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Sample records for absorptive partitioning theory

  1. Equilibrium absorptive partitioning theory between multiple aerosol particle modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooks, Matthew; Connolly, Paul; Topping, David; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-10-01

    An existing equilibrium absorptive partitioning model for calculating the equilibrium gas and particle concentrations of multiple semi-volatile organics within a bulk aerosol is extended to allow for multiple involatile aerosol modes of different sizes and chemical compositions. In the bulk aerosol problem, the partitioning coefficient determines the fraction of the total concentration of semi-volatile material that is in the condensed phase of the aerosol. This work modifies this definition for multiple polydisperse aerosol modes to account for multiple condensed concentrations, one for each semi-volatile on each involatile aerosol mode. The pivotal assumption in this work is that each aerosol mode contains an involatile constituent, thus overcoming the potential problem of smaller particles evaporating completely and then condensing on the larger particles to create a monodisperse aerosol at equilibrium. A parameterisation is proposed in which the coupled non-linear system of equations is approximated by a simpler set of equations obtained by setting the organic mole fraction in the partitioning coefficient to be the same across all modes. By perturbing the condensed masses about this approximate solution a correction term is derived that accounts for many of the removed complexities. This method offers a greatly increased efficiency in calculating the solution without significant loss in accuracy, thus making it suitable for inclusion in large-scale models.

  2. Partition Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, Adam

    2012-02-01

    Partition Density Functional Theory (PDFT) is a formally exact method for obtaining molecular properties from self-consistent calculations on isolated fragments [1,2]. For a given choice of fragmentation, PDFT outputs the (in principle exact) molecular energy and density, as well as fragment densities that sum to the correct molecular density. I describe our progress understanding the behavior of the fragment energies as a function of fragment occupations, derivative discontinuities, practical implementation, and applications of PDFT to small molecules. I also discuss implications for ground-state Density Functional Theory, such as the promise of PDFT to circumvent the delocalization error of approximate density functionals. [4pt] [1] M.H. Cohen and A. Wasserman, J. Phys. Chem. A, 111, 2229(2007).[0pt] [2] P. Elliott, K. Burke, M.H. Cohen, and A. Wasserman, Phys. Rev. A 82, 024501 (2010).

  3. Exact partition functions for gauge theories on Rλ3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallet, Jean-Christophe

    2016-11-01

    The noncommutative space Rλ3, a deformation of R3, supports a 3-parameter family of gauge theory models with gauge-invariant harmonic term, stable vacuum and which are perturbatively finite to all orders. Properties of this family are discussed. The partition function factorizes as an infinite product of reduced partition functions, each one corresponding to the reduced gauge theory on one of the fuzzy spheres entering the decomposition of Rλ3. For a particular sub-family of gauge theories, each reduced partition function is exactly expressible as a ratio of determinants. A relation with integrable 2-D Toda lattice hierarchy is indicated.

  4. Theory of graphene saturable absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, A.; Cox, J. D.; García de Abajo, F. J.

    2017-03-01

    Saturable absorption is a nonperturbative nonlinear optical phenomenon that plays a pivotal role in the generation of ultrafast light pulses. Here we show that this effect emerges in graphene at unprecedentedly low light intensities, thus opening avenues to new nonlinear physics and applications in optical technology. Specifically, we theoretically investigate saturable absorption in extended graphene by developing a semianalytical nonperturbative single-particle approach, describing electron dynamics in the atomically-thin material using the two-dimensional Dirac equation for massless Dirac fermions, which is recast in the form of generalized Bloch equations. By solving the electron dynamics nonperturbatively, we account for both interband and intraband contributions to the intensity-dependent saturated conductivity and conclude that the former dominates regardless of the intrinsic doping state of the material. We obtain results in qualitative agreement with atomistic quantum-mechanical simulations of graphene nanoribbons including electron-electron interactions, finite-size, and higher-band effects. Remarkably, such effects are found to affect mainly the linear absorption, while the predicted saturation intensities are in good quantitative agreement in the limit of extended graphene. Additionally, we find that the modulation depth of saturable absorption in graphene can be electrically manipulated through an externally applied gate voltage. Our results are relevant for the development of graphene-based optoelectronic devices, as well as for applications in mode-locking and random lasers.

  5. Dualities and Curved Space Partition Functions of Supersymmetric Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Prarit

    In this dissertation we discuss some conjectured dualities in supersymmetric field theories and provide non-trivial checks for these conjectures. A quick review of supersymmetry and related topics is provided in chapter 1. In chapter 2, we develop a method to identify the so called BPS states in the Hilbert space of a supersymmetric field theory (that preserves at least two real supercharges) on a generic curved space. As an application we obtain the superconformal index (SCI) of 4d theories. The large N SCI of quiver gauge theories has been previously noticed to factorize over the set of extremal BPS mesonic operators. In chapter 3, we reformulate this factorization in terms of the zigzag paths in the dimer model associated to the quiver and extend the factorization theorem of the index to include theories obtained from D-branes probing orbifold singularities. In chapter 4, we consider the dualities in two classes of 3 dimensional theories. The first class consist of dualities of certain necklace type Chern-Simons (CS) quiver gauge theories. A non trivial check of these dualities is provided by matching their squashed sphere partition functions. The second class consists of theories whose duals are described by a collection of free fields. In such cases, due to mixing between the superconformal R-symmetry and accidental symmetries, the matching of electric and magnetic partition functions is not straightforward. We provide a prescription to rectify this mismatch. In chapter 5, we consider some the N = 1 4d theories with orthogonal and symplectic gauge groups, arising from N = 1 preserving reduction of 6d theories on a Riemann surface. This construction allows us to dual descriptions of 4d theories. Some of the dual frames have no known Lagrangian description. We check the dualities by computing the anomaly coefficients and the superconformal indices. We also give a prescription to write the index of the theory obtained by reduction of 6d theories on a three

  6. Methamphetamine absorption by skin lipids: accumulated mass, partition coefficients, and the influence of fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Parker, K; Morrison, G

    2016-08-01

    Occupants of former methamphetamine laboratories, often residences, may experience increased exposure through the accumulation of the methamphetamine in the organic films that coat skin and indoor surfaces. The objectives of this study were to determine equilibrium partition coefficients of vapor-phase methamphetamine with artificial sebum (AS-1), artificial sebum without fatty acids (AS-2), and real skin surface films, herein called skin oils. Sebum and skin oil-coated filters were exposed to vapor-phase methamphetamine at concentrations ranging from 8 to 159 ppb, and samples were analyzed for exposure time periods from 2 h to 60 days. For a low vapor-phase methamphetamine concentration range of ~8-22 ppb, the equilibrium partition coefficient for AS-1 was 1500 ± 195 μg/g/ppb. For a high concentration range of 98-112 ppb, the partition coefficient was lower, 459 ± 80 μg/g/ppb, suggesting saturation of the available absorption capacity. The low partition coefficient for AS-2 (33 ± 6 μg/g/ppb) suggests that the fatty acids in AS-1 and skin oil are responsible for much high partition coefficients. We predict that the methamphetamine concentration in skin lipids coating indoor surfaces can exceed recommended surface remediation standards even for air concentrations well below 1 ppb.

  7. Energy-partition diagnostic for measuring time-resolved scattering and absorption in burst-mode laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Z; Schoenly, J E; Covarrubias, A; Lilge, L; Marjoribanks, R S

    2014-03-01

    We describe an energy-partition diagnostic based on integrating sphere principle for measuring absorption and scattering in plasma-mediated ablation by a high repetition-rate (133 MHz), pulsetrain-burst ultrafast-pulse laser. The system time-resolves the partition of elastically scattered laser light into specular reflection, diffuse reflection, and transmission, giving access to per-pulse absorption dynamics. Physical events such as optical breakdown and incubation effects in glass and aluminum are illustrated.

  8. Energy-partition diagnostic for measuring time-resolved scattering and absorption in burst-mode laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Z.; Schoenly, J. E.; Covarrubias, A.; Lilge, L.; Marjoribanks, R. S.

    2014-03-01

    We describe an energy-partition diagnostic based on integrating sphere principle for measuring absorption and scattering in plasma-mediated ablation by a high repetition-rate (133 MHz), pulsetrain-burst ultrafast-pulse laser. The system time-resolves the partition of elastically scattered laser light into specular reflection, diffuse reflection, and transmission, giving access to per-pulse absorption dynamics. Physical events such as optical breakdown and incubation effects in glass and aluminum are illustrated.

  9. Short Pulse Laser Absorption and Energy Partition at Relativistic Laser Intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R; Chen, H; Ping, Y; Dyer, G; Wilks, S; Chung, H; Kemp, A; Hanson, S; Widmann, K; Fournier, K; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T; Niles, A; Beiersdorfer, P

    2007-02-27

    We have performed experiments at the COMET and Calisto short pulse laser facilities to make the first comprehensive measurements of the laser absorption and energy partition in solid targets heated with an ultrashort laser pulse focused to relativistic laser intensities (>10 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}). The measurements show an exceedingly high absorption for P polarized laser-target interactions above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Additionally, the hot electron population is observed to markedly increase at the same intensity range. An investigation of the relaxation process was initiated u using time sing time-resolved K{sub {alpha}} spectroscopy. Measurements of the time time-resolved K{sub {alpha}} radiation suggest a 10-20 ps relativistic electron relaxation time. However modeling difficulties of these data are apparent and a more detailed investigation on this subject matter is warranted.

  10. Theory of absorption-induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, Sergio G.; García-Vidal, F. J.; Martín-Moreno, L.

    2013-10-01

    Recent experiments [Hutchison, O’Carroll, Schwartz, Genet, and Ebbesen, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.1433-785110.1002/anie.201006019 50, 2085 (2011)] have demonstrated that optical transmission through an array of subwavelength holes in a metal film can be enhanced by the intentional presence of dyes in the system. As the transmission maximum occurs spectrally close to the absorption resonances of the dyes, this phenomenon was christened “absorption induced transparency”. Here, a theoretical study on absorption induced transparency is presented. The results show that the appearance of transmission maxima requires that the absorbent fills the holes and that it occurs also for single holes. Furthermore, it is shown that the transmission process is nonresonant, being composed by a sequential passage of the electromagnetic field through the hole. Finally, the physical origin of the phenomenon is demonstrated to be nonplasmonic, which implies that absorption induced transparency should also occur at the infrared or terahertz frequency regimes.

  11. Generalized Møller-Plesset Partitioning in Multiconfiguration Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masato; Szabados, Ágnes; Nakai, Hiromi; Surján, Péter R

    2010-07-13

    Two perturbation (PT) theories are developed starting from a multiconfiguration (MC) zero-order function. To span the configuration space, the theories employ biorthogonal vector sets introduced in the MCPT framework. At odds with previous formulations, the present construction operates with the full Fockian corresponding to a principal determinant, giving rise to a nondiagonal matrix of the zero-order resolvent. The theories provide a simple, generalized Møller-Plesset (MP) second-order correction to improve any reference function, corresponding either to a complete or incomplete model space. Computational demand of the procedure is determined by the iterative inversion of the Fockian, similarly to the single reference MP theory calculated in a localized basis. Relation of the theory to existing multireference (MR) PT formalisms is discussed. The performance of the present theories is assessed by adopting the antisymmetric product of strongly orthogonal geminal (APSG) wave functions as the reference function.

  12. Conformal Orbifold Partition Functions from Topologically Massive Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelo Ferreira, Pedro; Kogan, Ian I.; Szabo, Richard J.

    2002-04-01

    We continue the development of the topological membrane approach to open and unoriented string theories. We study orbifolds of topologically massive gauge theory defined on the geometry [0,1] × Σ, where Σ is a generic compact Riemann surface. The orbifold operations are constructed by gauging the discrete symmetries of the bulk three-dimensional field theory. Multi-loop bosonic string vacuum amplitudes are thereby computed as bulk correlation functions of the gauge theory. It is shown that the three-dimensional correlators naturally reproduce twisted and untwisted sectors in the case of closed worldsheet orbifolds, and Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions in the case of open ones. The bulk wavefunctions are used to explicitly construct the characters of the underlying extended Kac-Moody group for arbitrary genus. The correlators for both the original theory and its orbifolds give the expected modular invariant statistical sums over the characters.

  13. Convergence behavior of multireference perturbation theory: Forced degeneracy and optimization partitioning applied to the beryllium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finley, James P.; Chaudhuri, Rajat K.; Freed, Karl F.

    1996-07-01

    High-order multireference perturbation theory is applied to the 1S states of the beryllium atom using a reference (model) space composed of the \\|1s22s2> and the \\|1s22p2> configuration-state functions (CSF's), a system that is known to yield divergent expansions using Mo/ller-Plesset and Epstein-Nesbet partitioning methods. Computations of the eigenvalues are made through 40th order using forced degeneracy (FD) partitioning and the recently introduced optimization (OPT) partitioning. The former forces the 2s and 2p orbitals to be degenerate in zeroth order, while the latter chooses optimal zeroth-order energies of the (few) most important states. Our methodology employs simple models for understanding and suggesting remedies for unsuitable choices of reference spaces and partitioning methods. By examining a two-state model composed of only the \\|1s22p2> and \\|1s22s3s> states of the beryllium atom, it is demonstrated that the full computation with 1323 CSF's can converge only if the zeroth-order energy of the \\|1s22s3s> Rydberg state from the orthogonal space lies below the zeroth-order energy of the \\|1s22p2> CSF from the reference space. Thus convergence in this case requires a zeroth-order spectral overlap between the orthogonal and reference spaces. The FD partitioning is not capable of generating this type of spectral overlap and thus yields a divergent expansion. However, the expansion is actually asymptotically convergent, with divergent behavior not displayed until the 11th order because the \\|1s22s3s> Rydberg state is only weakly coupled with the \\|1s22p2> CSF and because these states are energetically well separated in zeroth order. The OPT partitioning chooses the correct zeroth-order energy ordering and thus yields a convergent expansion that is also very accurate in low orders compared to the exact solution within the basis.

  14. Spatial assignment of symmetry adapted perturbation theory interaction energy components: The atomic SAPT partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, Robert M.; Sherrill, C. David

    2014-07-01

    We develop a physically-motivated assignment of symmetry adapted perturbation theory for intermolecular interactions (SAPT) into atom-pairwise contributions (the A-SAPT partition). The basic precept of A-SAPT is that the many-body interaction energy components are computed normally under the formalism of SAPT, following which a spatially-localized two-body quasiparticle interaction is extracted from the many-body interaction terms. For electrostatics and induction source terms, the relevant quasiparticles are atoms, which are obtained in this work through the iterative stockholder analysis (ISA) procedure. For the exchange, induction response, and dispersion terms, the relevant quasiparticles are local occupied orbitals, which are obtained in this work through the Pipek-Mezey procedure. The local orbital atomic charges obtained from ISA additionally allow the terms involving local orbitals to be assigned in an atom-pairwise manner. Further summation over the atoms of one or the other monomer allows for a chemically intuitive visualization of the contribution of each atom and interaction component to the overall noncovalent interaction strength. Herein, we present the intuitive development and mathematical form for A-SAPT applied in the SAPT0 approximation (the A-SAPT0 partition). We also provide an efficient series of algorithms for the computation of the A-SAPT0 partition with essentially the same computational cost as the corresponding SAPT0 decomposition. We probe the sensitivity of the A-SAPT0 partition to the ISA grid and convergence parameter, orbital localization metric, and induction coupling treatment, and recommend a set of practical choices which closes the definition of the A-SAPT0 partition. We demonstrate the utility and computational tractability of the A-SAPT0 partition in the context of side-on cation-π interactions and the intercalation of DNA by proflavine. A-SAPT0 clearly shows the key processes in these complicated noncovalent interactions, in

  15. Spatial assignment of symmetry adapted perturbation theory interaction energy components: The atomic SAPT partition

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, Robert M.; Sherrill, C. David

    2014-07-28

    We develop a physically-motivated assignment of symmetry adapted perturbation theory for intermolecular interactions (SAPT) into atom-pairwise contributions (the A-SAPT partition). The basic precept of A-SAPT is that the many-body interaction energy components are computed normally under the formalism of SAPT, following which a spatially-localized two-body quasiparticle interaction is extracted from the many-body interaction terms. For electrostatics and induction source terms, the relevant quasiparticles are atoms, which are obtained in this work through the iterative stockholder analysis (ISA) procedure. For the exchange, induction response, and dispersion terms, the relevant quasiparticles are local occupied orbitals, which are obtained in this work through the Pipek-Mezey procedure. The local orbital atomic charges obtained from ISA additionally allow the terms involving local orbitals to be assigned in an atom-pairwise manner. Further summation over the atoms of one or the other monomer allows for a chemically intuitive visualization of the contribution of each atom and interaction component to the overall noncovalent interaction strength. Herein, we present the intuitive development and mathematical form for A-SAPT applied in the SAPT0 approximation (the A-SAPT0 partition). We also provide an efficient series of algorithms for the computation of the A-SAPT0 partition with essentially the same computational cost as the corresponding SAPT0 decomposition. We probe the sensitivity of the A-SAPT0 partition to the ISA grid and convergence parameter, orbital localization metric, and induction coupling treatment, and recommend a set of practical choices which closes the definition of the A-SAPT0 partition. We demonstrate the utility and computational tractability of the A-SAPT0 partition in the context of side-on cation-π interactions and the intercalation of DNA by proflavine. A-SAPT0 clearly shows the key processes in these complicated noncovalent interactions, in

  16. Spatial assignment of symmetry adapted perturbation theory interaction energy components: The atomic SAPT partition.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Robert M; Sherrill, C David

    2014-07-28

    We develop a physically-motivated assignment of symmetry adapted perturbation theory for intermolecular interactions (SAPT) into atom-pairwise contributions (the A-SAPT partition). The basic precept of A-SAPT is that the many-body interaction energy components are computed normally under the formalism of SAPT, following which a spatially-localized two-body quasiparticle interaction is extracted from the many-body interaction terms. For electrostatics and induction source terms, the relevant quasiparticles are atoms, which are obtained in this work through the iterative stockholder analysis (ISA) procedure. For the exchange, induction response, and dispersion terms, the relevant quasiparticles are local occupied orbitals, which are obtained in this work through the Pipek-Mezey procedure. The local orbital atomic charges obtained from ISA additionally allow the terms involving local orbitals to be assigned in an atom-pairwise manner. Further summation over the atoms of one or the other monomer allows for a chemically intuitive visualization of the contribution of each atom and interaction component to the overall noncovalent interaction strength. Herein, we present the intuitive development and mathematical form for A-SAPT applied in the SAPT0 approximation (the A-SAPT0 partition). We also provide an efficient series of algorithms for the computation of the A-SAPT0 partition with essentially the same computational cost as the corresponding SAPT0 decomposition. We probe the sensitivity of the A-SAPT0 partition to the ISA grid and convergence parameter, orbital localization metric, and induction coupling treatment, and recommend a set of practical choices which closes the definition of the A-SAPT0 partition. We demonstrate the utility and computational tractability of the A-SAPT0 partition in the context of side-on cation-π interactions and the intercalation of DNA by proflavine. A-SAPT0 clearly shows the key processes in these complicated noncovalent interactions, in

  17. Theory of partitioning of disease prevalence and mortality in observational data.

    PubMed

    Akushevich, I; Yashkin, A P; Kravchenko, J; Fang, F; Arbeev, K; Sloan, F; Yashin, A I

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we present a new theory of partitioning of disease prevalence and incidence-based mortality and demonstrate how this theory practically works for analyses of Medicare data. In the theory, the prevalence of a disease and incidence-based mortality are modeled in terms of disease incidence and survival after diagnosis supplemented by information on disease prevalence at the initial age and year available in a dataset. Partitioning of the trends of prevalence and mortality is calculated with minimal assumptions. The resulting expressions for the components of the trends are given by continuous functions of data. The estimator is consistent and stable. The developed methodology is applied for data on type 2 diabetes using individual records from a nationally representative 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries age 65+. Numerical estimates show excellent concordance between empirical estimates and theoretical predictions. Evaluated partitioning model showed that both prevalence and mortality increase with time. The primary driving factors of the observed prevalence increase are improved survival and increased prevalence at age 65. The increase in diabetes-related mortality is driven by increased prevalence and unobserved trends in time-periods and age-groups outside of the range of the data used in the study. Finally, the properties of the new estimator, possible statistical and systematical uncertainties, and future practical applications of this methodology in epidemiology, demography, public health and health forecasting are discussed.

  18. Geometric model from microscopic theory for nuclear absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    John, Sarah; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    A parameter-free geometric model for nuclear absorption is derived herein from microscopic theory. The expression for the absorption cross section in the eikonal approximation, taken in integral form, is separated into a geometric contribution that is described by an energy-dependent effective radius and two surface terms that cancel in an asymptotic series expansion. For collisions of light nuclei, an expression for the effective radius is derived from harmonic oscillator nuclear density functions. A direct extension to heavy nuclei with Woods-Saxon densities is made by identifying the equivalent half-density radius for the harmonic oscillator functions. Coulomb corrections are incorporated, and a simplified geometric form of the Bradt-Peters type is obtained. Results spanning the energy range from 1 MeV/nucleon to 1 GeV/nucleon are presented. Good agreement with experimental results is obtained.

  19. Determination of time-dependent partition coefficients for several pesticides using diffusion theory.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Fabrice G; Leeds-Harrison, Peter B; Brown, Colin D; van Beinum, Wendy

    2004-12-01

    Diffusion-retarded partitioning of pesticides with aggregated soils results in a time-dependent partition coefficient (Kd') which is different at equilibrium from the partition coefficient derived from conventional 24-h batch studies (Kd) measured on dispersed soil. An experiment was undertaken to determine the importance of Kd' for the prediction of pesticide concentrations in solutions bathing artificial soil aggregates and to determine whether diffusion theory could accurately predict the concentrations. Two clay soils were mixed with polyacrylamide to create artificial aggregates of 0.8, 1.4 and 1.7 cm diameter when dry. After saturation, the aggregates were immersed in solutions containing isoproturon or a mixture of isoproturon, chlorotoluron and triasulfuron. The decline with time of the pesticide concentrations in the bathing solution was monitored and the results were compared with predictions from a diffusion-based model. The effective diffusion coefficients of the compounds were obtained by either fitting the non-linear diffusion model to the data (D(ef)) or by independent calculations based on the properties of the compounds and of the aggregates (D(ec)). The diffusion model was able to predict the temporal variation in pesticide concentrations in the bathing solution reasonably well whether D(ef) or D(ec) values were used. However, equilibrium concentrations in solution were sometimes overestimated due to increased sorption with time at the particle scale. Overall, the ratio between D(ef) and D(ec) ranged from 0.23 to 0.95 which was a reasonable variation when compared to the range of aggregate sizes used in the experiments and of the Kd values of the compounds.

  20. Octanol-Water Partition Coefficient from 3D-RISM-KH Molecular Theory of Solvation with Partial Molar Volume Correction.

    PubMed

    Huang, WenJuan; Blinov, Nikolay; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2015-04-30

    The octanol-water partition coefficient is an important physical-chemical characteristic widely used to describe hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties of chemical compounds. The partition coefficient is related to the transfer free energy of a compound from water to octanol. Here, we introduce a new protocol for prediction of the partition coefficient based on the statistical-mechanical, 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation. It was shown recently that with the compound-solvent correlation functions obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation, the free energy functional supplemented with the correction linearly related to the partial molar volume obtained from the Kirkwood-Buff/3D-RISM theory, also called the "universal correction" (UC), provides accurate prediction of the hydration free energy of small compounds, compared to explicit solvent molecular dynamics [ Palmer , D. S. ; J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 2010 , 22 , 492101 ]. Here we report that with the UC reparametrized accordingly this theory also provides an excellent agreement with the experimental data for the solvation free energy in nonpolar solvent (1-octanol) and so accurately predicts the octanol-water partition coefficient. The performance of the Kovalenko-Hirata (KH) and Gaussian fluctuation (GF) functionals of the solvation free energy, with and without UC, is tested on a large library of small compounds with diverse functional groups. The best agreement with the experimental data for octanol-water partition coefficients is obtained with the KH-UC solvation free energy functional.

  1. Current density partitioning in time-dependent current density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mosquera, Martín A.; Wasserman, Adam

    2014-05-14

    We adapt time-dependent current density functional theory to allow for a fragment-based solution of the many-electron problem of molecules in the presence of time-dependent electric and magnetic fields. Regarding a molecule as a set of non-interacting subsystems that individually evolve under the influence of an auxiliary external electromagnetic vector-scalar potential pair, the partition 4-potential, we show that there are one-to-one mappings between this auxiliary potential, a sharply-defined set of fragment current densities, and the total current density of the system. The partition electromagnetic (EM) 4-potential is expressed in terms of the real EM 4-potential of the system and a gluing EM 4-potential that accounts for exchange-correlation effects and mutual interaction forces between fragments that are required to yield the correct electron dynamics. We prove the zero-force theorem for the fragmented system, establish a variational formulation in terms of action functionals, and provide a simple illustration for a charged particle in a ring.

  2. [Effect of fertilization on the absorption, partition and accumulation of carbon and nitrogen of rice under the equal N conditions].

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Tong, Cheng-Li; Shi, Hui; Wu, Jin-Shui; Li, Yong; Huang, Tie-Ping; Xia, Hai-Ao

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the assimilation, partition and accumulation of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N), as well as the relationship between C and N accumulation of rice, were studied from typical paddy ecosystems under long-term fertilizer applications with equal N inputs in subtropical China. The results showed that chemical fertilizer plus low organic manure (LOM) could promote effectively the distribution of C in the rice plant. The N content in the stem-leaf and grain of rice under organic-inorganic fertilization was 8.9-10.2 g x kg(-1) and 11.9-14.8 g x kg(-1) respectively. It was much higher than under other treatments, with about 13% - 53% and 9% - 19% higher than under the chemical fertilization (NPK), separately and 12% - 77% and 23% - 32% higher than under the control treatment (CK), respectively. The C and N storages of rice were mainly accumulated in the aboveground part. Organic-inorganic fertilization treatment possessed higher storages of C (3467.8-4 323.9 kg x hm(-2)) and N (120.3-135.2 kg x hm(-2)) in the rice grain,which was about 13% - 23% of C and 26% - 45% of N higher than under NPK treatment. It indicated that rice grain was the main sink of C and N. The organic-inorganic fertilization was in favor of C accumulation and N absorption in the rice plant and it still possesses an obvious potential in C and N sequestration and absorption in subtropical paddy field.

  3. Chemical Assignment of Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory Interaction Energy Components: The Functional-Group SAPT Partition.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Robert M; Parker, Trent M; Sherrill, C David

    2014-10-14

    Recently, we introduced an effective atom-pairwise partition of the many-body symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) interaction energy decomposition, producing a method known as atomic SAPT (A-SAPT) [Parrish, R. M.; Sherrill, C. D. J. Chem. Phys. 2014, 141, 044115]. A-SAPT provides ab initio atom-pair potentials for force field development and also automatic visualizations of the spatial contributions of noncovalent interactions, but often has difficulty producing chemically useful partitions of the electrostatic energy, due to the buildup of oscillating partial charges on adjacent functional groups. In this work, we substitute chemical functional groups in place of atoms as the relevant local quasiparticles in the partition, resulting in a functional-group-pairwise partition denoted as functional-group SAPT (F-SAPT). F-SAPT assigns integral sets of local occupied electronic orbitals and protons to chemical functional groups and linking σ bonds. Link-bond contributions can be further assigned to chemical functional groups to simplify the analysis. This approach yields a SAPT partition between pairs of functional groups with integral charge (usually neutral), preventing oscillations in the electrostatic partition. F-SAPT qualitatively matches chemical intuition and the cut-and-cap fragmentation technique but additionally yields the quantitative many-body SAPT interaction energy. The conceptual simplicity, chemical utility, and computational efficiency of F-SAPT is demonstrated in the context of phenol dimer, proflavine(+)-DNA intercalation, and a cucurbituril host-guest inclusion complex.

  4. Ergodic theory and visualization. I. Mesochronic plots for visualization of ergodic partition and invariant sets.

    PubMed

    Levnajić, Zoran; Mezić, Igor

    2010-09-01

    We present a computational study of a visualization method for invariant sets based on ergodic partition theory, first proposed by Mezić (Ph.D. thesis, Caltech, 1994) and Mezić and Wiggins [Chaos 9, 213 (1999)]. The algorithms for computation of the time averages of observables on phase space are developed and used to provide an approximation of the ergodic partition of the phase space. We term the graphical representation of this approximation--based on time averages of observables--a mesochronic plot (from Greek: meso--mean, chronos--time). The method is useful for identifying low-dimensional projections (e.g., two-dimensional slices) of invariant structures in phase spaces of dimensionality bigger than two. We also introduce the concept of the ergodic quotient space, obtained by assigning a point to every ergodic set, and provide an embedding method whose graphical representation we call the mesochronic scatter plot. We use the Chirikov standard map as a well-known and dynamically rich example in order to illustrate the implementation of our methods. In addition, we expose applications to other higher dimensional maps such as the Froéschle map for which we utilize our methods to analyze merging of resonances and, the three-dimensional extended standard map for which we study the conjecture on its ergodicity [I. Mezić, Physica D 154, 51 (2001)]. We extend the study in our next paper [Z. Levnajić and I. Mezić, e-print arXiv:0808.2182] by investigating the visualization of periodic sets using harmonic time averages. Both of these methods are related to eigenspace structure of the Koopman operator [I. Mezić and A. Banaszuk, Physica D 197, 101 (2004)].

  5. Ergodic theory and visualization. I. Mesochronic plots for visualization of ergodic partition and invariant sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levnajić, Zoran; Mezić, Igor

    2010-09-01

    We present a computational study of a visualization method for invariant sets based on ergodic partition theory, first proposed by Mezić (Ph.D. thesis, Caltech, 1994) and Mezić and Wiggins [Chaos 9, 213 (1999)]. The algorithms for computation of the time averages of observables on phase space are developed and used to provide an approximation of the ergodic partition of the phase space. We term the graphical representation of this approximation—based on time averages of observables—a mesochronic plot (from Greek: meso—mean, chronos—time). The method is useful for identifying low-dimensional projections (e.g., two-dimensional slices) of invariant structures in phase spaces of dimensionality bigger than two. We also introduce the concept of the ergodic quotient space, obtained by assigning a point to every ergodic set, and provide an embedding method whose graphical representation we call the mesochronic scatter plot. We use the Chirikov standard map as a well-known and dynamically rich example in order to illustrate the implementation of our methods. In addition, we expose applications to other higher dimensional maps such as the Froéschle map for which we utilize our methods to analyze merging of resonances and, the three-dimensional extended standard map for which we study the conjecture on its ergodicity [I. Mezić, Physica D 154, 51 (2001)]. We extend the study in our next paper [Z. Levnajić and I. Mezić, e-print arXiv:0808.2182] by investigating the visualization of periodic sets using harmonic time averages. Both of these methods are related to eigenspace structure of the Koopman operator [I. Mezić and A. Banaszuk, Physica D 197, 101 (2004)].

  6. Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory with space partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, Haruhide; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2017-02-01

    Aiming at efficient numerical analysis of time-dependent (TD) many-electron dynamics of atoms involving multielectron continua, the TD restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory with space partition (TD-RASSCF-SP) is presented. The TD-RASSCF-SP wave function is expanded in terms of TD configuration-interaction coefficients with Slater determinants composed of two kinds of TD orbitals: M ̂ orbitals are defined to be nonvanishing in the inner region (V ̂), a small volume around the atomic nucleus, and M ˇ orbitals are nonvanishing in the large outer region (V ˇ). For detailed discussion of the SP strategy, the equations of motion are derived by two different formalisms for comparison. To ensure continuous differentiability of the wave function across the two regions, one of the formalisms makes use of the property of the finite-element discrete-variable-representation (FEDVR) functions and introduces additional time-independent orbitals. The other formalism is more general and is based on the Bloch operator as in the R -matrix theory, but turns out to be less practical for numerical applications. Hence, using the FEDVR-based formalism, the numerical performance is tested by computing double-ionization dynamics of atomic beryllium in intense light fields. To achieve high accuracy, M ̂ should be set large to take into account the strong many-electron correlation around the nucleus. On the other hand, M ˇ can be set much smaller than M ̂ for capturing the weaker correlation between the two outgoing photoelectrons. As a result, compared with more accurate multiconfigurational TD Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) method, the TD-RASSCF-SP method may achieve comparable accuracy in the description of the double-ionization dynamics. There are, however, difficulties related to the stiffness of the equations of motion of the TD-RASSCF-SP method, which makes the required time step for this method smaller than the one needed for the MCTDHF approach.

  7. Electric-magnetic duality of Abelian gauge theory on the four-torus, from the fivebrane on T 2 × T 4, via their partition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, Louise; Sun, Yang

    2015-06-01

    We compute the partition function of four-dimensional abelian gauge theory on a general four-torus T 4 with flat metric using Dirac quantization. In addition to an symmetry, it possesses symmetry that is electromagnetic S-duality. We show explicitly how this S-duality of the 4 d abelian gauge theory has its origin in symmetries of the 6 d (2 , 0) tensor theory, by computing the partition function of a single fivebrane compactified on T 2 times T 4, which has symmetry. If we identify the couplings of the abelian gauge theory with the complex modulus of the T 2 torus , then in the small T 2 limit, the partition function of the fivebrane tensor field can be factorized, and contains the partition function of the 4 d gauge theory. In this way the symmetry of the 6d tensor partition function is identified with the S-duality symmetry of the 4d gauge partition function. Each partition function is the product of zero mode and oscillator contributions, where the acts suitably. For the 4d gauge theory, which has a Lagrangian, this product redistributes when using path integral quantization.

  8. Microscopic Theory and Simulation of Quantum-Well Intersubband Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jianzhong; Ning, C. Z.

    2004-01-01

    We study the linear intersubband absorption spectra of a 15 nm InAs quantum well using the intersubband semiconductor Bloch equations with a three-subband model and a constant dephasing rate. We demonstrate the evolution of intersubband absorption spectral line shape as a function of temperature and electron density. Through a detailed examination of various contributions, such as the phase space filling effects, the Coulomb many-body effects and the non-parabolicity effect, we illuminate the underlying physics that shapes the spectra. Keywords: Intersubband transition, linear absorption, semiconductor heterostructure, InAs quantum well

  9. Theory of strong-field attosecond transient absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengxi; Chen, Shaohao; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Gaarde, Mette B.

    2016-03-01

    Attosecond transient absorption is one of the promising new techniques being developed to exploit the availability of sub-femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses to study the dynamics of the electron on its natural time scale. The temporal resolution in a transient absorption setup comes from the control of the relative delay and coherence between pump and probe pulses, while the spectral resolution comes from the characteristic width of the features that are being probed. In this review we focus on transient absorption scenarios where an attosecond pulse of XUV radiation creates a broadband excitation that is subsequently probed by a few cycle infrared (IR) laser. Because the attosecond XUV pulses are locked to the IR field cycle, the exchange of energy in the laser-matter interaction can be studied with unprecedented precision. We focus on the transient absorption by helium atoms of XUV radiation around the first ionization threshold, where we can simultaneoulsy solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the single atom response and the Maxwell wave equation for the collective response of the nonlinear medium. We use a time-domain method that allows us to treat on an equal footing all the different linear and nonlinear processes by which the medium can exchange energy with the fields. We present several simple models, based on a few-level system interacting with a strong IR field, to explain many of the novel features found in attosecond transient absorption spectrograms. These include the presence of light-induced states, which demonstrate the ability to probe the dressed states of the atom. We also present a time-domain interpretation of the resonant pulse propagation features that appear in absorption spectra in dense, macroscopic media. We close by reviewing several recent experimental results that can be explained in terms of the models we discuss. Our aim is to present a road map for understanding future attosecond transient absorption

  10. Evaluation of carbon isotope flux partitioning theory under simplified and controlled environmental conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Separation of the photosynthetic (Fp) and respiratory (Fr) fluxes of net CO2 exchange (Fn)remains a necessary step toward understanding the biological and physical controls on carbon cycling between the soil, biomass, and atmosphere. Despite recent advancements in stable carbon isotope partitioning ...

  11. Application of Equilibrium Partitioning Theory to Soil PAH Contamination (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In March 2004, ORD's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) received a request from the Ecological Risk Assessment Forum (ERAF) to provide insight into the issue of whether equilibrium partitioning (EqP) techniques can be used to predict the toxicity of polycyclic arom...

  12. Microscopic theory of electron absorption by plasma-facing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronold, F. X.; Fehske, H.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a method for calculating the probability with which the wall of a plasma absorbs an electron at low energy. The method, based on an invariant embedding principle, expresses the electron absorption probability as the probability for transmission through the wall’s long-range surface potential times the probability to stay inside the wall despite of internal backscattering. To illustrate the approach we apply it to a SiO2 surface. Besides emission of optical phonons inside the wall we take elastic scattering at imperfections of the plasma-wall interface into account and obtain absorption probabilities significantly less than unity in accordance with available electron-beam scattering data but in disagreement with the widely used perfect absorber model.

  13. Absorption and Fluorescence Lineshape Theory for Polynomial Potentials.

    PubMed

    Anda, André; De Vico, Luca; Hansen, Thorsten; Abramavičius, Darius

    2016-12-13

    The modeling of vibrations in optical spectra relies heavily on the simplifications brought about by using harmonic oscillators. However, realistic molecular systems can deviate substantially from this description. We develop two methods which show that the extension to arbitrarily shaped potential energy surfaces is not only straightforward, but also efficient. These methods are applied to an electronic two-level system with potential energy surfaces of polynomial form and used to study anharmonic features such as the zero-phonon line shape and mirror-symmetry breaking between absorption and fluorescence spectra. The first method, which constructs vibrational wave functions as linear combinations of the harmonic oscillator wave functions, is shown to be extremely robust and can handle large anharmonicities. The second method uses the cumulant expansion, which is readily solved, even at high orders, thanks to an ideally suited matrix theorem.

  14. Bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by earthworms: Assessment of equilibrium partitioning theory in in situ studies and water experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, W.; Kleunen, A. van; Immerzeel, J.; Maagd, P.G.J. de

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the suitability of applying equilibrium partitioning (EqP) theory to predict the bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by earthworms when these are exposed to contaminated soils in the field. Studies carried out in situ in various contaminated floodplain sites showed the presence of linear relationships with intercept zero between the lipid-normalized concentration of different PAHs in the earthworm, Lumbricus rubellus and the organic-matter-normalized concentration of the compounds in soil. The demonstration of such an isometric relationship is in agreement with the prediction of EqP theory that the biota-soil accumulation factor (BSAF) should be independent of the octanol/water partition coefficient, log K{sub ow}. The average BSAF of PAH compounds in the sampled 20-cm top layer of soil was 0.10. The present study also investigated the route of uptake of PAHs for earthworms in soil. The bioconcentration factor of low-molecular-weight PAHs, such as phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene, was derived from bioconcentration kinetic modeling of water-only experiments and found to be of the same order of magnitude as the bioaccumulation factor in the field when the latter was normalized to calculated concentrations in soil pore water. The results indicated that the exposure of earthworms to PAHs in soil is mediated through direct contact of the worms with the dissolved interstitial soil-water phase, further supporting the applicability of EqP theory to PAHs. The experimental data on the biotransformation of PAHs suggest that earthworms possess some capacity of metabolization, although this does not seem to be a major factor in the total elimination of these compounds. Even though the EqP approach was found to be applicable to low-molecular-weight PAHs with respect to the prediction of bioaccumulation by earthworms in the field, the results were less conclusive for high-molecular-weight compounds, such as

  15. Varied absorption peaks of dual-band metamaterial absorber analysis by using reflection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Han; Yu, Yan-Tao; Tang, Ming-Chun; Chen, Shi-Yong; Liu, Dan-Ping; Ou, Xiang; Zeng, Hao

    2016-03-01

    Cross-resonator metamaterial absorbers (MMA) have been widely investigated from microwave to optical frequencies. However, only part of the factors influencing the absorption properties were analyzed in previous works at the same time. In order to completely understand how the spacer thickness, dielectric parameter and incidence angle affect the absorption properties of the dual-band MMA, two sets of simulation were performed. It was found that with increasing incident angles, the low-frequency absorption peak showed a blue shift, while the high-frequency absorption peaks showed a red shift. However, with the increase in spacer thickness, both of the absorption peaks showed a red shift. By using the reflection theory expressions, the physical mechanism of the cross-resonator MMA was well explained. This method provides an effective way to analyze multi-band absorber in technology.

  16. Theory of Two-Photon Absorptions in Graphene Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryanpour, K.; Shukla, A.; Mazumdar, S.; Sandhu, A.; Roberts, A.

    2012-02-01

    Electron-electron correlations in graphene is currently an active field of research [1-3]. The carbon atoms in graphene have the same sp^2 hybridization as in strongly correlated π-conjugated polymer systems. The low energy behavior in graphene however appears to be reasonably described within the one-electron Dirac massless fermions model. Historically, the occurrence of the lowest two-photon state below the optical one-photon state provided the strongest proof for strong electron correlations in linear polyenes [4]. We systematically study the Coulomb interaction effects on the ground state and nonlinear absorptions in graphene fragments as a function of system size, beginning from the smallest stable fragment coronene. We report high order calculations of one- vs two-photon spin singlet and triplet states, in coronene, hexabenzocoronene and other molecular fragments that clearly indicate the strong role of electron-electron interactions. We will discuss the implications of our work on molecular systems for the thermodynamic limit of graphene. [4pt] [1] Siegel David A.; et al., PNAS, v108, 28, 11365-11369 (2011)[0pt] [2] Gr"onqvist J. H.; et al., arXiv: 1107.5653v1[0pt] [3] Uchoa B.; et al., arXiv: 1109.1577v1[0pt] [4] Ramasesha S.; et al., J. Chem. Phys. 80, 3278 (1984)

  17. Cross section calculations of astrophysical interest. [for theories of absorption and emission lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerjuoy, E.

    1974-01-01

    Cross sections are discussed for rotational excitation associated with theories of absorption and emission lines from molecules in space with emphasis on H2CO, CO, and OH by collisions with neutral particles such H, H2, and He. The sensitivity of the Thaddeus equation for the H2CO calculation is examined.

  18. Ex situ remediation of polluted soils by absorptive polymers, and a comparison of slurry and two-phase partitioning bioreactors for ultimate contaminant degradation.

    PubMed

    Tomei, M Concetta; Mosca Angelucci, Domenica; Annesini, M Cristina; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2013-11-15

    The present study has provided a comparison between a conventional ex situ method for the treatment of contaminated soil, a soil slurry bioreactor, with a novel technology in which a contaminant is rapidly and effectively removed from the soil by means of absorptive polymer beads, which are then added to a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) for biodegradation of the target molecule. 4-nitrophenol (4NP) was selected as a model contaminant, being representative of a large class of xenobiotics, and the DuPont thermoplastic Hytrel™ 8206 was utilized for its extraction from soil over ranges of soil contamination level, soil moisture content, and polymer:soil ratios. Since the polymers were able to rapidly (up to 77% and 85% in 4 and 24h respectively) and selectively remove the contaminant, the soil retained its nutrient and microflora content, which is in contrast to soil washing which can remove these valuable soil resources. After 4h of reaction time, the TPPB system demonstrated removal efficiency four times higher (77% vs 20%) than the slurry system, with expected concomitant savings in time and energy. A volumetric removal rate of 75 mg4NPh(-1) L(-1) was obtained in the TPPB, significantly greater than the value of 1.7 obtained in the slurry bioreactor. The polymers were readily regenerated for subsequent reuse, demonstrating the versatility of the polymer-based soil treatment technology.

  19. Intrinsic absolute bioavailability prediction in rats based on in situ absorption rate constants and/or in vitro partition coefficients: 6-fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Castaño, G; Ruíz-García, A; Bañón, N; Bermejo, M; Merino, V; Freixas, J; Garriguesx, T M; Plá-Delfina, J M

    2000-11-01

    A preliminary study attempting to predict the intrinsic absolute bioavailability of a group of antibacterial 6-fluoroquinolones-including true and imperfect homologues as well as heterologues-was carried out. The intrinsic absolute bioavailability of the test compounds, F, was assessed on permanently cannulated conscious rats by comparing the trapezoidal normalized areas under the plasma concentration-time curves obtained by intravenous and oral routes (n = 8-12). The high-performance liquid chromatography analytical methods used for plasma samples are described. Prediction of the absolute bioavailability of the compounds was based on their intrinsic rat gut in situ absorption rate constant, k(a). The working equation was: where T represents the mean absorbing time. A T value of 0.93 (+/-0.06) h provides the best correlation between predicted and experimentally obtained bioavailabilities (F' and F, respectively) when k(a) values are used (slope a = 1.10; intercept b = -0.05; r = 0.991). The k(a) values can also be expressed in function of the in vitro partition coefficients, P, between n-octanol and a phosphate buffer. In this case, theoretical k(a) values can be determined with the parameters of a standard k(a)/P correlation previously established for a group of model compounds. When P values are taken instead of k(a) values, reliable bioavailability predictions can also be made. These and other relevant features of the method are discussed.

  20. Revised Kubelka-Munk theory. III. A general theory of light propagation in scattering and absorptive media.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Miklavcic, Stanley J

    2005-09-01

    A generally applicable theoretical model describing light propagating through turbid media is proposed. The theory is a generalization of the revised Kubelka-Munk theory, extending its applicability to accommodate a wider range of absorption influences. A general expression for a factor taking into account the effect of scattering on the total photon path traversed in a turbid medium is derived. The extended model is applied to systems of ink-dyed paper sheets-mixtures of wood fibers with dyes-which represent examples of systems that have thus far eluded the original Kubelka-Munk model. The results of simulations of the spectral dependence of Kubelka-Munk coefficients of absorption and scattering show that they compare very well with those derived from experimental results.

  1. Microscopic nonlinear relativistic quantum theory of absorption of powerful x-ray radiation in plasma.

    PubMed

    Avetissian, H K; Ghazaryan, A G; Matevosyan, H H; Mkrtchian, G F

    2015-10-01

    The microscopic quantum theory of plasma nonlinear interaction with the coherent shortwave electromagnetic radiation of arbitrary intensity is developed. The Liouville-von Neumann equation for the density matrix is solved analytically considering a wave field exactly and a scattering potential of plasma ions as a perturbation. With the help of this solution we calculate the nonlinear inverse-bremsstrahlung absorption rate for a grand canonical ensemble of electrons. The latter is studied in Maxwellian, as well as in degenerate quantum plasma for x-ray lasers at superhigh intensities and it is shown that one can achieve the efficient absorption coefficient in these cases.

  2. Equilibrium partitioning theory to predict the sediment toxicity of the anionic surfactant C(12)-2-LAS to Corophium volutator.

    PubMed

    Rico-Rico, Angeles; Temara, Ali; Hermens, Joop L M

    2009-02-01

    The study of the effect of the sorption of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) on the bioavailability to marine benthic organisms is essential to refine the environmental risk assessment of these compounds. According to the equilibrium partitioning theory (EqP), the effect concentration in water-only exposure will be similar to the effect concentration in the sediment pore water. In this work, sorption and desorption experiments with two marine sediments were carried out using the compound C(12)-2-LAS. The effect of the sediment sorption on the toxicity of benthic organisms was studied in water-only and in sediment bioassays with the marine mud shrimp Corophium volutator. In addition, three common spiking methods were tested for its application in the toxicity tests, as well as the stability of the surfactant during the water-only and sediment-water test duration. LC50 values obtained from water-only exposure showed a good correspondence with the pore water concentrations calculated from the sorption and desorption isotherms in the spiked sediments.

  3. Absorption coefficient modeling of microcrystalline silicon thin film using Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Hui; Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Chang, Ting-Wei

    2012-03-12

    Considering the Mott-Davis density of state model and Rayleigh scattering effect, we present an approach to model the absorption profile of microcrystalline silicon thin films in this paper. Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory was applied to analyze the absorption curves. To validate the model, several experimental profiles have been established and compared with those results from the model. With the assistance of the genetic algorithm, our results show that the absorption curves from the model are in good agreement with the experiments. Our findings also indicate that, as the crystal volume fraction increases, not only do the defects in amorphous silicon reduce, but the bulk scattering effect is gradually enhanced as well.

  4. Diffuse reflectance relations based on diffusion dipole theory for large absorption and reduced scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremmer, Rolf H.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2013-08-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectra are used to determine the optical properties of biological samples. In medicine and forensic science, the turbid objects under study often possess large absorption and/or scattering properties. However, data analysis is frequently based on the diffusion approximation to the radiative transfer equation, implying that it is limited to tissues where the reduced scattering coefficient dominates over the absorption coefficient. Nevertheless, up to absorption coefficients of 20 m at reduced scattering coefficients of 1 and 11.5 mm-1, we observed excellent agreement (r2=0.994) between reflectance measurements of phantoms and the diffuse reflectance equation proposed by Zonios et al. [Appl. Opt. 38, 6628-6637 (1999)], derived as an approximation to one of the diffusion dipole equations of Farrell et al. [Med. Phys. 19, 879-888 (1992)]. However, two parameters were fitted to all phantom experiments, including strongly absorbing samples, implying that the reflectance equation differs from diffusion theory. Yet, the exact diffusion dipole approximation at high reduced scattering and absorption also showed agreement with the phantom measurements. The mathematical structure of the diffuse reflectance relation used, derived by Zonios et al. [Appl. Opt. 38, 6628-6637 (1999)], explains this observation. In conclusion, diffuse reflectance relations derived as an approximation to the diffusion dipole theory of Farrell et al. can analyze reflectance ratios accurately, even for much larger absorption than reduced scattering coefficients. This allows calibration of fiber-probe set-ups so that the object's diffuse reflectance can be related to its absorption even when large. These findings will greatly expand the application of diffuse reflection spectroscopy. In medicine, it may allow the use of blue/green wavelengths and measurements on whole blood, and in forensic science, it may allow inclusion of objects such as

  5. Diffuse reflectance relations based on diffusion dipole theory for large absorption and reduced scattering.

    PubMed

    Bremmer, Rolf H; van Gemert, Martin J C; Faber, Dirk J; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Aalders, Maurice C G

    2013-08-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectra are used to determine the optical properties of biological samples. In medicine and forensic science, the turbid objects under study often possess large absorption and/or scattering properties. However, data analysis is frequently based on the diffusion approximation to the radiative transfer equation, implying that it is limited to tissues where the reduced scattering coefficient dominates over the absorption coefficient. Nevertheless, up to absorption coefficients of 20  mm-1 at reduced scattering coefficients of 1 and 11.5  mm-1, we observed excellent agreement (r2=0.994) between reflectance measurements of phantoms and the diffuse reflectance equation proposed by Zonios et al. [Appl. Opt.38, 6628-6637 (1999)], derived as an approximation to one of the diffusion dipole equations of Farrell et al. [Med. Phys.19, 879-888 (1992)]. However, two parameters were fitted to all phantom experiments, including strongly absorbing samples, implying that the reflectance equation differs from diffusion theory. Yet, the exact diffusion dipole approximation at high reduced scattering and absorption also showed agreement with the phantom measurements. The mathematical structure of the diffuse reflectance relation used, derived by Zonios et al. [Appl. Opt.38, 6628-6637 (1999)], explains this observation. In conclusion, diffuse reflectance relations derived as an approximation to the diffusion dipole theory of Farrell et al. can analyze reflectance ratios accurately, even for much larger absorption than reduced scattering coefficients. This allows calibration of fiber-probe set-ups so that the object's diffuse reflectance can be related to its absorption even when large. These findings will greatly expand the application of diffuse reflection spectroscopy. In medicine, it may allow the use of blue/green wavelengths and measurements on whole blood, and in forensic science, it may allow inclusion of objects such as blood stains and cloth at crime

  6. Experimental validation of light scattering and absorption theories of fractal-like carbonaceous aerosol agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, R.; Moosmuller, H.; Arnott, W. P.; Garro, M.; Slowik, J.; Cross, E.; Han, J.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T.; Worsnop, D.

    2007-12-01

    The optical coefficients of size-selected carbonaceous aerosol agglomerates measured at a wavelength of 870 nm are compared with those predicted by three theories, namely Rayleigh-Debye-Gans (RDG) approximation, volume-equivalent Mie theory, and integral equation formulation for scattering (IEFS). Carbonaceous agglomerates, produced via flame synthesis, were size-selected using two differential mobility analyzers (DMAs) in series, and their scattering and absorption coefficients were measured with nephelometry and photoacoustic spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy, along with image processing techniques, were used for the parameterization of the structural properties of the fractal-like agglomerates. The agglomerate structural parameters were used to evaluate the predictions of the optical coefficients based on the three light scattering and absorption theories. The results indicate that the RDG approximation agrees within 10% of the experimental results and the exact electromagnetic calculations of the IEFS theory. The experimental scattering coefficient is over predicted by the volume-equivalent Mie theory by a factor of ~3.2. Also, the RDG approximation-predicted optical coefficients showed pronounced sensitivity to changes in monomer mean diameter, the count median diameter of the agglomerates, and the geometric standard deviation of the agglomerate number size distribution.

  7. Light scattering and absorption by fractal-like carbonaceous chain aggregates: comparison of theories and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Moosmüller, Hans; Arnott, W. Patrick; Garro, Mark A.; Slowik, Jay G.; Cross, Eben S.; Han, Jeong-Ho; Davidovits, Paul; Onasch, Timothy B.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2007-10-01

    This study compares the optical coefficients of size-selected soot particles measured at a wavelength of 870 nm with those predicted by three theories, namely, Rayleigh-Debye-Gans (RDG) approximation, volume-equivalent Mie theory, and integral equation formulation for scattering (IEFS). Soot particles, produced by a premixed ethene flame, were size-selected using two differential mobility analyzers in series, and their scattering and absorption coefficients were measured with nephelometry and photoacoustic spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy and image processing techniques were used for the parameterization of the structural properties of the fractal-like soot aggregates. The aggregate structural parameters were used to evaluate the predictions of the optical coefficients based on the three light-scattering and absorption theories. Our results show that the RDG approximation agrees within 10% with the experimental results and the exact electromagnetic calculations of the IEFS theory. Volume-equivalent Mie theory overpredicts the experimental scattering coefficient by a factor of ˜3.2. The optical coefficients predicted by the RDG approximation showed pronounced sensitivity to changes in monomer mean diameter, the count median diameter of the aggregates, and the geometric standard deviation of the aggregate number size distribution.

