Science.gov

Sample records for abstract atlantic cod

  1. Fisheries. Population of origin of Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, E E; Hansen, M M; Schmidt, C; Meldrup, D; Grønkjaer, P

    2001-09-20

    Most of the world's cod (Gadus morhua) fisheries are now tightly regulated or closed altogether. Being able to link individual fish to their population of origin would assist enormously in policing regulations and in identifying poachers. Here we show that microsatellite genetic markers can be used to assign individual cod from three different populations in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean to their population of origin. PMID:11565021

  2. Transcriptome analysis of gill tissue of Atlantic cod Gadus morhua L. from the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Małachowicz, Magdalena; Kijewska, Agnieszka; Wenne, Roman

    2015-10-01

    The Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) is one of the most ecologically and economically important marine fish species in the North Atlantic Ocean. Using Roche GS-FLX 454 pyrosequencing technique 962,516 reads, representing 379Mbp of the Baltic cod transcriptome, were obtained. Data was assembled into 14,029 contigs of which 100% displayed homology to the Atlantic cod transcriptome. Despite a high similarity between transcripts, evidence for significant differences between Baltic and Atlantic cod was found.

  3. Behavioral responses of Atlantic cod to sea temperature changes

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Carla; Olsen, Esben Moland; Moland, Even; Ciannelli, Lorenzo; Knutsen, Halvor

    2015-01-01

    Understanding responses of marine species to temperature variability is essential to predict impacts of future climate change in the oceans. Most ectotherms are expected to adjust their behavior to avoid extreme temperatures and minimize acute changes in body temperature. However, measuring such behavioral plasticity in the wild is challenging. Combining 4 years of telemetry-derived behavioral data on juvenile and adult (30–80 cm) Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), and in situ ocean temperature measurements, we found a significant effect of sea temperature on cod depth use and activity level in coastal Skagerrak. During summer, cod were found in deeper waters when sea surface temperature increased. Further, this effect of temperature was stronger on larger cod. Diel vertical migration, which consists in a nighttime rise to shallow feeding habitats, was stronger among smaller cod. As surface temperature increased beyond ∼15°C, their vertical migration was limited to deeper waters. In addition to larger diel vertical migrations, smaller cod were more active and travelled larger distances compared to larger specimens. Cold temperatures during winter tended, however, to reduce the magnitude of diel vertical migrations, as well as the activity level and distance moved by those smaller individuals. Our findings suggest that future and ongoing rises in sea surface temperature may increasingly deprive cod in this region from shallow feeding areas during summer, which may be detrimental for local populations of the species. PMID:26045957

  4. Behavioral responses of Atlantic cod to sea temperature changes.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Carla; Olsen, Esben Moland; Moland, Even; Ciannelli, Lorenzo; Knutsen, Halvor

    2015-05-01

    Understanding responses of marine species to temperature variability is essential to predict impacts of future climate change in the oceans. Most ectotherms are expected to adjust their behavior to avoid extreme temperatures and minimize acute changes in body temperature. However, measuring such behavioral plasticity in the wild is challenging. Combining 4 years of telemetry-derived behavioral data on juvenile and adult (30-80 cm) Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), and in situ ocean temperature measurements, we found a significant effect of sea temperature on cod depth use and activity level in coastal Skagerrak. During summer, cod were found in deeper waters when sea surface temperature increased. Further, this effect of temperature was stronger on larger cod. Diel vertical migration, which consists in a nighttime rise to shallow feeding habitats, was stronger among smaller cod. As surface temperature increased beyond ∼15°C, their vertical migration was limited to deeper waters. In addition to larger diel vertical migrations, smaller cod were more active and travelled larger distances compared to larger specimens. Cold temperatures during winter tended, however, to reduce the magnitude of diel vertical migrations, as well as the activity level and distance moved by those smaller individuals. Our findings suggest that future and ongoing rises in sea surface temperature may increasingly deprive cod in this region from shallow feeding areas during summer, which may be detrimental for local populations of the species.

  5. Automatic grunt detector and recognizer for Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Urazghildiiev, Ildar R; Van Parijs, Sofie M

    2016-05-01

    Northwest Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) have been heavily overfished in recent years and have not yet recovered. Passive acoustic technology offers a new approach to identify the spatial location of spawning fish, as well as their seasonal and long term persistence in an area. To date, the lack of a species-specific detector has made searching for Atlantic cod grunts in large amounts of passive acoustic data cumbersome. To address this problem, an automatic grunt detection and recognition algorithm that processes yearlong passive acoustic data recordings was designed. The proposed technique is a two-stage hypothesis testing algorithm that includes detecting and recognizing all grunt-like sounds. Test results demonstrated that the algorithm provided a detection probability of 0.93 for grunts with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) higher than 10 dB, and a detection probability of 0.8 for grunts with the SNR ranging from 3 to 10 dB. This detector is being used to identify cod in current and historical data from U.S. waters. Its use has significantly reduced the time required to find and validate the presence of cod grunts. PMID:27250148

  6. Automatic grunt detector and recognizer for Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Urazghildiiev, Ildar R; Van Parijs, Sofie M

    2016-05-01

    Northwest Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) have been heavily overfished in recent years and have not yet recovered. Passive acoustic technology offers a new approach to identify the spatial location of spawning fish, as well as their seasonal and long term persistence in an area. To date, the lack of a species-specific detector has made searching for Atlantic cod grunts in large amounts of passive acoustic data cumbersome. To address this problem, an automatic grunt detection and recognition algorithm that processes yearlong passive acoustic data recordings was designed. The proposed technique is a two-stage hypothesis testing algorithm that includes detecting and recognizing all grunt-like sounds. Test results demonstrated that the algorithm provided a detection probability of 0.93 for grunts with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) higher than 10 dB, and a detection probability of 0.8 for grunts with the SNR ranging from 3 to 10 dB. This detector is being used to identify cod in current and historical data from U.S. waters. Its use has significantly reduced the time required to find and validate the presence of cod grunts.

  7. Genomic characterization of the Atlantic cod sex-locus.

    PubMed

    Star, Bastiaan; Tørresen, Ole K; Nederbragt, Alexander J; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Pampoulie, Christophe; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    A variety of sex determination mechanisms can be observed in evolutionary divergent teleosts. Sex determination is genetic in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), however the genomic location or size of its sex-locus is unknown. Here, we characterize the sex-locus of Atlantic cod using whole genome sequence (WGS) data of 227 wild-caught specimens. Analyzing more than 55 million polymorphic loci, we identify 166 loci that are associated with sex. These loci are located in six distinct regions on five different linkage groups (LG) in the genome. The largest of these regions, an approximately 55 Kb region on LG11, contains the majority of genotypes that segregate closely according to a XX-XY system. Genotypes in this region can be used genetically determine sex, whereas those in the other regions are inconsistently sex-linked. The identified region on LG11 and its surrounding genes have no clear sequence homology with genes or regulatory elements associated with sex-determination or differentiation in other species. The functionality of this sex-locus therefore remains unknown. The WGS strategy used here proved adequate for detecting the small regions associated with sex in this species. Our results highlight the evolutionary flexibility in genomic architecture underlying teleost sex-determination and allow practical applications to genetically sex Atlantic cod. PMID:27499266

  8. Genomic characterization of the Atlantic cod sex-locus

    PubMed Central

    Star, Bastiaan; Tørresen, Ole K.; Nederbragt, Alexander J.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Pampoulie, Christophe; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    A variety of sex determination mechanisms can be observed in evolutionary divergent teleosts. Sex determination is genetic in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), however the genomic location or size of its sex-locus is unknown. Here, we characterize the sex-locus of Atlantic cod using whole genome sequence (WGS) data of 227 wild-caught specimens. Analyzing more than 55 million polymorphic loci, we identify 166 loci that are associated with sex. These loci are located in six distinct regions on five different linkage groups (LG) in the genome. The largest of these regions, an approximately 55 Kb region on LG11, contains the majority of genotypes that segregate closely according to a XX-XY system. Genotypes in this region can be used genetically determine sex, whereas those in the other regions are inconsistently sex-linked. The identified region on LG11 and its surrounding genes have no clear sequence homology with genes or regulatory elements associated with sex-determination or differentiation in other species. The functionality of this sex-locus therefore remains unknown. The WGS strategy used here proved adequate for detecting the small regions associated with sex in this species. Our results highlight the evolutionary flexibility in genomic architecture underlying teleost sex-determination and allow practical applications to genetically sex Atlantic cod. PMID:27499266

  9. Iodine nutrition and toxicity in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae

    PubMed Central

    Penglase, S; Harboe, T; Sæle, Ø; Helland, S; Nordgreen, A

    2013-01-01

    Copepods as feed promote better growth and development in marine fish larvae than rotifers. However, unlike rotifers, copepods contain several minerals such as iodine (I), at potentially toxic levels. Iodine is an essential trace element and both under and over supply of I can inhibit the production of the I containing thyroid hormones. It is unknown whether marine fish larvae require copepod levels of I or if mechanisms are present that prevent I toxicity. In this study, larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were fed rotifers enriched to intermediate (26 mg I kg-1 dry weight; MI group) or copepod (129 mg I kg-1 DW; HI group) I levels and compared to cod larvae fed control rotifers (0.6 mg I kg-1 DW). Larval I concentrations were increased by 3 (MI) and 7 (HI) fold compared to controls during the rotifer feeding period. No differences in growth were observed, but the HI diet increased thyroid follicle colloid to epithelium ratios, and affected the essential element concentrations of larvae compared to the other groups. The thyroid follicle morphology in the HI larvae is typical of colloid goitre, a condition resulting from excessive I intake, even though whole body I levels were below those found previously in copepod fed cod larvae. This is the first observation of dietary induced I toxicity in fish, and suggests I toxicity may be determined to a greater extent by bioavailability and nutrient interactions than by total body I concentrations in fish larvae. Rotifers with 0.6 mg I kg-1 DW appeared sufficient to prevent gross signs of I deficiency in cod larvae reared with continuous water exchange, while modelling of cod larvae versus rotifer I levels suggests that optimum I levels in rotifers for cod larvae is 3.5 mg I kg-1 DW. PMID:23638355

  10. Exophiala angulospora causes systemic inflammation in atlantic cod Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Gjessing, Mona Cecilie; Davey, Marie; Kvellestad, Agnar; Vrålstad, Trude

    2011-10-01

    Species of Exophiala are opportunistic fungal pathogens that may infect a broad range of warm- and cold-blooded animals, including salmonids and Atlantic cod. In the present study, we observed abnormal swimming behaviour and skin pigmentation and increased mortality in cod kept in an indoor tank. Necropsy revealed foci of different sizes with a greyish to brownish colour in internal organs of diseased fish. The foci consisted of ramifying darkly pigmented fungal hyphae surrounded by distinct layers of inflammatory cells, including macrophage-like cells. In the inner layer with many hyphae, the macrophage-like cells were dead. We observed no apparent restriction of fungal growth by the inflammatory response. A darkly pigmented fungus was repeatedly isolated in pure culture from foci of diseased fish and identified as Exophiala angulospora using morphological and molecular characters. This species has not been previously reported to cause disease in cod, but has been reported as an opportunistic pathogen of both marine and freshwater fish. Based on the morphology and sequence analysis presented here, we conclude that E. angulospora caused the observed chronic multifocal inflammation in internal organs of cod, leading to severe disease and mortality. PMID:22132499

  11. Aerobic and anaerobic swimming performance of individual Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Reidy, S P; Kerr, S R; Nelson, J A

    2000-01-01

    Individual Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were exercised using three different measures of swimming performance. (1) An endurance test (critical swimming speed, U(crit), protocol) designed to assess predominantly aerobic endurance swimming (duration hours). (2) An acceleration test (U(burst)), in which the fish were required to swim against a rapidly increasing current until exhausted (duration minutes). This test was designed to assess predominantly glycolytic-based swimming capacity. (3) A sprint test that examined the animals' ability to swim away from a sudden stimulus (duration seconds). Rates of oxygen consumption ( mdot (O2)) during the endurance test and various morphological variables of the individual fish were also measured. Both aerobic and anaerobic swimming performance of individual cod were found to be significantly repeatable over a 3 month period. mdot (O2) during the U(crit) protocol was also significantly repeatable at intermediate to high swimming speeds, but not at low speeds. Our results support extrapolation from metabolic rates at incremented swimming speeds to zero activity as the best way to measure standard metabolic rate in cod. While performance in the U(crit) test and the sprint test were positively correlated, there was a negative correlation between performance in the U(crit) test and performance in the U(burst) test. This implies a potential trade-off in individual cod between stamina and the ability to use glycolytic-based locomotion. Inter-individual variation in swimming performance during these protocols, while substantial, was not correlated with individual variation in fin surface areas, age or morphology. However, U(burst) performance was dependent upon the sex of the animals, while performance during the U(crit) protocol was significantly correlated with their aerobic scope for activity.

  12. Authentication of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) using real time PCR.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Beatriz; Madriñán, María; Vieites, Juan M; Espiñeira, Montserrat

    2010-04-28

    This work describes the development of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) system for the detection and identification of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Among the advantages of this technique, it is worth highlighting that this is reliable in terms of specificity and sensitivity. The TaqMan real-time PCR is the simplest, fastest testing process and has the highest potential for automation, therefore representing the currently most suitable method for screening, allowing the detection of fraudulent or unintentional mislabeling of this species. The method can be applied to all kinds of products, fresh, frozen, and processed products, including those undergoing intensive processes of transformation. The developed methodology using specific primer-probe set was validated and further applied to 40 commercial samples labeled as cod in order to determinate if the species used for their manufacturing corresponded to G. morhua, detecting 20% that were incorrectly labeled. A C(t) value of about 19 was obtained when G. morhua was present. In samples with a species mixture, all samples that had a fluorescence signal were positive (C(t) < 30) for the presence of G. morhua by conventional end-point RT-PCR, and the estimated limit of detection for these type of samples was of 20 pg of DNA. The methodology herein developed is useful to check the fulfilment of labeling regulations for seafood products and verify the correct traceability in commercial trade and for fisheries control.

  13. Diel variation in feeding and movement patterns of juvenile Atlantic cod at offshore wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reubens, Jan T.; De Rijcke, Maarten; Degraer, Steven; Vincx, Magda

    2014-01-01

    Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is a commercially important fish species suffering from overexploitation in the North-East Atlantic. In recent years, their natural environment is being intensively altered by the construction of offshore wind farms in many coastal areas. These constructions form artificial reefs influencing local biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. It has been demonstrated that Atlantic cod is present in the vicinity of these constructions. However, empirical data concerning the diel activity and feeding behaviour of Atlantic cod in the vicinity of these artificial reefs is lacking. Atlantic cod has a flexible diel activity cycle linked to spatio-temporal variations in food availability and predation risk. In this study we integrated acoustic telemetry with stomach content analysis to quantify diel activity and evaluate diel feeding patterns at a windmill artificial reef (WAR) in the Belgian part of the North Sea. Atlantic cod exhibited crepuscular movements related to feeding activity; a 12 h cycle was found and the highest catch rates and stomach fullness were recorded close to sunset and sunrise. It is suggested that the observed diel movement pattern is related to the prey species community and to predation pressure. Foraging at low ambient light levels (i.e. at dusk and dawn) probably causes a trade-off between foraging success and reducing predation pressure. Fish did not leave the area in-between feeding periods. Hence other benefits (i.e. shelter against currents and predators) besides food availability stimulate the aggregation behaviour at the WARs.

  14. The genome sequence of Atlantic cod reveals a unique immune system.

    PubMed

    Star, Bastiaan; Nederbragt, Alexander J; Jentoft, Sissel; Grimholt, Unni; Malmstrøm, Martin; Gregers, Tone F; Rounge, Trine B; Paulsen, Jonas; Solbakken, Monica H; Sharma, Animesh; Wetten, Ola F; Lanzén, Anders; Winer, Roger; Knight, James; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; Aken, Bronwen; Andersen, Oivind; Lagesen, Karin; Tooming-Klunderud, Ave; Edvardsen, Rolf B; Tina, Kirubakaran G; Espelund, Mari; Nepal, Chirag; Previti, Christopher; Karlsen, Bård Ove; Moum, Truls; Skage, Morten; Berg, Paul R; Gjøen, Tor; Kuhl, Heiner; Thorsen, Jim; Malde, Ketil; Reinhardt, Richard; Du, Lei; Johansen, Steinar D; Searle, Steve; Lien, Sigbjørn; Nilsen, Frank; Jonassen, Inge; Omholt, Stig W; Stenseth, Nils Chr; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2011-08-10

    Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is a large, cold-adapted teleost that sustains long-standing commercial fisheries and incipient aquaculture. Here we present the genome sequence of Atlantic cod, showing evidence for complex thermal adaptations in its haemoglobin gene cluster and an unusual immune architecture compared to other sequenced vertebrates. The genome assembly was obtained exclusively by 454 sequencing of shotgun and paired-end libraries, and automated annotation identified 22,154 genes. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II is a conserved feature of the adaptive immune system of jawed vertebrates, but we show that Atlantic cod has lost the genes for MHC II, CD4 and invariant chain (Ii) that are essential for the function of this pathway. Nevertheless, Atlantic cod is not exceptionally susceptible to disease under natural conditions. We find a highly expanded number of MHC I genes and a unique composition of its Toll-like receptor (TLR) families. This indicates how the Atlantic cod immune system has evolved compensatory mechanisms in both adaptive and innate immunity in the absence of MHC II. These observations affect fundamental assumptions about the evolution of the adaptive immune system and its components in vertebrates.

  15. Yersiniosis in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua (L.), characterization of the infective strain and host reactions.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsdottir, B K; Gudmundsdottir, S; Gudmundsdottir, S; Magnadottir, B

    2014-06-01

    A disease outbreak in farmed Atlantic cod caused by Yersinia ruckeri is reported. Mortality started following vaccination of cod reared in two tanks (A and B). The accumulated mortality reached 1.9% in A and 4.8% in B in the following 30 days when treatment with oxytetracycline was applied. Biochemical and molecular analysis of Y. ruckeri isolates from the cod and other fish species from fresh and marine waters in Iceland revealed a high salinity-tolerant subgroup of Y. ruckeri serotype O1. Infected fish showed clinical signs comparable with those of Y. ruckeri -infected salmonids, with the exception of granuloma formations in infected cod tissues, which is a known response of cod to bacterial infections. Immunohistological examination showed Y. ruckeri antigens in the core of granulomas and the involvement of immune parameters that indicates a strong association between complement and lysozyme killing of bacteria. Experimental infection of cod with a cod isolate induced disease, and the calculated LD50 was 1.7 × 10(4) CFU per fish. The results suggest that yersiniosis can be spread between populations of freshwater and marine fish. Treatment of infected cod with antibiotic did not eliminate the infection, which can be explained by the immune response of cod producing prolonged granulomatous infection.

  16. Adaptation to Low Salinity Promotes Genomic Divergence in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua L.).

    PubMed

    Berg, Paul R; Jentoft, Sissel; Star, Bastiaan; Ring, Kristoffer H; Knutsen, Halvor; Lien, Sigbjørn; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; André, Carl

    2015-06-01

    How genomic selection enables species to adapt to divergent environments is a fundamental question in ecology and evolution. We investigated the genomic signatures of local adaptation in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) along a natural salinity gradient, ranging from 35‰ in the North Sea to 7‰ within the Baltic Sea. By utilizing a 12 K SNPchip, we simultaneously assessed neutral and adaptive genetic divergence across the Atlantic cod genome. Combining outlier analyses with a landscape genomic approach, we identified a set of directionally selected loci that are strongly correlated with habitat differences in salinity, oxygen, and temperature. Our results show that discrete regions within the Atlantic cod genome are subject to directional selection and associated with adaptation to the local environmental conditions in the Baltic- and the North Sea, indicating divergence hitchhiking and the presence of genomic islands of divergence. We report a suite of outlier single nucleotide polymorphisms within or closely located to genes associated with osmoregulation, as well as genes known to play important roles in the hydration and development of oocytes. These genes are likely to have key functions within a general osmoregulatory framework and are important for the survival of eggs and larvae, contributing to the buildup of reproductive isolation between the low-salinity adapted Baltic cod and the adjacent cod populations. Hence, our data suggest that adaptive responses to the environmental conditions in the Baltic Sea may contribute to a strong and effective reproductive barrier, and that Baltic cod can be viewed as an example of ongoing speciation.

  17. Flow cytometry assays of respiratory burst in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) and in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Kalgraff, Cathrine A K; Wergeland, Heidrun I; Pettersen, Eirin Fausa

    2011-09-01

    The oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR) to the fluorescent rhodamine 123 (RHO) was detected using flow cytometry. This assay for detection of respiratory burst activity was established in peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL) and head kidney leucocytes (HKL) of Atlantic salmon and Atlantic cod. The leucocytes were stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). For cod cells 10 times lower concentration of PMA had to be used compared to salmon cells, as higher concentrations were toxic and resulted in considerable cell death. The cells found to be RHO-positive were monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils based on the scatter dot plots, but for salmon also some small cells were found to have high fluorescence intensity both in the flow cytometry analyses and by fluorescence microscopy of cytospin preparations. The nature of these cells is not known. For cod leucocytes, such cells were not obvious. The instrument settings are a bit more demanding for cod, as cod cells die more easily compared to salmon cells. In both assays the limit between negative and positive cells has to be carefully considered. The presented flow cytometry protocols for measurements of respiratory burst in salmon and cod leucocytes can be applied in various studies where respiratory burst functions are involved, such as to verify if it is activated or suppressed in connection with infections and immunostimulation.

  18. Genomic analysis of the host response to nervous necrosis virus in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) brain.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Aleksei; Kileng, Øyvind; Skugor, Stanko; Jørgensen, Sven Martin; Afanasyev, Sergey; Timmerhaus, Gerrit; Sommer, Ann-Inger; Jensen, Ingvill

    2013-07-01

    Genome sequencing combined with transcriptome profiling promotes exploration of defence against pathogens and discovery of immune genes. Based on sequences from the recently released genome of Atlantic cod, a genome-wide oligonucleotide microarray (ACIQ-1) was designed and used for analyses of gene expression in the brain during infection with nervous necrosis virus (NNV). A challenge experiment with NNV was performed with Atlantic cod juveniles and brain samples from virus infected and uninfected fish were used for microarray analysis. Expression of virus induced genes increased at 5 days post challenge and persisted at stable level to the last sampling at 25 days post challenge. A large fraction of the up-regulated genes (546 features) were known or expected to have immune functions and most of these have not previously been characterized in Atlantic cod. Transcriptomic changes induced by the virus involved strong activation of genes associated with interferon and tumour necrosis factor related responses and acute inflammation. Up-regulation of genes involved in adaptive immunity suggested a rapid recruitment of B and T lymphocytes to the NNV infected brain. QPCR analyses of 15 candidate genes of innate immunity showed rapid induction by poly(I:C) in Atlantic cod larvae cells suggesting an antiviral role. Earliest and greatest expression changes after poly I:C stimulation was observed for interferon regulatory factors IRF4 and IRF7. Comparative studies between teleost species provided new knowledge about the evolution of innate antiviral immunity in fish. A number of genes is present or responds to viruses only in fish. Innate immunity of Atlantic cod is characterized by selective expansion of several medium-sized multigene families with ribose binding domains. An interesting finding was the high representation of three large gene families among the early antiviral genes, including tripartite motif proteins (TRIM) and proteins with PRY-SPRY and NACHT domains. The

  19. Characterization of Atlantic cod spawning habitat and behavior in Icelandic coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grabowski, Timothy B.; Boswell, Kevin M.; McAdam, Bruce J.; Wells, R. J. David; Marteinsdóttir, Gudrún

    2012-01-01

    The physical habitat used during spawning may potentially be an important factor affecting reproductive output of broadcast spawning marine fishes, particularly for species with complex, substrate-oriented mating systems and behaviors, such as Atlantic cod Gadus morhua. We characterized the habitat use and behavior of spawning Atlantic cod at two locations off the coast of southwestern Iceland during a 2-d research cruise (15–16 April 2009). We simultaneously operated two different active hydroacoustic gear types, a split beam echosounder and a dual frequency imaging sonar (DIDSON), as well as a remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV). A total of five fish species were identified through ROV surveys: including cusk Brosme brosme, Atlantic cod, haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus, lemon sole Microstomus kitt, and Atlantic redfish Sebastes spp. Of the three habitats identified in the acoustic surveys, the transitional habitat between boulder/lava field and sand habitats was characterized by greater fish density and acoustic target strength compared to that of sand or boulder/lava field habitats independently. Atlantic cod were observed behaving in a manner consistent with published descriptions of spawning. Individuals were observed ascending 1–5 m into the water column from the bottom at an average vertical swimming speed of 0.20–0.25 m s−1 and maintained an average spacing of 1.0–1.4 m between individuals. Our results suggest that cod do not choose spawning locations indiscriminately despite the fact that it is a broadcast spawning fish with planktonic eggs that are released well above the seafloor.

  20. Characterization of Atlantic cod spawning habitat and behavior in Icelandic coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Timothy B; Boswell, Kevin M; McAdam, Bruce J; Wells, R J David; Marteinsdóttir, Guđrún

    2012-01-01

    The physical habitat used during spawning may potentially be an important factor affecting reproductive output of broadcast spawning marine fishes, particularly for species with complex, substrate-oriented mating systems and behaviors, such as Atlantic cod Gadus morhua. We characterized the habitat use and behavior of spawning Atlantic cod at two locations off the coast of southwestern Iceland during a 2-d research cruise (15-16 April 2009). We simultaneously operated two different active hydroacoustic gear types, a split beam echosounder and a dual frequency imaging sonar (DIDSON), as well as a remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV). A total of five fish species were identified through ROV surveys: including cusk Brosme brosme, Atlantic cod, haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus, lemon sole Microstomus kitt, and Atlantic redfish Sebastes spp. Of the three habitats identified in the acoustic surveys, the transitional habitat between boulder/lava field and sand habitats was characterized by greater fish density and acoustic target strength compared to that of sand or boulder/lava field habitats independently. Atlantic cod were observed behaving in a manner consistent with published descriptions of spawning. Individuals were observed ascending 1-5 m into the water column from the bottom at an average vertical swimming speed of 0.20-0.25 m s(-1) and maintained an average spacing of 1.0-1.4 m between individuals. Our results suggest that cod do not choose spawning locations indiscriminately despite the fact that it is a broadcast spawning fish with planktonic eggs that are released well above the seafloor. PMID:23236471

  1. Daily Rhythmicity of Clock Gene Transcripts in Atlantic Cod Fast Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lazado, Carlo C.; Kumaratunga, Hiruni P. S.; Nagasawa, Kazue; Babiak, Igor; Giannetto, Alessia; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2014-01-01

    The classical notion of a centralized clock that governs circadian rhythmicity has been challenged with the discovery of peripheral oscillators that enable organisms to cope with daily changes in their environment. The present study aimed to identify the molecular clock components in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and to investigate their daily gene expression in fast skeletal muscle. Atlantic cod clock genes were closely related to their orthologs in teleosts and tetrapods. Synteny was conserved to varying degrees in the majority of the 18 clock genes examined. In particular, aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like 2 (arntl2), RAR-related orphan receptor A (rora) and timeless (tim) displayed high degrees of conservation. Expression profiling during the early ontogenesis revealed that some transcripts were maternally transferred, namely arntl2, cryptochrome 1b and 2 (cry1b and cry2), and period 2a and 2b (per2a and per2b). Most clock genes were ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, suggesting the possible existence of multiple peripheral clock systems in Atlantic cod. In particular, they were all detected in fast skeletal muscle, with the exception of neuronal PAS (Per-Arnt-Single-minded) domain-containing protein (npas1) and rora. Rhythmicity analysis revealed 8 clock genes with daily rhythmic expression, namely arntl2, circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (clock), npas2, cry2, cry3 per2a, nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1 (nr1d1), and nr1d2a. Transcript levels of the myogenic genes myogenic factor 5 (myf5) and muscleblind-like 1 (mbnl1) strongly correlated with clock gene expression. This is the first study to unravel the molecular components of peripheral clocks in Atlantic cod. Taken together, our data suggest that the putative clock system in fast skeletal muscle of Atlantic cod has regulatory implications on muscle physiology, particularly in the expression of genes related to myogenesis. PMID:24921252

  2. Characterization of Atlantic cod spawning habitat and behavior in Icelandic coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Timothy B; Boswell, Kevin M; McAdam, Bruce J; Wells, R J David; Marteinsdóttir, Guđrún

    2012-01-01

    The physical habitat used during spawning may potentially be an important factor affecting reproductive output of broadcast spawning marine fishes, particularly for species with complex, substrate-oriented mating systems and behaviors, such as Atlantic cod Gadus morhua. We characterized the habitat use and behavior of spawning Atlantic cod at two locations off the coast of southwestern Iceland during a 2-d research cruise (15-16 April 2009). We simultaneously operated two different active hydroacoustic gear types, a split beam echosounder and a dual frequency imaging sonar (DIDSON), as well as a remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV). A total of five fish species were identified through ROV surveys: including cusk Brosme brosme, Atlantic cod, haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus, lemon sole Microstomus kitt, and Atlantic redfish Sebastes spp. Of the three habitats identified in the acoustic surveys, the transitional habitat between boulder/lava field and sand habitats was characterized by greater fish density and acoustic target strength compared to that of sand or boulder/lava field habitats independently. Atlantic cod were observed behaving in a manner consistent with published descriptions of spawning. Individuals were observed ascending 1-5 m into the water column from the bottom at an average vertical swimming speed of 0.20-0.25 m s(-1) and maintained an average spacing of 1.0-1.4 m between individuals. Our results suggest that cod do not choose spawning locations indiscriminately despite the fact that it is a broadcast spawning fish with planktonic eggs that are released well above the seafloor.

  3. Alterations in the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) hepatic thiol-proteome after methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, O A; Sheehan, D; Goksøyr, A

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic studies in general have demonstrated that the most effective and thorough analysis of biological samples requires subfractionation and/or enrichment prior to downstream processing. In the present study, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) liver samples were fractionated using activated thiol sepharose to isolate hepatic proteins containing free/reactive cysteines. This subset of proteins is of special interest when studying the physiological effects attributed to methylmercury (MeHg) exposure. Methylmercury is a persistent environmental contaminant that has a potent affinity toward thiol groups, and can directly bind proteins via available cysteine residues. Further, alterations in the cod thiol-proteome following MeHg exposure (2 mg/kg body weight) were explored with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with downstream mass spectrometry analyses for protein identifications. Thirty-five protein spots were found to respond to MeHg exposure, and 13 of these were identified when searching cod-specific databases with acquired mass spectrometry data. Among the identified thiol-containing proteins, some are known to respond to MeHg treatment, including constituents of the cytoskeleton, and proteins involved in oxidative stress responses, protein synthesis, protein folding, and energy metabolism. Methylmercury also appeared to affect cod heme metabolism/turnover, producing significantly altered levels of hemoglobin and hemopexin in liver following metal exposure. The latter finding suggests that MeHg may also affect the hematological system in Atlantic cod.

  4. Cloning, pharmacological characterization and expression analysis of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, L.) nuclear progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi X; Almeida, Fernanda F L; Andersson, Eva; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Schmidt, Ruben; Schulz, Rüdiger W; Bogerd, Jan

    2012-10-01

    To better understand the role(s) of progesterone in fish spermatogenesis, we cloned the nuclear progesterone receptor (Pgr) of Atlantic cod. The open-reading frame of the cod pgr consists of 2076 bp, coding for a 691-amino acids-long protein that shows the highest similarity with other piscine Pgr proteins. Functional characterization of the receptor expressed in mammalian cells revealed that the cod Pgr exhibited progesterone-specific, dose-dependent induction of reporter gene expression, with 17α,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP), a typical piscine progesterone, showing the highest potency in activating the receptor. During ontogenesis, the pgr mRNA was undetectable in embryo's 24 h after fertilization, but became detectable 4 days after fertilization. During the larval stage, the expression levels increased steadily with the development of the larvae. In adult fish, pgr was predominantly expressed in gonads of both sexes. During the onset of puberty, testicular pgr transcript levels started to increase during rapid spermatogonial proliferation, and peaked when spermiation started. In situ hybridization studies using testis tissue during the rapid growth phase containing all germ cell stages indicated that in cod, pgr mRNA is predominantly located in Sertoli cells that are in contact with proliferating spermatogonia. Taken together, our data suggests that the Pgr is involved in mediating progestagen stimulation of the mitotic expansion of spermatogonia, and in processes associated with the spermiation/spawning period in Atlantic cod. PMID:22885560

  5. Three chromosomal rearrangements promote genomic divergence between migratory and stationary ecotypes of Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Berg, Paul R; Star, Bastiaan; Pampoulie, Christophe; Sodeland, Marte; Barth, Julia M I; Knutsen, Halvor; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genome-wide patterns of divergence provides insight on how genomes are influenced by selection and can reveal the potential for local adaptation in spatially structured populations. In Atlantic cod - historically a major marine resource - Northeast-Arctic- and Norwegian coastal cod are recognized by fundamental differences in migratory and non-migratory behavior, respectively. However, the genomic architecture underlying such behavioral ecotypes is unclear. Here, we have analyzed more than 8.000 polymorphic SNPs distributed throughout all 23 linkage groups and show that loci putatively under selection are localized within three distinct genomic regions, each of several megabases long, covering approximately 4% of the Atlantic cod genome. These regions likely represent genomic inversions. The frequency of these distinct regions differ markedly between the ecotypes, spawning in the vicinity of each other, which contrasts with the low level of divergence in the rest of the genome. The observed patterns strongly suggest that these chromosomal rearrangements are instrumental in local adaptation and separation of Atlantic cod populations, leaving footprints of large genomic regions under selection. Our findings demonstrate the power of using genomic information in further understanding the population dynamics and defining management units in one of the world's most economically important marine resources.

  6. Mitogenome sequence variation in migratory and stationary ecotypes of North-east Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Bård O; Emblem, Åse; Jørgensen, Tor E; Klingan, Kevin A; Nordeide, Jarle T; Moum, Truls; Johansen, Steinar D

    2014-06-01

    Sequencing of mitochondrial gene fragments from specimens representing a wide range of geographical locations has indicated limited population structuring in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). We recently performed whole genome analysis based on next-generation sequencing of two pooled ecotype samples representing offshore migratory and inshore stationary cod from the North-east Atlantic Ocean. Here we report molecular features and variability of the 16.7kb mitogenome component that was collected from the datasets. These sequences represented more than 25 times coverage of each individual and more than 1100 times coverage of each ecotype sample. We estimated the mitogenome to have evolved 14 times more rapidly than the nuclear genome. Among the 365 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites identified, 121 were shared between ecotypes, and 151 and 93 were private within the migratory and stationary cod, respectively. We found 323 SNPs to be located in protein coding genes, of which 29 were non-synonymous. One synonymous site in ND2 was likely to be under positive selection. FST measurements indicated weak differentiation in ND1 and ND2 between ecotypes. We conclude that the Atlantic cod mitogenome and the nuclear genome apparently evolved by distinct evolutionary constraints, and that the reproductive isolation observed from whole genome analysis was not visible in the mtDNA sequences.

  7. Three chromosomal rearrangements promote genomic divergence between migratory and stationary ecotypes of Atlantic cod

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Paul R.; Star, Bastiaan; Pampoulie, Christophe; Sodeland, Marte; Barth, Julia M. I.; Knutsen, Halvor; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genome-wide patterns of divergence provides insight on how genomes are influenced by selection and can reveal the potential for local adaptation in spatially structured populations. In Atlantic cod – historically a major marine resource – Northeast-Arctic- and Norwegian coastal cod are recognized by fundamental differences in migratory and non-migratory behavior, respectively. However, the genomic architecture underlying such behavioral ecotypes is unclear. Here, we have analyzed more than 8.000 polymorphic SNPs distributed throughout all 23 linkage groups and show that loci putatively under selection are localized within three distinct genomic regions, each of several megabases long, covering approximately 4% of the Atlantic cod genome. These regions likely represent genomic inversions. The frequency of these distinct regions differ markedly between the ecotypes, spawning in the vicinity of each other, which contrasts with the low level of divergence in the rest of the genome. The observed patterns strongly suggest that these chromosomal rearrangements are instrumental in local adaptation and separation of Atlantic cod populations, leaving footprints of large genomic regions under selection. Our findings demonstrate the power of using genomic information in further understanding the population dynamics and defining management units in one of the world’s most economically important marine resources. PMID:26983361

  8. Adaptation to Low Salinity Promotes Genomic Divergence in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua L.).

    PubMed

    Berg, Paul R; Jentoft, Sissel; Star, Bastiaan; Ring, Kristoffer H; Knutsen, Halvor; Lien, Sigbjørn; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; André, Carl

    2015-06-01

    How genomic selection enables species to adapt to divergent environments is a fundamental question in ecology and evolution. We investigated the genomic signatures of local adaptation in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) along a natural salinity gradient, ranging from 35‰ in the North Sea to 7‰ within the Baltic Sea. By utilizing a 12 K SNPchip, we simultaneously assessed neutral and adaptive genetic divergence across the Atlantic cod genome. Combining outlier analyses with a landscape genomic approach, we identified a set of directionally selected loci that are strongly correlated with habitat differences in salinity, oxygen, and temperature. Our results show that discrete regions within the Atlantic cod genome are subject to directional selection and associated with adaptation to the local environmental conditions in the Baltic- and the North Sea, indicating divergence hitchhiking and the presence of genomic islands of divergence. We report a suite of outlier single nucleotide polymorphisms within or closely located to genes associated with osmoregulation, as well as genes known to play important roles in the hydration and development of oocytes. These genes are likely to have key functions within a general osmoregulatory framework and are important for the survival of eggs and larvae, contributing to the buildup of reproductive isolation between the low-salinity adapted Baltic cod and the adjacent cod populations. Hence, our data suggest that adaptive responses to the environmental conditions in the Baltic Sea may contribute to a strong and effective reproductive barrier, and that Baltic cod can be viewed as an example of ongoing speciation. PMID:25994933

  9. Adaptation to Low Salinity Promotes Genomic Divergence in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua L.)

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Paul R.; Jentoft, Sissel; Star, Bastiaan; Ring, Kristoffer H.; Knutsen, Halvor; Lien, Sigbjørn; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; André, Carl

    2015-01-01

    How genomic selection enables species to adapt to divergent environments is a fundamental question in ecology and evolution. We investigated the genomic signatures of local adaptation in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) along a natural salinity gradient, ranging from 35‰ in the North Sea to 7‰ within the Baltic Sea. By utilizing a 12 K SNPchip, we simultaneously assessed neutral and adaptive genetic divergence across the Atlantic cod genome. Combining outlier analyses with a landscape genomic approach, we identified a set of directionally selected loci that are strongly correlated with habitat differences in salinity, oxygen, and temperature. Our results show that discrete regions within the Atlantic cod genome are subject to directional selection and associated with adaptation to the local environmental conditions in the Baltic- and the North Sea, indicating divergence hitchhiking and the presence of genomic islands of divergence. We report a suite of outlier single nucleotide polymorphisms within or closely located to genes associated with osmoregulation, as well as genes known to play important roles in the hydration and development of oocytes. These genes are likely to have key functions within a general osmoregulatory framework and are important for the survival of eggs and larvae, contributing to the buildup of reproductive isolation between the low-salinity adapted Baltic cod and the adjacent cod populations. Hence, our data suggest that adaptive responses to the environmental conditions in the Baltic Sea may contribute to a strong and effective reproductive barrier, and that Baltic cod can be viewed as an example of ongoing speciation. PMID:25994933

  10. Effect of petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons on monogeneids parasitizing Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, R.A.; Kiceniuk, J.W.

    1988-07-01

    Fish gills appear to be more susceptible than other tissues to toxicants. The latter include petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons, which can induce lesions characterized by excessive mucus secretion, hyperplasia, fusion of secondary gill lamellae and capillary dilation. Fish are also natural hosts to several species of ectoparasites, especially monogeneans which live among the gill filaments. A previous study on the interrelation of water quality, gill parasites and gill pathology provided evidence that fish living in habitats degraded by pollutants such as Biscayne Bay, Florida, were heavily infested with monogeneids especially when gill lesions were severe. Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, are hosts to monogeneans. The authors reported previously that crude oil fractions induced gill lesions in cod and also affected some gastrointestinal parasites. In the light of these reports, a study was undertaken to ascertain whether any relationship existed between gill lesions and gill parasites in cod following chronic exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons.

  11. Photoperiod Influences Growth and mll (Mixed-Lineage Leukaemia) Expression in Atlantic Cod

    PubMed Central

    Nagasawa, Kazue; Giannetto, Alessia; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2012-01-01

    Photoperiod is associated to phenotypic plasticity of somatic growth in several teleost species. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are currently unknown but it is likely that epigenetic regulation by methyltransferases is involved. The MLL (mixed-lineage leukaemia) family comprises histone methyltransferases that play a critical role in regulating gene expression during early development in mammals. So far, these genes have received scant attention in teleost fish. In the present study, the mean weight of Atlantic cod juveniles reared under continuous illumination was found to be 13% greater than those kept under natural photoperiod conditions for 120 days. We newly determined cDNA sequences of five mll (mll1, mll2, mll3a, mll4b and mll5) and two setd1 (setd1a and setd1ba) paralogues from Atlantic cod. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the cod genes clustered within the appropriate mll clade and comparative mapping of mll paralogues showed that these genes lie within a region of conserved synteny among teleosts. All mll and setd1 genes were highly expressed in gonads and fast muscle of adult cod, albeit at different levels, and they were differentially regulated with photoperiod in muscle of juvenile fish. Following only one day of exposure to constant light, mll1, mll4b and setd1a were up to 57% lower in these fish compared to the natural photoperiod group. In addition, mRNA expression of myogenic regulatory factors (myog and myf-5) and pax7 in fast muscle was also affected by different photoperiod conditions. Notably, myog was significantly elevated in the continuous illumination group throughout the time course of the experiment. The absence of a day/night cycle is associated with a generalised decrease in mll expression concomitant with an increase in myog transcript levels in fast muscle of Atlantic cod, which may be involved in the observed epigenetic regulation of growth by photoperiod in this species. PMID:22590633

  12. Photoperiod influences growth and mll (mixed-lineage leukaemia) expression in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Kazue; Giannetto, Alessia; Fernandes, Jorge M O

    2012-01-01

    Photoperiod is associated to phenotypic plasticity of somatic growth in several teleost species. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are currently unknown but it is likely that epigenetic regulation by methyltransferases is involved. The MLL (mixed-lineage leukaemia) family comprises histone methyltransferases that play a critical role in regulating gene expression during early development in mammals. So far, these genes have received scant attention in teleost fish. In the present study, the mean weight of Atlantic cod juveniles reared under continuous illumination was found to be 13% greater than those kept under natural photoperiod conditions for 120 days. We newly determined cDNA sequences of five mll (mll1, mll2, mll3a, mll4b and mll5) and two setd1 (setd1a and setd1ba) paralogues from Atlantic cod. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the cod genes clustered within the appropriate mll clade and comparative mapping of mll paralogues showed that these genes lie within a region of conserved synteny among teleosts. All mll and setd1 genes were highly expressed in gonads and fast muscle of adult cod, albeit at different levels, and they were differentially regulated with photoperiod in muscle of juvenile fish. Following only one day of exposure to constant light, mll1, mll4b and setd1a were up to 57% lower in these fish compared to the natural photoperiod group. In addition, mRNA expression of myogenic regulatory factors (myog and myf-5) and pax7 in fast muscle was also affected by different photoperiod conditions. Notably, myog was significantly elevated in the continuous illumination group throughout the time course of the experiment. The absence of a day/night cycle is associated with a generalised decrease in mll expression concomitant with an increase in myog transcript levels in fast muscle of Atlantic cod, which may be involved in the observed epigenetic regulation of growth by photoperiod in this species. PMID:22590633

  13. The novel trypsin Y from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) - isolation, purification and characterisation.

    PubMed

    Pálsdóttir, Helga Margrét; Gudmundsdóttir, Ágústa

    2008-11-15

    This report describes the isolation and partial characterization of the novel group III trypsin Y from the pyloric caeca of Atlantic cod. Other Atlantic cod trypsins have been used as food processing aids with good results. Trypsin Y was purified by p-aminobenzamidine affinity chromatography and characterized by SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis, as well as by activity measurements towards synthetic substrates. Identification of trypsin Y was done with polyclonal antibodies raised towards the recombinant form of the enzyme and by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Trypsin Y is the only group III trypsin isolated from its native source and characterized by biochemical methods. In accordance with the r-trypsin Y, the native enzyme shows dual substrate specificity, i.e. towards trypsin and chymotrypsin specific substrates. This, along with the high cold-adapted character of trypsin Y, may be valuable for its use as a processing aid for sensitive products such as seafood. PMID:26047443

  14. Effects of Loma morhua (Microsporidia) infection on the cardiorespiratory performance of Atlantic cod Gadus morhua (L).

    PubMed

    Powell, M D; Gamperl, A K

    2016-02-01

    The microsporidian Loma morhua infects Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in the wild and in culture and results in the formation of xenomas within the gill filaments, heart and spleen. Given the importance of the two former organs to metabolic capacity and thermal tolerance, the cardiorespiratory performance of cod with a naturally acquired infection of Loma was measured during an acute temperature increase (2 °C h(-1)) from 10 °C to the fish's critical thermal maximum (CT(Max)). In addition, oxygen consumption and swimming performance were measured during two successive critical swimming speed (U(crit)) tests at 10 °C. While Loma infection had a negative impact on cod cardiac function at warm temperatures, and on metabolic capacity in both the CT(Max) and U(crit) tests (i.e. a reduction of 30-40%), it appears that the Atlantic cod can largely compensate for these Loma-induced cardiorespiratory limitations. For example, (i) CT(Max) (21.0 ± 0.3 °C) and U(crit) (~1.75 BL s(-1)) were very comparable to those reported in previous studies using uninfected fish from the same founder population; and (ii) our data suggest that tissue oxygen extraction, and potentially the capacity for anaerobic metabolism, is enhanced in fish infected with this microsporidian.

  15. Chapter 3. Effects of climate change and commercial fishing on Atlantic cod Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Mieszkowska, Nova; Genner, Martin J; Hawkins, Stephen J; Sims, David W

    2009-01-01

    During the course of the last century, populations of Atlantic cod Gadus morhua L. have undergone dramatic declines in abundance across their biogeographic range, leading to debate about the relative roles of climatic warming and overfishing in driving these changes. In this chapter, we describe the geographic distributions of this important predator of North Atlantic ecosystems and document extensive evidence for limitations of spatial movement and local adaptation from population genetic markers and electronic tagging. Taken together, this evidence demonstrates that knowledge of spatial population ecology is critical for evaluating the effects of climate change and commercial harvesting. To explore the possible effects of climate change on cod, we first describe thermal influences on individual physiology, growth, activity and maturation. We then evaluate evidence that temperature has influenced population-level processes including direct effects on recruitment through enhanced growth and activity, and indirect effects through changes to larval food resources. Although thermal regimes clearly define the biogeographic range of the species, and strongly influence many aspects of cod biology, the evidence that population declines across the North Atlantic are strongly linked to fishing activity is now overwhelming. Although there is considerable concern about low spawning stock biomasses, high levels of fishing activity continues in many areas. Even with reduced fishing effort, the potential for recovery from low abundance may be compromised by unfavourable climate and Allee effects. Current stock assessment and management approaches are reviewed, alongside newly advocated methods for monitoring stock status and recovery. However, it remains uncertain whether the rebuilding of cod to historic population sizes and demographic structures will be possible in a warmer North Atlantic.

  16. The Impact of Egg Ozonation on Hatching Success, Larval Growth, and Survival of Atlantic Cod, Atlantic Salmon, and Rainbow Trout.

    PubMed

    Fry, Jessica; Casanova, Pérez Juan; Hamoutene, Dounia; Lush, Lynn; Walsh, Andy; Couturier, Cyr

    2015-03-01

    The direct exposure of fish eggs to ozonated water has generated interest as a means of ensuring pathogen-free eggs without the use of harsh chemicals. However, there are numerous knowledge gaps, including safe contact times, exposure levels, and potential long-term effects on aquaculture species in both freshwater and seawater. The effect of different ozone (O3) doses (0.5-1.0, 1.5-2.0, and 2.5-3.0 mg of O3/L for 90 s) on recently fertilized eggs of Atlantic Cod Gadus morhua and eyed eggs of Atlantic Salmon Salmo salar and Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss was evaluated in comparison with the effects of two commercial disinfectants: Perosan (0.004 mg/L) and Ovadine (100 mg/L). The impact of ozone application was evaluated based on hatching success, larval nucleic acid concentration, larval growth, and survival. Overall, results indicated that ozonation of Atlantic Cod eggs at a dose less than 3.0 mg/L for 90 s produced no negative effect on the larvae up to 30 d posthatch. Furthermore, ozonation of Atlantic Salmon and Rainbow Trout eggs generated no negative effect on the larvae, based on monitoring until 85% yolk sac re-absorption (16 d posthatch). PMID:26306334

  17. Isolation and characterisation of two cDNAs encoding transglutaminase from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Furnes, Clemens; Kileng, Øyvind; Jensen, Ingvill; Karki, Pralav; Eichacker, Lutz; Robertsen, Børre

    2014-01-01

    Two cDNAs encoding transglutaminase (TG) were identified in a subtractive cDNA library prepared from the head kidney of poly I:C stimulated Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Full-length TG-1 and TG-2 cDNA were cloned from the head kidney by a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The deduced amino acid (aa) sequence for TG-1 was 695 aa with an estimated molecular mass of 78.3 kDa, while TG-2 was a 698 aa protein with an estimated molecular mass of 78.8 kDa. The two proteins were named TG-1 and TG-2 and both possess transglutaminase/protease-like homologous domains (TGc) and full conservation of amino acids cysteine, histidine, and aspartate residues that form the catalytic triad. Sequence analysis showed high similarity (93.1%) with Alaska pollock TG, and the TGs were grouped together with TGs from chum salmon, Japanese flounder, Nile tilapia, and red sea bream in addition to Alaska pollock in phylogenetic analysis. Interestingly, they showed different tissue distribution with highest constitutive expression in reproductive and immunological organs, indicating important roles in these organs. Furthermore, the up-regulation of TG-1 and TG-2 in head kidney after stimulating Atlantic cod with poly I:C suggested a role of TGs in immune response in Atlantic cod. PMID:24316498

  18. Evolutionary redesign of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) Toll-like receptor repertoire by gene losses and expansions

    PubMed Central

    Solbakken, Monica H.; Tørresen, Ole K.; Nederbragt, Alexander J.; Seppola, Marit; Gregers, Tone F.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequencing of the teleost Atlantic cod demonstrated loss of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II, an extreme gene expansion of MHC class I and gene expansions and losses in the innate pattern recognition receptor (PRR) family of Toll-like receptors (TLR). In a comparative genomic setting, using an improved version of the genome, we characterize PRRs in Atlantic cod with emphasis on TLRs demonstrating the loss of TLR1/6, TLR2 and TLR5 and expansion of TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, TLR22 and TLR25. We find that Atlantic cod TLR expansions are strongly influenced by diversifying selection likely to increase the detectable ligand repertoire through neo- and subfunctionalization. Using RNAseq we find that Atlantic cod TLRs display likely tissue or developmental stage-specific expression patterns. In a broader perspective, a comprehensive vertebrate TLR phylogeny reveals that the Atlantic cod TLR repertoire is extreme with regards to losses and expansions compared to other teleosts. In addition we identify a substantial shift in TLR repertoires following the evolutionary transition from an aquatic vertebrate (fish) to a terrestrial (tetrapod) life style. Collectively, our findings provide new insight into the function and evolution of TLRs in Atlantic cod as well as the evolutionary history of vertebrate innate immunity. PMID:27126702

  19. Evolutionary redesign of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) Toll-like receptor repertoire by gene losses and expansions.

    PubMed

    Solbakken, Monica H; Tørresen, Ole K; Nederbragt, Alexander J; Seppola, Marit; Gregers, Tone F; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequencing of the teleost Atlantic cod demonstrated loss of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II, an extreme gene expansion of MHC class I and gene expansions and losses in the innate pattern recognition receptor (PRR) family of Toll-like receptors (TLR). In a comparative genomic setting, using an improved version of the genome, we characterize PRRs in Atlantic cod with emphasis on TLRs demonstrating the loss of TLR1/6, TLR2 and TLR5 and expansion of TLR7, TLR8, TLR9, TLR22 and TLR25. We find that Atlantic cod TLR expansions are strongly influenced by diversifying selection likely to increase the detectable ligand repertoire through neo- and subfunctionalization. Using RNAseq we find that Atlantic cod TLRs display likely tissue or developmental stage-specific expression patterns. In a broader perspective, a comprehensive vertebrate TLR phylogeny reveals that the Atlantic cod TLR repertoire is extreme with regards to losses and expansions compared to other teleosts. In addition we identify a substantial shift in TLR repertoires following the evolutionary transition from an aquatic vertebrate (fish) to a terrestrial (tetrapod) life style. Collectively, our findings provide new insight into the function and evolution of TLRs in Atlantic cod as well as the evolutionary history of vertebrate innate immunity.

  20. Spawning behavior in Atlantic cod: analysis by use of data storage tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grabowski, Timothy B.; Thorsteinsson, Vilhjalmur; Marteinsdóttir, Gudrún

    2014-01-01

     Electronic data storage tags (DSTs) were implanted into Atlantic cod captured in Icelandic waters from 2002 to 2007 and the depth profiles recovered from these tags (females: n = 31, males: n = 27) were used to identify patterns consistent with published descriptions of cod courtship and spawning behavior. The individual periods of time that males spent exhibiting behavior consistent with being present in a spawning aggregation—i.e. periods consisting of a clear tidal signature in the DST depth profile associated with an individual remaining on or near the substrate—were longer than those of females. Over the course of a spawning season, male cod spent approximately twice the amount of time in spawning aggregations than females, but female cod visited more aggregations per unit time. On average, males participated in approximately 57% more putative spawning events, i.e. vertical ascents potentially corresponding to gamete release, than did females. However, males <85 cm total length participated in the same number of putative spawning events as females of comparable size. In both sexes, larger individuals and/or individuals that spent a longer period of time within an aggregation participated in a larger number of putative spawning events. Although further validation and refinement is necessary, particularly in the identification of spawning events, the ability offered by DSTs to quantify cod spawning behavior may aid in the development of management and conservation plans.

  1. Gene regulation of lipid and phospholipid metabolism in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae.

    PubMed

    Li, Keshuai; Østensen, Mari-Ann; Attramadal, Kari; Winge, Per; Sparstad, Torfinn; Bones, Atle M; Vadstein, Olav; Kjørsvik, Elin; Olsen, Yngvar

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism of essentiality of dietary phospholipid (PL) for larval fish is not clear. The main objective of the present study was to determine if the PL requirement of Atlantic cod larvae was due to any genetic impairment caused by functional immaturity. Cod larvae were sampled at 1, 3, 8, 13, 17, 18, 30, 42 and 60 days post hatch (dph) for transcriptome analysis using a recently developed microarray. The fatty acid profile and gene expression levels of cod larvae at 17 dph were compared after feeding differently enriched rotifers, which contained different DHA levels in PL. No significant differences (p<0.05) were found for the two rotifer diets in the overall gene expression level of cod larvae, their growth and survival, and their DHA levels in total lipid and PL fraction. The fatty acid data suggested that dietary EPA was elongated to DPA by cod larvae, and a threshold DHA level in PL to maintain membrane fluidity and other functions may exist. There appeared to be no major effect of development on the expression of key genes of PL biosynthesis suggesting no genetic constrain in early developmental stages. Our overall data suggested that besides the possible limited de novo PC synthesis ability in the intestine, other metabolic constraints should also be considered, especially the possible low input of bile PC as a result of immature liver. Further studies are needed to elucidate the gene expression level and enzyme activity in the PL biosynthesis pathways for specific tissue or cells.

  2. A Novel Beta-Defensin Antimicrobial Peptide in Atlantic Cod with Stimulatory Effect on Phagocytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Jareeporn; Kitani, Yoichiro; Kiron, Viswanath; Lokesh, Jep; Brinchmann, Monica F.; Karlsen, Bård Ove; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2013-01-01

    A novel defensin antimicrobial peptide gene was identified in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. This three exon/two intron defensin gene codes for a peptide precursor consisting of two domains: a signal peptide of 26 amino acids and a mature peptide of 40 residues. The mature cod defensin has six conserved cysteine residues that form 1–5, 2–4 and 3–6 disulphide bridges. This pattern is typical of beta-defensins and this gene was therefore named cod beta-defensin (defb). The tertiary structure of Defb exhibits an α/β fold with one α helix and β1β2β3 sheets. RT-PCR analysis indicated that defb transcripts were present mainly in the swim bladder and peritoneum wall but could also be detected at moderate to low levels in skin, head- and excretory kidneys. In situ hybridisation revealed that defb was specifically expressed by cells located in the swim bladder submucosa and the oocytes. During embryonic development, defb gene transcripts were detectable from the golden eye stage onwards and their expression was restricted to the swim bladder and retina. Defb was differentially expressed in several tissues following antigenic challenge with Vibrio anguillarum, being up-regulated up to 25-fold in head kidney. Recombinant Defb displayed antibacterial activity, with a minimal inhibitory concentration of 0.4–0.8 µM and 25–50 µM against the Gram-(+) bacteria Planococcus citreus and Micrococcus luteus, respectively. In addition, Defb stimulated phagocytic activity of cod head kidney leucocytes in vitro. These findings imply that beta-defensins may play an important role in the innate immune response of Atlantic cod. PMID:23638029

  3. Mitochondrial cytochrome B DNA variation in the high-fecundity atlantic cod: trans-atlantic clines and shallow gene genealogy.

    PubMed Central

    Arnason, Einar

    2004-01-01

    An analysis of sequence variation of 250 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene of 1278 Atlantic cod Gadus morhua ranging from Newfoundland to the Baltic shows four high-frequency (>8%) haplotypes and a number of rare and singleton haplotypes. Variation is primarily synonymous mutations. Natural selection acting directly on these variants is either absent or very weak. Common haplotypes show regular trans-Atlantic clines in frequencies and each of them reaches its highest frequency in a particular country. A shallow multifurcating constellation gene genealogy implies young age and recent turnover of polymorphism. Haplotypes characterizing populations at opposite ends of the geographic distribution in Newfoundland and the Baltic are mutationally closest together. The haplotypes are young and have risen rapidly in frequency. Observed differentiation among countries is due primarily to clinal variation. Hypotheses of historical isolation and polymorphisms balanced by local selection and gene flow are unlikely. Instead the results are explained by demic selection of mitochondria carried by highly fit females winning reproductive sweepstakes. By inference the Atlantic cod, a very high-fecundity vertebrate, is characterized by a high variance of offspring number and strong natural selection that leads to very low effective to actual population sizes. PMID:15126405

  4. Preferred temperature of juvenile Atlantic cod Gadus morhua with different haemoglobin genotypes at normoxia and moderate hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Maria Faldborg; Steffensen, John Fleng

    2003-01-01

    Atlantic cod Gadus morhua has polymorphic haemoglobin, which can be separated into two homozygous types, HbI-1 and HbI-2, and one heterozygous type HbI-1/2. The geographical distribution of Atlantic cod with the different haemoglobin types varies, with the HbI(2) allele occurring at high frequency in northern regions, and the HbI(1) allele dominant in warmer areas. To determine if temperature is a selective parameter in the distribution of the haemoglobin types, the preferred temperature of the homozygous genotypes HbI-1 and HbI-2 was measured. We found that HbI-2 cod preferred a temperature of 8.2+/-1.5 degrees C while HbI-1 cod preferred 15.4+/-1.1 degrees C, and this preference was significant. The effect of hypoxia (35% oxygen saturation) on the preferred temperature was also measured. Previous studies showed that the preferred temperature of fish decreases during hypoxia, and this was the case for HbI-1 cod, which preferred 9.8+/-1.8 degrees C during hypoxia, whereas HbI-2 cod did not show this effect. The results indicate that environmental temperature changes will lead to a distributional change in the different haemoglobin types of Atlantic cod, global warming providing an advantage for HbI-1 cod. However, since HbI-1 cod prefer a low temperature under hypoxic conditions, a combination of increased water temperature and hypoxia could be unfavourable for Atlantic cod stocks.

  5. An integrated approach to gene discovery and marker development in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Bowman, Sharen; Hubert, Sophie; Higgins, Brent; Stone, Cynthia; Kimball, Jennifer; Borza, Tudor; Bussey, Jillian Tarrant; Simpson, Gary; Kozera, Catherine; Curtis, Bruce A; Hall, Jennifer R; Hori, Tiago S; Feng, Charles Y; Rise, Marlies; Booman, Marije; Gamperl, A Kurt; Trippel, Edward; Symonds, Jane; Johnson, Stewart C; Rise, Matthew L

    2011-04-01

    Atlantic cod is a species that has been overexploited by the capture fishery. Programs to domesticate this species are underway in several countries, including Canada, to provide an alternative route for production. Selective breeding programs have been successfully applied in the domestication of other species, with genomics-based approaches used to augment conventional methods of animal production in recent years. Genomics tools, such as gene sequences and sets of variable markers, also have the potential to enhance and accelerate selective breeding programs in aquaculture, and to provide better monitoring tools to ensure that wild cod populations are well managed. We describe the generation of significant genomics resources for Atlantic cod through an integrated genomics/selective breeding approach. These include 158,877 expressed sequence tags (ESTs), a set of annotated putative transcripts and several thousand single nucleotide polymorphism markers that were developed from, and have been shown to be highly variable in, fish enrolled in two selective breeding programs. Our EST collection was generated from various tissues and life cycle stages. In some cases, tissues from which libraries were generated were isolated from fish exposed to stressors, including elevated temperature, or antigen stimulation (bacterial and viral) to enrich for transcripts that are involved in these response pathways. The genomics resources described here support the developing aquaculture industry, enabling the application of molecular markers within selective breeding programs. Marker sets should also find widespread application in fisheries management.

  6. Abstracting the Pacific Ocean's Impact on North Atlantic Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghmous, J.; Le, M.; Liess, S.; Mesquita, M.; Kumar, V.

    2012-12-01

    The warming anomalies of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) along the near- equatorial Pacific Ocean (ENSO) have well documented global long-range weather teleconnections from rainfall in southern India to mudslides in the western United States. In this work, we focus on ENSO's teleconnections with North Atlantic tropical cyclone (TC) activity. Traditionally, ENSO's impact on Atlantic TCs has been abstracted by monitoring the warming of static regions along the equatorial Pacific Ocean. We propose that the spatial distribution of Pacific Ocean warming might provide better predictive insights into ENSO-Atlantic TC impact than warming anomalies alone. We present a distance-based ENSO index (S-ENSO for spatial ENSO) that tracks the location of the maximum near-tropical Pacific warming anomaly instead the absolute warming of a static region. Our spatial ENSO index correlates better with seasonal TC activity than standard ENSO indices, especially with increased lead times.

  7. Physiological and Behavioural Responses to Noxious Stimuli in the Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua)

    PubMed Central

    Eckroth, Jared R.; Aas-Hansen, Øyvind; Sneddon, Lynne U.; Bichão, Helena; Døving, Kjell B.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, our aim was to compare physiological and behavioural responses to different noxious stimuli to those of a standardized innocuous stimulus, to possibly identify aversive responses indicative of injury detection in a commercially important marine teleost fish, the Atlantic cod. Individual fish were administered with a noxious stimulus to the lip under short-term general anaesthesia (MS-222). The noxious treatments included injection of 0.1% or 2% acetic acid, 0.005% or 0.1% capsaicin, or piercing the lip with a commercial fishing hook. Counts of opercular beat rate (OBR) at 10, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min and observations of behaviour at 30 and 90 min post-treatment were compared with pre-treatment values and with control fish injected with physiological saline, an innocuous stimulus. Circulatory levels of physiological stress indicators were determined in all fish at 120 minutes post-treatment. All treatments evoked temporarily increased OBR that returned to pre-treatment levels at 60 minutes (saline, 0.005% capsaicin, hook), 90 minutes (0.1% acetic acid, 0.1% capsaicin), or 120 minutes (2% acetic acid), but with no significant differences from the control group at any time point. Fish treated with 0.1% and 2% acetic acid and 0.1% capsaicin displayed increased hovering close to the bottom of the aquaria and fish given 2% acetic acid and 0.1% capsaicin also displayed a reduced use of shelter. The only effect seen in hooked fish was brief episodes of lateral head shaking which were not seen pre-treatment or in the other groups, possibly reflecting a resiliency to tissue damage in the mouth area related to the tough nature of the Atlantic cod diet. There were no differences between groups in circulatory stress indicators two hours after treatment. This study provides novel data on behavioural indicators that could be used to assess potentially aversive events in Atlantic cod. PMID:24936652

  8. Transcriptome profiling of the antiviral immune response in Atlantic cod macrophages.

    PubMed

    Eslamloo, Khalil; Xue, Xi; Booman, Marije; Smith, Nicole C; Rise, Matthew L

    2016-10-01

    A study was conducted to determine the transcriptome response of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) macrophages to the viral mimic, polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC), using a 20K Atlantic cod microarray platform and qPCR. We identified 285 significantly up-regulated and 161 significantly down-regulated probes in cod macrophages 24 h after pIC stimulation. A subset of 26 microarray-identified transcripts was subjected to qPCR validation using samples treated with pIC or phosphate-buffered saline (control) over time (3, 6, 12, 24, 48 h), and 77% of them showed a significant response to pIC. The microarray and qPCR analyses in this study showed that pIC induced the expression of cod macrophage transcripts involved in RLR- and TLR-dependent pathogen recognition (e.g. tlr3, tlr7, mda5 and lgp2), as well as signal transducers (e.g. stat1 and nfkbia) and transcription activators (e.g. irf7 and irf10) in the MyD88-independent and dependent signalling pathways. Several immune effectors (e.g. isg15s, viperin, herc4, mip2 and ccl13) were significantly up-regulated in pIC-stimulated cod macrophages. The expression of some transcripts (e.g. irf7, irf10, viperin) was significantly up-regulated by pIC as early as 12 h. All pIC-induced transcripts had peak expression at either 24 h (e.g. tlr7, irf7, mip2) or 48 h (e.g. tlr3, lgp2, stat1). This study suggests possible roles of both vertebrate-conserved (e.g. tlr3 as an up-regulated gene) and fish-specific (tlr22g as a down-regulated gene) receptors in dsRNA recognition, and the importance of conserved and potentially fish-specific interferon stimulated genes in cod macrophages.

