Science.gov

Sample records for abstract background studies

  1. Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Included are over 50 abstracts of papers being presented at the 1977 National Association of Biology Teachers Convention. Included in each abstract are the title, author, and summary of the paper. Topics include photographic techniques environmental studies, and biological instruction. (MA)

  2. Abstracts of Remediation Case Studies, Volume 9

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report, published by the Federal Remediation Technologies Roundtable (FRTR), is a collection of recently published abstracts summarizing 13 cost and performance case studies on the use of remediation technologies at contaminated sites.

  3. Abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-09-01

    Measuring cosmological parameters with GRBs: status and perspectives New interpretation of the Amati relation The SED Machine - a dedicated transient spectrograph PTF10iue - evidence for an internal engine in a unique Type Ic SN Direct evidence for the collapsar model of long gamma-ray bursts On pair instability supernovae and gamma-ray bursts Pan-STARRS1 observations of ultraluminous SNe The influence of rotation on the critical neutrino luminosity in core-collapse supernovae General relativistic magnetospheres of slowly rotating and oscillating neutron stars Host galaxies of short GRBs GRB 100418A: a bridge between GRB-associated hypernovae and SNe Two super-luminous SNe at z ~ 1.5 from the SNLS Prospects for very-high-energy gamma-ray bursts with the Cherenkov Telescope Array The dynamics and radiation of relativistic flows from massive stars The search for light echoes from the supernova explosion of 1181 AD The proto-magnetar model for gamma-ray bursts Stellar black holes at the dawn of the universe MAXI J0158-744: the discovery of a supersoft X-ray transient Wide-band spectra of magnetar burst emission Dust formation and evolution in envelope-stripped core-collapse supernovae The host galaxies of dark gamma-ray bursts Keck observations of 150 GRB host galaxies Search for properties of GRBs at large redshift The early emission from SNe Spectral properties of SN shock breakout MAXI observation of GRBs and short X-ray transients A three-dimensional view of SN 1987A using light echo spectroscopy X-ray study of the southern extension of the SNR Puppis A All-sky survey of short X-ray transients by MAXI GSC Development of the CALET gamma-ray burst monitor (CGBM)

  4. Youth Studies Abstracts. Vol. 4 No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youth Studies Abstracts, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts of 76 projects (most of which were conducted in Australia and New Zealand) concerned with programs for youth and with social and educational developments affecting youth. The abstracts are arranged in the following two categories: (1) Social and Educational Developments: Policy, Analysis, Research; and (2) Programs:…

  5. How language enables abstraction: a study in computational cultural psychology.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Yair; Turney, Peter; Cohen, Yohai

    2012-06-01

    The idea that language mediates our thoughts and enables abstract cognition has been a key idea in socio-cultural psychology. However, it is not clear what mechanisms support this process of abstraction. Peirce argued that one mechanism by which language enables abstract thought is hypostatic abstraction, the process through which a predicate (e.g., dark) turns into an object (e.g., darkness). By using novel computational tools we tested Peirce's idea. Analysis of the data provides empirical support for Peirce's mechanism and evidence of the way the use of signs enables abstraction. These conclusions are supported by the in-depth analysis of two case studies concerning the abstraction of sweet and dark. The paper concludes by discussing the findings from a broad and integrative theoretical perspective and by pointing to computational cultural psychology as a promising perspective for addressing long-lasting questions of the field.

  6. Honors Dissertation Abstracts: A Bounded Qualitative Meta-Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Debra K.; Banning, James H.

    2012-01-01

    A potential source of useful information about undergraduate honors education can be found in doctoral dissertation abstracts that focus on honors. Debra Holman and James Banning of Colorado State University sought to explore this resource by undertaking a bounded qualitative meta-study of such abstracts using document analysis. Three…

  7. Non-Determinism: An Abstract Concept in Computer Science Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armoni, Michal; Gal-Ezer, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Non-determinism is one of the most important, yet abstract, recurring concepts of Computer Science. It plays an important role in Computer Science areas such as formal language theory, computability theory, distributed computing, and operating systems. We conducted a series of studies on the perception of non-determinism. In the current research,…

  8. Abstract art and cortical motor activation: an EEG study

    PubMed Central

    Umilta', M. Alessandra; Berchio, Cristina; Sestito, Mariateresa; Freedberg, David; Gallese, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    The role of the motor system in the perception of visual art remains to be better understood. Earlier studies on the visual perception of abstract art (from Gestalt theory, as in Arnheim, 1954 and 1988, to balance preference studies as in Locher and Stappers, 2002, and more recent work by Locher et al., 2007; Redies, 2007, and Taylor et al., 2011), neglected the question, while the field of neuroesthetics (Ramachandran and Hirstein, 1999; Zeki, 1999) mostly concentrated on figurative works. Much recent work has demonstrated the multimodality of vision, encompassing the activation of motor, somatosensory, and viscero-motor brain regions. The present study investigated whether the observation of high-resolution digitized static images of abstract paintings by Lucio Fontana is associated with specific cortical motor activation in the beholder's brain. Mu rhythm suppression was evoked by the observation of original art works but not by control stimuli (as in the case of graphically modified versions of these works). Most interestingly, previous visual exposure to the stimuli did not affect the mu rhythm suppression induced by their observation. The present results clearly show the involvement of the cortical motor system in the viewing of static abstract art works. PMID:23162456

  9. A study of optimal abstract jamming strategies vs. noncoherent MFSK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.; Rodemich, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the performance of uncoded MFSK modulation in the presence of arbitrary additive jamming, taking into account the objective to devise robust antijamming strategies. An abstract model is considered, giving attention to the signal strength as a nonnegative real number X, the employment of X as a random variable, its distribution function G(x), the transmitter's strategy G, the jamming noise as an M-dimensional random vector Z, and the error probability. A summary of previous work on the considered problem is provided, and the results of the current study are presented.

  10. A Photometric Study of Three Eclipsing Binary Stars (Poster abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, A.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) As part of a program to study eclipsing binary stars that exhibit the O'Connell Effect (OCE) we are observing a selection of binary stars in a long term study. The OCE is a difference in maximum light across the ligthcurve possibly cause by starspots. We observed for 7 nights at McDonald Observatory using the 30-inch telescope in July 2015, and used the same telescope remotely for a total of 20 additional nights in August, October, December, and January. We will present lightcurves for three stars from this study, characterize the OCE for these stars, and present our model results for the physical parameters of the star making up each of these systems.