  8. The electronic absorption study of imide anion radicals in terms of time dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Andrzejak, Marcin; Sterzel, Mariusz; Pawlikowski, Marek T

    2005-07-01

    The absorption spectra of the N-(2,5-di-tert-butylphenyl) phthalimide (1-), N-(2,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)-1,8-naphthalimide (2-) and N-(2,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)-perylene-3,4-dicarboximide (3-) anion radicals are studied in terms of time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). For these anion radicals a large number electronic states (from 30 to 60) was found in the visible and near-IR regions (5000-45,000 cm(-1)). In these regions the TD/B3LYP treatment at the 6-1+G* level is shown to reproduce satisfactorily the empirical absorption spectra of all three anion radicals studied. The most apparent discrepancies between purely electronic theory and the experiment could be found in the excitation region corresponding to D0-->D1 transitions in the 2- and 3- molecules. For these species we argue that the structures seen in the lowest energy part of the absorptions of the 2- and 3- species are very likely due to Franck-Condon (FC) activity of the totally symmetric vibrations not studied in this Letter.

  9. The electronic absorption study of imide anion radicals in terms of time dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejak, Marcin; Sterzel, Mariusz; Pawlikowski, Marek T.

    2005-07-01

    The absorption spectra of the N-(2,5-di- tert-butylphenyl) phthalimide ( 1-), N-(2,5-di- tert-butylphenyl)-1,8-naphthalimide ( 2-) and N-(2,5-di- tert-butylphenyl)-perylene-3,4-dicarboximide ( 3-) anion radicals are studied in terms of time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). For these anion radicals a large number electronic states (from 30 to 60) was found in the visible and near-IR regions (5000-45000 cm -1). In these regions the TD/B3LYP treatment at the 6-1+G* level is shown to reproduce satisfactorily the empirical absorption spectra of all three anion radicals studied. The most apparent discrepancies between purely electronic theory and the experiment could be found in the excitation region corresponding to D0→ D1 transitions in the 2- and 3- molecules. For these species we argue that the structures seen in the lowest energy part of the absorptions of the 2- and 3- species are very likely due to Franck-Condon (FC) activity of the totally symmetric vibrations not studied in this Letter.

  10. Absorption of lithium in montmorillonite: a density functional theory (DFT) study.

    PubMed

    Wungu, Triati Dewi Kencana; Aspera, Susan Menez; David, Melanie Yadao; Dipojono, Hermawan Kresno; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Kasai, Hideaki

    2011-04-01

    The absorption of lithium in montmorillonite [LiSi8(Al3Mg)O20(OH)4] was investigated using Density Functional Theory (DFT). The final position of lithium after absorption was found to be in good agreement with an experimental observation where lithium atom migrated from the interlayer into the vacant octahedral site of montmorillonite. The lithium absorbed on montmorillonite was held together by a very strong attraction between ions and exhibited an insulating behavior as depicted from the density of states curve. Due to the presence of lithium in the octahedral site of montmorillonite, the OH group reoriented itself perpendicular to the ab plane and an electron of lithium was transferred in order to compensate the existing net charge of montmorillonite caused by isomorphous substitutions. Relative small charge transfer was observed between lithium and montmorillonite.

  11. Quantitative first-principles theory of interface absorption in multilayer heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Hachtel, Jordan A.; Sachan, Ritesh; Mishra, Rohan; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-08-31

    The unique chemical bonds and electronic states of interfaces result in optical properties that are different from those of the constituting bulk materials. In the nanoscale regime, the interface effects can be dominant and impact the optical response of devices. Using density functional theory (DFT), the interface effects can be calculated, but DFT is computationally limited to small systems. We describe a method to combine DFT with macroscopic methodologies to extract the interface effect on absorption in a consistent and quantifiable manner. The extracted interface effects are an independent parameter and can be applied to more complicated systems. We demonstrate, using NiSi{sub 2}/Si heterostructures, that by varying the relative volume fractions of interface and bulk, we can tune the spectral range of the heterostructure absorption.

  12. Quantitative first-principles theory of interface absorption in multilayer heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Hachtel, Jordan A.; Sachan, Ritesh; Mishra, Rohan; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-09-03

    The unique chemical bonds and electronic states of interfaces result in optical properties that are different from those of the constituting bulk materials. In the nanoscale regime, the interface effects can be dominant and impact the optical response of devices. Using density functional theory (DFT), the interface effects can be calculated, but DFT is computationally limited to small systems. In this paper, we describe a method to combine DFT with macroscopic methodologies to extract the interface effect on absorption in a consistent and quantifiable manner. The extracted interface effects are an independent parameter and can be applied to more complicated systems. Finally, we demonstrate, using NiSi2/Si heterostructures, that by varying the relative volume fractions of interface and bulk, we can tune the spectral range of the heterostructure absorption.

  13. Quantitative first-principles theory of interface absorption in multilayer heterostructures

    DOE PAGES

    Hachtel, Jordan A.; Sachan, Ritesh; Mishra, Rohan; ...

    2015-09-03

    The unique chemical bonds and electronic states of interfaces result in optical properties that are different from those of the constituting bulk materials. In the nanoscale regime, the interface effects can be dominant and impact the optical response of devices. Using density functional theory (DFT), the interface effects can be calculated, but DFT is computationally limited to small systems. In this paper, we describe a method to combine DFT with macroscopic methodologies to extract the interface effect on absorption in a consistent and quantifiable manner. The extracted interface effects are an independent parameter and can be applied to more complicatedmore » systems. Finally, we demonstrate, using NiSi2/Si heterostructures, that by varying the relative volume fractions of interface and bulk, we can tune the spectral range of the heterostructure absorption.« less

  14. Absorption microspectroscopy, theory and applications in the case of the photosynthetic compartment.

    PubMed

    Barsanti, Laura; Evangelista, Valtere; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Vesentini, Nicoletta; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    We performed microspectroscopic evaluation of the pigment composition of the photosynthetic compartments of both algae and higher plants. The feasibility of microspectroscopy for discriminating among species and/or phylogenetic groups was tested on laboratory cultures. Gaussian bands decompositions, and a fitting algorithm, together with fourth-derivative transformation of absorbance spectra, provided a reliable discrimination among chlorophylls, phycobiliproteins and carotenoids. Comparative analysis of absorption spectra highlighted the evolutionary grouping of the algae into three main lineages in accordance with the most recent endosymbiotic theories.

  15. Open-ended response theory with polarizable embedding: multiphoton absorption in biomolecular systems.

    PubMed

    Steindal, Arnfinn Hykkerud; Beerepoot, Maarten T P; Ringholm, Magnus; List, Nanna Holmgaard; Ruud, Kenneth; Kongsted, Jacob; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard

    2016-10-12

    We present the theory and implementation of an open-ended framework for electric response properties at the level of Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham density functional theory that includes effects from the molecular environment modeled by the polarizable embedding (PE) model. With this new state-of-the-art multiscale functionality, electric response properties to any order can be calculated for molecules embedded in polarizable atomistic molecular environments ranging from solvents to complex heterogeneous macromolecules such as proteins. In addition, environmental effects on multiphoton absorption (MPA) properties can be studied by evaluating single residues of the response functions. The PE approach includes mutual polarization effects between the quantum and classical parts of the system through induced dipoles that are determined self-consistently with respect to the electronic density. The applicability of our approach is demonstrated by calculating MPA strengths up to four-photon absorption for the green fluorescent protein. We show how the size of the quantum region, as well as the treatment of the border between the quantum and classical regions, is crucial in order to obtain reliable MPA predictions.

  16. Partition search

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, M.L.

    1996-12-31

    We introduce a new form of game search called partition search that incorporates dependency analysis, allowing substantial reductions in the portion of the tree that needs to be expanded. Both theoretical results and experimental data are presented. For the game of bridge, partition search provides approximately as much of an improvement over existing methods as {alpha}-{beta} pruning provides over minimax.

  17. Theoretical versus observed gas-particle partitioning of carbonyl emissions from motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianjun; Jakober, Chris; Clegg, Simon; Kleeman, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    A state-of-the-science thermodynamic model describing gas-particle absorption processes was used to predict the gas-particle partitioning of mixtures of approximately 60 carbonyl compounds emitted from low-emission gasoline-powered vehicles, three-way catalyst gasoline-powered vehicles, heavy-duty diesel vehicles under the idle-creep condition (HDDV idle), and heavy-duty diesel vehicles under the five-mode test (HDDV 5-mode). Exhaust was diluted by a factor of 120-580 with a residence time of approximately 43 sec. The predicted equilibrium absorption partitioning coefficients differed from the measured partitioning coefficients by several orders of magnitude. Time scales to reach equilibrium in the dilution sampling system were close to the actual residence time during the HDDV 5-mode test and much longer than the actual residence time during the other vehicle tests. It appears that insufficient residence time in the sampling system cannot uniformly explain the failure of the absorption mechanism to explain the measured partitioning. Other gas-particle partitioning mechanisms (e.g., heterogeneous reactions, capillary adsorption) beyond the simple absorption theory are needed to explain the discrepancy between calculated carbonyl partitioning coefficients and observed partitioning. Both of these alternative partitioning mechanisms imply great challenges for the measurement and modeling of semi-volatile primary organic aerosol (POA) species from motor vehicles. Furthermore, as emitted particle concentrations from newer vehicles approach atmospheric background levels, dilution sampling systems must fundamentally change their approach so that they use realistic particle concentrations in the dilution air to approximately represent real-world conditions. Samples collected with particle-free dilution air yielding total particulate matter concentrations below typical ambient concentrations will not provide a realistic picture of partitioning for semi-volatile compounds.

  18. Partition of actinides and fission products between metal and molten salt phases: Theory, measurement, and application to IFR pyroprocess development

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1993-10-01

    The chemical basis of Integral Fast Reactor fuel reprocessing (pyroprocessing) is partition of fuel, cladding, and fission product elements between molten LiCl-KCl and either a solid metal phase or a liquid cadmium phase. The partition reactions are described herein, and the thermodynamic basis for predicting distributions of actinides and fission products in the pyroprocess is discussed. The critical role of metal-phase activity coefficients, especially those of rare earth and the transuranic elements, is described. Measured separation factors, which are analogous to equilibrium constants but which involve concentrations rather than activities, are presented. The uses of thermodynamic calculations in process development are described, as are computer codes developed for calculating material flows and phase compositions in pyroprocessing.

  19. Absorption and resonance Raman study of the pyromellitic diahydride anion via density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andruniow, T.; Pawlikowski, M.

    2000-05-01

    The electronic structure of the low-energy states of the pyromellitic diahydride (PMDA) anion is investigated in terms of the VWN (Vosco-Wilk-Nusair) the BP (Becke-Perdew) and the B3LYP density functional (DF) methods employed with 6-31G * basis sets. All the methods are shown to reproduce correctly the absorption and resonance Raman spectra in the region corresponding to the low-energy 1 2Au→1 2B3g transition. The discrepancies between the theory and experiment are attributed to a (weak) Dushinsky effect predominately due to a mixing of the ν3=1593 cm -1 and ν4=1342 cm -1 vibrations in the 1 2B3 g state of the PMDA radical.

  20. Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials of perfluorocarbons: Comparison between experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, IváN.; Aranda, Alfonso; Hurley, Michael D.; Marston, George; Nutt, David R.; Shine, Keith P.; Smith, Kevin; Wallington, Timothy J.

    2010-12-01

    Experimentally and theoretically determined infrared spectra are reported for a series of straight-chain perfluorocarbons: C2F6, C3F8, C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, and C8F18. Theoretical spectra were determined using both density functional (DFT) and ab initio methods. Radiative efficiencies (REs) were determined using the method of Pinnock et al. (1995) and combined with atmospheric lifetimes from the literature to determine global warming potentials (GWPs). Theoretically determined absorption cross sections were within 10% of experimentally determined values. Despite being much less computationally expensive, DFT calculations were generally found to perform better than ab initio methods. There is a strong wavenumber dependence of radiative forcing in the region of the fundamental C-F vibration, and small differences in wavelength between band positions determined by theory and experiment have a significant impact on the REs. We apply an empirical correction to the theoretical spectra and then test this correction on a number of branched chain and cyclic perfluoroalkanes. We then compute absorption cross sections, REs, and GWPs for an additional set of perfluoroalkenes.

  1. Progress in the Theory and Interpretation of X-ray Absorption Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehr, J. J.

    2002-03-01

    There has been dramatic progress in recent years in the understanding of x-ray absorption spectra (XAS) [1]. For example, modern real space multiple scattering theory has yielded a quantitative treatment of the extended fine structure in XAS. Crucial in the theory is a treatment of electronic excited states including many-body effects such as inelastic losses and Debye-Waller factors. These developments have led to ab initio codes which permit an interpretation of the spectra in terms of geometrical and electronic properties of materials [2]. Indeed, the availability of such codes has revolutionized experimental investigations based on synchrotron radiation x-ray sources. Algorithmic improvements have recently made possible fast, parallel calculations of the near edge structure (XANES) [3], and approximate treatments of local field effects and many-body amplitude factors. Related techniques have been applied to several other spectroscopies, e.g., anomalous x-ray scattering, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and photoelectron diffraction [4]. [1] J. J. Rehr and R. C. Albers, Rev. Mod. Phys. 72, 621 (2000); [2] A. L. Ankudinov, B. Ravel, J.J. Rehr, and S. Conradson, Phys. Rev. B 58, 7565 (1998); [3] A. L. Ankudinov, C. E. Bouldin, J. J. Rehr, J. Sims, and H. Hung, Phys. Rev. B, in press (2002); [4] F. J. Garcia de Abajo, M. A. Van Hove, C. S. Fadley, Phys. Rev. B 63, 075404 (2001).

  2. Partition Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Michal; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    We introduce partition equilibrium and study its existence in resource selection games (RSG). In partition equilibrium the agents are partitioned into coalitions, and only deviations by the prescribed coalitions are considered. This is in difference to the classical concept of strong equilibrium according to which any subset of the agents may deviate. In resource selection games, each agent selects a resource from a set of resources, and its payoff is an increasing (or non-decreasing) function of the number of agents selecting its resource. While it has been shown that strong equilibrium exists in resource selection games, these games do not possess super-strong equilibrium, in which a fruitful deviation benefits at least one deviator without hurting any other deviator, even in the case of two identical resources with increasing cost functions. Similarly, strong equilibrium does not exist for that restricted two identical resources setting when the game is played repeatedly. We prove that for any given partition there exists a super-strong equilibrium for resource selection games of identical resources with increasing cost functions; we also show similar existence results for a variety of other classes of resource selection games. For the case of repeated games we identify partitions that guarantee the existence of strong equilibrium. Together, our work introduces a natural concept, which turns out to lead to positive and applicable results in one of the basic domains studied in the literature.

  3. A Systematic Approach for Computing Zero-Point Energy, Quantum Partition Function, and Tunneling Effect Based on Kleinert's Variational Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Gao, Jiali

    2008-09-09

    In this paper, we describe an automated integration-free path-integral (AIF-PI) method, based on Kleinert's variational perturbation (KP) theory, to treat internuclear quantum-statistical effects in molecular systems. We have developed an analytical method to obtain the centroid potential as a function of the variational parameter in the KP theory, which avoids numerical difficulties in path-integral Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics simulations, especially at the limit of zero-temperature. Consequently, the variational calculations using the KP theory can be efficiently carried out beyond the first order, i.e., the Giachetti-Tognetti-Feynman-Kleinert variational approach, for realistic chemical applications. By making use of the approximation of independent instantaneous normal modes (INM), the AIF-PI method can readily be applied to many-body systems. Previously, we have shown that in the INM approximation, the AIF-PI method is accurate for computing the quantum partition function of a water molecule (3 degrees of freedom) and the quantum correction factor for the collinear H(3) reaction rate (2 degrees of freedom). In this work, the accuracy and properties of the KP theory are further investigated by using the first three order perturbations on an asymmetric double-well potential, the bond vibrations of H(2), HF, and HCl represented by the Morse potential, and a proton-transfer barrier modeled by the Eckart potential. The zero-point energy, quantum partition function, and tunneling factor for these systems have been determined and are found to be in excellent agreement with the exact quantum results. Using our new analytical results at the zero-temperature limit, we show that the minimum value of the computed centroid potential in the KP theory is in excellent agreement with the ground state energy (zero-point energy) and the position of the centroid potential minimum is the expectation value of particle position in wave mechanics. The fast convergent property

  4. A Systematic Approach for Computing Zero-Point Energy, Quantum Partition Function, and Tunneling Effect Based on Kleinert’s Variational Perturbation Theory

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Gao, Jiali

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an automated integration-free path-integral (AIF-PI) method, based on Kleinert’s variational perturbation (KP) theory, to treat internuclear quantum-statistical effects in molecular systems. We have developed an analytical method to obtain the centroid potential as a function of the variational parameter in the KP theory, which avoids numerical difficulties in path-integral Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics simulations, especially at the limit of zero-temperature. Consequently, the variational calculations using the KP theory can be efficiently carried out beyond the first order, i.e., the Giachetti-Tognetti-Feynman-Kleinert variational approach, for realistic chemical applications. By making use of the approximation of independent instantaneous normal modes (INM), the AIF-PI method can readily be applied to many-body systems. Previously, we have shown that in the INM approximation, the AIF-PI method is accurate for computing the quantum partition function of a water molecule (3 degrees of freedom) and the quantum correction factor for the collinear H3 reaction rate (2 degrees of freedom). In this work, the accuracy and properties of the KP theory are further investigated by using the first three order perturbations on an asymmetric double-well potential, the bond vibrations of H2, HF, and HCl represented by the Morse potential, and a proton-transfer barrier modeled by the Eckart potential. The zero-point energy, quantum partition function, and tunneling factor for these systems have been determined and are found to be in excellent agreement with the exact quantum results. Using our new analytical results at the zero-temperature limit, we show that the minimum value of the computed centroid potential in the KP theory is in excellent agreement with the ground state energy (zero-point energy) and the position of the centroid potential minimum is the expectation value of particle position in wave mechanics. The fast convergent property of

  5. Coupled leaky mode theory for light absorption in 2D, 1D, and 0D semiconductor nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yiling; Cao, Linyou

    2012-06-18

    We present an intuitive, simple theoretical model, coupled leaky mode theory (CLMT), to analyze the light absorption of 2D, 1D, and 0D semiconductor nanostructures. This model correlates the light absorption of nanostructures to the optical coupling between incident light and leaky modes of the nanostructure. Unlike conventional methods such as Mie theory that requests specific physical features of nanostructures to evaluate the absorption, the CLMT model provides an unprecedented capability to analyze the absorption using eigen values of the leaky modes. Because the eigenvalue shows very mild dependence on the physical features of nanostructures, we can generally apply one set of eigenvalues calculated using a real, constant refractive index to calculations for the absorption of various nanostructures with different sizes, different materials, and wavelength-dependent complex refractive index. This CLMT model is general, simple, yet reasonably accurate, and offers new intuitive physical insights that the light absorption of nanostructures is governed by the coupling efficiency between incident light and leaky modes of the structure.

  6. Polarized x-ray-absorption spectroscopy of the uranyl ion: Comparison of experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.A.; Allen, P.G.; Terminello, L.J.; Denecke, M.A.; Reich, T.

    1996-07-01

    The x-ray linear dichroism of the uranyl ion (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) in uranium {ital L}{sub 3}-edge extended x-ray-absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and {ital L}{sub 1}- and {ital L}{sub 3}-edge x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES), has been investigated both by experiment and theory. A striking polarization dependence is observed in the experimental XANES and EXAFS for an oriented single crystal of uranyl acetate dihydrate [UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O], with the x-ray polarization vector aligned either parallel or perpendicular to the bond axis of the linear uranyl cation (O-U-O). Single-crystal results are compared to experimental spectra for a polycrystalline uranyl acetate sample and to calculations using the {ital ab} {ital initio} multiple-scattering (MS) code FEFF 6. Theoretical XANES spectra for uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) reproduce all the features of the measured uranyl acetate spectra. By identifying scattering paths which contribute to individual features in the calculated spectrum, a detailed understanding of the {ital L}{sub 1}-edge XANES is obtained. MS paths within the uranyl cation have a notable influence upon the XANES. The measured {ital L}{sub 3}-edge EXAFS is also influenced by MS, especially when the x-ray polarization is parallel to the uranyl species. These MS contributions are extracted from the total EXAFS and compared to calculations. The best agreement with the isolated MS signal is obtained by using nonoverlapped muffin-tin spheres in the FEFF 6 calculation. This contrasts the {ital L}{sub 1}-edge XANES calculations, in which overlapping was required for the best agreement with experiment. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Simulation of X-ray absorption spectra with orthogonality constrained density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Derricotte, Wallace D; Evangelista, Francesco A

    2015-06-14

    Orthogonality constrained density functional theory (OCDFT) [F. A. Evangelista, P. Shushkov and J. C. Tully, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 7378] is a variational time-independent approach for the computation of electronic excited states. In this work we extend OCDFT to compute core-excited states and generalize the original formalism to determine multiple excited states. Benchmark computations on a set of 13 small molecules and 40 excited states show that unshifted OCDFT/B3LYP excitation energies have a mean absolute error of 1.0 eV. Contrary to time-dependent DFT, OCDFT excitation energies for first- and second-row elements are computed with near-uniform accuracy. OCDFT core excitation energies are insensitive to the choice of the functional and the amount of Hartree-Fock exchange. We show that OCDFT is a powerful tool for the assignment of X-ray absorption spectra of large molecules by simulating the gas-phase near-edge spectrum of adenine and thymine.

  8. Absorption Spectra and Photoreactivity of p-Aminobenzophenone by Time-dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xue-mei; Huang, Yao; Ma, Jian-yi; Li, Xiang-yuan

    2007-06-01

    The absorption spectral properties of para-aminobenzophenone (p-ABP) were investigated in gas phase and in solution by time-dependent density functional theory. Calculations suggest that the singlet states vary greatly with the solvent polarities. In various polar solvents, including acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl sulfoxide, and dimethyl formamide, the excited S1 states with charge transfer character result from π → π* transitions. However, in nonpolar solvents, cyclohexane, and benzene, the S1 states are the result of n → π* transitions related to local excitation in the carbonyl group. The excited T1 states were calculated to have ππ* character in various solvents. From the variation of the calculated excited states, the band due to π → π* transition undergoes a redshift with an increase in solvent polarity, while the band due to n → π* transition undergoes a blueshift with an increase in solvent polarity. In addition, the triplet yields and the photoreactivities of p-ABP in various solvents are discussed.

  9. A far wing line shape theory and its application to the foreign-broadened water continuum absorption. III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Q.; Tipping, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The far wing line shape theory developed previously and applied to the calculation of the continuum absorption of pure water vapor is extended to foreign-broadened continua. Explicit results are presented for H2O-N2 and H2O-CO2 in the frequency range from 0 to 10,000/cm. For H2O-N2 the positive and negative resonant frequency average line shape functions and absorption coefficients are computed for a number of temperatures between 296 and 430 K for comparison with available laboratory data. In general the agreement is very good.

  10. Site partitioning of Cr3+ in the trichroic alexandrite BeAl2O4:Cr3+ crystal: contribution from x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bordage, Amélie; Rossano, Stéphanie; Horn, Adolf Heinrich; Fuchs, Yves

    2012-06-06

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at the Cr K-edge of a trichroic crystal of alexandrite BeAl(2)O(4):Cr(3+) for different orientations of the crystal with respect to the polarization and direction of the x-ray incident beam have been performed. Analysis of the experimental spectra with the help of first-principles calculations of x-ray absorption spectra allowed us to estimate the proportion of chromium Cr(3+) cations among the two different octahedral sites of the alexandrite structure (70% in the C(s) site-30% in the C(i) site). The methodology presented in this work opens up new possibilities in the field of mineralogy for the study of complex minerals containing several sites potentially occupied by several transition elements or for solid solutions.

  11. Site partitioning of Cr3+ in the trichroic alexandrite BeAl2O4:Cr3+ crystal: contribution from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordage, Amélie; Rossano, Stéphanie; Horn, Adolf Heinrich; Fuchs, Yves

    2012-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at the Cr K-edge of a trichroic crystal of alexandrite BeAl2O4:Cr3+ for different orientations of the crystal with respect to the polarization and direction of the x-ray incident beam have been performed. Analysis of the experimental spectra with the help of first-principles calculations of x-ray absorption spectra allowed us to estimate the proportion of chromium Cr3+ cations among the two different octahedral sites of the alexandrite structure (70% in the Cs site-30% in the Ci site). The methodology presented in this work opens up new possibilities in the field of mineralogy for the study of complex minerals containing several sites potentially occupied by several transition elements or for solid solutions.

  12. Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-03

    of Arsenic- Water Complexes Using Density Functional Theory June 3, 2016 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. L. Huang S.g...NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic- Water Complexes Using... water molecules should be associated with response features that are intermediate between that of isolated molecules and that of a bulk system. DFT and

  13. Satellite retrieval of the absorption coefficient of phytoplankton phycoerythrin pigment: theory and feasibility status.

    PubMed

    Hoge, F E; Wright, C W; Lyon, P E; Swift, R N; Yungel, J K

    1999-12-20

    Oceanic radiance model inversion methods are used to develop a comprehensive algorithm for retrieval of the absorption coefficients of phycourobilin (PUB) pigment, type I phycoerythrobilin (PEB) pigment rich in PUB, and type II PEB deficient in PUB pigment (together with the usual "big three" inherent optical properties: the total backscattering coefficient and the absorption coefficients of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM)-detritus and phytoplankton). This fully modeled inversion algorithm is then simplified to yield a hybrid modeled-unmodeled inversion algorithm in which the phycoerythrin (PE) absorption coefficient is retrieved as unmodeled 488-nm absorption (which exceeds the modeled phytoplankton and the CDOM-detritus absorption coefficients). Each algorithm was applied to water-leaving radiances, but only hybrid modeled-unmodeled inversions yielded viable retrievals of the PE absorption coefficient. Validation of the PE absorption coefficient retrieval was achieved by relative comparison with airborne laser-induced PEB fluorescence. The modeled-unmodeled retrieval of four inherent optical properties by direct matrix inversion is rapid and well conditioned, but the accuracy is strongly limited by the accuracy of the three principal inherent optical property models across all four spectral bands. Several research areas are identified to enhance the radiance-model-based retrievals: (a) improved PEB and PUB absorption coefficient models, (b) PE spectral shifts induced by PUB chromophore substitution at chromophore binding sites, (c) specific absorption-sensitive phytoplankton absorption modeling, (d) total constituent backscattering modeling, (e) unmodeled carotinoid and phycocyanin absorption that are not now accounted for in the chlorophyll-dominated phytoplankton absorption coefficient model, and (f) iterative inversion techniques to solve for six constituents with only five radiances. Although considerable progress has been made toward the

  14. Effective scheme for partitioning covalent bonds in density-functional embedding theory: From molecules to extended covalent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chen; Muñoz-García, Ana Belén; Pavone, Michele

    2016-12-01

    Density-functional embedding theory provides a general way to perform multi-physics quantum mechanics simulations of large-scale materials by dividing the total system's electron density into a cluster's density and its environment's density. It is then possible to compute the accurate local electronic structures and energetics of the embedded cluster with high-level methods, meanwhile retaining a low-level description of the environment. The prerequisite step in the density-functional embedding theory is the cluster definition. In covalent systems, cutting across the covalent bonds that connect the cluster and its environment leads to dangling bonds (unpaired electrons). These represent a major obstacle for the application of density-functional embedding theory to study extended covalent systems. In this work, we developed a simple scheme to define the cluster in covalent systems. Instead of cutting covalent bonds, we directly split the boundary atoms for maintaining the valency of the cluster. With this new covalent embedding scheme, we compute the dehydrogenation energies of several different molecules, as well as the binding energy of a cobalt atom on graphene. Well localized cluster densities are observed, which can facilitate the use of localized basis sets in high-level calculations. The results are found to converge faster with the embedding method than the other multi-physics approach ONIOM. This work paves the way to perform the density-functional embedding simulations of heterogeneous systems in which different types of chemical bonds are present.

  15. Effective scheme for partitioning covalent bonds in density-functional embedding theory: From molecules to extended covalent systems.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen; Muñoz-García, Ana Belén; Pavone, Michele

    2016-12-28

    Density-functional embedding theory provides a general way to perform multi-physics quantum mechanics simulations of large-scale materials by dividing the total system's electron density into a cluster's density and its environment's density. It is then possible to compute the accurate local electronic structures and energetics of the embedded cluster with high-level methods, meanwhile retaining a low-level description of the environment. The prerequisite step in the density-functional embedding theory is the cluster definition. In covalent systems, cutting across the covalent bonds that connect the cluster and its environment leads to dangling bonds (unpaired electrons). These represent a major obstacle for the application of density-functional embedding theory to study extended covalent systems. In this work, we developed a simple scheme to define the cluster in covalent systems. Instead of cutting covalent bonds, we directly split the boundary atoms for maintaining the valency of the cluster. With this new covalent embedding scheme, we compute the dehydrogenation energies of several different molecules, as well as the binding energy of a cobalt atom on graphene. Well localized cluster densities are observed, which can facilitate the use of localized basis sets in high-level calculations. The results are found to converge faster with the embedding method than the other multi-physics approach ONIOM. This work paves the way to perform the density-functional embedding simulations of heterogeneous systems in which different types of chemical bonds are present.

  16. Nucleic acid vibrational circular dichroism, absorption, and linear dichroism spectra. I. A DeVoe theory approach.

    PubMed Central

    Self, B D; Moore, D S

    1997-01-01

    Infrared (IR) vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), absorption, and linear dichroism (LD) spectra of four homopolyribonucleotides, poly(rA), poly(rG), poly(rC), and poly(rU), have been calculated, in the 1750-1550 cm-1 spectral region, using the DeVoe polarizability theory. A newly derived algorithm, which approximates the Hilbert transform of imaginaries to reals, was used in the calculations to obtain real parts of oscillator polarizabilities associated with each normal mode. The calculated spectra of the polynucleotides were compared with previously measured solution spectra. The good agreement between calculated and measured polynucleotide spectra indicates, for the first time, that the DeVoe theory is a useful means of calculating the VCD and IR absorption spectra of polynucleotides. For the first time, calculated DeVoe theory VCD and IR absorption spectra of oriented polynucleotides are presented. The calculated VCD spectra for the oriented polynucleotides are used to predict the spectra for such measurements made in the future. The calculated IR spectra for the oriented polynucleotides are useful in interpreting the linear dichroism of the polynucleotides. PMID:9199798

  17. In vitro prediction of human intestinal absorption and blood-brain barrier partitioning: development of a lipid analog for micellar liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Vrieze, Mike; Janssens, Pieter; Szucs, Roman; Van der Eycken, Johan; Lynen, Frédéric

    2015-09-01

    Over the past decades, several in vitro methods have been tested for their ability to predict either human intestinal absorption (HIA) or penetration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of drugs. Micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) has been a successful approach for retention time measurements of drugs to establish models together with other molecular descriptors. Thus far, MLC approaches have only made use of commercial surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether (Brij35), which are not representative for the phospholipids present in human membranes. Miltefosine, a phosphocholine-based lipid, is presented here as an alternative surfactant for MLC measurements. By using the obtained retention factors and several computed descriptors for a set of 48 compounds, two models were constructed: one for the prediction of HIA and another for the prediction of penetration across the BBB expressed as log BB. All data were correlated to experimental HIA and log BB values, and the performance of the models was evaluated. Log BB prediction performed better than HIA prediction, although HIA prediction was also improved a lot (from 0.5530 to 0.7175) compared to in silico predicted HIA values.

  18. Evidence for strong electron correlations in graphene molecular fragments: Theory and experiments on two-photon absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryanpour, Karan; Roberts, Adam; Sandhu, Arvinder; Shukla, Alok; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2013-03-01

    Historically, the occurrence of the lowest two-photon state below the optical one-photon state in linear polyenes, polyacetylenes and polydiacetylenes provided the strongest evidence for strong electron correlations in these linear π-conjugated systems. We demonstrate similar behavior in several molecular fragments of graphene with D6 h symmetry, theoretically and experimentally. Theoretically, we have calculated one versus two-photon absorptions in coronene, two different hexabenzocoronenes and circumcoronene, within the Pariser-Parr-Pople π-electron Hamiltonian using high order configuration interaction. Experimentally, we have performed z-scan measurements using a white light super-continuum source on coronene and hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene to determine frequency-dependent two-photon absorption coefficients, for comparison to the ground state absorptions. Excellent agreement between experiment and theory in our work gives strong evidence for significant electron correlations between the π-electrons in the graphene molecular fragments. We particularly benchmark high order electron-hole excitations in graphene fragments as a key element behind the agreement between theory and experiment in this work. We acknowledge NSF-CHE-1151475 grant as our funding source.

  19. Theory of edge-state optical absorption in two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushin, Maxim; Kelleher, Edmund J. R.; Hasan, Tawfique

    2016-10-01

    We develop an analytical model to describe sub-band-gap optical absorption in two-dimensional semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide (s-TMD) nanoflakes. The material system represents an array of few-layer molybdenum disulfide crystals, randomly orientated in a polymer matrix. We propose that optical absorption involves direct transitions between electronic edge states and bulk bands, depends strongly on the carrier population, and is saturable with sufficient fluence. For excitation energies above half the band gap, the excess energy is absorbed by the edge-state electrons, elevating their effective temperature. Our analytical expressions for the linear and nonlinear absorption could prove useful tools in the design of practical photonic devices based on s-TMDs.

  20. Far-infrared permanent and induced dipole absorption of diatomic molecules in rare-gas fluids. I. Spectral theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roco, J. M. M.; Hernández, A. Calvo; Velasco, S.

    1995-12-01

    We present a spectral theory for the far-infrared absorption spectrum of a very diluted solution of diatomic molecules in a rare-gas fluid, that includes permanent and induced contributions. The absorption coefficient is given as the convolution of a translational spectrum and a rotational spectrum. The former is described in terms of time correlation functions associated to the induced dipole moment. The latter is discussed on the basis of a model consisting of a quantum rigid rotor interacting with a thermal bath, making use of time correlation functions associated to the different anisotropic orders of the solute-solvent intermolecular potential. Non-Markovian and line mixing effects are taken into account. Explicit expressions for the five leading contributions of the induced dipole moment are given.

  1. Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1, 0) gamma band in the daytime thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eparvier, F. G.; Barth, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the UV fluorescent emissions of the NO (1, 0) and (0, 1) gamma bands in the lower-thermospheric dayglow, made with a sounding rocket launched on March 7, 1989 from Poker Flat, Alaska, were analyzed. The resonant (1, 0) gamma band was found to be attenuated below an altitude of about 120 km. A self-absorption model based on Holstein transmission functions was developed for the resonant (1, 0) gamma band under varying conditions of slant column density and temperature and was applied for the conditions of the rocket flight. The results of the model agreed with the measured attenuation of the band, indicating the necessity of including self-absorption theory in the analysis of satellite and rocket limb data of NO.

  2. Interaction of Isophorone with Pd(111): A Combination of Infrared Reflection–Absorption Spectroscopy, Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure, and Density Functional Theory Studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Atomistic level understanding of interaction of α,β-unsaturated carbonyls with late transition metals is a key prerequisite for rational design of new catalytic materials with the desired selectivity toward C=C or C=O bond hydrogenation. The interaction of this class of compounds with transition metals was investigated on α,β-unsaturated ketone isophorone on Pd(111) as a prototypical system. In this study, infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) experiments, and density functional theory calculations including van der Waals interactions (DFT+vdW) were combined to obtain detailed information on the binding of isophorone to palladium at different coverages and on the effect of preadsorbed hydrogen on the binding and adsorption geometry. According to these experimental observations and the results of theoretical calculations, isophorone adsorbs on Pd(111) in a flat-lying geometry at low coverages. With increasing coverage, both C=C and C=O bonds of isophorone tilt with respect to the surface plane. The tilting is considerably more pronounced for the C=C bond on the pristine Pd(111) surface, indicating a prominent perturbation and structural distortion of the conjugated π system upon interaction with Pd. Preadsorbed hydrogen leads to higher tilting angles of both π bonds, which points to much weaker interaction of isophorone with hydrogen-precovered Pd and suggests the conservation of the in-plane geometry of the conjugated π system. The results of the DFT+vdW calculations provide further insights into the perturbation of the molecular structure of isophorone on Pd(111). PMID:26089998

  3. Interaction of Isophorone with Pd(111): A Combination of Infrared Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy, Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure, and Density Functional Theory Studies.

    PubMed

    Dostert, Karl-Heinz; O'Brien, Casey P; Riedel, Wiebke; Savara, Aditya; Liu, Wei; Oehzelt, Martin; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Schauermann, Swetlana

    2014-12-04

    Atomistic level understanding of interaction of α,β-unsaturated carbonyls with late transition metals is a key prerequisite for rational design of new catalytic materials with the desired selectivity toward C=C or C=O bond hydrogenation. The interaction of this class of compounds with transition metals was investigated on α,β-unsaturated ketone isophorone on Pd(111) as a prototypical system. In this study, infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) experiments, and density functional theory calculations including van der Waals interactions (DFT+vdW) were combined to obtain detailed information on the binding of isophorone to palladium at different coverages and on the effect of preadsorbed hydrogen on the binding and adsorption geometry. According to these experimental observations and the results of theoretical calculations, isophorone adsorbs on Pd(111) in a flat-lying geometry at low coverages. With increasing coverage, both C=C and C=O bonds of isophorone tilt with respect to the surface plane. The tilting is considerably more pronounced for the C=C bond on the pristine Pd(111) surface, indicating a prominent perturbation and structural distortion of the conjugated π system upon interaction with Pd. Preadsorbed hydrogen leads to higher tilting angles of both π bonds, which points to much weaker interaction of isophorone with hydrogen-precovered Pd and suggests the conservation of the in-plane geometry of the conjugated π system. The results of the DFT+vdW calculations provide further insights into the perturbation of the molecular structure of isophorone on Pd(111).

  4. Absorption Spectra of Fe, Mn, and Mg Water Complexes Calculated Using Density Functional Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-20

    the calculated absorption spectra of isolated molecules can help to identify intramolecular vibrational modes of various materials. A series of...Transformation A molecule in 3-dimensions has a total of 3N-6 normal mode vibrations . The Schrodinger equation for the harmonic...oscillations of these normal modes has known solutions. The quantum mechanical spectrum of each of these vibrations is given in the harmonic approximation

  5. Tailored pump-probe transient spectroscopy with time-dependent density-functional theory: controlling absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkenhorst, Jessica; De Giovannini, Umberto; Castro, Alberto; Rubio, Angel

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in laser technology allow us to follow electronic motion at its natural time-scale with ultra-fast time resolution, leading the way towards attosecond physics experiments of extreme precision. In this work, we assess the use of tailored pumps in order to enhance (or reduce) some given features of the probe absorption (for example, absorption in the visible range of otherwise transparent samples). This type of manipulation of the system response could be helpful for its full characterization, since it would allow us to visualize transitions that are dark when using unshaped pulses. In order to investigate these possibilities, we perform first a theoretical analysis of the non-equilibrium response function in this context, aided by one simple numerical model of the hydrogen atom. Then, we proceed to investigate the feasibility of using time-dependent density-functional theory as a means to implement, theoretically, this absorption-optimization idea, for more complex atoms or molecules. We conclude that the proposed idea could in principle be brought to the laboratory: tailored pump pulses can excite systems into light-absorbing states. However, we also highlight the severe numerical and theoretical difficulties posed by the problem: large-scale non-equilibrium quantum dynamics are cumbersome, even with TDDFT, and the shortcomings of state-of-the-art TDDFT functionals may still be serious for these out-of-equilibrium situations.

  6. Classical microscopic theory of dispersion, emission and absorption of light in dielectrics. Classical microscopic theory of dielectric susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carati, Andrea; Galgani, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    This paper is a continuation of a recent one in which, apparently for the first time, the existence of polaritons in ionic crystals was proven in a microscopic electrodynamic theory. This was obtained through an explicit computation of the dispersion curves. Here the main further contribution consists in studying electric susceptibility, from which the spectrum can be inferred. We show how susceptibility is obtained by the Green-Kubo methods of Hamiltonian statistical mechanics, and give for it a concrete expression in terms of time-correlation functions. As in the previous paper, here too we work in a completely classical framework, in which the electrodynamic forces acting on the charges are all taken into account, both the retarded forces and the radiation reaction ones. So, in order to apply the methods of statistical mechanics, the system has to be previously reduced to a Hamiltonian one. This is made possible in virtue of two global properties of classical electrodynamics, namely, the Wheeler-Feynman identity and the Ewald resummation properties, the proofs of which were already given for ordered system. The second contribution consists in formulating the theory in a completely general way, so that in principle it applies also to disordered systems such as glasses, or liquids or gases, provided the two general properties mentioned above continue to hold. A first step in this direction is made here by providing a completely general proof of the Wheeler-Feynman identity, which is shown to be the counterpart of a general causality property of classical electrodynamics. Finally it is shown how a line spectrum can appear at all in classical systems, as a counterpart of suitable stability properties of the motions, with a broadening due to a coexistence of chaoticity. The relevance of some recent results of the theory of dynamical systems in this connection is also pointed out.

  7. Gas/particle partitioning of 2-methyltetrols and levoglucosan at an urban site in Denver.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingjie; Hannigan, Michael P; Barsanti, Kelley C

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a medium volume sampler incorporating quartz fiber filters (QFFs) and a polyurethane foam (PUF)/XAD/PUF sandwich (PXP) was used to collect 2-methyltetrols (isoprene tracer) and levoglucosan (biomass burning tracer) in gaseous and particle (PM2.5) phases. The measured gas/particle (G/P) partitioning coefficients (Kp,OMm) of 2-methyltetrols and levoglucosan were calculated and compared to their predicted G/P partitioning coefficients (Kp,OMt) based on an absorptive partitioning theory. The breakthrough experiments showed that gas-phase 2-methyltetrols and levoglucosan could be collected using the PXP or PUF adsorbent alone, with low breakthrough; however, the recoveries of levoglucosan in PXP samples were lower than 70% (average of 51.9–63.3%). The concentration ratios of 2-methyltetrols and levoglucosan in the gas phase to those in the particle phase were often close to or higher than unity in summer, indicating that these polar species are semi-volatile and their G/P partitioning should be considered when applying particle-phase data for source apportionment. The Kp,OMm values of 2-methyltetrols had small variability in summer Denver, which was ascribed to large variations in concentrations of particulate organic matter (5.14 ± 3.29 μg m–3) and small changes in ambient temperature (21.8 ± 4.05 °C). The regression between log Kp,OMm and log Kp,OMt suggested that the absorptive G/P partitioning theory could reasonably predict the measured G/P partitioning of levoglucosan in ambient samples.

  8. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure within Multilevel Coupled Cluster Theory.

    PubMed

    Myhre, Rolf H; Coriani, Sonia; Koch, Henrik

    2016-06-14

    Core excited states are challenging to calculate, mainly because they are embedded in a manifold of high-energy valence-excited states. However, their locality makes their determination ideal for local correlation methods. In this paper, we demonstrate the performance of multilevel coupled cluster theory in computing core spectra both within the core-valence separated and the asymmetric Lanczos implementations of coupled cluster linear response theory. We also propose a visualization tool to analyze the excitations using the difference between the ground-state and excited-state electron densities.

  9. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Theory and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borel, Christoph C.; Schlaepfer, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels; (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels. (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an "Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption" (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than +5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  10. Truncated Newton's optimization scheme for absorption and fluorescence optical tomography: Part I theory and formulation.

    PubMed

    Roy, R; Sevick-Muraca, E

    1999-05-10

    The development of non-invasive, biomedical optical imaging from time-dependent measurements of near-infrared (NIR) light propagation in tissues depends upon two crucial advances: (i) the instrumental tools to enable photon "time-of-flight" measurement within rapid and clinically realistic times, and (ii) the computational tools enabling the reconstruction of interior tissue optical property maps from exterior measurements of photon "time-of-flight" or photon migration. In this contribution, the image reconstruction algorithm is formulated as an optimization problem in which an interior map of tissue optical properties of absorption and fluorescence lifetime is reconstructed from synthetically generated exterior measurements of frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM). The inverse solution is accomplished using a truncated Newtons method with trust region to match synthetic fluorescence FDPM measurements with that predicted by the finite element prediction. The computational overhead and error associated with computing the gradient numerically is minimized upon using modified techniques of reverse automatic differentiation.

  11. X-ray-absorption spectroscopy and n-body distribution functions in condensed matter. I. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipponi, Adriano; di Cicco, Andrea; Natoli, Calogero Renzo

    1995-12-01

    The general theoretical framework underlying the GNXAS multiple-scattering (MS) data-analysis method for x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is presented. The main approximations leading to the reduction of the many-body process in that of a photoelectron scattering in an effective potential are summarized. The methods available to expand the extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure χ(k) into physically meaningful terms are described. In particular, emphasis is given to the definition of the irreducible n-body signals γ(n) that can be calculated directly by means of linear combinations of continued fractions, or by using their respective multiple-scattering series. It is found that even for an infinite system the expansion of the χ(k) signal in terms of γ(n) has a better convergence rate than the MS series. Simple expressions for performing the configurational averages of the structural signals in the presence of thermal and structural disorder are derived. These can be used for the structural analysis of molecular, crystalline, or moderately disordered systems. It is shown that in the case of highly disordered systems the expansion in terms of the γ(n) signals is the natural framework for the interpretation of the XAS signal. General equations for the ensemble-averaged χ(k) signal as a function of a series of integrals over the n-body n>~2 distribution functions gn are provided and the possible use of advanced strategies for the inversion of the structural information is suggested.

  12. Atmospheric pre-corrected differential absorption techniques to retrieve columnar water vapor: Theory and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Schlaepfer, D.

    1996-03-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels; and (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an {open_quote}Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption{close_quote} (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than {+-}5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  13. Theory of x-ray absorption by laser-dressed atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buth, Christian; Santra, Robin

    2007-03-01

    An ab initio theory is devised for the x-ray photoabsorption cross section of atoms in the field of a moderately intense optical laser ( 800nm , 1013W/cm2 ). The laser dresses the core-excited atomic states, which introduces a dependence of the cross section on the angle between the polarization vectors of the two linearly polarized radiation sources. We use the Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation to describe the atomic many-particle problem in conjunction with a nonrelativistic quantum-electrodynamic approach to treat the photon-electron interaction. The continuum wave functions of ejected electrons are treated with a complex absorbing potential that is derived from smooth exterior complex scaling. The solution to the two-color (x-ray plus laser) problem is discussed in terms of a direct diagonalization of the complex symmetric matrix representation of the Hamiltonian. Alternative treatments with time-independent and time-dependent non-Hermitian perturbation theories are presented that exploit the weak interaction strength between x rays and atoms. We apply the theory to study the photoabsorption cross section of krypton atoms near the K edge. A pronounced modification of the cross section is found in the presence of the optical laser.

  14. Band gap reduction in InNxSb1-x alloys: Optical absorption, k . P modeling, and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhart, W. M.; Rajpalke, M. K.; Buckeridge, J.; Murgatroyd, P. A. E.; Bomphrey, J. J.; Alaria, J.; Catlow, C. R. A.; Scanlon, D. O.; Ashwin, M. J.; Veal, T. D.

    2016-09-01

    Using infrared absorption, the room temperature band gap of InSb is found to reduce from 174 (7.1 μm) to 85 meV (14.6 μm) upon incorporation of up to 1.13% N, a reduction of ˜79 meV/%N. The experimentally observed band gap reduction in molecular-beam epitaxial InNSb thin films is reproduced by a five band k . P band anticrossing model incorporating a nitrogen level, EN, 0.75 eV above the valence band maximum of the host InSb and an interaction coupling matrix element between the host conduction band and the N level of β = 1.80 eV. This observation is consistent with the presented results from hybrid density functional theory.

  15. Many-body theory of trion absorption features in two-dimensional semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimkin, Dmitry K.; MacDonald, Allan H.

    2017-01-01

    Recent optical studies of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides have demonstrated that their excitonic absorption feature splits into two widely separated peaks at finite carrier densities. The additional peak is usually attributed to the presence of trions, bound states of two electrons and a hole or an electron and two holes. Here we argue that in the density range over which the trion peak is well resolved, it cannot be interpreted in terms of weakly coupled three-body systems and that the appropriate picture is instead one in which excitons are dressed by interactions with a Fermi sea of excess carriers. This coupling splits the exciton spectrum into a lower-energy attractive exciton-polaron branch, normally identified as a trion branch, and a higher-energy repulsive exciton-polaron branch, normally identified as an exciton branch. We have calculated the frequency and doping dependence of the optical conductivity and found that (i) the splitting varies linearly with the Fermi energy of the excess quasiparticles, (ii) the trion peak is dominant at high carrier densities, and (iii) the trion peak width is considerably smaller than that of the excitonic peak. Our results are in good agreement with recent experiments.

  16. L-asparagine crystals with wide gap semiconductor features: Optical absorption measurements and density functional theory computations

    SciTech Connect

    Zanatta, G.; Gottfried, C.; Silva, A. M.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Sales, F. A. M.; Freire, V. N.

    2014-03-28

    Results of optical absorption measurements are presented together with calculated structural, electronic, and optical properties for the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal. Density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) including dispersion effects (TS, Grimme) was employed to perform the calculations. The optical absorption measurements revealed that the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal is a wide band gap material with 4.95 eV main gap energy. DFT-GGA+TS simulations, on the other hand, produced structural parameters in very good agreement with X-ray data. The lattice parameter differences Δa, Δb, Δc between theory and experiment were as small as 0.020, 0.051, and 0.022 Å, respectively. The calculated band gap energy is smaller than the experimental data by about 15%, with a 4.23 eV indirect band gap corresponding to Z → Γ and Z → β transitions. Three other indirect band gaps of 4.30 eV, 4.32 eV, and 4.36 eV are assigned to α3 → Γ, α1 → Γ, and α2 → Γ transitions, respectively. Δ-sol computations, on the other hand, predict a main band gap of 5.00 eV, just 50 meV above the experimental value. Electronic wavefunctions mainly originating from O 2p–carboxyl, C 2p–side chain, and C 2p–carboxyl orbitals contribute most significantly to the highest valence and lowest conduction energy bands, respectively. By varying the lattice parameters from their converged equilibrium values, we show that the unit cell is less stiff along the b direction than for the a and c directions. Effective mass calculations suggest that hole transport behavior is more anisotropic than electron transport, but the mass values allow for some charge mobility except along a direction perpendicular to the molecular layers of L-asparagine which form the crystal, so anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystals could behave as wide gap semiconductors. Finally, the calculations point to a high degree of optical

  17. L-Asparagine crystals with wide gap semiconductor features: optical absorption measurements and density functional theory computations.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, G; Gottfried, C; Silva, A M; Caetano, E W S; Sales, F A M; Freire, V N

    2014-03-28

    Results of optical absorption measurements are presented together with calculated structural, electronic, and optical properties for the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal. Density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) including dispersion effects (TS, Grimme) was employed to perform the calculations. The optical absorption measurements revealed that the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal is a wide band gap material with 4.95 eV main gap energy. DFT-GGA+TS simulations, on the other hand, produced structural parameters in very good agreement with X-ray data. The lattice parameter differences Δa, Δb, Δc between theory and experiment were as small as 0.020, 0.051, and 0.022 Å, respectively. The calculated band gap energy is smaller than the experimental data by about 15%, with a 4.23 eV indirect band gap corresponding to Z → Γ and Z → β transitions. Three other indirect band gaps of 4.30 eV, 4.32 eV, and 4.36 eV are assigned to α3 → Γ, α1 → Γ, and α2 → Γ transitions, respectively. Δ-sol computations, on the other hand, predict a main band gap of 5.00 eV, just 50 meV above the experimental value. Electronic wavefunctions mainly originating from O 2p-carboxyl, C 2p-side chain, and C 2p-carboxyl orbitals contribute most significantly to the highest valence and lowest conduction energy bands, respectively. By varying the lattice parameters from their converged equilibrium values, we show that the unit cell is less stiff along the b direction than for the a and c directions. Effective mass calculations suggest that hole transport behavior is more anisotropic than electron transport, but the mass values allow for some charge mobility except along a direction perpendicular to the molecular layers of L-asparagine which form the crystal, so anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystals could behave as wide gap semiconductors. Finally, the calculations point to a high degree of optical

  18. Complexation of Neptunium(V) with Glutaroimide Dioxime: A Study by Absorption Spectroscopy, Microcalorimetry, and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Seraj A; Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Zhang, Zhicheng; Rao, Linfeng

    2015-09-08

    Complexation of NpO2(+) ions with glutaroimide dioxime (H2L), a cyclic imide dioxime ligand that has been shown to form strong complexes with UO2(2+) in aqueous solutions, was studied by absorption spectroscopy and microcalorimetry in 1.0 M NaClO4 aqueous solutions. NpO2(+) forms two successive complexes, NpO2(HL)(aq) and NpO2(HL)2(-) (where HL(-) stands for the partially deprotonated glutaroimide dioxime ligand), with stability constants of log β111 = 17.8 ± 0.1 and log β122 = 33.0 ± 0.2, respectively. The complexation is both enthalpy- and entropy-driven, with negative enthalpies (ΔH111 = -52.3 ± 1.0 kJ/mol and ΔH122 = -96.1 ± 1.4 kJ/mol) and positive entropies (ΔS111 = 164 ± 3 J/mol/K and ΔS122 = 310 ± 4 J/mol/K). The thermodynamic parameters suggest that, similar to complexation of UO2(2+), the ligand coordinates with NpO2(+) in a tridentate mode, via the two oxygen atoms of the oxime groups and the nitrogen atom of the imide group. Density functional theory calculations have helped to interpret the optical absorption properties of the NpO2(HL)2(-) complex, by showing that the cis and trans configurations of the complex have very similar energies so that both configurations could be present in the aqueous solutions. It is the noncentrosymmetric cis configuration that makes the 5f → 5f transition allowable so that the NpO2(HL)2(-) complex absorbs in the near-IR region.

  19. Collision-induced absorption with exchange effects and anisotropic interactions: Theory and application to H{sub 2} − H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Karman, Tijs; Avoird, Ad van der; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.

    2015-02-28

    We discuss three quantum mechanical formalisms for calculating collision-induced absorption spectra. First, we revisit the established theory of collision-induced absorption, assuming distinguishable molecules which interact isotropically. Then, the theory is rederived incorporating exchange effects between indistinguishable molecules. It is shown that the spectrum can no longer be written as an incoherent sum of the contributions of the different spherical components of the dipole moment. Finally, we derive an efficient method to include the effects of anisotropic interactions in the computation of the absorption spectrum. This method calculates the dipole coupling on-the-fly, which allows for the uncoupled treatment of the initial and final states without the explicit reconstruction of the many-component wave functions. The three formalisms are applied to the collision-induced rotation-translation spectra of hydrogen molecules in the far-infrared. Good agreement with experimental data is obtained. Significant effects of anisotropic interactions are observed in the far wing.