  9. Bacterial composition and succession during storage of North-Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) at superchilled temperatures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The bacteriology during storage of the North-Atlantic cod has been investigated for the past decades using conventional cultivation strategies which have generated large amount of information. This paper presents a study where both conventional cultivation and cultivation independent approaches were used to investigate the bacterial succession during storage of cod loins at chilled and superchilled temperatures. Results Unbrined (0.4% NaCl) and brined (2.5% NaCl) cod loins were stored at chilled (0°C) and superchilled (-2 and -3.6°C) temperatures in air or modified atmosphere (MA, % CO2/O2/N2: 49.0 ± 0.6/7.4 ± 0.2/43.7 ± 0.4). Discrepancy was observed between cultivation enumeration and culture independent methods where the former showed a general dominance of Pseudomonas spp. (up to 59%) while the latter showed a dominance of Photobacterium phosphoreum (up to 100%). Gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry (GC-MC) showed that trimethylamine was the most abundant volatile in mid- and late storage periods. Terminal restriction polymorphism (t-RFLP) analysis showed that the relative abundance of P. phosphoreum increased with storage time. Conclusion The present study shows the bacteriological developments on lightly salted or non-salted cod loins during storage at superchilled temperatures. It furthermore confirms the importance of P. phosphoreum as a spoilage organism during storage of cod loins at low temperatures using molecular techniques. The methods used compensate each other, giving more detailed data on bacterial population developments during spoilage. PMID:19961579

  10. Recombinant cold-adapted trypsin I from Atlantic cod-expression, purification, and identification.

    PubMed

    Jónsdóttir, Gudrún; Bjarnason, Jón Bragi; Gudmundsdóttir, Agústa

    2004-01-01

    Atlantic cod trypsin I is a cold-adapted proteolytic enzyme exhibiting approximately 20 times higher catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM) than its mesophilic bovine counterpart for the simple amide substrate BAPNA. In general, cold-adapted proteolytic enzymes are sensitive to autolytic degradation, thermal inactivation as well as molecular aggregation, even at temperatures as low as 18-25 degrees C which may explain the problems observed with their expression, activation, and purification. Prior to the data presented here, there have been no reports in the literature on the expression of psychrophilic or cold-adapted proteolytic enzymes from fish. Nevertheless, numerous cold-adapted proteolytic microbial enzymes have been successfully expressed in bacteria and yeast. This report describes successful expression, activation, and purification of the recombinant cod trypsin I in the His-Patch ThioFusion Escherichia coli expression system. The E. coli pThioHis expression vector used in the study enabled the formation of a fusion protein between a highly soluble fraction of HP-thioredoxin contained in the vector and the N-terminal end of the precursor form of cod trypsin I. The HP-thioredoxin part of the fusion protein binds to a metal-chelating ProBond column, which facilitated its purification. The cod trypsin I part of the purified fusion protein was released by proteolytic cleavage, resulting in concomitant activation of the recombinant enzyme. The recombinant cod trypsin I was purified to homogeneity on a trypsin-specific benzamidine affinity column. The identity of the recombinant enzyme was demonstrated by electrophoresis and chromatography.

  11. Ubiquitous presence of piscidin-1 in Atlantic cod as evidenced by immunolocalisation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), the natural antibiotics bestowed upon all forms of life, consist of small molecular weight proteins with a broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against a variety of pathogenic microorganisms. Piscidins are one of the AMP families that are imperative for the innate defence mechanisms of teleosts. Atlantic cod, a basal fish belonging to the superorder Paracanthopterygii also possesses multiple piscidin peptides. Two piscidin paralogues (pis1 and pis2) and a novel alternative splice variant of pis2 of this fish were previously described by us. To shed light on other potent roles of these molecules, now we have mapped the distribution of piscidin 1 (Pis1), in different tissues and organs of cod through immunohistochemistry (IHC) employing an affinity purified polyclonal antibody specific to Pis1. Results Various cell types and tissues of Atlantic cod including those from the immune organs of naïve fish are armed with Pis1 peptide. Different types of the blood leucocytes and phagocytic cells among the leucocytes examined gave a relatively strong indication of Pis1 immunopositivity. In addition, other cell types such as hematopoietic cells, epithelial cells and multi-granular cells located in the mucosal and hematopoietic tissues were also Pis1-immunoreactive. More interestingly, chondrocytes appear to produce Pis1 and this is the first report on the presence of an AMP in cartilage tissue of fish. Furthermore, Pis1 immunopositivity was detected in other tissues and organs of naïve fish including neural tissues, exocrine and endocrine glands, compound gland cells, excretory kidney, intestinal and respiratory epithelial cells, swim bladder, skin and hypodermis layer, myosepta, liver, heart, eye and oocytes. Conclusions Pis1 peptide is produced by various cell types located in different tissues and organs of Atlantic cod. It is present in all immune-related organs of naïve fish and the elevated peptide expression following

  12. Haemoglobin polymorphisms affect the oxygen-binding properties in Atlantic cod populations.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Oivind; Wetten, Ola Frang; De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Andre, Carl; Carelli Alinovi, Cristiana; Colafranceschi, Mauro; Brix, Ole; Colosimo, Alfredo

    2009-03-01

    A major challenge in evolutionary biology is to identify the genes underlying adaptation. The oxygen-transporting haemoglobins directly link external conditions with metabolic needs and therefore represent a unique system for studying environmental effects on molecular evolution. We have discovered two haemoglobin polymorphisms in Atlantic cod populations inhabiting varying temperature and oxygen regimes in the North Atlantic. Three-dimensional modelling of the tetrameric haemoglobin structure demonstrated that the two amino acid replacements Met55beta1Val and Lys62beta1Ala are located at crucial positions of the alpha1beta1 subunit interface and haem pocket, respectively. The replacements are proposed to affect the oxygen-binding properties by modifying the haemoglobin quaternary structure and electrostatic feature. Intriguingly, the same molecular mechanism for facilitating oxygen binding is found in avian species adapted to high altitudes, illustrating convergent evolution in water- and air-breathing vertebrates to reduction in environmental oxygen availability. Cod populations inhabiting the cold Arctic waters and the low-oxygen Baltic Sea seem well adapted to these conditions by possessing the high oxygen affinity Val55-Ala62 haplotype, while the temperature-insensitive Met55-Lys62 haplotype predominates in the southern populations. The distinct distributions of the functionally different haemoglobin variants indicate that the present biogeography of this ecologically and economically important species might be seriously affected by global warming.

  13. Haemoglobin polymorphisms affect the oxygen-binding properties in Atlantic cod populations

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Øivind; Wetten, Ola Frang; De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Andre, Carl; Carelli Alinovi, Cristiana; Colafranceschi, Mauro; Brix, Ole; Colosimo, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    A major challenge in evolutionary biology is to identify the genes underlying adaptation. The oxygen-transporting haemoglobins directly link external conditions with metabolic needs and therefore represent a unique system for studying environmental effects on molecular evolution. We have discovered two haemoglobin polymorphisms in Atlantic cod populations inhabiting varying temperature and oxygen regimes in the North Atlantic. Three-dimensional modelling of the tetrameric haemoglobin structure demonstrated that the two amino acid replacements Met55β1Val and Lys62β1Ala are located at crucial positions of the α1β1 subunit interface and haem pocket, respectively. The replacements are proposed to affect the oxygen-binding properties by modifying the haemoglobin quaternary structure and electrostatic feature. Intriguingly, the same molecular mechanism for facilitating oxygen binding is found in avian species adapted to high altitudes, illustrating convergent evolution in water- and air-breathing vertebrates to reduction in environmental oxygen availability. Cod populations inhabiting the cold Arctic waters and the low-oxygen Baltic Sea seem well adapted to these conditions by possessing the high oxygen affinity Val55–Ala62 haplotype, while the temperature-insensitive Met55–Lys62 haplotype predominates in the southern populations. The distinct distributions of the functionally different haemoglobin variants indicate that the present biogeography of this ecologically and economically important species might be seriously affected by global warming. PMID:19033139

  14. Substantial Downregulation of Myogenic Transcripts in Skeletal Muscle of Atlantic Cod during the Spawning Period

    PubMed Central

    Edvardsen, Vigdis

    2016-01-01

    Gonadal maturation is an extremely energy consuming process for batch spawners and it is associated with a significant decrease in growth and seasonal deterioration in flesh quality. Our knowledge about the molecular mechanisms linking sexual maturation and muscle growth is still limited. In the present study, we performed RNA-Seq using 454 GS-FLX pyrosequencing in fast skeletal muscle sampled from two-year-old Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) at representative time points throughout the reproductive cycle (August, March and May). In total, 126,937 good quality reads were obtained, with 546 nucleotide length and 52% GC content on average. RNA-Seq analysis using the CLC Genomics Workbench with the Atlantic cod reference UniGene cDNA data revealed 59,581 (46.9%) uniquely annotated reads. Pairwise comparison for expression levels identified 153 differentially expressed UniGenes between time points. Notably, we found a significant suppression of myh13 and myofibrillar gene isoforms in fast skeletal muscle during the spawning season. This study uncovered a large number of differentially expressed genes that may be influenced by gonadal maturation, thus representing a significant contribution to our limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating muscle wasting and regeneration in batch spawners during their reproductive cycle. PMID:26844771

  15. The immune response of juvenile Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) to chronic exposure to produced water.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Casanova, Juan C; Hamoutene, Dounia; Samuelson, Stephanie; Burt, Kimberly; King, Thomas L; Lee, Kenneth

    2010-07-01

    Produced water (PW) is the main discharge from the offshore oil industry and contains oil-derived compounds such as poly-aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, alkylphenols, and heavy metals. Studies suggest that PW discharges may affect the biota over larger areas from the oil drilling sites at sea than originally predicted. We investigated the effects of chronic exposure to PW on some aspects of juvenile Atlantic cod immunity, stress response and growth by intermittently exposing fish to 0, 100 or 200 ppm of PW for 22 weeks. No significant effects of PW were observed on growth, hepatosomatic index, condition factor or plasma cortisol. The respiratory burst (RB) of circulating leukocytes was significantly elevated in the 100 ppm group only, while the RB of head-kidney leukocytes was significantly decreased in both the 100 and 200 ppm groups. Significant up-regulation of the mRNA expression of beta-2-microglobulin, immunoglobulin-M light chain and interleukins-1beta and -8 was observed in the 200 ppm group, while the down-regulation of interferon stimulated gene 15 was obvious for both the 100 and 200 ppm groups. The results suggest that chronic exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of PW causes modulations of the immune system of juvenile Atlantic cod with most immune parameters being stimulated, potentially resulting in an energetic cost that may be detrimental to the fish.

  16. The immune response of juvenile Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) to chronic exposure to produced water.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Casanova, Juan C; Hamoutene, Dounia; Samuelson, Stephanie; Burt, Kimberly; King, Thomas L; Lee, Kenneth

    2010-07-01

    Produced water (PW) is the main discharge from the offshore oil industry and contains oil-derived compounds such as poly-aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, alkylphenols, and heavy metals. Studies suggest that PW discharges may affect the biota over larger areas from the oil drilling sites at sea than originally predicted. We investigated the effects of chronic exposure to PW on some aspects of juvenile Atlantic cod immunity, stress response and growth by intermittently exposing fish to 0, 100 or 200 ppm of PW for 22 weeks. No significant effects of PW were observed on growth, hepatosomatic index, condition factor or plasma cortisol. The respiratory burst (RB) of circulating leukocytes was significantly elevated in the 100 ppm group only, while the RB of head-kidney leukocytes was significantly decreased in both the 100 and 200 ppm groups. Significant up-regulation of the mRNA expression of beta-2-microglobulin, immunoglobulin-M light chain and interleukins-1beta and -8 was observed in the 200 ppm group, while the down-regulation of interferon stimulated gene 15 was obvious for both the 100 and 200 ppm groups. The results suggest that chronic exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of PW causes modulations of the immune system of juvenile Atlantic cod with most immune parameters being stimulated, potentially resulting in an energetic cost that may be detrimental to the fish. PMID:20338632

  17. Two adjacent inversions maintain genomic differentiation between migratory and stationary ecotypes of Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Kirubakaran, Tina Graceline; Grove, Harald; Kent, Matthew P; Sandve, Simen R; Baranski, Matthew; Nome, Torfinn; De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Righino, Benedetta; Johansen, Torild; Otterå, Håkon; Sonesson, Anna; Lien, Sigbjørn; Andersen, Øivind

    2016-05-01

    Atlantic cod is composed of multiple migratory and stationary populations widely distributed in the North Atlantic Ocean. The Northeast Arctic cod (NEAC) population in the Barents Sea undertakes annual spawning migrations to the northern Norwegian coast. Although spawning occurs sympatrically with the stationary Norwegian coastal cod (NCC), phenotypic and genetic differences between NEAC and NCC are maintained. In this study, we resolve the enigma by revealing the mechanisms underlying these differences. Extended linkage disequilibrium (LD) and population divergence were demonstrated in a 17.4-Mb region on linkage group 1 (LG1) based on genotypes of 494 SNPs from 192 parents of farmed families of NEAC, NCC or NEACxNCC crosses. Linkage analyses revealed two adjacent inversions within this region that repress meiotic recombination in NEACxNCC crosses. We identified a NEAC-specific haplotype consisting of 186 SNPs that was fixed in NEAC sampled from the Barents Sea, but segregating under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in eight NCC stocks. Comparative genomic analyses determine the NEAC configuration of the inversions to be the derived state and date it to ~1.6-2.0 Mya. The haplotype block harbours 763 genes, including candidates regulating swim bladder pressure, haem synthesis and skeletal muscle organization conferring adaptation to long-distance migrations and vertical movements down to large depths. Our results suggest that the migratory ecotype experiences strong directional selection for the two adjacent inversions on LG1. Despite interbreeding between NEAC and NCC, the inversions are maintaining genetic differentiation, and we hypothesize the co-occurrence of multiple adaptive alleles forming a 'supergene' in the NEAC population.

  18. Two adjacent inversions maintain genomic differentiation between migratory and stationary ecotypes of Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Kirubakaran, Tina Graceline; Grove, Harald; Kent, Matthew P; Sandve, Simen R; Baranski, Matthew; Nome, Torfinn; De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Righino, Benedetta; Johansen, Torild; Otterå, Håkon; Sonesson, Anna; Lien, Sigbjørn; Andersen, Øivind

    2016-05-01

    Atlantic cod is composed of multiple migratory and stationary populations widely distributed in the North Atlantic Ocean. The Northeast Arctic cod (NEAC) population in the Barents Sea undertakes annual spawning migrations to the northern Norwegian coast. Although spawning occurs sympatrically with the stationary Norwegian coastal cod (NCC), phenotypic and genetic differences between NEAC and NCC are maintained. In this study, we resolve the enigma by revealing the mechanisms underlying these differences. Extended linkage disequilibrium (LD) and population divergence were demonstrated in a 17.4-Mb region on linkage group 1 (LG1) based on genotypes of 494 SNPs from 192 parents of farmed families of NEAC, NCC or NEACxNCC crosses. Linkage analyses revealed two adjacent inversions within this region that repress meiotic recombination in NEACxNCC crosses. We identified a NEAC-specific haplotype consisting of 186 SNPs that was fixed in NEAC sampled from the Barents Sea, but segregating under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in eight NCC stocks. Comparative genomic analyses determine the NEAC configuration of the inversions to be the derived state and date it to ~1.6-2.0 Mya. The haplotype block harbours 763 genes, including candidates regulating swim bladder pressure, haem synthesis and skeletal muscle organization conferring adaptation to long-distance migrations and vertical movements down to large depths. Our results suggest that the migratory ecotype experiences strong directional selection for the two adjacent inversions on LG1. Despite interbreeding between NEAC and NCC, the inversions are maintaining genetic differentiation, and we hypothesize the co-occurrence of multiple adaptive alleles forming a 'supergene' in the NEAC population. PMID:26923504

  19. Constant proportion harvest policies: dynamic implications in the Pacific halibut and Atlantic cod fisheries.

    PubMed

    Yakubu, Abdul-Aziz; Li, Nianpeng; Conrad, Jon M; Zeeman, Mary-Lou

    2011-07-01

    Overfishing, pollution and other environmental factors have greatly reduced commercially valuable stocks of fish. In a 2006 Science article, a group of ecologists and economists warned that the world may run out of seafood from natural stocks if overfishing continues at current rates. In this paper, we explore the interaction between a constant proportion harvest policy and recruitment dynamics. We examine the discrete-time constant proportion harvest policy discussed in Ang et al. (2009) and then expand the framework to include stock-recruitment functions that are compensatory and overcompensatory, both with and without the Allee effect. We focus on constant proportion policies (CPPs). CPPs have the potential to stabilize complex overcompensatory stock dynamics, with or without the Allee effect, provided the rates of harvest stay below a threshold. If that threshold is exceeded, CPPs are known to result in the sudden collapse of a fish stock when stock recruitment exhibits the Allee effect. In case studies, we analyze CPPs as they might be applied to Gulf of Alaska Pacific halibut fishery and the Georges Bank Atlantic cod fishery based on harvest rates from 1975 to 2007. The best fit models suggest that, under high fishing mortalities, the halibut fishery is vulnerable to sudden population collapse while the cod fishery is vulnerable to steady decline to zero. The models also suggest that CPP with mean harvesting levels from the last 30 years can be effective at preventing collapse in the halibut fishery, but these same policies would lead to steady decline to zero in the Atlantic cod fishery. We observe that the likelihood of collapse in both fisheries increases with increased stochasticity (for example, weather variability) as predicted by models of global climate change.

  20. Horizontal transmission of nervous necrosis virus between turbot Scophthalmus maximus and Atlantic cod Gadus morhua using cohabitation challenge.

    PubMed

    Korsnes, Kjetil; Karlsbakk, Egil; Nylund, Are; Nerland, Audun Helge

    2012-05-15

    Experimental horizontal transmission of nervous necrosis virus (NNV) originating from halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus was studied through cohabitation of intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected fish with uninfected fish for 125 d. The experimental groups consisted of i.p. injected turbot Scophthalmus maximus or i.p. injected Atlantic salmon Salmo salar with turbot, salmon or Atlantic cod Gadus morhua cohabitants. The initial weights were cod 10 g, salmon 40 g and turbot 3 g. NNV was detected in brain, eye and spleen by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) in cod cohabitated with i.p. injected turbot after 90 and 125 d, suggesting NNV infection was transmitted horizontally from the turbot to cod. NNV was not detected in salmon that were cohabitated with i.p. challenged turbot or salmon. This study shows that NNV strains belonging to the Barfin Flounder Nervous Necrosis Virus (BFNNV) clade may be transmitted from halibut to cod via water. Hence there is a potential risk of horizontal transmission of the virus from farmed halibut to farmed and wild cod. The lack of detection of NNV in cohabitant salmon suggests that this fish species is less susceptible than cod, or not susceptible, to horizontal NNV transmission. This result might be influenced by the size of salmon, viral load in i.p. injected cohabitants or insufficient duration of the experiment.

  1. Development of a SNP resource and a genetic linkage map for Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is a species with increasing economic significance for the aquaculture industry. The genetic improvement of cod will play a critical role in achieving successful large-scale aquaculture. While many microsatellite markers have been developed in cod, the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is currently limited. Here we report the identification of SNPs from sequence data generated by a large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST) program, focusing on fish originating from Canadian waters. Results A total of 97976 ESTs were assembled to generate 13448 contigs. We detected 4753 SNPs that met our selection criteria (depth of coverage ≥ 4 reads; minor allele frequency > 25%). 3072 SNPs were selected for testing. The percentage of successful assays was 75%, with 2291 SNPs amplifying correctly. Of these, 607 (26%) SNPs were monomorphic for all populations tested. In total, 64 (4%) of SNPs are likely to represent duplicated genes or highly similar members of gene families, rather than alternative alleles of the same gene, since they showed a high frequency of heterozygosity. The remaining polymorphic SNPs (1620) were categorised as validated SNPs. The mean minor allele frequency of the validated loci was 0.258 (± 0.141). Of the 1514 contigs from which validated SNPs were selected, 31% have a significant blast hit. For the SNPs predicted to occur in coding regions (141), we determined that 36% (51) are non-synonymous. Many loci (1033 SNPs; 64%) are polymorphic in all populations tested. However a small number of SNPs (184) that are polymorphic in the Western Atlantic were monomorphic in fish tested from three European populations. A preliminary linkage map has been constructed with 23 major linkage groups and 924 mapped SNPs. Conclusions These SNPs represent powerful tools to accelerate the genetic improvement of cod aquaculture. They have been used to build a genetic linkage map that can be applied to quantitative trait

  2. Effects of North Sea oil and alkylphenols on biomarker responses in juvenile Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Sturve, Joachim; Hasselberg, Linda; Fälth, Herman; Celander, Malin; Förlin, Lars

    2006-06-01

    A consequence of oil drilling at sea is the release of produced water contaminated with e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and alkylphenols. In the present study, juvenile Atlantic cod were exposed to North Sea oil, nonylphenol and a combination of the North Sea oil and an alkylphenol mixture in a flow-through system. A suite of hepatic biomarkers were analysed. Exposure to North Sea oil resulted in strong induction of CYP1A protein levels and EROD activities. Exposure to nonylphenol, on the other hand, resulted in decreased CYP1A levels and EROD activities. Thus, nonylphenol appears to down-regulate CYP1A expression in Atlantic cod. Combined exposure to North Sea oil with an alkylphenol mixture resulted in lower EROD induction, compared to that in fish exposed to North Sea oil alone. This difference was not statistically significant, but still we believe that the alkylphenols have inhibited CYP1A activities in the fish which may have compromised CYP1A mediated metabolism of other xenobiotics, including PAH. CYP3A protein levels were lower, compared to controls, in fish exposed to nonylphenol and the combination of North Sea oil and alkylphenol mixture. In contrast, the oil alone had no effect on CYP3A protein content. North Sea oil exposure, alone or in combination with alkylphenols, caused oxidative stress observed as elevated levels of GSSG content and GR and CAT activities. Interestingly, exposure to nonylphenol resulted in a marked depletion of total glutathione levels. This apparent depletion may be a consequence of increased conjugation of glutathione to nonylphenol followed by excretion. An increase in conjugation enzyme GST activity was observed in the nonylphenol exposed group, although the difference was not significant. No sign of oxidative damage, measured as lipid peroxidation, was observed in any of the exposures experiments. This study suggests that North Sea oil may lead to oxidative stress and altered CYP1A and CYP3A expression

  3. Residency, site fidelity and habitat use of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) at an offshore wind farm using acoustic telemetry.

    PubMed

    Reubens, Jan T; Pasotti, Francesca; Degraer, Steven; Vincx, Magda

    2013-09-01

    Because offshore wind energy development is fast growing in Europe it is important to investigate the changes in the marine environment and how these may influence local biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. One of the species affected by these ecosystem changes is Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), a heavily exploited, commercially important fish species. In this research we investigated the residency, site fidelity and habitat use of Atlantic cod on a temporal scale at windmill artificial reefs in the Belgian part of the North Sea. Acoustic telemetry was used and the Vemco VR2W position system was deployed to quantify the movement behaviour. In total, 22 Atlantic cod were tagged and monitored for up to one year. Many fish were present near the artificial reefs during summer and autumn, and demonstrated strong residency and high individual detection rates. When present within the study area, Atlantic cod also showed distinct habitat selectivity. We identified aggregation near the artificial hard substrates of the wind turbines. In addition, a clear seasonal pattern in presence was observed. The high number of fish present in summer and autumn alternated with a period of very low densities during the winter period. PMID:23937893

  4. Residency, site fidelity and habitat use of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) at an offshore wind farm using acoustic telemetry.

    PubMed

    Reubens, Jan T; Pasotti, Francesca; Degraer, Steven; Vincx, Magda

    2013-09-01

    Because offshore wind energy development is fast growing in Europe it is important to investigate the changes in the marine environment and how these may influence local biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. One of the species affected by these ecosystem changes is Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), a heavily exploited, commercially important fish species. In this research we investigated the residency, site fidelity and habitat use of Atlantic cod on a temporal scale at windmill artificial reefs in the Belgian part of the North Sea. Acoustic telemetry was used and the Vemco VR2W position system was deployed to quantify the movement behaviour. In total, 22 Atlantic cod were tagged and monitored for up to one year. Many fish were present near the artificial reefs during summer and autumn, and demonstrated strong residency and high individual detection rates. When present within the study area, Atlantic cod also showed distinct habitat selectivity. We identified aggregation near the artificial hard substrates of the wind turbines. In addition, a clear seasonal pattern in presence was observed. The high number of fish present in summer and autumn alternated with a period of very low densities during the winter period.

  5. Composition and structure of the parasite faunas of cod, Gadus morhua L. (Teleostei: Gadidae), in the North East Atlantic

    PubMed Central

    Perdiguero-Alonso, Diana; Montero, Francisco E; Raga, Juan Antonio; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2008-01-01

    Background Although numerous studies on parasites of the Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L. have been conducted in the North Atlantic, comparative analyses on local cod parasite faunas are virtually lacking. The present study is based on examination of large samples of cod from six geographical areas of the North East Atlantic which yielded abundant baseline data on parasite distribution and abundance. Materials and Methods A total of 826 fish was sampled in the Baltic, Celtic, Irish and North seas, Icelandic waters and Trondheimsfjord (Norway) in 2002 (spring and autumn) and 2003 (spring). The gills and internal organs (oesophagus, stomach, intestine, pyloric caeca, liver, heart, spleen, gall bladder and gonads) were examined for macroparasites following a standardised protocol. The taxonomic consistency of the identification was ensured thorough the entire study. Results We discuss some problems in parasite identification, outline the composition of the parasite faunas in cod in the six North East Atlantic regions, provide novel data on parasite prevalence and abundance and a comparative assessment of the structure of the regional parasite faunas with respect to the higher-level taxonomic groupings, host specificity and zoogeographical distribution of the parasites. Altogether 57 different parasite forms were found including seven new host records (Diclidophora merlangi, Rhipidocotyle sp., Fellodistomum sp., Steringotrema sp., Cucullanus sp., Spinitectus sp., and Chondracanthus ornatus). The predominant groups of cod parasites were trematodes (19 species) and nematodes (13 species) including larval anisakids which comprised 58.2% of the total number of individuals. Conclusion Our study reveals relatively rich regional parasite faunas in cod from the North East Atlantic which are dominated by generalist parasites with Arcto-Boreal distribution. Further, it provides more detailed data on the distribution in the North East Atlantic of the majority of cod parasites which

  6. Parallel adaptive evolution of Atlantic cod on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean in response to temperature.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Ian R; Hubert, Sophie; Higgins, Brent; Borza, Tudor; Bowman, Sharen; Paterson, Ian G; Snelgrove, Paul V R; Morris, Corey J; Gregory, Robert S; Hardie, David C; Hutchings, Jeffrey A; Ruzzante, Daniel E; Taggart, Chris T; Bentzen, Paul

    2010-12-22

    Despite the enormous economic and ecological importance of marine organisms, the spatial scales of adaptation and biocomplexity remain largely unknown. Yet, the preservation of local stocks that possess adaptive diversity is critical to the long-term maintenance of productive stable fisheries and ecosystems. Here, we document genomic evidence of range-wide adaptive differentiation in a broadcast spawning marine fish, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), using a genome survey of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Of 1641 gene-associated polymorphisms examined, 70 (4.2%) tested positive for signatures of selection using a Bayesian approach. We identify a subset of these loci (n=40) for which allele frequencies show parallel temperature-associated clines (p<0.001, r2=0.89) in the eastern and western north Atlantic. Temperature associations were robust to the statistical removal of geographic distance or latitude effects, and contrasted 'neutral' loci, which displayed no temperature association. Allele frequencies at temperature-associated loci were significantly correlated, spanned three linkage groups and several were successfully annotated supporting the involvement of multiple independent genes. Our results are consistent with the evolution and/or selective sweep of multiple genes in response to ocean temperature, and support the possibility of a new conservation paradigm for non-model marine organisms based on genomic approaches to resolving functional and adaptive diversity.

  7. Spatial ecology of coastal Atlantic cod Gadus morhua associated with parasite load.

    PubMed

    Aalvik, I M; Moland, E; Olsen, E M; Stenseth, N C

    2015-08-01

    Acoustic tags and receivers were used to investigate the spatial ecology of coastal Atlantic cod Gadus morhua (n = 32, mean fork length: 50 cm, range: 33-80 cm) on the Norwegian Skagerrak coast in 2012. Monthly home ranges (HR), swimming activity and depth use varied considerably among individuals and through the months of June, July and August. HR sizes for the period ranged from 0.25 to 5.20 km2 (mean = 2.30 km2. Two thirds of the tagged G. morhua were infected with black spot disease Cryptocotyle lingua parasites; these fish had larger HRs and occupied deeper water compared with non-infected fish. The infected fish also tended to be more active in terms of horizontal swimming. From an ecological and evolutionary perspective, any environmental change that modifies G. morhua behaviour may therefore also alter the parasite load of the population, and its conservation and fishery status.

  8. Changes in qualitative composition of white muscle with nutritional status of Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, M A; Guderley, H

    1998-10-01

    Proteins from white muscle are mobilized to cover energy requirements during long-term starvation in fish. Using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we compared the soluble and insoluble fractions of white muscle proteins from fed and starved Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, to establish whether preferential preservation or degradation of specific proteins occurred during starvation. While starvation induced no qualitative changes in the electrophoretic pattern of the myofibrillar fraction, our results document differential decreases in the levels of soluble proteins during fasting. Moreover, immunoblot analysis using a monoclonal antibody directed against actin, showed a marked accumulation of this protein in the sarcoplasmic fraction of starved individuals, most likely due to myofibrillar degradation. PMID:9883575

  9. Recruitment Variability in North Atlantic Cod and Match-Mismatch Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Trond; Drinkwater, Kenneth F.; Lough, R. Gregory; Sundby, Svein

    2011-01-01

    Background Fisheries exploitation, habitat destruction, and climate are important drivers of variability in recruitment success. Understanding variability in recruitment can reveal mechanisms behind widespread decline in the abundance of key species in marine and terrestrial ecosystems. For fish populations, the match-mismatch theory hypothesizes that successful recruitment is a function of the timing and duration of larval fish abundance and prey availability. However, the underlying mechanisms of match-mismatch dynamics and the factors driving spatial differences between high and low recruitment remain poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We used empirical observations of larval fish abundance, a mechanistic individual-based model, and a reanalysis of ocean temperature data from 1960 to 2002 to estimate the survival of larval cod (Gadus morhua). From the model, we quantified how survival rates changed during the warmest and coldest years at four important cod spawning sites in the North Atlantic. The modeled difference in survival probability was not large for any given month between cold or warm years. However, the cumulative effect of higher growth rates and survival through the entire spawning season in warm years was substantial with 308%, 385%, 154%, and 175% increases in survival for Georges Bank, Iceland, North Sea, and Lofoten cod stocks, respectively. We also found that the importance of match-mismatch dynamics generally increased with latitude. Conclusions/Significance Our analyses indicate that a key factor for enhancing survival is the duration of the overlap between larval and prey abundance and not the actual timing of the peak abundance. During warm years, the duration of the overlap between larval fish and their prey is prolonged due to an early onset of the spring bloom. This prolonged season enhances cumulative growth and survival, leading to a greater number of large individuals with enhanced potential for survival to recruitment

  10. Climate warming causes life-history evolution in a model for Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Rebecca E.; Jørgensen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Climate change influences the marine environment, with ocean warming being the foremost driving factor governing changes in the physiology and ecology of fish. At the individual level, increasing temperature influences bioenergetics and numerous physiological and life-history processes, which have consequences for the population level and beyond. We provide a state-dependent energy allocation model that predicts temperature-induced adaptations for life histories and behaviour for the North-East Arctic stock (NEA) of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in response to climate warming. The key constraint is temperature-dependent respiratory physiology, and the model includes a number of trade-offs that reflect key physiological and ecological processes. Dynamic programming is used to find an evolutionarily optimal strategy of foraging and energy allocation that maximizes expected lifetime reproductive output given constraints from physiology and ecology. The optimal strategy is then simulated in a population, where survival, foraging behaviour, growth, maturation and reproduction emerge. Using current forcing, the model reproduces patterns of growth, size-at-age, maturation, gonad production and natural mortality for NEA cod. The predicted climate responses are positive for this stock; under a 2°C warming, the model predicted increased growth rates and a larger asymptotic size. Maturation age was unaffected, but gonad weight was predicted to more than double. Predictions for a wider range of temperatures, from 2 to 7°C, show that temperature responses were gradual; fish were predicted to grow faster and increase reproductive investment at higher temperatures. An emergent pattern of higher risk acceptance and increased foraging behaviour was also predicted. Our results provide important insight into the effects of climate warming on NEA cod by revealing the underlying mechanisms and drivers of change. We show how temperature-induced adaptations of behaviour and several life

  11. Harvest selection on Atlantic cod behavioral traits: implications for spatial management

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Esben Moland; Heupel, Michelle R; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; Moland, Even

    2012-01-01

    Harvesting wild populations may contrast or reinforce natural agents of selection and potentially cause evolutionary changes in life-history traits such as growth and maturation. Harvest selection may also act on behavioral traits, although this field of research has so far received less attention. We used acoustic tags and a network of receivers to monitor the behavior and fate of individual Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, N = 60) in their natural habitat on the Norwegian Skagerrak coast. Fish with a strong diel vertical migration, alternating between shallow- and deep-water habitats, had a higher risk of being captured in the fishery (traps, gillnet, hand line) as compared to fish that stayed in deeper water. There was also a significant negative correlation between fish size (30–66 cm) and the magnitude of diel vertical migration. Natural selection on behavior was less clear, but tended to favor fish with a large activity space. On a monthly time scale we found significant repeatabilities for cod behavior, meaning that individual characteristics tended to persist and therefore may be termed personality traits. We argue that an evolutionary approach to fisheries management should consider fish behavior. This would be of particular relevance for spatial management actions such as marine reserve design. PMID:22957161

  12. Harvest selection on Atlantic cod behavioral traits: implications for spatial management.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Esben Moland; Heupel, Michelle R; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; Moland, Even

    2012-07-01

    Harvesting wild populations may contrast or reinforce natural agents of selection and potentially cause evolutionary changes in life-history traits such as growth and maturation. Harvest selection may also act on behavioral traits, although this field of research has so far received less attention. We used acoustic tags and a network of receivers to monitor the behavior and fate of individual Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua, N = 60) in their natural habitat on the Norwegian Skagerrak coast. Fish with a strong diel vertical migration, alternating between shallow- and deep-water habitats, had a higher risk of being captured in the fishery (traps, gillnet, hand line) as compared to fish that stayed in deeper water. There was also a significant negative correlation between fish size (30-66 cm) and the magnitude of diel vertical migration. Natural selection on behavior was less clear, but tended to favor fish with a large activity space. On a monthly time scale we found significant repeatabilities for cod behavior, meaning that individual characteristics tended to persist and therefore may be termed personality traits. We argue that an evolutionary approach to fisheries management should consider fish behavior. This would be of particular relevance for spatial management actions such as marine reserve design.

  13. Ocean Acidification Effects on Atlantic Cod Larval Survival and Recruitment to the Fished Population.

    PubMed

    Stiasny, Martina H; Mittermayer, Felix H; Sswat, Michael; Voss, Rüdiger; Jutfelt, Fredrik; Chierici, Melissa; Puvanendran, Velmurugu; Mortensen, Atle; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Clemmesen, Catriona

    2016-01-01

    How fisheries will be impacted by climate change is far from understood. While some fish populations may be able to escape global warming via range shifts, they cannot escape ocean acidification (OA), an inevitable consequence of the dissolution of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in marine waters. How ocean acidification affects population dynamics of commercially important fish species is critical for adapting management practices of exploited fish populations. Ocean acidification has been shown to impair fish larvae's sensory abilities, affect the morphology of otoliths, cause tissue damage and cause behavioural changes. Here, we obtain first experimental mortality estimates for Atlantic cod larvae under OA and incorporate these effects into recruitment models. End-of-century levels of ocean acidification (~1100 μatm according to the IPCC RCP 8.5) resulted in a doubling of daily mortality rates compared to present-day CO2 concentrations during the first 25 days post hatching (dph), a critical phase for population recruitment. These results were consistent under different feeding regimes, stocking densities and in two cod populations (Western Baltic and Barents Sea stock). When mortality data were included into Ricker-type stock-recruitment models, recruitment was reduced to an average of 8 and 24% of current recruitment for the two populations, respectively. Our results highlight the importance of including vulnerable early life stages when addressing effects of climate change on fish stocks.

  14. Ocean Acidification Effects on Atlantic Cod Larval Survival and Recruitment to the Fished Population.

    PubMed

    Stiasny, Martina H; Mittermayer, Felix H; Sswat, Michael; Voss, Rüdiger; Jutfelt, Fredrik; Chierici, Melissa; Puvanendran, Velmurugu; Mortensen, Atle; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Clemmesen, Catriona

    2016-01-01

    How fisheries will be impacted by climate change is far from understood. While some fish populations may be able to escape global warming via range shifts, they cannot escape ocean acidification (OA), an inevitable consequence of the dissolution of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in marine waters. How ocean acidification affects population dynamics of commercially important fish species is critical for adapting management practices of exploited fish populations. Ocean acidification has been shown to impair fish larvae's sensory abilities, affect the morphology of otoliths, cause tissue damage and cause behavioural changes. Here, we obtain first experimental mortality estimates for Atlantic cod larvae under OA and incorporate these effects into recruitment models. End-of-century levels of ocean acidification (~1100 μatm according to the IPCC RCP 8.5) resulted in a doubling of daily mortality rates compared to present-day CO2 concentrations during the first 25 days post hatching (dph), a critical phase for population recruitment. These results were consistent under different feeding regimes, stocking densities and in two cod populations (Western Baltic and Barents Sea stock). When mortality data were included into Ricker-type stock-recruitment models, recruitment was reduced to an average of 8 and 24% of current recruitment for the two populations, respectively. Our results highlight the importance of including vulnerable early life stages when addressing effects of climate change on fish stocks. PMID:27551924

  15. Gender differences in health and aging of Atlantic cod subject to size selective fishery

    PubMed Central

    Carney Almroth, Bethanie; Sköld, Mattias; Nilsson Sköld, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Summary We have analyzed health and physiological aging parameters in male and female Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, captured in Kattegat, Skagerrak and in Öresund. Gender differences were clearly evident in a number of variables. Males had longer liver telomeres and higher catalase activities than females, while females had higher superoxide dismutase activity, liver somatic index and condition factor. Effects of age were found for males where levels of the antioxidant glutathione and telomere length declined with age, indicating physiological aging. Liver somatic index increased and percentage oxidized glutathione decreased with age. Between-site comparisons of males show that percentage oxidized glutathione and catalase were lowest in Kattegat, whereas protein carbonyls and condition factor were higher in Skagerrak. Females, on the other hand, showed no differences between sites or indications of somatic aging or age-related effects in egg quality, indicating that older and larger female cod are healthy and show no changes in eggs with age. In contrast, males showed indications of physiological aging and lower condition than females. The results emphasize the importance of conserving old mature fish, in particular high egg-productive females, when managing fisheries. PMID:23213487

  16. Ocean Acidification Effects on Atlantic Cod Larval Survival and Recruitment to the Fished Population

    PubMed Central

    Stiasny, Martina H.; Mittermayer, Felix H.; Sswat, Michael; Voss, Rüdiger; Jutfelt, Fredrik; Chierici, Melissa; Puvanendran, Velmurugu; Mortensen, Atle; Reusch, Thorsten B. H.; Clemmesen, Catriona

    2016-01-01

    How fisheries will be impacted by climate change is far from understood. While some fish populations may be able to escape global warming via range shifts, they cannot escape ocean acidification (OA), an inevitable consequence of the dissolution of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in marine waters. How ocean acidification affects population dynamics of commercially important fish species is critical for adapting management practices of exploited fish populations. Ocean acidification has been shown to impair fish larvae’s sensory abilities, affect the morphology of otoliths, cause tissue damage and cause behavioural changes. Here, we obtain first experimental mortality estimates for Atlantic cod larvae under OA and incorporate these effects into recruitment models. End-of-century levels of ocean acidification (~1100 μatm according to the IPCC RCP 8.5) resulted in a doubling of daily mortality rates compared to present-day CO2 concentrations during the first 25 days post hatching (dph), a critical phase for population recruitment. These results were consistent under different feeding regimes, stocking densities and in two cod populations (Western Baltic and Barents Sea stock). When mortality data were included into Ricker-type stock-recruitment models, recruitment was reduced to an average of 8 and 24% of current recruitment for the two populations, respectively. Our results highlight the importance of including vulnerable early life stages when addressing effects of climate change on fish stocks. PMID:27551924

  17. Chitosan as an edible invisible film for quality preservation of herring and atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Jeon, You-Jin; Kamil, Janak Y V A; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2002-08-28

    The effect of chitosan with different molecular weights as coatings for shelf-life extension of fresh fillets of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and herring (Clupea harengus) was evaluated over a 12-day storage at refrigerated temperature (4 +/- 1 degrees C). Three chitosan preparations from snow crab (Chinoecetes opilio) processing wastes, differing in viscosities and molecular weights, were prepared; their apparent viscosities (360, 57, and 14 cP) depended on the deacetylation time (4, 10, and 20 h, respectively) of the chitin precursor. Upon coating with chitosans, a significant (p < or = 0.05) reduction in relative moisture losses of 37, 29, 29, 40, and 32% was observed for cod samples coated with 360 cP chitosan after 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 days of storage, respectively. Chitosan coating significantly (p < or = 0.05) reduced lipid oxidation as displayed in peroxide value, conjugated dienes, 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and headspace volatiles, chemical spoilage as reflected in total volatile basic nitrogen, trimethylamine, and hypoxanthine, and growth of microorganisms as reflected in total plate count in both fish model systems compared to uncoated samples. The preservative efficacy and the viscosity of chitosan were inter-related; the efficacy of chitosans with viscosities of 57 and 360 cP was superior to that of chitosan with a 14 cP viscosity. Thus, chitosan as edible coating would enhance the quality of seafoods during storage.

  18. Effects of produced water on reproductive parameters in prespawning Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Sundt, Rolf C; Björkblom, Carina

    2011-01-01

    Produced water (PW) discharged from offshore oil industry activities contains substances that are known to contribute to a range of mechanisms of toxicity. In the present study selected reproductive biomarkers were studied in prespawning Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) exposed to PW. The fish were exposed for 12 wk within a continuous flow-through system at realistic environmental near-field concentrations. Concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and alkylphenol (AP) compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection measurement, as were PAH and AP metabolites in fish bile for verification of exposure conditions and presence of compounds in PW. A suite of reproductive biomarkers (vitellogenin, zona radiata protein, and plasma steroid concentrations) and histological alterations of the gonads were determined. Results showed that exposure to sufficiently high levels of PW produced an increase in vitellogenin levels in female fish compared to the control. Impaired oocyte development and reduced estrogen levels were also observed in PW-exposed female fish. In male fish testicular development was altered, showing a rise in amount of spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes and a reduction in quantity of mature sperm in the PW-exposed fish compared to control. Data indicate that sufficiently high levels of PW have the potential to adversely affect the reproductive fitness of cod. PMID:21391097

  19. First feed affects the expressions of microRNA and their targets in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Bizuayehu, Teshome Tilahun; Furmanek, Tomasz; Karlsen, Ørjan; van der Meeren, Terje; Edvardsen, Rolf Brudvik; Rønnestad, Ivar; Hamre, Kristin; Johansen, Steinar D; Babiak, Igor

    2016-04-14

    To our knowledge, there is no report on microRNA (miRNA) expression and their target analysis in relation to the type of the first feed and its effect on the further growth of fish. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae have better growth and development performance when fed natural zooplankton as a start-feed, as compared with those fed typical aquaculture start-feeds. In our experiment, two groups of Atlantic cod larvae were fed reference feed (zooplankton, mostly copepods, filtered from a seawater pond) v. aquaculture feeds: enriched rotifers (Brachionus sp.) and later brine shrimp (Artemia salina). We examined the miRNA expressions of six defined developmental stages as determined and standardised by body length from first feeding for both diet groups. We found eight miRNA (miR-9, miR-19a, miR-130b, miR-146, miR-181a, miR-192, miR-206 and miR-11240) differentially expressed between the two feeding groups in at least one developmental stage. We verified the next-generation sequencing data using real-time RT-PCR. We found 397 putative targets (mRNA) to the differentially expressed miRNA; eighteen of these mRNA showed differential expression in at least one stage. The patterns of differentially expressed miRNA and their putative target mRNA were mostly inverse, but sometimes also concurrent. The predicted miRNA targets were involved in different pathways, including metabolic, phototransduction and signalling pathways. The results of this study provide new nutrigenomic information on the potential role of miRNA in mediating nutritional effects on growth during the start-feeding period in fish larvae. PMID:26857476

  20. First feed affects the expressions of microRNA and their targets in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Bizuayehu, Teshome Tilahun; Furmanek, Tomasz; Karlsen, Ørjan; van der Meeren, Terje; Edvardsen, Rolf Brudvik; Rønnestad, Ivar; Hamre, Kristin; Johansen, Steinar D; Babiak, Igor

    2016-04-14

    To our knowledge, there is no report on microRNA (miRNA) expression and their target analysis in relation to the type of the first feed and its effect on the further growth of fish. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae have better growth and development performance when fed natural zooplankton as a start-feed, as compared with those fed typical aquaculture start-feeds. In our experiment, two groups of Atlantic cod larvae were fed reference feed (zooplankton, mostly copepods, filtered from a seawater pond) v. aquaculture feeds: enriched rotifers (Brachionus sp.) and later brine shrimp (Artemia salina). We examined the miRNA expressions of six defined developmental stages as determined and standardised by body length from first feeding for both diet groups. We found eight miRNA (miR-9, miR-19a, miR-130b, miR-146, miR-181a, miR-192, miR-206 and miR-11240) differentially expressed between the two feeding groups in at least one developmental stage. We verified the next-generation sequencing data using real-time RT-PCR. We found 397 putative targets (mRNA) to the differentially expressed miRNA; eighteen of these mRNA showed differential expression in at least one stage. The patterns of differentially expressed miRNA and their putative target mRNA were mostly inverse, but sometimes also concurrent. The predicted miRNA targets were involved in different pathways, including metabolic, phototransduction and signalling pathways. The results of this study provide new nutrigenomic information on the potential role of miRNA in mediating nutritional effects on growth during the start-feeding period in fish larvae.

  1. Trans-species polymorphism at antimicrobial innate immunity cathelicidin genes of Atlantic cod and related species

    PubMed Central

    Árnason, Einar

    2015-01-01

    Natural selection, the most important force in evolution, comes in three forms. Negative purifying selection removes deleterious variation and maintains adaptations. Positive directional selection fixes beneficial variants, producing new adaptations. Balancing selection maintains variation in a population. Important mechanisms of balancing selection include heterozygote advantage, frequency-dependent advantage of rarity, and local and fluctuating episodic selection. A rare pathogen gains an advantage because host defenses are predominantly effective against prevalent types. Similarly, a rare immune variant gives its host an advantage because the prevalent pathogens cannot escape the host’s apostatic defense. Due to the stochastic nature of evolution, neutral variation may accumulate on genealogical branches, but trans-species polymorphisms are rare under neutrality and are strong evidence for balancing selection. Balanced polymorphism maintains diversity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in vertebrates. The Atlantic cod is missing genes for both MHC-II and CD4, vital parts of the adaptive immune system. Nevertheless, cod are healthy in their ecological niche, maintaining large populations that support major commercial fisheries. Innate immunity is of interest from an evolutionary perspective, particularly in taxa lacking adaptive immunity. Here, we analyze extensive amino acid and nucleotide polymorphisms of the cathelicidin gene family in Atlantic cod and closely related taxa. There are three major clusters, Cath1, Cath2, and Cath3, that we consider to be paralogous genes. There is extensive nucleotide and amino acid allelic variation between and within clusters. The major feature of the results is that the variation clusters by alleles and not by species in phylogenetic trees and discriminant analysis of principal components. Variation within the three groups shows trans-species polymorphism that is older than speciation and that is suggestive of

  2. "Islands of Divergence" in the Atlantic Cod Genome Represent Polymorphic Chromosomal Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Sodeland, Marte; Jorde, Per Erik; Lien, Sigbjørn; Jentoft, Sissel; Berg, Paul R; Grove, Harald; Kent, Matthew P; Arnyasi, Mariann; Olsen, Esben Moland; Knutsen, Halvor

    2016-01-01

    In several species genetic differentiation across environmental gradients or between geographically separate populations has been reported to center at "genomic islands of divergence," resulting in heterogeneous differentiation patterns across genomes. Here, genomic regions of elevated divergence were observed on three chromosomes of the highly mobile fish Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) within geographically fine-scaled coastal areas. The "genomic islands" extended at least 5, 9.5, and 13 megabases on linkage groups 2, 7, and 12, respectively, and coincided with large blocks of linkage disequilibrium. For each of these three chromosomes, pairs of segregating, highly divergent alleles were identified, with little or no gene exchange between them. These patterns of recombination and divergence mirror genomic signatures previously described for large polymorphic inversions, which have been shown to repress recombination across extensive chromosomal segments. The lack of genetic exchange permits divergence between noninverted and inverted chromosomes in spite of gene flow. For the rearrangements on linkage groups 2 and 12, allelic frequency shifts between coastal and oceanic environments suggest a role in ecological adaptation, in agreement with recently reported associations between molecular variation within these genomic regions and temperature, oxygen, and salinity levels. Elevated genetic differentiation in these genomic regions has previously been described on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, and we therefore suggest that these polymorphisms are involved in adaptive divergence across the species distributional range. PMID:26983822

  3. “Islands of Divergence” in the Atlantic Cod Genome Represent Polymorphic Chromosomal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Sodeland, Marte; Jorde, Per Erik; Lien, Sigbjørn; Jentoft, Sissel; Berg, Paul R.; Grove, Harald; Kent, Matthew P.; Arnyasi, Mariann; Olsen, Esben Moland; Knutsen, Halvor

    2016-01-01

    In several species genetic differentiation across environmental gradients or between geographically separate populations has been reported to center at “genomic islands of divergence,” resulting in heterogeneous differentiation patterns across genomes. Here, genomic regions of elevated divergence were observed on three chromosomes of the highly mobile fish Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) within geographically fine-scaled coastal areas. The “genomic islands” extended at least 5, 9.5, and 13 megabases on linkage groups 2, 7, and 12, respectively, and coincided with large blocks of linkage disequilibrium. For each of these three chromosomes, pairs of segregating, highly divergent alleles were identified, with little or no gene exchange between them. These patterns of recombination and divergence mirror genomic signatures previously described for large polymorphic inversions, which have been shown to repress recombination across extensive chromosomal segments. The lack of genetic exchange permits divergence between noninverted and inverted chromosomes in spite of gene flow. For the rearrangements on linkage groups 2 and 12, allelic frequency shifts between coastal and oceanic environments suggest a role in ecological adaptation, in agreement with recently reported associations between molecular variation within these genomic regions and temperature, oxygen, and salinity levels. Elevated genetic differentiation in these genomic regions has previously been described on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, and we therefore suggest that these polymorphisms are involved in adaptive divergence across the species distributional range. PMID:26983822

  4. Effects of turbidity on the spontaneous and prey-searching activity of juvenile Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Meager, Justin J; Batty, Robert S

    2007-11-29

    Increasing turbidity in coastal waters in the North Atlantic and adjacent seas has raised concerns about impacts on Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) using these areas as nurseries. A previous experiment (Meager et al. 2005 Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 62, 1978-1984) has shown that turbidity (up to 28 beam attenuation m-1) had little effect on the foraging rate of juvenile cod. Although this was attributed to cod using chemoreception in conjunction with vision to locate prey, foraging rates may also be maintained by increased activity. Higher activity, however, is energetically costly and may offset benefits from increased foraging return. We examined the effects of turbidity on prey searching and spontaneous activity of juvenile cod in the laboratory, by measuring activity with and without prey cues. Activity of juvenile cod was nonlinearly affected by turbidity and was lower at intermediate turbidity, regardless of the presence of prey odour. Activity increased over time when prey odour was present and decreased when absent, but the effects of prey odour were similar across all turbidity levels. Position in the tank was unaffected by turbidity or prey odour. Reduced activity at intermediate turbidities is likely to offset longer prey-search times. At high turbidity (greater than 17m-1), both longer prey-search times and higher activity indicate that increased energetic costs are probable.

  5. Effect of moderate hypoxia at three acclimation temperatures on stress responses in Atlantic cod with different haemoglobin types.

    PubMed

    Methling, Caroline; Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Vijayan, Mathilakath M; Steffensen, John F

    2010-08-01

    This study examines stress responses in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) when exposed to a moderate and transient reduction (35% O(2) sat.) in dissolved oxygen at a range of temperatures (5 degrees C, 10 degrees C and 15 degrees C), conditions occurring in some areas they inhabit. Given their geographical distribution pattern, and differences in preferred temperature of cod with different haemoglobin types, the study was extended to include haemoglobin polymorphism. We hypothesised that the differences in temperature preference between HbI-1 and HbI-2 type cod might also be reflected in a difference in stress response to hypoxia exposure. Two hsp70-isoforms (labelled a and b) were detected and they differed in expression in the gills but not in the liver of Atlantic cod. Acclimation temperature significantly affected the expression of hsp70 in the liver, and in an isoform-specific manner in the gills. Hypoxia exposure increased the expression of hsp70 in the liver, but not the gills, of cod and this response was not influenced by the acclimation temperature. The expression of hsp70 in both tissues did not differ between fish with different haemoglobin types. Acclimation temperature significantly impacted plasma cortisol but not lactate levels. Also, acute oxygen limitation or HbI-type significantly elevated plasma cortisol and lactate levels but these responses were not modulated by acclimation temperature. Taken together, our results suggest that both temperature acclimation and acute hypoxic exposure influence the organismal and cellular stress responses in Atlantic cod. We hypothesise that HbI-2 fish are more tolerant to short-term hypoxic episodes than HbI-1 fish, and this adaptation may be independent of tissue hsp70 expression.

  6. Multiple specialised goose-type lysozymes potentially compensate for an exceptional lack of chicken-type lysozymes in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Seppola, Marit; Bakkemo, Kathrine Ryvold; Mikkelsen, Helene; Myrnes, Bjørnar; Helland, Ronny; Irwin, David M; Nilsen, Inge W

    2016-01-01

    Previous analyses of the Atlantic cod genome showed unique combinations of lacking and expanded number of genes for the immune system. The present study examined lysozyme activity, lysozyme gene distribution and expression in cod. Enzymatic assays employing specific bacterial lysozyme inhibitors provided evidence for presence of g-type, but unexpectedly not for c-type lysozyme activity. Database homology searches failed to identify any c-type lysozyme gene in the cod genome or in expressed sequence tags from cod. In contrast, we identified four g-type lysozyme genes (LygF1a-d) constitutively expressed, although differentially, in all cod organs examined. The active site glutamate residue is replaced by alanine in LygF1a, thus making it enzymatic inactive, while LygF1d was found in two active site variants carrying alanine or glutamate, respectively. In vitro and in vivo infection by the intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis gave a significantly reduced LygF1a and b expression but increased expression of the LygF1c and d genes as did also the interferon gamma (IFNγ) cytokine. These results demonstrate a lack of c-type lysozyme that is unprecedented among vertebrates. Our results further indicate that serial gene duplications have produced multiple differentially regulated cod g-type lysozymes with specialised functions potentially compensating for the lack of c-type lysozymes. PMID:27324690

  7. Multiple specialised goose-type lysozymes potentially compensate for an exceptional lack of chicken-type lysozymes in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Seppola, Marit; Bakkemo, Kathrine Ryvold; Mikkelsen, Helene; Myrnes, Bjørnar; Helland, Ronny; Irwin, David M; Nilsen, Inge W

    2016-01-01

    Previous analyses of the Atlantic cod genome showed unique combinations of lacking and expanded number of genes for the immune system. The present study examined lysozyme activity, lysozyme gene distribution and expression in cod. Enzymatic assays employing specific bacterial lysozyme inhibitors provided evidence for presence of g-type, but unexpectedly not for c-type lysozyme activity. Database homology searches failed to identify any c-type lysozyme gene in the cod genome or in expressed sequence tags from cod. In contrast, we identified four g-type lysozyme genes (LygF1a-d) constitutively expressed, although differentially, in all cod organs examined. The active site glutamate residue is replaced by alanine in LygF1a, thus making it enzymatic inactive, while LygF1d was found in two active site variants carrying alanine or glutamate, respectively. In vitro and in vivo infection by the intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis gave a significantly reduced LygF1a and b expression but increased expression of the LygF1c and d genes as did also the interferon gamma (IFNγ) cytokine. These results demonstrate a lack of c-type lysozyme that is unprecedented among vertebrates. Our results further indicate that serial gene duplications have produced multiple differentially regulated cod g-type lysozymes with specialised functions potentially compensating for the lack of c-type lysozymes.

  8. Multiple specialised goose-type lysozymes potentially compensate for an exceptional lack of chicken-type lysozymes in Atlantic cod

    PubMed Central

    Seppola, Marit; Bakkemo, Kathrine Ryvold; Mikkelsen, Helene; Myrnes, Bjørnar; Helland, Ronny; Irwin, David M.; Nilsen, Inge W.

    2016-01-01

    Previous analyses of the Atlantic cod genome showed unique combinations of lacking and expanded number of genes for the immune system. The present study examined lysozyme activity, lysozyme gene distribution and expression in cod. Enzymatic assays employing specific bacterial lysozyme inhibitors provided evidence for presence of g-type, but unexpectedly not for c-type lysozyme activity. Database homology searches failed to identify any c-type lysozyme gene in the cod genome or in expressed sequence tags from cod. In contrast, we identified four g-type lysozyme genes (LygF1a-d) constitutively expressed, although differentially, in all cod organs examined. The active site glutamate residue is replaced by alanine in LygF1a, thus making it enzymatic inactive, while LygF1d was found in two active site variants carrying alanine or glutamate, respectively. In vitro and in vivo infection by the intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis gave a significantly reduced LygF1a and b expression but increased expression of the LygF1c and d genes as did also the interferon gamma (IFNγ) cytokine. These results demonstrate a lack of c-type lysozyme that is unprecedented among vertebrates. Our results further indicate that serial gene duplications have produced multiple differentially regulated cod g-type lysozymes with specialised functions potentially compensating for the lack of c-type lysozymes. PMID:27324690

  9. Influence of environmental changes in the north-western Atlantic Ocean on a parasite, Echinorhynchus gadi (Acanthocephala) of Atlantic cod ( Gadus morhua) occurring off coastal Labrador, Canada.

    PubMed

    Khan, R A

    2008-09-01

    A study was conducted to determine the influence of environmental change on an endoparasite, Echinorhynchus gadi (Acanthocephala) of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) over a 30-year period off the coast of Labrador in the north-western Atlantic, North Atlantic Fisheries Organization subareas 2J-3K. Cod, once an abundant fish species that had been commercially exploited for many decades, declined precipitously during the mid-1980s onwards. This decline was attributed to climatic changes that affected the entire food chain from zooplankton to fish, sea birds and marine mammals. A monitoring programme was introduced, sampling cod by otter trawling using research vessels. The fish, after capture, were frozen at - 20 degrees C, subsequently thawed and the digestive tract removed and examined for the parasite in 2006. Data from samples taken in 1976, 1980-81, 1986, 1990, 2000 and 2003 were compared statistically with those collected in 2006. The results indicate a decline in the prevalence and mean abundance of E. gadi in 1986 with a minimum in 2000 but increasing gradually in 2003 and 2006. These changes were coincident initially with a decline of oceanic temperature and the entire food web, including capelin (Mallotus villosus), a preferred prey of cod and primary source of E. gadi. The increase in prevalence and mean abundance of the parasite in 2006 were associated with an increase of oceanic temperature and the return of small schools of capelin to offshore areas. Cod older than 4 years harboured a greater abundance of E. gadi than younger fish, while no difference was observed between the sexes. The results suggest that the abundance of E. gadi can be useful as a bioindicator of environmental changes in the north-western Atlantic.

  10. Temperature and sex dependent effects on cardiac mitochondrial metabolism in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.).

    PubMed

    Rodnick, Kenneth J; Gamperl, A Kurt; Nash, Gordon W; Syme, Douglas A

    2014-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that impaired mitochondrial respiration limits cardiac performance at warm temperatures, and examine if any effect(s) are sex-related, the consequences of high temperature on cardiac mitochondrial oxidative function were examined in 10°C acclimated, sexually immature, male and female Atlantic cod. Active (State 3) and uncoupled (States 2 and 4) respiration were measured in isolated ventricular mitochondria at 10, 16, 20, and 24°C using saturating concentrations of malate and pyruvate, but at a submaximal (physiological) level of ADP (200µM). In addition, citrate synthase (CS) activity was measured at these temperatures, and mitochondrial respiration and the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation (P:O ratio) were determined at [ADP] ranging from 25-200µM at 10 and 20°C. Cardiac morphometrics and mitochondrial respiration at 10°C, and the thermal sensitivity of CS activity (Q10=1.51), were all similar between the sexes. State 3 respiration at 200µM ADP increased gradually in mitochondria from females between 10 and 24°C (Q10=1.48), but plateaued in males above 16°C, and this resulted in lower values in males vs. females at 20 and 24°C. At 10°C, State 4 was ~10% of State 3 values in both sexes [i.e. a respiratory control ratio (RCR) of ~10] and P:O ratios were approximately 1.5. Between 20 and 24°C, State 4 increased more than State 3 (by ~70 vs. 14%, respectively), and this decreased RCR to ~7.5. The P:O ratio was not affected by temperature at 200μM ADP. However, (1) the sensitivity of State 3 respiration to increasing [ADP] (from 25 to 200μM) was reduced at 20 vs. 10°C in both sexes (Km values 105±7 vs. 68±10μM, respectively); and (2) mitochondria from females had lower P:O values at 25 vs. 100μM ADP at 20°C, whereas males showed a similar effect at 10°C but a much more pronounced effect at 20°C (P:O 1.05 at 25μM ADP vs. 1.78 at 100μMADP). In summary, our results demonstrate several sex-related differences in

  11. Temperature and sex dependent effects on cardiac mitochondrial metabolism in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.).

    PubMed

    Rodnick, Kenneth J; Gamperl, A Kurt; Nash, Gordon W; Syme, Douglas A

    2014-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that impaired mitochondrial respiration limits cardiac performance at warm temperatures, and examine if any effect(s) are sex-related, the consequences of high temperature on cardiac mitochondrial oxidative function were examined in 10°C acclimated, sexually immature, male and female Atlantic cod. Active (State 3) and uncoupled (States 2 and 4) respiration were measured in isolated ventricular mitochondria at 10, 16, 20, and 24°C using saturating concentrations of malate and pyruvate, but at a submaximal (physiological) level of ADP (200µM). In addition, citrate synthase (CS) activity was measured at these temperatures, and mitochondrial respiration and the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation (P:O ratio) were determined at [ADP] ranging from 25-200µM at 10 and 20°C. Cardiac morphometrics and mitochondrial respiration at 10°C, and the thermal sensitivity of CS activity (Q10=1.51), were all similar between the sexes. State 3 respiration at 200µM ADP increased gradually in mitochondria from females between 10 and 24°C (Q10=1.48), but plateaued in males above 16°C, and this resulted in lower values in males vs. females at 20 and 24°C. At 10°C, State 4 was ~10% of State 3 values in both sexes [i.e. a respiratory control ratio (RCR) of ~10] and P:O ratios were approximately 1.5. Between 20 and 24°C, State 4 increased more than State 3 (by ~70 vs. 14%, respectively), and this decreased RCR to ~7.5. The P:O ratio was not affected by temperature at 200μM ADP. However, (1) the sensitivity of State 3 respiration to increasing [ADP] (from 25 to 200μM) was reduced at 20 vs. 10°C in both sexes (Km values 105±7 vs. 68±10μM, respectively); and (2) mitochondria from females had lower P:O values at 25 vs. 100μM ADP at 20°C, whereas males showed a similar effect at 10°C but a much more pronounced effect at 20°C (P:O 1.05 at 25μM ADP vs. 1.78 at 100μMADP). In summary, our results demonstrate several sex-related differences in

  12. Rested and stressed farmed Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) chilled in ice or slurry and effects on quality.

    PubMed

    Digre, Hanne; Erikson, Ulf; Aursand, Ida G; Gallart-Jornet, Lorena; Misimi, Ekrem; Rustad, Turid

    2011-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to investigate (1) whether rested harvest of farmed cod was better maintained by chilling with slurry rather than by traditional ice storage, (2) whether chilling with slurry would be a feasible chilling method to assure low core temperatures (≤0 °C) at packing of gutted fish, and (3) the effects of superchilling compared with traditional ice on selected quality parameters of cod during storage. In the experiment, seawater slurry at -2.0 ± 0.3 °C was used. Anesthetized (AQUI-S™), percussion stunned, and stressed cod chilled in slurry were compared. Cod stored on ice were used as reference group. The fish were evaluated at the day of slaughter, and after 7 and 14 d of storage according to handling stress (initial muscle pH, muscle twitches, rigor mortis), core temperatures, quality index method, microbial counts, weight changes, salt and water content, water distribution, pH, adenosine triphosphate-degradation products, K-value, water-holding capacity, fillet color, and texture. Chilling cod in slurry was more rapid than chilling in ice. Prechilling (1 d) of cod in slurry before subsequent ice storage resulted in lower quality 7 d postmortem compared with both ice and continuous slurry storage. The potential advantages of superchilling became more prominent after 14 d with lower microbiological activity, better maintenance of freshness (lower total quality index scores and lower K-values) compared with fish stored on ice. A drawback with slurry-stored fish was that cloudy eyes developed earlier, in addition to weight gain and salt uptake compared to ice-stored fish. Practical Application: Chilling is an essential operation in any fish-processing plant. This manuscript addresses different applications of slurry ice in the processing and storage of Atlantic cod. Cod quality was assessed after 7 and 14 d of iced and superchilled storage.

  13. Variation in embryonic mortality and maternal transcript expression among Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) broodstock: a functional genomics study.

    PubMed

    Rise, Matthew L; Nash, Gordon W; Hall, Jennifer R; Booman, Marije; Hori, Tiago S; Trippel, Edward A; Gamperl, A Kurt

    2014-12-01

    Early life stage mortality is an important issue for Atlantic cod aquaculture, yet the impact of the cod maternal (egg) transcriptome on egg quality and mortality during embryonic development is poorly understood. In the present work, we studied embryonic mortality and maternal transcript expression using eggs from 15 females. Total mortality at 7days post-fertilization (7 dpf, segmentation stage) was used as an indice of egg quality. A 20,000 probe (20K) microarray experiment compared the 7hours post-fertilization (7 hpf, ~2-cell stage) egg transcriptome of the two lowest quality females (>90% mortality at 7 dpf) to that of the highest quality female (~16% mortality at 7 dpf). Forty-three microarray probes were consistently differentially expressed in both low versus high quality egg comparisons (25 higher expressed in low quality eggs, and 18 higher expressed in high quality eggs). The microarray experiment also identified many immune-relevant genes [e.g. interferon (IFN) pathway genes ifngr1 and ifrd1)] that were highly expressed in eggs of all 3 females regardless of quality. Twelve of the 43 candidate egg quality-associated genes, and ifngr1, ifrd1 and irf7, were included in a qPCR study with 7 hpf eggs from all 15 females. Then, the genes that were confirmed by qPCR to be greater than 2-fold differentially expressed between 7 hpf eggs from the lowest and highest quality females (dcbld1, ddc, and acy3 more highly expressed in the 2 lowest quality females; kpna7 and hacd1 more highly expressed in the highest quality female), and the 3 IFN pathway genes, were included in a second qPCR study with unfertilized eggs. While some maternal transcripts included in these qPCR studies were associated with extremes in egg quality, there was little correlation between egg quality and gene expression when all females were considered. Both dcbld1 and ddc showed greater than 100-fold differences in transcript expression between females and were potentially influenced by

  14. Experimental Challenge of Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua) with a Brucella pinnipedialis Strain from Hooded Seal (Cystophora cristata).

