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Sample records for abstinence-only sex education

  1. Abstinence-Only Sex Education: College Students' Evaluations and Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the abstinence-only sex education experiences of a small group of young adults in the southeastern USA. Most participants felt that their abstinence-only sex education had mixed value and low overall impact in their lives. Perceptions about abstinence, virginity, and marriage varied significantly from those stressed…

  2. Abstinence-Only Sex Education Fails African American Youth.

    PubMed

    Breunig, Michelle

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) disproportionately affect U.S. African American (AA) youth. In AA faith communities, cultural practices have contributed to increased STI rates because abstinence-only-until-marriage education programs do not teach the use of condoms or birth control for preventing STIs or pregnancy. Comprehensive sex education or abstinence-plus programs have been reported to increase STI knowledge and reduce risk-taking behaviors in adolescents and young adults. Evidence supports computerized education to increase STI knowledge and decrease risky sexual behaviors of AA churchgoing youth.

  3. Worth the Wait? The Consequences of Abstinence-Only Sex Education for Marginalized Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoefer, Sharon E.; Hoefer, Richard

    2017-01-01

    "Abstinence-only" sex education, which is still widely used across the United States, does not prepare students to engage in healthy adult relationships. Prior research evidence indicates that abstinence-only education is less effective at preventing pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) than comprehensive sex education.…

  4. Abstinence-only and comprehensive sex education and the initiation of sexual activity and teen pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Pamela K; Manhart, Lisa E; Lafferty, William E

    2008-04-01

    The role that sex education plays in the initiation of sexual activity and risk of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease (STD) is controversial in the United States. Despite several systematic reviews, few epidemiologic evaluations of the effectiveness of these programs on a population level have been conducted. Among never-married heterosexual adolescents, aged 15-19 years, who participated in Cycle 6 (2002) of the National Survey of Family Growth and reported on formal sex education received before their first sexual intercourse (n = 1719), we compared the sexual health risks of adolescents who received abstinence-only and comprehensive sex education to those of adolescents who received no formal sex education. Weighted multivariate logistic regression generated population-based estimates. Adolescents who received comprehensive sex education were significantly less likely to report teen pregnancy (OR(adj) = .4, 95% CI = .22- .69, p = .001) than those who received no formal sex education, whereas there was no significant effect of abstinence-only education (OR(adj) = .7, 95% CI = .38-1.45, p = .38). Abstinence-only education did not reduce the likelihood of engaging in vaginal intercourse (OR(adj) = .8, 95% CI = .51-1.31, p = .40), but comprehensive sex education was marginally associated with a lower likelihood of reporting having engaged in vaginal intercourse (OR(adj) = .7, 95% CI = .49-1.02, p = .06). Neither abstinence-only nor comprehensive sex education significantly reduced the likelihood of reported STD diagnoses (OR(adj) = 1.7, 95% CI = .57-34.76, p = .36 and OR(adj) = 1.8, 95% CI = .67-5.00, p = .24 respectively). Teaching about contraception was not associated with increased risk of adolescent sexual activity or STD. Adolescents who received comprehensive sex education had a lower risk of pregnancy than adolescents who received abstinence-only or no sex education.

  5. The Knowledge Gap Versus the Belief Gap and Abstinence-Only Sex Education.

    PubMed

    Hindman, Douglas Blanks; Yan, Changmin

    2015-08-01

    The knowledge gap hypothesis predicts widening disparities in knowledge of heavily publicized public affairs issues among socioeconomic status groups. The belief gap hypothesis extends the knowledge gap hypothesis to account for knowledge and beliefs about politically contested issues based on empirically verifiable information. This analysis of 3 national surveys shows belief gaps developed between liberals and conservatives regarding abstinence-only sex education; socioeconomic status-based knowledge gaps did not widen. The findings partially support both belief gap and knowledge gap hypotheses. In addition, the unique contributions of exposure to Fox News, CNN, and MSNBC in this process were investigated. Only exposure to Fox News was linked to beliefs about abstinence-only sex education directly and indirectly through the cultivation of conservative ideology.

  6. Abstinence-Only Education and Teen Pregnancy Rates: Why We Need Comprehensive Sex Education in the U.S

    PubMed Central

    Stanger-Hall, Kathrin F.; Hall, David W.

    2011-01-01

    The United States ranks first among developed nations in rates of both teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. In an effort to reduce these rates, the U.S. government has funded abstinence-only sex education programs for more than a decade. However, a public controversy remains over whether this investment has been successful and whether these programs should be continued. Using the most recent national data (2005) from all U.S. states with information on sex education laws or policies (N = 48), we show that increasing emphasis on abstinence education is positively correlated with teenage pregnancy and birth rates. This trend remains significant after accounting for socioeconomic status, teen educational attainment, ethnic composition of the teen population, and availability of Medicaid waivers for family planning services in each state. These data show clearly that abstinence-only education as a state policy is ineffective in preventing teenage pregnancy and may actually be contributing to the high teenage pregnancy rates in the U.S. In alignment with the new evidence-based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative and the Precaution Adoption Process Model advocated by the National Institutes of Health, we propose the integration of comprehensive sex and STD education into the biology curriculum in middle and high school science classes and a parallel social studies curriculum that addresses risk-aversion behaviors and planning for the future. PMID:22022362

  7. Abstinence-only education and teen pregnancy rates: why we need comprehensive sex education in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Stanger-Hall, Kathrin F; Hall, David W

    2011-01-01

    The United States ranks first among developed nations in rates of both teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. In an effort to reduce these rates, the U.S. government has funded abstinence-only sex education programs for more than a decade. However, a public controversy remains over whether this investment has been successful and whether these programs should be continued. Using the most recent national data (2005) from all U.S. states with information on sex education laws or policies (N = 48), we show that increasing emphasis on abstinence education is positively correlated with teenage pregnancy and birth rates. This trend remains significant after accounting for socioeconomic status, teen educational attainment, ethnic composition of the teen population, and availability of Medicaid waivers for family planning services in each state. These data show clearly that abstinence-only education as a state policy is ineffective in preventing teenage pregnancy and may actually be contributing to the high teenage pregnancy rates in the U.S. In alignment with the new evidence-based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative and the Precaution Adoption Process Model advocated by the National Institutes of Health, we propose the integration of comprehensive sex and STD education into the biology curriculum in middle and high school science classes and a parallel social studies curriculum that addresses risk-aversion behaviors and planning for the future.

  8. An Evaluation of an Abstinence-Only Sex Education Curriculum: An 18-Month Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, George; Young, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The article examines the results from an 18-month follow-up evaluation of an abstinence education curriculum series. Participants were students from 15 school districts recruited to participate in the project. The intervention was the Sex Can Wait curriculum series, consisting of upper elementary, middle school, and high school components. The…

  9. Abstinence and abstinence-only education.

    PubMed

    Ott, Mary A; Santelli, John S

    2007-10-01

    To review recent literature on medical accuracy, program effectiveness, and ethical concerns related to abstinence-only policies for adolescent sexuality education. The federal government invests over 175 million dollars annually in 'abstinence-only-until-marriage' programs. These programs are required to withhold information on contraception and condom use, except for information on failure rates. Abstinence-only curricula have been found to contain scientifically inaccurate information, distorting data on topics such as condom efficacy, and promote gender stereotypes. An independent evaluation of the federal program, several systematic reviews, and cohort data from population-based surveys find little evidence of efficacy and evidence of possible harm. In contrast, comprehensive sexuality education programs have been found to help teens delay initiation of intercourse and reduce sexual risk behaviors. Abstinence-only policies violate the human rights of adolescents because they withhold potentially life-saving information on HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Federal support of abstinence-only as an approach to adolescent sexuality education is of much concern due to medical inaccuracies, lack of effectiveness, and the withholding and distorting of health information.

  10. An evaluation of an abstinence-only sex education curriculum: an 18-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Denny, George; Young, Michael

    2006-10-01

    The article examines the results from an 18-month follow-up evaluation of an abstinence education curriculum series. Participants were students from 15 school districts recruited to participate in the project. The intervention was the Sex Can Wait curriculum series, consisting of upper elementary, middle school, and high school components. The 5-week curriculum was implemented by teachers who had participated in a special teacher training workshop. Both intervention and comparison students were surveyed before and after the curriculum intervention and at 18-month follow-up. Results indicated short-term effects as follows. Upper elementary intervention students indicated higher level of knowledge, more hopefulness for the future, and greater self-efficacy than did the comparison group. Middle school intervention students did not differ from comparison students. High school intervention students reported lower participation rates than the comparison group students in sexual intercourse (ever and last month), a more positive attitude toward abstinence and a greater intent to remain abstinent. Long-term (18 month) benefits were noted as follows: upper elementary intervention students had greater knowledge and were less likely than comparison students to report participation in sexual intercourse in the last month. Middle school intervention students were less likely than comparison students to report participation in sexual intercourse ever and sexual intercourse in the last month. High school intervention students evidenced greater knowledge and greater intent to remain abstinent than did comparison students. Results indicate that the program did have some positive benefits that should be considered by those interested in abstinence education programming.

  11. Neoliberal Narratives and the Logic of Abstinence Only Education: Why Are We Still Having This Conversation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Lauren; Stitzlein, Sarah M.

    2018-01-01

    Given the lack of citizen or medical support for abstinence-only education, we ask how abstinence-education maintains such a stronghold in America and other Western democracies' public policy and consciousness. Our response has three parts. In the first, we outline the disproportionately negative health outcomes of sex education experienced by…

  12. Advocates Call for a New Approach after the Era of "Abstinence-Only" Sex Education. Guttmacher Policy Review. Volume 12, Number 1, Winter 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boonstra, Heather D.

    2009-01-01

    In 1981, the first grants for what later came to be called "abstinence-only" programs were authorized under the Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA). Sponsored by congressional family planning opponents, AFLA was promoted as a "family-centered" alternative to contraceptive counseling and services to teenagers; instead, this…

  13. Comparison of comprehensive and abstinence-only sexuality education in young African American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Lindsay M; Sly, Kaye F; Girard, Jeffrey M

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of sexual behavior and condom use in African American adolescents, as well as to evaluate the effectiveness of comprehensive sexuality and abstinence-only education to reduce adolescent sexual behavior and increase condom use. Participants included 450 adolescents aged 12-14 years in the southern United States. Regression analyses showed favorable attitudes toward sexual behavior and social norms significantly predicted recent sexual behavior, and favorable attitudes toward condoms significantly predicted condom usage. Self-efficacy was not found to be predictive of adolescents' sexual behavior or condom use. There were no significant differences in recent sexual behavior based on type of sexuality education. Adolescents who received abstinence-only education had reduced favorable attitudes toward condom use, and were more likely to have unprotected sex than the comparison group. Findings suggest that adolescents who receive abstinence-only education are at greater risk of engaging in unprotected sex. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nigerian secondary school adolescents' perspective on abstinence-only sexual education as an effective tool for promotion of sexual health.

    PubMed

    Inyang, Mfrekemfon P; Inyang, Obonganyie P

    2013-01-01

    The success of any type of sexual education programme depends on the knowledge and preparedness for practice by adolescents. A recent study has found that an 'abstinence-only' sexual education programme is effective in reducing sexual activity among adolescents. Knowledge of abstinence-only sexual education and preparedness for practice as an effective tool for promotion of sexual health among Nigerian secondary school adolescents was studied. An analytic descriptive survey design was used for the study. The research population comprised of all public secondary schools in three southern geopolitical zones of the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. A multistage sampling technique was used to select 2020 senior secondary school (SS1-SS3) students as sample for the study. A partially self-designed and partially adapted questionnaire from an 'abstinence-only versus comprehensive sex education' debate, from debatepedia (http://wiki.idebate.org/), entitled 'Questionnaire on Nigerian Secondary School Adolescents' Perspective on Abstinence-Only Sexual Education (QNSSAPAOSE)' was used in eliciting information from respondents. Hypotheses were formulated and tested. Frequency counts, percentage and Pearson Product Moment Correlation were used in analysing data. A greater proportion of secondary school adolescents in this study lacked knowledge of sexual education. About 80% of the respondents could not define sexual education. The general perspective on abstinence-only sexual education was negative, as revealed by the larger number of respondents who demonstrated unwillingness to practice abstinence-only sexual education. Specifically, of those who responded in favour of abstinence-only sexual education, the youngest group of adolescents (11-13 years) and the male respondents were more likely to accept this type of education than the other groups. Poor knowledge of sexual education could be responsible for unwillingness to practice abstinence-only sexual education. Sexual

  15. Nigerian secondary school adolescents’ perspective on abstinence-only sexual education as an effective tool for promotion of sexual health

    PubMed Central

    Inyang, Mfrekemfon P; Inyang, Obonganyie P

    2013-01-01

    The success of any type of sexual education programme depends on the knowledge and preparedness for practice by adolescents. A recent study has found that an ‘abstinence-only’ sexual education programme is effective in reducing sexual activity among adolescents. Knowledge of abstinence-only sexual education and preparedness for practice as an effective tool for promotion of sexual health among Nigerian secondary school adolescents was studied. An analytic descriptive survey design was used for the study. The research population comprised of all public secondary schools in three southern geopolitical zones of the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. A multistage sampling technique was used to select 2020 senior secondary school (SS1-SS3) students as sample for the study. A partially self-designed and partially adapted questionnaire from an 'abstinence-only versus comprehensive sex education' debate, from debatepedia (http://wiki.idebate.org/), entitled 'Questionnaire on Nigerian Secondary School Adolescents’ Perspective on Abstinence-Only Sexual Education (QNSSAPAOSE)' was used in eliciting information from respondents. Hypotheses were formulated and tested. Frequency counts, percentage and Pearson Product Moment Correlation were used in analysing data. A greater proportion of secondary school adolescents in this study lacked knowledge of sexual education. About 80% of the respondents could not define sexual education. The general perspective on abstinence-only sexual education was negative, as revealed by the larger number of respondents who demonstrated unwillingness to practice abstinence-only sexual education. Specifically, of those who responded in favour of abstinence-only sexual education, the youngest group of adolescents (11-13 years) and the male respondents were more likely to accept this type of education than the other groups. Poor knowledge of sexual education could be responsible for unwillingness to practice abstinence-only sexual education. Sexual

  16. Comprehensive Sexuality Education or Abstinence-Only Education: Which Is More Effective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Vicki; Gahungu, Athanase

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the difference in effectiveness between comprehensive sexuality abstinence-based education and abstinence-only education. A survey was developed and distributed to over 140 individuals via a variety of sources such as: (1) the researcher's e-mail lists; (2) a group of City Core/City Year volunteers; (3) a…

  17. Beyond Abstinence-Only: Relationships between Abstinence Education and Comprehensive Topic Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffries, William L., IV; Dodge, Brian; Bandiera, Frank C.; Reece, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, a debate exists as to whether abstinence-only or comprehensive sexuality education strategies are most beneficial for school-age youth. Despite abstinence being a fundamental component of comprehensive education, the two are often characterized as polar opposites. Few studies have examined overlaps between the approaches. The…

  18. Science Teachers' Decision-Making in Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage (AOUM) Classrooms: Taboo Subjects and Discourses of Sex and Sexuality in Classroom Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Puneet Singh

    2015-01-01

    Sex education, especially in the southeastern USA, remains steeped in an Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage (AOUM) approach, which sets up barriers to the education of sexually active students. Research confirms that science education has the potential to facilitate discussion of controversial topics, including sex education. Science teachers in the…

  19. Abstinence and abstinence-only education: a review of U.S. policies and programs.

    PubMed

    Santelli, John; Ott, Mary A; Lyon, Maureen; Rogers, Jennifer; Summers, Daniel; Schleifer, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    Abstinence from sexual intercourse is an important behavioral strategy for preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and pregnancy among adolescents. Many adolescents, including most younger adolescents, have not initiated sexual intercourse and many sexually experienced adolescents and young adults are abstinent for varying periods of time. There is broad support for abstinence as a necessary and appropriate part of sexuality education. Controversy arises when abstinence is provided to adolescents as a sole choice and where health information on other choices is restricted or misrepresented. Although abstinence is theoretically fully effective, in actual practice abstinence often fails to protect against pregnancy and STIs. Few Americans remain abstinent until marriage; many do not or cannot marry, and most initiate sexual intercourse and other sexual behaviors as adolescents. Although abstinence is a healthy behavioral option for teens, abstinence as a sole option for adolescents is scientifically and ethically problematic. A recent emphasis on abstinence-only programs and policies appears to be undermining more comprehensive sexuality education and other government-sponsored programs. We believe that abstinence-only education programs, as defined by federal funding requirements, are morally problematic, by withholding information and promoting questionable and inaccurate opinions. Abstinence-only programs threaten fundamental human rights to health, information, and life.

  20. Adult Discrimination against Children: The Case of Abstinence-Only Education in Twenty-First-Century USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greslé-Favier, Claire

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses abstinence-only education programmes and discourses within the frame of theories of adult discrimination against children. To begin with, a definition of abstinence-only programmes and of the political context in which they were created will be provided. These programmes will then be analysed through the lens of children's…

  1. From Birth Control to Sex Control: Unruly Young Women and the Origins of the National Abstinence-Only Mandate.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, J Shoshanna

    2013-01-01

    In the early 1980s, conservative politicians in the United States argued that the federal government was promoting promiscuity by providing teens with confidential access to government-funded family planning services. Claiming the problem was not that young women were getting pregnant but that they were having sex, they promised a new national policy-one that would stress self-discipline and family values over sexual indulgence. As argued in this paper, the resulting abstinence-only federal mandate both draws upon and reinforces traditional sexual scripts, which hold young women responsible for keeping male passion in check, thus selectively burdening them with the work of "doing abstinence."

  2. Dangerous Omissions: Abstinence-Only-until-Marriage School-Based Sexuality Education and the Betrayal of LGBTQ Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elia, John P.; Eliason, Mickey J.

    2010-01-01

    To gain an understanding of how abstinence-only-until-marriage school-based sexuality education has been exclusionary, it is important to explore how heteronormativity has been endorsed, played out, and reproduced ever since school-based sexuality education has been offered in the United States. Such an exploration reveals glaring evidence that…

  3. Queer Youth Experiences with Abstinence-Only-until-Marriage Sexuality Education: "I Can't Get Married so where Does that Leave Me?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Christopher Micheal

    2009-01-01

    Abstinence-only-until-marriage sexuality education has received increasing attention vis-a-vis policy, funding, and research. Despite large sums of federal money to develop, implement, and to some extent, assess abstinence-only education, virtually no studies have looked to assess the experiences of such a curriculum for gay and bisexual male…

  4. [Effects of TeenSTAR, an abstinence only sexual education program, on adolescent sexual behavior].

    PubMed

    Vigil, Pilar; Riquelme, Rosa; Rivadeneira, Rosario; Aranda, Waldo

    2005-10-01

    Urgent measures are required to stop the increase in the frequency of pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases among teenagers. A means of facing this problem is promoting sexual abstinence among youngsters. There are studies that confirm the efficacy of this approach. To show the results of the application of a holistic sexuality program (TeenSTAR) among Chilean teenagers. Students attending basic or high school were divided into a control or study group. The control group (342 students) received the usual education on sexuality given by their schools and the study group (398 students) participated in twelve TeenSTAR sessions lasting 1.5 hours each, given by a trained professor. Assessment of achievements was made using an anonymous questionnaire answered at the start and end of the program. The rates of sexual initiation among control and study groups were 15 and 6.5%, respectively. Among sexually active students, 20% of those in the study group and 9% of those in the control group discontinued sexual activity. A higher proportion of students in the TeenSTAR program retarded their sexual initiation or discontinued sexual activity and found more reasons to maintain sexual abstinence than control students.

  5. Association of State-Mandated Abstinence-only Sexuality Education with Rates of Adolescent HIV Infection and Teenage Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Elliot, L M; Booth, M M; Patterson, G; Althoff, M; Bush, C K; Dery, M A

    2017-01-01

    Abstinence-only sexuality education (AOSE); is required in the public school systems of many states, raising public health concerns and perpetuating health disparities through school systems. This study aimed to determine the correlations between state-mandated AOSE and the rates of adolescent HIV and teen pregnancy. Using publicly available data on all 50 United States' laws and policies on AOSE, states were ranked according to their level of abstinence emphasis on sexuality education (Level 0 - Level 3);. We calculated the relative proportion of Black students in public schools and the proportion of families below the federal poverty line then ranked them by state. We compared the states' ranks to the incidence of adolescent HIV and teen pregnancy in those states to identify associations between variables. The majority of states (~44 percent ); have legally mandated AOSE policies (Level 3); and adolescent HIV and teen pregnancy rates were highest in these Level 3 states. There were significant, positive correlations between HIV incidence rates of 13-19 year olds, HIV rates of 20-24 year olds, teen pregnancy rates, and AOSE level, with the proportion of the population that lives below the federal poverty level, and whether they attended schools that had a greater than 50 percent of an African American population. These data show a clear association between state sexuality education policies and adolescent HIV and teen pregnancy rates not previously demonstrated. Our data further show that states that have higher proportions of at-risk populations, with higher adolescent HIV and teen pregnancy rates, are more likely to also have restrictive AOSE policies. These populations may be more likely to attend public schools where AOSE is taught, increasing their risk for HIV and teen pregnancy. The World Health Organization considers fact-based Comprehensive Sexuality Education a human right, and the authors believe it is past time to end harmful, discriminatory sexuality

  6. Government Influence and Community Involvement on Abstinence-Only Programs in 1999 and 2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gusrang, Jamie L.; Cheng, Simon

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we compare federal government influence on abstinence-only programs in 1999 and 2003 to better see how shifts in the federal government's sex education polices impacted other government and community actors. Using data from the Sex Education in America Surveys (SEAS), we find that changes in federal policy, particularly after the…

  7. It Must Be True -- I Read It in "Seventeen" Magazine: US Popular Culture and Sexual Messages in an Era of Abstinence-Only Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegmann, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    As discourse in sexual education classes across the USA in 1996 began to change, media outlets became important sources of education for teenage girls. Unaffected directly by government policy, one of the most popular teenage girls' magazines, "Seventeen," provided a plethora of information on sex. Several scholars have examined…

  8. The Legacy of Abstinence-Only Discourses and the Place of Pleasure in US Discourses on Teenage Sexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresle-Favier, Claire

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to examine the potential long-term legacy of abstinence-only discourses in the USA in order to consider the extent of the changes that might actually occur as a consequence of the 2009 presidential election. It first provides a brief overview of the history of discourses regarding youth sexuality and sex education over the past 30…

  9. Influence of Materials on Teacher Adoption of Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kelly L.; Wiley, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Given the growing scientific evidence against abstinence-only-until-marriage education, health educators are supporting an evidence-based approach to teaching sexuality education. However, there is still an abundance of federal support and funding streams allocated to sustain abstinence-only programs. This study assessed indicators…

  10. Influence of materials on teacher adoption of abstinence-only- until-marriage programs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kelly L; Wiley, David C

    2009-12-01

    Given the growing scientific evidence against abstinence-only-until-marriage education, health educators are supporting an evidence-based approach to teaching sexuality education. However, there is still an abundance of federal support and funding streams allocated to sustain abstinence-only programs. This study assessed indicators that influence the adoption of abstinence-only-until-marriage education as well as school teachers' likelihood of adopting such programs. Predictors included relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, and observability and were assessed with a self-administered, validated questionnaire. Additional questions were asked related to demographics, professional history, and abstinence-only-until-marriage education policies and funding. The relationships were tested with multiple regression analysis. A trend became apparent in which most teachers would allow a state- or federally funded program to be offered and presented in their schools, but most did not know if their school received funding to support abstinence-only-until-marriage education. Attendance at religious services, complexity of abstinence-only-until-marriage programs, and abstinence-only-until-marriage curriculum emerged as important predictors of the likelihood to adopt abstinence education. Trends in political agendas, policy development, and state and federal funding have supported abstinence-only-until-marriage education programs. In order to ensure an understanding about the inclusion of sexuality education in the classroom, insight into the teacher's role in the integration of sexuality education in the classroom is important.

  11. Sex (Education) in the City: Singapore's Sexuality Education Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liew, Warren Mark

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the Singapore Ministry of Education's sexuality education curriculum in relation to two leading approaches to sex education, namely, abstinence-only-until-marriage education (AOUME) and comprehensive sexuality education (CSE). Based on competing cultural, political, and religious beliefs, the arguments between the advocates of…

  12. Should We Be Teaching Sex Education or Sexual Abstinence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Del

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author examines the controversial issue whether to teach sex education or sexual abstinence. Sex education has always been fraught with controversy. The discord in Westbrook, Maine, school district is noteworthy because of the vocal support for an abstinence-only curriculum approach to sex education that has reshaped the…

  13. Young People's Perceptions of Relationships and Sexual Practices in the Abstinence-Only Context of Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Haas, Billie; Hutter, Inge; Timmerman, Greetje

    2017-01-01

    The Ugandan government has been criticised on several grounds for its abstinence-only policies on sexuality education directed towards young people. These grounds include the failure to recognise the multiple realities faced by young people, some of whom may already be sexually active. In the study reported on this paper, students' perceptions of…

  14. "Sex Respect": Abstinence Education and Other Deployments for Sexual "Freedom"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Liz

    2006-01-01

    Those who view the right to a religiously neutral, empirically-based public education as fundamental have been able to do little more than watch in terror as abstinence-only sex education, which excludes information on either safe sex or birth control, has come to prevail in United States (US) schools. Among causes for concern are abstinence…

  15. Public opinion on sex education in US schools.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, Amy; Hennessy, Michael; Fishbein, Martin

    2006-11-01

    To examine US public opinion on sex education in schools to determine how the public's preferences align with those of policymakers and research scientists. Cross-sectional survey. July 2005 through January 2006. Randomly selected nationally representative sample of US adults aged 18 to 83 years (N = 1096). Support for 3 different types of sex education in schools: abstinence only, comprehensive sex education, and condom instruction. Approximately 82% of respondents indicated support for programs that teach students about both abstinence and other methods of preventing pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. Similarly, 68.5% supported teaching how to properly use condoms. Abstinence-only education programs, in contrast, received the lowest levels of support (36%) and the highest level of opposition (about 50%) across the 3 program options. Self-identified conservative, liberal, and moderate respondents all supported abstinence-plus programs, although the extent of support varied significantly. Our results indicate that US adults, regardless of political ideology, favor a more balanced approach to sex education compared with the abstinence-only programs funded by the federal government. In summary, abstinence-only programs, while a priority of the federal government, are supported by neither a majority of the public nor the scientific community.

  16. Mediation and moderation of an efficacious theory-based abstinence-only intervention for African American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwen; Jemmott, John B; Jemmott, Loretta Sweet

    2015-12-01

    This secondary data analysis sought to determine what mediated reductions in self-reported sexual initiation over the 24-month postintervention period in early adolescents who received "Promoting Health among Teens," a theory-based, abstinence-only intervention (Jemmott, Jemmott, & Fong, 2010). African American Grade 6 and 7 students at inner-city public middle schools were randomized to 1 of 5 interventions grounded in social-cognitive theory and the theory of reasoned action: 8-hr abstinence-only targeting reduced sexual intercourse; 8-hr safer-sex-only targeting increased condom use; 8-hr and 12-hr comprehensive interventions targeting sexual intercourse and condom use; 8-hr control intervention targeting physical activity and diet. Primary outcome was self-report of vaginal intercourse by 24 months postintervention. Potential mediators, assessed immediately postintervention, were theory-of-reasoned-action variables, including behavioral beliefs about positive consequences of abstinence and negative consequences of sex, intention to have sex, normative beliefs about sex, and HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) knowledge. We tested single and serial mediation models using the product-of-coefficients approach. Of 509 students reporting never having vaginal intercourse at baseline (324 girls and 185 boys; mean age = 11.8 years, SD = 0.8), 500 or 98.2% were included in serial mediation analyses. Consistent with the theory of reasoned action, the abstinence-only intervention increased positive behavioral beliefs about abstinence, which reduced intention to have sex, which in turn reduced sexual initiation. Negative behavioral beliefs about sex, normative beliefs about sex, and HIV/STI knowledge were not mediators. Abstinence-only interventions should stress the gains to be realized from abstinence rather than the deleterious consequences of sexual involvement. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Mediation and Moderation of an Efficacious Theory-Based Abstinence-Only Intervention for African American Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingwen; Jemmott, John B.; Jemmott, Loretta Sweet

    2018-01-01

    Objective This secondary data analysis sought to determine what mediated reductions in self-reported sexual initiation over the 24-month post-intervention period in early adolescents who received “Promoting Health among Teens,” a theory-based, abstinence-only intervention (Jemmott, Jemmott, & Fong, 2010). Methods African American grade 6 and 7 students at inner-city public middle schools were randomized to one of five interventions grounded in social cognitive theory and the theory of reasoned action: 8-hour abstinence-only targeting reduced sexual intercourse; 8-hour safer-sex-only targeting increased condom use; 8-hour and 12-hour comprehensive interventions targeting sexual intercourse and condom use; 8-hour control intervention targeting physical activity and diet. Primary outcome was self-report of vaginal intercourse by 24 months post-intervention. Potential mediators, assessed immediately post-intervention, were theory-of-reasoned-action variables, including behavioral beliefs about positive consequences of abstinence and negative consequences of sex, intention to have sex, normative beliefs about sex, and HIV/STI knowledge. We tested single and serial mediation models using the product-of-coefficients approach. Results Of 509 students reporting never having vaginal intercourse at baseline (324 girls and 185 boys; mean age = 11.8 years; SD = 0.8), 500 or 98.2% were included in serial mediation analyses. Consistent with the theory of reasoned action, the abstinence-only intervention increased positive behavioral beliefs about abstinence, which reduced intention to have sex, which in turn reduced sexual initiation. Negative behavioral beliefs about sex, normative beliefs about sex, and HIV/STI knowledge were not mediators. Conclusions Abstinence-only interventions should stress the gains to be realized from abstinence rather than the deleterious consequences of sexual involvement. PMID:26214076

  18. Exclusive purpose: abstinence-only proponents create federal entitlement in welfare reform.

    PubMed

    Daley, D

    1997-01-01

    Since 1981, the US government has funded a program promoting sexual abstinence among young people through its Office of Population's Adolescent Family Life Demonstration Grants program (AFLA). A 1983 court challenge which held that AFLA violated the separation of church and state by endorsing a particular religious viewpoint was settled out of court in 1993 with stipulations that AFLA-funded sexuality education must not include religious references, must be medically accurate, must respect the principle of self-determination of teenagers regarding contraceptive referrals, and must not be implemented on church property. Critics continue to charge that AFLA's abstinence-only programs have failed to receive proper evaluation. While AFLA has no broad-based support, it is backed by the same small group of Congressional proponents who are attempting to promote broad-scale, federally-funded abstinence-only programs. Thus, the August 1996 welfare reform legislation represents the broadest attack on the provision of comprehensive sexuality education in the US. While opponents of sexuality education could not restrict the content of education programs, they could restrict programs through health policy and funding mechanisms. Congress, thus, mandated $50 million a year for 1998-2002 to a matching grant with entitlement status, which was tagged on to final versions of the larger welfare reform bill. The intent of this action was to use federal law to change the social norm of premarital sexual activity. Funds will not go to programs which discuss contraception. Additional problems with the statute include misinformation, ambiguity, and a lack of evaluation requirements. It remains for states to decide whether to accept the restricted funds and for parties on both sides of the issue to continue to lobby for their positions.

  19. Public Opinion on School-Based Sex Education in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alton, Forrest L.; Valois, Robert F.; Oldendick, Robert; Drane, J. Wanzer

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to determine opinions on the use of abstinence only versus comprehensive sex education by registered voters in South Carolina. A cross-sectional, random-digit dial sample was utilized. Approximately 81% of respondents indicated support for sex education that emphasizes abstinence but also teaches about the benefits…

  20. Comprehensive Sex Education: Research and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advocates for Youth, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Since 1997 the federal government has invested more than $1.5 billion dollars in abstinence-only programs--proven ineffective programs which censor or exclude important information that could help young people protect their health. In fact, until recently, programs which met a strict abstinence-only definition were the only type of sex education…

  1. School-Based Sex Education and Neuroscience: What We Know about Sex, Romance, Marriage, and Adolescent Brain Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballonoff Suleiman, Ahna; Johnson, Megan; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.; Galván, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many school-based abstinence-only sex education curricula state that sexual activity outside of marriage is likely to have harmful psychological effects. Recent advances in neuroscience have expanded our understanding of the neural underpinnings of romantic love, marriage, sexual desire, and sexual behavior and improved our…

  2. Hold the Sex, Please: The Discursive Politics between National and Local Abstinence Education Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Amie

    2010-01-01

    There are many assumptions made about the beliefs behind abstinence-only until marriage (AOUM) sex education, yet comparatively little research examining the views of abstinence education providers. Drawing on in-depth interviews with 21 abstinence grantees throughout New York State, I examine how individuals working in abstinence organizations…

  3. Teacher Perspectives on Abstinence and Safe Sex Education in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Dennis A.; DePalma, Renée

    2014-01-01

    The stakes are high for sex education in South Africa: it has been estimated that 8.7% of young people live with HIV. Within primarily US and UK contexts, there has been much debate over the relative merits of abstinence-only and comprehensive sexual education programmes. These perspectives have largely been presented as irreconcilable, but…

  4. Ignorance Only: HIV/AIDS, Human Rights, and Federally Funded Abstinence-Only Programs in the United States. Texas: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleifer, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    This report contends that programs teaching teenagers to "just say no" to sex before marriage are threatening adolescent health by censoring basic information about how to prevent HIV/AIDS. The report focuses on federally funded "abstinence-only-until-marriage" programs in Texas, where advertising campaigns convey the message…

  5. A Review of 21 Curricula for Abstinence-Only-until-Marriage Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kelly L.; Goodson, Patricia; Pruitt, B.E.; Buhi, Eric; Davis-Gunnels, Emily

    2005-01-01

    The authors reviewed the content, methods, and overall quality of 21 curricula used in abstinence-only-until-marriage programs. Only materials designed for use in middle school grades (fifth to eighth) or with middle school-aged audiences (9-13 years of age), which presented the abstinence message in at least 40% of their content, were included. A…

  6. Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage Policies and Programs: An Updated Position Paper of the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine.

    PubMed

    2017-09-01

    Abstinence from sexual intercourse can be a healthy choice for adolescents, particularly if an adolescent is not ready to engage in sex. However, government programs exclusively promoting abstinence-only-until-marriage (AOUM) are problematic from scientific and ethical viewpoints. Most young people initiate sexual intercourse as adolescents or young adults, and given a rising age at first marriage around the globe, increasingly fewer adolescents wait until marriage to initiate sex. While theoretically fully protective, abstinence intentions often fail, as abstinence is not maintained. AOUM programs are not effective in delaying initiation of sexual intercourse or changing other behaviors. Conversely, many comprehensive sexuality education programs successfully delay initiation of sexual intercourse and reduce sexual risk behaviors. AOUM programs inherently provide incomplete information and are often neglectful to sexually active adolescents; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning adolescents; pregnant and parenting adolescents; and survivors of sexual assault. Promotion of AOUM policies by the U.S. government has undermined sexuality education in the United States and in U.S. foreign aid programs to prevent HIV infection. In many U.S. communities, AOUM programs have replaced more comprehensive approaches to sexuality education. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review of the Report "Efficacy of a Theory-Based Abstinence-Only Intervention Over 24 Months"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The study examined whether a theory-based abstinence-only education program could reduce sexual behavior over a 24-month follow-up period. The study recruited sixth- and seventh-grade volunteers from four public middle schools serving low-income African-American communities in a city in the northeastern United States. The study authors randomly…

  8. Parents' perception, students' and teachers' attitude towards school sex education.

    PubMed

    Fentahun, Netsanet; Assefa, Tsion; Alemseged, Fessahaye; Ambaw, Fentie

    2012-07-01

    Sex education is described as education about human sexual anatomy, sexual reproduction, sexual intercourse, reproductive health, emotional relations, reproductive rights and responsibilities, abstinence, contraception, family planning, body image, sexual orientation, sexual pleasure, values, decision making, communication, dating, relationships, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and how to avoid them, and birth control methods. This study was conducted to explore perception of parents about school sex education and assess the attitude of teachers and students towards school sex education. A cross-sectional quantitative and qualitative study was conducted on randomly selected 386 students, total census of 94 teachers and 10 parents in Merawi Town from March 13-27, 2011. Data were collected using self-administered structured questionnaire and in-depth interview guideline. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed using total score to determine the effect of the independent variables on the outcome variable and thematic analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data. All study participants have favourable attitude towards the importance of school sex education. They also agreed that the content of school sex education should include abstinence-only and abstinence-plus based on mental maturity of the students. That means at early age (Primary school) the content of school sex education should be abstinence-only and at later age (secondary school) the content of school sex education should be added abstinence-plus. The students and the teachers said that the minimum and maximum introduction time for school sex education is 5 year and 25 year with mean of 10.97(SD±4.3) and 12.36(SD±3.7) respectively. Teacher teaching experiences and field of studies have supportive idea about the starting of school sex education. Watching romantic movies, reading romantic materials and listening romantic radio programs appear to have a contribution on the predictor of

  9. Back to Basics: How Young Mothers Learn about Sex and Sexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, James; Crowder, Amanda; Montgomery, Tchernavia R.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy continues to be a major concern for policy-makers, programme developers, helping professionals and society generally in the USA, especially in light of the US federal government's legislative emphasis on abstinence-only sex education until recently. Studies have found that abstinence-only programmes do not succeed in…

  10. Satisfaction with Sex Education in New Mexico High Schools: A Survey of College Students.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Meredith; Espey, Eve; Leeman, Lawrence; Scott, Ariel; Ogburn, Tony; Singh, Rameet

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the perceived quality of and satisfaction with sex education among University of New Mexico (UNM) college students. Survey methods utilized with 18-21- year-old UNM freshmen and sophomores who graduated from a New Mexico high school. The survey included questions about type of sex education, satisfaction with sex education (on a 5-point Likert scale), and impact on sexual decision-making and was emailed to participants. A total of 9,866 surveys were emailed; 2,441 were returned (response rate = 24.7%); 415 did not attend high school in New Mexico, leaving 2,024 surveys in the analytic sample. Comprehensive sex education received higher ratings than abstinence-only or no sex education (3.29 ± 0.03 vs. 2.53 ± 0.07 vs. 1.87 ± 0.08, respectively, p<0.0001). More students receiving comprehensive sex education than abstinence-only education reported improved ability to make decisions about sexual initiation (66.6% vs. 54.0%; p = 0.0005), pregnancy prevention (92.7% vs. 72.9%; p < 0.0001), sexually transmitted, infection prevention (92.5% vs. 70.4%; p < 0.0001), and avoidance of unwanted sex (77.6% vs. 65.8%; p = 0.0003). New Mexico college students were more satisfied with comprehensive sex education in high school. New Mexico should consider establishing a state requirement for comprehensive sex education.