  11. Studying RR Lyrae Stars with Kepler/K2 (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, C.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) While RR Lyrae stars have long been studied from the ground, the high photometric precision, high cadence, and long observing times offered by the Kepler Space Telescope have yielded exciting discoveries that are revolutionizing our understanding of these stars. In its new K2 mission, Kepler is observing an even larger sample of RR Lyrae stars, promising to provide new insights into them and our Milky Way. In this talk I will present some of the most exciting new discoveries about RR Lyrae stars from the K2 mission with a special focus on what we are learning about the RR Lyrae in the globular cluster M4, our first chance to observe a single population of RR Lyrae with Kepler.

  12. Hanford Personnel Dosimeter supporting studies FY-1980. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Endres, G.W.R.; Cummings, F.M.; Aldrich, J.M.; Thorson, M.R.; Kathren, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report which describe fundamental characteristics of the Hanford multipurpose personnel dosimeter (HMPD). Abstracts were not prepared for Appendix A and Appendix B which deal with calculated standard deviations for 100 mrem mixed field exposures and detailed calculations of standard deviations, respectively. (KRM)

  13. Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An analysis was made of the UF6 fueled gas core reactor as a function of cavity reactor criticality and fluid mechanics tests, investigations of uranium optical emission spectra, and radiant heat transfer power plant studies. Data are also given on nuclear and thermodynamic cycle analysis.

  14. Pythia Jet Finding Study with Trento Backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Joseph; Soltz, Ron

    2016-06-22

    We present results applying the Pythia SlowJet Finder to Pythia generated QCD and QED hard processes in the presence of simulated heavy ion backgrounds. The hard process events are generated with Pythia version 8.219 for √sNN=200 GeV proton-proton collisions and the backgrounds are generated by the Reduced Thickness Event-by-event Nuclear Topology model TRENTo for Au-Au collisions with a nucleon-nucleon cross-section of 4.23 fm2. The TRENTo model is used to calculate the initial entropy and ellipticity from which the total charged particle multiplicity and elliptic ow are determined. We report results in the form of event displays, total pT distributions, and fragmentation distributions for SlowJet applied to Pythia events with and without the simulated heavy ion backgrounds.

  15. International symposium on in vivo body composition studies: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This booklet contains the program and individual abstracts for papers presented at the International symposium on in vivo body composition studies. The presentations were divided into five sessions. Individual abstracts were indexed for the Energy Data Base. (DT)

  16. An Analytic Study of the Postgraduate Students' Difficulties in Writing Abstracts in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aly, Mahsoub Abdul-Sadeq

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigated the Egyptian postgraduate students' difficulties in writing abstracts in English. In order to achieve the objectives of this study, a list of criteria for writing a good and effective abstract has been developed in the light of the review of literature. Besides, a content analysis of 35 abstracts written in English…

  17. Neural Correlates of Abstract Rule Learning: An Event-Related Potential Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Fang; Hoshi-Shiba, Reiko; Abla, Dilshat; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract rule learning is a fundamental aspect of human cognition, and is essential for language acquisition. However, despite its importance, the neural mechanisms underlying abstract rule learning are still largely unclear. In this study, we investigated the neural correlates of abstract rule learning by recording auditory event-related…

  18. Field Initiated Studies Program. Abstracts of Funded Projects 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC. Office of Research.

    The Field-Initiated Studies program is open to institutions of higher education, public and private organizations, institutions, and agencies, as well as individuals. Applicants may propose projects that last up to 18 months, and proposals are reviewed and evaluated based on their technical quality and national importance judged by scholars and…

  19. METRICS OF PERFORMANCE FOR THE SABRE MICROCOSM STUDY (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project will evaluate accelerated anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in areas of high concentration, such as DNAPL source areas. In preparation for a field scale pilot test, a laboratory microcosm study was conducted to provide...

  20. CHARACTERIZING THE MICROBIAL COMMUNITY IN SABRE MICROCOSM STUDIES (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project will evaluate accelerated anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in areas of high concentration, such as DNAPL source areas. In preparation for a field scale pilot test, laboratory microcosm and column studies were conducte...

  1. The Art of Abstracting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cremmins, Edward T.

    A three-stage analytical reading method for the composition of informative and indicative abstracts by authors and abstractors is presented in this monograph, along with background information on the abstracting process and a discussion of professional considerations in abstracting. An introduction to abstracts and abstracting precedes general…

  2. Using ClinicalTrials.gov to Supplement Information in Ophthalmology Conference Abstracts about Trial Outcomes: A Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Roberta W.; Huynh, Lynn; Ervin, Ann-Margret; Dickersin, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Background Including results from unpublished randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in a systematic review may ameliorate the effect of publication bias in systematic review results. Unpublished RCTs are sometimes described in abstracts presented at conferences, included in trials registers, or both. Trial results may not be available in a trials register and abstracts describing RCT results often lack study design information. Complementary information from a trials register record may be sufficient to allow reliable inclusion of an unpublished RCT only available as an abstract in a systematic review. Methods We identified 496 abstracts describing RCTs presented at the 2007 to 2009 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) meetings; 154 RCTs were registered in ClinicalTrials.gov. Two persons extracted verbatim primary and non-primary outcomes reported in the abstract and ClinicalTrials.gov record. We compared each abstract outcome with all ClinicalTrials.gov outcomes and coded matches as complete, partial, or no match. Results We identified 800 outcomes in 152 abstracts (95 primary [51 abstracts] and 705 [141 abstracts] non-primary outcomes). No outcomes were reported in 2 abstracts. Of 95 primary outcomes, 17 (18%) agreed completely, 53 (56%) partially, and 25 (26%) had no match with a ClinicalTrials.gov primary or non-primary outcome. Among 705 non-primary outcomes, 56 (8%) agreed completely, 205 (29%) agreed partially, and 444 (63%) had no match with a ClinicalTrials.gov primary or non-primary outcome. Among the 258 outcomes partially agreeing, we found additional information on the time when the outcome was measured more often in ClinicalTrials.gov than in the abstract (141/258 (55%) versus 55/258 (21%)). We found no association between the presence of non-matching “new” outcomes and year of registration, time to registry update, industry sponsorship, or multi-center status. Conclusion Conference abstracts may be a valuable source of

  3. Using Music as a Background for Reading: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulliken, Colleen N.; Henk, William A.