    PubMed

    Nymo, Ingebjørg Helena; Seppola, Marit; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Bakkemo, Kathrine Ryvold; Jiménez de Bagüés, María Pilar; Godfroid, Jacques; Larsen, Anett Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Pathology has not been observed in true seals infected with Brucella pinnipedialis. A lack of intracellular survival and multiplication of B. pinnipedialis in hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) macrophages in vitro indicates a lack of chronic infection in hooded seals. Both epidemiology and bacteriological patterns in the hooded seal point to a transient infection of environmental origin, possibly through the food chain. To analyse the potential role of fish in the transmission of B. pinnipedialis, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were injected intraperitoneally with 7.5 x 107 bacteria of a hooded seal field isolate. Samples of blood, liver, spleen, muscle, heart, head kidney, female gonads and feces were collected on days 1, 7, 14 and 28 post infection to assess the bacterial load, and to determine the expression of immune genes and the specific antibody response. Challenged fish showed an extended period of bacteremia through day 14 and viable bacteria were observed in all organs sampled, except muscle, until day 28. Neither gross lesions nor mortality were recorded. Anti-Brucella antibodies were detected from day 14 onwards and the expression of hepcidin, cathelicidin, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-10, and interferon (IFN)-γ genes were significantly increased in spleen at day 1 and 28. Primary mononuclear cells isolated from head kidneys of Atlantic cod were exposed to B. pinnipedialis reference (NCTC 12890) and hooded seal (17a-1) strain. Both bacterial strains invaded mononuclear cells and survived intracellularly without any major reduction in bacterial counts for at least 48 hours. Our study shows that the B. pinnipedialis strain isolated from hooded seal survives in Atlantic cod, and suggests that Atlantic cod could play a role in the transmission of B. pinnipedialis to hooded seals in the wild.

  15. Experimental Challenge of Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua) with a Brucella pinnipedialis Strain from Hooded Seal (Cystophora cristata)

    PubMed Central

    Nymo, Ingebjørg Helena; Seppola, Marit; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Bakkemo, Kathrine Ryvold; Jiménez de Bagüés, María Pilar; Godfroid, Jacques; Larsen, Anett Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Pathology has not been observed in true seals infected with Brucella pinnipedialis. A lack of intracellular survival and multiplication of B. pinnipedialis in hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) macrophages in vitro indicates a lack of chronic infection in hooded seals. Both epidemiology and bacteriological patterns in the hooded seal point to a transient infection of environmental origin, possibly through the food chain. To analyse the potential role of fish in the transmission of B. pinnipedialis, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were injected intraperitoneally with 7.5 x 107 bacteria of a hooded seal field isolate. Samples of blood, liver, spleen, muscle, heart, head kidney, female gonads and feces were collected on days 1, 7, 14 and 28 post infection to assess the bacterial load, and to determine the expression of immune genes and the specific antibody response. Challenged fish showed an extended period of bacteremia through day 14 and viable bacteria were observed in all organs sampled, except muscle, until day 28. Neither gross lesions nor mortality were recorded. Anti-Brucella antibodies were detected from day 14 onwards and the expression of hepcidin, cathelicidin, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-10, and interferon (IFN)-γ genes were significantly increased in spleen at day 1 and 28. Primary mononuclear cells isolated from head kidneys of Atlantic cod were exposed to B. pinnipedialis reference (NCTC 12890) and hooded seal (17a-1) strain. Both bacterial strains invaded mononuclear cells and survived intracellularly without any major reduction in bacterial counts for at least 48 hours. Our study shows that the B. pinnipedialis strain isolated from hooded seal survives in Atlantic cod, and suggests that Atlantic cod could play a role in the transmission of B. pinnipedialis to hooded seals in the wild. PMID:27415626

  16. Experimental Challenge of Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua) with a Brucella pinnipedialis Strain from Hooded Seal (Cystophora cristata).

    PubMed

    Nymo, Ingebjørg Helena; Seppola, Marit; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Bakkemo, Kathrine Ryvold; Jiménez de Bagüés, María Pilar; Godfroid, Jacques; Larsen, Anett Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Pathology has not been observed in true seals infected with Brucella pinnipedialis. A lack of intracellular survival and multiplication of B. pinnipedialis in hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) macrophages in vitro indicates a lack of chronic infection in hooded seals. Both epidemiology and bacteriological patterns in the hooded seal point to a transient infection of environmental origin, possibly through the food chain. To analyse the potential role of fish in the transmission of B. pinnipedialis, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were injected intraperitoneally with 7.5 x 107 bacteria of a hooded seal field isolate. Samples of blood, liver, spleen, muscle, heart, head kidney, female gonads and feces were collected on days 1, 7, 14 and 28 post infection to assess the bacterial load, and to determine the expression of immune genes and the specific antibody response. Challenged fish showed an extended period of bacteremia through day 14 and viable bacteria were observed in all organs sampled, except muscle, until day 28. Neither gross lesions nor mortality were recorded. Anti-Brucella antibodies were detected from day 14 onwards and the expression of hepcidin, cathelicidin, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-10, and interferon (IFN)-γ genes were significantly increased in spleen at day 1 and 28. Primary mononuclear cells isolated from head kidneys of Atlantic cod were exposed to B. pinnipedialis reference (NCTC 12890) and hooded seal (17a-1) strain. Both bacterial strains invaded mononuclear cells and survived intracellularly without any major reduction in bacterial counts for at least 48 hours. Our study shows that the B. pinnipedialis strain isolated from hooded seal survives in Atlantic cod, and suggests that Atlantic cod could play a role in the transmission of B. pinnipedialis to hooded seals in the wild. PMID:27415626

  17. Allometric relationships to liver tissue concentrations of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Warner, Nicholas A; Nøst, Therese H; Andrade, Hector; Christensen, Guttorm

    2014-07-01

    Spatial distribution and relationship of allometric measurements (length, weight and age) to liver concentrations of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) including octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) and dodecamethylcyclosiloxane (D6) in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) collected near the community of Tromsø in Northern Norway were assessed. These congeners were benchmarked against known persistent polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs 153 and 180) to assess accumulation behavior of cVMS. D5 was the dominate cVMS detected in all fish livers with lipid normalized concentrations up to 10 times or greater than those observed for PCB 153 and 180. D4 and D6 concentration were negatively correlated with fish length and weight, indicating a greater elimination capacity compared to uptake processes with increasing fish size for these chemicals. These results indicate relationships between allometric measurements and cVMS concentrations may account for concentration variations observed within fish and should be assessed in future studies evaluating cVMS bioaccumulation potential.

  18. Zschokkella hildae Auerbach, 1910: phylogenetic position, morphology, and location in cultured Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Astrid Sibylle; Wootten, Rod; Sommerville, Christina

    2010-06-01

    The myxozoan Zschokkella hildae Auerbach, 1910, was detected with a prevalence of 100% in cultured Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L. aged 1+ from a culture facility on the west coast of Scotland. Sporogonic stages of Z. hildae, plasmodia producing 2-5 mature spores, were located predominantly in the collecting ducts and ureters of the kidney, and spores were present in the urine collected from the bladder. Less frequently, plasmodia were detected in the interstitial tissue of the kidney. The parasite prevalence in cultured fish was considerably higher than reported in wild fish but no obvious signs of pathology were detected. SSU rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis showed that Z. hildae is closely related to a Sinuolinea sp. from the urinary system of turbot, Psetta maxima (L.), and that these two species, together with other myxozoans from the urinary system of marine fish cluster together in a sub-clade of the recognised marine clade of myxozoans. This sub-clade is characterised by a specific linear expansion segment, helix E23_15 in the secondary structure of variable region V4 of the SSU rDNA. Z. hildae and Sinuolinea sp. show extraordinary large linear expansion segment in both V4 and V7 and an important number of complementary base changes in the conservative regions of the SSU rDNA, indicating considerable evolutionary changes in the SSU rDNA of these species when compared with other myxozoans from the marine environment.

  19. Severe tissue damage in Atlantic cod larvae under increasing ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frommel, Andrea Y.; Maneja, Rommel; Lowe, David; Malzahn, Arne M.; Geffen, Audrey J.; Folkvord, Arild; Piatkowski, Uwe; Reusch, Thorsten B. H.; Clemmesen, Catriona

    2012-01-01

    Ocean acidification, caused by increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 (refs , , ), is one of the most critical anthropogenicthreats to marine life. Changes in seawater carbonate chemistry have the potential to disturb calcification, acid-base regulation, blood circulation and respiration, as well as the nervous system of marine organisms, leading to long-term effects such as reduced growth rates and reproduction. In teleost fishes, early life-history stages are particularly vulnerable as they lack specialized internal pH regulatory mechanisms. So far, impacts of relevant CO2 concentrations on larval fish have been found in behaviour and otolith size, mainly in tropical, non-commercial species. Here we show detrimental effects of ocean acidification on the development of a mass-spawning fish species of high commercial importance. We reared Atlantic cod larvae at three levels of CO2, (1) present day, (2) end of next century and (3) an extreme, coastal upwelling scenario, in a long-term ( months) mesocosm experiment. Exposure to CO2 resulted in severe to lethal tissue damage in many internal organs, with the degree of damage increasing with CO2 concentration. As larval survival is the bottleneck to recruitment, ocean acidification has the potential to act as an additional source of natural mortality, affecting populations of already exploited fish stocks.

  20. Does condition of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) have a greater impact upon swimming performance at Ucrit or sprint speeds?

    PubMed

    Martínez, M; Bédard, M; Dutil, J-D; Guderley, H

    2004-08-01

    To compare the sensitivity of sprint and critical (Ucrit) swimming speeds to the condition of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and to identify the best anatomic, behavioural and biochemical correlates of these types of swimming, we established two groups of cod that were fed or starved for 12 weeks. We evaluated sprint swimming and Ucrit performance as well as the speed at which repeated burst-coast movements began in the Ucrit test before measuring the metabolic capacities of red and white muscle sampled caudally, centrally and rostrally and the anatomic characteristics of the cod. White muscle lactate was measured directly after the Ucrit test. As expected, the twofold difference in Fulton's condition factor (0.5+/-0.04 for starved and 1.0+/-0.1 for fed cod) was accompanied by large differences in the anatomic and biochemical parameters measured. Despite the relative sparing of muscle aerobic capacity during starvation and despite the greater use of oxidative fibres during Ucrit compared with sprint swimming, these types of swimming differed by much the same extent between starved and fed cod. In the Ucrit tests, white muscle lactate levels and lactate accumulation per burst-coast movement were considerably higher in fed than starved cod, suggesting more intensive use of fast muscle fibres in cod in good condition. Multiple regression analysis indicated strong correlations between Ucrit, the speed at which regular burst-coasting began and the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) in red muscle (both caudal and central positions). PDH activity may limit the rate of oxidative ATP production by red muscle. The activity of cytochrome c oxidase in rostral white muscle was the strongest correlate of sprint swimming, suggesting that aerobic preparation of white muscle facilitates rapid contraction. The correlation between Ucrit and sprint swimming was weak, perhaps due to inter-individual differences in sensitivity during sprint tests. PMID:15277553

  1. Tissue tropism of nervous necrosis virus (NNV) in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L., after intraperitoneal challenge with a virus isolate from diseased Atlantic halibut, Hippoglossus hippoglossus (L.).

    PubMed

    Korsnes, K; Karlsbakk, E; Devold, M; Nerland, A H; Nylund, A

    2009-08-01

    Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, averaging 100 g, were experimentally challenged by intraperitoneal injection of nervous necrosis virus (NNV) originating from Atlantic halibut. Cod tissues, including blood, gill, pectoral fin, barbel, ventricle, atrium, spleen, liver, lateral line (including muscle tissue), eye (retina) and brain, were sampled at day 25 and 130 and investigated by real-time RT-PCR for the presence of NNV. Relative quantifications at day 130 were calculated using the 2(-DeltaDeltaCt) method. Immunosuppression by injection of prednisolone-acetate was introduced for a 30-day period, and tissue sampled at day 180 and relative quantification estimated. No mortality or clinical signs of disease were observed in the challenged group. The challenge resulted in detection of NNV in blood, spleen, kidney, liver, heart atrium and heart ventricle at day 25, and by the end of the experiment NNV showed a clear increase in brain and retina, suggesting these to be the primary tissues for viral replication. There was no increase in the relative amount of NNV in blood, atrium, ventricle, spleen, liver and kidney. Corticosteroid implants resulted in a weak increase in virus RNA in spleen, kidney, liver and brain. These findings suggest that Atlantic cod is susceptible to infection with NNV from halibut. The observed tissue tropism patterns suggest an initial viraemic phase, followed by neurotrophy. Head-kidney is the best tissue identified for possible NNV detection by non-lethal biopsy, but detection was not possible in all injected fish. PMID:19500207

  2. Temperature Modulates the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Intestinal Ion Transport in Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Hu, Marian Y; Michael, Katharina; Kreiss, Cornelia M; Stumpp, Meike; Dupont, Sam; Tseng, Yung-Che; Lucassen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    CO2-driven seawater acidification has been demonstrated to enhance intestinal bicarbonate secretion rates in teleosts, leading to an increased release of CaCO3 under simulated ocean acidification scenarios. In this study, we investigated if increasing CO2 levels stimulate the intestinal acid-base regulatory machinery of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and whether temperatures at the upper limit of thermal tolerance stimulate or counteract ion regulatory capacities. Juvenile G. morhua were acclimated for 4 weeks to three CO2 levels (550, 1200, and 2200 μatm) covering present and near-future natural variability, at optimum (10°C) and summer maximum temperature (18°C), respectively. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the subcellular localization of ion transporters, including Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA), Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger 3 (NHE3), Na(+)/[Formula: see text] cotransporter (NBC1), pendrin-like Cl(-)/[Formula: see text] exchanger (SLC26a6), V-type H(+)-ATPase subunit a (VHA), and Cl(-) channel 3 (CLC3) in epithelial cells of the anterior intestine. At 10°C, proteins and mRNA were generally up-regulated for most transporters in the intestinal epithelium after acclimation to higher CO2 levels. This supports recent findings demonstrating increased intestinal [Formula: see text] secretion rates in response to CO2 induced seawater acidification. At 18°C, mRNA expression and protein concentrations of most ion transporters remained unchanged or were even decreased, suggesting thermal compensation. This response may be energetically favorable to retain blood [Formula: see text] levels to stabilize pHe, but may negatively affect intestinal salt and water resorption of marine teleosts in future oceans. PMID:27313538

  3. Impact of dietary selenium on methylmercury toxicity in juvenile Atlantic cod: a transcriptional survey.

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Amlund, Heidi; Sæle, Øystein; Ellingsen, Ståle; Skjaerven, Kaja H

    2015-02-01

    Selenium (Se) and its derivatives are known to have protective effects against mercury (Hg) toxicity in mammals. In this study we wanted to evaluate whether Se co-exposure affect the transcription of methylmercury (MeHg) toxicity-relevant genes in early life stages of fish. Juvenile Atlantic cod were exposed to regular feed (control), Se-spiked feed (3mg Se kg(-1)), MeHg-spiked feed (10mg Hg kg(-1)) or to Se- and MeHg-spiked feed (3mg Se kg(-1) and 10mg Hg kg(-1), respectively) for ten weeks. Liver tissue was harvested for transcriptional analysis when the fish were weighing 11.4 ± 3.2g. Accumulated levels of Hg in liver of the two groups of fish exposed to MeHg were 1.5mg Hg kg(-1) wet weight, or 44-fold higher than in the control group, while the Se concentrations differed with less than 2-fold between the fish groups. Selenium co-exposure had no effect on the accumulated levels of Hg in liver tissue; however, MeHg co-exposure reduced the accumulated level of Se. Dietary exposure to MeHg had no effect on fish growth. Interaction effects between Se and MeHg exposure were observed for the transcriptional levels of CAT, GPX1, GPX3, NFE2L2, UBA52, SEPP1 and DNMT1. Significant effects of MeHg exposure were seen for DNMT1 and PPARG, while effects of Se exposure were seen for GPX4B and SEPP1A, as well as for DNA methyltransferase activity. The transcriptional results suggest, by considering up-regulation as a proxy for negative impact and at the tested concentrations, a pro-oxidative effect of Se co-exposure with MeHg, rather than an antioxidative effect.

  4. Aerobic scope for activity in age 0 year Atlantic cod Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Hansen, S L; von Herbing, I Hunt

    2009-05-01

    Key components of swimming metabolism: standard metabolism (R(s)), active metabolism (R(a)) and absolute aerobic scope for activity (R(a)-R(s)) were determined for small age 0 year Atlantic cod Gadus morhua. Gadus morhua juveniles grew from 0.50 to 2.89 g wet body mass (M(WB)) over the experimental period of 100 days, and growth rates (G) ranged from 1.4 to 2.9% day(-1), which decreased with increasing size. Metabolic rates were recorded by measuring changes in oxygen consumption over time at different activity levels using modified Brett-type respirometers designed to accommodate the small size and short swimming endurance of small fishes. Power performance relationships were established between oxygen consumption and swimming speed measurements were repeated for individual fish as each fish grew. Mass-specific standard metabolic rates (RsMWB-1) were calculated from the power performance relationships by extrapolating to zero swimming speed and decreased from 7.00 to 5.77 micromol O(2) g(-1) h(-1), mass-specific active metabolic rates (RaMWB-1) were calculated from extrapolation to maximum swimming speed (U(max)) and decreased from 26.18 to 14.35 micromol O(2) g(-1) h(-1) and mass-specific absolute scope for activity was calculated as the difference between active and standard metabolism (RaMWB-1-RsMWB-1) and decreased from 26.18 to 14.35 micromol O(2) g(-1) h(-1) as M(WB) increased. Small fish with low R(s) had bigger aerobic scopes but, as expected, R(s) was higher in smaller fish than larger fish. The measurements and results from this study are unique as R(s), R(a) and absolute aerobic scopes have not been previously determined for small age 0 year G. morhua.

  5. Temperature Modulates the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Intestinal Ion Transport in Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Hu, Marian Y; Michael, Katharina; Kreiss, Cornelia M; Stumpp, Meike; Dupont, Sam; Tseng, Yung-Che; Lucassen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    CO2-driven seawater acidification has been demonstrated to enhance intestinal bicarbonate secretion rates in teleosts, leading to an increased release of CaCO3 under simulated ocean acidification scenarios. In this study, we investigated if increasing CO2 levels stimulate the intestinal acid-base regulatory machinery of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and whether temperatures at the upper limit of thermal tolerance stimulate or counteract ion regulatory capacities. Juvenile G. morhua were acclimated for 4 weeks to three CO2 levels (550, 1200, and 2200 μatm) covering present and near-future natural variability, at optimum (10°C) and summer maximum temperature (18°C), respectively. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the subcellular localization of ion transporters, including Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA), Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger 3 (NHE3), Na(+)/[Formula: see text] cotransporter (NBC1), pendrin-like Cl(-)/[Formula: see text] exchanger (SLC26a6), V-type H(+)-ATPase subunit a (VHA), and Cl(-) channel 3 (CLC3) in epithelial cells of the anterior intestine. At 10°C, proteins and mRNA were generally up-regulated for most transporters in the intestinal epithelium after acclimation to higher CO2 levels. This supports recent findings demonstrating increased intestinal [Formula: see text] secretion rates in response to CO2 induced seawater acidification. At 18°C, mRNA expression and protein concentrations of most ion transporters remained unchanged or were even decreased, suggesting thermal compensation. This response may be energetically favorable to retain blood [Formula: see text] levels to stabilize pHe, but may negatively affect intestinal salt and water resorption of marine teleosts in future oceans.

  6. Effects of temperature on specific dynamic action in Atlantic cod Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Tirsgaard, Bjørn; Svendsen, Jon Christian; Steffensen, John Fleng

    2015-02-01

    Growth requires that energy is directed towards ingestion, digestion, absorption and assimilation of a meal; energy expenditures are often expressed as the specific dynamic action (SDA). While SDA is an important part of fish energy budgets and strongly affected by water temperature, temperature effects are not known across a wide temperature range in Atlantic cod Gadus morhua. The objective of this study was to examine effects of temperature (2, 5, 10, 15 or 20 °C) on the energetic cost and time used for SDA in juvenile G. morhua by intermittent flow respirometry. At each temperature, G. morhua were fed a meal of herring (Clupea harengus) corresponding to 5 % of the body mass. Standard metabolic rates measured pre-feeding and post-feeding metabolic rates were measured to determine SDA. The study showed that SDA coefficients (%, SDA energy divided by meal energy) were significantly lower at 2 and 10 °C (5.4-6.3 %) compared to 5, 15 and 20 °C (10.4-12.4 %), while SDA duration increased significantly from 80 h at 10 °C to 130-160 h at 2, 15 and 20 °C and reached a maximum of 250 h at 5 °C. The significant decrease in SDA duration at 10 °C combined with a low SDA coefficient suggests that water temperatures close to 10 °C may represent the optimum temperatures for SDA in this population of G. morhua. Our results suggest that SDA is not a simple function of temperature, but may vary with temperature in a more complex fashion. PMID:25343877

  7. Temperature Modulates the Effects of Ocean Acidification on Intestinal Ion Transport in Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Marian Y.; Michael, Katharina; Kreiss, Cornelia M.; Stumpp, Meike; Dupont, Sam; Tseng, Yung-Che; Lucassen, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    CO2-driven seawater acidification has been demonstrated to enhance intestinal bicarbonate secretion rates in teleosts, leading to an increased release of CaCO3 under simulated ocean acidification scenarios. In this study, we investigated if increasing CO2 levels stimulate the intestinal acid–base regulatory machinery of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and whether temperatures at the upper limit of thermal tolerance stimulate or counteract ion regulatory capacities. Juvenile G. morhua were acclimated for 4 weeks to three CO2 levels (550, 1200, and 2200 μatm) covering present and near-future natural variability, at optimum (10°C) and summer maximum temperature (18°C), respectively. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the subcellular localization of ion transporters, including Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA), Na+/H+-exchanger 3 (NHE3), Na+/HCO3− cotransporter (NBC1), pendrin-like Cl−/HCO3− exchanger (SLC26a6), V-type H+-ATPase subunit a (VHA), and Cl− channel 3 (CLC3) in epithelial cells of the anterior intestine. At 10°C, proteins and mRNA were generally up-regulated for most transporters in the intestinal epithelium after acclimation to higher CO2 levels. This supports recent findings demonstrating increased intestinal HCO3− secretion rates in response to CO2 induced seawater acidification. At 18°C, mRNA expression and protein concentrations of most ion transporters remained unchanged or were even decreased, suggesting thermal compensation. This response may be energetically favorable to retain blood HCO3− levels to stabilize pHe, but may negatively affect intestinal salt and water resorption of marine teleosts in future oceans. PMID:27313538

  8. The effect of temperature and body size on metabolic scope of activity in juvenile Atlantic cod Gadus morhua L.

    PubMed

    Tirsgaard, Bjørn; Behrens, Jane W; Steffensen, John F

    2015-01-01

    Changes in ambient temperature affect the physiology and metabolism and thus the distribution of fish. In this study we used intermittent flow respirometry to determine the effect of temperature (2, 5, 10, 15 and 20°C) and wet body mass (BM) (~30-460g) on standard metabolic rate (SMR, mgO2h(-1)), maximum metabolic rate (MMR, mgO2h(-1)) and metabolic scope (MS, mgO2h(-1)) of juvenile Atlantic cod. SMR increased with BM irrespectively of temperature, resulting in an average scaling exponent of 0.87 (0.82-0.92). Q10 values were 1.8-2.1 at temperatures between 5 and 15°C but higher (2.6-4.3) between 2 and 5°C and lower (1.6-1.4) between 15 and 20°C in 200 and 450g cod. MMR increased with temperature in the smallest cod (50g) but in the larger cod MMR plateaued between 10, 15 and 20°C. This resulted in a negative correlation between the optimal temperature for MS (Topt) and BM, Topt being respectively 14.5, 11.8 and 10.9°C in a 50, 200 and 450g cod. Irrespective of BM cold water temperatures resulted in a reduction (30-35%) of MS whereas the reduction of MS at warm temperatures was only evident for larger fish (200 and 450g), caused by plateauing of MMR at 10°C and above. Warm temperatures thus seem favourable for smaller (50g) juvenile cod, but not for larger conspecifics (200 and 450g). PMID:25281351

  9. Diversification of the expanded teleost-specific toll-like receptor family in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptors (Tlrs) are major molecular pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is the first vertebrate known to have lost most of the mammalian Tlr orthologues, particularly all bacterial recognising and other cell surface Tlrs. On the other hand, its genome encodes a unique repertoire of teleost-specific Tlrs. The aim of this study was to investigate if these duplicate Tlrs have been retained through adaptive evolution to compensate for the lack of other cell surface Tlrs in the cod genome. Results In this study, one tlr21, 12 tlr22 and two tlr23 genes representing the teleost-specific Tlr family have been cloned and characterised in cod. Phylogenetic analysis grouped all tlr22 genes under a single clade, indicating that the multiple cod paralogues have arisen through lineage-specific duplications. All tlrs examined were transcribed in immune-related tissues as well as in stomach, gut and gonads of adult cod and were differentially expressed during early development. These tlrs were also differentially regulated following immune challenge by immersion with Vibrio anguillarum, indicating their role in the immune response. An increase in water temperature from 4 to 12°C was associated with a 5.5-fold down-regulation of tlr22d transcript levels in spleen. Maximum likelihood analysis with different evolution models revealed that tlr22 genes are under positive selection. A total of 24 codons were found to be positively selected, of which 19 are in the ligand binding region of ectodomain. Conclusion Positive selection pressure coupled with experimental evidence of differential expression strongly support the hypothesis that teleost-specific tlr paralogues in cod are undergoing neofunctionalisation and can recognise bacterial pathogen-associated molecular patterns to compensate for the lack of other cell surface Tlrs. PMID:23273344

  10. Differentially expressed proteins in the skin mucus of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) upon natural infection with Vibrio anguillarum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vibriosis caused by V. anguillarum is a commonly encountered disease in Atlantic cod farms and several studies indicate that the initiation of infection occurs after the attachment of the pathogen to the mucosal surfaces (gut, skin and gills) of fish. Therefore it is necessary to investigate the role of different mucosal components in fish upon V. anguillarum infection. The present study has two parts; in the first part we analyzed the differential expression of skin mucus proteins from Atlantic cod naturally infected with V. anguillarum using two dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. In the second part, a separate bath challenge experiment with V. anguillarum was conducted to assess the mRNA levels of the genes in skin tissue, corresponding to the selected proteins identified in the first part. Results Comparative proteome analysis of skin mucus of cod upon natural infection with V. anguillarum revealed key immune relevant proteins like calpain small subunit 1, glutathione-S-transferase omega 1, proteasome 26S subunit, 14-kDa apolipoprotein, beta 2-tubulin, cold inducible RNA binding protein, malate dehydrogenase 2 (mitochondrial) and type II keratin that exhibited significant differential expression. Additionally a number of protein spots which showed large variability amongst individual fish were also identified. Some of the proteins identified were mapped to the immunologically relevant JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinases) signalling pathway that is connected to cellular events associated with pathogenesis. A bath challenge experiment with V. anguillarum showed differential expression of beta 2-tubulin, calpain small subunit 1, cold inducible RNA binding protein, flotillin1, and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 transcripts in the skin tissue of cod during early stages of infection. Conclusions Differentially expressed proteins identified in the cod skin mucus point towards their possible involvement in V. anguillarum pathogenesis

  11. Historical DNA reveals the demographic history of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in medieval and early modern Iceland.

    PubMed

    Ólafsdóttir, Guðbjörg Ásta; Westfall, Kristen M; Edvardsson, Ragnar; Pálsson, Snæbjörn

    2014-02-22

    Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) vertebrae from archaeological sites were used to study the history of the Icelandic Atlantic cod population in the time period of 1500-1990. Specifically, we used coalescence modelling to estimate population size and fluctuations from the sequence diversity at the cytochrome b (cytb) and Pantophysin I (PanI) loci. The models are consistent with an expanding population during the warm medieval period, large historical effective population size (NE), a marked bottleneck event at 1400-1500 and a decrease in NE in early modern times. The model results are corroborated by the reduction of haplotype and nucleotide variation over time and pairwise population distance as a significant portion of nucleotide variation partitioned across the 1550 time mark. The mean age of the historical fished stock is high in medieval times with a truncation in age in early modern times. The population size crash coincides with a period of known cooling in the North Atlantic, and we conclude that the collapse may be related to climate or climate-induced ecosystem change.

  12. Historical DNA reveals the demographic history of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in medieval and early modern Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Ólafsdóttir, Guðbjörg Ásta; Westfall, Kristen M.; Edvardsson, Ragnar; Pálsson, Snæbjörn

    2014-01-01

    Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) vertebrae from archaeological sites were used to study the history of the Icelandic Atlantic cod population in the time period of 1500–1990. Specifically, we used coalescence modelling to estimate population size and fluctuations from the sequence diversity at the cytochrome b (cytb) and Pantophysin I (PanI) loci. The models are consistent with an expanding population during the warm medieval period, large historical effective population size (NE), a marked bottleneck event at 1400–1500 and a decrease in NE in early modern times. The model results are corroborated by the reduction of haplotype and nucleotide variation over time and pairwise population distance as a significant portion of nucleotide variation partitioned across the 1550 time mark. The mean age of the historical fished stock is high in medieval times with a truncation in age in early modern times. The population size crash coincides with a period of known cooling in the North Atlantic, and we conclude that the collapse may be related to climate or climate-induced ecosystem change. PMID:24403343

  13. Haemoglobin polymorphism in atlantic cod (Gadus morhua): Allele frequency variation between yearclasses in a Norwegian fjord stock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mork, J.; Sundnes, G.

    1985-03-01

    A total of 262 specimens (0-, and 1-group) of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) representing 4 different yearclasses were caught in Trondheimsfjorden, Norway, during 1977 1984. They were genotyped by agar gel electrophoresis for the polymorphic haemoglobin locus HbI (Sick, 1961). The analyses revealed a highly significant (P=0.0003) heterogeneity of HbI allele frequencies between yearclasses. The difference in the frequency of the HbI-1 allele between the first (1977) and the last (1983) yearclass amounted to 0.18 (±0.07). The results appear to support recent reports on considerable selection effects at HbI, and stress the unreliability of allele frequencies at this locus for use in studies of the genetic population structure of cod.

  14. Innovative behaviour in fish: Atlantic cod can learn to use an external tag to manipulate a self-feeder.

    PubMed

    Millot, Sandie; Nilsson, Jonatan; Fosseidengen, Jan Erik; Bégout, Marie-Laure; Fernö, Anders; Braithwaite, Victoria A; Kristiansen, Tore S

    2014-05-01

    This study describes how three individual fish, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.), developed a novel behaviour and learnt to use a dorsally attached external tag to activate a self-feeder. This behaviour was repeated up to several hundred times, and over time these fish fine-tuned the behaviour and made a series of goal-directed coordinated movements needed to attach the feeder's pull string to the tag and stretch the string until the feeder was activated. These observations demonstrate a capacity in cod to develop a novel behaviour utilizing an attached tag as a tool to achieve a goal. This may be seen as one of the very few observed examples of innovation and tool use in fish.

  15. Evolutionary history and adaptive significance of the polymorphic Pan I in migratory and stationary populations of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Andersen, Øivind; Johnsen, Hanne; De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Præbel, Kim; Stjelja, Suzana; Kirubakaran, Tina Graceline; Pirolli, Davide; Jentoft, Sissel; Fevolden, Svein-Erik

    2015-08-01

    The synaptophysin (SYP) family comprises integral membrane proteins involved in vesicle-trafficking events, but the physiological function of several members has been enigmatic for decades. The presynaptic SYP protein controls neurotransmitter release, while SYP-like 2 (SYPL2) contributes to maintain normal Ca(2+)-signaling in the skeletal muscles. The polymorphic pantophysin (Pan I) of Atlantic cod shows strong genetic divergence between stationary and migratory populations, which seem to be adapted to local environmental conditions. We have investigated the functional involvement of Pan I in the different ecotypes by analyzing the 1) phylogeny, 2) spatio-temporal gene expression, 3) structure-function relationship of the Pan I(A) and I(B) protein variants, and 4) linkage to rhodopsin (rho) recently proposed to be associated with different light sensitivities in Icelandic populations of Atlantic cod. We searched for SYP family genes in phylogenetic key species and identified a single syp-related gene in three invertebrate chordates, while four members, Syp, Sypl1, Sypl2 and synaptoporin (Synpr), were found in tetrapods, Comoran coelacanth and spotted gar. Teleost fish were shown to possess duplicated syp, sypl2 and synpr genes of which the sypl2b paralog is identical to Pan I. The ubiquitously expressed cod Pan I codes for a tetra-spanning membrane protein possessing five amino acid substitutions in the first intravesicular loop, but only minor structural differences were shown between the allelic variants. Despite sizable genomic distance (>2.5 Mb) between Pan I and rho, highly significant linkage disequilibrium was found by genotyping shallow and deep water juvenile settlers predominated by the Pan I(A)-rho(A) and Pan I(B)-rho(B) haplotypes, respectively. However, the predicted rhodopsin protein showed no amino acid changes, while multiple polymorphic sites in the upstream region might affect the gene expression and pigment levels in stationary and migratory cod

  16. Low impact of exposure to environmentally relevant doses of 226Ra in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) embryonic cells.

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Berntssen, Marc H G; Hylland, Ketil; Eriksen, Dag Ø; Holen, Elisabeth

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether (226)Ra, a radionuclide present in produced water from oil platforms in the North Sea and other offshore drilling areas, could affect vulnerable early life stages of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Blastula-stage embryonic cells (EC) from fertilized eggs of Atlantic cod were isolated and exposed to environmental relevant concentrations of (226)Ra and transcription of selected genes quantified. The results showed a weak, but significant up-regulation of GPx3 and HSP70 transcripts after 48 h of exposure to 2.11 Bq/L. In EC exposed to three (226)Ra concentrations (2.11, 23 and 117 Bq/L) for 12 h, metallothionein, HSP90AA, thioredoxin and caspase 8 were significantly up-regulated in cells exposed to 117 Bq/L, whereas thioredoxin was also significantly up-regulated in EC exposed to 23 Bq/L. When EC were exposed to the same (226)Ra concentrations for 48 h, only heme oxygenase was significantly up-regulated in the 23 Bq/L exposure group. The results suggest that environmentally relevant activities of (226)Ra may induce oxidative stress and apoptosis in fish ECs. Exposure of Atlantic cod EC to Cd, selected as a model toxicant, supported the ability of EC around blastula stage to respond to toxicants by altered transcription. Due to dilution, environmentally relevant concentrations of radionuclides present in produced water would be expected to pose a minor threat to early life stages of fish.

  17. Low impact of exposure to environmentally relevant doses of 226Ra in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) embryonic cells.

    PubMed

    Olsvik, Pål A; Berntssen, Marc H G; Hylland, Ketil; Eriksen, Dag Ø; Holen, Elisabeth

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether (226)Ra, a radionuclide present in produced water from oil platforms in the North Sea and other offshore drilling areas, could affect vulnerable early life stages of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Blastula-stage embryonic cells (EC) from fertilized eggs of Atlantic cod were isolated and exposed to environmental relevant concentrations of (226)Ra and transcription of selected genes quantified. The results showed a weak, but significant up-regulation of GPx3 and HSP70 transcripts after 48 h of exposure to 2.11 Bq/L. In EC exposed to three (226)Ra concentrations (2.11, 23 and 117 Bq/L) for 12 h, metallothionein, HSP90AA, thioredoxin and caspase 8 were significantly up-regulated in cells exposed to 117 Bq/L, whereas thioredoxin was also significantly up-regulated in EC exposed to 23 Bq/L. When EC were exposed to the same (226)Ra concentrations for 48 h, only heme oxygenase was significantly up-regulated in the 23 Bq/L exposure group. The results suggest that environmentally relevant activities of (226)Ra may induce oxidative stress and apoptosis in fish ECs. Exposure of Atlantic cod EC to Cd, selected as a model toxicant, supported the ability of EC around blastula stage to respond to toxicants by altered transcription. Due to dilution, environmentally relevant concentrations of radionuclides present in produced water would be expected to pose a minor threat to early life stages of fish. PMID:22388182

  18. Metabolic priorities during starvation: enzyme sparing in liver and white muscle of Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L.

    PubMed

    Guderley, Helga; Lapointe, Dominique; Bédard, Martin; Dutil, Jean-Denis

    2003-06-01

    Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, respond to starvation first by mobilising hepatic lipids, then muscle and hepatic glycogen and finally muscle proteins. The dual role of proteins as functional elements and energetic reserves should lead to a temporal hierarchy of mobilisation where the nature of a function dictates its conservation during starvation. We examined (1) whether lysosomal and anti-oxidant enzymes in liver and white muscle are spared during prolonged starvation, (2) whether the responses of these enzymes in muscle vary longitudinally. Hepatic contents of lysosomal proteases decreased with starvation, whereas those of catalase (CAT) increased and lysosomal enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism and glutathione S-transferase (GST) did not change. In white muscle, starvation decreased the specific activity of lysosomal enzymes of carbohydrate degradation and doubled that of cathepsin D (CaD). The activity of anti-oxidant enzymes and acid phosphatase in muscle was unchanged with starvation. In white muscle neither lysosomal enzymes nor anti-oxidant enzymes varied significantly with sampling position. In cod muscle, antioxidant enzymes, CaD and acid phosphatase are spared during a period of starvation that decreases lysosomal enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism and decreases glycolytic enzyme activities. In cod liver, the anti-oxidant enzymes, CAT and GST, were also spared during starvation. PMID:12781835

  19. Cape Cod

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Image Cape Cod extends over 50 miles into the Atlantic Ocean. Its rugged coastline, dangerous sand bars and rip tides, and ever ... over the land and "puffy" cumulus clouds are over the ocean. The effects of the warm ocean water are evident in the lack of snow near ...

  20. Nucleotide variation and balancing selection at the Ckma gene in Atlantic cod: analysis with multiple merger coalescent models

    PubMed Central

    Halldórsdóttir, Katrín

    2015-01-01

    High-fecundity organisms, such as Atlantic cod, can withstand substantial natural selection and the entailing genetic load of replacing alleles at a number of loci due to their excess reproductive capacity. High-fecundity organisms may reproduce by sweepstakes leading to highly skewed heavy-tailed offspring distribution. Under such reproduction the Kingman coalescent of binary mergers breaks down and models of multiple merger coalescent are more appropriate. Here we study nucleotide variation at the Ckma (Creatine Kinase Muscle type A) gene in Atlantic cod. The gene shows extreme differentiation between the North (Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Barents Sea) and the South (Faroe Islands, North-, Baltic-, Celtic-, and Irish Seas) with FST > 0.8 between regions whereas neutral loci show no differentiation. This is evidence of natural selection. The protein sequence is conserved by purifying selection whereas silent and non-coding sites show extreme differentiation. The unfolded site-frequency spectrum has three modes, a mode at singleton sites and two high frequency modes at opposite frequencies representing divergent branches of the gene genealogy that is evidence for balancing selection. Analysis with multiple-merger coalescent models can account for the high frequency of singleton sites and indicate reproductive sweepstakes. Coalescent time scales vary with population size and with the inverse of variance in offspring number. Parameter estimates using multiple-merger coalescent models show that times scales are faster than under the Kingman coalescent. PMID:25755922

  1. Prolonged SDA and reduced digestive efficiency under elevated CO2 may explain reduced growth in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Tirsgaard, Bjørn; Moran, Damian; Steffensen, John F

    2015-01-01

    Land-based aquaculture systems expose fish to elevated dissolved CO2 levels, a factor that is correlated with reduced growth, feed conversion efficiency and body condition index. The physiological basis underlying the pathological effects of environmental hypercapnia is poorly understood, in particular for marine fish species. We investigated whether changes in energy expenditure and the specific dynamic action (SDA) of digestion and assimilation could account for the lower growth of adult Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) under environmental hypercapnia. Fish acclimated to a partial pressure of 800 μatm CO2 (0.6 mmHg, 1.5 mg/L) and 9200 μatm CO2 (7 mmHg, 18.7 mg/L) exhibited no difference in maintenance metabolic rates, which concurs with previous research for this species and other fish species. At 9200 μatm CO2 Atlantic cod had a significantly diminished (14%) maximum aerobic capacity. While hypercapnia did not affect the amount of oxygen required for the SDA process, it did prolong the SDA duration by 23%. The longer SDA process time may offer an explanation for the observation of lower feed intake, growth and condition factor in long-term hypercapnia studies. Comparison of aerobic scope and cardiac performance during digestion suggested that reduced oxygen delivery capacity under hypercapnia could be one mechanism by which CO2 prolongs SDA, although our results could not definitively demonstrate this effect.

  2. Nucleotide variation and balancing selection at the Ckma gene in Atlantic cod: analysis with multiple merger coalescent models.

    PubMed

    Árnason, Einar; Halldórsdóttir, Katrín

    2015-01-01

    High-fecundity organisms, such as Atlantic cod, can withstand substantial natural selection and the entailing genetic load of replacing alleles at a number of loci due to their excess reproductive capacity. High-fecundity organisms may reproduce by sweepstakes leading to highly skewed heavy-tailed offspring distribution. Under such reproduction the Kingman coalescent of binary mergers breaks down and models of multiple merger coalescent are more appropriate. Here we study nucleotide variation at the Ckma (Creatine Kinase Muscle type A) gene in Atlantic cod. The gene shows extreme differentiation between the North (Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Barents Sea) and the South (Faroe Islands, North-, Baltic-, Celtic-, and Irish Seas) with FST > 0.8 between regions whereas neutral loci show no differentiation. This is evidence of natural selection. The protein sequence is conserved by purifying selection whereas silent and non-coding sites show extreme differentiation. The unfolded site-frequency spectrum has three modes, a mode at singleton sites and two high frequency modes at opposite frequencies representing divergent branches of the gene genealogy that is evidence for balancing selection. Analysis with multiple-merger coalescent models can account for the high frequency of singleton sites and indicate reproductive sweepstakes. Coalescent time scales vary with population size and with the inverse of variance in offspring number. Parameter estimates using multiple-merger coalescent models show that times scales are faster than under the Kingman coalescent. PMID:25755922

  3. Global transcriptome analysis identifies regulated transcripts and pathways activated during oogenesis and early embryogenesis in atlantic cod

    PubMed Central

    Kleppe, Lene; Edvardsen, Rolf Brudvik; Furmanek, Tomasz; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Wargelius, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying oogenesis and maternally controlled embryogenesis in fish are not fully understood, especially in marine species. Our aim was to study the egg and embryo transcriptome during oogenesis and early embryogenesis in Atlantic cod. Follicles from oogenesis stages (pre-, early-, and late-vitellogenic), ovulated eggs, and two embryonic stages (blastula, gastrula) were collected from broodstock fish and fertilized eggs. Gene expression profiles were measured in a 44 K oligo microarray consisting of 23,000 cod genes. Hundreds of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in the follicle stages investigated, implicating a continuous accumulation and degradation of polyadenylated transcripts throughout oogenesis. Very few DEGs were identified from ovulated egg to blastula, showing a more stable maternal RNA pool in early embryonic stages. The highest induction of expression was observed between blastula and gastrula, signifying the onset of zygotic transcription. During early vitellogenesis, several of the most upregulated genes are linked to nervous system signaling, suggesting increasing requirements for ovarian synaptic signaling to stimulate the rapid growth of oocytes. Highly upregulated genes during late vitellogenesis are linked to protein processing, fat metabolism, osmoregulation, and arrested meiosis. One of the genes with the highest upregulation in the ovulated egg is involved in oxidative phosphorylation, reflecting increased energy requirements during fertilization and the first rapid cell divisions of early embryogenesis. In conclusion, this study provides a large-scale presentation of the Atlantic cod's maternally controlled transcriptome in ovarian follicles through oogenesis, ovulated eggs, and early embryos. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 81: 619–635, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24687555

  4. Molecular Evidence that Only Two Opsin Subfamilies, the Blue Light- (SWS2) and Green Light-Sensitive (RH2), Drive Color Vision in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua)

    PubMed Central

    Søviknes, Anne Mette; Drivenes, Øyvind; Helvik, Jon Vidar

    2014-01-01

    Teleosts show a great variety in visual opsin complement, due to both gene duplication and gene loss. The repertoire ranges from one subfamily of visual opsins (scotopic vision) including rod opsin only retinas seen in many deep-sea species to multiple subfamilies of visual opsins in some pelagic species. We have investigated the opsin repertoire of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) using information in the recently sequenced cod genome and found that despite cod not being a deep sea species it lacks visual subfamilies sensitive towards the most extreme parts of the light spectra representing UV and red light. Furthermore, we find that Atlantic cod has duplicated paralogs of both blue-sensitive SWS2 and green-sensitive RH2 subfamilies, with members belonging to each subfamily linked in tandem within the genome (two SWS2-, and three RH2A genes, respectively). The presence of multiple cone opsin genes indicates that there have been duplication events in the cod ancestor SWS2 and RH2 opsins producing paralogs that have been retained in Atlantic. Our results are supported by expressional analysis of cone opsins, which further revealed an ontogenetic change in the array of cone opsins expressed. These findings suggest life stage specific programs for opsin regulation which could be linked to habitat changes and available light as the larvae is transformed into an early juvenile. Altogether we provide the first molecular evidence for color vision driven by only two families of cone opsins due to gene loss in a teleost. PMID:25551396

  5. Functional genomic analysis of the response of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) spleen to the viral mimic polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC).

    PubMed

    Rise, Matthew L; Hall, Jennifer; Rise, Marlies; Hori, Tiago; Gamperl, A Kurt; Kimball, Jennifer; Hubert, Sophie; Bowman, Sharen; Johnson, Stewart C

    2008-01-01

    In order to improve our understanding of how Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) respond to viruses, we characterized immune-related gene expression in spleen tissues following stimulation with a synthetic double-stranded RNA polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC). We used reciprocal suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA libraries and quantitative RTPCR (QPCR) to identify and quantify pIC-responsive transcripts. A total of 3874 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated from SSH libraries enriched for genes responsive to pIC. Thirteen immune-relevant genes from the libraries were subjected to QPCR. Genes confirmed as up-regulated by pIC included interferon stimulated gene 15, a small inducible cytokine, interferon regulatory factors (1, 7, and 10), MHC class I, viperin, and ATP-dependent helicase LGP2. Alpha-1-microglobulin (bikunin) was down-regulated, suggesting that pIC may suppress the acute phase response. Since the SSH libraries built for this study identified genes involved in the antiviral response, they are important resources for studying the responses of Atlantic cod to viruses. Evidence is provided for the existence of a RIG-I-like RNA helicase viral recognition pathway in Atlantic cod. Taken together, our data show that Atlantic cod can recognize double-stranded RNA and mount a rapid and potent interferon pathway response that is similar to that observed in other fish species and higher vertebrates.

  6. An assessment of juvenile Atlantic cod Gadus morhua distribution and growth using diver operated stereo-video surveys.

    PubMed

    Elliott, S A M; Ahti, P A; Heath, M R; Turrell, W R; Bailey, D M

    2016-08-01

    Stereo-video scuba transects were conducted during daylight hours from June to September 2013 within a proposed marine protected area (MPA) in the Firth of Clyde, west of Scotland. More juvenile Atlantic cod Gadus morhua of fork length (LF ) range 6-11 cm were observed in substrata containing mixed gravel, including maerl, than in boulder-cobble substrata with high algal cover, or sand with low density seagrass. Community composition was significantly different between substratum types. A decrease in G. morhua abundance was observed over the period of data collection. Over time, mean and variance in G. morhua LF increased, indicating multiple recruitment events. Protecting mixed gravel substrata could be a beneficial management measure to support the survival and recruitment of juvenile G. morhua; other substrata might be important at night given their diel migratory behaviour. Stereo-video cameras provide a useful non-destructive fisheries-independent method to monitor species abundance and length measurements. PMID:27221152

  7. Evidence from data storage tags for the presence of lunar and semilunar behavioral cycles in spawning Atlantic cod

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grabowski, Timothy B.; McAdam, Bruce J.; Thorsteinsson, Vilhjalmur; Marteinsdóttir, Gudrún

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the environmental processes determining the timing and success of reproduction is of critical importance to developing effective management strategies of marine fishes. Unfortunately it has proven difficult to comprehensively study the reproductive behavior of broadcast-spawning fishes. The use of electronic data storage tags (DSTs) has the potential to provide insights into the behavior of fishes. These tags allow for data collection over relatively large spatial and temporal scales that can be correlated to predicted environmental conditions and ultimately be used to refine predictions of year class strength. In this paper we present data retrieved from DSTs demonstrating that events putatively identified as Atlantic cod spawning behavior is tied to a lunar cycle with a pronounced semi-lunar cycle within it. Peak activity occurs around the full and new moon with no evidence of relationship with day/night cycles.

  8. An investigation of appetite-related peptide transcript expression in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) brain following a Camelina sativa meal-supplemented feeding trial.

    PubMed

    Tuziak, Sarah M; Rise, Matthew L; Volkoff, Hélène

    2014-10-25

    Camelina sativa is a hardy oilseed crop with seeds that contain high levels of ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and protein, which are critical components of fish feed. Camelina might thus be used as a cheaper and more sustainable supplement to fish-based products in aquaculture. Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, is a species of interest in the aquaculture industry due to a decrease in wild populations and subsequent collapse of some cod fisheries. As cod are carnivorous fish, it is necessary to determine how this species physiologically tolerates plant-based diets. In this study, juvenile Atlantic cod were subjected to 13 weeks of either 15 or 30% camelina meal (CM)-supplemented diets or a control fish meal feed. Growth and food intake were evaluated and the mRNA expression of appetite-related hormones [pro-melanin-concentrating hormone (pmch), hypocretin (synonym: orexin, hcrt), neuropeptide Y (npy) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (cart)] was assessed using quantitative real-time PCR in brain regions related to food intake regulation (telencephalon/preoptic area, optic tectum/thalamus and hypothalamus). CM inclusion diets caused decreases in both growth and food intake in Atlantic cod. Optic tectum pmch transcript expression was significantly higher in fish fed the 30% CM diet compared to fish fed the 15% CM diet. In the hypothalamus, compared to fish fed the control diet, hcrt expression was significantly higher in fish fed the 30% CM diet, while npy transcript expression was significantly higher in fish fed the 15% CM diet. cart mRNA expression was not affected by diet in any brain region. Further studies are needed to determine which factors (e.g. anti-nutritional factors, palatability and nutritional deficits) contribute to reduced feed intake and growth, as well as the maximum CM inclusion level that does not negatively influence feed intake, growth rate and the transcript expression of appetite-related factors in Atlantic cod.

  9. An investigation of appetite-related peptide transcript expression in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) brain following a Camelina sativa meal-supplemented feeding trial.

    PubMed

    Tuziak, Sarah M; Rise, Matthew L; Volkoff, Hélène

    2014-10-25

    Camelina sativa is a hardy oilseed crop with seeds that contain high levels of ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and protein, which are critical components of fish feed. Camelina might thus be used as a cheaper and more sustainable supplement to fish-based products in aquaculture. Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, is a species of interest in the aquaculture industry due to a decrease in wild populations and subsequent collapse of some cod fisheries. As cod are carnivorous fish, it is necessary to determine how this species physiologically tolerates plant-based diets. In this study, juvenile Atlantic cod were subjected to 13 weeks of either 15 or 30% camelina meal (CM)-supplemented diets or a control fish meal feed. Growth and food intake were evaluated and the mRNA expression of appetite-related hormones [pro-melanin-concentrating hormone (pmch), hypocretin (synonym: orexin, hcrt), neuropeptide Y (npy) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (cart)] was assessed using quantitative real-time PCR in brain regions related to food intake regulation (telencephalon/preoptic area, optic tectum/thalamus and hypothalamus). CM inclusion diets caused decreases in both growth and food intake in Atlantic cod. Optic tectum pmch transcript expression was significantly higher in fish fed the 30% CM diet compared to fish fed the 15% CM diet. In the hypothalamus, compared to fish fed the control diet, hcrt expression was significantly higher in fish fed the 30% CM diet, while npy transcript expression was significantly higher in fish fed the 15% CM diet. cart mRNA expression was not affected by diet in any brain region. Further studies are needed to determine which factors (e.g. anti-nutritional factors, palatability and nutritional deficits) contribute to reduced feed intake and growth, as well as the maximum CM inclusion level that does not negatively influence feed intake, growth rate and the transcript expression of appetite-related factors in Atlantic cod. PMID:25151310

  10. Copepods enhance nutritional status, growth and development in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) larvae - can we identify the underlying factors?

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Ørjan; van der Meeren, Terje; Rønnestad, Ivar; Mangor-Jensen, Anders; Galloway, Trina F; Kjørsvik, Elin; Hamre, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The current commercial production protocols for Atlantic cod depend on enriched rotifers and Artemia during first-feeding, but development and growth remain inferior to fish fed natural zooplankton. Two experiments were conducted in order to identify the underlying factors for this phenomenon. In the first experiment (Exp-1), groups of cod larvae were fed either (a) natural zooplankton, mainly copepods, increasing the size of prey as the larvae grew or (b) enriched rotifers followed by Artemia (the intensive group). In the second experiment (Exp-2), two groups of larvae were fed as in Exp-1, while a third group was fed copepod nauplii (approximately the size of rotifers) throughout the larval stage. In both experiments, growth was not significantly different between the groups during the first three weeks after hatching, but from the last part of the rotifer feeding period and onwards, the growth of the larvae fed copepods was higher than that of the intensive group. In Exp-2, the growth was similar between the two copepod groups during the expeimental period, indicating that nutrient composition, not prey size caused the better growth on copepods. Analyses of the prey showed that total fatty acid composition and the ratio of phospholipids to total lipids was slightly different in the prey organisms, and that protein, taurine, astaxanthin and zinc were lower on a dry weight basis in rotifers than in copepods. Other measured nutrients as DHA, all analysed vitamins, manganese, copper and selenium were similar or higher in the rotifers. When compared to the present knowledge on nutrient requirements, protein and taurine appeared to be the most likely limiting nutrients for growth in cod larvae fed rotifers and Artemia. Larvae fed rotifers/Artemia had a higher whole body lipid content than larvae fed copepods at the end of the experiment (stage 5) after the fish had been fed the same formulated diet for approximately 2 weeks.

  11. Copepods enhance nutritional status, growth and development in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) larvae - can we identify the underlying factors?

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Ørjan; van der Meeren, Terje; Rønnestad, Ivar; Mangor-Jensen, Anders; Galloway, Trina F; Kjørsvik, Elin; Hamre, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The current commercial production protocols for Atlantic cod depend on enriched rotifers and Artemia during first-feeding, but development and growth remain inferior to fish fed natural zooplankton. Two experiments were conducted in order to identify the underlying factors for this phenomenon. In the first experiment (Exp-1), groups of cod larvae were fed either (a) natural zooplankton, mainly copepods, increasing the size of prey as the larvae grew or (b) enriched rotifers followed by Artemia (the intensive group). In the second experiment (Exp-2), two groups of larvae were fed as in Exp-1, while a third group was fed copepod nauplii (approximately the size of rotifers) throughout the larval stage. In both experiments, growth was not significantly different between the groups during the first three weeks after hatching, but from the last part of the rotifer feeding period and onwards, the growth of the larvae fed copepods was higher than that of the intensive group. In Exp-2, the growth was similar between the two copepod groups during the expeimental period, indicating that nutrient composition, not prey size caused the better growth on copepods. Analyses of the prey showed that total fatty acid composition and the ratio of phospholipids to total lipids was slightly different in the prey organisms, and that protein, taurine, astaxanthin and zinc were lower on a dry weight basis in rotifers than in copepods. Other measured nutrients as DHA, all analysed vitamins, manganese, copper and selenium were similar or higher in the rotifers. When compared to the present knowledge on nutrient requirements, protein and taurine appeared to be the most likely limiting nutrients for growth in cod larvae fed rotifers and Artemia. Larvae fed rotifers/Artemia had a higher whole body lipid content than larvae fed copepods at the end of the experiment (stage 5) after the fish had been fed the same formulated diet for approximately 2 weeks. PMID:26038712

  12. Effects of hypoxic exposure during feeding on SDA and postprandial cardiovascular physiology in the Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Jane W; Axelsson, Michael; Neuenfeldt, Stefan; Seth, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Some Atlantic cod in the Bornholm Basin undertake vertical foraging migrations into severely hypoxic bottom water. Hypoxic conditions can reduce the postprandial increase in gastrointestinal blood flow (GBF). This could subsequently postpone or reduce the postprandial increase in oxygen consumption (MO(2)), i.e. the SDA, leading to a disturbed digestion. Additionally, a restricted oxygen uptake could result in an oxygen debt that needs to be compensated for upon return to normoxic waters and this may also affect the ability to process the food. Long-term cardio-respiratory measurements were made on fed G. morhua in order to understand how the cardio-respiratory system of feeding fish respond to a period of hypoxia and a subsequent return to normoxia. These were exposed to 35% water oxygen saturation for 90 minutes, equivalent to the time and oxygen level cod voluntarily endure when searching for food in the Bornholm Basin. We found that i) gastric and intestinal blood flows, cardiac output and MO(2) increased after feeding, ii) gastric and intestinal blood flows were spared in hypoxia, and iii) there were no indications of an oxygen debt at the end of the hypoxic period. The magnitude and time course of the measured variables are similar to values obtained from fish not exposed to the hypoxic period. In conclusion, when cod in the field search for and ingest prey under moderate hypoxic conditions they appear to stay within safe limits of oxygen availability as we saw no indications of an oxygen debt, or negative influence on digestive capacity, when simulating field observations.

  13. Effects of Hypoxic Exposure during Feeding on SDA and Postprandial Cardiovascular Physiology in the Atlantic Cod, Gadus morhua

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Jane W.; Axelsson, Michael; Neuenfeldt, Stefan; Seth, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Some Atlantic cod in the Bornholm Basin undertake vertical foraging migrations into severely hypoxic bottom water. Hypoxic conditions can reduce the postprandial increase in gastrointestinal blood flow (GBF). This could subsequently postpone or reduce the postprandial increase in oxygen consumption (MO2), i.e. the SDA, leading to a disturbed digestion. Additionally, a restricted oxygen uptake could result in an oxygen debt that needs to be compensated for upon return to normoxic waters and this may also affect the ability to process the food. Long-term cardio-respiratory measurements were made on fed G. morhua in order to understand how the cardio-respiratory system of feeding fish respond to a period of hypoxia and a subsequent return to normoxia. These were exposed to 35% water oxygen saturation for 90 minutes, equivalent to the time and oxygen level cod voluntarily endure when searching for food in the Bornholm Basin. We found that i) gastric and intestinal blood flows, cardiac output and MO2 increased after feeding, ii) gastric and intestinal blood flows were spared in hypoxia, and iii) there were no indications of an oxygen debt at the end of the hypoxic period. The magnitude and time course of the measured variables are similar to values obtained from fish not exposed to the hypoxic period. In conclusion, when cod in the field search for and ingest prey under moderate hypoxic conditions they appear to stay within safe limits of oxygen availability as we saw no indications of an oxygen debt, or negative influence on digestive capacity, when simulating field observations. PMID:23049987

  14. Is chemically dispersed oil more toxic to Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae than mechanically dispersed oil? A transcriptional evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of dispersants can be an effective way to deal with acute oil spills to limit environmental damage, however very little is known about whether chemically dispersed oil have the same toxic effect on marine organisms as mechanically dispersed oil. We exposed Atlantic cod larvae to chemically and mechanically dispersed oil for four days during the first-feeding stage of development, and collected larvae at 14 days post hatch for transcriptional analysis. A genome-wide microarray was used to screen for effects and to assess whether molecular responses to chemically and mechanically dispersed oil were similar, given the same exposure to oil (droplet distribution and concentration) with and without the addition of a chemical dispersant (Dasic NS). Results Mechanically dispersed oil induced expression changes in almost three times as many transcripts compared to chemically dispersed oil (fold change >+/−1.5). Functional analyses suggest that chemically dispersed oil affects partly different pathways than mechanically dispersed oil. By comparing the alteration in gene transcription in cod larvae exposed to the highest concentrations of either chemically or mechanically dispersed oil directly, the chemically dispersed oil affected transcription of genes involved nucleosome regulation, i.e. genes encoding proteins participating in DNA replication and chromatin formation and regulation of cell proliferation, whereas the mechanically dispersed oil most strongly affected genes encoding proteins involved in proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Cyp1a was the transcript that was most strongly affected in both exposure groups, with a 60-fold induction in the two high-exposure groups according to the RT-qPCR data, but no significant difference in transcriptional levels was observed between the two treatments. Conclusions In summary, dispersants do not appear to add to the magnitude of transcriptional responses of oil compounds but rather appear to lower or

  15. Single and mixture effects of aquatic micropollutants studied in precision-cut liver slices of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Bizarro, Cristina; Eide, Marta; Hitchcock, Daniel J; Goksøyr, Anders; Ortiz-Zarragoitia, Maren

    2016-08-01

    The low concentrations of most contaminants in the aquatic environment individually may not affect the normal function of the organisms on their own. However, when combined, complex mixtures may provoke unexpected effects even at low amounts. Selected aquatic micropollutants such as chlorpyrifos, bis-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) were tested singly and in mixtures at nM to μM concentrations using precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Fish liver is a target organ for contaminants due to its crucial role in detoxification processes. In order to understand the effects on distinct key liver metabolic pathways, transcription levels of various genes were measured, including cyp1a1 and cyp3a, involved in the metabolism of organic compounds, including toxic ones, and the catabolism of bile acids and steroid hormones; cyp7a1, fabp and hmg-CoA, involved in lipid and cholesterol homeostasis; cyp24a1, involved in vitamin D metabolism; and vtg, a key gene in xenoestrogenic response. Only EE2 had significant effects on gene expression in cod liver slices when exposed singly at the concentrations tested. However, when exposed in combinations, effects not detected in single exposure conditions arose, suggesting complex interactions between studied pollutants that could not be predicted from the results of individual exposure scenarios. Thus, the present work highlights the importance of assessing mixtures when describing the toxic effects of micropollutants to fish liver metabolism. PMID:27388235

  16. Infection dynamics of two renal myxozoans in hatchery reared fry and juvenile Atlantic cod Gadus morhua L.

    PubMed

    Holzer, A S; Stewart, S; Tildesley, A; Wootten, R; Sommerville, C

    2010-09-01

    In order to study the infection dynamics of 2 renal myxozoans, Zschokkella hildae Auerbach, 1910 and Gadimyxa atlantica Køie, Karlsbakk and Nylund, 2007 in cultured Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L. aged 3-19 months, a specific single-round PCR assay and a double-label in situ hybridization protocol were developed. The results demonstrated that the 2 myxozoans show spatial separation of their development with regard to spore formation inside the renal tubules versus the collecting ducts and ureters, as well as temporal separation with Z. hildae proliferating and developing spores only once the G. atlantica infection decreases, despite the presence of both myxozoans in the smallest fry studied. These results strongly suggest within-host competition of the 2 myxozoans with potential suppression of Z. hildae by G. atlantica until G. morhua acquires immunity against G. atlantica. The quantification of the G. atlantica infection inside the renal tubules before and after a 29-day experimental growth performance study using fry from hatcheries with differing filtration systems showed that the intensity of infection with G. atlantica seems to be controlled if prolonged exposure to the myxozoan transmission stages takes place from hatching onwards. Surprisingly, growth rates in the trial were inversely affected suggesting that G. atlantica does not negatively influence cod fry growth performance.

  17. Single and mixture effects of aquatic micropollutants studied in precision-cut liver slices of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Bizarro, Cristina; Eide, Marta; Hitchcock, Daniel J; Goksøyr, Anders; Ortiz-Zarragoitia, Maren

    2016-08-01

    The low concentrations of most contaminants in the aquatic environment individually may not affect the normal function of the organisms on their own. However, when combined, complex mixtures may provoke unexpected effects even at low amounts. Selected aquatic micropollutants such as chlorpyrifos, bis-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) were tested singly and in mixtures at nM to μM concentrations using precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Fish liver is a target organ for contaminants due to its crucial role in detoxification processes. In order to understand the effects on distinct key liver metabolic pathways, transcription levels of various genes were measured, including cyp1a1 and cyp3a, involved in the metabolism of organic compounds, including toxic ones, and the catabolism of bile acids and steroid hormones; cyp7a1, fabp and hmg-CoA, involved in lipid and cholesterol homeostasis; cyp24a1, involved in vitamin D metabolism; and vtg, a key gene in xenoestrogenic response. Only EE2 had significant effects on gene expression in cod liver slices when exposed singly at the concentrations tested. However, when exposed in combinations, effects not detected in single exposure conditions arose, suggesting complex interactions between studied pollutants that could not be predicted from the results of individual exposure scenarios. Thus, the present work highlights the importance of assessing mixtures when describing the toxic effects of micropollutants to fish liver metabolism.

  18. Effects of water accommodated fractions of crude oils and diesel on a suite of biomarkers in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Holth, T F; Eidsvoll, D P; Farmen, E; Sanders, M B; Martínez-Gómez, C; Budzinski, H; Burgeot, T; Guilhermino, L; Hylland, K

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize concentration- and time-dependent responses in juvenile Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) following exposure for one and three weeks to the water-soluble fraction (WAF) of three weathered oils: Arabian Light crude oil (ALC), North Sea crude oil (NSC) and ship-diesel. The sum of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in water was highest after one week of exposure and within environmentally relevant concentrations. PAH metabolites in bile confirmed exposure to and uptake of PAHs. Hepatic cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) gene expression (mRNA quantification) increased dramatically following exposure to all three oil types (fold-change up to 165) and there was a time lag between gene and protein expression. Hepatic CYP1A protein concentration and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity were more variable among individuals and treatments than gene expression. EROD activity in liver and gills increased in fish exposed to WAF from the two crude oils, but not in fish exposed to WAF from diesel. Exposure to diesel appeared to induce oxidative stress to a greater extent than exposure to crude oils. Other biomarkers (glutathione S-transferases, acetylcholine esterase, vitellogenin) did not appear to respond to the exposure and hence did not discriminate among oils. Biomarker responses in cod after exposure to weathered crude oils and diesel suggested that the CYP1A system and oxidative stress markers have the highest potential for discriminating among different oil types and to monitor the environmental consequences of spills.

  19. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua: tissue distributions, early ontogeny and effects of fasting.