  11. California parents' preferences and beliefs regarding school-based sex education policy.

    PubMed

    Constantine, Norman A; Jerman, Petra; Huang, Alice X

    2007-09-01

    Policy debates over the merits of abstinence-only versus comprehensive approaches to sex education are ongoing, despite well-documented public support for comprehensive sex education. Although parents are key stakeholders in the outcomes of these debates, their views have been less thoroughly considered. A random digit dial survey of 1,284 California parents was conducted in 2006. Parents were asked about their sex education policy preferences, the importance of teaching selected topics at different grade levels and reasons for their preferences. Cross-tabulations and odds ratios were used to assess regional and other subgroup differences. Overall, 89% of parents reported a preference for comprehensive sex education, and 11% for abstinence-only education. Support for comprehensive sex education was high in all regions (87-93%) and across all subgroup characteristics: race or ethnicity (79-92%), age (86-94%), education (84-93%), household income (87-92%), religious affiliation (86-91%), religious service attendance (69-96%) and ideological leaning (71-96%). Four types of reasons for preferences emerged: those focused on the consequences of actions, on the importance of providing complete information, on the inevitability of adolescents' engaging in sex and on religious or purity-based morality concerns. While 64% of abstinence-only supporters cited the last type (absolutist reasons), 94% of comprehensive sex education supporters cited one of the first three (pragmatic reasons). The high levels of support for comprehensive sex education across California's diverse regions and demographic subgroups suggest that such support may be generalizable to communities and school districts both in California and around the country. Furthermore, ideological differences might be less important to the sex education debates than the distinction between pragmatic and absolutist perspectives.

  12. Abstinence-Only-Until-Marriage: An Updated Review of U.S. Policies and Programs and Their Impact.

    PubMed

    Santelli, John S; Kantor, Leslie M; Grilo, Stephanie A; Speizer, Ilene S; Lindberg, Laura D; Heitel, Jennifer; Schalet, Amy T; Lyon, Maureen E; Mason-Jones, Amanda J; McGovern, Terry; Heck, Craig J; Rogers, Jennifer; Ott, Mary A

    2017-09-01

    Adolescence is marked by the emergence of human sexuality, sexual identity, and the initiation of intimate relations; within this context, abstinence from sexual intercourse can be a healthy choice. However, programs that promote abstinence-only-until-marriage (AOUM) or sexual risk avoidance are scientifically and ethically problematic and-as such-have been widely rejected by medical and public health professionals. Although abstinence is theoretically effective, in actual practice, intentions to abstain from sexual activity often fail. Given a rising age at first marriage around the world, a rapidly declining percentage of young people remain abstinent until marriage. Promotion of AOUM policies by the U.S. government has undermined sexuality education in the United States and in U.S. foreign aid programs; funding for AOUM continues in the United States. The weight of scientific evidence finds that AOUM programs are not effective in delaying initiation of sexual intercourse or changing other sexual risk behaviors. AOUM programs, as defined by U.S. federal funding requirements, inherently withhold information about human sexuality and may provide medically inaccurate and stigmatizing information. Thus, AOUM programs threaten fundamental human rights to health, information, and life. Young people need access to accurate and comprehensive sexual health information to protect their health and lives. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sex Education: Another View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Jennifer

    1977-01-01

    The mother of a 14-year-old mentally retarded boy comments on the viewpoints of Dr. Sol Gordon (a sex education columnist) regarding masturbation, questions on sex, marriage, and the parents' role. (SBH)

  14. Sex education in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Frade, A; Vilar, D

    1991-05-01

    The article on sex education in Portugal covers background, the educational system, the clashes of the 1960's over sex education, the Committee for the Study of Sexuality and Education (CSSE), the policies, politics and social movements during the period 1974 - 1984, the discussions in Parliament, the 1988 Reform of the Educational System, the Family Planning Association (FPA) and sex education, and the future role of the FPA. It was not until the institution of the multiparity parliamentary system in 1974 that discussing social and political changes was possible, culminating in 1984 with new legislation on abortion, family planning, and sex education. School reform came in 1987/8 with the Ministry of Education primarily responsible for curricula. The 1960's brought with it the influence of the Catholic Church. Change came in the form of progressivism among Catholics who replaced dogma with dialogue and listening. Sex education was considered as preparation for marriage, but masturbation, contraception, and prostitution were also discussed. In addition, the founder of FPA chaired the CSSE in 1971 and opened up debate on sex issues and drafted a bill to establish co-education in Portuguese schools. The revolution of 1974 brought an end to censorship and brought forth a policy of developing family planning. Changed in the Family Code gave women greater equality. UNFPA supported teacher training in non-sexist education. With human reproduction included in the natural sciences, there was still no school sex education policy and contraception was only sometimes represented in the biology curriculum. The focus of FPA was on contraception and abortion. Finally in the 1980's, the first sex education programs were developed for out-of-school youth. Even though in the 1970's there were leftists groups promoting sex education, it took leftist parliamentary power to get legislation on sex education in the schools adopted. The Ministry of Education however was pressured by the

  15. School-Based Sex Education and Neuroscience: What We Know About Sex, Romance, Marriage, and Adolescent Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Ballonoff Suleiman, Ahna; Johnson, Megan; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Galván, Adriana

    2015-08-01

    Many school-based abstinence-only sex education curricula state that sexual activity outside of marriage is likely to have harmful psychological effects. Recent advances in neuroscience have expanded our understanding of the neural underpinnings of romantic love, marriage, sexual desire, and sexual behavior and improved our understanding of adolescent brain development. In this article, we review recent advances in neuroscience and clarify what is known about the link between neural development and adolescent romantic and sexual behavior and what opportunities exist for future research. Whereas the evidence from neuroscience does not yet allow for clear conclusions about the cost or benefits of early romantic relationships and sexual behavior, it does indicate that providing developmentally appropriate education contributes to lifelong sexual health. Developing policies and practices for school-based sex education that reflect current research will best support the sexual and reproductive health of adolescents throughout their lives. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  16. What schools teach our patients about sex: content, quality, and influences on sex education.

    PubMed

    Lindau, Stacy Tessler; Tetteh, Adjoa S; Kasza, Kristen; Gilliam, Melissa

    2008-02-01

    To identify predictors of comprehensive sex education in public schools. Using a three-stage design, 335 sex education teachers from a probability sample of 201 schools in 112 Illinois school districts were surveyed regarding the 2003-2004 school year. Coverage of at least all of the following topics constituted "comprehensiveness": abstinence, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and contraception. A logistic regression model identified predictors of comprehensiveness. Representing 91.3% of sampled schools, the teacher survey response rate was 62.4%. The most frequently taught topics included HIV/AIDS (97%), STDs (96%), and abstinence-until-marriage (89%). The least frequently taught topics were emergency contraception (31%), sexual orientation (33%), condom (34%) and other contraceptive (37%) use, and abortion (39%). Abstinence-only curricula were used by 74% of teachers, but 33% of these teachers supplemented with "other" curricula. Overall, two thirds met comprehensiveness criteria based on topics taught. Curricular material availability was most commonly cited as having a "great deal" of influence on topics taught. Thirty percent had no training in sex education; training was the only significant predictor of providing comprehensive sex education in multivariable analysis. Illinois public school-based sex education emphasizes abstinence and STDs and is heavily influenced by the available curricular materials. Nearly one in three sex education teachers were not trained. Obstetrician-gynecologists caring for adolescents may need to fill gaps in adolescent knowledge and skills due to deficits in content, quality, and teacher training in sex education. III.

  17. Sex education and the news: lessons from how journalists framed virginity pledges.

    PubMed

    Mebane, Felicia E; Yam, Eileen A; Rimer, Barbara K

    2006-09-01

    This analysis of newspaper articles about virginity pledges published from 1987 to 2001 describes prominent news frames on sex education. The articles focused on True Love Waits, a nationwide virginity pledge campaign encouraging abstinence, and results from Add Health (TLW), a longitudinal study that included questions to evaluate the effects of virginity pledges. Our results show how news frames and sources can vary for related events. Reporting on virginity pledges was often not grounded in science, and reporting on the science of pledges did not reflect a broader context. In this case, reporting may have encouraged support for abstinence-only programs.

  18. Sex Education. Kaleidoscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boderick, Carlfred; And Others

    This publication attempts to keep a portion of the educational community in touch with current topics and trends. The present focus is on sex education, a topic of growing concern in educational circles. The texts of three addresses are presented, with audience questions and speaker responses. Dr. Carlfred Broderick gives an overview of sex…

  19. Sex Education Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer-Magdoff, Laura

    1969-01-01

    After briefly discussing the philosophy of sex education and appraising generally the nature of the instructional methods and materials currently in use in the schools, the author provides brief but incisive reviews of a number of films, filmstrips, and other instructional materials dealing with sex. The reviews are continued in the succeeding…

  20. Controversial Conversations in Science: Incorporating the Science "Sex Box"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Puneet

    2016-01-01

    Science classrooms--and science textbooks--are proving to be challenging spaces for education that contradicts abstinence-only-until-marriage (AOUM) sex education. However, science educators can teach against this knowledge in a way that is critical of oppressive language. In fact, having explicit dialogue about gender identities and sexual…

  1. Sex education in Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Patsalides, N

    1991-05-01

    The objective of educating people on family planning and sexuality issues has been carried forth by the Family Planning Association of Cyprus (FPAC) since 1971. The promotion of sex education in schools has generated respect for their expertise. Sex education has reached the agenda of the General Assembly of Parliament only to be postponed due to the April 1991 end of term dismissal. A newly elected Parliament are not expected to act immediately. The Ministry of Education Committee on Health Education has been actively counseled since 1974, and most recently in their examination of the possibilities of school sex education and training of high school teachers. The Ministry of Education has authority over primary and secondary education, which is compulsory up to 3 years of secondary education. The approach of FPAC has been to work with parents first in education lectures at various well publicized locations. The agenda was to inform about FPAC, explain the purpose and meaning of sex education, and show the Merry-Go-Round educational film followed by a question and answer session. Eventually, presentations involved children with parent observation. In 1977, authorization from the Ministry of Education gave official approval to FPAC, but not on school premises. FPAC went directly to headmasters and gained support in primary schools to organize sessions on school premises, which successfully involved many primary schools even in the much needed rural areas. Home Economics and Child Care, offered in the 5th and 6th grades was the only vehicle for gaining permission to enter secondary schools. In Larnaca, secondary school headmasters at the 3rd and 6th grade levels permitted invitations which requested parental permission. Lecture topics on human reproduction, sex roles, and disease and contraception were also provided in a follow-up letter. Higher education levels were involved through youth clubs and evening lectures. In 1988, FPAC urged the Director General of the

  2. Does Early Adolescent Sex Cause Depressive Symptoms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabia, Joseph J.

    2006-01-01

    A recent study by the Heritage Foundation (Rector, Johnson, & Noyes, 2003) found evidence of a positive relationship between early sexual intercourse and depressive symptoms. This finding has been used to bolster support for funding abstinence only sex education. However, promoting abstinence will only yield mental health benefits if there is…

  3. Sex Education and Ideals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ruyter, Doret J.; Spiecker, Ben

    2008-01-01

    This article argues that sex education should include sexual ideals. Sexual ideals are divided into sexual ideals in the strict sense and sexual ideals in the broad sense. It is argued that ideals that refer to the context that is deemed to be most ideal for the gratification of sexual ideals in the strict sense are rightfully called sexual…

  4. Comprehensive Sexuality Education vs. Abstinence-Only Sexuality Education: The Need for Evidence-Based Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCave, Emily L.

    2007-01-01

    Teen pregnancy has declined due to stagnating sexual activity rates and increases in contraceptive use. Still, between 800,000 and 900,000 adolescents become pregnant each year in America. Many who become parents during adolescence are unable to achieve positive health, economic, and social well-being outcomes, particularly around educational…

  5. Sex Education: Challenges and Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Alison; Hedge, Nicki; Enslin, Penny

    2017-01-01

    Noting public concern about sexual exploitation, abuse and sexualisation, we argue that sex education in the UK needs revision. Choice is a feature of current sex education policy and, acknowledging that choice can be problematic, we defend its place in an approach to sex education premised on informed deliberation, relational autonomy, a…

  6. Associations Between Sex Education and Contraceptive Use Among Heterosexually Active, Adolescent Males in the United States.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Nicole; Buhi, Eric R; Elder, John P; Corliss, Heather L

    2017-05-01

    This study examined associations between reports of receiving education on topics commonly included in sex education (e.g., abstinence only, comprehensive) prior to age 18 years and contraceptive use at the last sex among heterosexually active, 15- to 20-year-old males in the United States. Cross-sectional data from 539 males participating in the 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth were analyzed. Bivariate and multinomial logistic regression analyses adjusting for confounding estimated associations between receipt of seven sex education topics (e.g., information on HIV/AIDS, how to say no to sex) and contraceptive use at the last sex (i.e., dual barrier and female-controlled effective methods, female-controlled effective method only, barrier method only, and no method). Nearly, all participants (99%) reported receiving sex education on at least one topic. Education on sexually transmitted diseases (94.7%) and HIV/AIDS (92.0%) were the most commonly reported topics received; education on where to get birth control was the least common (41.6%). Instruction about birth control methods (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.01; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.32-6.87) and how to say no to sex (AOR = 3.39; CI = 1.33-8.64) were positively associated with dual contraception compared to no use. For each additional sex education topic respondents were exposed to, their odds of using dual methods compared to no method was 47% greater (AOR = 1.47; CI = 1.16-1.86). Exposure to a larger number of sex education topics is associated with young men's report of dual contraception use at the last sex. Comprehensive sex education, focusing on a range of topics, may be most effective at promoting safer sex among adolescent males. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Changes in formal sex education: 1995-2002.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Laura Duberstein; Santelli, John S; Singh, Susheela

    2006-12-01

    Although comprehensive sex education is broadly supported by health professionals, funding for abstinence-only education has increased. Using data from the 1995 National Survey of Adolescent Males, the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) and the 2002 NSFG, changes in male and female adolescents' reports of the sex education they have received from formal sources were examined. Life-table methods were used to measure the timing of instruction, and t tests were used for changes over time. From 1995 to 2002, reports of formal instruction about birth control methods declined among both genders (males, from 81% to 66%; females, from 87% to 70%). This, combined with increases in reports of abstinence education among males (from 74% to 83%), resulted in a lower proportion of teenagers' overall receiving formal instruction about both abstinence and birth control methods (males, 65% to 59%; females, 84% to 65%), and a higher proportion of teenagers' receiving instruction only about abstinence (males, 9% to 24%; females, 8% to 21%). Teenagers in 2002 had received abstinence education about two years earlier (median age, 11.4 for males, 11.8 for females) than they had received birth control instruction (median age, 13.5 for both males and females). Among sexually experienced adolescents, 62% of females and 54% of males had received instruction about birth control methods prior to first sex. A substantial retreat from formal instruction about birth control methods has left increasing proportions of adolescents receiving only abstinence education. Efforts are needed to expand teenagers' access to medically accurate and comprehensive reproductive health information.

  8. Sex education and contraceptive use at coital debut in the United States: results from Cycle 6 of the National Survey of Family Growth.

    PubMed

    Isley, Michelle M; Edelman, Alison; Kaneshiro, Bliss; Peters, Dawn; Nichols, Mark D; Jensen, Jeffrey T

    2010-09-01

    The study was conducted to characterize the relationship between formal sex education and the use and type of contraceptive method used at coital debut among female adolescents. This study employed a cross-sectional, nationally representative database (2002 National Survey of Family Growth). Contraceptive use and type used were compared among sex education groups [abstinence only (AO), birth control methods only (MO) and comprehensive (AM)]. Analyses also evaluated the association between demographic, socioeconomic, behavioral variables and sex education. Multiple logistic regression with adjustment for sampling design was used to measure associations of interest. Of 1150 adolescent females aged 15-19 years, 91% reported formal sex education (AO 20.4%, MO 4.9%, AM 65.1%). The overall use of contraception at coitarche did not differ between groups. Compared to the AO and AM groups, the proportion who used a reliable method in the MO group (37%) was significantly higher (p=.03) (vs. 15.8% and 14.8%, respectively). Data from the 2002 NSFG do not support an association between type of formal sex education and contraceptive use at coitarche but do support an association between abstinence-only messaging and decreased reliable contraceptive method use at coitarche. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sex Education with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koblinsky, Sally; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses guidelines (developed by the Oregon State University Early Childhood Sex Education Project) for developing teacher-parent cooperation in providing sex education to young children. The guidelines concern how to talk about body differences and body functions; how to deal with masturbation, sex play and obscene language; and how to involve…

  10. Against Abstinence-Only Education Abroad: Viewing Internet Use during Study Abroad as a Possible Experience Enhancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikal, Jude P.; Grace, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    As the old model of study abroad welcomes a new generation of student, administrators are forced to grapple with how and whether to adapt the old model to new communication technologies. Assumed in the traditional model of study abroad, and in the cultural and language learning theories around which those programs were constructed, is that…

  11. Viewpoints: Sex Education and Deafness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitz-Gerald, Della, Ed.; Fitz-Gerald, Max, Ed.

    The 10 contributed papers are intended to clarify the major issues of sex education and deafness and offer realistic responses to the expressed needs of professionals serving the deaf. Papers have the following titles and authors: "Sex Education from the Deaf Perspective" (Robert Davila); "Sexuality and Deafness: An Overview" (Max Fitz-Gerald and…

  12. Moral Pluralism and Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corngold, Josh

    2013-01-01

    How should common schools in a liberal pluralist society approach sex education in the face of deep disagreement about sexual morality? Should they eschew sex education altogether? Should they narrow its focus to facts about biology, reproduction, and disease prevention? Should they, in addition to providing a broad palette of information about…

  13. Education, Socialization, and Sex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Daniel U.; Ornstein, Allan C.

    1981-01-01

    Four topics are briefly reviewed: how girls are socialized into the feminine role; how elementary schools discriminate against boys and secondary schools against girls; the question of biological sex differences in learning; and recent changes in sex roles and the status of women. (Part of a theme issue on women.) (SJL)

  14. Disestablishing Sex: The Case for Released-Time Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanzer, Perry L.

    2011-01-01

    Allowing nonschool organizations to provide sex education in a released-time format would disestablish state-funded sex education and give families a choice in the sex education that would be provided for their children. Released-time programs, as originally conceived and currently practiced, allow students to be released for a period of time…

  15. Education protects health, delays sex.

    PubMed

    Barnett, B

    1997-01-01

    Sex education can help prevent the risk of unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) by providing information to young people about reproductive issues and encouraging the consistent use of contraception or STD protection. In Jamaica a study surveyed about 500 students 11-14 years old and found that only 27% of girls and 32% of boys knew that getting pregnant during the first intercourse was possible. Similar lack of accurate information was found in other regions among young people. In India 80% of 100 girls seeking abortion did not know that sexual intercourse could lead to pregnancy or STDs and 90% did not know about contraception. Among 370 Russian high school students surveyed only 25% of the girls and 35% of the boys knew that condoms were intended for only a single occasion of use. A survey in 17 high schools in Bucharest showed that lack of information on reproductive health was one of the main reasons for unplanned pregnancies and abortion among Rumanian youth. Lack of vital information is one of the reasons for the low use of family planning among adolescents. The evaluation of sex education among young adults shows that formal sex education programs can increase the knowledge of reproductive health. In Tanzania a school-based program for students 13-15 years old showed an increase in knowledge about AIDS and decrease in those wanting to have sex. Attaining behavior change is the focus of these programs, but few studies deal with the results of sex education. Several family planning programs have incorporated elements of behavior change into sex education programs for young people, e.g., the Planning your Life program in Mexico, with information about pregnancy, disease prevention and STDs, relationships, decision-making, communication, and assertiveness. The Sexuality Information and Education Council lists concepts in a comprehensive sex education program: human development, relationships, personal skills, sexual behavior, sexual

  16. 1996-97 trends in opposition to comprehensive sexuality education in public schools in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mayer, R

    1997-01-01

    Since 1992, SIECUS' Community Advocacy Project has promoted comprehensive sexuality education programs versus fear-based, abstinence-only programs and has issued annual analyses of current trends that have documented more than 500 controversies in all 50 states. During the 1996-97 school year, SIECUS documented 127 controversies in 33 states. The current situation on the Federal level was marked by President Clinton's endorsement of abstinence-only programs and a call issued by the Institute for Medicine and the National Institutes of Health for comprehensive sex education to combat sexually transmitted diseases and HIV/AIDS. Various states considered or enacted legislation allowing parents to remove children from sex education classes, dictating sex education curricula, or removing state mandates for sexuality education in schools. On the local level, the Medical Institute for Sexual Health's "National Guidelines for Sexuality and Character Education" (confusingly similar in style to SIECUS' "Guidelines for Comprehensive Sexuality Education") has been used to promote fear-based, abstinence-only curricula. Local controversies arose over efforts led by small groups to promote fear-based, abstinence-only curricula, over the content and existence of elementary school sex education programs, over coeducational sexuality education, over policies related to sexual orientation, over opt-out/opt-in programs, and over availability of alternative abstinence-only sex education programs. The past year showed that the active involvement of community members will be required to ensure the survival of comprehensive sex education programs. Included in this article are interviews with a school board member who successfully protected comprehensive sex education in her Kansas community and a member of a school board committee unable to save a comprehensive program in Brookfield, Connecticut.

  17. Welfare, Liberty, and Security for All? U.S. Sex Education Policy and the 1996 Title V Section 510 of the Social Security Act.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Justin E; Hawkins, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    When adolescents delay (meaning they wait until after middle school) engaging in sexual intercourse, they use condoms at higher rates and have fewer sexual partners than those who have sex earlier, thus resulting in a lower risk for unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections. The 1996 Section 510 of Title V of the Social Security Act (often referred to as A-H) is a policy that promotes abstinence-only-until-marriage education (AOE) within public schools. Using Stone's (2012) policy analysis framework, this article explores how A-H limits welfare, liberty, and security among adolescents due to the poor empirical outcomes of AOE policy. We recommend incorporating theory-informed comprehensive sex education in addition to theory-informed abstinence education that utilizes Fishbein and Ajzen's (2010) reasoned action model within schools in order to begin to address adolescent welfare, liberty, and security.

  18. Sex Education in Multicultural Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartz, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    Scandinavia has long been admired by American liberals and sex education advocates who cite comparable rates of adolescent sexuality, yet lower rates of teenage pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases and abortion in Scandinavia. The United States has, however, two variables with which Scandinavia in general, and Norway in particular, has not…

  19. Sex Education. Grades K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Objectives Exchange, Los Angeles, CA.

    This collection of fifty objectives, related sample items, and directions for administering and scoring, is divided into three sections. The first, growth and development, deals with basic factual information relating to sex education; both animal and human biology are included. The second section, social and emotional growth, deals with the…

  20. Sex Discrimination in Education: Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, B.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews various perspectives on sex discrimination in schools and colleges, presents case studies of sex discrimination in the English educational system, and distinguishes between sex discrimination and gender forming. Journal availability: see SO 507 421. (DB)

  1. More on the New Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasun, Jacqueline

    1980-01-01

    Replies to Paul V. Crosbie's criticisms. Argues that: reports of teenage sexuality and pregnancy are exaggerated; sex education programs encourage acceptance of every form of sexual expression; parents cannot always control their children's participation in sex education; and teachers are not equipped to teach sex education in a neutral fashion.…

  2. Sense about Sex: Media, Sex Advice, Education and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attwood, Feona; Barker, Meg John; Boynton, Petra; Hancock, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The media are widely acknowledged as important in sex and relationship education, but they are usually associated with "bad" effects on young people in contrast to the "good" knowledge represented by more informational and educational formats. In this paper we look at sex advice giving in newspapers, magazines and television in…

  3. THE INDIVIDUAL, SOCIETY AND SEX. BACKGROUND READINGS FOR SEX EDUCATORS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRODERICK, CARLFRED B.; AND OTHERS

    THIS BOOK IS DESIGNED AS A TEXT PRIMARILY FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS PREPARING TO TEACH SEX EDUCATION OR "EDUCATION IN THE NATURE OF HUMAN SEXUALITY AND THE RELATIONS BETWEEN THE SEXES" IN ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS. AN ATTEMPT IS MADE BY THE 13 WRITERS, MOST OF THEM SOCIOLOGISTS OR PSYCHOLOGISTS, TO DISTINGUISH BETWEEN THE KNOWLEDGE WHICH THE…

  4. Handbook for Achieving Sex Equity through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan S., Ed.

    This handbook of collected papers is intended to aid in the achievement of sex equity in education, and in society through education. It is divided into six parts, each with a separate editor (or editors) and contains the following chapters: (1) Examining the Achievement of Sex Equity in and through Education (S. S. Klein, and others); (2)…

  5. School based sex education and HIV prevention in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fonner, Virginia A; Armstrong, Kevin S; Kennedy, Caitlin E; O'Reilly, Kevin R; Sweat, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    School-based sex education is a cornerstone of HIV prevention for adolescents who continue to bear a disproportionally high HIV burden globally. We systematically reviewed and meta-analyzed the existing evidence for school-based sex education interventions in low- and middle-income countries to determine the efficacy of these interventions in changing HIV-related knowledge and risk behaviors. We searched five electronic databases, PubMed, Embase, PsycInfo, CINAHL, and Sociological Abstracts, for eligible articles. We also conducted hand-searching of key journals and secondary reference searching of included articles to identify potential studies. Intervention effects were synthesized through random effects meta-analysis for five outcomes: HIV knowledge, self-efficacy, sexual debut, condom use, and number of sexual partners. Of 6191 unique citations initially identified, 64 studies in 63 articles were included in the review. Nine interventions either focused exclusively on abstinence (abstinence-only) or emphasized abstinence (abstinence-plus), whereas the remaining 55 interventions provided comprehensive sex education. Thirty-three studies were able to be meta-analyzed across five HIV-related outcomes. Results from meta-analysis demonstrate that school-based sex education is an effective strategy for reducing HIV-related risk. Students who received school-based sex education interventions had significantly greater HIV knowledge (Hedges g = 0.63, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.49-0.78, p<0.001), self-efficacy related to refusing sex or condom use (Hedges g = 0.25, 95% CI: 0.14-0.36, p<0.001), condom use (OR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.18-1.52, p<0.001), fewer sexual partners (OR = 0.75, 95% CI:0.67-0.84, p<0.001) and less initiation of first sex during follow-up (OR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.54-0.83, p<0.001). The paucity of abstinence-only or abstinence-plus interventions identified during the review made comparisons between the predominant comprehensive and

  6. School Based Sex Education and HIV Prevention in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fonner, Virginia A.; Armstrong, Kevin S.; Kennedy, Caitlin E.; O'Reilly, Kevin R.; Sweat, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives School-based sex education is a cornerstone of HIV prevention for adolescents who continue to bear a disproportionally high HIV burden globally. We systematically reviewed and meta-analyzed the existing evidence for school-based sex education interventions in low- and middle-income countries to determine the efficacy of these interventions in changing HIV-related knowledge and risk behaviors. Methods We searched five electronic databases, PubMed, Embase, PsycInfo, CINAHL, and Sociological Abstracts, for eligible articles. We also conducted hand-searching of key journals and secondary reference searching of included articles to identify potential studies. Intervention effects were synthesized through random effects meta-analysis for five outcomes: HIV knowledge, self-efficacy, sexual debut, condom use, and number of sexual partners. Results Of 6191 unique citations initially identified, 64 studies in 63 articles were included in the review. Nine interventions either focused exclusively on abstinence (abstinence-only) or emphasized abstinence (abstinence-plus), whereas the remaining 55 interventions provided comprehensive sex education. Thirty-three studies were able to be meta-analyzed across five HIV-related outcomes. Results from meta-analysis demonstrate that school-based sex education is an effective strategy for reducing HIV-related risk. Students who received school-based sex education interventions had significantly greater HIV knowledge (Hedges g = 0.63, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.49–0.78, p<0.001), self-efficacy related to refusing sex or condom use (Hedges g = 0.25, 95% CI: 0.14–0.36, p<0.001), condom use (OR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.18–1.52, p<0.001), fewer sexual partners (OR = 0.75, 95% CI:0.67–0.84, p<0.001) and less initiation of first sex during follow-up (OR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.54–0.83, p<0.001). Conclusions The paucity of abstinence-only or abstinence-plus interventions identified during the review made

  7. The Advantages of Single-Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Teresa A.

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally, single-sex education has been provided in the form of private schooling. Title IX regulations have loosened as a result of the No Child Left Behind Legislation; therefore, public school districts now have the legal right to create single-sex classes or single-sex schools if they deem it to be in the best interest of their students.…

  8. Attitudes of mothers toward sex education.

    PubMed Central

    Block, D

    1979-01-01

    Data are presented on the attitudes of mothers from the entire social class spectrum toward content and timing of sex education for children (CT-Attitudes), and also toward sex education in school (S-Attitudes) in two California communities in 1969. Findings underscore the necessity to consider these two attitudinal variables separately. As a result of their separation for study purposes, it was possible to arrive at a four-fold typology or grouping of mothers: 1) CT liberals in favor, and 2) CT liberals opposed to sex education in schools, 3) CT conservatives in favor, and 4) CT conservatives opposed to school programs of sex education. It is inferred that educational planners need to pay due regard to the sentiments of all four maternal groups and all social classes in developing sex education programs for families and for school children. PMID:474847

  9. Attitudes of mothers toward sex education.

    PubMed

    Block, D

    1979-09-01

    Data are presented on the attitudes of mothers from the entire social class spectrum toward content and timing of sex education for children (CT-Attitudes), and also toward sex education in school (S-Attitudes) in two California communities in 1969. Findings underscore the necessity to consider these two attitudinal variables separately. As a result of their separation for study purposes, it was possible to arrive at a four-fold typology or grouping of mothers: 1) CT liberals in favor, and 2) CT liberals opposed to sex education in schools, 3) CT conservatives in favor, and 4) CT conservatives opposed to school programs of sex education. It is inferred that educational planners need to pay due regard to the sentiments of all four maternal groups and all social classes in developing sex education programs for families and for school children.

  10. Elusive Sex Acts: Pleasure and Politics in Norwegian Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svendsen, Stine H. Bang

    2012-01-01

    While there is little political opposition towards sex education as such in Norway, recent attempts at reforming the subject reveal underlying heteronormative presumptions that seem resistant to reform. While a focus on homosexuality is included in the national curriculum at all levels of compulsory education, the sexual practices involved in…

  11. Conflicting Philosophies of School Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiss, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the strengths and weaknesses of the five main philosophical positions currently found in school sex education. Argues that valid sex education promotes rational sexual autonomy, requires pupils to consider the needs and wishes of others, and occurs within a moral framework. Suggests teachers adopt a supportive but neutral position. (MJP)

  12. What's Missing? Anti-Racist Sex Education!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitten, Amanda; Sethna, Christabelle

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary sexual health curricula in Canada include information about sexual diversity and queer identities, but what remains missing is any explicit discussion of anti-racist sex education. Although there exists federal and provincial support for multiculturalism and anti-racism in schools, contemporary Canadian sex education omits crucial…

  13. Strategies for Achieving Sex Equity in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Glen; Hergert, Leslie F.

    1986-01-01

    While progress has been made, sex equity in education remains an elusive goal. This article identifies strategies that can be used to achieve and maintain sex equity. Research on creating change in education is reviewed, and what, in practice, has succeeded is discussed. (MT)

  14. Can Sex Education Delay Early Sexual Debut?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erkut, Sumru; Grossman, Jennifer M.; Frye, Alice A.; Ceder, Ineke; Charmaraman, Linda; Tracy, Allison J.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examine whether a nine-lesson sex education intervention, "Get Real: Comprehensive Sex Education That Works," implemented in sixth grade, can reduce the number of adolescents who might otherwise become "early starters" of sexual activity (defined as heterosexual intercourse) by seventh grade. Participants were…

  15. Putting sex education in its place.

    PubMed

    Cassell, C

    1981-04-01

    In order to help reduce fears and anxieties regarding the influence of sex education in a public school setting, school and community sexuality educators need to better articulate the difference between formal and structured sex education and non-formal, informal and incidental sex learning. Sex education is only 1 aspect of the sexual learning process. 2 main points have to be clarified for parents and the general public to set the stage for a new way to view the school and community involvement in the sexual learning process: the schools' sexuality education courses constitute only a small portion of the sexual learning process; and sexual learning is not an event for youth only, but a process spanning life. Sex education (the process) connotates an academic setting with a specific curricula taught by a trained instructor, but sexual learning relates to environmental, non-formal incidental learning from a multitude of sources. Studies indicate that teenagers receive about 90% of their contraceptive and sexuality informaation from peers and mass media and that these sources of information are becoming their preferred sources of sex education. What is needed is a way to address and improve the conditions of sexual learning in the community. As home is the ideal environment for primary and positive sexual learning, parents need support in their role as sex educators. Classroom sexuality education curricula in all school settings have a solid place in the process of sexual learning.

  16. Sex Education: Talking to Your Teen about Sex

    MedlinePlus

    ... might miss the best opportunities. Instead, think of sex education as an ongoing conversation. Here are some ideas to help you get started — and keep the discussion going. Seize the moment. When a TV program or music video raises issues about responsible sexual behavior, use it ...

  17. Learning about Sex: Resource Guide for Sex Educators. Revised Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberman, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Whether you are someone new to the field of sex education, trying to start a library or resource center on adolescent sexual health, or an old pro, this guide should give you a basic orientation to what's available to support your work. These resources are important to advancing positive attitudes toward adolescent sexual health and the author…

  18. Empowerment through Sex Education? Rethinking Paradoxical Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naezer, Marijke; Rommes, Els; Jansen, Willy

    2017-01-01

    Youth empowerment is the main goal of sex education according to Dutch Government and NGO policies. Academics from different disciplines have argued, however, that the ideal of empowerment through education is problematic, because of the unequal power relations implicated in educational practices. Building on one-and-a-half years of online and…

  19. It Isn't Sex Education unless...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hacker, Sylvia S.

    1981-01-01

    An effective sex education curriculum deals with both feelings and behaviors. It must address decision making and problem solving in regard to relationship formation, readiness for intercourse, use of contraception, child rearing, and social responsibility and should be incorporated into education throughout the educational process. (JN)

  20. Social Conflict and Sex Equity in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quantz, Richard A.

    1983-01-01

    Holds that male/female differences in such behavior characteristics as aggression, cooperation/competition, compliance, and anxiety are not innate, but rather are social strategies available to both sexes and utilized whenever reasonable. Suggests that the sex equity problems in education can be solved by eliminating differential treatment of boys…

  1. Appraising the Vatican's Approach to Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David M.

    1984-01-01

    Analyzes the Vatican publication, "Educational Guidance in Human Love," which underscores the responsibilities of family and church in sex education. Affirms the positive aspects of the report and points to its weaknesses and omissions. Suggests possible responses to the document by parishes and schools. (DMM)

  2. Major Legal Aspects of Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartoo, Jean

    The legal status of sex education in the public schools in the United States as it existed at the close of the 1971-72 school year was investigated. The investigation included surveys, analyses, and interpretations of statutes, significant rules and regulations of state departments of education, and court holdings as they applied specifically to…

  3. Sex Education and Sex Stereotypes: Theory and Practice. Working Paper No. 198.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Margaret L.

    This paper presents an explanation of practitioners' reactions to sex equitable sex education. Several constraints can prohibit practitioners from engaging in sex equitable sex education: (1) lack of community support; (2) lack of expertise in human sexuality education; (3) vagueness of school committee views; and (4) lack of answers to logistical…

  4. Sex Education Knowledge Differences between Freshmen and Senior College Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Ruth M.; Dotger, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Abstinence sexuality education (sex ed) is the only federally funded sex ed in the United States. The strict curriculum of this education does not educate American adolescents about safer sex practices and leaves a knowledge gap in these adolescents that follows them into college. The Problem: This project aimed to identify sex knowledge…

  5. Sex Bias in Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalinowski, Edward

    Practical information is provided on sexual harassment within the vocational education context. A definition of sexual harassment is followed by examples of practices or behaviors that may be used to determine sexual harassment, including both physical conduct and communication. Possible impacts of sexual harassment in a vocational training…

  6. Young Men, Masculinities and Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limmer, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This paper draws on focus group and interview data from 45 young men from the north of England to explore the barriers to effective sex and relationships education (SRE). Recent policy debates in relation to establishing statutory SRE in schools provide an opportunity to revisit how it is currently delivered to, and received by, young men. The…

  7. The Multiple Choices of Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Rashea; Sanders, Megan; Anderman, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Sex education in middle and high school health classes is critically important because it frequently comprises the primary mechanism for conveying information about sexual health to adolescents. Deliver evidence-based information on HIV and pregnancy prevention practices and they will be less likely to engage in risky sexual behaviors, the theory…

  8. Review of Comprehensive Sex Education Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This evaluation was undertaken by the Administration for Children and Families within the Department of Health and Human Services to inform federal policymakers of the content, medical accuracy, and effectiveness of comprehensive sex education (CSE) curricula currently in use. Nine curricula were chosen based on the frequency and strength of…

  9. Sex Education as a Transversal Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabelo, Amanda Oliveira; Pereira, Graziela Raupp; Reis, Maria Amélia; Ferreira, António G.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, sex education is in many countries a transversal subject, in which the school becomes a privileged place for the implementation of policies that aim at promoting "public health." Its design as a cross-cutting subject envisages fostering the dissemination of these subjects in all pedagogical and curricular fields; however, we…

  10. New Standards Aim to Guide Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on national standards about sexuality, sexual health, and relationships that outline topics students should learn, starting in kindergarten, and that they can build on as they grow older. The standards--an initiative by groups concerned with student health and sex education--are intended to mimic content standards for other…

  11. Single-Sex Schools and Classrooms. The Informed Educator Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    In October 2006, the U.S. Department of Education introduced the so-called "single-sex regulations," which brought the issue of single-sex education to the forefront of discussion among educators, policymakers, and parents. Anecdotal evidence suggests that single-sex education can have a positive impact on student achievement. However,…

  12. The Case for a New Approach to Sex Education Mounts; Will Policymakers Heed the Message? Guttmacher Policy Review. Volume 10, Number 2, Spring 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boonstra, Heather D.

    2007-01-01

    Abstinence-only-until-marriage education is a key component of social conservatives' global moral and religious agenda, and the cornerstone of the Bush administration's approach to reducing U.S. teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STI) rates. Fearful of being portrayed as anti-abstinence, policymakers have continued to support these…

  13. Sex Education Attitudes and Outcomes among North American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Monnica T.; Bonner, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Attitudes and outcomes of sex education received by North American women are examined via an Internet survey (N = 1,400). Mean age was 19.5, with 24% reporting one or more unplanned pregnancies. Women were more satisfied with sex education from informal sources than from parents, schools, and physicians. Those receiving sex education from parents…

  14. Curricular Decision-Making among Public Sex Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrion, Melissa L.; Jensen, Robin E.

    2014-01-01

    The content of sex education in government-funded schools in the USA varies dramatically and reflects its contested nature and goals. Drawing from 50 interviews with sex educators working in the public, government-funded school system in a Midwestern US state, this study explores the processes through which sex educators decide what and how to…

  15. What Should Be the Moral Aims of Compulsory Sex Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steutel, Jan; de Ruyter, Doret J.

    2011-01-01

    With reference to the unsuccessful attempt of the Labour Government to make sex education a statutory part of the National Curriculum, this paper argues in favour of making liberal sex education compulsory at all state schools. First, the main characteristics of a liberal sex education are briefly explained. Promoting the virtue of respect for…

  16. Risking a Relation: Sex Education and Adolescent Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jen

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers how issues of adolescent development might be brought into conversation with dilemmas in sex education. Here, sex education is larger than information, affirmation or prohibition. In its address to the most intimate aspects of life--love, loss, vulnerability, power, friendship, aggression--sex education is necessarily…

  17. Sex education sources and attitudes about premarital sex of Seventh Day Adventist youth.

    PubMed

    Ali, H K; Naidoo, A

    1999-02-01

    37 Seventh Day Adventist youth were surveyed about their sex education and attitudes towards premarital sex. Analysis indicated differences between their attitudes and actual sexual behaviour. While 70% endorsed the church's prohibition on premarital sex, 54% had engaged in premarital sex.

