adsorbed to the coating layer covering the luminal surface of the cells. In the intermediate stage (1 to 3 hours after introducing tracer) particles were present in small vesicles, tubules, and multivesicular bodies. In the later stages (up to 65 hours), the particles were more commonly seen to be densely packed within large membrane-bounded bodies which were often found near the Golgi region. These large bodies probably were formed by the fusion of small vesicles. Irrespective of the stages of absorption, no particles were found in the intercellular spaces or in the submucosa. Particles apparently did not penetrate the intercellular spaces of the epithelium beyond the level of the tight junction. PMID:14287173

  7. Electronic structure of transition metal-cysteine complexes from X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leung, Bonnie O; Jalilehvand, Farideh; Szilagyi, Robert K

    2008-04-17

    The electronic structures of HgII, NiII, CrIII, and MoV complexes with cysteine were investigated by sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and density functional theory. The covalency in the metal-sulfur bond was determined by analyzing the intensities of the electric-dipole allowed pre-edge features appearing in the XANES spectra below the ionization threshold. Because of the well-defined structures of the selected cysteine complexes, the current work provides a reference set for further sulfur K-edge XAS studies of bioinorganic active sites with transition metal-sulfur bonds from cysteine residues as well as more complex coordination compounds with thiolate ligands.

  8. Magnetically confined electron beam system for high resolution electron transmission-beam experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, A. I.; Oller, J. C.; Krupa, K.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Blanco, F.; Muñoz, A.; Colmenares, R.; García, G.

    2018-06-01

    A novel experimental setup has been implemented to provide accurate electron scattering cross sections from molecules at low and intermediate impact energies (1-300 eV) by measuring the attenuation of a magnetically confined linear electron beam from a molecular target. High-resolution electron energy is achieved through confinement in a magnetic gas trap where electrons are cooled by successive collisions with N2. Additionally, we developed and present a method to correct systematic errors arising from energy and angular resolution limitations. The accuracy of the entire measurement procedure is validated by comparing the N2 total scattering cross section in the considered energy range with benchmark values available in the literature.

  9. Specimen-thickness effects on transmission Kikuchi patterns in the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Rice, K P; Keller, R R; Stoykovich, M P

    2014-06-01

    We report the effects of varying specimen thickness on the generation of transmission Kikuchi patterns in the scanning electron microscope. Diffraction patterns sufficient for automated indexing were observed from films spanning nearly three orders of magnitude in thickness in several materials, from 5 nm of hafnium dioxide to 3 μm of aluminum, corresponding to a mass-thickness range of ~5 to 810 μg cm(-2) . The scattering events that are most likely to be detected in transmission are shown to be very near the exit surface of the films. The energies, spatial distribution and trajectories of the electrons that are transmitted through the film and are collected by the detector are predicted using Monte Carlo simulations. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Recent developments of the in situ wet cell technology for transmission electron microscopies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Li, Chang; Cao, Hongling

    2015-03-21

    In situ wet cells for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allow studying structures and processes in a liquid environment with high temporal and spatial resolutions, and have been attracting increasing research interests in many fields. In this review, we highlight the structural and functional developments of the wet cells for TEM and STEM. One of the key features of the wet cells is the sealing technique used to isolate the liquid sample from the TEM/STEM vacuum environments, thus the existing in situ wet cells are grouped by different sealing methods. In this study, the advantages and shortcomings of each type of in situ wet cells are discussed, the functional developments of different wet cells are presented, and the future trends of the wet cell technology are addressed. It is suggested that in the future the in situ wet cell TEM/STEM technology will have an increasing impact on frontier nanoscale research.

  11. A graphene oxide-carbon nanotube grid for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Haoxu; Zhou, Ruifeng; Chen, Zhuo; Li, Qunqing; Fan, Shoushan; Ge, Guanglu; Liu, Renxiao; Jiang, Kaili

    2011-09-23

    A novel grid for use in transmission electron microscopy is developed. The supporting film of the grid is composed of thin graphene oxide films overlying a super-aligned carbon nanotube network. The composite film combines the advantages of graphene oxide and carbon nanotube networks and has the following properties: it is ultra-thin, it has a large flat and smooth effective supporting area with a homogeneous amorphous appearance, high stability, and good conductivity. The graphene oxide-carbon nanotube grid has a distinct advantage when characterizing the fine structure of a mass of nanomaterials over conventional amorphous carbon grids. Clear high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of various nanomaterials are obtained easily using the new grids.

  12. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; ...

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for themore » analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.« less

  13. Barrier layers against oxygen transmission on the basis of electron beam cured methacrylated gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherzer, Tom

    1997-08-01

    The development of barrier layers against oxygen transmission on the basis of radiation-curable methacrylated gelatin will be reported. The electron beam cured gelatin coatings show an extremely low oxygen permeability and a high resistance against boiling water. Moreover, the methacrylated gelatins possess good adhesion characteristics. Therefore, they are suited as barrier adhesives in laminates for food packaging applications. If substrate foils from biodegradable polymers are used, the development of completely biodegradable packaging materials seems to be possible.

  14. A Transmission Electron Microscope Investigation of Space Weathering Effects in Hayabusa Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, Eve L.

    2014-01-01

    The Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa successfully returned the first direct samples of the regolith from the surface of an asteroid. The Hayabusa samples thus present a special opportunity to directly investigate the evolution of asteroidal surfaces, from the development of the regolith to the study of the more complex effects of space weathering. Here we describe the mineralogy, microstructure and composition of three Hayabusa mission particles using transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques

  15. A Monte Carlo investigation of contaminant electrons due to a novel in vivo transmission detector.

    PubMed

    Asuni, G; Jensen, J M; McCurdy, B M C

    2011-02-21

    A novel transmission detector (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) developed as an IMRT quality assurance tool, intended for in vivo patient dose measurements, is studied here. The goal of this investigation is to use Monte Carlo techniques to characterize treatment beam parameters in the presence of the detector and to compare to those of a plastic block tray (a frequently used clinical device). Particular attention is paid to the impact of the detector on electron contamination model parameters of two commercial dose calculation algorithms. The linac head together with the COMPASS transmission detector (TRD) was modeled using BEAMnrc code. To understand the effect of the TRD on treatment beams, the contaminant electron fluence, energy spectra, and angular distributions at different SSDs were analyzed for open and non-open (i.e. TRD and block tray) fields. Contaminant electrons in the BEAMnrc simulations were separated according to where they were created. Calculation of surface dose and the evaluation of contributions from contaminant electrons were performed using the DOSXYZnrc user code. The effect of the TRD on contaminant electrons model parameters in Eclipse AAA and Pinnacle(3) dose calculation algorithms was investigated. Comparisons of the fluence of contaminant electrons produced in the non-open fields versus open field show that electrons created in the non-open fields increase at shorter SSD, but most of the electrons at shorter SSD are of low energy with large angular spread. These electrons are out-scattered or absorbed in air and contribute less to surface dose at larger SSD. Calculated surface doses with the block tray are higher than those with the TRD. Contribution of contaminant electrons to dose in the buildup region increases with increasing field size. The additional contribution of electrons to surface dose increases with field size for TRD and block tray. The introduction of the TRD results in a 12% and 15% increase in the Gaussian widths used in the

  16. Defects in paramagnetic Co-doped ZnO films studied by transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacs, Andras; Ney, A.; Duchamp, Martial

    2013-12-23

    We have studied planar defects in epitaxial Co:ZnO dilute magnetic semiconductor thin films deposited on c-plane sapphire (Al2O3) and the Co:ZnO/Al2O3 interface structure at atomic resolution using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Comparing Co:ZnO samples deposited by pulsed laser deposition and reactive magnetron sputtering, both exhibit extrinsic stacking faults, incoherent interface structures, and compositional variations within the first 3-4 Co:ZnO layers at the interface.. In addition, we have measured the local strain which reveals the lattice distortion around the stacking faults.

  17. Transmission Electron Microscopy Analysis of Skin Lesions from Sporotrichosis Epidemic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Porto Ferreira, Cassio; Oliveira de Almeida, Ana Cristina; Corte-Real, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy can yield useful information in a range of scientific fields; it is capable of imaging at a significantly higher resolution than light microscopes and has been a very useful tool in the identification of morphological changes of the dermis as well as assessment of changes in the extracellular matrix. Our aim is to characterize by electron microscopy the cellular profile of lesions caused by Sporothrix schenckii from the sporotrichosis epidemic in its zoonotic form that occurs in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. PMID:25653392

  18. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of skin lesions from sporotrichosis epidemic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Cassio Porto; Oliveira de Almeida, Ana Cristina; Corte-Real, Suzana

    2015-02-01

    Transmission electron microscopy can yield useful information in a range of scientific fields; it is capable of imaging at a significantly higher resolution than light microscopes and has been a very useful tool in the identification of morphological changes of the dermis as well as assessment of changes in the extracellular matrix. Our aim is to characterize by electron microscopy the cellular profile of lesions caused by Sporothrix schenckii from the sporotrichosis epidemic in its zoonotic form that occurs in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  19. Correlated Optical Spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy of Individual Hollow Nanoparticles and their Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linglu; Yan, Bo; Reinhard, Björn M.

    2009-01-01

    The optical spectra of individual Ag-Au alloy hollow particles were correlated with the particles’ structures obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM provided direct experimental access to the dimension of the cavity, thickness of the metal shell, and the interparticle distance of hollow particle dimers with high spatial resolution. The analysis of correlated spectral and structural information enabled the quantification of the influence of the core-shell structure on the resonance energy, plasmon lifetime, and plasmon coupling efficiency. Electron beam exposure during TEM inspection was observed to affect plasmon wavelength and lifetime, making optical inspection prior to structural characterization mandatory. PMID:19768108

  20. Employing NMR Spectroscopy To Evaluate Transmission of Electronic Effects in 4-Substituted Chalcones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachter-Jurcsak, Nanette; Zamani, Hossein

    1999-05-01

    Described is an organic synthesis experiment that demonstrates the electronic transmission by substituents. The effect of substitution at the para-position of the styryl ring of 1,3-diphenyl-2-propenones (chalcones) by typical electron-donating or -accepting groups can be observed by proton and carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy. A linear correlation is observed when the differences in chemical shift measurements for H are plotted against the corresponding Hammett substituent constant values. Good correlation between carbon-13 chemical shifts of the alpha carbon are also observed. The syntheses of the 4-substituted chalcones is presented as well as a brief discussion of the theory.

  1. Possibilities and limitations of advanced transmission electron microscopy for carbon-based nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Carla; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2015-01-01

    Summary A major revolution for electron microscopy in the past decade is the introduction of aberration correction, which enables one to increase both the spatial resolution and the energy resolution to the optical limit. Aberration correction has contributed significantly to the imaging at low operating voltages. This is crucial for carbon-based nanomaterials which are sensitive to electron irradiation. The research of carbon nanomaterials and nanohybrids, in particular the fundamental understanding of defects and interfaces, can now be carried out in unprecedented detail by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (AC-TEM). This review discusses new possibilities and limits of AC-TEM at low voltage, including the structural imaging at atomic resolution, in three dimensions and spectroscopic investigation of chemistry and bonding. In situ TEM of carbon-based nanomaterials is discussed and illustrated through recent reports with particular emphasis on the underlying physics of interactions between electrons and carbon atoms. PMID:26425406

  2. Coherence of a spin-polarized electron beam emitted from a semiconductor photocathode in a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahara, Makoto, E-mail: kuwahara@esi.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Saitoh, Koh; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2014-11-10

    The brightness and interference fringes of a spin-polarized electron beam extracted from a semiconductor photocathode excited by laser irradiation are directly measured via its use in a transmission electron microscope. The brightness was 3.8 × 10{sup 7 }A cm{sup −2 }sr{sup −1} for a 30-keV beam energy with the polarization of 82%, which corresponds to 3.1 × 10{sup 8 }A cm{sup −2 }sr{sup −1} for a 200-keV beam energy. The resulting electron beam exhibited a long coherence length at the specimen position due to the high parallelism of (1.7 ± 0.3) × 10{sup −5 }rad, which generated interference fringes representative of a first-order correlation using an electron biprism. The beam also had amore » high degeneracy of electron wavepacket of 4 × 10{sup −6}. Due to the high polarization, the high degeneracy and the long coherence length, the spin-polarized electron beam can enhance the antibunching effect.« less

  3. Preparation and Observation of Thick Biological Samples by Scanning Transmission Electron Tomography.

    PubMed

    Trépout, Sylvain; Bastin, Philippe; Marco, Sergio

    2017-03-12

    This report describes a protocol for preparing thick biological specimens for further observation using a scanning transmission electron microscope. It also describes an imaging method for studying the 3D structure of thick biological specimens by scanning transmission electron tomography. The sample preparation protocol is based on conventional methods in which the sample is fixed using chemical agents, treated with a heavy atom salt contrasting agent, dehydrated in a series of ethanol baths, and embedded in resin. The specific imaging conditions for observing thick samples by scanning transmission electron microscopy are then described. Sections of the sample are observed using a through-focus method involving the collection of several images at various focal planes. This enables the recovery of in-focus information at various heights throughout the sample. This particular collection pattern is performed at each tilt angle during tomography data collection. A single image is then generated, merging the in-focus information from all the different focal planes. A classic tilt-series dataset is then generated. The advantage of the method is that the tilt-series alignment and reconstruction can be performed using standard tools. The collection of through-focal images allows the reconstruction of a 3D volume that contains all of the structural details of the sample in focus.

  4. Electron phonon couplings in 2D perovskite probed by ultrafast photoinduced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Uyen; Ni, Limeng; Rao, Akshay

    We use the time-resolved photoinduced absorption (PIA) spectroscopy with 20fs time resolution to investigate the electron phonon coupling in the self-assembled hybrid organic layered perovskite, the hexyl ammonium lead iodide compound (C6H13NH3)2 (PbI4) . The coupling results in the broadening and asymmetry of its temperature-dependence photoluminescence spectra. The exact time scale of this coupling, however, wasn't reported experimentally. Here we show that using an ultrashort excitation pulse allows us to resolve from PIA kinetics the oscillation of coherent longitudinal optical phonons that relaxes and self-traps electrons to lower energy states within 200 fs. The 200fs relaxation time is equivalent to a coupling strength of 40meV. Two coupled phonon modes are also identified as about 100 cm-1 and 300 cm-1 from the FFT spectrum of the PIA kinetics. The lower energy mode is consistent with previous reports and Raman spectrum but the higher energy one hasn't been observed before.

  5. Analysis of Multilayer Devices for Superconducting Electronics by High-Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Missert, Nancy; Kotula, Paul G.; Rye, Michael; ...

    2017-02-15

    We used a focused ion beam to obtain cross-sectional specimens from both magnetic multilayer and Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb Josephson junction devices for characterization by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). An automated multivariate statistical analysis of the EDX spectral images produced chemically unique component images of individual layers within the multilayer structures. STEM imaging elucidated distinct variations in film morphology, interface quality, and/or etch artifacts that could be correlated to magnetic and/or electrical properties measured on the same devices.

  6. What transmission electron microscopes can visualize now and in the future.

    PubMed

    Müller, Shirley A; Aebi, Ueli; Engel, Andreas

    2008-09-01

    Our review concentrates on the progress made in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in the past decade. This includes significant improvements in sample preparation by quick-freezing aimed at preserving the specimen in a close-to-native state in the high vacuum of the microscope. Following advances in cold stage and TEM vacuum technology systems, the observation of native, frozen hydrated specimens has become a widely used approach. It fostered the development of computer guided, fully automated low-dose data acquisition systems allowing matched pairs of images and diffraction patterns to be recorded for electron crystallography, and the collection of entire tilt-series for electron tomography. To achieve optimal information transfer to atomic resolution, field emission electron guns combined with acceleration voltages of 200-300 kV are now routinely used. The outcome of these advances is illustrated by the atomic structure of mammalian aquaporin-O and by the pore-forming bacterial cytotoxin ClyA resolved to 12 A. Further, the Yersinia injectisome needle, a bacterial pseudopilus and the binding of phalloidin to muscle actin filaments were chosen to document the advantage of the high contrast offered by dedicated scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and/or the STEM's ability to measure the mass of protein complexes and directly link this to their shape. Continued progress emerging from leading research laboratories and microscope manufacturers will eventually enable us to determine the proteome of a single cell by electron tomography, and to more routinely solve the atomic structure of membrane proteins by electron crystallography.

  7. The Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation in Environmental Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Whole Cells in Liquid.

    PubMed

    Hermannsdörfer, Justus; Tinnemann, Verena; Peckys, Diana B; de Jonge, Niels

    2016-06-01

    Whole cells can be studied in their native liquid environment using electron microscopy, and unique information about the locations and stoichiometry of individual membrane proteins can be obtained from many cells thus taking cell heterogeneity into account. Of key importance for the further development of this microscopy technology is knowledge about the effect of electron beam radiation on the samples under investigation. We used environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detection to examine the effect of radiation for whole fixed COS7 fibroblasts in liquid. The main observation was the localization of nanoparticle labels attached to epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). It was found that the relative distances between the labels remained mostly unchanged (<1.5%) for electron doses ranging from the undamaged native state at 10 e-/Å2 toward 103 e-/Å2. This dose range was sufficient to determine the EGFR locations with nanometer resolution and to distinguish between monomers and dimers. Various different forms of radiation damage became visible at higher doses, including severe dislocation, and the dissolution of labels.

  8. On the threshold conditions for electron beam damage of asbestos amosite fibers in the transmission electron microscope (TEM).

    PubMed

    Martin, Joannie; Beauparlant, Martin; Sauvé, Sébastien; L'Espérance, Gilles

    2016-12-01

    Asbestos amosite fibers were investigated to evaluate the damage caused by a transmission electron microscope (TEM) electron beam. Since elemental x-ray intensity ratios obtained by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) are commonly used for asbestos identification, the impact of beam damage on these ratios was evaluated. It was determined that the magnesium/silicon ratio best represented the damage caused to the fiber. Various tests showed that most fibers have a current density threshold above which the chemical composition of the fiber is modified. The value of this threshold current density varied depending on the fiber, regardless of fiber diameter, and in some cases could not be determined. The existence of a threshold electron dose was also demonstrated. This value was dependent on the current density used and can be increased by providing a recovery period between exposures to the electron beam. This study also established that the electron beam current is directly related to the damage rate above a current density of 165 A/cm 2 . The large number of different results obtained suggest, that in order to ensure that the amosite fibers are not damaged, analysis should be conducted below a current density of 100 A/cm 2 .

  9. Polarized electronic absorption spectra of Cr2SiO4 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furche, A.; Langer, K.

    Polarized electronic absorption spectra, E∥a(∥X), E∥b(∥Y) and E∥c(∥Z), in the energy range 3000-5000 cm-1 were obtained for the orthorhombic thenardite-type phase Cr2SiO4, unique in its Cr2+-allocation suggesting some metal-metal bonding in Cr2+Cr2+ pairs with Cr-Cr distance 2.75 Å along [001]. The spectra were scanned at 273 and 120 K on single crystal platelets ∥(100), containing optical Y and Z, and ∥(010), containing optical X and Z, with thicknesses 12.3 and 15.6 μm, respectively. Microscope-spectrometric techniques with a spatial resolution of 20 μm and 1 nm spectral resolution were used. The orientations were obtained by means of X-ray precession photographs. The xenomorphic, strongly pleochroic crystal fragments (X deeply greenish-blue, Y faint blue almost colourless, Z deeply purple almost opaque) were extracted from polycrystalline Cr2SiO4, synthesized at 35 kbar, above 1440 °C from high purity Cr2O3, Cr (10% excess) and SiO2 in chromium capsules. The Cr2SiO4-phase was identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Four strongly polarized bands, at about 13500 (I), 15700 (II), 18700 (III) and 19700 (IV) cm-1, in the absorption spectra of Cr2SiO4 single crystals show properties (temperature behaviour of linear and integral absorption coefficients, polarization behaviour, molar absorptivities) which are compatible with an assignment to localized spin-allowed transitions of Cr2+ in a distorted square planar coordination of point symmetry C2. The crystal field parameter of Cr2+ is estimated to be 10 Dq =10700 cm-1. A relatively intense, sharp band at 18400 cm-1 and three other minor features can, from their small half widths, be assigned to spin-forbidden dd-transitions of Cr2+. The intensity of such bands strongly decreases on decreasing temperature. The large half widths, near 5000 cm-1 of band III are indicative of some Cr-Cr interactions, i.e. δ-δ* transitions of Cr24+, whereas the latter alone would be in conflict with the strong

  10. Liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy: imaging protein complexes in their native environment in whole eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-04-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of specimens in liquid, so-called Liquid STEM, is capable of imaging the individual subunits of macromolecular complexes in whole eukaryotic cells in liquid. This paper discusses this new microscopy modality within the context of state-of-the-art microscopy of cells. The principle of operation and equations for the resolution are described. The obtained images are different from those acquired with standard transmission electron microscopy showing the cellular ultrastructure. Instead, contrast is obtained on specific labels. Images can be recorded in two ways, either via STEM at 200 keV electron beam energy using a microfluidic chamber enclosing the cells, or via environmental scanning electron microscopy at 30 keV of cells in a wet environment. The first series of experiments involved the epidermal growth factor receptor labeled with gold nanoparticles. The labels were imaged in whole fixed cells with nanometer resolution. Since the cells can be kept alive in the microfluidic chamber, it is also feasible to detect the labels in unfixed, live cells. The rapid sample preparation and imaging allows studies of multiple whole cells.

  11. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    DOE PAGES

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; ...

    2016-02-29

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, makingmore » it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Ultimately, simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.« less

  12. Synthesis and Cs-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Characterization of Multimetallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Subarna; Bhattarai, Nabraj; Velázquez-Salazar, Jesus; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel; Subarna Khanal Team

    2014-03-01

    Multimetallic nanoparticles have been attracted greater attention both in materials science and nanotechnology due to its unique electronic, optical, biological, and catalytic properties lead by physiochemical interactions among different atoms and phases. The distinct features of multimetallic nanoparticles enhanced synergetic properties, large surface to volume ratio and quantum size effects ultimately lead to novel and wide range of possibilities for different applications than monometallic counterparts. For instance, PtPd, Pt/Cu, Au-Au3Cu, AgPd/Pt, AuCu/Pt and many other multimetallic nanoparticles have raised interest for their various applications in fuel cells, ethanol and methanol oxidation reactions, hydrogen storage, and so on. The nanostructures were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-corrected STEM), in combination with high angle annular dark field (HAADF), bright field (BF), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) detectors. These techniques allowed us to probe the structure at the atomic level of the nanoparticles revealing new structural information and elemental composition of the nanoparticles. The authors would like to acknowledge NSF grants DMR-1103730, ``Alloys at the Nanoscale: The Case of Nanoparticles Second Phase'' and NSF PREM Grant # DMR 0934218.

  13. Substituent and solvent effects on electronic absorption spectra of some N-(substitutedphenyl)benzene sulphonamides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganya, Krishnasamy; Kabilan, Senthamaraikannan

    2004-04-01

    The effects of substituents and solvents have been studied through the absorption spectra of nearly 23 ortho- and para-N-(substitutedphenyl)benzene sulphonamides in the range of 200-400 nm. The effects of substituents on the absorption spectra of compounds under present investigation are interpreted by correlation of absorption frequencies with simple and extended Hammett equations. Effect of solvent polarity and hydrogen bonding on the absorption spectra are interpreted by means of Kamlet equation and the results are discussed.

  14. Electron holography study of magnetization behavior in the writer pole of a perpendicular magnetic recording head by a 1 MV transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Kei; Ishida, Yoichi; Akashi, Tetsuya; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic domain structure of the writer poles of perpendicular magnetic recording heads was studied using electron holography. Although the domain structure of a 100-nm-thick writer pole could be observed with a 300 kV transmission electron microscope, that of the 250-nm-thick writer pole could not be analyzed due to the limited transmission capability of the instrument. On the other hand, the detailed domain structure of the 250-nm-thick writer pole was successfully analyzed by a 1 MV electron microscope using its high transmission capability. The thickness and material dependency of the domain structure of a writer pole were discussed.

  15. Multiscale phase mapping of LiFePO4-based electrodes by transmission electron microscopy and electron forward scattering diffraction.

    PubMed

    Robert, Donatien; Douillard, Thierry; Boulineau, Adrien; Brunetti, Guillaume; Nowakowski, Pawel; Venet, Denis; Bayle-Guillemaud, Pascale; Cayron, Cyril

    2013-12-23

    LiFePO4 and FePO4 phase distributions of entire cross-sectioned electrodes with various Li content are investigated from nanoscale to mesoscale, by transmission electron microscopy and by the new electron forward scattering diffraction technique. The distributions of the fully delithiated (FePO4) or lithiated particles (LiFePO4) are mapped on large fields of view (>100 × 100 μm(2)). Heterogeneities in thin and thick electrodes are highlighted at different scales. At the nanoscale, the statistical analysis of 64 000 particles unambiguously shows that the small particles delithiate first. At the mesoscale, the phase maps reveal a core-shell mechanism at the scale of the agglomerates with a preferential pathway along the electrode porosities. At larger scale, lithiation occurs in thick electrodes "stratum by stratum" from the surface in contact with electrolyte toward the current collector.

  16. Dependence of the electronic absorption spectra of aqueous solutions of iodine monochloride on the conditions of dilution and storage time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyubin, V. V.; Klyubina, K. A.; Makovetskaya, K. N.

    2017-04-01

    The electronic absorption spectra of aqueous solutions of iodine monochloride ICl are studied. The spectra of as-prepared solutions display the absorption band associated with hydrated ICl molecules. An additional band indicating that molecular iodine was formed in the solution emerges in the spectrum as dissolution takes place. Only the band belonging to iodine monochloride remains in the absorption spectra, and no additional bands appear after chloride anions Cl- are added to the solution. The absorption spectrum becomes more complex when ICl is dissolved in an alkaline medium. The band belonging to molecular iodine emerges in the spectra at low alkali concentrations, while being transformed to other shorter-wavelength bands at high alkali concentrations (pH ≥ 12).