    PubMed

    Tuziak, Sarah M; Volkoff, Hélène

    2013-12-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is classically known for its role in regulating teleost fish skin color change for environmental adaptation. Recent evidence suggests that MCH also has appetite-stimulating properties. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) peptide family has dual roles in endocrine control of reproduction and energy status in fish. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) are a commercially important aquaculture species inhabiting the shores of Atlantic Canada. In this study, we examine MCH and GnRH transcript expression profiles during early development as well as in central and peripheral tissues and quantify juvenile Atlantic cod MCH and GnRH hypothalamic mRNA expressions following food deprivation. MCH and GnRH3 cDNAs are maternally deposited into cod eggs, while MCH has variable expression throughout early development. GnRH2 and GnRH3 mRNAs "turn-on" during mid-segmentation once the brain is fully developed. For both MCH and GnRH, highest expression appears during the exogenous feeding stages, perhaps supporting their functions as appetite regulators during early development. MCH and GnRH transcripts are found in brain regions related to appetite regulation (telencephalon/preoptic area, optic tectum/thalamus, hypothalamus), as well as the pituitary gland and the stomach, suggesting a peripheral function in food intake regulation. Atlantic cod MCH mRNA is upregulated during fasting, while GnRH2 and GnRH3 transcripts do not appear to be influenced by food deprivation. In conclusion, MCH might be involved in stimulating food intake in juvenile Atlantic cod, while GnRHs may play a more significant role in appetite regulation during early development.

  20. Synergies between climate and management for Atlantic cod fisheries at high latitudes

    PubMed Central

    Kjesbu, Olav Sigurd; Bogstad, Bjarte; Devine, Jennifer A.; Gjøsæter, Harald; Howell, Daniel; Ingvaldsen, Randi B.; Nash, Richard D. M.; Skjæraasen, Jon Egil

    2014-01-01

    The widespread depletion of commercially exploited marine living resources is often seen as a general failure of management and results in criticism of contemporary management procedures. When populations show dramatic and positive changes in population size, this invariably leads to questions about whether favorable climatic conditions or good management (or both) were responsible. The Barents Sea cod (Gadus morhua) stock has recently increased markedly and the spawning stock biomass is now at an unprecedented high. We identify the crucial social and environmental factors that made this unique growth possible. The relationship between vital rates of Barents Sea cod stock productivity (recruitment, growth, and mortality) and environment is investigated, followed by simulations of population size under different management scenarios. We show that the recent sustained reduction in fishing mortality, facilitated by the implementation of a “harvest control rule,” was essential to the increase in population size. Simulations show that a drastic reduction in fishing mortality has resulted in a doubling of the total population biomass compared with that expected under the former management regime. However, management alone was not solely responsible. We document that prevailing climate, operating through several mechanistic links, positively reinforced management actions. Heightened temperature resulted in an increase in the extent of the suitable feeding area for Barents Sea cod, likely offering a release from density-dependent effects (for example, food competition and cannibalism) through prolonged overlap with prey and improved adult stock productivity. Management and climate may thus interact to give a positive outlook for exploited high-latitude marine resources. PMID:24550465

  1. Genetic and morphological variation in Echinorhynchus gadi Zoega in Müller, 1776 (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) from Atlantic cod Gadus morhua L.

    PubMed

    Sobecka, E; Szostakowska, B; MacKenzie, K; Hemmingsen, W; Prajsnar, S; Eydal, M

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies have shown considerable variability in morphological features and the existence of genetically distinct sibling species in the acanthocephalan Echinorhynchus gadi Zoega in Müller, 1776. The aim of the present study was to follow up and extend those earlier studies by using a combination of DNA analysis and morphometrics to investigate differences between samples of E. gadi from Atlantic cod Gadus morhua L. caught at five fishing grounds in the Baltic Sea and three in different parts of the North Atlantic. Twelve morphological features were measured in 431 specimens of E. gadi, 99 individuals were studied by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphosm (PCR-RFLP), and selected PCR products were sequenced. The molecular analyses showed the nucleotide sequences of E. gadi rDNA from cod caught at all the sampling sites to be identical. The comparative morphological study, in contrast, revealed significant differences between samples of E. gadi from different sampling sites and showed the separation of E. gadi into two groups corresponding approximately to the systematic classification of cod into the two subspecies, Atlantic G. morhua morhua and Baltic G. morhua callarias. The E. gadi infrapopulation size had a significant effect on some of the morphological features. The results are discussed in relation to cod population biology, the hydrography of the study area and the history of the Baltic Sea formation.

  2. Precision-cut liver slices of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua): an in vitro system for studying the effects of environmental contaminants.

    PubMed

    Eide, M; Karlsen, O A; Kryvi, H; Olsvik, P A; Goksøyr, A

    2014-08-01

    The Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is an economically important species commonly consumed by humans. The widespread distribution of cod in the North Atlantic Ocean makes it vulnerable to effluents from human activities, such as coastal industries and offshore petroleum exploration. It has been demonstrated that many effluents have adverse effects on cod reproduction and health, e.g. by disrupting endocrine signaling pathways. The liver, expressing important components of the biotransformation and the endocrine system, is one of the main target organs. Thus, reliable and reproducible in vitro systems of the liver are important for studying effects of environmental contaminants. The aim of this study was to investigate precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) as an alternative in vitro system for toxicological studies of the Atlantic cod liver. Slices of 8 mm in diameter and 250 μm thickness were prepared and cultivated from immature cod. Several analyses to measure the liver slice viability were performed: enzyme assays, histology, and morphometric analysis, all confirming cell viability for up to 72 h in culture. The liver slices were also exposed to two well-known model environmental contaminants, β-naphthoflavone (BNF) and 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), representing established agonists for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and the estrogen receptor (ER), respectively. The results showed increased transcription of the target genes cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) and vitellogenin (VTG), both well-established biomarkers for exposure of fish to the selected compounds. In conclusion, PCLS is a promising in vitro system for toxicological studies of cod liver cells. The liver slices are viable in culture for several days and respond to environmental contaminants in a dose- and time-specific manner.

  3. Correlation between microbiota and growth in Mangrove Killifish (Kryptolebias marmoratus) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    PubMed Central

    Forberg, Torunn; Sjulstad, Eli Bjørnø; Bakke, Ingrid; Olsen, Yngvar; Hagiwara, Atsushi; Sakakura, Yoshitaka; Vadstein, Olav

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate gut is host to large communities of bacteria, and one of the beneficial contributions of this commensal gut microbiota is the increased nutritional gain from feed components that the host cannot degrade on its own. Fish larvae of similar age and under the same rearing conditions often diverge with regards to growth. The underlying reasons for this could be differences in genetic background, feeding behavior or digestive capacity. Both feeding behavior and digestion can be influenced by differences in the microbiota. To investigate possible correlations between the size of fish larvae and their gut microbiota, we analyzed the microbiota small and large genetically homogenous killifish and genetically heterogeneous cod larvae by Bray-Curtis Similarity measures of 16S DNA DGGE patterns. A significant difference in richness (p = 0.037) was observed in the gut microbiota of small and large killifish, but the overall gut microbiota was not found to be significantly different (p = 0.13), indicating strong genetic host selection on microbiota composition at the time of sampling. The microbiota of small and large cod larvae was significantly different with regards to evenness and diversity (p = 0.0001), and a strong correlation between microbiota and growth was observed. PMID:26875510

  4. Correlation between microbiota and growth in Mangrove Killifish (Kryptolebias marmoratus) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Forberg, Torunn; Sjulstad, Eli Bjørnø; Bakke, Ingrid; Olsen, Yngvar; Hagiwara, Atsushi; Sakakura, Yoshitaka; Vadstein, Olav

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate gut is host to large communities of bacteria, and one of the beneficial contributions of this commensal gut microbiota is the increased nutritional gain from feed components that the host cannot degrade on its own. Fish larvae of similar age and under the same rearing conditions often diverge with regards to growth. The underlying reasons for this could be differences in genetic background, feeding behavior or digestive capacity. Both feeding behavior and digestion can be influenced by differences in the microbiota. To investigate possible correlations between the size of fish larvae and their gut microbiota, we analyzed the microbiota small and large genetically homogenous killifish and genetically heterogeneous cod larvae by Bray-Curtis Similarity measures of 16S DNA DGGE patterns. A significant difference in richness (p = 0.037) was observed in the gut microbiota of small and large killifish, but the overall gut microbiota was not found to be significantly different (p = 0.13), indicating strong genetic host selection on microbiota composition at the time of sampling. The microbiota of small and large cod larvae was significantly different with regards to evenness and diversity (p = 0.0001), and a strong correlation between microbiota and growth was observed. PMID:26875510

  5. Large scale distribution of dioxins, PCBs, heavy metals, PAH-metabolites and radionuclides in cod (Gadus morhua) from the North Atlantic and its adjacent seas.

    PubMed

    Karl, Horst; Kammann, Ulrike; Aust, Marc-Oliver; Manthey-Karl, Monika; Lüth, Anja; Kanisch, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Regarding cod as sea food for human consumption and as bio indicator of the marine eco system, this study is the first approach to combine the analysis of organic and inorganic contaminants and radionuclides in cod muscle as well as PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs in its livers from the same fishing areas. Concentrations of 1-hydroxypyrene, PCDD/Fs, PCBs, cesium-137 (Cs-137), cadmium and lead were determined in individual or pooled samples over a wide geographic area, including Greenland Seas, Barents Sea, North and Baltic Sea. Highest concentrations were found in samples from the Baltic Sea, lowest in the pristine areas of the Barents Sea and Greenland. Levels of contaminants in cod muscle were found to be far below the established EU maximum levels (ML), regardless of which fishing grounds. In contrast to this, most cod liver samples from the North and Baltic Sea showed PCDD/F and PCB contents exceeding the ML. In addition, new background assessment criteria (BAC) for 1-hydroxypyrene in cod of 4.6 ng mL(-1) bile and for Cs-137 a BAC of 0.16 Bq kg(-1) wet weight are proposed to be included in the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive for cod from the Northeast Atlantic. PMID:26874057

  6. Large scale distribution of dioxins, PCBs, heavy metals, PAH-metabolites and radionuclides in cod (Gadus morhua) from the North Atlantic and its adjacent seas.

    PubMed

    Karl, Horst; Kammann, Ulrike; Aust, Marc-Oliver; Manthey-Karl, Monika; Lüth, Anja; Kanisch, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Regarding cod as sea food for human consumption and as bio indicator of the marine eco system, this study is the first approach to combine the analysis of organic and inorganic contaminants and radionuclides in cod muscle as well as PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs in its livers from the same fishing areas. Concentrations of 1-hydroxypyrene, PCDD/Fs, PCBs, cesium-137 (Cs-137), cadmium and lead were determined in individual or pooled samples over a wide geographic area, including Greenland Seas, Barents Sea, North and Baltic Sea. Highest concentrations were found in samples from the Baltic Sea, lowest in the pristine areas of the Barents Sea and Greenland. Levels of contaminants in cod muscle were found to be far below the established EU maximum levels (ML), regardless of which fishing grounds. In contrast to this, most cod liver samples from the North and Baltic Sea showed PCDD/F and PCB contents exceeding the ML. In addition, new background assessment criteria (BAC) for 1-hydroxypyrene in cod of 4.6 ng mL(-1) bile and for Cs-137 a BAC of 0.16 Bq kg(-1) wet weight are proposed to be included in the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive for cod from the Northeast Atlantic.

  7. Changes in natural mortality of Atlantic cod ( Gadus morhua) on Eastern Georges Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanjun

    2016-10-01

    The assessment of Eastern Georges Bank cod with the assumption of a constant natural mortality of 0.2 has over-estimated stock productivity, resulting in a severe retrospective pattern since the late 2000s. Comparing relative exploitation rate (ratio of fishery catch at age to survey abundance indices at age) with total mortality calculated from the age distribution in surveys indicated a conflict when constant natural mortality was assumed. This inconsistency implies an increase in natural mortality since the mid-1990s. In this paper, natural mortality estimated by Virtual Population Analysis (VPA) indicated that natural mortality for this stock has increased to 0.8 since the mid-1990s for ages 6+. Potential factors contributing to this elevated natural mortality, including poor fish conditions and increased losses due to seal predation were discussed.

  8. Ocean warming and acidification modulate energy budget and gill ion regulatory mechanisms in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Kreiss, C M; Michael, K; Lucassen, M; Jutfelt, F; Motyka, R; Dupont, S; Pörtner, H-O

    2015-10-01

    Ocean warming and acidification are threatening marine ecosystems. In marine animals, acidification is thought to enhance ion regulatory costs and thereby baseline energy demand, while elevated temperature also increases baseline metabolic rate. Here we investigated standard metabolic rates (SMR) and plasma parameters of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) after 3-4 weeks of exposure to ambient and future PCO2 levels (550, 1200 and 2200 µatm) and at two temperatures (10, 18 °C). In vivo branchial ion regulatory costs were studied in isolated, perfused gill preparations. Animals reared at 18 °C responded to increasing CO2 by elevating SMR, in contrast to specimens at 10 °C. Isolated gills at 10 °C and elevated PCO2 (≥1200 µatm) displayed increased soft tissue mass, in parallel to increased gill oxygen demand, indicating an increased fraction of gill in whole animal energy budget. Altered gill size was not found at 18 °C, where a shift in the use of ion regulation mechanisms occurred towards enhanced Na(+)/H(+)-exchange and HCO3 (-) transport at high PCO2 (2200 µatm), paralleled by higher Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities. This shift did not affect total gill energy consumption leaving whole animal energy budget unaffected. Higher Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities in the warmth might have compensated for enhanced branchial permeability and led to reduced plasma Na(+) and/or Cl(-) concentrations and slightly lowered osmolalities seen at 18 °C and 550 or 2200 µatm PCO2 in vivo. Overall, the gill as a key ion regulation organ seems to be highly effective in supporting the resilience of cod to effects of ocean warming and acidification. PMID:26219611

  9. Physiology and behaviour of free-swimming Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) facing fluctuating salinity and oxygenation conditions

    PubMed

    Claireaux; Webber; Kerr; Boutilier

    1995-01-01

    1. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) acclimated to a temperature of 5 °C and 30 salinity were equipped with ultrasonic transmitters which allowed continuous monitoring of their heart rate and their position in the water column. Fish were placed in a 125 m3 tower tank which permitted various environmentally relevant modifications of the salinity and oxygenation conditions. Cod physiological and behavioural responses were followed in parallel to the environmental manipulations. Some of the experimental conditions studied in the tower tank were also reproduced in a swimming respirometer where fish oxygen consumption and heart rate were monitored at various levels of activity. 2. Lowering salinity from 30 to 26 did not change resting oxygen consumption, but increased active oxygen consumption. 3. Lowering salinity from 30 to 26 increased heart rate over the whole range of swimming speeds except at maximum speed. 4. Lowering oxygen tension to 9 kPa decreased oxygen consumption over the whole range of swimming speeds and decreased resting heart rate. 5. Low salinity did not significantly affect the relationship between heart rate and oxygen consumption. 6. Low oxygen levels decreased the oxygen transported per heart beat. 7. In the tower tank, bursts of activity were associated with tachycardias. 8. In uniform conditions, fish swam more deeply during the day than at night. 9. After an exploratory period of approximately 6 h, fish chose to remain in a low-salinity upper layer of the tank. Thereafter, high salinities were avoided. Fish tended to select low salinities if a choice was provided. 10. Fish generally avoided zones of low oxygen (<9 kPa) but continued voluntarily to enter regions with values as low as 3.0 kPa for short excursions or if food was offered. PMID:9317341

  10. Ocean warming and acidification modulate energy budget and gill ion regulatory mechanisms in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Kreiss, C M; Michael, K; Lucassen, M; Jutfelt, F; Motyka, R; Dupont, S; Pörtner, H-O

    2015-10-01

    Ocean warming and acidification are threatening marine ecosystems. In marine animals, acidification is thought to enhance ion regulatory costs and thereby baseline energy demand, while elevated temperature also increases baseline metabolic rate. Here we investigated standard metabolic rates (SMR) and plasma parameters of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) after 3-4 weeks of exposure to ambient and future PCO2 levels (550, 1200 and 2200 µatm) and at two temperatures (10, 18 °C). In vivo branchial ion regulatory costs were studied in isolated, perfused gill preparations. Animals reared at 18 °C responded to increasing CO2 by elevating SMR, in contrast to specimens at 10 °C. Isolated gills at 10 °C and elevated PCO2 (≥1200 µatm) displayed increased soft tissue mass, in parallel to increased gill oxygen demand, indicating an increased fraction of gill in whole animal energy budget. Altered gill size was not found at 18 °C, where a shift in the use of ion regulation mechanisms occurred towards enhanced Na(+)/H(+)-exchange and HCO3 (-) transport at high PCO2 (2200 µatm), paralleled by higher Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities. This shift did not affect total gill energy consumption leaving whole animal energy budget unaffected. Higher Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities in the warmth might have compensated for enhanced branchial permeability and led to reduced plasma Na(+) and/or Cl(-) concentrations and slightly lowered osmolalities seen at 18 °C and 550 or 2200 µatm PCO2 in vivo. Overall, the gill as a key ion regulation organ seems to be highly effective in supporting the resilience of cod to effects of ocean warming and acidification.

  11. Characterization and expression analyses of five interferon regulatory factor transcripts (Irf4a, Irf4b, Irf7, Irf8, Irf10) in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Inkpen, Sabrina M; Hori, Tiago S; Gamperl, A Kurt; Nash, Gordon W; Rise, Matthew L

    2015-05-01

    The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family of genes encodes a group of transcription factors that have important roles not only in regulating the expression of Type I interferons (IFNs) and other genes in the IFN pathway, but also in growth, development and the regulation of oncogenesis. In this study, several IRF family members (Irf4a, Irf4b, Irf7, Irf8, Irf10) in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were characterized at the cDNA and putative amino acid levels, allowing for phylogenetic analysis of these proteins in teleost fish, as well as the development of gene-specific primers used in RT-PCR and quantitative PCR (QPCR) analyses. Two Atlantic cod Irf10 splice variants were identified and their presence confirmed by sequencing of the Irf10 genomic region. RT-PCR showed that Irf7, Irf8 and both Irf10 transcripts were expressed in all 15 cod tissues tested, while Irf4a and Irf4b were absent in some tissues. QPCR analysis of spleen expression expanded upon this, and upon previous work. All IRF transcripts in the study were responsive to stimulation by the viral mimic poly(I:C), and all except Irf4a were responsive to exposure to formalin-killed Aeromonas salmonicida (ASAL). These IRF genes, thus, are likely important in the cod immune response to both viral and bacterial infections. Increased temperature (10 °C to 16 °C) was also observed to modulate the antibacterial responses of all IRF transcripts, and the antiviral responses of Irf4b and Irf10-v2. This research supports earlier studies which reported that elevated temperature modulates the expression of many immune genes in Atlantic cod. PMID:25731920

  12. Ultraviolet (280-400 nm)-induced DNA damage in the eggs and larvae of Calanus finmarchicus G. (Copepoda) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Browman, Howard I; Vetter, Russell D; Rodriguez, Carolina Alonso; Cullen, John J; Davis, Richard F; Lynn, Eric; St Pierre, Jean-François

    2003-04-01

    In previous work, we evaluated the effects of ultraviolet (UV = 280-400 nm) radiation on the early life stages of a planktonic Calanoid copepod (Calanus finmarchicus Gunnerus) and of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Both are key species in North Atlantic food webs. To further describe the potential impacts of UV exposure on the early life stages of these two species, we measured the wavelength-specific DNA damage (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer [CPD] formation per megabase of DNA) induced under controlled experimental exposure to UV radiation. UV-induced DNA damage in C. finmarchicus and cod eggs was highest in the UV-B exposure treatments. Under the same spectral exposures, CPD loads in C. finmarchicus eggs were higher than those in cod eggs, and for both C. finmarchicus and cod embryos, CPD loads were generally lower in eggs than in larvae. Biological weighting functions (BWF) and exposure response curves that explain most of the variability in CPD production were derived from these data. Comparison of the BWF revealed significant differences in sensitivity to UV-B: C. finmarchicus is more sensitive than cod, and larvae are more sensitive than eggs. This is consistent with the raw CPD values. Shapes of the BWF were similar to each other and to a quantitative action spectrum for damage to T7 bacteriophage DNA that is unshielded by cellular material. The strong similarities in the shapes of the weighting functions are not consistent with photoprotection by UV-absorbing compounds, which would generate features in BWF corresponding to absorption bands. The BWF reported in this study were applied to assess the mortality that would result from accumulation of a given CPD load: for both C. finmarchicus and cod eggs, an increased load of 10 CPD Mb(-1) of DNA due to UV exposure would result in approximately 10% mortality. PMID:12737142

  13. Changes in the condition factor have an impact on metabolic rate and swimming performance relationships in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.).

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Dominique; Guderley, Helga; Dutil, Jean-Denis

    2006-01-01

    In the field, Atlantic cod face seasonal changes in food availability that in turn lead to changes in condition. To examine the physiological consequences of these changes in condition, we measured routine metabolic rate (RMR) to estimate standard metabolic rate (SMR), active metabolic rate (AMR), aerobic scope, critical swimming speed (Ucrit), cost of transport, sprint performance, time to exhaustion, and postexhaustion metabolic rate (EMR) for 24 Atlantic cod from the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Cod were measured at their initial condition (condition factor of 0.676+/-0.076) and after 9 wk of feeding (condition factor of 0.923+/-0.096). These levels of condition are representative of wild cod in the Gulf of St. Lawrence during the spring and during the fall-early winter, respectively. The improved condition did not change mass-specific SMR. However, mass-specific AMR, aerobic scope, and EMR decreased with the improvement in condition. The various measures of swimming performance were affected differently. Ucrit increased and cost of transport at 1.3 and 1.5 body lengths s(-1) decreased with improved condition, but the cost of transport at 0.3, 0.9, 1.1, 1.7, and 1.9 body lengths s(-1), sprint performance, and time to exhaustion did not change. Hierarchies for the speed at first burst-coast, the proportion of Ucrit supported by burst-coasts, and time to exhaustion were maintained with the improvement in condition. The relationships between metabolic rates and swimming performance differed with condition level, with stronger correlations apparent in the cod at their initial condition. Given the low condition of wild cod stocks, these responses indicate that reduced performance, due to both maintenance of metabolic expenditures and modified swimming capacities, may impair survival under conditions of reduced food availability. PMID:16380932

  14. The fate of Lernaeocera branchialis (L.) (Crustacea; Copepoda) in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L.

    PubMed

    Baily, J E; Smith, J L; Wootten, R; Sommerville, C

    2011-02-01

    Lernaeocera branchialis, a copepod crustacean parasite of gadoids, represents a potential threat to both wild and farmed cod, Gadus morhua. The pathological changes associated with the early stages of experimental infection have previously been reported in detail, and this article describes the lesions associated with later chronic stages of experimental infection. Chronic infection is characterised by extravascular granuloma formation and proliferation of fibrovascular tissue around intact and fragmented, degenerate parasites within both the gill arch and cardiac region. The majority of parasite granulomas are located within connective tissues of the gill arch or pericardium; however, low numbers are present within the wall of large vessels. The intraluminal parasites and thrombi of early stage infection are largely absent in these later lesions. We propose that organisation and incorporation of the parasite thrombus into the vessel wall with subsequent granuloma formation and extrusion into the surrounding connective tissue leads to the elimination of the parasite from the vascular system. Thus, rather than being a negative consequence of infection thrombosis is protective, allowing the host to survive the substantial initial vascular insult.

  15. Longitudinal and allometric variation in indicators of muscle metabolic capacities in atlantic cod (Gadus morrhua).

    PubMed

    Martínez, M; Dutil, J D; Guderley, H

    2000-06-15

    This study evaluated whether indicators of metabolic capacity of cod white muscle differ along the length of the body, whether this variation persists over a large range of body sizes, and whether the allometry of metabolic capacities is similar along the length of the body. We examined the maximal activities of two glycolytic enzymes, phosphofructokinase (PFK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a mitochondrial enzyme, cytochrome C oxidase (CCO), and the biosynthetic enzyme nucleotide diphosphate kinase (NDPK). All enzymes examined showed significant size dependence, which was generally apparent in all regions. The activity of glycolytic enzymes increased with size, whereas that of CCO and NDPK decreased with size. For PFK and LDH, the size dependence decreased caudally, whereas for CCO and NDPK it was strongest in the caudal sample. For each size range, the activities of PFK, LDH, and CCO were higher in the last third of the body than in the middle or just behind the head. In contrast, NDPK activity was higher just behind the head than at the middle or in the last third of the body, suggesting that nuclear proliferation is more rapid in this zone. The high capacity for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation in the caudal region suggests that increases in mass-specific ATP output are advantageous in this relatively thin section of the body. PMID:10861548

  16. Impacts of regular and random noise on the behaviour, growth and development of larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Sophie L; Simpson, Stephen D; Morley, Erica L; Nedelec, Brendan; Radford, Andrew N

    2015-10-22

    Anthropogenic noise impacts behaviour and physiology in many species, but responses could change with repeat exposures. As repeat exposures can vary in regularity, identifying regimes with less impact is important for regulation. We use a 16-day split-brood experiment to compare effects of regular and random acoustic noise (playbacks of recordings of ships), relative to ambient-noise controls, on behaviour, growth and development of larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Short-term noise caused startle responses in newly hatched fish, irrespective of rearing noise. Two days of both regular and random noise regimes reduced growth, while regular noise led to faster yolk sac use. After 16 days, growth in all three sound treatments converged, although fish exposed to regular noise had lower body width-length ratios. Larvae with lower body width-length ratios were easier to catch in a predator-avoidance experiment. Our results demonstrate that the timing of acoustic disturbances can impact survival-related measures during development. Much current work focuses on sound levels, but future studies should consider the role of noise regularity and its importance for noise management and mitigation measures.

  17. Nucleotide polymorphism and natural selection at the pantophysin (Pan I) locus in the Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua (L.).

    PubMed Central

    Pogson, G H

    2001-01-01

    Molecular studies of nucleotide sequence variation have rarely attempted to test hypotheses related to geographically varying patterns of natural selection. The present study tested the role of spatially varying selection in producing significant linkage disequilibrium and large differences in the frequencies of two common alleles at the pantophysin (Pan I) locus among five populations of the Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua. Nucleotide sequences of 124 Pan I alleles showed strong evidence for an unusual mix of balancing and directional selection but no evidence of stable geographically varying selection. The alleles were highly divergent at both the nucleotide level (differing on average by 19 mutations) and at amino acid level (each having experienced three amino acid substitutions since diverging from a common ancestral allele). All six amino acid substitutions occurred in a 56-residue intravesicular loop (IV1 domain) of the vesicle protein and each involved a radical change. An analysis of molecular variation revealed significant heterogeneity in the frequencies of recently derived mutations segregating within both allelic classes, suggesting that two selective sweeps may be presently occurring among populations. The dynamic nature of the Pan I polymorphism in G. morhua and clear departure from equilibrium conditions invalidate a simple model of spatially varying selection. PMID:11139512

  18. Impacts of regular and random noise on the behaviour, growth and development of larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    PubMed Central

    Nedelec, Sophie L.; Simpson, Stephen D.; Morley, Erica L.; Nedelec, Brendan; Radford, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise impacts behaviour and physiology in many species, but responses could change with repeat exposures. As repeat exposures can vary in regularity, identifying regimes with less impact is important for regulation. We use a 16-day split-brood experiment to compare effects of regular and random acoustic noise (playbacks of recordings of ships), relative to ambient-noise controls, on behaviour, growth and development of larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Short-term noise caused startle responses in newly hatched fish, irrespective of rearing noise. Two days of both regular and random noise regimes reduced growth, while regular noise led to faster yolk sac use. After 16 days, growth in all three sound treatments converged, although fish exposed to regular noise had lower body width–length ratios. Larvae with lower body width–length ratios were easier to catch in a predator-avoidance experiment. Our results demonstrate that the timing of acoustic disturbances can impact survival-related measures during development. Much current work focuses on sound levels, but future studies should consider the role of noise regularity and its importance for noise management and mitigation measures. PMID:26468248

  19. Impacts of regular and random noise on the behaviour, growth and development of larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Sophie L; Simpson, Stephen D; Morley, Erica L; Nedelec, Brendan; Radford, Andrew N

    2015-10-22

    Anthropogenic noise impacts behaviour and physiology in many species, but responses could change with repeat exposures. As repeat exposures can vary in regularity, identifying regimes with less impact is important for regulation. We use a 16-day split-brood experiment to compare effects of regular and random acoustic noise (playbacks of recordings of ships), relative to ambient-noise controls, on behaviour, growth and development of larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Short-term noise caused startle responses in newly hatched fish, irrespective of rearing noise. Two days of both regular and random noise regimes reduced growth, while regular noise led to faster yolk sac use. After 16 days, growth in all three sound treatments converged, although fish exposed to regular noise had lower body width-length ratios. Larvae with lower body width-length ratios were easier to catch in a predator-avoidance experiment. Our results demonstrate that the timing of acoustic disturbances can impact survival-related measures during development. Much current work focuses on sound levels, but future studies should consider the role of noise regularity and its importance for noise management and mitigation measures. PMID:26468248

  20. Microevolution in time and space: SNP analysis of historical DNA reveals dynamic signatures of selection in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Therkildsen, Nina O; Hemmer-Hansen, Jakob; Als, Thomas D; Swain, Douglas P; Morgan, M Joanne; Trippel, Edward A; Palumbi, Stephen R; Meldrup, Dorte; Nielsen, Einar E

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about how quickly natural populations adapt to changes in their environment and how temporal and spatial variation in selection pressures interact to shape patterns of genetic diversity. We here address these issues with a series of genome scans in four overfished populations of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) studied over an 80-year period. Screening of >1000 gene-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified 77 loci that showed highly elevated levels of differentiation, likely as an effect of directional selection, in either time, space or both. Exploratory analysis suggested that temporal allele frequency shifts at certain loci may correlate with local temperature variation and with life history changes suggested to be fisheries induced. Interestingly, however, largely nonoverlapping sets of loci were temporal outliers in the different populations and outliers from the 1928 to 1960 period showed almost complete stability during later decades. The contrasting microevolutionary trajectories among populations resulted in sequential shifts in spatial outliers, with no locus maintaining elevated spatial differentiation throughout the study period. Simulations of migration coupled with observations of temporally stable spatial structure at neutral loci suggest that population replacement or gene flow alone could not explain all the observed allele frequency variation. Thus, the genetic changes are likely to at least partly be driven by highly dynamic temporally and spatially varying selection. These findings have important implications for our understanding of local adaptation and evolutionary potential in high gene flow organisms and underscore the need to carefully consider all dimensions of biocomplexity for evolutionarily sustainable management.

  1. Evidence of uptake, biotransformation and DNA binding of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in Atlantic cod and corkwing wrasse caught in the vicinity of an aluminium works.

    PubMed

    Aas, E; Beyer, J; Jonsson, G; Reichert, W L; Andersen, O K

    2001-09-01

    Feral Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and corkwing wrasse (Symphodus melops) were investigated for polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in the Karmsund strait, western Norway. This strait is highly contaminated with PAHs, and a main source is the chronic release of gas-scrubbing effluents from a local aluminium works. In both species, the level of biliary PAH metabolites and hepatic DNA adducts were higher in fish collected near the aluminium works. Interestingly, a significantly higher level of both biliary PAH metabolites and hepatic DNA adducts was found in corkwing wrasse as compared to cod, indicating a higher potential for genotoxic effects in this species. Hepatic cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) in cod estimated by ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase and an immunoassay technique (ELISA), seemed to be weakly induced at the contaminated sites. At the most contaminated site, skin ulcers and fin erosion were detected in about 70 and 45% of the cods, respectively. The data demonstrated that both cod and corkwing wrasse may be suitable target species for PAH pollution monitoring.

  2. Harvest Pressure on Coastal Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua) from Recreational Fishing Relative to Commercial Fishing Assessed from Tag-Recovery Data.

    PubMed

    Kleiven, Alf Ring; Fernandez-Chacon, Albert; Nordahl, Jan-Harald; Moland, Even; Espeland, Sigurd Heiberg; Knutsen, Halvor; Olsen, Esben Moland

    2016-01-01

    Marine recreational fishing is a popular outdoor activity. However, knowledge about the magnitude of recreational catches relative to commercial catches in coastal fisheries is generally sparse. Coastal Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is a target species for recreational fishers in the North Atlantic. In Norway, recreational fishers are allowed to use a variety of traps and nets as well as long-line and rod and line when fishing for cod. From 2005 to 2013, 9729 cod (mean size: 40 cm, range: 15-93 cm) were tagged and released in coastal Skagerrak, southeast Norway. Both high-reward (NOK 500) and low-reward tags (NOK 50) were used in this study. Because some harvested fish (even those posting high-reward tags) may go unreported by fishers, reporting rates were estimated from mark-recovery models that incorporate detection parameters in their structure, in addition to survival and mortality estimates. During 2005 to 2013, a total of 1707 tagged cod were recovered and reported by fishers. We estimate the overall annual survival to be 33% (SE 1.5). Recreational rod and line fishing were responsible for 33.7% (SE 2.4) of total mortality, followed by commercial fisheries (15.1% SE 0.8) and recreational fixed gear (6.8% SE 0.4). Natural mortality was 44.4% (SE 2.5) of total mortality. Our findings suggest that recreational fishing-rod and line fishing in particular-is responsible for a substantial part of fishing mortality exerted on coastal cod in southern Norway. PMID:26959371

  3. Harvest Pressure on Coastal Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua) from Recreational Fishing Relative to Commercial Fishing Assessed from Tag-Recovery Data.

    PubMed

    Kleiven, Alf Ring; Fernandez-Chacon, Albert; Nordahl, Jan-Harald; Moland, Even; Espeland, Sigurd Heiberg; Knutsen, Halvor; Olsen, Esben Moland

    2016-01-01

    Marine recreational fishing is a popular outdoor activity. However, knowledge about the magnitude of recreational catches relative to commercial catches in coastal fisheries is generally sparse. Coastal Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is a target species for recreational fishers in the North Atlantic. In Norway, recreational fishers are allowed to use a variety of traps and nets as well as long-line and rod and line when fishing for cod. From 2005 to 2013, 9729 cod (mean size: 40 cm, range: 15-93 cm) were tagged and released in coastal Skagerrak, southeast Norway. Both high-reward (NOK 500) and low-reward tags (NOK 50) were used in this study. Because some harvested fish (even those posting high-reward tags) may go unreported by fishers, reporting rates were estimated from mark-recovery models that incorporate detection parameters in their structure, in addition to survival and mortality estimates. During 2005 to 2013, a total of 1707 tagged cod were recovered and reported by fishers. We estimate the overall annual survival to be 33% (SE 1.5). Recreational rod and line fishing were responsible for 33.7% (SE 2.4) of total mortality, followed by commercial fisheries (15.1% SE 0.8) and recreational fixed gear (6.8% SE 0.4). Natural mortality was 44.4% (SE 2.5) of total mortality. Our findings suggest that recreational fishing-rod and line fishing in particular-is responsible for a substantial part of fishing mortality exerted on coastal cod in southern Norway.

  4. Harvest Pressure on Coastal Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua) from Recreational Fishing Relative to Commercial Fishing Assessed from Tag-Recovery Data

    PubMed Central

    Kleiven, Alf Ring; Fernandez-Chacon, Albert; Nordahl, Jan-Harald; Moland, Even; Espeland, Sigurd Heiberg; Knutsen, Halvor; Olsen, Esben Moland

    2016-01-01

    Marine recreational fishing is a popular outdoor activity. However, knowledge about the magnitude of recreational catches relative to commercial catches in coastal fisheries is generally sparse. Coastal Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is a target species for recreational fishers in the North Atlantic. In Norway, recreational fishers are allowed to use a variety of traps and nets as well as long-line and rod and line when fishing for cod. From 2005 to 2013, 9729 cod (mean size: 40 cm, range: 15–93 cm) were tagged and released in coastal Skagerrak, southeast Norway. Both high-reward (NOK 500) and low-reward tags (NOK 50) were used in this study. Because some harvested fish (even those posting high-reward tags) may go unreported by fishers, reporting rates were estimated from mark-recovery models that incorporate detection parameters in their structure, in addition to survival and mortality estimates. During 2005 to 2013, a total of 1707 tagged cod were recovered and reported by fishers. We estimate the overall annual survival to be 33% (SE 1.5). Recreational rod and line fishing were responsible for 33.7% (SE 2.4) of total mortality, followed by commercial fisheries (15.1% SE 0.8) and recreational fixed gear (6.8% SE 0.4). Natural mortality was 44.4% (SE 2.5) of total mortality. Our findings suggest that recreational fishing—rod and line fishing in particular—is responsible for a substantial part of fishing mortality exerted on coastal cod in southern Norway. PMID:26959371

  5. Evidence of microsatellite hitch-hiking selection in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.): implications for inferring population structure in nonmodel organisms.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Einar E; Hansen, Michael M; Meldrup, Dorte

    2006-10-01

    Microsatellites have gained wide application for elucidating population structure in nonmodel organisms. Since they are generally noncoding, neutrality is assumed but rarely tested. In Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.), microsatellite studies have revealed highly heterogeneous estimates of genetic differentiation among loci. In particular one locus, Gmo 132, has demonstrated elevated genetic differentiation. We investigated possible hitch-hiking selection at this and other microsatellite loci in Atlantic cod. We employed 11 loci for analysing samples from the Baltic Sea, North Sea, Barents Sea and Newfoundland covering a large part of the species' distributional range. The 'classical' Lewontin-Krakauer test for selection based on variance in estimates of F(ST) and (standardized genetic differentiation) revealed only one significant pairwise test (North Sea-Barents Sea), and the source of the elevated variance could not be ascribed exclusively to Gmo 132. In contrast, different variants of the recently developed ln Rtheta test for selective sweeps at microsatellite loci revealed a high number of significant outcomes of pair-wise tests for Gmo 132. Further, the presence of selection was indicated in at least one other locus. The results suggest that many previous estimates of genetic differentiation in cod based on microsatellites are inflated, and in some cases relationships among populations are obscured by one or more loci being the subject to hitch-hiking selection. Likewise, temporal estimates of effective population sizes in Atlantic cod may be flawed. We recommend, generally, to use a higher number of microsatellite loci to elucidate population structure in marine fishes and other nonmodel species to allow for identification of outlier loci that are subject to selection.

  6. Biological effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their first metabolic products in in vivo exposed Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Pampanin, Daniela M; Le Goff, Jeremie; Skogland, Karianne; Marcucci, Cristian R; Øysæd, Kjell Birger; Lorentzen, Marianne; Jørgensen, Kåre B; Sydnes, Magne O

    2016-01-01

    The monitoring of the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the aquatic environment is a worldwide activity since some of these compounds are well-established carcinogens and mutagens. Contaminants in this class are in fact regarded as priority hazardous substances for environmental pollution (Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC). In this study, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) was selected to assess in vivo effects of two PAH and their first metabolic products, namely, the corresponding trans-dihydrodiols, using biological markers. Fish were exposed for 1 wk to a single PAH (naphthalene or chrysene) and its synthetic metabolites ((1R,2R)-1,2-dihydronaphthalene-1,2-diol and (1R,2R)-1,2-dihydrochrysene-1,2-diol) by intraperitoneal injection in a continuous seawater flow system. After exposure, PAH metabolism including PAH metabolites in bile and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity, oxidative stress glutathione S-transferases (GST) and catalase (CAT) activities, and genotoxicity such as DNA adducts were evaluated, as well as general health conditions including condition index (CI), hepatosomatic index (HSI), and gonadosomatic index (GSI). PAH metabolite values were low and not significantly different when measured with the fixed-wavelength fluorescence screening method, while the gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) method showed an apparent dose response in fish exposed to naphthalene. DNA adduct levels ≥0.16 × 10(-8) relative adduct level (RAL) were detected. It should be noted that 0.16 × 10(-8) RAL is considered the maximal acceptable background level for this species. The other biomarkers activities of catalase, GST, and EROD did not display a particular compound- or dose-related response. The GSI values were significantly lower in some chrysene- and in both naphthalene- and naphthalene diol-exposed groups compared to control. PMID:27484143

  7. Global transcriptome analysis of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) liver after in vivo methylmercury exposure suggests effects on energy metabolism pathways.

    PubMed

    Yadetie, Fekadu; Karlsen, Odd Andre; Lanzén, Anders; Berg, Karin; Olsvik, Pål; Hogstrand, Christer; Goksøyr, Anders

    2013-01-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a widely distributed contaminant polluting many aquatic environments, with health risks to humans exposed mainly through consumption of seafood. The mechanisms of toxicity of MeHg are not completely understood. In order to map the range of molecular targets and gain better insights into the mechanisms of toxicity, we prepared Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) 135k oligonucleotide arrays and performed global analysis of transcriptional changes in the liver of fish treated with MeHg (0.5 and 2 mg/kg of body weight) for 14 days. Inferring from the observed transcriptional changes, the main pathways significantly affected by the treatment were energy metabolism, oxidative stress response, immune response and cytoskeleton remodeling. Consistent with known effects of MeHg, many transcripts for genes in oxidative stress pathways such as glutathione metabolism and Nrf2 regulation of oxidative stress response were differentially regulated. Among the differentially regulated genes, there were disproportionate numbers of genes coding for enzymes involved in metabolism of amino acids, fatty acids and glucose. In particular, many genes coding for enzymes of fatty acid beta-oxidation were up-regulated. The coordinated effects observed on many transcripts coding for enzymes of energy pathways may suggest disruption of nutrient metabolism by MeHg. Many transcripts for genes coding for enzymes in the synthetic pathways of sulphur containing amino acids were also up-regulated, suggesting adaptive responses to MeHg toxicity. By this toxicogenomics approach, we were also able to identify many potential biomarker candidate genes for monitoring environmental MeHg pollution. These results based on changes on transcript levels, however, need to be confirmed by other methods such as proteomics.

  8. Discrimination between weaned and unweaned Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in capture-based aquaculture (CBA) by X-ray imaging and radio-frequency metal detector.

    PubMed

    Misimi, Ekrem; Martinsen, Svein; Mathiassen, John Reidar; Erikson, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of two detection methods for use in discrimination and sorting of adult Atlantic cod (about 2 kg) in the small scale capture-based aquaculture (CBA). Presently, there is no established method for discrimination of weaned and unweaned cod in CBA. Generally, 60-70% of the wild-caught cod in the CBA are weaned into commercial dry feed. To increase profitability for the fish farmers, unweaned cod must be separated from the stock, meaning the fish must be sorted into two groups - unweaned and weaned from moist feed. The challenges with handling of large numbers of fish in cages, defined the limits of the applied technology. As a result, a working model was established, focusing on implementing different marking materials added to the fish feed, and different technology for detecting the feed presence in the fish gut. X-ray imaging in two modes (planar and dual energy band) and sensitive radio-frequency metal detection were the detection methods that were chosen for the investigations. Both methods were tested in laboratory conditions using dead fish with marked feed inserted into the gut cavity. In particular, the sensitive radio-frequency metal detection method with carbonyl powder showed very promising results in detection of marked feed. Results show also that Dual energy band X-ray imaging may have potential for prediction of fat content in the feed. Based on the investigations it can be concluded that both X-ray imaging and sensitive radio-frequency metal detector technology have the potential for detecting cod having consumed marked feed. These are all technologies that may be adapted to large scale handling of fish from fish cages. Thus, it may be possible to discriminate between unweaned and weaned cod in a large scale grading situation. Based on the results of this study, a suggestion for evaluation of concept for in-situ sorting system is presented.

  9. Changes in arterial PO₂, physiological blood parameters and intracellular antioxidants in free-swimming Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) exposed to varying levels of hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Anders; Heier, Lene Sørlie; Rosseland, Bjørn Olav; Salbu, Brit; Kiessling, Anders

    2011-03-01

    Free-swimming Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were exposed to water oxygen pressures (P(w)O₂) ranging from 18.1 to 41.5 kPa and sampled for blood using an indwelling caudal artery cannula. Arterial blood oxygen pressure (P(a)O₂) increased with increasing P(w)O₂, from 12.0 kPa in normoxia (18.1 kPa) to 34.2 kPa in the highest hyperoxic level tested (41.5 kPa). Blood CO₂ pressure and plasma bicarbonate concentration increased with P(w)O₂, indicating reduced ventilation with increased P(w)O₂. Plasma glucose, sodium and potassium were not affected by water oxygen level. Blood oxidative stress biomarkers, reduced glutathione, oxidized glutathione and the oxidative stress index (ratio between oxidized and total glutathione) differed intermittently between normoxia and hyperoxia. The oxidative stress index was higher in the blood of exposed compared to unexposed control cod. Together with elevated P(a)O₂, these findings suggest increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased oxidative stress in Atlantic cod exposed to hyperoxia. PMID:20878467

  10. A review of the contributions of fisheries and climate variability to contrasting dynamics in two Arcto-boreal Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) stocks: Persistent high productivity in the Barents Sea and collapse on the Newfoundland and Labrador Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, George R.; Nakken, Odd; Brattey, John

    2013-07-01

    Stocks of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) across the North Atlantic and adjacent seas have been fished intensively for years, and many are now severely depleted. In order to promote recovery and sustainable harvesting, it is essential to understand factors that have contributed to the declines and to variability in rates of recovery. Considerable insight may be gleaned by comparing and contrasting the histories of the Northeast Arctic (NEA) cod in the Barents Sea - Svalbard area of the northeast Atlantic and the “northern cod” on the Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) shelf in the northwest Atlantic. These two stocks, which were among the 3 largest cod stocks during the middle of the 20th century, are Arcto-boreal, and have many species of prey and predators in common. The biomass of NEA cod has varied considerably over time, and in 2009 was a little above 60% of its maximum observed level, which occurred in the late 1940s and early 1950s. In contrast, the biomass of NL cod decreased steadily from the early 1960s to the late 1970s, increased somewhat during the 1980s, and crashed during the early 1990s to an extremely low level, at which it remained for a decade before showing recent indications of improvement. Although both stocks were influenced by similar changes in harvesting strategies and environmental circumstances, both biotic and abiotic, there are two events which stand out as being particularly influential. First, crises developed in the management of both stocks in the late 1980s. For NEA cod, the crisis was environmental, caused by the collapse of capelin (Mallotus villosus), the main food for adult cod, whereas for NL cod the crisis was caused by a sudden large reduction in scientific perception of stock size. The difference in response to these crises strongly influenced subsequent stock dynamics. Catches of NEA cod were reduced considerably, preventing severe overharvesting of the cod that at that time experienced low productivity, whereas catches of NL

  11. Validation of reference genes for quantitative RT-qPCR studies of gene expression in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua l.) during temperature stress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One important physiological response to environmental stress in animals is change in gene expression. To obtain reliable data from gene expression studies using RT-qPCR it is important to evaluate a set of possible reference genes as normalizers for expression. The expression of these candidate genes should be analyzed in the relevant tissues during normal and stressed situations. To find suitable reference genes it was crucial that the genes were stably expressed also during a situation of physiological stress. For poikilotermic animals like cod, changes in temperature are normal, but if the changes are faster than physiological compensation, the animals respond with typical stress responses. It has previously been shown that Atlantic cod show stress responses when elevation of water temperature is faster than 1 degree/day, for this reason we chose hyperthermia as stress agent for this experiment. Findings We here describe the expression of eight candidate reference genes from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua l.) and their stability during thermal stress (temperature elevation of one degree C/day for 5 days). The genes investigated were: Eukaryotic elongation factor 1 alpha, ef1a; 18s ribosomal RNA; 18s, Ubiquitin conjugate protein; ubiq, cytoskeletal beta-actin; actb, major histcompatibility complex I; MHC-I light chain, beta-2 -microglobulin; b2m, cytoskeletal alpha-tubulin; tba1c, acidic ribosomal phosphoprotein; rplp1, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase; g6pd. Their expression were analyzed in 6 tissues (liver, head kidney, intestine, spleen, heart and gills) from cods exposed to elevated temperature and compared to a control group. Although there were variations between tissues with respect to reference gene stability, four transcripts were more consistent than the others: ubiq, ef1a, 18s and rplp1. We therefore used these to analyze the expression of stress related genes (heat shock proteins) induced during hyperthermia. We found that both transcripts

  12. Extracellular glucose supports lactate production but not aerobic metabolism in cardiomyocytes from both normoglycemic Atlantic cod and low glycemic short-horned sculpin.

    PubMed

    Clow, Kathy A; Short, Connie E; Driedzic, William R

    2016-05-01

    Fish exhibit a wide range of species-specific blood glucose levels. How this relates to glucose utilization is yet to be fully realized. Here, we assessed glucose transport and metabolism in myocytes isolated from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and short-horned sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius), species with blood glucose levels of 3.7 and 0.57 mmol l(-1), respectively. Glucose metabolism was assessed by the production of (3)H2O from [2-(3)H]glucose. Glucose metabolism was 3.5- to 6-fold higher by myocytes from Atlantic cod than by those from short-horned sculpin at the same level of extracellular glucose. In Atlantic cod myocytes, glucose metabolism displayed what appears to be a saturable component with respect to extracellular glucose, and cytochalasin B inhibited glucose metabolism. These features revealed a facilitated glucose diffusion mechanism that accounts for between 30% and 55% of glucose entry at physiological levels of extracellular glucose. Facilitated glucose diffusion appears to be minimal in myocytes for short-horned sculpin. Glucose entry by simple diffusion occurs in both cell types with the same linear relationship between glucose metabolism and extracellular glucose concentration, presumably due to similarities in membrane composition. Oxygen consumption by myocytes incubated in medium containing physiological levels of extracellular glucose (Atlantic cod 5 mmol l(-1), short-horned sculpin 0.5 mmol l(-1)) was similar in the two species and was not decreased by cytochalasin B, suggesting that these cells have the capability of oxidizing alternative on-board metabolic fuels. Cells produced lactate at low rates but glycogen levels did not change during the incubation period. In cells from both species, glucose utilization assessed by both simple chemical analysis of glucose disappearance from the medium and (3)H2O production was half the rate of lactate production and as such extracellular glucose was not available for oxidative metabolism

  13. Seasonal variation in biomarkers in blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), Icelandic scallop (Chlamys islandica) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua): implications for environmental monitoring in the Barents Sea.

    PubMed

    Nahrgang, J; Brooks, S J; Evenset, A; Camus, L; Jonsson, M; Smith, T J; Lukina, J; Frantzen, M; Giarratano, E; Renaud, P E

    2013-02-01

    In the Barents Sea, the limited data on biological relevant indicators and their responses to various anthropogenic stressors have hindered the development of a consistent scientific basis for selecting indicator species and developing practical procedures for environmental monitoring. Accordingly, the main aim of the present study was to develop a common set of baseline values for contaminants and biomarkers in three species, and to identify their strengths and limitations in monitoring of the Barents Sea. Blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), Icelandic scallop (Chlamys islandica) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were sampled from a north Norwegian fjord in March, June, September and December 2010. Digestive glands from the bivalve species and liver from Atlantic cod were analysed for biomarkers of oxidative stress (catalase [CAT], glutathione peroxidase [GPX], glutathione-S-transferase activities [GST], lipid peroxidation as thiobarbituric reactive substances [TBARS] and total oxyradical scavenging capacity [TOSC]), biotransformation (ethoxyresorufine-O-deethylase activity [EROD]) and general stress (lysosomal membrane stability [LMS]). Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals in the bivalves and PAH metabolites in fish bile were quantified. Finally, energy reserves (total lipids, proteins and carbohydrates) and electron transport system (ETS) activity in the digestive gland of the bivalves and liver of Atlantic cod provided background information for reproductive cycle and general physiological status of the organisms. Blue mussel and Icelandic scallop showed very similar trends in biological cycle, biomarker expression and seasonality. Biomarker baselines in Atlantic cod showed weaker seasonal variability. However, important biological events may have been undetected due to the large time intervals between sampling occasions. Physiological biomarkers such as energy reserves and ETS activity were recommended as complementary parameters to the

  14. Studies on uptake and intracellular processing of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus by Atlantic cod scavenger endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Martin-Armas, M; Sommer, A-I; Smedsrød, B

    2007-11-01

    Previous work in our group has identified the scavenger endothelial cells (SECs) of heart endocardium in cod, Gadus morhua L., as the major site for elimination of both physiological and foreign macromolecular waste from the circulation. The present study was undertaken to establish the role of cod SECs in the clearance of virus. We focused on infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) as it is a well-known virus with a broad host range, and causes significant economic losses in the salmon industry. Our results showed that cod SEC cultures infected by the IPNV produce high titres of new virus. Ligand-receptor inhibition experiments suggested that the virus did not enter the cells through any of the major endocytosis receptors of cod SECs. Yet, the infection lowered the capacity of the cells to endocytose ligands via the scavenger receptor. Inhibitors of receptor recycling and vesicle acidification did not affect virus infectivity. The finding that SEC cultures prepared from 25% of the cod produced high titres of IPNV without being infected in the laboratory, suggests that SECs of cod may serve as reservoirs for IPNV in persistently infected cod. PMID:17958614

  15. Genetic analysis of vibriosis and viral nervous necrosis resistance in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) using a cure model.

    PubMed

    Bangera, R; Ødegård, J; Nielsen, H M; Gjøen, H M; Mortensen, A

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether observed time-until-death of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) juveniles in separate challenge tests with Vibrio anguillarum (causes vibriosis) and nodavirus [causes viral nervous necrosis (VNN)] are due to differences in susceptibility (whether at risk or not) or increased endurance (individual hazard, given that the animal is susceptible) using a cure mixture (CURE) model with Gibbs sampling. Observed time-until-death, prepared as sequential binary records, were analyzed with the CURE model and results were compared with cross-sectional threshold (SIMPLE) and an ordinary longitudinal survival score (NAÏVE) model (i.e., assuming that all animals are susceptible). Overall mortality at the end of the test was 86 and 71% for vibriosis and VNN, respectively. But the CURE model estimated 92 and 82% of the population to be susceptible to vibriosis and VNN, respectively. Hence, a substantial fraction among the survivors were considered to be susceptible but with high endurance. The underlying heritability of susceptibility was moderate for vibriosis (0.33) and extremely high for VNN (0.91), somewhat greater compared with classical SIMPLE model (0.19 and 0.76 for vibriosis and VNN, respectively), analyzing end survival as a cross-sectional binary trait. Estimates of the underlying heritability were low for single test-day scores of both endurance (0.02 and 0.15 for vibriosis and VNN, respectively) in the CURE model and for the NAÏVE model (0.02 and 0.18 for vibriosis and VNN, respectively). Based on the CURE model, the genetic correlation between susceptibility and endurance was low to moderately positive and significantly different from unity (P < 0.01) for both vibriosis (0.13) and VNN (0.47). Estimated breeding values from the SIMPLE and NAÏVE models showed moderate to high correlations (0.41 to 0.96) with EBV for susceptibility and endurance in the CURE model. The analyses indicate that susceptibility and endurance are

  16. The use of multibeam and split-beam echo sounders for assessing biomass and distribution of spring-spawning Atlantic cod in the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurshin, Christopher William Damon

    This research focused on advancing the application of split-beam and multibeam echo sounding to remotely locate and describe spatial distribution, and to provide a relative measure of abundance of the spring-spawning Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in the western Gulf of Maine. Specifically, the main objectives of this research were 1) to test the feasibility of a multibeam echo sounder to detect changes in volume backscatter proportional to incrementally decreasing quantities of cod held in a submerged cage, and to compare results to a split-beam echo sounder; 2) to describe the spatio-temporal distribution and estimate biomass of spring-spawning cod in the Gulf of Maine cod spawning protection area (GOMCSPA) by repeated acoustic and trawl surveys; and 3) to determine a predictive relation between target strength and length for 38-kHz and 120-kHz split-beam echo sounders and a 300-kHz multibeam echo sounder, and characterize other factors affecting backscattering of sound. The multibeam echo sounder detected a small and large reduction in volume backscatter proportional to reductions in stocking density of caged cod, while the split-beam echo sounder only detected a large reduction in stocking density. The spatial information from the multibeam echo sounder helped interpret and explain results from the split-beam echo sounder. Repeated acoustic and trawl surveys showed cod were relatively widespread in the survey area in May, but congregated at higher densities in areas adjacent to two elevated bathymetric features. Most cod converged to a single location in June, and were at a higher concentration than observations in May. This congregation decreased in size and density in July. Survey estimates of cod biomass ranged 184-494 mt in May, 138-617 mt in June, and 39-135 mt in July, depending on the estimation method. Based on echo classification and extrapolation, cod biomass to the GOMCSPA ranged 260-466 mt in May, 196-513 mt in June, and 91-198 mt in July. The biomass

  17. Short-term overcrowding of Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua: effects on serum-mediated antibacterial activity and transcription of glucose transport and antioxidant defense related genes.

    PubMed

    Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A; Brinchmann, Monica F; Kiron, Viswanath

    2008-12-01

    Serum-mediated control of Listonella anguillarum and transcriptional profiles of selected glucose transport and antioxidant defense genes, following short-term overcrowding in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua were determined. Fish were subjected to overcrowding by reducing the water level in the tank for 1 h and this was repeated thrice over a 12 h period. Blood samples were collected before overcrowding (initial group) and at 2, 24 and 72 h post-crowding. The sera from fish obtained at 2 h post-crowding caused a significant reduction in L. anguillarum counts compared to the initial samples. There was a transcriptional upregulation of the glucose transport-4 and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes at 2 h after crowding. Gene transcripts of the antioxidant enzymes, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn SOD), catalase and phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase also significantly increased at 2 h post-crowding, but thereafter they returned to their pre-crowding levels with the exception of Cu/Zn SOD that remained significantly higher than the initial group until 72 h. Thus, short-term overcrowding of Atlantic cod leads to a transient enhancement of in vitro serum antibacterial activity and enhanced transcriptional activity of glucose transport and antioxidant defense genes.

  18. Effects of oil pollution and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) on glycerophospholipids in liver and brain of male Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Bratberg, Mari; Olsvik, Pål A; Edvardsen, Rolf B; Brekken, Hans Kristian; Vadla, Reidun; Meier, Sonnich

    2013-02-01

    Fish in the North Sea are exposed to relatively high levels of halogenated compounds in addition to the pollutants released by oil production activities. In this study male Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were orally exposed to environmental realistic levels (low and high) of weathered crude oil and/or a mixture of POPs for 4weeks. Lipid composition in brain and in liver extracts were analysed in order to assess the effects of the various pollutants on membrane lipid composition and fatty acid profiles. Transcriptional effects in the liver were studied by microarray and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Chemical analyses confirmed uptake of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) in the liver and excretion of metabolites of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the bile. Treatment with POPs and/or crude oil did not induce significant changes in lipid composition in cod liver. Only a few minor changes were observed in the fatty acid profile of the brain and the lipid classes in the liver. The hypothesis that pollution from oil or POPs at environmental realistic levels alters the lipid composition in marine fish was therefore not confirmed in this study. However, the transcriptional data suggest that the fish were affected by the treatment at the mRNA level. This study suggests that a combination of oil and POPs induce the CYP1a detoxification system and gives an increase in the metabolism and clearing rate of PAHs and POPs, but with no effects on membrane lipids in male Atlantic cod.

  19. Quality changes during refrigerated storage of MA-packaged pre-rigor fillets of farmed Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) using traditional MAP, CO2 emitter, and vacuum.

    PubMed

    Hansen, A A; Mørkøre, T; Rudi, K; Olsen, E; Eie, T

    2007-11-01

    Quality changes during 3 wk of refrigerated storage (1.3 degrees C) were studied on pre-rigor filleted farmed Atlantic cod packed in modified atmosphere (MAP, 60% CO2 and 40% O2) or vacuum. The packages of MAP contained either a CO2 emitter and low gas volume to product volume (g/p ratio) of 1.3, or a 3.9 g/p ratio and no emitter. The CO2 level remained stable or increased in the packages with CO2 emitter, whereas the CO2 level in the packages with no CO2 emitter decreased to 40% after 4 d of refrigerated storage. High levels of oxygen in the gas mixture prevented formation of trimethyl amine (TMA) during storage of the MA-packed fish, whereas the TMA content increased significantly after 10-d storage in vacuum. MA-packed samples had the highest values of 1-penten-3-ol. Sensory scores of sour, sulfur, and pungent odors were significantly higher for vacuum-packed cod compared to the 2 MA-packaging methods measured 14 d after slaughtering. No differences in sensory scores were observed between the 2 methods of MAP, and shelf life of these samples seemed to be 14 to 21 d. Cod samples packaged in vacuum packages had higher pH values compared to ordinary MAP and packages containing a CO2 emitter. Bacterial growth was inhibited by MAP and resulted at the end of the storage period in dominance of Carnobacterium and some Photobacterium. In MA packages with high O2 levels the Photobacterium was inhibited. It is concluded that CO2 emitters are well suited for reduction of transport volume for MA-packaged farmed cod.

  20. Differential Survival among Batches of Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua L.) from Fertilisation through to Post-Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Petra E; Penman, David J; Dahle, Geir; Patursson, Øystein; Taggart, John B

    2016-01-01

    Aquaculture production of cod has decreased from over 20,000 tonnes in 2009 to less than 2,000 tonnes in 2014 and the industry faces many challenges, one of which is high and unpredictably variable mortality rates in the early life stages. Hence, full-cycle farming with hatchery produced juveniles is still considered unprofitable compared to fisheries and on-growing of wild cod. In the present study, potential batch differences in progeny survival of wild-caught, hatchery-spawned Faroe Bank cod (Gadus morhua L.) were investigated at two defined periods during early life history; i) the embryo stage (60 day degrees post fertilisation) and ii) the fry stage (110 days post hatch), post metamorphosis. The fry stage experiment was conducted in three replicates (N = 300 per replicate), and a panel of three polymorphic microsatellite markers was used for parental analysis. Mean survival rate at the embryo stage was 69% (± 20% SD). Survival was positively associated with egg diameter (P < 0.01), explaining 90% of the variation in egg survival rates. The data were too scarce to conclude either way concerning a possible correlation between survival rates between the two periods (P < 0.10). Offspring from three batches (from a total of eight) dominated in the fry stage, contributing over 90% of the progeny, and results were consistent over all three replicate tanks. The skewed batch representation observed may be of relevance to the effective management of selective breeding programmes for cod. PMID:27362346

  1. Differential Survival among Batches of Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua L.) from Fertilisation through to Post-Metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Petra E.; Penman, David J.; Dahle, Geir; Patursson, Øystein; Taggart, John B.

    2016-01-01

    Aquaculture production of cod has decreased from over 20,000 tonnes in 2009 to less than 2,000 tonnes in 2014 and the industry faces many challenges, one of which is high and unpredictably variable mortality rates in the early life stages. Hence, full-cycle farming with hatchery produced juveniles is still considered unprofitable compared to fisheries and on-growing of wild cod. In the present study, potential batch differences in progeny survival of wild-caught, hatchery-spawned Faroe Bank cod (Gadus morhua L.) were investigated at two defined periods during early life history; i) the embryo stage (60 day degrees post fertilisation) and ii) the fry stage (110 days post hatch), post metamorphosis. The fry stage experiment was conducted in three replicates (N = 300 per replicate), and a panel of three polymorphic microsatellite markers was used for parental analysis. Mean survival rate at the embryo stage was 69% (± 20% SD). Survival was positively associated with egg diameter (P < 0.01), explaining 90% of the variation in egg survival rates. The data were too scarce to conclude either way concerning a possible correlation between survival rates between the two periods (P < 0.10). Offspring from three batches (from a total of eight) dominated in the fry stage, contributing over 90% of the progeny, and results were consistent over all three replicate tanks. The skewed batch representation observed may be of relevance to the effective management of selective breeding programmes for cod. PMID:27362346

  2. Differential Survival among Batches of Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua L.) from Fertilisation through to Post-Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Petra E; Penman, David J; Dahle, Geir; Patursson, Øystein; Taggart, John B

    2016-01-01

    Aquaculture production of cod has decreased from over 20,000 tonnes in 2009 to less than 2,000 tonnes in 2014 and the industry faces many challenges, one of which is high and unpredictably variable mortality rates in the early life stages. Hence, full-cycle farming with hatchery produced juveniles is still considered unprofitable compared to fisheries and on-growing of wild cod. In the present study, potential batch differences in progeny survival of wild-caught, hatchery-spawned Faroe Bank cod (Gadus morhua L.) were investigated at two defined periods during early life history; i) the embryo stage (60 day degrees post fertilisation) and ii) the fry stage (110 days post hatch), post metamorphosis. The fry stage experiment was conducted in three replicates (N = 300 per replicate), and a panel of three polymorphic microsatellite markers was used for parental analysis. Mean survival rate at the embryo stage was 69% (± 20% SD). Survival was positively associated with egg diameter (P < 0.01), explaining 90% of the variation in egg survival rates. The data were too scarce to conclude either way concerning a possible correlation between survival rates between the two periods (P < 0.10). Offspring from three batches (from a total of eight) dominated in the fry stage, contributing over 90% of the progeny, and results were consistent over all three replicate tanks. The skewed batch representation observed may be of relevance to the effective management of selective breeding programmes for cod.

  3. In vitro and ex vivo models indicate that the molecular clock in fast skeletal muscle of Atlantic cod is not autonomous.

    PubMed

    Lazado, Carlo C; Kumaratunga, Hiruni P S; Nagasawa, Kazue; Babiak, Igor; Caipang, Christopher Marlowe A; Fernandes, Jorge M O

    2014-10-01

    The notion that the circadian rhythm is exclusively regulated by a central clock has been challenged by the discovery of peripheral oscillators. These peripheral clocks are known to have a direct influence on the biological processes in a tissue or cell. In fish, several peripheral clocks respond directly to light, thus raising the hypothesis of autonomous regulation. Several clock genes are expressed with daily rhythmicity in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) fast skeletal muscle. In the present study, myosatellite cell culture and short-term cultured fast skeletal muscle explant models were developed and characterized, in order to investigate the autonomy of the clock system in skeletal muscle of Atlantic cod. Myosatellite cells proliferated and differentiated in vitro, as shown by the changes in cellular and myogenic gene markers. The high expression of myogenic differentiation 1 during the early days post-isolation implied the commitment to myogenic lineage and the increasing mRNA levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (pcna) indicated the proliferation of the cells in vitro. Transcript levels of myogenic marker genes such as pcna and myogenin increased during 5 days in culture of skeletal muscle explants, indicating that the muscle cells were proliferating and differentiating under ex vivo conditions. Transcript levels of the clock gene aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like 2 (arntl2) in myosatellite cells showed no daily oscillation regardless of photoperiod manipulation. On the other hand, mRNA levels of the clock gene circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (clock) showed circadian rhythmicity in 5-day-old skeletal muscle explant under different photoperiod regimes. The expression of arntl2, cryptochrome2 (cry2), period 2a (per2a) and nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1 was not rhythmic in muscle explants but photoperiod manipulation had a significant effect on mRNA levels of cry2 and per2a. Taken together, the lack of rhythmicity

  4. Identification of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), ling (Molva molva), and Alaska pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) by PCR-ELISA using duplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Taboada, Ledicia; Sánchez, Ana; Velasco, Amaya; Santaclara, Francisco J; Pérez-Martín, Ricardo I; Sotelo, Carmen G

    2014-06-18

    Species-specific PCR-ELISA assays for the identification of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), Alaska pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus), and ling (Molva molva) in food products have been developed. The method, comprising a set of primers common to the first two species, a set of primers for M. molva, and a probe for each species, was designed using ND4 and cytochrome b genes as molecular markers. The sensitivity and selectivity were then determined for each assay. These assays were afterward used to analyze DNA extracted from commercial fish products. The presence of the target species was successfully detected in all analyzed samples, demonstrating the applicability of this method to the analysis of food products.