  18. Sex education and adolescent sexual behavior: do community characteristics matter?

    PubMed

    Kraft, Joan Marie; Kulkarni, Aniket; Hsia, Jason; Jamieson, Denise J; Warner, Lee

    2012-09-01

    Studies point to variation in the effects of formal sex education on sexual behavior and contraceptive use by individual and community characteristics. Using the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth, we explored associations between receipt of sex education and intercourse by age 15, intercourse by the time of the interview and use of effective contraception at first sex among 15-19-year-olds, stratified by quartiles of three community characteristics and adjusted for demographics. Across all quartiles of community characteristics, sex education reduced the odds of having sex by age 15. Sex education resulted in reduced odds of having sex by the date of the interview and increased odds of using contraception in the middle quartiles of community characteristics. Variation in the effects of sex education should be explored. Research might focus on programmatic differences by community type and programmatic needs in various types of communities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. [Sex education and sexual development of female adolescents].

    PubMed

    Barth, H; Döbler, T; Galletzki, R; Amon, K

    1983-01-01

    A questionnaire survey on sex knowledge of 930 female vocational students (17-18 year olds) was done to assess future needs in sex education. Main points in the questionnaire were sex upbringing and education received; peer groups, couple and contraceptive behavior; and attitude to family and family planning. Socioeconomic factors, parents' occupation, and size of residence were considered. Results showed: 70.4% had some kind of sex upbringing before age 12; 24.5% after age 12. Whereas up to 80% wanted sex education from parents, only about 55% actually received this (mothers mostly); 80% of actual sex information came from books and TV. Peers proved closer to the girls in confidence than parents. Although teachers were 3rd in line to provide actual sex education they were last as persons desired by the girls to provide this. Nearly 60% of the subjects desired more information in the areas of love and marriage, sex in adolescence, effects and side effects of the pill, general contraceptive methods and sex behavior. Conclusions from the survey point to the need to start sex education at an early age and extend it into adolescence and beyond; it should be direct, continuous and goal-oriented. Teenagers desire interpersonal dialogue with concerned adults. There should be cooperation in sex education between parents, teachers, and youth organizations. Teachers are insufficiently prepared to assume the role as sex educator. Teenagers need more factual information on conscious family planning and contraceptive methods.

  20. Does sex education affect adolescent sexual behaviors and health?

    PubMed

    Sabia, Joseph J

    2006-01-01

    This study examines whether offering sex education to young teenagers affects several measures of adolescent sexual behavior and health: virginity status, contraceptive use, frequency of intercourse, likelihood of pregnancy, and probability of contracting a sexually transmitted disease. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, I find that while sex education is associated with adverse health outcomes, there is little evidence of a causal link after controlling for unobserved heterogeneity via fixed effects and instrumental variables. These findings suggest that those on each side of the ideological debate over sex education are, in a sense, both correct and mistaken. Opponents are correct in observing that sex education is associated with adverse health outcomes, but are generally incorrect in interpreting this relationship causally. Proponents are generally correct in claiming that sex education does not encourage risky sexual activity, but are incorrect in asserting that investments in typical school-based sex education programs produce measurable health benefits.

  1. Single-Sex Education in Public School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford-Ferre, Heather Glynn; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2013-01-01

    Although researchers have studied the effectiveness of single-sex education (SSE), the findings have been mixed. This exploratory study reports the perceived goals and effectiveness of single-sex education based on interviews with a small group of educators involved with SSE in various ways. Research participants included a school principal and…

  2. Sex Education in South Australia: The Past and the Present

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talukdar, Joy; Aspland, Tania; Datta, Poulomee

    2013-01-01

    In South Australia, sex education has been controversial since its inception. The Australasian White Cross league and the Family Planning Association of South Australia were the pioneers of sex education in South Australia. The framing of a national framework and the implementation of the SHARE (Sexual Health and Relationships Education) project…

  3. Sex Education Guidelines, Including Reproductive Health and Family Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing.

    Legislation permitting the teaching of reproductive health in Michigan schools mandates that the State Board of Education establish approval criteria for those who will be supervising instructional programs in sex education, determine certification requirements for those teaching classes in sex education, and establish guidelines for the review…

  4. The Use and Misuse of Pleasure in Sex Education Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Sharon; Lustig, Kara; Graling, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Since Michelle Fine's writing on the missing discourse of desire in sex education, there has been considerable prompting among sexuality educators and feminist scholars to incorporate talk of pleasure into sex education curricula. While the calls for inclusion continue, few have actually examined the curricula for a pleasure discourse or…

  5. Thinking in Sex Education: Reading Prohibition through the Film "Desire"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jen

    2013-01-01

    This paper argues that sex education must move beyond a focus on compliance so that we may risk the uncertain work of thinking. How might we understand the work of thinking in sex education if we begin from the assumptions that learning is conflicted, that sexuality resists being educated even as it inspires curiosity, and that the subject of sex…

  6. Sex Education Justice: A Call for Comprehensive Sex Education and the Inclusion of Latino Early Adolescent Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouyoumdjian, Claudia; Guzman, Bianca L.

    2013-01-01

    Many sex education programs do not conceptualize adolescent sexuality as a normative process of development, thus sexuality is not part of a holistic picture of health education.The current project examines the multiple determinants of adolescent boys' sexual behaviors in the context of developing sex education. Limited research has examined the…

  7. The Individual Society, and Sex-Background Readings for Sex Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broderick, Carlfred B.; And Others

    This book is designed as a text primarily for college students preparing to teach sex education or "education in the nature of human sexuality and the relations between the sexes" in elementary and secondary schools. An attempt is made by the 13 writers, most of them sociologists or psychologists, to distinguish between the knowledge which the…

  8. Sex education changes for the worse, say sexual health organisations.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Amendments to the Education Bill, which was part of the Education act of 1993, included some changes for sex education in Great Britain. These changes included 1) removing from the science curriculum all mention of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) including HIV infections, 2) giving parents the right to withdraw their children from sex education classes in primary and secondary schools, and 3) placing the responsibility for sex education, including HIV/AIDS and STDs, in "maintained" secondary schools with governors. Family planning and sexual health educators were opposed to the amendment. Over 30 different organizations grouped under the Sex Education Forum also expressed concern about the changes. The UK has not had a compulsory and comprehensive sex education program; compulsory sex education has been a component only within the science curriculum, mostly reproductive biology. The thinking was that this amendment would not strengthen effective sex education. Sex education advocates want a broad-based curriculum, that covers more than reproductive biology and is provided throughout the developmental stages of a young person's schooling. Critics of this amendment have proposed that the parental right to withdraw their children from sex education classes deprives children of potentially life-saving information. There would also appear to be a conflict with the Children Act of 1989 and the UN Convention on the Rights of Children, which assures the rights of children to information. These changes would add to the existing difficulties and create new ones. Implementation is in the hands of the Department of Education. Draft guidelines are expected in the Fall 1993; sex education circulars would be distributed in the Spring 1994, and curriculum changes would be fully implemented in August 1994.

  9. Sex Education, Sexual Labor, and Education: The Need for Alternative Sexual Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howlett, Caitlin

    2016-01-01

    This paper interrogates education's relationship to labor through a consideration of sex education's relationship to sexual labor. Beginning with a basic question--why does sex education exist as a federally funded project?--the author examines sex education's relationship to normativity and sexual labor throughout its history as a federally…

  10. Effect of Single-Sex Education on Progress in GCSE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malacova, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Multilevel modeling was carried out on national value-added data to study the effects of single-sex education on the progress of pupils from 2002 Key Stage 3 to 2004 GCSE. The analysis suggests that pupils in a selective environment achieve higher progress in single-sex schools; however, the advantage of single-sex schooling seems to decrease with…

  11. Helping teachers conduct sex education in secondary schools in Thailand: overcoming culturally sensitive barriers to sex education.

    PubMed

    Thammaraksa, Pimrat; Powwattana, Arpaporn; Lagampan, Sunee; Thaingtham, Weena

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this quasi experimental study was to evaluate the effects of Culturally Sensitive Sex Education Skill Development, a teacher-led sex education program in secondary schools in Thailand. Two public secondary schools in the suburban areas of Bangkok were randomly selected. One was designated as the experimental school and the other as the comparison school. Ninety grade seven and eight teachers, 45 from each school, were selected to participate in the study. Self efficacy theory and culturally appropriate basis were applied to develop the program which included 4 weeks of intervention and 2 weeks of follow up. Primary outcomes were attitudes toward sex education, perceived self efficacy, and sex education skills. Statistical analysis included independent and paired t test, and repeated one-way analysis of variance. At the end of the intervention and during the follow-up period, the intervention group had significantly higher mean scores of attitudes toward sex education, perceived self efficacy, and sex education skills than their scores before (p < .001), and than those of the comparison group (p < .001). The results showed that Culturally Sensitive Sex Education Skill Development could enhance attitudes and sex education self efficacy to promote the implementation of sex education among teachers. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Why Johnny Can't in: Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, A. Gray

    1971-01-01

    Sex education in the schools is predicted to be the major educational issue in the 70's. It is concluded that total community involvement will eventually immobilize its politico-religious critics. (CP)

  13. Should the Sexes Be Separated for Secondary Education--Comparisons of Single-Sex and Co-Educational Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Pamela; Smithers, Alan

    1999-01-01

    English researchers compared the academic and social benefits of single sex and coeducational schools, examining test scores and interviewing 100 college students (balanced for sex and type of school) about their experiences and their ease of adjustment to higher education. Results indicated that segregating the sexes did not increase…

  14. Sex Education and Premarital Sexual Behavior among American College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanier, Graham B.

    1978-01-01

    Interviews with 1177 male and female college students revealed no significant differences in sexual behavior between those who took public school sex education courses and those who did not, nor between those taught about birth control or about coitus. Implications for successful sex education programs are discussed. (SJL)

  15. The Aims of Sex Education: Demoting Autonomy and Promoting Mutuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAvoy, Paula

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, Paula McAvoy critiques a commonly held view that teaching young people to be good choice makers should be a central aim of sex education. Specifically, she argues against David Archard's recommendation that sex educators ought to focus on the development of autonomy and teaching young people that "choice should be accorded…

  16. Sex Education in Northern Ireland Schools: A Critical Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolston, Bill; Schubotz, Dirk; Simpson, Audrey

    2005-01-01

    To date there has been little research on young people and sexuality in Northern Ireland. This paper draws on the first major study in this area to analyse the delivery of formal sex education in schools. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used to access young people's opinions about the quality of the sex education they had received…

  17. Sex Education: New Resources Help Parents Talk with Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Virginia

    2002-01-01

    To help parents talk with children about sexual health, the Kaiser Family Foundation and National PTA developed a series of free resources for parents (e.g., the booklet "Talking with Kids: A Parent's Guide to Sex Education") to increase parent involvement and communication around sex education. This paper notes the importance of parents…

  18. Practice Meets Theory: A New Approach to Medical Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Jane M.; Sklarew, Bruce H.

    1978-01-01

    An elective clinical practicum in sex education is reported. Staff from the D.C. Department of Human Resources and Planned Parenthood train third- and fourth-year medical students in sex education techniques and supervise their work with public school children, mostly fifth- and sixth-grade pupils. (Author/LBH)

  19. Sources of Sex Discrimination in Educational Systems: A Conceptual Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutner, Nancy G.; Brogan, Donna

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual model is presented relating numerous variables contributing to sexism in American education. Discrimination is viewed as intervening between two sets of interrelated independent variables and the dependent variable of sex inequalities in educational attainment. Sex-role orientation changes are the key to significant change in the…

  20. Sex Education and Student Rights: Including the Missing Actor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Paul T.

    2011-01-01

    In the West, sex education has always been a taboo subject that continues to challenge the public schools. Drawing on recent developments in some Canadian provinces, I argue that we cannot begin to address the issue of responsible sex education until we first acknowledge that students themselves have a moral and constitutional right to this kind…

  1. Exercising Your Rights: Eliminating Sex Bias in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Patricia B.; Katrin, Susan E.

    A module on sex stereotyping and its effect on physical education is described. This unit is a part of a series of instructional modules on sex-role stereotyping in education. Designed to be used independently or to supplement an existing instructional unit, the module is composed of a 25-minute tape, five transparency masters, three handouts, and…

  2. Thinking and Doing: Overcoming Sex-Role Stereotyping in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Dorothy; And Others

    This manual outlines goals, and provides reading material, problem situations and suggested class activities for use in teacher education workshops concerned with overcoming sex role stereotyping in education. Materials for the first workshop session cover the general topic of sex-role stereotyping and its definition in terms of the traits,…

  3. [Sex education in practice and science in Germany].

    PubMed

    Sielert, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Sex education in Germany has a history full of conflict and ideological change between emancipatory, reforming, and repressive tendencies. As a science, sex education has only recently gained independence from its mother disciplines theology, medicine, psychology, and sociology and at the same time has taken a critically constructive position towards sexual science. Its topics range from dissemination of knowledge about biological processes and contraception to relationship concerns, sexual orientation, gender issues, sexual transgression, moral, and ethical questions. Sexual socialization happens nearly everywhere. Sexual education takes place mainly in families, elementary education, and school, but increasingly also in all other areas of education, social work, and health service. Its clientèle are no longer exclusively children and adolescents but increasingly adults of every age group. Subjects such as AIDS, sexual abuse, and teenage pregnancy have contributed to governmental funding of projects and training in sex education. Thus, sex education still reaches from mere protection from dangers to fostering or maintaining psychological health.

  4. Queering Sex Education: Young Adult Literature with LGBT Content as Complementary Sources of Sex and Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bittner, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the nature of young adult texts as complementary sources of informal queer sex and sexuality education, along with a close reading of a sample of this young adult (YA) literature. LGBT teens are often left out of discussions in sex education classrooms in the United States because of discriminatory curricula, ignorance on the…

  5. Factors affecting sex education in the school system.

    PubMed

    Woo, G W; Soon, R; Thomas, J M; Kaneshiro, B

    2011-06-01

    To describe the current status of school based sex education and to determine predictors of providing a comprehensive sex education curriculum. Cross-sectional mailed survey Hawaii Seventh and eighth grade health teachers Participants were surveyed regarding the content, quality, and influences on sex education for the 2007 to 2008 academic year. Measures of association (chi-square, ANOVA) and multiple logistic regression were used to determine predictors for teaching comprehensive sex education topics including sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy prevention. Approximately 80% of teachers incorporated some form of sex education into their curriculum and 54.4% of teachers incorporated a comprehensive education. Teachers indicated that personal values and the availability of curriculum had the greatest influence on the content of the curriculum. Specific factors which were associated with an increased likelihood of providing a comprehensive curriculum included teaching in a public school (public 66.7% versus private 34.6%, P = 0.01), receiving formal training in sex education (received training 77.8% versus did not receive training 50.0%, P = 0.03) and having contact with a student who became pregnant (contact 72.7% versus no contact 46.7%, P = 0.04). Although most teachers incorporate some form of sex education, only half incorporate a comprehensive curriculum. Personal values as well as teacher resources play an important role in the content of the curriculum. Copyright © 2011 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sex education attitudes and outcomes among North American women.

    PubMed

    Williams, Monnica T; Bonner, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Attitudes and outcomes of sex education received by North American women are examined via an Internet survey (N = 1,400). Mean age was 19.5, with 24% reporting one or more unplanned pregnancies. Women were more satisfied with sex education from informal sources than from parents, schools, and physicians. Those receiving sex education from parents or schools reported fewer pregnancies and abortions. In school, women receiving a combination of contraceptive and abstinence education and those receiving primarily abstinence education were least likely to experience unplanned pregnancy. Religious identification was significantly related to unplanned pregnancy and type of sex education received from parents. These factors seem to play a significant role in reducing unplanned pregnancy and abortion.

  7. Nurses Urged to Prepare for Sex Education.

    PubMed

    2017-01-01

    Editors' note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over more than a century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives highlights articles selected to fit today's topics and times.This month we reprint a brief "Professional Practice" note from the June 1969 issue about what was described as the first family planning conference for nurse educators. Speakers emphasized the need to make this subject a routine part of nursing school curricula (despite debates over the nurse's role in family planning), "so that nurses can counsel out of wisdom and not from piety or ignorance." Speakers included James Lieberman, MD, who years later coauthored with his daughter a teen sex guide, and Alan Guttmacher, MD, then president of Planned Parenthood, whose Center for Family Planning Program Development within that organization was later renamed the Guttmacher Institute in his honor.Nurses today are deeply involved in sexual and reproductive health care. In this issue, public health specialist Diane Santa Maria and colleagues offer ways to advance sexual and reproductive health care for adolescents by devising more friendly, youth-oriented clinical settings.

  8. Where Do Chinese Adolescents Obtain Knowledge of Sex? Implications for Sex Education in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Liying; Li, Xiaoming; Shah, Iqbal H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Sex education in China has been promoted for many years, but limited data are available regarding the sources from which adolescents receive sex-related knowledge. The present study was designed to examine the sources from which Chinese adolescents obtain their information on puberty, sexuality and STI/HIV/AIDS, and whether there are any…

  9. Teacher/Student Classroom Interaction in Vocational Education. A Sex Bias/Sex Stereotyping Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omvig, Clayton P.

    A study examined teacher-student interaction in Kentucky's secondary and postsecondary vocational education classrooms. It investigated whether sex bias or inequities were present and what might explain such differences. A literature review focused on studies conducted at different grade levels with relation to sex bias and classroom interactions.…

  10. Sex Education Representations in Spanish Combined Biology and Geology Textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Cabeza, Belén; Sánchez-Bello, Ana

    2013-07-01

    Sex education is principally dealt with as part of the combined subject of Biology and Geology in the Spanish school curriculum. Teachers of this subject are not specifically trained to teach sex education, and thus the contents of their assigned textbooks are the main source of information available to them in this field. The main goal of this study was to determine what information Biology and Geology textbooks provide with regard to sex education and the vision of sexuality they give, but above all to reveal which perspectives of sex education they legitimise and which they silence. We analysed the textbooks in question by interpreting both visual and text representations, as a means of enabling us to investigate the nature of the discourse on sex education. With this aim, we have used a qualitative methodology, based on the content analysis. The main analytical tool was an in-house grid constructed to allow us to analyse the visual and textual representations. Our analysis of the combined Biology and Geology textbooks for Secondary Year 3 revealed that there is a tendency to reproduce models of sex education that take place within a framework of the more traditional discourses. Besides, the results suggested that the most of the sample chosen for this study makes a superficial, incomplete, incorrect or biased approach to sex education.

  11. Oral sex: behaviours and feelings of Canadian young women and implications for sex education.

    PubMed

    Malacad, Brea L; Hess, Gretchen C

    2010-06-01

    Anecdotal reports indicate that, over the past decade, oral sex has become an increasingly common and casual activity among adolescent females. To investigate the validity of this claim the authors set out to study the oral sex practices of young women in Canada and to explore the attitudes and emotions that young women associate with oral sex. An anonymous self-report questionnaire, which contained questions pertaining to both vaginal intercourse and oral sex, was completed by 181 women aged 18-25 years. Approximately three quarters of the women in this sample had engaged in oral sex, a prevalence rate that was almost identical to that for vaginal intercourse. The mean age at first experience was approximately 17 years for both coitus and oral sex, though 27% of the sexually active participants had their first oral sex experience before age 16 (compared to 16% for coitus). Most women had their most recent sexual experiences within committed relationships and reported positive emotions associated with those experiences. Negative emotions at most recent oral sex were more commonly reported by the younger women in the sample and by those who were not in love with their partner. These results indicate that oral sex is at least as common as vaginal intercourse and that it has the same emotional implications for young women. Therefore, this topic should be given the same consideration as coitus within the context of sex education. Young people must be informed about risks, protective factors, and emotional implications associated with engagement in oral sex.

  12. Single-Sex Schooling and Women's Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauch, Patricia A.

    Rarely when single-sex Catholic secondary schools convert to coed school organization is the potential loss of gender-specific benefits addressed. Since the movement to coeducation is seldom accompanied by the return of a "converted" school to single-sex status, the incalculable loss to the traditional gender diversity of school organization is…

  13. Sex education and family planning messages in Greek school books.

    PubMed

    Frisiras, S; Lagiou, A; Sourtzi, P; Vidalaki, M

    1991-05-01

    The Greek Family Planning Association (GFPA) completed in march 1990 a 3-year effort to evaluate whether sex education was an integral part of the school curricula. It was reported by a representative of the Pedagogical Institute in the Ministry of Education and Religion that important efforts have been made. The findings were presented at the 2nd Sex Education and Health seminar in March, 1990. Greek primary schools have 1 teacher for all lessons; but specialists in various fields of the secondary school curricula. Primary school books have various references and pictures on human reproduction. Equality of the sexes socially and culturally is represented, as well as good health messages on nutrition and hygiene. Noticeably absent, however, is any reference to human sexuality, nude human body or sex organ pictures, or other non-traditional family models. Family planning and contraception are also missing; teacher training or special courses are needed. Secondary school books have clear but limited messages. For example, there is a whole page on the philosophy and aims of family planning, but parenthood is only presented in the context of traditional marriage without contraception. It is recommended that legislative support be engaged to insure that sex education programs are systematic, age-specific, and a continuous activity from the primary level. Another important role in the implementation and curriculum development of sex education is one played by teachers and health professionals, those in touch with young people. GFPA needs to compile basic guidelines for those teaching sex education.

  14. Indiana Guide to Sex Equity in Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Michael O.

    This publication for Indiana vocational education personnel is intended to raise some sex equity issues. In its best use, it provides educators with a bibliography of resources available from the Library Services and Consultation and Field Services units of Vocational Education Services (VES). Section 1 on the problem of equity discusses the…

  15. Federal Funding to Promote Sex Equity in Education: 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan S.; Goodman, Melanie A.

    This publication discusses federal funds which are available for research and development in sex equity in education. A major objective is to identify specific Federal funding opportunities for projects focusing on sex equity. Another objective is to help individuals understand the overall Federal pattern of support for activities to promote sex…

  16. Talking with Kids: A Parent's Guide to Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National PTA, Chicago, IL.

    This guide is designed to help parents determine what is being taught to their children about sex education in school, offering tips on how to talk to children about these issues. The first section presents pointers from the "Talking with Kids" campaign: start early; initiate conversations; talk about sex and relationships; create an open…

  17. Gender and Sex Education: A Study of Adolescent Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Measor, Lynda; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Responses of English adolescents to single-sex sex education classes were studied, focusing on about 20 females and about 20 males. There were clear gender differences in student reactions, with boys responding more openly, disruptively, and negatively. The role of cultural prescriptions in their responses is explored. (SLD)

  18. Institutionalizing Sex Education in Diverse U.S. School Districts.

    PubMed

    Saul Butler, Rebekah; Sorace, Danene; Hentz Beach, Kathleen

    2018-02-01

    This paper describes the Working to Institutionalize Sex Education (WISE) Initiative, a privately funded effort to support ready public school districts to advance and sustain comprehensive sexuality programs, and examines the degree to which WISE has been successful in increasing access to sex education, removing barriers, and highlighting best practices. The data for this study come from a set of performance indicators, guidance documents, and tools designed for the WISE Initiative to capture changes in sex education institutionalization at WISE school districts. The evaluation includes the analysis of 186 school districts across 12 states in the U.S. As a result of the WISE Initiative, 788,865 unique students received new or enhanced sex education in school classrooms and 88 school districts reached their sex education institutionalization goals. In addition to these school district successes, WISE codified the WISE Method and toolkit-a practical guide to help schools implement sex education. Barriers to implementing sexuality education can be overcome with administrative support and focused technical assistance and training, resulting in significant student reach in diverse school districts nationwide. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sex Education for Young Children with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Edith Marie; Farley, Jack W.

    1990-01-01

    The article briefly reviews the research and controversy concerning sex education for handicapped children and offers five guidelines including build self-esteem, answer questions clearly and accurately, avoid threats and jokes, and respect children's privacy. (DB)

  20. An Innovative Approach to Sex Education in Rural Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaisdell, Nancy L.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews a rural Washington State teacher's experience in approaching the sensitive topic of sex education. Includes advice on dealing with opposing parents, church, and school officials. The reported lesson considered the biology and reproduction of a pet boa constrictor. (TES)

  1. Sex differences in educational encouragement and academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aqeel

    2012-08-01

    Sex differences in educational encouragement and their predictiveness of academic achievement were examined among 442 secondary school students (M age = 13.2 yr., SD = 1.9). Education-related encouragement received from mothers, fathers, friends, and teachers was assessed. Academic achievement was based on student self-reports and grades. Female adolescents reported receiving statistically significantly more educational encouragement from their mothers, fathers, friends, and teachers than did male adolescents. In regression, sex and educational encouragement from parents, friends, and teachers were found to be significant predictors of academic achievement.

  2. Separated by Sex: A Critical Look at Single-Sex Education for Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Naval Research, Washington, DC. Naval Applications and Analysis Div.

    This report summarizes the discussion and conclusions of an educational roundtable examining the collected research on K-12 single-sex education produced over more than two decades. The one day roundtable generated many points of disagreement and several profound unanswered questions. Nonetheless, there was consensus on a series of statements.…

  3. Sex Equality in Vocational Education: A Chance for Educators to Expand Opportunities for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonborn, Barbara G.; O'Neil, Mary L.

    Addressed to vocational educators and counselors, this booklet contains four main sections. The first section includes definitions of terms in the area of sex equality in vocational education, an overview of the problems created by sex discrimination, and a discussion of the question: Where does vocational education lead? The second section…

  4. Sex education in Swedish schools as described by young women.

    PubMed

    Ekstrand, Maria; Engblom, Camilla; Larsson, Margareta; Tydén, Tanja

    2011-06-01

    To investigate sex education in Swedish schools regarding content, satisfaction, and suggested improvements, as described by teenagers and young adults. Waiting-room survey conducted among 225 female patients (aged 13-25) at youth and student health clinics in one large-, and one medium-sized Swedish city. Most participants (97%, n = 218) had received sex education in school, of varying content and quality. Sixty percent thought basic body development was sufficiently covered. Insufficiently covered topics included sexual assault (96%), sexual harassment (94%), pornography (90%), abortion (81%), emergency contraception (80%), fertility (80%), and pregnancy (59%). Thirty percent received no information about chlamydia, and almost half reported that condyloma and human papillomavirus had not been addressed. The youngest respondents (13-19 years) were significantly more likely to have been told about emergency contraception, homosexuality, bisexuality, and transsexuality. Nearly half (46%) considered 'acceptable' the knowledge gained from sex education provided at school whereas more than a third considered it 'poor' or 'very poor'. Suggested improvements included more information, more discussion, greater emphasis on sexual diversity, and more knowledgeable teachers. Content and quality of sex education varied greatly. Most respondents thought many topics were insufficiently covered, sex education should be more extensive, and teachers better educated.

  5. Open Letter to Religious Leaders about Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Sexuality Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "Open Letter to Religious Leaders about Sex Education" reinforces scriptural and theological commitments to truth-telling in calling for "full and honest education about sexual and reproductive health." This "Open Letter" was published in 2002, at about the midpoint of a decade-long federal government commitment to…

  6. Queer Breeding: Historicising Popular Culture, Homosexuality and Informal Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Through an analysis of gay protest music (1975) and an educational kit for students (1978), both sponsored by the Campaign for Homosexual Equality in the UK, this paper brings into focus a history of gay rights activists' efforts to marshal popular culture in the development of informal sex education for young people in the second half of the…

  7. How Sex Education Research Methodologies Frame GLBTIQ Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Tiffany

    2013-01-01

    The "bullied" gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, intersex and otherwise Queer (GLBTIQ) student is a fairly recent figure in the sexuality education research literature. GLBTIQ students have previously been problematised by sex education research in a range of different ways and have been the subjects of varying methodological…

  8. "Innovations" On Hold: Sex Education in the Greek Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerouki, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to examine the way sex and relationships education programs, as part of Health Education extra curriculum activities, have been implemented in the Greek primary schools. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents and discusses data from an anonymous survey research questionnaire distributed to the 68 Elementary…

  9. Use of Sexuality-Focused Entertainment Media in Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neustifter, Ruth; Blumer, Markie L. C.; O'Reilly, Jessica; Ramirez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The literature on the impact of entertainment media on sex education is typically pathology-focused, unclear regarding the effects of such usage, and void of dialogue between those who actually work in the areas of sexuality education and entertainment. To address this gap, this paper is the product of joint authorship between media figures from…

  10. Occupational Stigma Communication: The Anticipatory Socialization of Sex Educators.

    PubMed

    Selzer King, Abigail; Jensen, Robin E; Jones, Christina; McCarthy, Michael J

    2017-08-21

    Controversies about sex education have complex, yet often overlooked, occupational implications related to stigma for teachers. In this study, we interviewed 26 future sex educators in their last year of certification about how their anticipatory socialization experiences spoke to the management of potential occupational stigma. Our analysis revealed two stigma management communication (SMC) strategies future sex educators learned, strategies we term cooperation and opportunism, and identified the ways in which those strategies were responses to stigma content cues of responsibility and peril, respectively. We contend that the interactivity of stigma communication is an important site for the theorizing of as-yet-unidentified SMC strategies, strategies that can be enlisted in a diversity of health education and healthcare contexts.

  11. Greek students' knowledge and sources of information regarding sex education.

    PubMed

    Matziou, V; Perdikaris, P; Petsios, K; Gymnopoulou, E; Galanis, P; Brokalaki, H

    2009-09-01

    Human sexuality is a complex part of life and is considered a multidimensional phenomenon. Therefore there is an increased need for adequate and comprehensive sex education, especially for teenagers and young adults. The main aim of the study was to evaluate the level of students' sexual knowledge, as well as to identify their sources of information regarding sexual life and reproduction. A cross-sectional study using a designed self-report questionnaire was performed. The study population consisted of 936 students who were attending 10 high schools and four medical schools in Attica. Data were collected after obtaining permission from the Pedagogic Institute of the Greek Ministry of Education. The main sources of students' sexual information about reproduction were friends (29.1%) and parents (24.0%), whereas school was reported by 14.3% of them. The preferred sources of information, according to students' perceptions, were sex education specialists (65.6%), followed by school (39.1%), parents (32.2%) and friends (27.7%). The importance of school, peer and parent support upon adolescents' sexual life was revealed by the results of the study. Students' knowledge level on sex topics is not satisfactory and therefore there is a need for sex education specialists and special courses regarding sex education in Greek schools.

  12. Sex and Relationships Education: Whose Responsibility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strachan, Amy; Sinclair, Alex

    2017-01-01

    In the primary science department of an initial teacher training institute, it is the responsibility of educators to ensure that their students enter the education profession with the knowledge and confidence to deliver all areas of the National Curriculum in England programmes of study for science. The authors aim for their students to use…

  13. Demythologizing sex education in Oklahoma: an attitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Turner, N H

    1983-08-01

    A randomized study was conducted to determine the distribution of attitudes among Oklahomans of voting age toward sex education and to analyze the relationship of demographic, sociocultural, and attitudinal factors. The state was stratified into six regions. Forty-five percent of the sample lived in urban areas, and 55% in rural areas. Random digit dialing and random selection within households were utilized to ensure a representative sample of the population. Eighty percent of the sample was found to be favorable toward sex education in the public schools, while 20% was unfavorable. A majority of respondents in all religious groups including "fundamentalists" were favorable. Seventeen variables were found to be significant in the univariate analysis of the data; eight were not significant. In a multivariate analysis, three variables, age, Protestant denominational type and female employment, were shown to have predictive ability in determining favorability and unfavorability. Implications for building community support for sex education also are discussed.

  14. Changes in Adolescents’ Receipt of Sex Education, 2006–2013

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Laura Duberstein; Maddow-Zimet, Isaac; Boonstra, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Updated estimates of adolescents’ receipt of sex education are needed to monitor changing access to information. Methods Using nationally representative data from the 2006–2010 and 2011–2013 National Survey of Family Growth, we estimated changes over time in adolescents’ receipt of sex education from formal sources and from parents and differentials in these trends by adolescents’ gender, race/ethnicity, age, and place of residence. Results Between 2006–2010 and 2011–2013, there were significant declines in adolescent females’ receipt of formal instruction about birth control (70% to 60%), saying no to sex (89% to 82%), sexually transmitted disease (94% to 90%), and HIV/AIDS (89% to 86%). There was a significant decline in males’ receipt of instruction about birth control (61% to 55%). Declines were concentrated among adolescents living in nonmetropolitan areas. The proportion of adolescents talking with their parents about sex education topics did not change significantly. Twenty-one percent of females and 35% of males did not receive instruction about methods of birth control from either formal sources or a parent. Conclusions Declines in receipt of formal sex education and low rates of parental communication may leave adolescents without instruction, particularly in nonmetropolitan areas. More effort is needed to understand this decline and to explore adolescents’ potential other sources of reproductive health information. PMID:27032487

  15. "Use Condoms for Safe Sex!" Youth-Led Video Making and Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Kyung-Hwa; MacEntee, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Situated at the intersection between child-led visual methods and sex education, this paper focuses on the potential of youth-led video making to enable young people to develop guiding principles to inform their own sexual behaviour. It draws on findings from a video-making project carried out with a group of South African young people, which…

  16. Sex Is Like Jelly Beans: Educating Students on the Risks of Oral Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Erin; Harris, Terrance

    2014-01-01

    This study provides a description of an innovative workshop that educated college students about the risks of unprotected sexual behavior, particularly oral sex, and methods of risk reduction using a metaphor of "sharing and eating jelly beans." Intervention development was guided by the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills model.…

  17. Sex Ed...And the Reds? Reconsidering the Anaheim Battle over Sex Education, 1962-1969

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehlman, Natalia

    2007-01-01

    By December 1968, the Anaheim Family Life and Sex Education (FLSE) program, celebrated since its formal introduction in 1965 as one of the most progressive in the nation, was being smeared as communistic and perverse. Local activists in this Orange County city had been congregating in hotel rooms and homes, screening cautionary films for the…

  18. Sources of Sex Education as a Function of Sex, Coital Activity, and Type of Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andre, Thomas; And Others

    The perceived importance of sources of sex education and the effects of gender, coital activity, and type of information were studied, and previous studies were assessed. Attention was directed to the relative contribution of parents, institutions, reading, and peers to the information about each of 35 different sexual topics of 116 male and 116…

  19. Racial and/or Ethnic Differences in Formal Sex Education and Sex Education by Parents among Young Women in the United States.

    PubMed

    Vanderberg, Rachel H; Farkas, Amy H; Miller, Elizabeth; Sucato, Gina S; Akers, Aletha Y; Borrero, Sonya B

    2016-02-01

    We sought to investigate the associations between race and/or ethnicity and young women's formal sex education and sex education by parents. Cross-sectional analysis of a nationally representative sample of 1768 women aged 15-24 years who participated in the 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth. We assessed 6 main outcomes: participants' report of: (1) any formal sex education; (2) formal contraceptive education; (3) formal sexually transmitted infection (STI) education; (4) any sex education by parents; (5) contraceptive education by parents; and (6) STI education by parents. The primary independent variable was self-reported race and/or ethnicity. Nearly all of participants (95%) reported any formal sex education, 68% reported formal contraceptive education, and 92% reported formal STI education. Seventy-five percent of participants reported not having any sex education by parents and only 61% and 56% reported contraceptive and STI education by parents, respectively. US-born Hispanic women were more likely than white women to report STI education by parents (adjusted odds ratio = 1.87; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-2.99). No other significant racial and/or ethnic differences in sex education were found. There are few racial and/or ethnic differences in formal sex education and sex education by parents among young women. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. All rights reserved.

  20. An Analysis of U.S. Sex Education Programs and Evaluation Methods. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Douglas; And Others

    The volume, first in a series of five, presents an analysis of sex education programs in the United States. It is presented in six chapters. Chapter I provides a brief overview of sex education in the public schools and summarizes goals, forms, and prevalence of sex education. Chapter II reviews literature on the effects of school sex education…

  1. [Sex education of children and adolescent].

    PubMed

    Montenegro, H

    2000-06-01

    There is a remarkable ignorance about sexuality among Chilean teenagers, as underscored by the paper by Fernández et al, published in this issue. The authors analyze the biological, psychological and social consequences of the lack of parental and school sexual education. Among them, there is an increasing incidence of unwanted pregnancies, abortions and sexually transmitted diseases in teenagers. Child abuse, neglect, battering, mortality and maternal deprivation are more frequent among the offspring of teenage parents. School desertion caused by unwanted pregnancies will seriously jeopardize the education and training of these teenagers, perpetuating the cycle of poverty.

  2. Love grows with sex: teenagers negotiating sex and gender in the context of HIV and the implications for sex education.

    PubMed

    Bhana, Deevia

    2017-03-01

    How do teenagers located in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa, the epicentre of the HIV pandemic, give meaning to sexuality? This paper examines teenage black Africans investments in sex and sexuality and the gendered dynamics through which sexuality is articulated. Whilst unequal gender relations of power continue to feature prominently within relationship dynamics fuelling the gendering of HIV, attention to the micro-processes through which relationships are forged remain significant in illustrating the complex connections between love, sex and gender. Drawing on empirical findings with teenagers between the ages of 16 and 17 years old, the paper shows how relationships are conceptualised based on discourses of love. Love is inextricably bound up with sex and when teenagers talk about love and sex they also talk about condom use, multiple sexual partners and gender inequalities. What teenagers were interested in for their sexual relationships was not raised in sex education programmes at school. Implications for addressing teenage constructions of sexuality are discussed in the conclusion.

  3. Sex education is key to combatting AIDS in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Csillag, C

    1999-06-26

    About 60,000 children in Brazil were born from an AIDS-affected mother, and 16,000 were orphaned by AIDS. These stark figures were released by the Global Orphan Project and the Instituto Promundo at the EducAids conference. About 90% of childhood AIDS cases were a result of perinatal exposure, and the other 10% from unknown exposure. In response to these prevalences, the EducAids initiative, which aims to promote AIDS education in schools, was considering sex education for preschool children. The coordinator of the government's AIDS prevention program, Pedro Chequer, believes sex education for children as young as 4 years old would reduce AIDS among teenagers and help avoid unwanted pregnancies. The Minister of Health supported this concept. Jose Serra, the Minister of Health declared that it was not the aim of the ministry to avoid teenage pregnancy but to prevent early sexual intercourse. In 1997 the number of deliveries by girls aged 15-19 years had risen to 25.27%, from 21.41% in 1993. However, the number of deliveries for women over age 20 are falling. Pedro Chequer, EducAids coordinator, stated that despite these facts, campaigns for sex education would be opposed by the Roman Catholic Church.

  4. [School nursing and sex education for adolescents].

    PubMed

    Felizari, G M

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to organize and testify the teaching of Sexual Education for Adolescents. Two groups of first level School adolescents were selected to be submitted to a diagnostic test; after being worked, they were submitted to a post-test about their knowledge of subject matter. It was concluded that the teenagers are very little informed about sexuality, although they are highly motivated and able to discuss and to receive information about the subject. The results of the research points to the necessity of a multidisciplinary approach, with the active participation of scholar nursing in its development. It is recommended that the Program of Sexual Education should also include some bio-psychosocial aspects and must be based on the diagnosis of students' needs.

  5. [Beliefs, attitudes and knowledge about sex education].