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of changes induced by solvent and substituent in electronic absorption spectra of some azo disperse dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Asadollah; Yazdanbakhsh, Mohammad Reza; Farahnak, Lahya

    2012-04-01

    Five azo disperse dyes were prepared by diazotizing 4'-aminoacetophenone and p-anisidine and coupling with varies N-alkylated aromatic amines. Characterization of the dyes was carried out by using UV-vis, FTIR and 1H NMR spectroscopic techniques. The electronic absorption spectra of dyes are determined at room temperature in fifteen solvents with different polarities. The solvent dependent maximum absorption band shifts, were investigated using dielectric constant (ɛ), refractive index (n) and Kamlet-Taft polarity parameters (hydrogen bond donating ability (α), hydrogen bond accepting ability (β) and dipolarity/polarizability polarity scale (π*)). Acceptable agreement was found between the maximum absorption band of dyes and solvent polarity parameters especially with π*. The effect of substituents of coupler and/or diazo component on the color of dyes was investigated. The effects of acid and base on the visible absorption maxima of the dyes are also reported.

  18. Absorption/transmission measurements of PSAP particle-laden filters from the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Presser, Cary; Nazarian, Ashot; Conny, Joseph M.

    Absorptivity measurements with a laser-heating approach, referred to as the laser-driven thermal reactor (LDTR), were carried out in the infrared and applied at ambient (laboratory) nonreacting conditions to particle-laden filters from a three-wavelength (visible) particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP). Here, the particles were obtained during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign. The focus of this study was to determine the particle absorption coefficient from field-campaign filter samples using the LDTR approach, and compare results with other commercially available instrumentation (in this case with the PSAP, which has been compared with numerous other optical techniques).

  19. Absorption/transmission measurements of PSAP particle-laden filters from the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign

    DOE PAGES

    Presser, Cary; Nazarian, Ashot; Conny, Joseph M.; ...

    2016-12-02

    Absorptivity measurements with a laser-heating approach, referred to as the laser-driven thermal reactor (LDTR), were carried out in the infrared and applied at ambient (laboratory) nonreacting conditions to particle-laden filters from a three-wavelength (visible) particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP). Here, the particles were obtained during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign. The focus of this study was to determine the particle absorption coefficient from field-campaign filter samples using the LDTR approach, and compare results with other commercially available instrumentation (in this case with the PSAP, which has been compared with numerous other optical techniques).

  20. Nucleation of diamond by pure carbon ion bombardment—a transmission electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Liao, M. Y.; Wang, Z. G.; Lifshitz, Y.; Lee, S. T.

    2005-08-01

    A cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study of a film deposited by a 1 keV mass-selected carbon ion beam onto silicon held at 800 °C is presented. Initially, a graphitic film with its basal planes perpendicular to the substrate is evolving. The precipitation of nanodiamond crystallites in upper layers is confirmed by HRTEM, selected area electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The nucleation of diamond on graphitic edges as predicted by Lambrecht et al. [W. R. L. Lambrecht, C. H. Lee, B. Segall, J. C. Angus, Z. Li, and M. Sunkara, Nature, 364 607 (1993)] is experimentally confirmed. The results are discussed in terms of our recent subplantation-based diamond nucleation model.

  1. In Situ Microstructural Control and Mechanical Testing Inside the Transmission Electron Microscope at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoming; Haque, M. A.

    2015-08-01

    With atomic-scale imaging and analytical capabilities such as electron diffraction and energy-loss spectroscopy, the transmission electron microscope has allowed access to the internal microstructure of materials like no other microscopy. It has been mostly a passive or post-mortem analysis tool, but that trend is changing with in situ straining, heating and electrical biasing. In this study, we design and demonstrate a multi-functional microchip that integrates actuators, sensors, heaters and electrodes with freestanding electron transparent specimens. In addition to mechanical testing at elevated temperatures, the chip can actively control microstructures (grain growth and phase change) of the specimen material. Using nano-crystalline aluminum, nickel and zirconium as specimen materials, we demonstrate these novel capabilities inside the microscope. Our approach of active microstructural control and quantitative testing with real-time visualization can influence mechanistic modeling by providing direct and accurate evidence of the fundamental mechanisms behind materials behavior.

  2. Probing plasmons in three dimensions by combining complementary spectroscopies in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Hachtel, Jordan A.; Marvinney, Claire; Mouti, Anas; ...

    2016-03-02

    The nanoscale optical response of surface plasmons in three-dimensional metallic nanostructures plays an important role in many nanotechnology applications, where precise spatial and spectral characteristics of plasmonic elements control device performance. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and cathodoluminescence (CL) within a scanning transmission electron microscope have proven to be valuable tools for studying plasmonics at the nanoscale. Each technique has been used separately, producing three-dimensional reconstructions through tomography, often aided by simulations for complete characterization. Here we demonstrate that the complementary nature of the two techniques, namely that EELS probes beam-induced electronic excitations while CL probes radiative decay, allows usmore » to directly obtain a spatially- and spectrally-resolved picture of the plasmonic characteristics of nanostructures in three dimensions. Furthermore, the approach enables nanoparticle-by-nanoparticle plasmonic analysis in three dimensions to aid in the design of diverse nanoplasmonic applications.« less

  3. Anisotropic Shape Changes of Silica Nanoparticles Induced in Liquid with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zečević, Jovana; Hermannsdörfer, Justus; Schuh, Tobias; de Jong, Krijn P; de Jonge, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used for in-situ imaging of nanoscale processes taking place in liquid, such as the evolution of nanoparticles during synthesis or structural changes of nanomaterials in liquid environment. Here, it is shown that the focused electron beam of scanning TEM (STEM) brings about the dissolution of silica nanoparticles in water by a gradual reduction of their sizes, and that silica redeposites at the sides of the nanoparticles in the scanning direction of the electron beam, such that elongated nanoparticles are formed. Nanoparticles with an elongation in a different direction are obtained simply by changing the scan direction. Material is expelled from the center of the nanoparticles at higher electron dose, leading to the formation of doughnut-shaped objects. Nanoparticles assembled in an aggregate gradually fuse, and the electron beam exposed section of the aggregate reduces in size and is elongated. Under TEM conditions with a stationary electron beam, the nanoparticles dissolve but do not elongate. The observed phenomena are important to consider when conducting liquid-phase STEM experiments on silica-based materials and may find future application for controlled anisotropic manipulation of the size and the shape of nanoparticles in liquid. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-02-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (electron microscope pixel array detector, or EMPAD) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128×128 pixel detector consists of a 500 µm thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit. The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as local sample thickness can be directly determined. This paper describes the detector architecture, data acquisition system, and preliminary results from experiments with 80-200 keV electron beams.

  5. Revealing electronic structure changes in Chevrel phase cathodes upon Mg insertion using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Liwen F.; Wright, Joshua; Perdue, Brian R.

    Following previous work predicting the electronic response of the Chevrel phase Mo6S8 upon Mg insertion (Thole et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, 17, 22548), we provide the experimental proof, evident in X-ray absorption spectroscopy, to illustrate the charge compensation mechanism of the Chevrel phase compound during Mg insertion and de-insertion processes.

  6. Analysis of Mesa Dislocation Gettering in HgCdTe/CdTe/Si(211) by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, R. N.; Stoltz, A. J.; Benson, J. D.; Smith, P.; Lennon, C. M.; Almeida, L. A.; Farrell, S.; Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.; Brill, G.; Chen, Y.; Salmon, M.; Zu, J.

    2013-11-01

    Due to its strong infrared absorption and variable band-gap, HgCdTe is the ideal detector material for high-performance infrared focal-plane arrays (IRFPAs). Next-generation IRFPAs will utilize dual-color high-definition formats on large-area substrates such as Si or GaAs. However, heteroepitaxial growth on these substrates is plagued by high densities of lattice-mismatch-induced threading dislocations (TDs) that ultimately reduce IRFPA operability. Previously we demonstrated a postgrowth technique with the potential to eliminate or move TDs such that they have less impact on detector operability. In this technique, highly reticulated mesa structures are produced in as-grown HgCdTe epilayers, and then subjected to thermal cycle annealing. To fully exploit this technique, better understanding of the inherent mechanism is required. In this work, we employ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis of HgCdTe/CdTe/Si(211) samples prepared by focused ion beam milling. A key factor is the use of defect-decorated samples, which allows for a correlation of etch pits observed on the surface with underlying dislocation segments viewed in cross-section STEM images. We perform an analysis of these dislocations in terms of the general distribution, density, and mobility at various locations within the mesa structures. Based on our observations, we suggest factors that contribute to the underlying mechanism for dislocation gettering.

  7. A menu of electron probes for optimising information from scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D T; Findlay, S D; Etheridge, J

    2018-01-01

    We assess a selection of electron probes in terms of the spatial resolution with which information can be derived about the structure of a specimen, as opposed to the nominal image resolution. Using Ge [001] as a study case, we investigate the scattering dynamics of these probes and determine their relative merits in terms of two qualitative criteria: interaction volume and interpretability. This analysis provides a 'menu of probes' from which an optimum probe for tackling a given materials science question can be selected. Hollow cone, vortex and spherical wave fronts are considered, from unit cell to Ångstrom size, and for different defocus and specimen orientations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Low-energy electron effects on tensile modulus and infrared transmission properties of a polypyromellitimide film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, J. E.; Long, E. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy and tensile modulus testing were used to evaluate the importance of experimental procedure on changes in properties of pyromellitic dianhydride-p,p prime-oxydianiline film exposed to electron radiation. The radiation exposures were accelerated, approximate equivalents to the total dose expected for a 30 year mission in geosynchronous Earth orbit. The change in the tensile modulus depends more on the dose rate and the time interval between exposure and testing than on total dose. The IR data vary with both total dose and dose rate. A threshold dose rate exists below which reversible radiation effects on the IR spectra occur. Above the threshold dose rate, irreversible effects occur with the appearance of a new band. Post-irradiation and in situ IR absorption bands are significantly different. It is suggested that the electron radiation induced metastable, excites molecular states.

  9. Preparation of cryofixed cells for improved 3D ultrastructure with scanning transmission electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Höhn, Katharina; Sailer, Michaela; Wang, Li; Lorenz, Myriam; Schneider, Marion E; Walther, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Scanning transmission electron tomography offers enhanced contrast compared to regular transmission electron microscopy, and thicker samples, up to 1 μm or more, can be analyzed, since the depth of focus and inelastic scattering are not limitations. In this study, we combine this novel imaging approach with state of the art specimen preparation by using novel light transparent sapphire specimen carrier for high-pressure freezing and a freeze substitution protocol for better contrast of membranes. This combination allows for imaging membranes and other subcellular structures with unsurpassed quality. This is demonstrated with mitochondria, where the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes as well as the membranes in the cristae appear in very close apposition with a minimal intermembrane space. These findings correspond well with old observations using freeze fracturing. In 880-nm thick sections of hemophagocytes, the three-dimensional structure of membrane sheets could be observed in the virtual sections of the tomogram. Microtubules, actin and intermediate filaments could be visualized within one sample. Intermediate filaments, however, could even be better observed in 3D using surface scanning electron tomography.

  10. A streaming multi-GPU implementation of image simulation algorithms for scanning transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Pryor, Alan; Ophus, Colin; Miao, Jianwei

    2017-10-25

    Simulation of atomic-resolution image formation in scanning transmission electron microscopy can require significant computation times using traditional methods. A recently developed method, termed plane-wave reciprocal-space interpolated scattering matrix (PRISM), demonstrates potential for significant acceleration of such simulations with negligible loss of accuracy. In this paper, we present a software package called Prismatic for parallelized simulation of image formation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using both the PRISM and multislice methods. By distributing the workload between multiple CUDA-enabled GPUs and multicore processors, accelerations as high as 1000 × for PRISM and 15 × for multislice are achieved relative to traditionalmore » multislice implementations using a single 4-GPU machine. We demonstrate a potentially important application of Prismatic, using it to compute images for atomic electron tomography at sufficient speeds to include in the reconstruction pipeline. Prismatic is freely available both as an open-source CUDA/C++ package with a graphical user interface and as a Python package, PyPrismatic.« less

  11. A streaming multi-GPU implementation of image simulation algorithms for scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Alan; Ophus, Colin; Miao, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Simulation of atomic-resolution image formation in scanning transmission electron microscopy can require significant computation times using traditional methods. A recently developed method, termed plane-wave reciprocal-space interpolated scattering matrix (PRISM), demonstrates potential for significant acceleration of such simulations with negligible loss of accuracy. Here, we present a software package called Prismatic for parallelized simulation of image formation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using both the PRISM and multislice methods. By distributing the workload between multiple CUDA-enabled GPUs and multicore processors, accelerations as high as 1000 × for PRISM and 15 × for multislice are achieved relative to traditional multislice implementations using a single 4-GPU machine. We demonstrate a potentially important application of Prismatic , using it to compute images for atomic electron tomography at sufficient speeds to include in the reconstruction pipeline. Prismatic is freely available both as an open-source CUDA/C++ package with a graphical user interface and as a Python package, PyPrismatic .

  12. Chemical mapping and quantification at the atomic scale by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ming-Wen; Chen, Cheng Hsuan

    2013-06-25

    With innovative modern material-growth methods, a broad spectrum of fascinating materials with reduced dimensions-ranging from single-atom catalysts, nanoplasmonic and nanophotonic materials to two-dimensional heterostructural interfaces-is continually emerging and extending the new frontiers of materials research. A persistent central challenge in this grand scientific context has been the detailed characterization of the individual objects in these materials with the highest spatial resolution, a problem prompting the need for experimental techniques that integrate both microscopic and spectroscopic capabilities. To date, several representative microscopy-spectroscopy combinations have become available, such as scanning tunneling microscopy, tip-enhanced scanning optical microscopy, atom probe tomography, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Among these tools, STEM boasts unique chemical and electronic sensitivity at unparalleled resolution. In this Perspective, we elucidate the advances in STEM and chemical mapping applications at the atomic scale by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy with a focus on the ultimate challenge of chemical quantification with atomic accuracy.

  13. Studying Dynamic Processes of Nano-sized Objects in Liquid using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hermannsdörfer, Justus; de Jonge, Niels

    2017-02-05

    Samples fully embedded in liquid can be studied at a nanoscale spatial resolution with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) using a microfluidic chamber assembled in the specimen holder for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and STEM. The microfluidic system consists of two silicon microchips supporting thin Silicon Nitride (SiN) membrane windows. This article describes the basic steps of sample loading and data acquisition. Most important of all is to ensure that the liquid compartment is correctly assembled, thus providing a thin liquid layer and a vacuum seal. This protocol also includes a number of tests necessary to perform during sample loading in order to ensure correct assembly. Once the sample is loaded in the electron microscope, the liquid thickness needs to be measured. Incorrect assembly may result in a too-thick liquid, while a too-thin liquid may indicate the absence of liquid, such as when a bubble is formed. Finally, the protocol explains how images are taken and how dynamic processes can be studied. A sample containing AuNPs is imaged both in pure water and in saline.

  14. Studying Dynamic Processes of Nano-sized Objects in Liquid using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hermannsdörfer, Justus; de Jonge, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Samples fully embedded in liquid can be studied at a nanoscale spatial resolution with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) using a microfluidic chamber assembled in the specimen holder for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and STEM. The microfluidic system consists of two silicon microchips supporting thin Silicon Nitride (SiN) membrane windows. This article describes the basic steps of sample loading and data acquisition. Most important of all is to ensure that the liquid compartment is correctly assembled, thus providing a thin liquid layer and a vacuum seal. This protocol also includes a number of tests necessary to perform during sample loading in order to ensure correct assembly. Once the sample is loaded in the electron microscope, the liquid thickness needs to be measured. Incorrect assembly may result in a too-thick liquid, while a too-thin liquid may indicate the absence of liquid, such as when a bubble is formed. Finally, the protocol explains how images are taken and how dynamic processes can be studied. A sample containing AuNPs is imaged both in pure water and in saline. PMID:28190028

  15. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic analysis of ampullary segment of oviduct during estrous cycle in caprines.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Singh, R; Bhardwaj, J K

    2015-01-01

    The ampullary segment of the mammalian oviduct provides suitable milieu for fertilization and development of zygote before implantation into uterus. It is, therefore, in the present study, the cyclic changes in the morphology of ampullary segment of goat oviduct were studied during follicular and luteal phases using scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Topographical analysis revealed the presence of uniformly ciliated ampullary epithelia, concealing apical processes of non-ciliated cells along with bulbous secretory cells during follicular phase. The luteal phase was marked with decline in number of ciliated cells with increased occurrence of secretory cells. The ultrastructure analysis has demonstrated the presence of indented nuclear membrane, supranuclear cytoplasm, secretory granules, rough endoplasmic reticulum, large lipid droplets, apically located glycogen masses, oval shaped mitochondria in the secretory cells. The ciliated cells were characterized by the presence of elongated nuclei, abundant smooth endoplasmic reticulum, oval or spherical shaped mitochondria with crecentric cristae during follicular phase. However, in the luteal phase, secretory cells were possessing highly indented nucleus with diffused electron dense chromatin, hyaline nucleosol, increased number of lipid droplets. The ciliated cells had numerous fibrous granules and basal bodies. The parallel use of scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques has enabled us to examine the cyclic and hormone dependent changes occurring in the topography and fine structure of epithelium of ampullary segment and its cells during different reproductive phases that will be great help in understanding major bottle neck that limits success rate in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer technology. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. 3D simulation of electron and ion transmission of GEM-based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Purba; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Majumdar, Nayana; da Luz, Hugo Natal

    2017-10-01

    Time Projection Chamber (TPC) has been chosen as the main tracking system in several high-flux and high repetition rate experiments. These include on-going experiments such as ALICE and future experiments such as PANDA at FAIR and ILC. Different R&D activities were carried out on the adoption of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) as the gas amplification stage of the ALICE-TPC upgrade version. The requirement of low ion feedback has been established through these activities. Low ion feedback minimizes distortions due to space charge and maintains the necessary values of detector gain and energy resolution. In the present work, Garfield simulation framework has been used to study the related physical processes occurring within single, triple and quadruple GEM detectors. Ion backflow and electron transmission of quadruple GEMs, made up of foils with different hole pitch under different electromagnetic field configurations (the projected solutions for the ALICE TPC) have been studied. Finally a new triple GEM detector configuration with low ion backflow fraction and good electron transmission properties has been proposed as a simpler GEM-based alternative suitable for TPCs for future collider experiments.

  17. A streaming multi-GPU implementation of image simulation algorithms for scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, Alan; Ophus, Colin; Miao, Jianwei

    Simulation of atomic-resolution image formation in scanning transmission electron microscopy can require significant computation times using traditional methods. A recently developed method, termed plane-wave reciprocal-space interpolated scattering matrix (PRISM), demonstrates potential for significant acceleration of such simulations with negligible loss of accuracy. In this paper, we present a software package called Prismatic for parallelized simulation of image formation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using both the PRISM and multislice methods. By distributing the workload between multiple CUDA-enabled GPUs and multicore processors, accelerations as high as 1000 × for PRISM and 15 × for multislice are achieved relative to traditionalmore » multislice implementations using a single 4-GPU machine. We demonstrate a potentially important application of Prismatic, using it to compute images for atomic electron tomography at sufficient speeds to include in the reconstruction pipeline. Prismatic is freely available both as an open-source CUDA/C++ package with a graphical user interface and as a Python package, PyPrismatic.« less

  18. First principles electron-correlated calculations of optical absorption in magnesium clusters★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Ravindra; Shukla, Alok

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we report large-scale configuration interaction (CI) calculations of linear optical absorption spectra of various isomers of magnesium clusters Mgn (n = 2-5), corresponding to valence transitions. Geometry optimization of several low-lying isomers of each cluster was carried out using coupled-cluster singles doubles (CCSD) approach, and these geometries were subsequently employed to perform ground and excited state calculations using either the full-CI (FCI) or the multi-reference singles-doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) approach, within the frozen-core approximation. Our calculated photoabsorption spectrum of magnesium dimer (Mg2) is in excellent agreement with the experiments both for peak positions, and intensities. Owing to the sufficiently inclusive electron-correlation effects, these results can serve as benchmarks against which future experiments, as well as calculations performed using other theoretical approaches, can be tested. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf fille available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2017-80356-6.

  19. Attosecond transient absorption probing of electronic superpositions of bound states in neon. Detection of quantum beats

    DOE PAGES

    Beck, Annelise R; Bernhardt, Birgitta; Warrick, Erika R.; ...

    2014-11-07

    Electronic wavepackets composed of multiple bound excited states of atomic neon lying between 19.6 and 21.5 eV are launched using an isolated attosecond pulse. Individual quantum beats of the wavepacket are detected by perturbing the induced polarization of the medium with a time-delayed few-femtosecond near-infrared (NIR) pulse via coupling the individual states to multiple neighboring levels. All of the initially excited states are monitored simultaneously in the attosecond transient absorption spectrum, revealing Lorentzian to Fano lineshape spectral changes as well as quantum beats. The most prominent beating of the several that were observed was in the spin–orbit split 3d absorptionmore » features, which has a 40 femtosecond period that corresponds to the spin–orbit splitting of 0.1 eV. The few-level models and multilevel calculations confirm that the observed magnitude of oscillation depends strongly on the spectral bandwidth and tuning of the NIR pulse and on the location of possible coupling states.« less

  20. Self-consistent method for quantifying indium content from X-ray spectra of thick compound semiconductor specimens in a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Walther, T; Wang, X

    2016-05-01

    Based on Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray generation by fast electrons we calculate curves of effective sensitivity factors for analytical transmission electron microscopy based energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy including absorption and fluorescence effects, as a function of Ga K/L ratio for different indium and gallium containing compound semiconductors. For the case of InGaN alloy thin films we show that experimental spectra can thus be quantified without the need to measure specimen thickness or density, yielding self-consistent values for quantification with Ga K and Ga L lines. The effect of uncertainties in the detector efficiency are also shown to be reduced. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Studies of Sound Absorption by and Transmission Through Layers of Elastic Noise Control Foams: Finite Element Modeling and Effects of Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yeon June

    In this thesis an elastic-absorption finite element model of isotropic elastic porous noise control materials is first presented as a means of investigating the effects of finite dimension and edge constraints on the sound absorption by, and transmission through, layers of acoustical foams. Methods for coupling foam finite elements with conventional acoustic and structural finite elements are also described. The foam finite element model based on the Biot theory allows for the simultaneous propagation of the three types of waves known to exist in an elastic porous material. Various sets of boundary conditions appropriate for modeling open, membrane-sealed and panel-bonded foam surfaces are formulated and described. Good agreement was achieved when finite element predictions were compared with previously established analytical results for the plane wave absorption coefficient and transmission loss in the case of wave propagation both in foam-filled waveguides and through foam-lined double panel structures of infinite lateral extent. The primary effect of the edge constraints of a foam layer was found to be an acoustical stiffening of the foam. Constraining the ends of the facing panels in foam-lined double panel systems was also found to increase the sound transmission loss significantly in the low frequency range. In addition, a theoretical multi-dimensional model for wave propagation in anisotropic elastic porous materials was developed to study the effect of anisotropy on the sound transmission of foam-lined noise control treatments. The predictions of the theoretical anisotropic model have been compared with experimental measurements for the random incidence sound transmission through double panel structure lined with polyimide foam. The predictions were made by using the measured and estimated macroscopic physical parameters of polyimide foam samples which were known to be anisotropic. It has been found that the macroscopic physical parameters in the direction

  2. In situ transmission electron microscopy of individual carbon nanotetrahedron/ribbon structures in bending

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, Hideo, E-mail: kohno.hideo@kochi-tech.ac.jp; Masuda, Yusuke

    2015-05-11

    When the direction of flattening of a carbon nanotube changes during growth mediated by a metal nanoparticle, a carbon nanotetrahedron is formed in the middle of the carbon nanoribbon. We report the bending properties of the carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structure using a micro-manipulator system in a transmission electron microscope. In many cases, bending occurs at an edge of the carbon nanotetrahedron. No significant change is observed in the tetrahedron's shape during bending, and the bending is reversible and repeatable. Our results show that the carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structure has good durability against mechanical bending.

  3. Visualizing gold nanoparticle uptake in live cells with liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; de Jonge, Niels

    2011-04-13

    The intracellular uptake of 30 nm diameter gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) was studied at the nanoscale in pristine eukaryotic cells. Live COS-7 cells were maintained in a microfluidic chamber and imaged using scanning transmission electron microscopy. A quantitative image analysis showed that Au-NPs bound to the membranes of vesicles, possibly lysosomes, and occupied 67% of the available surface area. The vesicles accumulated to form a micrometer-sized cluster after 24 h of incubation. Two clusters were analyzed and found to consist of 117 ± 9 and 164 ± 4 NP-filled vesicles.

  4. Direct visualization of lithium via annular bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy: a review.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Scott David; Huang, Rong; Ishikawa, Ryo; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-02-08

    Annular bright field (ABF) scanning transmission electron microscopy has proven able to directly image lithium columns within crystalline environments, offering much insight into the structure and properties of lithium-ion battery materials. We summarize the image formation mechanisms underpinning ABF imaging, review the experimental application of this technique to imaging lithium in materials and overview the conditions that help maximize the visibility of lithium columns. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. In situ nanomechanical testing of twinned metals in a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Nan; Wang, Jiangwei; Mao, Scott

    This paper focuses on in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) characterization to explore twins in face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic monolithic metals, and their impact on the overall mechanical performance. Taking advantage of simultaneous nanomechanical deformation and nanoscale imaging using versatile in situ TEM tools, direct correlation of these unique microscopic defects with macroscopic mechanical performance becomes possible. This article summarizes recent evidence to support the mechanisms related to strengthening and plasticity in metals, including nanotwinned Cu, Ni, Al, Au, and others in bulk, thin film, and nanowire forms.

  6. Laser-Induced Skyrmion Writing and Erasing in an Ultrafast Cryo-Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berruto, G.; Madan, I.; Murooka, Y.; Vanacore, G. M.; Pomarico, E.; Rajeswari, J.; Lamb, R.; Huang, P.; Kruchkov, A. J.; Togawa, Y.; LaGrange, T.; McGrouther, D.; Rønnow, H. M.; Carbone, F.

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate that light-induced heat pulses of different duration and energy can write Skyrmions in a broad range of temperatures and magnetic field in FeGe. Using a combination of camera-rate and pump-probe cryo-Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, we directly resolve the spatiotemporal evolution of the magnetization ensuing optical excitation. The Skyrmion lattice was found to maintain its structural properties during the laser-induced demagnetization, and its recovery to the initial state happened in the sub-μ s to μ s range, depending on the cooling rate of the system.