  20. Partitioning ecosystems for sustainability.

    PubMed

    Murray, Martyn G

    2016-03-01

    Decline in the abundance of renewable natural resources (RNRs) coupled with increasing demands of an expanding human population will greatly intensify competition for Earth's natural resources during this century, yet curiously, analytical approaches to the management of productive ecosystems (ecological theory of wildlife harvesting, tragedy of the commons, green economics, and bioeconomics) give only peripheral attention to the driving influence of competition on resource exploitation. Here, I apply resource competition theory (RCT) to the exploitation of RNRs and derive four general policies in support of their sustainable and equitable use: (1) regulate resource extraction technology to avoid damage to the resource base; (2) increase efficiency of resource use and reduce waste at every step in the resource supply chain and distribution network; (3) partition ecosystems with the harvesting niche as the basic organizing principle for sustainable management of natural resources by multiple users; and (4) increase negative feedback between consumer and resource to bring about long-term sustainable use. A simple policy framework demonstrates how RCT integrates with other elements of sustainability science to better manage productive ecosystems. Several problem areas of RNR management are discussed in the light of RCT, including tragedy of the commons, overharvesting, resource collapse, bycatch, single species quotas, and simplification of ecosystems.

  1. High-resolution molybdenum K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyzed with time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Lima, Frederico A; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Chandrasekaran, Perumalreddy; Glatzel, Pieter; Neese, Frank; DeBeer, Serena

    2013-12-28

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a widely used experimental technique capable of selectively probing the local structure around an absorbing atomic species in molecules and materials. When applied to heavy elements, however, the quantitative interpretation can be challenging due to the intrinsic spectral broadening arising from the decrease in the core-hole lifetime. In this work we have used high-energy resolution fluorescence detected XAS (HERFD-XAS) to investigate a series of molybdenum complexes. The sharper spectral features obtained by HERFD-XAS measurements enable a clear assignment of the features present in the pre-edge region. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has been previously shown to predict K-pre-edge XAS spectra of first row transition metal compounds with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Here we extend this approach to molybdenum K-edge HERFD-XAS and present the necessary calibration. Modern pure and hybrid functionals are utilized and relativistic effects are accounted for using either the Zeroth Order Regular Approximation (ZORA) or the second order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH2) scalar relativistic approximations. We have found that both the predicted energies and intensities are in excellent agreement with experiment, independent of the functional used. The model chosen to account for relativistic effects also has little impact on the calculated spectra. This study provides an important calibration set for future applications of molybdenum HERFD-XAS to complex catalytic systems.

  2. Plasmid Partition Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Jamie C; Funnell, Barbara E

    2014-12-01

    The stable maintenance of low-copy-number plasmids in bacteria is actively driven by partition mechanisms that are responsible for the positioning of plasmids inside the cell. Partition systems are ubiquitous in the microbial world and are encoded by many bacterial chromosomes as well as plasmids. These systems, although different in sequence and mechanism, typically consist of two proteins and a DNA partition site, or prokaryotic centromere, on the plasmid or chromosome. One protein binds site-specifically to the centromere to form a partition complex, and the other protein uses the energy of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis to transport the plasmid, via interactions with this partition complex inside the cell. For plasmids, this minimal cassette is sufficient to direct proper segregation in bacterial cells. There has been significant progress in the last several years in our understanding of partition mechanisms. Two general areas that have developed are (i) the structural biology of partition proteins and their interactions with DNA and (ii) the action and dynamics of the partition ATPases that drive the process. In addition, systems that use tubulin-like GTPases to partition plasmids have recently been identified. In this chapter, we concentrate on these recent developments and the molecular details of plasmid partition mechanisms.

  3. Gas-particle partitioning of primary organic aerosol emissions: (1) Gasoline vehicle exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Andrew A.; Presto, Albert A.; Hennigan, Christopher J.; Nguyen, Ngoc T.; Gordon, Timothy D.; Robinson, Allen L.

    2013-10-01

    The gas-particle partitioning of the primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions from fifty-one light-duty gasoline vehicles (model years 1987-2012) was investigated at the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Smit Laboratory. Each vehicle was operated over the cold-start unified cycle on a chassis dynamometer and its emissions were sampled using a constant volume sampler. Four independent yet complementary approaches were used to investigate POA gas-particle partitioning: sampling artifact correction of quartz filter data, dilution from the constant volume sampler into a portable environmental chamber, heating in a thermodenuder, and thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of quartz filter samples. This combination of techniques allowed gas-particle partitioning measurements to be made across a wide range of atmospherically relevant conditions - temperatures of 25-100 °C and organic aerosol concentrations of <1-600 μg m-3. The gas-particle partitioning of the POA emissions varied continuously over this entire range of conditions and essentially none of the POA should be considered non-volatile. Furthermore, for most vehicles, the low levels of dilution used in the constant volume sampler created particle mass concentrations that were greater than a factor of 10 or higher than typical ambient levels. This resulted in large and systematic partitioning biases in the POA emission factors compared to more dilute atmospheric conditions, as the POA emission rates may be over-estimated by nearly a factor of four due to gas-particle partitioning at higher particle mass concentrations. A volatility distribution was derived to quantitatively describe the measured gas-particle partitioning data using absorptive partitioning theory. Although the POA emission factors varied by more than two orders of magnitude across the test fleet, the vehicle-to-vehicle differences in gas-particle partitioning were modest. Therefore, a single volatility distribution

  4. Decoupling scattering and absorption of turbid samples using a simple empirical relation between coefficients of the Kubelka-Munk and radiative transfer theories.

    PubMed

    Gaonkar, Harshavardhan Ashok; Kumar, Dinesh; Ramasubramaniam, Rajagopal; Roy, Arindam

    2014-05-01

    Efforts are underway to better understand the absorption properties of micro- and nano-sized particles due to their potential in various photonic applications. However, most of these particles exhibit strong scattering in the spectral regions of interest in addition to absorption. Due to strong interference from scattering, the absorption of these turbid samples cannot be directly measured using conventional spectroscopy techniques. The optical properties of these particles are also different from that of the bulk due to quantum confinement and plasmon resonance effects and cannot be inferred from their bulk properties. By measuring the total transmittance and total reflectance (diffuse and collimated) of turbid samples and using an empirical relation between the coefficients of the Kubelka-Munk and radiative transfer theories, we have demonstrated a method to calculate the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of turbid samples. This method is capable of extracting the absorption coefficient of turbid samples with an error of 2%. Using this method, we have decoupled the specific absorption and specific reduced scattering coefficients of commercially available micro-sized iron oxide particles. The current method can be used to measure the optical properties of irregularly shaped particle dispersions, which are otherwise difficult to estimate theoretically.

  5. Polymers as Reference Partitioning Phase: Polymer Calibration for an Analytically Operational Approach To Quantify Multimedia Phase Partitioning.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Witt, Gesine; Smedes, Foppe; Mayer, Philipp

    2016-06-07

    Polymers are increasingly applied for the enrichment of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) from various types of samples and media in many analytical partitioning-based measuring techniques. We propose using polymers as a reference partitioning phase and introduce polymer-polymer partitioning as the basis for a deeper insight into partitioning differences of HOCs between polymers, calibrating analytical methods, and consistency checking of existing and calculation of new partition coefficients. Polymer-polymer partition coefficients were determined for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) by equilibrating 13 silicones, including polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) in methanol-water solutions. Methanol as cosolvent ensured that all polymers reached equilibrium while its effect on the polymers' properties did not significantly affect silicone-silicone partition coefficients. However, we noticed minor cosolvent effects on determined polymer-polymer partition coefficients. Polymer-polymer partition coefficients near unity confirmed identical absorption capacities of several PDMS materials, whereas larger deviations from unity were indicated within the group of silicones and between silicones and LDPE. Uncertainty in polymer volume due to imprecise coating thickness or the presence of fillers was identified as the source of error for partition coefficients. New polymer-based (LDPE-lipid, PDMS-air) and multimedia partition coefficients (lipid-water, air-water) were calculated by applying the new concept of a polymer as reference partitioning phase and by using polymer-polymer partition coefficients as conversion factors. The present study encourages the use of polymer-polymer partition coefficients, recognizing that polymers can serve as a linking third phase for a quantitative understanding of equilibrium partitioning of HOCs between any two phases.

  6. Chiral partition functions of quantum Hall droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Cappelli, Andrea Viola, Giovanni; Zemba, Guillermo R.

    2010-02-15

    Chiral partition functions of conformal field theory describe the edge excitations of isolated Hall droplets. They are characterized by an index specifying the quasiparticle sector and transform among themselves by a finite-dimensional representation of the modular group. The partition functions are derived and used to describe electron transitions leading to Coulomb blockade conductance peaks. We find the peak patterns for Abelian hierarchical states and non-Abelian Read-Rezayi states, and compare them. Experimental observation of these features can check the qualitative properties of the conformal field theory description, such as the decomposition of the Hilbert space into sectors, involving charged and neutral parts, and the fusion rules.

  7. Insights into secondary organic aerosol formation mechanisms from measured gas/particle partitioning of specific organic tracer compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunliang; Kreisberg, Nathan M; Worton, David R; Isaacman, Gabriel; Weber, Robin J; Liu, Shang; Day, Douglas A; Russell, Lynn M; Markovic, Milos Z; VandenBoer, Trevor C; Murphy, Jennifer G; Hering, Susanne V; Goldstein, Allen H

    2013-04-16

    In situ measurements of organic compounds in both gas and particle phases were made with a thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography (TAG) instrument. The gas/particle partitioning of phthalic acid, pinonaldehyde, and 6,10,14-trimethyl-2-pentadecanone is discussed in detail to explore secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation mechanisms. Measured fractions in the particle phase (f(part)) of 6,10,14-trimethyl-2-pentadecanone were similar to those expected from the absorptive gas/particle partitioning theory, suggesting that its partitioning is dominated by absorption processes. However, f(part) of phthalic acid and pinonaldehyde were substantially higher than predicted. The formation of low-volatility products from reactions of phthalic acid with ammonia is proposed as one possible mechanism to explain the high f(part) of phthalic acid. The observations of particle-phase pinonaldehyde when inorganic acids were fully neutralized indicate that inorganic acids are not required for the occurrence of reactive uptake of pinonaldehyde on particles. The observed relationship between f(part) of pinonaldehyde and relative humidity suggests that the aerosol water plays a significant role in the formation of particle-phase pinonaldehyde. Our results clearly show it is necessary to include multiple gas/particle partitioning pathways in models to predict SOA and multiple SOA tracers in source apportionment models to reconstruct SOA.

  8. The Benefits of Adaptive Partitioning for Parallel AMR Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Steensland, Johan

    2008-07-01

    Parallel adaptive mesh refinement methods potentially lead to realistic modeling of complex three-dimensional physical phenomena. However, the dynamics inherent in these methods present significant challenges in data partitioning and load balancing. Significant human resources, including time, effort, experience, and knowledge, are required for determining the optimal partitioning technique for each new simulation. In reality, scientists resort to using the on-board partitioner of the computational framework, or to using the partitioning industry standard, ParMetis. Adaptive partitioning refers to repeatedly selecting, configuring and invoking the optimal partitioning technique at run-time, based on the current state of the computer and application. In theory, adaptive partitioning automatically delivers superior performance and eliminates the need for repeatedly spending valuable human resources for determining the optimal static partitioning technique. In practice, however, enabling frameworks are non-existent due to the inherent significant inter-disciplinary research challenges. This paper presents a study of a simple implementation of adaptive partitioning and discusses implied potential benefits from the perspective of common groups of users within computational science. The study is based on a large set of data derived from experiments including six real-life, multi-time-step adaptive applications from various scientific domains, five complementing and fundamentally different partitioning techniques, a large set of parameters corresponding to a wide spectrum of computing environments, and a flexible cost function that considers the relative impact of multiple partitioning metrics and diverse partitioning objectives. The results show that even a simple implementation of adaptive partitioning can automatically generate results statistically equivalent to the best static partitioning. Thus, it is possible to effectively eliminate the problem of determining the

  9. Equivalence of partition properties and determinacy

    PubMed Central

    Kechris, Alexander S.; Woodin, W. Hugh

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that, within L(ℝ), the smallest inner model of set theory containing the reals, the axiom of determinacy is equivalent to the existence of arbitrarily large cardinals below Θ with the strong partition property κ → (κ)κ. PMID:16593299

  10. A Partition Formula for Fibonacci Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahr, Philipp; Ringerl, Claus Michael

    2008-02-01

    We present a partition formula for the even index Fibonacci numbers. The formula is motivated by the appearance of these Fibonacci numbers in the representation theory of the socalled 3-Kronecker quiver, i.e., the oriented graph with two vertices and three arrows in the same direction.

  11. Toxicokinetics and toxicity of sediment-associated pyrene and phenanthrene in Diporeia spp. : Examination of equilibrium-partitioning theory and residue-based effects for assessing hazard

    SciTech Connect

    Landrum, P.F.; Dupuis, W.S. . Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab.); Kukkonen, J. . Dept. of Biology)

    1994-11-01

    The amphipod Diporeia spp. was exposed to pyrene or phenanthrene-dosed sediments for month-long exposures. Phenanthrene was only slightly toxic with 12 [+-] 3% mortality at the highest sediment dose (0.62 [mu]mol g[sup [minus]1]). Failure to attain and maintain toxic residue body burdens, based on a nonpolar narcosis concentration of approximately 6 [mu]mol g[sup [minus]1], accounts for the low mortality. Phenanthrene toxicokinetic parameters were essentially constant among all doses and consistent with previous measures. Sediment concentration was a poor representation of dose for mortality by pyrene. The relative pyrene distribution among the < 63-[mu]m particles increased in the smallest-sized particles at larger doses. An apparent stimulation of pyrene accumulation was observed as a peak in uptake clearance values between sediment concentrations of 0.16 and 0.26 [mu]mol g[sup [minus]1] dry sediment. The pyrene particle-size distribution and the variation in kinetics with dose provide a partial explanation for the poor representation of dose by the sediment concentration. The pyrene body burdens provided a good dose response yielding LD50 values of 6.3 and 9.4 [mu]mol g[sup [minus]1] for two experiments. These values are consistent with the residue concentrations for 50% mortality by a nonpolar narcosis mechanism. Comparing the experimental and predicted equilibrium partitioning-based sediment concentrations for 50% mortality, the equilibrium prediction overestimates the toxic pyrene sediment concentration by approximately a factor of ten. Diporeia behavior, differential particle-size distribution, and kinetic limitations appear as likely reasons for the variation between calculated and observed concentrations required to produce mortality.

  12. Chaos synchronization basing on symbolic dynamics with nongenerating partition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingyuan; Wang, Mogei; Liu, Zhenzhen

    2009-06-01

    Using symbolic dynamics and information theory, we study the information transmission needed for synchronizing unidirectionally coupled oscillators. It is found that when sustaining chaos synchronization with nongenerating partition, the synchronization error will be larger than a critical value, although the required coupled channel capacity can be smaller than the case of using a generating partition. Then we show that no matter whether a generating or nongenerating partition is in use, a high-quality detector can guarantee the lead of the response oscillator, while the lag responding can make up the low precision of the detector. A practicable synchronization scheme basing on a nongenerating partition is also proposed in this paper.

  13. Simulating One-Photon Absorption and Resonance Raman Scattering Spectra Using Analytical Excited State Energy Gradients within Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Daniel W.; Govind, Niranjan; van Dam, Hubertus J. J.; Jensen, Lasse

    2013-12-10

    A parallel implementation of analytical time-dependent density functional theory gradients is presented for the quantum chemistry program NWChem. The implementation is based on the Lagrangian approach developed by Furche and Ahlrichs. To validate our implementation, we first calculate the Stokes shifts for a range of organic dye molecules using a diverse set of exchange-correlation functionals (traditional density functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids) followed by simulations of the one-photon absorption and resonance Raman scattering spectrum of the phenoxyl radical, the well-studied dye molecule rhodamine 6G, and a molecular host–guest complex (TTFcCBPQT4+). The study of organic dye molecules illustrates that B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP generally give the best agreement with experimentally determined Stokes shifts unless the excited state is a charge transfer state. Absorption, resonance Raman, and fluorescence simulations for the phenoxyl radical indicate that explicit solvation may be required for accurate characterization. For the host–guest complex and rhodamine 6G, it is demonstrated that absorption spectra can be simulated in good agreement with experimental data for most exchange-correlation functionals. Finally, however, because one-photon absorption spectra generally lack well-resolved vibrational features, resonance Raman simulations are necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the exchange-correlation functional for describing a potential energy surface.

  14. Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior

    SciTech Connect

    UC Davis; Cappa, Christopher D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-10-28

    Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure the evolution of chemical composition for two distinct organic aerosol types as they are passed through a thermodenuder at different temperatures. The two organic aerosol types considered are primary lubricating oil (LO) aerosol and secondary aerosol from the alpha-pinene + O3 reaction (alphaP). The evolution of the VUV mass spectra for the two aerosol types with temperature are observed to differ dramatically. For LO particles, the spectra exhibit distinct changes with temperature in which the lower m/z peaks, corresponding to compounds with higher vapor pressures, disappear more rapidly than the high m/z peaks. In contrast, the alphaP aerosol spectrum is essentially unchanged by temperature even though the particles experience significant mass loss due to evaporation. The variations in the LO spectra are found to be quantitatively in agreement with expectations from absorptive partitioning theory whereas the alphaP spectra suggest that the evaporation of alphaP derived aerosol appears to not be governed by partitioning theory. We postulate that this difference arises from the alphaP particles existing as in a glassy state instead of having the expected liquid-like behavior. To reconcile these observations with decades of aerosol growth measurements, which indicate that OA formation is described by equilibrium partitioning, we present a conceptual model wherein the secondary OA is formed and then rapidly converted from an absorbing form to a non-absorbing form. The results suggest that although OA growth may be describable by equilibrium partitioning theory, the properties of organic aerosol once formed may differ significantly from the properties determined in the equilibrium framework.

  15. Excitation dynamics in Phycoerythrin 545: modeling of steady-state spectra and transient absorption with modified Redfield theory.

    PubMed

    Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Doust, Alexander B; Curutchet, Carles; Scholes, Gregory D; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2010-07-21

    We model the spectra and excitation dynamics in the phycobiliprotein antenna complex PE545 isolated from the unicellular photosynthetic cryptophyte algae Rhodomonas CS24. The excitonic couplings between the eight bilins are calculated using the CIS/6-31G method. The site energies are extracted from a simultaneous fit of the absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and excitation anisotropy spectra together with the transient absorption kinetics using the modified Redfield approach. Quantitative fit of the data enables us to assign the eight exciton components of the spectra and build up the energy transfer picture including pathways and timescales of energy relaxation, thus allowing a visualization of excitation dynamics within the complex.

  16. Graviton 1-loop partition function for 3-dimensional massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaberdiel, Matthias R.; Grumiller, Daniel; Vassilevich, Dmitri

    2010-11-01

    Thegraviton1-loop partition function in Euclidean topologically massivegravity (TMG) is calculated using heat kernel techniques. The partition function does not factorize holomorphically, and at the chiral point it has the structure expected from a logarithmic conformal field theory. This gives strong evidence for the proposal that the dual conformal field theory to TMG at the chiral point is indeed logarithmic. We also generalize our results to new massive gravity.

  17. Partitioning Breaks Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Fergal; McDaid, Aaron; Hurley, Neil

    Considering a clique as a conservative definition of community structure, we examine how graph partitioning algorithms interact with cliques. Many popular community-finding algorithms partition the entire graph into non-overlapping communities. We show that on a wide range of empirical networks, from different domains, significant numbers of cliques are split across the separate partitions produced by these algorithms. We then examine the largest connected component of the subgraph formed by retaining only edges in cliques, and apply partitioning strategies that explicitly minimise the number of cliques split. We further examine several modern overlapping community finding algorithms, in terms of the interaction between cliques and the communities they find, and in terms of the global overlap of the sets of communities they find. We conclude that, due to the connectedness of many networks, any community finding algorithm that produces partitions must fail to find at least some significant structures. Moreover, contrary to traditional intuition, in some empirical networks, strong ties and cliques frequently do cross community boundaries; much community structure is fundamentally overlapping and unpartitionable in nature.

  18. A brief history of partitions of numbers, partition functions and their modern applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2016-04-01

    'Number rules the universe.' The Pythagoras 'If you wish to forsee the future of mathematics our course is to study the history and present conditions of the science.' Henri Poincaré 'The primary source (Urqell) of all mathematics are integers.' Hermann Minkowski This paper is written to commemorate the centennial anniversary of the Mathematical Association of America. It deals with a short history of different kinds of natural numbers including triangular, square, pentagonal, hexagonal and k-gonal numbers, and their simple properties and their geometrical representations. Included are Euclid's and Pythagorean's main contributions to elementary number theory with the main contents of the Euclid Elements of the 13-volume masterpiece of mathematical work. This is followed by Euler's new discovery of the additive number theory based on partitions of numbers. Special attention is given to many examples, Euler's theorems on partitions of numbers with geometrical representations of Ferrers' graphs, Young's diagrams, Lagrange's four-square theorem and the celebrated Waring problem. Included are Euler's generating functions for the partitions of numbers, Euler's pentagonal number theorem, Gauss' triangular and square number theorems and the Jacobi triple product identity. Applications of the theory of partitions of numbers to different statistics such as the Bose- Einstein, Fermi- Dirac, Gentile, and Maxwell- Boltzmann statistics are briefly discussed. Special attention is given to pedagogical information through historical approach to number theory so that students and teachers at the school, college and university levels can become familiar with the basic concepts of partitions of numbers, partition functions and their modern applications, and can pursue advanced study and research in analytical and computational number theory.

  19. Factorization of the bosonic partition function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsharafat, Ayed; Chair, Noureddine

    2017-04-01

    The factorization formula in the non-interacting quantum field theories that relates the fermionic partition function to the bosonic partition function considered recently by Chair (2013) [3] is obtained for the harmonic oscillator using the path integral formulation. By using the latter, the fermionic partition function turns out to be the ratio of two determinants of the same operator (∂τ + ω), whose eigenmodes being both periodic on the imaginary time intervals [ 0 , 2 β ], [ 0 , β ]. The natural generalization of the factorization formula when β →2m β is derived, such a factorization implies that the bosonic oscillator at temperature β can be seen as a non-interacting mixture of a bosonic oscillator at temperature 2m β and m-fermionic oscillators at different temperatures 2 m - k β, k = 1 , 2 , … , m. As a consequence, a general relationship between the bosonic and fermionic thermal zeta functions is deduced.

  20. Iron Partitioning in Ferropericlase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, J. W. H.; Stixrude, L. P.; Pinilla, C.; Holmstrom, E.

    2015-12-01

    Ferropericlase, (Mg,Fe)O, is the second most abundant mineral in the Earth's lower mantle. Whether iron favours the liquid or solid phase of (Mg,Fe)O has important implications for the Earth's mantle, both chemically and dynamically. As iron is much heavier than magnesium, the partitioning of iron between liquid and solid will lead to a contrast in densities. This difference in density will lead one phase to be more buoyant than the other and would help, in part, to explain how the mantle crystallised from the magma ocean of the Hadean eon to its current state. The partitioning of iron between the two phases is characterized by partition coefficients. Using ab-initio methods, thermodynamic integration and adiabatic switching these coefficients have been determined. Results are presented for pressures encompassing the region between the upper mantle and the core-mantle boundary (10-140GPa).

  1. Comment on “Rethinking first-principles electron transport theories with projection operators: The problems caused by partitioning the basis set” [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114104 (2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Brandbyge, Mads

    2014-05-07

    In a recent paper Reuter and Harrison [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114104 (2013)] question the widely used mean-field electron transport theories, which employ nonorthogonal localized basis sets. They claim these can violate an “implicit decoupling assumption,” leading to wrong results for the current, different from what would be obtained by using an orthogonal basis, and dividing surfaces defined in real-space. We argue that this assumption is not required to be fulfilled to get exact results. We show how the current/transmission calculated by the standard Greens function method is independent of whether or not the chosen basis set is nonorthogonal, and that the current for a given basis set is consistent with divisions in real space. The ambiguity known from charge population analysis for nonorthogonal bases does not carry over to calculations of charge flux.

  2. Comment on "Rethinking first-principles electron transport theories with projection operators: The problems caused by partitioning the basis set" [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114104 (2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandbyge, Mads

    2014-05-01

    In a recent paper Reuter and Harrison [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 114104 (2013)] question the widely used mean-field electron transport theories, which employ nonorthogonal localized basis sets. They claim these can violate an "implicit decoupling assumption," leading to wrong results for the current, different from what would be obtained by using an orthogonal basis, and dividing surfaces defined in real-space. We argue that this assumption is not required to be fulfilled to get exact results. We show how the current/transmission calculated by the standard Greens function method is independent of whether or not the chosen basis set is nonorthogonal, and that the current for a given basis set is consistent with divisions in real space. The ambiguity known from charge population analysis for nonorthogonal bases does not carry over to calculations of charge flux.

  3. Charge transfer optical absorption and fluorescence emission of 4-(9-acridyl)julolidine from long-range-corrected time dependent density functional theory in polarizable continuum approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kityk, A. V.

    2014-07-01

    A long-range-corrected time-dependent density functional theory (LC-TDDFT) in combination with polarizable continuum model (PCM) have been applied to study charge transfer (CT) optical absorption and fluorescence emission energies basing on parameterized LC-BLYP xc-potential. The molecule of 4-(9-acridyl)julolidine selected for this study represents typical CT donor-acceptor dye with strongly solvent dependent optical absorption and fluorescence emission spectra. The result of calculations are compared with experimental spectra reported in the literature to derive an optimal value of the model screening parameter ω. The first absorption band appears to be quite well predictable within DFT/TDDFT/PCM with the screening parameter ω to be solvent independent (ω≈0.245 Bohr-1) whereas the fluorescence emission exhibits a strong dependence on the range separation with ω-value varying on a rising solvent polarity from about 0.225 to 0.151 Bohr-1. Dipolar properties of the initial state participating in the electronic transition have crucial impact on the effective screening.

  4. FNAS phase partitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanalstine, James M.

    1993-01-01

    Project NAS8-36955 D.O. #100 initially involved the following tasks: (1) evaluation of various coatings' ability to control wall wetting and surface zeta potential expression; (2) testing various methods to mix and control the demixing of phase systems; and (3) videomicroscopic investigation of cell partition. Three complementary areas were identified for modification and extension of the original contract. They were: (1) identification of new supports for column cell partition; (2) electrokinetic detection of protein adsorption; and (3) emulsion studies related to bioseparations.

  5. Beyond the electric-dipole approximation: A formulation and implementation of molecular response theory for the description of absorption of electromagnetic field radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    List, Nanna Holmgaard; Kauczor, Joanna; Saue, Trond; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Norman, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    We present a formulation of molecular response theory for the description of a quantum mechanical molecular system in the presence of a weak, monochromatic, linearly polarized electromagnetic field without introducing truncated multipolar expansions. The presentation focuses on a description of linear absorption by adopting the energy-loss approach in combination with the complex polarization propagator formulation of response theory. Going beyond the electric-dipole approximation is essential whenever studying electric-dipole-forbidden transitions, and in general, non-dipolar effects become increasingly important when addressing spectroscopies involving higher-energy photons. These two aspects are examined by our study of the near K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure of the alkaline earth metals (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Ra) as well as the trans-polyenes. In following the series of alkaline earth metals, the sizes of non-dipolar effects are probed with respect to increasing photon energies and a detailed assessment of results is made in terms of studying the pertinent transition electron densities and in particular their spatial extension in comparison with the photon wavelength. Along the series of trans-polyenes, the sizes of non-dipolar effects are probed for X-ray spectroscopies on organic molecules with respect to the spatial extension of the chromophore.

  6. Beyond the electric-dipole approximation: A formulation and implementation of molecular response theory for the description of absorption of electromagnetic field radiation

    SciTech Connect

    List, Nanna Holmgaard Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick; Saue, Trond

    2015-06-28

    We present a formulation of molecular response theory for the description of a quantum mechanical molecular system in the presence of a weak, monochromatic, linearly polarized electromagnetic field without introducing truncated multipolar expansions. The presentation focuses on a description of linear absorption by adopting the energy-loss approach in combination with the complex polarization propagator formulation of response theory. Going beyond the electric-dipole approximation is essential whenever studying electric-dipole-forbidden transitions, and in general, non-dipolar effects become increasingly important when addressing spectroscopies involving higher-energy photons. These two aspects are examined by our study of the near K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure of the alkaline earth metals (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Ra) as well as the trans-polyenes. In following the series of alkaline earth metals, the sizes of non-dipolar effects are probed with respect to increasing photon energies and a detailed assessment of results is made in terms of studying the pertinent transition electron densities and in particular their spatial extension in comparison with the photon wavelength. Along the series of trans-polyenes, the sizes of non-dipolar effects are probed for X-ray spectroscopies on organic molecules with respect to the spatial extension of the chromophore.

  7. Application of Time-Dependent Density Functional and Natural Bond Orbital Theories to the UV-vis Absorption Spectra of Some Phenolic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Marković, Svetlana; Tošović, Jelena

    2015-09-03

    The UV-vis properties of 22 natural phenolic compounds, comprising anthraquinones, neoflavonoids, and flavonoids were systematically examined. The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) approach in combination with the B3LYP, B3LYP-D2, B3P86, and M06-2X functionals was used to simulate the UV-vis spectra of the investigated compounds. It was shown that all methods exhibit very good (B3LYP slightly better) performance in reproducing the examined UV-vis spectra. However, the shapes of the Kohn-Sham molecular orbitals (MOs) involved in electronic transitions were misleading in constructing the MO correlation diagrams. To provide better understanding of redistribution of electron density upon excitation, the natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was applied. Bearing in mind the spatial and energetic separations, as well as the character of the π bonding, lone pair, and π* antibonding natural localized molecular orbitals (NLMOs), the "NLMO clusters" were constructed. NLMO cluster should be understood as a part of a molecule characterized with distinguished electron density. It was shown that all absorption bands including all electronic transitions need to be inspected to fully understand the UV-vis spectrum of a certain compound, and, thus, to learn more about its UV-vis light absorption. Our investigation showed that the TDDFT and NBO theories are complementary, as the results from the two approaches can be combined to interpret the UV-vis spectra. Agreement between the predictions of the TDDFT approach and those based on the NLMO clusters is excellent in the case of major electronic transitions and long wavelengths. It should be emphasized that the approach for investigation of UV-vis light absorption based on the NLMO clusters is applied for the first time.

  8. X-ray absorption and reflection as probes of the GaN conduction bands: Theory and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrecht, W.R.L.; Rashkeev, S.N.; Segall, B.

    1997-04-01

    X-ray absorption measurements are a well-known probe of the unoccupied states in a material. The same information can be obtained by using glancing angle X-ray reflectivity. In spite of several existing band structure calculations of the group III nitrides and previous optical studies in UV range, a direct probe of their conduction band densities of states is of interest. The authors performed a joint experimental and theoretical investigation using both of these experimental techniques for wurtzite GaN.

  9. Experimental determination of partition coefficient for β-pinene ozonolysis products in SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensch, Iulia; Hohaus, Thorsten; Kimmel, Joel; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, simultaneous measurement of β-pinene ozonolysis products in the gas phase by Proton Transfer Reaction - Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToFMS) and particle phase by using an Aerosol Collection Module coupled to a Gas Chromatograph - Mass Spectrometer (ACM-GC-MS) were employed to determine the equilibrium partitioning coefficient (Kp) of several semi-volatile organic species. Mean Kp values of 6.7 10-5 ± 2.5 10-5 for nopinone, 4.8 10-4 ± 1.7 10-4 for apoverbenone, 7.0 10-4 ± 1.7 10-4 for oxonopinone and 1.9 10-3 ± 1.1 10-3 for hydroxynopinone were obtained. The results were compared with calculations arising from studies on the gas-particle partitioning, based on the Pankow absorption model. The experimental partition coefficients are two to three orders of magnitudes higher than the calculated values, leading to the conclusion that the amount of semi-volatile organic compounds in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is currently underestimated by the theory, thus impacting on the modeling of the organic matter in the atmosphere.

  10. Theory of direct and indirect effect of two-photon absorption on nonlinear optical losses in high power semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrutin, E. A.; Ryvkin, B. S.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the transverse laser structure on two-photon absorption (TPA) related effects in high-power diode lasers is analysed theoretically. The direct effect of TPA is found to depend significantly on the transverse waveguide structure, and predicted to be weaker in broad and asymmetric waveguide designs. The indirect effect of TPA, via carrier generation in the waveguide and free-carrier absorption, is analysed for the case of a symmetric laser waveguide and shown to be strongly dependent on the active layer position. With the active layer near the mode peak, the indirect effect is weaker than the direct effect due to the population of TPA-created carriers being efficiently depleted by their diffusion and capture into the active layer, whereas for the active layer position strongly shifted towards the p-cladding, the indirect effect can become the dominant power limitation at very high currents. It is shown that for optimizing a laser design for pulsed high power operation, both TPA related effects and the inhomogeneous carrier accumulation in the waveguide caused by diffusive current need to be taken into account.

  11. A method based on reflection theory to test the attenuation performance of an absorption coat to 8mm waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuanyu

    2016-09-01

    A testing method has been set up to evaluate the attenuation performance of an absorption coat to 8mm waves, which is based on a set of detecting system included by an 8mm wave emitter, a millimeter power meter, a point to point collimator and a reflecting plate. The power meter was aimed at the 8 mm wave emitter along the reflection optical path instead of the direction observation between incident and reflected millimeter wave. Some Al, Fe and aluminum alloy sample plates were made and painted by the dope which was complexed with chopped carbon fibers. A naked metal plate was first used to adjust the transmission path of the millimeter wave. Then the power meter was adjusted to phase locking after preheating, and the millimeter wave power was sampled as the background value. Then the other painted plates were tested under the same conditions. When the concentration of chopped carbon fibers is 0.5mg/ml and the thickness of the absorption coat is 0.5mm, the attenuation percentages of Al, Fe and aluminum alloy painted plates respectively is 54.29%, 58.31% and 41.12%. By the result, the reflection testing method may be widely used to measure the reflection capacity or attenuation performance of various surfaces to millimeter waves.

  12. QED Theory of Radiation Emission and Absorption Lines for Atoms and Ions in a Strong Laser Field

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, A. V.

    2008-10-22

    The results of numerical calculating the multi-photon resonance shift and width for transition 6S-6F in the atom of Cs (wavelength 1059nm) in a laser pulse of the Gaussian and soliton-like shapes are presented. QED theory of radiation atomic lines is used.

  13. Multiple slow waves in metaporous layers for broadband sound absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jieun; Lee, Joong Seok; Kim, Yoon Young

    2017-01-01

    Sound absorption for a broad frequency range requires sound dissipation. The mechanics of acoustic metamaterials for non-dissipative applications has been extensively studied, but sound absorption using dissipative porous metamaterials has been less explored because of the complexity resulting from the coupling of its dissipative mechanism and metamaterial behavior. We investigated broadband sound absorption by engineering dissipative metaporous layers, which absorb sound by the mechanism of multiple slow waves, and combined local and global resonance phenomena. A set of rigid partitions of varying lengths was elaborately inserted in a hard-backed porous layer of a finite thickness. An effective medium theory was used to explain the physics involved; high performance at a low-frequency range was found to be mainly due to the formation of global resonances caused by multiple slow waves over the thickness of the metaporous layer, while enhancement at a high-frequency range was attributed to the combined effects of the global resonances and the local resonances directly related to the sizes of the inserted partitions.

  14. Transition from exo- to endo- Cu absorption in CuSin clusters: A Genetic Algorithms Density Functional Theory (DFT) Study

    PubMed Central

    Oña, Ofelia B.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Facelli, Julio C.

    2010-01-01

    The characterization and prediction of the structures of metal silicon clusters is important for nanotechnology research because these clusters can be used as building blocks for nano devices, integrated circuits and solar cells. Several authors have postulated that there is a transition between exo to endo absorption of Cu in Sin clusters and showed that for n larger than 9 it is possible to find endohedral clusters. Unfortunately, no global searchers have confirmed this observation, which is based on local optimizations of plausible structures. Here we use parallel Genetic Algorithms (GA), as implemented in our MGAC software, directly coupled with DFT energy calculations to show that the global search of CuSin cluster structures does not find endohedral clusters for n < 8 but finds them for n ≥ 10. PMID:21785526

  15. Analysis of fractals with combined partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedovich, T. G.; Tokarev, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    The space—time properties in the general theory of relativity, as well as the discreteness and non-Archimedean property of space in the quantum theory of gravitation, are discussed. It is emphasized that the properties of bodies in non-Archimedean spaces coincide with the properties of the field of P-adic numbers and fractals. It is suggested that parton showers, used for describing interactions between particles and nuclei at high energies, have a fractal structure. A mechanism of fractal formation with combined partition is considered. The modified SePaC method is offered for the analysis of such fractals. The BC, PaC, and SePaC methods for determining a fractal dimension and other fractal characteristics (numbers of levels and values of a base of forming a fractal) are considered. It is found that the SePaC method has advantages for the analysis of fractals with combined partition.

  16. Acid-catalyzed condensed-phase reactions of limonene and terpineol and their impacts on gas-to-particle partitioning in the formation of organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong Jie; Cheong, Gema Y L; Lau, Arthur P S; Chan, Chak K

    2010-07-15

    We investigated the condensed-phase reactions of biogenic VOCs with C double bond C bonds (limonene, C(10)H(16), and terpineol, C(10)H(18)O) catalyzed by sulfuric acid by both bulk solution (BS) experiments and gas-particle (GP) experiments using a flow cell reactor. Product analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that cationic polymerization led to dimeric and trimeric product formation under conditions of relative humidity (RH) <20% (in the GP experiments) and a sulfuric acid concentration of 57.8 wt % (in the BS experiments), while hydration occurred under conditions of RH > 20% (in the GP experiments) and sulfuric acid concentrations of 46.3 wt % or lower (in the BS experiments). Apparent partitioning coefficients (K(p,rxn)) were estimated from the GP experiments by including the reaction products. Only under extremely low RH conditions (RH < 5%) did the values of K(p,rxn) ( approximately 5 x 10(-6) m(3)/microg for limonene and approximately 2 x 10(-5) m(3)/microg for terpineol) substantially exceed the physical partitioning coefficients (K(p) = 6.5 x 10(-8) m(3)/microg for limonene and =2.3 x 10(-6) m(3)/microg for terpineol) derived from the absorptive partitioning theory. At RH higher than 5%, the apparent partitioning coefficients (K(p,rxn)) of both limonene and terpineol were in the same order of magnitude as the K(p) values derived from the absorptive partitioning theory. Compared with other conditions including VOC concentration and degree of neutralization (by ammonium) of acidic particles, RH is a critical parameter that influences both the reaction mechanisms and the uptake ability (K(p,rxn) values) of these processes. The finding suggests that RH needs to be considered when taking the effects of acid-catalyzed reactions into account in estimating organic aerosol formation from C double bond C containing VOCs.

  17. Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1,0)[gamma] band in the daytime thermosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Eparvier, F.G.; Barth, C.A. )

    1992-09-01

    Sounding rocket observations of the ultraviolet fluorescent emissions of the nitric oxide molecule in the lower thermospheric dayglow are described and analyzed. The rocket experiment was an ultraviolet spectrometer which took limb-viewing spectra of the dayglow between 90- and 185- km altitude in the spectral region from 2120 to 2505 [angstrom] with a resolution of 2.0 [angstrom]. The flight occurred at local noon on March 7, 1989, from Poker Flat, Alaska. Several NO[gamma] bands were visible at all altitudes of the flight, along with emission features of N[sub 2], O[sup +], and N[sup +]. The data for the NO (1,0) and (0,1)[gamma] bands were modeled with optically thin synthetic spectra and used as diagnostics of nitric oxide concentrations. The resonant NO (1,0)[gamma] band emissions were shown to be attenuated at low altitudes relative to the expected emission rates predicted from comparison with the nonresonant (0,1)[gamma] band. Inversion of the optically thin data resulted in a peak nitric oxide concentration of 3.1x10[sup 8] cm[sup [minus]3] at an altitude of 100km. A self-absorption model using Holstein transmission functions was developed and applied to the (1,0) [gamma] band observation. The model results agree with the measured attenuation of the band, indicating the necessity of including self-absorption theory in the analysis of satellite and rocket limb data of NO. The success of the model also confirms the value adopted for the absorption oscillator strength of the (1,0)[gamma] band transition and the instrument calibration.

  18. Theory and operation of the real-time data acquisition system for the NASA-LaRC differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.

    1986-01-01

    The improvement of computer hardware and software of the NASA Multipurpose Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system is documented. The NASA DIAL system is undergoing development and experimental deployment at NASA Langley Research Center for the remote measurement of atmospheric trace gas concentrations from ground and aircraft platforms. A viable DIAL system was developed capable of remotely measuring O3 and H2O concentrations from an aircraft platform. Test flights of the DIAL system were successfully performed onboard the NASA Goddard Flight Center Electra aircraft from 1980 to 1985. The DIAL Data Acquisition System has undergone a number of improvements over the past few years. These improvements have now been field tested. The theory behind a real time computer system as it applies to the needs of the DIAL system is discussed. This report is designed to be used as an operational manual for the DIAL DAS.

  19. The Be K-edge in beryllium oxide and chalcogenides: soft x-ray absorption spectra from first-principles theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Olovsson, W; Weinhardt, L; Fuchs, O; Tanaka, I; Puschnig, P; Umbach, E; Heske, C; Draxl, C

    2013-08-07

    We have carried out a theoretical and experimental investigation of the beryllium K-edge soft x-ray absorption fine structure of beryllium compounds in the oxygen group, considering BeO, BeS, BeSe, and BeTe. Theoretical spectra are obtained ab initio, through many-body perturbation theory, by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE), and by supercell calculations using the core-hole approximation. All calculations are performed with the full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave method. It is found that the two different theoretical approaches produce a similar fine structure, in good agreement with the experimental data. Using the BSE results, we interpret the spectra, distinguishing between bound core-excitons and higher energy excitations.

  20. Time dependent density functional theory study of the near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure of benzene in gas phase and on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Asmuruf, Frans A; Besley, Nicholas A

    2008-08-14

    The near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure of benzene in the gas phase and adsorbed on the Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces is studied with time dependent density functional theory. Excitation energies computed with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals are too low compared to experiment. However, after applying a constant shift the spectra are in good agreement with experiment. For benzene on the Au(111) surface, two bands arising from excitation to the e(2u)(pi(*)) and b(2g)(pi(*)) orbitals of benzene are observed for photon incidence parallel to the surface. On Pt(111) surface, a broader band arises from excitation to benzene orbitals that are mixed with the surface and have both sigma(*)(Pt-C) and pi(*) characters.

  1. The 4He Total Photo-Absorption Cross Section With Two- Plus Three-Nucleon Interactions From Chiral Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P

    2007-03-09

    The total photo-absorption cross section of {sup 4}He is evaluated microscopically using two- (NN) and three-nucleon (NNN) interactions based upon chiral effective field theory ({chi}EFT). The calculation is performed using the Lorentz integral transform method along with the ab initio no-core shell model approach. An important feature of the present study is the consistency of the NN and NNN interactions and also, through the Siegert theorem, of the two- and three-body current operators. This is due to the application of the {chi}EFT framework. The inclusion of the NNN interaction produces a suppression of the peak height and enhancement of the tail of the cross section. We compare to calculations obtained using other interactions and to representative experiments. The rather confused experimental situation in the giant resonance region prevents discrimination among different interaction models.

  2. Dopant activation mechanism of Bi wire-δ-doping into Si crystal, investigated with wavelength dispersive fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Murata, Koichi; Kirkham, Christopher; Shimomura, Masaru; Nitta, Kiyofumi; Uruga, Tomoya; Terada, Yasuko; Nittoh, Koh-Ichi; Bowler, David R; Miki, Kazushi

    2017-04-20

    We successfully characterized the local structures of Bi atoms in a wire-δ-doped layer (1/8 ML) in a Si crystal, using wavelength dispersive fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure at the beamline BL37XU, in SPring-8, with the help of density functional theory calculations. It was found that the burial of Bi nanolines on the Si(0 0 1) surface, via growth of Si capping layer at 400 °C by molecular beam epitaxy, reduced the Bi-Si bond length from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] Å. We infer that following epitaxial growth the Bi-Bi dimers of the nanoline are broken, and the Bi atoms are located at substitutional sites within the Si crystal, leading to the shorter Bi-Si bond lengths.

  3. Dopant activation mechanism of Bi wire-δ-doping into Si crystal, investigated with wavelength dispersive fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Koichi; Kirkham, Christopher; Shimomura, Masaru; Nitta, Kiyofumi; Uruga, Tomoya; Terada, Yasuko; Nittoh, Koh-ichi; Bowler, David R.; Miki, Kazushi

    2017-04-01

    We successfully characterized the local structures of Bi atoms in a wire-δ-doped layer (1/8 ML) in a Si crystal, using wavelength dispersive fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure at the beamline BL37XU, in SPring-8, with the help of density functional theory calculations. It was found that the burial of Bi nanolines on the Si(0 0 1) surface, via growth of Si capping layer at 400 °C by molecular beam epitaxy, reduced the Bi–Si bond length from 2.79+/- 0.01~{\\mathring{\\text{A}}} to 2.63+/- 0.02 Å. We infer that following epitaxial growth the Bi–Bi dimers of the nanoline are broken, and the Bi atoms are located at substitutional sites within the Si crystal, leading to the shorter Bi–Si bond lengths.

  4. Carbon X-ray absorption spectra of fluoroethenes and acetone: a study at the coupled cluster, density functional, and static-exchange levels of theory.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Coriani, Sonia; Christiansen, Ove; Norman, Patrick

    2013-03-28

    Near carbon K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra of a series of fluorine-substituted ethenes and acetone have been studied using coupled cluster and density functional theory (DFT) polarization propagator methods, as well as the static-exchange (STEX) approach. With the complex polarization propagator (CPP) implemented in coupled cluster theory, relaxation effects following the excitation of core electrons are accounted for in terms of electron correlation, enabling a systematic convergence of these effects with respect to electron excitations in the cluster operator. Coupled cluster results have been used as benchmarks for the assessment of propagator methods in DFT as well as the state-specific static-exchange approach. Calculations on ethene and 1,1-difluoroethene illustrate the possibility of using nonrelativistic coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) with additional effects of electron correlation and relativity added as scalar shifts in energetics. It has been demonstrated that CPP spectra obtained with coupled cluster singles and approximate doubles (CC2), CCSD, and DFT (with a Coulomb attenuated exchange-correlation functional) yield excellent predictions of chemical shifts for vinylfluoride, 1,1-difluoroethene, trifluoroethene, as well as good spectral features for acetone in the case of CCSD and DFT. Following this, CPP-DFT is considered to be a viable option for the calculation of X-ray absorption spectra of larger π-conjugated systems, and CC2 is deemed applicable for chemical shifts but not for studies of fine structure features. The CCSD method as well as the more approximate CC2 method are shown to yield spectral features relating to π∗-resonances in good agreement with experiment, not only for the aforementioned molecules but also for ethene, cis-1,2-difluoroethene, and tetrafluoroethene. The STEX approach is shown to underestimate π∗-peak separations due to spectral compressions, a characteristic which is inherent to this

  5. Carbon X-ray absorption spectra of fluoroethenes and acetone: A study at the coupled cluster, density functional, and static-exchange levels of theory

    SciTech Connect

    Fransson, Thomas; Norman, Patrick; Coriani, Sonia; Christiansen, Ove

    2013-03-28

    Near carbon K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra of a series of fluorine-substituted ethenes and acetone have been studied using coupled cluster and density functional theory (DFT) polarization propagator methods, as well as the static-exchange (STEX) approach. With the complex polarization propagator (CPP) implemented in coupled cluster theory, relaxation effects following the excitation of core electrons are accounted for in terms of electron correlation, enabling a systematic convergence of these effects with respect to electron excitations in the cluster operator. Coupled cluster results have been used as benchmarks for the assessment of propagator methods in DFT as well as the state-specific static-exchange approach. Calculations on ethene and 1,1-difluoroethene illustrate the possibility of using nonrelativistic coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) with additional effects of electron correlation and relativity added as scalar shifts in energetics. It has been demonstrated that CPP spectra obtained with coupled cluster singles and approximate doubles (CC2), CCSD, and DFT (with a Coulomb attenuated exchange-correlation functional) yield excellent predictions of chemical shifts for vinylfluoride, 1,1-difluoroethene, trifluoroethene, as well as good spectral features for acetone in the case of CCSD and DFT. Following this, CPP-DFT is considered to be a viable option for the calculation of X-ray absorption spectra of larger {pi}-conjugated systems, and CC2 is deemed applicable for chemical shifts but not for studies of fine structure features. The CCSD method as well as the more approximate CC2 method are shown to yield spectral features relating to {pi}*-resonances in good agreement with experiment, not only for the aforementioned molecules but also for ethene, cis-1,2-difluoroethene, and tetrafluoroethene. The STEX approach is shown to underestimate {pi}*-peak separations due to spectral compressions, a characteristic which is inherent to this

  6. Prediction of High-Valent Iron K-edge Absorption Spectra by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, P.; Stieber, S. Chantal E.; Collins, Terrence J.; Que, Lawrence; Neese, Frank; DeBeer, Serena

    2011-01-01

    In recent years a number of high-valent iron intermediates have been identified as reactive species in iron-containing metalloproteins. Inspired by the interest in these highly reactive species, chemists have synthesized Fe(IV) and Fe(V) model complexes with terminal oxo or nitrido groups, as well as a rare example of an Fe(VI)-nitrido species. In all these cases, X-ray absorption spectroscopy has played a key role in the identification and characterization of these species, with both the energy and intensity of the pre-edge features providing spectroscopic signatures for both the oxidation state and the local site geometry. Here we build on a time-dependent DFT methodology for the prediction of Fe K- pre-edge features, previously applied to ferrous and ferric complexes, and extend it to a range of Fe(IV), Fe(V) and Fe(VI) complexes. The contributions of oxidation state, coordination environment and spin state to the spectral features are discussed. These methods are then extended to calculate the spectra of the heme active site of P450 Compound II and the non-heme active site of TauD. The potential for using these methods in a predictive manner is highlighted. PMID:21956429

  7. Multiphoton transition moments and absorption cross sections in coupled cluster response theory employing variational transition moment functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hättig, Christof; Christiansen, Ove; Jørgensen, Poul

    1998-05-01

    Based on an analysis of the first residues of coupled cluster response functions we devise variational functionals from which the transition moments for n-photon excitations can be calculated as nth derivatives. Combining these functionals with variational perturbation theory, we obtain a new approach for the derivation of multiphoton transition moments which allows us to utilize the full strengths of variational perturbation theory without the roundabout way via residues of response functions. Coupled cluster multiphoton transition moments derived by this approach are formally equivalent to the one identified from the first residues of the ground state response functions. The introduction of the variational functionals makes the mathematical structure of the transition moments more transparent and provides an interpretation of intermediates in terms of responses of excited state vectors and Lagrangian multipliers. 2n+1 and 2n+2 rules are formulated for the transition moments and build the basis for a straightforward derivation of a computational efficient formulation. The strength of the new approach is demonstrated by the derivation of three- and four-photon transition moments.

  8. Improved input parameters for diffusion models of skin absorption.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Steffi; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Schaefer, Ulrich F

    2013-02-01

    To use a diffusion model for predicting skin absorption requires accurate estimates of input parameters on model geometry, affinity and transport characteristics. This review summarizes methods to obtain input parameters for diffusion models of skin absorption focusing on partition and diffusion coefficients. These include experimental methods, extrapolation approaches, and correlations that relate partition and diffusion coefficients to tabulated physico-chemical solute properties. Exhaustive databases on lipid-water and corneocyte protein-water partition coefficients are presented and analyzed to provide improved approximations to estimate lipid-water and corneocyte protein-water partition coefficients. The most commonly used estimates of lipid and corneocyte diffusion coefficients are also reviewed. In order to improve modeling of skin absorption in the future diffusion models should include the vertical stratum corneum heterogeneity, slow equilibration processes, the absorption from complex non-aqueous formulations, and an improved representation of dermal absorption processes. This will require input parameters for which no suitable estimates are yet available.

  9. Spatially-partitioned many-body vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaiman, S.; Alon, O. E.

    2016-02-01

    A vortex in Bose-Einstein condensates is a localized object which looks much like a tiny tornado storm. It is well described by mean-field theory. In the present work we go beyond the current paradigm and introduce many-body vortices. These are made of spatially- partitioned clouds, carry definite total angular momentum, and are fragmented rather than condensed objects which can only be described beyond mean-field theory. A phase diagram based on a mean-field model assists in predicting the parameters where many-body vortices occur. Implications are briefly discussed.

  10. Quasiparticle electronic structure and optical absorption of diamond nanoparticles from ab initio many-body perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Huabing; Ma, Yuchen Mu, Jinglin; Liu, Chengbu; Hao, Xiaotao; Yi, Zhijun

    2014-06-07

    The excited states of small-diameter diamond nanoparticles in the gas phase are studied using the GW method and Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) within the ab initio many-body perturbation theory. The calculated ionization potentials and optical gaps are in agreement with experimental results, with the average error about 0.2 eV. The electron affinity is negative and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital is rather delocalized. Precise determination of the electron affinity requires one to take the off-diagonal matrix elements of the self-energy operator into account in the GW calculation. BSE calculations predict a large exciton binding energy which is an order of magnitude larger than that in the bulk diamond.

  11. Chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Elkin, Chris

    2006-05-09

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  12. PREFERENTIAL PARTITIONING OF A PAH AND PCB TO A MARINE SEDIMENT AMENDED WITH SEVERAL SOURCES OF SOOT CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last decade, several studies reported that the partitioning of PAHs to sediments, in some cases, did not follow predictions based on equilibrium partitioning theory. One explanation for these differences is the presence of a second sedimentary phase with partitioning cha...

  13. Partitioning the Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, Philip L.; Lewin, John

    2016-11-01

    We review the historical purposes and procedures for stratigraphical division and naming within the Quaternary, and summarize the current requirements for formal partitioning through the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS). A raft of new data and evidence has impacted traditional approaches: quasi-continuous records from ocean sediments and ice cores, new numerical dating techniques, and alternative macro-models, such as those provided through Sequence Stratigraphy and Earth-System Science. The practical usefulness of division remains, but there is now greater appreciation of complex Quaternary detail and the modelling of time continua, the latter also extending into the future. There are problems both of commission (what is done, but could be done better) and of omission (what gets left out) in partitioning the Quaternary. These include the challenge set by the use of unconformities as stage boundaries, how to deal with multiphase records in ocean and terrestrial sediments, what happened at the 'Early-Mid- (Middle) Pleistocene Transition', dealing with trends that cross phase boundaries, and the current controversial focus on how to subdivide the Holocene and formally define an 'Anthropocene'.