    PubMed

    Fernández, L; Bustos, L; González, L; Palma, D; Villagrán, J; Muñoz, S

    2000-06-01

    Previous reports show that Chilean teenagers have an inadequate knowledge about sexuality and reproduction. To compare the knowledge about sexuality among adolescents coming from private and public schools, with and without sexual education programs. A structured anonymous inquiry, containing multiple choice and open questions, was applied to a sample of 229 adolescents attending seventh and eighth grade of junior school, in private and public schools of Temuco, Chile. Eleven percent of adolescents had already their first sexual intercourse at a mean age of 12.2 +/- 2.4 years old. Of these, 96% came from public schools. An overall analysis of tests, disclosed a 53% of correct answers to the inquiry. Adolescents coming from private schools had a better performance than those coming from public schools. Sexual attitudes were not influenced by sexual education programs. Adolescents coming from private schools have a better sexual knowledge level and more conservative attitudes towards sexuality. Overall knowledge is inadequate albeit overvalued. These teenagers are high risk group for unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases and require efficient sexual education programs.

  6. Young People's Views of Sex Education: Gender, Information and Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Measor, Lynda

    2004-01-01

    This paper derives from research that had the aim of understanding more about adolescents' views of sex education and adolescent sexuality. The data are taken from three separate pieces of research conducted in 1984, 1998 and 2003. This paper presents data about gender, information and knowledge relating to sexuality. It seeks to demonstrate that…

  7. "Just Say No" Isn't Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Anne

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the need for sex education and the inclusion of accurate information in materials produced for young people. Materials that address sexual reproduction, puberty, teenage pregnancy, AIDS, and other sexually transmitted diseases are reviewed, and recommended titles for print and nonprint materials are listed together with resources for…

  8. Sex Education: A Success in Our Social-Studies Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michner, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Whenever secondary schools permit students to participate in the determination of the social studies curriculum, sex education is almost always demanded. Adolescents are often-times more deeply interested in this question than most people suspect, for courtship and marriage relationships are vital problems. Because many students have been asking…

  9. Adolescent Sex Education: A Preventive Mental Health Measure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obstfeld, Lisa S.; Meyers, Andrew W.

    1984-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of adolescent sex education as a means of preventing sexuality-related disorders, including: sexual dysfunction; sexual deviance; physical health problems often contracted from sexual activity; and various psychological and sociological ill effects resulting from unplanned pregnancies. (Author/CJB)

  10. Impact of Sex Education in Kogi State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sule, H. A.; Akor, J. A.; Toluhi, O. J.; Suleiman, R. O.; Akpihi, L.; Ali, O. U.

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this study was to investigate the impact of family sex education in secondary schools on students in Kogi State, Nigeria. The descriptive survey design was used for the study. A total of 1,960 secondary school students were drawn by stratified random sampling from 40 schools within Kogi State, Nigeria. Three research questions were…

  11. Whither Sex Education? Excellence in Comprehensive Program Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern, Stephen

    A review of recent sex education literature is presented in an attempt to integrate observations and recommendations related to both program development and innovation acceptance. A Developmental Research and Utilization Model is employed to systematically guide planning, implementation, evaluation, advocacy, and institutionalization. Curriculum…

  12. Does Sex Education Affect Adolescent Sexual Behaviors and Health?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabia, Joseph J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines whether offering sex education to young teenagers affects several measures of adolescent sexual behavior and health: virginity status, contraceptive use, frequency of intercourse, likelihood of pregnancy, and probability of contracting a sexually transmitted disease. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent…

  13. BDSM Disclosure and Stigma Management: Identifying Opportunities for Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezreh, Tanya; Weinberg, Thomas S.; Edgar, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    While participation in the activities like bondage, domination, submission/sadism, masochism that fall under the umbrella term BDSM is widespread, stigma surrounding BDSM poses risks to practitioners who wish to disclose their interest. We examined risk factors involved with disclosure to posit how sex education might diffuse stigma and warn of…

  14. Picturing Sex Education: Notes on the Politics of Visual Stratification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Diederik F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the scarcity of research on depictions and layout in sex education materials. It is argued that pictures and layout can inform an analysis of social stratification based on visual access. This process of social organization is located using four theoretical models. However these models do not lend themselves to a close reading…

  15. Reducing Barriers to Sex Education for Adults with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntley, Cristy F.; Benner, Susan M.

    1993-01-01

    Opinions of professionals from 16 agencies were obtained to identify techniques that agencies serving adults or adolescents with mental retardation could utilize to provide systematic sex education and counseling. Recommendations are offered in five areas: self-advocacy and self-determination, individual design, staff training and support,…

  16. No Room at the Top: Sex Discrimination in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorgman, Margo

    Data are presented on women in higher education, along with information on federal legislation to eliminate sex discrimination, issues concerning redressing employment discrimination, specific problems with legislative procedures and enforcement of legislation, and case studies that highlight some of the processes involved. Evidence is cited that…

  17. Life Science Teachers' Decision Making on Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Puneet Singh

    2013-01-01

    The desires of young people and especially young bodies are constructed at the intersections of policies that set the parameters of sex education policies, the embodied experiences of students in classrooms, and the way bodies are discussed in the complex language of science. Moreover, more research points to the lack of scientifically and…

  18. Curriculum Guide in Sex Education for the TMR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Kathy L.

    Presented is a sex education curriculum guide for teachers of trainable retarded students ages 12 to 21 years. The guide is divided into six units: body parts, gender identification, and restroom signs; living things; reproduction; growth; adolescence, menstruation, and street language; and maturity (including sexual feelings and birth control).…

  19. Introduction of Sex Education: An American School in Tunisia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Elisabeth E.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction of a sex education course into a private American school in Tunisia. The steps involved in the development of the project and curriculum are recorded. The impact of the project on receptive Tunisian authorities and its influence on change are discussed. (Author)

  20. Sex Education for Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingraham, Cynthia L.; Vernon, McCay; Clemente, Brenda; Olney, Linda

    2000-01-01

    This article describes a model sex education program developed for youths and adults who are deafblind by the Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults. In addition, it also discusses major related issues and presents general recommendations and a resource for further information. (Contains 11 references.) (Author/CR)

  1. Business as Usual: Sex Stereotyping in Business Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project on Sex Stereotyping in Education, Red Bank, NJ.

    The module described in this document is part of a series of instructional modules on sex-role stereotyping in education. This document (including all but the cassette tape) is the module that explores the myths and stereotypes that have limited women in the world of work. The material provides suggestions for helping students expand occupational…

  2. Education and Employment. A Handbook to Promote Sex Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenback, Kathryn

    This handbook is intended to help instructors and administrators increase enrollments of females in nontraditional vocational training programs and thereby foster sex equity in society. Information is provided that is designed to address the following objectives: increasing nontraditional enrollment, facilitating positive educational experiences…

  3. Sex Education in Bermuda: Curriculum Development and Community Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, June Dobbs

    1976-01-01

    Deal with one instance in which the Government of Bermuda sought to effect social change. Discusses the author's experiences in introducing a sex education program there as well as the implications of that program's development for five social problems, which Bermuda faces in its struggle to maintain economic survival. (RK)

  4. The case for a moral sex education in the schools.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S

    1981-04-01

    The potential benefits of sex education cannot be realistically discussed without initially rooting out the fears and myths which prevent the active promotion of good programs. The truth of the situation is that knowledgeable and informed adolescents are more likely to postpone sexual relations until they feel emotionally ready and are able to take the necessary precautions against pregnancy and venereal disease. It is essential that sexuality programs be taught with values. When teaching contraception, the instructor needs to convey some basic guidelines. Sex education should be taught from the perspective that it is wrong to take advantage of another individual. The function of a "moral" education is to encourage people to strive toward the universally accepted ideals of this democratic and pluralistic society and to offer facts which facilitate responsible decision making. The value of equality of the sexes, dignity and respect for all human being must be taught. A great difference exists between being moral and being moralistic. In moralistic presentations the attempt is made a impose a personal point of view in a dogmatic way. Sex education programs are best taught from a moral perspective which encourages the accepted aspirations of this society while preserving individual liberty. Given these guidelines, even the most controversial subjects may be discussed in school within a moral framework. A quality sex education program must include the following principles: enhancing the self-concept; preparation for marriage and parenthood; understanding love; preparation for making responsible decisions; helping people understand the need for equal opportunities for males and for females; and contributing to knowledge and understanding of the sexual dimension of life.

  5. Cultural, religious and socio-economic factors affecting sex education in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Koral, S

    1991-05-01

    Although professional pressure groups attempted to address the need for formal sex education in the 1970's, the Family Planning Association of Turkey (FPAT) has successfully introduced sex education subjects into school programs. It has also been endorsed as a major resource by the Ministry of Health; however, the Ministry of Education has been backsliding recently on sex education and in general has not generated zealous supporters of sex education. Different attitudes and practices prevail. Sex education is not usually discussed in the home, but there is support for sex education in schools. Its importance is recognized. Turkish society tends to be conservative particularly among middle socioeconomic stratum. Upper classes tend to be more liberal, and lower classes perceive sexuality as the normal way of life. The term sex is associated with eroticism, sex education as sex techniques; so sexuality must fall within the confines of health education. Within the Muslim faith, views on sex support discussion of sexual issues with couples, for example, or among students of Islamic jurisprudence. According to Quaranic teachings, women have a right to a sex life, including divorce options if sexuality is not fulfilled. Misinterpretations of Quaranic teachings have hindered the effort to plan an appropriate sex education program. Islamic values are liberal in their support for family planning. The FPAT's objective is to change the image of sex education and eliminate the fear that established values will be challenged by sex education.

  6. Sex Education in Children and Adolescents With Disabilities in Yogyakarta, Indonesia From a Teachers' Gender Perspective.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Satoko; Hartini, Sri; Hapsari, Elsi Dwi; Takada, Satoshi

    2017-05-01

    Children and adolescents with disabilities (CAD) frequently engage in inappropriate sexual behaviors. In Indonesia, the need for sex education for CAD remains unclear. This study investigated teacher attitudes toward providing sex education in special schools to clarify the gender differences among teachers providing sex education. Questionnaires were sent to 180 teachers. The response rate was 72.2%. Eighty-three percent of responders were Muslim. Our findings revealed that teachers in special schools considered sex education to be important. However, the number of sex education contents was limited, and female teachers were more positive about teaching sex education than male teachers. Equally, female teachers taught a greater number of sex education contents than did male teachers. These findings were consistent with reports from developed countries although cultural and religious background differed from those of Indonesia. Sex education for CAD was accepted by teachers in Indonesia; however, materials and tools for education should be developed further.

  7. Impacts of abstinence education on teen sexual activity, risk of pregnancy, and risk of sexually transmitted diseases.

    PubMed

    Trenholm, Christopher; Devaney, Barbara; Fortson, Kenneth; Clark, Melissa; Bridgespan, Lisa Quay; Wheeler, Justin

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the impacts of four abstinence-only education programs on adolescent sexual activity and risks of pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Based on an experimental design, the impact analysis uses survey data collected in 2005 and early 2006 from more than 2,000 teens who had been randomly assigned to either a program group that was eligible to participate in one of the four programs or a control group that was not. The findings show no significant impact on teen sexual activity, no differences in rates of unprotected sex, and some impacts on knowledge of STDs and perceived effectiveness of condoms and birth control pills

  8. Sex Education, Public Opinion, and Pornography: A Conditional Process Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Paul J

    2018-05-10

    This study assesses the relationship between pornography consumption and support for sex education in public schools among adults in the United States. Goals were theoretical and applied. At the theoretical level, conditional process analyses are needed to further evaluate the predictions of the primary theory applied to pornography and social influence, the sexual script acquisition, activation, application model ( 3 AM) of sexual media socialization. At the applied level, themes in pornography are most often associated with socialization outcomes that are a threat to the public health. In certain instances, however, pornography may socialize its users in ways that lead to health-promoting attitudes. An increased likelihood of support for sex education among youth may be one such example. Probabilistic national survey data gathered between 1988 and 2016 from 16 unique samples were utilized. A moderated-mediation path analysis indicated that pornography consumption was associated with support for sex education through more acceptance of teenage sex, but that this indirect effect (IE) was moderated by religiosity. Specifically, as religiosity decreased, the magnitude of the IE increased. These results are consistent with 3 AM tenets about the role of sexual scripts in mass media socialization and factors that increase the likelihood of sexual scripting effects.

  9. Resisting the "Condom Every Time for Anal Sex" Health Education Message

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jeffery; Neville, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Ensuring men who have sex with men (MSM) adopt and maintain condom use for anal sex is a challenging health education goal. In order to inform the development of social marketing practices to encourage safe-sex practices, the views of MSM about a key HIV health education message ("using a condom every time for anal sex") were…

  10. "This Is How You Hetero:" Sexual Minorities in Heteronormative Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobaica, Steven; Kwon, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of sex education has been questioned, as students participate in high rates of unsafe sex after completion. Without exploring various sexual minority (SM) identities (e.g., gay, lesbian, and bisexual) and forms of sex, sex education may be especially unhelpful for SMs by perpetuating the heteronormative (i.e., assuming heterosexuality…

  11. The Condom Works in All Situations? Paradoxical Messages in Mainstream Sex Education in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolander, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The condom plays a vital part in safe sex, the ideal outcome of mainstream Swedish sex education. As researchers have pointed out, however, the condom is not a neutral object; rather, it plays a part in shaping, in different ways, both sexual practices and the idea of what sex is. This paper focuses on sex education television programmes produced…

  12. Life science teachers' decision making on sex education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Puneet Singh

    The desires of young people and especially young bodies are constructed at the intersections of policies that set the parameters of sex education policies, the embodied experiences of students in classrooms, and the way bodies are discussed in the complex language of science. Moreover, more research points to the lack of scientifically and medically accurate information about sex education. Through this research, I hope to extend the discussion about sex education to life science classrooms, where youth can discuss how sex occurs according to scientific concepts and processes. However, science classrooms are caught in a double bind: They maintain positivist methods of teaching science while paying little attention to the nature of science or the nature and function of science that offer explanations of scientific phenomena. In this study, I describe how science teachers made decisions about what to include or not include about sexuality in a life science classroom and the discursive frameworks that shaped these decisions. I also analyzed the ways that these relationships functioned to produce certain truths, or discourses. The current trends in research concerning SSI are pointing to understanding how controversial issues are framed according to personal philosophies, identities, and teaching approaches. If we can understand science teachers' inner aspects as they relate to sexuality education, we can also understand the deep-seeded motivations behind how these specific issues are being taught. In science classrooms where a discussion of the body is part of the curriculum, specific discourses of the body and sex/sexuality are excluded. In this study, I describe how science teachers made decisions about what to include or not include about sexuality in a life science classroom and the discursive practices that shaped these decisions.

  13. [Of songs and theater. Sex education].

    PubMed

    Klepp, K I

    1995-04-01

    In two regions of Tanzania, school teachers and health workers developed an education program on HIV called Ngao, which means shield, symbolizing the fact that youth must be prepared to protect themselves against HIV infection. The program targets 14-year-old students. School health workers and teachers underwent 3 days of training on AIDS. After the training, the teachers organized about 20 training meetings where they used flipcharts, black boards, posters, brochures, and manuals for students. They learned about using participative teaching methods and how to organize students to direct class discussions. Students made their own posters; enlivened discussions with 6-7 peers; directed and performed skits in which they together tried to conquer HIV risks or acquire negotiation skills; and wrote songs, plays, and poems about ways youth can protect themselves or ways to address AIDS in their community. The plays, skits, poems, and songs were performed in front of younger children to also inform them about AIDS. Students wore special T-shirts with the logo of the Ngao program, which stimulated discussion on the program. Information on condom use was introduced as an option. Dignitaries, religious leaders, and parents participated in discussions on the program and on AIDS control strategies for the community to adopt. Initially, the program was implemented in 6 schools in urban and rural areas. The students had more knowledge and more positive attitudes towards persons with AIDS than those in comparison schools. They were also less likely to become sexually active in the near future. Teachers and health workers enjoyed teaching the program's curriculum. They felt that the program better equipped and prepared the students to protect themselves against HIV infection. After the pilot project, the program was revised to make it a permanent part of the curriculum in primary schools. An expanded version will be integrated into the health program of secondary schools.

  14. Special Education Teachers Attitudes toward Teaching Sex Education to Students with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Carolann

    2017-01-01

    The attitudes and opinions of special education teachers may potentially reveal insight as to how and why teachers choose to include sex education in their curriculum for self-contained special education classrooms designed to serve students with developmental disabilities. The main objective in developing this study was to gather information…

  15. Toward a Theory of Educational Origins: The Genesis of Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imber, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Developments in the fields of medicine and education, in conjunction with social conditions and intellectual climate, influenced the promotion of school based sex education in the late nineteenth century and on into the twentieth century. The complexity of the relationship between education and society is illustrated through an examination of how…

  16. Pupils' Perceptions of Sex and Reproductive Health Education in Primary Schools in Tanzania: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapinga, Orestes Silverius; Hyera, Daniel Frans

    2015-01-01

    This study explored pupils' perceptions of sex and reproductive health education in primary schools in Tanzania. Specifically, the study aimed at (i) exploring pupils' views on sex and reproductive health education in primary schools; (ii) determining opinions on the appropriateness of sex and reproductive health education for pupils in primary…

  17. Consequences of a Recent Campaign of Criticism against School Sex Education in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirose, Hiroko

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to provide insights into recent events concerning school sex education in Japan. A campaign of criticism against school sex education emerged in 2002 at both national and regional levels, and included a court case in Tokyo. Despite leaving a depressing atmosphere regarding sex education teaching practices, this campaign also…

  18. Diversity, Values and Social Change: Renegotiating a Consensus on Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Rachel

    1997-01-01

    Proposes a framework for school sex education within a plural society based on three themes: social changes contributing to uncertainty about sexual values in British society, sex education policy changes' impact on claims to moral legitimacy in this area, and initiatives renegotiating a moral consensus on school sex education values. (DSK)

  19. Sex-Education Needs and Interests of High School Students in a Rural New York County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Naomi; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Administered sex-education quiz to 163 rural area high school students who also described their sexual and contraceptive experiences and sex-education interests. Most (57 percent) wanted to learn more about contraceptives and venereal disease prevention, either as primary focus of sex-education curriculum or combined with topics of sexual values,…

  20. Sex Education in Modern and Contemporary China: Interrupted Debates across the Last Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aresu, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    Since the late 1980s sex education has been widely promoted in the PRC, but this is not the first time in China's modern history that attempts to develop sex education have been made. The present essay traces the development of sex education debates over the last century, identifying the historical, political and social contexts in which they…

  1. Validity of a Scale to Measure Teachers' Attitudes towards Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Almeida Reis, Maria Helena; Vilar, Duarte Goncalo Rei

    2006-01-01

    Despite the current legislation requiring sex education as part of the school curriculum in Portugal, great obstacles to its implementation remain. Furthermore, sex education is far from being systematically administered. Thus, the main interest in our project was to validate a scale that measures teachers' attitudes towards sex education. There…

  2. Unintended pregnancy and sex education in Chile: a behavioural model.

    PubMed

    Herold, J M; Thompson, N J; Valenzuela, M S; Morris, L

    1994-10-01

    This study analysed factors associated with unintended pregnancy among adolescent and young adult women in Santiago, Chile. Three variations of a behavioural model were developed. Logistic regression showed that the effect of sex education on unintended pregnancy works through the use of contraception. Other significant effects were found for variables reflecting socioeconomic status and a woman's acceptance of her sexuality. The results also suggested that labelling affects measurement of 'unintended' pregnancy.

  3. [Sex education through popular education for health in a Brazilian rural social movement].

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Luiz Fabiano

    Based on the ideas of Paulo Freire, the methodological framework of Popular Education for Health (PEH) provides a more adaptable method for sex education, including societal participation as well as the social, historical and cultural dimensions of the population. The purpose of this work is to relate one such PEH experience in sex education, which took the form of a community project with a group of students from 10 to 28 years of age attending Itinerant Schools and with groups from the Landless Rural Workers Movement (MST) in the state of Parana, Brazil. This work provides knowledge of certain elements that may help in developing similar projects, not only for sex education but also education for other public health issues. PEH demonstrates a method of ensuring socially effective participation in the different dimensions of health-promotion strategies. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Sex Education, First Sex and Sexual Health Outcomes in Adulthood: Findings from a Nationally Representative Sexual Health Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourke, Ashling; Boduszek, Daniel; Kelleher, Caroline; McBride, Orla; Morgan, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between school sex education and sexual health behaviours at first sex and later in adulthood, using nationally representative data. Respondents were adults from the 2010 Irish Contraception and Crisis Pregnancy Survey, a cross-sectional survey designed to assess knowledge, attitudes and behaviours relating…

  5. The Impact of a Community-Based Comprehensive Sex Education Program on Chinese Adolescents' Sex-Related Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Bo; Meier, Ann; Shah, Iqbal; Li, Xiaoming

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a community-based comprehensive sex education program among unmarried youth in China. The impact of the intervention on sexual knowledge, attitudes, and sexual initiation were assessed, using a pre-test post-test quasi-experimental research design. The program used six methods for providing sex-related…

  6. Seventy Years of Sex Education in "Health Education Journal": A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyer, Padmini; Aggleton, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines key debates and perspectives on sex education in "Health Education Journal" ("HEJ"), from the date of the journal's first publication in March 1943 to the present day. Matters relating to sexuality and sexual health are revealed to be integral to "HEJ'"s history. First published as Health…

  7. From I to We: Sex Education as a Form of Civics Education in a Neoliberal Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Sharon; Randazzo, Renee

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the question of how a sex education curriculum can be a form of civics education, moving students from a discourse of personal responsibility to a discourse that represents a "we" voice and takes into consideration not only the other person but society. In two 8-week classes delivered in a charter school to a…

  8. Sex Education in Rural Schools in the United States: Impact of Rural Educators' Community Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinn-Pike, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The overall purpose of this exploratory research was to better understand rural educators' feelings about school-based sex education in order to foster better communication and collaboration between prevention researchers and rural teachers and administrators. In order to accomplish this purpose, the research question asked "How does…

  9. Guidelines to Ensure Sex Fairness in Education Division Communications and Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women on Words and Images, Princeton, NJ.

    The guidelines presented in this document are intended as a learning tool to assist preparers of education communications and products in creating sex-fair communications and eliminating sex bias. Presented with examples of sex-biased and sex-fair uses and the rationale for use, guidelines are given for the following categories: (1) language:…

  10. Fostering Sex Fairness in Vocational Education: Strategies for Administrators. Information Series No. 147.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiger, JoAnn M.; Schlesinger, Sue H.

    One of a series of sixteen knowledge transformation papers, this paper gives an overview of sex equity issues and suggests alternative strategies for administrators in vocational education to use in reducing sex segregation and fostering sex fairness. In the first section the nature of the problem is discussed; occupational sex stereotyping and…

  11. Does the "Negro" "Still" Need Separate Schools? Single-Sex Educational Settings as Critical Race Counterspaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Clarence L., Sr.; Flennaugh, Terry K.; Blackmon, Samarah M.; Howard, Tyrone C.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores whether contemporary educators should consider single-sex educational settings as viable interventions in educating African American males. Using qualitative data from a 2-year study of single-sex educational spaces in two Los Angeles County high schools, the authors argue that when all-male spaces effectively function as…

  12. "It Was as Useful as a Chocolate Kettle": Sex Education in the Lives of Same-Sex-Attracted Young People in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Lynne; Mitchell, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Sex education is a contested site in the school curriculum as communities grapple with who should teach young people about sex and how it should be taught. In this paper we ask whether same-sex-attracted young people are being exposed to appropriate and relevant sex education at school, and if they are not whether it is necessary that sex…

  13. "Because She Was My First Girlfriend, I Didn't Know Any Different": Making the Case for Mainstreaming Same-Sex Sex/Relationship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Catherine; Hester, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present the case for those entering/considering same-sex relationships to be included in sex and relationship education in schools. The Government's Guidance on Sex and Relationship Education provides a rationale for including same-sex relationships when it says that schools should meet the needs of all their pupils "whatever…

  14. Collaborating to Plan and Implement a Sex Education Curriculum for Individuals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, James; Kahn, Laurie G.; Rowe, Dawn A.; Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Hirano, Kara A.; Knowles, Christen

    2017-01-01

    Sex education is not only a necessary component of public school curriculum, but it is also an important opportunity for students with and without disabilities to learn about their own development as emerging adults. Although comprehensive sex education is not federally mandated, many states and districts choose to offer some form of sex education…

  15. Sex Bias in Career Education-What the Social Studies Teacher Can Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenneke, Judith S.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    To the extent that career education emulates the real world, it is inherently biased. However, the social studies classroom can be used to help change sex bias. Three activities for analyzing attitudes and investigating work motivation and occupational sex bias are reported. Seven comments on what teachers can do about career education sex bias…

  16. Protective Effects of Middle School Comprehensive Sex Education with Family Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Jennifer M.; Tracy, Allison J.; Charmaraman, Linda; Ceder, Ineke; Erkut, Sumru

    2014-01-01

    Background: School-based comprehensive sex education programs can reduce early adolescents' risky sexual behavior. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a 3-year comprehensive sex education program in delaying vaginal sex for middle school students and whether the family component of the intervention contributes to its…

  17. A Guide for Vocational Education Sex Equity Personnel. Research and Development Series No. 143.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vetter, Louise; And Others

    This training package is designed to assist sex equity personnel in implementing the Education Amendments of 1976. Chapter 1 examines the sex equity problem as it relates to vocational education. Chapter 2 discusses the concepts of program management and change agents in relation to the functions of the job of sex equity personnel. Chapter 3…

  18. Impact of sex education on knowledge and attitude of adolescent school children of Loni village.

    PubMed

    Avachat, Shubhada Sunil; Phalke, Deepak Baburao; Phalke, Vaishali Deepak

    2011-11-01

    Reproductive capability is now established at earlier age. But the subject of adolescent sexuality is taboo in most societies. There is widespread ignorance about risks of unprotected sex, problems among adolescents. Unfortunately need of sex education is not perceived and fulfilled in India especially in rural areas. The present study was conducted to assess the need and demonstrate the impact of sex education among adolescent school children. The impact of sex education workshop was tested by analysing pre- and postintervention questionnaire. The felt need of sex education increased considerably and the knowledge regarding contraceptives increased from manifolds after the intervention. There was significant increase in knowledge about menstrual hygiene, sexually transmitted diseases, etc, after sex education workshop. This study concludes that there is intense need of sex education and it has significant impact on knowledge of adolescent school children.

  19. Sex Education in the Public Schools: A Clash of Religious Freedom and the General Welfare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    First, Patricia F.

    1992-01-01

    Court litigation, state legislation, school board policy, and public opinion clash over sex education in public schools. However, rising teen pregnancy rates and AIDS make the availability of uncensored health and sex information in schools a necessity. (SK)

  20. People with Intellectual Disabilities Talk About Sexuality: Implications for the Development of Sex Education.

    PubMed

    Schaafsma, D; Kok, G; Stoffelen, J M T; Curfs, L M G

    2017-01-01

    Existing sex education programmes have failed in involving people with intellectual disabilities in the development of these programmes. Not involving the target population decreases the likelihood that the sex education programme will be effective. This study was conducted to assess the perspectives of people with intellectual disabilities on several sexuality-related topics. Semi-structured interviews were held with 20 people with intellectual disabilities covering topics such as: sex education, relationships, sex, social media, parenthood and support. The reported frequency of sex education the participants receive is low. Their knowledge regarding sex education is mainly limited to topics such as safe sex, contraception and STI's and tends to be superficial. Additionally, knowledge on safe sex does not always translate to safe sex behaviour. Finally, relationships are important for most participants; mainly because they don't want to be alone. Findings from both this study and literature shows that there seems to be a need for high quality sex education. Topics to consider to include are: online relationships, social media and parenthood. It would also be beneficial to focus on sexuality-related skills. Finally, to increase the effectiveness of a sex education programme, it is advisable that a theory-and evidence-based framework, such as Intervention Mapping, is used for its development.

  1. A Study of the Implementation of Sex Education in Hong Kong Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Che, Fok Shui

    2005-01-01

    Sex education is not treated as an important subject in the school curriculum of Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Education Department issued in 1986 and 1997, respectively, two guidelines on sex education for schools' reference. The 1997 Guidelines cover a broader conceptual framework relating to different aspects of human sexuality and also include…

  2. Student Participation in the Sex Industry: Higher Education Responses and Staff Experiences and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagar, Tracey; Jones, Deborah; Symons, Katrien; Bowring, Joanne; Roberts, Ron

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses student sex workers in higher education in Wales from an institutional perspective. It investigates how student sex work is dealt with within higher education and in doing so highlights the lack of higher education policies/guidance/training to assist staff members who have experiences with students working in the sex…

  3. Constructing the Ideal Muslim Sexual Subject: Problematics of School-Based Sex Education in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabatabaie, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    School-based sex education is an underdeveloped and challenging issue to address in Iran. This paper provides insights into the main challenges in developing and implementing school-based sex education in Iran. Through an investigation of one Iranian boys' school that, in contrast to the majority of Iranian educational institutions, has an…

  4. The Effects of Sex Education on Psychological Counselling Students in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çuhadaroglu, Alper

    2017-01-01

    Sex education is not included in Turkey's national curriculum and is rarely referenced in school and university curricula. This is even true for those undertaking training in psychological counselling where the need may be great. Only a very few university schools of education offer an elective sex education course. A group of 64 guidance and…

  5. Getting "Foolishly Hot and Bothered"? Parents and Teachers and Sex Education in the 1940s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Hera

    2012-01-01

    The reluctance of parents to provide sex education has been a problem for educators since the first attempts at the modernisation of sex education in the early twentieth century, yet the sexual needs, desires and fears of parents are rarely even mentioned in pedagogical debates. This article examines the intense anxiety and embarrassment felt by…

  6. Poz-itively Transformational: Sex Workers and HIV/AIDS Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    HIV and AIDS are complex events that offer numerous opportunities for adult education. However, mainstream education on this issue has often not been relevant to a number of subpopulations, including sex workers. This chapter explores sources and content of HIV/AIDS education in the sex work industry (including art and the Internet) and suggests…

  7. Sex Discrimination in Education: A Report from the Commission on Sex Discrimination in the Statutes of the New Jersey Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Commission on Sex Discrimination in the Statutes, Trenton.

    This report, which is the result of an examination of New Jersey's public education system, contends that the state has not been completely successful in providing an educational atmosphere free from sex bias. The report reviews federal and state legislation, and law, policy, and research in the areas of sexual harassment, teacher training and…

  8. School nurses and sex education: surveillance and disciplinary practices in primary schools.

    PubMed

    Hayter, Mark; Piercy, Hilary; Massey, Marie-Therese; Gregory, Trudy

    2008-02-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore how school nurses perceive the influence of schools on their role in delivering sex and relationship education in primary schools. School nurses play a key role in sex education in English schools. However, sex education is a contentious issue meaning the sex education of children is often an area of tension within the curriculum. However, the impact of these tensions upon school nursing practice is poorly described. Three focus groups with a convenience sample of 16 nurses experienced in conducting sex and relationship education were conducted during 2006. Focus groups were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and subjected to a thematic analysis. Four themes were identified in the data: 'covert surveillance' refers to school staff conducting clandestine surveillance of the classroom actions of the nurse; 'overt surveillance' reflects how nurses felt they were being openly monitored by teachers in the classroom; 'Teacher attitude' refers to the interventions of the supervising teacher in the classroom during the sex education session and 'resistance practices' detailed how nurses attempted to manage the disciplinary practices of the school. School nurses need to be pragmatic about the fact that there will be some attempts by the school to regulate sex education. Developing an early dialogue with the school can mediate this. Closer working practices and the involvement of school nurses in the development of sex education policy and practice is vital to ensure that they continue to make a valuable contribution to sex education in schools.

  9. Just the Facts? the Separation of Sex Education from Moral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    In this essay Sharon Lamb considers how progressives have begun to win the longstanding battle to shape sex education and what they have had to give up in the process. After framing the battle in historical context, Lamb uses discourse analysis to explore the hidden values in the "evidence-based" (EB) curricula that progressives…

  10. Condom Nation: The U.S. Government's Sex Education Campaign from World War I to the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Alexandra M.

    2009-01-01

    This history of the U.S. Public Health Service's efforts to educate Americans about sex makes clear why federally funded sex education has been haphazard, ad hoc, and often ineffectual. Since launching its first sex ed program during World War I, the Public Health Service has dominated federal sex education efforts. Alexandra M. Lord draws on…

  11. Education for Changing Sex Roles for the Year 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grobman, Hulda

    1983-01-01

    Offers (1) definitions of the terms "sex differences,""gender identity," and "sex roles"; (2) a list of sex role problems students will have to face as adults; and (3) some strategies for coping with sex role changes and conflicts. (FL)

  12. BDSM Disclosure and Stigma Management: Identifying Opportunities for Sex Education

    PubMed Central

    Bezreh, Tanya; Weinberg, Thomas S.; Edgar, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    While participation in the activities like bondage, domination, submission/sadism, masochism that fall under the umbrella term BDSM is widespread, stigma surrounding BDSM poses risks to practitioners who wish to disclose their interest. We examined risk factors involved with disclosure to posit how sex education might diffuse stigma and warn of risks. Semi-structured interviews asked 20 adults reporting an interest in BDSM about their disclosure experiences. Most respondents reported their BDSM interests starting before age 15, sometimes creating a phase of anxiety and shame in the absence of reassuring information. As adults, respondents often considered BDSM central to their sexuality, thus disclosure was integral to dating. Disclosure decisions in nondating situations were often complex considerations balancing desire for appropriateness with a desire for connection and honesty. Some respondents wondered whether their interests being found out would jeopardize their jobs. Experiences with stigma varied widely. PMID:22754406

  13. Contraception, Copulation Domination, and the Theoretical Barrenness of Sex Education Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diorio, Joseph A.

    1985-01-01

    Sex education which deals with the problem of teenage pregnancy and is based upon the essentialist view of sex as heterosexual copulation constitutes misrepresentation of sexuality to young people. The alternative of encouraging adolescents to pursue sexual satisfaction through activities other than copulation is ignored in sex education…

  14. Higher and Further Education Institution Policies on Student and Staff Involvement in Commercial Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cusick, Linda; Roberts, Ron; Paton, Susan

    2009-01-01

    This paper concerns higher and further education institutions' policies as they relate to the interactions of their staff and students with the sex industry. In Scotland and England, consenting adults may legally buy and sell sex and commercial sexual entertainment, such as erotic dance and phone sex, provided that they do not do so in a public…

  15. Eliminating Sex-Role Stereotyping in Vocational Education: A National and State Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Karla

    This report explores sex role stereotyping and sex bias in national and state (Michigan) secondary vocational education program from several perspectives. Section I states the problem and gives the purpose of the report. Section II reviews the sources of sex role stereotyping in the legal, social, and cultural environments. Sections III and IV…

  16. Multiculturalism and inconsistency in the perception of sex education in Australian society.

    PubMed

    Almahbobi, Ghanim

    2012-01-01

    A group of individuals who share common beliefs form a culture in which they communicate their values and attributes about certain aspects of society. Sex education remains one of the early teachings that humans experience irrespective of the race or level of development of a given society. However, different cultures perceive sex education differently due to differences in attitudes and beliefs, leading to significant diversity in the management of sex education among different societies across the globe. Many studies have found that in a traditional society with a homogeneous culture, the foremost reason for the different approaches to sex education is related to traditional values, in addition to other factors such as religion and political belief. In order to improve sex education, and consequently, sexual health in a modern multicultural society such as Australia, it becomes imperative to identify the inconsistency in beliefs about sex education among individuals with different cultural backgrounds in the Australian population. In this report, the author highlights similarities and differences in the methods employed by certain cultures of the Australian population. The report considers the different cultural environments of specific societies, the prevalence of sex education in these societies and how culture influences the prevalence. The concluding thoughts reflect on the success of the education programs in Australia, based on the idea that resolving the problems of sex education needs support from a number of bodies within Australian society.

  17. Consequences of sex education on teen and young adult sexual behaviors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Laura Duberstein; Maddow-Zimet, Isaac

    2012-10-01

    This study examined whether formal sex education is associated with sexual health behaviors and outcomes using recent nationally representative survey data. Data used were from 4,691 male and female individuals aged 15-24 years from the 2006-2008 National Survey of Family Growth. Weighted bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted by gender, estimating the associations of sex education by type (only abstinence, abstinence and birth control, or neither) before first sexual intercourse, and sexual behaviors and outcomes. Receipt of sex education, regardless of type, was associated with delays in first sex for both genders, as compared with receiving no sex education. Respondents receiving instruction about abstinence and birth control were significantly more likely at first sex to use any contraception (odds ratio [OR] = 1.73, females; OR = 1.91, males) or a condom (OR = 1.69, females; OR = 1.90, males), and less likely to have an age-discrepant partner (OR = .67, females; OR = .48, males). Receipt of only abstinence education was not statistically distinguishable in most models from receipt of either both or neither topics. Among female subjects, condom use at first sex was significantly more likely among those receiving instruction in both topics as compared with only abstinence education. The associations between sex education and all longer-term outcomes were mediated by older age at first sex. Sex education about abstinence and birth control was associated with healthier sexual behaviors and outcomes as compared with no instruction. The protective influence of sex education is not limited to if or when to have sex, but extends to issues of contraception, partner selection, and reproductive health outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Correlation of Sex Education and the Racial Composition of a School District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, Kelly

    The purpose of the project was to determine whether there was a correlation between the racial makeup of a school district and the decision to provide sex education in its schools. Interviews were conducted with six different school districts across Santa Clara County, California. After the interviews, it was determined that the racial diversity did not play a role in deciding if sex education would be taught. This researcher did learn that a lack of educational funding had an effect on the school districts and their decisions. Due to this lack of funding for schools, educational programs, such as sex education, were not being provided to the students.