  7. Post-ion beam induced degradation of copper layers in transmission electron microscopy specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, F.; Richard, O.; Bender, H.; Vandervorst, W.

    2015-11-01

    Copper containing transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimens frequently show corrosion after focused ion beam (FIB) preparation. This paper reveals that the corrosion product is a Cu-S phase growing over the specimen surface. The layer is identified by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and lattice spacing indexing of power spectra patterns. The corrosion process is further studied by TEM on cone-shaped specimens, which are intentionally stored after FIB preparation with S flakes for short time. Furthermore, a protective method against corrosion is developed by varying the time in the FIB vacuum and the duration of a subsequent plasma cleaning.

  8. Structural defects in GaN revealed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

    This paper reviews the various types of structural defects observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy in GaN heteroepitaxial layers grown on foreign substrates and homoepitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates. The structural perfection of these layers is compared to the platelet self-standing crystals grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution. Defects in undoped and Mg doped GaN are discussed. Lastly, some models explaining the formation of inversion domains in heavily Mg doped layers that are possible defects responsible for the difficulties of p-doping in GaN are also reviewed.

  9. Structural defects in GaN revealed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

    2014-09-08

    This paper reviews the various types of structural defects observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy in GaN heteroepitaxial layers grown on foreign substrates and homoepitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates. The structural perfection of these layers is compared to the platelet self-standing crystals grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution. Defects in undoped and Mg doped GaN are discussed. Lastly, some models explaining the formation of inversion domains in heavily Mg doped layers that are possible defects responsible for the difficulties of p-doping in GaN are also reviewed.

  10. High-resolution mapping of molecules in an ionic liquid via scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Tomohiro; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu

    2018-03-01

    Understanding structures and spatial distributions of molecules in liquid phases is crucial for the control of liquid properties and to develop efficient liquid-phase processes. Here, real-space mapping of molecular distributions in a liquid was performed. Specifically, the ionic liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (C2mimTFSI) was imaged using atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. Simulations revealed network-like bright regions in the images that were attributed to the TFSI- anion, with minimal contributions from the C2mim+ cation. Simple visualization of the TFSI- distribution in the liquid sample was achieved by binarizing the experimental image.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of microstructural features of Al-Li-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avalos-Borja, M.; Pizzo, P. P.; Larson, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of aluminum-lithium-copper alloys was conducted. The principal purpose is to characterize the nature, size, and distribution of stringer particles which result from the powder metallurgy (P/M) processing of these alloys. Microstructural features associated with the stringer particles are reported that help explain the stress corrosion susceptibility of the powder metallurgy-processed Al-Li-Cu alloys. In addition, matrix precipitation events are documented for a variety of heat treatments and process variations. Hot rolling is observed to significant alter the nature of matrix precipitation, and the observations are correlated with concomitant mechanical property variations.

  12. Current status and future directions for in situ transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Mitra L.; Stach, Eric A.; Arslan, Ilke; Crozier, P.A.; Kabius, Bernd C.; LaGrange, Thomas; Minor, Andrew M.; Takeda, Seiji; Tanase, Mihaela; Wagner, Jakob B.; Sharma, Renu

    2016-01-01

    This review article discusses the current and future possibilities for the application of in situ transmission electron microscopy to reveal synthesis pathways and functional mechanisms in complex and nanoscale materials. The findings of a group of scientists, representing academia, government labs and private sector entities (predominantly commercial vendors) during a workshop, held at the Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology- National Institute of Science and Technology (CNST-NIST), are discussed. We provide a comprehensive review of the scientific needs and future instrument and technique developments required to meet them. PMID:27566048

  13. Visualizing non-equilibrium lithiation of spinel oxide via in situ transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    He, Kai; Zhang, Sen; Li, Jing; ...

    2016-05-09

    In this study, spinel transition metal oxides are an important class of materials that are being considered as electrodes for lithium-ion batteries, due to their low cost and high theoretical capacity. The lithiation of these compounds is known to undergo a two-step reaction, whereby intercalation and conversion occur in a sequential fashion. These two reactions are known to have distinct reaction dynamics, but it is unclear how the kinetics of these processes affect the overall electrochemical response. Here, we explore the lithiation of nanosized magnetite (F e3O 4) by employing a new strain-sensitive, bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy approach.

  14. Transmission electron diffraction determination of the Ge(001)-(2 × 1) surface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collazo-Davila, C.; Grozea, D.; Landree, E.; Marks, L. D.

    1997-04-01

    The lateral displacements in the Ge(001)-(2 × 1) surface reconstruction have been determined using transmission electron diffraction (TED). The best-fit model includes displacements extending six layers into the bulk. The atomic positions found agree with X-ray studies to within a few hundredths of an ångström. With the positions determined so precisely, it is suggested that the Ge(001)-(2 × 1) surface can now serve as a standard for comparison with theoretical surface structure calculations. The results from the currently available theoretical studies on the surface are compared with the experimentally determined structure.

  15. In situ nanomechanical testing of twinned metals in a transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Nan; Wang, Jiangwei; Mao, Scott; ...

    2016-04-01

    This paper focuses on in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) characterization to explore twins in face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic monolithic metals, and their impact on the overall mechanical performance. Taking advantage of simultaneous nanomechanical deformation and nanoscale imaging using versatile in situ TEM tools, direct correlation of these unique microscopic defects with macroscopic mechanical performance becomes possible. This article summarizes recent evidence to support the mechanisms related to strengthening and plasticity in metals, including nanotwinned Cu, Ni, Al, Au, and others in bulk, thin film, and nanowire forms.

  16. Carbon Nanostructure Examined by Lattice Fringe Analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Tomasek, Aaron J.; Street, Kenneth; Thompson, William K.

    2002-01-01

    The dimensions of graphitic layer planes directly affect the reactivity of soot towards oxidation and growth. Quantification of graphitic structure could be used to develop and test correlations between the soot nanostructure and its reactivity. Based upon transmission electron microscopy images, this paper provides a demonstration of the robustness of a fringe image analysis code for determining the level of graphitic structure within nanoscale carbon, i.e. soot. Results, in the form of histograms of graphitic layer plane lengths, are compared to their determination through Raman analysis.

  17. Carbon Nanostructure Examined by Lattice Fringe Analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Tomasek, Aaron J.; Street, Kenneth; Thompson, William K.; Hull, David R.

    2003-01-01

    The dimensions of graphitic layer planes directly affect the reactivity of soot towards oxidation and growth. Quantification of graphitic structure could be used to develop and test correlations between the soot nanostructure and its reactivity. Based upon transmission electron microscopy images, this paper provides a demonstration of the robustness of a fringe image analysis code for determining the level of graphitic structure within nanoscale carbon, i.e., soot. Results, in the form of histograms of graphitic layer plane lengths, are compared to their determination through Raman analysis.

  18. Soot Nanostructure: Using Fringe Analysis Software on High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy of Carbon Soot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Using high resolution transmission electron images of carbon nanotubes and carbon particles, we are able to use image analysis program to determine several carbon fringe properties, including length, separation, curvature and orientation. Results are shown in the form of histograms for each of those quantities. The combination of those measurements can give a better indication of the graphic structure within nanotubes and particles of carbon and can distinguish carbons based upon fringe properties. Carbon with longer, straighter and closer spaced fringes are considered graphite, while amorphous carbon contain shorter, less structured fringes.

  19. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of microstructural features in aluminum-lithium-copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avalos-Borja, M.; Larson, L. A.; Pizzo, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of aluminum-lithium-copper alloys was conducted. The principal purpose is to characterize the nature, size, and distribution of stringer particles which result from the powder metallurgy (P/M) processing of these alloys. Microstructural features associated with the stringer particles are reported that help explain the stress corrosion susceptibility of the powder metallurgy-processed Al-Li-Cu alloys. In addition, matrix precipitaton events are documented for a variety of heat treatments and process variations. Hot rolling is observed to significantly alter the nature of matrix precipitation, and the observations are correlated with concomitant mechanical property variations.

  20. High temperature irradiation induced creep in Ag nanopillars measured via in situ transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jawaharram, Gowtham Sriram; Price, Patrick M.; Barr, Christopher M.

    Irradiation induced creep (IIC) rates are measured in compression on Ag nanopillar (square) beams in the sink-limited regime. The IIC rate increases linearly with stress at lower stresses, i.e. below ≈2/3 the high temperature yield stress and parabolically with pillar width, L, for L less than ≈300 nm. Here, the data are obtained by combining in situ transmission electron imaging with simultaneous ion irradiation, laser heating, and nanopillar compression. Results in the larger width regime are consistent with prior literature.

  1. High temperature irradiation induced creep in Ag nanopillars measured via in situ transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Jawaharram, Gowtham Sriram; Price, Patrick M.; Barr, Christopher M.; ...

    2018-01-30

    Irradiation induced creep (IIC) rates are measured in compression on Ag nanopillar (square) beams in the sink-limited regime. The IIC rate increases linearly with stress at lower stresses, i.e. below ≈2/3 the high temperature yield stress and parabolically with pillar width, L, for L less than ≈300 nm. Here, the data are obtained by combining in situ transmission electron imaging with simultaneous ion irradiation, laser heating, and nanopillar compression. Results in the larger width regime are consistent with prior literature.

  2. Single particle analysis based on Zernike phase contrast transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Danev, Radostin; Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2008-02-01

    We present the first application of Zernike phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy to single-particle 3D reconstruction of a protein, using GroEL chaperonin as the test specimen. We evaluated the performance of the technique by comparing 3D models derived from Zernike phase contrast imaging, with models from conventional underfocus phase contrast imaging. The same resolution, about 12A, was achieved by both imaging methods. The reconstruction based on Zernike phase contrast data required about 30% fewer particles. The advantages and prospects of each technique are discussed.

  3. Electron gun with a transmission photocathode for the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balalykin, N. I.; Minashkin, V. F.; Nozdrin, M. A.; Shirkov, G. D.; Zelenogorskii, V. V.; Gacheva, E. I.; Potemkin, A. K.; Huran, J.

    2017-10-01

    Photocathode electron guns are key to the generation of high-quality electron bunches, which are currently the primary source of electrons for linear electron accelerators. The photogun test bench built at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) is currently being used to further develop the hollow (backside irradiated) photocathode concept. A major achievement was the replacement of the hollow photocathode by a technologically more feasible transmission photocathode made from a metal mesh that serves as a substrate for films of various photomaterials. A number of thin-film cathodes on quartz glass substrates are fabricated by photolithography. The vectorial photoeffect (related to the surface-normal component of the wave electric field) is observed and found to significantly affect the quantum efficiency. The dependence of the quantum efficiency of diamond-like carbon photocathodes on the manufacturing technology is investigated. The Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection techniques are combined to carry out an elemental analysis of the films. An estimate of the emittance of a 400 pC electron beam is obtained using the cross-section method.

  4. Using Graphene Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy to Study in Situ Nanocrystal Etching.

    PubMed

    Hauwiller, Matthew R; Ondry, Justin C; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2018-05-17

    Graphene liquid cell electron microscopy provides the ability to observe nanoscale chemical transformations and dynamics as the reactions are occurring in liquid environments. This manuscript describes the process for making graphene liquid cells through the example of graphene liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments of gold nanocrystal etching. The protocol for making graphene liquid cells involves coating gold, holey-carbon TEM grids with chemical vapor deposition graphene and then using those graphene-coated grids to encapsulate liquid between two graphene surfaces. These pockets of liquid, with the nanomaterial of interest, are imaged in the electron microscope to see the dynamics of the nanoscale process, in this case the oxidative etching of gold nanorods. By controlling the electron beam dose rate, which modulates the etching species in the liquid cell, the underlying mechanisms of how atoms are removed from nanocrystals to form different facets and shapes can be better understood. Graphene liquid cell TEM has the advantages of high spatial resolution, compatibility with traditional TEM holders, and low start-up costs for research groups. Current limitations include delicate sample preparation, lack of flow capability, and reliance on electron beam-generated radiolysis products to induce reactions. With further development and control, graphene liquid cell may become a ubiquitous technique in nanomaterials and biology, and is already being used to study mechanisms governing growth, etching, and self-assembly processes of nanomaterials in liquid on the single particle level.

  5. Novel method for measurement of transistor gate length using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungho; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kang, Jonghyuk; Yang, Cheol-Woong

    2016-12-01

    As the feature size of devices continues to decrease, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is becoming indispensable for measuring the critical dimension (CD) of structures. Semiconductors consist primarily of silicon-based materials such as silicon, silicon dioxide, and silicon nitride, and the electrons transmitted through a plan-view TEM sample provide diverse information about various overlapped silicon-based materials. This information is exceedingly complex, which makes it difficult to clarify the boundary to be measured. Therefore, we propose a simple measurement method using energy-filtered TEM (EF-TEM). A precise and effective measurement condition was obtained by determining the maximum value of the integrated area ratio of the electron energy loss spectrum at the boundary to be measured. This method employs an adjustable slit allowing only electrons with a certain energy range to pass. EF-TEM imaging showed a sharp transition at the boundary when the energy-filter’s passband centre was set at 90 eV, with a slit width of 40 eV. This was the optimum condition for the CD measurement of silicon-based materials involving silicon nitride. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and EF-TEM images were used to verify this method, which makes it possible to measure the transistor gate length in a dynamic random access memory manufactured using 35 nm process technology. This method can be adapted to measure the CD of other non-silicon-based materials using the EELS area ratio of the boundary materials.

  6. Substituent and solvent effects on electronic absorption spectra of some N-(substitutedphenyl)benzene sulphonamides.

    PubMed

    Suganya, Krishnasamy; Kabilan, Senthamaraikannan

    2004-04-01

    The effects of substituents and solvents have been studied through the absorption spectra of nearly 23 ortho- and para-N-(substitutedphenyl)benzene sulphonamides in the range of 200-400 nm. The effects of substituents on the absorption spectra of compounds under present investigation are interpreted by correlation of absorption frequencies with simple and extended Hammett equations. Effect of solvent polarity and hydrogen bonding on the absorption spectra are interpreted by means of Kamlet equation and the results are discussed. Copyright 2003 Elsevier B.V.

  7. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Electron Beam-Induced Transformations in Colloidal Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Dang, Zhiya; Shamsi, Javad; Palazon, Francisco; Imran, Muhammad; Akkerman, Quinten A; Park, Sungwook; Bertoni, Giovanni; Prato, Mirko; Brescia, Rosaria; Manna, Liberato

    2017-02-28

    An increasing number of studies have recently reported the rapid degradation of hybrid and all-inorganic lead halide perovskite nanocrystals under electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope, with the formation of nanometer size, high contrast particles. The nature of these nanoparticles and the involved transformations in the perovskite nanocrystals are still a matter of debate. Herein, we have studied the effects of high energy (80/200 keV) electron irradiation on colloidal cesium lead bromide (CsPbBr 3 ) nanocrystals with different shapes and sizes, especially 3 nm thick nanosheets, a morphology that facilitated the analysis of the various ongoing processes. Our results show that the CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals undergo a radiolysis process, with electron stimulated desorption of a fraction of bromine atoms and the reduction of a fraction of Pb 2+ ions to Pb 0 . Subsequently Pb 0 atoms diffuse and aggregate, giving rise to the high contrast particles, as previously reported by various groups. The diffusion is facilitated by both high temperature and electron beam irradiation. The early stage Pb nanoparticles are epitaxially bound to the parent CsPbBr 3 lattice, and evolve into nonepitaxially bound Pb crystals upon further irradiation, leading to local amorphization and consequent dismantling of the CsPbBr 3 lattice. The comparison among CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals with various shapes and sizes evidences that the damage is particularly pronounced at the corners and edges of the surface, due to a lower diffusion barrier for Pb 0 on the surface than inside the crystal and the presence of a larger fraction of under-coordinated atoms.

  8. Effect of interdiffusion and external magnetic field on electronic states and light absorption in Gaussian-shaped double quantum ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz-Aghchegala, V. L.; Mughnetsyan, V. N.; Kirakosyan, A. A.

    2018-02-01

    The effect of interdiffusion and magnetic field on confined states of electron and heavy hole as well as on interband absorption spectrum in a Ga1-xAlxAs/GaAs Gaussian-shaped double quantum ring are investigated. It is shown that both interdiffusion and magnetic field lead to the change of the charge carriers' quantum states arrangement by their energies. The oscillating behavior of the electron ground state energy as a function of magnetic field induction gradually disappears with the increase of diffusion parameter due to the enhanced tunneling of electron to the central region of the ring. For the heavy hole the ground state energy oscillations are not observable in the region of the values of magnetic field induction B = 0 - 10 T . For considered transitions both the magnetic field and the interdiffusion lead to a blue-shift of the absorption spectrum and to decreasing of the absorption intensity. The obtained results indicate on the opportunity of purposeful manipulation of energy states and absorption spectrum of a Gaussian-shaped double quantum ring by means of the post growth annealing and the external magnetic field.

  9. Ionic species produced on gamma radiolysis: Studies by matrix isolation technique—I. Electronic absorption spectra of perfluorosubstituted aromatic radical anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou-te, Lian C. T.; Mittal, Jai P.

    The absorption spectra of several perfluorosubstituted aromatic radical anions are compared with the corresponding perhydro compounds in which the various transitions involved have been assigned to those predicted theoretically. The electronic absorption spectra were obtained for pentafluorostyrene, pentafluorobenzaldehyde, pentafluorobenzoic acid, pentafluorobenzonitride, tetrafluorophthalic acid and pentafluoroaniline, by gamma radiolysis in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran at 77 K. A general similarity in the absorption spectra between the perfluorinated and the corresponding perhydro radical anion is observed except for a shift in the absorption band.

  10. Transmission electron microscopy of unstained hybrid Au nanoparticles capped with PPAA (plasma-poly-allylamine): structure and electron irradiation effects.

    PubMed

    Gontard, Lionel C; Fernández, Asunción; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Kasama, Takeshi; Lozano-Pérez, Sergio; Lucas, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    Hybrid (organic shell-inorganic core) nanoparticles have important applications in nanomedicine. Although the inorganic components of hybrid nanoparticles can be characterized readily using conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, the structural and chemical arrangement of the organic molecular components remains largely unknown. Here, we apply TEM to the physico-chemical characterization of Au nanoparticles that are coated with plasma-polymerized-allylamine, an organic compound with the formula C3H5NH2. We discuss the use of energy-filtered TEM in the low-energy-loss range as a contrast enhancement mechanism for imaging the organic shells of such particles. We also study electron-beam-induced crystallization and amorphization of the shells and the formation of graphitic-like layers that contain both C and N. The resistance of the samples to irradiation by high-energy electrons, which is relevant for optical tuning and for understanding the degree to which such hybrid nanostructures are stable in the presence of biomedical radiation, is also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of LiBC by phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krumeich, Frank; Wörle, Michael; Reibisch, Philipp; Nesper, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    LiBC was used as a model compound for probing the applicability of phase-contrast (PC) imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to visualize lithium distributions. In the LiBC structure, boron and carbon are arranged to hetero graphite layers between which lithium is incorporated. The crystal structure is reflected in the PC-STEM images recorded perpendicular to the layers. The experimental images and their defocus dependence match with multi-slice simulations calculated utilizing the reciprocity principle. The observation that a part of the Li positions is not occupied is likely an effect of the intense electron beam triggering Li displacement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of hexagonal and rhombohedral molybdenum disulfide crystals.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, T; Nishio, K; Saijo, H; Shiojiri, M; Yabuuchi, Y; Takahashi, N

    1993-07-01

    Natural (molybdenite) and synthesized molybdenum disulfide crystals have been studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The image simulation demonstrates that the [0001] and [0110] HRTEM images of hexagonal and rhombohedral MoS2 crystals hardly disclose their stacking sequences, and that the [2110] images can distinguish the Mo and S columns along the incident electron beam and enable one to determine not only the crystal structure but also the fault structure. Observed [0001] images of cleaved molybdenite and synthesized MoS2 crystals, however, reveal the strain field around partial dislocations limiting an extended dislocation. A cross-sectional image of a single molecular (S-Mo-S) layer cleaved from molybdenite has been observed. Synthesized MoS2 flakes which were prepared by grinding have been found to be rhombohedral crystals containing many stacking faults caused by glides between S/S layers.

  13. Switching behaviour of individual Ag-TCNQ nanowires: an in situ transmission electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Ke; Rösner, Benedikt; Butz, Benjamin; Fink, Rainer H.; Spiecker, Erdmann

    2016-10-01

    The organic semiconductor silver-tetracyanoquinodimethane (Ag-TCNQ) exhibits electrical switching and memory characteristics. Employing a scanning tunnelling microscopy setup inside a transmission electron microscope, the switching behaviour of individual Ag-TCNQ nanowires (NWs) is investigated in detail. For a large number of NWs, the switching between a high (OFF) and a low (ON) resistance state was successfully stimulated by negative bias sweeps. Fitting the experimental I-V curves with a Schottky emission function makes the switching features prominent and thus enables a direct evaluation of the switching process. A memory cycle including writing, reading and erasing features is demonstrated at an individual NW. Moreover, electronic failure mechanisms due to Joule heating are discussed. These findings have a significant impact on our understanding of the switching behaviour of Ag-TCNQ.

  14. The structure of Escherichia coli signal recognition particle revealed by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mainprize, Iain L; Beniac, Daniel R; Falkovskaia, Elena; Cleverley, Robert M; Gierasch, Lila M; Ottensmeyer, F Peter; Andrews, David W

    2006-12-01

    Structural studies on various domains of the ribonucleoprotein signal recognition particle (SRP) have not converged on a single complete structure of bacterial SRP consistent with the biochemistry of the particle. We obtained a three-dimensional structure for Escherichia coli SRP by cryoscanning transmission electron microscopy and mapped the internal RNA by electron spectroscopic imaging. Crystallographic data were fit into the SRP reconstruction, and although the resulting model differed from previous models, they could be rationalized by movement through an interdomain linker of Ffh, the protein component of SRP. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments determined interdomain distances that were consistent with our model of SRP. Docking our model onto the bacterial ribosome suggests a mechanism for signal recognition involving interdomain movement of Ffh into and out of the nascent chain exit site and suggests how SRP could interact and/or compete with the ribosome-bound chaperone, trigger factor, for a nascent chain during translation.

  15. Thickness dependence of scattering cross-sections in quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Martinez, G T; van den Bos, K H W; Alania, M; Nellist, P D; Van Aert, S

    2018-04-01

    In quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), scattering cross-sections have been shown to be very sensitive to the number of atoms in a column and its composition. They correspond to the integrated intensity over the atomic column and they outperform other measures. As compared to atomic column peak intensities, which saturate at a given thickness, scattering cross-sections increase monotonically. A study of the electron wave propagation is presented to explain the sensitivity of the scattering cross-sections. Based on the multislice algorithm, we analyse the wave propagation inside the crystal and its link to the scattered signal for the different probe positions contained in the scattering cross-section for detector collection in the low-, middle- and high-angle regimes. The influence to the signal from scattering of neighbouring columns is also discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Accurate Nanoscale Crystallography in Real-Space Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dycus, J Houston; Harris, Joshua S; Sang, Xiahan; Fancher, Chris M; Findlay, Scott D; Oni, Adedapo A; Chan, Tsung-Ta E; Koch, Carl C; Jones, Jacob L; Allen, Leslie J; Irving, Douglas L; LeBeau, James M

    2015-08-01

    Here, we report reproducible and accurate measurement of crystallographic parameters using scanning transmission electron microscopy. This is made possible by removing drift and residual scan distortion. We demonstrate real-space lattice parameter measurements with <0.1% error for complex-layered chalcogenides Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3, and a Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 nanostructured alloy. Pairing the technique with atomic resolution spectroscopy, we connect local structure with chemistry and bonding. Combining these results with density functional theory, we show that the incorporation of Se into Bi2Te3 causes charge redistribution that anomalously increases the van der Waals gap between building blocks of the layered structure. The results show that atomic resolution imaging with electrons can accurately and robustly quantify crystallography at the nanoscale.

  17. Layer Number and Stacking Order Imaging of Few-layer Graphenes by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jinglei; Fuhrer, Michael

    2012-02-01

    A method using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns and dark field (DF) images is developed to identify graphene layer number and stacking order by comparing intensity ratios of SAED spots with theory. Graphene samples are synthesized by ambient pressure chemical vapor depostion and then etched by hydrogen in high temperature to produce samples with crystalline stacking but varying layer number on the nanometer scale. Combined DF images from first- and second-order diffraction spots are used to produce images with layer-number and stacking-order contrast with few-nanometer resolution. This method is proved to be accurate enough for quantative stacking-order-identification of graphenes up to at least four layers. This work was partially supported by Science of Precision Multifunctional Nanostructures for Elecrical Energy Storage, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DESC0001160.