  14. Partition-DFT on the water dimer.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Sara; Nafziger, Jonathan; Restrepo, Albeiro; Wasserman, Adam

    2017-02-21

    As is well known, the ground-state symmetry group of the water dimer switches from its equilibrium Cs-character to C2h-character as the distance between the two oxygen atoms of the dimer decreases below RO-O∼2.5 Å. For a range of RO-O between 1 and 5 Å, and for both symmetries, we apply Partition Density Functional Theory (PDFT) to find the unique monomer densities that sum to the correct dimer densities while minimizing the sum of the monomer energies. We calculate the work involved in deforming the isolated monomer densities and find that it is slightly larger for the Cs geometry for all RO-O. We discuss how the PDFT densities and the corresponding partition potentials support the orbital-interaction picture of hydrogen-bond formation.

  15. A Thermodynamic Model for Predicting Phosphorus Partition between CaO-based Slags and Hot Metal during Hot Metal Dephosphorization Pretreatment Process Based on the Ion and Molecule Coexistence Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue-min; Li, Jin-yan; Chai, Guo-ming; Duan, Dong-ping; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    A thermodynamic model for predicting phosphorus partition L P between a CaO-based slags and hot metal during hot metal dephosphorization pretreatment process has been developed based on the ion and molecule coexistence theory (IMCT), i.e., the IMCT- L P model. The reaction abilities of structural units or ion couples in the CaO-based slags have been represented by the calculated mass action concentrations N i through the developed IMCT- N i model based on the IMCT. The developed IMCT- L P model has been verified to be valid through comparing with the measured L P as well as the predicted L P by two reported L P models from the literature. Besides the total phosphorus partition L P between the CaO-based slag and hot metal, the respective phosphorus partitions L P, i of nine dephosphorization products as P2O5, 3FeO·P2O5, 4FeO·P2O5, 2CaO·P2O5, 3CaO·P2O5, 4CaO·P2O5, 2MgO·P2O5, 3MgO·P2O5, and 3MnO·P2O5 can also be accurately predicted by the developed IMCT- L P model. The formed 3CaO·P2O5 accounts for 99.20 pct of dephosphorization products comparing with the generated 4CaO·P2O5 for 0.08 pct. The comprehensive effect of CaO+Fe t O, which can be described by the mass percentage ratio (pct Fe t O)/(pct CaO) or the mass action concentration ratio N_{Fe}t O/N_{Fe}t O N_{CaO}. N_{CaO}} as well as the mass percentage product (pct Fe t O) × (pct CaO) or the mass action concentration product N_{{{{Fe}}t {{O}}}}5 × N_{{CaO}}3 , controls dephosphorization ability of the CaO-based slags. A linear relationship of L P against (pct Fe t O)/(pct CaO) can be correlated compared with a parabolic relationship of L P against N_{Fe}t O/N_{Fe}t O N_{CaO}. N_{CaO}, while the linear relationship of L P against (pct Fe t O) × (pct CaO) or N_{Fe}t O5 × N_{CaO}3 can be established. Thus, the mass percentage product (pct Fe t O) × (pct CaO) and the mass action concentration product N_{Fe}t O5 × N_{CaO}3 are recommended to represent the comprehensive effect of CaO+Fe t O on

  16. Scheduling Independent Partitions in Integrated Modular Avionics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chenglie; Han, Pengcheng

    2016-01-01

    Recently the integrated modular avionics (IMA) architecture has been widely adopted by the avionics industry due to its strong partition mechanism. Although the IMA architecture can achieve effective cost reduction and reliability enhancement in the development of avionics systems, it results in a complex allocation and scheduling problem. All partitions in an IMA system should be integrated together according to a proper schedule such that their deadlines will be met even under the worst case situations. In order to help provide a proper scheduling table for all partitions in IMA systems, we study the schedulability of independent partitions on a multiprocessor platform in this paper. We firstly present an exact formulation to calculate the maximum scaling factor and determine whether all partitions are schedulable on a limited number of processors. Then with a Game Theory analogy, we design an approximation algorithm to solve the scheduling problem of partitions, by allowing each partition to optimize its own schedule according to the allocations of the others. Finally, simulation experiments are conducted to show the efficiency and reliability of the approach proposed in terms of time consumption and acceptance ratio. PMID:27942013

  17. Scheduling Independent Partitions in Integrated Modular Avionics Systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinchao; Du, Chenglie; Han, Pengcheng

    2016-01-01

    Recently the integrated modular avionics (IMA) architecture has been widely adopted by the avionics industry due to its strong partition mechanism. Although the IMA architecture can achieve effective cost reduction and reliability enhancement in the development of avionics systems, it results in a complex allocation and scheduling problem. All partitions in an IMA system should be integrated together according to a proper schedule such that their deadlines will be met even under the worst case situations. In order to help provide a proper scheduling table for all partitions in IMA systems, we study the schedulability of independent partitions on a multiprocessor platform in this paper. We firstly present an exact formulation to calculate the maximum scaling factor and determine whether all partitions are schedulable on a limited number of processors. Then with a Game Theory analogy, we design an approximation algorithm to solve the scheduling problem of partitions, by allowing each partition to optimize its own schedule according to the allocations of the others. Finally, simulation experiments are conducted to show the efficiency and reliability of the approach proposed in terms of time consumption and acceptance ratio.

  18. Partitioning: splitting fact from fiction.

    PubMed

    Pike, Brian

    2012-05-01

    Many larger hospitals are sprawling complexes with endless corridors and rooms of varying purpose. While cleanliness and infection control are, understandably, leading considerations in any hospital building, fire safety also plays a crucial role. Here Brian Pike MBE, technical consultant at partitioning system designer and manufacturer, Komfort Workspace, looks at how current fire guidelines impact on the use of partitioning systems in hospital premises.

  19. Graphene quantum dots with visible light absorption of the carbon core: insights from single-particle spectroscopy and first principles based theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Siddharth; Awasthi, Manohar; Ghosh, Moumita; Seibt, Michael; Niehaus, Thomas A.

    2016-12-01

    Luminescent carbon nanodots (CND) are a recent addition to the family of carbon nanostructures. Interestingly, a large group of CNDs are fluorescent in the visible spectrum and possess single dipole emitters with potential applications in super-resolution microscopy, quantum information science, and optoelectronics. There is a large diversity of CND’s size as well as a strong variability of edge topology and functional groups in real samples. This hampers a direct comparison of experimental and theoretical findings that is necessary to understand the unusual photophysics of these systems. Here, we derive atomistic models of finite sized (<2.5 nm) CNDs from high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) which are studied using approximate time-dependent density functional theory. The atomistic models are found to be primarily two-dimensional (2D) and can hence be categorised as graphene quantum dots (GQD). The GQD model structures that are presented here show excitation energies in the visible spectrum matching previous single GQD level photoluminescence studies. We also present the effect of edge hydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups on the absorption spectrum. Overall, the study reveals the atomistic origin of CNDs photoluminescence in the visible range.

  20. Optical absorption spectra of boron clusters Bn (n = 2-5) for application in nano scintillator - a time dependent density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivade, Rajendra K.; Chakraborty, Brahmananda

    2016-09-01

    Boron nano-clusters of various shapes and sizes have potential applications as scintillating detector and hydrogen storage material. Using time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) as implemented in CASIDA we have studied the linear optical absorption spectra for boron clusters B n ( n = 2-5) and compared with previously reported results using Hatree-Fock (H-F) based method where the spectrum is limited to 8 eV due to exclusion of excitation into very high energy unoccupied orbital. The optical spectra fall in the visible and near UV region and are very much dependent on the shape of the isomer. We have obtained additional peaks for B2 linear, B3 triangular, B4 rhombus and square shaped isomers beyond 8 eV which were missing in the previous H-F based study and has significance as they fall below the ionization potential. We correlate the optical spectrum with the shape of the Kohn-Sham orbitals and HUMO-LUMO gap and assess comparative stability of various B n ( n = 2-5) clusters in terms of HUMO-LUMO gap, bond-length and relative energy. TDDFT computed optical spectroscopy correlated with Kohn-Sham orbitals and HUMO-LUMO gap and its comparison with H-F based method may give significant knowledge regarding geometry and optical properties of B n ( n = 2-5) clusters enabling to distingush between various isomers of B n clusters.

  1. Gas-particle partitioning and hydrolysis of organic nitrates formed from the oxidation of α-pinene in environmental chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Jeffrey K.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, Lea

    2016-02-01

    Gas-particle partitioning and hydrolysis of organic nitrates (ON) influences their role as sinks and sources of NOx and their effects on the formation of tropospheric ozone and organic aerosol (OA). In this work, organic nitrates were formed from the photo-oxidation of α-pinene in environmental chamber experiments under different conditions. Particle-phase ON hydrolysis rates, consistent with observed ON decay, exhibited a nonlinear dependence on relative humidity (RH): an ON decay rate of 2 day-1 was observed when the RH ranged between 20 and 60 %, and no significant ON decay was observed at RH lower than 20 %. In experiments when the highest observed RH exceeded the deliquescence RH of the ammonium sulfate seed aerosol, the particle-phase ON decay rate was as high as 7 day-1 and more variable. The ON gas-particle partitioning was dependent on total OA concentration and temperature, consistent with absorptive partitioning theory. In a volatility basis set, the ON partitioning was consistent with mass fractions of [0 0.11 0.03 0.86] at saturation mass concentrations (C*) of [1 10 100 1000] µg m-3.

  2. Four-Component Damped Density Functional Response Theory Study of UV/Vis Absorption Spectra and Phosphorescence Parameters of Group 12 Metal-Substituted Porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Saue, Trond; Norman, Patrick

    2016-05-10

    The influences of group 12 (Zn, Cd, Hg) metal-substitution on the valence spectra and phosphorescence parameters of porphyrins (P) have been investigated in a relativistic setting. In order to obtain valence spectra, this study reports the first application of the damped linear response function, or complex polarization propagator, in the four-component density functional theory framework [as formulated in Villaume et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2010 , 133 , 064105 ]. It is shown that the steep increase in the density of states as due to the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling yields only minor changes in overall computational costs involved with the solution of the set of linear response equations. Comparing single-frequency to multifrequency spectral calculations, it is noted that the number of iterations in the iterative linear equation solver per frequency grid-point decreases monotonously from 30 to 0.74 as the number of frequency points goes from one to 19. The main heavy-atom effect on the UV/vis-absorption spectra is indirect and attributed to the change of point group symmetry due to metal-substitution, and it is noted that substitutions using heavier atoms yield small red-shifts of the intense Soret-band. Concerning phosphorescence parameters, the adoption of a four-component relativistic setting enables the calculation of such properties at a linear order of response theory, and any higher-order response functions do not need to be considered-a real, conventional, form of linear response theory has been used for the calculation of these parameters. For the substituted porphyrins, electronic coupling between the lowest triplet states is strong and results in theoretical estimates of lifetimes that are sensitive to the wave function and electron density parametrization. With this in mind, we report our best estimates of the phosphorescence lifetimes to be 460, 13.8, 11.2, and 0.00155 s for H2P, ZnP, CdP, and HgP, respectively, with the corresponding transition

  3. Adsorption of isophorone and trimethyl-cyclohexanone on Pd(111): A combination of infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostert, Karl-Heinz; O'Brien, Casey P.; Liu, Wei; Riedel, Wiebke; Savara, Aditya; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Schauermann, Swetlana; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the interaction of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds with late transition metals is a key prerequisite for rational design of new catalysts with desired selectivity towards C = C or C = O bond hydrogenation. The interaction of the α,β-unsaturated ketone isophorone and the saturated ketone TMCH (3,3,5-trimethylcyclohexanone) with Pd(111) was investigated in this study as a prototypical system. Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) and density functional theory calculations including van der Waals interactions (DFT + vdWsurf) were combined to form detailed assignments of IR vibrational modes in the range from 3000 cm- 1 to 1000 cm- 1 in order to obtain information on the binding of isophorone and TMCH to Pd(111) as well as to study the effect of co-adsorbed hydrogen. IRAS measurements were performed with deuterium-labeled (d5-) isophorone, in addition to unlabeled isophorone and unlabeled TMCH. Experimentally observed IR absorption features and calculated vibrational frequencies indicate that isophorone and TMCH molecules in multilayers have a mostly unperturbed structure with random orientation. At sub-monolayer coverages, strong perturbation and preferred orientations of the adsorbates were found. At low coverage, isophorone interacts strongly with Pd(111) and adsorbs in a flat-lying geometry with the C = C and C = O bonds parallel, and a CH3 group perpendicular, to the surface. At intermediate sub-monolayer coverage, the C = C bond is strongly tilted, while the C = O bond remains flat-lying, which indicates a prominent perturbation of the conjugated π system. Pre-adsorbed hydrogen leads to significant changes in the adsorption geometry of isophorone, which suggests a weakening of its binding to Pd(111). At low coverage, the structure of the CH3 groups seems to be mostly unperturbed on the hydrogen pre-covered surface. With increasing coverage, a conservation of the in-plane geometry of the conjugated π system was observed in the

  4. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  5. COMPARISON OF THE OCTANOL-AIR PARTITION COEFFICIENT AND LIQUID-PHASE VAPOR PRESSURE AS DESCRIPTORS FOR PARTICLE/GAS PARTITIONING USING LABORATORY AND FIELD DATA FOR PCBS AND PCNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The conventional Junge-Pankow adsorption model uses the sub-cooled liquid vapor pressure (pLo) as a correlation parameter for gas/particle interactions. An alternative is the octanol-air partition coefficient (Koa) absorption model. Log-log plots of the particle-gas partition c...

  6. Electronic structure and optical properties of CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures from X-ray absorption near edge structure, X-ray excited optical luminescence, and density functional theory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M. W.; Yiu, Y. M. Sham, T. K.; Ward, M. J.; Liu, L.; Hu, Y.; Zapien, J. A.; Liu, Yingkai

    2014-11-21

    The electronic structure and optical properties of a series of iso-electronic and iso-structural CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures have been investigated using X-ray absorption near edge structure, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and X-ray excited optical luminescence at various absorption edges of Cd, S, and Se. It is found that the system exhibits compositions, with variable local structure in-between that of CdS and CdSe accompanied by tunable optical band gap between that of CdS and CdSe. Theoretical calculation using density functional theory has been carried out to elucidate the observations. It is also found that luminescence induced by X-ray excitation shows new optical channels not observed previously with laser excitation. The implications of these observations are discussed.

  7. High-temperature asymptotics of supersymmetric partition functions

    SciTech Connect

    Ardehali, Arash Arabi

    2016-07-05

    We study the supersymmetric partition function of 4d supersymmetric gauge theories with a U(1) R-symmetry on Euclidean S3 × Sβ1, with S3 the unit-radius squashed three-sphere, and β the circumference of the circle. For superconformal theories, this partition function coincides (up to a Casimir energy factor) with the 4d superconformal index. The partition function can be computed exactly using the supersymmetric localization of the gauge theory path-integral. It takes the form of an elliptic hypergeometric integral, which may be viewed as a matrix-integral over the moduli space of the holonomies of the gauge fields around Sβ1. At high temperatures (β → 0, corresponding to the hyperbolic limit of the elliptic hypergeometric integral) we obtain from the matrix-integral a quantum effective potential for the holonomies. The effective potential is proportional to the temperature. Therefore the high-temperature limit further localizes the matrix-integral to the locus of the minima of the potential. If the effective potential is positive semi-definite, the leading high-temperature asymptotics of the partition function is given by the formula of Di Pietro and Komargodski, and the subleading asymptotics is connected to the Coulomb branch dynamics on R3 × S1. In theories where the effective potential is not positive semi-definite, the Di Pietro-Komargodski formula needs to be modified. In particular, this modification occurs in the SU(2) theory of Intriligator-Seiberg-Shenker, and the SO(N) theory of Brodie-Cho-Intriligator, both believed to exhibit “misleading” anomaly matchings, and both believed to yield interacting superconformal field theories with c < a. Lastly, two new simple tests for dualities between 4d supersymmetric gauge theories emerge as byproducts of our analysis.

  8. High-temperature asymptotics of supersymmetric partition functions

    DOE PAGES

    Ardehali, Arash Arabi

    2016-07-05

    We study the supersymmetric partition function of 4d supersymmetric gauge theories with a U(1) R-symmetry on Euclidean S3 × Sβ1, with S3 the unit-radius squashed three-sphere, and β the circumference of the circle. For superconformal theories, this partition function coincides (up to a Casimir energy factor) with the 4d superconformal index. The partition function can be computed exactly using the supersymmetric localization of the gauge theory path-integral. It takes the form of an elliptic hypergeometric integral, which may be viewed as a matrix-integral over the moduli space of the holonomies of the gauge fields around Sβ1. At high temperatures (βmore » → 0, corresponding to the hyperbolic limit of the elliptic hypergeometric integral) we obtain from the matrix-integral a quantum effective potential for the holonomies. The effective potential is proportional to the temperature. Therefore the high-temperature limit further localizes the matrix-integral to the locus of the minima of the potential. If the effective potential is positive semi-definite, the leading high-temperature asymptotics of the partition function is given by the formula of Di Pietro and Komargodski, and the subleading asymptotics is connected to the Coulomb branch dynamics on R3 × S1. In theories where the effective potential is not positive semi-definite, the Di Pietro-Komargodski formula needs to be modified. In particular, this modification occurs in the SU(2) theory of Intriligator-Seiberg-Shenker, and the SO(N) theory of Brodie-Cho-Intriligator, both believed to exhibit “misleading” anomaly matchings, and both believed to yield interacting superconformal field theories with c < a. Lastly, two new simple tests for dualities between 4d supersymmetric gauge theories emerge as byproducts of our analysis.« less

  9. The Parameterization of Solid Metal-Liquid Metal Partitioning of Siderophile Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chabot, N. L.; Jones, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    The composition of a metallic liquid can significantly affect the partitioning behavior of elements. For example, some experimental solid metal-liquid metal partition coefficients have been shown to increase by three orders of magnitude with increasing S-content of the metallic liquid. Along with S, the presence of other light elements, such as P and C, has also been demonstrated to affect trace element partitioning behavior. Understanding the effects of metallic composition on partitioning behavior is important for modeling the crystallization of magmatic iron meteorites and the chemical effects of planetary differentiation. It is thus useful to have a mathematical expression that parameterizes the partition coefficient as a function of the composition of the metal. Here we present a revised parameterization method, which builds on the theory of the current parameterization of Jones and Malvin and which better handles partitioning in multi-light-element systems.

  10. Line defects and 5d instanton partition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee-Cheol

    2016-03-01

    We consider certain line defect operators in five-dimensional SUSY gauge theories, whose interaction with the self-dual instantons is described by 1d ADHM-like gauged quantum mechanics constructed by Tong and Wong. The partition function in the presence of these operators is known to be a generating function of BPS Wilson loops in skew symmetric tensor representations of the gauge group. We calculate the partition function and explicitly prove that it is a finite polynomial of the defect mass parameter x, which is an essential property of the defect operator and the Wilson loop generating function. The relation between the line defect partition function and the qq-character defined by N . Nekrasov is briefly discussed.

  11. Temporal Partitioning on Multicore Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud Pathan, Ristat; Hashi, Feysal; Stenstrom, Per; Green, Lars-Goran; Hult, Torbjorn; Sandin, Patrik

    2014-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of ensuring temporal partitioning according to the ARINC-653 standard for integrating multiple applications on the same multicore platform. To employ temporal partitioning, we propose the design and analysis of a hierarchical scheduling framework (HSF) for multicore platform. In HSF, each application has a server task, which is mapped to one of the physical cores of the multicore platform. The HSF framework is based on scheduling at two-levels: (i) a system-level scheduler for each core schedules the server tasks that are mapped to that core, and (ii) a task- level scheduler for each application schedules the tasks of the application. This paper presents the design and analysis of this two-level HSF that can be used to ensure temporal partitioning and meeting all the deadlines of each application tasks. The effectiveness of our technique is demonstrated using real-world space applications provided by RUAG Space Sweden AB.

  12. Revisiting noninteracting string partition functions in Rindler space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Thomas G.; Verschelde, Henri; Zakharov, Valentin I.

    2016-05-01

    We revisit noninteracting string partition functions in Rindler space by summing over fields in the spectrum. In field theory, the total partition function splits in a natural way into a piece that does not contain surface terms and a piece consisting of solely the so-called edge states. For open strings, we illustrate that surface contributions to the higher-spin fields correspond to open strings piercing the Rindler origin, unifying the higher-spin surface contributions in string language. For closed strings, we demonstrate that the string partition function is not quite the same as the sum over the partition functions of the fields in the spectrum: an infinite overcounting is present for the latter. Next we study the partition functions obtained by excluding the surface terms. Using recent results of He et al. [J. High Energy Phys. 05 (2015) 106], this construction, first done by Emparan [arXiv:hep-th/9412003], can be put on much firmer ground. We generalize to type II and heterotic superstrings and demonstrate modular invariance. All of these exhibit an IR divergence that can be interpreted as a maximal acceleration close to the black hole horizon. Ultimately, since these partition functions are only part of the full story, divergences here should not be viewed as a failure of string theory: maximal acceleration is a feature of a faulty treatment of the higher-spin fields in the string spectrum. We comment on the relevance of this to Solodukhin's recent proposal [Phys. Rev. D 91, 084028 (2015)]. A possible link with the firewall paradox is apparent.

  13. New parallel SOR method by domain partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Dexuan

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we propose and analyze a new parallel SOR method, the PSOR method, formulated by using domain partitioning together with an interprocessor data-communication technique. For the 5-point approximation to the Poisson equation on a square, we show that the ordering of the PSOR based on the strip partition leads to a consistently ordered matrix, and hence the PSOR and the SOR using the row-wise ordering have the same convergence rate. However, in general, the ordering used in PSOR may not be {open_quote}consistently ordered{close_quotes}. So, there is a need to analyze the convergence of PSOR directly. In this paper, we present a PSOR theory, and show that the PSOR method can have the same asymptotic rate of convergence as the corresponding sequential SOR method for a wide class of linear systems in which the matrix is {open_quotes}consistently ordered{close_quotes}. Finally, we demonstrate the parallel performance of the PSOR method on four different message passing multiprocessors (a KSR1, the Intel Delta, an Intel Paragon and an IBM SP2), along with a comparison with the point Red-Black and four-color SOR methods.

  14. Ferrous iron partitioning in the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Joshua M. R.; Brodholt, John P.

    2016-08-01

    We used density functional theory (DFT) to examine the partitioning of ferrous iron between periclase and bridgmanite under lower mantle conditions. To study the effects of the three major variables - pressure, temperature and concentration - these have been varied from 0 to 150 GPa, from 1000 to 4000 K and from 0 to 100% total iron content. We find that increasing temperature increases KD, increasing iron concentration decreases KD, while pressure can both increase and decrease KD. We find that KD decreases slowly from about 0.32 to 0.06 with depth under lower mantle conditions. We also find that KD increases sharply to 0.15 in the very lowermost mantle due to the strong temperature increases near the CMB. Spin transitions have a large effect on the activity of ferropericlase which causes KD to vary with pressure in a peak-like fashion. Despite the apparently large changes in KD through the mantle, this actually results in relatively small changes in total iron content in the two phases, with XFefp ranging from about 0.20 to 0.35, before decreasing again to about 0.28 at the CMB, and XFebd has a pretty constant value of about 0.04-0.07 throughout the lower mantle. For the very high Fe concentrations suggested for ULVZs, Fe partitions very strongly into ferropericlase.

  15. Irradiation of linear polyethylene - Partitioning between sol and gel.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rijke, A. M.; Mandelkern, L.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the importance of chain-scission processes and of the applicability of the general theory of network formation to polyethylene with respect to critical conditions for gelation, using molecular weight fractions of linear polyethylene irradiated at 133 C. The partitioning between sol and gel was found to adhere to the theory just beyond the gel point. Deviations from theory occurred as the irradiation dosage was increased. It was concluded that main-chain scission at the temperatures concerned is not a significant process.

  16. Understanding Partitive Division of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Jack M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Concrete experience should be a first step in the development of new abstract concepts and their symbolization. Presents concrete activities based on Hyde and Nelson's work with egg cartons and Steiner's work with money to develop students' understanding of partitive division when using fractions. (MDH)

  17. METAL PARTITIONING IN COMBUSTION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article summarizes ongoing research efforts at the National Risk Management Research Laboratory of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency examining [high temperature] metal behavior within combustion environments. The partitioning of non-volatile (Cr and Ni), semi-volatil...

  18. Some trees with partition dimension three

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredlina, Ketut Queena; Baskoro, Edy Tri

    2016-02-01

    The concept of partition dimension of a graph was introduced by Chartrand, E. Salehi and P. Zhang (1998) [2]. Let G(V, E) be a connected graph. For S ⊆ V (G) and v ∈ V (G), define the distance d(v, S) from v to S is min{d(v, x)|x ∈ S}. Let Π be an ordered partition of V (G) and Π = {S1, S2, ..., Sk }. The representation r(v|Π) of vertex v with respect to Π is (d(v, S1), d(v, S2), ..., d(v, Sk)). If the representations of all vertices are distinct, then the partition Π is called a resolving partition of G. The partition dimension of G is the minimum k such that G has a resolving partition with k partition classes. In this paper, we characterize some classes of trees with partition dimension three, namely olive trees, weeds, and centipedes.

  19. 3D-partition functions on the sphere: exact evaluation and mirror symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuti, Sergio; Pasquetti, Sara

    2012-05-01

    We study {N} = {4} quiver theories on the three-sphere. We compute partition functions using the localisation method by Kapustin et al. solving exactly the matrix integrals at finite N, as functions of mass and Fayet-Iliopoulos parameters. We find a simple explicit formula for the partition function of the quiver tail T(SU( N)). This formula opens the way for the analysis of star-shaped quivers and their mirrors (that are the Gaiotto-type theories arising from M5 branes on punctured Riemann surfaces). We provide non-perturbative checks of mirror symmetry for infinite classes of theories and find the partition functions of the T N theory, the building block of generalised quiver theories.

  20. Electronic Absorption Spectra of Neutral Perylene (C20H12), Terrylene (C30H16), and Quaterrylene (C40H20) and their Positive and Negative Ions: Ne Matrix-Isolation Spectroscopy and Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halasinski, Thomas M.; Weisman, Jennifer L.; Lee, Timothy J.; Salama, Farid; Head-Gordon, Martin; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a full experimental and theoretical study of an interesting series of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the oligorylenes. The absorption spectra of perylene, terrylene and quaterrylene in neutral, cationic and anionic charge states are obtained by matrix-isolation spectroscopy in Ne. The experimental spectra are dominated by a bright state that red shifts with growing molecular size. Excitation energies and state symmetry assignments are supported by calculations using time dependent density functional theory methods. These calculations also provide new insight into the observed trends in oscillator strength and excitation energy for the bright states: the oscillator strength per unit mass of carbon increases along the series.

  1. PERITONEAL ABSORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, P. F.; Miller, L. L.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.; Bale, W. F.; Whipple, G. H.

    1944-01-01

    The absorption of red cells from the normal peritoneum of the dog can be demonstrated by means of red cells labeled with radio-iron incorporated in the hemoglobin of these red cells. Absorption in normal dogs runs from 20 to 100 per cent of the amount given within 24 hours. Dogs rendered anemic by bleeding absorb red cells a little less rapidly—ranging from 5 to 80 per cent of the injected red cells. Doubly depleted dogs (anemic and hypoproteinemic) absorb even less in the three experiments recorded. This peritoneal absorption varies widely in different dogs and even in the same dog at different times. We do not know the factors responsible for these variations but there is no question about active peritoneal absorption. The intact red cells pass readily from the peritoneal cavity into lymph spaces in diaphragm and other areas of the peritoneum. The red cells move along the lymphatics and through the lymph glands with little or no phagocytosis and eventually into the large veins through the thoracic ducts. PMID:19871404

  2. Nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Deborah C

    2004-03-01

    Our understanding of nutrient absorption continues to grow, from the development of unique animal models and from studies in which cutting-edge molecular and cellular biologic approaches have been used to analyze the structure and function of relevant molecules. Studies of the molecular genetics of inherited disorders have also provided many new insights into these processes. A major advance in lipid absorption has been the cloning and characterization of several intestinal acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferases; these may provide new targets for antiobesity drug therapy. Studies of intestinal cholesterol absorption and reverse cholesterol transport have encouraged the development of novel potential treatments for hyperlipidemia. Observations in genetically modified mice and in humans with mutations in glucose transporter 2 suggest the importance of a separate microsomal membrane transport pathway for glucose transport. The study of iron metabolism has advanced greatly with the identification of the hemochromatosis gene and the continued examination of the genetic regulation of iron absorptive pathways. Several human thiamine transporters have been identified, and their specific roles in different tissues are being explored.

  3. Optical Absorption Characteristics of Aerosols.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-11

    properties of the powder as well as the thickness of the layer. For a layer that is thick enough so that no light is transmitted, the Kubelka -- Munk theory...which is a two stream radiative transfer model, relates the reflectance to the ratio of the absorption to the scattering. The Kubelka - Munk theory has...of the aerosol material is known. Under the assumptions of the Kubelka - Munk . theory, the imaginary component of the refractive index is deter- mined

  4. Determination of descriptors for fragrance compounds by gas chromatography and liquid-liquid partition.

    PubMed

    Karunasekara, Thushara; Poole, Colin F

    2012-04-27

    Retention factors on a minimum of eight stationary phases at various temperatures by gas-liquid chromatography and liquid-liquid partition coefficients for five totally organic biphasic systems were combined to estimate descriptors for 28 fragrance compounds with an emphasis on compounds that are known or potential allergens. The descriptors facilitated the estimation of several properties of biological and environmental interest (sensory irritation threshold, odor detection threshold, nasal pungency threshold, skin permeability from water, skin-water partition coefficients, octanol-water partition coefficients, absorption by air particles, adsorption by diesel soot particles, air-water partition coefficients, and adsorption by film water). The descriptors are suitable for use in the solvation parameter model and facilitate the estimation of a wide range of physicochemical, chromatographic, biological, and environmental properties using existing models.

  5. "K"-Balance Partitioning: An Exact Method with Applications to Generalized Structural Balance and Other Psychological Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusco, Michael; Steinley, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Structural balance theory (SBT) has maintained a venerable status in the psychological literature for more than 5 decades. One important problem pertaining to SBT is the approximation of structural or generalized balance via the partitioning of the vertices of a signed graph into "K" clusters. This "K"-balance partitioning problem also has more…

  6. Partitioning sparse rectangular matrices for parallel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kolda, T.G.

    1998-05-01

    The authors are interested in partitioning sparse rectangular matrices for parallel processing. The partitioning problem has been well-studied in the square symmetric case, but the rectangular problem has received very little attention. They will formalize the rectangular matrix partitioning problem and discuss several methods for solving it. They will extend the spectral partitioning method for symmetric matrices to the rectangular case and compare this method to three new methods -- the alternating partitioning method and two hybrid methods. The hybrid methods will be shown to be best.

  7. MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR GAS/PARTICLE PARTITIONING OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOLS. (R824970)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A dynamic model is developed for gas-particle absorptive partitioning of semi-volatile organic aerosols. The model is applied to simulate a pair of m-xylene/NOx outdoor smog chamber experiments. In the presence of an inorganic seed aerosol a threshold ...

  8. ARSENIC SOLID-PHASE PARTITIONING IN REDUCING SEDIMENTS OF CONTAMINATED WETLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The geochemical partitioning of arsenic in organic-rich sediments from a contaminated wetland is examined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and selective chemical extraction procedures, and evaluated in context to the anoxic diagenesis of iron and sulfur. The interaction betwe...

  9. Size-dependent forced PEG partitioning into channels: VDAC, OmpC, and α-hemolysin

    PubMed Central

    Aksoyoglu, M. Alphan; Podgornik, Rudolf; Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Gurnev, Philip A.; Muthukumar, Murugappan; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Nonideal polymer mixtures of PEGs of different molecular weights partition differently into nanosize protein channels. Here, we assess the validity of the recently proposed theoretical approach of forced partitioning for three structurally different β-barrel channels: voltage-dependent anion channel from outer mitochondrial membrane VDAC, bacterial porin OmpC (outer membrane protein C), and bacterial channel-forming toxin α-hemolysin. Our interpretation is based on the idea that relatively less-penetrating polymers push the more easily penetrating ones into nanosize channels in excess of their bath concentration. Comparison of the theory with experiments is excellent for VDAC. Polymer partitioning data for the other two channels are consistent with theory if additional assumptions regarding the energy penalty of pore penetration are included. The obtained results demonstrate that the general concept of “polymers pushing polymers” is helpful in understanding and quantification of concrete examples of size-dependent forced partitioning of polymers into protein nanopores. PMID:27466408

  10. Size-dependent forced PEG partitioning into channels: VDAC, OmpC, and α-hemolysin.

    PubMed

    Aksoyoglu, M Alphan; Podgornik, Rudolf; Bezrukov, Sergey M; Gurnev, Philip A; Muthukumar, Murugappan; Parsegian, V Adrian

    2016-08-09

    Nonideal polymer mixtures of PEGs of different molecular weights partition differently into nanosize protein channels. Here, we assess the validity of the recently proposed theoretical approach of forced partitioning for three structurally different β-barrel channels: voltage-dependent anion channel from outer mitochondrial membrane VDAC, bacterial porin OmpC (outer membrane protein C), and bacterial channel-forming toxin α-hemolysin. Our interpretation is based on the idea that relatively less-penetrating polymers push the more easily penetrating ones into nanosize channels in excess of their bath concentration. Comparison of the theory with experiments is excellent for VDAC. Polymer partitioning data for the other two channels are consistent with theory if additional assumptions regarding the energy penalty of pore penetration are included. The obtained results demonstrate that the general concept of "polymers pushing polymers" is helpful in understanding and quantification of concrete examples of size-dependent forced partitioning of polymers into protein nanopores.

  11. Metaporous layer to overcome the thickness constraint for broadband sound absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jieun; Lee, Joong Seok; Kim, Yoon Young

    2015-05-07

    The sound absorption of a porous layer is affected by its thickness, especially in a low-frequency range. If a hard-backed porous layer contains periodical arrangements of rigid partitions that are coordinated parallel and perpendicular to the direction of incoming sound waves, the lower bound of the effective sound absorption can be lowered much more and the overall absorption performance enhanced. The consequence of rigid partitioning in a porous layer is to make the first thickness resonance mode in the layer appear at much lower frequencies compared to that in the original homogeneous porous layer with the same thickness. Moreover, appropriate partitioning yields multiple thickness resonances with higher absorption peaks through impedance matching. The physics of the partitioned porous layer, or the metaporous layer, is theoretically investigated in this study.

  12. Reducing the 4d index to the S 3 partition function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadde, Abhijit; Yan, Wenbin

    2012-12-01

    The superconformal index of a 4 d gauge theory is computed by a matrix integral arising from localization of the supersymmetric path integral on S 3 × S 1. As the radius of the circle goes to zero, it is natural to expect that the 4 d path integral becomes the partition function of dimensionally reduced gauge theory on S 3. We show that this is indeed the case and recover the matrix integral of Kapustin, Willett and Yaakov from the matrix integral that computes the superconformal index. Remarkably, the superconformal index of the "parent" 4 d theory can be thought of as the q-deformation of the 3 d partition function.

  13. Information-theoretic indices usage for the prediction and calculation of octanol-water partition coefficient.

    PubMed

    Persona, Marek; Kutarov, Vladimir V; Kats, Boris M; Persona, Andrzej; Marczewska, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes the new prediction method of octanol-water partition coefficient, which is based on molecular graph theory. The results obtained using the new method are well correlated with experimental values. These results were compared with the ones obtained by use of ten other structure correlated methods. The comparison shows that graph theory can be very useful in structure correlation research.

  14. Semiclassical partition function for the double-well potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroff, D.; Bessa, A.; de Carvalho, C. A. A.; Fraga, E. S.; Jorás, S. E.

    2014-07-01

    We compute the partition function and specific heat for a quantum-mechanical particle under the influence of a quartic double-well potential nonperturbatively, using the semiclassical method. Near the region of bounded motion in the inverted potential, the usual quadratic approximation fails due to the existence of multiple classical solutions and caustics. Using the tools of catastrophe theory, we identify the relevant classical solutions, showing that at most two have to be considered. This corresponds to the first step towards the study of spontaneous symmetry breaking and thermal phase transitions in the nonperturbative framework of the boundary effective theory.

  15. The effect of glycerol, propylene glycol and polyethylene glycol 400 on the partition coefficient of benzophenone-3 (oxybenzone).

    PubMed

    Mbah, C J

    2007-01-01

    Sunscreen products are widely used to protect the skin from sun-related deleterious effects. The objective of the study was to investigate the potential effect of glycerol, propylene glycol and polyethylene glycol 400 on dermal absorption of oxybenzone by studying their effects on its partition coefficient. The partition coefficient was evaluated in a chloroform-water system at room temperature. It was found that glycerol and propylene glycol decreased the partition coefficient of oxybenzone, while an increase in partition coefficient was observed with polyethylene glycol 400. The findings suggest that polyethylene glycol 400 in contrast to glycerol and propylene glycol has the potential of increasing the vehicle-skin partition coefficient of oxybenzone when cosmetic products containing such an UV absorber are topically applied to the skin.

  16. Five-Photon Absorption and Selective Enhancement of Multiphoton Absorption Processes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We study one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-photon absorption of three centrosymmetric molecules using density functional theory. These calculations are the first ab initio calculations of five-photon absorption. Even- and odd-order absorption processes show different trends in the absorption cross sections. The behavior of all even- and odd-photon absorption properties shows a semiquantitative similarity, which can be explained using few-state models. This analysis shows that odd-photon absorption processes are largely determined by the one-photon absorption strength, whereas all even-photon absorption strengths are largely dominated by the two-photon absorption strength, in both cases modulated by powers of the polarizability of the final excited state. We demonstrate how to selectively enhance a specific multiphoton absorption process. PMID:26120588

  17. Five-Photon Absorption and Selective Enhancement of Multiphoton Absorption Processes.

    PubMed

    Friese, Daniel H; Bast, Radovan; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-05-20

    We study one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-photon absorption of three centrosymmetric molecules using density functional theory. These calculations are the first ab initio calculations of five-photon absorption. Even- and odd-order absorption processes show different trends in the absorption cross sections. The behavior of all even- and odd-photon absorption properties shows a semiquantitative similarity, which can be explained using few-state models. This analysis shows that odd-photon absorption processes are largely determined by the one-photon absorption strength, whereas all even-photon absorption strengths are largely dominated by the two-photon absorption strength, in both cases modulated by powers of the polarizability of the final excited state. We demonstrate how to selectively enhance a specific multiphoton absorption process.

  18. Laser system with partitioned prism

    SciTech Connect

    Nettleton, J. E.; Barr, D. N.

    1985-03-26

    An array of optical frequency-sensitive elements such as diffraction gratings or interference filters are arranged in a row, and the optical path of the laser cavity can be directed to include one of these elements. A partitioned optical prism consisting of a triangular portion and one or more paralleogramatic portions are used to direct the path. Between the portions are piezoelectric elements which, when energized, expand to provide an air gap between the portions and to allow total reflection of an optical ray at the surface of the prism next to the gap.

  19. Characterization of As-Doped p-Type ZnO by X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure Spectroscopy: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Limpijumnong, S.; Smith, M. F.; Zhang, S. B.

    2006-01-01

    Vaithianathan et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 112103 (2006)] measured x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) of As-doped ZnO and analyzed it as evidence for As{sub o} acceptors. However, upon carrying out first principles calculations, we found that the simulated XANES spectrum for As{sub o} is very different from that observed. Instead, the simulated spectrum for As{sub Zn}-2V{sub Zn} defect complex, which is predicted to be an acceptor [S. Limpijumnong et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 155504 (2004)], is far more consistent with the XANES data. The combination of our study, with the XANES of Vaithianathan et al. might be, until now, the strongest support for the As{sub Zn}-2V{sub Zn} model.

  20. Theory and operation of the real-time data acquisition system for the NASA-LaRC differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Carolyn; Spencer, Randall

    1988-01-01

    The improvement of computer hardware and software of the NASA Multipurpose Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system is documented. The NASA DIAL system has undergone development and experimental deployment at NASA/Langley Res. Center for the remote measurement of atmospheric trace gas concentrations from ground and aircraft platforms. A viable DIAL system was developed capable of remotely measuring O3 and H2O concentrations from an aircraft platform. The DIAL Data Acquisition System (DAS) has undergone a number of improvements also. Due to the participation of the DIAL in the Global Tropospheric Experiment, modifications and improvements of the system were tested and used both in the lab and in air. Therefore, this is an operational manual for the DIAL DAS.

  1. On some trees having partition dimension four

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida Bagus Kade Puja Arimbawa, K.; Baskoro, Edy Tri

    2016-02-01

    In 1998, G. Chartrand, E. Salehi and P. Zhang introduced the notion of partition dimension of a graph. Since then, the study of this graph parameter has received much attention. A number of results have been obtained to know the values of partition dimensions of various classes of graphs. However, for some particular classes of graphs, finding of their partition dimensions is still not completely solved, for instances a class of general tree. In this paper, we study the properties of trees having partition dimension 4. In particular, we show that, for olive trees O(n), its partition dimension is equal to 4 if and only if 8 ≤ n ≤ 17. We also characterize all centipede trees having partition dimension 4.

  2. Displaying multimedia environmental partitioning by triangular diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.C.; Mackay, D.

    1995-11-01

    It is suggested that equilateral triangular diagrams are a useful method of depicting the equilibrium partitioning of organic chemicals among the three primary environmental media of the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the organosphere (natural organic matter and biotic lipids and waxes). The technique is useful for grouping chemicals into classes according to their partitioning tendencies, for depicting the incremental effects of substituents such as alkyl groups and chlorine, and for showing how partitioning changes in response to changes in temperature.

  3. Chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning in an immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Bill W.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2010-09-28

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  4. The stringy instanton partition function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonelli, Giulio; Sciarappa, Antonio; Tanzini, Alessandro; Vasko, Petr

    2014-01-01

    We perform an exact computation of the gauged linear sigma model associated to a D1-D5 brane system on a resolved A 1 singularity. This is accomplished via supersymmetric localization on the blown-up two-sphere. We show that in the blow-down limit the partition function reduces to the Nekrasov partition function evaluating the equivariant volume of the instanton moduli space. For finite radius we obtain a tower of world-sheet instanton corrections, that we identify with the equivariant Gromov-Witten invariants of the ADHM moduli space. We show that these corrections can be encoded in a deformation of the Seiberg-Witten prepotential. From the mathematical viewpoint, the D1-D5 system under study displays a twofold nature: the D1-branes viewpoint captures the equivariant quantum cohomology of the ADHM instanton moduli space in the Givental formalism, and the D5-branes viewpoint is related to higher rank equivariant Donaldson-Thomas invariants of.

  5. Thermodynamics of sodium dodecyl sulfate partitioning into lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Anmin; Ziegler, André; Steinbauer, Bernhard; Seelig, Joachim

    2002-09-01

    The partition equilibria of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and lithium dodecyl sulfate between water and bilayer membranes were investigated with isothermal titration calorimetry and spectroscopic methods (light scattering, (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance) in the temperature range of 28 degrees C to 56 degrees C. The partitioning of the dodecyl sulfate anion (DS(-)) into the bilayer membrane is energetically favored by an exothermic partition enthalpy of Delta H(O)(D) = -6.0 kcal/mol at 28 degrees C. This is in contrast to nonionic detergents where Delta H(O)(D) is usually positive. The partition enthalpy decreases linearly with increasing temperature and the molar heat capacity is Delta C(O)(P) = -50 +/- 3 cal mol(-1) K(-1). The partition isotherm is nonlinear if the bound detergent is plotted versus the free detergent concentration in bulk solution. This is caused by the electrostatic repulsion between the DS(-) ions inserted into the membrane and those free in solution near the membrane surface. The surface concentration of DS(-) immediately above the plane of binding was hence calculated with the Gouy-Chapman theory, and a strictly linear relationship was obtained between the surface concentration and the extent of DS(-) partitioning. The surface partition constant K describes the chemical equilibrium in the absence of electrostatic effects. For the SDS-membrane equilibrium K was found to be 1.2 x 10(4) M(-1) to 6 x 10(4) M(-1) for the various systems and conditions investigated, very similar to data available for nonionic detergents of the same chain length. The membrane-micelle phase diagram was also studied. Complete membrane solubilization requires a ratio of 2.2 mol SDS bound per mole of total lipid at 56 degrees C. The corresponding equilibrium concentration of SDS free in solution is C (sat)(D,F) approximately 1.7 mM and is slightly below the critical micelles concentration (CMC) = 2.1 mM (at 56 degrees C and 0.11 M buffer). Membrane saturation occurs at

  6. Automatic analysis of D-partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogaevskaya, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to automatization of D-partition analysis. D-partition is one of the most common methods for determination of solution stability in systems with time-delayed feedback control and its dependency on values of control parameters. A transition from analytical form of D-partition to plain graph has been investigated. An algorithm of graph faces determination and calculation of count of characteristic equation roots with positive real part for appropriate area of D-partition has been developed. The algorithm keeps an information about analytical formulas for edges of faces. It allows to make further analytical research based on the results of computer analysis.

  7. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  8. RNA graph partitioning for the discovery of RNA modularity: a novel application of graph partition algorithm to biology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namhee; Zheng, Zhe; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2014-01-01

    Graph representations have been widely used to analyze and design various economic, social, military, political, and biological networks. In systems biology, networks of cells and organs are useful for understanding disease and medical treatments and, in structural biology, structures of molecules can be described, including RNA structures. In our RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) framework, we represent RNA structures as tree graphs by translating unpaired regions into vertices and helices into edges. Here we explore the modularity of RNA structures by applying graph partitioning known in graph theory to divide an RNA graph into subgraphs. To our knowledge, this is the first application of graph partitioning to biology, and the results suggest a systematic approach for modular design in general. The graph partitioning algorithms utilize mathematical properties of the Laplacian eigenvector (µ2) corresponding to the second eigenvalues (λ2) associated with the topology matrix defining the graph: λ2 describes the overall topology, and the sum of µ2's components is zero. The three types of algorithms, termed median, sign, and gap cuts, divide a graph by determining nodes of cut by median, zero, and largest gap of µ2's components, respectively. We apply these algorithms to 45 graphs corresponding to all solved RNA structures up through 11 vertices (∼ 220 nucleotides). While we observe that the median cut divides a graph into two similar-sized subgraphs, the sign and gap cuts partition a graph into two topologically-distinct subgraphs. We find that the gap cut produces the best biologically-relevant partitioning for RNA because it divides RNAs at less stable connections while maintaining junctions intact. The iterative gap cuts suggest basic modules and assembly protocols to design large RNA structures. Our graph substructuring thus suggests a systematic approach to explore the modularity of biological networks. In our applications to RNA structures, subgraphs also suggest

  9. Tin Oxide Crystals Exposed by Low-Energy {110} Facets for Enhanced Electrochemical Heavy Metal Ions Sensing: X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Experimental Combined with Density-Functional Theory Evidence.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen; Yang, Meng; Chen, Shao-Hua; Liu, Jin-Huai; Li, Qun-Xiang; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2017-02-21

    Herein, we revealed that the electrochemical behaviors on the detection of heavy metal ions (HMIs) would largely rely on the exposed facets of SnO2 nanoparticles. Compared to the high-energy {221} facet, the low-energy {110} facet of SnO2 possessed better electrochemical performance. The adsorption/desorption tests, density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies showed that the lower barrier energy of surface diffusion on {110} facet was critical for the superior electrochemical property, which was favorable for the ions diffusion on the electrode, and further leading the enhanced electrochemical performance. Through the combination of experiments and theoretical calculations, a reliable interpretation of the mechanism for electroanalysis of HMIs with nanomaterials exposed by different crystal facets has been provided. Furthermore, it provides a deep insight into understanding the key factor to improve the electrochemical performance for HMIs detection, so as to design high-performance electrochemical sensors.

  10. LPS-protein aggregation influences protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase micellar systems.

    PubMed

    Lopes, André Moreni; Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria de Carvalho; Novaes, Leticia Celia de Lencastre; Molino, João Vitor Dutra; Barbosa, Leandro Ramos Souza; Pessoa, Adalberto; Rangel-Yagui, Carlota de Oliveira

    2013-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharide endotoxins (LPS) are the most common pyrogenic substances in recombinant peptides and proteins purified from Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli. In this respect, aqueous two-phase micellar systems (ATPMS) have already proven to be a good strategy to purify recombinant proteins of pharmaceutical interest and remove high LPS concentrations. In this paper, we review our recent experimental work in protein partitioning in Triton X-114 ATPMS altogether with some new results and show that LPS-protein aggregation can influence both protein and LPS partitioning. Green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) was employed as a model protein. The ATPMS technology proved to be effective for high loads of LPS removal into the micelle-rich phase (%REM(LPS) > 98 %) while GFPuv partitioned preferentially to the micelle-poor phase (K GFP(uv) < 1.00) due to the excluded-volume interactions. However, theoretically predicted protein partition coefficient values were compared with experimentally obtained ones, and good agreement was found only in the absence of LPS. Dynamic light scattering measurements showed that protein-LPS interactions were taking place and influenced the partitioning process. We believe that this phenomenon should be considered in LPS removal employing any kind of aqueous two-phase system. Nonetheless, ATPMS can still be considered as an efficient strategy for high loads of LPS removal, but being aware that the excluded-volume partitioning theory available might overestimate partition coefficient values due to the presence of protein-LPS aggregation.

  11. Improving accuracy in the quantitation of overlapping, asymmetric, chromatographie peaks by deconvolution: theory and application to coupled gas chromatography atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, M.; Berglund, M.; Baxter, D. C.

    1993-09-01

    Systematic errors in the measurement of overlapping asymmetric, Chromatographic peaks are observed using the perpendicular-drop and tangent-skimming algorithms incorporated in commercial integrators. The magnitude of such errors increases with the degree of tailing and differences in peak size, and was found to be as great as 80% for peak-area and 100% for peak-height measurements made on the smaller, second component of simulated, noise-free chromatograms containing peaks at a size ratio of 10 to 1. Initial deconvolution of overlapping peaks, by mathematical correction for asymmetry, leads to significant improvements in the accuracy of both peak-area and height measurements using the simple, perpendicular-drop algorithm. A comparison of analytical data for the separation and determination of three organolead species by coupled gas chromatography atomic absorption spectrometry using peak-height and area measurements also demonstrates the improved accuracy obtained following deconvolution. It is concluded that the deconvolution method described could be beneficial in a variety of Chromatographic applications where overlapping, asymmetric peaks are observed.

  12. K- and L-edge X-ray absorption spectrum calculations of closed-shell carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds using damped four-component density functional response theory.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Burdakova, Daria; Norman, Patrick

    2016-05-21

    X-ray absorption spectra of carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds have been investigated by means of damped four-component density functional response theory. It is demonstrated that a reliable description of relativistic effects is obtained at both K- and L-edges. Notably, an excellent agreement with experimental results is obtained for L2,3-spectra-with spin-orbit effects well accounted for-also in cases when the experimental intensity ratio deviates from the statistical one of 2 : 1. The theoretical results are consistent with calculations using standard response theory as well as recently reported real-time propagation methods in time-dependent density functional theory, and the virtues of different approaches are discussed. As compared to silane and silicon tetrachloride, an anomalous error in the absolute energy is reported for the L2,3-spectrum of silicon tetrafluoride, amounting to an additional spectral shift of ∼1 eV. This anomaly is also observed for other exchange-correlation functionals, but it is seen neither at other silicon edges nor at the carbon K-edge of fluorine derivatives of ethene. Considering the series of molecules SiH4-XFX with X = 1, 2, 3, 4, a gradual divergence from interpolated experimental ionization potentials is observed at the level of Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT), and to a smaller extent with the use of Hartree-Fock. This anomalous error is thus attributed partly to difficulties in correctly emulating the electronic structure effects imposed by the very electronegative fluorines, and partly due to inconsistencies in the spurious electron self-repulsion in DFT. Substitution with one, or possibly two, fluorine atoms is estimated to yield small enough errors to allow for reliable interpretations and predictions of L2,3-spectra of more complex and extended silicon-based systems.

  13. Impact of gas/particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds on source apportionment with positive matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingjie; Hannigan, Michael P; Barsanti, Kelley C

    2014-08-19

    To quantify and minimize the influence of gas/particle (G/P) partitioning on receptor-based source apportionment using particle-phase semivolatile organic compound (SVOC) data, positive matrix factorization (PMF) coupled with a bootstrap technique was applied to three data sets mainly composed of "measured-total" (measured particle- + gas-phase), "particle-only" (measured particle-phase) and "predicted-total" (measured particle-phase + predicted gas-phase) SVOCs to apportion carbonaceous aerosols. Particle- (PM2.5) and gas-phase SVOCs were collected using quartz fiber filters followed by PUF/XAD-4/PUF adsorbents and measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Concentrations of gas-phase SVOCs were also predicted from their particle-phase concentrations using absorptive partitioning theory. Five factors were resolved for each data set, and the factor profiles were generally consistent across the three PMF solutions. Using a previous source apportionment study at the same receptor site, those five factors were linked to summertime biogenic emissions (odd n-alkane factor), unburned fossil fuels (light SVOC factor), road dust and/or cooking (n-alkane factor), motor vehicle emissions (PAH factor), and lubricating oil combustion (sterane factor). The "measured-total" solution was least influenced by G/P partitioning and used as reference. Two out of the five factors (odd n-alkane and PAH factors) exhibited consistent contributions for "particle-only" vs "measured-total" and "predicted-total" vs "measured-total" solutions. Factor contributions of light SVOC and n-alkane factors were more consistent for "predicted-total" vs "measured-total" than "particle-only" vs "measured-total" solutions. The remaining factor (sterane factor) underestimated the contribution by around 50% from both "particle-only" and "predicted-total" solutions. The results of this study confirm that when measured gas-phase SVOCs are not available, "predicted-total" SVOCs should be used

  14. Localized operator partitioning method for electronic excitation energies in the time-dependent density functional formalism.