  19. Rethinking Difference and Sex Education: From Cultural Inclusivity to Normative Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggis, Jane; Mulholland, Monique

    2014-01-01

    This paper aimed to problematise what is meant by 'difference' and consider what such a reinterpretation might mean for methodological interventions in sex education research. Our concern is the tendency for sex education research to treat difference as a set of categories to be "added-on", such as religious difference, cultural…

  20. Sex Education, Homosexuality, and Social Contestation in 1970s New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickell, Chris

    2007-01-01

    This essay examines the relationships between homosexuality and sex education in New Zealand during the 1970s. It argues that reading sex education debates and resources provides a useful way of exploring connections between the ontologies and politics of sexuality at that time. In particular, the advent of social movements concerned with sexual…

  1. Key Issues in Sex Education: Reflecting on Teaching, Learning and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oerton, Sarah; Bowen, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Drawing upon critical reflections of staff and student experiences of teaching, learning and assessment on an undergraduate module entitled Key Issues in Sex Education, we discuss the strategies used to engage students in debates around sex and relationships education (SRE). To date, there is little research which evaluates how formal assessments…

  2. Parents and Sex Education--Looking beyond "The Birds and the Bees"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Joy

    2004-01-01

    The social and political climate of sex education over the last two decades has dramatically changed, with parents now being encouraged to work in partnership with professionals. This paper seeks to further the argument that involving parents in their child's sex education does matter and can have an impact on their child's future sexual health.…

  3. "Zina" and the Enigma of Sex Education for Indonesian Muslim Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Linda Rae

    2007-01-01

    Sexuality and sex education cannot be divorced from the moral values of the societies within which we must negotiate our sexual identities and relationships. Rather than pandering to the moral panic that is too often associated with the provision of sex education in non-secular societies where religion is more visibly active in shaping sexual…

  4. Young Sexual Citizens: Reimagining Sex Education as an Essential Form of Civic Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illes, Judit

    2012-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) pose a significant threat to the health and well-being of populations worldwide, and to young people in particular. Despite empirical evidence that comprehensive sex education is an important tool for prevention, the legitimacy and content of sex education in schools continue to be challenged by conservative…

  5. A History of Sex Education in the United States since 1900

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Valerie J.; Firmin, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    We provide a historical perspective toward the current public school practices of American sex education. The primary time frames include the progressive era (1880-1920), intermediate era (1920-1960), the sexual revolution era (1960s and 1970s), and the modern sex education era (1980s to the present). In each period, we highlight key developments…

  6. A Review of Parental Involvement in Sex Education: The Role for Effective Communication in British Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Triece; van Wersch, Anna; van Schaik, Paul

    2008-01-01

    A review of recent literature (2000--2006) has been undertaken to investigate the role of sex education within the family context, in order to engage with the problems of sexual health in British society. The findings which emerged were categorized under the following five themes: (1) Parental roles regarding sex education; (2) The importance of…

  7. Making Smart Choices: A Serious Game for Sex Education for Young Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Alvin C. M.; Chu, Samuel K. W.; Hong, Athena W. L.; Tam, Frankie; Lee, Grace M. Y.; Mellecker, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Current educational resources for sex education in Hong Kong are mainly designed to be used in classroom. They are mostly text-based and are unattractive to the most vulnerable adolescent group. As discussion on sex is still taboo in Chinese society, self-learning resources can supplement classroom teaching. This paper describes an interactive…

  8. The Role of Sexuality and Sex Equity in the Education of Disabled Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Katherine; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This article tackles the broad issue of the intersection of sexuality, disability, and sex education. Myths and stereotypes about the nonsexual disabled woman are examined, as are issues of identity, dating and other loving relationships, sexual abuse, sex education, sexuality related services, and inclusion of disabled students in curriculum and…

  9. Data Processing and Related Occupations Module. Achieving Sex Equity in Business and Office Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Sara L.; Mayhew, Carol O.

    The Vocational Education Amendments of 1976 mandate that sex bias and sex stereotyping be eliminated from all vocational education programs. In business and office occupations programs, the problems have been centered around increasing the number of male students in the program, encouraging women to move into management positions and other upper…

  10. Positioning Sex Educators: A Critical Ethnography of a Professional Development Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Brigitte C.

    2013-01-01

    In this ethnographic research, I offer an analysis of a state-sponsored professional development workshop for sex educators. Positioning theory is used to understand how the lived space of the workshop -- including texts, talk and silence -- positions sex education teachers as professionals and practitioners with certain (limited) speaking rights…

  11. Understanding Parental Views of Adolescent Sexuality and Sex Education in Ecuador: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerves, Elena; López, Silvia; Castro, Cecilia; Ortiz, William; Palacios, María; Rober, Peter; Enzlin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Parents' contribution to sex education is increasingly receiving research attention. This growing interest stems from recognition of the influence that parental attitudes may have both on young people's sexual attitudes and behaviour, and on school-based sex education. Studies regarding parental attitudes towards sexuality are, however, still…

  12. Lessons Learnt from a Secondary School Sex Education Program in Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sousa, Ana Paula; Soares, Isabel; Vilar, Duarte

    2007-01-01

    Based on a developmental framework, a study was conducted in Portugal in two groups of youth in terms of relevant aspects related to adolescent psychosexual development: one group participated in an Experimental Project of Sex Education and Health Promotion during high school, whereas the other did not receive any formal sex education in school.…

  13. Learning to Be a Woman: Feminist Theological Reflections on Sex Education in Church Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isherwood, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    This article suggests that sex education in Church schools should address the personal as political through proclaiming the liberating potential of incarnational theology. The author suggests that Christian sex educators should be alert to the construction and commodification of desire and its attendant capitalist implications. While resisting…

  14. The Differences in Academic Achievement between Single-Sex Education and Coeducation Classes in Fifth Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scoggins, Donna K.

    2009-01-01

    Single-sex education is an instructional innovation implemented to improve student academic achievement by teaching to the learning styles and interests of boys and/or girls. This ex post facto quantitative study examined the differences in academic achievement between single-sex education and coeducation classes on students' achievement in…

  15. The First World War, Sex Education, and the American Social Hygiene Association's Campaign against Venereal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imber, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Prior to the First World War, the public's attitude toward sex education was apathetic. With venereal disease posing a threat to America's "military efficiency" during the war, however, military programs in sex education were instituted that then gave rise to similar programs in secondary schools in the 1920s. (JBM)

  16. Teacher Philosophy and Program Implementation and the Impact on Sex Education Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Gaston, Jacqueline F.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reports a study that evaluated teacher influence and impact in a middle school abstinence sex education program, noting pre-post change, teacher differences, and student differences. Surveys indicated abstinence sex education programs can produce positive outcomes that are significantly influenced by the teacher's own philosophy and commitment to…

  17. The Sex Education Debates: Teaching "Life Style" in West Bengal, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakravarti, Paromita

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the recent controversies surrounding the decision to introduce sex education in secondary schools in India to combat the rapid spread of HIV and AIDS in the country. While 11 Indian states have banned it, the Left-ruled state of West Bengal has designed a teachers' manual to impart sex education. However, a close analysis of…

  18. Pupil-led sex education in England (RIPPLE study): cluster-randomised intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, J M; Strange, V; Forrest, S; Oakley, A; Copas, A; Allen, E; Babiker, A; Black, S; Ali, M; Monteiro, H; Johnson, A M

    Improvement of sex education in schools is a key part of the UK government's strategy to reduce teenage pregnancy in England. We examined the effectiveness of one form of peer-led sex education in a school-based randomised trial of over 8000 pupils. 29 schools were randomised to either peer-led sex education (intervention) or to continue their usual teacher-led sex education (control). In intervention schools, peer educators aged 16-17 years delivered three sessions of sex education to 13-14 year-old pupils from the same schools. Primary outcome was unprotected (without condom) first heterosexual intercourse by age 16 years. Analysis was by intention to treat. By age 16 years, significantly fewer girls reported intercourse in the peer-led arm than in the control arm, but proportions were similar for boys. The proportions of pupils reporting unprotected first sex did not differ for girls (8.4% intervention vs 8.3% control) or for boys (6.2% vs 4.7%). Stratified estimates of the difference between arms were -0.4% (95% CI -3.7% to 2.8%, p=0.79) for girls and -1.4% (-4.4% to 1.6%, p=0.36) for boys. At follow-up (mean age 16.0 years [SD 0.32]), girls in the intervention arm reported fewer unintended pregnancies, although the difference was borderline (2.3% vs 3.3%, p=0.07). Girls and boys were more satisfied with peer-led than teacher-led sex education, but 57% of girls and 32% of boys wanted sex education in single-sex groups. Peer-led sex education was effective in some ways, but broader strategies are needed to improve young people's sexual health. The role of single-sex sessions should be investigated further.

  19. Sex education among Asian American college females: who is teaching them and what is being taught.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christine; Tran, Denise Yen; Thoi, Deanna; Chang, Melissa; Wu, Lisa; Trieu, Sang Leng

    2013-04-01

    Many parents are reluctant to educate their Asian American adolescents on sexual health topics because sexuality is taboo in most Asian cultures. A survey was conducted with Chinese, Filipina, Korean, and Vietnamese college females ages 18-25 to assess sources of abstinence and birth control education and age of sexual debut. Parents were the least reported source of sex education for all four ethnic groups, with the majority of respondents reporting school as their source of sex education. Respondents who reported family as their source of abstinence education had a sexual debut of 6 months later than those who did not. Females who reported family as their source of birth control education began having sex more than 7 months later than those who reported other sources. Disaggregation of data by Asian ethnic groups and examining differences in delivery of sex education among ethnic groups may improve school curricula and sexual health.

  20. What do young people want from sex education? The results of a needs assessment from a peer-led sex education programme.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Simon; Strange, Vicki; Oakley, Ann; The Ripple Study Team

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents data on the need for sexual health information and advice of 4353 students aged 13/14 years in 13 English secondary schools. Data were collected by peer educators as part of a sex education programme, and through a questionnaire survey administered by researchers. Data illustrate young people's need for concrete information and advice on issues related to physical development and puberty; transmission of sexually transmitted diseases; accessing and using condoms and other contraception; using sexual health services; managing relationships and dealing with jealousy, love and sexual attraction; how people have sex; sexual pleasure; masturbation; and homosexuality. Differences between the concerns and interests raised by young people and current UK guidance on sex and relationships education are examined, and the implications of these findings for designing future policy and effective school based sex education programmes are discussed. The paper highlights some of the wider social norms around sex and sexuality that influence young people's understanding and sexual behaviour, and the importance of addressing these within sex education is noted. Factors influencing the processes of expressing and assessing needs are explored.

  1. 'Dear diary I saw an angel, she looked like heaven on earth': Sex talk and sex education.

    PubMed

    Pattman, Rob; Chege, Fatuma

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we highlight and address some of the problems involved in teaching HIV/AIDS education in southern and eastern Africa, and especially in generating open discussion among pupils about sex and sexuality. The paper draws on the findings of a UNICEF-funded study, in which we were involved, as research consultants (2001). The study focused on 'young people, gender, sexuality and HIV/AIDS education' and was conducted in Botswana, Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe. In Botswana, Rwanda and Kenya, teachers and young people were interviewed about their attitudes towards and experiences of teaching/learning HIV/AIDS education. Young people were also interviewed more generally, in all the countries, about what it was like being a boy or girl of their age. We argue that HIV/AIDS education, as it is commonly taught, as a series of moral injunctions (against pre marital sex) effectively silences young people, and means that sex 'becomes' naughty when they do talk about it. We propose HIV/AIDS pedagogies, which emulate the practices our researchers adopted when researching the identities and views of boys and girls, especially concerning gender and sexuality. By addressing young people as experts about themselves and in a holistic and non-judgemental way, our interviewees were able to speak about anxieties and pleasures, many of which related to sexuality. This, they had not been able to do with other adults, and even with other children. We focus on the regulation and production of gender identities through the ways boys and girls talked about sex in our interviews and also in their participation in HIV/AIDS classes. In particular we look at how boys and girls 'performed' gender when discussing sexuality with boys often very loud and girls quiet, with boys presenting themselves as sexual and girls presenting themselves as asexual. We argue for approaches to HIV/AIDS education which challenge gender power relations without alienating boys by

  2. "Virginity Is a Virtue: Prevent Early Sex"--Teacher Perceptions of Sex Education in a Ugandan Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyer, Padmini; Aggleton, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Sex education is a politically contentious issue in many countries, and there are numerous, competing ideologies relating to the most appropriate methods to teach young people about sexual and reproductive health. This paper examines policy and practice in Uganda in light of two contrasting ideologies, namely morally conservative and comprehensive…

  3. Need for a Comprehensive Sex and Relationship Education Programme for Adults with Learning Disability.

    PubMed

    Enow, Humphrey; Nagalingam, Priya; Singh, Ranbir; Thalitaya, Madhusudan Deepak

    2015-09-01

    Most people with learning disabilities (PWLD) have little understanding of the concept of sex and relationship. PWLD are vulnerable and more likely to be victims of sexual offending. Currently, the only formal access to sex and relationship education that PWLD have is in special need schools. The right to express their sexuality is frequently restricted or denied by restricted policies, negative attitudes and lack of awareness of their needs. To provide a Comprehensive Sex and Relationship Education programme for PWLD. These group/individual sessions will led by a sexuality support worker with experience in working with PWLD. They will be supported by members of the multidisciplinary team including, psychiatrist, psychologist, occupational therapists etc. Providing sex and relationship education PWLD would help them achieve a fulfilling and rewarding sexual experience and make them less vulnerable to sexual abuse. There should be greater emphasis to be placed on sex and relationship education in PWLD; preferably by qualified professionals.

  4. What is talked about when parents discuss sex with children: family based sex education in Windhoek, Namibia.

    PubMed

    Nambambi, Ndishishi M; Mufune, Pempelani

    2011-12-01

    Among limits to school based sex education in Namibia are teachers that sexually harass children, unqualified Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) teachers and lack of teaching materials. Moreover out of school youths cannot access school based SRH education. Given these shortcomings, and in the context of HIV/AIDS, promoting parental-child communication about sex is an important measure to prevent HIV infections in Namibia. Parents are important because they support the emotional and physical development of children and greater parent-adolescent communication delays sexual initiation and reduces the number of sexual partners. The rationale for the paper is that there is need to know more about what parents and children discuss if the development of more effective communication about sexual issues between parents and their children as a tool for fighting HIV/AIDS is to be accomplished. Using qualitative data from Windhoek this study explored parents' communication with their children about sex. Findings indicate such discussions are traditionally seen as a taboo but nowadays they do take place (especially with mothers) around menstruation, pregnancy and HIV/AIDS. There is resistance to more specific discussions around sexual intercourse and relationships. We conclude that there is a need for parents to be taught how to educate their children on sex.

  5. Evaluation of sex education curricula: measuring up to the SIECUS guidelines. Sex Information and Education Council of the U.S.

    PubMed

    Klein, N A; Goodson, P; Serrins, D S; Edmundson, E; Evans, A

    1994-10-01

    Most sexuality education curricula developed the past 20 years were not thoroughly evaluated. This study provides results from a content analysis of 10 sexuality education curricula for junior and senior high school students. Nine nationally available sexuality education curricula and one curriculum guide comprised the sample. The basis for analysis was the Guidelines for Comprehensive Sexuality Education, developed by the Sex Information and Education Council of the U.S. (SIECUS) and an instrument developed to measure bias in the curricula. Trained coders found that Sex Respect and Teen Aid addressed less than half the topics suggested by the SIECUS guidelines. Several of the curricula contained gender and sexual orientation bias. Certain key concepts such as "Sexual Behavior" and "Society and Culture" were not adequately addressed by most of the curricula. Findings indicate that of 10 curricula, only six are considered acceptable for educating junior and senior high school students.

  6. Sex education and family planning services for young adults: alternative urban strategies in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Townsend, J W; Diaz de May, E; Sepúlveda, Y; Santos de Garza, Y; Rosenhouse, S

    1987-01-01

    In Mexico, youth face difficulties in obtaining reliable information on sex education and family planning through existing community programs. Two alternative strategies to provide these services are being tested in poor urban areas of Monterrey. In one experimental area, Integrated Youth Centers were established, which provide sex education and family planning services as well as counseling, academic tutoring, and recreational activities. In another area, trained young adults and community counselors work through informal networks to provide sex education and family planning information. Both utilization and the cost of these services are examined in the context of plans for expanding coverage in Mexico-U.S. border areas.

  7. Sex Squad: Engaging Humour to Reinvigorate Sexual Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Robert; Gere, David

    2016-01-01

    The Sex Squad is a collective of US-based college students, who create and perform monologues, scenes and musical parodies for ninth graders (ranging in age from 13 to 15). The Sex Squad is the central element in the "AMP!" programme for adolescent sexual health, developed at the University of California-Los Angeles in collaboration with…

  8. Students Selling Sex: Marketisation, Higher Education and Consumption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Teela; Hardy, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Robust academic research on the topic of students involved in the sex industry is in its infancy, yet the relationship appears consistent and permanent. This paper draws on findings from the largest study into the stripping industry in the United Kingdom to explore the relationships between students, sex work and consumption. To make sense of the…

  9. Single-Sex Education in the 21st Century. Education Policy Brief. Volume 6, Number 9, Fall 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cable, Kelly E.; Spradlin, Terry E.

    2008-01-01

    Single-sex education describes a diverse range of situations, including individual classes, programs after school, required programs, voluntary programs, and programs to remedy gender inequities and encourage cultural and racial pride. This brief addresses the genesis and legality of single-sex classrooms, the merits and critiques of single-sex…

  10. Sex and Relationships Education and Gender Equality: Recent Experiences from Andalusia (Spain)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venegas, Mar

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent advances in sex and relationships education (SRE), the Spanish education system still lacks coherent policies in this field. This paper provides an overview of the current situation, focusing specifically on Andalusia, and discusses the importance of providing SRE for young people. It first describes current Spanish education policy…

  11. Policy Statement and General Guidelines on Family Life and Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    This guide is a statement of policy and guidelines on family life and sex education devised by the Illinois State Board of Education to aid local boards of education, school administrators, and community groups in developing and implementing new programs or extending existing programs. A statement of policy including purpose, programs, and…

  12. Sophie and Emile: A Case Study of Sex Bias in the History of Educational Thought.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jane Roland

    1981-01-01

    Martin argues that the accepted interpretation of Rousseau's philosophy of education, as revealed in "Emile," is fundamentally mistaken because it fails to acknowledge his discussion of the education of girls. She proposes that Rousseau intended a production and not a growth model which applies to the education of both sexes. (SK)

  13. The Comparative Research on Sex Education for Adolescents of China and the US

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu-feng, Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Sex education refers to people's comprehension about sex, which involves not only sexual structure (anatomy, physiology, birth control, pregnancy, etc.), but also sexual relationships concerning human and moral problems. It includes at least sexual physiology, sexual psychology, sexual ethic, sexual law, etc., which aims to help people form the…

  14. Educating Teenagers about Sex in the United States. NCHS Data Brief. Number 44

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Gladys; Abma, Joyce; Copen, Casey

    2010-01-01

    Sex education in schools and other places, as well as received from parents, provides adolescents with information to make informed choices about sex at a crucial period of their development. Using data from the 2006-2008 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), this report examines the percentage of male and female teenagers 15-19 years who…

  15. The Gendered Nature of South African Teachers' Discourse on Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePalma, R.; Francis, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    In South Africa, high pregnancy and infection rates show that many teenagers are having sex, and that they are not adequately protecting themselves against undesired pregnancies and disease. Sex education is usually taught as part of the subject area Life Orientation. In a qualitative study of 25 Life Orientation teachers in the South African Free…

  16. Sex Discrimination in Higher Education and the Professions: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Mary

    An annotated bibliography on sex discrimination in higher education and the professions is presented. Sex discrimination remains a major workplace problem and is found in virtually all levels of employment. The bibliography consists of 124 citations which appeared from 1984-1988. It excludes court cases and the "popular press," and although not…

  17. Sex Fair Knowledge, Attitudes & Behaviors of Vocational Educators: A Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Charlotte J.

    A study examined the sex-fair knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of vocational educators who attended a credit inservice course on sex equity that was given in various locations throughout New York State. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the course, researchers used three survey instruments to collect initial data on the knowledge,…

  18. Puberty/Adolescence. Growing Pains: Sex Education for Parents. A Newsletter Series. Letter III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polulech, Joan Burgess; Nuttall, Paul

    This document presents the third of five newsletters on sex education for parents. The newsletters were designed to help parents increase their ability to communicate with their adolescents about sexual issues. They explore the origins of the parents' feelings about sex; teach the importance of a healthy self-concept and how to build it in the…

  19. "Having a Real Debate": Using Media as a Resource in Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Sara

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the genesis, development and evaluation of Media Relate, a project and teaching pack about media images of sex and relationships for use in school sex and relationship education and citizenship curricula, with young people aged 12-15. Media Relate was based on the findings of an earlier research project into young people's…

  20. Evaluation of Modules on Sex Role Stereotyping Integrated into Preservice Elementary Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter S.

    Twelve instructional modules for Project BECOMING were administered to an undergraduate class of elementary education majors as part of their social studies methods course, in order to promote sex blindness, prevent sex-role stereotyping, and develop teachers who were supportive of students trying out new roles. The modules included: Values…

  1. Predictors of access to sex education for children with intellectual disabilities in public schools.

    PubMed

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Schmidt, Marcelo; Chesnut, Steven; Wei, Tianlan; Richman, David

    2014-04-01

    Data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 ( SRI International, 2002 ) were analyzed to identify variables that predicted whether individuals with intellectual disability (ID) received sex education in public schools across the United States. Results suggested that individuals receiving special education services without ID were only slightly more likely to receive sex education than students with mild ID (47.5% and 44.1%, respectively), but the percentage of students with moderate to profound ID that received sex education was significantly lower (16.18%). Analysis of teacher opinions and perceptions of the likelihood of the students benefiting from sex education found that most teachers indicated that students without ID or with mild ID would benefit (60% and 68%, respectively), but the percentage dropped to 25% for students with moderate to profound ID. Finally, across all students, the only significant demographic variable that predicted receipt of sex education was more expressive communication skills. Results are discussed in terms of ensuring equal access to sex education for students with ID in public schools.

  2. Creating comprehensive, youth centered, culturally appropriate sex education: What do young gay, bisexual and questioning men want?

    PubMed

    Pingel, Emily Sweetnam; Thomas, Laura; Harmell, Chelsea; Bauermeister, José

    2013-12-01

    We examined young gay, bisexual and questioning men's (YGBQM) experiences with school-based sex education as they sought to learn about sex and sexual health, and their suggestions for improving same-sex education resources. Thematic analysis of 30 in-depth interviews with YGBQM (ages 18-24) underscored the discrepancies between the existing school-based sex education curricula and YGBQM's perceived sex education needs. Our results show that many youths' sexuality and same-sex sexual behaviors are excluded in sex education lessons; however, YGBQM noted that they sought out other resources (e.g., websites) to answer their questions. We discuss YGBQM's ideas for the creation of a sex and sexual health website that would be tailored for youth like themselves, including topics and features that an ideal website would contain. In addition, we present recommended changes to existing school-based sexual education curricula.

  3. Creating comprehensive, youth centered, culturally appropriate sex education: What do young gay, bisexual and questioning men want?

    PubMed Central

    Pingel, Emily Sweetnam; Thomas, Laura; Harmell, Chelsea; Bauermeister, José

    2013-01-01

    We examined young gay, bisexual and questioning men's (YGBQM) experiences with school-based sex education as they sought to learn about sex and sexual health, and their suggestions for improving same-sex education resources. Thematic analysis of 30 in-depth interviews with YGBQM (ages 18-24) underscored the discrepancies between the existing school-based sex education curricula and YGBQM's perceived sex education needs. Our results show that many youths' sexuality and same-sex sexual behaviors are excluded in sex education lessons; however, YGBQM noted that they sought out other resources (e.g., websites) to answer their questions. We discuss YGBQM's ideas for the creation of a sex and sexual health website that would be tailored for youth like themselves, including topics and features that an ideal website would contain. In addition, we present recommended changes to existing school-based sexual education curricula. PMID:24348222

  4. Conflicted Identification in the Sex Education Classroom: Balancing Professional Values With Organizational Mandates.

    PubMed

    Williams, Elizabeth A; Jensen, Robin E

    2016-09-01

    Despite enormous resources spent on sex education, the United States faces an epidemic of unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections among young people. Little research has examined the role sex educators play in alleviating or exacerbating this problem. In this study, we interviewed 50 sex educators employed by public schools throughout a Midwestern, U.S. state about their experiences in the sex education classroom. Twenty-two interviewees communicated feelings of conflicted identification and provided examples of the ways in which they experienced this subjectivity in the context of their employment. We find these interviews shed light on the as-yet-understudied communicative experience of conflicted identification by delineating key sources of such conflict and discursive strategies used in its negotiation. Our results suggest that those who experience conflicted identification and who have a sense of multiple or nested identifications within their overarching professional identity may be safeguarded to some extent from eventual organizational disidentification. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Experiences of Sex Education and Sexual Awareness in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Laura A; Stagg, Steven D

    2016-12-01

    The research investigated feelings towards sex education and sexual awareness in young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Data were generated from the sexual knowledge, experiences, feelings and needs questionnaire (McCabe et al. 1999), the sexual awareness questionnaire (Snell et al. 1991) and semi-structured interviews. Twenty typically developing and 20 ASD individuals participated. Feelings toward sex education did not differ between the groups, but the groups differed significantly on measures of sexual awareness. Negative experiences of sex education and issues of vulnerability, social anxiety, and confused sexuality were prominent features of the qualitative interviews. This report suggest that mainstream sex and relationship education is not sufficient for people with ASD, specific methods and curricular are necessary to match their needs.

  6. Practice and content of sex education among adolescents in a family setting in rural southwest Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Asekun-Olarinmoye, E O; Dairo, M D; Abodurin, O L; Asekun-Olarinmoye, I O

    A descriptive cross-sectional study to assess adolescents' view of the practice and content of sex education within the family setting in a rural Nigerian community and explore whether there is any association between parental communication on sex and adolescents' sexual debut and habits. Simple random sampling was utilized, while a semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 350 respondents. Data analysis was by the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 11). Majority of the respondents (48.8%) were late adolescents, 291 (85.1%) had had sex education, most (45.7%) of whom were exposed between ages 10 and 14 years. The main content of parental sex education was HIV/AIDS prevention (51.9%), avoidance of pregnancy (40.9%), abstinence (38.1%), and basic information about reproduction and biology (35.4%). Poor attitude to parental communication on sex was associated with a higher likelihood of pre-marital sex (p = 0.001). Curiosity was the most common major reason for sexual debut. This emphasizes the importance of early sex education within the family setting and its possible impact in delaying sexual initiation. Promotion of parent-child communication about sexual issues is vital in order to improve the reproductive health of the adolescents in this environment. Community-based health education intervention programs for parents are recommended.

  7. Sex-Role Stereotyping and Sex Bias in Secondary Vocational Education in Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiegler, C. B.

    A research project assessed the extent to which sex bias existed in Kentucky secondary vocational schools. The American Institutes for Research (AIR) Survey was administered to a statewide population of 483 secondary administrators/principals, counselors, vocational instructors, and traditional and nontraditional students; 406 responded. The…

  8. Parents' views on sex education in schools: How much do Democrats and Republicans agree?

    PubMed

    Kantor, Leslie; Levitz, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    More than 93 percent of parents place high importance on sex education in both middle and high school. Sex education in middle and high school is widely supported by parents regardless of their political affiliation. Using data from a large diverse sample of 1,633 parents of children aged 9 to 21 years, we examined whether views on sex education differed by parents' political affiliation. More than 89 percent of parents that identified as Republicans or Democrats support including a wide range of topics in sex education including puberty, healthy relationships, abstinence, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and birth control in high school. In middle school, 78 percent or more of both parents that identified as Republicans and Democrats support the inclusion of those topics. Controlling for key demographic factors, parents that identified as Democrats are more likely than those that identified as Republicans to support the inclusion of the topics of healthy relationships, birth control, STDs, and sexual orientation in both middle and high school. However, a strong majority of Republican parents want all these topics included in sex education. Sex education which includes a broad set of topics represents an area of strong agreement between parents of both political parties.

  9. Parents’ views on sex education in schools: How much do Democrats and Republicans agree?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    More than 93 percent of parents place high importance on sex education in both middle and high school. Sex education in middle and high school is widely supported by parents regardless of their political affiliation. Using data from a large diverse sample of 1,633 parents of children aged 9 to 21 years, we examined whether views on sex education differed by parents’ political affiliation. More than 89 percent of parents that identified as Republicans or Democrats support including a wide range of topics in sex education including puberty, healthy relationships, abstinence, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and birth control in high school. In middle school, 78 percent or more of both parents that identified as Republicans and Democrats support the inclusion of those topics. Controlling for key demographic factors, parents that identified as Democrats are more likely than those that identified as Republicans to support the inclusion of the topics of healthy relationships, birth control, STDs, and sexual orientation in both middle and high school. However, a strong majority of Republican parents want all these topics included in sex education. Sex education which includes a broad set of topics represents an area of strong agreement between parents of both political parties. PMID:28672027

  10. Rousseau on Sex-Roles, Education and Happiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonas, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, philosophers of education have begun taking a renewed interest in Rousseau's educational thought. This is a welcome development as his ideas are rich with educational insights. His philosophy is not without its flaws, however. One significant flaw is his educational project for females, which is sexist in the highest degree.…

  11. A Sex Education Programme for Mothers in Iran: Does Preschool Children's Sex Education Influence Mothers' Knowledge and Attitudes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jeno; Riazi, Hedyeh; Firoozi, Armin; Nasiri, Maliheh

    2018-01-01

    Mothers have an important role to play in teaching their children about sexual issues and shaping children's sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. In many cases, however, mothers themselves need help and support. This study was conducted to examine the effects of a sex education programme on the knowledge and attitudes of the mothers of…

  12. The Role of Single-Sex Education in the Academic Engagement of College-Bound Women: A Multilevel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sax, Linda J.; Riggers, Tiffani A.; Eagan, M. Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context: As opportunities for public and private single-sex education have expanded, the debate surrounding this issue has become more heated. Recent reviews of research on single-sex education have concluded that the evidence is mixed, due in large part to the difficulty of attributing differences between single-sex and coeducational…

  13. Online Activities for Enhancing Sex Education Curricula: Preliminary Evidence on the Effectiveness of the Abstinence and Contraception Education Storehouse

    PubMed Central

    Raghupathy, Shobana; Klein, Charles; Card, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to conduct a preliminary evaluation of the Abstinence and Contraception Education Storehouse (ACES), a digital, classroom-based resource designed to supplement existing sex education curricula with highly interactive materials such as video clips, multimedia polls and quizzes, and audiovisual demonstrations. 335 students ages 14–19 were randomly assigned to an ACES–based (treatment) or a standard (control) sex education curriculum. Data were collected at the onset of the intervention and 3-months after the completion of the intervention. Preliminary results were highly encouraging, with ACES participants who were sexually initiated at baseline reporting at the 3-month follow-up significant reductions in the number of times they had sex in the past four weeks. Both sexually initiated and non-sexually initiated youth who experienced the ACES curriculum also demonstrated greater intent to abstain from the sex during the follow-up period than those in the control group. PMID:24078799

  14. Online Activities for Enhancing Sex Education Curricula: Preliminary Evidence on the Effectiveness of the Abstinence and Contraception Education Storehouse.

    PubMed

    Raghupathy, Shobana; Klein, Charles; Card, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to conduct a preliminary evaluation of the Abstinence and Contraception Education Storehouse (ACES), a digital, classroom-based resource designed to supplement existing sex education curricula with highly interactive materials such as video clips, multimedia polls and quizzes, and audiovisual demonstrations. 335 students ages 14-19 were randomly assigned to an ACES-based (treatment) or a standard (control) sex education curriculum. Data were collected at the onset of the intervention and 3-months after the completion of the intervention. Preliminary results were highly encouraging, with ACES participants who were sexually initiated at baseline reporting at the 3-month follow-up significant reductions in the number of times they had sex in the past four weeks. Both sexually initiated and non-sexually initiated youth who experienced the ACES curriculum also demonstrated greater intent to abstain from the sex during the follow-up period than those in the control group.

  15. Same-Sex Sexuality and Educational Attainment: The Pathway to College.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Jennifer; Wilkinson, Lindsey

    2017-01-01

    Research finds lower levels of academic performance among sexual minority high school students, but some studies suggest sexual minorities have higher levels of educational attainment in adulthood. To further our understanding of how and why sexual orientation is associated with educational success, this study turns attention to the pathways to college completion, examining points along educational trajectories in which sexual minorities fall behind or surpass their heterosexual peers. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, we find that sexual minority women are less likely than women with no same-sex sexuality to complete college, in part due to their high school performance and transition into college. Men who experience same-sex sexuality only in adolescence struggle in high school, but men who experience same-sex sexuality for the first time in adulthood are more likely to earn a college degree than men who do not experience same-sex sexuality.

  16. Sex Education beyond School: Implications for Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Juping

    2010-01-01

    The negative consequences of teenage sexual behaviour are issues of concern in Britain and many other western countries. Over one-quarter of British young people are reported to become sexually active prior to the age of 16 and the rate of teenage pregnancy remains one of the highest in Western Europe. Current UK Government policy on sex education…

  17. Sex Education and the Disabled--Teaching Adult Responsibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varnet, Theresa

    1984-01-01

    The author describes her experiences in teaching her mentally retarded daughter about sex and the changes happening to her body. She suggests the needs of disabled young people extend beyond preventing unplanned pregnancy and preparing them for their menstrual period. (CL)

  18. Equal Educational Opportunity, Sex Discrimination Prohibited, Ch 392-190.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board of Education, Olympia.

    This document lists the provisions of the Washington state statute which prohibits sex discrimination in: public schools, employment, counseling and guidance services to students, recreational and athletic activities for students, access to course offerings, and in textbooks and instructional materials used by students. All school districts in…

  19. Race, Sex, and Their Influences on Introductory Statistics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Es, Cindy; Weaver, Michelle M.

    2018-01-01

    The Survey of Attitudes Toward Statistics or SATS was administered for three consecutive years to students in an Introductory Statistics course at Cornell University. Questions requesting demographic information and expected final course grade were added. Responses were analyzed to investigate possible differences between sexes and racial/ethnic…

  20. Single-Sex Classes in Co-Educational Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wills, Robin; Kilpatrick, Sue; Hutton, Biddy

    2006-01-01

    This research investigated social and academic outcomes from single-sex classrooms in a Tasmanian coeducational government primary school. Interviews, observations and surveys formed the basis of the evidence. Teachers, parents and children reported positive benefits from the class organisation, but these differed according to gender. Staff…

  1. Florida Residents' Preferred Approach to Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard-Barr, Elissa M.; Moore, Michele Johnson

    2007-01-01

    Although there is widespread support for sexuality education, whether to use an abstinence-only or comprehensive approach is hotly debated. This study assessed Florida residents preferred approach to school-based sexuality education. The 641 respondents were selected by random digit dialing, using methods to ensure ethnic and geographic…

  2. Inequality in Education, Number 18, October 1974: Sex Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Center for Law and Education.

    The contents of this volume published by the Center for Law and Education, which was established to protect and advance the legal interests of the poor through research and action on the legal implications of educational policies, include the following articles: "Introduction" and "Sexism in Public Education: Litigation…

  3. Promoting Sex Education Among Teenagers Through an Interactive Game: Reasons for Success and Implications.

    PubMed

    Chu, Samuel Kai Wah; Kwan, Alvin C M; Reynolds, Rebecca; Mellecker, Robin R; Tam, Frankie; Lee, Grace; Hong, Athena; Leung, Ching Yin

    2015-06-01

    A game application, "Making Smart Choices", was developed to fill the gap of limited easy-to-access resources available on sex education in Hong Kong and to disseminate correct knowledge and positive attitudes toward sex to teenagers using popular platforms such as tablets, Facebook, and the Web. Three versions of the game (iPAD, Facebook, and Web-based) were developed using HTML5. A theoretical framework that involved game-based learning and participatory design approach was used to design, develop, modify, and optimize the game for use with secondary school students (n=1176) 12-16 years of age. Pre- and post-test scores of students' safer sex knowledge were compared to test the effectiveness of the game. Students' survey and interviews were analyzed to assess participant feelings and attitudes toward the game. The Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test indicated that students' sex knowledge (n=788) improved with a medium effect size (0.477) after playing the game. Increases in positive attitudes toward sex and relationship and in awareness of making smart sexual choices were reported from student surveys and interviews. Students described the game as "interesting," "interactive," "informative," and "real-to-life." We advocate that the participatory design approach, which supports collaborative efforts of different stakeholders, is an effective framework for developing game-based learning tools for sex education. Our work provides preliminary findings that suggest game-based learning, preferably delivered through popular interactive platforms, can be effective in promoting sex education to teenagers.

  4. Protective effects of middle school comprehensive sex education with family involvement.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Jennifer M; Tracy, Allison J; Charmaraman, Linda; Ceder, Ineke; Erkut, Sumru

    2014-11-01

    School-based comprehensive sex education programs can reduce early adolescents' risky sexual behavior. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a 3-year comprehensive sex education program in delaying vaginal sex for middle school students and whether the family component of the intervention contributes to its effectiveness. This longitudinal evaluation followed a cohort of 6th graders (N = 2453) through the end of 8th grade. The design used random assignment of 24 schools into treatment and comparison conditions. The analysis included multiple-group logistic regression to assess differences in delay of sex between intervention and comparison groups. In schools where the program was taught, 16% fewer boys and 15% fewer girls had had sex by the end of 8th grade compared to boys and girls at comparison schools. Completing family activities during the first year of the program predicted delayed sexual debut for boys. Theory-based, developmentally appropriate, comprehensive sex education programs that include parent involvement can be effective in delaying vaginal sex for middle school students. Parent involvement is particularly important for boys, as family activities may encourage parents to talk with their sons earlier and more frequently. © 2014, American School Health Association.

  5. Youth in India Ready for Sex Education? Emerging Evidence from National Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Niharika; Sekher, T. V.

    2013-01-01

    Context Sex education/family life education (FLE) has been one of the highly controversial issues in Indian society. Due to increasing incidences of HIV/AIDS, RTIs/STIs and teenage pregnancies, there is a rising need to impart sex education. However, introducing sex education at school level always received mixed response from various segments of Indian society. Data and Methods We attempt to understand the expectations and experiences of youth regarding family life education in India by analysing the data from District Level Household and Facility Survey (DLHS-3: 2007–08) and Youth Study in India (2006–07). We used descriptive methods to analyse the extent of access to FLE and socio demographic patterning among Indian youth. Results and Discussions We found substantial gap between the proportion of youth who perceived sex education to be important and those who actually received it, revealing considerable unmet need for FLE. Youth who received FLE were relatively more aware about reproductive health issues than their counterparts. Majority among Indian youth, irrespective of their age and sex, favoured introduction of FLE at school level, preferably from standard 8th onwards. The challenge now is to develop a culturally-sensitive FLE curriculum acceptable to all sections of society. PMID:23951197

  6. Formal and informal sex education as determinants of premarital sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Spanier, G B

    1976-01-01

    Controversies exist regarding the effects of sex education in the schools and informal sex education obtained from parents, peers, the mass media, and other sources. Similarly, there is widespread interest in premarital sexual behavior, especially its determinants. This study presents several issues reflecting these concerns which have been the subject of much speculation but which have received little attention by researchers. The purpose of this study was to investigate--through the use of respondent reports--how formal and informal sex education influences premarital sexual behavior during college. A national probability sample of 1177 college students was studied using face-to-face interviews with approximately equal numbers of males and females. These interviews, which were conducted for the Institute for Sex Research, included questions about past and present sexual involvement and other attitudinal, behavioral and background variables. Accordingly, the data about sexual behavior and attitudes are based on the interviewees' self-reports. Indices were created which operationalized independent variables such as familial sexual conservatism, exposure to eroticism, perceived sex knowledge, and sexual exposure and assault during childhood and adolescence. Individual items reflecting childhood sex play, masturbation, current religiosity, religiosity while growing up, social class, sources of sex information, sex education in classrooms, and high school and college dating were used. The dependent variable, premarital sociosexual involvement, is a composite measure of incidence and prevalence of premarital heterosexual involvement which meets Guttman scaling criteria. An Automatic Interaction Detector analysis was used to determine the relative influences of reported sexualization variables on premarital sexual behavior. Major findings can be summarized as follows: Heterosexual behavior progresses in stepwise fashion from elementary to advanced levels of involvement

  7. Sources and Timing of Sex Education: Relations with American Adolescent Sexual Attitudes and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Cheryl L.; Surmann, Amy T.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the comparative contribution that (a) multiple sources of education about sexual topics (peers, media, school and other adults), and (b) the timing of this sex education, make on American adolescent sexual attitudes and behavior. Participants were 672 ethnically and economically diverse male and female,…

  8. Saying One Thing and Doing Another: The Paradox of Best Practices and Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oster, Maryjo M.