    1985-01-01

    Reports on a study during which intermediate level students were exposed to three auditory backgrounds while reading (no music, classical music, and rock music), and their subsequent comprehension performance was measured. Concludes that the auditory background during reading may affect comprehension and that, for most students, rock music should…

  4. STEM Education Related Dissertation Abstracts: A Bounded Qualitative Meta-Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banning, James; Folkestad, James E.

    2012-01-01

    This article utilizes a bounded qualitative meta-study framework to examine the 101 dissertation abstracts found by searching the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses[TM] digital database for dissertations abstracts from 1990 through 2010 using the search terms education, science, technology, engineer, and STEM/SMET. Professional search librarians…

  5. Study of Background Rejection Systems for the IXO Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Philippe; Limousin, O.; Tatischeff, V.

    2009-01-01

    The scientific performances of the IXO mission will necessitate a very low detector background level. This will imply thorough background simulations, and efficient background rejection systems. It necessitates also a very good knowledge of the detectors to be shielded. In APC, Paris, and CEA, Saclay, we got experience on these activities by conceiving and optimising in parallel the high energy detector and the active and passive background rejection system of the Simbol-X mission. Considering that this work may be naturally extended to other X-ray missions, we have initiated with CNES a R&D project on the study of background rejection systems mainly in view the IXO project. We will detail this activity in the poster.

  6. Preattentive Extraction of Abstract Auditory Rules in Speech Sound Stream: A Mismatch Negativity Study Using Lexical Tones

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Gu, Feng; He, Kang; Chen, Ling-Hui; Chen, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Background Extraction of linguistically relevant auditory features is critical for speech comprehension in complex auditory environments, in which the relationships between acoustic stimuli are often abstract and constant while the stimuli per se are varying. These relationships are referred to as the abstract auditory rule in speech and have been investigated for their underlying neural mechanisms at an attentive stage. However, the issue of whether or not there is a sensory intelligence that enables one to automatically encode abstract auditory rules in speech at a preattentive stage has not yet been thoroughly addressed. Methodology/Principal Findings We chose Chinese lexical tones for the current study because they help to define word meaning and hence facilitate the fabrication of an abstract auditory rule in a speech sound stream. We continuously presented native Chinese speakers with Chinese vowels differing in formant, intensity, and level of pitch to construct a complex and varying auditory stream. In this stream, most of the sounds shared flat lexical tones to form an embedded abstract auditory rule. Occasionally the rule was randomly violated by those with a rising or falling lexical tone. The results showed that the violation of the abstract auditory rule of lexical tones evoked a robust preattentive auditory response, as revealed by whole-head electrical recordings of the mismatch negativity (MMN), though none of the subjects acquired explicit knowledge of the rule or became aware of the violation. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that there is an auditory sensory intelligence in the perception of Chinese lexical tones. The existence of this intelligence suggests that the humans can automatically extract abstract auditory rules in speech at a preattentive stage to ensure speech communication in complex and noisy auditory environments without drawing on conscious resources. PMID:22238691

  7. Background Studies for the pn-CCD Detector of CAST

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, A.; Beltran, B.; Cebrian, S.; Gomez, H.; Irastorza, I. G.; Luzon, G.; Morales, J.; Ruz, J.; Villar, J. A.; Hartmann, R.; Kotthaus, R.; Klose, C.; Kuster, M.; Strueder, L.

    2007-03-28

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) experiment searches for axions from the Sun converted into photons with energies up to around 10 keV via the inverse Primakoff effect in the high magnetic field of a superconducting Large Hadron Collider (LHC) prototype magnet. A backside illuminated pn-CCD detector in conjunction with an X-ray mirror optics is one of the three detectors used in CAST to register the expected photon signal. Since this signal is very rare a detailed study of the detector background has been undertaken with the aim to understand and further reduce the background level of the detector. The analysis is based on measured data taken during the data taking period of 2003 and 2004 of CAST and on Monte Carlo simulations of background with different origin. The background study performed for this detector show that the level of background (8.00{+-}0.07)x10-5 counts cm-2 s-1 keV-1 between 1 and 7 keV is dominated by the external gamma background due to natural activities at the experimental site, while radioactive impurities in the detector itself and cosmic neutrons contribute with a smaller fraction.

  8. STEM Education Related Dissertation Abstracts: A Bounded Qualitative Meta-study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banning, James; Folkestad, James E.

    2012-12-01

    This article utilizes a bounded qualitative meta-study framework to examine the 101 dissertation abstracts found by searching the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses™ digital database for dissertations abstracts from 1990 through 2010 using the search terms education, science, technology, engineer, and STEM/SMET. Professional search librarians established the search criteria used to establish the database. The overarching research question for this study was: What can we learn from the examination of doctoral dissertations abstracts that focus on the STEM education found from 1990 through 2010? The study's findings provide an overview of doctoral research related to STEM education and the discussion section focuses on quality of abstracts, questions regarding the use of the pipeline metaphor, and location of instructional innovation.

  9. Excerpta Medica abstracting journals: a case study of costs to medical school libraries.

    PubMed

    La Rocco, A; Feng, C

    1977-04-01

    A cost comparison study was made of Excerpta Medica's abstracting journals, based upon actual costs to a library. Unit costs were determined for six sections of EM as compared with six corresponding abstract journals. On average, EM sections were found to be 138% more costly than corresponding abstract journals. The effects of splitting of EM journal titles were also analyzed. This practice increases the price of a total subscription to EM and makes comprehensive information retrieval more difficult. A survey of medical school librarians as users of EM points to dissatisfaction with its increasing price, particularly when it results from title splitting.