  18. Balamuthia mandrillaris: Further morphological observations of trophozoites by light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    González-Robles, Arturo; Lares-Villa, Fernando; Lares-Jiménez, Luis Fernando; Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Salazar-Villatoro, Lizbeth; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2015-10-01

    Additional morphological features of Balamuthia mandrillaris observed by light and electron microscopy are reported. Trophozoites were extremely pleomorphic: their cell shapes ranged from rounded to elongated and sometimes they appeared exceptionally stretched out and branched. By transmission electron microscopy it was possible to observe two different cytoplasmic areas, the ectoplasm and the endoplasm and often sections of rough endoplasmic reticulum were found in the transition zone. The cytoplasm was very fibrogranular and most of the organelles typically found in eukaryotic cells were observed. A particular finding was the presence of numerous mitochondria with a different structure from those of other free-living amoebae. The observations reported here may reinforce the morphological knowledge of this amoeba and provide a background for further analyses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of light elements in silicon nitride by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Idrobo, Juan C; Walkosz, Weronika; Klie, Robert F; Oğüt, Serdar

    2012-12-01

    In silicon nitride structural ceramics, the overall mechanical and thermal properties are controlled by the atomic and electronic structures at the interface between the ceramic grains and the amorphous intergranular films (IGFs) formed by various sintering additives. In the last ten years the atomic arrangements of heavy elements (rare-earths) at the Si(3)N(4)/IGF interfaces have been resolved. However, the atomic position of light elements, without which it is not possible to obtain a complete description of the interfaces, has been lacking. This review article details the authors' efforts to identify the atomic arrangement of light elements such as nitrogen and oxygen at the Si(3)N(4)/SiO(2) interface and in bulk Si(3)N(4) using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Atomic bonding effects in annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. I. Computational predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Odlyzko, Michael L.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre, E-mail: mkhoyan@umn.edu; Himmetoglu, Burak

    2016-07-15

    Annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) image simulations were performed for zone-axis-oriented light-element single crystals, using a multislice method adapted to include charge redistribution due to chemical bonding. Examination of these image simulations alongside calculations of the propagation of the focused electron probe reveal that the evolution of the probe intensity with thickness exhibits significant sensitivity to interatomic charge transfer, accounting for observed thickness-dependent bonding sensitivity of contrast in all ADF-STEM imaging conditions. Because changes in image contrast relative to conventional neutral atom simulations scale directly with the net interatomic charge transfer, the strongest effects are seen inmore » crystals with highly polar bonding, while no effects are seen for nonpolar bonding. Although the bonding dependence of ADF-STEM image contrast varies with detector geometry, imaging parameters, and material temperature, these simulations predict the bonding effects to be experimentally measureable.« less

  1. In situ investigation of bismuth nanoparticles formation by transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liming; Wang, Honghang; Yi, Zichuan; Deng, Quanrong; Lin, Zhidong; Zhang, Xiaowen

    2018-02-01

    Bismuth (Bi) nanoparticles are prepared by using NaBi(MoO 4 ) 2 nanosheets in the beam of electrons emitted by transmission electron microscope. The formation and growth of Bi nanoparticles are investigated in situ. The sizes of Bi nanoparticles are confined within the range of 6-10nm by controlling irradiation time. It is also observed that once the diameter of nanoparticles is larger than 10nm, the Bi particles are stable as a result of the immobility of large nanoparticles. In addition, some nanoparticles on the edges form nanorods, which are explained as the result of a coalescence process, if the irradiation period is longer than 10min. The in situ research on Bi nanoparticles facilitates in-depth investigations of the physicochemical behavior and provides more potential applications in various fields such as sensors, catalysts and optical devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Atomic-Scale Characterization of Oxide Interfaces and Superlattices Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Spurgeon, Steven R.; Chambers, Scott A.

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has become one of the fundamental tools to characterize oxide interfaces and superlattices. Atomic-scale structure, chemistry, and composition mapping can now be conducted on a wide variety of materials systems thanks to the development of aberration-correctors and advanced detectors. STEM imaging and diffraction, coupled with electron energy loss (EELS) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDS) spectroscopies, offer unparalleled, high-resolution analysis of structure-property relationships. In this chapter we highlight investigations into key phenomena, including interfacial conductivity in oxide superlattices, charge screening effects in magnetoelectric heterostructures, the design of high-quality iron oxide interfaces, and the complex physics governing atomic-scalemore » chemical mapping. These studies illustrate how unique insights from STEM characterization can be integrated with other techniques and first-principles calculations to develop better models for the behavior of functional oxides.« less

  3. Tackling the Challenges of Dynamic Experiments Using Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Parent, Lucas R; Bakalis, Evangelos; Proetto, Maria; Li, Yiwen; Park, Chiwoo; Zerbetto, Francesco; Gianneschi, Nathan C

    2018-01-16

    Revolutions in science and engineering frequently result from the development, and wide adoption, of a new, powerful characterization or imaging technique. Beginning with the first glass lenses and telescopes in astronomy, to the development of visual-light microscopy, staining techniques, confocal microscopy, and fluorescence super-resolution microscopy in biology, and most recently aberration-corrected, cryogenic, and ultrafast (4D) electron microscopy, X-ray microscopy, and scanning probe microscopy in nanoscience. Through these developments, our perception and understanding of the physical nature of matter at length-scales beyond ordinary perception have been fundamentally transformed. Despite this progression in microscopy, techniques for observing nanoscale chemical processes and solvated/hydrated systems are limited, as the necessary spatial and temporal resolution presents significant technical challenges. However, the standard reliance on indirect or bulk phase characterization of nanoscale samples in liquids is undergoing a shift in recent times with the realization ( Williamson et al. Nat. Mater . 2003 , 2 , 532 - 536 ) of liquid-cell (scanning) transmission electron microscopy, LC(S)TEM, where picoliters of solution are hermetically sealed between electron-transparent "windows," which can be directly imaged or videoed at the nanoscale using conventional transmission electron microscopes. This Account seeks to open a discussion on the topic of standardizing strategies for conducting imaging experiments with a view to characterizing dynamics and motion of nanoscale materials. This is a challenge that could be described by critics and proponents alike, as analogous to doing chemistry in a lightning storm; where the nature of the solution, the nanomaterial, and the dynamic behaviors are all potentially subject to artifactual influence by the very act of our observation.

  4. Environmental transmission electron microscopy for catalyst materials using a spherical aberration corrector.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Seiji; Kuwauchi, Yasufumi; Yoshida, Hideto

    2015-04-01

    Atomic resolution has been obtained using environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) by installing a spherical aberration corrector (Cs-corrector) on the objective lens. Simultaneously, the technology for controlling the environment around a specimen in ETEM has advanced significantly in the past decade. Quantification methodology has recently been established for deriving relevant experimental data in catalyst materials from substantial and systematic ETEM observation at the atomic scale. With this background, this paper summarizes aspects of the evolutional microscopy technique: necessary conditions for atomic resolution in ETEM; reduction of the scattering of electrons by the medium surrounding a specimen; and an environmental cell for structural imaging of a crystalline specimen. The high spatial resolution of a Cs-corrected ETEM is demonstrated for different observation conditions. After statistical analysis combined with numerical image analysis of ETEM data is briefly described, the recent applications of the Cs-corrected ETEM to catalyst materials are reviewed. For gold nanoparticulate catalysts, the structural information on the reaction sites and adsorption sites are deduced. For Pt nanoparticulate catalysts, ETEM studies elucidate the correlation between the catalytic activity and the morphology of the nanoparticles. These studies also reveal oxidation and reduction on the topmost Pt surface layer at the atomic scale. Finally, current issues and the future perspectives of Cs-corrected ETEM are summarized, including the reproducibility of ETEM observation data, the control of environments, the critical evaluation of electron irradiation effects, the full implementation of transmission electron microscopy technology in ETEM, and the safety issues for an ETEM laboratory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Automated magnification calibration in transmission electron microscopy using Fourier analysis of replica images.

    PubMed

    van der Laak, Jeroen A W M; Dijkman, Henry B P M; Pahlplatz, Martin M M

    2006-03-01

    The magnification factor in transmission electron microscopy is not very precise, hampering for instance quantitative analysis of specimens. Calibration of the magnification is usually performed interactively using replica specimens, containing line or grating patterns with known spacing. In the present study, a procedure is described for automated magnification calibration using digital images of a line replica. This procedure is based on analysis of the power spectrum of Fourier transformed replica images, and is compared to interactive measurement in the same images. Images were used with magnification ranging from 1,000 x to 200,000 x. The automated procedure deviated on average 0.10% from interactive measurements. Especially for catalase replicas, the coefficient of variation of automated measurement was considerably smaller (average 0.28%) compared to that of interactive measurement (average 3.5%). In conclusion, calibration of the magnification in digital images from transmission electron microscopy may be performed automatically, using the procedure presented here, with high precision and accuracy.

  6. A scanning transmission electron microscopy approach to analyzing large volumes of tissue to detect nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kempen, Paul J; Thakor, Avnesh S; Zavaleta, Cristina; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The use of nanoparticles for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer requires the complete characterization of their toxicity, including accurately locating them within biological tissues. Owing to their size, traditional light microscopy techniques are unable to resolve them. Transmission electron microscopy provides the necessary spatial resolution to image individual nanoparticles in tissue, but is severely limited by the very small analysis volume, usually on the order of tens of cubic microns. In this work, we developed a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) approach to analyze large volumes of tissue for the presence of polyethylene glycol-coated Raman-active-silica-gold-nanoparticles (PEG-R-Si-Au-NPs). This approach utilizes the simultaneous bright and dark field imaging capabilities of STEM along with careful control of the image contrast settings to readily identify PEG-R-Si-Au-NPs in mouse liver tissue without the need for additional time-consuming analytical characterization. We utilized this technique to analyze 243,000 mm³ of mouse liver tissue for the presence of PEG-R-Si-Au-NPs. Nanoparticles injected into the mice intravenously via the tail vein accumulated in the liver, whereas those injected intrarectally did not, indicating that they remain in the colon and do not pass through the colon wall into the systemic circulation.

  7. A Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) Approach to Analyzing Large Volumes of Tissue to Detect Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kempen, Paul J.; Thakor, Avnesh S.; Zavaleta, Cristina; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Sinclair, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer requires the complete characterization of their toxicity, including accurately locating them within biological tissues. Owing to their size, traditional light microscopy techniques are unable to resolve them. Transmission electron microscopy provides the necessary spatial resolution to image individual nanoparticles in tissue but is severely limited by the very small analysis volume, usually on the order of tens of cubic microns. In this work we developed a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) approach to analyze large volumes of tissue for the presence of polyethylene glycol coated Raman-active-silica-gold-nanoparticles (PEG-R-Si-Au-NPs). This approach utilizes the simultaneous bright and dark field imaging capabilities of STEM along with careful control of the image contrast settings to readily identify PEG-R-Si-Au-NPs in mouse liver tissue without the need for additional time consuming analytical characterization. We utilized this technique to analyze 243,000 µm3 of mouse liver tissue for the presence of PEG-R-Si-Au-NPs. Nanoparticles injected into the mice intravenously via the tail-vein accumulated in the liver while those injected intrarectally did not, indicating that they remain in the colon and do not pass through the colon wall into the systemic circulation. PMID:23803218

  8. Design of Polymer Networks Involving a Photoinduced Electronic Transmission Circuit toward Artificial Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Okeyoshi, Kosuke; Kawamura, Ryuzo; Yoshida, Ryo; Osada, Yoshihito

    2016-01-19

    Many strategies have been explored to achieve artificial photosynthesis utilizing mediums such as liposomes and supramolecules. Because the photochemical reaction is composed of multiple functional molecules, the surrounding microenvironment is expected to be rationally integrated as observed during photosynthesis in chloroplasts. In this study, photoinduced electronic transmission surrounding the microenvironment of Ru(bpy)3(2+) in a polymer network was investigated using poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-Ru(bpy)3), poly(acrylamide-co-Ru(bpy)3), and Ru(bpy)3-conjugated microtubules. Photoinduced energy conversion was evaluated by investigating the effects of (i) Ru(bpy)3(2+) immobilization, (ii) polymer type, (iii) thermal energy, and (iv) cross-linking. The microenvironment surrounding copolymerized Ru(bpy)3(2+) in poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) suppressed quenching and had a higher radiative process energy than others. This finding is related to the nonradiative process, i.e., photoinduced H2 generation with significantly higher overall quantum efficiency (13%) than for the bulk solution. We envision that useful molecules will be generated by photoinduced electronic transmission in polymer networks, resulting in the development of a wide range of biomimetic functions with applications for a sustainable society.

  9. Electronic absorption spectrum of copper-doped magnesium potassium phosphate hexahydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, S. N.; Sivaprasad, P.; Reddy, Y. P.; Rao, P. S.

    1992-04-01

    The optical absorption and EPR spectra of magnesium potassium phosphate hexahydrate (MPPH) doped with copper ions are recorded both at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. The spectrum is characteristic of Cu2+ in tetragonal symmetry. The spin-Hamiltonian parameters and molecular orbital coefficients are evaluated. A correlation between EPR and optical absorption studies is drawn.

  10. Dark-field transmission electron microscopy and the Debye-Waller factor of graphene

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, William A.; White, E. R.; Dawson, Ben; Lodge, M. S.; Ishigami, Masa; Regan, B. C.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene's structure bears on both the material's electronic properties and fundamental questions about long range order in two-dimensional crystals. We present an analytic calculation of selected area electron diffraction from multi-layer graphene and compare it with data from samples prepared by chemical vapor deposition and mechanical exfoliation. A single layer scatters only 0.5% of the incident electrons, so this kinematical calculation can be considered reliable for five or fewer layers. Dark-field transmission electron micrographs of multi-layer graphene illustrate how knowledge of the diffraction peak intensities can be applied for rapid mapping of thickness, stacking, and grain boundaries. The diffraction peak intensities also depend on the mean-square displacement of atoms from their ideal lattice locations, which is parameterized by a Debye-Waller factor. We measure the Debye-Waller factor of a suspended monolayer of exfoliated graphene and find a result consistent with an estimate based on the Debye model. For laboratory-scale graphene samples, finite size effects are sufficient to stabilize the graphene lattice against melting, indicating that ripples in the third dimension are not necessary. PMID:25242882

  11. Ultrastructural analysis of testicular tissue and sperm by transmission and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chemes, Hector E

    2013-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies have provided the basis for an in-depth understanding of the cell biology and normal functioning of the testis and male gametes and have opened the way to characterize the functional role played by specific organelles in spermatogenesis and sperm function. The development of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) extended these boundaries to the recognition of cell and organ surface features and the architectural array of cells and tissues. The merging of immunocytochemical and histochemical approaches with electron microscopy has completed a series of technical improvements that integrate structural and functional features to provide a broad understanding of cell biology in health and disease. With these advances the detailed study of the intricate structural and molecular organization as well as the chemical composition of cellular organelles is now possible. Immunocytochemistry is used to identify proteins or other components and localize them in specific cells or organelles with high specificity and sensitivity, and histochemistry can be used to understand their function (i.e., enzyme activity). When these techniques are used in conjunction with electron microscopy their resolving power is further increased to subcellular levels. In the present chapter we will describe in detail various ultrastructural techniques that are now available for basic or translational research in reproductive biology and reproductive medicine. These include TEM, ultrastructural immunocytochemistry, ultrastructural histochemistry, and SEM.

  12. Unravelling surface and interfacial structures of a metal-organic framework by transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yihan; Ciston, Jim; Zheng, Bin; Miao, Xiaohe; Czarnik, Cory; Pan, Yichang; Sougrat, Rachid; Lai, Zhiping; Hsiung, Chia-En; Yao, Kexin; Pinnau, Ingo; Pan, Ming; Han, Yu

    2017-05-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline porous materials with designable topology, porosity and functionality, having promising applications in gas storage and separation, ion conduction and catalysis. It is challenging to observe MOFs with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) due to the extreme instability of MOFs upon electron beam irradiation. Here, we use a direct-detection electron-counting camera to acquire TEM images of the MOF ZIF-8 with an ultralow dose of 4.1 electrons per square ångström to retain the structural integrity. The obtained image involves structural information transferred up to 2.1 Å, allowing the resolution of individual atomic columns of Zn and organic linkers in the framework. Furthermore, TEM reveals important local structural features of ZIF-8 crystals that cannot be identified by diffraction techniques, including armchair-type surface terminations and coherent interfaces between assembled crystals. These observations allow us to understand how ZIF-8 crystals self-assemble and the subsequent influence of interfacial cavities on mass transport of guest molecules.

  13. The Probe Profile and Lateral Resolution of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Thick Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Demers, Hendrix; Ramachandra, Ranjan; Drouin, Dominique; de Jonge, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Lateral profiles of the electron probe of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were simulated at different vertical positions in a micrometers-thick carbon sample. The simulations were carried out using the Monte Carlo method in the CASINO software. A model was developed to fit the probe profiles. The model consisted of the sum of a Gaussian function describing the central peak of the profile, and two exponential decay functions describing the tail of the profile. Calculations were performed to investigate the fraction of unscattered electrons as function of the vertical position of the probe in the sample. Line scans were also simulated over gold nanoparticles at the bottom of a carbon film to calculate the achievable resolution as function of the sample thickness and the number of electrons. The resolution was shown to be noise limited for film thicknesses less than 1 μm. Probe broadening limited the resolution for thicker films. The validity of the simulation method was verified by comparing simulated data with experimental data. The simulation method can be used as quantitative method to predict STEM performance or to interpret STEM images of thick specimens. PMID:22564444

  14. Dark-field transmission electron microscopy and the Debye-Waller factor of graphene.

    PubMed

    Shevitski, Brian; Mecklenburg, Matthew; Hubbard, William A; White, E R; Dawson, Ben; Lodge, M S; Ishigami, Masa; Regan, B C

    2013-01-15

    Graphene's structure bears on both the material's electronic properties and fundamental questions about long range order in two-dimensional crystals. We present an analytic calculation of selected area electron diffraction from multi-layer graphene and compare it with data from samples prepared by chemical vapor deposition and mechanical exfoliation. A single layer scatters only 0.5% of the incident electrons, so this kinematical calculation can be considered reliable for five or fewer layers. Dark-field transmission electron micrographs of multi-layer graphene illustrate how knowledge of the diffraction peak intensities can be applied for rapid mapping of thickness, stacking, and grain boundaries. The diffraction peak intensities also depend on the mean-square displacement of atoms from their ideal lattice locations, which is parameterized by a Debye-Waller factor. We measure the Debye-Waller factor of a suspended monolayer of exfoliated graphene and find a result consistent with an estimate based on the Debye model. For laboratory-scale graphene samples, finite size effects are sufficient to stabilize the graphene lattice against melting, indicating that ripples in the third dimension are not necessary.

  15. Low-energy transmission electron diffraction and imaging of large-area graphene

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Xia, Bingyu; Lin, Li; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Liu, Peng; Lin, Xiaoyang; Peng, Hailin; Zhu, Yuanmin; Yu, Rong; Lei, Peng; Wang, Jiangtao; Zhang, Lina; Xu, Yong; Zhao, Mingwen; Peng, Lianmao; Li, Qunqing; Duan, Wenhui; Liu, Zhongfan; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2017-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted interest because of their excellent properties and potential applications. A key step in realizing industrial applications is to synthesize wafer-scale single-crystal samples. Until now, single-crystal samples, such as graphene domains up to the centimeter scale, have been synthesized. However, a new challenge is to efficiently characterize large-area samples. Currently, the crystalline characterization of these samples still relies on selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) or low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), which is more suitable for characterizing very small local regions. This paper presents a highly efficient characterization technique that adopts a low-energy electrostatically focused electron gun and a super-aligned carbon nanotube (SACNT) film sample support. It allows rapid crystalline characterization of large-area graphene through a single photograph of a transmission-diffracted image at a large beam size. Additionally, the low-energy electron beam enables the observation of a unique diffraction pattern of adsorbates on the suspended graphene at room temperature. This work presents a simple and convenient method for characterizing the macroscopic structures of 2D materials, and the instrument we constructed allows the study of the weak interaction with 2D materials. PMID:28879233

  16. Low-energy transmission electron diffraction and imaging of large-area graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Xia, Bingyu; Lin, Li; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Liu, Peng; Lin, Xiaoyang; Peng, Hailin; Zhu, Yuanmin; Yu, Rong; Lei, Peng; Wang, Jiangtao; Zhang, Lina; Xu, Yong; Zhao, Mingwen; Peng, Lianmao; Li, Qunqing; Duan, Wenhui; Liu, Zhongfan; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2017-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted interest because of their excellent properties and potential applications. A key step in realizing industrial applications is to synthesize wafer-scale single-crystal samples. Until now, single-crystal samples, such as graphene domains up to the centimeter scale, have been synthesized. However, a new challenge is to efficiently characterize large-area samples. Currently, the crystalline characterization of these samples still relies on selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) or low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), which is more suitable for characterizing very small local regions. This paper presents a highly efficient characterization technique that adopts a low-energy electrostatically focused electron gun and a super-aligned carbon nanotube (SACNT) film sample support. It allows rapid crystalline characterization of large-area graphene through a single photograph of a transmission-diffracted image at a large beam size. Additionally, the low-energy electron beam enables the observation of a unique diffraction pattern of adsorbates on the suspended graphene at room temperature. This work presents a simple and convenient method for characterizing the macroscopic structures of 2D materials, and the instrument we constructed allows the study of the weak interaction with 2D materials.

  17. Scanning transmission electron microscopy and its application to the study of nanoparticles and nanoparticle systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyue

    2005-06-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques can provide imaging, diffraction and spectroscopic information, either simultaneously or in a serial manner, of the specimen with an atomic or a sub-nanometer spatial resolution. High-resolution STEM imaging, when combined with nanodiffraction, atomic resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy and nanometer resolution X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy techniques, is critical to the fundamental studies of importance to nanoscience and nanotechnology. The availability of sub-nanometer or sub-angstrom electron probes in a STEM instrument, due to the use of a field emission gun and aberration correctors, ensures the greatest capabilities for studies of sizes, shapes, defects, crystal and surface structures, and compositions and electronic states of nanometer-size regions of thin films, nanoparticles and nanoparticle systems. The various imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy modes available in a dedicated STEM or a field emission TEM/STEM instrument are reviewed and the application of these techniques to the study of nanoparticles and nanostructured catalysts is used as an example to illustrate the critical role of the various STEM techniques in nanotechnology and nanoscience research.

  18. Nanoparticle Immobilization for Controllable Experiments in Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Alex W; Zhu, Guomin; Mehdi, B Layla; Jacobs, Robert M J; De Yoreo, James; Browning, Nigel D

    2018-06-22

    We demonstrate that silanization can control the adhesion of nanostructures to the SiN windows compatible with liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (LC-TEM). Formation of an (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) self-assembled monolayer on a SiN window, producing a surface decorated with amino groups, permits strong adhesion of Au nanoparticles to the window. Many of these nanoparticles remain static, undergoing minimal translation or rotation during LC-TEM up to high electron beam current densities due to the strong interaction between the APTES amino group and Au. We then use this technique to perform a direct comparative LC-TEM study on the behavior of ligand and nonligand-coated Au nanoparticles in a Au growth solution. While the ligand coated nanoparticles remain consistent even under high electron beam current densities, the naked nanoparticles acted as sites for secondary Au nucleation. These nucleated particles decorated the parent nanoparticle surface, forming consecutive monolayer assemblies of ∼2 nm diameter nanoparticles, which sinter into the parent particle when the electron beam was shut off. This method for facile immobilization of nanostructures for LC-TEM study will permit more sophisticated and controlled in situ experiments into the properties of solid-liquid interfaces in the future.

  19. Quasi-parallel precession diffraction: Alignment method for scanning transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Plana-Ruiz, S; Portillo, J; Estradé, S; Peiró, F; Kolb, Ute; Nicolopoulos, S

    2018-06-06

    A general method to set illuminating conditions for selectable beam convergence and probe size is presented in this work for Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEM) fitted with µs/pixel fast beam scanning control, (S)TEM, and an annular dark field detector. The case of interest of beam convergence and probe size, which enables diffraction pattern indexation, is then used as a starting point in this work to add 100 Hz precession to the beam while imaging the specimen at a fast rate and keeping the projector system in diffraction mode. The described systematic alignment method for the adjustment of beam precession on the specimen plane while scanning at fast rates is mainly based on the sharpness of the precessed STEM image. The complete alignment method for parallel condition and precession, Quasi-Parallel PED-STEM, is presented in block diagram scheme, as it has been tested on a variety of instruments. The immediate application of this methodology is that it renders the TEM column ready for the acquisition of Precessed Electron Diffraction Tomographies (EDT) as well as for the acquisition of slow Precessed Scanning Nanometer Electron Diffraction (SNED). Examples of the quality of the Precessed Electron Diffraction (PED) patterns and PED-STEM alignment images are presented with corresponding probe sizes and convergence angles. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Unravelling surface and interfacial structures of a metal-organic framework by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yihan; Ciston, Jim; Zheng, Bin; Miao, Xiaohe; Czarnik, Cory; Pan, Yichang; Sougrat, Rachid; Lai, Zhiping; Hsiung, Chia-En; Yao, Kexin; Pinnau, Ingo; Pan, Ming; Han, Yu

    2017-05-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline porous materials with designable topology, porosity and functionality, having promising applications in gas storage and separation, ion conduction and catalysis. It is challenging to observe MOFs with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) due to the extreme instability of MOFs upon electron beam irradiation. Here, we use a direct-detection electron-counting camera to acquire TEM images of the MOF ZIF-8 with an ultralow dose of 4.1 electrons per square ångström to retain the structural integrity. The obtained image involves structural information transferred up to 2.1 Å, allowing the resolution of individual atomic columns of Zn and organic linkers in the framework. Furthermore, TEM reveals important local structural features of ZIF-8 crystals that cannot be identified by diffraction techniques, including armchair-type surface terminations and coherent interfaces between assembled crystals. These observations allow us to understand how ZIF-8 crystals self-assemble and the subsequent influence of interfacial cavities on mass transport of guest molecules.

  1. Comparison between POES energetic electron precipitation observations and riometer absorptions: Implications for determining true precipitation fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodger, Craig J.; Kavanagh, Andrew J.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Marple, Steve R.

    2013-12-01

    electron precipitation (EEP) impacts the chemistry of the middle atmosphere with growing evidence of coupling to surface temperatures at high latitudes. To better understand this link, it is essential to have realistic observations to properly characterize precipitation and which can be incorporated into chemistry-climate models. The Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) detectors measure precipitating particles but only integral fluxes and only in a fraction of the bounce loss cone. Ground-based riometers respond to precipitation from the whole bounce loss cone; they measure the cosmic radio noise absorption (CNA), a qualitative proxy with scant direct information on the energy flux of EEP. POES observations should have a direct relationship with ΔCNA and comparing the two will clarify their utility in studies of atmospheric change. We determined ionospheric changes produced by the EEP measured by the POES spacecraft in ~250 overpasses of an imaging riometer in northern Finland. The ΔCNA modeled from the POES data is 10-15 times less than the observed ΔCNA when the >30 keV flux is reported as <106 cm-2 s-1 sr-1. Above this level, there is relatively good agreement between the space-based and ground-based measurements. The discrepancy occurs mostly during periods of low geomagnetic activity, and we contend that weak diffusion is dominating the pitch angle scattering into the bounce loss cone at these times. A correction to the calculation using measurements of the trapped flux considerably reduces the discrepancy and provides further support to our hypothesis that weak diffusion leads to underestimates of the EEP.

  2. Electron-cyclotron absorption in high-temperature plasmas: quasi-exact analytical evaluation and comparative numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albajar, F.; Bertelli, N.; Bornatici, M.; Engelmann, F.