  5. Environmental harm assessment of a wastewater discharge from Hammerfest LNG: a study with biomarkers in mussels (Mytilus sp.) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Beyer, Jonny; Aarab, Nadia; Tandberg, Anne Helene; Ingvarsdottir, Anna; Bamber, Shaw; Børseth, Jan Fredrik; Camus, Lionel; Velvin, Roger

    2013-04-15

    Biologically treated wastewater (WW) from the Hammerfest LNG (liquefied natural gas) plant is discharged to the sea. A study using biomarkers in mussels and Atlantic cod was performed to examine whether this discharge meets a zero harmful emission requirement. Caging of mussels close to the outfall and exposure of mussels and fish to WW in the laboratory were conducted, and a suite of contaminant responsive markers was assessed in exposed animals. In mussels the markers included chemical contaminant levels, haemocyte lysosomal instability and nucleus integrity, cellular energy allocation, digestive gland and gonad histopathology and shell-opening behaviour. In fish, biliary PAH metabolites and gill histopathology biomarkers were measured. A consistent cause-effect relationship between WW treatments and markers measured in test animals was not found. The results therefore indicate that the WW emission is unlikely to represent a significant stress factor for the local marine environment under the conditions studied.

  6. Environmental harm assessment of a wastewater discharge from Hammerfest LNG: a study with biomarkers in mussels (Mytilus sp.) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Beyer, Jonny; Aarab, Nadia; Tandberg, Anne Helene; Ingvarsdottir, Anna; Bamber, Shaw; Børseth, Jan Fredrik; Camus, Lionel; Velvin, Roger

    2013-04-15

    Biologically treated wastewater (WW) from the Hammerfest LNG (liquefied natural gas) plant is discharged to the sea. A study using biomarkers in mussels and Atlantic cod was performed to examine whether this discharge meets a zero harmful emission requirement. Caging of mussels close to the outfall and exposure of mussels and fish to WW in the laboratory were conducted, and a suite of contaminant responsive markers was assessed in exposed animals. In mussels the markers included chemical contaminant levels, haemocyte lysosomal instability and nucleus integrity, cellular energy allocation, digestive gland and gonad histopathology and shell-opening behaviour. In fish, biliary PAH metabolites and gill histopathology biomarkers were measured. A consistent cause-effect relationship between WW treatments and markers measured in test animals was not found. The results therefore indicate that the WW emission is unlikely to represent a significant stress factor for the local marine environment under the conditions studied. PMID:23419752

  7. Copepods enhance nutritional status, growth and development in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) larvae — can we identify the underlying factors?

    PubMed Central

    van der Meeren, Terje; Rønnestad, Ivar; Mangor-Jensen, Anders; Galloway, Trina F.; Kjørsvik, Elin; Hamre, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The current commercial production protocols for Atlantic cod depend on enriched rotifers and Artemia during first-feeding, but development and growth remain inferior to fish fed natural zooplankton. Two experiments were conducted in order to identify the underlying factors for this phenomenon. In the first experiment (Exp-1), groups of cod larvae were fed either (a) natural zooplankton, mainly copepods, increasing the size of prey as the larvae grew or (b) enriched rotifers followed by Artemia (the intensive group). In the second experiment (Exp-2), two groups of larvae were fed as in Exp-1, while a third group was fed copepod nauplii (approximately the size of rotifers) throughout the larval stage. In both experiments, growth was not significantly different between the groups during the first three weeks after hatching, but from the last part of the rotifer feeding period and onwards, the growth of the larvae fed copepods was higher than that of the intensive group. In Exp-2, the growth was similar between the two copepod groups during the expeimental period, indicating that nutrient composition, not prey size caused the better growth on copepods. Analyses of the prey showed that total fatty acid composition and the ratio of phospholipids to total lipids was slightly different in the prey organisms, and that protein, taurine, astaxanthin and zinc were lower on a dry weight basis in rotifers than in copepods. Other measured nutrients as DHA, all analysed vitamins, manganese, copper and selenium were similar or higher in the rotifers. When compared to the present knowledge on nutrient requirements, protein and taurine appeared to be the most likely limiting nutrients for growth in cod larvae fed rotifers and Artemia. Larvae fed rotifers/Artemia had a higher whole body lipid content than larvae fed copepods at the end of the experiment (stage 5) after the fish had been fed the same formulated diet for approximately 2 weeks. PMID:26038712

  8. Genetic diversity within and among Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) farmed in marine cages: a proof-of-concept study for the identification of escapees

    PubMed Central

    Glover, K A; Dahle, G; Westgaard, J I; Johansen, T; Knutsen, H; Jørstad, K E

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a molecular genetic characterization of Atlantic cod reared in commercial marine farms. Samples consisted of approximately 47 fish collected from nine cages located on four farms throughout Norway. In addition, 28 farmed escapees were recaptured in the sea (443 fish in total). Nine microsatellite loci and the Pan I gene were analysed, revealing a total of 181 alleles. Each sample contained 43–63% of total allelic variation. Comparing variation with published data for wild cod indicates that lower genetic variation exists within single cages than in wild populations. Significant linkage disequilibrium was observed amongst pairs of loci in all samples, suggesting a low number of contributing parental fish. Global FST was 0.049, and the highest pairwise FST value (pooled loci) was 0.085. For single loci, the Pan I gene was the most diagnostic, displaying a global FST of 0.203. Simulations amongst the samples collected on farms revealed an overall correct self-assignment percentage of 75%, demonstrating a high probability of identifying individuals to their farm of origin. Identification of the 28 escapees revealed a single cage as the most likely source of origin for half of the escapees, whilst the remaining fish were assigned to a mixture of samples, suggesting more than one source of escapees. PMID:20331613

  9. Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis replicates within Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) leucocytes and inhibits respiratory burst activity.

    PubMed

    Vestvik, Nils; Rønneseth, Anita; Kalgraff, Cathrine A K; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C; Wergeland, Heidrun I; Haugland, Gyri T

    2013-09-01

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis, causing granulomatosis in cod, has been shown to reside within cod immune cells, mainly within monocytes and macrophages. In the present study, we analysed the ability of the bacterium to replicate within adherent cells isolated from head kidney by in vitro infection of leucocytes. Two different technical approaches for flow cytometry analyses were performed for detection of intracellular bacteria. The presence of the wild type was assessed after identification by intracellular binding of specific antibodies to the pathogen. The other way was to use green fluorescent protein (GFP) transformed bacterium for infection studies allowing direct measurements of fluorescence from infected cells. By both methods we found an increase in fluorescence in infected cells, verifying bacterial replication, both after 4 and 28 h post infection in leucocytes isolated from head kidney (HKL). The GFP transformed bacterium was similar to the wild type in growth and infectivity pattern, showing that it can be a valuable tool for further studies of infection routes and pathology. Further, F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis was found to inhibit respiratory burst activity, a potent pathogen killing mechanism, in cod leucocytes, but not in such cells from salmon. Our findings may indicate that inhibition of respiratory burst during Francisella infection is a key to its intracellular existence. This strategy seems to be conserved through evolution as it is also observed during infections in higher vertebrates caused by bacteria within the Francisella genus. The results presented here, showing the intracellular existence of Francisella, its replication within leucocytes and the inhibitory effect on respiratory burst, strongly support that these factors contribute to disease and pathology in infected cod. The intracellular replication shown in the present study might contribute to explain the problems of obtaining protective vaccines against

  10. The Ontogeny and Brain Distribution Dynamics of the Appetite Regulators NPY, CART and pOX in Larval Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua L.)

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hoang T. M. D.; Angotzi, Anna Rita; Ebbesson, Lars O. E.; Karlsen, Ørjan

    2016-01-01

    Similar to many marine teleost species, Atlantic cod undergo remarkable physiological changes during the early life stages with concurrent and profound changes in feeding biology and ecology. In contrast to the digestive system, very little is known about the ontogeny and the localization of the centers that control appetite and feed ingestion in the developing brain of fish. We examined the expression patterns of three appetite regulating factors (orexigenic: neuropeptide Y, NPY; prepro-orexin, pOX and anorexigenic: cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, CART) in discrete brain regions of developing Atlantic cod using chromogenic and double fluorescent in situ hybridization. Differential temporal and spatial expression patterns for each appetite regulator were found from first feeding (4 days post hatch; dph) to juvenile stage (76 dph). Neurons expressing NPY mRNA were detected in the telencephalon (highest expression), diencephalon, and optic tectum from 4 dph onward. CART mRNA expression had a wider distribution along the anterior-posterior brain axis, including both telencephalon and diencephalon from 4 dph. From 46 dph, CART transcripts were also detected in the olfactory bulb, region of the nucleus of medial longitudinal fascicle, optic tectum and midbrain tegmentum. At 4 and 20 dph, pOX mRNA expression was exclusively found in the preoptic region, but extended to the hypothalamus at 46 and 76 dph. Co-expression of both CART and pOX genes were also observed in several hypothalamic neurons throughout larval development. Our results show that both orexigenic and anorexigenic factors are present in the telencephalon, diencephalon and mesencephalon in cod larvae. The telencephalon mostly contains key factors of hunger control (NPY), while the diencephalon, and particularly the hypothalamus may have a more complex role in modulating the multifunctional control of appetite in this species. As the larvae develop, the overall progression in temporal and

  11. The Ontogeny and Brain Distribution Dynamics of the Appetite Regulators NPY, CART and pOX in Larval Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua L.).

    PubMed

    Le, Hoang T M D; Angotzi, Anna Rita; Ebbesson, Lars O E; Karlsen, Ørjan; Rønnestad, Ivar

    2016-01-01

    Similar to many marine teleost species, Atlantic cod undergo remarkable physiological changes during the early life stages with concurrent and profound changes in feeding biology and ecology. In contrast to the digestive system, very little is known about the ontogeny and the localization of the centers that control appetite and feed ingestion in the developing brain of fish. We examined the expression patterns of three appetite regulating factors (orexigenic: neuropeptide Y, NPY; prepro-orexin, pOX and anorexigenic: cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, CART) in discrete brain regions of developing Atlantic cod using chromogenic and double fluorescent in situ hybridization. Differential temporal and spatial expression patterns for each appetite regulator were found from first feeding (4 days post hatch; dph) to juvenile stage (76 dph). Neurons expressing NPY mRNA were detected in the telencephalon (highest expression), diencephalon, and optic tectum from 4 dph onward. CART mRNA expression had a wider distribution along the anterior-posterior brain axis, including both telencephalon and diencephalon from 4 dph. From 46 dph, CART transcripts were also detected in the olfactory bulb, region of the nucleus of medial longitudinal fascicle, optic tectum and midbrain tegmentum. At 4 and 20 dph, pOX mRNA expression was exclusively found in the preoptic region, but extended to the hypothalamus at 46 and 76 dph. Co-expression of both CART and pOX genes were also observed in several hypothalamic neurons throughout larval development. Our results show that both orexigenic and anorexigenic factors are present in the telencephalon, diencephalon and mesencephalon in cod larvae. The telencephalon mostly contains key factors of hunger control (NPY), while the diencephalon, and particularly the hypothalamus may have a more complex role in modulating the multifunctional control of appetite in this species. As the larvae develop, the overall progression in temporal and

  12. Effect of Sub-Lethal Exposure to Ultraviolet Radiation on the Escape Performance of Atlantic Cod Larvae (Gadus morhua)

    PubMed Central

    Fukunishi, Yuichi; Browman, Howard I.; Durif, Caroline M. F.; Bjelland, Reidun M.; Skiftesvik, Anne Berit

    2012-01-01

    The amount of ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the earth's surface has increased due to depletion of the ozone layer. Several studies have reported that UV radiation reduces survival of fish larvae. However, indirect and sub-lethal impacts of UV radiation on fish behavior have been given little consideration. We observed the escape performance of larval cod (24 dph, SL: 7.6±0.2 mm; 29 dph, SL: 8.2±0.3 mm) that had been exposed to sub-lethal levels of UV radiation vs. unexposed controls. Two predators were used (in separate experiments): two-spotted goby (Gobiusculus flavescens; a suction predator) and lion's mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata; a “passive" ambush predator). Ten cod larvae were observed in the presence of a predator for 20 minutes using a digital video camera. Trials were replicated 4 times for goby and 5 times for jellyfish. Escape rate (total number of escapes/total number of attacks ×100), escape distance and the number of larvae remaining at the end of the experiment were measured. In the experiment with gobies, in the UV-treated larvae, both escape rate and escape distance (36%, 38±7.5 mm respectively) were significantly lower than those of control larvae (75%, 69±4.7 mm respectively). There was a significant difference in survival as well (UV: 35%, Control: 63%). No apparent escape response was observed, and survival rate was not significantly different, between treatments (UV: 66%, Control: 74%) in the experiment with jellyfish. We conclude that the effect and impact of exposure to sub-lethal levels of UV radiation on the escape performance of cod larvae depends on the type of predator. Our results also suggest that prediction of UV impacts on fish larvae based only on direct effects are underestimations. PMID:22536406

  13. Suspended matter in surface waters of the Atlantic continental margin from Cape Cod to the Florida keys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.; Meade, R.H.; Bond, G.C.

    1970-01-01

    Appreciable amounts of suspended matter (> 1.0 milligram per liter) in surface waters are restricted to within a few kilometers of the Atlantic coast. Particles that escape estuaries or are discharged by rivers into the shelf region tend to travel longshoreward rather than seaward. Suspended matter farther offshore, chiefly amorphous organic particles, totals 0.1 milligram per liter or less. Soot, fly ash, processed cellulose, and other pollutants are widespread.

  14. Adjustments of molecular key components of branchial ion and pH regulation in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in response to ocean acidification and warming.

    PubMed

    Michael, Katharina; Kreiss, Cornelia M; Hu, Marian Y; Koschnick, Nils; Bickmeyer, Ulf; Dupont, Sam; Pörtner, Hans-O; Lucassen, Magnus

    2016-03-01

    Marine teleost fish sustain compensation of extracellular pH after exposure to hypercapnia by means of efficient ion and acid-base regulation. Elevated rates of ion and acid-base regulation under hypercapnia may be stimulated further by elevated temperature. Here, we characterized the regulation of transepithelial ion transporters (NKCC1, NBC1, SLC26A6, NHE1 and 2) and ATPases (Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and V-type H(+) ATPase) in gills of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) after 4 weeks of exposure to ambient and future PCO2 levels (550 μatm, 1200 μatm, 2200 μatm) at optimum (10 °C) and summer maximum temperature (18 °C), respectively. Gene expression of most branchial ion transporters revealed temperature- and dose-dependent responses to elevated PCO2. Transcriptional regulation resulted in stable protein expression at 10 °C, whereas expression of most transport proteins increased at medium PCO2 and 18 °C. mRNA and protein expression of distinct ion transport proteins were closely co-regulated, substantiating cellular functional relationships. Na(+)/K(+) ATPase capacities were PCO2 independent, but increased with acclimation temperature, whereas H(+) ATPase capacities were thermally compensated but decreased at medium PCO2 and 10 °C. When functional capacities of branchial ATPases were compared with mitochondrial F1Fo ATP-synthase strong correlations of F1Fo ATP-synthase and ATPase capacities generally indicate close coordination of branchial aerobic ATP demand and supply. Our data indicate physiological plasticity in the gills of cod to adjust to a warming, acidifying ocean within limits. In light of the interacting and non-linear, dose-dependent effects of both climate factors the role of these mechanisms in shaping resilience under climate change remains to be explored.

  15. Molecular identification and transmission studies of X-cell parasites from Atlantic cod Gadus morhua (Gadiformes: Gadidae) and the northern black flounder Pseudopleuronectes obscurus (Pleuronectiformes: Pleuronectidae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidermal pseudotumours from Hippoglossoides dubius and Acanthogobius flavimanus in Japan and gill lesions in Limanda limanda from the UK have been shown to be caused by phylogenetically related protozoan parasites, known collectively as X-cells. However, the phylogenetic position of the X-cell group is not well supported within any of the existing protozoan phyla and they are currently thought to be members of the Alveolata. Ultrastructural features of X-cells in fish pseudotumours are somewhat limited and no typical environmental stages, such as spores or flagellated cells, have been observed. The life cycles for these parasites have not been demonstrated and it remains unknown how transmission to a new host occurs. In the present study, pseudobranchial pseudotumours from Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, in Iceland and epidermal pseudotumours from the northern black flounder, Pseudopleuronectes obscurus, in Japan were used in experimental transmission studies to establish whether direct transmission of the parasite is achievable. In addition, X-cells from Atlantic cod were sequenced to confirm whether they are phylogenetically related to other X-cells and epidermal pseudotumours from the northern black flounder were analysed to establish whether the same parasite is responsible for infecting different flatfish species in Japan. Results Phylogenetic analyses of small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) sequence data from Atlantic cod X-cells show that they are a related parasite that occupies a basal position to the clade containing other X-cell parasites. The X-cell parasite causing epidermal pseudotumours in P. obscurus is the same parasite that causes pseudotumours in H. dubius. Direct, fish to fish, transmission of the X-cell parasites used in this study, via oral feeding or injection, was not achieved. Non-amoeboid X-cells are contained within discrete sac-like structures that are loosely attached to epidermal pseudotumours in flatfish; these X-cells are

  16. Computer vision-based evaluation of pre- and postrigor changes in size and shape of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fillets during rigor mortis and ice storage: effects of perimortem handling stress.

    PubMed

    Misimi, E; Erikson, U; Digre, H; Skavhaug, A; Mathiassen, J R

    2008-03-01

    The present study describes the possibilities for using computer vision-based methods for the detection and monitoring of transient 2D and 3D changes in the geometry of a given product. The rigor contractions of unstressed and stressed fillets of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were used as a model system. Gradual changes in fillet shape and size (area, length, width, and roundness) were recorded for 7 and 3 d, respectively. Also, changes in fillet area and height (cross-section profiles) were tracked using a laser beam and a 3D digital camera. Another goal was to compare rigor developments of the 2 species of farmed fish, and whether perimortem stress affected the appearance of the fillets. Some significant changes in fillet size and shape were found (length, width, area, roundness, height) between unstressed and stressed fish during the course of rigor mortis as well as after ice storage (postrigor). However, the observed irreversible stress-related changes were small and would hardly mean anything for postrigor fish processors or consumers. The cod were less stressed (as defined by muscle biochemistry) than the salmon after the 2 species had been subjected to similar stress bouts. Consequently, the difference between the rigor courses of unstressed and stressed fish was more extreme in the case of salmon. However, the maximal whole fish rigor strength was judged to be about the same for both species. Moreover, the reductions in fillet area and length, as well as the increases in width, were basically of similar magnitude for both species. In fact, the increases in fillet roundness and cross-section height were larger for the cod. We conclude that the computer vision method can be used effectively for automated monitoring of changes in 2D and 3D shape and size of fish fillets during rigor mortis and ice storage. In addition, it can be used for grading of fillets according to uniformity in size and shape, as well as measurement of

  17. Characterization of the fatty acyl elongase (elovl) gene family, and hepatic elovl and delta-6 fatty acyl desaturase transcript expression and fatty acid responses to diets containing camelina oil in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Xue, Xi; Feng, Charles Y; Hixson, Stefanie M; Johnstone, Kim; Anderson, Derek M; Parrish, Christopher C; Rise, Matthew L

    2014-09-01

    For aquaculture to become sustainable, there is a need to substitute fish oil [FO, rich in ω3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) such as 20:5ω3 (EPA) and 22:6ω3 (DHA)] in aquafeed with plant oils such as camelina oil [CO, rich in C18 PUFA such as 18:3ω3 (ALA) and 18:2ω6 (LNA)]. The LC-PUFA are essential components in fish diets for maintaining optimal health, physiology and growth. However, most marine fish including Atlantic cod are inefficient at producing LC-PUFA from shorter chain precursors. Since elovl genes encode enzymes that play key roles in fatty acid biosynthesis, we hypothesized that they may be involved in Atlantic cod responses to diets rich in 18:3ω3 and 18:2ω6. Ten members of the cod elovl gene family were characterized at the mRNA level. RT-PCR was used to study constitutive expression of elovl transcripts in fifteen tissues. Some transcripts (e.g. elovl5) were ubiquitously expressed, while others had tissue-specific expression (e.g. elovl4a in brain and eye). Cod fed a CO-containing diet (100% CO replacement of FO and including solvent-extracted fish meal) had significantly lower weight gain, with significant up-regulation of elovl5 and fadsd6 transcripts in the liver as shown by QPCR analysis, compared with cod on a FO control diet after a 13-week trial. Multivariate statistical analyses (SIMPER and PCA) indicated that high 18:3ω3 and/or low ω3 LC-PUFA levels in the liver were associated with the up-regulation of elovl5 and fadsd6, which are involved in LC-PUFA biosynthesis in cod.

  18. Cloning, tissue distribution and effects of food deprivation on pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PACAP-related peptide (PRP) and preprosomatostatin 1 (PPSS 1) in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Xu, Meiyu; Volkoff, Hélène

    2009-04-01

    Full-length complementary deoxyribonucleic acid sequences encoding pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PACAP-related peptide (PRP) and preprosomatostatin 1 (PPSS 1) were cloned from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) hypothalamus using reverse transcription and rapid amplification of complementary deoxyribonucleic acid ends. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction shows that PRP/PACAP mRNA and PPSS 1 mRNA are widely distributed throughout cod brain. During development, PRP/PACAP and PPSS 1 were detected at the 30-somite stage and pre-hatching stage, respectively, and expression levels gradually increased up to the hatched larvae. PPSS 1, but not PRP/PACAP, appeared to be affected by food availability during early development. In juvenile cod, PPSS 1 expression levels increased and remained significantly higher than that of control fed fish throughout 30 days of starvation and during a subsequent 10 days refeeding period. In contrast, PRP/PACAP expression levels were not affected by 30 days of food deprivation, but a significant increase in expression levels was observed during the 10 days refeeding period in the experimental food-deprived group as compared to the control fed group. Our results suggest that PRP/PACAP and PPSS 1 may be involved in the complex regulation of growth, feeding and metabolism during food deprivation and refeeding in Atlantic cod. PMID:19135491

  19. Discovery of miRNAs and Their Corresponding miRNA Genes in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua): Use of Stable miRNAs as Reference Genes Reveals Subgroups of miRNAs That Are Highly Expressed in Particular Organs

    PubMed Central

    Andreassen, Rune; Rangnes, Fredrik; Sivertsen, Maria; Chiang, Michelle; Tran, Michelle; Worren, Merete Molton

    2016-01-01

    Background Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is among the economically most important species in the northern Atlantic Ocean and a model species for studying development of the immune system in vertebrates. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of small RNA molecules that regulate fundamental biological processes at the post-transcriptional level. Detailed knowledge about a species miRNA repertoire is necessary to study how the miRNA transcriptome modulate gene expression. We have therefore discovered and characterized mature miRNAs and their corresponding miRNA genes in Atlantic cod. We have also performed a validation study to identify suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of miRNA expression in Atlantic cod. Finally, we utilized the newly characterized miRNA repertoire and the dedicated RT-qPCR method to reveal miRNAs that are highly expressed in certain organs. Results The discovery analysis revealed 490 mature miRNAs (401 unique sequences) along with precursor sequences and genomic location of the miRNA genes. Twenty six of these were novel miRNA genes. Validation studies ranked gmo-miR-17-1—5p or the two-gene combination gmo-miR25-3p and gmo-miR210-5p as most suitable qPCR reference genes. Analysis by RT-qPCR revealed 45 miRNAs with significantly higher expression in tissues from one or a few organs. Comparisons to other vertebrates indicate that some of these miRNAs may regulate processes like growth, lipid metabolism, immune response to microbial infections and scar damage repair. Three teleost-specific and three novel Atlantic cod miRNAs were among the differentially expressed miRNAs. Conclusions The number of known mature miRNAs was considerably increased by our identification of miRNAs and miRNA genes in Atlantic cod. This will benefit further functional studies of miRNA expression using deep sequencing methods. The validation study showed that stable miRNAs are suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of miRNA expression. Applying RT-qPCR we

  20. Effects of 17alpha-methyltestosterone exposure on steroidogenesis and cyclin-B mRNA expression in previtellogenic oocytes of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Kortner, Trond M; Arukwe, Augustine

    2007-11-01

    Steroid hormone (estrogens and androgens) synthesis and regulation involve a large number of enzymes and potential biochemical pathways. In the context of these biochemical pathways, it is believed that the true rate-limiting step in acute steroid production is the movement of cholesterol across the mitochondrial membrane by the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein and the subsequent conversion to pregnenolone by cytochrome P450-mediated side-chain cleavage (P450scc) enzyme. Oocyte development is a complex process that is triggered by the maturation-promoting factor (MPF) involving cyclin-B as a regulatory factor. In the present study, we evaluated the endocrine effects of 17alpha-methyltestosterone (MT) on steroidogenic pathways of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), using an in vitro previtellogenic oocyte culture technique that is based on an agarose floating method. Tissue was cultured in a humidified incubator at 10 degrees C for 1, 5, 10 and 20 days with different concentrations of the synthetic androgen MT (0 (control), 1, 10, 100 and 1000 microM) dissolved in ethanol (0.3%). Gene expressions for StAR, P450scc, aromatase-alpha (P450aromA) and cyclin-B were detected using validated real-time PCR with specific primer pairs. Cellular localization of the StAR protein and P450scc were performed using the immunohistochemical technique with antisera prepared against synthetic peptide for both proteins. Steroid hormones (estradiol-17beta: E2 and testosterone: T) levels were estimated using enzyme immunoassay. Our data showed significant concentration-specific increase (at day 1 and 5) and decrease (at day 10 and 20) of the StAR mRNA expression after exposure to MT. P450scc expression showed a MT concentration-specific decrease during the exposure periods and cyclin-B mRNA expression was decreased in MT concentration-dependent manner at days 10 and 20 (reaching almost total inhibition after exposure to 1000 microM MT). MT exposure produced variable effects on the P

  1. Substitution of fish oil with camelina oil and inclusion of camelina meal in diets fed to Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and their effects on growth, tissue lipid classes, and fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Hixson, S M; Parrish, C C

    2014-03-01

    Developing a commercially relevant Atlantic cod aquaculture industry will require improvements in feed sustainability. Camelina oil and meal are potential replacements of fish oil and fish meal in aquaculture feeds. Camelina oil is high in 18:3ω3 (30%), with an ω3/ω6 ratio > 1. Camelina meal has a considerable crude protein level (38%), which includes significant amounts of methionine and phenylalanine. Four diets were tested; each diet was fed to triplicate tanks (3 tanks per diet) of Atlantic cod (14.4 g/fish; 70 fish per tank) for 13 wk. The diets included a fish oil/fish meal control (FO) and three diets which replaced 100% of fish oil with camelina oil: one diet contained fish meal (100CO), another solvent extracted fish meal (100COSEFM), and another had fish meal partially reduced by 15% inclusion of camelina meal (100CO15CM). Growth was measured (length and weight) and tissue samples were collected for lipid analysis (muscle, liver, brain, gut, spleen, skin, and carcass) at wk 0 (before feeding the experimental diet) and at wk 13. Cod fed camelina oil had a lower (P < 0.001) final weight than cod fed the FO diet (50.8 ± 10.3 g/fish). Cod fed 100CO15CM had a lower (P < 0.001) final weight (35.0 ± 8.0 g) than those fed 100CO (43.6 ± 8.9 g) and 100COSEFM (46.7 ± 10.7 g). Cod tissues in the 100COSEFM treatment were most impacted by dietary fatty acid profile. Multivariate statistics revealed that FO and 100COSEFM tissue fatty acid profiles were 21 to 31% different, depending on tissue type. The full replacement of fish oil with camelina oil, plus solvent extracted fish meal had an overarching effect on the entire fatty acid profile of the whole animal. Fatty acid mass balance calculations indicated that cod fed 100COSEFM elongated 13% of 18:3ω3 to 20:3ω3 and oxidized the remaining 87%, whereas cod fed fish oil showed a much lower (P < 0.001) elongation of 18:3ω3 of 1.6%. These results suggest that excess 18:3ω3 from camelina oil caused some fatty acid

  2. Vitamin A and arachidonic acid altered the skeletal mineralization in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae without any interactions on the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Lie, Kai Kristoffer; Kvalheim, Karen; Rasinger, Josef Daniel; Harboe, Torstein; Nordgreen, Andreas; Moren, Mari

    2016-01-01

    The main object of this study was to evaluate the impact of different levels of vitamin A (VA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) in relation to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on mineralization and gene expression in Atlantic cod larvae (Gadus morhua). First-feeding larvae were fed enriched rotifers from start-feeding until 29 days post hatch (dph). Larvae in four tanks were fed one of the following diets: control (EPA/ARA ratio: 15.8, 0.9μg VA g(-1)), control+VA (EPA/ARA ratio: 15.8, 7.8μg VA g(-1)), High ARA (EPA/ARA ratio: 0.9, 1.5μg VA g(-1)) or High ARA+VA (EPA/ARA ratio: 0.9, 12.0μg VA g(-1)). Larvae fed High ARA+VA were shorter at 29dph compared to the other groups and had significantly less mineralized bones when comparing larvae of similar size, showing interaction effects between VA and ARA. Although transcriptomic analysis did not reveal any interaction effects, a higher number of genes were differentially expressed in the high ARA fed larvae compared to control+VA fed larvae. Furthermore, bglap1, bglap2 and col10a1 were all down-regulated in larvae fed High ARA-diets and to a greater extent than larvae fed VA supplemented diet, indicating an additive effect on mineralization. In conclusion, this study showed that the dietary increase in ARA and VA altered the skeletal metabolism during larval development, most likely through signaling pathways specific for each nutrient rather than an interaction. The present study also demonstrates that VA could affect the larval response to ARA, even within the accepted non-toxic/non-deficient range.

  3. High rates of glucose utilization in the gas gland of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) are supported by GLUT1 and HK1b.

    PubMed

    Clow, Kathy A; Short, Connie E; Hall, Jennifer R; Gendron, Robert L; Paradis, Hélène; Ralhan, Ankur; Driedzic, William R

    2016-09-01

    The gas gland of physoclistous fish utilizes glucose to generate lactic acid that leads to the off-loading of oxygen from haemoglobin. This study addresses characteristics of the first two steps in glucose utilization in the gas gland of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Glucose metabolism by isolated gas gland cells was 12- and 170-fold higher, respectively, than that in heart and red blood cells (RBCs) as determined by the production of (3)H2O from [2-(3)H]glucose. In the gas gland, essentially all of the glucose consumed was converted to lactate. Glucose uptake in the gas gland shows a very high dependence upon facilitated transport as evidenced by saturation of uptake of 2-deoxyglucose at a low extracellular concentration and a requirement for high levels of cytochalasin B for uptake inhibition despite the high efficacy of this treatment in heart and RBCs. Glucose transport is via glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), which is localized to the glandular cells. GLUT1 western blot analysis from whole-tissue lysates displayed a band with a relative molecular mass of 52 kDa, consistent with the deduced amino acid sequence. Levels of 52 kDa GLUT1 in the gas gland were 2.3- and 33-fold higher, respectively, than those in heart and RBCs, respectively. Glucose phosphorylation is catalysed by hexokinase Ib (HKIb), a paralogue that cannot bind to the outer mitochondrial membrane. Transcript levels of HKIb in the gas gland were 52- and 57-fold more abundant, respectively, than those in heart and RBCs. It appears that high levels of GLUT1 protein and an unusual isoform of HKI are both critical for the high rates of glycolysis in gas gland cells.

  4. High rates of glucose utilization in the gas gland of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) are supported by GLUT1 and HK1b.

    PubMed

    Clow, Kathy A; Short, Connie E; Hall, Jennifer R; Gendron, Robert L; Paradis, Hélène; Ralhan, Ankur; Driedzic, William R

    2016-09-01

    The gas gland of physoclistous fish utilizes glucose to generate lactic acid that leads to the off-loading of oxygen from haemoglobin. This study addresses characteristics of the first two steps in glucose utilization in the gas gland of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Glucose metabolism by isolated gas gland cells was 12- and 170-fold higher, respectively, than that in heart and red blood cells (RBCs) as determined by the production of (3)H2O from [2-(3)H]glucose. In the gas gland, essentially all of the glucose consumed was converted to lactate. Glucose uptake in the gas gland shows a very high dependence upon facilitated transport as evidenced by saturation of uptake of 2-deoxyglucose at a low extracellular concentration and a requirement for high levels of cytochalasin B for uptake inhibition despite the high efficacy of this treatment in heart and RBCs. Glucose transport is via glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), which is localized to the glandular cells. GLUT1 western blot analysis from whole-tissue lysates displayed a band with a relative molecular mass of 52 kDa, consistent with the deduced amino acid sequence. Levels of 52 kDa GLUT1 in the gas gland were 2.3- and 33-fold higher, respectively, than those in heart and RBCs, respectively. Glucose phosphorylation is catalysed by hexokinase Ib (HKIb), a paralogue that cannot bind to the outer mitochondrial membrane. Transcript levels of HKIb in the gas gland were 52- and 57-fold more abundant, respectively, than those in heart and RBCs. It appears that high levels of GLUT1 protein and an unusual isoform of HKI are both critical for the high rates of glycolysis in gas gland cells. PMID:27401755

  5. Differential impacts of elevated CO2 and acidosis on the energy budget of gill and liver cells from Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Stapp, L S; Kreiss, C M; Pörtner, H O; Lannig, G

    2015-09-01

    Ocean acidification impacts fish and other marine species through increased seawater PCO2 levels (hypercapnia). Knowledge of the physiological mechanisms mediating effects in various tissues of fish is incomplete. Here we tested the effects of extracellular hypercapnia and acidosis on energy metabolism of gill and liver cells of Atlantic cod. Exposure media mimicked blood conditions in vivo, either during normo- or hypercapnia and at control or acidic extracellular pH (pHe). We determined metabolic rate and energy expenditure for protein biosynthesis, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and H(+)-ATPase and considered nutrition status by measurements of metabolic rate and protein biosynthesis in media with and without free amino acids (FAA). Addition of FAA stimulated hepatic but not branchial oxygen consumption. Normo- and hypercapnic acidosis as well as hypercapnia at control pHe depressed metabolic stimulation of hepatocytes. In gill cells, acidosis depressed respiration independent of PCO2 and FAA levels. For both cell types, depressed respiration was not correlated with the same reduction in energy allocated to protein biosynthesis or Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Hepatic energy expenditure for protein synthesis and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase was even elevated at acidic compared to control pHe suggesting increased costs for ion regulation and cellular reorganization. Hypercapnia at control pHe strongly reduced oxygen demand of branchial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase with a similar trend for H(+)-ATPase. We conclude that extracellular acidosis triggers metabolic depression in gill and metabolically stimulated liver cells. Additionally, hypercapnia itself seems to limit capacities for metabolic usage of amino acids in liver cells while it decreases the use and costs of ion regulatory ATPases in gill cells.

  6. Evaluation of the impact of camelina oil-containing diets on the expression of genes involved in the innate anti-viral immune response in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Booman, Marije; Xu, Qingheng; Rise, Matthew L

    2014-11-01

    To improve sustainability of aquaculture, especially for carnivorous species like Atlantic cod, replacement of fish oil-based diets with vegetable oil-based diets has been studied. The use of vegetable oil in fish feeds can significantly change the fatty acid composition of fish tissues, and given the importance of fatty acids in inflammation and immunity, this change could potentially impact the immune response and health of the fish. The oilseed Camelina sativa is a promising source for this vegetable oil, because of the high oil content of its seeds (40%), a higher n-3 fatty acid content than most other oilseeds, and a high amount of γ-tocopherol. This study aims to investigate the effect of the replacement of dietary fish oil with oil from Camelina sativa on the immune response of Atlantic cod, as measured by the gene expression in spleen. Juvenile cod were fed on a fish oil-based diet (FO) or one of two diets in which camelina oil replaced 40% or 80% of fish oil (40CO and 80CO respectively) for 67 days, after which they were injected with either the viral mimic polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as a control. Microarray analysis was used to determine the effect of the diet on the basal spleen transcriptome (pre-injection), and on the response to pIC (24 h post-injection). No marked differences in the spleen transcriptome were found between the three diets, either before or after injection with pIC. All fish, regardless of diet, showed a strong anti-viral response 24 h after pIC injection, with more than 500 genes having a significant difference of expression of 2-fold or higher compared to the PBS-injected fish for the FO, 40CO and 80CO diets. Gene Ontology annotation analysis of the three pIC-responsive gene lists indicated they were highly similar, and that the term 'immune system process' was significantly enriched in the pIC-responsive gene lists for all three diets. QPCR analysis for 5 genes with a known

  7. β-naphthoflavone interferes with cyp1c1, cox2 and IL-8 gene transcription and leukotriene B4 secretion in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) head kidney cells during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Holen, Elisabeth; Olsvik, Pål A

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate how β-naphthoflavone interacts with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and polyinosinic acid: polycytidylic acid (poly I: C) induced innate immune parameters as well as phase I and phase II detoxification enzymes in head kidney cells isolated from Atlantic cod. β-naphthoflavone is a pure agonist of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) while LPS and poly I: C are not. β-naphthoflavone was added to head kidney leukocytes alone or together with LPS or poly I: C and the responses were evaluated in terms of protein and gene expression. The results showed that β-naphthoflavone (25 nM), with and without LPS, significantly induced cytochrome P450 (cyp1c) transcription in cod head kidney cells. β-naphthoflavone (100 nM) in the presence of the virus mimic, poly I: C, also increased cyp1c1transcription. LPS induced cyp1c1, cyclooxygenase 2 (cox2), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and interleukin 8 (IL-8) transcription, genes that were not affected by the tested β-naphthoflavone concentrations alone. However, β-naphthoflavone (25 and 50 nM) strengthened LPS induced cox2 and IL-8 transcription. Cod head kidney cells exposed to β-naphthoflavone concentrations ranging from 25 to 100 nM, with and without LPS or poly I: C, expressed AhR protein. LPS or β-naphthoflavone (5-50 nM) significantly induced leukotriene B4 (LTB4) secretion compared to control. In conclusion, this study suggests that β-naphthoflavone could interfere with LPS induced immune cell signaling in cod head kidney cells.

  8. Rapid, economical single-nucleotide polymorphism and microsatellite discovery based on de novo assembly of a reduced representation genome in a non-model organism: a case study of Atlantic cod Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, J; Gauthier, D T; Carlsson, J E L; Coughlan, J P; Dillane, E; Fitzgerald, R D; Keating, U; McGinnity, P; Mirimin, L; Cross, T F

    2013-03-01

    By combining next-generation sequencing technology (454) and reduced representation library (RRL) construction, the rapid and economical isolation of over 25 000 potential single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and >6000 putative microsatellite loci from c. 2% of the genome of the non-model teleost, Atlantic cod Gadus morhua from the Celtic Sea, south of Ireland, was demonstrated. A small-scale validation of markers indicated that 80% (11 of 14) of SNP loci and 40% (6 of 15) of the microsatellite loci could be amplified and showed variability. The results clearly show that small-scale next-generation sequencing of RRL genomes is an economical and rapid approach for simultaneous SNP and microsatellite discovery that is applicable to any species. The low cost and relatively small investment in time allows for positive exploitation of ascertainment bias to design markers applicable to specific populations and study questions.

  9. Evidence of a hybrid-zone in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in the Baltic and the Danish Belt Sea revealed by individual admixture analysis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Einar E; Hansen, Michael M; Ruzzante, Daniel E; Meldrup, Dorte; Grønkjaer, Peter

    2003-06-01

    The study of hybrid zones is central to our understanding of the genetic basis of reproductive isolation and speciation, yet very little is known about the extent and significance of hybrid zones in marine fishes. We examined the population structure of cod in the transition area between the North Sea and the Baltic Sea employing nine microsatellite loci. Genetic differentiation between the North Sea sample and the rest increased along a transect to the Baltic proper, with a large increase in level of differentiation occurring in the Western Baltic area. Our objective was to determine whether this pattern was caused purely by varying degrees of mechanical mixing of North Sea and Baltic Sea cod or by interbreeding and formation of a hybrid swarm. Simulation studies revealed that traditional Hardy-Weinberg analysis did not have sufficient power for detection of a Wahlund effect. However, using a model-based clustering method for individual admixture analysis, we were able to demonstrate the existence of intermediate genotypes in all samples from the transition area. Accordingly, our data were explained best by a model of a hybrid swarm flanked by pure nonadmixed populations in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea proper. Significant correlation of gene identities across loci (gametic phase disequilibrium) was found only in a sample from the Western Baltic, suggesting this area as the centre of the apparent hybrid zone. A hybrid zone for cod in the ecotone between the high-saline North Sea and the low-saline Baltic Sea is discussed in relation to its possible origin and maintenance, and in relation to a classical study of haemoglobin variation in cod from the Baltic Sea/Danish Belt Sea, suggesting mixing of two divergent populations without interbreeding.

  10. Response of branchial Na(+)/K(+) ATPase to changes in ambient temperature in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and whiting (Merlangius merlangus).

    PubMed

    Michael, Katharina; Koschnick, Nils; Pörtner, Hans-O; Lucassen, Magnus

    2016-05-01

    The maintenance of ion and pH homeostasis despite changes in ambient temperature is crucial for ectothermic organisms. Thermal sensitivity of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase mRNA expression, protein expression and activity was determined in gills of North Sea cod (NC) and Northeastern Arctic cod (NEAC), acclimated for 6 weeks at 4 and 10 °C and compared to field samples of North Sea cod (sNC), acclimatized to early spring (4 °C) and summer (18 °C) conditions. The same analyses were conducted in gills of the confamiliar whiting, acclimated at 4 and 10 °C. Branchial Na(+)/K(+) ATPase capacities remained uncompensated at functional and protein levels in NC and NEAC at both acclimation temperatures. Na(+)/K(+) ATPase mRNA expression in NEAC acclimated at 10 °C was about twofold higher compared to NC, indicating some population-specific differentiation at this level. Lower Na(+)/K(+) ATPase capacities in gills of warm-acclimatized sNC at common assay temperatures indicate thermal compensation between seasonal extremes, and post-translational modifications contributed to this mitigation at high assay temperature. Together, cod compensates Na(+)/K(+) ATPase capacities on the warm edge of the thermal window and below 4 °C, respectively. In contrast, whiting Na(+)/K(+) ATPase capacities were cold compensated at 4 °C, supported by 1.5-fold higher mRNA and protein expression. Besides, capacities were lower in whiting compared to NC and NEAC at optimum temperature, which may be advantageous in terms of reduced maintenance cost, but at temperatures ≤4 °C, compensation may represent an energy trade-off to maintain homeostasis. The species-specific response of gadid Na(+)/K(+) ATPase indicates certain threshold temperatures beyond which compensation of the pump is elicited, possibly related to the different biogeography of these species.

  11. Climate induced temperature effects on growth performance, fecundity and recruitment in marine fish: developing a hypothesis for cause and effect relationships in Atlantic cod ( Gadus morhua) and common eelpout ( Zoarces viviparus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pörtner, H. O.; Berdal, B.; Blust, R.; Brix, O.; Colosimo, A.; De Wachter, B.; Giuliani, A.; Johansen, T.; Fischer, T.; Knust, R.; Lannig, G.; Naevdal, G.; Nedenes, A.; Nyhammer, G.; Sartoris, F. J.; Serendero, I.; Sirabella, P.; Thorkildsen, S.; Zakhartsev, M.

    2001-12-01

    Effects of global warming on animal distribution and performance become visible in many marine ecosystems. The present study was designed to develop a concept for a cause and effect understanding with respect to temperature changes and to explain ecological findings based on physiological processes. The concept is based on a wide comparison of invertebrate and fish species with a special focus on recent data obtained in two model species of fish. These fish species are both characterized by northern and southern distribution limits in the North Atlantic: eelpout ( Zoarces viviparus), as a typical non-migrating inhabitant of the coastal zone and the cod ( Gadus morhua), as a typical inhabitant of the continental shelf with a high importance for fisheries. Mathematical modelling demonstrates a clear significant correlation between climate induced temperature fluctuations and the recruitment of cod stocks. Growth performance in cod is optimal at temperatures close to 10°C, regardless of the population investigated in a latitudinal cline. However, temperature specific growth rates decrease at higher latitudes. Also, fecundity is less in White Sea than in North and Baltic Sea cod or eelpout populations. These findings suggest that a cold-induced shift in energy budget occurs which is unfavorable for growth performance and fecundity. Thermal tolerance limits shift depending on latitude and are characterized by oxygen limitation at both low or high temperatures. Oxygen supply to tissues is optimized at low temperature by a shift in hemoglobin isoforms and oxygen binding properties to lower affinities and higher unloading potential. Protective stimulation of heat shock protein synthesis was not observed. According to a recent model of thermal tolerance the downward shift of tolerance limits during cold adaptation is associated with rising mitochondrial densities and, thus, aerobic capacity and performance in the cold, especially in eurythermal species. At the same time

  12. Estimating effluent COD

    SciTech Connect

    Eckenfelder, W.W.; Landine, R.

    1995-06-01

    In many parts of the world, chemical oxygen demand (COD) is a primary effluent parameter. Unlike BOD, which considers only biodegradable organics, COD also includes non-degradable organics and non-degradable biological oxidation by-products, generally referred to as soluble microbial products (SMP). The SMP can vary from 2% to 10% of the influent degradable COD. If the technology is limited to biological treatment only, the degradable COD will be removed. Further reductions in COD will require physical chemical treatments such as activated carbon. Effluent COD values for several industrial wastewaters are presented. Effluent characteristics from the anaerobic treatment of industrial wastewaters are also discussed.

  13. Understanding climate impacts on recruitment and spatial dynamics of Atlantic cod in the Gulf of Maine: Integration of observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Jeffrey A.; Kovach, Adrienne I.; Churchill, James H.; Kerr, Lisa A.; Morrison, John R.; Beardsley, Robert C.; Berlinsky, David L.; Chen, Changsheng; Cadrin, Steven X.; Davis, Cabell S.; Ford, Kathryn H.; Grabowski, Jonathan H.; Howell, W. Huntting; Ji, Rubao; Jones, Rebecca J.; Pershing, Andrew J.; Record, Nicholas R.; Thomas, Andrew C.; Sherwood, Graham D.; Tallack, Shelly M. L.; Townsend, David W.

    2010-10-01

    We put forward a combined observing and modeling strategy for evaluating effects of environmental forcing on the dynamics of spatially structured cod populations spawning in the western Gulf of Maine. Recent work indicates at least two genetically differentiated complexes in this region: a late spring spawning, coastal population centered in Ipswich Bay, and a population that spawns in winter inshore and on nearshore banks in the Gulf of Maine and off southern New England. The two populations likely differ in trophic interactions and in physiological and behavioral responses to different winter and spring environments. Coupled physical-biological modeling has advanced to the point where within-decade forecasting of environmental conditions for recruitment to each of the two populations is feasible. However, the modeling needs to be supported by hydrographic, primary production and zooplankton data collected by buoys, and by data from remote sensing and fixed station sampling. Forecasts of environmentally driven dispersal and growth of planktonic early life stages, combined with an understanding of possible population-specific predator fields, usage of coastal habitat by juveniles and adult resident and migratory patterns, can be used to develop scenarios for spatially explicit population responses to multiple forcings, including climate change, anthropogenic impacts on nearshore juvenile habitat, connectivity among populations and management interventions such as regional fisheries closures.

  14. Cod Liver Oil

    MedlinePlus

    ... cod liver oil on their skin to speed wound healing. When taken in appropriate doses by mouth, cod ... young children. Heart disease. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Wound healing. Glaucoma. Other conditions. More evidence is needed to ...

  15. Plankton effect on cod recruitment in the North Sea.

    PubMed

    Beaugrand, Grégory; Brander, Keith M; Alistair Lindley, J; Souissi, Sami; Reid, Philip C

    2003-12-11

    The Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) has been overexploited in the North Sea since the late 1960s and great concern has been expressed about the decline in cod biomass and recruitment. Here we show that, in addition to the effects of overfishing, fluctuations in plankton have resulted in long-term changes in cod recruitment in the North Sea (bottom-up control). Survival of larval cod is shown to depend on three key biological parameters of their prey: the mean size of prey, seasonal timing and abundance. We suggest a mechanism, involving the match/mismatch hypothesis, by which variability in temperature affects larval cod survival and conclude that rising temperature since the mid-1980s has modified the plankton ecosystem in a way that reduces the survival of young cod.

  16. New England Cod Collapse and the Climate.

    PubMed

    Meng, Kyle C; Oremus, Kimberly L; Gaines, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    To improve fishery management, there is an increasing need to understand the long-term consequences of natural and anthropogenic climate variability for ecological systems. New England's iconic cod populations have been in decline for several decades and have recently reached unprecedented lows. We find that 17% of the overall decline in Gulf of Maine cod biomass since 1980 can be attributed to positive phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). This is a consequence of three results: i) a 1-unit increase in the NAO winter index is associated with a 17% decrease in the spring biomass of age-1 cod the following year; ii) this NAO-driven decrease persists as the affected cohort matures; iii) fishing practices appear to exacerbate NAO's direct biological effect such that, since 1913, a 1-unit increase in the NAO index lowers subsequent cod catch for up to 19 years. The Georges Bank cod stock displays similar patterns. Because we statistically detect a delay between the NAO and subsequent declines in adult biomass, our findings imply that observed current NAO conditions can be used in stock forecasts, providing lead time for adaptive policy. More broadly, our approach can inform forecasting efforts for other fish populations strongly affected by natural and anthropogenic climatic variation. PMID:27463967

  17. New England Cod Collapse and the Climate

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Kyle C.; Oremus, Kimberly L.; Gaines, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    To improve fishery management, there is an increasing need to understand the long-term consequences of natural and anthropogenic climate variability for ecological systems. New England’s iconic cod populations have been in decline for several decades and have recently reached unprecedented lows. We find that 17% of the overall decline in Gulf of Maine cod biomass since 1980 can be attributed to positive phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). This is a consequence of three results: i) a 1-unit increase in the NAO winter index is associated with a 17% decrease in the spring biomass of age-1 cod the following year; ii) this NAO-driven decrease persists as the affected cohort matures; iii) fishing practices appear to exacerbate NAO’s direct biological effect such that, since 1913, a 1-unit increase in the NAO index lowers subsequent cod catch for up to 19 years. The Georges Bank cod stock displays similar patterns. Because we statistically detect a delay between the NAO and subsequent declines in adult biomass, our findings imply that observed current NAO conditions can be used in stock forecasts, providing lead time for adaptive policy. More broadly, our approach can inform forecasting efforts for other fish populations strongly affected by natural and anthropogenic climatic variation. PMID:27463967

  18. New England Cod Collapse and the Climate.

    PubMed

    Meng, Kyle C; Oremus, Kimberly L; Gaines, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    To improve fishery management, there is an increasing need to understand the long-term consequences of natural and anthropogenic climate variability for ecological systems. New England's iconic cod populations have been in decline for several decades and have recently reached unprecedented lows. We find that 17% of the overall decline in Gulf of Maine cod biomass since 1980 can be attributed to positive phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). This is a consequence of three results: i) a 1-unit increase in the NAO winter index is associated with a 17% decrease in the spring biomass of age-1 cod the following year; ii) this NAO-driven decrease persists as the affected cohort matures; iii) fishing practices appear to exacerbate NAO's direct biological effect such that, since 1913, a 1-unit increase in the NAO index lowers subsequent cod catch for up to 19 years. The Georges Bank cod stock displays similar patterns. Because we statistically detect a delay between the NAO and subsequent declines in adult biomass, our findings imply that observed current NAO conditions can be used in stock forecasts, providing lead time for adaptive policy. More broadly, our approach can inform forecasting efforts for other fish populations strongly affected by natural and anthropogenic climatic variation.

  19. 1H NMR metabolic profiling of cod (Gadus morhua) larvae: potential effects of temperature and diet composition during early developmental stages

    PubMed Central

    Chauton, Matilde Skogen; Galloway, Trina Falck; Kjørsvik, Elin; Størseth, Trond Røvik; Puvanendran, Velmurugu; van der Meeren, Terje; Karlsen, Ørjan; Rønnestad, Ivar; Hamre, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marine aquaculture offers a great source of protein for the increasing human population, and farming of, for example, Atlantic salmon is a global industry. Atlantic cod farming however, is an example of a promising industry where the potential is not yet realized. Research has revealed that a major bottleneck to successful farming of cod is poor quality of the larvae and juveniles. A large research program was designed to increase our understanding of how environmental factors such as temperature and nutrition affects cod larvae development. Data on larvae growth and development were used together with nuclear magnetic resonance. The NMR data indicated that the temperature influenced the metabolome of the larvae; differences were related to osmolytes such as betaine/TMAO, the amino acid taurine, and creatine and lactate which reflect muscle activity. The larvae were fed Artemia from stage 2, and this was probably reflected in a high taurine content of older larvae. Larvae fed with copepods in the nutrition experiment also displayed a high taurine content, together with higher creatine and betaine/TMAO content. Data on the cod larvae metabolome should be coupled to data on gene expression, in order to identify events which are regulated on the genetic level versus regulation resulting from temperature or nutrition during development, to fully understand how the environment affects larval development. PMID:26545964

  20. Geologic history of Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1976-01-01

    Cape Cod, a sandy peninsula built mostly during the Ice Age, juts into the Atlantic Ocean like a crooked arm. Because of its exposed location, Cape Cod was visited by many early explorers. Although clear-cut evidence is lacking, the Vikings may have sighted this land about 1,000 years ago. It was visited by Samuel de Champlain in 1605, and his detailed descriptions and charts have helped present-day scientists to determine the rate of growth of Nauset Beach marsh and Nauset spit. Bartholomew Gosnold, a lesser known explorer, settled for a short time on the Elizabeth Islands to the southwest and gave Cape Cod its name in 1602. The Pilgrims first landed in America on the tip of Lower Cape Cod after they were turned back from their more southerly destination by shoals between Cape Cod and Nantucket Island. On Cape Cod they found potable water and food and had their first fight with the natives. The Pilgrims, however, decided that this land was too isolated, too exposed, and too sandy to support them, and they sailed across Cape Cod Bay to establish Plymouth. These features remain today. Small villages are separated by large areas of forest, dune, beach, and marsh. This unspoiled natural beauty makes Cape Cod one of the most favored vacation areas for the people living in the thickly settled Northeastern States. Cape Cod is of particular interest to geologists because it was formed by glaciers very recently in terms of geologic time. During the Great Ice Age, (the Pleistocene Epoch which began 2 to 3 million years ago), glaciers advanced from the north into the temperate regions of the Earth. Glacial ice covered the land at least four times. Each advance was accompanied by a worldwide lowering of sea level because the source of the ice was water from the seas. When the glaciers melted, the climate and sea level were probably much like they are today. In fact, some scientists believe that the Earth is presently between glacial episodes and that ice once again will

  1. Once a fast cod, always a fast cod: maintenance of performance hierarchies despite changing food availability in cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Martínez, M; Guderley, H; Nelson, J A; Webber, D; Dutil, J-D

    2002-01-01

    To examine whether Atlantic cod maintain constant hierarchies of sprint speeds and muscle metabolic capacities under different feeding regimes, the physiological capacities of individual cod were followed through a starvation-feeding-starvation cycle. We examined sprint speeds and maximal enzyme activities in white-muscle biopsies at each period. We measured the glycolytic enzymes, phosphofructokinase (PFK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), the mitochondrial enzyme, cytochrome C oxidase (CCO), and the biosynthetic enzyme, nucleotide diphosphate kinase (NDPK). Sprint speeds were measured in a laser diode/photocell-timed raceway. As expected, the feeding regime had a marked impact on the physiological capacities of cod, but the responses differed for sprint-swimming and muscle metabolic capacities. The different enzyme activities as well the condition index generally decreased during the first starvation, improved with feeding, and fell again during the second starvation. In contrast, sprint performance improved after feeding but did not fall with the second starvation. Although both the enzyme activities and the sprint speeds showed considerable interindividual variation, sprint speeds were not significantly correlated with the enzyme activities. The hierarchy of sprint performance of the cod was maintained, regardless of the preceding feeding regime, whereas those of muscle metabolic capacities were not. PMID:11880982

  2. Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This view of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA (42.0N, 70.5W) is a detailed look at the national seashore recreation area with its many fine resorts and summer estate homes. Geologically, the cape is a deposit of earth and stone called a terminal moraine, left by the great Pleistocene glaciers of about 20,000 years ago.

  3. Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This view of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA (42.0N, 70.0W) is a detailed look at the national seashore recreation area with its many fine resorts and summer estate homes. Geologically, the cape is a deposit of earth and stone called a terminal moraine, left by the great Pleistocene glaciers of about 20,000 years ago.

  4. Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA (42.0N, 70.5W) is a national seashore recreation area with many fine resorts and summer estate homes. Geologically, the cape is a deposit of earth and stone called a terminal moraine, left by the great Pleistocene glaciers of about 20,000 years ago. The through canal at the base of the cape is a manmade feature for waterborne traffic and is part of the Intercoastal Canal network. The cape actually begins south of the canal.

  5. Submarine Hydrogeological Data from Cape Cod National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, VeeAnn A.; Bratton, John F.; Crusius, John; Colman, John A.; McCobb, Timothy D.

    2008-01-01

    In order to test hypotheses about ground water flow under and into estuaries and the Atlantic Ocean, geophysical surveys, geophysical probing, submarine ground-water sampling, and sediment coring were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists at Cape Cod National Seashore (CCNS) in Massachusetts from 2004 through 2006. This USGS Open-File Report presents the data collected as a result of these field efforts.

  6. Integrative environmental genomics of Cod (Gadus morhua): the proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Odd André; Bjørneklett, Silje; Berg, Karin; Brattås, Marianne; Bohne-Kjersem, Anneli; Grøsvik, Bjørn Einar; Goksøyr, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is an essential species in North Atlantic fisheries and increasingly relevant as an aquaculture species. However, potential conflicts with both coastal industry and petroleum industry expanding into northern waters make it important to understand how effluents (produced water, pharmaceuticals, food contaminants, and feed contaminants) affect the growth, reproduction, and health of this species in order to maintain a sustainable cod population and a healthy human food source, and to discover biomarkers for environmental monitoring and risk assessment. The ongoing genome sequencing effort of Atlantic cod has opened the possibility for a systems biology approach to elucidate molecular mechanisms of toxicity. Our study aims to be a first step toward such a systems toxicology understanding of genomic responses to environmental insults. A toxicogenomic approach was initiated that is combining data generated from proteomics analyses and transcriptomics analyses, and the concurrent development of searchable expressed sequence tags (EST) databases and genomic databases. This interdisciplinary study may also open new possibilities of gene annotation and pathway analyses.

  7. Trophic structure of the Barents Sea fish assemblage with special reference to the cod stock recoverability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov, Andrey V.

    2009-04-01

    The species composition and trophic structure of the Barents Sea fish assemblage is analysed based on data from research survey trawls and diet analyses of various species. Atlantic cod was the dominant fish species encountered, accounting for more than 55% by abundance or biomass. Only five fish species (long rough dab, thorny skate, Greenland halibut, deepwater redfish and saithe) were sufficiently abundant to be considered as possible food competitors with cod in the Barents Sea. However, possible trophic competition is not high, due to low spatial and temporal overlap between cod and these other species. Analyses of fish assemblages and trophic structures of the Barents Sea and other areas (North Sea, Western Greenland, Newfoundland-Labrador shelf) suggest that Barents Sea cod is the only cod stock for which the ability to recover may not be restricted by trophic relations among fishes, due to a lack of other abundant predatory species and low potential for competition caused by spatial-temporal changes.

  8. Abstract Painting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkes, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Abstract art provokes numerous interpretations, and as many misunderstandings. The adolescent reaction is no exception. The procedure described here can help the student to understand the abstract from at least one direction. (Author/RK)

  9. A comparison between egg trancriptomes of cod and salmon reveals species-specific traits in eggs for each species.

    PubMed

    Wargelius, Anna; Furmanek, Tomasz; Montfort, Jérôme; Le Cam, Aurélie; Kleppe, Lene; Juanchich, Amelie; Edvardsen, Rolf B; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Bobe, Julien

    2015-05-01

    Fish in use in aquaculture display large variation in gamete biology. To reach better understanding around this issue, this study aims at identifying if species specific "egg life history traits" can be hidden in the unfertilized egg. This was done by investigating egg transcriptome differences between Atlantic salmon and Atlantic cod. Salmon and cod eggs were selected due to their largely differencing phenotypes. An oligo microarray analysis was performed on ovulated eggs from cod (n = 8) and salmon (n = 7). The arrays were normalized to a similar spectrum for both arrays. Both arrays were re-annotated with SWISS-Prot and KEGG genes to retrieve an official gene symbol and an orthologous KEGG annotation, in salmon and cod arrays this represented 14,009 and 7,437 genes respectively. The probe linked to the highest gene expression for that particular KEGG annotation was used to compare expression between species. Differential expression was calculated for genes that had an annotation with score >300, resulting in a total of 2,457 KEGG annotations (genes) being differently expressed between the species (FD > 2). This analysis revealed that immune, signal transduction and excretory related pathways were overrepresented in salmon compared to cod. The most overrepresented pathways in cod were related to regulation of genetic information processing and metabolism. To conclude this analysis clearly point at some distinct transcriptome repertoires for cod and salmon and that these differences may explain some of the species-specific biological features for salmon and cod eggs.

  10. Acoustically Induced Streaming Flows near a Model Cod Otolith and their Potential Implications for Fish Hearing

    SciTech Connect

    Kotas, Charlotte W; Rogers, Peter; Yoda, Minami

    2011-01-01

    The ears of fishes are remarkable sensors for the small acoustic disturbances associated with underwater sound. For example, each ear of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) has three dense bony bodies (otoliths) surrounded by fluid and tissue, and detects sounds at frequencies from 30 to 500 Hz. Atlantic cod have also been shown to localize sounds. However, how their ears perform these functions is not fully understood. Steady streaming, or time-independent, flows near a 350% scale model Atlantic cod otolith immersed in a viscous fluid were studied to determine if these fluid flows contain acoustically relevant information that could be detected by the ear s sensory hair cells. The otolith was oscillated sinusoidally at various orientations at frequencies of 8 24 Hz, corresponding to an actual frequency range of 280 830 Hz. Phaselocked particle pathline visualizations of the resulting flows give velocity, vorticity, and rate of strain fields over a single plane of this mainly two-dimensional flow. Although the streaming flows contain acoustically relevant information, the displacements due to these flows are likely too small to explain Atlantic cod hearing abilities near threshold. The results, however, may suggest a possible mechanism for detection of ultrasound in some fish species.

  11. 75 FR 34479 - Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on July...

  12. 75 FR 5622 - Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission AGENCY.... App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on March 22, 2010 at 1...

  13. 75 FR 48990 - Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission AGENCY.... App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on September 13, 2010, at 1...

  14. 75 FR 63854 - Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on...

  15. 76 FR 44606 - Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory.... 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on September...

  16. 76 FR 66082 - Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on...

  17. 77 FR 9699 - Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission; Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission; Cape Cod National Seashore, South... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on March...

  18. 75 FR 20380 - Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, Massachusetts; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, Massachusetts; Cape Cod National... (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission...

  19. 75 FR 77900 - Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on...

  20. 76 FR 81965 - Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission; Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission; Cape Cod National Seashore, South... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on...

  1. 76 FR 8768 - Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on March...

  2. Research Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotnick, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Presents research abstracts from the ERIC Clearinghouse on Information and Technology. Topics include: classroom communication apprehension and distance education; outcomes of a distance-delivered science course; the NASA/Kennedy Space Center Virtual Science Mentor program; survey of traditional and distance learning higher education members;…

  3. Abstract Constructions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietropola, Anne

    1998-01-01

    Describes a lesson designed to culminate a year of eighth-grade art classes in which students explore elements of design and space by creating 3-D abstract constructions. Outlines the process of using foam board and markers to create various shapes and optical effects. (DSK)

  4. Organochlorines including polychlorinated biphenyls in muscle, liver, and ovaries of cod, Gadus morhua

    SciTech Connect

    Hellou, J.; Warren, W.G.; Payne, J.F. )

    1993-11-01

    Twenty-three specific organochlorine contaminants and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), measured as three Aroclor standards were analyzed in muscle, liver, and ovaries of cod, Gadus morhua, collected in the Northwest Atlantic. In general, contaminants were undetectable in muscle tissue, while concentrations were 10 times lower in ovaries than liver (wet weight). Comparison of results to other locations indicated a similarity between the ratio of the concentrations of p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDT, in liver of cod from the northern North Sea and from the Northwest Atlantic, although with lower levels in the present study. The ratio of alpha-HCH and gamma-HCH was between that of the central and northern North Sea. Similar ratios tend to indicate similar residence times in the atmosphere, from source to sampling area. Comparison of sigma PCB and sigma DDT in the liver of cod from various geographical locations showed the following general trend in concentrations: Arctic, Northwest Atlantic, West Atlantic, Norway < North Baltic, Nova Scotia, North Sea < South Baltic. It was observed that if the liver concentration of one compound was low (high), there was a tendency for all compounds to be low (high). Cluster analysis of organochlorines in liver pointed to the presence of four basic clusters, which could reflect similar physical chemical properties within a group. Concentrations of organochlorines in ovaries were below levels expected to affect egg and larval viability.