  10. Revisiting Caroline Furness's An Introduction to the Study of Variable Stars on its Centenary (Poster abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, K.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) A century and one month ago (October 1915) Dr. Caroline Ellen Furness (1869-1936), Director of the Vassar College Observatory, published An Introduction to the Study of Variable Stars. Issued in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of Vassar College, the work was meant to fill a void in the literature, namely as both an introduction to the topic of variable stars and as a manual explaining how they should be observed and the resulting data analyzed. It was judged to be one of the hundred best books written by an American woman in the last hundred years at the 1933 World's Fair in Chicago. The book covers the relevant history of and background on types of variable stars, star charts, catalogs, and the magnitude scale, then describes observing techniques, including visual, photographic, and photoelectric photometry. The work finishes with a discussion of light curves and patterns of variability, with a special emphasis on eclipsing binaries and long period variables. Furness's work is a valuable snapshot of the state of astronomical knowledge, technology, and observing techniques from a century ago. This presentation will analyze both Furness's book and its reception in the scientific community, and draw parallels to current advice given to beginning variable star observers.

  11. High-level ab initio studies of hydrogen abstraction from prototype hydrocarbon systems.

    PubMed

    Temelso, Berhane; Sherrill, C David; Merkle, Ralph C; Freitas, Robert A

    2006-09-28

    Symmetric and nonsymmetric hydrogen abstraction reactions are studied using state-of-the-art ab initio electronic structure methods. Second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) and the coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] methods with large correlation consistent basis sets (cc-pVXZ, where X = D,T,Q) are used in determining the transition-state geometries, activation barriers, and thermodynamic properties of several representative hydrogen abstraction reactions. The importance of basis set, electron correlation, and choice of zeroth-order reference wave function in the accurate prediction of activation barriers and reaction enthalpies are also investigated. The ethynyl radical (*CCH), which has a very high affinity for hydrogen atoms, is studied as a prototype hydrogen abstraction agent. Our high-level quantum mechanical computations indicate that hydrogen abstraction using the ethynyl radical has an activation energy of less than 3 kcal mol(-1) for hydrogens bonded to an sp(2) or sp(3) carbon. These low activation barriers further corroborate previous studies suggesting that ethynyl-type radicals would make good tooltips for abstracting hydrogens from diamondoid surfaces during mechanosynthesis. Modeling the diamond C(111) surface with isobutane and treating the ethynyl radical as a tooltip, hydrogen abstraction in this reaction is predicted to be barrierless.

  12. The Effect of Background Music on Bullying: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziv, Naomi; Dolev, Einat

    2013-01-01

    School bullying is a source of growing concern. A number of intervention programs emphasize the importance of a positive school climate in preventing bullying behavior. The aim of the presented pilot study was to examine whether calming background music, through its effect on arousal and mood, could create a pleasant atmosphere and reduce bullying…

  13. A study of the background corona near solar minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, K.; Poland, A. I.; Munro, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Equatorial and polar K and F coronal components during the declining phase of the solar cycle are studied through use of the white light coronagraph data obtained by Skylab. At this phase of the solar cycle, streams and holes dominate the equatorial corona (approximately 50 and 30% of the time, respectively) between 2.5 and 5.5 solar radii; however, two episodes are noted when equatorial background density of the corona could be distinguished. The derived background density is less than 15% below values predicted by the models of Newkirk (1967) and Saito (1970). The brightness of the F-corona is also discussed.

  14. Reading and Study Skills and Instruction: Secondary: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1980 (Vol. 41 Nos. 1 through 6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 16 titles deal with the following topics: (1) guiding the learner through a textual passage with an associate passage; (2) use of direct-functional study skill technique in seventh grade social studies classes; (3) three types of…

  15. Studying extragalactic background fluctuations with the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment 2 (CIBER-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, Alicia; Arai, Toshiaki; Battle, John; Bock, James; Cooray, Asantha; Hristov, Viktor; Korngut, Phillip; Lee, Dae Hee; Mason, Peter; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Morford, Tracy; Onishi, Yosuke; Shirahata, Mai; Tsumura, Kohji; Wada, Takehiko; Zemcov, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Fluctuations in the extragalactic background light trace emission from the history of galaxy formation, including the emission from the earliest sources from the epoch of reionization. A number of recent near-infrared measure- ments show excess spatial power at large angular scales inconsistent with models of z < 5 emission from galaxies. These measurements have been interpreted as arising from either redshifted stellar and quasar emission from the epoch of reionization, or the combined intra-halo light from stars thrown out of galaxies during merging activity at lower redshifts. Though astrophysically distinct, both interpretations arise from faint, low surface brightness source populations that are difficult to detect except by statistical approaches using careful observations with suitable instruments. The key to determining the source of these background anisotropies will be wide-field imaging measurements spanning multiple bands from the optical to the near-infrared. The Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment 2 (CIBER-2) will measure spatial anisotropies in the extra- galactic infrared background caused by cosmological structure using six broad spectral bands. The experiment uses three 2048 x 2048 Hawaii-2RG near-infrared arrays in three cameras coupled to a single 28.5 cm telescope housed in a reusable sounding rocket-borne payload. A small portion of each array will also be combined with a linear-variable filter to make absolute measurements of the spectrum of the extragalactic background with high spatial resolution for deep subtraction of Galactic starlight. The large field of view and multiple spectral bands make CIBER-2 unique in its sensitivity to fluctuations predicted by models of lower limits on the luminosity of the first stars and galaxies and in its ability to distinguish between primordial and foreground anisotropies. In this paper the scientific motivation for CIBER-2 and details of its first flight instrumentation will be discussed, including

  16. An experimental analogue study into the role of abstract thinking in trauma-related rumination.

    PubMed

    Ehring, Thomas; Szeimies, Anna-Kristina; Schaffrick, Christina

    2009-04-01

    Trauma-related rumination has been shown to predict the maintenance of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, it is still unclear how rumination can be distinguished from functional forms of thinking about traumatic events. The current study used an analogue design to experimentally test the hypothesis that the abstractness of thinking is responsible for the dysfunctional effects of trauma-related rumination. Eighty-three healthy university students first watched a distressing video and were then randomly assigned to abstract ruminative thinking, concrete thinking or distraction. Abstract thinking was found to lead to a significantly longer maintenance of negative mood and arousal than both concrete thinking and distraction. These results are in line with earlier findings in the context of excessive worry and depressive rumination and support the view that abstractness is a critical factor for the dysfunctional effects of trauma-related rumination. However, results regarding intrusive memories were not supportive of the hypotheses. Unexpectedly, the distraction group showed the highest number of intrusions, whereas the abstract and concrete conditions did not significantly differ. Implications for theoretical models of trauma-related rumination and possible clinical implications are discussed.