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the electromagnetic energy balance equation, a quasi-exact analytical evaluation of the electron-cyclotron (EC) absorption coefficient is performed for arbitrary propagation (with respect to the magnetic field) in a (Maxwellian) magneto-plasma for the temperature range of interest for fusion reactors (in which EC radiation losses tend to be important in the plasma power balance). The calculation makes use of Bateman's expansion for the product of two Bessel functions, retaining the lowest-order contribution. The integration over electron momentum can then be carried out analytically, fully accounting for finite Larmor radius effects in this approximation. On the basis of the analytical expressions for the EC absorption coefficients of both the extraordinary and ordinary modes thus obtained, (i) for the case of perpendicular propagation simple formulae are derived for both modes and (ii) a numerical analysis of the angular distribution of EC absorption is carried out. An assessment of the accuracy of asymptotic expressions that have been given earlier is also performed, showing that these approximations can be usefully applied for calculating EC power losses from reactor-grade plasmas. Presented in part at the 14th Joint Workshop on Electron Cyclotron Emission and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating, Santorini, Greece, 9-12 May 2006.

  3. Time-Resolved IR-Absorption Spectroscopy of Hot-Electron Dynamics in Satellite and Upper Conduction Bands in GaP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavicchia, M. A.; Alfano, R. R.

    1995-01-01

    The relaxation dynamics of hot electrons in the X6 and X7 satellite and upper conduction bands in GaP was directly measured by femtosecond UV-pump-IR-probe absorption spectroscopy. From a fit to the induced IR-absorption spectra the dominant scattering mechanism giving rise to the absorption at early delay times was determined to be intervalley scattering of electrons out of the X7 upper conduction-band valley. For long delay times the dominant scattering mechanism is electron-hole scattering. Electron transport dynamics of the upper conduction band of GaP has been time resolved.

  4. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, J.; Fourment, C.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Galtier, E.; Harmand, M.; Leguay, P. M.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Ozkan, C.; Störmer, M.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, Th; Heimann, P. A.; Dorchies, F.

    2014-01-01

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called “molecular movie” within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level of the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes. PMID:24740172

  5. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, J.; Fourment, C.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Galtier, E.; Harmand, M.; Leguay, P. M.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Ozkan, C.; Störmer, M.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, Th; Heimann, P. A.; Dorchies, F.

    2014-04-01

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called ``molecular movie'' within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level of the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes.

  6. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Gaudin, J.; Fourment, C.; Cho, B. I.; ...

    2014-04-17

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called “molecular movie” within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level ofmore » the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes.« less

  7. Dependency of magnetic microwave absorption on surface architecture of Co20Ni80 hierarchical structures studied by electron holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qinhe; Xu, Xianhui; Xia, Weixing; Che, Renchao; Chen, Chen; Cao, Qi; He, Jingang

    2015-01-01

    To design and fabricate rational surface architecture of individual particles is one of the key factors that affect their magnetic properties and microwave absorption capability, which is still a great challenge. Herein, a series of Co20Ni80 hierarchical structures with different surface morphologies, including flower-, urchin-, ball-, and chain-like morphologies, were obtained using structure-directing templates via a facile one-step solvothermal treatment. The microwave reflection loss (RL) of urchin-like Co20Ni80 hierarchical structures reaches as high as -33.5 dB at 3 GHz, with almost twice the RL intensity of the ball- and chain-like structures, and the absorption bandwidth (<-10 dB) is about 5.5 GHz for the flower-like morphology, indicating that the surface nanospikes and nanoflakes on the Co20Ni80 microsphere surfaces have great influences on their magnetic microwave absorption properties. Electron holography analysis reveals that the surface nanospikes and nanoflakes could generate a high density of stray magnetic flux lines and contribute a large saturation magnetization (105.62 emu g-1 for urchin-like and 96.41 emu g-1 for flower-like morphology), leading the urchin-like and flower-like Co20Ni80 to possess stronger microwave RL compared with the ball-like and chain-like Co20Ni80 alloys. The eddy-current absorption mechanism μ''(μ')-2(f)-1 is dominant in the frequency region above 8 GHz, implying that eddy-current loss is a vital factor for microwave RL in the high frequency range. It can be supposed from our findings that different surface morphologies of magnetic hierarchical structures might become an effective path to achieve high-performance microwave absorption for electromagnetic shielding and stealth camouflage applications.To design and fabricate rational surface architecture of individual particles is one of the key factors that affect their magnetic properties and microwave absorption capability, which is still a great challenge. Herein, a

  8. Direct-write liquid phase transformations with a scanning transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Borisevich, Albina Y.

    The highly energetic electron beam from a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can induce local changes in the state of matter, ranging from local knock-out and atomic movement, to amorphization/crystallization, and chemical/electrochemical reactions occuring at localized liquid-solid and gas-solid interfaces. To date, fundamental studies of e-beam induced phenomena and practical applications have been limited by conventional e-beam rastering modes that allow only for uniform e-beam exposures. Here we develop an automated liquid phase nanolithography method that is capable of directly writing nanometer scaled features within silicon nitride encapsulated liquid cells. An external beam control system, connected to the scan coilsmore » of an aberration-corrected STEM, is used to precisely control the position, dwell time, and scan velocity of a sub-nanometer STEM probe. Site-specific locations in a sealed liquid cell containing an aqueous solution of H 2PdCl 4 are irradiated to controllably deposit palladium onto silicon nitride membranes. We determine the threshold electron dose required for the radiolytic deposition of metallic palladium, explore the influence of electron dose on the feature size and morphology of nanolithographically patterned nanostructures, and propose a feedback-controlled monitoring method for active control of the nanofabricated structures through STEM detector signal monitoring. As a result, this approach enables both fundamental studies of electron beam induced interactions with matter, as well as opens a pathway to fabricate nanostructures with tailored architectures and chemistries via shape-controlled nanolithographic patterning from liquid phase precursors.« less

  9. Platinum blue as an alternative to uranyl acetate for staining in transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Inaga, Sumire; Katsumoto, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Keiichi; Kameie, Toshio; Nakane, Hironobu; Naguro, Tomonori

    2007-04-01

    This paper introduces an aqueous solution of platinum blue (Pt-blue) as an alternative to uranyl acetate (UA) for staining in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Pt-blue was prepared from a reaction of cis-dichlorodiamine-platinum (II) (cis-platin) with thymidine. When Pt-blue was dried on a microgrid and observed by TEM it showed a uniform appearance with tiny particles less than 1 nm in diameter. The effect of Pt-blue as an electron stain was then examined not only for positive staining of conventional ultrathin resin sections and counterstaining of post-embedding immuno-electron microscopy but also for negative staining. In ultrathin sections of the rat liver and renal glomerulus, Pt-blue provided good contrast images, especially in double staining combined with a lead stain (Pb). Almost all cell organelles were clearly observed with high contrast in these sections. Glycogen granules in the hepatic parenchymal cells were particularly electron dense in Pt-blue stained sections compared with those treated with UA. In longitudinal and transverse sections of budding influenza A viruses, a specific arrangement of rod-like structures, which correspond to the ribonucleoprotein complexes, was clearly shown in each virion stained with Pt-blue and Pb. When post-embedding immunoelectron microscopy was performed in ultrathin sections of HeLa cells embedded in Lowicryl K4M, the localization of Ki-67 protein was sufficiently detected even after Pt-blue and Pb staining. The present study also revealed that Pt-blue could be used for the negative staining of E. coli, allowing the visualization of a flagellum. These findings indicate that Pt-blue is a useful, safe, and easily obtainable electron stain that is an alternative to UA for TEM preparations.

  10. Direct-write liquid phase transformations with a scanning transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Unocic, Raymond R.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; ...

    2016-08-03

    The highly energetic electron beam from a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can induce local changes in the state of matter, ranging from local knock-out and atomic movement, to amorphization/crystallization, and chemical/electrochemical reactions occuring at localized liquid-solid and gas-solid interfaces. To date, fundamental studies of e-beam induced phenomena and practical applications have been limited by conventional e-beam rastering modes that allow only for uniform e-beam exposures. Here we develop an automated liquid phase nanolithography method that is capable of directly writing nanometer scaled features within silicon nitride encapsulated liquid cells. An external beam control system, connected to the scan coilsmore » of an aberration-corrected STEM, is used to precisely control the position, dwell time, and scan velocity of a sub-nanometer STEM probe. Site-specific locations in a sealed liquid cell containing an aqueous solution of H 2PdCl 4 are irradiated to controllably deposit palladium onto silicon nitride membranes. We determine the threshold electron dose required for the radiolytic deposition of metallic palladium, explore the influence of electron dose on the feature size and morphology of nanolithographically patterned nanostructures, and propose a feedback-controlled monitoring method for active control of the nanofabricated structures through STEM detector signal monitoring. As a result, this approach enables both fundamental studies of electron beam induced interactions with matter, as well as opens a pathway to fabricate nanostructures with tailored architectures and chemistries via shape-controlled nanolithographic patterning from liquid phase precursors.« less

  11. Microwave transmission efficiency and simulations of electron plasma in ELTRAP device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikram, M.; Mushtaq, A.; Ali, S.

    2017-11-01

    A Thomson backscattering experiment has been performed in a Penning-Malmberg device ELTRAP. To estimate the minimum sensitivity of diagnostics, we have computed the signal to noise ratio and found that the present bunch has a number density of 4.3 × 108 cm-3, which is three orders of magnitude less than the desired density of 1011 cm-3. To increase the signal level from the RF studies to the GHz range, the transmission efficiency from the rectangular waveguide orthogonally coupled to a prototype circular waveguide was experimentally analyzed on a test-bench. It is observed that the lengths of waveguides play an important role in the transmission efficiency and return loss. When the length of the optimum rectangular waveguide (>2 λg = 31 cm) is reduced to 7 cm, due to geometrical constraints of the ELTRAP device, consequently, the transmission efficiency is also reduced and shifts away from the maximum 3 GHz operating frequency. The useful frequency band is then reduced with the increasing length of the prototype circular waveguide (102 cm). Using the electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell simulations involving the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), we have utilized a magnetic field of 0.1 T resonating with 2.8 GHz RF drive during each time step (1 ps) having the power level of 0.04 V to the middle and to the end of the trap. A more efficient increase in the radial and azimuthal temperature profiles is observed as compared to the axial temperature profile. The reason is the use of ECRH to heat electrons in cyclotron motion, which is completely kinetic and magnetron motion which is almost entirely potential based. The axial motion interchanges in between the kinetic and potential with a slight enhancement in axial motion to maintain the total canonical angular momentum conserved. The temperature profile of the confined electron plasma increases with the variation of densities from 5 × 107 m-3 to 1012 m-3. The major heating effect occurs when the RF power is

  12. A correlative approach for combining microCT, light and transmission electron microscopy in a single 3D scenario

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In biomedical research, a huge variety of different techniques is currently available for the structural examination of small specimens, including conventional light microscopy (LM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), microscopic X-ray computed tomography (microCT), and many others. Since every imaging method is physically limited by certain parameters, a correlative use of complementary methods often yields a significant broader range of information. Here we demonstrate the advantages of the correlative use of microCT, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy for the analysis of small biological samples. Results We used a small juvenile bivalve mollusc (Mytilus galloprovincialis, approximately 0.8 mm length) to demonstrate the workflow of a correlative examination by microCT, LM serial section analysis, and TEM-re-sectioning. Initially these three datasets were analyzed separately, and subsequently they were fused in one 3D scene. This workflow is very straightforward. The specimen was processed as usual for transmission electron microscopy including post-fixation in osmium tetroxide and embedding in epoxy resin. Subsequently it was imaged with microCT. Post-fixation in osmium tetroxide yielded sufficient X-ray contrast for microCT imaging, since the X-ray absorption of epoxy resin is low. Thereafter, the same specimen was serially sectioned for LM investigation. The serial section images were aligned and specific organ systems were reconstructed based on manual segmentation and surface rendering. According to the region of interest (ROI), specific LM sections were detached from the slides, re-mounted on resin blocks and re-sectioned (ultrathin) for TEM. For analysis, image data from the three different modalities was co-registered into a single 3D scene using the software AMIRA®. We were able to register both the LM section series volume and TEM slices neatly to the microCT dataset, with

  13. Analytic model of a magnetically insulated transmission line with collisional flow electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stygar, W. A.; Wagoner, T. C.; Ives, H. C.; Corcoran, P. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Douglas, J. W.; Gilliland, T. L.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Ramirez, J. J.; Seamen, J. F.; Seidel, D. B.; Spielman, R. B.

    2006-09-01

    We have developed a relativistic-fluid model of the flow-electron plasma in a steady-state one-dimensional magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL). The model assumes that the electrons are collisional and, as a result, drift toward the anode. The model predicts that in the limit of fully developed collisional flow, the relation between the voltage Va, anode current Ia, cathode current Ik, and geometric impedance Z0 of a 1D planar MITL can be expressed as Va=IaZ0h(χ), where h(χ)≡[(χ+1)/4(χ-1)]1/2-ln⁡⌊χ+(χ2-1)1/2⌋/2χ(χ-1) and χ≡Ia/Ik. The relation is valid when Va≳1MV. In the minimally insulated limit, the anode current Ia,min⁡=1.78Va/Z0, the electron-flow current If,min⁡=1.25Va/Z0, and the flow impedance Zf,min⁡=0.588Z0. {The electron-flow current If≡Ia-Ik. Following Mendel and Rosenthal [Phys. Plasmas 2, 1332 (1995)PHPAEN1070-664X10.1063/1.871345], we define the flow impedance Zf as Va/(Ia2-Ik2)1/2.} In the well-insulated limit (i.e., when Ia≫Ia,min⁡), the electron-flow current If=9Va2/8IaZ02 and the flow impedance Zf=2Z0/3. Similar results are obtained for a 1D collisional MITL with coaxial cylindrical electrodes, when the inner conductor is at a negative potential with respect to the outer, and Z0≲40Ω. We compare the predictions of the collisional model to those of several MITL models that assume the flow electrons are collisionless. We find that at given values of Va and Z0, collisions can significantly increase both Ia,min⁡ and If,min⁡ above the values predicted by the collisionless models, and decrease Zf,min⁡. When Ia≫Ia,min⁡, we find that, at given values of Va, Z0, and Ia, collisions can significantly increase If and decrease Zf. Since the steady-state collisional model is valid only when the drift of electrons toward the anode has had sufficient time to establish fully developed collisional flow, and collisionless models assume there is no net electron drift toward the anode, we expect these two types

  14. Sea Spray Aerosol Structure and Composition Using Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The composition and surface properties of atmospheric aerosol particles largely control their impact on climate by affecting their ability to uptake water, react heterogeneously, and nucleate ice in clouds. However, in the vacuum of a conventional electron microscope, the native surface and internal structure often undergo physicochemical rearrangement resulting in surfaces that are quite different from their atmospheric configurations. Herein, we report the development of cryogenic transmission electron microscopy where laboratory generated sea spray aerosol particles are flash frozen in their native state with iterative and controlled thermal and/or pressure exposures and then probed by electron microscopy. This unique approach allows for the detection of not only mixed salts, but also soft materials including whole hydrated bacteria, diatoms, virus particles, marine vesicles, as well as gel networks within hydrated salt droplets—all of which will have distinct biological, chemical, and physical processes. We anticipate this method will open up a new avenue of analysis for aerosol particles, not only for ocean-derived aerosols, but for those produced from other sources where there is interest in the transfer of organic or biological species from the biosphere to the atmosphere. PMID:26878061

  15. Nanoscale imaging of whole cells using a liquid enclosure and a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; Veith, Gabriel M; Joy, David C; de Jonge, Niels

    2009-12-14

    Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7) were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM) laboratory.

  16. Theory of the spatial resolution of (scanning) transmission electron microscopy in liquid water or ice layers.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Niels

    2018-04-01

    The sample dependent spatial resolution was calculated for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) of objects (e.g., nanoparticles, proteins) embedded in a layer of liquid water or amorphous ice. The theoretical model includes elastic- and inelastic scattering, beam broadening, and chromatic aberration. Different contrast mechanisms were evaluated as function of the electron dose, the detection angle, and the sample configuration. It was found that the spatial resolution scales with the electron dose to the -1/4th power. Gold- and carbon nanoparticles were examined in the middle of water layers ranging from 0.01--10 µm thickness representing relevant classes of experiments in both materials science and biology. The optimal microscope settings differ between experimental configurations. STEM performs the best for gold nanoparticles for all layer thicknesses, while carbon is best imaged with phase-contrast TEM for thin layers but bright field STEM is preferred for thicker layers. The resolution was also calculated for a water layer enclosed between thin membranes. The influence of chromatic aberration correction for TEM was examined as well. The theory is broadly applicable to other types of materials and sample configurations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. New insights on ion track morphology in pyrochlores by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zhang, Yanwen; Ou, Xin

    Here we demonstrate the enhanced imaging capabilities of an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope to advance the understanding of ion track structure in pyrochlore structured materials (i.e., Gd 2Ti 2O 7 and Gd 2TiZrO 7). Track formation occurs due to the inelastic transfer of energy from incident ions to electrons, and atomic-level details of track morphology as a function of energy-loss are revealed in the present work. A comparison of imaging details obtained by varying collection angles of detectors is discussed in the present work. A quantitative analysis of phase identification using high-angle annular dark field imaging is performedmore » on the ion tracks. Finally, a novel 3-dimensional track reconstruction method is provided that is based on depth dependent imaging of the ion tracks. The technique is used in extracting the atomic-level details of nanoscale features, such as the disordered ion tracks, which are embedded in relatively thicker matrix. Another relevance of the method is shown by measuring the tilt of the ion tracks relative to the electron beam incidence that helps in knowing the structure and geometry of ion tracks quantitatively.« less

  18. New insights on ion track morphology in pyrochlores by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zhang, Yanwen; Ou, Xin; ...

    2016-12-13

    Here we demonstrate the enhanced imaging capabilities of an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope to advance the understanding of ion track structure in pyrochlore structured materials (i.e., Gd 2Ti 2O 7 and Gd 2TiZrO 7). Track formation occurs due to the inelastic transfer of energy from incident ions to electrons, and atomic-level details of track morphology as a function of energy-loss are revealed in the present work. A comparison of imaging details obtained by varying collection angles of detectors is discussed in the present work. A quantitative analysis of phase identification using high-angle annular dark field imaging is performedmore » on the ion tracks. Finally, a novel 3-dimensional track reconstruction method is provided that is based on depth dependent imaging of the ion tracks. The technique is used in extracting the atomic-level details of nanoscale features, such as the disordered ion tracks, which are embedded in relatively thicker matrix. Another relevance of the method is shown by measuring the tilt of the ion tracks relative to the electron beam incidence that helps in knowing the structure and geometry of ion tracks quantitatively.« less

  19. Nanoscale Imaging of Whole Cells Using a Liquid Enclosure and a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Peckys, Diana B.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Joy, David C.; de Jonge, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7) were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM) laboratory. PMID:20020038

  20. Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Alarcon, Ricardo; Balascuta, S.; Benson, Stephen V.

    2013-11-01

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that needmore » to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation when the machine is tuned for 130 MeV operation.« less

  1. Total coliphages removal by activated sludge process and their morphological diversity by transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jebri, Sihem; Hmaied, Fatma; Yahya, Mariem; Ben Ammar, Aouatef; Hamdi, Moktar

    This study was conducted to isolate phages in treated sewage collected from wastewater treatment plant, and explore their morphological diversity by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fates of total bacteriophages and their reduction by biological treatment were also assayed. Phages were isolated using the plaque assay then negatively stained and observed by electron microscope. Electron micrographs showed different types of phages with different shapes and sizes. The majority of viruses found in treated sewage ranged from 30 to 100 nm in capsid diameter. Many of them were tailed, belonging to Siphoviridae, Myoviridae and Podoviridae families. Non-tailed phage particles were also found at a low rate, presumably belonging to Leviviridae or Microviridae families. This study shows the diversity and the abundance of bacteriophages in wastewater after biological treatment. Their persistence in wastewater reused in agriculture should raise concerns about their potential role in controlling bacterial populations in the environment. They should be also included in water treatment quality controlling guidelines as fecal and viral indicators.

  2. Image processing for cryogenic transmission electron microscopy of symmetry-mismatched complexes.

    PubMed

    Huiskonen, Juha T

    2018-02-08

    Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) is a high-resolution biological imaging method, whereby biological samples, such as purified proteins, macromolecular complexes, viral particles, organelles and cells, are embedded in vitreous ice preserving their native structures. Due to sensitivity of biological materials to the electron beam of the microscope, only relatively low electron doses can be applied during imaging. As a result, the signal arising from the structure of interest is overpowered by noise in the images. To increase the signal-to-noise ratio, different image processing-based strategies that aim at coherent averaging of signal have been devised. In such strategies, images are generally assumed to arise from multiple identical copies of the structure. Prior to averaging, the images must be grouped according to the view of the structure they represent and images representing the same view must be simultaneously aligned relatively to each other. For computational reconstruction of the three-dimensional structure, images must contain different views of the original structure. Structures with multiple symmetry-related substructures are advantageous in averaging approaches because each image provides multiple views of the substructures. However, the symmetry assumption may be valid for only parts of the structure, leading to incoherent averaging of the other parts. Several image processing approaches have been adapted to tackle symmetry-mismatched substructures with increasing success. Such structures are ubiquitous in nature and further computational method development is needed to understanding their biological functions. ©2018 The Author(s).

  3. Optical absorption, electron spin resonance, and electron spin echo studies of the photoionization of tetramethylbenzidine in cationic and anionic synthetic vesicles: comparison with analogous micellar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, A.S.W.; Kevan, L.

    1983-09-07

    The photoionization of N,N,N',N'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in dihexadecylphosphate anionic vesicles and in dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride cationic vesicles has been studied by optical absorption and electron spin resonance in liquid and frozen solutions. The TMB cation has been observed to be stabilized in both types of vesicles. The photoionization efficiency is about twofold greater in the cationic vesicles compared to the anionic vesicles. Shifts in the optical absorption maximum between micellar and vesicle solutions indicate that TMB is in a less polar environment in the vesicle systems. Electron spin echo modulation spectrometry has been used to detect TMB cation-water interactions that are foundmore » to be weaker than in previously studied micellar solutions. This is consistent with the optical absorption results and with an asymmetric solubilization site for TMB and TMB/sup +/ within the vesicular structure. A new absorption in the photoionized vesicles is assigned to a nonparamagnetic diamine-diimine charge-transfer complex between two TMB cations in the same vesicle. This complex is not formed in micellar systems. 5 figures.« less

  4. Combined scanning transmission X-ray and electron microscopy for the characterization of bacterial endospores.

    PubMed

    Jamroskovic, Jan; Shao, Paul P; Suvorova, Elena; Barak, Imrich; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2014-09-01

    Endospores (also referred to as bacterial spores) are bacterial structures formed by several bacterial species of the phylum Firmicutes. Spores form as a response to environmental stress. These structures exhibit remarkable resistance to harsh environmental conditions such as exposure to heat, desiccation, and chemical oxidants. The spores include several layers of protein and peptidoglycan that surround a core harboring DNA as well as high concentrations of calcium and dipicolinic acid (DPA). A combination of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy was used for the direct quantitative characterization of bacterial spores. The concentration and localization of DPA, Ca(2+) , and other elements were determined and compared for the core and cortex of spores from two distinct genera: Bacillus subtilis and Desulfotomaculum reducens. This micro-spectroscopic approach is uniquely suited for the direct study of individual bacterial spores, while classical molecular and biochemical methods access only bulk characteristics. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Preparation of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea for high-resolution histology and transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brubacher, John L.; Vieira, Ana P.; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    The flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea is an emerging model species in such fields as stem-cell biology, regeneration, and evolutionary biology. Excellent molecular tools have been developed for S. mediterranea, but ultrastructural techniques have received far less attention. Processing specimens for histology and transmission electron microscopy is notoriously idiosyncratic for particular species or specimen types. Unfortunately however, most methods for S. mediterranea described in the literature lack numerous essential details, and those few that do provide them rely on specialized equipment that may not be readily available. Here we present an optimized protocol for ultrastructural preparation of S. mediterranea. The protocol can be completed in six days, much of which is “hands-off” time. To aid with troubleshooting, we also illustrate the significant effects of seemingly minor variations in fixative, buffer concentration, and dehydration steps. This procedure will be useful for all planarian researchers, particularly those with relatively little experience in tissue processing. PMID:24556788

  6. Transmission electron microscopy of AlGaAs/GaAs quantum cascade laser structures.

    PubMed

    Walther, T; Krysa, A B

    2017-12-01

    Quantum cascade lasers can be efficient infrared radiation sources and consist of several hundreds of very thin layers arranged in stacks that are repeated periodically. Both the thicknesses of the individual layers as well as the period lengths need to be monitored to high precision. Different transmission electron microscopy methods have been combined to analyse AlGaAs/GaAs quantum cascade laser structures in cross-section. We found a small parabolic variation of the growth rate during deposition, affecting the stack periodicity and a reduced aluminium content of the AlGaAs barriers, whereas their widths as well as those of the GaAs quantum wells agreed with the nominal values within one atomic layer. Growth on an offcut substrate led to facets and steps at the interfaces. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  7. Dark-field transmission electron microscopy of cortical bone reveals details of extrafibrillar crystals.

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, Henry P; McNally, Elizabeth A; Botton, Gianluigi A

    2014-12-01

    In a previous study we showed that most of the mineral in bone is present in the form of "mineral structures", 5-6nm-thick, elongated plates which surround and are oriented parallel to collagen fibrils. Using dark-field transmission electron microscopy, we viewed mineral structures in ion-milled sections of cortical human bone cut parallel to the collagen fibrils. Within the mineral structures we observe single crystals of apatite averaging 5.8±2.7nm in width and 28±19nm in length, their long axes oriented parallel to the fibril axis. Some appear to be composite, co-aligned crystals as thin as 2nm. From their similarity to TEM images of crystals liberated from deproteinated bone we infer that we are viewing sections through platy crystals of apatite that are assembled together to form the mineral structures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Microtubules in Plant Cells: Strategies and Methods for Immunofluorescence, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Celler, Katherine; Fujita, Miki; Kawamura, Eiko; Ambrose, Chris; Herburger, Klaus; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are required throughout plant development for a wide variety of processes, and different strategies have evolved to visualize and analyze them. This chapter provides specific methods that can be used to analyze microtubule organization and dynamic properties in plant systems and summarizes the advantages and limitations for each technique. We outline basic methods for preparing samples for immunofluorescence labelling, including an enzyme-based permeabilization method, and a freeze-shattering method, which generates microfractures in the cell wall to provide antibodies access to cells in cuticle-laden aerial organs such as leaves. We discuss current options for live cell imaging of MTs with fluorescently tagged proteins (FPs), and provide chemical fixation, high pressure freezing/freeze substitution, and post-fixation staining protocols for preserving MTs for transmission electron microscopy and tomography. PMID:26498784

  9. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of interfaces in a two-phase TiAl alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahon, G. J.; Howe, J. M.