  5. CodY Regulates Expression of the Bacillus subtilis Extracellular Proteases Vpr and Mpr

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Giulia; Voigt, Birgit; Albrecht, Dirk; Hecker, Michael; Albertini, Alessandra M.; Sonenshein, Abraham L.; Ferrari, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT CodY is a global transcriptional regulator in low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria that is responsive to GTP and branched-chain amino acids. By interacting with its two cofactors, it is able to sense the nutritional and energetic status of the cell and respond by regulating expression of adaptive genetic programs. In Bacillus subtilis, more than 200 genes, including those for peptide transporters, intracellular proteolytic enzymes, and amino acid degradative pathways, are controlled by CodY. In this study, we demonstrated that expression of two extracellular proteases, Vpr and Mpr, is negatively controlled by CodY. By gel mobility shift and DNase I footprinting assays, we showed that CodY binds to the regulatory regions of both genes, in the vicinity of their transcription start points. The mpr gene is also characterized by the presence of a second, higher-affinity CodY-binding site located at the beginning of its coding sequence. Using strains carrying vpr- or mpr-lacZ transcriptional fusions in which CodY-binding sites were mutated, we demonstrated that repression of both protease genes is due to the direct effect by CodY and that the mpr internal site is required for regulation. The vpr promoter is a rare example of a sigma H-dependent promoter that is regulated by CodY. In a codY null mutant, Vpr became one of the more abundant proteins of the B. subtilis exoproteome. IMPORTANCE CodY is a global transcriptional regulator of metabolism and virulence in low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria. In B. subtilis, more than 200 genes, including those for peptide transporters, intracellular proteolytic enzymes, and amino acid degradative pathways, are controlled by CodY. However, no role for B. subtilis CodY in regulating expression of extracellular proteases has been established to date. In this work, we demonstrate that by binding to the regulatory regions of the corresponding genes, B. subtilis CodY negatively controls expression of Vpr and Mpr, two extracellular

  6. Calcium from salmon and cod bone is well absorbed in young healthy men: a double-blinded randomised crossover design

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Calcium (Ca) - fortified foods are likely to play an important role in helping the consumer achieve an adequate Ca intake, especially for persons with a low intake of dairy products. Fish bones have a high Ca content, and huge quantities of this raw material are available as a by-product from the fish industry. Previously, emphasis has been on producing high quality products from fish by-products by use of bacterial proteases. However, documentation of the nutritional value of the enzymatically rinsed Ca-rich bone fraction remains unexplored. The objective of the present study was to assess the bioavailability of calcium in bones of Atlantic salmon (oily fish) and Atlantic cod (lean fish) in a double-blinded randomised crossover design. Methods Ca absorption was measured in 10 healthy young men using 47Ca whole body counting after ingestion of a test meal extrinsically labelled with the 47Ca isotope. The three test meals contained 800 mg of Ca from three different calcium sources: cod bones, salmon bones and control (CaCO3). Results Mean Ca absorption (± SEE) from the three different Ca sources were 21.9 ± 1.7%, 22.5 ± 1.7% and 27.4 ± 1.8% for cod bones, salmon bones, and control (CaCO3), respectively. Conclusion We conclude that bones from Atlantic salmon and Atlantic cod are suitable as natural Ca sources in e.g. functional foods or as supplements. PMID:20646299

  7. Comment on "Slow adaptation in the face of rapid warming leads to collapse of the Gulf of Maine cod fishery".

    PubMed

    Palmer, Michael C; Deroba, Jonathan J; Legault, Christopher M; Brooks, Elizabeth N

    2016-04-22

    Pershing et al (Reports, 13 November, p. 809) concluded that failure to account for temperature in the assessment and management of Gulf of Maine Atlantic cod caused overfishing. We argue that the "extra mortality" calculation driving this conclusion is an artifact. Environmental factors affect all stocks, but attribution of additional mortality to temperature alone by Pershing et al is unsupported by the data.

  8. MISR Looks at Cape Cod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Each year in late November the United States observes the Thanksgiving holiday, commemorating the harvest festival celebrated by the Plymouth colonists and the Native Americans who helped them survive the devastating winter of 1620. Plymouth, Massachusetts, where the Mayflower Pilgrims landed, is located on the west side of Cape Cod Bay, shown in this MISR vertical-viewing (nadir) camera image. This nearly cloud-free picture was acquired on April 13, 2000 during Terra orbit 1708.

    South of the distinctively-shaped Cape Cod are Nantucket Island and Martha's Vineyard. Further west is Block Island, south of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Montauk Point on the eastern tip of Long Island, New York, is visible at the lower left. On the mainland, Providence and Boston appear as gray patches. Jutting out from the Massachusetts coastline, northeast of Boston, is Cape Ann, location of the city of Gloucester, which was settled soon after the Pilgrim's arrival in Plymouth. Gloucester is the oldest fishing port in the eastern United States.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  9. Condition, prolonged swimming performance and muscle metabolic capacities of cod Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Martínez, M; Guderley, H; Dutil, J-D; Winger, P D; He, P; Walsh, S J

    2003-02-01

    This study evaluated the link between swimming endurance and condition of Atlantic cod Gadus morhua that had been fed or starved during the 16 weeks preceding the tests, and assessed whether muscle metabolic capacities explain such links. The condition factor [(somatic mass x fork length(-3))x100] of starved cod was 0.54+/-0.1 whereas that of fed cod was 0.81+/-0.1. In white and red muscle, we measured four glycolytic enzymes: phosphofructokinase (PFK), pyruvate kinase (PK), creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), two mitochondrial enzymes: cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) and citrate synthase (CS), a biosynthetic enzyme, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK), glycogen and protein levels and water content. Muscle samples were taken at three positions along the length of the fish; starvation affected the metabolic capacities of white muscle more than those of red muscle. The levels of glycolytic enzymes and glycogen changed more in white than red muscle during starvation. Both in fed and starved cod, muscle metabolic capacities varied with position along the fish; starvation reduced this longitudinal variation more in white than red muscle. In white muscle of fed cod, the glycolytic enzyme levels increased from head to tail, while in starved cod this longitudinal variation disappeared. In red muscle mitochondrial enzyme levels were highest in the caudal sample, but fewer differences were found for glycolytic enzymes. Swimming endurance was markedly affected by fish condition, with starved fish swimming only 30% of the time (and distance) of fed fish. This endurance was closely linked with the number of burst-coast movements during the test and the activity of CCO and LDH in white muscle. The number of burst-coast movements was significantly linked with condition factor and PFK activity in caudal red muscle and gill arch mass. Our data indicated that cod use both glycolytic and oxidative capacities to support endurance swimming. Furthermore, swimming endurance

  10. Alternative adaptive immunity strategies: coelacanth, cod and shark immunity.

    PubMed

    Buonocore, Francesco; Gerdol, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The advent of high throughput sequencing has permitted to investigate the genome and the transcriptome of novel non-model species with unprecedented depth. This technological advance provided a better understanding of the evolution of adaptive immune genes in gnathostomes, revealing several unexpected features in different fish species which are of particular interest. In the present paper, we review the current understanding of the adaptive immune system of the coelacanth, the elephant shark and the Atlantic cod. The study of coelacanth, the only living extant of the long thought to be extinct Sarcopterygian lineage, is fundamental to bring new insights on the evolution of the immune system in higher vertebrates. Surprisingly, coelacanths are the only known jawed vertebrates to lack IgM, whereas two IgD/W loci are present. Cartilaginous fish are of great interest due to their basal position in the vertebrate tree of life; the genome of the elephant shark revealed the lack of several important immune genes related to T cell functions, which suggest the existence of a primordial set of TH1-like cells. Finally, the Atlantic cod lacks a functional major histocompatibility II complex, but balances this evolutionary loss with the expansion of specific gene families, including MHC I, Toll-like receptors and antimicrobial peptides. Overall, these data point out that several fish species present an unconventional adaptive immune system, but the loss of important immune genes is balanced by adaptive evolutionary strategies which still guarantee the establishment of an efficient immune response against the pathogens they have to fight during their life.

  11. Amino acid decarboxylase activity and other chemical characteristics as related to freshness loss in iced cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Hernández-Herrero, M Manuela; Duflos, Guillaume; Malle, Pierre; Bouquelet, Stéphane

    2002-07-01

    Biogenic amine levels and other biochemical indicators were measured to study the safety of and the loss of freshness in iced Atlantic cod. Biogenic amine content exhibited high variability during iced storage of Atlantic cod. Ornithine and lysine decarboxylase activity apparently increased at the end of the storage period. Amino acid activity was probably generated by endogenous amino acid decarboxylases of raw fish. No statistical differences were observed in the total volatile base fraction or in the ammonia or monomethylamine contents during iced storage. However, trimethylamine contents showed a significant exponential relationship with time and sensory score. Cod formed inosine as the major metabolite of IMP. The H and G indices showed a linear relationship with time and sensory score and served as good indicators of cod freshness quality. However, the K, Ki, and P indices showed a logarithmic relationship with time and sensory score. IMP, K, Ki, and P served as indicators of freshness lost during the early stages of chilled storage of cod. PMID:12117250

  12. Historical Arctic Logbooks Provide Insights into Past Diets and Climatic Responses of Cod

    PubMed Central

    Townhill, Bryony L.; Maxwell, David; Engelhard, Georg H.; Simpson, Stephen D.; Pinnegar, John K.

    2015-01-01

    Gadus morhua (Atlantic cod) stocks in the Barents Sea are currently at levels not seen since the 1950s. Causes for the population increase last century, and understanding of whether such large numbers will be maintained in the future, are unclear. To explore this, we digitised and interrogated historical cod catch and diet datasets from the Barents Sea. Seventeen years of catch data and 12 years of prey data spanning 1930–1959 cover unexplored spatial and temporal ranges, and importantly capture the end of a previous warm period, when temperatures were similar to those currently being experienced. This study aimed to evaluate cod catch per unit effort and prey frequency in relation to spatial, temporal and environmental variables. There was substantial spatio-temporal heterogeneity in catches through the time series. The highest catches were generally in the 1930s and 1940s, although at some localities more cod were recorded late in the 1950s. Generalized Additive Models showed that environmental, spatial and temporal variables are all valuable descriptors of cod catches, with the highest occurring from 15–45°E longitude and 73–77°N latitude, at bottom temperatures between 2 and 4°C and at depths between 150 and 250 m. Cod diets were highly variable during the study period, with frequent changes in the relative frequencies of different prey species, particularly Mallotus villosus (capelin). Environmental variables were particularly good at describing the importance of capelin and Clupea harengus (herring) in the diet. These new analyses support existing knowledge about how the ecology of the region is controlled by climatic variability. When viewed in combination with more recent data, these historical relationships will be valuable in forecasting the future of Barents Sea fisheries, and in understanding how environments and ecosystems may respond. PMID:26331271

  13. Historical Arctic Logbooks Provide Insights into Past Diets and Climatic Responses of Cod.

    PubMed

    Townhill, Bryony L; Maxwell, David; Engelhard, Georg H; Simpson, Stephen D; Pinnegar, John K

    2015-01-01

    Gadus morhua (Atlantic cod) stocks in the Barents Sea are currently at levels not seen since the 1950s. Causes for the population increase last century, and understanding of whether such large numbers will be maintained in the future, are unclear. To explore this, we digitised and interrogated historical cod catch and diet datasets from the Barents Sea. Seventeen years of catch data and 12 years of prey data spanning 1930-1959 cover unexplored spatial and temporal ranges, and importantly capture the end of a previous warm period, when temperatures were similar to those currently being experienced. This study aimed to evaluate cod catch per unit effort and prey frequency in relation to spatial, temporal and environmental variables. There was substantial spatio-temporal heterogeneity in catches through the time series. The highest catches were generally in the 1930s and 1940s, although at some localities more cod were recorded late in the 1950s. Generalized Additive Models showed that environmental, spatial and temporal variables are all valuable descriptors of cod catches, with the highest occurring from 15-45°E longitude and 73-77°N latitude, at bottom temperatures between 2 and 4°C and at depths between 150 and 250 m. Cod diets were highly variable during the study period, with frequent changes in the relative frequencies of different prey species, particularly Mallotus villosus (capelin). Environmental variables were particularly good at describing the importance of capelin and Clupea harengus (herring) in the diet. These new analyses support existing knowledge about how the ecology of the region is controlled by climatic variability. When viewed in combination with more recent data, these historical relationships will be valuable in forecasting the future of Barents Sea fisheries, and in understanding how environments and ecosystems may respond. PMID:26331271

  14. 78 FR 32612 - Collect on Delivery (COD)-Service Features

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... 111 Collect on Delivery (COD)--Service Features AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM\\. ACTION: Proposed rule... the automatic holding period for Collect on Delivery (COD) articles, expand the acceptable payment methods for COD articles, and provide current options for the redirecting of COD mailpieces. DATES:...

  15. The dangers of ignoring stock complexity in fishery management: the case of the North Sea cod.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, William F

    2008-12-23

    The plight of the marine fisheries is attracting increasing attention as unsustainably high exploitation levels, exacerbated by more extreme climatic conditions, are driving stocks to the point of collapse. The North Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), a species which until recently formed a major component of the demersal fisheries, has undergone significant declines across its range. The North Sea stock is typical of many, with a spawning stock biomass that has remained below the safe biological limit since 2000 and recruitment levels near the lowest on record. Cod within the North Sea are currently managed as a single stock, and yet mounting empirical evidence supports the existence of a metapopulation of regionally variable, genetically distinct, sub-stocks. Applying the same management strategies to multiple stocks that differ in their resilience to exploitation inevitably results in the overfishing and likely collapse of the weaker components. Indeed, recent studies have identified two North Sea spawning stocks that have undergone disproportionally large collapses with very substantial reductions in egg production. Similarly affected cod stocks in the northwest Atlantic have shown little evidence of recovery, despite fishery closures. The possible implications of ignoring sub-structuring within management units for biocomplexity, local adaptation and ecosystem stability are considered.

  16. Who’s your mama? Riverine hybridisation of threatened freshwater Trout Cod and Murray Cod

    PubMed Central

    Unmack, Peter J.; Dyer, Fiona J.; Lintermans, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Rates of hybridization and introgression are increasing dramatically worldwide because of translocations, restocking of organisms and habitat modifications; thus, determining whether hybridization is occuring after reintroducing extirpated congeneric species is commensurately important for conservation. Restocking programs are sometimes criticized because of the genetic consequences of hatchery-bred fish breeding with wild populations. These concerns are important to conservation restocking programs, including those from the Australian freshwater fish family, Percichthyidae. Two of the better known Australian Percichthyidae are the Murray Cod, Maccullochella peelii and Trout Cod, Maccullochella macquariensis which were formerly widespread over the Murray Darling Basin. In much of the Murrumbidgee River, Trout Cod and Murray Cod were sympatric until the late 1970s when Trout Cod were extirpated. Here we use genetic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data together with mitochondrial sequences to examine hybridization and introgression between Murray Cod and Trout Cod in the upper Murrumbidgee River and consider implications for restocking programs. We have confirmed restocked riverine Trout Cod reproducing, but only as inter-specific matings, in the wild. We detected hybrid Trout Cod–Murray Cod in the Upper Murrumbidgee, recording the first hybrid larvae in the wild. Although hybrid larvae, juveniles and adults have been recorded in hatcheries and impoundments, and hybrid adults have been recorded in rivers previously, this is the first time fertile F1 have been recorded in a wild riverine population. The F1 backcrosses with Murray cod have also been found to be fertile. All backcrosses noted were with pure Murray Cod. Such introgression has not been recorded previously in these two species, and the imbalance in hybridization direction may have important implications for restocking programs. PMID:27812407

  17. 75 FR 64956 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... established by the final 2010 and 2011 harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Offshore...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels catching Pacific cod...

  18. 75 FR 56016 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... established by the final 2010 and 2011 harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels catching Pacific cod...

  19. 75 FR 10441 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... specifications for groundfish of the GOA (74 FR 7333, February 17, 2010) and inseason adjustment (74 FR 68713... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Offshore...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels catching Pacific cod...

  20. 75 FR 63402 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... established by the final 2010 and 2011 harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels catching Pacific cod...

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF WESTERN NORTH ATLANTIC RIGHT WHALE SPRING FEEDING HABITAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Great South Channel region of the southwestern Gulf of Maine, between George's Bank and Cape Cod, is the primary spring feeding ground for the western North Atlantic population of the I northern right whale, E. glacialis .Since this whale is so endangered, it is critical to i...

  2. LATITUDINAL GRADIENTS IN BENTHIC COMMUNITY COMPOSITION IN WESTERN ATLANTIC ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The community structure of benthic macroinvertebrates from estuaries along the Atlantic coast of North America from Cape Cod, MA, to Biscayne Bay, FL, were compared. Benthic data were collected over a 5 year period (1990 to 1995) by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Envi...

  3. Prehistoric versus modern Baltic Sea cod fisheries: selectivity across the millennia.

    PubMed

    Limburg, Karin E; Walther, Yvonne; Hong, Bongghi; Olson, Carina; Storå, Jan

    2008-12-01

    Combining Stone Age and modern data provides unique insights for management, extending beyond contemporary problems and shifting baselines. Using fish chronometric parts, we compared demographic characteristics of exploited cod populations from the Neolithic Period (4500 BP) to the modern highly exploited fishery in the central Baltic Sea. We found that Neolithic cod were larger (mean 56.4 cm, 95% confidence interval (CI)+/-0.9) than modern fish (weighted mean length in catch =49.5+/-0.2 cm in 1995, 48.2+/-0.2 cm in 2003), and older (mean ages=4.7+/-0.11, 3.1+/-0.02 and 3.6+/-0.02 years for Neolithic, 1995, and 2003 fisheries, respectively). Fishery-independent surveys in 1995 and 2003 show that mean sizes in the stock are 16-17 cm smaller than reflected in the fishery, and mean ages approximately 1-1.5 years younger. Modelled von Bertalanffy growth and back-calculated lengths indicated that Neolithic cod grew to smaller asymptotic lengths, but were larger at younger ages, implying rapid early growth. Very small Neolithic cod were absent and large individuals were rare as in modern times. This could be owing to selective harvests, the absence of small and large fish in the area or a combination. Comparing modern and prehistoric times, fishery selection is evident, but apparently not as great as in the North Atlantic proper.

  4. Slow adaptation in the face of rapid warming leads to collapse of the Gulf of Maine cod fishery.

    PubMed

    Pershing, Andrew J; Alexander, Michael A; Hernandez, Christina M; Kerr, Lisa A; Le Bris, Arnault; Mills, Katherine E; Nye, Janet A; Record, Nicholas R; Scannell, Hillary A; Scott, James D; Sherwood, Graham D; Thomas, Andrew C

    2015-11-13

    Several studies have documented fish populations changing in response to long-term warming. Over the past decade, sea surface temperatures in the Gulf of Maine increased faster than 99% of the global ocean. The warming, which was related to a northward shift in the Gulf Stream and to changes in the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation and Pacific Decadal Oscillation, led to reduced recruitment and increased mortality in the region's Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) stock. Failure to recognize the impact of warming on cod contributed to overfishing. Recovery of this fishery depends on sound management, but the size of the stock depends on future temperature conditions. The experience in the Gulf of Maine highlights the need to incorporate environmental factors into resource management. PMID:26516197

  5. Slow adaptation in the face of rapid warming leads to collapse of the Gulf of Maine cod fishery.

    PubMed

    Pershing, Andrew J; Alexander, Michael A; Hernandez, Christina M; Kerr, Lisa A; Le Bris, Arnault; Mills, Katherine E; Nye, Janet A; Record, Nicholas R; Scannell, Hillary A; Scott, James D; Sherwood, Graham D; Thomas, Andrew C

    2015-11-13

    Several studies have documented fish populations changing in response to long-term warming. Over the past decade, sea surface temperatures in the Gulf of Maine increased faster than 99% of the global ocean. The warming, which was related to a northward shift in the Gulf Stream and to changes in the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation and Pacific Decadal Oscillation, led to reduced recruitment and increased mortality in the region's Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) stock. Failure to recognize the impact of warming on cod contributed to overfishing. Recovery of this fishery depends on sound management, but the size of the stock depends on future temperature conditions. The experience in the Gulf of Maine highlights the need to incorporate environmental factors into resource management.

  6. Chemical quality of ground water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frimpter, M.H.; Gay, F.B.

    1979-01-01

    Cape Cod is a 440 square mile hook-shaped peninsula which extends 40 miles into the Atlantic. Freshwater in Pleistocene sand and gravel deposits is the source of supply for nearly 100 municipal and thousands of private domestic wells. Most ground water on Cape Cod is of good chemical quality for drinking and other uses. It is characteristically low in dissolved solids and is soft. In 90 percent of the samples analyzed, dissolved solids were less than 100 mg/l (milligrams per liter) and pH was less than 7.0. Highway deicing salt, sea-water flooding due to storms , and saltwater intrusion due to ground-water withdrawal are sources of sodium chloride contamination. Chloride concentrations have increased from 20 to 140 mg/l, owing to saltwater intrusion at Provincetown 's wells in Truro. In Yarmouth, contaminated ground water near a salt-storage area contained as much as 1,800 mg/l chloride. Heavy metals, insecticides, and herbicides were not found at concentrations above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 's recommended limits for public drinking-water supplies, but iron and manganese in some samples exceeded those limits. Ninety percent of 84 samples analyzed for nitrate reported as nitrogen contained less than 1.3 mg/l and 80 percent contained 0.5 mg/l or less of nitrate as nitrogen. Water containing nitrogen in excess of 0.5 mg/l has probably been affected by municipal or domestic sewage or fertilizer, and water with less than this amount may have been affected by them. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. An Oscillating Jet in the Cape Cod Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, F. J.; Flierl, G. R.

    2004-05-01

    During the spring months, the Cape Cod Bay is a roaming ground for the North Atlantic right whale, perhaps the most endangered whale species in the world. The whales are observed to travel along the topographic steps that run parallel to the shore, eating plankton patches that form in the coastal water. In this region, off the coast of Provincetown, there is an oscillatory current with the same period as that of the ambient tides. The location of the current and its periodicity suggest that the topography and tides play fundamental roles in generating the jet. This current, depending on its velocity profile, may become unstable and generate vortices. It is likely that the local surface convergences and divergences in the tidal flows and vortices are related to the aggregation of the copepods (Calanus Finmarchicus), which are the right whale's primary food source. Understanding the dynamics of this jet is essential to predicting the spatial and temporal patterns of the codepods, which will in turn help us understand the likely locations and feeding history of the whales. In this talk we discuss results of the first phase of this study, that of the oscillatory jet in the Cape Cod Bay. This jet is rather complicated since it involves complex topography and coastlines, bottom and lateral friction, stratification and numerous other effects. Rather than study this system in fine detail, we investigate an idealized model that captures the essential features. In the context of this model, we first compute possible profiles for the oscillating jet. We then solve the linear stability problem to determine how the growth rates depend on the various parameters. Finally, and most importantly, we study the nonlinear problem to observe the time evolution of the instability process along with its equilibration. This provides some insight into how the instabilities are related to fluid transport across the shelf.

  8. Mechanistic insights into the effects of climate change on larval cod.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Trond; Stock, Charles; Drinkwater, Kenneth F; Curchitser, Enrique N

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the biophysical mechanisms that shape variability in fisheries recruitment is critical for estimating the effects of climate change on fisheries. In this study, we used an Earth System Model (ESM) and a mechanistic individual-based model (IBM) for larval fish to analyze how climate change may impact the growth and survival of larval cod in the North Atlantic. We focused our analysis on five regions that span the current geographical range of cod and are known to contain important spawning populations. Under the SRES A2 (high emissions) scenario, the ESM-projected surface ocean temperatures are expected to increase by >1 °C for 3 of the 5 regions, and stratification is expected to increase at all sites between 1950-1999 and 2050-2099. This enhanced stratification is projected to decrease large (>5 μm ESD) phytoplankton productivity and mesozooplankton biomass at all 5 sites. Higher temperatures are projected to increase larval metabolic costs, which combined with decreased food resources will reduce larval weight, increase the probability of larvae dying from starvation and increase larval exposure to visual and invertebrate predators at most sites. If current concentrations of piscivore and invertebrate predators are maintained, larval survival is projected to decrease at all five sites by 2050-2099. In contrast to past observed responses to climate variability in which warm anomalies led to better recruitment in cold-water stocks, our simulations indicated that reduced prey availability under climate change may cause a reduction in larval survival despite higher temperatures in these regions. In the lower prey environment projected under climate change, higher metabolic costs due to higher temperatures outweigh the advantages of higher growth potential, leading to negative effects on northern cod stocks. Our results provide an important first large-scale assessment of the impacts of climate change on larval cod in the North Atlantic.

  9. Comment on "Slow adaptation in the face of rapid warming leads to collapse of the Gulf of Maine cod fishery".

    PubMed

    Palmer, Michael C; Deroba, Jonathan J; Legault, Christopher M; Brooks, Elizabeth N

    2016-04-22

    Pershing et al (Reports, 13 November, p. 809) concluded that failure to account for temperature in the assessment and management of Gulf of Maine Atlantic cod caused overfishing. We argue that the "extra mortality" calculation driving this conclusion is an artifact. Environmental factors affect all stocks, but attribution of additional mortality to temperature alone by Pershing et al is unsupported by the data. PMID:27102473

  10. From Europe to America: Pliocene to Recent trans-Atlantic expansion of cold-water North Atlantic molluscs

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Geerat J

    2005-01-01

    Data on the geographical distribution, phylogeny and fossil record of cool-temperate North Atlantic shell-bearing molluscs that live in waters shallower than 100 m depth belong to two biogeographic provinces, one in eastern North America north of Cape Cod, the other in northern Europe. Amphi-Atlantic species, which are found in both provinces, comprise 30.8% of the 402 species in the northeastern Atlantic and 47.3% of the 262 species in the northwestern Atlantic. Some 54.8% of these amphi-Atlantic species have phylogenetic origins in the North Pacific. Comparisons among fossil Atlantic faunas show that amphi-Atlantic distributions became established in the Middle Pliocene (about 3.5 million years ago), and that all represent westward expansions of European taxa to North America. No American taxa spread eastward to Europe without human assistance. These results are in accord with previous phylogeographic studies among populations within several amphi-Atlantic species. Explanations for the unidirectional expansion of species across the Atlantic remain uncertain, but may include smaller size and greater prior extinction of the North American as compared to the European fauna and biased transport mechanisms. Destruction of the European source fauna may jeopardize faunas on both sides of the Atlantic. PMID:16271981

  11. 44. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - BUILDING ELEVATION WITH BUILDING METAL SIDING BEING APPLIED ON "B" FACE. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  12. Piaget on Abstraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moessinger, Pierre; Poulin-Dubois, Diane

    1981-01-01

    Reviews and discusses Piaget's recent work on abstract reasoning. Piaget's distinction between empirical and reflective abstraction is presented; his hypotheses are considered to be metaphorical. (Author/DB)

  13. Benchtop Delivery of Ni(cod)2 using Paraffin Capsules.

    PubMed

    Dander, Jacob E; Weires, Nicholas A; Garg, Neil K

    2016-08-01

    A facile method that allows for Ni(cod)2 to be used on the benchtop is reported. The procedure involves the preparation of paraffin-Ni(cod)2 capsules, which are stable to air and moisture. It is demonstrated that these readily available capsules can be used to promote a range of Ni(cod)2-catalyzed transformations. These studies are expected to promote the further use of Ni(cod)2 in organic synthesis.

  14. Thermal sensitivity of metabolic rates and swimming performance in two latitudinally separated populations of cod, Gadus morhua L.

    PubMed

    Sylvestre, Eve-Lyne; Lapointe, Dominique; Dutil, Jean-Denis; Guderley, Helga

    2007-05-01

    Atlantic cod populations live in a wide thermal range and can differ genetically and physiologically. Thermal sensitivity of metabolic capacity and swimming performance may vary along a latitudinal gradient, to facilitate performance in distinct thermal environments. To evaluate this hypothesis, we compared the thermal sensitivity of performance in two cod stocks from the Northwest Atlantic that differ in their thermal experience: Gulf of St Lawrence (GSL) and Bay of Fundy (BF). We first compared the metabolic, physiological and swimming performance after short-term thermal change to that at the acclimation temperature (7 degrees C) for one stock (GSL), before comparing the performance of the two stocks after short-term thermal change. For cod from GSL, standard metabolism (SMR) increased with temperature, while active metabolism (AMR, measured in the critical swimming tests), EMR (metabolic rate after an exhaustive chase protocol), aerobic scope (AS) and critical swimming speeds (U (crit) and U (b-c)) were lower at 3 degrees C than 7 or 11 degrees C. In contrast, anaerobic swimming (sprint and burst-coasts in U (crit) test) was lower at 11 than 7 or 3 degrees C. Factorial AS (AMR SMR(-1)) decreased as temperature rose. Time to exhaustion (chase protocol) was not influenced by temperature. The two stocks differed little in the thermal sensitivities of metabolism or swimming. GSL cod had a higher SMR than BF cod despite similar AMR and AS. This led factorial AS to be significantly higher for the southern stock. Despite these metabolic differences, cod from the two stocks did not differ in their U (crit) speeds. BF cod were better sprinters at both temperatures. Cod from GSL had a lower aerobic cost of swimming at intermediate speeds than those from BF, particularly at low temperature. Only the activity of cytochrome C oxidase (CCO) in white muscle differed between stocks. No enzymatic correlates were found for swimming capacities, but oxygen consumption was best

  15. 75 FR 64957 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i), the Administrator, Alaska... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Offshore...; closure. ] SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels catching Pacific...

  16. Forecasting the major influences of predation and environment on cod recovery in the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Nicolas; Chassot, Emmanuel; Duplisea, Daniel E; Hammill, Mike O

    2014-01-01

    The northern Gulf of St. Lawrence (NGSL) stock of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), historically the second largest cod population in the Western Atlantic, has known a severe collapse during the early 1990 s and is currently considered as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. As for many fish populations over the world which are currently being heavily exploited or overfished, urgent management actions in the form of recovery plans are needed for restoring this stock to sustainable levels. Stochastic projections based on a statistical population model incorporating predation were conducted over a period of 30 years (2010-2040) to assess the expected outcomes of alternative fishing strategies on the stock recovery under different scenarios of harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) abundance and environmental conditions. This sensitivity study shows that water temperature is key in the rebuilding of the NGSL cod stock. Model projections suggest that maintaining the current management practice under cooler water temperatures is likely to maintain the species in an endangered status. Under current or warmer conditions in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, partial recovery might only be achieved by significant reductions in both fishing and predation pressure. In the medium-term, a management strategy that reduces catch could be favoured over a complete moratorium so as to minimize socio-economic impacts on the industry.

  17. Forecasting the Major Influences of Predation and Environment on Cod Recovery in the Northern Gulf of St. Lawrence

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Nicolas; Chassot, Emmanuel; Duplisea, Daniel E.; Hammill, Mike O.

    2014-01-01

    The northern Gulf of St. Lawrence (NGSL) stock of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), historically the second largest cod population in the Western Atlantic, has known a severe collapse during the early 1990 s and is currently considered as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. As for many fish populations over the world which are currently being heavily exploited or overfished, urgent management actions in the form of recovery plans are needed for restoring this stock to sustainable levels. Stochastic projections based on a statistical population model incorporating predation were conducted over a period of 30 years (2010–2040) to assess the expected outcomes of alternative fishing strategies on the stock recovery under different scenarios of harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) abundance and environmental conditions. This sensitivity study shows that water temperature is key in the rebuilding of the NGSL cod stock. Model projections suggest that maintaining the current management practice under cooler water temperatures is likely to maintain the species in an endangered status. Under current or warmer conditions in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, partial recovery might only be achieved by significant reductions in both fishing and predation pressure. In the medium-term, a management strategy that reduces catch could be favoured over a complete moratorium so as to minimize socio-economic impacts on the industry. PMID:24523852

  18. Psychological Abstracts/BRS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Donna R.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses particular problems and possible solutions in searching the Psychological Abstracts database, with special reference to its loading on BRS. Included are examples of typical searches, citations (with or without abstract/annotation), a tabulated searchguide to Psychological Abstracts on BRS and specifications for the database. (Author/JD)

  19. Abstraction and Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, John; Ozmantar, Mehmet Fatih

    2006-01-01

    The framework for this paper is a recently developed theory of abstraction in context. The paper reports on data collected from one student working on tasks concerned with absolute value functions. It examines the relationship between mathematical constructions and abstractions. It argues that an abstraction is a consolidated construction that can…

  20. Abstraction and Problem Reformulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giunchiglia, Fausto

    1992-01-01

    In work done jointly with Toby Walsh, the author has provided a sound theoretical foundation to the process of reasoning with abstraction (GW90c, GWS9, GW9Ob, GW90a). The notion of abstraction formalized in this work can be informally described as: (property 1), the process of mapping a representation of a problem, called (following historical convention (Sac74)) the 'ground' representation, onto a new representation, called the 'abstract' representation, which, (property 2) helps deal with the problem in the original search space by preserving certain desirable properties and (property 3) is simpler to handle as it is constructed from the ground representation by "throwing away details". One desirable property preserved by an abstraction is provability; often there is a relationship between provability in the ground representation and provability in the abstract representation. Another can be deduction or, possibly inconsistency. By 'throwing away details' we usually mean that the problem is described in a language with a smaller search space (for instance a propositional language or a language without variables) in which formulae of the abstract representation are obtained from the formulae of the ground representation by the use of some terminating rewriting technique. Often we require that the use of abstraction results in more efficient .reasoning. However, it might simply increase the number of facts asserted (eg. by allowing, in practice, the exploration of deeper search spaces or by implementing some form of learning). Among all abstractions, three very important classes have been identified. They relate the set of facts provable in the ground space to those provable in the abstract space. We call: TI abstractions all those abstractions where the abstractions of all the provable facts of the ground space are provable in the abstract space; TD abstractions all those abstractions wllere the 'unabstractions' of all the provable facts of the abstract space are

  1. Evidence of segregated spawning in a single marine fish stock: Sympatric divergence of ecotypes in icelandic cod?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grabowski, T.B.; Thorsteinsson, Vilhjalmur; McAdam, B.J.; Marteinsdottir, G.

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of intraspecific diversity and population structure within marine fish species, yet there is little direct evidence of the isolating mechanisms that maintain it or documentation of its ecological extent. We analyzed depth and temperature histories collected by electronic data storage tags retrieved from 104 Atlantic cod at liberty ???1 year to evaluate a possible isolating mechanisms maintaining population structure within the Icelandic cod stock. This stock consists of two distinct behavioral types, resident coastal cod and migratory frontal cod, each occurring within two geographically distinct populations. Despite being captured together on the same spawning grounds, we show the behavioral types seem reproductively isolated by fine-scale differences in spawning habitat selection, primarily depth. Additionally, the different groups occupied distinct seasonal thermal and bathymetric niches that generally demonstrated low levels of overlap throughout the year. Our results indicate that isolating mechanisms, such as differential habitat selection during spawning, might contribute to maintaining diversity and fine-scale population structure in broadcast-spawning marine fishes.

  2. Cape Cod, Buzzard's Bay, Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA (42.0N, 70.0W) is a national seashore recreation area with many fine resorts and summer estate homes. Geologically, the cape is a deposit of earth and stone called a terminal moraine, left by the great Pleistocene glaciers of about 20,000 years ago. The through canal at the base of the cape is a manmade feature for waterborne traffic and is part of the Intercoastal Canal network. The cape actually begins south of the canal.

  3. Loving Those Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lori

    2004-01-01

    The author describes a lesson she did on abstract art with her high school art classes. She passed out a required step-by-step outline of the project process. She asked each of them to look at abstract art. They were to list five or six abstract artists they thought were interesting, narrow their list down to the one most personally intriguing,…

  4. Ecological Condition of Coastal Ocean Waters Along the U.S. Mid-Atlantic Bight: 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of an assessment of ecological condition in coastal-ocean waters of the U.S. mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB), along the U.S. continental shelf from Cape Cod, MA and Nantucket Shoals to the northeast to Cape Hatteras to the south, based on sampling conduc...

  5. 1H NMR metabolic profiling of cod (Gadus morhua) larvae: potential effects of temperature and diet composition during early developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Chauton, Matilde Skogen; Galloway, Trina Falck; Kjørsvik, Elin; Størseth, Trond Røvik; Puvanendran, Velmurugu; van der Meeren, Terje; Karlsen, Ørjan; Rønnestad, Ivar; Hamre, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Marine aquaculture offers a great source of protein for the increasing human population, and farming of, for example, Atlantic salmon is a global industry. Atlantic cod farming however, is an example of a promising industry where the potential is not yet realized. Research has revealed that a major bottleneck to successful farming of cod is poor quality of the larvae and juveniles. A large research program was designed to increase our understanding of how environmental factors such as temperature and nutrition affects cod larvae development. Data on larvae growth and development were used together with nuclear magnetic resonance. The NMR data indicated that the temperature influenced the metabolome of the larvae; differences were related to osmolytes such as betaine/TMAO, the amino acid taurine, and creatine and lactate which reflect muscle activity. The larvae were fed Artemia from stage 2, and this was probably reflected in a high taurine content of older larvae. Larvae fed with copepods in the nutrition experiment also displayed a high taurine content, together with higher creatine and betaine/TMAO content. Data on the cod larvae metabolome should be coupled to data on gene expression, in order to identify events which are regulated on the genetic level versus regulation resulting from temperature or nutrition during development, to fully understand how the environment affects larval development. PMID:26545964

  6. Comment on “Slow adaptation in the face of rapid warming leads to collapse of the Gulf of Maine cod fishery”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Michael C.; Deroba, Jonathan J.; Legault, Christopher M.; Brooks, Elizabeth N.

    2016-04-01

    Pershing et al. (Reports, 13 November, p. 809) concluded that failure to account for temperature in the assessment and management of Gulf of Maine Atlantic cod caused overfishing. We argue that the “extra mortality” calculation driving this conclusion is an artifact. Environmental factors affect all stocks, but attribution of additional mortality to temperature alone by Pershing et al. is unsupported by the data.

  7. Mathematical Abstraction through Scaffolding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmantar, Mehmet Fatih; Roper, Tom

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the role of scaffolding in the process of abstraction. An activity-theoretic approach to abstraction in context is taken. This examination is carried out with reference to verbal protocols of two 17 year-old students working together on a task connected to sketching the graph of |f|x|)|. Examination of the data suggests that…

  8. Is It Really Abstract?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kernan, Christine

    2011-01-01

    For this author, one of the most enjoyable aspects of teaching elementary art is the willingness of students to embrace the different styles of art introduced to them. In this article, she describes a project that allows upper-elementary students to learn about abstract art and the lives of some of the master abstract artists, implement the idea…

  9. Designing for Mathematical Abstraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Dave; Noss, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Our focus is on the design of systems (pedagogical, technical, social) that encourage mathematical abstraction, a process we refer to as "designing for abstraction." In this paper, we draw on detailed design experiments from our research on children's understanding about chance and distribution to re-present this work as a case study in designing…

  10. Paper Abstract Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutley, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Abstraction is, in effect, a simplification and reduction of shapes with an absence of detail designed to comprise the essence of the more naturalistic images being depicted. Without even intending to, young children consistently create interesting, and sometimes beautiful, abstract compositions. A child's creations, moreover, will always seem to…

  11. Leadership Abstracts, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Larry, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    The abstracts in this series provide two-page discussions of issues related to leadership, administration, and teaching in community colleges. The 12 abstracts for Volume 8, 1995, are: (1) "Redesigning the System To Meet the Workforce Training Needs of the Nation," by Larry Warford; (2) "The College President, the Board, and the Board Chair: A…

  12. Concept Formation and Abstraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunzer, Eric A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper examines the nature of concepts and conceptual processes and the manner of their formation. It argues that a process of successive abstraction and systematization is central to the evolution of conceptual structures. Classificatory processes are discussed and three levels of abstraction outlined. (Author/SJL)

  13. Data Abstraction in GLISP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Gordon S., Jr.

    GLISP is a high-level computer language (based on Lisp and including Lisp as a sublanguage) which is compiled into Lisp. GLISP programs are compiled relative to a knowledge base of object descriptions, a form of abstract datatypes. A primary goal of the use of abstract datatypes in GLISP is to allow program code to be written in terms of objects,…

  14. Leadership Abstracts, Volume 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliron, Mark D., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The abstracts in this series provide brief discussions of issues related to leadership, administration, professional development, technology, and education in community colleges. Volume 10 for 1997 contains the following 12 abstracts: (1) "On Community College Renewal" (Nathan L. Hodges and Mark D. Milliron); (2) "The Community College Niche in a…

  15. Abstract Datatypes in PVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owre, Sam; Shankar, Natarajan

    1997-01-01

    PVS (Prototype Verification System) is a general-purpose environment for developing specifications and proofs. This document deals primarily with the abstract datatype mechanism in PVS which generates theories containing axioms and definitions for a class of recursive datatypes. The concepts underlying the abstract datatype mechanism are illustrated using ordered binary trees as an example. Binary trees are described by a PVS abstract datatype that is parametric in its value type. The type of ordered binary trees is then presented as a subtype of binary trees where the ordering relation is also taken as a parameter. We define the operations of inserting an element into, and searching for an element in an ordered binary tree; the bulk of the report is devoted to PVS proofs of some useful properties of these operations. These proofs illustrate various approaches to proving properties of abstract datatype operations. They also describe the built-in capabilities of the PVS proof checker for simplifying abstract datatype expressions.

  16. Abstract coherent categories.

    PubMed

    Rehder, B; Ross, B H

    2001-09-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the importance of the knowledge that interrelates features in people's mental representation of categories and that makes our conception of categories coherent. This article focuses on abstract coherent categories, coherent categories that are also abstract because they are defined by relations independently of any features. Four experiments demonstrate that abstract coherent categories are learned more easily than control categories with identical features and statistical structure, and also that participants induced an abstract representation of the category by granting category membership to exemplars with completely novel features. The authors argue that the human conceptual system is heavily populated with abstract coherent concepts, including conceptions of social groups, societal institutions, legal, political, and military scenarios, and many superordinate categories, such as classes of natural kinds. PMID:11550753

  17. 33 CFR 117.589 - Cape Cod Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cape Cod Canal. 117.589 Section 117.589 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.589 Cape Cod Canal. The draw...

  18. 47. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW OF "A" FACE (LEFT) WITH CLEANING SYSTEM INSTALLED (NOW REMOVED) AND "B" FACE (RIGHT) WITH CONSTRUCTION CRANE IN USE. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  19. 46. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - BUILDING ELEVATION VIEW WITH ALL METAL SIDING INSTALLED AND WITH EMITTER/ANTENNA ARRAY SYSTEM NEARING OCMPLETION ON "B" FACE (RIGHT). VIEW ALSO SHOWS TRAVELING "CLEANING" SYSTEM ON "B" FACE - NOW REMOVED. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  20. Direct Targets of CodY in Staphylococcus aureus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Majerczyk, Charlotte D.; Dunman, Paul M.; Luong, Thanh T.; Lee, Chia Y.; Sadykov, Marat R.; Somerville, Greg A.; Bodi, Kip; Sonenshein, Abraham L.

    2010-01-01

    More than 200 direct CodY target genes in Staphylococcus aureus were identified by genome-wide analysis of in vitro DNA binding. This analysis, which was confirmed for some genes by DNase I footprinting assays, revealed that CodY is a direct regulator of numerous transcription units associated with amino acid biosynthesis, transport of macromolecules, and virulence. The virulence genes regulated by CodY fell into three groups. One group was dependent on the Agr system for its expression; these genes were indirectly regulated by CodY through its repression of the agr locus. A second group was regulated directly by CodY. The third group, which includes genes for alpha-toxin and capsule synthesis, was regulated by CodY in two ways, i.e., by direct repression and by repression of the agr locus. Since S. aureus CodY was activated in vitro by the branched chain amino acids and GTP, CodY appears to link changes in intracellular metabolite pools with the induction of numerous adaptive responses, including virulence. PMID:20363936

  1. 36 CFR 7.67 - Cape Cod National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.67 Cape Cod National Seashore. (a) Off-road operation of motor vehicles. (1) What do I need to do to operate a vehicle off road? To operate a vehicle off road at Cape Cod National Seashore, you must meet the requirements in paragraphs (b) through...

  2. 17. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW WITH PROJECT NEARING COMPLETION. VIEW SHOWS "A" FACE (LEFT) AND "B" FACE OF RADAR ARRAY SYSTEM. NOTE THAT NORTH IS GENERALLY TO RIGHT OF VIEW. - Cape Cod Air Station, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  3. 45. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - BUILDING ELEVATION VIEW WITH BUILDING METAL SIDING BEING APPLIED ON "A" FACE (LEFT) AND "B" FACE (RIGHT). NOTE THAT NORTH IS GENERALLY TO RIGHT OF VIEW. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  4. 42. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - SHOWING BUILDING "RED IRON" STEEL STRUCTURE AT 46T DAY OF STEEL CONSTRUCTION. "BUILDING TOPPED OFF, 7 JULY, 1974. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  5. 43. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - WITH BUILDING METAL SIDING BEING APPLIED ON "C" FACE (RIGHT) AND "B" FACE BEING PREPARED FOR INSTALLATION. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  6. 9 CFR 2.79 - C.O.D. shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false C.O.D. shipments. 2.79 Section 2.79 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Records § 2.79 C.O.D. shipments. (a) No carrier or intermediate handler shall...

  7. 9 CFR 2.79 - C.O.D. shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false C.O.D. shipments. 2.79 Section 2.79 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Records § 2.79 C.O.D. shipments. (a) No carrier or intermediate handler shall...

  8. 9 CFR 2.79 - C.O.D. shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false C.O.D. shipments. 2.79 Section 2.79 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Records § 2.79 C.O.D. shipments. (a) No carrier or intermediate handler shall...

  9. 9 CFR 2.79 - C.O.D. shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false C.O.D. shipments. 2.79 Section 2.79 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Records § 2.79 C.O.D. shipments. (a) No carrier or intermediate handler shall...

  10. 9 CFR 2.79 - C.O.D. shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false C.O.D. shipments. 2.79 Section 2.79 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Records § 2.79 C.O.D. shipments. (a) No carrier or intermediate handler shall...

  11. Could seals prevent cod recovery in the Baltic Sea?

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Brian R; Eero, Margit; Ojaveer, Henn

    2011-05-09

    Fish populations are increasingly affected by multiple human and natural impacts including exploitation, eutrophication, habitat alteration and climate change. As a result many collapsed populations may have to recover in ecosystems whose structure and functioning differ from those in which they were formerly productive and supported sustainable fisheries. Here we investigate how a cod (Gadus morhua) population in the Baltic Sea whose biomass was reduced due to a combination of high exploitation and deteriorating environmental conditions might recover and develop in the 21st century in an ecosystem that likely will change due to both the already started recovery of a cod predator, the grey seal Halichoerus grypus, and projected climate impacts. Simulation modelling, assuming increased seal predation, fishing levels consistent with management plan targets and stable salinity, shows that the cod population could reach high levels well above the long-term average. Scenarios with similar seal and fishing levels but with 15% lower salinity suggest that the Baltic will still be able to support a cod population which can sustain a fishery, but biomass and yields will be lower. At present knowledge of cod and seal interactions, seal predation was found to have much lower impact on cod recovery, compared to the effects of exploitation and salinity. These results suggest that dual management objectives (recovery of both seal and cod populations) are realistic but success in achieving these goals will also depend on how climate change affects cod recruitment.

  12. 2016 ACPA MEETING ABSTRACTS.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The peer-reviewed abstracts presented at the 73rd Annual Meeting of the ACPA are published as submitted by the authors. For financial conflict of interest disclosure, please visit http://meeting.acpa-cpf.org/disclosures.html. PMID:27447885

  13. Abstracts--Citations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Mental Health, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Provides abstracts and citations of journal articles and reports dealing with aspects of mental health. Topics include alcoholism, drug abuse, disadvantaged, mental health programs, rehabilitation, student mental health, and others. (SB)

  14. Automatic Abstraction in Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, J.

    1991-01-01

    Traditionally, abstraction in planning has been accomplished by either state abstraction or operator abstraction, neither of which has been fully automatic. We present a new method, predicate relaxation, for automatically performing state abstraction. PABLO, a nonlinear hierarchical planner, implements predicate relaxation. Theoretical, as well as empirical results are presented which demonstrate the potential advantages of using predicate relaxation in planning. We also present a new definition of hierarchical operators that allows us to guarantee a limited form of completeness. This new definition is shown to be, in some ways, more flexible than previous definitions of hierarchical operators. Finally, a Classical Truth Criterion is presented that is proven to be sound and complete for a planning formalism that is general enough to include most classical planning formalisms that are based on the STRIPS assumption.

  15. Introducing Abstract Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciscell, Bob

    1973-01-01

    A functional approach involving collage, two-dimensional design, three-dimensional construction, and elements of Cubism, is used to teach abstract design in elementary and junior high school art classes. (DS)

  16. Abstracts of SIG Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents abstracts of 36 special interest group (SIG) sessions. Highlights include the Chemistry Online Retrieval Experiment; organizing and retrieving images; intelligent information retrieval using natural language processing; interdisciplinarity; libraries as publishers; indexing hypermedia; cognitive aspects of classification; computer-aided…

  17. 1971 Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Included are 112 abstracts listed under headings such as: acoustics, continuing engineering studies, educational research and methods, engineering design, libraries, liberal studies, and materials. Other areas include agricultural, electrical, mechanical, mineral, and ocean engineering. (TS)

  18. Paradigms for Abstracting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Maria; Galvez, Carmen

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of abstracting systems focuses on the paradigm concept and identifies and explains four paradigms: communicational, or information theory; physical, including information retrieval; cognitive, including information processing and artificial intelligence; and systemic, including quality management. Emphasizes multidimensionality and…

  19. The relation of ground-water quality to housing density, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Persky, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Correlation of median nitrate concentration in groundwater with housing density for 18 sample areas on Cape Cod yields a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.802, which is significant at the 95 % confidence level. In five of nine sample areas where housing density is greater than one unit/acre, nitrate concentrations exceed 5 mg of nitrate/L (the Barnstable County planning goal for nitrate) in 25% of wells. Nitrate concentrations exceed 5 mg of nitrogen/L in 25% of wells in only one of nine sample areas where housing density is less than one unit/acre. Median concentrations of sodium and iron, and median levels of pH and specific conductance, are not significantly correlated with housing density. A computer generated map of nitrate shows a positive relation between nitrate concentration and housing density on Cape Cod. However, the presence of septage- or sewage-disposal sites and fertilizer use are also important factors that affect the nitrate concentration. A map of specific conductance also shows a positive relation to housing density, but little or no relation between housing density and sodium, ammonia, pH, or iron is apparent on the maps. Chemical analyses of samples collected from 3,468 private- and public-supply wells between January 1980 and June 1984 were used to examine the extent to which housing density determines water quality on Cape Cod, an area largely unsewered and underlain by a sole source aquifer. (Author 's abstract)

  20. 76 FR 59922 - Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act Crab Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for Processing by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... FR 11111, March 1, 2011). ] In accordance with Sec. 680.22(e)(2)(i), the Administrator, Alaska Region... Fisheries Act Crab Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore Component in the Western... directed fishing for Pacific cod by non- American Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels that are subject...

  1. 76 FR 58414 - Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act Crab Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for Processing by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... FR 11111, March 1, 2011). In accordance with Sec. 680.22(e)(2)(i), the Administrator, Alaska Region... Fisheries Act Crab Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore Component in the Central... directed fishing for Pacific cod by non- American Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels that are subject...

  2. 76 FR 80266 - Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore Component of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... under Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(iii) on October 9, 2011 (76 FR 63564, October 13, 2011). As of December 15, 2011... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 679 RIN 0648-XA886 Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore Component of the Central Regulatory Area of the Gulf...

  3. 76 FR 63564 - Pacific Cod by Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore Component in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... specifications for groundfish of the GOA (76 FR 11111, March 1, 2011). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 679 RIN 0648-XA759 Pacific Cod by Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore Component in the Central Regulatory Area of the Gulf...

  4. 75 FR 8839 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (74 FR 7333, February 17, 2010) and inseason adjustment (74 FR 68713, December 29, 2009). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i), the Regional Administrator... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the...

  5. 75 FR 5541 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (74 FR 7333, February 17, 2010) and inseason adjustment (74 FR 68713, December 29, 2009). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i), the Regional Administrator... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the...

  6. 75 FR 7976 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... harvest specifications for groundfish of the GOA (74 FR 7333, February 17, 2010) and inseason adjustment (74 FR 68713, December 29, 2010). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i), the Regional Administrator... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for Processing by the...

  7. Abstracts of contributed papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains 571 abstracts of contributed papers to be presented during the Twelfth US National Congress of Applied Mechanics. Abstracts are arranged in the order in which they fall in the program -- the main sessions are listed chronologically in the Table of Contents. The Author Index is in alphabetical order and lists each paper number (matching the schedule in the Final Program) with its corresponding page number in the book.

  8. Dynamics of coastal cod populations: intra- and intercohort density dependence and stochastic processes

    PubMed Central

    Stenseth, N. C.; rnstad, O. N. Bj; Falck, W.; Fromentin, J.-M.; ter, J. Gj s; Gray, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    Skagerrak populations of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) have been surveyed at several fixed stations since 1919. These coastal populations consist of local stocks with a low age of maturity and a short life span. We investigated 60 time-series of 0-group juveniles (i.e. young of the year) sampled annually from 1945 to 1994. An age-structured model was developed which incorporates asymmetrical interactions between the juvenile cohorts (0-group and 1-group; i.e. one-year-old juveniles) and stochastic reproduction. The model was expressed in delay coordinates in order to estimate model parameters directly from the time-series and thereby test the model predictions. The autocovariance structure of the time-series was consistent with the delay coordinates model superimposed upon a long-term trend. The model illustrates how both regulatory (density-dependent) and disruptive (stochastic) forces are crucial in shaping the dynamics of the coastal cod populations. The age-structured life cycle acts to resonance the stochasticity inherent in the recruitment process.

  9. Seasonal distribution and abundance of fishes and decapod crustaceans in a Cape Cod estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Able, K.W.; Fahay, M.P.; Heck, K.L.; Roman, C.T.; Lazzari, M.A.; Kaiser, S.C.

    2002-01-01

    Sampling in several habitat types (sand/mud, eelgrass, sand, gravel, macroalgae/mud) during all seasons with a variety of gears in Nauset Marsh, Massachusetts during 1985-1987 found a fauna consisting of 35 fish and 10 decapod crustacean species. Although most of the abundant species were found in several habitat types, species richness and habitat use appeared to be highest for vegetated habitats (eelgrass, macroalgae). The fishes and decapods were numerically dominated by cold-water taxa; however, numerous fish species, represented by rare individuals of predominantly southern forms, enriched the fauna. Species composition of Nauset Marsh could be distinguished from estuaries south of Cape Cod and even from the south shore of the cape. Both fishes and decapods were most abundant during the summer, apparently due to the contributions from spring and summer spawning in the estuary and the adjacent Atlantic Ocean. The location of Nauset Marsh and other estuaries on Cape Cod provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the importance of this region as a faunal boundary to estuarine species.

  10. Metacognition and abstract reasoning.

    PubMed

    Markovits, Henry; Thompson, Valerie A; Brisson, Janie

    2015-05-01

    The nature of people's meta-representations of deductive reasoning is critical to understanding how people control their own reasoning processes. We conducted two studies to examine whether people have a metacognitive representation of abstract validity and whether familiarity alone acts as a separate metacognitive cue. In Study 1, participants were asked to make a series of (1) abstract conditional inferences, (2) concrete conditional inferences with premises having many potential alternative antecedents and thus specifically conducive to the production of responses consistent with conditional logic, or (3) concrete problems with premises having relatively few potential alternative antecedents. Participants gave confidence ratings after each inference. Results show that confidence ratings were positively correlated with logical performance on abstract problems and concrete problems with many potential alternatives, but not with concrete problems with content less conducive to normative responses. Confidence ratings were higher with few alternatives than for abstract content. Study 2 used a generation of contrary-to-fact alternatives task to improve levels of abstract logical performance. The resulting increase in logical performance was mirrored by increases in mean confidence ratings. Results provide evidence for a metacognitive representation based on logical validity, and show that familiarity acts as a separate metacognitive cue.

  11. Temporal trends of contaminants in cod from Icelandic waters.

    PubMed

    Sturludottir, Erla; Gunnlaugsdottir, Helga; Jorundsdottir, Hronn O; Magnusdottir, Elin V; Olafsdottir, Kristin; Stefansson, Gunnar

    2014-04-01

    Contaminants have been analyzed in cod (Gadus morhua) since 1990 as part of the national monitoring program for the environmental conditions in the sea around Iceland. The aim of this study was to determine the temporal trends of persistent organic pollutants (POPs: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethene (p,p'-DDE), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), chlordanes (CHLs) and toxaphenes (Tox)) and trace elements (As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, Se and Zn) in cod over the last two decades at two different locations in the Arctic Ocean north of Iceland. The relationship between the contaminant concentrations and biological covariates was also determined. All of the POPs showed decreasing trends but the trace elements showed no clear signs of trend except arsenic which showed an increasing trend and zinc which showed a decreasing trend. The concentration of the POPs were lower or similar in the Icelandic cod compared to cod sampled in Norway, the Barents Sea and in the Baltic Sea, except for HCB which was higher in the Icelandic cod compared to the Norwegian cod. The concentration of the trace elements As, Cu, Hg and Zn were similar in the Icelandic cod compared to cod sampled in Norway and Greenland but the concentration of Cd was higher in the Icelandic cod. The inclusion of the biological covariates was found to be important for the statistical analysis. The POPs had a positive relationship with liver fat content but negative relationship with liver weight. The trace elements had a negative relationship with liver fat and liver weight except As which had positive relationship with liver weight. Only positive relationships were observed between the contaminant concentrations and length. PMID:24463254

  12. Abstracting and indexing guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Department of the Interior; Office of Water Resources Research

    1974-01-01

    These instructions have been prepared for those who abstract and index scientific and technical documents for the Water Resources Scientific Information Center (WRSIC). With the recent publication growth in all fields, information centers have undertaken the task of keeping the various scientific communities aware of current and past developments. An abstract with carefully selected index terms offers the user of WRSIC services a more rapid means for deciding whether a document is pertinent to his needs and professional interests, thus saving him the time necessary to scan the complete work. These means also provide WRSIC with a document representation or surrogate which is more easily stored and manipulated to produce various services. Authors are asked to accept the responsibility for preparing abstracts of their own papers to facilitate quick evaluation, announcement, and dissemination to the scientific community.

  13. Thyra Abstract Interface Package

    2005-09-01

    Thrya primarily defines a set of abstract C++ class interfaces needed for the development of abstract numerical atgorithms (ANAs) such as iterative linear solvers, transient solvers all the way up to optimization. At the foundation of these interfaces are abstract C++ classes for vectors, vector spaces, linear operators and multi-vectors. Also included in the Thyra package is C++ code for creating concrete vector, vector space, linear operator, and multi-vector subclasses as well as other utilitiesmore » to aid in the development of ANAs. Currently, very general and efficient concrete subclass implementations exist for serial and SPMD in-core vectors and multi-vectors. Code also currently exists for testing objects and providing composite objects such as product vectors.« less

  14. EAARL topography: Cape Cod National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayegandhi, Amar; Travers, Laurinda J.

    2007-01-01

    This Web site contains 90 Lidar-derived bare earth topography maps and GIS files for the Cape Cod National Seashore. These Lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) St. Petersburg, Florida, the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs and barrier islands for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to coastal resource managers.

  15. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineering Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presents the abstracts of 158 papers presented at the American Society for Engineering Education's annual conference at Knoxville, Tennessee, June 14-17, 1976. Included are engineering topics covering education, aerospace, agriculture, biomedicine, chemistry, computers, electricity, acoustics, environment, mechanics, and women. (SL)

  16. Seismic Consequence Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    M. Gross

    2004-10-25

    The primary purpose of this model report is to develop abstractions for the response of engineered barrier system (EBS) components to seismic hazards at a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and to define the methodology for using these abstractions in a seismic scenario class for the Total System Performance Assessment - License Application (TSPA-LA). A secondary purpose of this model report is to provide information for criticality studies related to seismic hazards. The seismic hazards addressed herein are vibratory ground motion, fault displacement, and rockfall due to ground motion. The EBS components are the drip shield, the waste package, and the fuel cladding. The requirements for development of the abstractions and the associated algorithms for the seismic scenario class are defined in ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The development of these abstractions will provide a more complete representation of flow into and transport from the EBS under disruptive events. The results from this development will also address portions of integrated subissue ENG2, Mechanical Disruption of Engineered Barriers, including the acceptance criteria for this subissue defined in Section 2.2.1.3.2.3 of the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]).

  17. Abstraction through Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avraamidou, Antri; Monaghan, John; Walker, Aisha

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the computer game play of an 11-year-old boy. In the course of building a virtual house he developed and used, without assistance, an artefact and an accompanying strategy to ensure that his house was symmetric. We argue that the creation and use of this artefact-strategy is a mathematical abstraction. The discussion…

  18. Making the Abstract Concrete

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2005-01-01

    President Ronald Reagan nominated a woman to serve on the United States Supreme Court. He did so through a single-page form letter, completed in part by hand and in part by typewriter, announcing Sandra Day O'Connor as his nominee. While the document serves as evidence of a historic event, it is also a tangible illustration of abstract concepts…

  19. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  20. Computers in Abstract Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwabueze, Kenneth K.

    2004-01-01

    The current emphasis on flexible modes of mathematics delivery involving new information and communication technology (ICT) at the university level is perhaps a reaction to the recent change in the objectives of education. Abstract algebra seems to be one area of mathematics virtually crying out for computer instructional support because of the…

  1. 2002 NASPSA Conference Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Contains abstracts from the 2002 conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. The publication is divided into three sections: the preconference workshop, "Effective Teaching Methods in the Classroom;" symposia (motor development, motor learning and control, and sport psychology); and free…

  2. Abstracts of SIG Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Presents abstracts of 15 special interest group (SIG) sessions. Topics include navigation and information utilization in the Internet, natural language processing, automatic indexing, image indexing, classification, users' models of database searching, online public access catalogs, education for information professions, information services,…

  3. Abstraction and art.

    PubMed Central

    Gortais, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    In a given social context, artistic creation comprises a set of processes, which relate to the activity of the artist and the activity of the spectator. Through these processes we see and understand that the world is vaster than it is said to be. Artistic processes are mediated experiences that open up the world. A successful work of art expresses a reality beyond actual reality: it suggests an unknown world using the means and the signs of the known world. Artistic practices incorporate the means of creation developed by science and technology and change forms as they change. Artists and the public follow different processes of abstraction at different levels, in the definition of the means of creation, of representation and of perception of a work of art. This paper examines how the processes of abstraction are used within the framework of the visual arts and abstract painting, which appeared during a period of growing importance for the processes of abstraction in science and technology, at the beginning of the twentieth century. The development of digital platforms and new man-machine interfaces allow multimedia creations. This is performed under the constraint of phases of multidisciplinary conceptualization using generic representation languages, which tend to abolish traditional frontiers between the arts: visual arts, drama, dance and music. PMID:12903659

  4. Leadership Abstracts, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Cynthia, Ed.; Milliron, Mark David, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This 2002 volume of Leadership Abstracts contains issue numbers 1-12. Articles include: (1) "Skills Certification and Workforce Development: Partnering with Industry and Ourselves," by Jeffrey A. Cantor; (2) "Starting Again: The Brookhaven Success College," by Alice W. Villadsen; (3) "From Digital Divide to Digital Democracy," by Gerardo E. de los…

  5. Water reuse. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Middlebrooks, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 31 chapters of this book which deals with all aspects of wastewater reuse. Design data, case histories, performance data, monitoring information, health information, social implications, legal and organizational structures, and background information needed to analyze the desirability of water reuse are presented. (KRM)

  6. Abstract Film and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grice, Malcolm

    A theoretical and historical account of the main preoccupations of makers of abstract films is presented in this book. The book's scope includes discussion of nonrepresentational forms as well as examination of experiments in the manipulation of time in films. The ten chapters discuss the following topics: art and cinematography, the first…

  7. Monitoring the desalting process of cod using dielectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    De los Reyes, Ruth; Balbastre, Juan V; Andrés, Ana; Fito, Pedro; De los Reyes, Elias

    2009-01-01

    The desalted cod industry needs a suitable and reliable control system to check the desalting point of cod in order to provide a safe and high-quality product. The growth of the industries that are interested in a non-contacting, real-time control, encourages the development of new methods based on low-power radiation, such as dielectric spectroscopy. These techniques use the modification of wave parameters at some specific frequencies to provide information of the compositional characteristics of foods. In this work, cod parallelepipeds were desalted at 5 degrees C by immersing them in distilled water for different desalting times (15 and 30 minutes and 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24 and 48 hours). Dielectric Spectroscopy studies have been performed on cod samples in the frequency range 200 MHz-20 GHz. The dielectric properties were measured using a coaxial probe (Agilent 85070E) connected to a Network Analyzer (Agilent E8362B) immediately after removing the cod samples from their desalting solutions. After desalting, the cod samples were separated from their desalting solutions and kept in repose for 24 h at 5 degrees C after which some of their physical properties were measured. This experimental procedure ensures that those properties have already reached their final values. Good correlations were found between the quality properties of the cod samples (a(w), Xw, Z(NaCl) and xNaCl) after 24 h and their loss factor (epsilon") measured at 10 GHz just before leaving them in repose, showing the feasibility of an in-line control system for cod desalting process at that frequency. PMID:21384709

  8. [Experimental Conditions and Reliability Analysis of Results of COD components].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-hua; Zhang, Yin; Han, Xing; Yu, Ke; Li, Ru-jia

    2015-10-01

    The present study attempts to use SF( OUR(max)/OUR(en)) instead of S(0)/X(0) as an index of optimal initial conditions for determination of COD components by means of respirometry, thereby simplifying the measuring process and the operation can be automated. Further, the ratio of COD consumed by the growth of biomass can be used for the reliability assessment of results. Experimental results show that, experimental conditions for obtaining good results as follows: (1) for samples that composed of a large amount of easily biodegradable components (e. g., synthetic wastewater made by sodium acetate), SF should be in the range of 2.8 to 5.3, and the ratio of COD consumed by growth of biomass should be less than 30%; (2) for samples that composed of both readily biodegradable and slowly biodegradable components (i. e., typical domestic wastewater), SF should be in the range of 5.8 to 6.4, and the ratio of COD consumed by growth of biomass should be less than 30%; (3) and for samples that composed of a large amount of slowly biodegradable industrial wastewater (i. e., landfill leachate), SF should be 15 or less, and the ratio of COD consumed by growth of biomass should be approximately 40%. Therefore, when respirometry is used for the determination of COD components, the optimal conditions in terms of SF increase with the complexity of carbon source.

  9. Antiulcer activity of cod liver oil in rats

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Salaj; Asad, Mohammed; Dhamanigi, Sunil S.; Prasad, V. Satya

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Cod liver oil is used widely as a dietary supplement. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of cod liver oil (0.5 g/kg, p.o. and 1 g/kg, p.o.) on gastric and duodenal ulcers. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on different gastric ulcer models such as acetic acid induced chronic gastric ulcers, pylorus ligation, indomethacin induced ulcers, stress induced ulcers and ethanol induced ulcers. The duodenal ulcers were induced using cysteamine hydrochloride (HCl). Ranitidine (50 mg/kg p.o.) and misoprostol (100 µg/kg, p.o.) were used as standard drugs. Results: Both doses of cod liver oil showed gastric ulcer healing effect in acetic acid induced chronic gastric ulcers, produced gastric antisecretory effect in pylorus-ligated rats and also showed gastric cytoprotective effect in ethanol-induced and indomethacin-induced ulcer. Cod liver oil also produced a significant reduction in the development of stress induced gastric ulcers and cysteamine induced duodenal ulcer. The high dose of cod liver oil (1 g/kg, p.o.) was more effective compared to the low dose (0.5 g/kg, p.o.). Conclusion: Cod liver oil increases healing of gastric ulcers and prevents the development of experimentally induced gastric and duodenal ulcers in rats. PMID:20040959

  10. An Abstract Data Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, D. J.

    The Abstract Data Interface (ADI) is a system within which both abstract data models and their mappings on to file formats can be defined. The data model system is object-oriented and closely follows the Common Lisp Object System (CLOS) object model. Programming interfaces in both C and \\fortran are supplied, and are designed to be simple enough for use by users with limited software skills. The prototype system supports access to those FITS formats most commonly used in the X-ray community, as well as the Starlink NDF data format. New interfaces can be rapidly added to the system---these may communicate directly with the file system, other ADI objects or elsewhere (e.g., a network connection).