  17. Reading and Study Skills and Instruction: College and Adult: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," January through June 1982 (Vol. 42 Nos. 7 through 12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 19 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: (1) the effects of study guides on content retention and reading achievement among community college freshmen; (2) the effects of schemata and text structure on…

  18. Abstracts: US-International Biological Program ecosystems analysis studies. Volume 5. No. 3-4

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, J.A.; Myers, V.G.

    1980-12-01

    This issue documents 1149 entries to the US/IBP Abstracts computerized data base and completes the Abstracts journal series. Contributions from all five US/IBP biomes (Coniferous Forest, Desert, Eastern Deciduous Forest, Grassland, and Tundra) are included. Citations only for theses are included as abstracts were not available to the Ecosystem Analysis Data Center staff. Presentations and literature publications from the Desert Biome (Desert Biome 1975) have also been included in order to document the results of the US/IBP studies as completely as possible. Publication lists submitted by each biome (Brown 1977, Desert Biome 1975, Grassland Biome 1976, Coniferous Forest 1976, Eastern Deciduous Forest 1979) were used in compiling this volume.

  19. An Eye-Tracking Study of Learning from Science Text with Concrete and Abstract Illustrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Lucia; Pluchino, Patrik; Tornatora, Maria Caterina; Ariasi, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the online process of reading and the offline learning from an illustrated science text. The authors examined the effects of using a concrete or abstract picture to illustrate a text and adopted eye-tracking methodology to trace text and picture processing. They randomly assigned 59 eleventh-grade students to 3 reading…

  20. Television and Film in College English Instruction: A Bibliography of Research and Studies with Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svobodny, Dolly D., Comp.

    There are 62 abstracts in this compilation describing research and experimental teaching using television and film methods in college English instruction. The studies, most of them conducted since 1950, cover: (1) a comparison of televised instruction with face-to-face presentation, (2) a comparison of filmed or kinescoped courses with direct…

  1. Analogical scaffolding and the learning of abstract ideas in physics: Empirical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolefsky, Noah S.; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2007-12-01

    Previously, we proposed a model of student reasoning which combines the roles of representation, analogy, and layering of meaning—analogical scaffolding [Podolefsky and Finkelstein, Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 3, 010109 (2007)]. The present empirical studies build on this model to examine its utility and demonstrate the vital intertwining of representation, analogy, and conceptual learning in physics. In two studies of student reasoning using analogy, we show that representations couple to students’ existing prior knowledge and also lead to the dynamic formation of new knowledge. Students presented with abstract, concrete, or blended (both abstract and concrete) representations produced markedly different response patterns. In the first study, using analogies to scaffold understanding of electromagnetic (EM) waves, students in the blend group were more likely to reason productively about EM waves than students in the abstract group by as much as a factor of 3 (73% vs 24% correct, p=0.002 ). In the second study, examining representation use within one domain (sound waves), the blend group was more likely to reason productively about sound waves than the abstract group by as much as a factor of 2 (48% vs 23% correct, p=0.002 ). Using the analogical scaffolding model we examine when and why students succeed and fail to use analogies and interpret representations appropriately.

  2. An ERP study of recognition memory for concrete and abstract pictures in school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Olivier; Chouinard-Leclaire, Christine; Muckle, Gina; Westerlund, Alissa; Burden, Matthew J; Jacobson, Sandra W; Jacobson, Joseph L

    2016-08-01

    Recognition memory for concrete, nameable pictures is typically faster and more accurate than for abstract pictures. A dual-coding account for these findings suggests that concrete pictures are processed into verbal and image codes, whereas abstract pictures are encoded in image codes only. Recognition memory relies on two successive and distinct processes, namely familiarity and recollection. Whether these two processes are similarly or differently affected by stimulus concreteness remains unknown. This study examined the effect of picture concreteness on visual recognition memory processes using event-related potentials (ERPs). In a sample of children involved in a longitudinal study, participants (N=96; mean age=11.3years) were assessed on a continuous visual recognition memory task in which half the pictures were easily nameable, everyday concrete objects, and the other half were three-dimensional abstract, sculpture-like objects. Behavioral performance and ERP correlates of familiarity and recollection (respectively, the FN400 and P600 repetition effects) were measured. Behavioral results indicated faster and more accurate identification of concrete pictures as "new" or "old" (i.e., previously displayed) compared to abstract pictures. ERPs were characterized by a larger repetition effect, on the P600 amplitude, for concrete than for abstract images, suggesting a graded recollection process dependent on the type of material to be recollected. Topographic differences were observed within the FN400 latency interval, especially over anterior-inferior electrodes, with the repetition effect more pronounced and localized over the left hemisphere for concrete stimuli, potentially reflecting different neural processes underlying early processing of verbal/semantic and visual material in memory.

  3. ISO Lensing Studies: background galaxies and foreground cluster properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Martinez, Ricardo

    2003-02-01

    A number of ISO programmes, totaling over 100 hours of observation time, made use of the gravitational lensing phenomenon to extend the sensitivity of ISO observations. Substantial results derived from those programmes have been published, or are in the peer review process, addressing the MIR properties of the background lensed galaxy population. These results, which have important implications for galaxy evolution, and which resolve a large fraction of the 15 and 7 μm infrared-background light, will be briefly summarised. But the data has much further potential. Little has been published to date concerning the implications of the ISO lensing data for the foreground clusters themselves, nor addressing the overlap between the observed ISO sources and lensed populations seen at X-Ray and Sub-mm wavelengths. We report briefly on an ongoing programme to systematically reassess the set of ISO observations of lensing galaxy clusters and to describe and compare the IR properties of the clusters themselves. The overlap between ISO source lists and recently published lists of X-Ray and Sub-mm sources in the same fields is under study.

  4. Imagining the truth and the moon: an electrophysiological study of abstract and concrete word processing.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Margaret M; Mitra, Priya; Coch, Donna

    2013-05-01

    Previous event-related potential studies have indicated that both a widespread N400 and an anterior N700 index differential processing of concrete and abstract words, but the nature of these components in relation to concreteness and imagery has been unclear. Here, we separated the effects of word concreteness and task demands on the N400 and N700 in a single word processing paradigm with a within-subjects, between-tasks design and carefully controlled word stimuli. The N400 was larger to concrete words than to abstract words, and larger in the visualization task condition than in the surface task condition, with no interaction. A marked anterior N700 was elicited only by concrete words in the visualization task condition, suggesting that this component indexes imagery. These findings are consistent with a revised or extended dual coding theory according to which concrete words benefit from greater activation in both verbal and imagistic systems.