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) specifies that all educational programs or curricula be supported by "scientifically based research" in order to ensure better quality control. However, in the arena of sex education, the federal government allocates millions of dollars in grants for schools and organizations to implement…

  9. Women's and Men's Choice of Higher Education--What Explains the Persistent Sex Segregation in Norway?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storen, Liv Anne; Arnesen, Clara Ase

    2007-01-01

    This article examines sex segregation in higher education in Norway. The extent to which parent's education and occupation and students' grades have an impact on the choice of male and female dominated subjects is analysed. The analysis uses a framework which integrates socialisation and rational choice perspectives. The data used are from a…

  10. Title IX: A Practical Guide to Achieving Sex Equity in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Coalition for Women and Girls in Education.

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is the principal federal law which prohibits sex discriminaton in education. This monograph sets forth the extent of Title IX's coverage by subject area, describes the obligations of covered institutions, and explains how victims of discrimination can enforce their Title IX right. While dealing with…

  11. Schools, Sex Education, and Support for Sexual Minorities: Exploring Historic Marginalization and Future Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty-Caplan, David Milo

    2013-01-01

    School-based adolescent sexual health education in the United States has long served as a means of combating emotional and physical threats to the well-being of youth. However, this sex education has since its inception marginalized the experiences and health concerns of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) students and contributed to school…

  12. Predictors of Access to Sex Education for Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Schmidt, Marcelo; Chesnut, Steven; Wei, Tianlan; Richman, David

    2014-01-01

    Data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (SRI International, 2002) were analyzed to identify variables that predicted whether individuals with intellectual disability (ID) received sex education in public schools across the United States. Results suggested that individuals receiving special education services without ID were only…

  13. Sex Knowledge of Teenagers and the Effect of an Educational Rap Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, Paul A.; Werley, Harriet H.

    1976-01-01

    In order to provide the type of data necessary for sex education program implementation, a two-part study was undertaken by the authors, with the cooperation of the Planned Parenthood League, to explore teen knowledge of contraception, abortion, reproduction, and venereal disease, and to ascertain whether education in these areas results in…

  14. Sex Discrimination Against Students: Implications of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkle, Margaret C.; Sandler, Bernice

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 mandates that sex discrimination be eliminated in federally assisted education programs. Title IX has significant implications for a variety of issues including recruiting, admissions, financial aid, student rules and regulations, housing rules, health care and insurance benefits, student employment,…

  15. Addressing Sex Discrimination and Sexual Harassment: Your Responsibilities as an Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Equity Issues, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Educators need to be aware of sex discrimination in their schools and of the legislation that prohibits it, because it entails costs, liabilities, impact, and responsibilities for every educator. The obvious and direct costs are attorney fees, awarded damages, and settlement costs. Other, less obvious costs are unfavorable publicity, erosion of a…

  16. The Evolution of Sex Education and Students' Sexual Knowledge in Finland in the 2000s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontula, Osmo

    2010-01-01

    Finland is probably the only country where sex education has been studied in two consecutive national surveys, in 1996 and 2006 directed at biology and health education teachers, and in 2000 and 2006 by measuring adolescents' sexual knowledge. In 2006, responses from teachers and students could be combined for 339 schools. The most important…

  17. The Repudiation of Single-Sex Education: Boys' Schools in the Soviet Union, 1943-1954

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, E. Thomas

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the 11-year Soviet experiment with boys' schools as a way to cast new light on scholarly research and public debates about single-sex education. Drawing on archival and published materials by educators who described school conditions, identified problems, suggested reforms, and evaluated remedies, the author argues that…

  18. Teaching sex education: are Scottish school nurses prepared for the challenge?

    PubMed

    McFadyen, J

    2004-02-01

    Teaching sex education to school pupils in Scotland continues to be a controversial issue. In reality there is lack of leadership, strategy and an uncoordinated approach to delivering this important topic. The school nurse is frequently identified as a suitable professional to lead the way because it is assumed that school nurses are well educated in the field of sexual and reproductive health. Nationally, little is known about the educational status of Scottish school nurses and there is no research evidence available from which generalisations can be made. This study aims to explore the educational preparation of school nurses that underpins teaching sex education to school pupils in Scotland. A cross-sectional descriptive study was completed in September 1998. The results confirmed that school nurses in Scotland are predominantly female and 70% of the respondents (n=117) were over the age of 40 years of age. No common basic nursing qualification was identified. The majority of school nurses in Scotland perceive sex education to be part of their role and 39% (n=65) testified that specific sexual health training had been undertaken. Many lack confidence in this area of practice and are aware of extensive educational needs in relation to teaching sexual health and reproductive health. Despite these findings 75% (n=126) were actively involved in teaching sex education to school pupils.

  19. Predictors of Support for Juvenile Sex Offender Registration: Educated Individuals Recognize the Flaws of Juvenile Registration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Margaret C.; Smith, Amy C.; Sekely, Ady; Farnum, Katlyn S.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated demographic predictors of support for juvenile sex offender registration policies, including education level, gender, political orientation, and age. Participants were 168 individuals recruited from public places in a Midwest community (45% women; M age = 42). In line with hypotheses, as education level increased, support for…

  20. Single-Sex Education versus Coeducation in North Georgia Public Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Catherine Danielle

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education is giving more liberties to school districts to offer single-sex schools in order to adequately serve the needs of students. The purpose of this quantitative causal-comparative study was to test the theory of students' performances based on their educational environment by comparing students who received…

  1. Promoting Educational Equity through School Libraries. Module 4: Sex-Fair Resources for School Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsen, Alleen Pace; Tyler, Karen Beyard

    The school librarian or media specialist who wishes to promote educational equity through the selection of sex-fair materials is offered guidance in determining the suitability of reference sources in this fourth learning module of a continuing education program. The inadequacies of traditional resources are examined in three categories--omissions…

  2. An Equal Chance. A Parent's Introduction to Sex Fairness in Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Martha; McCune, Shirley

    This booklet was developed to introduce parents to sex fairness in vocational education. First, it presents the pictures of two women and two men and explains why they are enrolled in their particular vocational education programs. It then asks parents to consider whether they can see their daughters and sons in occupations nontraditional to their…

  3. Predictors of support for juvenile sex offender registration: educated individuals recognize the flaws of juvenile registration.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Margaret C; Smith, Amy C; Sekely, Ady; Farnum, Katlyn S

    2013-01-01

    We investigated demographic predictors of support for juvenile sex offender registration policies, including education level, gender, political orientation, and age. Participants were 168 individuals recruited from public places in a Midwest community (45% women; M age = 42). In line with hypotheses, as education level increased, support for juvenile registration decreased, as did the belief that juvenile registration protects the community. In addition, as education level increased, belief that the juvenile understood his actions decreased, as did support for juvenile registration when it is framed as ineffective at reducing sex crime. These beliefs mediated the relationship between education level and diminished support for juvenile registration. Implications of these results for the advancement of effective juvenile sex offender policy are discussed.

  4. The Effectiveness of Sex Education in the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    avoid pregnancy and parenthood in its recruits until they are emotionally and financially ready for such commitments. In addition, birth control should...become pregnant, that a woman won’t get pregnant if she really doesn’t want a baby even if she has sex without taking precautions, that birth control is...intercourse without using a birth control method were asked to indicate their pregnancy intention and reason for nonuse of contraception. Sixty-five percent of

  5. Teachers' Views on Co-Education: Co-Education or Single-Sex Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sari, Mediha

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate teachers' views on co-education. The study, which adopted a descriptive screening model, involved 240 teachers (142 females and 84 males) working in four primary schools and four secondary schools located in the central towns of Adana. Data were collected using Views on Co-education Scale (VCS). Analysis…

  6. Factors associated with the content of sex education in U.S. public secondary schools.

    PubMed

    Landry, David J; Darroch, Jacqueline E; Singh, Susheela; Higgins, Jenny

    2003-01-01

    While sex education is almost universal in U.S. schools, its content varies considerably. Topics such as abstinence, and basic information on HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), are commonly taught; birth control and how to access STD and contraceptive services are taught less often. Factors potentially associated with these variations need to be examined. Data on 1,657 respondents to a 1999 national survey of teachers providing sex education in grades 7-12 were assessed for variation in topics covered. Logistic regression was used to ascertain factors associated with instruction on selected topics. The content of sex education varied by region and by instructors' approach to teaching about abstinence and contraception. For example, teaching abstinence as the only means of pregnancy and STD prevention was more common in the South than in the Northeast (30% vs. 17%). Emphasizing the ineffectiveness of contraceptives was less common in the Northeast (17%) than in other regions (27-32%). Instructors teaching that methods are ineffective and presenting abstinence as teenagers' only option had significantly reduced odds of teaching various skills and topics (odds ratios, 0.1-0.5). Instructors' approach to teaching about methods is a very powerful indicator of the content of sex education. Given the well-documented relationship between what teenagers learn about safer sexual behavior and their use of methods when they initiate sexual activity, sex education in all U.S. high schools should include accurate information about condoms and other contraceptives.

  7. Identifying Effective Methods for Teaching Sex Education to Individuals With Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Schaafsma, Dilana; Kok, Gerjo; Stoffelen, Joke M. T.; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2015-01-01

    Sex education for individuals with intellectual disabilities is important. However, our knowledge about effective methods for teaching sex education to this population is limited. We report the results of a systematic review identifying methods for sex education programs aimed at individuals with intellectual disabilities. In all, 20 articles were included that met the criteria set in terms of topic—the effectiveness of sex education programs—and population of interest—individuals with intellectual disabilities. In these articles, methods for increasing knowledge and for improving skills and attitudes were reported. However, the studies revealed that generalization of skills to real-life situations was often not achieved. There are indications that the maintenance of knowledge and skills still needs extra attention. Moreover, detailed descriptions of the program materials, program goals, and methods used in the programs were often lacking in the reports. Although there is some evidence for methods that may improve knowledge, attitudes, and skills with regard to sex education aimed at individuals with intellectual disabilities, due to the lack of detailed descriptions provided it is unclear under which conditions these methods work. We therefore suggest that authors provide additional detail about methods in future publications or in online supplements. PMID:25085114

  8. HIV Education and Sexual Risk Behaviors Among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Beyrer, Chris; Arrington-Sanders, Renata

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Men who have sex with men (MSM) have nearly 80 times the lifetime risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) relative to men who have sex with women only (MSW), and young MSM (YMSM) accounted for 95% of estimated HIV diagnoses among adolescents between 13 and 24 years in 2015. We aimed to evaluate HIV education and sexual risk behaviors among YMSM relative to young MSW (YMSW) and to evaluate the relationship between HIV education and YMSM sexual risk behaviors. Methods: We used Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System data from 13 states that collected information on sex of sexual contacts and on HIV education in 2011 and/or 2013. We assessed HIV education, number of sexual partners ever and in the past three months, and condom use at last sex in logistic regression analyses controlling for age, race/ethnicity, state, and year. Results: YMSM were less likely to report school-based HIV education and more likely to report sexual risk behaviors relative to YMSW. HIV education was associated with reduced sexual risk behaviors among all students and with significant additional reductions in sexual risk behaviors among YMSM. Conclusion: There is a need for HIV education programs to reach YMSM, who are at increased risk of HIV. PMID:29297755

  9. HIV Education and Sexual Risk Behaviors Among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Raifman, Julia; Beyrer, Chris; Arrington-Sanders, Renata

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) have nearly 80 times the lifetime risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) relative to men who have sex with women only (MSW), and young MSM (YMSM) accounted for 95% of estimated HIV diagnoses among adolescents between 13 and 24 years in 2015. We aimed to evaluate HIV education and sexual risk behaviors among YMSM relative to young MSW (YMSW) and to evaluate the relationship between HIV education and YMSM sexual risk behaviors. We used Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System data from 13 states that collected information on sex of sexual contacts and on HIV education in 2011 and/or 2013. We assessed HIV education, number of sexual partners ever and in the past three months, and condom use at last sex in logistic regression analyses controlling for age, race/ethnicity, state, and year. YMSM were less likely to report school-based HIV education and more likely to report sexual risk behaviors relative to YMSW. HIV education was associated with reduced sexual risk behaviors among all students and with significant additional reductions in sexual risk behaviors among YMSM. There is a need for HIV education programs to reach YMSM, who are at increased risk of HIV.

  10. The politics of school sex education policy in England and Wales from the 1940s to the 1960s.

    PubMed

    Hampshire, James

    2005-04-01

    This article explores the political history of school sex education policy in England and Wales. Focusing on the period from the 1940s to the 1960s, it shows how sex education developed as a controversial political issue through an analysis of the differing institutional cultures and agendas of health and education administrators. The article argues that serious consideration of school sex education by central government was first prompted by concern about venereal disease during the Second World War. Thereafter, two groups of actors emerged with conflicting ideas about the role of government in prescribing school sex education. The medical establishment, including the Ministry of Health, was broadly supportive of a national policy, whereas the Department of Education, which had ultimate responsibility for any such policy in schools, sought to avoid decision-making about the issue. The article explores how a public health consensus on sex education developed and then explains why the Department of Education resisted this consensus.

  11. Educators' Handbook on Federal Anti-Sex Discrimination Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, James

    The document presents a summary of major federal legislation affecting the policy and operation of educational programs and activities. The handbook is intended to help educators locate information on the constitutional aspects of anti-discrimination laws. The document is presented in four chapters. Chapter I discusses the constitutional aspects…

  12. Attitudes Toward Sex-Role Differentiation in Secondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Paula F.; Davis, William J.

    To the extent that equalization of opportunities for females and males requires socialization or re-socialization of massive numbers of people, the education system has a vital function in approaching the new ideal. Since the education system is explicitly designed to bring about behavioral and attitudinal change in young members of society, its…

  13. Increases in knowledge following a course of sex education for people with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, W R; Bellshaw, E; Culross, G; Staines, C; Michie, A

    1992-12-01

    Although sex education programmes are thought to be useful in teaching people with intellectual disabilities, there is very little evidence that the material taught is retained by clients. This paper reports data which has been collected routinely on a sex education programme. Forty-six subjects were assessed on their level of sexual knowledge in seven areas: parts of the body, masturbation, male puberty, female puberty, intercourse, pregnancy and childbirth, and birth control and venereal disease. They were retested after a 9-month sex education programme and tested again at a 3-month follow-up. A control group of 14 subjects were tested on two occasions, 4 months apart. There were significant and substantial increases in sexual knowledge on all areas for the experimental group. The control group showed no corresponding increases in knowledge.

  14. An Analysis of Discourse Present in Sex Education Literature from Palm Beach County Middle Schools: Are Kids Really Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Avila, Elizabeth

    Issues of sexual assault have become pervasive across all social strata in American society. Citizens need to start having conversations regarding these issues. To combat the issue of sexual assault, children need to be educated regarding the multifaceted aspects of sex through sex education in order to understand consent and resources they have available to them. Utilizing grounded theory methodology, this thesis analyzes sex education literature provided to Palm Beach County Middle School students. Using Burke's theory of terministic screens and Foucauldian theories of power and control; an understanding of the ideological underpinnings of this literature and discourse were acquired. After analysis, suggestions for disclosure and sex education programs are provided.

  15. Family homework and school-based sex education: delaying early adolescents' sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Jennifer M; Frye, Alice; Charmaraman, Linda; Erkut, Sumru

    2013-11-01

    Early sexual activity can undermine adolescents' future school success and health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of a family homework component of a comprehensive sex education intervention in delaying sexual initiation for early adolescents and to explore what social and contextual factors prevent adolescents from completing these family homework activities. This mixed methods study included 6th- and 7th-grade survey responses from 706 students at 11 middle school schools receiving a sex education intervention, as well as interviews from a subset of 33, 7th-grade students from the larger sample. Adolescents who completed more family homework assignments were less likely to have vaginal intercourse in 7th grade than those who completed fewer assignments, after controlling for self-reports of having had vaginal intercourse in 6th grade and demographic variables. Participants' explanations for not completing assignments included personal, curriculum, and family-based reasons. Family homework activities designed to increase family communication about sexual issues can delay sex among early adolescents and contribute to school-based sex education programs. Successful sex education programs must identify and address barriers to family homework completion. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  16. Effects of age, education, and sex on response bias in a recognition task.

    PubMed

    Marquié, J C; Baracat, B

    2000-09-01

    This study examined age-related differences in decision criteria and the extent to which inconsistencies in earlier findings could be due to sampling artifacts, especially the underlying effects of educational level and sex. Male and female participants (N = 3,059) from 4 age groups (32, 42, 52, and 62 years) and a wide range of educational levels performed a word recognition task. Response bias was assessed with a nonparametric index derived from signal detection theory. The analyses revealed no age differences except for the most educated subjects, for whom increased age was associated with stricter decision criteria. Lower levels of education and men as compared with women were associated with a more conservative bias. Controlling for the level of sensitivity did not significantly change this pattern of results. This finding stresses the need for caution in generalizing age differences obtained from samples that are only partly representative or imbalanced with respect to education and sex.

  17. Students' experiences and perceived benefits of a sex education curriculum: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peggy B; Realini, Janet P; Buzi, Ruth S; Martinez, Mario

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative evaluation explored the experiences and perceived benefits of students who participated in an abstinence-plus sex education program at enrollment and conclusion. The sample included 1130 inner-city high school students, 73.7% of whom were Hispanic. Thematic analysis was used to identify main themes in responses made by students to 3 open-ended questions. The most common preparticipation request was for information about sexually transmitted infections. At program conclusion, the most common response theme involved the quality of course delivery. Students indicated that they appreciated the facilitators who allowed open conversations. The implications of these findings to sex education programs are discussed.

  18. New evidence: data documenting parental support for earlier sexuality education.

    PubMed

    Barr, Elissa M; Moore, Michele J; Johnson, Tammie; Forrest, Jamie; Jordan, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies document support for sexuality education to be taught in high school, and often, in middle school. However, little research has been conducted addressing support for sexuality education in elementary schools. As part of the state Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Survey administration, the Florida Department of Health conducted the Florida Child Health Survey (FCHS) by calling back parents who had children in their home and who agreed to participate (N = 1715). Most parents supported the following sexuality education topics being taught specifically in elementary school: communication skills (89%), human anatomy/reproductive information (65%), abstinence (61%), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (53%), and gender/sexual orientation issues (52%). Support was even greater in middle school (62-91%) and high school (72-91%) for these topics and for birth control and condom education. Most parents supported comprehensive sexuality education (40.4%), followed by abstinence-plus (36.4%) and abstinence-only (23.2%). Chi-square results showed significant differences in the type of sexuality education supported by almost all parent demographic variables analyzed including sex, race, marital status, and education. Results add substantial support for age-appropriate school-based sexuality education starting at the elementary school level, the new National Sexuality Education Standards, and funding to support evidence-based abstinence-plus or comprehensive sexuality education. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  19. General Directions for the Game of CESSHEE: Conflicts in Eliminating Sex Stereotyping in Home Economics Education. Project MOVE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Charlotte J.

    Intended for a group of twelve to sixteen people with one facilitator, CESSHEE (Conflicts in Eliminating Sex Stereotyping in Home Economics Education) includes materials and instructions for a simulation game for individuals concerned with how sex discrimination, stereotyping, and bias may influence the enrollment of both sexes in home economics…

  20. Promoting Educational Equity through School Libraries. Module 2: Sexism and Sex-Role Stereotyping in School Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsen, Alleen Pace; Tyler, Karen Beyard

    The second learning module in a continuing education program for inservice school media specialists focuses on sex stereotyping and ways in which inaccurate ideas about sex differences are transmitted through instructional materials in exploring the following questions: (1) Why do school materials communicate sexist ideas and sex-role stereotypes?…

  1. Parent opinion of sexuality education in a state with mandated abstinence education: does policy match parental preference?

    PubMed

    Ito, Kristin E; Gizlice, Ziya; Owen-O'Dowd, Judy; Foust, Evelyn; Leone, Peter A; Miller, William C

    2006-11-01

    Despite public debate about the content of sexuality education in schools, state and federal policy has increasingly financed and legislated abstinence-only education over the past decade. Although public schools strive to meet the needs of parents who, as taxpayers, fund the educational system, little is known about parental desires regarding sexuality education in states with mandated abstinence education. The objective of this study was to assess parental opinion about sexuality education in public schools in North Carolina, a state with mandated abstinence education. Computer-assisted, anonymous, cross-sectional telephone surveys were conducted among 1306 parents of North Carolina public school students in grades K-12. Parental support for sexuality education in public schools and 20 sexuality education topics was measured. We defined comprehensive sexuality education as education that includes a discussion of how to use and talk about contraception with partners. Parents in North Carolina overwhelmingly support sexuality education in public schools (91%). Of these respondents, the majority (89%) support comprehensive sexuality education. Less than a quarter of parents oppose teaching any specific topic, including those typically viewed as more controversial, such as discussions about sexual orientation, oral sex, and anal sex. Parents' level of education was inversely related to support for specific sexuality education topics and comprehensive education, although these differences were small in magnitude. More than 90% of respondents felt that parents and public health professionals should determine sexuality education content and opposed the involvement of politicians. Current state-mandated abstinence sexuality education does not match parental preference for comprehensive sexuality education in North Carolina public schools.

  2. Sex differences in genetic and environmental influences on educational attainment and income.

    PubMed

    Orstavik, Ragnhild E; Czajkowski, Nikolai; Røysamb, Espen; Knudsen, Gun Peggy; Tambs, Kristian; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted

    2014-12-01

    In many Western countries, women now reach educational levels comparable to men, although their income remains considerably lower. For the past decades, it has become increasingly clear that these measures of socio-economic status are influenced by genetic as well as environmental factors. Less is known about the relationship between education and income, and sex differences. The aim of this study was to explore genetic and environmental factors influencing education and income in a large cohort of young Norwegian twins, with special emphasis on gender differences. National register data on educational level and income were obtained for 7,710 twins (aged 29-41 years). Bivariate Cholesky models were applied to estimate qualitative and quantitative gender differences in genetic and environmental influences, the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to the correlation between education and income, and genetic correlations within and between sexes and phenotypes. The phenotypic correlation between educational level and income was 0.34 (0.32-0.39) for men and 0.45 (0.43-0.48) for women. An ACE model with both qualitative and quantitative sex differences fitted the data best. The genetic correlation between men and women (rg) was 0.66 (0.22-1.00) for educational attainment and 0.38 (0.01-0.75) for income, and between the two phenotypes 0.31 (0.08-0.52) for men and 0.72 (0.64-0.85) for women. Our results imply that, in relatively egalitarian societies with state-supported access to higher education and political awareness of gender equality, genetic factors may play an important role in explaining sex differences in the relationship between education and income.

  3. A Teacher's Point of View on Family Life (Sex) Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawlinski, Judy R.

    2007-01-01

    As a Family and Consumer Science educator at Union City High School in Union City, Pennsylvania, I have heard and seen a great deal. I have been teaching for 24 years at this rural Pennsylvania Middle/High School where teen pregnancy has always been a problem. Teaching students abstinence as the only method of birth control has been a major…

  4. "Sex and the Church": Sexuality, Misconduct, and Education in Methodism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Darryl W.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes Methodism's efforts to address misconduct within ministerial relationships as an important dimension of sexuality education within a religious context. The United Methodist Church (UMC) makes a concerted effort to promote awareness, justice, and healing in cases of sexual abuse within ministerial relationships. The most…

  5. Sex Education, Liberalism, and Natural Law: Toward an Overlapping Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Onofrio, Eve

    From a political standpoint, the battle over sexuality education is not simply a dispute over the most effective means to promote the sexual and reproductive health of youth; but rather, a clash over the shape and direction of society itself. (McKay, 1999). This paper explores the theoretical underpinnings of the debate over the content and scope…

  6. Illiberal Education: The Politics of Race and Sex on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Souza, Dinesh

    This book addresses the issue of angry campus confrontations over issues of race, gender, and ethnicity, and more broadly, the dilemma of the college's and university's ability and desire to attain the goals of liberal education while also desiring to be "politically correct." It is noted that student activists have split the university…

  7. Short-Term and Long-Term Educational Mobility of Families: A Two-Sex Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mare, Robert D.

    2017-01-01

    We use a multigenerational perspective to investigate how families reproduce and pass their educational advantages to succeeding generations. Unlike traditional mobility studies that have typically focused on one-sex influences from fathers to sons, we rely on a two-sex approach that accounts for interactions between males and females—the process in which males and females mate and have children with those of similar educational statuses and jointly determine the educational status attainment of their offspring. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, we approach this issue from both a short-term and a long-term perspective. For the short term, grandparents’ educational attainments have a direct association with grandchildren’s education as well as an indirect association that is mediated by parents’ education and demographic behaviors. For the long term, initial educational advantages of families may benefit as many as three subsequent generations, but such advantages are later offset by the lower fertility of highly educated persons. Yet, all families eventually achieve the same educational distribution of descendants because of intermarriages between families of high- and low-education origin. PMID:28058636

  8. Short-Term and Long-Term Educational Mobility of Families: A Two-Sex Approach.

    PubMed

    Song, Xi; Mare, Robert D

    2017-02-01

    We use a multigenerational perspective to investigate how families reproduce and pass their educational advantages to succeeding generations. Unlike traditional mobility studies that have typically focused on one-sex influences from fathers to sons, we rely on a two-sex approach that accounts for interactions between males and females-the process in which males and females mate and have children with those of similar educational statuses and jointly determine the educational status attainment of their offspring. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, we approach this issue from both a short-term and a long-term perspective. For the short term, grandparents' educational attainments have a direct association with grandchildren's education as well as an indirect association that is mediated by parents' education and demographic behaviors. For the long term, initial educational advantages of families may benefit as many as three subsequent generations, but such advantages are later offset by the lower fertility of highly educated persons. Yet, all families eventually achieve the same educational distribution of descendants because of intermarriages between families of high- and low-education origin.

  9. Separated by Sex: A Critical Look at Single-Sex Education for Girls (edited by Susan Morse)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceraulo, Reviewed By Sandra C.

    1999-05-01

    As Cornelius Riordan states in his round-table paper, "The challenge of effective and equitable schooling in the next century is to overcome the resistance and recalcitrance of youth cultures in and out of school" (p 58). While this is admittedly not a new problem, it is more complex in its modern form and innovative ways to solve it are needed. In an old tradition, one such attempt has been single-sex schools, which have had particular success with the disadvantaged and white females in American society, with the notable involvement of Catholic religious communities. The report does not make clear whether their successes can be reproduced in some modification of the public school format. However, the AAUW report on single-sex schools sheds light on some of the characteristics that make true learning communities out of ordinary schools and on what it takes to reach disadvantaged girls. For these reasons, the AAUW report is good reading for educators at all levels.

  10. Future Sex Educator Perceptions of Rural versus Urban Instruction: A Case for Community-Centered Sexual Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Christina L.; Jensen, Robin E.; Selzer King, Abigail

    2014-01-01

    Instructors of sexual health courses in rural areas face unique challenges as they are often forced to use school-based prevention curricula field-tested in urban areas. Research has yet to consider what future sex educators' regional expectations are for their profession and how those expectations might have an impact on the classroom. Drawing…

  11. Development of a Sex Education Syllabus for Health Science at American River College. Emergence of Higher Education in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasler, Michael L.

    This practicum paper discusses the development, evaluation, and revision of a student sex education syllabus at American River College (California). The syllabus is intended to provide an alternative learning format to the traditional lecture format. After a review of the literature, it was decided to use a fill-in or sentence completion format…

  12. Young Cypriots on Sex Education: Sources and Adequacy of Information Received on Sexuality Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesta, Stalo; Lazarus, Jeffrey V.; Essen, Birgitta

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: In the absence of standardised sex education and because schools usually limit their teaching to the "health" aspects of sexuality, young people in Cyprus rely on their peers and the media for information on sexuality. This study examines the sources and adequacy of the information received by young people from various…

  13. Impact Evaluation of FACTS & Feelings: A Home-Based Video Sex Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Brent C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Families (n=548) with seventh- or eighth-grade adolescents were randomly assigned to receive videotape sex education curriculum including videos with mailed newsletters, videos without newsletters, or neither (control group). Found no significant effect of the program on key outcome variables of teenagers' sexual intentions or behaviors.…

  14. Evaluation of a School-Based Sex Education Programme Delivered to Grade Nine Students in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smylie, Lisa; Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Boyd, Dana

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of a multidimensional Canadian sex education programme was evaluated using 240 Grade Nine students. The intervention was offered by representatives from various community groups and involved instructional classes on anatomy/physiology of the reproductive system and sexually transmitted infections, a video and group discussion on…

  15. Sex Education Instruction for Students Who Are Visually Impaired: Recommendations to Guide Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapperman, Gaylen; Kelly, Stacy M.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with visual impairments (that is, those who are blind or have low vision) do not have the same opportunities to develop their knowledge of sexual health and participate in sex education as their sighted peers (Krupa & Esmail, 2010), although young adults with visual impairments participate in sexual activities at similar rates as their…

  16. Does Russia Need Sex Education? The Views of Stakeholders in Three Russian Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gevorgyan, Ruzanna; Schmidt, Elena; Wall, Martin; Garnett, Geoffrey; Atun, Rifat; Maksimova, Svetlana; Davidenko, Ludmila; Renton, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the attitudes of the main stakeholders towards the introduction of sex education in schools in Russia. Design: Qualitative semi-structured interview study. Setting: Altai Krai, Volgograd Oblast, Moscow, Russian Federation. Participants: One hundred and fifty-three interviews with Intersectoral HIV/AIDS Committee members,…

  17. Teenage Pregnancy and Sex and Relationship Education: Myths and (Mis)conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Kerry

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the role of sex and relationship education (SRE) in reducing teenage pregnancy rates. It critically examines some of the assumptions underlying the emphasis placed on SRE within the teenage pregnancy strategy ( SEU, 1999)--in particular, the view that ignorance of sexual matters plays a key part in teenage conception. An…

  18. How Do National Newspapers Report on Sex and Relationship Education in England?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simey, Piers; Wellings, Kaye

    2008-01-01

    Issues relating to the sexual behaviour and sexual health of young people consistently capture newspaper headlines in the UK. The present paper provides a qualitative analysis of national newspaper articles reporting on sex and relationship education (SRE) within the context of teenage pregnancy. Overall, conservative newspapers were generally…

  19. Family Life and Human Development (Sex Education): The Prince George's County Public Schools Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    The Prince George's County schools' sex education program for grades K-12 was developed and implemented in the late 1960s and has three focus areas: family life and interpersonal relationships; the physiological and personality changes during puberty; and advanced physiology and psychology of human sexual behavior. The program augments what the…

  20. Preferences towards Sex Education and Information from an Ethnically Diverse Sample of Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, L.; Testa, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports sex education preferences from an ethnically diverse sample of 3007 15-18 year olds. Findings are presented on preferred topics, where and from whom young people would like to receive this information. Preferences were centred around learning more about sexual behaviour and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in particular,…

  1. Learning about Sex in Later Life: Sources of Education and Older Australian Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fileborn, Bianca; Lyons, Anthony; Hinchliff, Sharron; Brown, Graham; Heywood, Wendy; Minichiello, Victor

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the preferred sexuality education sources of older Australian adults in later life. Drawing on findings from qualitative interviews with 30 men and 23 women aged 60 years and older, we consider the sources that participants currently use, or would like to use, in seeking information about sex. Where relevant, we examine…

  2. Experiences of Sex Education and Sexual Awareness in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannah, Laura A.; Stagg, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    The research investigated feelings towards sex education and sexual awareness in young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Data were generated from the sexual knowledge, experiences, feelings and needs questionnaire (McCabe et al. 1999), the sexual awareness questionnaire (Snell et al. 1991) and semi-structured interviews. Twenty typically…

  3. "Knowledge" in English Primary Schools' Decision-Making about Sex and Relationships Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, Rachel

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To assess what kinds of knowledge policymakers in a sample of English primary schools utilised to make decisions about their school's sex and relationships education policy. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with policymakers at three primary schools in the southwest of England, and documentary analysis of the schools'…

  4. "If I Have a Daughter...": The Sex Education Program for Teen-agers at Clarke School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Anne Small

    1973-01-01

    After 16 years of a sex education program at Clarke School (Northampton, Massachusetts) the leaders are continuing to make every effort to prepare the hearing impaired boys and girls, ages 10 to 17 years, to adjust positively to the constantly changing society in which they will live. (Author)

  5. Sex-Typing of Occupations in the Israeli Education System: Students versus Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, Liat

    1997-01-01

    Rating of the femininity/masculinity of 27 occupations was undertaken by four age groups in the Israeli education system: 14-year-olds (n=194); 17-year-olds (n=183); university students (n=89); and teachers (n=148). Results indicated that sex-related stereotypes of occupations continue to be maintained among youth and adults. (JOW)

  6. Character Development in Business Education: A Comparison of Coeducational and Single-Sex Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, James H.; Ruhe, John; Lee, Monle; Rajadhyaksha, Ujvala

    2011-01-01

    This study questions the widely held assumption, particularly in the United States, that coeducation is best. Previous research supports the development of single-sex education for both female and male students. This study examines how the learning climate of the coeducation environment seems to affect the character development of female business…

  7. Family Homework and School-Based Sex Education: Delaying Early Adolescents' Sexual Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Jennifer M.; Frye, Alice; Charmaraman, Linda; Erkut, Sumru

    2013-01-01

    Background: Early sexual activity can undermine adolescents' future school success and health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of a family homework component of a comprehensive sex education intervention in delaying sexual initiation for early adolescents and to explore what social and contextual factors prevent…

  8. Sex Education and Cultural Values: Experiences and Attitudes of Latina Immigrant Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villar, Maria Elena; Concha, Maritza

    2012-01-01

    The paper aims to further explore the role that culture plays in the provision and assimilation of sex education among Latina immigrants in the USA. To accomplish this, researchers conducted focus groups and interviews with 30 women from Central and South America who have lived in the USA for at least five years. Participants were asked to reflect…

  9. Evaluation of a Sex Education Program for Children and Their Parents: Attitude and Interactional Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carton, Jacqueline; Carton, John

    1971-01-01

    Within a small group of ten and eleven year-old children, and a separate group of their parents, changes occurred in attitudes in parent child communications following participation in a planned sex education program. Attitude changes pointed to movement in both groups from lesser to greater permissiveness. (Author)

  10. Spring Fever: Process Evaluation of a Sex and Relationships Education Programme for Primary School Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Katie V.; Mathieu-Chartier, Sara

    2018-01-01

    In primary schools in England, programmes of Sex and Relationships Education (SRE) are rare. Provision has been judged as requiring improvement in over one-third of these schools at a time when statutory provision has been mandated by the government. The aim of this study was to examine the early implementation of Spring Fever, a programme of…

  11. The Oregon Network: A Research and Service Activity of the Sex Equity in Educational Leadership Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyant, Spencer; Schmuck, Patricia

    The Oregon Network, a research and service activity of the Sex Equity in Educational Leadership Project, was created in 1977 to perform four functions: 1) to document job vacancies and the processes of administrative hiring in Oregon; 2) to help school districts find qualified female applicants; 3) to affect hiring practices that stand as barriers…

  12. Engaging Parents with Sex and Relationship Education: A UK Primary School Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alldred, Pam; Fox, Nick; Kulpa, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess an intervention to familiarise parents with children's books for use in primary (5-11 years) sex and relationship education (SRE) classes. Method: Case study of a 7-week programme in one London primary school, using ethnographic observation, semi-structured interviews and focus groups with parents (n = 7) and key stakeholders…

  13. Childhood and Adolescent Sexuality, Islam, and Problematics of Sex Education: A Call for Re-Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabatabaie, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a critical examination of the problematics of childhood and adolescent sexuality and sex education in an Islamic context. By exploring conceptions of (pre-marital) sexuality, childhood, and maturity/adulthood, it is suggested that: (i) "childhood" and "sexuality" do not coexist harmoniously in Islamic…

  14. The Effects of Children's Age and Sex on Acquiring Pro-Environmental Attitudes through Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liefländer, Anne Kristin; Bogner, Franz Xaver

    2014-01-01

    Environmental education programs aiming to enhance children's environmental attitudes in a pro-environmental direction require background information, such as age and sex differences, to ensure appropriate design. We used the 2-MEV model with its domains "preservation" and "utilization" of nature to assess a four-day program at…

  15. The Language of the Right: Sex Education Debates in South Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Sally

    2007-01-01

    In 2003 a campaign took place against a new model of sex education in South Australia. This campaign, organized primarily by Christian Right groups, included community forums, a letter-writing campaign, extensive media coverage and a parliamentary debate. This paper analyses the language, arguments and strategies used by those who opposed the…

  16. Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA) Members' Engagement with Sex Education in Canadian High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapointe, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers an examination of gay-straight alliance (GSA) members' engagement with sex education, sexual health, and prejudice and discrimination in Canadian public high schools. It explores how five students' (four straight and one gay-identifying) participation in GSAs served as a springboard for learning about and challenging stereotypes;…

  17. Doug Kirby's Contribution to the Field of Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantor, Leslie M.; Rolleri, Lori; Kolios, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Doug Kirby transformed the field of sex education by conducting rigorous research that led to new, critical insights about ways to strengthen programmes, evaluation and policies related to sexual health throughout the world. Throughout his career, Kirby was meticulous in compiling evidence and translating findings into actionable recommendations…

  18. The Power in Pleasure: Practical Implementation of Pleasure in Sex Education Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepsel, Erica R.

    2016-01-01

    Pleasure is an important aspect of healthy sexual development. Moreover, public health researchers and feminist scholars suggest that pleasure-inclusive sex education is effective for reducing pregnancy and rates of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections and may create a more inclusive classroom environment for underserved individuals.…

  19. Students' Attitudes towards School-Based Sex and Relationships Education in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mkumbo, Kitila A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper was to assess students' attitudes towards school-based sex and relationships education (SRE). Design: This study featured a cross-sectional survey design. Method: A sample of 715 students from two districts in Tanzania completed a survey questionnaire assessing various aspects related to their attitudes…

  20. A Survey of English Teenagers' Sexual Experience and Preferences for School-Based Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Katie; Wallace, Louise M.; Dunn, Orla; Brown, Katherine E.

    2012-01-01

    Rates of sexually transmitted infections and teenage pregnancy amongst the under-16s are causing increasing concern. There is limited evidence about the sexual behaviour and sex education preferences of this age group, especially of those from Black and minority ethnic groups. This study aimed to provide data on early heterosexual risk behaviour,…

  1. Youth Participation in Setting the Agenda: Learning Outcomes for Sex Education in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Higgins, Siobhan; Nic Gabhainn, Saoirse

    2010-01-01

    This research set out to explore how young people could contribute to sexual health curriculum development, in order to increase the relevance of such curricula to school children. The aim was to facilitate young Irish people, through a participatory research methodology, to generate, collate and present their views on effective sex education.…

  2. "I Hope Someone Castrates You, You Perverted Bastard": Martin Cole's Sex Education Film, "Growing Up"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limond, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper concerns the response to the sex education film "Growing Up", made in 1971 by Dr Martin Cole, which used a combination of animation and live action to offer a frank and uncompromising account of sexual reproduction. As part of this, both male and female masturbation and an unsimulated act of male-female coitus featured in the…

  3. Provisions and Guiding Proposals concerning the Curriculum in Health and Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education and Research, Copenhagen (Denmark).