  11. Meeting Abstracts - Nexus 2015.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    The AMCP Abstracts program provides a forum through which authors can share their insights and outcomes of advanced managed care practice through publication in AMCP's Journal of Managed Care Specialty Pharmacy (JMCP). Of the abstracts accepted for publication, most are presented as posters, so interested AMCP meeting attendees can review findings and query authors. The main poster presentation is Tuesday, October 27, 2015; posters are also displayed on Wednesday, October 28, 2015. The AMCP Nexus 2015 in Orlando, Florida, is expected to attract more than 3,500 managed care pharmacists and other health care professionals who manage and evaluate drug therapies, develop and manage networks, and work with medical managers and information specialists to improve the care of all individuals enrolled in managed care programs.  Abstracts were submitted in the following categories:  Research Report: describe completed original research on managed care pharmacy services or health care interventions. Examples include (but are not limited to) observational studies using administrative claims, reports of the impact of unique benefit design strategies, and analyses of the effects of innovative administrative or clinical programs.Economic Model: describe models that predict the effect of various benefit design or clinical decisions on a population. For example, an economic model could be used to predict the budget impact of a new pharmaceutical product on a health care system. Solving Problems in Managed Care: describe the specific steps taken to introduce a needed change, develop and implement a new system or program, plan and organize an administrative function, or solve other types of problems in managed care settings. These abstracts describe a course of events; they do not test a hypothesis, but they may include data.

  12. Generalized Abstract Symbolic Summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Person, Suzette; Dwyer, Matthew B.

    2009-01-01

    Current techniques for validating and verifying program changes often consider the entire program, even for small changes, leading to enormous V&V costs over a program s lifetime. This is due, in large part, to the use of syntactic program techniques which are necessarily imprecise. Building on recent advances in symbolic execution of heap manipulating programs, in this paper, we develop techniques for performing abstract semantic differencing of program behaviors that offer the potential for improved precision.

  13. Lobster and cod benefit from small-scale northern marine protected areas: inference from an empirical before–after control-impact study

    PubMed Central

    Moland, Even; Olsen, Esben Moland; Knutsen, Halvor; Garrigou, Pauline; Espeland, Sigurd Heiberg; Kleiven, Alf Ring; André, Carl; Knutsen, Jan Atle

    2013-01-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are increasingly implemented as tools to conserve and manage fisheries and target species. Because there are opportunity costs to conservation, there is a need for science-based assessment of MPAs. Here, we present one of the northernmost documentations of MPA effects to date, demonstrated by a replicated before–after control-impact (BACI) approach. In 2006, MPAs were implemented along the Norwegian Skagerrak coast offering complete protection to shellfish and partial protection to fish. By 2010, European lobster (Homarus gammarus) catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) had increased by 245 per cent in MPAs, whereas CPUE in control areas had increased by 87 per cent. Mean size of lobsters increased by 13 per cent in MPAs, whereas increase in control areas was negligible. Furthermore, MPA-responses and population development in control areas varied significantly among regions. This illustrates the importance of a replicated BACI design for reaching robust conclusions and management decisions. Partial protection of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) was followed by an increase in population density and body size compared with control areas. By 2010, MPA cod were on average 5 cm longer than in any of the control areas. MPAs can be useful management tools in rebuilding and conserving portions of depleted lobster populations in northern temperate waters, and even for a mobile temperate fish species such as the Atlantic cod. PMID:23303544

  14. Lobster and cod benefit from small-scale northern marine protected areas: inference from an empirical before-after control-impact study.

    PubMed

    Moland, Even; Olsen, Esben Moland; Knutsen, Halvor; Garrigou, Pauline; Espeland, Sigurd Heiberg; Kleiven, Alf Ring; André, Carl; Knutsen, Jan Atle

    2013-03-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are increasingly implemented as tools to conserve and manage fisheries and target species. Because there are opportunity costs to conservation, there is a need for science-based assessment of MPAs. Here, we present one of the northernmost documentations of MPA effects to date, demonstrated by a replicated before-after control-impact (BACI) approach. In 2006, MPAs were implemented along the Norwegian Skagerrak coast offering complete protection to shellfish and partial protection to fish. By 2010, European lobster (Homarus gammarus) catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) had increased by 245 per cent in MPAs, whereas CPUE in control areas had increased by 87 per cent. Mean size of lobsters increased by 13 per cent in MPAs, whereas increase in control areas was negligible. Furthermore, MPA-responses and population development in control areas varied significantly among regions. This illustrates the importance of a replicated BACI design for reaching robust conclusions and management decisions. Partial protection of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) was followed by an increase in population density and body size compared with control areas. By 2010, MPA cod were on average 5 cm longer than in any of the control areas. MPAs can be useful management tools in rebuilding and conserving portions of depleted lobster populations in northern temperate waters, and even for a mobile temperate fish species such as the Atlantic cod. PMID:23303544

  15. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  16. Comparison of the Northeast Arctic cod year class strength (at the age of 3+) with the SST anomalies in main spawning ground (the Norwegian Shelf Waters) by results of analysis satellite monitoring data during last years.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanyushin, George

    2015-04-01

    Continuous long-term database (1998-2014) on the sea surface temperature (SST) comprising results of regional satellite monitoring (the Norwegian and the Barents seas) is used to resolve several applied problems. Authors have analyzed indirect influence the SST (the NOAA satellite data) on modern cod total stock biomass (abundance of the Northeast Arctic cod at age 3+). In this study, we went on the consideration of the relationship between the SST anomalies for March-April in the main spawning ground of the cod off the Lofoten islands in the Norwegian Shelf Waters and forecasting assessment of future cod generation success and its future abundance of 3 year old. Mean monthly SST and SST anomalies are computed for the selected area on the basis of the weekly SST maps which made by using the NOAA satellites data for the period 1998-2014. Comparison of the SST anomalies in the main spawning ground with abundance of the cod year class at age 3+ shows that survival of the cod generations was inhibited on the whole as negative (below -0,1C) well as positive SST anomalies (above +1,3C) during March and April. Finally, the results indicate that poor and low middle generations of cod at age 3+ (2002, 2004, 2010) occurred in years with negative or extremely high positive the SST anomalies in the spawning area. The SST anomalies in years which were close to normal significances provide conditions for appearance middle or strong generations of cod (2001-2003, 2005-2009, 2011-2013). So, the SST and SST anomalies (by the NOAA satellite data) characterize of increase in input of warm Atlantic waters which form numerous eddies along the main stream thus creating favorable conditions for spawning and development of the cod larvae and fry and provide them with food stock, finally direct influence on forming total stock biomass of cod and helping its population forecast. Key words: satellite monitoring of SST, the Northeast Arctic cod, spawning ground, forecast of the cod year class

  17. Interplay of CodY and ScoC in the Regulation of Major Extracellular Protease Genes of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Giulia; Albertini, Alessandra M.; Ferrari, Eugenio; Sonenshein, Abraham L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT AprE and NprE are two major extracellular proteases in Bacillus subtilis whose expression is directly regulated by several pleiotropic transcriptional factors, including AbrB, DegU, ScoC, and SinR. In cells growing in a rich, complex medium, the aprE and nprE genes are strongly expressed only during the post-exponential growth phase; mutations in genes encoding the known regulators affect the level of post-exponential-phase gene expression but do not permit high-level expression during the exponential growth phase. Using DNA-binding assays and expression and mutational analyses, we have shown that the genes for both exoproteases are also under strong, direct, negative control by the global transcriptional regulator CodY. However, because CodY also represses scoC, little or no derepression of aprE and nprE was seen in a codY null mutant due to overexpression of scoC. Thus, CodY is also an indirect positive regulator of these genes by limiting the synthesis of a second repressor. In addition, in cells growing under conditions that activate CodY, a scoC null mutation had little effect on aprE or nprE expression; full effects of scoC or codY null mutations could be seen only in the absence of the other regulator. However, even the codY scoC double mutant did not show high levels of aprE and nprE gene expression during exponential growth phase in a rich, complex medium. Only a third mutation, in abrB, allowed such expression. Thus, three repressors can contribute to reducing exoprotease gene expression during growth in the presence of excess nutrients. IMPORTANCE The major Bacillus subtilis exoproteases, AprE and NprE, are important metabolic enzymes whose genes are subject to complex regulation by multiple transcription factors. We show here that expression of the aprE and nprE genes is also controlled, both directly and indirectly, by CodY, a global transcriptional regulator that responds to the intracellular pools of amino acids. Direct Cod

  18. Structure-function relationships in histidine-rich antimicrobial peptides from Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Mark; Mannion, Michael; Pike, Damien; Lewis, Krystina; Flynn, Andrew; Brannan, Alex M; Browne, Mitchell J; Jackman, Donna; Madera, Laurence; Power Coombs, Melanie R; Hoskin, David W; Rise, Matthew L; Booth, Valerie

    2015-07-01

    Gad-1 and Gad-2 are antimicrobial peptide (AMP) sequences encoded by paralogous genes. They are rich in histidine, which suggests that their activity might be pH-dependent. We examined their structure-function relationships with a view to learning how to improve AMP therapeutic ratios. Activity assays with Gram-negative bacteria and cancer cell lines demonstrate that Gad-2 is substantially more active at slightly acidic pH than it is at neutral pH. By contrast, the activity of Gad-1 at lower pH is similar to its activity at pH7. Circular dichroism spectra indicate that the greater functional plasticity of Gad-2 correlates with a greater structural plasticity; Gad-2's percent helicity varies dramatically with altered pH and lipid environment. Interestingly, Gad-2's highest levels of helicity do not correspond to the conditions where it is most active. High resolution solution NMR structures were determined in SDS micelles at pH5, conditions that induce an intermediate level of helicity in the peptides. Gad-1 is more helical than Gad-2, with both peptides exhibiting the greatest helical tendencies in their central region and lowest helicity in their N-termini. The high resolution structures suggest that maximum activity relies on the appropriate balance between an N-terminal region with mixed hydrophobic/hydrophilic structure features and an amphipathic central and C-terminal region. Taken together with previous studies, our results suggest that to improve the therapeutic ratio of AMPs, consideration should be given to including sequential histidine-pairs, keeping the overall charge of the peptide modest, and retaining a degree of structural plasticity and imperfect amphipathicity.

  19. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers

  20. A LARI Experience (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, M.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) In 2012, Lowell Observatory launched The Lowell Amateur Research Initiative (LARI) to formally involve amateur astronomers in scientific research by bringing them to the attention of and helping professional astronomers with their astronomical research. One of the LARI projects is the BVRI photometric monitoring of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs), wherein amateurs obtain observations to search for new outburst events and characterize the colour evolution of previously identified outbursters. A summary of the scientific and organizational aspects of this LARI project, including its goals and science motivation, the process for getting involved with the project, a description of the team members, their equipment and methods of collaboration, and an overview of the programme stars, preliminary findings, and lessons learned is presented.

  1. IEEE conference record -- Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This conference covers the following areas: computational plasma physics; vacuum electronic; basic phenomena in fully ionized plasmas; plasma, electron, and ion sources; environmental/energy issues in plasma science; space plasmas; plasma processing; ball lightning/spherical plasma configurations; plasma processing; fast wave devices; magnetic fusion; basic phenomena in partially ionized plasma; dense plasma focus; plasma diagnostics; basic phenomena in weakly ionized gases; fast opening switches; MHD; fast z-pinches and x-ray lasers; intense ion and electron beams; laser-produced plasmas; microwave plasma interactions; EM and ETH launchers; solid state plasmas and switches; intense beam microwaves; and plasmas for lighting. Separate abstracts were prepared for 416 papers in this conference.

  2. Writing a successful research abstract.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Donna Z

    2012-01-01

    Writing and submitting a research abstract provides timely dissemination of the findings of a study and offers peer input for the subsequent development of a quality manuscript. Acceptance of abstracts is competitive. Understanding the expected content of an abstract, the abstract review process and tips for skillful writing will improve the chance of acceptance.

  3. Mortality trends of stranded marine mammals on Cape Cod and southeastern Massachusetts, USA, 2000 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Bogomolni, Andrea L; Pugliares, Katie R; Sharp, Sarah M; Patchett, Kristen; Harry, Charles T; LaRocque, Jane M; Touhey, Kathleen M; Moore, Michael

    2010-01-25

    To understand the cause of death of 405 marine mammals stranded on Cape Cod and southeastern Massachusetts between 2000 and 2006, a system for coding final diagnosis was developed and categorized as (1) disease, (2) human interaction, (3) mass-stranded with no significant findings, (4) single-stranded with no significant findings, (5) rock and/or sand ingestion, (6) predatory attack, (7) failure to thrive or dependent calf or pup, or (8) other. The cause of death for 91 animals could not be determined. For the 314 animals that could be assigned a cause of death, gross and histological pathology results and ancillary testing indicated that disease was the leading cause of mortality in the region, affecting 116/314 (37%) of cases. Human interaction, including harassment, entanglement, and vessel collision, fatally affected 31/314 (10%) of all animals. Human interaction accounted for 13/29 (45%) of all determined gray seal Halichoerus grypus mortalities. Mass strandings were most likely to occur in northeastern Cape Cod Bay; 97/106 (92%) of mass stranded animals necropsied presented with no significant pathological findings. Mass strandings were the leading cause of death in 3 of the 4 small cetacean species: 46/67 (69%) of Atlantic white-sided dolphin Lagenorhynchus acutus, 15/21 (71%) of long-finned pilot whale Globicephala melas, and 33/54 (61%) of short-beaked common dolphin Delphinus delphis. These baseline data are critical for understanding marine mammal population health and mortality trends, which in turn have significant conservation and management implications. They not only afford a better retrospective analysis of strandings, but ultimately have application for improving current and future response to live animal stranding. PMID:20225675

  4. COD removal characteristics in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan; He, Weihua; Ren, Lijiao; Stager, Jennifer; Evans, Patrick J; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-01-01

    Exoelectrogenic microorganisms in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) compete with other microorganisms for substrate. In order to understand how this affects removal rates, current generation, and coulombic efficiencies (CEs), substrate removal rates were compared in MFCs fed a single, readily biodegradable compound (acetate) or domestic wastewater (WW). Removal rates based on initial test conditions fit first-order kinetics, but rate constants varied with circuit resistance. With filtered WW (100Ω), the rate constant was 0.18h(-)(1), which was higher than acetate or filtered WW with an open circuit (0.10h(-)(1)), but CEs were much lower (15-24%) than acetate. With raw WW (100Ω), COD removal proceeded in two stages: a fast removal stage with high current production, followed by a slower removal with little current. While using MFCs increased COD removal rate due to current generation, secondary processes will be needed to reduce COD to levels suitable for discharge.

  5. Linking North Atlantic Teleconnections to Latitudinal Variability of Wave Climate Along the North American Atlantic Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provancha, C.; Adams, P. N.; Hegermiller, C.; Storlazzi, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Shoreline change via coastal erosion and accretion is largely influenced by variations in ocean wave climate. Identifying the sources of these variations is challenging because the timing of wave energy delivery varies over multiple timescales within ocean basins. We present the results of an investigation of USACE Wave Information Studies hindcast hourly wave heights, periods, and directions along the North American Atlantic coast from 1980-2012, designed to explore links between wave climate and teleconnection patterns. Trends in median and extreme significant wave heights (SWHs) demonstrate that mean monthly SWHs increased from 1 to 5 cm/yr along the roughly 3000 km reach of study area, with changes in hurricane season waves appearing to be most influential in producing the overall trends. Distributions of SWHs categorized by North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) phase, show that positive-period NAO SWHs are greater than negative-period NAO SWHs along the entire eastern seaboard (25°N to 45°N). The most prominent wave direction off Cape Cod, MA during positive-period NAO is approximately 105°, as compared to approximately 75° during negative-period NAO. Prominent wave directions between Cape Canaveral, FL, and Savannah, GA exhibit a similar shift but during opposite phases of the NAO. The results of this analysis suggest that the atmosphere-ocean interactions associated with contrasting NAO phases can significantly change the wave climate observed offshore along the North American Atlantic coast, altering alongshore wave energy fluxes and sediment transport patterns along the coast.

  6. Causes and projections of abrupt climate-driven ecosystem shifts in the North Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Beaugrand, Grégory; Edwards, Martin; Brander, Keith; Luczak, Christophe; Ibanez, Frederic

    2008-11-01

    Warming of the global climate is now unequivocal and its impact on Earth' functional units has become more apparent. Here, we show that marine ecosystems are not equally sensitive to climate change and reveal a critical thermal boundary where a small increase in temperature triggers abrupt ecosystem shifts seen across multiple trophic levels. This large-scale boundary is located in regions where abrupt ecosystem shifts have been reported in the North Atlantic sector and thereby allows us to link these shifts by a global common phenomenon. We show that these changes alter the biodiversity and carrying capacity of ecosystems and may, combined with fishing, precipitate the reduction of some stocks of Atlantic cod already severely impacted by exploitation. These findings offer a way to anticipate major ecosystem changes and to propose adaptive strategies for marine exploited resources such as cod in order to minimize social and economic consequences.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of the sleepy cod (Oxyeleotris lineolatus).

    PubMed

    Chen, Haigang; Li, Wei; Zhao, Jian; Zhu, Xinping

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the sleepy cod (Oxyeleotris lineolatus) is determined for the first time in this study. It is a circular molecule of 16,519 bp in length, consisting 37 genes, typically found in other vertebrates. The AT content of the overall base composition of the whole mitogenome was 53.90%, while the control region was 62.59%. The protein-coding genes and 6 CSBs were identified. The sequence information could play an important role in the study of phylogenetic relationships between the sleepy cod and its related species.

  8. COD measurements at various positions along a crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, W. N., Jr.; Su, X.

    1988-01-01

    Load versus crack-opening-displacement (COD) was measured at various positions along the border of a fatigue crack as it grew from a small surface crack on the edge of an aluminum specimen into a through-the-thickness crack. Displacements were measured with a laser-based interferometric system with a gage length of 70 microns and a resolution of 0.01 micron. These load-COD curves can be used to determine opening loads and thereby investigate the effect of closure on the growth of small cracks. In general, the opening loads decrease as the crack grows.

  9. Stellar Presentations (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) The AAVSO is in the process of expanding its education, outreach and speakers bureau program. powerpoint presentations prepared for specific target audiences such as AAVSO members, educators, students, the general public, and Science Olympiad teams, coaches, event supervisors, and state directors will be available online for members to use. The presentations range from specific and general content relating to stellar evolution and variable stars to specific activities for a workshop environment. A presentation—even with a general topic—that works for high school students will not work for educators, Science Olympiad teams, or the general public. Each audience is unique and requires a different approach. The current environment necessitates presentations that are captivating for a younger generation that is embedded in a highly visual and sound-bite world of social media, twitter and U-Tube, and mobile devices. For educators, presentations and workshops for themselves and their students must support the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the Common Core Content Standards, and the Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) initiative. Current best practices for developing relevant and engaging powerpoint presentations to deliver information to a variety of targeted audiences will be presented along with several examples.

  10. Automated Supernova Discovery (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) We are developing a system of robotic telescopes for automatic recognition of Supernovas as well as other transient events in collaboration with the Puckett Supernova Search Team. At the SAS2014 meeting, the discovery program, SNARE, was first described. Since then, it has been continuously improved to handle searches under a wide variety of atmospheric conditions. Currently, two telescopes are used to build a reference library while searching for PSN with a partial library. Since data is taken every night without clouds, we must deal with varying atmospheric and high background illumination from the moon. Software is configured to identify a PSN, reshoot for verification with options to change the run plan to acquire photometric or spectrographic data. The telescopes are 24-inch CDK24, with Alta U230 cameras, one in CA and one in NM. Images and run plans are sent between sites so the CA telescope can search while photometry is done in NM. Our goal is to find bright PSNs with magnitude 17.5 or less which is the limit of our planned spectroscopy. We present results from our first automated PSN discoveries and plans for PSN data acquisition.

  11. Oxygen limitation of thermal tolerance in cod, Gadus morhua L., studied by magnetic resonance imaging and on-line venous oxygen monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lannig, Gisela; Bock, Christian; Sartoris, Franz J; Pörtner, Hans O

    2004-10-01

    The hypothesis of an oxygen-limited thermal tolerance due to restrictions in cardiovascular performance at extreme temperatures was tested in Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua (North Sea). Heart rate, changes in arterial and venous blood flow, and venous oxygen tensions were determined during an acute temperature change to define pejus ("getting worse") temperatures that border the thermal optimum range. An exponential increase in heart rate occurred between 2 and 16 degrees C (Q(10) = 2.38 +/- 0.35). Thermal sensitivity was reduced beyond 16 degrees C when cardiac arrhythmia became visible. Flow-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of temperature-dependent blood flow revealed no exponential but a hyperbolic increase of blood flow with a moderate linear increase at temperatures >4 degrees C. Therefore, temperature-dependent heart rate increments are not mirrored by similar increments in blood flow. Venous Po(2) (Pv(O(2))), which reflects the quality of oxygen supply to the heart of cod (no coronary circulation present), followed an inverse U-shaped curve with highest Pv(O(2)) levels at 5.0 +/- 0.2 degrees C. Thermal limitation of circulatory performance in cod set in below 2 degrees C and beyond 7 degrees C, respectively, characterized by decreased Pv(O(2)). Further warming led to a sharp drop in Pv(O(2)) beyond 16.1 +/- 1.2 degrees C in accordance with the onset of cardiac arrhythmia and, likely, the critical temperature. In conclusion, progressive cooling or warming brings cod from a temperature range of optimum cardiac performance into a pejus range, when aerobic scope falls before critical temperatures are reached. These patterns might cause a shift in the geographical distribution of cod with global warming.

  12. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-11-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package corrosion or radionuclide transport.

  13. Abstracts and reviews.

    PubMed

    Liebmann, G H; Wollman, L; Woltmann, A G

    1966-09-01

    Abstract Eric Berne, M.D.: Games People Play. Grove Press, New York, 1964. 192 pages. Price $5.00. Reviewed by Hugo G. Beigel Finkle, Alex M., Ph.D., M.D. and Prian, Dimitry F. Sexual Potency in Elderly Men before and after Prostatectomy. J.A.M.A., 196: 2, April, 1966. Reviewed by H. George Liebman Calvin C. Hernton: Sex and Racism In America. Grove Press, Inc. Black Cat Edition No. 113 (Paperback), 1966, 180 pp. Price $.95. Reviewed by Gus Woltmann Hans Lehfeldt, M.D., Ernest W. Kulka, M.D., H. George Liebman, M.D.: Comparative Study of Uterine Contraceptive Devices. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 26: 5, 1965, pp. 679-688. Lawrence Lipton. The Erotic Revolution. Sherbourne Press, Los Angeles, 1965. 322 pp., Price $7.50. Masters, William H., M.D. and Johnson, Virginia E. Human Sexual Response. Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1966. 366 pages. Price $.10.00. Reviewed by Hans Lehfeldt Douglas P. Murphy, M.D. and Editha F. Torrano, M.D. Male Fertility in 3620 Childless Couples. Fertility and Sterility, 16: 3, May-June, 1965. Reviewed by Leo Wollman, M.D. Edwin M. Schur, Editor: The Family and the Sexual Revolution, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Indiana, 1964. 427 pgs. Weldon, Virginia F., M.D., Blizzard, Robert M., M.D., and Migeon, Claude, M.D. Newborn Girls Misdiagnosed as Bilaterally Chryptorchid Males. The New England Journal of Medicine, April 14, 1966. Reviewed by H. George Liebman.

  14. Accepted scientific research works (abstracts).

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    These are the 39 accepted abstracts for IAYT's Symposium on Yoga Research (SYR) September 24-24, 2014 at the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health and published in the Final Program Guide and Abstracts. PMID:25645134

  15. Delineation of groundwater recharge areas, western Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterson, John P.; Walter, Donald A.

    2000-01-01

    For additional information on the hydrology and geology of western Cape Cod, the reader is referred to the following reports: LeBlanc and others (1986), Barlow and Hess (1993), Masterson and others (1997a), Masterson and others (1997b), Masterson and others (1998), Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Inc. (1998) and Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. (1999).

  16. Arctic Climate Change: A Tale of Two Cod Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arctic cod play an important role in the Arctic trophic hierarchy as the consumer of primary productivity and a food source for many marine fish and mammals. Shifts in their distribution and abundance could have cascading affects in the marine environment. This paper investigates...

  17. Staphylococcus aureus CodY Negatively Regulates Virulence Gene Expression▿

    PubMed Central

    Majerczyk, Charlotte D.; Sadykov, Marat R.; Luong, Thanh T.; Lee, Chia; Somerville, Greg A.; Sonenshein, Abraham L.

    2008-01-01

    CodY is a global regulatory protein that was first discovered in Bacillus subtilis, where it couples gene expression to changes in the pools of critical metabolites through its activation by GTP and branched-chain amino acids. Homologs of CodY can be found encoded in the genomes of nearly all low-G+C gram-positive bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus. The introduction of a codY-null mutation into two S. aureus clinical isolates, SA564 and UAMS-1, through allelic replacement, resulted in the overexpression of several virulence genes. The mutant strains had higher levels of hemolytic activity toward rabbit erythrocytes in their culture fluid, produced more polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), and formed more robust biofilms than did their isogenic parent strains. These phenotypes were associated with derepressed levels of RNA for the hemolytic alpha-toxin (hla), the accessory gene regulator (agr) (RNAII and RNAIII/hld), and the operon responsible for the production of PIA (icaADBC). These data suggest that CodY represses, either directly or indirectly, the synthesis of a number of virulence factors of S. aureus. PMID:18156263

  18. 78 FR 41305 - Collect on Delivery (COD)-Service Features

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... INFORMATION: The Postal Service published a notice of proposed rulemaking on May 31, 2013 (78 FR 32612-32613... sending of a notification to the mailer by mail and requiring the mailer to then send written instructions... fourth sentences of 12.2.1 as follows:] Any mailer may use collect on delivery (COD) service to mail...

  19. Human metabolism of arsenolipids present in cod liver.

    PubMed

    Schmeisser, Ernst; Goessler, Walter; Francesconi, Kevin A

    2006-05-01

    We report results from the first investigation of the human metabolism of arsenic-containing lipids (arsenolipids), significant arsenic constituents of some seafood products. Two male volunteers ingested canned cod liver and the arsenic metabolites in their urine were monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry over a 66-h period. Volunteer A consumed 85 g (wet mass) of cod liver containing a total of approximately 120 microg arsenic, 77% of which was present as arsenolipids, and volunteer B consumed 85 g (wet mass) of cod liver, 25% of which was present as arsenolipids, together with 20 g of cod liver oil, containing a total of about 180 microg arsenic. The structures of the arsenolipids are currently unknown, whereas the majority of the non-lipid arsenic in the cod liver was identified as arsenobetaine, which was excreted unchanged. The arsenolipids were rapidly metabolised to water-soluble compounds and excreted in the urine; peak arsenic concentrations were recorded between 7 and 15 h (volunteer A) and between 6.5 and 15 h (volunteer B), and by the end of the experiment about 90% of the ingested arsenic had been accounted for in the urine for both volunteers. The major arsenolipid metabolite was dimethylarsinate (DMA), constituting 73% (volunteer A) or 41% (volunteer B) of the total urinary arsenic, and most of the remaining arsenolipid-derived arsenic, constituting about 10% (volunteer A) and 5% (volunteer B), comprised four novel arsenic-containing fatty acids, namely oxo-dimethylarsenopropanoic acid, thio-dimethylarsenopropanoic acid, oxo-dimethylarsenobutanoic acid, and thio-dimethylarsenobutanoic acid. Unchanged arsenobetaine (15% for volunteer A and 51% for volunteer B) made up the remaining urinary arsenic together with trace quantities of other, mostly unknown, arsenicals. In a second experiment (volunteer A only), performed with pure cod liver oil, which contains only arsenolipids, DMA and the same

  20. Platinum(II) 1,5-COD oxo complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, H.; James, A.; Sharp, P.R.

    1998-11-02

    Three new types of platinum(II) oxo complexes--[(1,5-COD)Pt({mu}{sup 3}-O)(AuL)]{sub 2}(BF{sub 4}){sub 2} [1, L = PPh{sub 3}, PPh{sub 2}Et, PPh{sub 2}-i-Pr, P(o-tol){sub 3}, P(p-tol){sub 3}, P(p-MeOC{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 3}, P(p-CF{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}){sub 3}], [(1,5-COD)Pt{l_brace}{mu}{sup 3}-O(AuL){sub 2}{r_brace}{sub 2}](BF{sub 4}){sub 2} (2), and [(1,5-COD){sub 4}Pt{sub 4}({mu}{sup 3}-O){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}]X{sub 2} (3, X = BF{sub 4}; 3a, X = CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3})--are obtained from oxo/chloro exchange reactions between (1,5-COD)PtCl{sub 2} and [(LAu){sub 3}({mu}{sup 3}-O)]BF{sub 4}. Crystals of 1 (L = PPh{sub 3}) from CDCl{sub 3} are triclinic. Crystals of 3a from CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}/toluene are trigonal. The structure of the cationic portion of 1 shows a planar (COD)-Pt({mu}-O){sub 2}Pt(COD) unit with slightly out-of-plane LAu{sup +} groups linearly coordinated to the oxo ligands. The structure of the cationic portion of 3a is similar and shows a slightly folded (COD)Pt({mu}-O){sub 2}Pt(COD) unit with out-of-plane [(COD)PtCl]{sup +} groups coordinated to the oxo ligands. Solutions of 3 in untreated CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} or CD{sub 2}Cl{sup 2} deposit crystals of [(1,5-COD){sub 4}Pt{sub 4}({mu}{sup 3}-O){sub 2}({mu}{sup 2}-OH)](BF{sub 4}){sub 3} (4) which are monoclinic. The core structure of the cationic portion of 4 shows a tetranuclear platinum cation in which the metal atoms occupy the corners of a distorted tetrahedron and two {mu}{sup 3}-oxo ligands and one {mu}{sup 2}-hydroxo ligand bridge the four platinum atoms. Reaction of 1 (L = PPh{sub 3}) with PPh{sub 3} gives OPPh{sub 3} and [(Ph{sub 3}P){sub 3}PtAuPPh{sub 3}]BF{sub 4} (5) which is also obtained from (Ph{sub 3}P){sub 4}Pt and Ph{sub 3}-PAuBF{sub 4}. Crystals of 5 from THF are monoclinic. The structure of 5 consists of an L{sub 3}Pt-AuL cation where the Au atom is linear 2-coordinate and the Pt atom is distorted square-planar 4-coordinate.

  1. Using abstract language signals power.

    PubMed

    Wakslak, Cheryl J; Smith, Pamela K; Han, Albert

    2014-07-01

    Power can be gained through appearances: People who exhibit behavioral signals of power are often treated in a way that allows them to actually achieve such power (Ridgeway, Berger, & Smith, 1985; Smith & Galinsky, 2010). In the current article, we examine power signals within interpersonal communication, exploring whether use of concrete versus abstract language is seen as a signal of power. Because power activates abstraction (e.g., Smith & Trope, 2006), perceivers may expect higher power individuals to speak more abstractly and therefore will infer that speakers who use more abstract language have a higher degree of power. Across a variety of contexts and conversational subjects in 7 experiments, participants perceived respondents as more powerful when they used more abstract language (vs. more concrete language). Abstract language use appears to affect perceived power because it seems to reflect both a willingness to judge and a general style of abstract thinking.

  2. 3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH WEST OVER CENTRAL ATLANTIC WITH ATLANTIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH WEST OVER CENTRAL ATLANTIC WITH ATLANTIC OCEAN IN THE FOREGROUND. DENNIS HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL, AND MARLBOROUGH HOTEL (LEFT TO RIGHT) ARE LOCATED IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THE CLARIDGE HOTEL IS THE HIGHRISE IMMEDIATELY TO THE RIGHT OF THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  3. Drivers of spring and summer variability in the coastal ocean offshore of Cape Cod, MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirincich, Anthony R.; Gawarkiewicz, Glen G.

    2016-03-01

    The drivers of spring and summer variability within the coastal ocean east of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, a critical link between the Gulf of Maine and Mid-Atlantic Bight, are investigated using 2 years of shipboard and moored hydrographic and velocity observations from 2010 and 2011. The observations reveal sharp differences in the spring transition and along-shelf circulation due to variable freshwater and meteorological forcing, along with along-shelf pressure gradients. The role of the along-shelf pressure gradient is inferred using in situ observations of turbulent momentum flux, or Reynolds stresses, estimated from the ADCP-based velocities using recently developed methods and an inversion of the along-shelf momentum balance. During spring, the locally relevant along-shelf pressure gradient contains a sizable component that is not coupled to the along-shelf winds and often opposes the regional sea level gradient. Together with the winds, local pressure gradients dominate along-shelf transport variability during spring, while density-driven geostrophic flows appear to match the contribution of the local winds during summer. These results suggest that local effects along the Outer Cape have the potential to cause significant changes in exchange between the basins.

  4. Genotoxicity of environmentally relevant concentrations of water-soluble oil components in cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Holth, Tor F; Beylich, Bjørnar A; Skarphédinsdóttir, Halldóra; Liewenborg, Birgitta; Grung, Merete; Hylland, Ketil

    2009-05-01

    Large discharges from oil and gas production platforms (produced water) have led to concerns for adverse biological effects in marine areas. The aim of this study was to investigate the development of DNA adductformation and related biomarkers in fish after chronic exposure to water-soluble components of oil. Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were exposed for up to 44 weeks to three treatments (low, pulsed, high) containing environmentally relevant concentrations of low-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and short-chained alkylphenols (APs). A time- and dose-related pattern of DNA adduct formation (measured using 32P-postlabeling) was observed. The results suggested that an extended exposure period (more than 16 weeks) would be required for the formation of DNA adduct levels above background. Interestingly, fish receiving pulsed high exposure did not develop elevated concentrations of DNA adducts, possibly due to DNA repair processes. No obvious relationship between DNA adduct concentration and cytochrome P4501A activity (EROD) was observed. This study has demonstrated the genotoxic potential of water-soluble oil components, relevant for operational discharges (produced water) and chronic oil spills. The quantification of PAH metabolites in bile and hepatic DNA adduct formation appear to be suitable for environmental monitoring of chronic oil pollution. PMID:19534154

  5. A sampler for capturing larval and juvenile Atlantic menhaden

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, J.D.; Hedrick, L.R.; Margraf, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in capturing larval and juvenile Atlantic menhaden Brevoortia tyrannus for use in laboratory studies required the design and construction of a sampling device that would allow us to make collections of live fish from open-water areas. Our device for capturing 1-2.5-in larval-juvenile fish was constructed of a stainless steel frame that supported a 9.84-ft-long (3-m-long)5 cone plankton net with a 3.28-ft-diameter (1-m-diameter) opening and a 0.04-in (1-mm) mesh size. Although the plankton net was similar to that used during typical larval fish collections, the cod end was constructed of Plexiglas and was nearly watertight; this prevented impingement and injury to larval fish and provided a calm-water environment. The cod end was designed for quick release from the plankton net, and the entire cod end could be submerged into a 75-gal onboard holding tank. This design and technique obviated the netting or emerging of fish from the water until they were returned to the laboratory. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  6. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 449 - Sampling Protocol for Soluble COD

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of collection (see the requirements for COD in Table II at 40 CFR part 136). 6. Analyze the sample using a method approved for COD in Table IB at 40 CFR part 136. Note: Because this procedure is specific... or to prepare QC samples. 7. Analyze the sample using a method approved for COD in Table 1B at 40...

  7. 78 FR 66763 - Notice of December 2, 2013, Meeting for Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... National Park Service Notice of December 2, 2013, Meeting for Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... the date of the 291st Meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The public meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on Monday, December 2, 2013,...

  8. 78 FR 14588 - Notice of March 25, 2013, Meeting for Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... National Park Service Notice of March 25, 2013, Meeting for Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission... of the Two Hundred Eighty- Eighth Meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The public meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on...

  9. 77 FR 59970 - Notice of November 14, 2012, Meeting for Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of November 14, 2012, Meeting for Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... the date of the Two Hundred Eighty- Sixth Meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The public meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held...

  10. 78 FR 23783 - Notice of May 13, 2013, Meeting for Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... National Park Service Notice of May 13, 2013, Meeting for Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission... of the Two Hundred Eighty- Ninth Meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The public meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on Monday,...

  11. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic bight

    SciTech Connect

    Paffenhoefer, G.A.; Yoder, J.A.

    1980-01-31

    Progress is reported on research conducted during 1979 on the biological oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight. The presentation consists of a number of published articles and abstracts of oral presentations. (ACR)

  12. Grounding Abstractness: Abstract Concepts and the Activation of the Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Anna M.; Zarcone, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    One key issue for theories of cognition is how abstract concepts, such as freedom, are represented. According to the WAT (Words As social Tools) proposal, abstract concepts activate both sensorimotor and linguistic/social information, and their acquisition modality involves the linguistic experience more than the acquisition of concrete concepts. We report an experiment in which participants were presented with abstract and concrete definitions followed by concrete and abstract target-words. When the definition and the word matched, participants were required to press a key, either with the hand or with the mouth. Response times and accuracy were recorded. As predicted, we found that abstract definitions and abstract words yielded slower responses and more errors compared to concrete definitions and concrete words. More crucially, there was an interaction between the target-words and the effector used to respond (hand, mouth). While responses with the mouth were overall slower, the advantage of the hand over the mouth responses was more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts. The results are in keeping with grounded and embodied theories of cognition and support the WAT proposal, according to which abstract concepts evoke linguistic-social information, hence activate the mouth. The mechanisms underlying the mouth activation with abstract concepts (re-enactment of acquisition experience, or re-explanation of the word meaning, possibly through inner talk) are discussed. To our knowledge this is the first behavioral study demonstrating with real words that the advantage of the hand over the mouth is more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts, likely because of the activation of linguistic information with abstract concepts. PMID:27777563

  13. Function of global regulator CodY in Bacillus thuringiensis BMB171 by comparative proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Mingxia; Mei, Fei; Wang, Hui; Sun, Ming; Wang, Gejiao; Yu, Ziniu; Je, Yeonho; Li, Mingshun

    2015-02-01

    CodY is a highly conserved protein in low G+C gram-positive bacteria that regulates genes involved in sporulation and stationary-phase adaptation. Bacillus thuringiensis is a grampositive bacterium that forms spores and parasporal crystals during the stationary phase. To our knowledge, the regulatory mechanism of CodY in B. thuringiensis is unknown. To study the function of CodY protein in B. thuringiensis, BMB171codY(-) was constructed in a BMB171 strain. A shuttle vector containing the ORF of cry1Ac10 was transformed into BMB171 and BMB171codY(-), named BMB171cry1Ac and BMB171codY(-)cry1Ac, respectively. Some morphological and physiological changes of codY mutant BMB171codY(-)cry1Ac were observed. A comparative proteomic analysis was conducted for both BMB171codY(-)cry1Ac and BMB171cry1Ac through two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis. The results showed that the proteins regulated by CodY are involved in microbial metabolism, including branched-chain amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and energy metabolism. Furthermore, we found CodY to be involved in sporulation, biosynthesis of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate, growth, genetic competence, and translation. According to the analysis of differentially expressed proteins, and physiological characterization of the codY mutant, we performed bacterial one-hybrid and electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments and confirmed the direct regulation of genes by CodY, specifically those involved in metabolism of branched-chain amino acids, ribosomal recycling factor FRR, and the late competence protein ComER. Our data establish the foundation for in-depth study of the regulation of CodY in B. thuringiensis, and also offer a potential biocatalyst for functions of CodY in other bacteria.

  14. Abstract shape analysis of RNA.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Stefan; Giegerich, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Abstract shape analysis abstract shape analysis is a method to learn more about the complete Boltzmann ensemble of the secondary structures of a single RNA molecule. Abstract shapes classify competing secondary structures into classes that are defined by their arrangement of helices. It allows us to compute, in addition to the structure of minimal free energy, a set of structures that represents relevant and interesting structural alternatives. Furthermore, it allows to compute probabilities of all structures within a shape class. This allows to ensure that our representative subset covers the complete Boltzmann ensemble, except for a portion of negligible probability. This chapter explains the main functions of abstract shape analysis, as implemented in the tool RNA shapes. RNA shapes It reports on some other types of analysis that are based on the abstract shapes idea and shows how you can solve novel problems by creating your own shape abstractions.

  15. Mechanical Engineering Department technical abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, R.M.

    1982-07-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department publishes listings of technical abstracts twice a year to inform readers of the broad range of technical activities in the Department, and to promote an exchange of ideas. Details of the work covered by an abstract may be obtained by contacting the author(s). Overall information about current activities of each of the Department's seven divisions precedes the technical abstracts.

  16. A rapid liquid chromatography determination of free formaldehyde in cod.

    PubMed

    Storey, Joseph M; Andersen, Wendy C; Heise, Andrea; Turnipseed, Sherri B; Lohne, Jack; Thomas, Terri; Madson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A rapid method for the determination of free formaldehyde in cod is described. It uses a simple water extraction of formaldehyde which is then derivatised with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) to form a sensitive and specific chromophore for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) detection. Although this formaldehyde derivative has been widely used in past tissue analysis, this paper describes an improved derivatisation procedure. The formation of the DNPH formaldehyde derivative has been shortened to 2 min and a stabilising buffer has been added to the derivative to increase its stability. The average recovery of free formaldehyde in spiked cod was 63% with an RSD of 15% over the range of 25-200 mg kg(-1) (n = 48). The HPLC procedure described here was also compared to a commercial qualitative procedure - a swab test for the determination of free formaldehyde in fish. Several positive samples were compared by both methods.

  17. COD and Color Removal from Real Dyeing Wastewater by Ozonation.

    PubMed

    Yang, De-min; Yuan, Jian-mei

    2016-05-01

    Ozonation of real dye wastewater for removal of color and COD reduction covering a wide range in operating parameters forms the scope of the present work. The influence of parameters such as influent pH, ozone flow rate and initial effluent concentration on ozonation efficiency has been critically examined. It has been observed from the present investigation that a maximum of COD removal efficiency of 92.5% has been achieved under optimum operating conditions (pH=11; ozone flow rate: 6×10(-3) m(3)/minute). Further the biodegradability index of the dye effluent has increased from an initial value of 0.18 to 0.49 during ozonation indicating favorable adaptation of ozonation as a primer to the biochemical technique to enhance the efficiency of biochemical treatment. PMID:27131304

  18. Ozonation of tannery effluent for removal of cod and color.

    PubMed

    Preethi, V; Kalyani, K S Parama; Iyappan, K; Srinivasakannan, C; Balasubramaniam, N; Vedaraman, N

    2009-07-15

    Ozonation of leather dye effluent for removal of color and COD reduction covering wide range in operating parameters forms the scope of the present work. The influence of parameters such as influent pH, ozone flow rate and initial effluent concentration on ozonation efficiency has been critically examined. It has been observed from the present investigation that a maximum of COD removal efficiency of 92% has been achieved under optimum operating conditions. Further the biodegradability index of the tannery effluent has increased from an initial value of 0.18 to 0.49 during ozonation indicating favorable adaptation of ozonation as a primer to the biochemical technique to enhance the efficiency of biochemical treatment. PMID:19118944

  19. Preliminary Results of Recent Deep Drilling on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Koteff, C; Cotton, J E

    1962-07-01

    In 1961 a 1000-foot drill hole near Harwich on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, penetrated 435 feet of Pleistocene deposits above 50 to 60 feet of crystalline limestone and phyllitic schist, and more than 500 feet of phyllitic schist with abundant quartz veins. Similar rock is known in the Pennsylvanian and Precambrian (?) sections of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Material of Eocene age was found in earlier drilling near Provincetown, but none was identified from this hole.

  20. The CodY regulator is essential for virulence in Streptococcus suis serotype 2

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Liping; Zhu, Jiawen; Chang, Haitao; Gao, Xiaoping; Gao, Cheng; Wei, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Fangyan; Bei, Weicheng

    2016-01-01

    The main role of CodY, a global regulatory protein in most low G + C gram-positive bacteria, is in transcriptional repression. To study the functions of CodY in Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (S. suis 2), a mutant codY clone named ∆codY was constructed to explore the phenotypic variation between ∆codY and the wild-type strain. The result showed that the codY mutation significantly inhibited cell growth, adherence and invasion ability of S. suis 2 to HEp-2 cells. The codY mutation led to decreased binding of the pathogen to the host cells, easier clearance by RAW264.7 macrophages and decreased growth ability in fresh blood of Cavia porcellus. The codY mutation also attenuated the virulence of S. suis 2 in BALB/c mice. Morphological analysis revealed that the codY mutation decreased the thickness of the capsule of S. suis 2 and changed the surface structures analylized by SDS-PAGE. Finally, the codY mutation altered the expressions of many virulence related genes, including sialic acid synthesis genes, leading to a decreased sialic acid content in capsule. Overall, mutation of codY modulated bacterial virulence by affecting the growth and colonization of S. suis 2, and at least via regulating sialic acid synthesis and capsule thickness. PMID:26883762

  1. Improvement of COD removal by controlling the substrate degradability during the anaerobic digestion of recalcitrant wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Minako; Nagao, Norio; Kawasaki, Nobuyuki; Imai, Akio; Toda, Tatsuki

    2016-10-01

    The recalcitrant landfill leachate was anaerobically digested at various mixing ratios with labile synthetic wastewater to evaluate the degradation properties of recalcitrant wastewater. The proportion of leachate to the digestion system was increased in three equal steps, starting from 0% to 100%, and later decreased back to 0% with the same steps. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) for organic carbon and other components were calculated by analyzing the COD and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and the removal efficiencies of COD carbon and COD others were evaluated separately. The degradation properties of COD carbon and COD others shifted owing to changing of substrate degradability, and the removal efficiencies of COD carbon and COD others were improved after supplying 100% recalcitrant wastewater. The UV absorptive property and total organic carbon (TOC) of each molecular size using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with UVA and TOC detectors were also investigated, and the degradability of different molecular sizes was determined. Although the SEC system detected extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which are produced by microbes in stressful environments, during early stages of the experiment, EPS were not detected after feeding 100% recalcitrant wastewater. These results suggest that the microbes had acclimatized to the recalcitrant wastewater degradation. The high removal rates of both COD carbon and COD others were sustained when the proportion of labile wastewater in the substrate was 33%, indicating that the effective removal of recalcitrant COD might be controlled by changing the substrate's degradability. PMID:27449962

  2. Improvement of COD removal by controlling the substrate degradability during the anaerobic digestion of recalcitrant wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Minako; Nagao, Norio; Kawasaki, Nobuyuki; Imai, Akio; Toda, Tatsuki

    2016-10-01

    The recalcitrant landfill leachate was anaerobically digested at various mixing ratios with labile synthetic wastewater to evaluate the degradation properties of recalcitrant wastewater. The proportion of leachate to the digestion system was increased in three equal steps, starting from 0% to 100%, and later decreased back to 0% with the same steps. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) for organic carbon and other components were calculated by analyzing the COD and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and the removal efficiencies of COD carbon and COD others were evaluated separately. The degradation properties of COD carbon and COD others shifted owing to changing of substrate degradability, and the removal efficiencies of COD carbon and COD others were improved after supplying 100% recalcitrant wastewater. The UV absorptive property and total organic carbon (TOC) of each molecular size using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with UVA and TOC detectors were also investigated, and the degradability of different molecular sizes was determined. Although the SEC system detected extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which are produced by microbes in stressful environments, during early stages of the experiment, EPS were not detected after feeding 100% recalcitrant wastewater. These results suggest that the microbes had acclimatized to the recalcitrant wastewater degradation. The high removal rates of both COD carbon and COD others were sustained when the proportion of labile wastewater in the substrate was 33%, indicating that the effective removal of recalcitrant COD might be controlled by changing the substrate's degradability.

  3. Can Georges Bank larval cod survive on a calanoid diet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Daniel R.; Lewis, Craig V. W.; Werner, Francisco E.

    A simple conceptual model is developed for larval fish feeding on stage-structured prey populations, in an Eulerian framework. The model combines simplified contemporary models of larval fish trophodynamics, zooplankton population dynamics, and hydrodynamic turbulence. The Eulerian view allows instructive maps of larval feeding and growth rates for individual prey species, alone or in combination. Decadally averaged MARMAP surveys of Calanus finmarchicus and Pseudocalanus spp. are analyzed for the March-April period. Quasi-static population dynamics are used to infer the abundance of the smallest stages from adult female abundance. Computed growth rates show that Calanus alone is insufficient to support the smallest cod larvae (4 and 6 mm), but provides good growth (⩾10%/day) for large larvae (10, 12 mm). Pseudocalanus alone provides generally good growth for all larvae but is mismatched spatially with observed cod spawning and subsequent larval advection. Both species together provide good growth, matched spatially with larval cod, for 6 mm and larger larvae. A dietary supplement beyond these two species is needed for the smallest larvae. The procedure provides a general method for mapping observations of zooplankton abundance, distribution and reproductive status, and their relevance to larval fish survival, when the smallest stages are not observable.

  4. A late Wisconsinan marine incursion into Cape Cod Bay, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldale, Robert N.

    1988-11-01

    Reinterpretation of seismic-reflection data from Cape Cod Bay has produced a revised late Wisconsinan history. Acoustically laminated deposits, originally inferred to be glaciolacustrine, are shown to be glaciomarine by tracing them to glaciomarine mud in Stellwagen Basin, north of Cape Cod Bay. A late Wisconsinan marine deposit of nonglacial origin overlies the glaciomarine deposits in Cape Cod Bay. Both deposits indicate that the crust was isostatically depressed below the late Wisconsinan eustatic sea level and that deglaciation and marine submergence occurred simultaneously. Valleys cut into the marine deposits, both glacial and nonglacial, indicate that a low sea-level stand, the result of isostatic rebound, occurred shortly after the marine incursion. A transgressive uncomformity and marine deposits, both mostly of Holocene age, overlie the late Wisconsinan deposits. The marine incursion, regression, and Holocene transgression represent the northward passage of an isostatically induced peripheral bulge following deglaciation. In turn, the bulge, a response to crustal loading and unloading, indicates thick glacier ice in the terminal zone and lends support to arguments for a maximum Laurentide ice model. Evidence for a late Wisconsinan marine incursion, regression, and the passage of a peripheral bulge should be sought in the other bays and sounds of the New England terminal zone.

  5. A late Wisconsinan marine incursion into Cape Cod Bay, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oldale, R.N.

    1988-01-01

    Reinterpretation of seismic-reflection data from Cape Cod Bay has produced a revised late Wisconsinan history. Acoustically laminated deposits, originally inferred to be glaciolacustrine, are shown to be glaciomarine by tracing them to glaciomarine mud in Stellwagen Basin, north of Cape Cod Bay. A late Wisconsinan marine deposit of nonglacial origin overlies the glaciomarine deposits in Cape Cod Bay. Both deposits indicate that the crust was isostatically depressed below the late Wisconsinan eustatic sea level and that deglaciation and marine submergence occurred simultaneously. Valleys cut into the marine deposits, both glacial and nonglacial, indicate that a low sea-level stand, the result of isostatic rebound, occurred shortly after the marine incursion. A transgressive uncomformity and marine deposits, both mostly of Holocene age, overlie the late Wisconsinan deposits. The marine incursion, regression, and Holocene transgression represent the northward passage of an isostatically induced peripheral bulge following deglaciation. In turn, the bulge, a response to crustal loading and unloading, indicates thick glacier ice in the terminal zone and lends support to arguments for a maximum Laurentide ice model. Evidence for a late Wisconsinan marine incursion, regression, and the passage of a peripheral bulge should be sought in the other bays and sounds of the New England terminal zone. ?? 1988.

  6. Removal of ecotoxicity and COD from tank truck cleaning wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dries, Jan; De Schepper, Wim; Geuens, Luc; Blust, Ronny

    2013-01-01

    Tank truck cleaning (TTC) activities generate highly complex wastewater. In a previous study, we found that a significant ecotoxic effect was still present in biologically treated TTC wastewater. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the removal of acute toxicity from TTC wastewater by a sequence of technologies routinely applied for industrial wastewater. Acute toxicity was assayed with the widely applied and standardized Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition test. During a 5-month period, raw wastewater was grab-sampled from a full-scale TTC company and treated by the different unit operations on a laboratory scale. Chemical pretreatment of the wastewater by coagulation with FeCl3 removed approx. 38% of the influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) and reduced the bioluminescence inhibition by 8%. Biological treatment with activated sludge subsequently removed another 77% of the remaining COD. This treatment step also reduced the bioluminescence inhibition but the removal efficiency varied strongly from 5 to 92% for the different samples. Powdered activated carbon almost completely removed the remaining COD and inhibition in all samples. The results suggest that conventional technologies did not suffice for complete removal of toxicity from TTC wastewater, and that advanced wastewater treatment technologies such as activated carbon are required for a satisfactory detoxification. PMID:24292468

  7. Positive regulation of botulinum neurotoxin gene expression by CodY in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Dahlsten, Elias; Korkeala, Hannu; Lindström, Miia

    2014-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin, produced mainly by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum, is the most poisonous biological substance known. Here, we show that CodY, a global regulator conserved in low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria, positively regulates the botulinum neurotoxin gene expression. Inactivation of codY resulted in decreased expression of botA, encoding the neurotoxin, as well as in reduced neurotoxin synthesis. Complementation of the codY mutation in trans rescued neurotoxin synthesis, and overexpression of codY in trans caused elevated neurotoxin production. Recombinant CodY was found to bind to a 30-bp region containing the botA transcription start site, suggesting regulation of the neurotoxin gene transcription through direct interaction. GTP enhanced the binding affinity of CodY to the botA promoter, suggesting that CodY-dependent neurotoxin regulation is associated with nutritional status.

  8. COD::CIF::Parser: an error-correcting CIF parser for the Perl language

    PubMed Central

    Merkys, Andrius; Vaitkus, Antanas; Butkus, Justas; Okulič-Kazarinas, Mykolas; Kairys, Visvaldas; Gražulis, Saulius

    2016-01-01

    A syntax-correcting CIF parser, COD::CIF::Parser, is presented that can parse CIF 1.1 files and accurately report the position and the nature of the discovered syntactic problems. In addition, the parser is able to automatically fix the most common and the most obvious syntactic deficiencies of the input files. Bindings for Perl, C and Python programming environments are available. Based on COD::CIF::Parser, the cod-tools package for manipulating the CIFs in the Crystallography Open Database (COD) has been developed. The cod-tools package has been successfully used for continuous updates of the data in the automated COD data deposition pipeline, and to check the validity of COD data against the IUCr data validation guidelines. The performance, capabilities and applications of different parsers are compared. PMID:26937241

  9. Positive Regulation of Botulinum Neurotoxin Gene Expression by CodY in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Dahlsten, Elias; Korkeala, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin, produced mainly by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum, is the most poisonous biological substance known. Here, we show that CodY, a global regulator conserved in low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria, positively regulates the botulinum neurotoxin gene expression. Inactivation of codY resulted in decreased expression of botA, encoding the neurotoxin, as well as in reduced neurotoxin synthesis. Complementation of the codY mutation in trans rescued neurotoxin synthesis, and overexpression of codY in trans caused elevated neurotoxin production. Recombinant CodY was found to bind to a 30-bp region containing the botA transcription start site, suggesting regulation of the neurotoxin gene transcription through direct interaction. GTP enhanced the binding affinity of CodY to the botA promoter, suggesting that CodY-dependent neurotoxin regulation is associated with nutritional status. PMID:25281376

  10. Innovation Abstracts; Volume XIV, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, Suanne D., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This series of 30 one- to two-page abstracts covering 1992 highlights a variety of innovative approaches to teaching and learning in the community college. Topics covered in the abstracts include: (1) faculty recognition and orientation; (2) the Amado M. Pena, Jr., Scholarship Program; (3) innovative teaching techniques, with individual abstracts…

  11. Innovation Abstracts, Volume XV, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, Suanne D., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This volume of 30 one- to two-page abstracts from 1993 highlights a variety of innovative approaches to teaching and learning in the community college. Topics covered in the abstracts include: (1) role-playing to encourage critical thinking; (2) team learning techniques to cultivate business skills; (3) librarian-instructor partnerships to create…

  12. Leadership Abstracts; Volume 4, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doucette, Don, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    "Leadership Abstracts" is published bimonthly and distributed to the chief executive officer of every two-year college in the United States and Canada. This document consists of the 15 one-page abstracts published in 1991. Addressing a variety of topics of interest to the community college administrators, this volume includes: (1) "Delivering the…

  13. Student Success with Abstract Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamidou, Kristine

    2009-01-01

    An abstract art project can be challenging or not, depending on the objectives the teacher sets up. In this article, the author describes an abstract papier-mache project that is a success for all students, and is a versatile project easily manipulated to suit the classroom of any art teacher.

  14. Abstraction in perceptual symbol systems.

    PubMed Central

    Barsalou, Lawrence W

    2003-01-01

    After reviewing six senses of abstraction, this article focuses on abstractions that take the form of summary representations. Three central properties of these abstractions are established: ( i ) type-token interpretation; (ii) structured representation; and (iii) dynamic realization. Traditional theories of representation handle interpretation and structure well but are not sufficiently dynamical. Conversely, connectionist theories are exquisitely dynamic but have problems with structure. Perceptual symbol systems offer an approach that implements all three properties naturally. Within this framework, a loose collection of property and relation simulators develops to represent abstractions. Type-token interpretation results from binding a property simulator to a region of a perceived or simulated category member. Structured representation results from binding a configuration of property and relation simulators to multiple regions in an integrated manner. Dynamic realization results from applying different subsets of property and relation simulators to category members on different occasions. From this standpoint, there are no permanent or complete abstractions of a category in memory. Instead, abstraction is the skill to construct temporary online interpretations of a category's members. Although an infinite number of abstractions are possible, attractors develop for habitual approaches to interpretation. This approach provides new ways of thinking about abstraction phenomena in categorization, inference, background knowledge and learning. PMID:12903648

  15. Food Science and Technology Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Elinor; Federman, Joan

    1979-01-01

    Introduces the reader to the Food Science and Technology Abstracts, a data file that covers worldwide literature on human food commodities and aspects of food processing. Topics include scope, subject index, thesaurus, searching online, and abstracts; tables provide a comparison of ORBIT and DIALOG versions of the file. (JD)

  16. South Atlantic interbasin exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rintoul, Stephen Rich

    1991-01-01

    The exchange of mass and heat between the South Atlantic and the neighboring ocean basins was estimated using hydrographic data and inverse methods, in order to gain information on the links between the deep-water formation processes occurring within the Atlantic and the global thermohaline circulation. Results demonstrate that the global thermohaline cell associated with the formation and export of North Atlantic deep water (NADW) is closed primarily by a 'cold water path' in which deep water leaving the Atlantic ultimately returns as intermediate water entering the basin through Drake Passage. This conclusion conflicts with the suggestion by Gordon (1986) that the global thermohaline circulation associated with the formation of NADW is closed primarily by a 'warm water path', in which the export of NADW is compensated by an inflow of warm Indian Ocean thermocline water south of Africa.

  17. Tectonics of Atlantic Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, H.; Dehler, S.A.; Grant, A.C.; Oakey, G.N.

    1999-01-01

    The tectonic history of Atlantic Canada is summarized according to a model of multiple ocean opening-closing cycles. The modern North Atlantic Ocean is in the opening phase of its cycle. It was preceded by an early Paleozoic lapetus Ocean whose cycle led to formation of the Appalachian Orogen. lapetus was preceded by the Neoproterozoic Uranus Ocean whose cycle led to formation of the Grenville Orogen. The phenomenon of coincident, or almost coincident orogens and modern continental margins that relate to repeated ocean opening-closing cycles is called the Accordion Effect. An understanding of the North Atlantic Ocean and its continental margins provides insights into the nature of lapetus and the evolution of the Appalachian Orogen. Likewise, an understanding of lapetus and the Appalachian Orogen raises questions about Uranus and the development of the Grenville Orogen. Modern tectonic patterns in the North Atlantic may have been determined by events that began before 1000 m.y.

  18. Technical abstracts: Mechanical engineering, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Broesius, J.Y.

    1991-03-01

    This document is a compilation of the published, unclassified abstracts produced by mechanical engineers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during the calendar year 1990. Many abstracts summarize work completed and published in report form. These are UCRL-JC series documents, which include the full text of articles to be published in journals and of papers to be presented at meetings, and UCID reports, which are informal documents. Not all UCIDs contain abstracts: short summaries were generated when abstracts were not included. Technical Abstracts also provides descriptions of those documents assigned to the UCRL-MI (miscellaneous) category. These are generally viewgraphs or photographs presented at meetings. An author index is provided at the back of this volume for cross referencing.

  19. Metaphor: Bridging embodiment to abstraction.

    PubMed

    Jamrozik, Anja; McQuire, Marguerite; Cardillo, Eileen R; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2016-08-01

    Embodied cognition accounts posit that concepts are grounded in our sensory and motor systems. An important challenge for these accounts is explaining how abstract concepts, which do not directly call upon sensory or motor information, can be informed by experience. We propose that metaphor is one important vehicle guiding the development and use of abstract concepts. Metaphors allow us to draw on concrete, familiar domains to acquire and reason about abstract concepts. Additionally, repeated metaphoric use drawing on particular aspects of concrete experience can result in the development of new abstract representations. These abstractions, which are derived from embodied experience but lack much of the sensorimotor information associated with it, can then be flexibly applied to understand new situations. PMID:27294425

  20. Abstracts.

    PubMed

    Gandelman, Kuan; Lamson, Michael; Bramson, Candace; Matschke, Kyle; Salageanu, Joanne; Malhotra, Bimal

    2015-09-01

    ALO-02 capsules (ALO-02) contain pellets that consist of extended-release oxycodone that surrounds sequestered naltrexone. The primary objective was to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) of oxycodone following single- and multiple-dose oral administration of ALO-02 40 mg BID in healthy volunteers. Secondary objectives were to characterize (1) the PK of oxycodone following single- and multiple-dose administration of a comparator OxyContin (OXY-ER) 40 mg BID as well as an alternate regimen of ALO-02 80 mg QD, and (2) the safety and tolerability assessments. Healthy volunteers received three treatments on a background of oral naltrexone (50 mg). Noncompartmental PK parameters were calculated for oxycodone. All 12 subjects were male with a mean age (SD, range) of 44.6 years (7.6, 25-55). Single-dose PK results for ALO-02 indicate that median peak plasma oxycodone concentrations were reached by 12 hours compared to 4 hours for OXY-ER. Compared to OXY-ER, mean dose-normalized, single-dose Cmax values were approximately 27% and 23% lower for ALO-02 40 mg BID and ALO-02 80 mg QD treatments, respectively. Following multiple doses all treatments reached steady state by 3 days. At steady state, oxycodone peak-to-trough fluctuation was significantly lower for ALO-02 BID versus OXY-ER. Adverse events were consistent with opioid therapy. ALO-02 40 mg BID treatment provided a PK profile appropriate for around-the-clock treatment of chronic pain. PMID:27137145

  1. Transcriptomic analysis and biomarkers (Rag1 and Igμ) for probing the immune system development in Pacific cod, Gadus macrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ming-Guang; Li, Xing; Perálvarez-Marín, Alejandro; Jiang, Jie-Lan; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Wen, Shi-Hui; Lü, Hui-Qian

    2015-06-01

    Mortality (>90%) is a big concern in larval rearing facilities of Pacific cod, Gadus macrocephalus, limiting its culture presently still in the experimental stages. Understanding the immune system development of G. macrocephalus is crucial to optimize the aquaculture of this species, to improve the use of economic resources and to avoid abuse of antibiotics. For the transcriptome analysis, using an Illumina sequencing platform, 61,775,698 raw reads were acquired. After a de novo assembly, 77,561 unigenes were obtained. We have classified functionally these transcripts by Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). 27 genes mainly related to hematopoietic or lymphoid organ development and somatic diversification of immune receptors have been reported for the first time in Pacific cod, and 14 Ig heavy chain (μ chain) locuses were assembled using Trinity. Based on our previous achievement, we have chosen Rag1 and Igμ as immune system development biomarkers. Full length cDNA of Rag1 and Igμ as biomarkers were obtained respectively using RACE PCR. Concerning Rag1, the deduced amino acid of Rag1 and protein immunodetection revealed a Rag1 isoform of 69 kDa, significantly different from other fish orthologs, such as Oncorhynchus mykiss (121 kDa). Phylogenetic analysis reveals a unique immune system for the Gadus genre, not exclusive for Atlantic cod, among vertebrates. Meanwhile, full length cDNA of Igμ included an ORF of 1710 bp and the deduced amino acid was composed of a leader peptide, a variable domain, CH1, CH2, Hinge, CH3, CH4 and C-terminus, which was in accordance with most teleost. Absolute quantification PCR revealed that significant expression of Rag1 appeared earlier than Igμ, 61 and 95 dph compared to 95 dph, respectively. Here we report the first transcriptomic analysis of G. macrocephalus as the starting point for genetic research on immune system development towards improving the Pacific cod aquaculture.

  2. NASA Patent Abstracts bibliography: A continuing bibliography. Section 1: Abstracts (supplement 21) Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Abstracts are cited for 87 patents and applications introduced into the NASA scientific and technical information system during the period of January 1982 through June 1982. Each entry consists of a citation, an abstract, and in mose cases, a key illustration selected from the patent or patent application.

  3. Standardization of BOD₅/COD ratio as a biological stability index for MSW.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Raffaello; Lai, Tiziana; Sandon, Annalisa

    2012-08-01

    The control of biodegradable substances is the key issue in evaluating the short and long-term emission potential and environmental impact of a landfill. Aerobic and anaerobic indices, such as respirometric index (RI) and biomethane potential production (GB21), can be used in the estimation of the stability of solid waste samples. Previous studies showed different degrees of relationship between BOD₅/COD ratio compared with RI4. Aim of this study is to standardize the parameter BOD₅/COD ratio and to test the methodology under different operating conditions (dynamic or static leaching and leaching duration, 6 and 24-h) keeping constant temperature and liquid/solid ratio (L/S=10 l/kg(TS)), with the introduction of a COD fractioning method. The COD fractioning is based on the differentiation between the soluble fraction (COD(sol)) and the colloidal fraction (COD(coll)) using a flocculation method. The BOD₅/COD and the BOD₅/COD(sol) indices are both consistent and significant and can be used as stability indices. The BOD₅/COD ratio does not seem to be influenced, for the same test duration, by the type of test, static or dynamic. In the same way the longer test duration (24-h) does not influence significantly the values of BOD₅/COD ratio. As a consequence a leaching test duration of 6-h is preferable to avoid the beginning of the hydrolysis and oxidation processes. PMID:22549125

  4. Improved COD Measurements for Organic Content in Flowback Water with High Chloride Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Isabel; Park, Ho Il; Lin, Lian-Shin

    2016-03-01

    An improved method was used to determine chemical oxygen demand (COD) as a measure of organic content in water samples containing high chloride content. A contour plot of COD percent error in the Cl(-)-Cl(-):COD domain showed that COD errors increased with Cl(-):COD. Substantial errors (>10%) could occur in low Cl(-):COD regions (<300) for samples with low (<10 g/L) and high chloride concentrations (>25 g/L). Applying the method to flowback water samples resulted in COD concentrations ranging in 130 to 1060 mg/L, which were substantially lower than the previously reported values for flowback water samples from Marcellus Shale (228 to 21 900 mg/L). It is likely that overestimations of COD in the previous studies occurred as result of chloride interferences. Pretreatment with mercuric sulfate, and use of a low-strength digestion solution, and the contour plot to correct COD measurements are feasible steps to significantly improve the accuracy of COD measurements. PMID:26931531

  5. Improved COD Measurements for Organic Content in Flowback Water with High Chloride Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Isabel; Park, Ho Il; Lin, Lian-Shin

    2016-03-01

    An improved method was used to determine chemical oxygen demand (COD) as a measure of organic content in water samples containing high chloride content. A contour plot of COD percent error in the Cl(-)-Cl(-):COD domain showed that COD errors increased with Cl(-):COD. Substantial errors (>10%) could occur in low Cl(-):COD regions (<300) for samples with low (<10 g/L) and high chloride concentrations (>25 g/L). Applying the method to flowback water samples resulted in COD concentrations ranging in 130 to 1060 mg/L, which were substantially lower than the previously reported values for flowback water samples from Marcellus Shale (228 to 21 900 mg/L). It is likely that overestimations of COD in the previous studies occurred as result of chloride interferences. Pretreatment with mercuric sulfate, and use of a low-strength digestion solution, and the contour plot to correct COD measurements are feasible steps to significantly improve the accuracy of COD measurements.