  5. Ab initio study of the kinetics of hydrogen abstraction reactions on toluene and tetralin

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Britt, Phillip F; Buchanan III, A C; Harrison, Robert J; Hathorn, Bryan C

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen abstraction reactions play a key role in many thermal and catalytic processes involved in the production of fuels and chemicals. In this paper, the reaction barriers and rate constants for the hydrogen abstraction reactions on toluene and tetralin by the benzyl radical are calculated by ab initio methods. These reactions are representatives of similar reactions occurring in the thermolysis of lignin model compounds containing the phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE) structural moiety. Thermolysis of PPE occurs by a free radical chain mechanism in which the product selectivity arises from competitive hydrogen abstraction at the benzylic and nonbenzylic methylen sites by chain carrying benzyl and phenoxyl radicals. The title reactions serve to calibrate the theoretical methods to be used in the study of PPE through comparison of the rate constants and the reaction enthalpies with reliable experimental values. In this study, we used two different hybrid density functionals (BHandHLYP, B3LYP) and second-order perturbation theory to obtain equilibrium and transition state geometries. Multiple transition states were found for both reactions. BHandHLYP underestimates and second-order perturbation theory overestimates the reaction barriers; B3LYP energy barriers agree well with experiment. Absolute and relative rate constants were calculated using transition state theory. We found that the relative rate constant using the B3LYP functional agrees within a factor of 2.0 with experiment at the experimental temperature of 333 K, indicating that the B3LYP functional will be successful in predicting relative rate constants for hydrogen abstraction reactions participating in the pyrolysis of PPE.

  6. Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Aaron Owen; /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-07-01

    Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor discrepancies in the neutron

  7. Theoretical study of the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen abstractions from hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Vandeputte, Aäron G; Sabbe, Maarten K; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Waroquier, Michel; Marin, Guy B

    2007-11-22

    Thermochemical and kinetic data were calculated at four cost-effective levels of theory for a set consisting of five hydrogen abstraction reactions between hydrocarbons for which experimental data are available. The selection of a reliable, yet cost-effective method to study this type of reactions for a broad range of applications was done on the basis of comparison with experimental data or with results obtained from computationally demanding high level of theory calculations. For this benchmark study two composite methods (CBS-QB3 and G3B3) and two density functional theory (DFT) methods, MPW1PW91/6-311G(2d,d,p) and BMK/6-311G(2d,d,p), were selected. All four methods succeeded well in describing the thermochemical properties of the five studied hydrogen abstraction reactions. High-level Weizmann-1 (W1) calculations indicated that CBS-QB3 succeeds in predicting the most accurate reaction barrier for the hydrogen abstraction of methane by methyl but tends to underestimate the reaction barriers for reactions where spin contamination is observed in the transition state. Experimental rate coefficients were most accurately predicted with CBS-QB3. Therefore, CBS-QB3 was selected to investigate the influence of both the 1D hindered internal rotor treatment about the forming bond (1D-HR) and tunneling on the rate coefficients for a set of 21 hydrogen abstraction reactions. Three zero curvature tunneling (ZCT) methods were evaluated (Wigner, Skodje & Truhlar, Eckart). As the computationally more demanding centrifugal dominant small curvature semiclassical (CD-SCS) tunneling method did not yield significantly better agreement with experiment compared to the ZCT methods, CD-SCS tunneling contributions were only assessed for the hydrogen abstractions by methyl from methane and ethane. The best agreement with experimental rate coefficients was found when Eckart tunneling and 1D-HR corrections were applied. A mean deviation of a factor 6 on the rate coefficients is found for

  8. Microwave and theoretical studies for Cosmic Background Explorer satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, D. T.

    1983-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, its instruments, and its scientific mission are discussed. The COBE radiometer is considered, and measurement of galactic radio emission with masers is reviewed. Extragalactic radiation and zodiacal dust are mentioned briefly.

  9. A Study of Nuclear Recoil Backgrounds in Dark Matter Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Westerdale, Shawn S.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great success of the Standard Model of particle physics, a preponderance of astrophysical evidence suggests that it cannot explain most of the matter in the universe. This so-called dark matter has eluded direct detection, though many theoretical extensions to the Standard Model predict the existence of particles with a mass on the $1-1000$ GeV scale that interact only via the weak nuclear force. Particles in this class are referred to as Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), and their high masses and low scattering cross sections make them viable dark matter candidates. The rarity of WIMP-nucleus interactions makes them challenging to detect: any background can mask the signal they produce. Background rejection is therefore a major problem in dark matter detection. Many experiments greatly reduce their backgrounds by employing techniques to reject electron recoils. However, nuclear recoil backgrounds, which produce signals similar to what we expect from WIMPs, remain problematic. There are two primary sources of such backgrounds: surface backgrounds and neutron recoils. Surface backgrounds result from radioactivity on the inner surfaces of the detector sending recoiling nuclei into the detector. These backgrounds can be removed with fiducial cuts, at some cost to the experiment's exposure. In this dissertation we briefly discuss a novel technique for rejecting these events based on signals they make in the wavelength shifter coating on the inner surfaces of some detectors. Neutron recoils result from neutrons scattering from nuclei in the detector. These backgrounds may produce a signal identical to what we expect from WIMPs and are extensively discussed here. We additionally present a new tool for calculating ($\\alpha$, n)yields in various materials. We introduce the concept of a neutron veto system designed to shield against, measure, and provide an anti-coincidence veto signal for background neutrons. We discuss the research and development

  10. Background study for the KamLAND reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimura, K.; Minekawa, Y.

    2008-07-01

    One of the goals of the KamLAND experiment is a search for anti-neutrino oscillation via inverse β decay with the characteristic delayed-coincidence method in the liquid scintillator. For a more precise measurement than previous KamLAND result [1], we have improved the background estimations of (α, n) and fast neutrons. We present the estimated number of backgrounds in our data set from Mar. 2002 to May 2007.

  11. Abstracts: US-International Biological Program ecosystems analysis studies. Volume 5. No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, J.A.; Myers, V.G.