    PubMed

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Frisch, Michael J; Brumer, Paul; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2016-12-28

    We extend the localized operator partitioning method (LOPM) [J. Nagesh, A. F. Izmaylov, and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 084114 (2015)] to the time-dependent density functional theory framework to partition molecular electronic energies of excited states in a rigorous manner. A molecular fragment is defined as a collection of atoms using Becke's atomic partitioning. A numerically efficient scheme for evaluating the fragment excitation energy is derived employing a resolution of the identity to preserve standard one- and two-electron integrals in the final expressions. The utility of this partitioning approach is demonstrated by examining several excited states of two bichromophoric compounds: 9-((1- naphthyl)- methyl)- anthracene and 4-((2- naphthyl)- methyl)- benzaldehyde. The LOPM is found to provide nontrivial insights into the nature of electronic energy localization that is not accessible using a simple density difference analysis.

  15. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-14

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  16. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-14

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  17. Kinetic partitioning mechanism of HDV ribozyme folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiawen; Gong, Sha; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Wenbing

    2014-01-01

    RNA folding kinetics is directly tied to RNA biological functions. We introduce here a new approach for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. This approach is based on our previous established helix-based method for predicting the folding kinetics of RNA secondary structure. In this approach, the transition rates for an elementary step: (1) formation, (2) disruption of a helix stem, and (3) helix formation with concomitant partial melting of an incompatible helix, are calculated with the free energy landscape. The folding kinetics of the Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and the mutated sequences are studied with this method. The folding pathways are identified by recursive searching the states with high net flux-in(out) population starting from the native state. The theory results are in good agreement with that of the experiments. The results indicate that the bi-phasic folding kinetics for the wt HDV sequence is ascribed to the kinetic partitioning mechanism: Part of the population will quickly fold to the native state along the fast pathway, while another part of the population will fold along the slow pathway, in which the population is trapped in a non-native state. Single mutation not only changes the folding rate but also the folding pathway.

  18. Ionic partitioning and stomatal regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sanoubar, Rabab; Orsini, Francesco; Gianquinto, Giorgio Prosdocimi

    2013-01-01

    Vegetable grafting is commonly claimed to improve crop’s tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, including salinity. Although the use of inter-specific graftings is relatively common, whether the improved salt tolerance should be attributed to the genotypic background rather than the grafting per se is a matter of discussion among scientists. It is clear that most of published research has to date overlooked the issue, with the mutual presence of self-grafted and non-grafted controls resulting to be quite rare within experimental evidences. It was recently demonstrated that the genotype of the rootstock and grafting per se are responsible respectively for the differential ion accumulation and partitioning as well as to the stomatal adaptation to the stress. The present paper contributes to the ongoing discussion with further data on the differences associated to salinity response in a range of grafted melon combinations. PMID:24309549

  19. Assimilate partitioning during reproductive growth

    SciTech Connect

    Finazzo, S.F.; Davenport, T.L.

    1987-04-01

    Leaves having various phyllotactic relationships to fruitlets were labeled for 1 hour with 10/sub r/Ci of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. Fruitlets were also labeled. Fruitlets did fix /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. Translocation of radioactivity from the peel into the fruit occurred slowly and to a limited extent. No evidence of translocation out of the fruitlets was observed. Assimilate partitioning in avocado was strongly influenced by phyllotaxy. If a fruit and the labeled leaf had the same phyllotaxy then greater than 95% of the radiolabel was present in this fruit. When the fruit did not have the same phyllotaxy as the labeled leaf, the radiolabel distribution was skewed with 70% of the label going to a single adjacent position. Avocado fruitlets exhibit uniform labeling throughout a particular tissue. In avocado, assimilates preferentially move from leaves to fruits with the same phyllotaxy.

  20. MULTIVARIATE KERNEL PARTITION PROCESS MIXTURES

    PubMed Central

    Dunson, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures provide a useful approach for relaxing parametric assumptions. Discrete mixture models induce clusters, typically with the same cluster allocation for each parameter in multivariate cases. As a more flexible approach that facilitates sparse nonparametric modeling of multivariate random effects distributions, this article proposes a kernel partition process (KPP) in which the cluster allocation varies for different parameters. The KPP is shown to be the driving measure for a multivariate ordered Chinese restaurant process that induces a highly-flexible dependence structure in local clustering. This structure allows the relative locations of the random effects to inform the clustering process, with spatially-proximal random effects likely to be assigned the same cluster index. An exact block Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, avoiding truncation of the infinite measure. The methods are applied to hormone curve data, and a dependent KPP is proposed for classification from functional predictors. PMID:24478563

  1. HPAM: Hirshfeld partitioned atomic multipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elking, Dennis M.; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2012-02-01

    An implementation of the Hirshfeld (HD) and Hirshfeld-Iterated (HD-I) atomic charge density partitioning schemes is described. Atomic charges and atomic multipoles are calculated from the HD and HD-I atomic charge densities for arbitrary atomic multipole rank l on molecules of arbitrary shape and size. The HD and HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are tested by comparing molecular multipole moments and the electrostatic potential (ESP) surrounding a molecule with their reference ab initio values. In general, the HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are found to better reproduce ab initio electrostatic properties over HD atomic charges/multipoles. A systematic increase in precision for reproducing ab initio electrostatic properties is demonstrated by increasing the atomic multipole rank from l=0 (atomic charges) to l=4 (atomic hexadecapoles). Both HD and HD-I atomic multipoles up to rank l are shown to exactly reproduce ab initio molecular multipole moments of rank L for L⩽l. In addition, molecular dipole moments calculated by HD, HD-I, and ChelpG atomic charges only ( l=0) are compared with reference ab initio values. Significant errors in reproducing ab initio molecular dipole moments are found if only HD or HD-I atomic charges used. Program summaryProgram title: HPAM Catalogue identifier: AEKP_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License v2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 500 809 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 424 494 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: Any Operating system: Linux RAM: Typically, a few hundred megabytes Classification: 16.13 External routines: The program requires 'formatted checkpoint' files obtained from the Gaussian 03 or Gaussian 09 quantum chemistry program. Nature of problem: An ab initio

  2. The nature of chemical bonding in actinide and lanthanide ferrocyanides determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Thomas; Guillaumont, Dominique; Fillaux, Clara; Scheinost, Andreas; Moisy, Philippe; Petit, Sébastien; Shuh, David K; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2016-01-28

    The electronic properties of actinide cations are of fundamental interest to describe intramolecular interactions and chemical bonding in the context of nuclear waste reprocessing or direct storage. The 5f and 6d orbitals are the first partially or totally vacant states in these elements, and the nature of the actinide ligand bonds is related to their ability to overlap with ligand orbitals. Because of its chemical and orbital selectivities, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an effective probe of actinide species frontier orbitals and for understanding actinide cation reactivity toward chelating ligands. The soft X-ray probes of the light elements provide better resolution than actinide L3-edges to obtain electronic information from the ligand. Thus coupling simulations to experimental soft X-ray spectral measurements and complementary quantum chemical calculations yields quantitative information on chemical bonding. In this study, soft X-ray XAS at the K-edges of C and N, and the L2,3-edges of Fe was used to investigate the electronic structures of the well-known ferrocyanide complexes K4Fe(II)(CN)6, thorium hexacyanoferrate Th(IV)Fe(II)(CN)6, and neodymium hexacyanoferrate KNd(III)Fe(II)(CN)6. The soft X-ray spectra were simulated based on quantum chemical calculations. Our results highlight the orbital overlapping effects and atomic effective charges in the Fe(II)(CN)6 building block. In addition to providing a detailed description of the electronic structure of the ferrocyanide complex (K4Fe(II)(CN)6), the results strongly contribute to confirming the actinide 5f and 6d orbital oddity in comparison to lanthanide 4f and 5d.

  3. [On the partition of acupuncture academic schools].

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengyan; Luo, Xi; Xia, Youbing

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays extensive attention has been paid on the research of acupuncture academic schools, however, a widely accepted method of partition of acupuncture academic schools is still in need. In this paper, the methods of partition of acupuncture academic schools in the history have been arranged, and three typical methods of"partition of five schools" "partition of eighteen schools" and "two-stage based partition" are summarized. After adeep analysis on the disadvantages and advantages of these three methods, a new method of partition of acupuncture academic schools that is called "three-stage based partition" is proposed. In this method, after the overall acupuncture academic schools are divided into an ancient stage, a modern stage and a contemporary stage, each schoolis divided into its sub-school category. It is believed that this method of partition can remedy the weaknesses ofcurrent methods, but also explore a new model of inheritance and development under a different aspect through thedifferentiation and interaction of acupuncture academic schools at three stages.

  4. Continuous Graph Partitioning for Camera Network Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-23

    Symmetric Gossip partitioning algorithm The distributed algorithm presented in this section assumes a symmetric gossip -type communication protocol . In... gossip communication. We prove convergence of all these algorithms, and we analyze their performance in a simulation study. 2 Continuous Partitions of...section assumes an asymmetric broadcast communication protocol . In particular, at each iteration only one camera updates its state by using local

  5. Building Ecology and Partition Design. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    This bulletin is intended as a resource for school system facility planners and architects who design schools. Ways in which decision makers can incorporate environmental concerns in the design of school buildings are detailed. Focus is on the design of interior partition systems. Partition systems in schools serve several purposes; they define…

  6. Graph Partitioning Models for Parallel Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Kolda, T.G.

    1999-03-02

    Calculations can naturally be described as graphs in which vertices represent computation and edges reflect data dependencies. By partitioning the vertices of a graph, the calculation can be divided among processors of a parallel computer. However, the standard methodology for graph partitioning minimizes the wrong metric and lacks expressibility. We survey several recently proposed alternatives and discuss their relative merits.

  7. Purification of biomaterials by phase partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A technique which is particularly suited to microgravity environments and which is potentially more powerful than electrophoresis is phase partitioning. Phase partitioning is purification by partitioning between the two immiscible aqueous layers formed by solution of the polymers poly(ethylene glycol) and dextran in water. This technique proved to be very useful for separations in one-g but is limited for cells because the cells are more dense than the phase solutions thus tend to sediment to the bottom of the container before reaching equilibrium with the preferred phase. There are three phases to work in this area: synthesis of new polymers for affinity phase partitioning; development of automated apparatus for ground-based separations; and design of apparatus for performing simple phase partitioning space experiments, including examination of mechanisms for separating phases in the absence of gravity.

  8. Cell partition in two phase polymer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Aqueous phase-separated polymer solutions can be used as support media for the partition of biological macromolecules, organelles and cells. Cell separations using the technique have proven to be extremely sensitive to cell surface properties but application of the systems are limited to cells or aggregates which do not significantly while the phases are settling. Partition in zero g in principle removes this limitation but an external driving force must be applied to induce the phases to separate since their density difference disappears. We have recently shown that an applied electric field can supply the necessary driving force. We are proposing to utilize the NASA FES to study field-driven phase separation and cell partition on the ground and in zero g to help define the separation/partition process, with the ultimate goal being to develop partition as a zero g cell separation technique.

  9. Parallel hypergraph partitioning for scientific computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Heaphy, Robert; Devine, Karen Dragon; Catalyurek, Umit; Bisseling, Robert; Hendrickson, Bruce Alan; Boman, Erik Gunnar

    2005-07-01

    Graph partitioning is often used for load balancing in parallel computing, but it is known that hypergraph partitioning has several advantages. First, hypergraphs more accurately model communication volume, and second, they are more expressive and can better represent nonsymmetric problems. Hypergraph partitioning is particularly suited to parallel sparse matrix-vector multiplication, a common kernel in scientific computing. We present a parallel software package for hypergraph (and sparse matrix) partitioning developed at Sandia National Labs. The algorithm is a variation on multilevel partitioning. Our parallel implementation is novel in that it uses a two-dimensional data distribution among processors. We present empirical results that show our parallel implementation achieves good speedup on several large problems (up to 33 million nonzeros) with up to 64 processors on a Linux cluster.

  10. Efficient multiple-way graph partitioning algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Dasdan, A.; Aykanat, C.

    1995-12-01

    Graph partitioning deals with evenly dividing a graph into two or more parts such that the total weight of edges interconnecting these parts, i.e., cutsize, is minimized. Graph partitioning has important applications in VLSI layout, mapping, and sparse Gaussian elimination. Since graph partitioning problem is NP-hard, we should resort to polynomial-time algorithms to obtain a good solution, or hopefully a near-optimal solution. Kernighan-Lin (KL) propsoed a 2-way partitioning algorithms. Fiduccia-Mattheyses (FM) introduced a faster version of KL algorithm. Sanchis (FMS) generalized FM algorithm to a multiple-way partitioning algorithm. Simulated Annealing (SA) is one of the most successful approaches that are not KL-based.

  11. Recovery of small bioparticles by interfacial partitioning.

    PubMed

    Jauregi, P; Hoeben, M A; van der Lans, R G J M; Kwant, G; van der Wielen, L A M

    2002-05-20

    In this article, a qualitative study of the recovery of small bioparticles by interfacial partitioning in liquid-liquid biphasic systems is presented. A range of crystallised biomolecules with varying polarities have been chosen such as glycine, phenylglycine and ampicillin. Liquid-liquid biphasic systems in a range of polarity differences were selected such as an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS), water-butanol and water-hexanol. The results indicate that interfacial partitioning of crystals occurs even when their density exceeds that of the individual liquid phases. Yet, not all crystals partition to the same extent to the interface to form a stable and thick interphase layer. This indicates some degree of selectivity. From the analysis of these results in relation to the physicochemical properties of the crystals and the liquid phases, a hypothetical mechanism for the interfacial partitioning is deduced. Overall these results support the potential of interfacial partitioning as a large scale separation technology.

  12. Two-photon absorption cross sections within equation-of-motion coupled-cluster formalism using resolution-of-the-identity and Cholesky decomposition representations: Theory, implementation, and benchmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, Kaushik D.; Krylov, Anna I.

    2015-02-01

    The equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-CC) methods provide a robust description of electronically excited states and their properties. Here, we present a formalism for two-photon absorption (2PA) cross sections for the equation-of-motion for excitation energies CC with single and double substitutions (EOM-CC for electronically excited states with single and double substitutions) wave functions. Rather than the response theory formulation, we employ the expectation-value approach which is commonly used within EOM-CC, configuration interaction, and algebraic diagrammatic construction frameworks. In addition to canonical implementation, we also exploit resolution-of-the-identity (RI) and Cholesky decomposition (CD) for the electron-repulsion integrals to reduce memory requirements and to increase parallel efficiency. The new methods are benchmarked against the CCSD and CC3 response theories for several small molecules. We found that the expectation-value 2PA cross sections are within 5% from the quadratic response CCSD values. The RI and CD approximations lead to small errors relative to the canonical implementation (less than 4%) while affording computational savings. RI/CD successfully address the well-known issue of large basis set requirements for 2PA cross sections calculations. The capabilities of the new code are illustrated by calculations of the 2PA cross sections for model chromophores of the photoactive yellow and green fluorescent proteins.

  13. Two-photon absorption cross sections within equation-of-motion coupled-cluster formalism using resolution-of-the-identity and Cholesky decomposition representations: Theory, implementation, and benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Kaushik D; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-02-14

    The equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-CC) methods provide a robust description of electronically excited states and their properties. Here, we present a formalism for two-photon absorption (2PA) cross sections for the equation-of-motion for excitation energies CC with single and double substitutions (EOM-CC for electronically excited states with single and double substitutions) wave functions. Rather than the response theory formulation, we employ the expectation-value approach which is commonly used within EOM-CC, configuration interaction, and algebraic diagrammatic construction frameworks. In addition to canonical implementation, we also exploit resolution-of-the-identity (RI) and Cholesky decomposition (CD) for the electron-repulsion integrals to reduce memory requirements and to increase parallel efficiency. The new methods are benchmarked against the CCSD and CC3 response theories for several small molecules. We found that the expectation-value 2PA cross sections are within 5% from the quadratic response CCSD values. The RI and CD approximations lead to small errors relative to the canonical implementation (less than 4%) while affording computational savings. RI/CD successfully address the well-known issue of large basis set requirements for 2PA cross sections calculations. The capabilities of the new code are illustrated by calculations of the 2PA cross sections for model chromophores of the photoactive yellow and green fluorescent proteins.

  14. Two-photon absorption cross sections within equation-of-motion coupled-cluster formalism using resolution-of-the-identity and Cholesky decomposition representations: Theory, implementation, and benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Nanda, Kaushik D.; Krylov, Anna I.

    2015-02-14

    The equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-CC) methods provide a robust description of electronically excited states and their properties. Here, we present a formalism for two-photon absorption (2PA) cross sections for the equation-of-motion for excitation energies CC with single and double substitutions (EOM-CC for electronically excited states with single and double substitutions) wave functions. Rather than the response theory formulation, we employ the expectation-value approach which is commonly used within EOM-CC, configuration interaction, and algebraic diagrammatic construction frameworks. In addition to canonical implementation, we also exploit resolution-of-the-identity (RI) and Cholesky decomposition (CD) for the electron-repulsion integrals to reduce memory requirements and to increase parallel efficiency. The new methods are benchmarked against the CCSD and CC3 response theories for several small molecules. We found that the expectation-value 2PA cross sections are within 5% from the quadratic response CCSD values. The RI and CD approximations lead to small errors relative to the canonical implementation (less than 4%) while affording computational savings. RI/CD successfully address the well-known issue of large basis set requirements for 2PA cross sections calculations. The capabilities of the new code are illustrated by calculations of the 2PA cross sections for model chromophores of the photoactive yellow and green fluorescent proteins.

  15. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations on superoxide reductase: role of the axial thiolate in reactivity.

    PubMed

    Dey, Abhishek; Jenney, Francis E; Adams, Michael W W; Johnson, Michael K; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I

    2007-10-17

    Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a non-heme iron enzyme that reduces superoxide to peroxide at a diffusion-controlled rate. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is used to investigate the ground-state electronic structure of the resting high-spin and CN- bound low-spin FeIII forms of the 1Fe SOR from Pyrococcus furiosus. A computational model with constrained imidazole rings (necessary for reproducing spin states), H-bonding interaction to the thiolate (necessary for reproducing Fe-S bond covalency of the high-spin and low-spin forms), and H-bonding to the exchangeable axial ligand (necessary to reproduce the ground state of the low-spin form) was developed and then used to investigate the enzymatic reaction mechanism. Reaction of the resting ferrous site with superoxide and protonation leading to a high-spin FeIII-OOH species and its subsequent protonation resulting in H2O2 release is calculated to be the most energetically favorable reaction pathway. Our results suggest that the thiolate acts as a covalent anionic ligand. Replacing the thiolate with a neutral noncovalent ligand makes protonation very endothermic and greatly raises the reduction potential. The covalent nature of the thiolate weakens the FeIII bond to the proximal oxygen of this hydroperoxo species, which raises its pKa by an additional 5 log units relative to the pKa of a primarily anionic ligand, facilitating its protonation. A comparison with cytochrome P450 indicates that the stronger equatorial ligand field from the porphyrin results in a low-spin FeIII-OOH species that would not be capable of efficient H2O2 release due to a spin-crossing barrier associated with formation of a high-spin 5C FeIII product. Additionally, the presence of the dianionic porphyrin pi ring in cytochrome P450 allows O-O heterolysis, forming an FeIV-oxo porphyrin radical species, which is calculated to be extremely unfavorable for the non-heme SOR ligand environment. Finally, the 5C FeIII site that results

  16. Tensor Spectral Clustering for Partitioning Higher-order Network Structures

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Austin R.; Gleich, David F.; Leskovec, Jure

    2016-01-01

    Spectral graph theory-based methods represent an important class of tools for studying the structure of networks. Spectral methods are based on a first-order Markov chain derived from a random walk on the graph and thus they cannot take advantage of important higher-order network substructures such as triangles, cycles, and feed-forward loops. Here we propose a Tensor Spectral Clustering (TSC) algorithm that allows for modeling higher-order network structures in a graph partitioning framework. Our TSC algorithm allows the user to specify which higher-order network structures (cycles, feed-forward loops, etc.) should be preserved by the network clustering. Higher-order network structures of interest are represented using a tensor, which we then partition by developing a multilinear spectral method. Our framework can be applied to discovering layered flows in networks as well as graph anomaly detection, which we illustrate on synthetic networks. In directed networks, a higher-order structure of particular interest is the directed 3-cycle, which captures feedback loops in networks. We demonstrate that our TSC algorithm produces large partitions that cut fewer directed 3-cycles than standard spectral clustering algorithms. PMID:27812399

  17. Do Psychological Sex Differences Reflect Evolutionary Bisexual Partitioning?

    PubMed

    Trofimova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes sex differences in communicative and exploratory abilities and mental disabilities from the rarely discussed perspective of sex differences in the shape of phenotypic distributions. The article reviews the most consistent findings related to such differences and compares them with the evolutionary theory of sex (ETS). The ETS considers sexual dimorphism as a functional specialization of a species into 2 partitions: variational and conservational. The analysis suggests that male superiority in risk and sensation seeking and physical abilities; higher rates of psychopathy, dyslexia, and autism; and higher birth and accidental death rates reflects the systemic variational function of the male sex. Female superiority in verbal abilities, lawfulness, socialization, empathy, and agreeableness is presented as a reflection of the systemic conservational function of the female sex. From this perspective psychological sex differences in communicative and exploratory abilities might not just be an accidental result of sexual selection or labor distribution in early humans. It might reflect a global functional differentiation tendency within a species to expand its phenotypic diversity and at the same time to conserve beneficial features in the species' behavior. The article also offers an addition to the ETS by suggesting that the male sex (variable partition) plays an evolutionary role in pruning of the redundant excesses in a species' bank of beneficial characteristics despite resistance from the conservational partition.

  18. Tensor Spectral Clustering for Partitioning Higher-order Network Structures.

    PubMed

    Benson, Austin R; Gleich, David F; Leskovec, Jure

    2015-01-01

    Spectral graph theory-based methods represent an important class of tools for studying the structure of networks. Spectral methods are based on a first-order Markov chain derived from a random walk on the graph and thus they cannot take advantage of important higher-order network substructures such as triangles, cycles, and feed-forward loops. Here we propose a Tensor Spectral Clustering (TSC) algorithm that allows for modeling higher-order network structures in a graph partitioning framework. Our TSC algorithm allows the user to specify which higher-order network structures (cycles, feed-forward loops, etc.) should be preserved by the network clustering. Higher-order network structures of interest are represented using a tensor, which we then partition by developing a multilinear spectral method. Our framework can be applied to discovering layered flows in networks as well as graph anomaly detection, which we illustrate on synthetic networks. In directed networks, a higher-order structure of particular interest is the directed 3-cycle, which captures feedback loops in networks. We demonstrate that our TSC algorithm produces large partitions that cut fewer directed 3-cycles than standard spectral clustering algorithms.

  19. The origin of the unusual broad and intense visible absorption of tetrathiafulvalene-annulated zinc porphyrazine: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wei; Kan, Yu-He; Wu, Shui-Xing; Li, Hai-Bin; Yan, Li-Kai; Sun, Shi-Ling; Su, Zhong-Min

    2012-03-01

    The vertical excitation energies of tetrathiafulvalene (TTF)-annulated zinc porphyrazine (ZnPzTTF) were investigated using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations and compared to the experimental UV-vis spectra. To examine the effects of the aza substitutions and TTF groups on the molecular properties, zinc complexes of porphyrin (ZnP), porphyrazine (ZnPz) and tetraTTF-annulated porphyrin (ZnPTTF) were also selected for comparison. It was shown that numerous electronic transitions with TTF-to-porphyrin or porphyrazine charge transfer character exist and the Q band of ZnPzTTF is dominated by TTF-to-porphyrazine charge transfer transition mixed with porphyrazine core unit itself except for classic porphyrazine π→π* transitions. The Q band of ZnPzTTF mixes with other configurations, which breaks down the Gouterman's classic four-orbital model for the spectral interpretation. The data suggest that TDDFT/SAOP performs best for Q and B bands of ZnPzTTF with the maximum error in excitation energy being 0.17 eV. The CAM-B3LYP, ωB97XD and M06-2X calculations qualitatively predict that the low-lying electronic transitions of ZnPzTTF with TTF-to-porphyrazine charge transfer character located below the Q band. The broad and intense red-shifted Q band suggests that ZnPzTTF can be a candidate for dye-sensitized solar cells.

  20. Stress partition and microstructure in size-segregating granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staron, L.; Phillips, J. C.

    2015-08-01

    When a granular mixture involving grains of different sizes is shaken, sheared, mixed, or left to flow, grains tend to separate by sizes in a process known as size segregation. In this study, we explore the size segregation mechanism in granular chute flows in terms of the pressure distribution and granular microstructure. Therefore, two-dimensional discrete numerical simulations of bidisperse granular chute flows are systematically analyzed. Based on the theoretical models of J. M. N. T. Gray and A. R. Thornton [Proc. R. Soc. A 461, 1447 (2005), 10.1098/rspa.2004.1420] and K. M. Hill and D. S. Tan [J. Fluid Mech. 756, 54 (2014), 10.1017/jfm.2014.271], we explore the stress partition in the phases of small and large grains, discriminating between contact stresses and kinetic stresses. Our results support both gravity-induced and shear-gradient-induced segregation mechanisms. However, we show that the contact stress partition is extremely sensitive to the definition of the partial stress tensors and, more specifically, to the way mixed contacts (i.e., involving a small grain and a large grain) are handled, making conclusions on gravity-induced segregation uncertain. By contrast, the computation of the partial kinetic stress tensors is robust. The kinetic pressure partition exhibits a deviation from continuum mixture theory of a significantly higher amplitude than the contact pressure and displays a clear dependence on the flow dynamics. Finally, using a simple approximation for the contact partial stress tensors, we investigate how the contact stress partition relates to the flow microstructure and suggest that the latter may provide an interesting proxy for studying gravity-induced segregation.

  1. Partitioned Bayesian analyses, partition choice, and the phylogenetic relationships of scincid lizards.

    PubMed

    Brandley, Matthew C; Schmitz, Andreas; Reeder, Tod W

    2005-06-01

    Partitioned Bayesian analyses of approximately 2.2 kb of nucleotide sequence data (mtDNA) were used to elucidate phylogenetic relationships among 30 scincid lizard genera. Few partitioned Bayesian analyses exist in the literature, resulting in a lack of methods to determine the appropriate number of and identity of partitions. Thus, a criterion, based on the Bayes factor, for selecting among competing partitioning strategies is proposed and tested. Improvements in both mean -lnL and estimated posterior probabilities were observed when specific models and parameter estimates were assumed for partitions of the total data set. This result is expected given that the 95% credible intervals of model parameter estimates for numerous partitions do not overlap and it reveals that different data partitions may evolve quite differently. We further demonstrate that how one partitions the data (by gene, codon position, etc.) is shown to be a greater concern than simply the overall number of partitions. Using the criterion of the 2 ln Bayes factor > 10, the phylogenetic analysis employing the largest number of partitions was decisively better than all other strategies. Strategies that partitioned the ND1 gene by codon position performed better than other partition strategies, regardless of the overall number of partitions. Scincidae, Acontinae, Lygosominae, east Asian and North American "Eumeces" + Neoseps; North African Eumeces, Scincus, and Scincopus, and a large group primarily from sub-Saharan Africa, Madagascar, and neighboring islands are monophyletic. Feylinia, a limbless group of previously uncertain relationships, is nested within a "scincine" clade from sub-Saharan Africa. We reject the hypothesis that the nearly limbless dibamids are derived from within the Scincidae, but cannot reject the hypothesis that they represent the sister taxon to skinks. Amphiglossus, Chalcides, the acontines Acontias and Typhlosaurus, and Scincinae are paraphyletic. The globally widespread

  2. REE Partitioning in Lunar Minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, J. F.; Lapen, T. J.; Draper, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are an extremely useful tool in modeling lunar magmatic processes. Here we present the first experimentally derived plagioclase/melt partition coefficients in lunar compositions covering the entire suite of REE. Positive europium anomalies are ubiquitous in the plagioclase-rich rocks of the lunar highlands, and complementary negative Eu anomalies are found in most lunar basalts. These features are taken as evidence of a large-scale differentiation event, with crystallization of a global-scale lunar magma ocean (LMO) resulting in a plagioclase flotation crust and a mafic lunar interior from which mare basalts were subsequently derived. However, the extent of the Eu anomaly in lunar rocks is variable. Fagan and Neal [1] reported highly anorthitic plagioclase grains in lunar impact melt rock 60635,19 that displayed negative Eu anomalies as well as the more usual positive anomalies. Indeed some grains in the sample are reported to display both positive and negative anomalies. Judging from cathodoluminescence images, these anomalies do not appear to be associated with crystal overgrowths or zones.

  3. Spectral partitioning in diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Chambers, D H; Candy, J V

    1999-06-14

    The scattering mechanism of diffraction tomography is described by the integral form of the Helmholtz equation. The goal of diffraction tomography is to invert this equation in order to reconstruct the object function from the measured scattered fields. During the forward propagation process, the spatial spectrum of the object under investigation is ''smeared,'' by a convolution in the spectral domain, across the propagating and evanescent regions of the received field. Hence, care must be taken in performing the reconstruction, as the object's spectral information has been moved into regions where it may be considered to be noise rather than useful information. This will reduce the quality and resolution of the reconstruction. We show haw the object's spectrum can be partitioned into resolvable and non-resolvable parts based upon the cutoff between the propagating and evanescent fields. Operating under the Born approximation, we develop a beam-forming on transmit approach to direct the energy into either the propagating or evanescent parts of the spectrum. In this manner, we may individually interrogate the propagating and evanescent regions of the object spectrum.

  4. Partitioning of regular computation on multiprocessor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Fung Fung

    1988-01-01

    Problem partitioning of regular computation over two dimensional meshes on multiprocessor systems is examined. The regular computation model considered involves repetitive evaluation of values at each mesh point with local communication. The computational workload and the communication pattern are the same at each mesh point. The regular computation model arises in numerical solutions of partial differential equations and simulations of cellular automata. Given a communication pattern, a systematic way to generate a family of partitions is presented. The influence of various partitioning schemes on performance is compared on the basis of computation to communication ratio.

  5. Partitioning of regular computation on multiprocessor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Fung F.

    1990-01-01

    Problem partitioning of regular computation over two dimensional meshes on multiprocessor systems is examined. The regular computation model considered involves repetitive evaluation of values at each mesh point with local communication. The computational workload and the communication pattern are the same at each mesh point. The regular computation model arises in numerical solutions of partial differential equations and simulations of cellular automata. Given a communication pattern, a systematic way to generate a family of partitions is presented. The influence of various partitioning schemes on performance is compared on the basis of computation to communication ratio.

  6. Partitioning of regular computation on multiprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, F. . Computer Systems Lab.)

    1990-07-01

    Problem partitioning of regular computation over two-dimensional meshes on multiprocessor systems is examined. The regular computation model considered involves repetitive evaluation of values at each mesh point with local communication. The computational workload and the communication pattern are the same at each mesh point. The regular computation model arises in numerical solutions of partial differential equations and simulations of cellular automata. Given a communication pattern, a systematic way to generate a family of partitions is presented. The influence of various partitioning schemes on performance is compared on the basis of computation to communication ratio.

  7. Determination of octanol-air partition coefficients and supercooled liquid vapor pressures of PAHs as a function of temperature: Application to gas-particle partitioning in an urban atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odabasi, Mustafa; Cetin, Eylem; Sofuoglu, Aysun

    Octanol-air partition coefficients ( KOA) for 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined as a function of temperature using the gas chromatographic retention time method. log KOA values at 25° ranged over six orders of magnitude, between 6.34 (acenaphthylene) and 12.59 (dibenz[ a,h]anthracene). The determined KOA values were within factor of 0.7 (dibenz[ a,h]anthracene) to 15.1 (benz[ a]anthracene) of values calculated as the ratio of octanol-water partition coefficient to dimensionless Henry's law constant. Supercooled liquid vapor pressures ( PL) of 13 PAHs were also determined using the gas chromatographic retention time technique. Activity coefficients in octanol calculated using KOA and PL ranged between 3.2 and 6.2 indicating near-ideal solution behavior. Atmospheric concentrations measured in this study in Izmir, Turkey were used to investigate the partitioning of PAHs between particle and gas-phases. Experimental gas-particle partition coefficients ( Kp) were compared to the predictions of KOA absorption and KSA (soot-air partition coefficient) models. Octanol-based absorptive partitioning model predicted lower partition coefficients especially for relatively volatile PAHs. Ratios of measured/modeled partition coefficients ranged between 1.1 and 15.5 (4.5±6.0, average±SD) for KOA model. KSA model predictions were relatively better and measured to modeled ratios ranged between 0.6 and 5.6 (2.3±2.7, average±SD).

  8. Seasonality and interspecies differences in particle/gas partitioning of PAHs observed by the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network (IADN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galarneau, Elisabeth; Bidleman, Terry F.; Blanchard, Pierrette

    This study presents partitioning data from eight locations in the Laurentian Great Lakes region collected by the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network (IADN) over periods ranging from 1 to 6 years. Particle/gas partitioning varies sufficiently between sites in the Great Lakes region to preclude the use of a uniform temperature dependence for its description. Site-specific parameters for describing partitioning as a function of inverse temperature are presented. Relationships between partitioning of appreciably semivolatile PAHs and saturated vapour pressure at Chicago (IIT) and Sturgeon Point (STP) demonstrate that anthracene, benz[a]anthracene and retene behave differently than phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene and chrysene+triphenylene. Possible reasons for these differences include interspecies variations in the fraction of atmospherically non-exchangeable, though analytically extractable, PAHs on particles and differences in soot-air partition coefficients as they relate to saturated vapour pressure. The observed interspecies differences are not consistent with sampling artefacts such as filter adsorption or sorbent breakthrough. At IIT, but not at STP, values of the slope of the relationship between the log partition coefficient and log vapour pressure vary in a manner opposing the annual temperature cycle. A comparison of partitioning calculated by a combined absorption/adsorption model shows good predictability at Chicago but underestimates values at a rural site (Eagle Harbor, EGH) by an order of magnitude.

  9. SpecP: A tool for spectral partitioning of protein contact graph.

    PubMed

    Namboodiri, Saritha; K, Kripadas

    2013-01-01

    SpecP is an open-source Python module that performs Spectral Partitioning on Protein Contact Graphs. Protein Contact Graphs are graph theory based representation of the protein structure, where each amino acid forms a 'vertex' and spatial contact of any two amino acids is an 'edge' between them. Spectral partitioning is carried out in SpecP based on the second smallest spectral value (eigen value) of the Protein Contact Graph. The eigen vector corresponding to the second smallest spectral value are partitioned into two clusters based on the sign of the corresponding vector entry. Spectral Partitioning algorithm is repeatedly carried out until the desired numbers of partitions are obtained. SpecP visualizes the spectrally partitioned clusters of protein structure along with the Protein Contact Map and Protein Contact Graph which can be saved for later use. It also possesses an interactive mode whereby the user has the ability to zoom, pan, resize and save these raster images in various image formats (.eps, .jpg, .png) manually. SpecP is a stand-alone extensible tool useful for structural analysis of proteins.

  10. Merging Groups to Maximize Object Partition Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klastorin, T. D.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of objectively comparing two independently determined partitions of N objects or variables is discussed. A similarity measure based on the simple matching coefficient is defined and related to previously suggested measures. (Author/JKS)

  11. Cell Partition in Two Polymer Aqueous Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Partition of biological cells in two phase aqueous polymer systems is recognized as a powerful separation technique which is limited by gravity. The synthesis of new, selective polymer ligand conjugates to be used in affinity partition separations is of interest. The two most commonly used polymers in two phase partitioning are dextran and polyethylene glycol. A thorough review of the chemistry of these polymers was begun, particularly in the area of protein attachment. Preliminary studies indicate the importance in affinity partitioning of minimizing gravity induced randomizing forces in the phase separation process. The PEG-protein conjugates that were prepared appear to be ideally suited for achieving high quality purifications in a microgravity environment. An interesting spin-off of this synthetic work was the observation of catalytic activity for certain of our polymer derivatives.

  12. Synthesis on evaporation partitioning using stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; Bogaard, Thom; Wenninger, Jochen; Jonson Sutanto, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    Partitioning of evaporation into productive (transpiration) and non-productive evaporation (interception, soil evaporation) is of highest importance for water management practices, irrigation scheme design, and climate modeling. Despite this urge, the magnitude of the ratio of transpiration over total evaporation is still under debate and poorly understood due to measuring difficulties. However, with the current development in isotope measuring devices, new opportunities arise to untangle the partitioning of evaporation. In this paper we synthesize the opportunities and limitations using stable water isotopes in evaporation partitioning. We will analyze a set of field as well as laboratory studies to demonstrate the different evaporation components for various climate and vegetation conditions using stable isotopes 18O/16O and 2H/1H. Experimental data on evaporation partitioning of crops, grass, shrubs and trees are presented and we will discuss the specific experimental set-ups and data collection methods. The paper will be a synthesis of these studies.

  13. Reducing variance in batch partitioning measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, Paul E.

    2010-08-11

    The partitioning experiment is commonly performed with little or no attention to reducing measurement variance. Batch test procedures such as those used to measure K{sub d} values (e.g., ASTM D 4646 and EPA402 -R-99-004A) do not explain how to evaluate measurement uncertainty nor how to minimize measurement variance. In fact, ASTM D 4646 prescribes a sorbent:water ratio that prevents variance minimization. Consequently, the variance of a set of partitioning measurements can be extreme and even absurd. Such data sets, which are commonplace, hamper probabilistic modeling efforts. An error-savvy design requires adjustment of the solution:sorbent ratio so that approximately half of the sorbate partitions to the sorbent. Results of Monte Carlo simulations indicate that this simple step can markedly improve the precision and statistical characterization of partitioning uncertainty.

  14. Connections between groundwater flow and transpiration partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Reed M.; Condon, Laura E.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding freshwater fluxes at continental scales will help us better predict hydrologic response and manage our terrestrial water resources. The partitioning of evapotranspiration into bare soil evaporation and plant transpiration remains a key uncertainty in the terrestrial water balance. We used integrated hydrologic simulations that couple vegetation and land-energy processes with surface and subsurface hydrology to study transpiration partitioning at the continental scale. Both latent heat flux and partitioning are connected to water table depth, and including lateral groundwater flow in the model increases transpiration partitioning from 47 ± 13 to 62 ± 12%. This suggests that lateral groundwater flow, which is generally simplified or excluded in Earth system models, may provide a missing link for reconciling observations and global models of terrestrial water fluxes.

  15. Connections between groundwater flow and transpiration partitioning.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Reed M; Condon, Laura E

    2016-07-22

    Understanding freshwater fluxes at continental scales will help us better predict hydrologic response and manage our terrestrial water resources. The partitioning of evapotranspiration into bare soil evaporation and plant transpiration remains a key uncertainty in the terrestrial water balance. We used integrated hydrologic simulations that couple vegetation and land-energy processes with surface and subsurface hydrology to study transpiration partitioning at the continental scale. Both latent heat flux and partitioning are connected to water table depth, and including lateral groundwater flow in the model increases transpiration partitioning from 47 ± 13 to 62 ± 12%. This suggests that lateral groundwater flow, which is generally simplified or excluded in Earth system models, may provide a missing link for reconciling observations and global models of terrestrial water fluxes.

  16. Ambient Gas-Particle Partitioning of Tracers for Biogenic Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel; Yee, Lindsay D.; Kreisberg, Nathan M.; Wernis, Rebecca; Moss, Joshua A.; Hering, Susanne V.; de Sa, Suzanne; Martin, Scot T.; Alexander, Mikaela L.; Palm, Brett B.; Hu, Weiwei; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas; Jimenez, Jose L.; Riva, Matthieu; Surratt, Jason D.; Viegas, Juarez; Manzi, Antonio; Edgerton, Eric S.; Baumann, K.; Souza, Rodrigo A.; Artaxo, Paulo; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2016-08-23

    Exchange of atmospheric organic compounds between gas and particle phases is important in the production and chemistry of particle-phase mass but is poorly understood due to a lack of simultaneous measurements in both phases of individual compounds. Measurements of particle- and gas phase organic compounds are reported here for the southeastern United States and central Amazonia. Polyols formed from isoprene oxidation contribute 8% and 15% on average to particle-phase organic mass at these sites but are also observed to have substantial gas-phase concentrations contrary to many models that treat these compounds as nonvolatile. The results of the present study show that the gas-particle partitioning of approximately 100 known and newly observed oxidation products is not well explained by environmental factors (e.g., temperature). Compounds having high vapor pressures have higher particle fractions than expected from absorptive equilibrium partitioning models. These observations support the conclusion that many commonly measured biogenic oxidation products may be bound in low-volatility mass (e.g., accretion products, inorganic organic adducts) that decomposes to individual compounds on analysis. However, the nature and extent of any such bonding remains uncertain. Similar conclusions are reach for both study locations, and average particle fractions for a given compound are consistent within similar to 25% across measurement sites.

  17. Partitioning of Alkali Metal Salts and Boric Acid from Aqueous Phase into the Polyamide Active Layers of Reverse Osmosis Membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingbo; Kingsbury, Ryan S; Perry, Lamar A; Coronell, Orlando

    2017-02-21

    The partition coefficient of solutes into the polyamide active layer of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes is one of the three membrane properties (together with solute diffusion coefficient and active layer thickness) that determine solute permeation. However, no well-established method exists to measure solute partition coefficients into polyamide active layers. Further, the few studies that measured partition coefficients for inorganic salts report values significantly higher than one (∼3-8), which is contrary to expectations from Donnan theory and the observed high rejection of salts. As such, we developed a benchtop method to determine solute partition coefficients into the polyamide active layers of RO membranes. The method uses a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to measure the change in the mass of the active layer caused by the uptake of the partitioned solutes. The method was evaluated using several inorganic salts (alkali metal salts of chloride) and a weak acid of common concern in water desalination (boric acid). All partition coefficients were found to be lower than 1, in general agreement with expectations from Donnan theory. Results reported in this study advance the fundamental understanding of contaminant transport through RO membranes, and can be used in future studies to decouple the contributions of contaminant partitioning and diffusion to contaminant permeation.

  18. Partition function zeros and finite size scaling for polymer adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Mark P.; Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta

    2014-11-28

    The zeros of the canonical partition functions for a flexible polymer chain tethered to an attractive flat surface are computed for chains up to length N = 1536. We use a bond-fluctuation model for the polymer and obtain the density of states for the tethered chain by Wang-Landau sampling. The partition function zeros in the complex e{sup β}-plane are symmetric about the real axis and densest in a boundary region that has the shape of a nearly closed circle, centered at the origin, terminated by two flaring tails. This structure defines a root-free zone about the positive real axis and follows Yang-Lee theory. As the chain length increases, the base of each tail moves toward the real axis, converging on the phase-transition point in the thermodynamic limit. We apply finite-size scaling theory of partition-function zeros and show that the crossover exponent defined through the leading zero is identical to the standard polymer adsorption crossover exponent ϕ. Scaling analysis of the leading zeros locates the polymer adsorption transition in the thermodynamic (N → ∞) limit at reduced temperature T{sub c}{sup *}=1.027(3) [β{sub c}=1/T{sub c}{sup *}=0.974(3)] with crossover exponent ϕ = 0.515(25). Critical exponents for the order parameter and specific heat are determined to be β{sup ~}=0.97(5) and α = 0.03(4), respectively. A universal scaling function for the average number of surface contacts is also constructed.

  19. Deriving the Hirshfeld partitioning using distance metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Heidar-Zadeh, Farnaz; Ayers, Paul W.; Bultinck, Patrick

    2014-09-07

    The atoms in molecules associated with the Hirshfeld partitioning minimize the generalized Hellinger-Bhattacharya distance to the reference pro-atom densities. Moreover, the reference pro-atoms can be chosen by minimizing the distance between the pro-molecule density and the true molecular density. This provides an alternative to both the heuristic “stockholder” and the mathematical information-theoretic interpretations of the Hirshfeld partitioning. These results extend to any member of the family of f-divergences.

  20. Structural Analysis of the Mn(IV)/Fe(III) Cofactor of Chlamydia Trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase By Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy And Density Functional Theory Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, J.M.; Krest, C.M.; Jiang, W.; Krebs, C.; Bollinger, J.M.Jr.; Green, M.T.

    2009-05-28

    The class Ic ribonucleotide reductase from Chlamydia trachomatis (C{bar A}) uses a stable Mn(lV)/ Fe(lll) cofactor to initiate nucleotide reduction by a free-radical mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to postulate a structure for this cofactor. Fe and Mn K-edge EXAFS data yield an intermetallic distance of -2.92 {angstrom}. The Mn data also suggest the presence of a short 1.74 {angstrom} Mn-O bond. These metrics are compared to the results of DFT calculations on 12 cofactor models derived from the crystal structure of the inactive Fe2(lll/ III) form of the protein. Models are differentiated by the protonation states of their bridging and terminal OH{sub x} ligands as well as the location of the Mn(lV) ion (site 1 or 2). The models that agree best with experimental observation feature a{mu}-1, 3-carboxylate bridge (E120), terminal solvent (H{sub 2}O/OH) to site 1, one {mu}-O bridge, and one {mu}-OH bridge. The site-placement of the metal ions cannot be discerned from the available data.

  1. Irradiation of linear polyethylene - Partitioning between sol and gel.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rijke, A. M.; Mandelkern, L.

    1971-01-01

    Molecular weight fractions of linear polyethylene were irradiated at 133 C, in the completely molten and highly crystalline states, for the purpose of assessing the importance of chain-scission processes and establishing the critical conditions for gelation. The partitioning between sol and gel in either state was found to adhere to the theory for the intermolecular cross-linking of monodisperse species for dosages just beyond the gel point. Deviations from theory occurred as the dosage was increased further. It was concluded that main-chain scission, at these temperatures, is not a significant process. High molecular weight samples in the completely molten state obeyed the Flory-Stockmayer condition for critical gelation.

  2. Certificate Revocation Using Fine Grained Certificate Space Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Vipul

    A new certificate revocation system is presented. The basic idea is to divide the certificate space into several partitions, the number of partitions being dependent on the PKI environment. Each partition contains the status of a set of certificates. A partition may either expire or be renewed at the end of a time slot. This is done efficiently using hash chains.

  3. Lévy/Anomalous Diffusion as a Mean-Field Theory for 3D Cloud Effects in SW-RT: Empirical Support, New Analytical Formulation, and Impact on Atmospheric Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeilsticker, K.; Davis, A.; Marshak, A.; Suszcynsky, D. M.; Buldryrev, S.; Barker, H.

    2001-12-01

    systems with strongly nonlinear dynamics; these applications range from random advection in turbulent fluids to the erratic behavior of financial time-series and, most recently, self-regulating ecological systems. We will briefly survey the state-of-the-art observations that offer compelling empirical support for the Lévy/anomalous diffusion model in atmospheric radiation: (1) high-resolution spectroscopy of differential absorption in the O2 A-band from ground; (2) temporal transient records of lightning strokes transmitted through clouds to a sensitive detector in space; and (3) the Gamma-distributions of optical depths derived from Landsat cloud scenes at 30-m resolution. We will then introduce a rigorous analytical formulation of anomalous transport through finite media based on fractional derivatives and Sonin calculus. A remarkable result from this new theoretical development is an extremal property of the α = 1+ case (divergent mean-free-path), as is observed in the cloudy atmosphere. Finally, we will discuss the implications of anomalous transport theory for bulk 3D effects on the current enhanced absorption problem as well as its role as the basis of a next-generation GCM RT parameterization.

  4. Lévy/Anomalous Diffusion as a Mean-Field Theory for 3D Cloud Effects in Shortwave Radiative Transfer: Empirical Support, New Analytical Formulation, and Impact on Atmospheric Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, S.; Davis, A.; Marshak, A.; Stanley, H. E.

    2001-12-01

    -of-the-art observations that offer compelling empirical support for the Lévy/anomalous diffusion model in atmospheric radiation: (1) high-resolution spectroscopy of differential absorption in the O2 A-band from ground; (2) temporal transient records of lightning strokes transmitted through clouds to a sensitive detector in space; and (3) the Gamma-distributions of optical depths derived from Landsat cloud scenes at 30-m resolution. We will then introduce a rigorous analytical formulation of Lévy/anomalous transport through finite media based on fractional derivatives and Sonin calculus. A remarkable result from this new theoretical development is an extremal property of the α = 1+ case (divergent mean-free-path), as is observed in the cloudy atmosphere. Finally, we will discuss the implications of anomalous transport theory for bulk 3D effects on the current enhanced absorption problem as well as its role as the basis of a next-generation GCM radiation parameterization.

  5. Anomalous absorption of laser light on ion acoustic fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, Wojciech; Bychenkov, Valery Yu.

    2016-10-01

    Theory of laser light absorption due to ion acoustic turbulence (IAT) is discussed in high Z plasmas where ion acoustic waves are weakly damped. Our theory applies to the whole density range from underdense to critical density plasmas. It includes an absorption rate for the resonance anomalous absorption due to linear conversion of electromagnetic waves into electron plasma oscillations by the IAT near the critical density in addition to the absorption coefficient due to enhanced effective electron collisionality. IAT is driven by large electron heat flux through the return current instability. Stationary spectra of IAT are given by weak plasma turbulence theory and applied in description of the anomalous absorption in the inertial confinement fusion plasmas at the gold walls of a hohlraum. This absorption is anisotropic in nature due to IAT angular anisotropy and differs for p- and s-polarization of the laser radiation. Possible experiments which could identify the resonance anomalous absorption in a laser heated plasma are discussed.

  6. DEVELOPMENT AND AVAILABILITY OF EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING SEDIMENT GUIDELINES (ESGS) FOR NONIONIC ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS, METALS MIXTURES, AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON (PAH) MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Collaborative efforts between EPA's Office of Water and Office of Research and Development have resulted in the development of sediment guidelines based on equilibrium partitioning theory (EqP). The guidance available includes a technical support document, describing the derivat...

  7. Screening of pesticides for environmental partitioning tendency.

    PubMed

    Gramatica, Paola; Di Guardo, Antonio

    2002-06-01

    The partitioning tendency of chemicals, in this study pesticides in particular, into different environmental compartments depends mainly on the concurrent relevance of the physico-chemical properties of the chemical itself. To rank the pesticides according to their distribution tendencies in the different environmental compartments we propose a multivariate approach: the combination, by principal component analysis, of those physico-chemical properties like organic carbon partition coefficient (Koc), n-octanol/water partition coefficient (Kow), water solubility (Sw), vapour pressure and Henry's law constant (H) that are more relevant to the determination of environmental partitioning. The resultant macrovariables, the PC1 and PC2 scores here named leaching index (LIN) and volatality index (VIN), are proposed as preliminary environmental partitioning indexes in different media. These two indexes are modeled by theoretical molecular descriptors with satisfactory predictive power. Such an approach allows a rapid pre-determination and screening of the environmental distribution of pesticides starting only from the molecular structure of the pesticide, without any a priori knowledge of the physico-chemical properties.

  8. A biologically motivated partitioning of mortality.

    PubMed

    Carnes, B A; Olshansky, S J

    1997-01-01

    For over a century, actuaries and biologists working independently of each other have presented arguments for why total mortality needs to be partitioned into biologically meaningful subcomponents. These mortality partitions tended to overlook genetic diseases that are inherited because the partitions were motivated by a paradigm focused on aging. In this article, we combine and extend the concepts from these disciplines to develop a conceptual partitioning of total mortality into extrinsic and intrinsic causes of death. An extrinsic death is either caused or initiated by something that orginates outside the body of an individual, while an intrinsic death is either caused or initiated by processes that originate within the body. It is argued that extrinsic mortality has been a driving force in determining why we die when we do from intrinsic causes of death. This biologically motivated partitioning of mortality provides a useful perspective for researchers interested in comparative mortality analyses, the consequences of population aging, limits to human life expectancy, the progress made by the biomedical sciences against lethal diseases, and demographic models that predict the life expectancy of future populations.

  9. Octanol/air partitioning of polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Komp, P.; McLachlan, M.S.

    1997-12-01

    The partitioning of 16 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) between air and 1-octanol was investigated using a fugacity meter. The measurements were conducted over an environmentally relevant temperature range (10--43 C). For a given congener the measured 1-octanol/air partition coefficient K{sub OA} was exponentially proportional to the reciprocal temperature. The enthalpy of phase change (octanol to air) {Delta}H{sub OA} ranged from 71 to 93 kJ/mol. Up to log K{sub OA} values of 9.37 (corresponding to 2,2{prime},3,4{prime},5{prime},6-hexachlorobiphenyl), the enthalpy of phase change was similar to the enthalpy of vaporization of the subcooled liquid PCB. For the less volatile congeners (log K{sub OA} > 9.37), the enthalpies of vaporization exceeded the enthalpies of phase change, the difference increasing with increasing log K{sub OA}. Solubilities of the PCBs in 1-octanol were calculated from the data, and the results were in excellent agreement with octanol solubilities calculated using the OCTASOL fragment method. A very good correlation between the measured octanol/air partition coefficients and values calculated from octanol/water and air/water partition coefficients was obtained. This yielded a method to estimate reliably the octanol/air partitioning of all PCB congeners.

  10. Highly sensitive detection using Herriott cell for laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chongyi; Song, Guangming; Du, Yang; Zhao, Xiaojun; Wang, Wenju; Zhong, Liujun; Hu, Mai

    2016-11-01

    The tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy combined with the long absorption path technique is a significant method to detect harmful gas. The long optical path could come true by Herriott cell reducing the size of the spectrometers. A 15 cm long Herriott cell with 28.8 m optical absorption path after 96 times reflection was designed that enhanced detection sensitivity of absorption spectroscopy. According to the theory data of calculation, Herriott cell is analyzed and simulated by softwares Matlab and Lighttools.

  11. Graphite filter atomizer in atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-09-01

    Graphite filter atomizers (GFA) for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) show substantial advantages over commonly employed electrothermal vaporizers and atomizers, tube and platform furnaces, for direct determination of high and medium volatility elements in matrices associated with strong spectral and chemical interferences. Two factors provide lower limits of detection and shorter determination cycles with the GFA: the vaporization area in the GFA is separated from the absorption volume by a porous graphite partition; the sample is distributed over a large surface of a collector in the vaporization area. These factors convert the GFA into an efficient chemical reactor. The research concerning the GFA concept, technique and analytical methodology, carried out mainly in the author's laboratory in Russia and South Africa, is reviewed. Examples of analytical applications of the GFA in AAS for analysis of organic liquids and slurries, bio-samples and food products are given. Future prospects for the GFA are discussed in connection with analyses by fast multi-element AAS.

  12. Partition and generating function zeros in adsorbing self-avoiding walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janse van Rensburg, E. J.