    1990-06-01

    The atomic structures of the γ/α2 and γ/γT interfaces in a TiAl alloy were investigated using conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to understand the growth mechanisms and deformation behavior of the two-phase alloy. The results show that the α2 plates grow from the γ phase by the migration of a/6<112> partial dislocation ledges across the faces and that the γ/α2 interface usually contains closely spaced arrays of interfacial dislocations. Deformation twins cut through both γ twin boundaries and α2 plates during deformation, although slip of twinning c slocations through α2 appears to be a difficult process. Both the γ/α2 and γ/γT interfaces can be imaged and modeled at the atomic level, although slight crystal and/or beam tilt can complicate image interpretation.

  10. Transmission Electron Microscopy for Nanomedicine: Novel Applications for Long-established Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    During the last twenty years, the research in nanoscience and nanotechnology has dramatically increased and, in the last decade, the interest has progressively been oriented towards biomedical applications, giving rise to a new field termed nanomedicine. Transmission electron microscopy is a valuable technique not only for the thorough physico-chemical characterization of newly synthesized nanoparticulates, but especially to explore the effects of nanocomposites on biological systems, providing essential information for the development of efficient therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. Thus, for the progress of nanotechnology in the biomedical field, experts in cell biology, histochemistry and ultramicroscopy should always support the chemists, physicists and pharmacologists engaged in the synthesis and characterization of innovative nanoconstructs. PMID:28076938

  11. Quantitative Description of Crystal Nucleation and Growth from in Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ievlev, Anton V; Jesse, Stephen; Cochell, Thomas J; Unocic, Raymond R; Protopopescu, Vladimir A; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2015-12-22

    Recent advances in liquid cell (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (S)TEM has enabled in situ nanoscale investigations of controlled nanocrystal growth mechanisms. Here, we experimentally and quantitatively investigated the nucleation and growth mechanisms of Pt nanostructures from an aqueous solution of K2PtCl6. Averaged statistical, network, and local approaches have been used for the data analysis and the description of both collective particles dynamics and local growth features. In particular, interaction between neighboring particles has been revealed and attributed to reduction of the platinum concentration in the vicinity of the particle boundary. The local approach for solving the inverse problem showed that particles dynamics can be simulated by a stationary diffusional model. The obtained results are important for understanding nanocrystal formation and growth processes and for optimization of synthesis conditions.

  12. A simple method for orienting silk and other flexible fibres in transmission electron microscopy specimens.

    PubMed

    Trancik, J E; Czernuszka, J T; Merriman, C; Viney, C

    2001-09-01

    When microstructures are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the interpretation of results is facilitated if the material can be sectioned in defined orientations. In the case of fibres, it is especially useful if transverse and longitudinal sections can be obtained reliably. Here we describe a procedure for orienting spider silk and other flexible fibres for TEM investigation. Prior to embedding in epoxy resin, the silk is wound around a notched support made from polyester film. No glue is required. After the silk and its supporting film have been embedded and the resin has been cured the film can be peeled away to reveal nearly perfectly orientated silk threads. Both transverse and longitudinal sections can then be cut with a microtome. The method can be extended to obtain sections at any intermediate orientation.

  13. Web technology for emergency medicine and secure transmission of electronic patient records.

    PubMed

    Halamka, J D

    1998-01-01

    The American Heritage dictionary defines the word "web" as "something intricately contrived, especially something that ensnares or entangles." The wealth of medical resources on the World Wide Web is now so extensive, yet disorganized and unmonitored, that such a definition seems fitting. In emergency medicine, for example, a field in which accurate and complete information, including patients' records, is urgently needed, more than 5000 Web pages are available today, whereas fewer than 50 were available in December 1994. Most sites are static Web pages using the Internet to publish textbook material, but new technology is extending the scope of the Internet to include online medical education and secure exchange of clinical information. This article lists some of the best Web sites for use in emergency medicine and then describes a project in which the Web is used for transmission and protection of electronic medical records.

  14. Morphology of the ferritin iron core by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Nan; Dowle, Miriam; Horniblow, Richard D.; Tselepis, Chris; Palmer, Richard E.

    2016-11-01

    As the major iron storage protein, ferritin stores and releases iron for maintaining the balance of iron in fauna, flora, and bacteria. We present an investigation of the morphology and iron loading of ferritin (from equine spleen) using aberration-corrected high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Atom counting method, with size selected Au clusters as mass standards, was employed to determine the number of iron atoms in the nanoparticle core of each ferritin protein. Quantitative analysis shows that the nuclearity of iron atoms in the mineral core varies from a few hundred iron atoms to around 5000 atoms. Moreover, a relationship between the iron loading and iron core morphology is established, in which mineral core nucleates from a single nanoparticle, then grows along the protein shell before finally forming either a solid or hollow core structure.

  15. Measuring nanometre-scale electric fields in scanning transmission electron microscopy using segmented detectors.

    PubMed

    Brown, H G; Shibata, N; Sasaki, H; Petersen, T C; Paganin, D M; Morgan, M J; Findlay, S D

    2017-11-01

    Electric field mapping using segmented detectors in the scanning transmission electron microscope has recently been achieved at the nanometre scale. However, converting these results to quantitative field measurements involves assumptions whose validity is unclear for thick specimens. We consider three approaches to quantitative reconstruction of the projected electric potential using segmented detectors: a segmented detector approximation to differential phase contrast and two variants on ptychographical reconstruction. Limitations to these approaches are also studied, particularly errors arising from detector segment size, inelastic scattering, and non-periodic boundary conditions. A simple calibration experiment is described which corrects the differential phase contrast reconstruction to give reliable quantitative results despite the finite detector segment size and the effects of plasmon scattering in thick specimens. A plasmon scattering correction to the segmented detector ptychography approaches is also given. Avoiding the imposition of periodic boundary conditions on the reconstructed projected electric potential leads to more realistic reconstructions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Matched Backprojection Operator for Combined Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Tilt- and Focal Series.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Tim; Kohr, Holger; de Jonge, Niels; Slusallek, Philipp

    2015-06-01

    Combined tilt- and focal series scanning transmission electron microscopy is a recently developed method to obtain nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) information of thin specimens. In this study, we formulate the forward projection in this acquisition scheme as a linear operator and prove that it is a generalization of the Ray transform for parallel illumination. We analytically derive the corresponding backprojection operator as the adjoint of the forward projection. We further demonstrate that the matched backprojection operator drastically improves the convergence rate of iterative 3D reconstruction compared to the case where a backprojection based on heuristic weighting is used. In addition, we show that the 3D reconstruction is of better quality.

  17. Enhanced light element imaging in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Findlay, S D; Kohno, Y; Cardamone, L A; Ikuhara, Y; Shibata, N

    2014-01-01

    We show that an imaging mode based on taking the difference between signals recorded from the bright field (forward scattering region) in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy provides an enhancement of the detectability of light elements over existing techniques. In some instances this is an enhancement of the visibility of the light element columns relative to heavy element columns. In all cases explored it is an enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the image at the light column site. The image formation mechanisms are explained and the technique is compared with earlier approaches. Experimental data, supported by simulation, are presented for imaging the oxygen columns in LaAlO₃. Case studies looking at imaging hydrogen columns in YH₂ and lithium columns in Al₃Li are also explored through simulation, particularly with respect to the dependence on defocus, probe-forming aperture angle and detector collection aperture angles. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Atomic bonding effects in annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. II. Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Odlyzko, Michael L.; Held, Jacob T.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre, E-mail: mkhoyan@umn.edu

    2016-07-15

    Quantitatively calibrated annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) imaging experiments were compared to frozen phonon multislice simulations adapted to include chemical bonding effects. Having carefully matched simulation parameters to experimental conditions, a depth-dependent bonding effect was observed for high-angle ADF-STEM imaging of aluminum nitride. This result is explained by computational predictions, systematically examined in the preceding portion of this study, showing the propagation of the converged STEM beam to be highly sensitive to net interatomic charge transfer. Thus, although uncertainties in experimental conditions and simulation accuracy remain, the computationally predicted experimental bonding effect withstands the experimental testing reportedmore » here.« less

  19. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope Observation of Zero-Strain Deformation Twinning Mechanisms in Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wang, J.; Gong, S. K.; Mao, S. X.

    2011-04-01

    We have observed a new deformation-twinning mechanism using the high resolution transmission electron microscope in polycrystalline Ag films, zero-strain twinning via nucleation, and the migration of a Σ3{112} incoherent twin boundary (ITB). This twinning mechanism produces a near zero macroscopic strain because the net Burgers vectors either equal zero or are equivalent to a Shockley partial dislocation. This observation provides new insight into the understanding of deformation twinning and confirms a previous hypothesis: detwinning could be accomplished via the nucleation and migration of Σ3{112} ITBs. The zero-strain twinning mechanism may be unique to low staking fault energy metals with implications for their deformation behavior.

  20. Study of liquid crystal space groups using controlled tilting with cryogenic transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sagalowicz, Laurent; Acquistapace, Simone; Watzke, Heribert J; Michel, Martin

    2007-11-20

    We developed a method that enables differentiation between liquid crystalline-phase particles corresponding to different space groups. It consists of controlled tilting of the specimen to observe different orientations of the same particle using cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. This leads to the visualization of lattice planes (or reflections) that are present for a given structure and absent for the other one(s) and that give information on liquid crystalline structures and their space groups. In particular, we show that we can unambiguously distinguish among particles having the inverted micellar cubic (space group Fd(3)m, 227), the inverted bicontinuous gyroid (space group Ia(3)d, 230), the inverted bicontinuous diamond (space group Pn(3)m, 224), and the inverted bicontinuous primitive cubic structure (space group Im(3)m, 229).

  1. Picoliter Drop-On-Demand Dispensing for Multiplex Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Joseph P.; Parent, Lucas R.; Cantlon, Joshua

    2016-05-03

    Abstract Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM) provides a unique insight into the dynamics of nanomaterials in solution. Controlling the addition of multiple solutions to the liquid cell remains a key hurdle in our ability to increase throughput and to study processes dependent on solution mixing including chemical reactions. Here, we report that a piezo dispensing technique allows for mixing of multiple solutions directly within the viewing area. This technique permits deposition of 50 pL droplets of various aqueous solutions onto the liquid cell window, before assembly of the cell in a fully controlled manner. This proof-of-concept study highlights themore » great potential of picoliter dispensing in combination with LCTEM for observing nanoparticle mixing in the solution phase and the creation of chemical gradients.« less

  2. Preparation of herpes simplex virus-infected primary neurons for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Saksena, Monica; Boadle, Ross; Cunningham, Anthony L

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides the resolution necessary to identify both viruses and subcellular components of cells infected with many types of viruses, including herpes simplex virus. Recognized as a powerful tool in both diagnostic and research-based virology laboratories, TEM has made possible the identification of new viruses and has contributed to the elucidation of virus life cycle and virus-host cell interaction. Whilst there are many sample preparation techniques for TEM, conventional processing using chemical fixation and resin embedding remains a useful technique, available in virtually all EM laboratories, for studying virus/cell ultrastructure. In this chapter, we describe the preparation of herpes simplex virus-infected primary neurons, grown on plastic cover slips, to allow sectioning of neurons and axons in their growth plane. This technique allows TEM examination of cell bodies, axons, growth cones, and varicosities, providing powerful insights into virus-cell interaction.

  3. Transmission electron microscopy of a refractory inclusion from the Allende meteorite - Anatomy of a pyroxene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doukhan, N.; Doukhan, J. C.; Poirier, J. P.

    1991-06-01

    A crystal of clinopyroxene from the coarse-grained refractory inclusion Egg 6 of the Allende meteorite has been studied in detail by transmission electron microscopy. The pyroxene crystal contains euhedral, dislocation-free inclusions of pure spinel MgAl2O4, without any topotactic relation to the host. Extensive dislocation walls at equilibrium, characteristic of high-temperature anneal, are present in the crystal. Alteration products are occasionaly observed at the spinel-pyroxene interface close to regions where dislocation walls decorated with bubbles (or voids) are present. The bubbles, often in the shape of tubes along the dislocation lines, are thought to be due to the precipitation of a fluid migrating along the dislocations. The observations are compatible with crystallization of the refractory inclusions from the melt and with the existence of a later stage of metasomatism.

  4. Avoiding drying-artifacts in transmission electron microscopy: Characterizing the size and colloidal state of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Michen, Benjamin; Geers, Christoph; Vanhecke, Dimitri; Endes, Carola; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Balog, Sandor; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2015-01-01

    Standard transmission electron microscopy nanoparticle sample preparation generally requires the complete removal of the suspending liquid. Drying often introduces artifacts, which can obscure the state of the dispersion prior to drying and preclude automated image analysis typically used to obtain number-weighted particle size distribution. Here we present a straightforward protocol for prevention of the onset of drying artifacts, thereby allowing the preservation of in-situ colloidal features of nanoparticles during TEM sample preparation. This is achieved by adding a suitable macromolecular agent to the suspension. Both research- and economically-relevant particles with high polydispersity and/or shape anisotropy are easily characterized following our approach (http://bsa.bionanomaterials.ch), which allows for rapid and quantitative classification in terms of dimensionality and size: features that are major targets of European Union recommendations and legislation. PMID:25965905

  5. Design of an electrostatic phase shifting device for biological transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Philip J B

    2018-04-01

    I suggest an electrostatic phase plate designed to broaden the contrast transfer function of a transmission electron microscope operated close to Scherzer defocus primarily in the low resolution direction. At higher defocus the low frequency behavior is equal to that close to Scherzer defocus, but CTF-correction becomes necessary to extend image interpretation to higher resolution. One simple realization of the phase plate consists of two ring shaped electrodes symmetrically surrounding the central beam. Since no physical components come into contact with the central beam and charge on the electrodes is controlled by an external voltage supply, problems with uncontrolled charging are expected to be reduced. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Directly Observing Micelle Fusion and Growth in Solution by Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, Lucas R.; Bakalis, Evangelos; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo

    Amphiphilic small molecules and polymers form commonplace nanoscale macromolecular compartments and bilayers, and as such are truly essential components in all cells and in many cellular processes. The nature of these architectures, including their formation, phase changes, and stimuli-response behaviors, is necessary for the most basic functions of life, and over the past half-century, these natural micellar structures have inspired a vast diversity of industrial products, from biomedicines to detergents, lubricants, and coatings. The importance of these materials and their ubiquity have made them the subject of intense investigation regarding their nanoscale dynamics with increasing interest in obtaining sufficient temporalmore » and spatial resolution to directly observe nanoscale processes. However, the vast majority of experimental methods involve either bulk-averaging techniques including light, neutron, and X-ray scattering, or are static in nature including even the most advanced cryogenic transmission electron microscopy techniques. Here, we employ in situ liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM) to directly observe the evolution of individual amphiphilic block copolymer micellar nanoparticles in solution, in real time with nanometer spatial resolution. These observations, made on a proof-of-concept bioconjugate polymer amphiphile, revealed growth and evolution occurring by unimer addition processes and by particle-particle collision-and-fusion events. The experimental approach, combining direct LCTEM observation, quantitative analysis of LCTEM data, and correlated in silico simulations, provides a unique view of solvated soft matter nanoassemblies as they morph and evolve in time and space, enabling us to capture these phenomena in solution.« less

  7. Measurement of gamma' precipitates in a nickel-based superalloy using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy coupled with automated segmenting techniques.

    PubMed

    Tiley, J S; Viswanathan, G B; Shiveley, A; Tschopp, M; Srinivasan, R; Banerjee, R; Fraser, H L

    2010-08-01

    Precipitates of the ordered L1(2) gamma' phase (dispersed in the face-centered cubic or FCC gamma matrix) were imaged in Rene 88 DT, a commercial multicomponent Ni-based superalloy, using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM). Imaging was performed using the Cr, Co, Ni, Ti and Al elemental L-absorption edges in the energy loss spectrum. Manual and automated segmentation procedures were utilized for identification of precipitate boundaries and measurement of precipitate sizes. The automated region growing technique for precipitate identification in images was determined to measure accurately precipitate diameters. In addition, the region growing technique provided a repeatable method for optimizing segmentation techniques for varying EFTEM conditions. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Charging Electron Exposure on 1064nm Transmission Through Bare Sapphire Optics and SiO2 over HfO2 AR-Coated Sapphire Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottens, Brian P.; Connelly, Joseph; Brown, Stephen; Roeder, James; Kauder, Lonny; Cavanaugh, John

    2010-01-01

    Experiments measuring the effect of electron exposure on 1064nm transmission for optical sapphire were conducted. Detailed before and after inspections did not identify any resulting Litchenburg patterns. Pre- and post-exposure 1064nm transmission measurements are compared.

  9. Effect of Charging Electron Exposure on 1064nm Transmission through Bare Sapphire Optics and SiO2 over HfO2 AR-coated Sapphire Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottens, Brian P.; Connelly, Joseph; Brown, Stephen; Roeder, james; Kauder, Lonny; Cavanaugh, John

    2008-01-01

    Experiments measuring the effect of electron exposure on 1064nm transmission for optical sapphire were conducted. Detailed before and after inspections did not identify any resulting Litchenburg patterns. Pre- and post-exposure 1064nm transmission measurements are compared.

  10. Direct Visualization of Local Electromagnetic Field Structures by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Naoya; Findlay, Scott D; Matsumoto, Takao; Kohno, Yuji; Seki, Takehito; Sánchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-07-18

    The functional properties of materials and devices are critically determined by the electromagnetic field structures formed inside them, especially at nanointerface and surface regions, because such structures are strongly associated with the dynamics of electrons, holes and ions. To understand the fundamental origin of many exotic properties in modern materials and devices, it is essential to directly characterize local electromagnetic field structures at such defect regions, even down to atomic dimensions. In recent years, rapid progress in the development of high-speed area detectors for aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with sub-angstrom spatial resolution has opened new possibilities to directly image such electromagnetic field structures at very high-resolution. In this Account, we give an overview of our recent development of differential phase contrast (DPC) microscopy for aberration-corrected STEM and its application to many materials problems. In recent years, we have developed segmented-type STEM detectors which divide the detector plane into 16 segments and enable simultaneous imaging of 16 STEM images which are sensitive to the positions and angles of transmitted/scattered electrons on the detector plane. These detectors also have atomic-resolution imaging capability. Using these segmented-type STEM detectors, we show DPC STEM imaging to be a very powerful tool for directly imaging local electromagnetic field structures in materials and devices in real space. For example, DPC STEM can clearly visualize the local electric field variation due to the abrupt potential change across a p-n junction in a GaAs semiconductor, which cannot be observed by normal in-focus bright-field or annular type dark-field STEM imaging modes. DPC STEM is also very effective for imaging magnetic field structures in magnetic materials, such as magnetic domains and skyrmions. Moreover, real-time imaging of electromagnetic field structures can

  11. Joint denoising and distortion correction of atomic scale scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkels, Benjamin; Wirth, Benedikt

    2017-09-01

    Nowadays, modern electron microscopes deliver images at atomic scale. The precise atomic structure encodes information about material properties. Thus, an important ingredient in the image analysis is to locate the centers of the atoms shown in micrographs as precisely as possible. Here, we consider scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), which acquires data in a rastering pattern, pixel by pixel. Due to this rastering combined with the magnification to atomic scale, movements of the specimen even at the nanometer scale lead to random image distortions that make precise atom localization difficult. Given a series of STEM images, we derive a Bayesian method that jointly estimates the distortion in each image and reconstructs the underlying atomic grid of the material by fitting the atom bumps with suitable bump functions. The resulting highly non-convex minimization problems are solved numerically with a trust region approach. Existence of minimizers and the model behavior for faster and faster rastering are investigated using variational techniques. The performance of the method is finally evaluated on both synthetic and real experimental data.

  12. Obtaining 3D Chemical Maps by Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy Tomography.

    PubMed

    Roiban, Lucian; Sorbier, Loïc; Hirlimann, Charles; Ersen, Ovidiu

    2018-06-09

    Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy tomography (EFTEM tomography) can provide three-dimensional (3D) chemical maps of materials at a nanometric scale. EFTEM tomography can separate chemical elements that are very difficult to distinguish using other imaging techniques. The experimental protocol described here shows how to create 3D chemical maps to understand the chemical distribution and morphology of a material. Sample preparation steps for data segmentation are presented. This protocol permits the 3D distribution analysis of chemical elements in a nanometric sample. However, it should be noted that currently, the 3D chemical maps can only be generated for samples that are not beam sensitive, since the recording of filtered images requires long exposure times to an intense electron beam. The protocol was applied to quantify the chemical distribution of the components of two different heterogeneous catalyst supports. In the first study, the chemical distribution of aluminum and titanium in titania-alumina supports was analyzed. The samples were prepared using the swing-pH method. In the second, the chemical distribution of aluminum and silicon in silica-alumina supports that were prepared using the sol-powder and mechanical mixture methods was examined.

  13. Automated 100-Position Specimen Loader and Image Acquisition System for Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lefman, Jonathan; Morrison, Robert; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2007-01-01

    We report the development of a novel, multi-specimen imaging system for high-throughput transmission electron microscopy. Our cartridge-based loading system, called the “Gatling”, permits the sequential examination of as many as 100 specimens in the microscope for room temperature electron microscopy using mechanisms for rapid and automated specimen exchange. The software for the operation of the Gatling and automated data acquisition has been implemented in an updated version of our in-house program AutoEM. In the current implementation of the system, the time required to deliver 95 specimens into the microscope and collect overview images from each is about 13 hours. Regions of interest are identified from a low magnification atlas generation from each specimen and an unlimited number of higher magnifications images can be subsequently acquired from these regions using fully automated data acquisition procedures that can be controlled from a remote interface. We anticipate that the availability of the Gatling will greatly accelerate the speed of data acquisition for a variety of applications in biology, materials science and nanotechnology that require rapid screening and image analysis of multiple specimens. PMID:17240161

  14. Transmission electron microscopy artifacts in characterization of the nanomaterial-cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yu Hang; Guo, Mu Yao; Ma, Angel P Y; Ng, Alan M C; Djurišić, Aleksandra B; Degger, Natalie; Leung, Frederick C C

    2017-07-01

    We investigated transmission electron microscopy artifacts obtained using standard sample preparation protocols applied to the investigation of Escherichia coli cells exposed to common nanomaterials, such as TiO 2 , Ag, ZnO, and MgO. While the common protocols for some nanomaterials result only in known issues of nanomaterial-independent generation of anomalous deposits due to fixation and staining, for others, there are reactions between the nanomaterial and chemicals used for post-fixation or staining. Only in the case of TiO 2 do we observe only the known issues of nanomaterial-independent generation of anomalous deposits due to exceptional chemical stability of this material. For the other three nanomaterials, different artifacts are observed. For each of those, we identify causes of the observed problems and suggest alternative sample preparation protocols to avoid artifacts arising from the sample preparation, which is essential for correct interpretation of the obtained images and drawing correct conclusions on cell-nanomaterial interactions. Finally, we propose modified sample preparation and characterization protocols for comprehensive and conclusive investigations of nanomaterial-cell interactions using electron microscopy and for obtaining clear and unambiguous revelation whether the nanomaterials studied penetrate the cells or accumulate at the cell membranes. In only the case of MgO and ZnO, the unambiguous presence of Zn and Mg could be observed inside the cells.

  15. An efficient and cost-effective method for preparing transmission electron microscopy samples from powders

    DOE PAGES

    Wen, Haiming; Lin, Yaojun; Seidman, David N.; ...

    2015-09-09

    The preparation of transmission electron microcopy (TEM) samples from powders with particle sizes larger than ~100 nm poses a challenge. The existing methods are complicated and expensive, or have a low probability of success. Herein, we report a modified methodology for preparation of TEM samples from powders, which is efficient, cost-effective, and easy to perform. This method involves mixing powders with an epoxy on a piece of weighing paper, curing the powder–epoxy mixture to form a bulk material, grinding the bulk to obtain a thin foil, punching TEM discs from the foil, dimpling the discs, and ion milling the dimpledmore » discs to electron transparency. Compared with the well established and robust grinding–dimpling–ion-milling method for TEM sample preparation for bulk materials, our modified approach for preparing TEM samples from powders only requires two additional simple steps. In this article, step-by-step procedures for our methodology are described in detail, and important strategies to ensure success are elucidated. Furthermore, our methodology has been applied successfully for preparing TEM samples with large thin areas and high quality for many different mechanically milled metallic powders.« less

  16. Preparation of high-quality ultrathin transmission electron microscopy specimens of a nanocrystalline metallic powder.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Thomas; Gemming, Thomas; Mickel, Christine; Eymann, Konrad; Kirchner, Alexander; Kieback, Bernd

    2012-06-01

    This article explores the achievable transmission electron microscopy specimen thickness and quality by using three different preparation methods in the case of a high-strength nanocrystalline Cu-Nb powder alloy. Low specimen thickness is essential for spatially resolved analyses of the grains in nanocrystalline materials. We have found that single-sided as well as double-sided low-angle Ar ion milling of the Cu-Nb powders embedded into epoxy resin produced wedge-shaped particles of very low thickness (<10 nm) near the edge. By means of a modified focused ion beam lift-out technique generating holes in the lamella interior large micrometer-sized electron-transparent regions were obtained. However, this lamella displayed a higher thickness at the rim of ≥30 nm. Limiting factors for the observed thicknesses are discussed including ion damage depths, backscattering, and surface roughness, which depend on ion type, energy, current density, and specimen motion. Finally, sections cut by ultramicrotomy at low stroke rate and low set thickness offered vast, several tens of square micrometers uniformly thin regions of ∼10-nm minimum thickness. As major drawbacks, we have detected a thin coating on the sections consisting of epoxy deployed as the embedding material and considerable nanoscale thickness variations. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Precision controlled atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy using spiral scan pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Xiahan; Lupini, Andrew R.; Ding, Jilai; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Unocic, Raymond R.