    1980-12-01

    This issue documents 162 entries to the US/IBP Abstracts computerized data base. Only contributions from the Eastern Deciduous Forest Biome (EDFB) and the Tundra Biome (TNB) are included. Literature contributions and numeric data are abstracted in this volume.

  12. Studying Variable Stars with Undergraduate Students at the University of Nebraska Kearney (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, W. L., Jr.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) Over the past several years I have involved undergraduate students in studies of intrinsic variable stars and, more recently, binary stars. In this talk I will address the challenges that come when working exclusively with undergraduate students, as well as detail recent results from this work. In particular I will cover the results of a study of three RR Lyrae (RRL) stars that were identified from the SDSS using a novel technique, and a follow-up study on a previously unknown W UMa contact binary star that exhibits the O'Connell Effect (OCE) that we found in the field of one of the RRL we studied. Finally, I will describe our current work on binary stars and the OCE. Our current work will also be presented in more detail in my student's poster at this meeting.

  13. Disciplinarity and sport science in Europe: A statistical and sociological study of ECSS conference abstracts.

    PubMed

    Champely, Stéphane; Fargier, Patrick; Camy, Jean

    2017-02-01

    Abstracts of European College of Sports Science conferences (1995-2014) are studied. The number of abstracts has been increasing regularly (+90 per year). This rise is in recent years largely due to extra-European countries. The magnitude and accumulation of the different topics of discussion are examined. An operational criterion determines four stages of evolution of a topic: social network, cluster, specialty, and discipline. The scientific production can, therefore, be classified as disciplinary or non-disciplinary. The disciplinary part is more important but has been less dynamic recently. The cognitive content of sport science is then explored through a multidimensional scaling of the topics based on the keywords used in the abstracts. Three areas are visible: social sciences and humanities, sports medicine and physiology, and biomechanics and neurophysiology. According to the field theory of Bourdieu ( 1975 ), three scientific habitus are distinguished. The logic of academic disciplinary excellence is the consequence of the autonomy of this scientific field, its closure, peer-review process, and barriers to entry. The distribution of scientific capital and professional capital is unequal across the three areas. Basically, conservation strategies of academic disciplinary excellence are predicted in biomechanics and neurophysiology, subversion strategies of interdisciplinarity based on professional concerns can appear in the sports medicine and physiology area, and critical strategies of interdisciplinarity based on social utility in social sciences and humanities. Moreover, additional tensions within these areas are depicted. Lastly methods based on co-citations of disciplines and boundary objects are proposed to find tangible patterns of multidisciplinarity confirming these strategies.

  14. Study on a focusing, low-background neutron delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahn, J.; Panzner, T.; Filges, U.; Marcelot, C.; Böni, P.

    2011-04-01

    In various fields of neutron scattering there is a tendency to use smaller and smaller samples. There are various reasons for this, e.g. the limited size in high pressure cells, the restrictions given by growth methods of thin films, or the impossibility to grow larger single crystals. With conventional guides this leads to the situation that a white beam with some 50 cm2 cross-section and a broad divergence is to illuminate a sample of some mm2 area. Thus more than 99% of the neutrons leaving the guide are not needed and cause background and radiation problems.It is suggested to change the order of the optical elements and the design of the guide section to filter neutrons not intended to hit the sample as early as possible. As an example a set-up for specular reflectivity on small samples is presented. A double monochromator some meters behind the source cuts away all neutrons of the wrong wavelength even before they enter the guide. The guide itself is one branch of an ellipse. It maps the divergent beam from the monochromator to a convergent beam at the sample position. An entry aperture at the first focal point, a bit larger than the sample, guarantees that just enough neutrons enter the guide to bath the sample. There is no direct line of sight to the source and the guide ends far away from the sample position, so that there are only few spacial restrictions.Detailed McStas calculations and a design study for a down-scaled test device, both for reflectometry and diffraction, are presented.

  15. Ab initio study for the hydrogen abstraction reactions on toluene and tetralin.

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Harrison, Robert J; Britt, Phillip F; Buchanan III, A C

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen abstraction reactions play a key role in many thermal and catalytic processes involved in the production of fuels and chemicals. In this paper, the hydrogen abstraction reactions on toluene and tetralin by the benzyl radical are investigated by ab initio methods. These reactions are representatives of similar reactions occurring in the thermolysis of lignin model compounds containing the phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE) structural moiety. The title reactions serve to calibrate the theoretical methods to be used in the study of PPE pyrolysis through comparison of the reaction barriers with reliable experimental values. We used two different hybrid density functionals (BHandHLYP, B3LYP) and second-order perturbation theory to obtain equilibrium and transition state geometries. We recomputed selected energy barriers at the B3LYP geometries with the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) method. Multiple transition states were found for both reactions. BHandHLYP underestimates and second-order perturbation theory overestimates the reaction barriers; B3LYP energy barriers agree well with experiment and the corresponding CCSD energy barriers. The flat potential energy surface around the saddle points causes numerical inaccuracies. We observe the break down of the harmonic approximation in the calculation of low frequencies.

  16. Struggling to understand abstract science topics: a Roundhouse diagram-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Robin E.; Wandersee, James H.

    2002-06-01

    This study explored the effects of Roundhouse diagram construction on a previously low-performing middle school science student's struggles to understand abstract science concepts and principles. It is based on a metacognition-based visual learning model proposed by Wandersee in 1994. Ward and Wandersee introduced the Roundhouse diagram strategy and showed how it could be applied in science education. This article aims at elucidating the process by which Roundhouse diagramming helps learners bootstrap their current understandings to reach the intended meaningful understanding of complex science topics. The main findings of this study are that (a) it is crucial that relevant prior knowledge and dysfunctional alternative conceptions not be ignored during new learning if low-performing science students are to understand science well; (b) as the student's mastery of the Roundhouse diagram construction improved, so did science achievement; and (c) the student's apt choice of concept-related visual icons aided progress toward meaningful understanding of complex science concepts.