    2017-03-01

    The Lee–Yang theory of adsorbing self-avoiding walks is presented. It is shown that Lee–Yang zeros of the generating function of this model asymptotically accumulate uniformly on a circle in the complex plane, and that Fisher zeros of the partition function distribute in the complex plane such that a positive fraction are located in annular regions centred at the origin. These results are examined in a numerical study of adsorbing self-avoiding walks in the square and cubic lattices. The numerical data are consistent with the rigorous results; for example, Lee–Yang zeros are found to accumulate on a circle in the complex plane and a positive fraction of partition function zeros appear to accumulate on a critical circle. The radial and angular distributions of partition function zeros are also examined and it is found to be consistent with the rigorous results.

  13. Effect of partitioning on the convergence properties of the Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation series.

    PubMed

    Mihálka, Zsuzsanna É; Szabados, Ágnes; Surján, Péter R

    2017-03-28

    Convergence features of the Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory (PT) strongly depend on the partitioning applied. We investigate the large order behavior of the Møller-Plesset and Epstein Nesbet partitionings in comparison with a less known partitioning obtained by level shift parameters minimizing the norm of operator Q^W^, with W^ being the perturbation operator while Q standing for the reduced resolvent of the zero order Hamiltonian H^(0). Numerical results, presented for molecular systems for the first time, indicate that it is possible to find level shift parameters in this way which convert divergent perturbation expansions to convergent ones in some cases. Besides numerical calculations of high-order PT terms, convergence radii of the corresponding perturbation expansions are also estimated using quadratic Padé approximants.

  14. Limitations in the spectral method for graph partitioning: Detectability threshold and localization of eigenvectors.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Investigating the performance of different methods is a fundamental problem in graph partitioning. In this paper, we estimate the so-called detectability threshold for the spectral method with both un-normalized and normalized Laplacians in sparse graphs. The detectability threshold is the critical point at which the result of the spectral method is completely uncorrelated to the planted partition. We also analyze whether the localization of eigenvectors affects the partitioning performance in the detectable region. We use the replica method, which is often used in the field of spin-glass theory, and focus on the case of bisection. We show that the gap between the estimated threshold for the spectral method and the threshold obtained from Bayesian inference is considerable in sparse graphs, even without eigenvector localization. This gap closes in a dense limit.

  15. Limitations in the spectral method for graph partitioning: Detectability threshold and localization of eigenvectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    Investigating the performance of different methods is a fundamental problem in graph partitioning. In this paper, we estimate the so-called detectability threshold for the spectral method with both un-normalized and normalized Laplacians in sparse graphs. The detectability threshold is the critical point at which the result of the spectral method is completely uncorrelated to the planted partition. We also analyze whether the localization of eigenvectors affects the partitioning performance in the detectable region. We use the replica method, which is often used in the field of spin-glass theory, and focus on the case of bisection. We show that the gap between the estimated threshold for the spectral method and the threshold obtained from Bayesian inference is considerable in sparse graphs, even without eigenvector localization. This gap closes in a dense limit.

  16. Comparison of the composition and gas/particle partitioning of organic acids in monoterpene and isoprene dominated environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S.; Yatavelli, L. R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Krechmer, J.; Hu, W.; Palm, B. B.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Isaacman, G. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Khan, M. H.; Holzinger, R.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Thornton, J. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Gas and particle-phase organic acids measurements from two different regions with different biogenic volatile organic compound emissions are used to understand gas/particle partitioning principles. A Chemical Ionization High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS), with acetate (CH3COO-) as the reagent ion was used to selectively detect acids. Hundreds of gas and particle-phase organic acids were measured in both locations, a monoterpene and MBO-dominated environment (ponderosa pine forest in Colorado, BEACHON-RoMBAS 2011) and isoprene and terpene-dominated environment (mixed deciduous and pine forest in Alabama, SOAS 2013). Time series of gas/particle partitioning for ions consistent with tracers for isoprene oxidation such as methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) and isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) and tracers for α-pinene oxidation such as pinic and pinonic acid will be presented. Gas/particle partitioning, represented as the fraction of each species in the particle-phase, Fp, was calculated for C1-C18 alkanoic acids and biogenic VOC oxidation tracers and compared to an absorptive partitioning model. These results are compared with those of two other instruments that can also quantify gas/particle partitioning with high time resolution: a Semivolatile Thermal Desorption Aerosol GC/MS (SV-TAG) and a Thermal Desorption Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTRMS). Data from both environments were consistent with the values and trends predicted by the absorptive partitioning model for the tracer acids. However, for low carbon number alkanoic acids we report a higher fraction in the particle phase than predicted by the model. The Fp for the bulk-averaged acids and its relationship to the degree of oxidation and carbon number will also be presented. Temporal patterns and correlations with atmospheric conditions and composition will be explored for individual and bulk acids. We will discuss atmospheric implications of the gas/particle partitioning

  17. Partitioning sources of variation in vertebrate species richness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, R.B.; Krohn, W.B.

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To explore biogeographic patterns of terrestrial vertebrates in Maine, USA using techniques that would describe local and spatial correlations with the environment. Location: Maine, USA. Methods: We delineated the ranges within Maine (86,156 km2) of 275 species using literature and expert review. Ranges were combined into species richness maps, and compared to geomorphology, climate, and woody plant distributions. Methods were adapted that compared richness of all vertebrate classes to each environmental correlate, rather than assessing a single explanatory theory. We partitioned variation in species richness into components using tree and multiple linear regression. Methods were used that allowed for useful comparisons between tree and linear regression results. For both methods we partitioned variation into broad-scale (spatially autocorrelated) and fine-scale (spatially uncorrelated) explained and unexplained components. By partitioning variance, and using both tree and linear regression in analyses, we explored the degree of variation in species richness for each vertebrate group that Could be explained by the relative contribution of each environmental variable. Results: In tree regression, climate variation explained richness better (92% of mean deviance explained for all species) than woody plant variation (87%) and geomorphology (86%). Reptiles were highly correlated with environmental variation (93%), followed by mammals, amphibians, and birds (each with 84-82% deviance explained). In multiple linear regression, climate was most closely associated with total vertebrate richness (78%), followed by woody plants (67%) and geomorphology (56%). Again, reptiles were closely correlated with the environment (95%), followed by mammals (73%), amphibians (63%) and birds (57%). Main conclusions: Comparing variation explained using tree and multiple linear regression quantified the importance of nonlinear relationships and local interactions between species

  18. The EPRL intertwiners and corrected partition function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, Wojciech; Kisielowski, Marcin; Lewandowski, Jerzy

    2010-08-01

    Do the SU(2) intertwiners parametrize the space of the Engle, Pereira, Rovelli, Livine (EPRL) solutions to the simplicity constraint? What is the complete form of the partition function written in terms of this parametrization? We prove that the EPRL map is injective in the general n-valent vertex case for the Barbero-Immirzi parameter less than 1. We find, however, that the EPRL map is not isometric. In the consequence, a partition function can be defined either using the EPRL intertwiners Hilbert product or the SU(2) intertwiners Hilbert product. We use the EPRL one and derive a new, complete formula for the partition function. Next, we view it in terms of the SU(2) intertwiners. The result, however, goes beyond the SU(2) spin-foam models' framework and the original EPRL proposal.

  19. New parallel SOR method by domain partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, D.; Adams, L.

    1999-07-01

    In this paper the authors propose and analyze a new parallel SOR method, the PSOR method, formulated by using domain partitioning and interprocessor data communication techniques. They prove that the PSOR method has the same asymptotic rate of convergence as the Red/Black (R/B) SOR method for the five-point stencil on both strip and block partitions, and as the four-color (R/B/G/O) SOR method for the nine-point stencil on strip partitions. They also demonstrate the parallel performance of the PSOR method on four different MIMD multiprocessors (a KSR1, an Intel Delta, a Paragon, and an IBM SP2). Finally, they compare the parallel performance of PSOR, R/B SOR, and R/B/G/O SOR. Numerical results on the Paragon indicate that PSOR is more efficient than R/B SOR and R/B/G/O SOR in both computation and interprocessor data communication.

  20. Parallel algorithms for dynamically partitioning unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, P.; Plimpton, S.; Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1994-10-01

    Grid partitioning is the method of choice for decomposing a wide variety of computational problems into naturally parallel pieces. In problems where computational load on the grid or the grid itself changes as the simulation progresses, the ability to repartition dynamically and in parallel is attractive for achieving higher performance. We describe three algorithms suitable for parallel dynamic load-balancing which attempt to partition unstructured grids so that computational load is balanced and communication is minimized. The execution time of algorithms and the quality of the partitions they generate are compared to results from serial partitioners for two large grids. The integration of the algorithms into a parallel particle simulation is also briefly discussed.

  1. Using Solution- and Solid-State S K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy with Density Functional Theory to Evaluate M–S Bonding for MS42- (M = Cr, Mo, W) Dianions

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Angela C.; Keith, Jason M.; Batista, Enrique R.; Boland, Kevin S.; Daly, Scott R.; Kozimor, Stosh A.; MacInnes, Molly M.; Martin, Richard L.; Scott, Brian L.

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we have evaluated relative changes in M–S electronic structure and orbital mixing in Group 6 MS42- dianions using solid- and solution-phase S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS; M = Mo, W), as well as density functional theory (DFT; M = Cr, Mo, W) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. To facilitate comparison with solution measurements (conducted in acetonitrile), theoretical models included gas-phase calculations as well as those that incorporated an acetonitrile dielectric, the latter of which provided better agreement with experiment. Two pre-edge features arising from S 1s → e* and t2* electron excitations were observed in the S K-edge XAS spectra and were reasonably assigned as 1A1 → 1T2 transitions. For MoS42-, both solution-phase pre-edge peak intensities were consistent with results from the solid-state spectra. For WS42-, solution- and solid-state pre-edge peak intensities for transitions involving e* were equivalent, while transitions involving the t2* orbitals were less intense in solution. Experimental and computational results have been presented in comparison to recent analyses of MO42- dianions, which allowed M–S and M–O orbital mixing to be evaluated as the principle quantum number (n) for the metal valence d orbitals increased (3d, 4d, 5d). Overall, the M–E (E = O, S) analyses revealed distinct trends in orbital mixing. For example, as the Group 6 triad was descended, e* (π*) orbital mixing remained constant in the M–S bonds, but increased appreciably for M–O interactions. For the t2* orbitals (σ* + π*), mixing decreased slightly for M–S bonding and increased only slightly for the M–O interactions. These results suggested that the metal and ligand valence orbital energies and radial extensions delicately influenced the orbital compositions for isoelectronic ME42- (E = O, S) dianions. PMID:25311904

  2. Using solution- and solid-state S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy with density functional theory to evaluate M-S bonding for MS4(2-) (M = Cr, Mo, W) dianions.

    PubMed

    Olson, Angela C; Keith, Jason M; Batista, Enrique R; Boland, Kevin S; Daly, Scott R; Kozimor, Stosh A; MacInnes, Molly M; Martin, Richard L; Scott, Brian L

    2014-12-14

    Herein, we have evaluated relative changes in M-S electronic structure and orbital mixing in Group 6 MS4(2-) dianions using solid- and solution-phase S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS; M = Mo, W), as well as density functional theory (DFT; M = Cr, Mo, W) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. To facilitate comparison with solution measurements (conducted in acetonitrile), theoretical models included gas-phase calculations as well as those that incorporated an acetonitrile dielectric, the latter of which provided better agreement with experiment. Two pre-edge features arising from S 1s → e* and t electron excitations were observed in the S K-edge XAS spectra and were reasonably assigned as (1)A1 → (1)T2 transitions. For MoS4(2-), both solution-phase pre-edge peak intensities were consistent with results from the solid-state spectra. For WS4(2-), solution- and solid-state pre-edge peak intensities for transitions involving e* were equivalent, while transitions involving the t orbitals were less intense in solution. Experimental and computational results have been presented in comparison to recent analyses of MO4(2-) dianions, which allowed M-S and M-O orbital mixing to be evaluated as the principle quantum number (n) for the metal valence d orbitals increased (3d, 4d, 5d). Overall, the M-E (E = O, S) analyses revealed distinct trends in orbital mixing. For example, as the Group 6 triad was descended, e* (π*) orbital mixing remained constant in the M-S bonds, but increased appreciably for M-O interactions. For the t orbitals (σ* + π*), mixing decreased slightly for M-S bonding and increased only slightly for the M-O interactions. These results suggested that the metal and ligand valence orbital energies and radial extensions delicately influenced the orbital compositions for isoelectronic ME4(2-) (E = O, S) dianions.

  3. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Studies of [(H3buea)FeIII-X]n1 (X= S2-, O2-,OH-): Comparison of Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding in Oxo and Sulfido Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Abhishek; Hocking, Rosalie K.; Larsen, Peter; Borovik, Andrew S.; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-09-27

    Iron L-edge, iron K-edge, and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed on a series of compounds [Fe{sup III}H{sub 3}buea(X)]{sup n-} (X = S{sup 2-}, O{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}). The experimentally determined electronic structures were used to correlate to density functional theory calculations. Calculations supported by the data were then used to compare the metal-ligand bonding and to evaluate the effects of H-bonding in Fe{sup III}-O vs Fe{sup III-}S complexes. It was found that the Fe{sup III-}O bond, while less covalent, is stronger than the FeIII-S bond. This dominantly reflects the larger ionic contribution to the Fe{sup III-}O bond. The H-bonding energy (for three H-bonds) was estimated to be -25 kcal/mol for the oxo as compared to -12 kcal/mol for the sulfide ligand. This difference is attributed to the larger charge density on the oxo ligand resulting from the lower covalency of the Fe-O bond. These results were extended to consider an Fe{sup IV-}O complex with the same ligand environment. It was found that hydrogen bonding to Fe{sup IV-}O is less energetically favorable than that to Fe{sup III-}O, which reflects the highly covalent nature of the Fe{sup IV-}O bond.

  4. Simulating Ru L 3 -Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Model Complexes and Electron Localization in Mixed-Valence Metal Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kuiken, Benjamin E.; Valiev, Marat; Daifuku, Stephanie L.; Bannan, Caitlin; Strader, Matthew L.; Cho, Hana; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Govind, Niranjan; Khalil, Munira

    2013-05-30

    Ruthenium L3-edge X-ray absorption (XA) spectroscopy probes unoccupied 4d orbitals of the metal atom and is increasingly being used to investigate the local electronic structure in ground and excited electronic states of Ru complexes. The simultaneous development of computational tools for simulating Ru L3-edge spectra is crucial for interpreting the spectral features at a molecular level. This study demonstrates that time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is a viable and predictive tool for simulating ruthenium L3-edge XA spectroscopy. We systematically investigate the effects of exchange correlation functional and implicit and explicit solvent interactions on a series of RuII and RuIII complexes in their ground and electronic excited states. The TDDFT simulations reproduce all of the experimentally observed features in Ru L3-edge XA spectra within the experimental resolution (0.4 eV). Our simulations identify ligand-specific charge transfer features in complicated Ru L3-edge spectra of [Ru(CN)6]4- and RuII polypyridyl complexes illustrating the advantage of using TDDFT in complex systems. We conclude that the B3LYP functional most accurately predicts the transition energies of charge transfer features in these systems. We use our TDDFT approach to simulate experimental Ru L3-edge XA spectra of transition metal mixed-valence dimers of the form [(NC)5MII-CN-RuIII(NH3)5] (where M = Fe or Ru) dissolved in water. Our study determines the spectral signatures of electron delocalization in Ru L3-edge XA spectra. We find that the inclusion of explicit solvent molecules is necessary for reproducing the spectral features and the experimentally determined valencies in these mixed-valence complexes. This study validates the use of TDDFT for simulating Ru 2p excitations using popular quantum chemistry codes and providing a powerful interpretive tool for equilibrium and ultrafast Ru L3-edge XA spectroscopy.

  5. Partitioning SAT Instances for Distributed Solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyvärinen, Antti E. J.; Junttila, Tommi; Niemelä, Ilkka

    In this paper we study the problem of solving hard propositional satisfiability problem (SAT) instances in a computing grid or cloud, where run times and communication between parallel running computations are limited.We study analytically an approach where the instance is partitioned iteratively into a tree of subproblems and each node in the tree is solved in parallel.We present new methods for constructing partitions which combine clause learning and lookahead. The methods are incorporated into the iterative approach and its performance is demonstrated with an extensive comparison against the best sequential solvers in the SAT competition 2009 as well as against two efficient parallel solvers.

  6. Cochlear implant in incomplete partition type I.

    PubMed

    Berrettini, S; Forli, F; De Vito, A; Bruschini, L; Quaranta, N

    2013-02-01

    In this investigation, we report on 4 patients affected by incomplete partition type I submitted to cochlear implant at our institutions. Preoperative, surgical, mapping and follow-up issues as well as results in cases with this complex malformation are described. The cases reported in the present study confirm that cochlear implantation in patients with incomplete partition type I may be challenging for cochlear implant teams. The results are variable, but in many cases satisfactory, and are mainly related to the surgical placement of the electrode and residual neural nerve fibres. Moreover, in some cases the association of cochlear nerve abnormalities and other disabilities may significantly affect results.

  7. K-balance partitioning: an exact method with applications to generalized structural balance and other psychological contexts.

    PubMed

    Brusco, Michael; Steinley, Douglas

    2010-06-01

    Structural balance theory (SBT) has maintained a venerable status in the psychological literature for more than 5 decades. One important problem pertaining to SBT is the approximation of structural or generalized balance via the partitioning of the vertices of a signed graph into K clusters. This K-balance partitioning problem also has more general psychological applications associated with the analysis of similarity/dissimilarity relationships among stimuli. Accordingly, K-balance partitioning can be gainfully used in a wide variety of SBT applications, such as attraction and child development, evaluation of group membership, marketing and consumer issues, and other psychological contexts not necessarily related to SBT. We present a branch-and-bound algorithm for the K-balance partitioning problem. This new algorithm is applied to 2 synthetic numerical examples as well as to several real-world data sets from the behavioral sciences literature.

  8. Partitioning and lipophilicity in quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Dearden, J C

    1985-01-01

    The history of the relationship of biological activity to partition coefficient and related properties is briefly reviewed. The dominance of partition coefficient in quantitation of structure-activity relationships is emphasized, although the importance of other factors is also demonstrated. Various mathematical models of in vivo transport and binding are discussed; most of these involve partitioning as the primary mechanism of transport. The models describe observed quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) well on the whole, confirming that partitioning is of key importance in in vivo behavior of a xenobiotic. The partition coefficient is shown to correlate with numerous other parameters representing bulk, such as molecular weight, volume and surface area, parachor and calculated indices such as molecular connectivity; this is especially so for apolar molecules, because for polar molecules lipophilicity factors into both bulk and polar or hydrogen bonding components. The relationship of partition coefficient to chromatographic parameters is discussed, and it is shown that such parameters, which are often readily obtainable experimentally, can successfully supplant partition coefficient in QSARs. The relationship of aqueous solubility with partition coefficient is examined in detail. Correlations are observed, even with solid compounds, and these can be used to predict solubility. The additive/constitutive nature of partition coefficient is discussed extensively, as are the available schemes for the calculation of partition coefficient. Finally the use of partition coefficient to provide structural information is considered. It is shown that partition coefficient can be a valuable structural tool, especially if the enthalpy and entropy of partitioning are available. PMID:3905374

  9. Mapping Pesticide Partition Coefficients By Electromagnetic Induction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A potential method for reducing pesticide leaching is to base application rates on the leaching potential of a specific chemical and soil combination. However, leaching is determined in part by the partitioning of the chemical between the soil and soil solution, which varies across a field. Standard...

  10. Solute partitioning and filtration by extracellular matrices

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Christina L.; Ferrell, Nicholas; Schnell, Lisa; Dubnisheva, Anna; Zydney, Andrew L.; Yurchenco, Peter D.; Roy, Shuvo

    2009-01-01

    The physiology of glomerular filtration remains mechanistically obscure despite its importance in disease. The correspondence between proteinuria and foot process effacement suggests podocytes as the locus of the filtration barrier. If so, retained macromolecules ought to accumulate at the filtration barrier, an effect called concentration polarization. Literature data indicate macromolecule concentrations decrease from subendothelial to subepithelial glomerular basement membrane (GBM), as would be expected if the GBM were itself the filter. The objective of this study was to obtain insights into the possible role of the GBM in protein retention by performing fundamental experimental and theoretical studies on the properties of three model gels. Solute partitioning and filtration through thin gels of a commercially available laminin-rich extracellular matrix, Matrigel, were measured using a polydisperse polysaccharide tracer molecule, Ficoll 70. Solute partitioning into laminin gels and lens basement membrane (LBM) were measured using Ficoll 70. A novel model of a laminin gel was numerically simulated, as well as a mixed structure-random-fiber model for LBM. Experimental partitioning was predicted by numerical simulations. Sieving coefficients through thin gels of Matrigel were size dependent and strongly flux dependent. The observed flux dependence arose from compression of the gel in response to the applied pressure. Gel compression may alter solute partitioning into extracellular matrix at physiologic pressures present in the glomerular capillary. This suggests a physical mechanism coupling podocyte structure to permeability characteristics of the GBM. PMID:19587146

  11. A review of approaches for evapotranspiration partitioning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Partitioning of evapotranspiration (ET) into evaporation from the soil surface (E) and transpiration (T) is challenging but important in order to assess biomass production and the allocation of increasingly scarce water resources. Generally T is the desired component with the water being used to enh...

  12. 25 CFR 152.33 - Partition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER ISSUANCE OF PATENTS IN FEE, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY, REMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS, AND SALE OF CERTAIN INDIAN LANDS Partitions in Kind of Inherited Allotments § 152..., regardless of their competency, patents in fee to be issued to the competent heirs for their shares and...

  13. 25 CFR 152.33 - Partition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER ISSUANCE OF PATENTS IN FEE, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY, REMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS, AND SALE OF CERTAIN INDIAN LANDS Partitions in Kind of Inherited Allotments § 152..., regardless of their competency, patents in fee to be issued to the competent heirs for their shares and...

  14. 25 CFR 152.33 - Partition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER ISSUANCE OF PATENTS IN FEE, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY, REMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS, AND SALE OF CERTAIN INDIAN LANDS Partitions in Kind of Inherited Allotments § 152..., regardless of their competency, patents in fee to be issued to the competent heirs for their shares and...

  15. 25 CFR 152.33 - Partition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER ISSUANCE OF PATENTS IN FEE, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY, REMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS, AND SALE OF CERTAIN INDIAN LANDS Partitions in Kind of Inherited Allotments § 152..., regardless of their competency, patents in fee to be issued to the competent heirs for their shares and...

  16. 25 CFR 152.33 - Partition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER ISSUANCE OF PATENTS IN FEE, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY, REMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS, AND SALE OF CERTAIN INDIAN LANDS Partitions in Kind of Inherited Allotments § 152..., regardless of their competency, patents in fee to be issued to the competent heirs for their shares and...

  17. Set Partitions and the Multiplication Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Elise; Caughman, John S., IV

    2016-01-01

    To further understand student thinking in the context of combinatorial enumeration, we examine student work on a problem involving set partitions. In this context, we note some key features of the multiplication principle that were often not attended to by students. We also share a productive way of thinking that emerged for several students who…

  18. Zr partitioning and kinetics and mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    The results of investigations concerning the cooling histories of lunar rocks are reported. Publications resulting from this research are listed. Studies discussed include the partitioning of Zr between FeTi03 and Fe2Ti04 in the presence of Fe + Zr02, and ulvospinel reduction.

  19. Application of partition technology to particle electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Harris, J. Milton; Karr, Laurel J.; Bamberger, Stephan; Matsos, Helen C.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of polymer-ligand concentration on particle electrophoretic mobility and partition in aqueous polymer two-phase systems are investigated. Polymer coating chemistry and affinity ligand synthesis, purification, and analysis are conducted. It is observed that poly (ethylene glycol)-ligands are effective for controlling particle electrophoretic mobility.

  20. Atom-partitioned multipole expansions for electrostatic potential boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Leiter, K.; Eisner, C.; Knap, J.

    2017-01-01

    Applications such as grid-based real-space density functional theory (DFT) use the Poisson equation to compute electrostatics. However, the expected long tail of the electrostatic potential requires either the use of a large and costly outer domain or Dirichlet boundary conditions estimated via multipole expansion. We find that the oft-used single-center spherical multipole expansion is only appropriate for isotropic mesh domains such as spheres and cubes. In this work, we introduce a method suitable for high aspect ratio meshes whereby the charge density is partitioned into atomic domains and multipoles are computed for each domain. While this approach is moderately more expensive than a single-center expansion, it is numerically stable and still a small fraction of the overall cost of a DFT calculation. The net result is that when high aspect ratio systems are being studied, form-fitted meshes can now be used in lieu of cubic meshes to gain computational speedup.

  1. Atmospheric absorption cell characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    The measurement capability of the Avionics Laboratory IR Facility was used to evaluate an absorption cell that will be used to simulate atmospheric absorption over horizontal paths of 1 - 10 km in length. Band models were used to characterize the transmittance of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen (N2), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in the cell. The measured transmittance was compared to the calculated values. Nitrous oxide is important in the 4 - 4.5 micron range in shaping the weak line absorption of carbon dioxide. The absorption cell is adequate for simulating atmospheric absorption over these paths.

  2. Isotope fractionation of benzene during partitioning - Revisited.

    PubMed

    Kopinke, F-D; Georgi, A; Imfeld, G; Richnow, H-H

    2017-02-01

    Isotope fractionation between benzene-D0 and benzene-D6 caused by multi-step partitioning of the benzenes between water and two organic solvents, n-octane and 1-octanol, as well as between water and the gas phase, was measured. The obtained fractionation factors αH = KH/KD are αH = 1.080 ± 0.015 and αH = 1.074 ± 0.015 for extraction into n-octane and 1-octanol, respectively, and αH = 1.049 ± 0.010 for evaporation from aqueous solution. The comparison of solvent- and gas-phase partitioning reveals that about 2/3 of the driving force of fractionation is due to different interactions in the aqueous phase, whereas 1/3 is due to different interactions in the organic phase. The heavy benzene isotopologue behaves more 'hydrophilically' and the light one more 'hydrophobically'. This synergistic alignment gives rise to relatively large fractionation effects in partitioning between water and non-polar organic matter. In contrast to a previous study, there is no indication of strong fractionation by specific interactions between benzene and octanol. Partitioning under non-equilibrium conditions yields smaller apparent fractionation effects due to opposite trends of thermodynamic and kinetic fractionation parameters, i.e. partition and diffusion coefficients of the isotopologues. This may have consequences which should be taken into account when considering isotope fractionation due to sorption in environmental compartments.

  3. Open software tools for eddy covariance flux partitioning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agro-ecosystem management and assessment will benefit greatly from the development of reliable techniques for partitioning evapotranspiration (ET) into evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). Among other activities, flux partitioning can aid in evaluating consumptive vs. non-consumptive agricultural...

  4. Using Reward/Utility Based Impact Scores in Partitioning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    ing approach called Reward/Utility-Based Impact ( RUBI ). RUBI nds an e ective partitioning of agents while requir- ing no prior domain knowledge...provides better performance by discovering a non-trivial agent partitioning, and leads to faster simulations. We test RUBI in the Air Tra c Flow Management...partitioning with RUBI in the ATFMP, there is a 37% increase in per- formance, with a 510x speed up per simulation step over non-partitioning approaches

  5. Infrasound absorption by atmospheric clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudoin, Michael; Coulouvrat, Francois; Thomas, Jean-Louis

    2010-05-01

    A model is developed for the absorption of infrasound by atmospheric clouds made of a suspension of liquid water droplets within a gaseous mixture of water vapor and air. The model is based on the work of D.A. Gubaidullin and R.I. Nigmatulin [Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 26, 207-228, 2000], which is applied to atmospheric clouds. Three physical mechanisms are included : unsteady viscous drag associated with momentum transfers due to the translation of water droplets, unsteady thermal transfers between the liquid and gaseous phases, and mass transfers due to the evaporation or condensation of the water phase. For clouds, in the infrasonic frequency range, phase changes are the dominant mechanisms (around 1 Hz), while viscous and heat transfers become significant only around 100 Hz. Mass transfers involve two physical effects : evaporation and condensation of the water phase at the droplet surface, and diffusion of the water vapor within the gaseous phase. The first one is described through the Hertz-Knudsen-Langmuir theory based on kinetic theory. It involves a little known coefficient known as coefficient of accommodation. The second one is the classical Fick diffusion. For clouds, and unless the coefficient of accommodation is very small (far from the generally recommended value is close to one), diffusion is the main limiting effects for mass transfers. In a second stage, the sound and infrasound absorption is evaluated for various typical clouds up to about 4 km altitude. Above this altitude, the ice content of clouds is dominant compared to their water content, and the present model is not applicable. Cloud thickness, water content, and droplets size distribution are shown to be the major factors influencing the infrasound absorption. A variety of clouds have been analyzed. In most cases, it is shown that infrasound absorption within clouds is several orders larger than classical absorption (due to molecular relaxation of nitrogen and oxygen molecules in presence

  6. Partitioned density functional approach for a Lennard-Jones fluid.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2003-12-01

    The existing classical density functional approach for nonuniform Lennard-Jones fluid, which is based on dividing the Lennard-Jones interaction potential into a short-range, repulsive part, and a smoothly varying, long-range, attractive tail, was improved by dividing the bulk second-order direct correlation function into strongly density-depending short-range part and weakly density-depending long-range part. The latter is treated by functional perturbation expansion truncated at the lowest order whose accuracy depends on how weakly the long-range part depends on the bulk density. The former is treated by the truncated functional perturbation expansion which is rewritten in the form of the simple weighted density approximation and incorporates the omitted higher-order terms by applying Lagrangian theorem of differential calculus to the reformulated form. The two approximations are put into the density profile equation of the density functional theory formalism to predict the density distribution for Lennard-Jones fluid in contact with a hard wall or between two hard walls within the whole density range for reduced temperature T(*)=1.35 and a density point for reduced temperature T(*)=1. The present partitioned density functional theory performs much better than several previous density functional perturbation theory approaches and a recently proposed bridge density functional approximation.

  7. An in silico skin absorption model for fragrance materials.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Kromidas, Lambros; Schultz, Terry; Bhatia, Sneha

    2014-12-01

    Fragrance materials are widely used in cosmetics and other consumer products. The Research Institute for Fragrance Materials (RIFM) evaluates the safety of these ingredients and skin absorption is an important parameter in refining systemic exposure. Currently, RIFM's safety assessment process assumes 100% skin absorption when experimental data are lacking. This 100% absorption default is not supportable and alternate default values were proposed. This study aims to develop and validate a practical skin absorption model (SAM) specific for fragrance material. It estimates skin absorption based on the methodology proposed by Kroes et al. SAM uses three default absorption values based on the maximum flux (J(max)) - namely, 10%, 40%, and 80%. J(max) may be calculated by using QSAR models that determine octanol/water partition coefficient (K(ow)), water solubility (S) and permeability coefficient (K(p)). Each of these QSAR models was refined and a semi-quantitative mechanistic model workflow is presented. SAM was validated with a large fragrance-focused data set containing 131 materials. All resulted in predicted values fitting the three-tiered absorption scenario based on Jmax ranges. This conservative SAM may be applied when fragrance material lack skin absorption data.

  8. 47 CFR 27.904 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. An entity that acquires a portion of a 1670-1675 MHz band licensee's geographic area or spectrum subject to a geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation agreement...

  9. 47 CFR 27.805 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. An entity that acquires a portion of a 1.4 GHz band licensee's geographic area or spectrum subject to a geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation agreement...

  10. 47 CFR 90.911 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.911 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility...) that constitute the partitioned area. (2) Disaggregation. Spectrum may be disaggregated in any...

  11. 47 CFR 27.805 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. An entity that acquires a portion of a 1.4 GHz band licensee's geographic area or spectrum subject to a geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation agreement...

  12. 47 CFR 90.911 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.911 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility...) that constitute the partitioned area. (2) Disaggregation. Spectrum may be disaggregated in any...

  13. 47 CFR 90.911 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.911 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility...) that constitute the partitioned area. (2) Disaggregation. Spectrum may be disaggregated in any...

  14. 47 CFR 95.823 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. (a) Eligibility. Parties seeking Commission approval of geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation of 218-219 MHz Service system licenses shall request...

  15. 47 CFR 27.904 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. An entity that acquires a portion of a 1670-1675 MHz band licensee's geographic area or spectrum subject to a geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation agreement...

  16. 47 CFR 27.904 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. An entity that acquires a portion of a 1670-1675 MHz band licensee's geographic area or spectrum subject to a geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation agreement...

  17. 47 CFR 27.805 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. An entity that acquires a portion of a 1.4 GHz band licensee's geographic area or spectrum subject to a geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation agreement...

  18. 47 CFR 27.904 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. An entity that acquires a portion of a 1670-1675 MHz band licensee's geographic area or spectrum subject to a geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation agreement...

  19. 47 CFR 95.823 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. (a) Eligibility. Parties seeking Commission approval of geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation of 218-219 MHz Service system licenses shall request...

  20. 47 CFR 90.813 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.813 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility.... Spectrum may be disaggregated in any amount. (3) Combined partitioning and disaggregation. The...

  1. 47 CFR 90.813 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.813 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility.... Spectrum may be disaggregated in any amount. (3) Combined partitioning and disaggregation. The...

  2. 47 CFR 90.911 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.911 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility...) that constitute the partitioned area. (2) Disaggregation. Spectrum may be disaggregated in any...

  3. 47 CFR 90.813 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.813 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility.... Spectrum may be disaggregated in any amount. (3) Combined partitioning and disaggregation. The...

  4. 47 CFR 27.904 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. An entity that acquires a portion of a 1670-1675 MHz band licensee's geographic area or spectrum subject to a geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation agreement...

  5. 47 CFR 95.823 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. (a) Eligibility. Parties seeking Commission approval of geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation of 218-219 MHz Service system licenses shall request...

  6. 47 CFR 90.813 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.813 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility.... Spectrum may be disaggregated in any amount. (3) Combined partitioning and disaggregation. The...

  7. 47 CFR 90.911 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.911 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility...) that constitute the partitioned area. (2) Disaggregation. Spectrum may be disaggregated in any...

  8. 47 CFR 95.823 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. (a) Eligibility. Parties seeking Commission approval of geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation of 218-219 MHz Service system licenses shall request...

  9. 47 CFR 27.805 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. An entity that acquires a portion of a 1.4 GHz band licensee's geographic area or spectrum subject to a geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation agreement...

  10. 47 CFR 95.823 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. (a) Eligibility. Parties seeking Commission approval of geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation of 218-219 MHz Service system licenses shall request...

  11. 47 CFR 90.813 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.813 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility.... Spectrum may be disaggregated in any amount. (3) Combined partitioning and disaggregation. The...

  12. 47 CFR 27.805 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. An entity that acquires a portion of a 1.4 GHz band licensee's geographic area or spectrum subject to a geographic partitioning or spectrum disaggregation agreement...

  13. 33. Elevation of Doors / Typical Cement Toilet Partitions / ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Elevation of Doors / Typical Cement Toilet Partitions / Typical Cement Shower Bath Partitions / Typical Marble Shower Bath Partitions / Dispensary Cupboard Supply Room Cupboard Similar / Section / Kitchen Cupboard and Sink / Screened Porch Cupboard (drawing 10) - Whittier State School, Hospital & Receiving Building, 11850 East Whittier Boulevard, Whittier, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. Membrane potential and ion partitioning in an erythrocyte using the Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Nathalia S V; Lima, Eduardo R A; Boström, Mathias; Tavares, Frederico W

    2015-05-28

    In virtually all mammal cells, we can observe a much higher concentration of potassium ions inside the cell and vice versa for sodium ions. Classical theories ignore the specific ion effects and the difference in the thermodynamic reference states between intracellular and extracellular environments. Usually, this differential ion partitioning across a cell membrane is attributed exclusively to the active ion transport. Our aim is to investigate how much the dispersion forces contribute to active ion pumps in an erythrocyte (red blood cell) as well as the correction of chemical potential reference states between intracellular and extracellular environments. The ionic partition and the membrane potential in an erythrocyte are analyzed by the modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation, considering nonelectrostatic interactions between ions and macromolecules. Results show that the nonelectrostatic potential calculated by Lifshitz theory has only a small influence with respect to the high concentration of K(+) in the intracellular environment in comparison with Na(+).

  15. Measurement of the iodine partition coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Furrer, M.; Cripps, R.C.; Gubler, R.

    1985-08-01

    The hydrolysis of iodine is complicated because it involves a number of species that differ considerably in their individual volatilities. Large uncertainties exist in the thermodynamic data of some of the iodine species, especially at temperatures above 25C. Because of this, an experiment was undertaken to measure the partition coefficient under varying physical and chemical conditions. Measurements of P were made for a temperature range of 21 to 113C under well-defined conditions (liquid molar concentration, pH, and redox potential) for inorganic iodine. The experimental results are interpreted with the aid of an analytical model and published thermodynamic data. A good agreement between calculated and measured values was found. The experimental setup allows the determination of very high partition coefficients up to a value of 2.0 X 10W. This is demonstrated by adding cesium-iodide to the fuel pool water of a boiling water reactor.

  16. Number Partitioning via Quantum Adiabatic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Toussaint, Udo; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We study both analytically and numerically the complexity of the adiabatic quantum evolution algorithm applied to random instances of combinatorial optimization problems. We use as an example the NP-complete set partition problem and obtain an asymptotic expression for the minimal gap separating the ground and exited states of a system during the execution of the algorithm. We show that for computationally hard problem instances the size of the minimal gap scales exponentially with the problem size. This result is in qualitative agreement with the direct numerical simulation of the algorithm for small instances of the set partition problem. We describe the statistical properties of the optimization problem that are responsible for the exponential behavior of the algorithm.

  17. Dynamic criteria for partitioning and transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, A.H. )

    1991-11-01

    Because of the slow progress being made in the national geologic repository program, the idea of partitioning and transmuting (P-T) long-lived radionuclides resurfaces as a potential improvement in high-level radioactive waste management. It seems theoretically possible to reduce the overall problems of radioactive waste by repeatedly partitioning and recycling wastes into actinide-free wastes, but there are recognizable difficulties and negative consequences that may overshadow the long-term benefits. This paper addresses some of the criteria that might be used to achieve an optimal P-T concept development, i.e., to minimize the negative short-term impact and to maximize both short-term and long-term benefits.

  18. Bipartite graph partitioning and data clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Zha, Hongyuan; He, Xiaofeng; Ding, Chris; Gu, Ming; Simon, Horst D.

    2001-05-07

    Many data types arising from data mining applications can be modeled as bipartite graphs, examples include terms and documents in a text corpus, customers and purchasing items in market basket analysis and reviewers and movies in a movie recommender system. In this paper, the authors propose a new data clustering method based on partitioning the underlying biopartite graph. The partition is constructed by minimizing a normalized sum of edge weights between unmatched pairs of vertices of the bipartite graph. They show that an approximate solution to the minimization problem can be obtained by computing a partial singular value decomposition (SVD) of the associated edge weight matrix of the bipartite graph. They point out the connection of their clustering algorithm to correspondence analysis used in multivariate analysis. They also briefly discuss the issue of assigning data objects to multiple clusters. In the experimental results, they apply their clustering algorithm to the problem of document clustering to illustrate its effectiveness and efficiency.

  19. Partition algebraic design of asynchronous sequential circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maki, Gary K.; Chen, Kristen Q.; Gopalakrishnan, Suresh K.

    1993-01-01

    Tracey's Theorem has long been recognized as essential in generating state assignments for asynchronous sequential circuits. This paper shows that partitioning variables derived from Tracey's Theorem also has a significant impact in generating the design equations. Moreover, this theorem is important to the fundamental understanding of asynchronous sequential operation. The results of this work simplify asynchronous logic design. Moreover, detection of safe circuits is made easier.

  20. Partitioning coefficients between olivine and silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bédard, J. H.

    2005-08-01

    Variation of Nernst partition coefficients ( D) between olivine and silicate melts cannot be neglected when modeling partial melting and fractional crystallization. Published natural and experimental olivine/liquidD data were examined for covariation with pressure, temperature, olivine forsterite content, and melt SiO 2, H 2O, MgO and MgO/MgO + FeO total. Values of olivine/liquidD generally increase with decreasing temperature and melt MgO content, and with increasing melt SiO 2 content, but generally show poor correlations with other variables. Multi-element olivine/liquidD profiles calculated from regressions of D REE-Sc-Y vs. melt MgO content are compared to results of the Lattice Strain Model to link melt MgO and: D0 (the strain compensated partition coefficient), EM3+ (Young's Modulus), and r0 (the size of the M site). Ln D0 varies linearly with Ln MgO in the melt; EM3+ varies linearly with melt MgO, with a dog-leg at ca. 1.5% MgO; and r0 remains constant at 0.807 Å. These equations are then used to calculate olivine/liquidD for these elements using the Lattice Strain Model. These empirical parameterizations of olivine/liquidD variations yield results comparable to experimental or natural partitioning data, and can easily be integrated into existing trace element modeling algorithms. The olivine/liquidD data suggest that basaltic melts in equilibrium with pure olivine may acquire small negative Ta-Hf-Zr-Ti anomalies, but that negative Nb anomalies are unlikely to develop. Misfits between results of the Lattice Strain Model and most light rare earth and large ion lithophile partitioning data suggest that kinetic effects may limit the lower value of D for extremely incompatible elements in natural situations characterized by high cooling/crystallization rates.

  1. Pure Partition Functions of Multiple SLEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kytölä, Kalle; Peltola, Eveliina

    2016-08-01

    Multiple Schramm-Loewner Evolutions (SLE) are conformally invariant random processes of several curves, whose construction by growth processes relies on partition functions—Möbius covariant solutions to a system of second order partial differential equations. In this article, we use a quantum group technique to construct a distinguished basis of solutions, which conjecturally correspond to the extremal points of the convex set of probability measures of multiple SLEs.

  2. Hardware Index to Set Partition Converter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    www.jstatsoft.org/ 8. Knuth , D.E.: Volume 4 Generating all combinations and permutations. In: The Art of Computer Programming, Fascicle 3. Addison...especially requires high-speed enumeration of partitions. Recent research in computational molecular biology has shown the importance of par- titions...speed generation of combinations, as well as the generation of random combina- tions for use in reconfigurable computers . It can also be viewed as a

  3. Environment Partitioning and Reactivity of Polybrominated Diphenylethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Inez; Iraci, Laura T.; Jafvert, Chad; Bezares-Cruz, Juan

    2004-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are an important class of flame retardants. Annual global demand for these compounds was over 67,000 metric tons in 2001. PBDEs have recently been extensively investigated as environmental contaminants because they have been detected in air, sediment, and tissue samples from urban and remote areas. Important issues include quantifying PBDE partitioning in various environmental compartments, and elucidating transformation pathways. The partitioning of PBDE congeners to aerosols was estimated for 16 sites in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The aerosol particles were PM2.5, the total suspended particle (TSP) concentration varied between 3.0 - 55.4 micro g/cubic meter, and the organic fraction ranged from 11 - 41%; these data are published values for each site. It is estimated that the largest fraction of each PBDE associated with the aerosol particles occurs in Mexico City, and the smallest fraction in Colorado Plateau. Although the organic fraction in Mexico City is about 60% of that observed in the Colorado Plateau, the TSP is larger by a factor of about 18.5, and it is the difference in TSP that strongly influences the fraction of particle-bound PBDE in this case. PBDE partitioning to PM2.5 particles also varies seasonally because of temperature variations. For the less brominated congeners the percentage that is particle-bound is relatively low, regardless of air temperature. In contrast, the heavier congeners exhibit a significant temperature dependence: as the temperature decreases (fall, winter) the percentage of PBDE that is particle-bound increases. The partitioning calculations complement experimental data indicating that decabromodiphenyl ether (DBDE) dissolved in hexane transforms very rapidly when irradiated with solar light. DBDE is the most highly brominated PBDE congener (10 bromine atoms) and occurs in the commercial formulation which is subject to the largest global demand.

  4. REE Partition Coefficients from Synthetic Diogenite-Like Enstatite and the Implications of Petrogenetic Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwandt, C. S.; McKay, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    Determining the petrogenesis of eucrites (basaltic achondrites) and diogenites (orthopyroxenites) and the possible links between the meteorite types was initiated 30 years ago by Mason. Since then, most investigators have worked on this question. A few contrasting theories have emerged, with the important distinction being whether or not there is a direct genetic link between eucrites and diogenites. One theory suggests that diogenites are cumulates resulting from the fractional crystallization of a parent magma with the eucrites crystallizing, from the residual magma after separation from the diogenite cumulates. Another model proposes that diogenites are cumulates formed from partial melts derived from a source region depleted by the prior generation of eucrite melts. It has also been proposed that the diogenites may not be directly linked to the eucrites and that they are cumulates derived from melts that are more orthopyroxene normative than the eucrites. This last theory has recently received more analytical and experimental support. One of the difficulties with petrogenetic modeling is that it requires appropriate partition coefficients for modeling because they are dependent on temperature, pressure, and composition. For this reason, we set out to determine minor- and trace-element partition coefficients for diogenite-like orthopyroxene. We have accomplished this task and now have enstatite/melt partition coefficients for Al, Cr, Ti, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Dy, Er, Yb, and La.

  5. Supersymmetric partition functions and the three-dimensional A-twist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Closset, Cyril; Kim, Heeyeon; Willett, Brian

    2017-03-01

    We study three-dimensional N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories on M_{g,p} , an oriented circle bundle of degree p over a closed Riemann surface, Σ g . We compute the M_{g,p} supersymmetric partition function and correlation functions of supersymmetric loop operators. This uncovers interesting relations between observables on manifolds of different topologies. In particular, the familiar supersymmetric partition function on the round S 3 can be understood as the expectation value of a so-called "fibering operator" on S 2 ×S 1 with a topological twist. More generally, we show that the 3d N=2 supersymmetric partition functions (and supersymmetric Wilson loop correlation functions) on M_{g,p} are fully determined by the two-dimensional A-twisted topological field theory obtained by compactifying the 3d theory on a circle. We give two complementary derivations of the result. We also discuss applications to F-maximization and to three-dimensional supersymmetric dualities.

  6. Peptide partitioning properties from direct insertion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmschneider, Martin; Smith, Jeremy C; Ulmschneider, Jakob

    2010-06-01

    Partitioning properties of polypeptides are at the heart of biological membrane phenomena and their precise quantification is vital for ab-initio structure prediction and the accurate simulation of membrane protein folding and function. Recently the cellular translocon machinery has been employed to determine membrane insertion propensities and transfer energetics for a series of polyleucine segments embedded in a carrier sequence. We show here that the insertion propensity, pathway, and transfer energetics into synthetic POPC bilayers can be fully described by direct atomistic peptide partitioning simulations. The insertion probability as a function of peptide length follows two-state Boltzmann statistics, in agreement with the experiments. The simulations expose a systematic offset between translocon-mediated and direct insertion free energies. Compared to the experiment the insertion threshold is shifted toward shorter peptides by 2 leucine residues. The simulations reveal many hitherto unknown atomic-resolution details about the partitioning process and promise to provide a powerful tool for urgently needed calibration of lipid parameters to match experimentally observed peptide transfer energies.

  7. Airborne phthalate partitioning to cotton clothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Glenn; Li, Hongwan; Mishra, Santosh; Buechlein, Melissa

    2015-08-01

    Accumulation on indoor surfaces and fabrics can increase dermal uptake and non-dietary ingestion of semi-volatile organic compounds. To better understand the potential for dermal uptake of phthalates from clothing, we measured the mass accumulation on cotton fabrics of two phthalate esters commonly identified in indoor air: diethylphthalate (DEP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP). In 10-day chamber experiments, we observed strong air-to-cloth partitioning of these phthalates to shirts and jean material. Area-normalized partition coefficients ranged from 209 to 411 (μg/m2)/(μg/m3) for DEP and 2850 to 6580 (μg/m2)/(μg/m3) for DnBP. Clothing volume-normalized partition coefficients averaged 2.6 × 105 (μg/m3)/(μg/m3) for DEP and 3.9 × 106 (μg/m3)/(μg/m3) for DnBP. At equilibrium, we estimate that a typical set of cotton clothing can sorb DnBP from the equivalent of >10,000 m3 of indoor air, thereby substantially decreasing external mass-transfer barriers to dermal uptake. Further, we estimate that a significant fraction of a child's body burden of DnBP may come from mouthing fabric material that has been equilibrated with indoor air.

  8. Diversity partitioning during the Cambrian radiation

    PubMed Central

    Na, Lin; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The fossil record offers unique insights into the environmental and geographic partitioning of biodiversity during global diversifications. We explored biodiversity patterns during the Cambrian radiation, the most dramatic radiation in Earth history. We assessed how the overall increase in global diversity was partitioned between within-community (alpha) and between-community (beta) components and how beta diversity was partitioned among environments and geographic regions. Changes in gamma diversity in the Cambrian were chiefly driven by changes in beta diversity. The combined trajectories of alpha and beta diversity during the initial diversification suggest low competition and high predation within communities. Beta diversity has similar trajectories both among environments and geographic regions, but turnover between adjacent paleocontinents was probably the main driver of diversification. Our study elucidates that global biodiversity during the Cambrian radiation was driven by niche contraction at local scales and vicariance at continental scales. The latter supports previous arguments for the importance of plate tectonics in the Cambrian radiation, namely the breakup of Pannotia. PMID:25825755

  9. Microbial partitioning to settleable particles in stormwater.

    PubMed

    Characklis, Gregory W; Dilts, Mackenzie J; Simmons, Otto D; Likirdopulos, Christina A; Krometis, Leigh-Anne H; Sobsey, Mark D

    2005-05-01

    The degree to which microbes in the water column associate with settleable particles has important implications for microbial transport in receiving waters, as well as for microbial removal via sedimentation (i.e. detention basins). The partitioning behavior of several bacterial, protozoan and viral indicator organisms is explored in three urban streams under both storm and dry weather conditions. The fraction of organisms associated with settleable particles in stormwater is estimated through use of a centrifugation technique which is calibrated using suspensions of standard particles (e.g., glass, latex). The fraction of organisms associated with settleable particles varies by type of microbe, and the partitioning behavior of each organism generally changes between dry weather and storm conditions. Bacterial indicator organisms (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci) exhibited relatively consistent behavior, with an average of 20-35% of organisms associated with these particles in background samples and 30-55% in storm samples. Clostridium perfringens spores exhibited the highest average level of particle association, with storm values varying from 50% to 70%. Results related to total coliphage partitioning were more variable, with 20-60% associated with particles during storms. These estimates should be valuable in surface water quality modeling efforts, many of which currently assume that all microbes exist as free (unattached) organisms.

  10. Phase partitioning experiment (8-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Donald E.

    1992-01-01

    Phase partitioning is a method of separating biological cells and macromolecules via their differential distribution in two phase aqueous polymer solutions. The ultimate goal of the experiment is to test the hypothesis that the efficiency of separation of closely related cell types, by partitioning in immiscible aqueous phases, will be enhanced in the non-convective environment provided by space. Before a cell separation experiment can be performed, the demixing of immiscible aqueous polymer solutions must be understood and controlled in order to optimize the experimental conditions for a cell separation experiment in the future. The present Phase Partitioning Experiment (PPE) is the third in a series, the first two flew on STS 51-D in Apr. 1985 and STS 26 in Oct. 1988. In those experiments the immiscible aqueous phases demixed spontaneously at different rates, the final disposition being one in which the phase which wetted the container wall surrounded the second phase which formed an 'egg yolk' in the center of the chamber.

  11. Equilibrium Partitioning Sediment Benchmarks (ESBs) for the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document describes procedures to determine the concentrations of nonionic organic chemicals in sediment interstitial waters. In previous ESB documents, the general equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen for the derivation of sediment benchmarks because it accounts for the varying bioavailability of chemicals in different sediments and allows for the incorporation of the appropriate biological effects concentration. This provides for the derivation of benchmarks that are causally linked to the specific chemical, applicable across sediments, and appropriately protective of benthic organisms.  This equilibrium partitioning sediment benchmark (ESB) document was prepared by scientists from the Atlantic Ecology Division, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, and Western Ecology Division, the Office of Water, and private consultants. The document describes procedures to determine the interstitial water concentrations of nonionic organic chemicals in contaminated sediments. Based on these concentrations, guidance is provided on the derivation of toxic units to assess whether the sediments are likely to cause adverse effects to benthic organisms. The equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen because it is based on the concentrations of chemical(s) that are known to be harmful and bioavailable in the environment.  This document, and five others published over the last nine years, will be useful for the Program Offices, including Superfund, a

  12. Biogeography of time partitioning in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Bennie, Jonathan J.; Duffy, James P.; Inger, Richard; Gaston, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Many animals regulate their activity over a 24-h sleep–wake cycle, concentrating their peak periods of activity to coincide with the hours of daylight, darkness, or twilight, or using different periods of light and darkness in more complex ways. These behavioral differences, which are in themselves functional traits, are associated with suites of physiological and morphological adaptations with implications for the ecological roles of species. The biogeography of diel time partitioning is, however, poorly understood. Here, we document basic biogeographic patterns of time partitioning by mammals and ecologically relevant large-scale patterns of natural variation in “illuminated activity time” constrained by temperature, and we determine how well the first of these are predicted by the second. Although the majority of mammals are nocturnal, the distributions of diurnal and crepuscular species richness are strongly associated with the availability of biologically useful daylight and twilight, respectively. Cathemerality is associated with relatively long hours of daylight and twilight in the northern Holarctic region, whereas the proportion of nocturnal species is highest in arid regions and lowest at extreme high altitudes. Although thermal constraints on activity have been identified as key to the distributions of organisms, constraints due to functional adaptation to the light environment are less well studied. Global patterns in diversity are constrained by the availability of the temporal niche; disruption of these constraints by the spread of artificial lighting and anthropogenic climate change, and the potential effects on time partitioning, are likely to be critical influences on species’ future distributions. PMID:25225371

  13. Biogeography of time partitioning in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bennie, Jonathan J; Duffy, James P; Inger, Richard; Gaston, Kevin J

    2014-09-23

    Many animals regulate their activity over a 24-h sleep-wake cycle, concentrating their peak periods of activity to coincide with the hours of daylight, darkness, or twilight, or using different periods of light and darkness in more complex ways. These behavioral differences, which are in themselves functional traits, are associated with suites of physiological and morphological adaptations with implications for the ecological roles of species. The biogeography of diel time partitioning is, however, poorly understood. Here, we document basic biogeographic patterns of time partitioning by mammals and ecologically relevant large-scale patterns of natural variation in "illuminated activity time" constrained by temperature, and we determine how well the first of these are predicted by the second. Although the majority of mammals are nocturnal, the distributions of diurnal and crepuscular species richness are strongly associated with the availability of biologically useful daylight and twilight, respectively. Cathemerality is associated with relatively long hours of daylight and twilight in the northern Holarctic region, whereas the proportion of nocturnal species is highest in arid regions and lowest at extreme high altitudes. Although thermal constraints on activity have been identified as key to the distributions of organisms, constraints due to functional adaptation to the light environment are less well studied. Global patterns in diversity are constrained by the availability of the temporal niche; disruption of these constraints by the spread of artificial lighting and anthropogenic climate change, and the potential effects on time partitioning, are likely to be critical influences on species' future distributions.