    2017-03-01

    Atomic-resolution imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can enable direct correlation between atomic structure and materials functionality. The fast and precise control of the STEM probe is, however, challenging because the true beam location deviates from the assigned location depending on the properties of the deflectors. To reduce these deviations, i.e. image distortions, we use spiral scanning paths, allowing precise control of a sub-Å sized electron probe within an aberration-corrected STEM. Although spiral scanning avoids the sudden changes in the beam location (fly-back distortion) present in conventional raster scans, it is not distortion-free. “Archimedean” spirals, with a constant angular frequency within each scan, are used to determine the characteristic response at different frequencies. We then show that such characteristic functions can be used to correct image distortions present in more complicated constant linear velocity spirals, where the frequency varies within each scan. Through the combined application of constant linear velocity scanning and beam path corrections, spiral scan images are shown to exhibit less scan distortion than conventional raster scan images. The methodology presented here will be useful for in situ STEM imaging at higher temporal resolution and for imaging beam sensitive materials.

  18. Precision controlled atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy using spiral scan pathways.

    PubMed

    Sang, Xiahan; Lupini, Andrew R; Ding, Jilai; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen; Unocic, Raymond R

    2017-03-08

    Atomic-resolution imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can enable direct correlation between atomic structure and materials functionality. The fast and precise control of the STEM probe is, however, challenging because the true beam location deviates from the assigned location depending on the properties of the deflectors. To reduce these deviations, i.e. image distortions, we use spiral scanning paths, allowing precise control of a sub-Å sized electron probe within an aberration-corrected STEM. Although spiral scanning avoids the sudden changes in the beam location (fly-back distortion) present in conventional raster scans, it is not distortion-free. "Archimedean" spirals, with a constant angular frequency within each scan, are used to determine the characteristic response at different frequencies. We then show that such characteristic functions can be used to correct image distortions present in more complicated constant linear velocity spirals, where the frequency varies within each scan. Through the combined application of constant linear velocity scanning and beam path corrections, spiral scan images are shown to exhibit less scan distortion than conventional raster scan images. The methodology presented here will be useful for in situ STEM imaging at higher temporal resolution and for imaging beam sensitive materials.

  19. Thin-Film Phase Plates for Transmission Electron Microscopy Fabricated from Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Dries, Manuel; Hettler, Simon; Schulze, Tina; Send, Winfried; Müller, Erich; Schneider, Reinhard; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Luo, Yuansu; Samwer, Konrad

    2016-10-01

    Thin-film phase plates (PPs) have become an interesting tool to enhance the contrast of weak-phase objects in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thin film usually consists of amorphous carbon, which suffers from quick degeneration under the intense electron-beam illumination. Recent investigations have focused on the search for alternative materials with an improved material stability. This work presents thin-film PPs fabricated from metallic glass alloys, which are characterized by a high electrical conductivity and an amorphous structure. Thin films of the zirconium-based alloy Zr65.0Al7.5Cu27.5 (ZAC) were fabricated and their phase-shifting properties were evaluated. The ZAC film was investigated by different TEM techniques, which reveal beneficial properties compared with amorphous carbon PPs. Particularly favorable is the small probability for inelastic plasmon scattering, which results from the combined effect of a moderate inelastic mean free path and a reduced film thickness due to a high mean inner potential. Small probability plasmon scattering improves contrast transfer at high spatial frequencies, which makes the ZAC alloy a promising material for PP fabrication.

  20. Live Bacterial Physiology Visualized with 5 nm Resolution Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Eamonn; Nelson, Edward M; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Damiano, John; Timp, Gregory

    2016-02-23

    It is now possible to visualize at nanometer resolution the infection of a living biological cell with virus without compromising cell viability using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). To provide contrast while preserving viability, Escherichia coli and P1 bacteriophages were first positively stained with a very low concentration of uranyl acetate in minimal phosphate medium and then imaged with low-dose STEM in a microfluidic liquid flow cell. Under these conditions, it was established that the median lethal dose of electrons required to kill half the tested population was LD50 = 30 e(-)/nm(2), which coincides with the disruption of a wet biological membrane, according to prior reports. Consistent with the lateral resolution and high-contrast signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) inferred from Monte Carlo simulations, images of the E. coli membrane, flagella, and the bacteriophages were acquired with 5 nm resolution, but the cumulative dose exceeded LD50. On the other hand, with a cumulative dose below LD50 (and lower SNR), it was still possible to visualize the infection of E. coli by P1, showing the insertion of viral DNA within 3 s, with 5 nm resolution.

  1. Rare-earth-doped nanophosphors for multicolor cathodoluminescence nanobioimaging using scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Taichi; Fukushima, Shoichiro; Niioka, Hirohiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Miyake, Jun; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2015-05-01

    We describe rare-earth-doped nanophosphors (RE-NPs) for biological imaging using cathodoluminescence(CL) microscopy based on scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). We report the first demonstration of multicolor CL nanobioimaging using STEM with nanophosphors. The CL spectra of the synthesized nanophosphors (Y2O3∶Eu, Y2O3∶Tb) were sufficiently narrow to be distinguished. From CL images of RE-NPs on an elastic carbon-coated copper grid, the spatial resolution was beyond the diffraction limit of light.Y2O3∶Tb and Y2O3∶Eu RE-NPs showed a remarkable resistance against electron beam exposure even at high acceleration voltage (80 kV) and retained a CL intensity of more than 97% compared with the initial intensity for 1 min. In biological CL imaging with STEM, heavy-metal-stained cell sections containing the RE-NPs were prepared,and both the CL images of RE-NPs and cellular structures, such as mitochondria, were clearly observed from STEM images with high contrast. The cellular CL imaging using RE-NPs also had high spatial resolution even though heavy-metal-stained cells are normally regarded as highly scattering media. Moreover, since theRE-NPs exhibit photoluminescence (PL) excited by UV light, they are useful for multimodal correlative imaging using CL and PL.

  2. Anterior lens epithelium in intumescent white cataracts - scanning and transmission electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Andjelic, Sofija; Drašlar, Kazimir; Hvala, Anastazija; Hawlina, Marko

    2016-02-01

    Our purpose was to study the structure of the lens epithelial cells (LECs) of intumescent white cataracts (IC) in comparison with nuclear cataracts (NC) in order to investigate possible structural reasons for development of IC. The anterior lens capsule (aLC: basement membrane and associated LECs) were obtained from cataract surgery and prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We observed by SEM that in IC, LEC swelling was pronounced with the clefts surrounding the groups of LECs. Another structural feature was spherical formations, that were observed on the apical side of LEC's, towards the fibre cell layer, both by SEM and TEM. Development of these structures, bulging out from the apical cell membrane of the LEC's and disrupting it, could be followed in steps towards the sphere formation. The degeneration of the lens epithelium and the structures of the aLC in IC similar to Morgagnian globules were also observed. None of these structural changes were observed in NC. We show by SEM and TEM that, in IC, LECs have pronounced structural features not observed in NC. This supports the hypothesis that the disturbed structure of LECs plays a role in water accumulation in the IC lens. We also suggest that, in IC, LECs produce bulging spheres that represent unique structures of degenerated material, extruded from the LEC.

  3. Nature and evolution of incommensurate charge order in manganites visualized with cryogenic scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    El Baggari, Ismail; Savitzky, Benjamin H; Admasu, Alemayehu S; Kim, Jaewook; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Hovden, Robert; Kourkoutis, Lena F

    2018-02-13

    Incommensurate charge order in hole-doped oxides is intertwined with exotic phenomena such as colossal magnetoresistance, high-temperature superconductivity, and electronic nematicity. Here, we map, at atomic resolution, the nature of incommensurate charge-lattice order in a manganite using scanning transmission electron microscopy at room temperature and cryogenic temperature ([Formula: see text]93 K). In diffraction, the ordering wave vector changes upon cooling, a behavior typically associated with incommensurate order. However, using real space measurements, we discover that the ordered state forms lattice-locked regions over a few wavelengths interspersed with phase defects and changing periodicity. The cations undergo picometer-scale ([Formula: see text]6 pm to 11 pm) transverse displacements, suggesting that charge-lattice coupling is strong. We further unearth phase inhomogeneity in the periodic lattice displacements at room temperature, and emergent phase coherence at 93 K. Such local phase variations govern the long-range correlations of the charge-ordered state and locally change the periodicity of the modulations, resulting in wave vector shifts in reciprocal space. These atomically resolved observations underscore the importance of lattice coupling and phase inhomogeneity, and provide a microscopic explanation for putative "incommensurate" order in hole-doped oxides. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  4. Determination of aberration center of Ronchigram for automated aberration correctors in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sannomiya, Takumi; Sawada, Hidetaka; Nakamichi, Tomohiro; Hosokawa, Fumio; Nakamura, Yoshio; Tanishiro, Yasumasa; Takayanagi, Kunio

    2013-12-01

    A generic method to determine the aberration center is established, which can be utilized for aberration calculation and axis alignment for aberration corrected electron microscopes. In this method, decentering induced secondary aberrations from inherent primary aberrations are minimized to find the appropriate axis center. The fitness function to find the optimal decentering vector for the axis was defined as a sum of decentering induced secondary aberrations with properly distributed weight values according to the aberration order. Since the appropriate decentering vector is determined from the aberration values calculated at an arbitrary center axis, only one aberration measurement is in principle required to find the center, resulting in /very fast center search. This approach was tested for the Ronchigram based aberration calculation method for aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Both in simulation and in experiments, the center search was confirmed to work well although the convergence to find the best axis becomes slower with larger primary aberrations. Such aberration center determination is expected to fully automatize the aberration correction procedures, which used to require pre-alignment of experienced users. This approach is also applicable to automated aperture positioning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Nature and evolution of incommensurate charge order in manganites visualized with cryogenic scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Savitzky, Benjamin H.; Admasu, Alemayehu S.; Kim, Jaewook; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Hovden, Robert; Kourkoutis, Lena F.

    2018-01-01

    Incommensurate charge order in hole-doped oxides is intertwined with exotic phenomena such as colossal magnetoresistance, high-temperature superconductivity, and electronic nematicity. Here, we map, at atomic resolution, the nature of incommensurate charge–lattice order in a manganite using scanning transmission electron microscopy at room temperature and cryogenic temperature (∼93 K). In diffraction, the ordering wave vector changes upon cooling, a behavior typically associated with incommensurate order. However, using real space measurements, we discover that the ordered state forms lattice-locked regions over a few wavelengths interspersed with phase defects and changing periodicity. The cations undergo picometer-scale (∼6 pm to 11 pm) transverse displacements, suggesting that charge–lattice coupling is strong. We further unearth phase inhomogeneity in the periodic lattice displacements at room temperature, and emergent phase coherence at 93 K. Such local phase variations govern the long-range correlations of the charge-ordered state and locally change the periodicity of the modulations, resulting in wave vector shifts in reciprocal space. These atomically resolved observations underscore the importance of lattice coupling and phase inhomogeneity, and provide a microscopic explanation for putative “incommensurate” order in hole-doped oxides. PMID:29382750

  6. Cryo-transmission electron tomography of native casein micelles from bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Trejo, R; Dokland, T; Jurat-Fuentes, J; Harte, F

    2011-12-01

    Caseins are the principal protein components in milk and an important ingredient in the food industry. In liquid milk, caseins are found as micelles of casein proteins and colloidal calcium nanoclusters. Casein micelles were isolated from raw skim milk by size exclusion chromatography and suspended in milk protein-free serum produced by ultrafiltration (molecular weight cut-off of 3 kDa) of raw skim milk. The micelles were imaged by cryo-electron microscopy and subjected to tomographic reconstruction methods to visualize the 3-dimensional and internal organization of native casein micelles. This provided new insights into the internal architecture of the casein micelle that had not been apparent from prior cryo-transmission electron microscopy studies. This analysis demonstrated the presence of water-filled cavities (∼20 to 30 nm in diameter), channels (diameter greater than ∼5 nm), and several hundred high-density nanoclusters (6 to 12 nm in diameter) within the interior of the micelles. No spherical protein submicellar structures were observed. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An efficient and cost-effective method for preparing transmission electron microscopy samples from powders

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Haiming; Lin, Yaojun; Seidman, David N.

    The preparation of transmission electron microcopy (TEM) samples from powders with particle sizes larger than ~100 nm poses a challenge. The existing methods are complicated and expensive, or have a low probability of success. Herein, we report a modified methodology for preparation of TEM samples from powders, which is efficient, cost-effective, and easy to perform. This method involves mixing powders with an epoxy on a piece of weighing paper, curing the powder–epoxy mixture to form a bulk material, grinding the bulk to obtain a thin foil, punching TEM discs from the foil, dimpling the discs, and ion milling the dimpledmore » discs to electron transparency. Compared with the well established and robust grinding–dimpling–ion-milling method for TEM sample preparation for bulk materials, our modified approach for preparing TEM samples from powders only requires two additional simple steps. In this article, step-by-step procedures for our methodology are described in detail, and important strategies to ensure success are elucidated. Furthermore, our methodology has been applied successfully for preparing TEM samples with large thin areas and high quality for many different mechanically milled metallic powders.« less

  8. In situ transmission electron microscopy of lead dendrites and lead ions in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    White, Edward R; Singer, Scott B; Augustyn, Veronica; Hubbard, William A; Mecklenburg, Matthew; Dunn, Bruce; Regan, Brian C

    2012-07-24

    An ideal technique for observing nanoscale assembly would provide atomic-resolution images of both the products and the reactants in real time. Using a transmission electron microscope we image in situ the electrochemical deposition of lead from an aqueous solution of lead(II) nitrate. Both the lead deposits and the local Pb(2+) concentration can be visualized. Depending on the rate of potential change and the potential history, lead deposits on the cathode in a structurally compact layer or in dendrites. In both cases the deposits can be removed and the process repeated. Asperities that persist through many plating and stripping cycles consistently nucleate larger dendrites. Quantitative digital image analysis reveals excellent correlation between changes in the Pb(2+) concentration, the rate of lead deposition, and the current passed by the electrochemical cell. Real-time electron microscopy of dendritic growth dynamics and the associated local ionic concentrations can provide new insight into the functional electrochemistry of batteries and related energy storage technologies.

  9. Precision controlled atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy using spiral scan pathways

    DOE PAGES

    Sang, Xiahan; Lupini, Andrew R.; Ding, Jilai; ...

    2017-03-08

    Atomic-resolution imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can enable direct correlation between atomic structure and materials functionality. The fast and precise control of the STEM probe is, however, challenging because the true beam location deviates from the assigned location depending on the properties of the deflectors. To reduce these deviations, i.e. image distortions, we use spiral scanning paths, allowing precise control of a sub-Å sized electron probe within an aberration-corrected STEM. Although spiral scanning avoids the sudden changes in the beam location (fly-back distortion) present in conventional raster scans, it is not distortion-free. “Archimedean” spirals, with amore » constant angular frequency within each scan, are used to determine the characteristic response at different frequencies. We then show that such characteristic functions can be used to correct image distortions present in more complicated constant linear velocity spirals, where the frequency varies within each scan. Through the combined application of constant linear velocity scanning and beam path corrections, spiral scan images are shown to exhibit less scan distortion than conventional raster scan images. The methodology presented here will be useful for in situ STEM imaging at higher temporal resolution and for imaging beam sensitive materials.« less

  10. Mass Determination of Rous Sarcoma Virus Virions by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Volker M.; Simon, Martha N.

    1999-01-01

    The internal structural protein of retroviruses, Gag, comprises most of the mass of the virion, and Gag itself can give rise to virus-like particles when expressed in appropriate cells. Previously the stoichiometry of Gag in virions was inferred from indirect measurements carried out 2 decades ago. We now have directly determined the masses of individual particles of the prototypic avian retrovirus, Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), by using scanning transmission electron microscopy. In this technique, the number of scattered electrons in the dark-field image integrated over an individual freeze-dried virus particle on a grid is directly proportional to its mass. The RSV virions had a mean mass of 2.5 × 108 Da, corresponding to about 1,500 Gag molecules per virion. The population of virions was not homogeneous, with about one-third to two-thirds of the virions deviating from the mean by more than 10% of the mass in two respective preparations. The mean masses for virions carrying genomes of 7.4 or 9.3 kb were indistinguishable, suggesting that mass variability is not due to differences in RNA incorporation. PMID:10400808

  11. Collagen Fibrils and Proteoglycans of Macular Dystrophy Cornea: Ultrastructure and 3D Transmission Electron Tomography.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Saeed; Alkatan, Hind M; Kirat, Omar; Khan, Adnan A; Almubrad, Turki

    2015-06-01

    We report the ultrastructure and 3D transmission electron tomography of collagen fibrils (CFs), proteoglycans (PGs), and microfibrils within the CF of corneas of patients with macular corneal dystrophy (MCD). Three normal corneas and three MCD corneas from three Saudi patients (aged 25, 31, and 49 years, respectively) were used for this study. The corneas were processed for light and electron microscopy studies. 3D images were composed from a set of 120 ultrastructural images using the program "Composer" and visualized using the program "Visuliser Kai". 3D image analysis of MCD cornea showed a clear organization of PGs around the CF at very high magnification and degeneration of the microfibrils within the CF. Within the MCD cornea, the PG area in the anterior stroma was significantly larger than in the middle and posterior stroma. The PG area in the MCD cornea was significantly larger compared with the PG area in the normal cornea. The CF diameter and inter-fibrillar spacing of the MCD cornea were significantly smaller compared with those of the normal cornea. Ultrastructural 3D imaging showed that the production of unsulfated keratin sulfate (KS) may lead to the degeneration of micro-CFs within the CFs. The effect of the unsulfated KS was higher in the anterior stroma compared with the posterior stroma.

  12. Determination of domain wall chirality using in situ Lorentz transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chess, Jordan J.; Montoya, Sergio A.; Fullerton, Eric E.; ...

    2017-02-23

    Controlling domain wall chirality is increasingly seen in non-centrosymmetric materials. Mapping chiral magnetic domains requires knowledge about all the vector components of the magnetization, which poses a problem for conventional Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (LTEM) that is only sensitive to magnetic fields perpendicular to the electron beams direction of travel. The standard approach in LTEM for determining the third component of the magnetization is to tilt the sample to some angle and record a second image. Furthermore, this presents a problem for any domain structures that are stabilized by an applied external magnetic field (e.g. skyrmions), because the standard LTEMmore » setup does not allow independent control of the angle of an applied magnetic field, and sample tilt angle. Here we show that applying a modified transport of intensity equation analysis to LTEM images collected during an applied field sweep, we can determine the domain wall chirality of labyrinth domains in a perpendicularly magnetized material, avoiding the need to tilt the sample.« less

  13. Determination of domain wall chirality using in situ Lorentz transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chess, Jordan J.; Montoya, Sergio A.; Fullerton, Eric E.

    Controlling domain wall chirality is increasingly seen in non-centrosymmetric materials. Mapping chiral magnetic domains requires knowledge about all the vector components of the magnetization, which poses a problem for conventional Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (LTEM) that is only sensitive to magnetic fields perpendicular to the electron beams direction of travel. The standard approach in LTEM for determining the third component of the magnetization is to tilt the sample to some angle and record a second image. Furthermore, this presents a problem for any domain structures that are stabilized by an applied external magnetic field (e.g. skyrmions), because the standard LTEMmore » setup does not allow independent control of the angle of an applied magnetic field, and sample tilt angle. Here we show that applying a modified transport of intensity equation analysis to LTEM images collected during an applied field sweep, we can determine the domain wall chirality of labyrinth domains in a perpendicularly magnetized material, avoiding the need to tilt the sample.« less

  14. Comparison of nitrogen adsorption and transmission electron microscopy analyses for structural characterization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaslou, Reza Malek; Vosoughi, Vahid; Dalai, Ajay K.

    2017-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are different from other porous substrates such as activated carbon due to their high external surfaces. This structural feature can lead in some uncertainties in the results of nitrogen adsorption analysis for characterization of CNTs. In this paper, the results of microscopic analyses and nitrogen adsorption method for characterization of carbon nanotubes were compared. Five different types of CNTs with different structures were either synthesized or purchased. The CNT samples were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and N2 adsorption analysis. The comparisons between the results from the microscopic analyses and N2 adsorption showed that the total pore volume and BET surface measurements include the internal and external porosity of CNTs. Therefore, the interpretation of N2 adsorption data required accurate TEM analysis. In addition, the evaluation of pore size distribution curves from all CNT samples in this study and several instances in the literature revealed the presence of a common peak in the range of 2-5 nm. This peak does not explain the inner pore size distribution. The presence of this common peak can be attributed to the strong adsorption of N2 on the junction of touched and crossed nanotubes.

  15. Precision controlled atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy using spiral scan pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Sang, Xiahan; Lupini, Andrew R.; Ding, Jilai

    Atomic-resolution imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can enable direct correlation between atomic structure and materials functionality. The fast and precise control of the STEM probe is, however, challenging because the true beam location deviates from the assigned location depending on the properties of the deflectors. To reduce these deviations, i.e. image distortions, we use spiral scanning paths, allowing precise control of a sub-Å sized electron probe within an aberration-corrected STEM. Although spiral scanning avoids the sudden changes in the beam location (fly-back distortion) present in conventional raster scans, it is not distortion-free. “Archimedean” spirals, with amore » constant angular frequency within each scan, are used to determine the characteristic response at different frequencies. We then show that such characteristic functions can be used to correct image distortions present in more complicated constant linear velocity spirals, where the frequency varies within each scan. Through the combined application of constant linear velocity scanning and beam path corrections, spiral scan images are shown to exhibit less scan distortion than conventional raster scan images. The methodology presented here will be useful for in situ STEM imaging at higher temporal resolution and for imaging beam sensitive materials.« less

  16. Lithium electrodeposition dynamics in aprotic electrolyte observed in situ via transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Leenheer, Andrew Jay; Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh; Zavadil, Kevin Robert; ...

    2015-03-18

    Electrodeposited metallic lithium is an ideal negative battery electrode, but nonuniform microstructure evolution during cycling leads to degradation and safety issues. A better understanding of the Li plating and stripping processes is needed to enable practical Li-metal batteries. Here we use a custom microfabricated, sealed liquid cell for in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to image the first few cycles of lithium electrodeposition/dissolution in liquid aprotic electrolyte at submicron resolution. Cycling at current densities from 1 to 25 mA/cm 2 leads to variations in grain structure, with higher current densities giving a more needle-like, higher surface area deposit. Themore » effect of the electron beam was explored, and it was found that, even with minimal beam exposure, beam-induced surface film formation could alter the Li microstructure. The electrochemical dissolution was seen to initiate from isolated points on grains rather than uniformly across the Li surface, due to the stabilizing solid electrolyte interphase surface film. As a result, we discuss the implications for operando STEM liquid-cell imaging and Li-battery applications.« less

  17. Cryo-transmission electron tomography of native casein micelles from bovine milk

    PubMed Central

    Trejo, R.; Dokland, T.; Jurat-Fuentes, J.; Harte, F.

    2013-01-01

    Caseins are the principal protein components in milk and an important ingredient in the food industry. In liquid milk, caseins are found as micelles of casein proteins and colloidal calcium nanoclusters. Casein micelles were isolated from raw skim milk by size exclusion chromatography and suspended in milk protein-free serum produced by ultrafiltration (molecular weight cut-off of 3 kDa) of raw skim milk. The micelles were imaged by cryo-electron microscopy and subjected to tomographic reconstruction methods to visualize the 3-dimensional and internal organization of native casein micelles. This provided new insights into the internal architecture of the casein micelle that had not been apparent from prior cryo-transmission electron microscopy studies. This analysis demonstrated the presence of water-filled cavities (~20 to 30 nm in diameter), channels (diameter greater than ~5 nm), and several hundred high-density nanoclusters (6 to 12 nm in diameter) within the interior of the micelles. No spherical protein submicellar structures were observed. PMID:22118067

  18. Investigating fold structures of 2D materials by quantitative transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Zengming; Liu, Wei; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-04-01

    We report an approach developed for deriving 3D structural information of 2D membrane folds based on the recently-established quantitative transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Systematic multislice simulations reveal that the membrane folding leads to sufficiently strong electron scattering which enables a precise determination of bending radius. The image contrast depends also on the folding angles of 2D materials due to the variation of projection potentials, which however exerts much smaller effect compared with the bending radii. DFT calculations show that folded edges are typically characteristic of (fractional) nanotubes with the same curvature retained after energy optimization. Owing to the exclusion of Stobbs factor issue, numerical simulations were directly used in comparison with the experimental measurements on an absolute contrast scale, which results in a successful determination of bending radius of folded monolayer MoS 2 films. The method should be applicable to characterizing all 2D membranes with 3D folding features. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A literature review of in situ transmission electron microscopy technique in corrosion studies.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhengwei; Xie, Zhi-Hui

    2018-06-18

    One of the biggest challenges in corrosion investigation is foreseeing precisely how and where materials will degenerate in a designated condition owing to scarceness of accurate corrosion mechanisms. Recent fast development of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique makes it achievable to better understand the corrosion mechanism and physicochemical processes at the interfaces between samples and gases or electrolytes by dynamical capture the microstructural and chemical changes with high resolution within a realistic or near-realistic environment. However, a detailed and in-depth account summing up the development and latest achievements of in situ TEM techniques, especially the application of emerging liquid and electrochemical cells in the community of corrosion study in the last several years is lacking and is urgently needed for its heathy development. To fill this gap, this critical review summarizes firstly the key scientific issues in corrosion research, followed by introducing the configurations of several typical closed-type cells. Then, the achievements of in situ TEM using open-type or closed-type cells in corrosion study are presented in detail. The study directions in the future are commented finally in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, electron radiation, and linkage between microstructure and electrochemical performance in corrosion community. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Demonstration of correlative atomic force and transmission electron microscopy using actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yutaro; Konno, Hiroki; Shimabukuro, Katsuya

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we present a new technique called correlative atomic force and transmission electron microscopy (correlative AFM/TEM) in which a targeted region of a sample can be observed under AFM and TEM. The ultimate goal of developing this new technique is to provide a technical platform to expand the fields of AFM application to complex biological systems such as cell extracts. Recent advances in the time resolution of AFM have enabled detailed observation of the dynamic nature of biomolecules. However, specifying molecular species, by AFM alone, remains a challenge. Here, we demonstrate correlative AFM/TEM, using actin filaments as a test sample, and further show that immuno-electron microscopy (immuno-EM), to specify molecules, can be integrated into this technique. Therefore, it is now possible to specify molecules, captured under AFM, by subsequent observation using immuno-EM. In conclusion, correlative AFM/TEM can be a versatile method to investigate complex biological systems at the molecular level. PMID:28828286

  1. Structure analysis of Si(111)-7 × 7 reconstructed surface by transmission electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Kunio; Tanishiro, Yasumasa; Takahashi, Shigeki; Takahashi, Masaetsu

    1985-12-01

    The atomic structure of the 7 × 7 reconstructed Si(111) surface has been analysed by ultra-high vacuum (UHV) transmission electron diffraction (TED). A possible projected structure of the surface is deduced from the intensity distribution in TED patterns of normal electron incidence and from Patterson and Fourier syntheses of the intensities. A new three-dimensional structure model, the DAS model, is proposed: The model consists of 12 adatoms arranged locally in the 2 × 2 structure, a stacking fault layer and a layer with a vacancy at the corner and 9 dimers on the sides of each of the two triangular subcells of the 7 × 7 unit cell. The silicon layers in one subcell are stacked with the normal sequence, CcAaB + adatoms, while those in the other subcell are stacked with a faulted sequence, CcAa/C + adatoms. The model has only 19 dangling bonds, the smallest number among models so far proposed. Previously proposed models are tested quantitatively by the TED intensity. Advantages and limits of the TED analysis are discussed.