    These guidelines for a health and sex education curriculum in Denmark outline the curriculum's aims and content. The aim of the instruction is to qualify pupils to further their own health and that of others, to contribute to pupils' knowledge of human health and the importance of life conditions and lifestyle to health, to develop pupils'…

  4. A Practical Approach to Sex Fair Performance Evaluation in Secondary Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGonagle, Kenneth; Stevens, Ann

    A method of sex-fair performance evaluation is presented which can be used in coeducational secondary school physical education classes. This method tallies specific skill areas associated with athletic activities, disregarding such concepts as student improvement, level of competition, participation, effort, and exact skill measurement.…

  5. Low Opinions, High Hopes: Revisiting Pupils' Expectations of Sex and Relationship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haste, Polly

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses data from a focus group conducted with a group of female pupils aged 13-14 to re-examine the assumption that pupils' negative assessments of sex and relationship education (SRE) should be understood only as a reflection of inadequate teaching. Focusing on the emotional aspects of their accounts, and the inconsistencies in their…

  6. The protective value of parental sex education: a clinic-based exploratory study of adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Richard A; Hanson, Amy; Rager, Kristin

    2009-06-01

    This exploratory study compared the impact of sex education provided by parents to female adolescents against the same education provided in formal settings to female adolescents. Females, 16-24 years old, attending an adolescent medicine clinic in an urban area of the South were recruited prior to examination. Each patient completed an anonymous self-administered questionnaire. Data from 110 respondents were analyzed to compare those indicating they had learned about each of four topics from parents to those not indicating learning about all four topics from a parent. The same process was repeated relative to learning about the four topics in formal educational settings. In controlled, multivariate, analyses, adolescents not communicating with parents on all four topics were nearly five times more likely to report having multiple sex partners in the past three months. Further, these adolescents were 3.5 times more likely to have low self-efficacy for condom negotiation, 2.7 times more likely to report ever using alcohol or drugs before sex, and about 70% less likely to have ever talked about HIV prevention with a partner before engaging in sex. Differences relative to learning about the four topics in formal settings were not found. Findings suggest that teen females (attending teen clinics) may experience a protective benefit based on communication with parents. This protective effect was not observed for education delivered in formal settings.

  7. Sex Discrimination in Higher Education Employment: An Empirical Analysis of the Case Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Sage L.; Zirkel, Perry A.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of 132 court decisions for the period of 1976-86 concerning sex discrimination of faculty and nonfaculty employees in higher education indicates that the overall odds favor the defendant-institutions over the plaintiff-employees by a four-to-one ratio. The most frequently litigated institutional action was salary, followed by hiring and…

  8. Sex Education Targeting African Communities in the United Kingdom: Is It Fit for Purpose?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, E.; Olomo, F.; Corcoran, N.

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the issue of the sexual needs of ethnic minority groups in the UK. Using focus group discussions with health service users and third-sector providers, it explores the perception of sex education by Black African communities living in a culturally diverse area in East London, focusing specifically on participants' understanding…

  9. Cognitive Sex Differences in Reasoning Tasks: Evidence from Brazilian Samples of Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores-Mendoza, Carmen; Widaman, Keith F.; Rindermann, Heiner; Primi, Ricardo; Mansur-Alves, Marcela; Pena, Carla Couto

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences on the Attention Test (AC), the Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM), and the Brazilian Cognitive Battery (BPR5), were investigated using four large samples (total N=6780), residing in the states of Minas Gerais and Sao Paulo. The majority of samples used, which were obtained from educational settings, could be considered a…

  10. Measuring Effectiveness in School Sex Education--Methodological Dilemmas in Researching an Intervention Involving Young Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidger, Judi

    2006-01-01

    Defining and therefore evaluating the effectiveness of school sex education is problematic because of its location at the site of struggle between competing discourses. Those discourses--summarised here as "moralistic," "harm reductionist" and "empowering"--each emphasise a different conceptualisation of sex…

  11. The Effects of Three Abstinence Sex Education Programs on Student Attitudes toward Sexual Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Joseph A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examined effects of three abstinence sex education programs on student attitudes toward sexual activity. Administered programs to seventh and tenth graders in three school districts. Independent variables were program, grade level, gender, and pre/posttest. Dependent variable was combined and averaged response to 12 questions. Found four-way…

  12. A Multi-Disciplinary Inquiry of Secular and Christian Approaches to Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Chong Ho; Lee, Hyun Seo

    2018-01-01

    Secular scholars have criticized Christian education and counseling on sex as restrictive, ineffective, and outdated. The authors of the current study explored both common non-Christian and Christian approaches to human sexuality with reference to overarching domains of religion, philosophy, psychology, sociology, and anthropology. Secular…

  13. Rules of Engagement: Boys, Young Men and the Challenge of Effective Sex and Relationships Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddulph, Max

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decade, the relationship between boys, young men and sex and relationships education (SRE) is one that has been characterised by a history of problematising. One of the main difficulties lies with young men's engagement with the subject, and in this article I make a retrospective examination of recent classroom experience with young…

  14. A Handbook Related to Office Counseling Techniques for the College Level Sex Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Anne D.

    This handbook is designed for use by the college level sex educator who attempts preventative counseling related to sexual dysfunction in an office setting. It contains a brief review of current literature related to coitus among single youth which reveals the sociopsychological context of behavior. This discussion includes incidence of coitus…

  15. Promoting Educational Equity through School Libraries. Module 3: Sex-Fair Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsen, Alleen Pace; Tyler, Karen Beyard

    The sex-fair characteristics which school librarians and media specialists should look for in the content, language, and illustrations when selecting instructional materials are described in this third learning module of an inservice continuing education program. Recommended criteria for selection include the portrayal of approximately equal…

  16. Interrogating Single-Sex Classes as a Strategy for Addressing Boys' Educational and Social Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, Wayne; Mills, Martin; Lingard, Bob

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the policy of single-sex classes that is currently being adopted in some schools as a strategy for addressing boys educational and social needs. It draws on research in one Australian government, coeducational primary school to examine teachers' and students' experiences of this strategy. Interviews with the principal, male and…

  17. Reimagining Gender through Policy Development: The Case of a "Single-Sex" Educational Organisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthirt Cohen, Beth

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, a feminist educational organisation in the USA for young women, ages 14-21, adopted a policy in order to clarify their target constituency of girls and young women. The policy defined "girls and young women" not as a designation associated with fixed biological sex, but instead as a self-determined identity label creating an explicit…

  18. Sex Discrimination in Education: Newsletter. Vol. 1, Nos. 1 and 2, Oct.-Dec., 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor. Dept. of Psychology.

    This new bimonthly publication attempts to respond to the intent of the Women's Educational Equity Act (1974) which includes provisions for support of research and corrective programs geared toward elimination of sex stereotyping in textbooks and curricular materials. Regular features include sections on issues, categories and periodicals, print…

  19. Effects of Single-Sex and Coeducational Schooling on the Gender Gap in Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Sheree J.; Fergusson, David M.; Horwood, L. John

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects of single-sex and coeducational schooling on the gender gap in educational achievement to age 25. Data were drawn from the Christchurch Health and Development Study, a longitudinal study of a birth cohort of 1265 individuals born in 1977 in Christchurch, New Zealand. After adjustment for a series of covariates…

  20. Free Association in Sex Education: Understanding Sexuality as the Flow of Thought in Conversation and Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casemore, Brian

    2010-01-01

    This paper draws on the theory and method of free association in psychoanalysis to frame an investigation of the content, structure, and function of the thinking expressed in conversations about sexuality and sexual health. The investigation emerges from an ongoing three-year study of the way adolescents, teachers, and peer sex educators negotiate…

  1. Sex Education in France: A Case-study in Curriculum Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beattie, Nicholas

    1976-01-01

    The introduction of sex education into the French school curriculum has had reverberations beyond more curricular reform. Indeed, the changes of 1973/74 constitute a fascinating case-study both of the dynamics of curricular change in a centralized system and of the impact of external social pressures on schools. (Author/RK)

  2. "What if you already know everything about sex?" Content analysis of questions from early adolescents in a middle school sex education program.

    PubMed

    Charmaraman, Linda; Lee, Alice J; Erkut, Sumru

    2012-05-01

    To assess sixth graders' knowledge and curiosity about sex-related topics that can guide the development of sexual health education and healthcare delivery. Sixth graders (n = 795) in eight ethnically diverse schools participating in an evaluation of a sex education curriculum submitted 859 anonymous questions that were content analyzed. The χ(2) analysis examined whether the themes varied by coed/single-sex environments or by school-level sexual risk. Sexual activity, female anatomy, reproduction, and puberty were the most frequently mentioned topics, whereas, questions on STIs, sexual violence, and drug/alcohol use were fewer. Questions that avoided sexual topics came from lower sexual-risk schools; students at higher-risk schools asked about sexual initiation, contraception, vaginal and anal sex, general health, and pain during sex. Single-sex classrooms elicited more direct and explicit questions about sex. The results are relevant to educators and healthcare providers who ask and answer questions from early adolescents regarding sexual health. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a Sex Education Programme for 12-Year-Old to 14-Year-Old Turkish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cok, Figen; Gray, Lizbeth Ann

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has documented a need for the development of a sex education programme in Turkish schools in terms of adolescence readiness and the presence of misconceptions regarding critical aspects of sexual issues. Currently no school-based sex education is available for Turkish adolescents. This paper presents the development of a…

  4. The Effectiveness of a Sex Education Program Facilitating Social Skills for People with Intellectual Disability in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayashi, Mayumi; Arakida, Mikako; Ohashi, Kazutomo

    2011-01-01

    Background: Sex education should include social skills, such as those that allow individuals to relate, socialise, and communicate with others, to assist people with intellectual disability (ID) to live life fully in the community. Objectives: We administered and investigated the effects of a program involving 8 interactive sex education sessions…

  5. Impact of Sex Education Programs on Sexual Knowledge and Feelings of Men with a Mild Intellectual Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garwood, Monique; McCabe, Marita P.

    2000-01-01

    After participating in 6 to 10 sex education sessions, six adolescent and adult men with mild mental retardation showed minimal increases in their knowledge of friendship, contraception, pregnancy, sexual interaction, and social skills. Following sex education, negative feelings developed about marriage, having children, and being present during…

  6. An Action Research Project to Assess Middle School Educators' Professional Development Needs in Single-Sex Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simm, Lynnette Marie Gresham

    2010-01-01

    According to the National Association of Single-Sex Public Education (NASSPE, 2010), an increase of 540 public schools offering single-sex classrooms in the United States has occurred since 2001. Educators who understand the gender differences between boys and girls can inspire students to learn to the best of their ability; however, the problem…

  7. Occupational Sex-Role Stereotyping. Effects of a Ninth-Grade Experience-Based Career Education Program on Occupational Sex-Role Stereotyping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humburg, Renae Bygel

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of a ninth-grade experience-based career education (EBCE) program upon occupational sex role stereotyping. Twenty-four volunteers were assigned to the EBCE group and twenty-four assigned to the control group. The career education group met four class periods per week and one full day per week for…

  8. Sex, Class, and Physical Science Educational Attainment: Portions due to Achievement Versus Recruitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Richard M.; Farkas, George

    Nationally representative data from the National Education Longitudinal Study are used to investigate why males (rather than females) and children of parents with advanced degrees (rather than those from less-educated parents) are more highly represented among physical science bachelor's degrees and graduate students. Parental education is measured by three categories: neither parent has a bachelor's degree, at least one parent has a bachelor's degree, or at least one parent has a degree beyond the bachelor's. Physical science is defined as students majoring in physics, engineering, mathematics, or computer science. The effects of mathematics achievement and effects not accounted for by mathematics achievement (what the authors call "recruitment" effects) are isolated for parental education categories and for sex, allowing inequality in physical science degree attainment to be decomposed into portions due to achievement and portions due to recruitment. Additionally, the results from logistic regressions predicting the attainment of a bachelor's degree in physical science as well as the pursuit of a graduate degree in physical science are presented. It is found that for parental education categories, the gaps in physical science educational attainment are nearly entirely accounted for by differences in mathematics achievement, suggesting that if achievement could be equalized, physical science educational attainment differences among parental education categories would disappear. However, the sex gap in physical science educational attainment operates almost entirely independent of achievement effects, suggesting that if the mathematics achievement distributions of males and females were identical, the sex gap in physical science educational attainment would be unchanged from what it is today.

  9. A Health Education Program in Poland from the Perspective of Adolescent Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopacz, Marek S.

    2008-01-01

    Poland subscribes to an abstinence-only model of reproductive health education called "Education for Life in the Family." The aim of this study was to determine if the perceptions of adolescent mothers could be used to improve delivery of the Polish model of education. This study was conducted using focus group interviews with fourteen…

  10. [Sex education as a cornerstone for a healthy teenage sexuality].

    PubMed

    Montero V, Adela

    2011-10-01

    Sexuality is more than reproduction, it is an intrinsic part of each of us, is how we develop and relate with others and with the environment of the society to which we belong. Adolescence is a period with special vulnerability for the development of risky behaviors. In Chile, a progressive decrease in the age of sexual activity onset is observed, particularly in lower socioeconomic strata. The main consequences in sexual health are teenage pregnancies and the risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections such as HIV. The main strategy for the prevention of this risks is a thorough sexual education, that has to be timely, objective, based on scientific evidence, friendly and confidential.

  11. Sex education in schools in Denmark. Does Foreningen for Familieplanlaegning (the Danish PPA) have a role to play?

    PubMed

    Risor, H

    1991-05-01

    The Danish Foreningen for Familieplanlaegning (FF), planned parenthood, has a role to play as a watchdog for human sexuality education in schools and teacher training and development of educational material. Sex education has been in the school system since the 1900's, but in 1970 it was made compulsory. Sex education must be integrated in all subjects, and teacher or student may introduce a sex topic/question at any time. Minimum requirements are information on contraceptives and STD's. In 1970, the Curriculum Committee provided Guidelines for Sex Education in Public Schools which stated the following limitations for teachers: no vulgar terminology, no pupil counseling, no information on sexual intercourse techniques, and no erotic photographic material. In 1986, the Committee on Health and Sex Education was formed to work out subject and guide materials; these curriculum guidelines will be available in August 1991. FF was invited only to address the committee, at which time it was advised that teachers not lump health and sex together, and that specific issues such as sex anatomy, contraception, STD's, AIDs, and abortion be addressed as well as the rights of saying no, first sexual experiences, emotions and feelings, and being in love. After some insistence and negotiation, the final draft included more on sex education. The FF Education Committee plans to hold a 3-day training course for teachers at teacher training colleges in the Fall, 1991. One of the first tasks of the Sex Education Committee was to form a workshop with representatives from 10 schools. Their conclusions were that 1) the class teacher be responsible for sex education, 2) cross professional collaboration needs to be implemented with, for example, guest speakers who are homosexuals, prostitutes, AID's related persons. 3) Parents must be given information and sought out for advice. 4) The limitations in the 1970 Guidelines need to be cancelled. 5) Teacher training must be expanded and improved.

  12. Effects of the culturally-sensitive comprehensive sex education programme among Thai secondary school students.

    PubMed

    Thato, R; Jenkins, R A; Dusitsin, N

    2008-05-01

    This paper reports on a study to evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally-sensitive comprehensive sex education programme among Thai secondary school students. Increasing number of adolescents in Thailand have been engaging in premarital sex. No theory-based, abstinence-oriented models of sex education have been evaluated in this population. A quasi-experimental study was conducted in 2006-2007. Outcome measures included sexual behaviour, condom use, intention to refuse sex, intention to use condoms, and knowledge regarding sexually transmitted infections/human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and pregnancy. Students in the experimental group had lower levels of reported sexual intercourse at 3- and 6-month follow-ups, compared with those in control group (P < 0.01). Students participating in the programme had significantly greater intention to refuse sex in the future across time than controls (P < 0.05). Sexually active adolescents participating in the programme reported significantly lower frequencies of sexual intercourse across time than controls (P < 0.01). However, the programme did not influence consistent condom use (P > 0.05), although the intervention was associated with increased intention to use condoms (P < 0.01). Knowledge about sexually transmitted infections/human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and pregnancy among students in the intervention group was significantly greater than that of the controls (P < 0.05). School nurses can play a major role by applying this kind of sex education programme. For nurse researchers, it would be useful to extend this research by considering alternative ways to foster condom use in the non-commercial partnerships that have become common among adolescents.

  13. The Effects of State-Mandated Abstinence-Based Sex Education on Teen Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Carr, Jillian B; Packham, Analisa

    2017-04-01

    In 2011, the USA had the second highest teen birth rate of any developed nation, according to the World Bank, . In an effort to lower teen pregnancy rates, several states have enacted policies requiring abstinence-based sex education. In this study, we utilize a difference-in-differences research design to analyze the causal effects of state-level sex education policies from 2000-2011 on various teen sexual health outcomes. We find that state-level abstinence education mandates have no effect on teen birth rates or abortion rates, although we find that state-level policies may affect teen sexually transmitted disease rates in some states. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A Social Attitude Approach to Sex Education for the Educable Mentally Retarded. In-Service Training Materials for Teachers of the Educable Mentally Retarded, Session III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyen, Edward L.; Carr, Donald L.

    Designed for educable mentally handicapped children, these lessons on social attitudes stress sex education and also present broader coverage of information relevant to the development of social skills. The pre-primary unit, for ages 4 to 7, includes lessons on healthy body image, proper toilet habits, male and female roles, sequence of growth,…

  15. An exploratory study of Muslim adolescents' views on sexuality: Implications for sex education and prevention

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This paper describes the results of an exploratory qualitative study on Muslim adolescents' views on sexuality in the Netherlands. Methods Data were gathered from an Internet forum on which 44 Muslim and 33 non-Muslim adolescents discussed sexuality as it relates to Islam. These discussions were subsequently analyzed for content using Nvivo 2.0. Results Our analysis revealed several issues that are relevant for the design of future sex education programs targeting Muslim youth. Apart from some expected outcomes regarding, for example, taboos on sexuality, sex outside marriage, abortion, homosexuality and conservative gender roles, our analyses showed that in cases of disputes 1) discussions were polarized, 2) opponents used the same Qur'anic passages to support their views, and 3) the authority of an Imam was questioned when his interpretation of Qur'anic passages was not in line with the views of participants. Conclusions Our findings show that current approaches to sex education among Muslim youth are likely to be unsuccessful given the rigidity of sexual norms in Muslim society. In addition, we also identified new barriers to sex education among Muslim youth (e.g. lack of respect for an Imam who opposes a youth's views on sexuality). PMID:20815921

  16. Masculinities and young men's sex education needs in Ireland: problematizing client-centred health promotion approaches.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Abbey; Howlett, Etaoine; Drennan, Jonathan; Brady, Dympna

    2005-12-01

    In recent decades, dominant discourses in health promotion have emphasized empowerment, client participation and the notion of people identifying and being facilitated to meet their own health needs. However, there has been little analysis of the concept of 'need' and the possibility, at least, that the fulfillment of some such self-defined needs are not in the interest of social justice and equality. In this article, we present an account of the sex education needs of secondary school pupils from their own perspectives, and problematize the concept of self-identified needs in health education. Twenty-nine focus group interviews were conducted with 226 secondary school pupils in Ireland, and data were subjected to a qualitative analysis. Findings suggested that young men tended to prioritize practical guidance that would provide them with the skills and confidence to take the lead in sexual encounters, and display competence in the act of penetrative sex. We argue that these self-defined sex education needs emanate from a culture of traditional masculinity where, for a male, one's place in the pecking order is derived from one's capacity to conquer, lead and display mastery with regard to sex. In the discussion, we attempt to unpack the notion of clients identifying their own needs and the concept of empowerment as it relates to our data, in the context of gender-based structural inequalities.

  17. [Attitudes of Costa Rican students and teachers on sex and population education].

    PubMed

    Stycos, J M

    1987-01-01

    Students in 34 secondary schools and the last year of primary school throughout Costa Rica were interviewed to determine the attitudes of older students toward sex and population education. The sex, grade level, and geographic region of residence were considered key study variables. To ensure an adequate number of cases in each geographic region, the sample was stratified into 4 zones: downtown San Jose, the rest of metropolitan San Jose, other cantons of the central valley, and cantons outside the central valley. Various smaller studies were also conducted, including brief intelligence tests for 190 students, interviews with 286 parents, focus group debates in 8 schools, surveys of 10 teachers in each school, and interviews with Ministry of Education and other officials. The final questionnaire was very long, consisting of 281 questions as well as data about the student's residence. Although students cooperated in filling out the questionnaires, it was too long and 27% of all students failed to complete it. The average student completed 91% of the questions, but fewer than 1/2 of the 6th year primary students were able to complete it. Costa Rican students gain at least a partial understanding of sex at an early age. Almost all secondary students and 71% of the 6th year primary students knew 1 or more contraceptive methods. Most acquired contraceptive information before the age of 12, often from the mass media. 2/3 said their parents had been important sources of information on sex. Most students said they had received some information on sex or family planning in school, but no influence was seen on knowledge or attitudes. The survey results revealed considerable misinformation about sex and family planning. The attitude of Costa Rican students toward equality of the sexes appears conservative, but it becomes less so as their grade level advances, especially for girls. The majority of students had tolerant or indifferent attitudes toward premarital fertility, the

  18. Sex differences in child and adolescent mortality by parental education in the Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Gissler, Mika; Rahkonen, Ossi; Mortensen, Laust; Arntzen, Annett; Cnattingius, Sven; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie; Hemminki, Elina

    2012-01-01

    Socioeconomic position inequalities in infant mortality are well known, but there is less information on how child mortality is socially patterned by sex and age. To assess maternal and paternal socioeconomic inequalities in mortality by sex, whether these differences vary by age and country, and how much of the sex differences can be explained by external causes of death. Data on all live-born children were received from national birth registries for 1981-2000 (Denmark: n=1,184,926; Norway: n=1,090,127; and Sweden n=1,961,911) and for 1987-2000 (Finland: n=841,470). Data on the highest level of education in 2000 were obtained from national education registers, and data on mortality and causes of death were received from the national cause-of-death registers until the end of follow-up (20 years or 2003). Boys had a higher child and adolescent mortality than girls. The children of mothers and fathers who had had the shortest education time had the highest mortality for both sexes and for all ages and countries. The differences between the groups with longer than basic education were smaller, particularly among older children and girls. The gradient in mortality was mostly similar for boys and girls. Among 1-19-year-olds, 32% of boys' deaths and 27% of girls' deaths were due to external causes. Boys' excess mortality was only partly explained by educational inequalities or by deaths from external causes. A more detailed analysis is needed to study whether the share of avoidable deaths is higher among children whose parents have had a shorter education time.

  19. Project Awareness: A Multi-State Leadership Project Addressing Sex Discrimination Issues in Education. A Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelberger, Audra; And Others

    This report describes a training program designed to increase educators' awareness of sex bias and its consequences in education. A major objective of the program is to suggest strategies for increasing educational opportunities for girls and women. The training program was part of a two-year project undertaken by seven state education agencies…

  20. [Sex education : representations of 13- to 15-year-old junior high school children and slow learners].

    PubMed

    Berger, Dominique; Rochigneux, Jean-Claude; Bernard, Sandie; Morand, Josette; Mougniotte, Alain

    2015-01-01

    In France, the National Education system has attributed an important health and sex education role to its teachers, based on a global and positive vision of sexuality Parents, teachers, public services and specialized resources each have a role to play in sex education for children and adolescents so that each young person can receive an education allowing him or her to enjoy a healthy sexuality. This study investigated the individual representations of sexuality, declared practices and knowledge of junior high schoolchildren and Section d'Enseignement G6n6ral et Professionnel Adapt6 (SEGPA) students, a structure for children with serious learning difficulties. The study methodology was based on administration of questionnaires (n = 524) to the two cohorts concerned. The secondary objective was to compare these two populations and identify the specificities of SEGPA pupils. The conclusions of this study should allow adults in charge of sex education in junior high schools and SEGPA to adapt sex education tools.

  1. Taking account of what young women want from school sex education: two groups from Scotland and Uganda.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sinead

    2010-01-01

    This study seeks to explore what young women want from their school-based sex education. Qualitative methods were used to explore the perspectives of two groups of young women from Uganda and Scotland. Of particular importance to all the young women were: a diverse sex education curriculum appropriate to the ages of the students, being taught by an outside female facilitator, single-sex classes and access to a female teacher. Furthermore, they proposed that discussion between small groups of friends is very useful. The Scottish group said that having a young teacher, teaching about emotions and relationships and being guided through their own decision making is also important. The Ugandan group emphasized the importance of being taught by female family members and having written materials provided on sex education. The study showed that young women from different backgrounds have strong opinions about sex education, and are an important resource for policy makers.

  2. Implementing Community-Based Comprehensive Sexuality Education with High-Risk Youth in a Conservative Environment: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secor-Turner, Molly; Randall, Brandy A.; Christensen, Katie; Jacobson, Amy; Loyola Meléndez, Migdalia

    2017-01-01

    Although comprehensive sexuality education programmes have the potential to improve the sexual health and well-being of young people, many socially conservative rural states in the USA have laws and policies restricting school-based comprehensive sexuality education and supporting abstinence-only education. This paper describes the process of…

  3. Evaluation outcomes of a sex education strategy in high schools of Pavia (Italy).

    PubMed

    Benni, Emanuela; Sacco, Sara; Bianchi, Leonardo; Carrara, Roberto; Zanini, Chiara; Comelli, Mario; Tenconi, Maria Teresa

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to provide process and effectiveness evaluations of a sex education intervention realized with interactive techniques in high schools of Pavia (Italy). Six public high schools, divided into 'treated' and 'control' units, voluntarily joined this mixed-methods study. Only second-year classes were enrolled: treated adolescents followed a sex education course, performed by trained 'near-peer educators' (undergraduate medical students) with interactive techniques. All adolescents compiled an anonymous effectiveness evaluation questionnaire at baseline (pre-test) and 3 months later (post-test). Sexual knowledge and reported behavioural changes were compared between the two groups through linear mixed-effects models. The process was assessed through a satisfaction questionnaire for treated students, monitoring cards for working group members and cards/diaries for educators. The final sample consisted of 547 treated and 355 control adolescents (mean age = 15.28 ± 0.61 years). Highly significant changes (p < 0.001) from pre-test to post-test, with strong improvements of treated adolescents, were evident for all knowledge items. No significant changes for behavioural items were reported. Process evaluation showed positive results in adolescents' satisfaction, highlighting the need for more youth gathering places. Working group members and educators generally provided positive evaluations, although difficult communication was perceived. The intervention was effective in improving adolescents' sexual knowledge. The present work highlighted that in Italy sex education in adolescence is still neglected: this could encourage misinformation and health-risk behaviour. Young people perceive the need for a serious health-promoting action in which they could play an active role, spreading educational messages with organized interactive methods. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Coordinated analysis of age, sex, and education effects on change in MMSE scores.

    PubMed

    Piccinin, Andrea M; Muniz-Terrera, Graciela; Clouston, Sean; Reynolds, Chandra A; Thorvaldsson, Valgeir; Deary, Ian J; Deeg, Dorly J H; Johansson, Boo; Mackinnon, Andrew; Spiro, Avron; Starr, John M; Skoog, Ingmar; Hofer, Scott M

    2013-05-01

    We describe and compare the expected performance trajectories of older adults on the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) across six independent studies from four countries in the context of a collaborative network of longitudinal studies of aging. A coordinated analysis approach is used to compare patterns of change conditional on sample composition differences related to age, sex, and education. Such coordination accelerates evaluation of particular hypotheses. In particular, we focus on the effect of educational attainment on cognitive decline. Regular and Tobit mixed models were fit to MMSE scores from each study separately. The effects of age, sex, and education were examined based on more than one centering point. Findings were relatively consistent across studies. On average, MMSE scores were lower for older individuals and declined over time. Education predicted MMSE score, but, with two exceptions, was not associated with decline in MMSE over time. A straightforward association between educational attainment and rate of cognitive decline was not supported. Thoughtful consideration is needed when synthesizing evidence across studies, as methodologies adopted and sample characteristics, such as educational attainment, invariably differ.

  5. Coordinated Analysis of Age, Sex, and Education Effects on Change in MMSE Scores

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We describe and compare the expected performance trajectories of older adults on the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) across six independent studies from four countries in the context of a collaborative network of longitudinal studies of aging. A coordinated analysis approach is used to compare patterns of change conditional on sample composition differences related to age, sex, and education. Such coordination accelerates evaluation of particular hypotheses. In particular, we focus on the effect of educational attainment on cognitive decline. Method. Regular and Tobit mixed models were fit to MMSE scores from each study separately. The effects of age, sex, and education were examined based on more than one centering point. Results. Findings were relatively consistent across studies. On average, MMSE scores were lower for older individuals and declined over time. Education predicted MMSE score, but, with two exceptions, was not associated with decline in MMSE over time. Conclusion. A straightforward association between educational attainment and rate of cognitive decline was not supported. Thoughtful consideration is needed when synthesizing evidence across studies, as methodologies adopted and sample characteristics, such as educational attainment, invariably differ. PMID:23033357

  6. Teaching sex education improves medical students' confidence in dealing with sexual health issues.

    PubMed

    Faulder, Georgina S; Riley, Simon C; Stone, Nicole; Glasier, Anna

    2004-08-01

    Medical students at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland can volunteer to participate in an undergraduate options project that gives them the opportunity to provide sex education for secondary school (high school) pupils. Using a questionnaire presenting a set of fictional case histories, we assessed medical students' theoretical confidence at dealing with sexual health consultations. Students who had participated in delivering peer-led sex education felt significantly more confident at discussing sexual health issues with patients of all age groups (p = 0.001) than students who had not participated in the project. All students felt more comfortable seeing patients of the same gender as themselves but more than half felt that their training left them generally ill-equipped to handle sexual health consultations.

  7. [Sex education and prevention of sexual violence : Contributions to a differential-sensitive prevention of sexualised violence].

    PubMed

    Wazlawik, Martin; Christmann, Bernd; Dekker, Arne

    2017-09-01

    Prevention of sexual violence against children and adolescents obtains high priority in educational contexts. This is due to the massive (possible) psychosocial impacts of sexual victimization as well as to the considerable prevalence rates that are reported in current studies. Preventive approaches are predominantly native to violence prevention and sex education where they are characterized by independent lines of tradition and positions. This contribution outlines their empirically largely unexplained relation with a focus on the history and development of the discourses of sex education. Diverging disciplinary attempts of positioning towards the prevention of sexual violence reveal an area of conflict between sex-positive and preventive educational objectives. A primacy of preventive contents is seen to be threatening a comprehensive sex education that emphasizes the positive aspects of sexuality. On the other hand, its standards are opposed to excluding and to tabooing sexual violence as a topic. Yet unfinished is therefore the search for a "third way" that might transfer the opposites of both approaches into integrative educational concepts. Unsettled questions about possible contributions of sex education to the prevention of sexual violence, and especially to which extent they are sensitive to difference are discussed based on international research and the theory of sex education.

  8. Sex during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Sex During Pregnancy KidsHealth / For Parents / Sex During Pregnancy ... satisfying and safe sexual relationship during pregnancy. Is Sex During Pregnancy Safe? Sex is considered safe during ...

  9. The association of AIDS education and sex education with sexual behavior and condom use among teenage men.

    PubMed

    Ku, L C; Sonenstein, F L; Pleck, J H

    1992-01-01

    According to a 1988 nationally representative survey, most 15-19--year-old men in the United States have received formal instruction about AIDS (73%), birth control (79%) and resisting sexual activity (58%). Results of multivariate analyses show the receipt of AIDS education and sex education to be associated with modest but significant decreases in the number of partners and the frequency of intercourse in the year prior to the survey. Having received instruction in these topics was also associated with more consistent condom use. Instruction in some topics was associated with increases in knowledge and attitudes about AIDS, but these increases were not always correlated with safer behavior.

  10. Comprehensive Sexuality Education: A Historical and Comparative Analysis of Public Opinion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrman, Judith W.; Solano, Paul; Stotz, Lauren; McDuffie, Mary Joan

    2013-01-01

    This research clarifies the public support of comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) in terms of acceptance, content, timing, and effectiveness as it may inform practice in the United States. The historical context of public opinion, as well as a summary of the efficacy of abstinence only education (AOE) versus CSE in the scientific literature,…

  11. Texas Abstinence Educators' Self-Efficacy to Motivate Youth Sexual Abstinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasberry, Catherine N.; Goodson, Patricia; Buhi, Eric R.; Pruitt, B. E.; Wilson, Kelly; Suther, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    Authors examined self-efficacy to motivate abstinent behavior (among youth) in a sample of instructors teaching abstinence-only-until-marriage education in Texas (N = 104). Sixty-one percent of the sample had been trained/certified to teach abstinence education. Instructors (mostly female and White) were more confident motivating students to…

  12. Effect of Sex Education Programme on at-risk sexual behaviour of school-going adolescents in Ilorin, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Esere, Mary Ogechi

    2008-06-01

    Adolescents display sexual behaviours and developmental characteristics that place them at risk for Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs). Because young people experiment sexually and because of the consequences of indiscriminate sexual activities on the youth, there is the need to mount sex education programmes that are geared towards enlightenment and appropriate education about sex and sexuality. To determine whether Sex Education Intervention Programme would reduce at-risk sexual behaviours of school-going adolescents. Pre-test, post-test control group quasi-experimental design. A randomly selected co-educational school in Ilorin Metropolis, Nigeria. 24 school-going adolescents aged 13-19 years. Sex Education Programme (treatment group) versus Control programme (placebo). Self-reported exposure to sexually transmitted diseases, multiple sex partners, anal sex, oral sex, non use of condom. When the treatment (intervention) group was compared with the control group in an intention to treat analysis, there were significant differences in at-risk sexual behaviours of the two groups. Those in the intervention group reported less at-risk sexual behaviours than their counterparts in the control group. The treatment group evaluated the intervention programme positively and their knowledge of sexual health improved. Lack of behavioural effect on the control group could be linked to differential quality of delivery of intervention. Compared with the control group, this specially designed intervention sex education programme reduced at-risk sexual behaviour in adolescents. Based on this finding, it was recommended that sex education be introduced into the curriculum of secondary school education in Nigeria.

  13. Influence of Gender, Single-Sex and Co-Educational Schooling on Students' Enjoyment and Achievement in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prendergast, Mark; O'Donoghue, John

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates the influence that gender, single-sex and co-educational schooling can have on students' mathematics education in second-level Irish classrooms. Although gender differences in mathematics education have been the subject of research for many years, recent results from PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment)…

  14. A Comparison of Single-Sex and Coeducational Catholic Secondary Schooling: Evidence from the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LePore, Paul C.; Warren, John Robert

    1997-01-01

    Results from a comparison of single-sex and coeducational Catholic secondary schools using data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988 suggest that single-sex Catholic high schools are not especially favorable academic settings, and that any advantages of the schools only benefited boys. Pre-enrollment differences may explain…

  15. Secrets and Lies: Sex Education and Gendered Memories of Childhood's End in an Australian Provincial City, 1930s-1950s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Josephine

    2006-01-01

    There are few historical studies about the sex education of Australian youth. Drawing on a range of sources, including the oral histories of 40 women and men who attended two single-sex, selective high schools in a provincial Australian city (Newcastle, New South Wales) in the 1930s-1950s, this paper explores the adolescent experience of sex…

  16. Exploring the Development of Existing Sex Education Programmes for People with Intellectual Disabilities: An Intervention Mapping Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaafsma, Dilana; Stoffelen, Joke M. T.; Kok, Gerjo; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities face barriers that affect their sexual health. Sex education programmes have been developed by professionals working in the field of intellectual disabilities with the aim to overcome these barriers. The aim of this study was to explore the development of these programmes. Methods: Sex education…

  17. Effects of Same-Sex versus Coeducational Physical Education on the Self-Perceptions of Middle and High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lirgg, Cathy D.

    1993-01-01

    Students from coeducational classes were assigned to a same-sex or a new coeducational physical education class for a 10-lesson unit of basketball. Group and individual analyses indicated that middle school students preferred same-sex classes, whereas high school students preferred coeducational classes. (SM)

  18. Gaming for Safer Sex: Young German and Turkish People Report No Specific Culture-Related Preferences Toward Educational Games Promoting Safer Sex.

    PubMed

    Brüll, Phil; Ruiter, Robert A C; Wiers, Reinout W; Kok, Gerjo

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive sex education programs specifically designed for adolescents and young adults that take into account gender norms and cultural background have shown promise as a means of countering the high sexually transmitted infection rate in young people. Recently, digital gaming interventions delivered on computers or mobile devices have emerged as another way to promote safer sex behavior in a young population. Tailoring these computer-based interventions to their target population has been recognized to increase positive behavior outcomes. In this qualitative study, we investigated whether young female and male adults from two different cultural backgrounds (all living in Germany) would have different preferences and needs in relation to an educational game promoting safer sex. We conducted four semistructured focus group interviews comprising open-ended questions with male and female participants who had either a German or a Turkish background. In total, 20 individuals, aged between 18 and 22 years, from two socially diverse and ethnically mixed vocational schools in Germany participated. Independent of cultural background and gender, participants preferred a real-world design with a first-person visual perspective over a fantasy-like third-person perspective. Furthermore, they preferred highly customizable avatars. All participants mentioned the importance of including an alcohol-intoxicated avatar and most participants wanted there to be additional information available about various safer sex approaches and about the use of different barrier protection methods. Males and females reported similar preferences for the design of an educational game promoting safer sex, with the only difference being exactly how the topic of having sexual intercourse should be addressed in the game. Males preferred a direct approach, whereas females had a preference for treating this subject more sympathetically. Educational games offer anonymity and can provide young people

  19. Qualitative Exploration of Sexual Experiences Among Adults on the Autism Spectrum: Implications for Sex Education.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Jessica Penwell; Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor

    2015-12-01

    The increasing prevalence of autism since the 1990s has led to growing demand for sex education that meets the needs of persons on the autism spectrum. Yet there is a dearth of research documenting the firsthand experiences and perspectives of autistic individuals. A thematic analysis was conducted of in-depth, Internet-facilitated interviews with 24 adults on the autism spectrum who were recruited from Internet community spaces between November 2012 and May 2013. Inclusion criteria were self-identification as a person on the autism spectrum, being a U.S. resident, being aged 18 or older, and having the ability to communicate orally or through writing. Participants were aged 18-61 and were living in the community at the time of interview, most with limited extrafamilial support. They were less likely than the general population to be heterosexual or gender-conforming and were more likely to have experienced romantic or sexual debut after age 18. Participants' most common concerns were courtship difficulties and sensory dysregulation in the context of partnered sexuality. These concerns were exacerbated by inadequate and inappropriate sex education experiences. Participants addressed challenges by using sensory barriers (e.g., latex gloves); planning when and how to have sex; negotiating alternatives to sexual scripts predicated on nondisabled experience; and practicing explicit and intentional communication. Individuals on the autism spectrum would benefit from sex education that normalizes differences (e.g., in identities and experiences of sexuality), is offered throughout young adulthood, addresses disability-relevant sensory and communication needs, and includes practicing neurotypical sociosexual norms. Copyright © 2015 by the Guttmacher Institute.