  6. Standardization of BOD₅/COD ratio as a biological stability index for MSW.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Raffaello; Lai, Tiziana; Sandon, Annalisa

    2012-08-01

    The control of biodegradable substances is the key issue in evaluating the short and long-term emission potential and environmental impact of a landfill. Aerobic and anaerobic indices, such as respirometric index (RI) and biomethane potential production (GB21), can be used in the estimation of the stability of solid waste samples. Previous studies showed different degrees of relationship between BOD₅/COD ratio compared with RI4. Aim of this study is to standardize the parameter BOD₅/COD ratio and to test the methodology under different operating conditions (dynamic or static leaching and leaching duration, 6 and 24-h) keeping constant temperature and liquid/solid ratio (L/S=10 l/kg(TS)), with the introduction of a COD fractioning method. The COD fractioning is based on the differentiation between the soluble fraction (COD(sol)) and the colloidal fraction (COD(coll)) using a flocculation method. The BOD₅/COD and the BOD₅/COD(sol) indices are both consistent and significant and can be used as stability indices. The BOD₅/COD ratio does not seem to be influenced, for the same test duration, by the type of test, static or dynamic. In the same way the longer test duration (24-h) does not influence significantly the values of BOD₅/COD ratio. As a consequence a leaching test duration of 6-h is preferable to avoid the beginning of the hydrolysis and oxidation processes.

  7. North Atlantic Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, R.; Bryan, K.; Schott, F.

    The intensity of the North Atlantic winddriven and thermohaline circulation and the close proximity of many oceanographic installations make the North Atlantic a particularly favored region of the world ocean from the standpoint of research in ocean circulation. Recent increases in available data and advances in numerical modeling techniques served as the impetus to convene a joint workshop of modelers and observers working on the North Atlantic with the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR) Working Group (WG) 68 (“North Atlantic Circulation”). Goals of the workshop were to provide an update on data sets and models and to discuss the poleward heat flux problem and possible monitoring strategies. The joint Workshop/SCOR WG-68 meeting was convened by F. Schott (chairman of the working group; Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, Miami, Fla.), K. Bryan (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/ Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (NOAA/GFDL)), and R. Molinari (NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (NOAA/AOML)).

  8. Atlantic Telehealth Knowledge Exchange.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Patricia; Hagerman, Valerie; Ingram, Chris-Anne; MacFarlane, Ron; McCourt, Sherry

    2004-01-01

    Atlantic Canada has some of the earliest, most comprehensive, well-established networks, and innovative applications for telehealth in the country. The region offers a range of models for telehealth, in terms of management structure, coordination, funding, equipment, utilization, and telehealth applications. Collectively, this diversity, experience, and wealth of knowledge can significantly contribute to the development of a knowledge base for excellence in telehealth services. There is no formal process in place for the sharing of information amongst the provinces. Information sharing primarily occurs informally through professional contacts and participation in telehealth organizations. A core group of organizations partnered to develop a process for knowledge exchange to occur. This type of collaborative approach is favored in Atlantic Canada, given the region's economy and available resources. The Atlantic Telehealth Knowledge Exchange (ATKE) project centred on the development of a collaborative structure, information sharing and dissemination, development of a knowledge repository and sustainability. The project is viewed as a first step in assisting telehealth stakeholders with sharing knowledge about telehealth in Atlantic Canada. Significant progress has been made throughout the project in increasing the profile of telehealth in Atlantic Canada. The research process has captured and synthesized baseline information on telehealth, and fostered collaboration amongst telehealth providers who might otherwise have never come together. It has also brought critical awareness to the discussion tables of governments and key committees regarding the value of telehealth in sustaining our health system, and has motivated decision makers to take action to integrate telehealth into e-health discussions.

  9. Restoring nitrification and COD removal at a refinery in the Southwest

    SciTech Connect

    Dyke, P.M.; Lucas, G.F.; Christiansen, J.A.; Smith, C.R.

    1995-12-31

    During the month of April 1993, a Southwest Texas refinery experienced a loss of nitrification and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal capacity in their activated sludge system following several consecutive days of high COD loadings. This resulted in excessive effluent ammonia (NH{sup 3}) and COD levels approaching permit levels. International Biochemical Group-Microbe Masters (Microbe Masters) was brought into the plant at the end of April to assess the situation and provide recommendations to quickly restore nitrification and COD removal. The bioaugmentation program employed at this refinery achieved the following results: (1) restoration of complete nitrification in thirteen days; (2) a 17% increase in COD removal efficiency; and (3) improved plant/operator knowledge of biological system health and performance critical to maintaining optimum BOD, COD and NH{sub 3} removal.

  10. The CodY pleiotropic repressor controls virulence in gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Stenz, Ludwig; Francois, Patrice; Whiteson, Katrine; Wolz, Christiane; Linder, Patrick; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2011-07-01

    CodY is involved in the adaptive response to starvation in at least 30 different low G+C gram-positive bacteria. After dimerization and activation by cofactor binding, CodY binds to a consensus palindromic DNA sequence, leading to the repression of approximately 5% of the genome. CodY represses the transcription of target genes when bound to DNA by competition with the RNA polymerase for promoter binding, or by interference with transcriptional elongation as a roadblock. CodY displays enhanced affinity for its DNA target when bound to GTP and/or branched chain amino acids (BCAA). When nutrients become limiting in the postexponential growth phase, a decrease of intracellular levels of GTP and BCAA causes a deactivation of CodY and decreases its affinity for DNA, leading to the induction of its regulon. CodY-regulated genes trigger adaptation of the bacteria to starvation by highly diverse mechanisms, such as secretion of proteases coupled to expression of amino acid transporters, and promotion of survival strategies like sporulation or biofilm formation. Additionally, in pathogenic bacteria, several virulence factors are regulated by CodY. As a function of their access to nutrients, pathogenic gram-positive bacteria express virulence factors in a codY-dependant manner. This is true for the anthrax toxins of Bacillus anthracis and the haemolysins of Staphylococcus aureus. The purpose of this review is to illustrate CodY-regulated mechanisms on virulence in major gram-positive pathogens.

  11. Intense Habitat-Specific Fisheries-Induced Selection at the Molecular Pan I Locus Predicts Imminent Collapse of a Major Cod Fishery

    PubMed Central

    Árnason, Einar; Hernandez, Ubaldo Benitez; Kristinsson, Kristján

    2009-01-01

    Predation is a powerful agent in the ecology and evolution of predator and prey. Prey may select multiple habitats whereby different genotypes prefer different habitats. If the predator is also habitat-specific the prey may evolve different habitat occupancy. Drastic changes can occur in the relation of the predator to the evolved prey. Fisheries exert powerful predation and can be a potent evolutionary force. Fisheries-induced selection can lead to phenotypic changes that influence the collapse and recovery of the fishery. However, heritability of the phenotypic traits involved and selection intensities are low suggesting that fisheries-induced evolution occurs at moderate rates at decadal time scales. The Pantophysin I (Pan I) locus in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), representing an ancient balanced polymorphism predating the split of cod and its sister species, is under an unusual mix of balancing and directional selection including current selective sweeps. Here we show that Pan I alleles are highly correlated with depth with a gradient of 0.44% allele frequency change per meter. AA fish are shallow-water and BB deep-water adapted in accordance with behavioral studies using data storage tags showing habitat selection by Pan I genotype. AB fish are somewhat intermediate although closer to AA. Furthermore, using a sampling design covering space and time we detect intense habitat-specific fisheries-induced selection against the shallow-water adapted fish with an average 8% allele frequency change per year within year class. Genotypic fitness estimates (0.08, 0.27, 1.00 of AA, AB, and BB respectively) predict rapid disappearance of shallow-water adapted fish. Ecological and evolutionary time scales, therefore, are congruent. We hypothesize a potential collapse of the fishery. We find that probabilistic maturation reaction norms for Atlantic cod at Iceland show declining length and age at maturing comparable to changes that preceded the collapse of northern cod at

  12. Effect of high pressure on cod (Gadus morhua) desalting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, Ângelo C.; Saraiva, Jorge A.; Fidalgo, Liliana G.; Delgadillo, Ivonne

    2013-06-01

    The effect of high pressure on salt and water diffusion in the desalting process of cod was studied. Under pressure, up to 300 MPa, the osmotic equilibrium is reached much faster, compared to desalting at atmospheric pressure. Water (D ew) and salt (D es) effective diffusion coefficients reached a maximum at 200 MPa, increasing 500- and 160-fold, respectively, compared with desalting at atmospheric pressure. Increasing pressure up to 300 MPa causes a reduction in both effective diffusion coefficients, although they were still about 70-fold higher than at atmospheric pressure. Up to 200 MPa, a linear correlation was found between D ew and D es and pressure. However, the total diffused amounts of water and salt, when the osmotic equilibrium was reached, were lower under pressure. At atmospheric pressure cod water content increased 1.65-fold, but under pressure the increment was on average 1.25-fold, while salt content decreased to 0.51-fold the initial value at atmospheric pressure and to around 0.75-fold under pressure.

  13. Modelling Metamorphism by Abstract Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Preda, Mila; Giacobazzi, Roberto; Debray, Saumya; Coogan, Kevin; Townsend, Gregg M.

    Metamorphic malware apply semantics-preserving transformations to their own code in order to foil detection systems based on signature matching. In this paper we consider the problem of automatically extract metamorphic signatures from these malware. We introduce a semantics for self-modifying code, later called phase semantics, and prove its correctness by showing that it is an abstract interpretation of the standard trace semantics. Phase semantics precisely models the metamorphic code behavior by providing a set of traces of programs which correspond to the possible evolutions of the metamorphic code during execution. We show that metamorphic signatures can be automatically extracted by abstract interpretation of the phase semantics, and that regular metamorphism can be modelled as finite state automata abstraction of the phase semantics.

  14. (abstract) Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard

    1994-01-01

    AES is a low-cost analog of the TES downlooking modes. Because AES operates at ambient temperature, limb-viewing is not possible. The first flight of AES took place in April 1994 on the NASA P3B aircraft out of Wallops Island, VA. While planned as an engineering test flight, spectra were successfully acquired both over the Atlantic Ocean and the area of the Great Dismal Swamp on the Virginia-North Carolina border. At this writing (July 1994), a second series of flights on the NASA DC8 aircraft out of Ames RC,CA is in progress. By the time of the workshop, a third series using the NASA C130 should have been accomplished.

  15. Abstraction and natural language semantics.

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    According to the traditional view, a word prototypically denotes a class of objects sharing similar features, i.e. it results from an abstraction based on the detection of common properties in perceived entities. I explore here another idea: words result from abstraction of common premises in the rules governing our actions. I first argue that taking 'inference', instead of 'reference', as the basic issue in semantics does matter. I then discuss two phenomena that are, in my opinion, particularly difficult to analyse within the scope of traditional semantic theories: systematic polysemy and plurals. I conclude by a discussion of my approach, and by a summary of its main features. PMID:12903662

  16. Abstract communication for coordinated planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Bradley J.; Durfee, Edmund H.

    2003-01-01

    work offers evidence that distributed planning agents can greatly reduce communication costs by reasoning at abstract levels. While it is intuitive that improved search can reduce communication in such cases, there are other decisions about how to communicate plan information that greatly affect communication costs. This paper identifies cases independent of search where communicating at multiple levels of abstraction can exponentially decrease costs and where it can exponentially add costs. We conclude with a process for determining appropriate levels of communication based on characteristics of the domain.

  17. Invasion of the red seaweed Heterosiphonia japonica spans biogeographic provinces in the Western North Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Newton, Christine; Bracken, Matthew E S; McConville, Megan; Rodrigue, Katherine; Thornber, Carol S

    2013-01-01

    The recent invasion of the red alga Heterosiphonia japonica in the western North Atlantic Ocean has provided a unique opportunity to study invasion dynamics across a biogeographical barrier. Native to the western North Pacific Ocean, initial collections in 2007 and 2009 restricted the western North Atlantic range of this invader to Rhode Island, USA. However, through subtidal community surveys, we document the presence of Heterosiphonia in coastal waters from Maine to New York, USA, a distance of more than 700 km. This geographical distribution spans a well-known biogeographical barrier at Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Despite significant differences in subtidal community structure north and south of Cape Cod, Heterosiphonia was found at all but two sites surveyed in both biogeographic provinces, suggesting that this invader is capable of rapid expansion over broad geographic ranges. Across all sites surveyed, Heterosiphonia comprised 14% of the subtidal benthic community. However, average abundances of nearly 80% were found at some locations. As a drifting macrophyte, Heterosiphonia was found as intertidal wrack in abundances of up to 65% of the biomass washed up along beaches surveyed. Our surveys suggest that the high abundance of Heterosiphonia has already led to marked changes in subtidal community structure; we found significantly lower species richness in recipient communities with higher Heterosiphona abundances. Based on temperature and salinity tolerances of the European populations, we believe Heterosiphonia has the potential to invade and alter subtidal communities from Florida to Newfoundland in the western North Atlantic.

  18. CodY Deletion Enhances In Vivo Virulence of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clone USA300

    PubMed Central

    Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Roux, Agnès; Ebine, Kazumi; Sonenshein, Abraham L.; Daum, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus global regulator CodY responds to nutrient availability by controlling the expression of target genes. In vitro, CodY represses the transcription of virulence genes, but it is not known if CodY also represses virulence in vivo. The dominant community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) clone, USA300, is hypervirulent and has increased transcription of global regulators and virulence genes; these features are reminiscent of a strain defective in CodY. Sequence analysis revealed, however, that the codY genes of USA300 and other sequenced S. aureus isolates are not significantly different from the codY genes in strains known to have active CodY. codY was expressed in USA300, as well as in other pulsotypes assessed. Deletion of codY from a USA300 clinical isolate resulted in modestly increased expression of the global regulators agr and saeRS, as well as the gene encoding the toxin alpha-hemolysin (hla). A substantial increase (>30-fold) in expression of the lukF-PV gene, encoding part of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), was observed in the codY mutant. All of these expression differences were reversed by complementation with a functional codY gene. Moreover, purified CodY protein bound upstream of the lukSF-PV operon, indicating that CodY directly represses expression of lukSF-PV. Deletion of codY increased the virulence of USA300 in necrotizing pneumonia and skin infection. Interestingly, deletion of lukSF-PV from the codY mutant did not attenuate virulence, indicating that the hypervirulence of the codY mutant was not explained by overexpression of PVL. These results demonstrate that CodY is active in USA300 and that CodY-mediated repression restrains the virulence of USA300. PMID:22526672

  19. Handedness Shapes Children's Abstract Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casasanto, Daniel; Henetz, Tania

    2012-01-01

    Can children's handedness influence how they represent abstract concepts like "kindness" and "intelligence"? Here we show that from an early age, right-handers associate rightward space more strongly with positive ideas and leftward space with negative ideas, but the opposite is true for left-handers. In one experiment, children indicated where on…

  20. Rolloff Roof Observatory Construction (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulowetz, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) Lessons learned about building an observatory by someone with limited construction experience, and the advantages of having one for imaging and variable star studies. Sample results shown of composite light curves for cataclysmic variables UX UMa and V1101 Aql with data from my observatory combined with data from others around the world.

  1. Innovation Abstracts, Volume XX, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, Suanne D., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    The 52 abstracts in these 29 serial issues describe innovative approaches to teaching and learning in the community college. Sample topics include reading motivation, barriers to academic success, the learning environment, writing skills, leadership in the criminal justice profession, role-playing strategies, cooperative education, distance…

  2. ERGONOMICS ABSTRACTS 48347-48982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Technology, London (England). Warren Spring Lab.

    IN THIS COLLECTION OF ERGONOMICS ABSTRACTS AND ANNOTATIONS THE FOLLOWING AREAS OF CONCERN ARE REPRESENTED--GENERAL REFERENCES, METHODS, FACILITIES, AND EQUIPMENT RELATING TO ERGONOMICS, SYSTEMS OF MAN AND MACHINES, VISUAL, AUDITORY, AND OTHER SENSORY INPUTS AND PROCESSES (INCLUDING SPEECH AND INTELLIGIBILITY), INPUT CHANNELS, BODY MEASUREMENTS,…

  3. Does "Social Work Abstracts" Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Gary; Barker, Kathleen; Covert-Vail, Lucinda; Rosenberg, Gary; Cohen, Stephanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The current study seeks to provide estimates of the adequacy of journal coverage in the Social Work Abstracts (SWA) database. Method: A total of 23 journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports social work category during the 1997 to 2005 period were selected for study. Issue-level coverage estimates were obtained for SWA and…

  4. Abstract Expressionism. Clip and Save.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Provides information on the art movement, Abstract Expressionism, and includes learning activities. Focuses on the artist Jackson Pollock, offering a reproduction of his artwork, "Convergence: Number 10." Includes background information on the life and career of Pollock and a description of the included artwork. (CMK)

  5. Conference Abstracts: Microcomputers in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, William E.

    1985-01-01

    Provides abstracts of five papers presented at the Fourth Annual Microcomputers in Education Conference. Papers considered microcomputers in science laboratories, Apple II Plus/e computer-assisted instruction in chemistry, computer solutions for space mechanics concerns, computer applications to problem solving and hypothesis testing, and…

  6. Metaphoric Images from Abstract Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vizmuller-Zocco, Jana

    1992-01-01

    Discusses children's use of metaphors to create meaning, using as an example the pragmatic and "scientific" ways in which preschool children explain thunder and lightning to themselves. Argues that children are being shortchanged by modern scientific notions of abstractness and that they should be encouraged to create their own explanations of…

  7. What Is It? Elementary Abstraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Sossan, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Abstraction can be hard for older students to understand, and it usually involves simplifying or rearranging natural objects to meet the needs of the artist, whether it be for organization or expression. But, in reality, that is what young artists do when they draw from life. They do not have enough experience--and sometimes the patience--to see…

  8. [Effect of economic structure adjustment on pollution emission: a case study of COD].

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-Sheng; Zhou, Lei; Chen, Yuan-Hang; Li, Qian; Zhang, Jian-Hui

    2014-08-01

    Economic structure adjustment is an important means to reduce the emissions of pollutants. For quantitative analysis of the effect of economic structure adjustment on the reduction of pollution emission, the country was divided into four sub-regions, eastern, northeastern, central and western, and the industry was divided into 39 sectors. Taking chemical oxygen demand (COD) as an example, the influences of regional structure and industry structure adjustment on total emission reduction and emission intensity were analyzed through building a model. The results showed that, in 2000-2010: (1) COD emissions in China were reduced from 1 445 x 10(4) t to 1 238 x 10(4) t, with a total emission of 14 950 x 10(4) t in 11 years, among which the emissions from eastern area occupied the largest proportion, accounting for 35.6%. (2) In the industrial COD emissions, emission from paper and paper products was the largest, accounting for 35.8% of the industrial COD emissions. (3) The economic structure changes in the four areas reduced the COD emissions by 420 x 10(4) t, resulting in a decrease of 1.29% in COD emission intensity. (4) Industrial internal structure changes reduced the COD emissions by 533 x 10(4) t, leading to a decrease of 3.1% in COD emission intensity. The research results have certain reference value in guiding the Chinese economic structure adjustment and achieving the targets of energy-saving and emission reduction.

  9. Preparation, characterization, and in vitro cytotoxicity of COM and COD crystals with various sizes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Ouyang, Jian-Ming; Liu, Ai-Jie; Ding, Yi-Ming; Gan, Qiong-Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Calcium oxalate crystals in urine often differ in size and crystal phase between healthy humans and patients with kidney stones. In this work, calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) with sizes of about 50 nm, 100 nm, 1 μm, 3 μm, and 10 μm were prepared by varying reactant concentration, reaction temperature, solvent, mixing manner, and stirring speed. These crystals mainly had a smooth surface and no obvious pore structure, except COM-1 μm. In cell culture medium, the zeta potential of crystals became increasingly negative with increasing size, and the absolute value of zeta potential of COD was greater than the same-sized COM. Results of cell viability and PI staining assays showed that the order of injury degree in African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells caused by different sizes of COD was COD-50 nm>COD-100 nm>COD-1 μm>COD-3 μm>COD-10 μm, and that of different sizes of COM was COM-1 μm>COM-50~COM-100 nm>COM-3 μm>COM-10 μm. COM-1 μm presented the highest cytotoxicity in Vero cells, which was associated with its rougher surface, larger specific surface area (SBET), and larger pore volume. Overall, these findings indicated that the physical properties of crystals play an important role in their cytotoxicity.

  10. Sorption of chlorobenzenes to cape cod aquifer sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, L.B.

    1994-01-01

    Sorption of tetra- and pentachlorobenzene by sediment from a glacial outwash aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, was evaluated. Particle size and mineralogical fractions (separated based on paramagnetic susceptibility) were characterized with respect to sediment organic carbon (SOC), mineralogy, surface area, metal oxide coatings, and spatial variability. SOC increases by a factor of 10 as particle size decreases from 500-1000 to ?? 25 % in the <63-??m fraction, and SOC is preferentially associated with the magnetic minerals. Sorption increases with decreasing particle size (increasing SOC, magnetic minerals, surface area, and metal oxyhydroxides), and the magnetic mineral fraction has greater sorption than the bulk or nonmagnetic fractions. Removal of SOC decreases sorption proportional to the decrease in SOC and results in a nonlinear isotherm.

  11. Object Classification via Planar Abstraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oesau, Sven; Lafarge, Florent; Alliez, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    We present a supervised machine learning approach for classification of objects from sampled point data. The main idea consists in first abstracting the input object into planar parts at several scales, then discriminate between the different classes of objects solely through features derived from these planar shapes. Abstracting into planar shapes provides a means to both reduce the computational complexity and improve robustness to defects inherent to the acquisition process. Measuring statistical properties and relationships between planar shapes offers invariance to scale and orientation. A random forest is then used for solving the multiclass classification problem. We demonstrate the potential of our approach on a set of indoor objects from the Princeton shape benchmark and on objects acquired from indoor scenes and compare the performance of our method with other point-based shape descriptors.

  12. Abstraction of Seepage into Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    WILSON,MICHAEL L.; HO,CLIFFORD K.

    2000-10-16

    The abstraction model used for seepage into emplacement drifts in recent TSPA simulations has been presented. This model contributes to the calculation of the quantity of water that might contact waste if it is emplaced at Yucca Mountain. Other important components of that calculation not discussed here include models for climate, infiltration, unsaturated-zone flow, and thermohydrology; drip-shield and waste-package degradation; and flow around and through the drip shield and waste package. The seepage abstraction model is stochastic because predictions of seepage are necessarily quite uncertain. The model provides uncertainty distributions for seepage fraction fraction of waste-package locations flow rate as functions of percolation flux. In addition, effects of intermediate-scale flow with seepage and seep channeling are included by means of a flow-focusing factor, which is also represented by an uncertainty distribution.

  13. An Abstract Plan Preparation Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Munoz, Cesar A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a new planning language that is more abstract than most existing planning languages such as the Planning Domain Definition Language (PDDL) or the New Domain Description Language (NDDL). The goal of this language is to simplify the formal analysis and specification of planning problems that are intended for safety-critical applications such as power management or automated rendezvous in future manned spacecraft. The new language has been named the Abstract Plan Preparation Language (APPL). A translator from APPL to NDDL has been developed in support of the Spacecraft Autonomy for Vehicles and Habitats Project (SAVH) sponsored by the Explorations Technology Development Program, which is seeking to mature autonomy technology for application to the new Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) that will replace the Space Shuttle.

  14. Radiation dose descriptors: BERT, COD, DAP, and other strange creatures.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, Edward L; Lu, Zheng Feng; Dutta, Ajoy K; So, James C

    2008-01-01

    Over the years, a number of terms have been used to describe radiation dose. Eight common radiation dose descriptors include background equivalent radiation time (BERT), critical organ dose (COD), surface absorbed dose (SAD), dose area product (DAP), diagnostic acceptable reference level (DARLing), effective dose (ED), fetal absorbed dose (FAD), and total imparted energy (TIE). BERT is compared to the annual natural background radiation (about 3 mSv per year) and is easily understandable for the general public. COD refers to the radiation dose delivered to an individual critical organ. SAD is the radiation dose delivered at the skin surface. DAP is a product of the irradiated surface area multiplied by the radiation dose at the surface. DARLing is usually the radiation level that encompasses 75% (the third quartile) of the data derived from a nationwide or regional survey. DARLings are meant for voluntary guidance. Consistently higher patient doses should be investigated for possible equipment deficiencies or suboptimal protocols. ED is obtained by multiplying the radiation dose delivered to each organ by its weighting factor and then by adding those values to get the sum. It can be used to assess the risk of radiation-induced cancers and serious hereditary effects to future generations, regardless of the procedure being performed, and is the most useful radiation dose descriptor. FAD is the radiation dose delivered to the fetus, and TIE is the sum of the energy imparted to all irradiated tissue. Each of these descriptors is intended to relate radiation dose ultimately to potential biologic effects. To avoid confusion, the key is to avoid using the terms interchangeably. It is important to understand each of the radiation dose descriptors and their derivation in order to correctly evaluate radiation dose and to consult with patients concerned about the risks of radiation.

  15. Cryogenic foam insulation: Abstracted publications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. R.

    1977-01-01

    A group of documents were chosen and abstracted which contain information on the properties of foam materials and on the use of foams as thermal insulation at cryogenic temperatures. The properties include thermal properties, mechanical properties, and compatibility properties with oxygen and other cryogenic fluids. Uses of foams include applications as thermal insulation for spacecraft propellant tanks, and for liquefied natural gas storage tanks and pipelines.

  16. Long-term effects of the transient COD concentration on the performance of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Mateo, S; Gonzalez Del Campo, A; Lobato, J; Rodrigo, M; Cañizares, P; Fernandez-Morales, F J

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the long-term effects of transient chemical oxygen demands (COD) concentrations over the performance of a microbial fuel cell were studied. From the obtained results, it was observed that the repetitive change in the COD loading rate during 12 h conditioned the behavior of the system during periods of up to 7 days. The main modifications were the enhancement of the COD consumption rate and the exerted current. These enhancements yielded increasing Coulombic efficiencies (CEs) when working with COD concentrations of 300 mg/L, but constant CEs when working with COD concentrations from 900 to 1800 mg/L. This effect could be explained by the higher affinity for the substrate of Geobacter than that of the nonelectrogenic organisms such as Clostridia. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:883-890, 2016.

  17. Long-term effects of the transient COD concentration on the performance of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Mateo, S; Gonzalez Del Campo, A; Lobato, J; Rodrigo, M; Cañizares, P; Fernandez-Morales, F J

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the long-term effects of transient chemical oxygen demands (COD) concentrations over the performance of a microbial fuel cell were studied. From the obtained results, it was observed that the repetitive change in the COD loading rate during 12 h conditioned the behavior of the system during periods of up to 7 days. The main modifications were the enhancement of the COD consumption rate and the exerted current. These enhancements yielded increasing Coulombic efficiencies (CEs) when working with COD concentrations of 300 mg/L, but constant CEs when working with COD concentrations from 900 to 1800 mg/L. This effect could be explained by the higher affinity for the substrate of Geobacter than that of the nonelectrogenic organisms such as Clostridia. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:883-890, 2016. PMID:27072066

  18. 78 FR 34879 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Atlantic City Offshore Race, Atlantic Ocean...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... City Offshore Race, Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic City, NJ AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final... to only one recurring marine event, held on the Atlantic Ocean, offshore of Atlantic City, New Jersey... Atlantic Ocean near Atlantic City, New Jersey, during the event. DATES: This rule will be effective on...

  19. [Purification efficiency of several wetland macrophytes on COD and nitrogen removal from domestic sewage].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Donghai; Ren, Quanjin; Gao, Shixiang; Zhang, Hong; Yin, Daqiang; Wang, Liansheng

    2004-12-01

    In order to investigate the role of wetland macrophytes in waster water purification and to select appropriate native filter plants in constructed wetland, three vertical-flow constructed wetlands were built with river sands as the substrates of Acorus gramineus, Juncus effusus and Iris japonica, and one without plant as the control. Investigation on the removal of COD and total nitrogen (TN) from domestic sewage showed that within lower concentrations of COD (<200 mg x L(-1)) and TN (<30 mg x L(-1)), more than 90% of COD and 80% of TN were removed from domestic sewage in all constructed wetlands. When the concentration of COD and TN increased, the purification efficiency of all constructed wetlands decreased to some extent. The constructed wetlands with macrophytes had a higher efficiency than control. Among the three constructed wetlands with macrophytes, the one with Acorus gramineus had an average purification efficiency of 80.46% for COD and 77.77% for TN, that with Juncus effusus was 75.53% for COD and 71.17% for TN, and the one with Iris japonica was 70.50% for COD and 66.38% for TN. The constructed wetland without vegetation had an average purification efficiency of 61.39% for COD and 55.81% for TN. Acorus gramineus was more capable of removing COD and TN than Juncus effusus and Iris japonica. Vegetation biomass was the main factor affecting the removal rate of COD and nitrogen, because it significantly correlated with the ability of absorbing organic substance and nitrogen, and with the nitrification and denitrification around roots.

  20. [Influence of substrate COD on methane production in single-chambered microbial electrolysis cell].

    PubMed

    Teng, Wen-Kai; Liu, Guang-Li; Luo, Hai-Ping; Zhang, Ren-Duo; Fu, Shi-Yu

    2015-03-01

    The chemical oxygen demand (COD) of substrate can affect the microbial activity of both anode and cathode biofilm in the single-chamber methanogenic microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). In order to investigate the effect of COD on the performance of MEC, a single chamber MEC was constructed with biocathode. With the change of initial concentration of COD (700, 1 000 and 1 350 mg x L(-1)), the methane production rate, COD removal and energy efficiency in the MEC were examined under different applied voltages. The results showed that the methane production rate and COD removal increased with the increasing COD. With the applied voltage changing from 0.3 to 0.7 V, the methane production rate increased at the COD of 700 mg x L(-1), while it increased at first and then decreased at the COD of 1000 mg x L(-1) and 1350 mg x L(-1). A similar trend was observed for the COD removal. The cathode potential reached the minimum (- 0.694 ± 0.001) V as the applied voltage was 0.5 V, which therefore facilitated the growth of methanogenic bacteria and improved the methane production rate and energy efficiency of the MEC. The maximum energy income was 0.44 kJ ± 0.09 kJ (1450 kJ x m(-3)) in the MEC, which was obtained at the initial COD of 1000 mg x L(-1) and the applied voltage of 0.5 V. Methanogenic MECs could be used for the treatment of wastewaters containing low organic concentrations to achieve positive energy production, which might provide a new method to recover energy from low-strength domestic wastewater.

  1. 76 FR 12606 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 60...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 60 Feet (18.3 m) Length Overall Using... for Pacific cod by catcher vessels less than 60 feet (18.3 m) length overall (LOA) using jig or...

  2. Episodic Eolian Sand Deposition in the Past 4000 Years in Cape COD National Seashore, Massachusetts, USA in Response to Possible Hurricane/storm and Anthropogenic Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, Steven

    2015-02-01

    The eolian sand depositional record for a dune field within Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts is posit as a sensitive indicator of environmental disturbances in the late Holocene from a combination of factors such as hurricane/storm and forest fire occurrence, and anthropogenic activity. Stratigraphic and sedimentologic observations, particularly the burial of spodosol-like soils, and associated 14C and OSL ages that are concordant indicate at least six eolian depositional events at ca. 3750, 2500, 1800, 960, 430 and <250 years ago. The two oldest events are documented at just one locality and thus, the pervasiveness of this eolian activity is unknown. However, the four younger events are identified in three or more sites and show evidence for dune migration and sand sheet accretion. The timing of eolian deposition, particularly the initiation age, corresponds to documented periods of increased storminess/hurricane activity in the North Atlantic Ocean at ca. 2.0 to 1.6, and 1.0 ka and also a wetter coastal climate, which suppressed the occurrence of forest fire. Thus, local droughts are not associated with periods of dune movement in this mesic environment. Latest eolian activity on outer Cape Cod commenced in the past 300 to 500 years and may reflect multiple factors including broad-scale landscape disturbance with European colonization, an increased incidence of forest fires and heightened storminess. Eolian systems of Cape Cod appear to be sensitive to landscape disturbance and prior to European settlement may reflect predominantly hurricane/storm disturbance, despite generally mesic conditions in past 4 ka.

  3. Structural and biophysical analysis of interactions between cod and human uracil-DNA N-glycosylase (UNG) and UNG inhibitor (Ugi)

    SciTech Connect

    Assefa, Netsanet Gizaw; Niiranen, Laila; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti Schrøder; Smalås, Arne Oskar; Willassen, Nils Peder; Moe, Elin

    2014-08-01

    A structural and biophysical study of the interactions between cod and human uracil-DNA N-glycosylase (UNG) and their inhibitor Ugi is presented. The stronger interaction between cod UNG and Ugi can be explained by a greater positive electrostatic surface potential. Uracil-DNA N-glycosylase from Atlantic cod (cUNG) shows cold-adapted features such as high catalytic efficiency, a low temperature optimum for activity and reduced thermal stability compared with its mesophilic homologue human UNG (hUNG). In order to understand the role of the enzyme–substrate interaction related to the cold-adapted properties, the structure of cUNG in complex with a bacteriophage encoded natural UNG inhibitor (Ugi) has been determined. The interaction has also been analyzed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The crystal structure of cUNG–Ugi was determined to a resolution of 1.9 Å with eight complexes in the asymmetric unit related through noncrystallographic symmetry. A comparison of the cUNG–Ugi complex with previously determined structures of UNG–Ugi shows that they are very similar, and confirmed the nucleotide-mimicking properties of Ugi. Biophysically, the interaction between cUNG and Ugi is very strong and shows a binding constant (K{sub b}) which is one order of magnitude larger than that for hUNG–Ugi. The binding of both cUNG and hUNG to Ugi was shown to be favoured by both enthalpic and entropic forces; however, the binding of cUNG to Ugi is mainly dominated by enthalpy, while the entropic term is dominant for hUNG. The observed differences in the binding properties may be explained by an overall greater positive electrostatic surface potential in the protein–Ugi interface of cUNG and the slightly more hydrophobic surface of hUNG.

  4. Annual and spatial variability in endo- and ectoparasite infections of North Sea cod (Gadus morhua Linnaeus, 1758) larvae, post-larvae and juveniles.

    PubMed

    Mehrdana, Foojan; Bahlool, Qusay Z M; Skovgaard, Alf; Kuhn, Jesper A; Kania, Per W; Munk, Peter; Buchmann, Kurt

    2014-06-01

    A parasitological investigation was performed on a total of 5380 Atlantic cod larvae, post-larvae and small juveniles sampled from the North Sea during a period of five years. The copepod Caligus elongatus (Von Nordmann, 1832) and the nematode Hysterothylacium aduncum (Rudolphi, 1802) were found at a relatively high prevalence of infection (4.6% and 5.2%, respectively). The infection by both parasites showed annual and spatial variability. C. elongatus showed a higher prevalence in 1992 compared to the following years, whereas the prevalence of H. aduncum increased from 1992 to 2001.We observed a relation between parasite distribution and parameters such as latitude and water depth. Adult digeneans (Lecithaster gibbosus and Derogenes varicus) and larval cestodes were also found with lower infection rates. Since changes of infection levels coincided with increasing North Sea water temperature in the studied period, it is hypothesized that temperature may affect parasite population levels. However, it is likely that other environmental factors may contribute to the observed variations. Absence of infection intensities higher than one nematode per fish in small larvae and post-larvae suggests that host survival may be affected by a high infection pressure. The relatively high levels of infection in the younger stages of cod, and the annual/spatial variability of these infections should be considered in the understanding of the early life dynamics of the species. PMID:24827100

  5. Host size-dependent anisakid infection in Baltic cod Gadus morhua associated with differential food preferences.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Shaozhi; Huwer, Bastian; Bahlool, Qusay; Al-Jubury, Azmi; Daugbjerg Christensen, Nanna; Korbut, Rozalia; Kania, Per; Buchmann, Kurt

    2016-06-15

    A significant increase in the infection level of Baltic cod Gadus morhua with the anisakid nematode larvae Contracaecum osculatum and Pseudoterranova decipiens has been recorded during recent years due to the expanding local population of grey seals Halichoerus grypus, which act as final hosts for these parasites. Here, we report from an investigation of 368 cod (total length [TL] 6-49 cm; caught in ICES Subdivision 25) that the infection level of juvenile cod (TL 6-30 cm) with larvae of C. osculatum and P. decipiens is absent or very low, whereas it increases drastically in larger cod (TL 31-48 cm). A third nematode Hysterothylacium aduncum was rarely found. The study indicates that the prey animals for large cod act as transport hosts for the parasite larvae. Analyses of stomach contents of cod caught in the same area (2007-2014) showed that small benthic organisms (including polychaetes Harmothoë sarsi) are preferred food items by small cod, the isopod Saduria entomon is taken by all size classes, and sprat Sprattus sprattus are common prey items for cod larger than 30 cm. Parasitological investigations (microscopic and molecular analyses) of H. sarsi (100 specimens) and S. entomon (40 specimens) did not reveal infection in these invertebrates, but 11.6% of sprat (265 specimens examined) was shown to be infected with 1-8 C. osculatum third stage larvae per fish. Analyses of sprat stomach contents confirmed that copepods and cladocerans are the main food items of sprat. These observations suggest that the C. osculatum life cycle in the Baltic Sea includes grey seals as final hosts, sprat as the first transport host and cod as second transport host. It may be speculated that sprat obtain infection by feeding on copepods and/or cladocerans, which could serve as the first intermediate hosts. One cannot exclude the possibility that the size-dependent C. osculatum infection of cod may contribute (indirectly or directly) to the differential mortality of larger cod

  6. Host size-dependent anisakid infection in Baltic cod Gadus morhua associated with differential food preferences.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Shaozhi; Huwer, Bastian; Bahlool, Qusay; Al-Jubury, Azmi; Daugbjerg Christensen, Nanna; Korbut, Rozalia; Kania, Per; Buchmann, Kurt

    2016-06-15

    A significant increase in the infection level of Baltic cod Gadus morhua with the anisakid nematode larvae Contracaecum osculatum and Pseudoterranova decipiens has been recorded during recent years due to the expanding local population of grey seals Halichoerus grypus, which act as final hosts for these parasites. Here, we report from an investigation of 368 cod (total length [TL] 6-49 cm; caught in ICES Subdivision 25) that the infection level of juvenile cod (TL 6-30 cm) with larvae of C. osculatum and P. decipiens is absent or very low, whereas it increases drastically in larger cod (TL 31-48 cm). A third nematode Hysterothylacium aduncum was rarely found. The study indicates that the prey animals for large cod act as transport hosts for the parasite larvae. Analyses of stomach contents of cod caught in the same area (2007-2014) showed that small benthic organisms (including polychaetes Harmothoë sarsi) are preferred food items by small cod, the isopod Saduria entomon is taken by all size classes, and sprat Sprattus sprattus are common prey items for cod larger than 30 cm. Parasitological investigations (microscopic and molecular analyses) of H. sarsi (100 specimens) and S. entomon (40 specimens) did not reveal infection in these invertebrates, but 11.6% of sprat (265 specimens examined) was shown to be infected with 1-8 C. osculatum third stage larvae per fish. Analyses of sprat stomach contents confirmed that copepods and cladocerans are the main food items of sprat. These observations suggest that the C. osculatum life cycle in the Baltic Sea includes grey seals as final hosts, sprat as the first transport host and cod as second transport host. It may be speculated that sprat obtain infection by feeding on copepods and/or cladocerans, which could serve as the first intermediate hosts. One cannot exclude the possibility that the size-dependent C. osculatum infection of cod may contribute (indirectly or directly) to the differential mortality of larger cod

  7. IEEE conference record--Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The following topics were covered in this meeting: basic plasma phenomena and plasma waves; plasma diagnostics; space plasma diagnostics; magnetic fusion; electron, ion and plasma sources; intense electron and ion beams; intense beam microwaves; fast wave M/W devices; microwave plasma interactions; plasma focus; ultrafast Z-pinches; plasma processing; electrical gas discharges; fast opening switches; magnetohydrodynamics; electromagnetic and electrothermal launchers; x-ray lasers; computational plasma science; solid state plasmas and switches; environmental/energy issues in plasma science; vacuum electronics; plasmas for lighting; gaseous electronics; and ball lightning and other spherical plasmas. Separate abstracts were prepared for 278 papers of this conference.

  8. Operating System Abstraction Layer (OSAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanchik, Nicholas J.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the concept of the Operating System Abstraction Layer (OSAL) and its benefits. The OSAL is A small layer of software that allows programs to run on many different operating systems and hardware platforms It runs independent of the underlying OS & hardware and it is self-contained. The benefits of OSAL are that it removes dependencies from any one operating system, promotes portable, reusable flight software. It allows for Core Flight software (FSW) to be built for multiple processors and operating systems. The presentation discusses the functionality, the various OSAL releases, and describes the specifications.

  9. Late-Exponential Gene Expression in codY-Deficient Bacillus anthracis in a Host-Like Environment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Kye; Jung, Kyoung Hwa; Yoon, Sung Nyo; Kim, Yun Ki; Chai, Young Gyu

    2016-11-01

    CodY is a pleiotropic regulator commonly found in Gram-positive bacteria and regulates various biological processes during the stringent response in a nutrient-limiting environment. CodY also participates in virulence factor expression in many low G+C Gram-positive pathogens, as observed in Bacillus anthracis. However, the mechanism by which B. anthracis CodY regulates metabolism and virulence factors in response to environmental changes is unclear. Here, we attempted to identify the link between CodY and B. anthracis regulation with codY-deficient and codY-overexpressing mutants using high-throughput transcriptional analysis. Growth pattern analyses of codY mutants in both rich and minimal media showed defects in early cell proliferation, with opposite patterns in the early stationary phase: CodY overexpression prolonged bacterial growth, whereas deletion inhibited growth. RNA sequencing of codY-deficient B. anthracis showed both positive and negative changes in the gene expression of proteases and virulence factors as well as genes related to stringent response-related metabolism and biosynthetic processing. We also found that changes in codY expression could alter virulence gene expression of B. anthracis, suggesting modes of regulation in its virulence in a CodY concentration-dependent manner. Collectively, we conclude from these results that CodY can both positively and negatively regulate its regulon via direct and/or indirect approaches, and that its mode of regulation may be concentration dependent.

  10. 75 FR 8841 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... specifications for groundfish of the GOA (74 FR 7333, February 17, 2009) and inseason adjustment (74 FR 68713... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act Crab Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for... Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels catching Pacific cod for processing by the offshore component in...

  11. 76 FR 4551 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... groundfish of the GOA (75 FR 11749, March 12, 2010) and inseason adjustment (76 FR 469, January 5, 2011). In... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act Crab Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for... Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels that are subject to sideboard limits harvesting Pacific cod for...

  12. 76 FR 3045 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... FR 11749, March 12, 2010) and inseason adjustment (76 FR 469, January 5, 2011). In accordance with... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act Crab Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for... Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels that are subject to sideboard limits harvesting Pacific cod for...

  13. 75 FR 7205 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... groundfish of the GOA (74 FR 7333, February 17, 2009) and inseason adjustment (74 FR 68713, December 29, 2009... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act Crab Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for... Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels catching Pacific cod for processing by the inshore component in the...

  14. 75 FR 3875 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... of the GOA (74 FR 7333, February 17, 2009) and inseason adjustment (74 FR 68713, December 29, 2009... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Non-American Fisheries Act Crab Vessels Catching Pacific Cod for... Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels catching Pacific cod for processing by the inshore component in the...

  15. 76 FR 66196 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Harvesting Pacific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... GOA (76 FR 11111, March 1, 2011). In accordance with Sec. 679.20(d)(1)(i), the Administrator, Alaska... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Vessels Harvesting Pacific Cod for Processing by the Inshore...; closure. SUMMARY: NMFS is prohibiting directed fishing for Pacific cod by vessels harvesting Pacific...

  16. 77 FR 42762 - Notice of September 10, 2012, Meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... National Park Service Notice of September 10, 2012, Meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... the date of the Two Hundred Eighty- Fifth Meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The public meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held...

  17. 75 FR 8841 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 60...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Pacific Cod by Catcher Vessels Less Than 60 feet (18.3 m) Length Overall Using... for Pacific cod by catcher vessels less than 60 feet (18.3 m) length overall (LOA) using jig or hook... fishing for Pacific cod by catcher vessels less than 60 ft (18.3 m) LOA using jig or hook- and-line...

  18. 76 FR 73513 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Revisions to Pacific Cod Fishing in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    .... These three FMP amendments are the BSAI FMP Amendment 67 Pacific cod LLP endorsement (67 FR 18129, April 15, 2002), the BSAI FMP Amendment 85 Pacific cod sector allocations (72 FR 50788, September 4, 2007), and the BSAI hook-and-line C/P sector Pacific cod capacity reduction program (71 FR 57696,...

  19. Abstraction of Seepage into Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Wilson; C.K. Ho

    2000-09-26

    A total-system performance assessment (TSPA) for a potential nuclear-waste repository requires an estimate of the amount of water that might contact waste. This paper describes the model used for part of that estimation in a recent TSPA for the Yucca Mountain site. The discussion is limited to estimation of how much water might enter emplacement drifts; additional considerations related to flow within the drifts, and how much water might actually contact waste, are not addressed here. The unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain is being considered for the potential repository, and a drift opening in unsaturated rock tends to act as a capillary barrier and divert much of the percolating water around it. For TSPA, the important questions regarding seepage are how many waste packages might be subjected to water flow and how much flow those packages might see. Because of heterogeneity of the rock and uncertainty about the future (how the climate will evolve, etc.), it is not possible to predict seepage amounts or locations with certainty. Thus, seepage is treated as a stochastic quantity in TSPA simulations, with the magnitude and spatial distribution of seepage sampled from uncertainty distributions. The distillation of the essential components of process modeling into a form suitable for use in TSPA simulations is referred to as abstraction. In the following sections, seepage process models and abstractions will be summarized and then some illustrative results are presented.

  20. Two Distinct Roles of Atlantic SSTs in ENSO Variability: North Tropical Atlantic SST and Atlantic Nino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Yoo-Geun; Kug, Jong-Seong; Park, Jong-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Two distinct roles of the Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs), namely, the North Tropical Atlantic (NTA) SST and the Atlantic Nino, on the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability are investigated using the observational data from 1980 to 2010 and coupled model experiments. It appears that the NTA SST and the Atlantic Nino can be used as two independent predictors for predicting the development of ENSO events in the following season. Furthermore, they are likely to be linked to different types of El Nino events. Specifically, the NTA SST cooling during February, March, and April contributes to the central Pacific warming at the subsequent winter season, while the negative Atlantic Nino event during June, July, and August contributes to enhancing the eastern Pacific warming. The coupled model experiments support these results. With the aid of a lagged inverse relationship, the statistical forecast using two Atlantic indices can successfully predict various ENSO indices.

  1. Coupling of anaerobic digester and microbial fuel cell for COD removal and ammonia recovery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; An, Junyeong; Jang, Jae Kyung; Chang, In Seop

    2015-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were investigated for use in removing total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) and residual COD from effluent digested in an anaerobic digester (AD) fed with actual swine wastewater for 32 days in batch mode. Cumulative COD removal in the AD was as high as 59,647±2096 mg/L (80.5% removed), whereas TAN removal in the AD was negligible at 296±116 mg-N/L (5.8% removed), causing a decrease in the COD/TAN ratio from 14.5 to 3.0. In a subsequent MFC system, 77.5% of TAN was removed at 36 days, leading to an increase in COD/TAN ratio from 4.6 to 8.1. As a result, the COD in the anode was further reduced from 19,319±417 mg/L to 7519±554 mg/L (61.1% removed). From these results, removing the TAN in MFCs was found to increase the COD/TAN ratio, with the COD being further degraded.

  2. Interactive Regulation by the Bacillus subtilis Global Regulators CodY and ScoC

    PubMed Central

    BELITSKY, BORIS R.; BARBIERI, GIULIA; ALBERTINI, ALESSANDRA M.; FERRARI, EUGENIO; STRAUCH, MARK A.; SONENSHEIN, ABRAHAM L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY CodY and ScoC are Bacillus subtilis transcriptional regulators that control the expression of dozens of genes and operons. Using scoC-lacZ fusions and DNA-binding experiments, we show here that scoC is directly repressed by CodY. This effect creates multiple forms of cascade regulation. For instance, expression of the dtpT gene, which is directly and negatively controlled by ScoC and encodes a putative oligopeptide permease, was activated indirectly by CodY due to CodY-mediated repression of scoC. The opp operon, which encodes an oligopeptide permease that is essential for sporulation and genetic competence development, proved to be a direct target of repression by both ScoC and CodY, but was not significantly affected in codY or scoC single mutants. The combined actions of CodY and ScoC maintain opp repression when either one of the regulators loses activity, but limit the level of repression to that provided by one of the regulators acting alone. Under conditions of nitrogen limitation, repression by ScoC of dtpT and opp was partly prevented by TnrA. Thus, the functioning of ScoC is determined by other transcription factors via modulation of its expression or DNA binding. PMID:25966844

  3. An immunological study of glycosaminoglycans in the connective tissue of bovine and cod skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hannesson, Kirsten O; Tingbø, Monica G; Olsen, Ragnar L; Enersen, Grethe; Baevre, Anne Birgit; Ofstad, Ragni

    2007-04-01

    The presence of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) was demonstrated in the connective tissue of bovine and cod skeletal muscle by histochemical staining using Alcian blue added MgCl(2) (0.06 M and 0.4 M, respectively). For further identification of the sulfated GAGs, a panel of monoclonal antibodies, 1B5, 2B6, 3B3 and 5D4 was used that recognizes epitopes in chondroitin-0-sulfate (C0S), chondroitin-4-sulfate/dermatan sulfate (C4S/DS), chondroitin-6-sulfate (C6S) and keratan sulfate (KS), respectively. Light microscopy and Western blotting techniques showed that in bovine and cod muscle C0S and C6S were primarily localized pericellularly, whereas cod exhibited a more intermittent staining. C4S was expressed around the separate cells and also in the perimysium and myocommata. In contrast to bovine muscle, which hardly expressed highly sulfated KS, cod exhibited a very strong and consistent staining. Western blotting showed that C0S and C6S were mainly associated with proteoglycans (PGs) of high molecular sizes in both species. Contrary to bovine muscle, C4S in cod was associated with molecules of various sizes. Both cod and bovine muscle contained KSPGs of similar sizes as C4S. KSPGs of different sizes and buoyant densities, sensitive to keratanase I and II were found expressed in cod. PMID:17270478

  4. Experience with abstract notation one

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, James D.; Weaver, Alfred C.

    1990-01-01

    The development of computer science has produced a vast number of machine architectures, programming languages, and compiler technologies. The cross product of these three characteristics defines the spectrum of previous and present data representation methodologies. With regard to computer networks, the uniqueness of these methodologies presents an obstacle when disparate host environments are to be interconnected. Interoperability within a heterogeneous network relies upon the establishment of data representation commonality. The International Standards Organization (ISO) is currently developing the abstract syntax notation one standard (ASN.1) and the basic encoding rules standard (BER) that collectively address this problem. When used within the presentation layer of the open systems interconnection reference model, these two standards provide the data representation commonality required to facilitate interoperability. The details of a compiler that was built to automate the use of ASN.1 and BER are described. From this experience, insights into both standards are given and potential problems relating to this development effort are discussed.

  5. Abstraction Planning in Real Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, R.

    1994-01-01

    When a planning agent works in a complex, real-world domain, it is unable to plan for and store all possible contingencies and problem situations ahead of time. This thesis presents a method for planning a run time that incrementally builds up plans at multiple levels of abstraction. The plans are continually updated by information from the world, allowing the planner to adjust its plan to a changing world during the planning process. All the information is represented over intervals of time, allowing the planner to reason about durations, deadlines, and delays within its plan. In addition to the method, the thesis presents a formal model of the planning process and uses the model to investigate planning strategies.

  6. Abstraction Planning in Real Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Richard

    1994-01-01

    When a planning agent works in a complex, real-world domain, it is unable to plan for and store all possible contingencies and problem situations ahead of time. The agent needs to be able to fall back on an ability to construct plans at run time under time constraints. This thesis presents a method for planning at run time that incrementally builds up plans at multiple levels of abstraction. The plans are continually updated by information from the world, allowing the planner to adjust its plan to a changing world during the planning process. All the information is represented over intervals of time, allowing the planner to reason about durations, deadlines, and delays within its plan. In addition to the method, the thesis presents a formal model of the planning process and uses the model to investigate planning strategies. The method has been implemented, and experiments have been run to validate the overall approach and the theoretical model.

  7. Toward Millimagnitude Photometric Calibration (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dose, E.

    2014-12-01

    (Abstract only) Asteroid roation, exoplanet transits, and similar measurements will increasingly call for photometric precisions better than about 10 millimagnitudes, often between nights and ideally between distant observers. The present work applies detailed spectral simulations to test popular photometric calibration practices, and to test new extensions of these practices. Using 107 synthetic spectra of stars of diverse colors, detailed atmospheric transmission spectra computed by solar-energy software, realistic spectra of popular astronomy gear, and the option of three sources of noise added at realistic millimagnitude levels, we find that certain adjustments to current calibration practices can help remove small systematic errors, especially for imperfect filters, high airmasses, and possibly passing thin cirrus clouds.

  8. Strategies for writing a competitive research abstract.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, R A

    1993-01-01

    This article focuses on the process of preparing research abstracts for submission to scientific meetings of professional organizations. Perspectives on the process of specifying an abstract's focus, choosing a scientific meeting, selecting the type of presentation, developing an abstract, and writing an abstract in its form are presented.

  9. Transcriptomic analysis and biomarkers (Rag1 and Igμ) for probing the immune system development in Pacific cod, Gadus macrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ming-Guang; Li, Xing; Perálvarez-Marín, Alejandro; Jiang, Jie-Lan; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Wen, Shi-Hui; Lü, Hui-Qian

    2015-06-01

    Mortality (>90%) is a big concern in larval rearing facilities of Pacific cod, Gadus macrocephalus, limiting its culture presently still in the experimental stages. Understanding the immune system development of G. macrocephalus is crucial to optimize the aquaculture of this species, to improve the use of economic resources and to avoid abuse of antibiotics. For the transcriptome analysis, using an Illumina sequencing platform, 61,775,698 raw reads were acquired. After a de novo assembly, 77,561 unigenes were obtained. We have classified functionally these transcripts by Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). 27 genes mainly related to hematopoietic or lymphoid organ development and somatic diversification of immune receptors have been reported for the first time in Pacific cod, and 14 Ig heavy chain (μ chain) locuses were assembled using Trinity. Based on our previous achievement, we have chosen Rag1 and Igμ as immune system development biomarkers. Full length cDNA of Rag1 and Igμ as biomarkers were obtained respectively using RACE PCR. Concerning Rag1, the deduced amino acid of Rag1 and protein immunodetection revealed a Rag1 isoform of 69 kDa, significantly different from other fish orthologs, such as Oncorhynchus mykiss (121 kDa). Phylogenetic analysis reveals a unique immune system for the Gadus genre, not exclusive for Atlantic cod, among vertebrates. Meanwhile, full length cDNA of Igμ included an ORF of 1710 bp and the deduced amino acid was composed of a leader peptide, a variable domain, CH1, CH2, Hinge, CH3, CH4 and C-terminus, which was in accordance with most teleost. Absolute quantification PCR revealed that significant expression of Rag1 appeared earlier than Igμ, 61 and 95 dph compared to 95 dph, respectively. Here we report the first transcriptomic analysis of G. macrocephalus as the starting point for genetic research on immune system development towards improving the Pacific cod aquaculture. PMID:25842179

  10. Long term operation of continuous-flow system with enhanced biological phosphorus removal granules at different COD loading.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Lv, Yufeng; Zeng, Huiping; Zhang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a continuous-flow system with enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) granules was operated at different COD concentrations (200, 300 and 400mgL(-)(1)) to investigate the effect of COD loading on this system. The results showed that when the COD concentration in influent was increased to 400mgL(-)(1), the anaerobic COD removal efficiency and total phosphorus removal efficiency reduced obviously and the settling ability of granules deteriorated due to the proliferation of filamentous bacteria. Moreover, high COD loading inhibited the EPS secretion and destroyed the stability of granules. Results of high-through pyrosequencing indicated that filamentous bacteria had a competitive advantage over polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) at high COD loading. The performance of system, settling ability of granules and proportion of PAOs gradually recovered to the initial level after the COD concentration was reduced to 200mgL(-)(1) on day 81.

  11. Long term operation of continuous-flow system with enhanced biological phosphorus removal granules at different COD loading.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Lv, Yufeng; Zeng, Huiping; Zhang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a continuous-flow system with enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) granules was operated at different COD concentrations (200, 300 and 400mgL(-)(1)) to investigate the effect of COD loading on this system. The results showed that when the COD concentration in influent was increased to 400mgL(-)(1), the anaerobic COD removal efficiency and total phosphorus removal efficiency reduced obviously and the settling ability of granules deteriorated due to the proliferation of filamentous bacteria. Moreover, high COD loading inhibited the EPS secretion and destroyed the stability of granules. Results of high-through pyrosequencing indicated that filamentous bacteria had a competitive advantage over polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) at high COD loading. The performance of system, settling ability of granules and proportion of PAOs gradually recovered to the initial level after the COD concentration was reduced to 200mgL(-)(1) on day 81. PMID:27295254

  12. 75 FR 64955 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Correction to Cod...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... action published in the Federal Register on September 27, 2010 (75 FR 59154), reduced the GOM cod trip... stated in the action published on September 27, 2010 (75 FR 59154), and are not repeated here....

  13. 6. Photocopy of woodengraving in Rich, TruroCape Cod facing p. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of wood-engraving in Rich, Truro-Cape Cod facing p. 464. Copy owned by Miss Marion Rich, Truro, Mass. SUMMER HOME OF THE AUTHOR, AT LONGNOOK - Shebnah Rich House, Longnook Road, Truro, Barnstable County, MA

  14. Model-based evaluation of COD influence on a partial nitrification-Anammox biofilm (CANON) process.

    PubMed

    Hao, X D; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2004-01-01

    A model evaluating COD influence on a partial nitrification-Anammox biofilm process is integrated on the basis of heterotrophic growth as described in ASM3, combined with a previously published model for the CANON process. This integrated model can simulate the activities of heterotrophs and autotrophs involved in a biofilm, and interactions between COD oxidation, denitrification, nitrification and Anammox can be evaluated. Simulations indicate that COD in the influent has no important influence on the trends in the partial nitrification-Anammox biofilm process. Besides full COD removal, a total nitrogen removal efficiency of about 90% can be expected for stable biofilm systems. Furthermore, Anammox is a major contributor to the total nitrogen removal in stable biofilm systems and conventional denitrification only takes a share of <20% in the total nitrogen removal.

  15. Attracting Girls into Physics (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadalla, Afaf

    2009-04-01

    A recent international study of women in physics showed that enrollment in physics and science is declining for both males and females and that women are severely underrepresented in careers requiring a strong physics background. The gender gap begins early in the pipeline, from the first grade. Girls are treated differently than boys at home and in society in ways that often hinder their chances for success. They have fewer freedoms, are discouraged from accessing resources or being adventurous, have far less exposure to problem solving, and are not encouraged to choose their lives. In order to motivate more girl students to study physics in the Assiut governorate of Egypt, the Assiut Alliance for the Women and Assiut Education District collaborated in renovating the education of physics in middle and secondary school classrooms. A program that helps in increasing the number of girls in science and physics has been designed in which informal groupings are organized at middle and secondary schools to involve girls in the training and experiences needed to attract and encourage girls to learn physics. During implementation of the program at some schools, girls, because they had not been trained in problem-solving as boys, appeared not to be as facile in abstracting the ideas of physics, and that was the primary reason for girls dropping out of science and physics. This could be overcome by holding a topical physics and technology summer school under the supervision of the Assiut Alliance for the Women.

  16. 1986 annual information meeting. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Abstracts are presented for the following papers: Geohydrological Research at the Y-12 Plant (C.S. Haase); Ecological Impacts of Waste Disposal Operations in Bear Creek Valley Near the Y-12 Plant (J.M. Loar); Finite Element Simulation of Subsurface Contaminant Transport: Logistic Difficulties in Handling Large Field Problems (G.T. Yeh); Dynamic Compaction of a Radioactive Waste Burial Trench (B.P. Spalding); Comparative Evaluation of Potential Sites for a High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository (E.D. Smith); Changing Priorities in Environmental Assessment and Environmental Compliance (R.M. Reed); Ecology, Ecotoxicology, and Ecological Risk Assessment (L.W. Barnthouse); Theory and Practice in Uncertainty Analysis from Ten Years of Practice (R.H. Gardner); Modeling Landscape Effects of Forest Decline (V.H. Dale); Soil Nitrogen and the Global Carbon Cycle (W.M. Post); Maximizing Wood Energy Production in Short-Rotation Plantations: Effect of Initial Spacing and Rotation Length (L.L. Wright); and Ecological Communities and Processes in Woodland Streams Exhibit Both Direct and Indirect Effects of Acidification (J.W. Elwood).

  17. Ozone Conference II: Abstract Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    Ozone Conference II: Pre- and Post-Harvest Applications Two Years After Gras, was held September 27-28, 1999 in Tulare, California. This conference, sponsored by EPRI's Agricultural Technology Alliance and Southern California Edison's AgTAC facility, was coordinated and organized by the on-site ATA-AgTAC Regional Center. Approximately 175 people attended the day-and-a-half conference at AgTAC. During the Conference twenty-two presentations were given on ozone food processing and agricultural applications. Included in the presentations were topics on: (1) Ozone fumigation; (2) Ozone generation techniques; (3) System and design applications; (4) Prewater treatment requirements; (5) Poultry water reuse; (6) Soil treatments with ozone gas; and (7) Post-harvest aqueous and gaseous ozone research results. A live videoconference between Tulare and Washington, D.C. was held to discuss the regulators' view from inside the beltway. Attendees participated in two Roundtable Question and Answer sessions and visited fifteen exhibits and demonstrations. The attendees included university and governmental researchers, regulators, consultants and industry experts, technology developers and providers, and corporate and individual end-users. This report is comprised of the Abstracts of each presentation, biographical sketches for each speaker and a registration/attendees list.

  18. Handedness shapes children's abstract concepts.

    PubMed

    Casasanto, Daniel; Henetz, Tania

    2012-03-01

    Can children's handedness influence how they represent abstract concepts like kindness and intelligence? Here we show that from an early age, right-handers associate rightward space more strongly with positive ideas and leftward space with negative ideas, but the opposite is true for left-handers. In one experiment, children indicated where on a diagram a preferred toy and a dispreferred toy should go. Right-handers tended to assign the preferred toy to a box on the right and the dispreferred toy to a box on the left. Left-handers showed the opposite pattern. In a second experiment, children judged which of two cartoon animals looked smarter (or dumber) or nicer (or meaner). Right-handers attributed more positive qualities to animals on the right, but left-handers to animals on the left. These contrasting associations between space and valence cannot be explained by exposure to language or cultural conventions, which consistently link right with good. Rather, right- and left-handers implicitly associated positive valence more strongly with the side of space on which they can act more fluently with their dominant hands. Results support the body-specificity hypothesis (Casasanto, 2009), showing that children with different kinds of bodies think differently in corresponding ways. PMID:21916951

  19. An abstract approach to music.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, H. G.; Tipei, S.

    1999-04-19

    In this article we have outlined a formal framework for an abstract approach to music and music composition. The model is formulated in terms of objects that have attributes, obey relationships, and are subject to certain well-defined operations. The motivation for this approach uses traditional terms and concepts of music theory, but the approach itself is formal and uses the language of mathematics. The universal object is an audio wave; partials, sounds, and compositions are special objects, which are placed in a hierarchical order based on time scales. The objects have both static and dynamic attributes. When we realize a composition, we assign values to each of its attributes: a (scalar) value to a static attribute, an envelope and a size to a dynamic attribute. A composition is then a trajectory in the space of aural events, and the complex audio wave is its formal representation. Sounds are fibers in the space of aural events, from which the composer weaves the trajectory of a composition. Each sound object in turn is made up of partials, which are the elementary building blocks of any music composition. The partials evolve on the fastest time scale in the hierarchy of partials, sounds, and compositions. The ideas outlined in this article are being implemented in a digital instrument for additive sound synthesis and in software for music composition. A demonstration of some preliminary results has been submitted by the authors for presentation at the conference.

  20. Effect of influent COD/SO4(2-) ratios on UASB treatment of a synthetic sulfate-containing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Jing, Zhaoqian; Sudo, Yuta; Niu, Qigui; Du, Jingru; Wu, Jiang; Li, Yu-You

    2015-07-01

    The effect of the chemical oxygen demand/sulfate (COD/SO4(2-)) ratio on the anaerobic treatment of synthetic chemical wastewater containing acetate, ethanol, and sulfate, was investigated using a UASB reactor. The experimental results show that at a COD/SO4(2-) ratio of 20 and a COD loading rate of 25.2gCODL(-1)d(-1), a COD removal of as high as 87.8% was maintained. At a COD/SO4(2-) ratio of 0.5 (sulfate concentration 6000mgL(-1)), however, the COD removal was 79.2% and the methane yield was 0.20LCH4gCOD(-1). The conversion of influent COD to methane dropped from 80.5% to 54.4% as the COD/SO4(2-) ratio decreased from 20 to 0.5. At all the COD/SO4(2-) ratios applied, over 79.4% of the total electron flow was utilized by methane-producing archaea (MPA), indicating that methane fermentation was the predominant reaction. The majority of the methane was produced by acetoclastic MPA at high COD/SO4(2-) ratios and both acetoclastic and hydrogenthrophic MPA at low COD/SO4(2-) ratios. Only at low COD/SO4(2-) ratios were SRB species such as Desulfovibrio found to play a key role in ethanol degradation, whereas all the SRB species were found to be incomplete oxidizers at both high and low COD/SO4(2-) ratios.