  2. Assessment of microcrystal quality by transmission electron microscopy for efficient serial femtosecond crystallography.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Christopher O; Kovaleva, Elena G; Fu, Xiaofeng; Stevenson, Hilary P; Brewster, Aaron S; DePonte, Daniel P; Baxter, Elizabeth L; Cohen, Aina E; Calero, Guillermo

    2016-07-15

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) employing high-intensity X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources has enabled structural studies on microcrystalline protein samples at non-cryogenic temperatures. However, the identification and optimization of conditions that produce well diffracting microcrystals remains an experimental challenge. Here, we report parallel SFX and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments using fragmented microcrystals of wild type (WT) homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (HPCD) and an active site variant (H200Q). Despite identical crystallization conditions and morphology, as well as similar crystal size and density, the indexing efficiency of the diffraction data collected using the H200Q variant sample was over 7-fold higher compared to the diffraction results obtained using the WT sample. TEM analysis revealed an abundance of protein aggregates, crystal conglomerates and a smaller population of highly ordered lattices in the WT sample as compared to the H200Q variant sample. While not reported herein, the 1.75 Å resolution structure of the H200Q variant was determined from ∼16 min of beam time, demonstrating the utility of TEM analysis in evaluating sample monodispersity and lattice quality, parameters critical to the efficiency of SFX experiments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transmission electron microscopy as a tool for nanocrystal characterization pre- and post-injector

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, H. P.; DePonte, D. P.; Makhov, A. M.; Conway, James F.; Zeldin, O. B.; Boutet, S.; Calero, G.; Cohen, A. E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancements at the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) enabling successful serial femtosecond diffraction experiments using nanometre-sized crystals (NCs) have opened up the possibility of X-ray structure determination of proteins that produce only submicrometre crystals such as many membrane proteins. Careful crystal pre-characterization including compatibility testing of the sample delivery method is essential to ensure efficient use of the limited beamtime available at XFEL sources. This work demonstrates the utility of transmission electron microscopy for detecting and evaluating NCs within the carrier solutions of liquid injectors. The diffraction quality of these crystals may be assessed by examining the crystal lattice and by calculating the fast Fourier transform of the image. Injector reservoir solutions, as well as solutions collected post-injection, were evaluated for three types of protein NCs (i) the membrane protein PTHR1, (ii) the multi-protein complex Pol II-GFP and (iii) the soluble protein lysozyme. Our results indicate that the concentration and diffraction quality of NCs, particularly those with high solvent content and sensitivity to mechanical manipulation may be affected by the delivery process. PMID:24914151

  4. Automated Detection of Synapses in Serial Section Transmission Electron Microscopy Image Stacks

    PubMed Central

    Kreshuk, Anna; Koethe, Ullrich; Pax, Elizabeth; Bock, Davi D.; Hamprecht, Fred A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method for fully automated detection of chemical synapses in serial electron microscopy images with highly anisotropic axial and lateral resolution, such as images taken on transmission electron microscopes. Our pipeline starts from classification of the pixels based on 3D pixel features, which is followed by segmentation with an Ising model MRF and another classification step, based on object-level features. Classifiers are learned on sparse user labels; a fully annotated data subvolume is not required for training. The algorithm was validated on a set of 238 synapses in 20 serial 7197×7351 pixel images (4.5×4.5×45 nm resolution) of mouse visual cortex, manually labeled by three independent human annotators and additionally re-verified by an expert neuroscientist. The error rate of the algorithm (12% false negative, 7% false positive detections) is better than state-of-the-art, even though, unlike the state-of-the-art method, our algorithm does not require a prior segmentation of the image volume into cells. The software is based on the ilastik learning and segmentation toolkit and the vigra image processing library and is freely available on our website, along with the test data and gold standard annotations (http://www.ilastik.org/synapse-detection/sstem). PMID:24516550

  5. Self-assembly of silicon nanowires studied by advanced transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Agati, Marta; Amiard, Guillaume; Borgne, Vincent Le; Castrucci, Paola; Dolbec, Richard; De Crescenzi, Maurizio; El Khakani, My Alì

    2017-01-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) was successfully applied to the analysis of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) that were self-assembled during an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) process. The ICP-synthesized SiNWs were found to present a Si–SiO2 core–shell structure and length varying from ≈100 nm to 2–3 μm. The shorter SiNWs (maximum length ≈300 nm) were generally found to possess a nanoparticle at their tip. STEM energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy combined with electron tomography performed on these nanostructures revealed that they contain iron, clearly demonstrating that the short ICP-synthesized SiNWs grew via an iron-catalyzed vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) mechanism within the plasma reactor. Both the STEM tomography and STEM-EDX analysis contributed to gain further insight into the self-assembly process. In the long-term, this approach might be used to optimize the synthesis of VLS-grown SiNWs via ICP as a competitive technique to the well-established bottom-up approaches used for the production of thin SiNWs. PMID:28326234

  6. Mass and molecular composition of vesicular stomatitis virus: a scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D; Newcomb, W W; Brown, J C; Wall, J S; Hainfeld, J F; Trus, B L; Steven, A C

    1985-05-01

    Dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to perform mass analyses of purified vesicular stomatitis virions, pronase-treated virions, and nucleocapsids, leading to a complete self-consistent account of the molecular composition of vesicular stomatitis virus. The masses obtained were 265.6 +/- 13.3 megadaltons (MDa) for the native virion, 197.5 +/- 8.4 MDa for the pronase-treated virion, and 69.4 +/- 4.9 MDa for the nucleocapsid. The reduction in mass effected by pronase treatment, which corresponds to excision of the external domains (spikes) of G protein, leads to an average of 1,205 molecules of G protein per virion. The nucleocapsid mass, after compensation for the RNA (3.7 MDa) and residual amounts of other proteins, yielded a complement of 1,258 copies of N protein. Calibration of the amounts of M, NS, and L proteins relative to N protein by biochemical quantitation yielded values of 1,826, 466, and 50 molecules, respectively, per virion. Assuming that the remaining virion mass is contributed by lipids in the viral envelope, we obtained a value of 56.1 MDa for its lipid content. In addition, four different electron microscopy procedures were applied to determine the nucleocapsid length, which we conclude to be 3.5 to 3.7 micron. The nucleocapsid comprises a strand of repeating units which have a center-to-center spacing of 3.3 nm as measured along the middle of the strand. We show that these repeating units represent monomers of N protein, each of which is associated with 9 +/- 1 bases of single-stranded RNA. From scanning transmission electron microscopy images of negatively stained nucleocapsids, we inferred that N protein has a wedge-shaped, bilobed structure with dimensions of approximately 9.0 nm (length), approximately 5.0 nm (depth), and approximately 3.3 nm (width, at the midpoint of its long axis). In the coiled configuration of the in situ nucleocapsid, the long axis of N protein is directed radially, and its depth corresponds to

  7. Ultrastructural instability of paired helical filaments from corticobasal degeneration as examined by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ksiezak-Reding, H.; Tracz, E.; Yang, L. S.; Dickson, D. W.; Simon, M.; Wall, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    Paired helical filaments (PHFs) accumulate in the brains of subjects affected with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and certain other neurodegenerative disorders, including corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Electron microscope studies have shown that PHFs from CBD differ from those of AD by being wider and having a longer periodicity of the helical twist. Moreover, PHFs from CBD have been shown to be primarily composed of two rather than three highly phosphorylated polypeptides of tau (PHF-tau), with these polypeptides expressing no exons 3 and 10. To further explore the relationship between the heterogeneity of PHF-tau and the appearance of abnormal filaments, the ultrastructure and physical parameters such as mass per unit length and dimensions were compared in filaments from CBD and AD using high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Filament-enriched fractions were isolated as Sarcosyl-insoluble pellets and for STEM studies, samples were freeze-dried without prior fixation or staining. Ultrastructurally, PHFs from CBD were shown to be a heterogeneous population as double- and single-stranded filaments could be identified based on their width and physical mass per unit length expressed in kilodaltons (kd) per nanometer (nm). Less abundant, double-stranded filaments had a maximal width of 29 nm and a mass per unit length of 133 kd/nm, whereas three times more abundant single-stranded filaments were 15 nm wide and bad a mass per unit length of 62 kd/nm. Double-stranded filaments also displayed a distinct axial region of less dense mass, which appeared to divide the PHFs into two protofilament-like strands. Furthermore, these filaments were frequently observed to physically separate along the long axis into two single strands or to break longitudinally. In contrast, PHFs from AD were ultrastructurally stable and uniform both in their width (22 nm) and physical mass per unit length (104 kd/nm). The ultrastructural features indicate that filaments of

  8. Mass and molecular composition of vesicular stomatitis virus: a scanning transmission electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Newcomb, W W; Brown, J C; Wall, J S; Hainfeld, J F; Trus, B L; Steven, A C

    1985-01-01

    Dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to perform mass analyses of purified vesicular stomatitis virions, pronase-treated virions, and nucleocapsids, leading to a complete self-consistent account of the molecular composition of vesicular stomatitis virus. The masses obtained were 265.6 +/- 13.3 megadaltons (MDa) for the native virion, 197.5 +/- 8.4 MDa for the pronase-treated virion, and 69.4 +/- 4.9 MDa for the nucleocapsid. The reduction in mass effected by pronase treatment, which corresponds to excision of the external domains (spikes) of G protein, leads to an average of 1,205 molecules of G protein per virion. The nucleocapsid mass, after compensation for the RNA (3.7 MDa) and residual amounts of other proteins, yielded a complement of 1,258 copies of N protein. Calibration of the amounts of M, NS, and L proteins relative to N protein by biochemical quantitation yielded values of 1,826, 466, and 50 molecules, respectively, per virion. Assuming that the remaining virion mass is contributed by lipids in the viral envelope, we obtained a value of 56.1 MDa for its lipid content. In addition, four different electron microscopy procedures were applied to determine the nucleocapsid length, which we conclude to be 3.5 to 3.7 micron. The nucleocapsid comprises a strand of repeating units which have a center-to-center spacing of 3.3 nm as measured along the middle of the strand. We show that these repeating units represent monomers of N protein, each of which is associated with 9 +/- 1 bases of single-stranded RNA. From scanning transmission electron microscopy images of negatively stained nucleocapsids, we inferred that N protein has a wedge-shaped, bilobed structure with dimensions of approximately 9.0 nm (length), approximately 5.0 nm (depth), and approximately 3.3 nm (width, at the midpoint of its long axis). In the coiled configuration of the in situ nucleocapsid, the long axis of N protein is directed radially, and its depth corresponds to

  9. Observation of ultrahigh-energy electrons by resonance absorption of high-power microwaves in a pulsed plasma.

    PubMed

    Rajyaguru, C; Fuji, T; Ito, H; Yugami, N; Nishida, Y

    2001-07-01

    The interaction of high power microwave with collisionless unmagnetized plasma is studied. Investigation on the generation of superthermal electrons near the critical layer, by the resonance absorption phenomenon, is extended to very high microwave power levels (eta=E(2)(0)/4 pi n(e)kT(e) approximately 0.3). Here E0, n(e), and T(e) are the vacuum electric field, electron density, and electron temperature, respectively. Successive generation of electron bunches having maximum energy of about 2 keV, due to nonlinear wave breaking, is observed. The electron energy epsilon scales as a function of the incident microwave power P, according to epsilon proportional to P0.5 up to 250 kW. The two-dimensional spatial distribution of high energy electrons reveals that they are generated near the critical layer. However, the lower energy component is again produced in the subcritical density region indicating the possibility of other electron heating mechanisms.

  10. Three-dimensional bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy elucidate novel nanostructure in microbial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hickey, William J; Shetty, Ameesha R; Massey, Randall J; Toso, Daniel B; Austin, Jotham

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms play key roles in environmental and biomedical processes, and understanding their activities requires comprehension of their nanoarchitectural characteristics. Electron microscopy (EM) is an essential tool for nanostructural analysis, but conventional EM methods are limited in that they either provide topographical information alone, or are suitable for imaging only relatively thin (<300 nm) sample volumes. For biofilm investigations, these are significant restrictions. Understanding structural relations between cells requires imaging of a sample volume sufficiently large to encompass multiple cells and the capture of both external and internal details of cell structure. An emerging EM technique with such capabilities is bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF-STEM) and in the present report BF-STEM was coupled with tomography to elucidate nanostructure in biofilms formed by the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading soil bacterium, Delftia acidovorans Cs1-4. Dual-axis BF-STEM enabled high-resolution 3-D tomographic recontructions (6-10 nm) visualization of thick (1250 and 1500 nm) sections. The 3-D data revealed that novel extracellular structures, termed nanopods, were polymorphic and formed complex networks within cell clusters. BF-STEM tomography enabled visualization of conduits formed by nanopods that could enable intercellular movement of outer membrane vesicles, and thereby enable direct communication between cells. This report is the first to document application of dual-axis BF-STEM tomography to obtain high-resolution 3-D images of novel nanostructures in bacterial biofilms. Future work with dual-axis BF-STEM tomography combined with correlative light electron microscopy may provide deeper insights into physiological functions associated with nanopods as well as other nanostructures. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy for complex transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing-Hua, Zhang; Dong-Dong, Xiao; Lin, Gu

    2016-06-01

    Lattice, charge, orbital, and spin are the four fundamental degrees of freedom in condensed matter, of which the interactive coupling derives tremendous novel physical phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (high-T c SC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) in strongly correlated electronic system. Direct experimental observation of these freedoms is essential to understanding the structure-property relationship and the physics behind it, and also indispensable for designing new materials and devices. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) integrating multiple techniques of structure imaging and spectrum analysis, is a comprehensive platform for providing structural, chemical and electronic information of materials with a high spatial resolution. Benefiting from the development of aberration correctors, STEM has taken a big breakthrough towards sub-angstrom resolution in last decade and always steps forward to improve the capability of material characterization; many improvements have been achieved in recent years, thereby giving an in-depth insight into material research. Here, we present a brief review of the recent advances of STEM by some representative examples of perovskite transition metal oxides; atomic-scale mapping of ferroelectric polarization, octahedral distortions and rotations, valence state, coordination and spin ordering are presented. We expect that this brief introduction about the current capability of STEM could facilitate the understanding of the relationship between functional properties and these fundamental degrees of freedom in complex oxides. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Project, China (Grant No. 2014CB921002), the Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030200), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51522212 and 51421002).

  12. Composition analysis of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell microporous layer using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Michael G.; Wang, Jian; Banerjee, Rupak; Bazylak, Aimy

    2016-03-01

    The novel application of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) to the microporous layer (MPL) of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell is investigated. A spatially resolved chemical component distribution map is obtained for the MPL of a commercially available SGL 25 BC sample. This is achieved with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic analysis. Prior to analysis the sample is embedded in non-reactive epoxy and ultra-microtomed to a thickness of 100 nm. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), carbon particle agglomerates, and supporting epoxy resin distributions are identified and reconstructed for a scanning area of 6 μm × 6 μm. It is observed that the spatial distribution of PTFE is strongly correlated to the carbon particle agglomerations. Additionally, agglomerate structures of PTFE are identified, possibly indicating the presence of a unique mesostructure in the MPL. STXM analysis is presented as a useful technique for the investigation of chemical species distributions in the MPL.

  13. Operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence for a single electron redox process in copper catalysis

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Qingquan; Zhang, Jian; Peng, Pan; ...

    2015-05-26

    An unprecedented single electron redox process in copper catalysis is confirmed using operando X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopies. The oxidation state of the copper species in the interaction between Cu(II) and a sulfinic acid at room temperature, and the accurate characterization of the formed Cu(I) are clearly shown using operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence. Further investigation of anion effects on Cu(II) discloses that bromine ions can dramatically increase the rate of the redox process. Moreover, it is proven that the sulfinic acids are converted into sulfonyl radicals, which can be trapped by 2-arylacrylic acids and various valuable β-keto sulfonesmore » are synthesized with good to excellent yields under mild conditions.« less

  14. An in-situ analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigation of structure-property relationships in electronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Andrew James

    As electronic and mechanical devices are scaled downward in size and upward in complexity, macroscopic principles no longer apply. Synthesis of three-dimensionally confined structures exhibit quantum confinement effects allowing, for example, silicon nanoparticles to luminesce. The reduction in size of classically brittle materials reveals a ductile-to-brittle transition. Such a transition, attributed to a reduction in defects, increases elasticity. In the case of silicon, elastic deformation can improve electronic carrier mobility by over 50%, a vital attribute of modern integrated circuits. The scalability of such principles and the changing atomistic processes which contribute to them presents a vitally important field of research. Beginning with the direct observation of dislocations and lattice planes in the 1950s, the transmission electron microscope has been a powerful tool in materials science. More recently, as nanoscale technologies have proliferated modern life, their unique ability to spatially resolve nano- and atomic-scale structures has become a critical component of materials research and characterization. Signals produced by an incident beam of high-energy electrons enables researchers to both image and chemically analyze materials at the atomic scale. Coherently and elastically-scattered electrons can be collected to produce atomic-scale images of a crystalline sample. New specimen stages have enabled routine investigation of samples heated up to 1000 °C and cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. MEMS-based transducers allow for sub-nm scale mechanical testing and ultrathin membranes allow study of liquids and gases. Investigation of a myriad of previously "unseeable" processes can now be observed within the TEM, and sometimes something new is found within the old. High-temperature annealing of pure a Si:H films leads to crystallization of the film. Such films provide higher carrier mobility compared to amorphous films, offering improved

  15. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis of cultured myogenic C2C12 cells with scanning and scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tylko, G; Karasiński, J; Wróblewski, R; Roomans, G M; Kilarski, W M

    2000-01-01

    Heterogeneity of the elemental content of myogenic C2C12 cultured cells was studied by electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPXMA) with scanning (SEM EPXMA) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM EPXMA). The best plastic substrate for growing cells was Thermanox. For STEM EPXMA, a Formvar film coated with carbon was found to be suitable substrate. The cells examined by scanning transmission electron microscopy showed great heterogeneity in their elemental content in comparison with the cells examined in the scanning electron microscope despite of an almost identical preparation procedure for EPXMA. Nevertheless the K/Na ratios obtained from both methods of EPXMA were very close (4.1 and 4.3). We conclude that the observed discrepancy in the elemental content obtained by the two methods may be due to differences in instrumentation and this must be taken into account when planning a comparative study.

  16. Correlative scanning-transmission electron microscopy reveals that a chimeric flavivirus is released as individual particles in secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Burlaud-Gaillard, Julien; Sellin, Caroline; Georgeault, Sonia; Uzbekov, Rustem; Lebos, Claude; Guillaume, Jean-Marc; Roingeard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular morphogenesis of flaviviruses has been well described, but flavivirus release from the host cell remains poorly documented. We took advantage of the optimized production of an attenuated chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus for vaccine purposes to study this phenomenon by microscopic approaches. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the release of numerous viral particles at the cell surface through a short-lived process. For transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the intracellular ultrastructure of the small number of cells releasing viral particles at a given time, we developed a new correlative microscopy method: CSEMTEM (for correlative scanning electron microscopy - transmission electron microscopy). CSEMTEM analysis suggested that chimeric flavivirus particles were released as individual particles, in small exocytosis vesicles, via a regulated secretory pathway. Our morphological findings provide new insight into interactions between flaviviruses and cells and demonstrate that CSEMTEM is a useful new method, complementary to SEM observations of biological events by intracellular TEM investigations.

  17. Correlative Scanning-Transmission Electron Microscopy Reveals that a Chimeric Flavivirus Is Released as Individual Particles in Secretory Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Burlaud-Gaillard, Julien; Sellin, Caroline; Georgeault, Sonia; Uzbekov, Rustem; Lebos, Claude; Guillaume, Jean-Marc; Roingeard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular morphogenesis of flaviviruses has been well described, but flavivirus release from the host cell remains poorly documented. We took advantage of the optimized production of an attenuated chimeric yellow fever/dengue virus for vaccine purposes to study this phenomenon by microscopic approaches. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the release of numerous viral particles at the cell surface through a short-lived process. For transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of the intracellular ultrastructure of the small number of cells releasing viral particles at a given time, we developed a new correlative microscopy method: CSEMTEM (for correlative scanning electron microscopy - transmission electron microscopy). CSEMTEM analysis suggested that chimeric flavivirus particles were released as individual particles, in small exocytosis vesicles, via a regulated secretory pathway. Our morphological findings provide new insight into interactions between flaviviruses and cells and demonstrate that CSEMTEM is a useful new method, complementary to SEM observations of biological events by intracellular TEM investigations. PMID:24681578

  18. Indium hydroxide to oxide decomposition observed in one nanocrystal during in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miehe, Gerhard; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim

    The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) is used to study, in situ, spatially resolved decomposition in individual nanocrystals of metal hydroxides and oxyhydroxides. This case study reports on the decomposition of indium hydroxide (c-In(OH){sub 3}) to bixbyite-type indium oxide (c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The electron beam is focused onto a single cube-shaped In(OH){sub 3} crystal of {l_brace}100{r_brace} morphology with ca. 35 nm edge length and a sequence of HR-TEM images was recorded during electron beam irradiation. The frame-by-frame analysis of video sequences allows for the in situ, time-resolved observation of the shape and orientation of the transformed crystals, which in turnmore » enables the evaluation of the kinetics of c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystallization. Supplementary material (video of the transformation) related to this article can be found online at (10.1016/j.jssc.2012.09.022). After irradiation the shape of the parent cube-shaped crystal is preserved, however, its linear dimension (edge) is reduced by the factor 1.20. The corresponding spotted selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern representing zone [001] of c-In(OH){sub 3} is transformed to a diffuse strongly textured ring-like pattern of c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} that indicates the transformed cube is no longer a single crystal but is disintegrated into individual c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} domains with the size of about 5-10 nm. The induction time of approximately 15 s is estimated from the time-resolved Fourier transforms. The volume fraction of the transformed phase (c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3}), calculated from the shrinkage of the parent c-In(OH){sub 3} crystal in the recorded HR-TEM images, is used as a measure of the kinetics of c-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystallization within the framework of Avrami-Erofeev formalism. The Avrami exponent of {approx}3 is characteristic for a reaction mechanism with fast nucleation at the beginning of the reaction and subsequent three

  19. The core contribution of transmission electron microscopy to functional nanomaterials engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carenco, Sophie; Moldovan, Simona; Roiban, Lucian; Florea, Ileana; Portehault, David; Vallé, Karine; Belleville, Philippe; Boissière, Cédric; Rozes, Laurence; Mézailles, Nicolas; Drillon, Marc; Sanchez, Clément; Ersen, Ovidiu

    2016-01-01

    Research on nanomaterials and nanostructured materials is burgeoning because their numerous and versatile applications contribute to solve societal needs in the domain of medicine, energy, environment and STICs. Optimizing their properties requires in-depth analysis of their structural, morphological and chemical features at the nanoscale. In a transmission electron microscope (TEM), combining tomography with electron energy loss spectroscopy and high-magnification imaging in high-angle annular dark-field mode provides access to all features of the same object. Today, TEM experiments in three dimensions are paramount to solve tough structural problems associated with nanoscale matter. This approach allowed a thorough morphological description of silica fibers. Moreover, quantitative analysis of the mesoporous network of binary metal oxide prepared by template-assisted spray-drying was performed, and the homogeneity of amino functionalized metal-organic frameworks was assessed. Besides, the morphology and internal structure of metal phosphide nanoparticles was deciphered, providing a milestone for understanding phase segregation at the nanoscale. By extrapolating to larger classes of materials, from soft matter to hard metals and/or ceramics, this approach allows probing small volumes and uncovering materials characteristics and properties at two or three dimensions. Altogether, this feature article aims at providing (nano)materials scientists with a representative set of examples that illustrates the capabilities of modern TEM and tomography, which can be transposed to their own research.Research on nanomaterials and nanostructured materials is burgeoning because their numerous and versatile applications contribute to solve societal needs in the domain of medicine, energy, environment and STICs. Optimizing their properties requires in-depth analysis of their structural, morphological and chemical features at the nanoscale. In a transmission electron microscope (TEM

  20. An efficient and accurate technique to compute the absorption, emission, and transmission of radiation by the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Bernhard Lee; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Pollack, James B.

    1990-01-01

    CO2 comprises 95 pct. of the composition of the Martian atmosphere. However, the Martian atmosphere also has a high aerosol content. Dust particles vary from less than 0.2 to greater than 3.0. CO2 is an active absorber and emitter in near IR and IR wavelengths; the near IR absorption bands of CO2 provide significant heating of the atmosphere, and the 15 micron band provides rapid cooling. Including both CO2 and aerosol radiative transfer simultaneously in a model is difficult. Aerosol radiative transfer requires a multiple scattering code, while CO2 radiative transfer must deal with complex wavelength structure. As an alternative to the pure atmosphere treatment in most models which causes inaccuracies, a treatment was developed called the exponential sum or k distribution approximation. The chief advantage of the exponential sum approach is that the integration over k space of f(k) can be computed more quickly than the integration of k sub upsilon over frequency. The exponential sum approach is superior to the photon path distribution and emissivity techniques for dusty conditions. This study was the first application of the exponential sum approach to Martian conditions.