  20. Differences in caregiver daily impression by sex, education and career length.

    PubMed

    Ae, Ryusuke; Kojo, Takao; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Okayama, Masanobu; Kuwabara, Masanari; Makino, Nobuko; Aoyama, Yasuko; Sano, Takashi; Nakamura, Yosikazu

    2017-03-01

    We previously proposed the concept of caregiver daily impression (CDI) as a practical tool for emergency triage. We herein assessed how CDI varies by sex, education and career length by determining CDI scores as quantitative outcome measures. We carried out a cross-sectional study using a self-reported questionnaire among caregivers in 20 long-term care facilities in Hyogo, Japan. A total of 10 CDI variables measured participants' previous experience of emergency transfers using a scale from 0-10. The resulting total was defined as the CDI score. We hypothetically considered that higher scores indicated greater caregiver focus. The CDI scores were compared by sex, education and career length using analysis of covariance. A total of 601 personal caregivers were evaluated (mean age 36.7 years; 36% men). The mean career length was 6.9 years, with the following groupings: 1-4 years (38%), 5-9 years (37%) and >10 years (24%). After adjustment for sex and education, the CDI scores for the variable, "poor eye contact," significantly differed between caregivers with ≥10 and <5 years of experience (scores of 5.0 ± 3.1 and 4.0 ± 2.7, respectively). The CDI scores for variables related to eyes tended to increase with experience, whereas other CDI scores decreased. Male caregivers focused on residents' eyes significantly more than did female caregivers. We found that the CDI variable, "poor eye contact," is influenced by career length. Caregivers with more experience attach more importance to their impression of residents' eyes than do those with less experience. Sex-related differences in CDI might also exist. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 17: 410-415. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  1. Exploring the role of computers in sex and relationship education within British families.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Triece; van Schaik, Paul; van Wersch, Anna

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we aimed to identify the impact that computers can have in relation to sex and relationship education, as well as to provide a communication model that can be used within British families. We used a mixed-methods approach to explore the factors that influence communication of sexual matters within British families. Twenty families from the northeast of England were recruited through purposive sampling. First, semistructured interviews were conducted to identify how sexual matters were discussed within families. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and then analyzed using the grounded theory approach. The second part of the research involved identifying the impact of using a computer program on knowledge and confidence within families to enhance communication about sexual matters. Although the majority of parents and their children were found to discuss sexual matters, the computer program was found to increase knowledge and confidence, which led to greater communication within families. The results highlighted the beneficial role that computer programs can have when educating and increasing communication within families. Future research needs to focus on improving access to information relating to sex and relationship education for parents so they can educate and talk openly about sexual matters with their children. A resource that does exactly this is www.safecoolsex.com.

  2. Influence of level of education on disability free life expectancy by sex: the ILSA study.

    PubMed

    Minicuci, N; Noale, M

    2005-12-01

    To assess the effect of education on Disability Free Life Expectancy among older Italians, using a hierarchical model as indicator of disability, with estimates based on the multistate life table method and IMaCh software. Data were obtained from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging which considered a random sample of 5632 individuals. Total life expectancy ranged from 16.5 years for men aged 65 years to 6 years for men aged 80. The age range for women was 19.6 and 8.4 years, respectively. For both sexes, increasing age was associated with a lower probability of recovery from a mild state of disability, with a greater probability of worsening for all individuals presenting an independent state at baseline, and with a greater probability of dying except for women from a mild state of disability. A medium/high educational level was associated with a greater probability of recovery only in men with a mild state of disability at baseline, and with a lower probability of worsening in both sexes, except for men with a mild state of disability at baseline. The positive effects of high education are well established in most research work and, being a modifiable factor, strategies focused on increasing level of education and, hence strengthening access to information and use of health services would produce significant benefits.

  3. [Impact of teachers' conceptions on sex education in four Mediterranean countries.].

    PubMed

    Khzami, Salah-Eddine; Berger, Dominique; El Hage, Fadi; De La Forest, Valérie; Bernard, Sandie; Abrougui, Mondher; Joly, Jacques; Jourdan, Didier; de Carvalho, Graça

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, sex education contributes to public health not only with regard to the prevention of HIV/AIDS, other sexually transmitted infections and sex abuse, but it is also concerned with addressing aspects such as interpersonal relationships and psychosocial implications. The school setting has emerged as a unique environment for access to information and scientific knowledge that contribute to better understanding of the various dimensions of sexuality. Teachers' and future teachers' conceptions about sex education are analysed in this paper. Data were obtained from a questionnaire designed by the European Biohead-Citizen research project. Responses were received from 2 537 teachers from four Mediterranean countries (Tunisia, Lebanon, Morocco and France) who completed the questionnaire. The methodology is based upon analyses of core components that support the discovery of teachers' conceptions. Following that exercise, standardised factorial scores were calculated. Results for in-service and pre-service teachers show high correlations between their conceptions and national culture, religious beliefs, and level of academic training. Detailed results are presented and discussed.

  4. On the Feasibility of Conducting Randomised Trials in Education: Case Study of a Sex Education Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Laurence; Graham, Anna; Diamond, Ian

    2003-01-01

    This article reports on the conduct and results of a randomised controlled trial to test the effectiveness of a teacher-led intervention to improve teenagers' knowledge of emergency contraception. The trial was successfully conducted in 24 mixed-sex state secondary schools in Avon, South-west England. The intervention was popular with both…

  5. STI prevention and the male sex industry in London: evaluating a pilot peer education programme

    PubMed Central

    Ziersch, A; Gaffney, J; Tomlinson, D

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a pilot peer education STI prevention programme with male sex workers. Design: A process and outcome evaluation of the pilot programme undertaken in three London male escort agencies, using a quasi-experimental design. Subjects: Workers in three London escort agencies, including 88 who completed a questionnaire, five peer educators, and a further 16 men (including management) working in two of these agencies. Methods: A peer education STI prevention programme run by the Working Men Project (WMP), a specialist sexual health service for male sex workers, was piloted in two London escort agencies. Five male sex workers participated in a 2 day peer education training programme. They then returned to their respective agencies to disseminate information and condoms, in an attempt to influence norms of behaviour. An outcome evaluation aimed to assess changes in STI related knowledge, high risk sexual behaviour, and attendance at a sexual health service. A pre-intervention questionnaire assessing variables such as STI related knowledge, sexual behaviour, and demographic information was administered in both agency A and agency B and a third agency, C, which acted as a control. Ten weeks after the peer educators returned to their agencies, the same questionnaire was administered in the same agencies. Peer educator referrals to the WMP were also recorded over this time period. The process evaluation involved interviews and focus groups with peer educators, and the completion of diaries about their experiences in the role. A further 16 men working in the agencies (including managers and an owner) were interviewed about their experience of the programme. Participant observation was also undertaken through regular outreach work to the agencies. Results: 57 men completed the questionnaire at time 1 and 44 at time 2. Unfortunately, only 13 of these were matched, precluding any meaningful analysis of change in STI related knowledge and

  6. Provocative questions in parochial sex education classes: higher incidence in younger students.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Megan; Breuner, Cora C; Lozano, Paula

    2008-10-01

    Recent data show US adolescents are engaging in sexual activity at earlier ages; however, little is known about young teens' sexual attitudes and behaviors. Examining teens' questions in sex education classes may provide insight into these attitudes and behaviors. Quasi cohort study Parochial middle school sex education classes 5(th) through 8(th) graders Students' anonymous written questions submitted at the outset of sex education classes between 2003 and 2005. Questions were classified into topic categories. Three additional variables were then coded for each question. Ethics/guidance questions included requests for advice or value judgments. Prohibited questions included the topics homosexuality, abortion, masturbation, and contraception. "Red flag" questions were those that suggested consideration of or engagement in sexual behavior. Among 473 questions submitted by 410 students, the most popular topics for 5(th)/6(th) graders were pregnancy and puberty, and for 7(th)/8(th) graders puberty and menstruation. 41 questions (8.6%) were prohibited. 29 questions (6.2%) asked about ethics/guidance. 18 questions (3.81%) were coded as red flag questions. A chi-square analysis showed that 5(th)/6(th) graders asked more questions in the ethics/guidance (8.3% versus 3.64%) and red flag question categories (5.53% versus 1.82%) (P < 0.05) than 7(th)/8(th) graders. Although provocative questions represent a minority of these middle students' queries, these requests suggest the urgency of providing appropriate guidance to young teens, given the risks of early sexual activity. The role of school education programs, physicians and parents in addressing questions of this sort should be considered.

  7. Education and gender bias in the sex ratio at birth: evidence from India.

    PubMed

    Echávarri, Rebeca A; Ezcurra, Roberto

    2010-02-01

    This article investigates the possible existence of a nonlinear link between female disadvantage in natality and education. To this end, we devise a theoretical model based on the key role of social interaction in explaining people's acquisition of preferences, which justifies the existence of a nonmonotonic relationship between female disadvantage in natality and education. The empirical validity of the proposed model is examined for the case of India, using district-level data. In this context, our econometric analysis pays particular attention to the role of spatial dependence to avoid any potential problems of misspecification. The results confirm that the relationship between the sex ratio at birth and education in India follows an inverted U-shape. This finding is robust to the inclusion of additional explanatory variables in the analysis, and to the choice of the spatial weight matrix used to quantify the spatial interdependence between the sample districts.

  8. Sex education for local tourism/hospitality employees: addressing a local health need.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Irmgard L

    2009-11-01

    Health concerns arising from sexual relationships between tourists and locals usually focus on the travelling public. The local sex partners' health, and their impact on their communities' health, seem far less acknowledged. This paper describes a local health education session which implemented recommendations based on a study in Cuzco/Peru on tourists' and locals' views, knowledge, attitudes and experiences relating to sexual relationships between them. On location, fifteen discotheque employees received a health education session at the establishment's owner's request. Concluding from the positive experience, it is argued that researchers should, where possible, respond to requests to deliver ad hoc health education sessions while on location to address an identified local health need.

  9. Education And Gender Bias in the Sex Ratio At Birth: Evidence From India

    PubMed Central

    ECHÁVARRI, REBECA A.; EZCURRA, ROBERTO

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the possible existence of a nonlinear link between female disadvantage in natality and education. To this end, we devise a theoretical model based on the key role of social interaction in explaining people’s acquisition of preferences, which justifies the existence of a nonmonotonic relationship between female disadvantage in natality and education. The empirical validity of the proposed model is examined for the case of India, using district-level data. In this context, our econometric analysis pays particular attention to the role of spatial dependence to avoid any potential problems of misspecification. The results confirm that the relationship between the sex ratio at birth and education in India follows an inverted U-shape. This finding is robust to the inclusion of additional explanatory variables in the analysis, and to the choice of the spatial weight matrix used to quantify the spatial interdependence between the sample districts. PMID:20355693

  10. Options in Education: Program No. 88. Sex and Sexism in Education, Part II. Transcripts of a Weekly Series Broadcast by Member Stations of National Public Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Public Radio, Washington, DC.

    This booklet is a transcription of a program from the radio series, "Options in Education." It is part 2 of a two-part series dealing with sexism in education. It deals with sex discrimination in various aspects of public education, including textbooks, teacher promotion, sports programs and children's literature. There is also a…

  11. [140 physician petitions to the King about sex education in schools].

    PubMed

    Sjöstrand, Ylva

    2006-01-01

    In the early 1960's liberal and socialist groups laid claim to an unbiased sexual education in the public school system. Conservative groups responded with demands for a more rigid sexual education, of which a memorial signed by a number of Swedish physicians, 140 läkares hemställan till Konungen om atgärder för förstärkt karaktärsfostran m.m (140 physicians' petition to His Majesty the King for actions for a reinforced education of character, etc) drew most public attention. Against the background of an increased number of persons infected with venereal diseases, and of the many unmarried young mothers, the physicians meant that school education should make clear that sex was a part of marriage and that abstinence was the only acceptable prophylactic. Furthermore, they maintained that Christian faith should be emphasised as a rule of conduct and that the Swedish parliament should act in order to strengthen censorship regarding sex in the medias. After being published, the memorial was severely criticised mainly by the larger national newspapers. However, provincial newspapers, as well as the Christian and conservative press, defended the memorial, and eventually, the debate came to circle around the dominant position of radical press regarding moral issues. The petition came to have some importance for the founding of the political party Kristen demokratisk samling ("Christian democrats' movement"). However, partly due to the etition, a governmental inquiry into the matter of sexual education was enacted, resulting in the shaping of an education quite the opposite of what the physicians had demanded.

  12. Searching for Sexual Revolutions in India: Non-Governmental Organisation-Designed Sex Education Programmes as a Means towards Gender Equality and Sexual Empowerment in New Delhi, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabler, Mette

    2012-01-01

    At the foundation of most inequalities in expression of sexuality lie social constructions of gender. In this paper, sex education is considered as a possibility to challenge sexism and promote healthy and self-affirmative sex lives. In the past decade, the discourse of sex education in India has become a "battle of morality" where…

  13. Spatial ability in secondary school students: intra-sex differences based on self-selection for physical education.

    PubMed

    Tlauka, Michael; Williams, Jennifer; Williamson, Paul

    2008-08-01

    Past research has demonstrated consistent sex differences with men typically outperforming women on tests of spatial ability. However, less is known about intra-sex effects. In the present study, two groups of female students (physical education and non-physical education secondary students) and two corresponding groups of male students explored a large-scale virtual shopping centre. In a battery of tasks, spatial knowledge of the shopping centre as well as mental rotation ability were tested. Additional variables considered were circulating testosterone levels, the ratio of 2D:4D digit length, and computer experience. The results revealed both sex and intra-sex differences in spatial ability. Variables related to virtual navigation and computer ability and experience were found to be the most powerful predictors of group membership. Our results suggest that in female and male secondary students, participation in physical education and spatial skill are related.

  14. Family life and human development (sex education): the Prince George's County Public Schools experience.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, M J

    1981-04-01

    The Family Life and Human Development (Sex Education) program is now fully implemented in 99.5% of Prince George's County Public Schools. The program is credited with better than 98% parental acceptance and student participation. The administrative guidelines and program supervision are crucial to the program's success. The program was developed to be in compliance with the Maryland State Board of Education Bylaw 13.03.03.01 that requires that sex education be offered. Prior to program implementation, the guidelines were written, parents were involved, and teachers and administrators were trained. All instruction is organized around 3 areas of focus: interpersonal relationships; physiological and personality changes of puberty; and advanced physiology and psychology of human sexual behavior. The major limitation of the program is that in grades 9-12 when such subjects as contraception, abortion, homosexuality and premarital intercourse can be discussed, only a small percentage of the student population are able to enroll each year. The reason for the low percentage include lack of funds to hire additional teachers, limited time due to 1/2 day work/study teachers, and the elective classification of the program. Before a teacher is permitted to teach any aspect of the program that deals with the reproductive system or any potentially sensitive area of sexuality, he/she must 1st meet certain established criteria.

  15. Revolutionizing gender: Mariela Castro MS, director, National Sex Education Center, Cuba. Interview by Gail Reed.

    PubMed

    Castro, Mariela

    2012-04-01

    Medicine, social conditions, culture and politics are inextricably bound as determinants of health and wellbeing. In Cuba, perhaps this is nowhere more evident than in the arduous struggle to consider non-discriminatory analysis of gender-sensitive components as fundamental to population health, medical practice and research; national policy; and above all, public consciousness. Among the standard-bearers of this cause is Mariela Castro, psychologist and educator with a master's degree in sexuality, who directs the National Sex Education Center (CENESEX), its journal Sexologia y Sociedad, and the National Commission for Comprehensive Attention to Transsexual People. The Center's work is at the vortex of national polemics on sexuality, approaches to sex education and health, and respect for the human rights of people of differing sexual orientations and gender identities. The daughter of President Raúl Castro and the late Vilma Espín--who, as founder and leader of the Federation of Cuban Women, pioneered the defense of both women and homosexuals--Mariela Castro nevertheless speaks with her own voice in national as well as international debates. MEDICC Review talked with her about the range of issues that link gender to WHO's broad definition of health as the highest level of physical and mental wellbeing.

  16. STI prevention and the male sex industry in London: evaluating a pilot peer education programme.

    PubMed

    Ziersch, A; Gaffney, J; Tomlinson, D R

    2000-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a pilot peer education STI prevention programme with male sex workers. A process and outcome evaluation of the pilot programme undertaken in three London male escort agencies, using a quasi-experimental design. Workers in three London escort agencies, including 88 who completed a questionnaire, five peer educators, and a further 16 men (including management) working in two of these agencies. A peer education STI prevention programme run by the Working Men Project (WMP), a specialist sexual health service for male sex workers, was piloted in two London escort agencies. Five male sex workers participated in a 2 day peer education training programme. They then returned to their respective agencies to disseminate information and condoms, in an attempt to influence norms of behaviour. An outcome evaluation aimed to assess changes in STI related knowledge, high risk sexual behaviour, and attendance at a sexual health service. A pre-intervention questionnaire assessing variables such as STI related knowledge, sexual behaviour, and demographic information was administered in both agency A and agency B and a third agency, C, which acted as a control. Ten weeks after the peer educators returned to their agencies, the same questionnaire was administered in the same agencies. Peer educator referrals to the WMP were also recorded over this time period. The process evaluation involved interviews and focus groups with peer educators, and the completion of diaries about their experiences in the role. A further 16 men working in the agencies (including managers and an owner) were interviewed about their experience of the programme. Participant observation was also undertaken through regular outreach work to the agencies. 57 men completed the questionnaire at time 1 and 44 at time 2. Unfortunately, only 13 of these were matched, precluding any meaningful analysis of change in STI related knowledge and sexual behaviour. The questionnaire provided a

  17. Trail Making Test: normative data for Turkish elderly population by age, sex and education.

    PubMed

    Cangoz, Banu; Karakoc, Ebru; Selekler, Kaynak

    2009-08-15

    Trail Making Test (TMT) is a neuropsychological test, which has parts A and B that can precisely measure executive functions, like complex visual-motor conceptual screening, planning, organization, abstract thinking and response inhibition. The main purpose of this study is to standardize TMT for Turkish adults and/or elderly population. This study primarily consists of two main parts; norm determination study and reliability/validity studies, respectively. The standardization study was carried on 484 participants (238 female and 246 male). Participants at the age of 50 years and older were selected from a pool of people employed in or retired from governmental and/or private institutions. The research design of this study involves the following variables mainly; age (7 subgroups), sex (2 subgroups) and education (3 subgroups). Age, sex and education variables have significant influence on eight different kinds of TMT scores. Statistical analysis by ANOVA revealed a major effect of age (p<0.001) and education (p<0.001) on time spent in Part A or B, or time difference between Parts B and A, or sum of Parts A and B. Similarly, influence of sex (p<0.05) on time spent on Part A or B, or sum of Parts A and B was shown to be significant. Kruskal-Wallis Test was performed and chi-square (chi(2)) values revealed that, correction scores for Part A and B were found to be influenced by age groups (p<0.001). Test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability coefficients for time scores of Parts A and B were estimated as 0.78, 0.99 and 0.73, 0.93, respectively. This study provides normative data for a psychometric tool that reliably measures the executive functions in Turkish elderly population at the age of 50 and over.

  18. [Sex education and knowledge of venerial disease among public school 9th graders].

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jacob Lauesgaard; Boelskifte, Jane; Falk, Jørgen; Lauszus, Finn Friis; Rasmussen, Kjeld Leisgård

    2009-03-30

    A study on knowledge of venereal diseases, opinions on sexual matters, and satisfaction with sex education at school. A questionnaire was handed out on the same day in all ninth grade classes in the municipality of Viborg without prior notification of teachers and pupils. A total of 394 of 398 questionnaires were answered and returned. Only 36% were fully satisfied with the sex education imparted at school, while 70% of the teenagers were satisfied with the quantity. Satisfaction was similar between genders, but more marked among those without sexual debut as 66% were satisfied, while just 47% of those with sexual debut thought sex education was satisfactory (p < 0.006). Knowledge of venereal disease like hiv/aids, chlamydia and herpes simplex was high (> 80% of pupils). A total of 58% of boys and 76% of girls identified chlamydia as the most common venereal disease (p < 0.0001, girls vs. boys), while 26% of the boys and 27% of the girls answered AIDS/HIV (p < 0.75). Finally, 13% of boys and 6% of girls wrote "don't know" or did not answer the question. Having had sexual debut increased knowledge of chlamydia's status as the most common venereal disease to 85% among girls (p < 0.03). Knowledge of the symptoms and risks of chlamydia is rather limited. The girls were more aware of the fact that it may cause sterility (p < 0.001, girls vs. boys) and that it occurs symptomless (p< 0.02). The respondents' guess as to how many of the girls and boys had experienced sexual debut was not associated with gender but with own sexual debut. Those with no sexual debut guessed better than the pupils with sexual debut, as 77% of boys and 81% of girls with no sexual debut guessed correctly. The sex education curriculum should be differentiated with regard to sexual debut or not in order to increase satisfaction with teaching and increase the school's contribution to improve sexual knowledge and behaviour.

  19. Faith-based sex education programs: what they look like and who uses them.

    PubMed

    Freedman-Doan, Carol R; Fortunato, Leanna; Henshaw, Erin J; Titus, Jacqueline M

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the kinds of sex education programs for youth available in mainline churches. This research project sought to identify the kinds of programs developed, the ages of the youth involved, the reasons for implementing the programs, the goals of the programs, the topics covered, and the perceived youth response to these programs as identified by youth ministers and leaders. The sample included 92 churches/synagogues with memberships over 300 that were within a 25-mile radius of our small, urban area in southeast Michigan. Findings from this study lay the groundwork for exploring whether these programs have an impact on adolescents' sexual behaviors.

  20. Impact of timing of sex education on teenage pregnancy in Nigeria: cross-sectional survey of secondary school students.

    PubMed

    Ochiogu, Ifeoma N; Miettola, Juhani; Ilika, Amobi L; Vaskilampi, Tuula

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to explore whether the time at which sex education was provided had any impact on reported cases of unintended pregnancies. A cross-sectional survey of secondary school students and their teachers was conducted using self-administered questionnaires. The participants were 1,234 students aged 14-17 years and 46 teachers in 5 secondary schools in South Eastern Nigeria. The outcome measures were reported pregnancies within the last 3 years by type of school and class level; class level at the time of receiving sex education at school; and age at the time of receiving sex education at home. In all schools, sex education was provided at all the junior and senior secondary school levels (JSS and SSS, respectively). Overall, reported cases of unintended pregnancies were highest among the junior students. In the private schools, four in ten teachers reported pregnancies among JSS 3 students. Almost four in ten teachers in public schools reported pregnancies among JSS 2 students. Of all the students, about three in ten reported pregnancies among JSS 2 and 3 students respectively. At home, sex education was provided at the mean age of 16 years (SD ± 2.2). All participants cited financial need and marital promise as major predisposing factors. About four in ten students did not use contraceptives during their first sexual experience. This study highlights the need to introduce sex education much earlier, possibly before the JSS levels. At home, sex education may have greater impact if provided before the age of 14 years. Efforts should be made to address the factors predisposing to teenage pregnancy.

  1. [The effects of a sex education program on knowledge related to sexually transmitted diseases and sexual autonomy among university students].

    PubMed

    Shin, YunHee; Chun, YoungKyung; Cho, SungMi; Cho, YeRyung

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a sex education program, which was based on the Health Belief Model, on knowledge related to sexually transmitted diseases and sexual autonomy among university students. A non-equivalent control group, pretest-posttest design was used. The four session program was delivered to 18 students during 4 weeks; the control group consisted of 23 students. The theme of the first session was "sex, gender, and sexuality: all our concern", "dangerous sex" for the second session, "safe sex" for the third session, and "right sex for you and me" for the fourth session. At follow-up, the knowledge related to sexually transmitted diseases and sexual autonomy were significantly greater in the intervention group than in the control group. A sex education program with several sessions within the theoretical frame of HBM was effective to improve knowledge related to sexually transmitted diseases and sexual autonomy. The results suggest the potential of a systematic sexual education program to teach healthy sex and to extend the program for other various populations.

  2. Assessing the Impact of Peer Educator Outreach on the Likelihood and Acceleration of Clinic Utilization among Sex Workers.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Parthasarathy; Hui, Sam K; Shivkumar, Narayanan; Gowda, Chandrasekhar; Pushpalatha, R

    2016-01-01

    Peer-led outreach is a critical element of HIV and STI-reduction interventions aimed at sex workers. We study the association between peer-led outreach to sex workers and the time to utilize health facilities for timely STI syndromic-detection and treatment. Using data on the timing of peer-outreach interventions and clinic visits, we utilize an Extended Cox model to assess whether peer educator outreach intensity is associated with accelerated clinic utilization among sex workers. Our data comes from 2705 female sex workers registered into Pragati, a women-in-sex-work outreach program, and followed from 2008 through 2012. We analyze this data using an Extended Cox model with the density of peer educator visits in a 30-day rolling window as the key predictor, while controlling for the sex workers' age, client volume, location of sex work, and education level. The principal outcome of interest is the timing of the first voluntary clinic utilization. More frequent peer visit is associated with earlier first clinic visit (HR: 1.83, 95% CI, 1.75-1.91, p < .001). In addition, 18% of all syndrome-based STI detected come from clinic visits in which the sex worker reports no symptoms, underscoring the importance of inducing clinic visits in the detection of STI. Additional models to test the robustness of these findings indicate consistent beneficial effect of peer educator outreach. Peer outreach density is associated with increased likelihood of-and shortened duration to-clinic utilization among female sex workers, suggesting potential staff resourcing implications. Given the observational nature of our study, however, these findings should be interpreted as an association rather than as a causal relationship.

  3. Sex and Relationships Education in Schools--Evaluation of a Pilot Programme for the Certification of Community Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalmers, Helen; Tyrer, Paul; Aggleton, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Objective: In support of the UK Government's teenage pregnancy and sexual health strategies, a certificated programme of professional development for school nurses and other community nurses was developed to provide support for personal, social and health education (PSHE) work, including sex and relationships education (SRE), for young people.…

  4. Part 106--Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Receiving Federal Financial Assistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office for Civil Rights (ED), Washington, DC.

    This document addresses nondiscrimination on the basis of sex in education programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance. It includes the amendments made in the notice of Final Regulations published in the Federal Register on November 13, 2000. The amendments effectuate Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. The official…

  5. Pedagogical Design Considerations in Sex Education on Interactive Multimedia Using CD-Rom: An Example of Sexual Intercourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Juliette D. G.; Torrisi-Steele, Geraldine

    2005-01-01

    Human sexuality is a significant issue for educators to understand and teach about, and for young people to learn about. The development of interactive multimedia technologies has added a range of new dimensions associated with designing pedagogies for sex education on Interactive Multimedia (IMM). Here, a module on CD-Rom on Sexuality and Human…

  6. Girls and Women in Education: A Cross-National Study of Sex Inequities in Upbringing and in Schools and Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    This report examines how far Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries have come towards realizing equality between the sexes in education and the factors that facilitate or hinder progress in this regard. The report examines students in the formal education system of schools and colleges and reviews research findings…

  7. Self-aware sex education: a theoretical and practical approach in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M

    2001-05-01

    Even a few decades ago, it was considered normal and even desirable in Latin America for young women to become pregnant before they were 20--provided they were married; while young men were expected to become sexually active as soon as they entered adolescence, without much concern about potential risks or with whom they did so--as long as it was a woman. This view is now changing. There seems to be a general consensus that 'education' is necessary to prevent adolescent pregnancy, abortion, STI/HIV and sexual abuse. Attempts to reach agreement as to what kind of education and where, and how and when to provide it often fail, however, because of the conflicting views of sexuality upon which they are based. This article discusses conflicting concepts of sexuality and describes the theory of critical pedagogy followed by AVESA, a Venezuelan NGO whose work focuses on sexuality, problems of sexuality and alternative sex education. It describes AVESA's practical experience in training youth promoters and running on ongoing youth education programme in sexual and reproductive health. AVESA advocates an educational alternative that builds self-awareness and a critical understanding of social reality. We encourage individuals to engage with their own history and circumstances in order to be able to experience their sexuality in a full, responsible, pleasurable and just manner.

  8. Smoke-free environments: age, sex, and educational disparity in 25 Argentinean cities.

    PubMed

    Schoj, Veronica; Allemandi, Lorena; Ianovsky, Oscar; Lago, Manuel; Alderete, Mariela

    2012-10-01

    There is scarce evidence of secondhand smoke (SHS) and disparity in developing countries. We evaluated the relationship between socio-demographic variables and secondhand smoke-related factors in Argentina. We conducted a randomized telephone survey (2008/2009) in 25 Argentinean cities. We included a sample of 160 respondents per city stratified by sex and age. We used different generalized multivariate regression models with a confidence interval of 95 % for the five outcome variables. We sampled 4,000 respondents, 52.2 % women, 36 % adolescents and young adults (15-29 years), 58 % ≥12 years of education, and 72.6 % nonsmokers. Support to 100 % smoke-free environment legislation was higher in older than in younger respondents, OR = 1.5 (IC: 1.2-2.0), and in people with higher education levels, OR = 1.2 (IC: 1.1-1.4). Exposure to SHS was significantly lower in men than in women at home and in public places, IRR = 0.7 (IC: 0.5-0.9) and IRR  = 0.8 (IC: 0.6-0.9), respectively. Older respondents reported lower exposure at home and in public places than adolescents and young adults, IRR = 0.6 (IC: 0.4-0.8) and IRR = 0.4 (IC: 0.3-0.5), respectively. People with higher education levels had a higher level of exposure in indoor public places than less educated people, IRR = 1.1 (IC: 1.1-1.2). Knowledge of respiratory disease in children caused by SHS exposure was lower in men than in women, RRR = 0.3 (IC: 0.1-0.6). Perceived compliance was higher in men than in women, OR = 1.4 (IC: 1.1-1.8) and in people with higher education levels, OR = 1.2 (IC: 1.1-1.4). Older and more educated respondents were more empowered than. younger and less educated people, OR = 1.5 (IC: 1.2-1.9) and OR = 1.2 (IC: 1.1-1.3), respectively. Reference groups for each variable were age: 15-29; education: ≤7 years; and sex: men. This is the first study to explore socio-demographic variables regarding secondhand smoke in our country. Women and younger people are more

  9. Sex-role stereotype, self-concept, education and experience: do they influence decision-making?

    PubMed

    Joseph, D H

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of self-concept, sex-role stereotype, educational preparation and years of experience upon the nurse's attitudes regarding decision-making. The Joseph Decision-making Tool (JDMT) was designed by the investigator to measure nurses' attitudes regarding decision-making. The tool consists of 20 scenarios in which the subject is asked to make a decision regarding a patient problem. Having an alpha reliability of 0.79, the JDMT was found to be exceedingly useful and easy to administer. Self-concept was measured by the BEM Scale. A heterogeneous population of female staff nurses working in medical-surgical units of two large metropolitan hospitals was used. A stepwise multiple regression technique was used to measure the potency of the particular variables in question. In a selected sample of 85 nurses, it was found that nurses with masculine sex-type scores and diploma education (P less than 0.05) felt that nurses should assume responsibility for decision-making. Experience was found to have an inverse relationship (P less than 0.01) with the JDMT. The more experience the nurse has, the less willing she is to make decisions. The majority of nurses (62%) who participated in the study were found to have androgynous rather than feminine sex-role stereotype scores. These two findings indicate changing trends in the traditional view of staff nurses. These new findings will assist nurses in changing the current image of a typically feminine nurse with a low self-concept. This study found strengths in nurses that are often overlooked by the feminists when they study nurses.

  10. The gendered nature of South African teachers' discourse on sex education.

    PubMed

    DePalma, R; Francis, D A

    2014-08-01

    In South Africa, high pregnancy and infection rates show that many teenagers are having sex, and that they are not adequately protecting themselves against undesired pregnancies and disease. Sex education is usually taught as part of the subject area Life Orientation. In a qualitative study of 25 Life Orientation teachers in the South African Free State Province, we used semi-structured interviews to explore the ways in which these teachers understand gender to be a factor in learners' experiences of sexuality. Our analysis draws upon the conceptual framework of heteronormativity, a key aspect of which is that girls and boys are socialized into different gender roles in ways that propagate the patriarchy, and these are largely viewed as part of the natural order of things. Our data revealed a tendency for teachers to cast boys as largely predatory and girls as victims of sexual predation, either by their peers or by older boys or men. Although these assumptions reflect some of the everyday experiences in South Africa and many other countries, these expectations may be transmitted and reinforced unconsciously in well-meaning educational interventions meant to protect girls. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Is educational achievement a turning point for incarcerated delinquents across race and sex?

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Thomas G; Bales, William D; Piquero, Alex R

    2012-02-01

    Research has linked the role of education to delinquency, but much of the focus has been on general population samples and with little attention to demographic differences. Employing a cumulative disadvantage framework that integrates elements of informal social control and labeling theories, this article examines whether academic achievement serves as a positive turning point and re-directs juvenile delinquents away from subsequent offending. Attention is also given to race/sex contingencies. Using a sample of 4,147 delinquents released from Florida correctional institutions (86% male, 57% non-White, average age at release = 16.8 years), propensity score analysis yielded two findings: youth with above average academic achievement while incarcerated were significantly more likely to return to school post-release, and youth with above average attendance in public school were significantly less likely to be re-arrested in the 1-year post-release period. While the academic gains were pronounced among African-American males, the preventive effects of school attendance are similar across race and sex, suggesting that education can be a part of a larger prevention effort that assists juvenile delinquents in successful community re-entry.

  12. Changes in sexual behavior following a sex education program in Brazilian public schools.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Heloísa Helena Siqueira Monteiro; Mello, Maeve Brito de; Sousa, Maria Helena; Makuch, Maria Yolanda; Bertoni, Neilane; Faúndes, Anibal

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes an evaluation of possible changes in sexual behavior in adolescents who participated in a school-based sex education program in selected public schools in four municipalities in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The program is inserted within the context of reproductive rights, deals with risks involved in unsafe sexual practices and focuses on the positive aspects of sexuality. A quasi-experimental design with pre and post-tests and a non-equivalent control group was used to evaluate the intervention. A total of 4,795 questionnaires were included in this analysis. The program succeeded in more than doubling consistent condom use with casual partners and in increasing the use of modern contraceptives during last intercourse by 68%. The intervention had no effect on age at first intercourse or on adolescents' engagement in sexual activities. The sex education program was effective in generating positive changes in the sexual behavior of adolescents, while not stimulating participation in sexual activities.

  13. The Teachers' Lounge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Dudley

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author critiques two current behavioral trends in society among the youth regarding sexuality, namely the abstinence-only viewpoint and hooking-up. He comments that abstinence-only sex education classes seem to focus on and amplify the very dangers that informed students know they can minimize. Moreover, if protecting students…

  14. [Development and Effects of a Children's Sex Education Program for the Parents of Lower Elementary Grade Students].

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Mi; Kim, Hyunlye

    2017-04-01

    This study was done to develop a children's sex education program for the parents of lower elementary grade students and to evaluate its effects on sexual knowledge, gender role attitude, parent efficacy for child's sex education, and marital consistency. A quasi-experimental with a non-equivalent control group pretest-posttest design was used. The participants were 29 couples (58 parents, experimental group=28, control group=30) from G city. The 5-week (5-session) program was developed based on 'A theory of protection: parents as sex educators' and used the case-based small group learning method. Data were collected during July and August 2015. The characteristics of the program developed in the present study were a theoretical-based, client-centered, multi-method. After the intervention, the experimental group showed a significant improvement in sexual knowledge, gender role attitudes, parent efficacy for child's sex education, and marital consistency, compared to the control group. The effect sizes of the program were .64 (knowledge), .65 (gender role attitudes), and .68 (parent efficacy). The results of this study provided implications for the parents as effective sex educator and the role expansion of school health nurses. © 2017 Korean Society of Nursing Science

  15. [Travelling together: an experience in sex education in the area surrounding Sao Paulo].

    PubMed

    Barroso, C; Simonetti, C; Vieira, E

    1983-05-01

    This study describes group discussions of female sexuality held in a Sao Paulo Mothers' Club for the purpose of educating participants and producing educational pamphlets for publication. The participant research methodology is an attempt to integrate feminism with academic practice; the research is to be used to improve the condition of the research subjects and the research process itself is seen as educational. Participants were 8-15 low-income housewives 25-33 years old, with low level reading skills. In a series of discussion meetings, topics of interest identified included the physiology of the human body, sex education of children, and methods of contraception. Drafts of pamphlets and illustrations were presented for the immediate feedback of the group. Additional topics included the role of women in the family and society, women's rights, traditional class beliefs and myths about sexuality, medical care and examinations, and self-examination. 5 pamphlets and an accompanying manual for their use were produced for distribution to women's groups throughout Brazil. These include: Understanding Our Body; Do I want to be a Mother?; When Children Ask Certain Things; A gynecological Exam; and Much Pleasure.

  16. Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Receiving Federal Financial Assistance; Proposed Rule. Federal Register, Part V: Department of Education, 34 CFR Part 106.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Register, 2002

    2002-01-01

    The Secretary provides notice that the Secretary intends to propose amendments to the regulations implementing Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 to provide more flexibility for educators to establish single-sex classes and schools at the elementary and secondary levels. The purpose of the amendments would be to support efforts of school…

  17. In/Formal Sex Education: Learning Gay Identity in Cultural and Educational Contexts in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano-Verduzco, Ignacio; Rosales Mendoza, Adriana Leona

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses how educational and cultural contexts incorporate lessons around sexuality, particularly sexual and gender identity, and how these contexts impact on identity construction of gay men in Mexico City. We analyse the experiences of 15 gay men reported through semi-structured in-depth interviews and how they incorporate sexuality…

  18. Influences of sex, age and education on attitudes towards gender inequitable norms and practices in South Sudan.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jennifer; Hacker, Michele; Averbach, Sarah; Modest, Anna M; Cornish, Sarah; Spencer, Danielle; Murphy, Maureen; Parmar, Parveen

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged conflict in South Sudan exacerbated gender disparities and inequities. This study assessed differences in attitudes towards gender inequitable norms and practices by sex, age and education to inform programming. Applying community-based participatory research methodology, 680 adult respondents, selected by quota sampling, were interviewed in seven South Sudanese communities from 2009 to 2011. The verbally administered survey assessed attitudes using the Gender Equitable Men scale. Data were stratified by sex, age and education. Of 680 respondents, 352 were female, 326 were male and two did not report their sex. The majority of respondents agreed with gender inequitable household roles, but the majority disagreed with gender inequitable practices (i.e., early marriage, forced marriage and inequitable education of girls). Respondents who reported no education were more likely than those who reported any education to agree with gender inequitable practices (all p < 0.03) except for forced marriage (p = 0.07), and few significant differences were observed when these responses were stratified by sex and by age. The study reveals agreement with gender inequitable norms in the household but an overall disagreement with gender inequitable practices in sampled communities. The findings support that education of both women and men may promote gender equitable norms and practices.

  19. Influences of sex, age, and education on attitudes toward gender inequitable norms and practices in South Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Jennifer; Hacker, Michele; Averbach, Sarah; Modest, Anna M.; Cornish, Sarah; Spencer, Danielle; Murphy, Maureen; Parmar, Parveen

    2014-01-01

    Background Prolonged conflict in South Sudan exacerbated gender disparities and inequities. This study assessed differences in attitudes toward gender inequitable norms and practices by sex, age, and education to inform programming. Methods Applying community-based participatory research methodology, 680 adult respondents, selected by quota sampling, were interviewed in seven South Sudanese communities from 2009 to 2011. The verbally administered survey assessed attitudes using the Gender Equitable Men scale. Data were stratified by sex, age, and education. Results Of 680 respondents, 352 were female, 326 were male, and two did not report their sex. The majority of respondents agreed with gender inequitable household roles, but the majority disagreed with gender inequitable practices (i.e. early marriage, forced marriage, and inequitable education of girls). Respondents who reported no education were more likely than those who reported any education to agree with gender inequitable practices (all p<0.03) except for forced marriage (p=0.07), and few significant differences were observed when these responses were stratified by sex and age. Conclusion The study reveals agreement with gender inequitable norms in the household, but an overall disagreement with gender inequitable practices in sampled communities. The findings support that education of both women and men may promote gender equitable norms and practices. PMID:25026024

  20. Questions and Answers about Sex (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educators Search English Español Questions and Answers About Sex KidsHealth / For Parents / Questions and Answers About Sex ... extent can parents depend on schools to teach sex education? Parents should begin the sex education process ...