  14. Polarization control of intermediate state absorption in resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuwu; Huang, Yunxia; Yao, Yunhua; Jia, Tianqing; Ding, Jingxin; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong

    2015-07-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the control of the intermediate state absorption in an (n + m) resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process by the polarization-modulated femtosecond laser pulse. An analytical solution of the intermediate state absorption in a resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process is obtained based on the time-dependent perturbation theory. Our theoretical results show that the control efficiency of the intermediate state absorption by the polarization modulation is independent of the laser intensity when the transition from the intermediate state to the final state is coupled by the single-photon absorption, but will be affected by the laser intensity when this transition is coupled by the non-resonant multi-photon absorption. These theoretical results are experimentally confirmed via a two-photon fluorescence control in (2 + 1) resonance-mediated three-photon absorption of Coumarin 480 dye and a single-photon fluorescence control in (1 + 2) resonance-mediated three-photon absorption of IR 125 dye.

  15. Vehicle effects on human stratum corneum absorption and skin penetration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Alissa; Jung, Eui-Chang; Zhu, Hanjiang; Zou, Ying; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2016-07-19

    This study evaluated the effects of three vehicles-ethanol (EtOH), isopropyl alcohol (IPA), and isopropyl myristate (IPM)-on stratum corneum (SC) absorption and diffusion of the [(14)C]-model compounds benzoic acid and butenafine hydrochloride to better understand the transport pathways of chemicals passing through and resident in SC. Following application of topical formulations to human dermatomed skin for 30 min, penetration flux was observed for 24 h post dosing, using an in vitro flow-through skin diffusion system. Skin absorption and penetration was compared to the chemical-SC (intact, delipidized, or SC lipid film) binding levels. A significant vehicle effect was observed for chemical skin penetration and SC absorption. IPA resulted in the greatest levels of intact SC/SC lipid absorption, skin penetration, and total skin absorption/penetration of benzoic acid, followed by IPM and EtOH, respectively. For intact SC absorption and total skin absorption/penetration of butenafine, the vehicle that demonstrated the highest level of sorption/penetration was EtOH, followed by IPA and IPM, respectively. The percent doses of butenafine that were absorbed in SC lipid film and penetrated through skin in 24 h were greatest for IPA, followed by EtOH and IPM, respectively. The vehicle effect was consistent between intact SC absorption and total chemical skin absorption and penetration, as well as SC lipid absorption and chemical penetration through skin, suggesting intercellular transport as a main pathway of skin penetration for model chemicals. These results suggest the potential to predict vehicle effects on skin permeability with simple SC absorption assays. As decontamination was applied 30 min after chemical exposure, significant vehicle effects on chemical SC partitioning and percutaneous penetration also suggest that skin decontamination efficiency is vehicle dependent, and an effective decontamination method should act on chemical solutes in the lipid domain.

  16. On bottleneck partitioning k-ary n-cubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Mao, Weizhen

    1994-01-01

    Graph partitioning is a topic of extensive interest, with applications to parallel processing. In this context graph nodes typically represent computation, and edges represent communication. One seeks to distribute the workload by partitioning the graph so that every processor has approximately the same workload, and the communication cost (measured as a function of edges exposed by the partition) is minimized. Measures of partition quality vary; in this paper we consider a processor's cost to be the sum of its computation and communication costs, and consider the cost of a partition to be the bottleneck, or maximal processor cost induced by the partition. For a general graph the problem of finding an optimal partitioning is intractable. In this paper we restrict our attention to the class of k-art n-cube graphs with uniformly weighted nodes. Given mild restrictions on the node weight and number of processors, we identify partitions yielding the smallest bottleneck. We also demonstrate by example that some restrictions are necessary for the partitions we identify to be optimal. In particular, there exist cases where partitions that evenly partition nodes need not be optimal.

  17. Safety-Critical Partitioned Software Architecture: A Partitioned Software Architecture for Robotic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Greg; Chung, Seung H.; Cilloniz-Bicchi, Ferner

    2011-01-01

    The flight software on virtually every mission currently managed by JPL has several major flaws that make it vulnerable to potentially fatal software defects. Many of these problems can be addressed by recently developed partitioned operating systems (OS). JPL has avoided adopting a partitioned operating system on its flight missions, primarily because doing so would require significant changes in flight software design, and the risks associated with changes of that magnitude cannot be accepted by an active flight project. The choice of a partitioned OS can have a dramatic effect on the overall system and software architecture, allowing for realization of benefits far beyond the concerns typically associated with the choice of OS. Specifically, we believe that a partitioned operating system, when coupled with an appropriate architecture, can provide a strong infrastructure for developing systems for which reusability, modifiability, testability, and reliability are essential qualities. By adopting a partitioned OS, projects can gain benefits throughout the entire development lifecycle, from requirements and design, all the way to implementation, testing, and operations.

  18. Generalized linear solvation energy model applied to solute partition coefficients in ionic liquid-supercritical carbon dioxide systems.

    PubMed

    Planeta, Josef; Karásek, Pavel; Hohnová, Barbora; Sťavíková, Lenka; Roth, Michal

    2012-08-10

    Biphasic solvent systems composed of an ionic liquid (IL) and supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) have become frequented in synthesis, extractions and electrochemistry. In the design of related applications, information on interphase partitioning of the target organics is essential, and the infinite-dilution partition coefficients of the organic solutes in IL-scCO(2) systems can conveniently be obtained by supercritical fluid chromatography. The data base of experimental partition coefficients obtained previously in this laboratory has been employed to test a generalized predictive model for the solute partition coefficients. The model is an amended version of that described before by Hiraga et al. (J. Supercrit. Fluids, in press). Because of difficulty of the problem to be modeled, the model involves several different concepts - linear solvation energy relationships, density-dependent solvent power of scCO(2), regular solution theory, and the Flory-Huggins theory of athermal solutions. The model shows a moderate success in correlating the infinite-dilution solute partition coefficients (K-factors) in individual IL-scCO(2) systems at varying temperature and pressure. However, larger K-factor data sets involving multiple IL-scCO(2) systems appear to be beyond reach of the model, especially when the ILs involved pertain to different cation classes.

  19. Energy loss partitioning during ballistic impact of polymer composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zee, Ralph H.; Hsieh, Chung Y.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the energy dissipation processes in polymer-matrix composites during impact of ballistic projectiles. These processes include heat, fiber deformation and breakage, matrix deformation and fracture, and interfacial delamination. In this study, experimental measurements were made, using specialized specimen designs and test methods, to isolate the energy consumed by each of these processes during impact in the ballistic range. Using these experiments, relationships between material parameters and energy dissipation were examined. Composites with the same matrix but reinforced with Kevlar, PE, and graphite fabric were included in this study. These fibers were selected based on the differences in their intrinsic properties. Matrix cracking was found to be one of the most important energy absorption mechanisms during impact, especially in ductile samples such as Spectra-900 PE and Kevlar-49 reinforced polymer. On the contrary, delamination dominated the energy dissipation in brittle composites such as graphite reinforced materials. The contribution from frictional forces was also investigated and the energy partitioning among the different processes evaluated.

  20. An interesting relationship between drug absorption and melting point.

    PubMed

    Chu, Katherine A; Yalkowsky, Samuel H

    2009-05-21

    The ability to predict the extent of passive intestinal drug absorption is very important for efficient lead candidate selection and development. Physicochemical-based absorption predictive models previously developed use solubility, partition coefficient and pK(a) as drug input parameters for intestinal absorption. Alternatively, this study looks at the relationship between melting point and passive transport for poorly soluble drugs. It is based entirely on the expression derived from the General Solubility Equation (GSE) that relates melting point to the product of intrinsic solubility and partition coefficient. Given that the melting point of a compound is one of the first and more reliable physical properties measured, it can be advantageously used as a guide in early drug discovery and development. This paper elucidates the interesting relationship between the melting point and dose to the fraction absorbed of poorly soluble drugs, i.e., class II and IV compounds in the Biopharmaceutics Classification System. The newly defined melting point based absorption potential (MPbAP) parameter is successful at distinguishing 90% of the 91 drugs considered being well absorbed (FA>0.5) or poorly absorbed. In general, lower melting compounds are more likely to be well absorbed than higher melting compounds for any given dose. The fraction absorbed for drugs with high melting temperatures is limited by the dose to a greater degree than it is for low melting compounds.

  1. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  2. Rectal absorption of propylthiouracil.

    PubMed

    Bartle, W R; Walker, S E; Silverberg, J D

    1988-06-01

    The rectal absorption of propylthiouracil (PTU) was studied and compared to oral absorption in normal volunteers. Plasma levels of PTU after administration of suppositories of PTU base and PTU diethanolamine were significantly lower compared to the oral route. Elevated plasma reverse T3 levels were demonstrated after each treatment, however, suggesting a desirable therapeutic effect at this dosage level for all preparations.

  3. Probing the defect nanostructure of helium and proton tracks in LiF:Mg,Ti using optical absorption: Implications to track structure theory calculations of heavy charged particle relative efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliyahu, I.; Horowitz, Y. S.; Oster, L.; Weissman, L.; Kreisel, A.; Girshevitz, O.; Marino, S.; Druzhyna, S.; Biderman, S.; Mardor, I.

    2015-04-01

    A major objective of track structure theory (TST) is the calculation of heavy charged particle (HCP) induced effects. Previous calculations have been based exclusively on the radiation action/dose response of the released secondary electrons during the HCP slowing down. The validity of this presumption is investigated herein using optical absorption (OA) measurements on LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) samples following irradiation with 1.4 MeV protons and 4 MeV He ions at levels of fluence from 1010 cm-2 to 2 × 1014 cm-2. The major bands in the OA spectrum are the 5.08 eV (F band), 4.77 eV, 5.45 eV and the 4.0 eV band (associated with the trapping structure leading to composite peak 5 in the thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve). The maximum intensity of composite peak 5 occurs at a temperature of ∼200 °C in the glow curve and is the glow peak used for most dosimetric applications. The TST calculations use experimentally measured OA dose response following low ionization density (LID) 60Co photon irradiation over the dose-range 10-105 Gy for the simulation of the radiation action of the HCP induced secondary electron spectrum. Following proton and He irradiation the saturation levels of concentration for the F band and the 4.77 eV band are approximately one order of magnitude greater than following LID irradiation indicating enhanced HCP creation of the relevant defects. Relative HCP OA efficiencies, ηHCP, are calculated by TST and are compared with experimentally measured values, ηm, at levels of fluence from 1010 cm-2 to 1011 cm-2 where the response is linear due to negligible track overlap. For the F band, values of ηm/ηHCP = 2.0 and 2.6 for the He ions and protons respectively arise from the neglect of enhanced Fluorine vacancy/F center creation by the HCPs in the TST calculations. It is demonstrated that kinetic analysis simulating LID F band dose response with enhanced Fluorine vacancy creation, and incorporated into the TST calculation, can lead to values of

  4. High dimensional data clustering by partitioning the hypergraphs using dense subgraph partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xili; Tian, Shoucai; Lu, Yonggang

    2015-12-01

    Due to the curse of dimensionality, traditional clustering methods usually fail to produce meaningful results for the high dimensional data. Hypergraph partition is believed to be a promising method for dealing with this challenge. In this paper, we first construct a graph G from the data by defining an adjacency relationship between the data points using Shared Reverse k Nearest Neighbors (SRNN). Then a hypergraph is created from the graph G by defining the hyperedges to be all the maximal cliques in the graph G. After the hypergraph is produced, a powerful hypergraph partitioning method called dense subgraph partition (DSP) combined with the k-medoids method is used to produce the final clustering results. The proposed method is evaluated on several real high-dimensional datasets, and the experimental results show that the proposed method can improve the clustering results of the high dimensional data compared with applying k-medoids method directly on the original data.

  5. Staggered chiral random matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, James C.

    2011-02-01

    We present a random matrix theory for the staggered lattice QCD Dirac operator. The staggered random matrix theory is equivalent to the zero-momentum limit of the staggered chiral Lagrangian and includes all taste breaking terms at their leading order. This is an extension of previous work which only included some of the taste breaking terms. We will also present some results for the taste breaking contributions to the partition function and the Dirac eigenvalues.

  6. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  7. Absorption lineshapes of molecular aggregates revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Gelzinis, Andrius; Valkunas, Leonas; Abramavicius, Darius

    2015-04-21

    Linear absorption is the most basic optical spectroscopy technique that provides information about the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom of molecular systems. In simulations of absorption lineshapes, often diagonal fluctuations are included using the cumulant expansion, and the off-diagonal fluctuations are accounted for either perturbatively, or phenomenologically. The accuracy of these methods is limited and their range of validity is still questionable. In this work, a systematic study of several such methods is presented by comparing the lineshapes with exact results. It is demonstrated that a non-Markovian theory for off-diagonal fluctuations, termed complex time dependent Redfield theory, gives good agreement with exact lineshapes over a wide parameter range. This theory is also computationally efficient. On the other hand, accounting for the off-diagonal fluctuations using the modified Redfield lifetimes was found to be inaccurate.

  8. Percutaneous malathion absorption in the harvested perfused anuran pelvic limb.

    PubMed

    Willens, Scott; Stoskopf, Michael K; Baynes, Ronald E; Lewbart, Gregory A; Taylor, Sharon K; Kennedy-Stoskopf, Suzanne

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study was to establish an accurate in vitro model for cutaneous absorption in anurans. The harvested perfused anuran pelvic limb (HPAPL) model maintains the anatomic and physiologic integrity of the skin from the pelvic limb, including the intact capillary network. Radiolabeled malathion was applied to the skin of the dorsal thigh, and perfusate was collected over a 6h period. Residues from the skin surface, stratum externum, and dosed area beneath the stratum externum were analyzed. Kinetic parameters were calculated from these data. Absorption was significantly less for the HPAPL than previously reported for Teflon flow-through diffusion cells. However, partitioning effects were comparable. The HPAPL is an appropriate in vitro model for examining cutaneous absorption kinetics in the bullfrog.

  9. Partitioning of organophosphorus pesticides into phosphatidylcholine small unilamellar vesicles studied by second-derivative spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Takegami, Shigehiko; Kitamura, Keisuke; Ohsugi, Mayuko; Ito, Aya; Kitade, Tatsuya

    2015-06-15

    In order to quantitatively examine the lipophilicity of the widely used organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) chlorfenvinphos (CFVP), chlorpyrifos-methyl (CPFM), diazinon (DZN), fenitrothion (FNT), fenthion (FT), isofenphos (IFP), profenofos (PFF) and pyraclofos (PCF), their partition coefficient (Kp) values between phosphatidylcholine (PC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) and water (liposome-water system) were determined by second-derivative spectrophotometry. The second-derivative spectra of these OPs in the presence of PC SUV showed a bathochromic shift according to the increase in PC concentration and distinct derivative isosbestic points, demonstrating the complete elimination of the residual background signal effects that were observed in the absorption spectra. The Kp values were calculated from the second-derivative intensity change induced by addition of PC SUV and obtained with a good precision of R.S.D. below 10%. The Kp values were in the order of CPFM>FT>PFF>PCF>IFP>CFVP>FNT⩾DZN and did not show a linear correlation relationship with the reported partition coefficients obtained using an n-octanol-water system (R(2)=0.530). Also, the results quantitatively clarified the effect of chemical-group substitution in OPs on their lipophilicity. Since the partition coefficient for the liposome-water system is more effective for modeling the quantitative structure-activity relationship than that for the n-octanol-water system, the obtained results are toxicologically important for estimating the accumulation of these OPs in human cell membranes.

  10. Partitioning of organophosphorus pesticides into phosphatidylcholine small unilamellar vesicles studied by second-derivative spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegami, Shigehiko; Kitamura, Keisuke; Ohsugi, Mayuko; Ito, Aya; Kitade, Tatsuya

    2015-06-01

    In order to quantitatively examine the lipophilicity of the widely used organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) chlorfenvinphos (CFVP), chlorpyrifos-methyl (CPFM), diazinon (DZN), fenitrothion (FNT), fenthion (FT), isofenphos (IFP), profenofos (PFF) and pyraclofos (PCF), their partition coefficient (Kp) values between phosphatidylcholine (PC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) and water (liposome-water system) were determined by second-derivative spectrophotometry. The second-derivative spectra of these OPs in the presence of PC SUV showed a bathochromic shift according to the increase in PC concentration and distinct derivative isosbestic points, demonstrating the complete elimination of the residual background signal effects that were observed in the absorption spectra. The Kp values were calculated from the second-derivative intensity change induced by addition of PC SUV and obtained with a good precision of R.S.D. below 10%. The Kp values were in the order of CPFM > FT > PFF > PCF > IFP > CFVP > FNT ⩾ DZN and did not show a linear correlation relationship with the reported partition coefficients obtained using an n-octanol-water system (R2 = 0.530). Also, the results quantitatively clarified the effect of chemical-group substitution in OPs on their lipophilicity. Since the partition coefficient for the liposome-water system is more effective for modeling the quantitative structure-activity relationship than that for the n-octanol-water system, the obtained results are toxicologically important for estimating the accumulation of these OPs in human cell membranes.

  11. PARTITIONING SPECTRAL ABSORPTION IN CASE 2 WATERS: DISCRIMINATION OF DISSOLVED AND PARTICULATE COMPONENTS. (R826943)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  12. Quantitating the Absorption, Partitioning and Toxicity of Hydrocarbon Components of JP-8 Jet Fuel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-24

    with the skin. AFOSR Jet Fuel Toxicology Workshop. Tucson, AZ. October, 2004. 5. Basak SC, Riviere JE, Baynes RE, Xia XR, Gute BD. A hierarchical QSAR ... Toxicology Workshop, Tucson, AZ, 2005. 12. Basak SC, Riviere J, Baynes R, Gute BD: Theoretical descriptor based QSARs in predicting skin penetration of...NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Center for Chemical Toxicology Research and Pharmacokinetics College of Veterinary

  13. Boron, beryllium, and lithium, partitioning in olivine

    SciTech Connect

    Neroda, Elizabeth

    1996-05-01

    A one atmosphere experimental study was performed to determine the mineral/melt partition coefficients for B, Be, and Li in forsteritic olivine. Two compositions were chosen along the 1350{degrees}C isotherm, 1b (Fo{sub 17.3} Ab{sub 82.7} An{sub 0} by weight) and 8c (Fo{sub 30} Ab{sub 23.3} An{sub 47.8}, by weight) were then combined in equal amounts to form a composition was doped with 25ppm Li, B, Yb, Nb, Zr, Sr, and Hf, 50ppm Sm, and 100ppm Be, Nd, Ce, and Rb. Electron and ion microprobe analyses showed that the olivine crystals and surrounding glasses were homogeneous with respect to major and trace elements. Partition coefficients calculated from these analyses are as follows: 1b: D{sub B} = 4.41 ({+-} 2.3) E-03, D{sub Be} = 2.86 ({+-} 0.45) E-03, D{sub Li} = 1.54 ({+-} 0.21) E-01, 50/50: D{sub B} = 2.86 ({+-} 0.5) E-03, D{sub Be} = 2.07 ({+-} 0.09) E-03, D{sub Li} = 1.51 ({+-} 0.18) E-01, 8c: D{sub B} = 6.05 ({+-} 1.5) E-03, D{sub Be} = 1.81 ({+-} 0.03) E-03, D{sub Li} = 1.31 ({+-} 0.09) E-01. The results of this study will combined with similar data for other minerals as part of a larger study to understand the partitioning behavior of B, Be, and Li in melting of the upper mantle at subduction zones.

  14. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  15. Partitioning technique for discrete quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, L.; Song, Z.

    2011-06-15

    We develop the partitioning technique for quantum discrete systems. The graph consists of several subgraphs: a central graph and several branch graphs, with each branch graph being rooted by an individual node on the central one. We show that the effective Hamiltonian on the central graph can be constructed by adding additional potentials on the branch-root nodes, which generates the same result as does the the original Hamiltonian on the entire graph. Exactly solvable models are presented to demonstrate the main points of this paper.

  16. The minimal length and quantum partition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasiyan-Motlaq, M.; Pedram, P.

    2014-08-01

    We study the thermodynamics of various physical systems in the framework of the generalized uncertainty principle that implies a minimal length uncertainty proportional to the Planck length. We present a general scheme to analytically calculate the quantum partition function of the physical systems to first order of the deformation parameter based on the behavior of the modified energy spectrum and compare our results with the classical approach. Also, we find the modified internal energy and heat capacity of the systems for the anti-Snyder framework.

  17. Light period regulation of carbohydrate partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janes, Harry W.

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that the photosynthetic period is important in regulating carbon partitioning. Even when the same amount of carbon is fixed over a 24h period considerably more is translocated out of the leaf under the longer photosynthetic period. This is extremely important when parts of the plant other than the leaves are to be sold. It is also important to notice the amount of carbon respired in the short photosynthetic period. The light period effect on carbohydrate fixation, dark respiration, and translocation is shown in this report.

  18. Bacterial plasmid partition machinery: a minimalist approach to survival.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Maria A

    2012-02-01

    The accurate segregation or partition of replicated DNA is essential for ensuring stable genome transmission. Partition of bacterial plasmids requires only three elements: a centromere-like DNA site and two proteins, a partition NTPase, and a centromere-binding protein (CBP). Because of this simplicity, partition systems have served as tractable model systems to study the fundamental molecular mechanisms required for DNA segregation at an atomic level. In the last few years, great progress has been made in this endeavor. Surprisingly, these studies have revealed that although the basic partition components are functionally conserved between three types of plasmid partition systems, these systems employ distinct mechanisms of DNA segregation. This review summarizes the molecular insights into plasmid segregation that have been achieved through these recent structural studies.

  19. Effect of water saturation in soil organic matter on the partition of organic compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutherford, D.W.; Chlou, G.T.

    1992-01-01

    The sorption of benzene, trichloroethylene, and carbon tetrachloride at room temperature from water solution and from vapor on two high-organic-content soils (peat and muck) was determined in order to evaluate the effect of water saturation on the solute partition in soil organic matter (SOM). The uptake of water vapor was similarly determined to define the amounts of water in the saturated soil samples. In such high-organic-content soils the organic vapor sorption and the respective solute sorption from water exhibit linear isotherms over a wide range of relative concentrations. This observation, along with the low BET surface areas of the samples, suggests that partition in the SOM of the samples is the dominant process in the uptake of these liquids. A comparison of the sorption from water solution and from vapor phase shows that water saturation reduces the sorption (partition) efficiency of SOM by ?? 42%; the saturated water content is ??38% by weight of dry SOM. This reduction is relatively small when compared with the almost complete suppression by water of organic compound adsorption on soil minerals. While the effect of water saturation on solute uptake by SOM is much expected in terms of solute partition in SOM, the influence of water on the solubility behavior of polar SOM can be explained only qualitatively by regular solution theory. The results suggest that the major effect of water in a drying-wetting cycle on the organic compound uptake by normal low-organic-content soils (and the associated compound's activity) is the suppression of adsorption by minerals rather than the mitigation of the partition effect in SOM.

  20. Kinetic energy decomposition scheme based on information theory.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Yutaka; Suzuki, Jun; Nakai, Hiromi

    2013-12-15

    We proposed a novel kinetic energy decomposition analysis based on information theory. Since the Hirshfeld partitioning for electron densities can be formulated in terms of Kullback-Leibler information deficiency in information theory, a similar partitioning for kinetic energy densities was newly proposed. The numerical assessments confirm that the current kinetic energy decomposition scheme provides reasonable chemical pictures for ionic and covalent molecules, and can also estimate atomic energies using a correction with viral ratios.

  1. Subbarrier absorption in a stationary superlattice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arutyunyan, G. M.; Nerkararyan, K. V.

    1984-01-01

    The calculation of the interband absorption coefficient was carried out in the classical case, when the frequency of light was assumed to bind two miniband subbarrier states of different bands. The influence of two dimensional Mott excitons on this absorption was studied and a comparison was made with the experiment. All of these considerations were done taking into account the photon wave vector (the phase spatial heterogeneity). The basic traits of the energy spectra of superlattice semiconductors, their kinetic and optical properties, and possible means of electromagnetic wave intensification were examined. By the density matrix method, a theory of electrical and electromagnetic properties of superlattices was suggested.

  2. Automatic partitioning of unstructured grids into connected components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagum, Leonardo

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents two partitioning schemes that guarantee connected components given a connected initial grid. Connected components are important for convergence of methods such as domain decomposition or multigrid. For many of the grids tested, the schemes produce partitions as good (in terms of number of cut edges) or better than spectral partitioning and require only modest computational resources. This paper describes the two schemes in detail and presents comparison results from a number of two and three dimensional unstructured grids.

  3. Apparatus for chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning in an immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L [Lodi, CA; Colston, Bill W [San Ramon, CA; Elkin, Christopher J [San Ramon, CA

    2012-05-08

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  4. Method for chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning in an immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Bill W.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2015-06-02

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  5. Method for chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning in an immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Bill W.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2017-02-28

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  6. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  7. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  8. Soliton absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kalashnikov, V. L.; Sorokin, E.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze optical soliton propagation in the presence of weak absorption lines with much narrower linewidths as compared to the soliton spectrum width using the novel perturbation analysis technique based on an integral representation in the spectral domain. The stable soliton acquires spectral modulation that follows the associated index of refraction of the absorber. The model can be applied to ordinary soliton propagation and to an absorber inside a passively modelocked laser. In the latter case, a comparison with water vapor absorption in a femtosecond Cr:ZnSe laser yields a very good agreement with experiment. Compared to the conventional absorption measurement in a cell of the same length, the signal is increased by an order of magnitude. The obtained analytical expressions allow further improving of the sensitivity and spectroscopic accuracy making the soliton absorption spectroscopy a promising novel measurement technique. PMID:21151755

  9. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  10. Bioavailability of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs): Liposome-water partitioning and lipid membrane permeation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jung-Hwan

    The bioavailability of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is a function of a number of parameters including the ability of the chemical to partition into organic tissue and reach receptor sites within an organism. In this dissertation, equilibrium partition coefficients between water and lipid membrane vesicles and artificial lipid membrane permeability were investigated for evaluating bioavailability of aqueous pollutants. Structurally diverse endocrine disrupting chemicals were chosen as model compounds for partitioning experiments and simple hydrophobic organic chemicals were used for the evaluation of a parallel artificial membrane device developed to mimic bioconcentration rates in fish. Hydrophobic interactions represented by octanol/water partition coefficients (KOWs) were not appropriate for estimating lipid membrane/water partition coefficients (Klipws) for the selected EDCs having a relatively large molar liquid volume (MLV) and containing polar functional groups. Correlations that include MLV and polar surface area (PSA) reduce the predicted value of log K lipw, suggesting that lipid membranes are less favorable than 1-octanol for a hydrophobic solute because of the changes in membrane fluidity and the amount of cholesterol in the lipid bilayers. These results suggested that KOW alone has limited potential for estimating K lipw, and MLV or PSA may be used as additional descriptors for developing quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs). The poor correlations between KOW and Klipw observed in this research may be due to the highly organized structure of lipid bilayers. Measured thermodynamic constants demonstrated that the entropy contribution becomes more dominant for more organized liposomes having saturated lipid tails. This implies that entropy-driven partitioning process makes Klipw different from KOW especially for more saturated lipid bilayer membranes. In the parallel artificial membrane system developed, a membrane filter

  11. Partitioning kinetic energy during freewheeling wheelchair maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Medola, Fausto O; Dao, Phuc V; Caspall, Jayme J; Sprigle, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a systematic method to partition the kinetic energy (KE) of a free-wheeling wheelchair. An ultralightweight rigid frame wheelchair was instrumented with two axle-mounted encoders and data acquisition equipment to accurately measure the velocity of the drive wheels. A mathematical model was created combining physical specifications and geometry of the wheelchair and its components. Two able-bodied subjects propelled the wheelchair over four courses that involved straight and turning maneuvers at differing speeds. The KE of the wheelchair was divided into three components: translational, rotational, and turning energy. This technique was sensitive to the changing contributions of the three energy components across maneuvers. Translational energy represented the major component of total KE in all maneuvers except a zero radius turn in which turning energy was dominant. Both translational and rotational energies are directly related to wheelchair speed. Partitioning KE offers a useful means of investigating the dynamics of a moving wheelchair. The described technique permits analysis of KE imparted to the wheelchair during maneuvers involving changes in speed and direction, which are most representative of mobility in everyday life. This technique can be used to study the effort required to maneuver different types and configurations of wheelchairs.

  12. Vacuole Partitioning during Meiotic Division in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Roeder, A. D.; Shaw, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the partitioning of the yeast vacuole during meiotic division. In pulse-chase experiments, vacuoles labeled with the lumenal ade2 fluorophore or the membrane-specific dye FM 4-64 were not inherited by haploid spores. Instead, these fluorescent markers were excluded from spores and trapped between the spore cell walls and the ascus. Serial optical sections using a confocal microscope confirmed that spores did not inherit detectable amounts of fluorescently labeled vacuoles. Moreover, indirect immunofluorescence studies established that an endogenous vacuolar membrane protein, alkaline phosphatase, and a soluable vacuolar protease, carboxypeptidase Y, were also detected outside spores after meiotic division. Spores that did not inherit ade2- or FM 4-64-labeled vacuoles did generate an organelle that could be visualized by subsequent staining with vacuole-specific fluorophores. These data contrast with genetic evidence that a soluble vacuolar protease is inherited by spores. When the partitioning of both types of markers was examined in sporulating cultures, the vacuolar protease activity was inherited by spores while fluorescently labeled vacuoles were largely excluded from spores. Our results indicate that the majority of the diploid vacuole, both soluble contents and membrane-bound components, are excluded from spores formed during meiotic division. PMID:8889511

  13. Carbon partitioning in sugarcane (Saccharum species)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianping; Nayak, Spurthi; Koch, Karen; Ming, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Focus has centered on C-partitioning in stems of sugarcane (Saccharum sp.) due to their high-sucrose accumulation features, relevance to other grasses, and rising economic value. Here we review how sugarcane balances between sucrose storage, respiration, and cell wall biosynthesis. The specific topics involve (1) accumulation of exceptionally high sucrose levels (up to over 500 mM), (2) a potential, turgor-sensitive system for partitioning sucrose between storage inside (cytosol and vacuole) and outside cells, (3) mechanisms to prevent back-flow of extracellular sucrose to xylem or phloem, (4) apparent roles of sucrose-P-synthase in fructose retrieval and sucrose re-synthesis, (5) enhanced importance of invertases, and (6) control of C-flux at key points in cell wall biosynthesis (UDP-glucose dehydrogenase) and respiration (ATP- and pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinases). A combination of emerging technologies is rapidly enhancing our understanding of these points and our capacity to shift C-flux between sucrose, cell wall polymers, or other C-sinks. PMID:23785381

  14. Partitioning in parallel processing of production systems

    SciTech Connect

    Oflazer, K.

    1987-01-01

    This thesis presents research on certain issues related to parallel processing of production systems. It first presents a parallel production system interpreter that has been implemented on a four-processor multiprocessor. This parallel interpreter is based on Forgy's OPS5 interpreter and exploits production-level parallelism in production systems. Runs on the multiprocessor system indicate that it is possible to obtain speed-up of around 1.7 in the match computation for certain production systems when productions are split into three sets that are processed in parallel. The next issue addressed is that of partitioning a set of rules to processors in a parallel interpreter with production-level parallelism, and the extent of additional improvement in performance. The partitioning problem is formulated and an algorithm for approximate solutions is presented. The thesis next presents a parallel processing scheme for OPS5 production systems that allows some redundancy in the match computation. This redundancy enables the processing of a production to be divided into units of medium granularity each of which can be processed in parallel. Subsequently, a parallel processor architecture for implementing the parallel processing algorithm is presented.

  15. Recursive partitioning for heterogeneous causal effects.

    PubMed

    Athey, Susan; Imbens, Guido

    2016-07-05

    In this paper we propose methods for estimating heterogeneity in causal effects in experimental and observational studies and for conducting hypothesis tests about the magnitude of differences in treatment effects across subsets of the population. We provide a data-driven approach to partition the data into subpopulations that differ in the magnitude of their treatment effects. The approach enables the construction of valid confidence intervals for treatment effects, even with many covariates relative to the sample size, and without "sparsity" assumptions. We propose an "honest" approach to estimation, whereby one sample is used to construct the partition and another to estimate treatment effects for each subpopulation. Our approach builds on regression tree methods, modified to optimize for goodness of fit in treatment effects and to account for honest estimation. Our model selection criterion anticipates that bias will be eliminated by honest estimation and also accounts for the effect of making additional splits on the variance of treatment effect estimates within each subpopulation. We address the challenge that the "ground truth" for a causal effect is not observed for any individual unit, so that standard approaches to cross-validation must be modified. Through a simulation study, we show that for our preferred method honest estimation results in nominal coverage for 90% confidence intervals, whereas coverage ranges between 74% and 84% for nonhonest approaches. Honest estimation requires estimating the model with a smaller sample size; the cost in terms of mean squared error of treatment effects for our preferred method ranges between 7-22%.

  16. Gait Partitioning Methods: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Taborri, Juri; Palermo, Eduardo; Rossi, Stefano; Cappa, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, gait phase partitioning has come to be a challenging research topic due to its impact on several applications related to gait technologies. A variety of sensors can be used to feed algorithms for gait phase partitioning, mainly classifiable as wearable or non-wearable. Among wearable sensors, footswitches or foot pressure insoles are generally considered as the gold standard; however, to overcome some inherent limitations of the former, inertial measurement units have become popular in recent decades. Valuable results have been achieved also though electromyography, electroneurography, and ultrasonic sensors. Non-wearable sensors, such as opto-electronic systems along with force platforms, remain the most accurate system to perform gait analysis in an indoor environment. In the present paper we identify, select, and categorize the available methodologies for gait phase detection, analyzing advantages and disadvantages of each solution. Finally, we comparatively examine the obtainable gait phase granularities, the usable computational methodologies and the optimal sensor placements on the targeted body segments. PMID:26751449

  17. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  18. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  19. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  20. Intranasal absorption of oxymorphone.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M A; Aungst, B J

    1997-08-01

    The nasal bioavailability of oxymorphone HCI was determined. Rats were surgically prepared to isolate the nasal cavity, into which a solution of oxymorphone was administered. A reference group of rats was administered oxymorphone HCl intravenously. Plasma oxymorphone concentrations were determined by HPLC. Nasal absorption was rapid, nasal bioavailability was 43%, and the iv and nasal elimination profiles were similar. Oxymorphone HCI appears to have the solubility, potency, and absorption properties required for efficient nasal delivery, which is an alternative to injections.

  1. Effect of water on the fluorine and chlorine partitioning behavior between olivine and silicate melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joachim, Bastian; Stechern, André; Ludwig, Thomas; Konzett, Jürgen; Pawley, Alison; Ruzié-Hamilton, Lorraine; Clay, Patricia L.; Burgess, Ray; Ballentine, Christopher J.

    2017-04-01

    Halogens show a range from moderate (F) to highly (Cl, Br, I) volatile and incompatible behavior, which makes them excellent tracers for volatile transport processes in the Earth's mantle. Experimentally determined fluorine and chlorine partitioning data between mantle minerals and silicate melt enable us to estimate Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) and Ocean Island Basalt (OIB) source region concentrations for these elements. This study investigates the effect of varying small amounts of water on the fluorine and chlorine partitioning behavior at 1280 °C and 0.3 GPa between olivine and silicate melt in the Fe-free CMAS+F-Cl-Br-I-H2O model system. Results show that, within the uncertainty of the analyses, water has no effect on the chlorine partitioning behavior for bulk water contents ranging from 0.03 (2) wt% H2O (DCl ol/melt = 1.6 ± 0.9 × 10-4) to 0.33 (6) wt% H2O (DCl ol/melt = 2.2 ± 1.1 × 10-4). Consequently, with the effect of pressure being negligible in the uppermost mantle (Joachim et al. Chem Geol 416:65-78, 2015), temperature is the only parameter that needs to be considered for the determination of chlorine partition coefficients between olivine and melt at least in the simplified iron-free CMAS+F-Cl-Br-I-H2O system. In contrast, the fluorine partition coefficient increases linearly in this range and may be described at 1280 °C and 0.3 GPa with ( R 2 = 0.99): DF^{ol/melt} = 3.6± 0.4 × 10^{-3} × X_{H}_{2O}( wt %) + 6 ± 0.4× 10^{-4}. The observed fluorine partitioning behavior supports the theory suggested by Crépisson et al. (Earth Planet Sci Lett 390:287-295, 2014) that fluorine and water are incorporated as clumped OH/F defects in the olivine structure. Results of this study further suggest that fluorine concentration estimates in OIB source regions are at least 10% lower than previously expected (Joachim et al. Chem Geol 416:65-78, 2015), implying that consideration of the effect of water on the fluorine partitioning behavior between Earth

  2. Effect of water on the fluorine and chlorine partitioning behavior between olivine and silicate melt.

    PubMed

    Joachim, Bastian; Stechern, André; Ludwig, Thomas; Konzett, Jürgen; Pawley, Alison; Ruzié-Hamilton, Lorraine; Clay, Patricia L; Burgess, Ray; Ballentine, Christopher J

    2017-01-01

    Halogens show a range from moderate (F) to highly (Cl, Br, I) volatile and incompatible behavior, which makes them excellent tracers for volatile transport processes in the Earth's mantle. Experimentally determined fluorine and chlorine partitioning data between mantle minerals and silicate melt enable us to estimate Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) and Ocean Island Basalt (OIB) source region concentrations for these elements. This study investigates the effect of varying small amounts of water on the fluorine and chlorine partitioning behavior at 1280 °C and 0.3 GPa between olivine and silicate melt in the Fe-free CMAS+F-Cl-Br-I-H2O model system. Results show that, within the uncertainty of the analyses, water has no effect on the chlorine partitioning behavior for bulk water contents ranging from 0.03 (2) wt% H2O (DCl(ol/melt) = 1.6 ± 0.9 × 10(-4)) to 0.33 (6) wt% H2O (DCl(ol/melt) = 2.2 ± 1.1 × 10(-4)). Consequently, with the effect of pressure being negligible in the uppermost mantle (Joachim et al. Chem Geol 416:65-78, 2015), temperature is the only parameter that needs to be considered for the determination of chlorine partition coefficients between olivine and melt at least in the simplified iron-free CMAS+F-Cl-Br-I-H2O system. In contrast, the fluorine partition coefficient increases linearly in this range and may be described at 1280 °C and 0.3 GPa with (R(2) = 0.99): [Formula: see text]. The observed fluorine partitioning behavior supports the theory suggested by Crépisson et al. (Earth Planet Sci Lett 390:287-295, 2014) that fluorine and water are incorporated as clumped OH/F defects in the olivine structure. Results of this study further suggest that fluorine concentration estimates in OIB source regions are at least 10% lower than previously expected (Joachim et al. Chem Geol 416:65-78, 2015), implying that consideration of the effect of water on the fluorine partitioning behavior between Earth's mantle minerals and silicate melt

  3. Structural determinants of drug partitioning in n-hexadecane/water system.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Senthil; Wang, Zhanbin; Lukacova, Viera; Peng, Ming; Subramaniam, Rajesh; Lynch, Sandra; Balaz, Stefan

    2013-06-24

    Surrogate phases have been widely used as correlates for modeling transport and partitioning of drugs in biological systems, taking advantage of chemical similarity between the surrogate and the phospholipid bilayer as the elementary unit of biological phases, which is responsible for most of the transport and partitioning. Solvation in strata of the phospholipid bilayer is an important drug characteristic because it affects the rates of absorption and distribution, as well as the interactions with the membrane proteins having the binding sites located inside the bilayer. The bilayer core can be emulated by n-hexadecane (C16), and the headgroup stratum is often considered a hydrophilic phase because of the high water content. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the C16/water partition coefficients (P) can predict the bilayer locations of drugs and other small molecules better than other surrogate systems. Altogether 514 PC16/W values for nonionizable (458) and completely ionized (56) compounds were collected from the literature or measured, when necessary. With the intent to create a fragment-based prediction system, the PC16/W values were factorized into the fragment solvation parameters (f) and correction factors based on the ClogP fragmentation scheme. A script for the PC16/W prediction using the ClogP output is provided. To further expand the prediction system and reveal solvation differences, the fC16/W values were correlated with their more widely available counterparts for the 1-octanol/water system (O/W) using solvatochromic parameters. The analysis for 50 compounds with known bilayer location shows that the available and predicted PC16/W and PO/W values alone or the PC16/O values representing their ratio do not satisfactorily predict the preference for drug accumulation in bilayer strata. These observations indicate that the headgroups stratum, albeit well hydrated, does not have solvation characteristics similar to water and is also poorly described

  4. Kinetics and equilibrium partitioning of dissolved BTEX in PDMS and POM sheets.

    PubMed

    Nam, Go-Un; Bonifacio, Riza Gabriela; Kwon, Jung-Hwan; Hong, Yongseok

    2016-09-01

    Passive sampling of volatile organic chemicals from soil and groundwater is primarily important in assessing the status of environmental contamination. A group of low molecular weight pollutants usually found in petroleum fuels, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) was studied for its kinetics and equilibrium partitioning with single-phase passive samplers using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyoxymethylene (POM) as sorbing phase. PDMS (1 mm) and POM (0.076 mm) sheets were used for sorption of BTEX and concentrations were analyzed using GC-FID. The equilibrium absorption and desorption of PDMS in water was achieved after 120 min while POM sheets absorbed up to 35 days and desorbed in 7 days. The kinetic rate constants in PDMS is higher than in POM up to 3 orders of magnitude. Logarithms of partition coefficient were determined to be in the range of 1.6-2.8 for PDMS and 2.1-3.1 for POM. The results indicate that POM is a stronger sorbent for BTEX and has slower equilibration time than PDMS. The partitioning process for both polymers was found to be enthalpy-driven by measurement of K d values at varying temperatures. K d values increase at low temperature and high ionic strength conditions. Presence of other gasoline components, as well as dissolved organic matter, did not significantly affect equilibrium partitioning. A good 1:1 correlation between the measured and the predicted concentrations was established on testing the potential application of the constructed PDMS sampler on natural soils and artificial soils spiked with gasoline-contaminated water.

  5. Gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric PCDD/Fs in a satellite town in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng-xia; Yan, Jian-hua; Lu, Sheng-yong; Li, Xiao-dong; Chen, Tong; Ni, Ming-jiang; Dai, Hui-fen; Wang, Fei; Cen, Ke-fa

    2009-09-01

    Gas/particle partitioning of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in ambient air was investigated in a satellite town in Eastern China from April 2007 to January 2008 comprehending large temperature variations (from 3 to 34 degrees C, daily average). Molecular weight, molecular structure and ambient temperatures are the three major factors that govern the gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric PCDD/Fs throughout the year. Generally, good agreements were obtained (except for winter) between measured particulate fractions and theoretical estimates of both the Junge-Pankow adsorption model and Harner Bidleman absorption model using different sets of subcooled liquid vapor pressure (P(L)(o)) and octanol-air partition coefficient (K(oa)), respectively. Models utilizing P(L)(o) estimates, derived from gas chromatographic retention indices (GC-RIs), are more accurate than that of entropy-based. Moreover, during winter, the K(oa)-based model using the GC-RIs approach performs better on lower chlorinated PCDD/Fs than that of P(L)(o)-based. Furthermore, possible sources of mismatch between measured and predicted values in winter (3-7 degrees C) were discussed. Gas adsorption artifact was demonstrated to be of minor importance for the phenomena observed. On the other hand, large deviations of slopes (m(r)) and intercepts (b(r)) in logK(p) vs. logP(L)(o)(Pa)/logK(oa) plots from theoretical values are observed in the literature data and these are found to be linearly correlated with ambient temperatures (P<0.001) in this study. This indicates that the non-equilibrium partitioning of PCDD/Fs in winter may be significantly influenced by the colder temperatures that may have slowed down the exchange between gaseous and particulate fractions.

  6. A partitioning strategy for nonuniform problems on multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, M. J.; Bokhari, S.

    1985-01-01

    The partitioning of a problem on a domain with unequal work estimates in different subddomains is considered in a way that balances the work load across multiple processors. Such a problem arises for example in solving partial differential equations using an adaptive method that places extra grid points in certain subregions of the domain. A binary decomposition of the domain is used to partition it into rectangles requiring equal computational effort. The communication costs of mapping this partitioning onto different microprocessors: a mesh-connected array, a tree machine and a hypercube is then studied. The communication cost expressions can be used to determine the optimal depth of the above partitioning.

  7. Partition of nonionic organic compounds in aquatic systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, James A.; Witkowski, Patrick J.; Chiou, Cary T.

    1988-01-01

    In aqueous systems, the distribution of many nonionic organic solutes in soil-sediment, aquatic organisms, and dissolved organic matter can be explained in terms of a partition model. The nonionic organic solute is distributed between water and different organic phases that behave as bulk solvents. Factors such as polarity, composition, and molecular size of the solute and organic phase determine the relative importance of partition to the environmental distribution of the solute. This chapter reviews these factors in the context of a partition model and also examines several environmental applications of the partition model for surface- and ground-water systems.

  8. Deep eutectic solvents in countercurrent and centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Roehrer, Simon; Bezold, Franziska; García, Eva Marra; Minceva, Mirjana

    2016-02-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were evaluated as solvents in centrifugal partition chromatography, a liquid-liquid chromatography separation technology. To this end, the partition coefficients of ten natural compounds of different hydrophobicity were determined in non-aqueous biphasic systems containing DES. The influence of the composition of DESs and the presence of water in the biphasic system on the partition coefficient were also examined. In addition, several process relevant physical properties of the biphasic system, such as the density and viscosity of the phases, were measured. A mixture of three to four hydrophobic compounds was successfully separated in a centrifugal partition extractor using a heptane/ethanol/DES biphasic system.

  9. Proposed human stratum corneum water domain in chemical absorption.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hanjiang; Jung, Eui-Chang; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2016-08-01

    Compounds with varying physical and chemical properties may have different affinities to the stratum corneum (SC) and/or its intercellular lipids, keratin protein, and possible water domains. To better understand the mechanism of percutaneous absorption, we utilized 21 carbon-14 labeled chemicals, with wide hydrophilicity (log P = -0.05 to 6.17), and quantified their absorption/adsorption properties for a short incubation time (15 min) with regards to intact SC membrane, delipidized SC membrane and SC lipid. A facile method was developed for SC/lipid absorption, providing a more equivalent procedure and comparable data. SC lipid absorption of chemical solutes positively correlated with the octanol/water partition coefficient (log P). Differences between the percent dose of chemical absorption to intact SC and the total percent dose contributed by the protein and lipid domains suggest the possibility and significance of a water domain. Absorption rate experiments showed a longer lag time for intact SC than for delipidized SC or SC lipid, suggesting that the water domain may delay chemical binding to protein and lipid domains, and may be a factor in the resistance of many chemicals to current decontamination methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Partitioning planning studies: Preliminary evaluation of metal and radionuclide partitioning the high-temperature thermal treatment systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liekhus, K.; Grandy, J.; Chambers, A.

    1997-03-01

    A preliminary study of toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning during high-temperature processing of mixed waste has been conducted during Fiscal Year 1996 within the Environmental Management Technology Evaluation Project. The study included: (a) identification of relevant partitioning mechanisms that cause feed material to be distributed between the solid, molten, and gas phases within a thermal treatment system; (b) evaluations of existing test data from applicable demonstration test programs as a means to identify and understand elemental and species partitioning; and, (c) evaluation of theoretical or empirical partitioning models for use in predicting elemental or species partitioning in a thermal treatment system. This preliminary study was conducted to identify the need for and the viability of developing the tools capable of describing and predicting toxic metals and radionuclide partitioning in the most applicable mixed waste thermal treatment processes. This document presents the results and recommendations resulting from this study that may serve as an impetus for developing and implementing these predictive tools.

  11. Beta Absorption Mass Monitoring of Particulates - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienfeld, Pedro

    1971-01-01

    The theory and application of beta-radiation absorption for the measurement and monitoring of airborne particulates are discussed. The use of this technique, both for source testing and for ambient air quality monitoring is reviewed. Various particle collection methods used in conjunction with beta absorption sensing configurations are considered. State of the art and current developments of instrumentation approaches for the automated measurement of mass concentration and size distribution of aerosols by beta absorption are discussed. Methods for electronic signal processing and recording are presented. The Beta absorption technique appears as a powerful tool for the unattended measurement of the mass of particulate pollution, compatible with telemetry and central data processing methods.

  12. Temperature dependence of the particle/gas partition coefficient: An application to predict indoor gas-phase concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenjuan; Mandin, Corinne; Blanchard, Olivier; Mercier, Fabien; Pelletier, Maud; Le Bot, Barbara; Glorennec, Philippe; Ramalho, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    The indoor gas-phase concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) can be predicted from their respective concentrations in airborne particles by applying the particle/gas partitioning equilibrium. The temperature used for partitioning is often set to 25°C. However, indoor temperatures frequently differ from this reference value. This assumption may result in errors in the predicted equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentrations. To improve the prediction model, the temperature dependence of the particle/gas partition coefficient must be addressed. In this paper, a theoretical relationship between the particle/gas partition coefficient and temperature was developed based on the SVOC absorptive mechanism. The SVOC particle/gas partition coefficients predicted by employing the derived theoretical relationship agree well with the experimental data retrieved from the literature (R>0.93). The influence of temperature on the equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentration was quantified by a dimensionless analysis of the derived relationship between the SVOC particle/gas partition coefficient and temperature. The predicted equilibrium gas-phase SVOC concentration decreased by between 31% and 53% when the temperature was lowered by 6°C, while it increased by up to 750% when the indoor temperature increased from 15°C to 30°C.

  13. Hadronic density of states from string theory.

    PubMed

    Pando Zayas, Leopoldo A; Vaman, Diana

    2003-09-12

    We present an exact calculation of the finite temperature partition function for the hadronic states corresponding to a Penrose-Güven limit of the Maldacena-Nùñez embedding of the N=1 super Yang-Mills (SYM) into string theory. It is established that the theory exhibits a Hagedorn density of states. We propose a semiclassical string approximation to the finite temperature partition function for confining gauge theories admitting a supergravity dual, by performing an expansion around classical solutions characterized by temporal windings. This semiclassical approximation reveals a hadronic energy density of states of a Hagedorn type, with the coefficient determined by the gauge theory string tension as expected for confining theories. We argue that our proposal captures primarily information about states of pure N=1 SYM theory, given that this semiclassical approximation does not entail a projection onto states of large U(1) charge.

  14. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  15. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  16. Henry's law constant, octanol-air partition coefficient and supercooled liquid vapor pressure of carbazole as a function of temperature: application to gas/particle partitioning in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Odabasi, Mustafa; Cetin, Banu; Sofuoglu, Aysun

    2006-02-01

    The Henry's law constant for carbazole was experimentally determined between 5 and 35 degrees C using a gas-stripping technique. The following equation was obtained for dimensionless Henry's law constant (H') versus temperature (T, K): ln H' = -3982(T,K)(-1) + 1.01. Temperature-dependent octanol-air partition coefficients (KOA) and supercooled liquid vapor pressures (PL,Pa) of carbazole were also determined using the GC retention time method. The temperature dependence of KOA and PL were explained by the following: log KOA = 4076/(T,K) - 5.65, log PL(Pa) = -3948(T,K)(- 1) + 11.48. The gas and particle-phase carbazole concentrations measured previously in Chicago, IL in 1995 was used for gas/particle partitioning modeling. Octanol based absorptive partitioning model consistently underpredicted the gas/particle partition coefficients (Kp) for all sampling periods. However, overall there was a good agreement between the measured Kp and soot-based model predictions.

  17. Interspecific resource partitioning in sympatric ursids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belant, J.L.; Kielland, K.; Follmann, E.H.; Adams, L.G.

    2006-01-01

    The fundamental niche of a species is rarely if ever realized because the presence of other species restricts it to a narrower range of ecological conditions. The effects of this narrower range of conditions define how resources are partitioned. Resource partitioning has been inferred but not demonstrated previously for sympatric ursids. We estimated assimilated diet in relation to body condition (body fat and lean and total body mass) and reproduction for sympatric brown bears (Ursus arctos) and American black bears (U. americanus) in southcentral Alaska, 1998-2000. Based on isotopic analysis of blood and keratin in claws, salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) predominated in brown bear diets (>53% annually) whereas black bears assimilated 0-25% salmon annually. Black bears did not exploit salmon during a year with below average spawning numbers, probably because brown bears deterred black bear access to salmon. Proportion of salmon in assimilated diet was consistent across years for brown bears and represented the major portion of their diet. Body size of brown bears in the study area approached mean body size of several coastal brown bear populations, demonstrating the importance of salmon availability to body condition. Black bears occurred at a comparable density (mass:mass), but body condition varied and was related directly to the amount of salmon assimilated in their diet. Both species gained most lean body mass during spring and all body fat during summer when salmon were present. Improved body condition (i.e., increased percentage body fat) from salmon consumption reduced catabolism of lean body mass during hibernation, resulting in better body condition the following spring. Further, black bear reproduction was directly related to body condition; reproductive rates were reduced when body condition was lower. High body fat content across years for brown bears was reflected in consistently high reproductive levels. We suggest that the fundamental niche of black bears

  18. QED-driven laser absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew; Blackburn, T.; Ratan, N.; Sadler, J.; Ridgers, C.; Kasim, M.; Ceurvorst, L.; Holloway, J.; Baring, M.; Bell, A.; Glenzer, S.; Gregori, G.; Ilderton, A.; Marklund, M.; Tabak, M.; Wilks, S.; Norreys, P.

    2016-10-01

    Absorption covers the physical processes which convert intense photon flux into energetic particles when a high-power laser (I >1018 W cm-2 where I is intensity at 1 μm wavelength) illuminates optically-thick matter. It underpins important applications of petawatt laser systems today, e.g., in isochoric heating of materials. Next-generation lasers such as ELI are anticipated to produce quantum electrodynamical (QED) bursts of γ-rays and anti-matter via the multiphoton Breit-Wheeler process which could enable scaled laboratory probes, e.g., of black hole winds. Here, applying strong-field QED to advances in plasma kinematic theory, we present a model elucidating absorption limited only by an avalanche of self-created electron-positron pairs at ultra-high-field. The model, confirmed by multidimensional QED-PIC simulations, works over six orders of magnitude in optical intensity and reveals this cascade is initiated at 1.8 x 1025 W cm-2 using a realistic linearly-polarized laser pulse. Here the laser couples its energy into highly-collimated electrons, ions, γ-rays, and positrons at 12%, 6%, 58% and 13% efficiency, respectively. We remark on attributes of the QED plasma state and possible applications.

  19. Partitioning Drag Coefficient Estimates over Flat and Rippled Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Abudo, S.; Foster, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    Drag forces are imparted on a sediment bed by means of pressure and shear stresses. In coastal environments with ripples present, the pressure drag can be partitioned into a pressure contribution imposed by the waves, which is fairly accurately approximated with linear wave theory, and a bedform-induced pressure contribution that arises due to the presence of an uneven boundary. Experimentally resolving the bedform-induced pressure is difficult due to the highly dynamic granular boundary, and the turbulent nature flow, characterized by coherent flow structures highly correlated to the free-stream hydrodynamics. In this effort we use a physics-based formulation that explicitly yields a momentum balance between the bedform-induced pressure drag, vertical stress gradient and acceleration deficit. The formulation is derived from the Double-Averaged Navier Stokes (DANS) equations (Gimenez-Curto and Corniero Lera, 1996), in which the two-dimensional velocity field is decomposed into temporal and spatial components, followed by a double average (in time and space). Direct estimates of the drag coefficient are computed from Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) observations of the wave bottom boundary layer in a variety of wave forcing conditions, including laboratory experiments at full and 1:10 scales, and a field observational effort in a sheltered beach of New England. The results show that the relative importance of the bedform-induced pressure drag increases with increasing bedform signature.

  20. Partitioning of initial energy release in a tunnel environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felts, Joshua E.; Lee, Richard J.; Mychajlonka, Kyle; Davis, Andy

    2017-01-01

    After the detonation of an explosive charge in the closed end of a tunnel, product gases and metal fuels can continue to react with one another as well as combust with the available air while expanding down the tunnel. It is that total reaction that drives the blast wave at long distances from the charge. The initial energy release was calculated from pressure wave time of arrival at distances of 5 to 30 tunnel diameters away for several explosives in a 127-mm diameter tunnel using point blast theory. For similarly sized explosives, the anaerobic energy was measured using a detonation calorimeter. Comparisons were made for four explosives: one nearly ideal, two with aluminum, and one with aluminum and an oxidizer. The measured tunnel and calorimeter energies were equal, within error, for the near-ideal explosive. The other three explosives had tunnel and calorimeter energies higher than that which can be accounted for from the detonable ingredients alone, especially in the tunnel. The differences between the tunnel and calorimeter for the three aluminized explosives were taken to be from aerobic combustion of aluminum. The presence of higher concentrations of aluminum or an oxidizer enhanced the amount of aerobic combustion of aluminum. The aluminized explosive with additional oxidizer consumed more than twice the aluminum of the other two in the tunnel. More experiments are needed to better define the early partitioning of anaerobic and aerobic combustion of aluminum in the small-scale tunnel.

  1. Reduced partition function ratios of iron and oxygen in goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, M.; Dauphas, N.; Hu, M. Y.; Roskosz, M.; Alp, E. E.; Golden, D. C.; Sio, C. K.; Tissot, F. L. H.; Zhao, J.; Gao, L.; Morris, R. V.; Fornace, M.; Floris, A.; Lazzeri, M.; Balan, E.

    2015-02-01

    First-principles calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) with or without the addition of a Hubbard U correction, are performed on goethite in order to determine the iron and oxygen reduced partition function ratios (β-factors). The calculated iron phonon density of states (pDOS), force constant and β-factor are compared with reevaluated experimental β-factors obtained from Nuclear Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (NRIXS) measurements. The reappraisal of old experimental data is motivated by the erroneous previous interpretation of the low- and high-energy ends of the NRIXS spectrum of goethite and jarosite samples (Dauphas et al., 2012). Here the NRIXS data are analyzed using the SciPhon software that corrects for non-constant baseline. New NRIXS measurements also demonstrate the reproducibility of the results. Unlike for hematite and pyrite, a significant discrepancy remains between DFT, NRIXS and the existing Mössbauer-derived data. Calculations suggest a slight overestimation of the NRIXS signal possibly related to the baseline definition. The intrinsic features of the samples studied by NRIXS and Mössbauer spectroscopy may also contribute to the discrepancy (e.g., internal structural and/or chemical defects, microstructure, surface contribution). As for oxygen, DFT results indicate that goethite and hematite have similar β-factors, which suggests almost no fractionation between the two minerals at equilibrium.

  2. Advanced Aqueous Separation Systems for Actinide Partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Clark, Sue; Meier, G Patrick; Alexandratos, Spiro; Paine, Robert; Hancock, Robert; Ensor, Dale

    2012-03-21

    One of the most challenging aspects of advanced processing of spent nuclear fuel is the need to isolate transuranium elements from fission product lanthanides. This project expanded the scope of earlier investigations of americium (Am) partitioning from the lanthanides with the synthesis of new separations materials and a centralized focus on radiochemical characterization of the separation systems that could be developed based on these new materials. The primary objective of this program was to explore alternative materials for actinide separations and to link the design of new reagents for actinide separations to characterizations based on actinide chemistry. In the predominant trivalent oxidation state, the chemistry of lanthanides overlaps substantially with that of the trivalent actinides and their mutual separation is quite challenging.

  3. Experimental investigation of the iodine partition coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.L.; Babad, C.J.; Mulder, R.U.

    1985-11-01

    Short-term values of the iodine partition coefficient (IPC) were evaluated experimentally by an air/water system over the following ranges of conditions: temperature = 25 to 70/sup 0/C, pH = 5 to 9, and iodine concentration = 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -2/ kg iodine/m/sup 3/ H/sub 2/O. The experimental IPC values are relatively independent of temperature over the indicated range, but show a significant dependence on pH and iodine concentration. In basic solutions the short-term values are several orders of magnitude less than the true equilibrium values; in acid solutions, the differences are much less. These results are useful for predicting the disposition of iodine shortly (i.e., 1 to 10 h) after iodine has been released into an air/water environment.

  4. Partitional Classification: A Complement to Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Marc; Dassy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The tree of life is currently an active object of research, though next to vertical gene transmission non vertical gene transfers proved to play a significant role in the evolutionary process. To overcome this difficulty, trees of life are now constructed from genes hypothesized vital, on the assumption that these are all transmitted vertically. This view has been challenged. As a frame for this discussion, we developed a partitional taxonomical system clustering taxa at a high taxonomical rank. Our analysis (1) selects RNase P RNA sequences of bacterial, archaeal, and eucaryal genera from genetic databases, (2) submits the sequences, aligned, to k-medoid analysis to obtain clusters, (3) establishes the correspondence between clusters and taxa, (4) constructs from the taxa a new type of taxon, the genetic community (GC), and (5) classifies the GCs: Archaea–Eukaryotes contrastingly different from the six others, all bacterial. The GCs would be the broadest frame to carry out the phylogenies. PMID:27346943

  5. Exometabolite niche partitioning among sympatric soil bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Richard; Brodie, Eoin L.; Mayberry-Lewis, Jazmine; Hummel, Eric; Da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; Chakraborty, Romy; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Karaoz, Ulas; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Northen, Trent R.

    2015-01-01

    Soils are arguably the most microbially diverse ecosystems. Physicochemical properties have been associated with the maintenance of this diversity. Yet, the role of microbial substrate specialization is largely unexplored since substrate utilization studies have focused on simple substrates, not the complex mixtures representative of the soil environment. Here we examine the exometabolite composition of desert biological soil crusts (biocrusts) and the substrate preferences of seven biocrust isolates. The biocrust's main primary producer releases a diverse array of metabolites, and isolates of physically associated taxa use unique subsets of the complex metabolite pool. Individual isolates use only 13−26% of available metabolites, with only 2 out of 470 used by all and 40% not used by any. An extension of this approach to a mesophilic soil environment also reveals high levels of microbial substrate specialization. These results suggest that exometabolite niche partitioning may be an important factor in the maintenance of microbial diversity. PMID:26392107

  6. Exometabolite niche partitioning among sympatric soil bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, Richard; Brodie, Eoin L.; Mayberry-Lewis, Jazmine; Hummel, Eric; Da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; Chakraborty, Romy; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Karaoz, Ulas; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Northen, Trent R.

    2015-09-22

    Soils are arguably the most microbially diverse ecosystems. Physicochemical properties have been associated with the maintenance of this diversity. Yet, the role of microbial substrate specialization is largely unexplored since substrate utilization studies have focused on simple substrates, not the complex mixtures representative of the soil environment. Here we examine the exometabolite composition of desert biological soil crusts (biocrusts) and the substrate preferences of seven biocrust isolates. The biocrust's main primary producer releases a diverse array of metabolites, and isolates of physically associated taxa use unique subsets of the complex metabolite pool. Individual isolates use only 13-26% of available metabolites, with only 2 out of 470 used by all and 40% not used by any. An extension of this approach to a mesophilic soil environment also reveals high levels of microbial substrate specialization. In conclusion, these results suggest that exometabolite niche partitioning may be an important factor in the maintenance of microbial diversity.

  7. Exometabolite niche partitioning among sympatric soil bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Baran, Richard; Brodie, Eoin L.; Mayberry-Lewis, Jazmine; ...

    2015-09-22

    Soils are arguably the most microbially diverse ecosystems. Physicochemical properties have been associated with the maintenance of this diversity. Yet, the role of microbial substrate specialization is largely unexplored since substrate utilization studies have focused on simple substrates, not the complex mixtures representative of the soil environment. Here we examine the exometabolite composition of desert biological soil crusts (biocrusts) and the substrate preferences of seven biocrust isolates. The biocrust's main primary producer releases a diverse array of metabolites, and isolates of physically associated taxa use unique subsets of the complex metabolite pool. Individual isolates use only 13-26% of available metabolites,more » with only 2 out of 470 used by all and 40% not used by any. An extension of this approach to a mesophilic soil environment also reveals high levels of microbial substrate specialization. In conclusion, these results suggest that exometabolite niche partitioning may be an important factor in the maintenance of microbial diversity.« less

  8. Metal separations using aqueous biphasic partitioning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiko, D.J.; Zaslavsky, B.; Rollins, A.N.; Vojta, Y.; Gartelmann, J.; Mego, W.

    1996-05-01

    Aqueous biphasic extraction (ABE) processes offer the potential for low-cost, highly selective separations. This countercurrent extraction technique involves selective partitioning of either dissolved solutes or ultrafine particulates between two immiscible aqueous phases. The extraction systems that the authors have studied are generated by combining an aqueous salt solution with an aqueous polymer solution. They have examined a wide range of applications for ABE, including the treatment of solid and liquid nuclear wastes, decontamination of soils, and processing of mineral ores. They have also conducted fundamental studies of solution microstructure using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). In this report they review the physicochemical fundamentals of aqueous biphase formation and discuss the development and scaleup of ABE processes for environmental remediation.

  9. Recursive Partitioning Method on Competing Risk Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Che, Jiahua; Kong, Qin

    2016-01-01

    In some cancer clinical studies, researchers have interests to explore the risk factors associated with competing risk outcomes such as recurrence-free survival. We develop a novel recursive partitioning framework on competing risk data for both prognostic and predictive model constructions. We define specific splitting rules, pruning algorithm, and final tree selection algorithm for the competing risk tree models. This methodology is quite flexible that it can corporate both semiparametric method using Cox proportional hazards model and parametric competing risk model. Both prognostic and predictive tree models are developed to adjust for potential confounding factors. Extensive simulations show that our methods have well-controlled type I error and robust power performance. Finally, we apply both Cox proportional hazards model and flexible parametric model for prognostic tree development on a retrospective clinical study on oropharyngeal cancer patients. PMID:27486300

  10. Partitioned-Interval Quantum Optical Communications Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    The proposed quantum receiver in this innovation partitions each binary signal interval into two unequal segments: a short "pre-measurement" segment in the beginning of the symbol interval used to make an initial guess with better probability than 50/50 guessing, and a much longer segment used to make the high-sensitivity signal detection via field-cancellation and photon-counting detection. It was found that by assigning as little as 10% of the total signal energy to the pre-measurement segment, the initial 50/50 guess can be improved to about 70/30, using the best available measurements such as classical coherent or "optimized Kennedy" detection.

  11. Partitional Classification: A Complement to Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Marc; Dassy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The tree of life is currently an active object of research, though next to vertical gene transmission non vertical gene transfers proved to play a significant role in the evolutionary process. To overcome this difficulty, trees of life are now constructed from genes hypothesized vital, on the assumption that these are all transmitted vertically. This view has been challenged. As a frame for this discussion, we developed a partitional taxonomical system clustering taxa at a high taxonomical rank. Our analysis (1) selects RNase P RNA sequences of bacterial, archaeal, and eucaryal genera from genetic databases, (2) submits the sequences, aligned, to k-medoid analysis to obtain clusters, (3) establishes the correspondence between clusters and taxa, (4) constructs from the taxa a new type of taxon, the genetic community (GC), and (5) classifies the GCs: Archaea-Eukaryotes contrastingly different from the six others, all bacterial. The GCs would be the broadest frame to carry out the phylogenies.

  12. Application of the octanol-air partition coefficient for describing particle/gas distribution of chlorinated aromatics

    SciTech Connect

    Harner, T.; Bidleman, T.; Falconer, R.; Mackay, D.

    1995-12-31

    Partitioning of chlorinated aromatics between the gas and aerosol particulate phases can be explained by adsorption onto active sites on the surface of the aerosol and/or by absorption into a liquid film. In both cases the particle/gas distribution coefficient, K{sub P}, is well correlated with the vapor pressure of the compound. The correlation improves for the adsorption model by including a shape parameter which takes into account the planarity of the molecule. This investigation will consider using the octanol-air partition coefficient, K{sub OA}, as a surrogate for K{sub p}. A method for measuring K{sub OA} is described and results are presented for several PCBs over the temperature range {minus}10 C to + 30 C. The temperature dependence of K{sub P} for PCBs, measured in controlled laboratory experiments, is more closely described by the temperature slope of K{sub OA} than vapor pressure. This supports the hypothesis that absorption into an organic, liquid film is a plausible mechanism for sorption of chlorinated aromatics to urban aerosols. K{sub OA} is also believed to be a valuable descriptor of partitioning of persistent organochlorine chemicals between the atmosphere and lipid-containing phases such as soil and vegetation. Results of particle/gas distributions for PCBs and PCNs (polychlorinated naphthalenes) from field samples collected in Toronto and Chicago are presented and discussed with relation to OA, vapor pressure and planarity.

  13. Second derivative spectrophotometric determination of partition coefficients of phenothiazine derivatives between human erythrocyte ghost membranes and water.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, K; Goto, T; Kitade, T

    1998-08-01

    The absorption spectra of six phenothiazine derivatives, chlorpromazine, triflupromazine, promazine, promethazine, trifluoperazine and prochlorperazine, measured in the solutions containing various amounts of human erythrocyte ghosts (HEG) showed bathocromic shifts according to the amount of HEG. Due to the strong background signals caused by HEG, the baseline compensation was incomplete, even though the sample and the reference solutions contained the same amount of HEG, hence further spectral information could not be obtained. The second derivative spectra of these absorption spectra clearly showed the derivative isosbestic points, indicating that the residual background signal effects were entirely eliminated. The derivative intensity differences of the phenothiazines (DeltaD values) before and after the addition of HEG were measured at a specific wavelength. Using the DeltaD values, the partition coefficients (K(p)) of these drugs were calculated and obtained with R.S.D. of below 10 %. The fractions of partitioned phenothiazines calculated from the K(p) values agreed well with the experimental values. The results indicate that the derivative method can be applicable to the determination of partition coefficients of drugs to HEG without any separation procedures.

  14. Recursive partitioning for heterogeneous causal effects

    PubMed Central

    Athey, Susan; Imbens, Guido

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose methods for estimating heterogeneity in causal effects in experimental and observational studies and for conducting hypothesis tests about the magnitude of differences in treatment effects across subsets of the population. We provide a data-driven approach to partition the data into subpopulations that differ in the magnitude of their treatment effects. The approach enables the construction of valid confidence intervals for treatment effects, even with many covariates relative to the sample size, and without “sparsity” assumptions. We propose an “honest” approach to estimation, whereby one sample is used to construct the partition and another to estimate treatment effects for each subpopulation. Our approach builds on regression tree methods, modified to optimize for goodness of fit in treatment effects and to account for honest estimation. Our model selection criterion anticipates that bias will be eliminated by honest estimation and also accounts for the effect of making additional splits on the variance of treatment effect estimates within each subpopulation. We address the challenge that the “ground truth” for a causal effect is not observed for any individual unit, so that standard approaches to cross-validation must be modified. Through a simulation study, we show that for our preferred method honest estimation results in nominal coverage for 90% confidence intervals, whereas coverage ranges between 74% and 84% for nonhonest approaches. Honest estimation requires estimating the model with a smaller sample size; the cost in terms of mean squared error of treatment effects for our preferred method ranges between 7–22%. PMID:27382149

  15. Partition coefficients of organic contaminants with carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Hung, Hsu-Wen; Lin, Tsair-Fuh; Chiou, Cary T

    2010-07-15

    In view of the current lack of reliable partition coefficients for organic compounds with carbohydrates (K(ch)), carefully measured values with cellulose and starch, the two major forms of carbohydrates, are provided for a wide range of compounds: short-chain chlorinated hydrocarbons, halogenated benzenes, alkyl benzenes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine pesticides. To ensure the accuracy of the K(ch) data, solute concentrations in both water and carbohydrate phases are measured by direct solvent extraction of the samples. For a given compound, the observed partition coefficient with cellulose (K(cl)) is virtually the same as that with starch (K(st)). This finding expedites the evaluation of organic contamination with different forms of carbohydrates. The presently determined K(ch) values of 13 PAHs are substantially lower (by 3-66 times) than the literature data; the latter are suspect as they were obtained with (i) presumably impure carbohydrate samples or (ii) indirectly measured equilibrium solute concentrations in carbohydrate and water phases. Although the K(ch) values are generally considerably lower than the respective K(ow) (octanol-water) or K(lipid) (lipid-water), accurate K(ch) data are duly required to accurately estimate the contamination of carbohydrates by organic compounds because of the abundance of carbohydrates over lipids in crops and plants. To overcome the current lack of reliable K(ch) data for organic compounds, a close correlation of log K(ch) with log K(ow) has been established for predicting the unavailable K(ch) data for low-polarity compounds.

  16. 47 CFR 24.104 - Partitioning and disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... their authorized spectrum at any time following grant of their geographic area authorizations. (a... names that constitute the partitioned area. (c) Disaggregation. Spectrum may be disaggregated in any... for a partitioned license area and for disaggregated spectrum shall be the remainder of the...

  17. 47 CFR 24.714 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility. (1) Parties seeking approval for... § 24.839. (2) Broadband PCS licensees in spectrum blocks A, B, D, and E and broadband PCS C and F...

  18. 47 CFR 24.714 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility. (1) Parties seeking approval for... § 24.839. (2) Broadband PCS licensees in spectrum blocks A, B, D, and E and broadband PCS C and F...

  19. 47 CFR 22.948 - Partitioning and Disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... partition or disaggregate their spectrum to other qualified entities. (2) Partitioning. During the five year... obtaining disaggregated spectrum may only use such spectrum in that portion of the cellular market encompassed by the original licensee's CGSA and may not use such spectrum to provide service to...

  20. 47 CFR 27.15 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. (a) Eligibility. (1) Parties seeking approval for... service area or disaggregate their licensed spectrum at any time following the grant of their licenses....

  1. 47 CFR 90.365 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... § 90.365 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility. (1) Party seeking approval... disaggregate their licensed spectrum at any time following the grant of their licenses. Multilateration...

  2. 47 CFR 24.104 - Partitioning and disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... their authorized spectrum at any time following grant of their geographic area authorizations. (a... names that constitute the partitioned area. (c) Disaggregation. Spectrum may be disaggregated in any... for a partitioned license area and for disaggregated spectrum shall be the remainder of the...

  3. 47 CFR 24.104 - Partitioning and disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... their authorized spectrum at any time following grant of their geographic area authorizations. (a... names that constitute the partitioned area. (c) Disaggregation. Spectrum may be disaggregated in any... for a partitioned license area and for disaggregated spectrum shall be the remainder of the...

  4. 47 CFR 24.104 - Partitioning and disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... their authorized spectrum at any time following grant of their geographic area authorizations. (a... names that constitute the partitioned area. (c) Disaggregation. Spectrum may be disaggregated in any... for a partitioned license area and for disaggregated spectrum shall be the remainder of the...

  5. 47 CFR 101.1323 - Spectrum aggregation, disaggregation, and partitioning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spectrum aggregation, disaggregation, and... Requirements § 101.1323 Spectrum aggregation, disaggregation, and partitioning. (a) Eligibility. (1) Parties... aggregate spectrum in any MAS bands, but may not disaggregate their licensed spectrum or partition...

  6. 47 CFR 27.15 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. (a) Eligibility. (1) Parties seeking approval for... service area or disaggregate their licensed spectrum at any time following the grant of their licenses....

  7. 47 CFR 24.714 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility. (1) Parties seeking approval for... § 24.839. (2) Broadband PCS licensees in spectrum blocks A, B, D, and E and broadband PCS C and F...

  8. 47 CFR 90.365 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... § 90.365 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility. (1) Party seeking approval... disaggregate their licensed spectrum at any time following the grant of their licenses. Multilateration...

  9. 47 CFR 90.365 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... § 90.365 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility. (1) Party seeking approval... disaggregate their licensed spectrum at any time following the grant of their licenses. Multilateration...

  10. 47 CFR 101.1323 - Spectrum aggregation, disaggregation, and partitioning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spectrum aggregation, disaggregation, and... Requirements § 101.1323 Spectrum aggregation, disaggregation, and partitioning. (a) Eligibility. (1) Parties... aggregate spectrum in any MAS bands, but may not disaggregate their licensed spectrum or partition...

  11. 47 CFR 22.948 - Partitioning and Disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... partition or disaggregate their spectrum to other qualified entities. (2) Partitioning. During the five year... obtaining disaggregated spectrum may only use such spectrum in that portion of the cellular market encompassed by the original licensee's CGSA and may not use such spectrum to provide service to...

  12. 47 CFR 101.1323 - Spectrum aggregation, disaggregation, and partitioning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spectrum aggregation, disaggregation, and... Requirements § 101.1323 Spectrum aggregation, disaggregation, and partitioning. (a) Eligibility. (1) Parties... aggregate spectrum in any MAS bands, but may not disaggregate their licensed spectrum or partition...

  13. 47 CFR 27.15 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. (a) Eligibility. (1) Parties seeking approval for... service area or disaggregate their licensed spectrum at any time following the grant of their licenses....

  14. 47 CFR 22.948 - Partitioning and Disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... partition or disaggregate their spectrum to other qualified entities. (2) Partitioning. During the five year... obtaining disaggregated spectrum may only use such spectrum in that portion of the cellular market encompassed by the original licensee's CGSA and may not use such spectrum to provide service to...

  15. 47 CFR 27.15 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. (a) Eligibility. (1) Parties seeking approval for... service area or disaggregate their licensed spectrum at any time following the grant of their licenses....

  16. 47 CFR 22.948 - Partitioning and Disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... partition or disaggregate their spectrum to other qualified entities. (2) Partitioning. During the five year... obtaining disaggregated spectrum may only use such spectrum in that portion of the cellular market encompassed by the original licensee's CGSA and may not use such spectrum to provide service to...

  17. 47 CFR 24.714 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility. (1) Parties seeking approval for... § 24.839. (2) Broadband PCS licensees in spectrum blocks A, B, D, and E and broadband PCS C and F...

  18. 47 CFR 27.15 - Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Geographic partitioning and spectrum... Geographic partitioning and spectrum disaggregation. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 48537, Aug. 15... licensed spectrum at any time following the grant of their licenses. (b) Technical...

  19. 47 CFR 101.1323 - Spectrum aggregation, disaggregation, and partitioning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spectrum aggregation, disaggregation, and... Requirements § 101.1323 Spectrum aggregation, disaggregation, and partitioning. (a) Eligibility. (1) Parties... aggregate spectrum in any MAS bands, but may not disaggregate their licensed spectrum or partition...

  20. 47 CFR 101.1323 - Spectrum aggregation, disaggregation, and partitioning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spectrum aggregation, disaggregation, and... Requirements § 101.1323 Spectrum aggregation, disaggregation, and partitioning. (a) Eligibility. (1) Parties... aggregate spectrum in any MAS bands, but may not disaggregate their licensed spectrum or partition...

  1. 47 CFR 24.104 - Partitioning and disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... their authorized spectrum at any time following grant of their geographic area authorizations. (a... names that constitute the partitioned area. (c) Disaggregation. Spectrum may be disaggregated in any... for a partitioned license area and for disaggregated spectrum shall be the remainder of the...

  2. 47 CFR 22.948 - Partitioning and Disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... partition or disaggregate their spectrum to other qualified entities. (2) Partitioning. During the five year... obtaining disaggregated spectrum may only use such spectrum in that portion of the cellular market encompassed by the original licensee's CGSA and may not use such spectrum to provide service to...

  3. 47 CFR 24.714 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility. (1) Parties seeking approval for... § 24.839. (2) Broadband PCS licensees in spectrum blocks A, B, D, and E and broadband PCS C and F...

  4. 47 CFR 90.365 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... § 90.365 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility. (1) Party seeking approval... disaggregate their licensed spectrum at any time following the grant of their licenses. Multilateration...

  5. 47 CFR 90.365 - Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum... § 90.365 Partitioned licenses and disaggregated spectrum. (a) Eligibility. (1) Party seeking approval... disaggregate their licensed spectrum at any time following the grant of their licenses. Multilateration...

  6. 47 CFR 101.1111 - Partitioning and disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Partitioning and disaggregation. 101.1111 Section 101.1111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Competitive Bidding Procedures for LMDS § 101.1111 Partitioning...

  7. 47 CFR 101.1111 - Partitioning and disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Partitioning and disaggregation. 101.1111 Section 101.1111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Competitive Bidding Procedures for LMDS § 101.1111 Partitioning...

  8. 47 CFR 101.1111 - Partitioning and disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Partitioning and disaggregation. 101.1111 Section 101.1111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Competitive Bidding Procedures for LMDS § 101.1111 Partitioning...

  9. Spatial partitioning improves the reliability of biochemical signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mugler, Andrew; Tostevin, Filipe; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2013-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity is a hallmark of living systems, even at the molecular scale in individual cells. A key example is the partitioning of membrane-bound proteins via lipid domain formation or cytoskeleton-induced corralling. However, the impact of this spatial heterogeneity on biochemical signaling processes is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that partitioning improves the reliability of biochemical signaling. We exactly solve a stochastic model describing a ubiquitous motif in membrane signaling. The solution reveals that partitioning improves signaling reliability via two effects: it moderates the nonlinearity of the switching response, and it reduces noise in the response by suppressing correlations between molecules. An optimal partition size arises from a trade-off between minimizing the number of proteins per partition to improve signaling reliability and ensuring sufficient proteins per partition to maintain signal propagation. The predicted optimal partition size agrees quantitatively with experimentally observed systems. These results persist in spatial simulations with explicit diffusion barriers. Our findings suggest that molecular partitioning is not merely a consequence of the complexity of cellular substructures, but also plays an important functional role in cell signaling. PMID:23530194

  10. Trace-element partitioning in pantellerites and trachytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mahood, G.A.; Stimac, J.A. )

    1990-08-01

    In order to investigate the effect of increasing melt peralkalinity on partitioning, partition coefficients have been determined using neutron activation analyses of coexisting phenocrysts and glass of five samples from Pantelleria spanning the range trachyte to pantellerite. Alkali feldspar partition coefficients for Fe, Rb, Ba, Sr, and Eu vary with melt peralkalinity due to changes in melt polymerization and to the systematic increase in X{sub or} and decrease in X{sub an} of the feldspar. In going from trachyte to pantellerite, Fe partition coefficients increase from 0.04 to 0.10, presumably because Fe{sup +3} increasingly substitutes in the feldspar tetrahedral site as melt activity of Al declines and Fe concentrations increase. Partition coefficients for trivalent light REEs (rare earth elements) decrease and the partitioning pattern becomes flatter, the most evolved samples having some of the lowest published values for feldspar. The hundredfold decline in Eu partition coefficients (2.5 to 0.024) and the decrease in the size of the positive partitioning anomaly are attributed to increasing Eu{sup 3+}/Eu{sup 2+} in the melt as it becomes more peralkaline, as well as to concomitant decrease in the Ca content of feldspar. As a result, the behavior of Eu during fractional crystallization of peralkaline suites is fundamentally different from that in metaluminous suites; absolute abundances rise and the size of the negative Eu anomaly changes little with fractionation beyond pantelleritic trachyte.

  11. Simple partitions of a hyperbolic plane of positive curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Romakina, Lyudmila N

    2012-09-30

    We construct special monohedral isotropic partitions with symmetries of the hyperbolic plane H of positive curvature with a simple 4-contour as a cell. An analogue of mosaic in these partitions called a tiling is introduced. Also we consider some fractal tilings. The existence of band tilings in each homological series with code (m, n) is proved. Bibliography: 14 titles.

  12. DOES NITROGEN PARTITIONING PROMOTE SPECIES DIVERSITY IN ARCTIC TUSSOCK TUNDRA?

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used 15N soil-labeling techniques to examine how the dominant species in a N-limited, tussock tundra plant community partitioned soil N, and how such partitioning may contribute to community organization. The five most productive species were well differentiated with respect ...

  13. PARTITION COEFFICIENTS FOR METALS IN SURFACE WATER, SOIL, AND WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents metal partition coefficients for the surface water pathway and for the source model used in the Multimedia, Multi-pathway, Multi-receptor Exposure and Risk Assessment (3MRA) technology under development by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Partition ...

  14. ESTIMATING DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON PARTITION COEFFICIENTS FOR NONIONIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A literature search was performed for dissolved organic carbon/water partition coefficients for nonionic chemicals (Kdoc) and Kdoc data was taken from more than sixty references. The Kdoc data were evaluated as a function of the n-octanol/water partition coefficients (Kow). A pre...

  15. 47 CFR 101.1111 - Partitioning and disaggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Partitioning and disaggregation. 101.1111 Section 101.1111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Competitive Bidding Procedures for LMDS § 101.1111 Partitioning...

  16. REE and Strontium Partition Coefficients for Nakhla Pyroxenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oe, K.; McKay, G.; Le, L.

    2001-01-01

    We present new partition coefficients for REE and Sr determined using a synthetic melt that crystallizes pyroxenes very similar in composition to Nakhla pyroxene cores. We believe these are the most appropriate partition coefficients to use in studying Nakhla Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract..

  17. Topology theory on rough sets.

    PubMed

    Wu, QingE; Wang, Tuo; Huang, YongXuan; Li, JiSheng

    2008-02-01

    For further studying the theories and applications of rough sets (RS), this paper proposes a new theory on RS, which mainly includes topological space, topological properties, homeomorphism, and its properties on RS by some new definitions and theorems given. The relationship between partition and countable open covering is discussed, and some applications based on the topological rough space and its topological properties are introduced. Moreover, some perspectives for future research are given. Throughout this paper, the advancements of the new theory on RS and topological algebra not only represent an important theoretical value but also exhibit significant applications of RS and topology.

  18. Surprising Connections between Partitions and Divisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Thomas J.; Hassen, Abdulkadir; Chandrupatla, Tirupathi R.

    2007-01-01

    The sum of the divisors of a positive integer is one of the most interesting concepts in multiplicative number theory, while the number of ways of expressing a number as a sum is a primary topic in additive number theory. In this article, we describe some of the surprising connections between and similarities of these two concepts.

  19. Dominant partition method. [based on a wave function formalism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, R. M.; Redish, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    By use of the L'Huillier, Redish, and Tandy (LRT) wave function formalism, a partially connected method, the dominant partition method (DPM) is developed for obtaining few body reductions of the many body problem in the LRT and Bencze, Redish, and Sloan (BRS) formalisms. The DPM maps the many body problem to a fewer body one by using the criterion that the truncated formalism must be such that consistency with the full Schroedinger equation is preserved. The DPM is based on a class of new forms for the irreducible cluster potential, which is introduced in the LRT formalism. Connectivity is maintained with respect to all partitions containing a given partition, which is referred to as the dominant partition. Degrees of freedom corresponding to the breakup of one or more of the clusters of the dominant partition are treated in a disconnected manner. This approach for simplifying the complicated BRS equations is appropriate for physical problems where a few body reaction mechanism prevails.

  20. Bacterial partition complexes segregate within the volume of the nucleoid

    PubMed Central

    Le Gall, Antoine; Cattoni, Diego I.; Guilhas, Baptiste; Mathieu-Demazière, Céline; Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Rech, Jérôme; Abrahamsson, Sara; Murray, Heath; Bouet, Jean-Yves; Nollmann, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Precise and rapid DNA segregation is required for proper inheritance of genetic material. In most bacteria and archaea, this process is assured by a broadly conserved mitotic-like apparatus in which a NTPase (ParA) displaces the partition complex. Competing observations and models imply starkly different 3D localization patterns of the components of the partition machinery during segregation. Here we use super-resolution microscopies to localize in 3D each component of the segregation apparatus with respect to the bacterial chromosome. We show that Par proteins locate within the nucleoid volume and reveal that proper volumetric localization and segregation of partition complexes requires ATPase and DNA-binding activities of ParA. Finally, we find that the localization patterns of the different components of the partition system highly correlate with dense chromosomal regions. We propose a new mechanism in which the nucleoid provides a scaffold to guide the proper segregation of partition complexes. PMID:27377966

  1. Nutrient partitioning and seedling development in the genus Leucaena

    SciTech Connect

    Dovel, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Slow establishment of the genus Leucaena from seed has been attributed to law seedling vigor and late nodulation. Observation of early seedling growth indicated that partitioning of a large proportion of resources to the root of young Leucaena seedlings could account, in part, for the slow initial shoot growth observed in this genus. Therefore, a series of experiments were conducted to examine the partitioning of stored seed reserves, photosynthate, and nitrogen in developing Leucaena seedlings. The effects of nodulation and nitrogen fertilization on partitioning of nutrients in the seedling were also examined. Seed reserves were initially used for radicle growth in dark grown seedlings; however, partitioning soon shifted to the hypocotyl. By four days after imbibition, hypocotyl weight exceeded radicle weight in both species tested (L. leucocephala and L. retusa), at all temperatures above 20/sup 0/C. Two experiments were conducted examining the carbon partitioning of L. leucocephala cultivar K-8 using /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse labeling techniques.

  2. Equilibration timescale of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Seinfeld, John H.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from partitioning of oxidation products of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) accounts for a substantial portion of atmospheric particulate matter. In describing SOA formation, it is generally assumed that VOC oxidation products rapidly adopt gas-aerosol equilibrium. Here we estimate the equilibration timescale, τeq, of SOA gas-particle partitioning using a state-of-the-art kinetic flux model. τeq is found to be of order seconds to minutes for partitioning of relatively high volatility organic compounds into liquid particles, thereby adhering to equilibrium gas-particle partitioning. However, τeq increases to hours or days for organic aerosol associated with semi-solid particles, low volatility, large particle size, and low mass loadings. Instantaneous equilibrium partitioning may lead to substantial overestimation of particle mass concentration and underestimation of gas-phase concentration.

  3. Partitioning in Avionics Architectures: Requirements, Mechanisms, and Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushby, John

    1999-01-01

    Automated aircraft control has traditionally been divided into distinct "functions" that are implemented separately (e.g., autopilot, autothrottle, flight management); each function has its own fault-tolerant computer system, and dependencies among different functions are generally limited to the exchange of sensor and control data. A by-product of this "federated" architecture is that faults are strongly contained within the computer system of the function where they occur and cannot readily propagate to affect the operation of other functions. More modern avionics architectures contemplate supporting multiple functions on a single, shared, fault-tolerant computer system where natural fault containment boundaries are less sharply defined. Partitioning uses appropriate hardware and software mechanisms to restore strong fault containment to such integrated architectures. This report examines the requirements for partitioning, mechanisms for their realization, and issues in providing assurance for partitioning. Because partitioning shares some concerns with computer security, security models are reviewed and compared with the concerns of partitioning.

  4. Crystal/liquid partitioning in augite - Effects of cooling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, R. P.; Taylor, L. A.

    1980-03-01

    The partitioning of major and minor elements between augite and melt was determined as a function of cooling rate for two high-titanium basalt compositions. The results of this study of lunar rock systems 10017 and 75055 were compared with the results of other kinetic studies of augite-liquid partitioning in other rock systems. It was found that the partitioning of major elements (i.e., Ca, Fe, Mg) is essentially rate independent and is insensitive to bulk rock composition and to the nature and order of appearance of coexisting phases for cooling rates of less than 100 C/hr. The partitioning behavior of minor elements (i.e., Al, Cr, Ti) for the same range of cooling rates is complex, being dependent on cooling rate and bulk rock composition. Consideration of these factors is important when augite chemistry and/or partitioning behavior are used in modeling certain magmatic processes or in estimating the thermal history of basaltic rocks.

  5. Immiscible silicate liquid partition coefficients: implications for crystal-melt element partitioning and basalt petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Ilya V.; Dorfman, Alexander M.; Danyushevsky, Leonid V.; Jakobsen, Jakob K.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2006-12-01

    This study investigates partitioning of elements between immiscible aluminosilicate and borosilicate liquids using three synthetic mixtures doped with 32 trace elements. In order to get a good spatial separation of immiscible liquids, we employed a high-temperature centrifuge. Experiments were performed at 1,050-1,150°C, 1 atm, in sealed Fe and Pt containers. Quenched products were analysed by electron microprobe and LA ICP-MS. Nernst partition coefficients ( D’s) between the Fe-rich and Si-rich aluminosilicate immiscible liquids are the highest for Zn (3.3) and Fe (2.6) and the lowest for Rb and K (0.4-0.5). The plots of D values against ionic potential Z/r in all the compositions show a convex upward trend, which is typical also for element partitioning between immiscible silicate and salt melts. The results bear upon the speciation and structural position of elements in multicomponent silicate liquids. The ferrobasalt-rhyolite liquid immiscibility is observed in evolved basaltic magmas, and may play an important role in large gabbroic intrusions, such as Skaergaard, and during the generation of unusual lavas, such as ferropicrites.

  6. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  7. Absorption Heat Pump Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Yoshifumi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Various advanced absorption cycles are studied, developed and invented. In this paper, their cycles are classified and arranged using the three categories: effect, stage and loop, then an outline of the cycles are explained on the Duehring diagram. Their cycles include high COP cycles for refrigerations and heat pumps, high temperature lift cycles for heat transformer, absorption-compression hybrid cycles and heat pump transformer cycle. The highest COPi is attained by the seven effect cycle. In addition, the cycles for low temperature are invented and explained. Furthermore the power generation • refrigeration cycles are illustrated.

  8. Predicting human intestinal absorption in the presence of bile salt with micellar liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Waters, Laura J; Shokry, Dina S; Parkes, Gareth M B

    2016-10-01

    Understanding intestinal absorption for pharmaceutical compounds is vital to estimate the bioavailability and therefore the in vivo potential of a drug. This study considers the application of micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) to predict passive intestinal absorption with a selection of model compounds. MLC is already known to aid prediction of absorption using simple surfactant systems; however, with this study the focus was on the presence of a more complex, bile salt surfactant, as would be encountered in the in vivo environment. As a result, MLC using a specific bile salt has been confirmed as an ideal in vitro system to predict the intestinal permeability for a wide range of drugs, through the development of a quantitative partition-absorption relationship. MLC offers many benefits including environmental, economic, time-saving and ethical advantages compared with the traditional techniques employed to obtain passive intestinal absorption values. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Polyacrylate-water partitioning of biocidal compounds: enhancing the understanding of biocide partitioning between render and water.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, Ulla E; Ou, Yi; Mayer, Philipp; Trapp, Stefan; Bester, Kai

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the application of polymer-based renders and paints for façade coatings of buildings has risen enormously due to the increased mounting of thermal insulation systems. These materials are commonly equipped with biocides - algaecides, fungicides, and bactericides - to protect the materials from biological deterioration. However, the biocides need to be present in the water phase in order to be active and, hence, they are flushed of the material by rain water. In order to increase the knowledge about the partitioning of biocides from render into the water phase, partition constants between the polymer - in this case polyacrylate - and water were studied using glass fibre filters coated with polyacrylate. The polyacrylate-water partition constants (logKAcW) of ten biocides used in construction material varied between 1.66 (isoproturon) and 3.57 (dichloro-N-octylisothiazolinone). The correlation of the polyacrylate-water partition constants with the octanol-water partition constants is significant, but the polyacrylate-water partition constants were predominantly below octanol-water partition constants (Kow). The comparison with render-water distribution constants showed that estimating the leaching of biocides from render based on polymer-water partitioning is a useful and practical tool.

  10. New Linear Partitioning Models Based on Experimental Water: Supercritical CO 2 Partitioning Data of Selected Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Burant, Aniela; Thompson, Christopher; Lowry, Gregory V.; Karamalidis, Athanasios K.

    2016-05-17

    Partitioning coefficients of organic compounds between water and supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2) are necessary to assess the risk of migration of these chemicals from subsurface CO2 storage sites. Despite the large number of potential organic contaminants, the current data set of published water-sc-CO2 partitioning coefficients is very limited. Here, the partitioning coefficients of thiophene, pyrrole, and anisole were measured in situ over a range of temperatures and pressures using a novel pressurized batch reactor system with dual spectroscopic detectors: a near infrared spectrometer for measuring the organic analyte in the CO2 phase, and a UV detector for quantifying the analyte in the aqueous phase. Our measured partitioning coefficients followed expected trends based on volatility and aqueous solubility. The partitioning coefficients and literature data were then used to update a published poly-parameter linear free energy relationship and to develop five new linear free energy relationships for predicting water-sc-CO2 partitioning coefficients. Four of the models targeted a single class of organic compounds. Unlike models that utilize Abraham solvation parameters, the new relationships use vapor pressure and aqueous solubility of the organic compound at 25 °C and CO2 density to predict partitioning coefficients over a range of temperature and pressure conditions. The compound class models provide better estimates of partitioning behavior for compounds in that class than the model built for the entire dataset.

  11. Partitioning of Evapotranspiration Using a Stable Water Isotope Technique in a High Temperature Agricultural Production System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Liang, L.; Wang, L.; Jenerette, D.; Grantz, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural production in the hot and arid low desert systems of southern California relies heavily on irrigation. A better understanding of how much and to what extent the irrigation water is transpired by crops relative to being lost through evaporation will contribute to better management of increasingly limited agricultural water resources. In this study, we examined the evapotranspiration (ET) partitioning over a field of forage sorghum (S. bicolor) during a growing season with several irrigation cycles. In several field campaigns we used continuous measurements of near-surface variations in the stable isotopic composition of water vapor (δ2H). We employed custom built transparent chambers coupled with a laser-based isotope analyzer and used Keeling plot and mass balance methods for surface flux partitioning. The preliminary results show that δT is more enriched than δE in the early growing season, and becomes less enriched than δE later in the season as canopy cover increases. There is an increase in the contribution of transpiration to ET as (1) leaf area index increases, and (2) as soil surface moisture declines. These results are consistent with theory, and extend these measurements to an environment that experiences extreme soil surface temperatures. The data further support the use of chamber based methods with stable isotopic analysis for characterization of ET partitioning in challenging field environments.

  12. Temporally and spatially partitioned behaviours of spinner dolphins: implications for resilience to human disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, David W.; Christiansen, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Selective forces shape the evolution of wildlife behavioural strategies and influence the spatial and temporal partitioning of behavioural activities to maximize individual fitness. Globally, wildlife is increasingly exposed to human activities which may affect their behavioural activities. The ability of wildlife to compensate for the effects of human activities may have implications for their resilience to disturbance. Resilience theory suggests that behavioural systems which are constrained in their repertoires are less resilient to disturbance than flexible systems. Using behavioural time-series data, we show that spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) spatially and temporally partition their behavioural activities on a daily basis. Specifically, spinner dolphins were never observed foraging during daytime, where resting was the predominant activity. Travelling and socializing probabilities were higher in early mornings and late afternoons when dolphins were returning from or preparing for nocturnal feeding trips, respectively. The constrained nature of spinner dolphin behaviours suggests they are less resilient to human disturbance than other cetaceans. These dolphins experience the highest exposure rates to human activities ever reported for any cetaceans. Over the last 30 years human activities have increased significantly in Hawaii, but the spinner dolphins still inhabit these bays. Recent abundance estimates (2011 and 2012) however, are lower than all previous estimates (1979–1981, 1989–1992 and 2003), indicating a possible long-term impact. Quantification of the spatial and temporal partitioning of wildlife behavioural schedules provides critical insight for conservation measures that aim to mitigate the effects of human disturbance. PMID:28280561

  13. Controlled drug release from hydrogels for contact lenses: Drug partitioning and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, A F R; Ascenso, J; Fernandes, J C S; Colaço, R; Serro, A P; Saramago, B

    2016-12-30

    Optimization of drug delivery from drug loaded contact lenses assumes understanding the drug transport mechanisms through hydrogels which relies on the knowledge of drug partition and diffusion coefficients. We chose, as model systems, two materials used in contact lens, a poly-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (pHEMA) based hydrogel and a silicone based hydrogel, and three drugs with different sizes and charges: chlorhexidine, levofloxacin and diclofenac. Equilibrium partition coefficients were determined at different ionic strength and pH, using water (pH 5.6) and PBS (pH 7.4). The measured partition coefficients were related with the polymer volume fraction in the hydrogel, through the introduction of an enhancement factor following the approach developed by the group of C. J. Radke (Kotsmar et al., 2012; Liu et al., 2013). This factor may be decomposed in the product of three other factors EHS, Eel and Ead which account for, respectively, hard-sphere size exclusion, electrostatic interactions, and specific solute adsorption. While EHS and Eel are close to 1, Ead>1 in all cases suggesting strong specific interactions between the drugs and the hydrogels. Adsorption was maximal for chlorhexidine on the silicone based hydrogel, in water, due to strong hydrogen bonding. The effective diffusion coefficients, De, were determined from the drug release profiles. Estimations of diffusion coefficients of the non-adsorbed solutes D=De×Ead allowed comparison with theories for solute diffusion in the absence of specific interaction with the polymeric membrane.

  14. Single-molecule peptide-lipid affinity assay reveals interplay between solution structure and partitioning.

    PubMed

    Matin, Tina R; Sigdel, Krishna P; Utjesanovic, Milica; Marsh, Brendan P; Gallazzi, Fabio; Smith, Virginia F; Kosztin, Ioan; King, Gavin M

    2017-03-27

    Interactions between short protein segments and phospholipid bilayers dictate fundamental aspects of cellular activity and have important applications in biotechnology. Yet, a lack of suitable methodology for directly probing these interactions has hindered mechanistic understanding. We developed a precision atomic force microscope (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy assay and probed partitioning into lipid bilayers by measuring the mechanical force experienced by a peptide. Protein segments were constructed from the peripheral membrane protein SecA, a key ATPase in bacterial secretion. We focused on the first 10 amino-terminal residues of SecA (SecA2-11) which are known to be lipophilic. In addition to the core SecA2-11 sequence, constructs with nearly identical chemical composition but with differing geometry were used: two copies of SecA2-11 linked in series, and two copies in parallel. Lipid bilayer partitioning interactions of peptides with differing structures were distinguished. To model the energetic landscape, a theory of diffusive barrier crossing was extended to incorporate a superposition of potential barriers with variable weights. Analysis revealed two dissociation pathways for the core SecA2-11 sequence with well-separated intrinsic dissociation rates. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that the three peptides had significant conformational differences in solution that correlated well with measured variations in the propensity to partition into the bilayer. The methodology is generalizable and can be applied to other peptide and lipid species.

  15. Particulate matter, gaseous and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in an urban traffic tunnel of China: Emission from on-road vehicles and gas-particle partitioning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Gao, Yi; Yu, Na; Zhang, Chenkai; Wang, Siyao; Ma, Limin; Zhao, Jianfu; Lohmann, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    Traffic vehicles are a main source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in urban area. It is vital to understand PAH gas-particle partitioning in real traffic environment and assess PAH vehicular emission factors in developing China. Concentrations of particulate matter, carbonaceous products, gaseous and particulate PAHs were measured during 2011-2012 in a road tunnel of Shanghai, China. Time variation of them reflected basic traffic operation of the tunnel. PAHs approached equilibrium between gas and particle phases and the partitioning was predicted better by a dual sorption model combining absorption into organic matter and adsorption onto black carbon. The influence of black carbon adsorption on the partitioning behavior of PAHs was important. The difference in isomer ratios of gaseous and particulate PAHs was attributed to PAH contributions from different traffic-related PAHs sources. Real-world vehicle emission factors of gaseous and particulate PAHs were quantified based on fuel burned model and vehicle kilometer traveled model.

  16. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  17. Experimental chlorine partitioning between forsterite, enstatite and aqueous fluid at upper mantle conditions☆

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrizio, Alessandro; Stalder, Roland; Hametner, Kathrin; Günther, Detlef

    2013-01-01

    Cl partition coefficients between forsterite, enstatite and coexisting Cl-bearing aqueous fluids were determined in a series of high pressure and temperature piston cylinder experiments at 2 GPa between 900 and 1300 °C in the system MgO–SiO2–H2O–NaCl–BaO–C±CaCl2±TiO2±Al2O3±F. Diamond aggregates were added to the experimental capsule set-up in order to separate the fluid from the solid residue and enable in situ analysis of the quenched solute by LA-ICP-MS. The chlorine content of forsterite and enstatite was measured by electron microprobe, and the nature of hydrous defects was investigated by infrared spectroscopy. Partition coefficients show similar incompatibility for Cl in forsterite and enstatite, with DClfo/fl = 0.0012 ± 0.0006, DClen/fl = 0.0018 ± 0.0008 and DClfo/en = 1.43 ± 0.71. The values determined for mineral/fluid partitioning are very similar to previously determined values for mineral/melt. Applying the new mineral/fluid partition coefficients to fluids in subduction zones, a contribution between 0.15% and 20% of the total chlorine from the nominally anhydrous minerals is estimated. Infrared spectra of experimental forsterite show absorption bands at 3525 and 3572 cm−1 that are characteristic for hydroxyl point defects associated with trace Ti substitutions, and strongly suggest that the TiO2 content of the system can influence the chlorine and OH incorporation via the stabilization of Ti-clinohumite-like point defects. The water contents for coexisting forsterite and enstatite in some runs were determined using unpolarized IR spectra and calculated water partition coefficients DH2Ofo/en are between 0.01 and 0.5. PMID:25843971

  18. Recent developments in time-dependent density-functional theory within and beyond linear response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, E. K. U.

    2013-03-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is a popular and rather successful method in the description of photo-absorption spectra of atoms and molecules in the linear response regime. In extended solids, however, a satisfactory description of excitonic effects has become possible only recently with the advent of advanced approximations for the exchange-correlation kernel fxc. One of these advanced approximations is the so-called bootstrap kernel [S. Sharma et al, PRL 107, 186401 (2011)]. We shall explore the performance of this kernel in the long-wavelength limit and for finite values of q, looking at electron-loss as well as photo-absorption spectra. We find, in particular, that excitonic effects in LiF and Ar are enhanced for values of q away from the Γ-point [S. Sharma et al, New J Phys 14, 053052 (2012)]. Then we present two recent developments in TDDFT beyond the linear-response regime: (i) By using a geometrical partitioning, we calculate the angle and energy resolved photo-electron spectra of finite systems including multi-photon effects [De Giovannini, et al, A. Rubio, PRA 86, 062515 (2012)]. (ii) Finally we show how the dynamics of many-electron systems can be controlled with lasers by marrying TDDFT with optimal control theory [A. Castro et al, PRL 109, 153603 (2012)].

  19. Flow Partitioning in Fully Saturated Soil Aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Richmond, Marshall C.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Perkins, William A.; Resat, Haluk

    2014-03-30

    Microbes play an important role in facilitating organic matter decomposition in soils, which is a major component of the global carbon cycle. Microbial dynamics are intimately coupled to environmental transport processes, which control access to labile organic matter and other nutrients that are needed for the growth and maintenance of microorganisms. Transport of soluble nutrients in the soil system is arguably most strongly impacted by preferential flow pathways in the soil. Since the physical structure of soils can be characterized as being formed from constituent micro aggregates which contain internal porosity, one pressing question is the partitioning of the flow among the “inter-aggregate” and “intra-aggregate” pores and how this may impact overall solute transport within heterogeneous soil structures. The answer to this question is particularly important in evaluating assumptions to be used in developing upscaled simulations based on highly-resolved mechanistic models. We constructed a number of diverse multi-aggregate structures with different packing ratios by stacking micro-aggregates containing internal pores and varying the size and shape of inter-aggregate pore spacing between them. We then performed pore-scale flow simulations using computational fluid dynamics methods to determine the flow patterns in these aggregate-of-aggregates structures and computed the partitioning of the flow through intra- and inter-aggregate pores as a function of the spacing between the aggregates. The results of these numerical experiments demonstrate that soluble nutrients are largely transported via flows through inter-aggregate pores. Although this result is consistent with intuition, we have also been able to quantify the relative flow capacity of the two domains under various conditions. For example, in our simulations, the flow capacity through the aggregates (intra-aggregate flow) was less than 2% of the total flow when the spacing between the aggregates

  20. Graph Partitioning for Parallel Applications in Heterogeneous Grid Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisws, Rupak; Kumar, Shailendra; Das, Sajal K.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The problem of partitioning irregular graphs and meshes for parallel computations on homogeneous systems has been extensively studied. However, these partitioning schemes fail when the target system architecture exhibits heterogeneity in resource characteristics. With the emergence of technologies such as the Grid, it is imperative to study the partitioning problem taking into consideration the differing capabilities of such distributed heterogeneous systems. In our model, the heterogeneous system consists of processors with varying processing power and an underlying non-uniform communication network. We present in this paper a novel multilevel partitioning scheme for irregular graphs and meshes, that takes into account issues pertinent to Grid computing environments. Our partitioning algorithm, called MiniMax, generates and maps partitions onto a heterogeneous system with the objective of minimizing the maximum execution time of the parallel distributed application. For experimental performance study, we have considered both a realistic mesh problem from NASA as well as synthetic workloads. Simulation results demonstrate that MiniMax generates high quality partitions for various classes of applications targeted for parallel execution in a distributed heterogeneous environment.