  17. Abstract or Concrete Examples in Learning Mathematics? A Replication and Elaboration of Kaminski, Sloutsky, and Heckler's Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bock, Dirk; Deprez, Johan; Van Dooren, Wim; Roelens, Michel; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2011-01-01

    Kaminski, Sloutsky, and Heckler (2008a) published in "Science" a study on "The advantage of abstract examples in learning math," in which they claim that students may benefit more from learning mathematics through a single abstract, symbolic representation than from multiple concrete examples. This publication elicited both enthusiastic and…

  18. Excitation rate and background measurements during LIF studies on krypton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, C. A.; Cannon, B. D.; Wacker, J. F.

    1993-04-01

    The Krypton Isotope Laser Analysis (KILA) method is being developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to measure Kr-85 concentrations in small air samples. The technique uses high-resolution lasers to excite individual isotopes of krypton specifically to induce Kr-85 to fluorescence for detection by optical means. Production of krypton metastables via two-photon excitation to the 2p(sub 6) state has been shown to be 0.15% efficient in 0.13 mTorr of krypton--sufficiently high to demonstrate overall feasibility of the KILA method. Since this goal was met, focus has been directed toward development of a working vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) fluorescence detection system and toward understanding the VUV background. This report describes the progress made in these two areas. The second step of the KILA process is to optically pump all except the Kr-85 isotopes from the metastable state back to the ground state using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The rate of this process and the VUV background afterward will determine the sensitivity and selectivity of the KILA approach. De-excitation of the metastable population was accomplished via one-photon absorption of a continuous-wave (c-w) laser to the 2p(sub 8) energy level. Non-isotopically selective de-excitation rates as high as 5 x 10(exp 5)/sec have been measured, yielding a signal-to-background ratio of g reater than 10(exp 6). The lifetime of the metastables is 1.2 msec in 200 mTorr of neon--much longer than the time required to de-excite krypton metastables and to detect fluorescence produced by Kr-85. After attaining these high de-excitation rates, a gated VUV detection system was built with a dynamic range large enough to measure a small background following de-excitation of large metastable populations. Future experiments will focus on reducing the background level by another 2-3 orders of magnitude and perfecting the isotopically selective de-excitation technique with known samples.

  19. Excitation rate and background measurements during LIF studies on krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, C.A.; Cannon, B.D.; Wacker, J.F.

    1993-04-01

    The Krypton Isotope Laser Analysis (KILA) method is being developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to measure [sup 85]Kr concentrations in small air samples. The technique uses high-resolution lasers to excite individual isotopes of krypton specifically to induce [sup 85]Kr to fluorescence for detection by optical means. Production of krypton metastables via two-photon excitation to the 2p[sub 6] state has been shown to be 0.15% efficient in 0.13 mTorr of krypton--sufficiently high to demonstrate overall feasibility of the KILA method. Since this goal was met, focus has been directed toward development of a working vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) fluorescence detection system and toward understanding the VUV background. This report describes the progress made in these two areas. The second step of the KILA process is to optically pump all except the [sup 85]Kr isotopes from the metastable state back to the ground state using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The rate of this process and the VUV background afterward will determine the sensitivity and selectivity of the KILA approach. De-excitation of the metastable population was accomplished via one-photon absorption of a continuous-wave (c-w) laser to the 2p[sub 8] energy level. Non-isotopically selective de-excitation rates as high as 5 [times] 10[sup 5] sec[sup [minus]1] have been measured, yielding a signal-to-background ratio of >10[sup 6]. The lifetime of the metastables is 1.2 msec in 200 mTorr of neon--much longer than the time required to de-excite krypton metastables and to detect fluorescence produced by [sup 85]Kr. After attaining these high de-excitation rates, a gated VUV detection system was built with a dynamic range large enough to measure a small background following de-excitation of large metastable populations. Future experiments will focus on reducing the background level by another 2--3 orders of magnitude and perfecting the isotopically selective de-excitation technique with known samples.

  20. Excitation rate and background measurements during LIF studies on krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, C.A.; Cannon, B.D.; Wacker, J.F.

    1993-04-01

    The Krypton Isotope Laser Analysis (KILA) method is being developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to measure {sup 85}Kr concentrations in small air samples. The technique uses high-resolution lasers to excite individual isotopes of krypton specifically to induce {sup 85}Kr to fluorescence for detection by optical means. Production of krypton metastables via two-photon excitation to the 2p{sub 6} state has been shown to be 0.15% efficient in 0.13 mTorr of krypton--sufficiently high to demonstrate overall feasibility of the KILA method. Since this goal was met, focus has been directed toward development of a working vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) fluorescence detection system and toward understanding the VUV background. This report describes the progress made in these two areas. The second step of the KILA process is to optically pump all except the {sup 85}Kr isotopes from the metastable state back to the ground state using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The rate of this process and the VUV background afterward will determine the sensitivity and selectivity of the KILA approach. De-excitation of the metastable population was accomplished via one-photon absorption of a continuous-wave (c-w) laser to the 2p{sub 8} energy level. Non-isotopically selective de-excitation rates as high as 5 {times} 10{sup 5} sec{sup {minus}1} have been measured, yielding a signal-to-background ratio of >10{sup 6}. The lifetime of the metastables is 1.2 msec in 200 mTorr of neon--much longer than the time required to de-excite krypton metastables and to detect fluorescence produced by {sup 85}Kr. After attaining these high de-excitation rates, a gated VUV detection system was built with a dynamic range large enough to measure a small background following de-excitation of large metastable populations. Future experiments will focus on reducing the background level by another 2--3 orders of magnitude and perfecting the isotopically selective de-excitation technique with known samples.

  1. Norms from the Georgia Centenarian Study: Measures of verbal abstract reasoning, fluency, memory, and motor function

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Meghan B.; Miller, L. Stephen; Woodard, John L.; Davey, Adam; Martin, Peter; Poon, Leonard W.

    2014-01-01

    We previously presented normative data from a relatively large, population-based sample (n = 244) of centenarians and a reference group of octogenarians (n = 80) for several brief, global neurocognitive tasks adapted for use for older adults with physical and sensory limitations (Miller et al., 2010). Here, we present additional normative data on several domain-specific tasks from these samples from Phase III of the Georgia Centenarian Study, including measures of verbal abstract reasoning, fluency, memory, and motor function. Expected age differences were demonstrated across all cognitive measures, and, consistent with our previous findings, centenarians showed a stronger association between age and performance. Normative tables are presented unweighted as well as population-weighted, and stratified by age and education level. These findings offer a unique contribution to the literature on cognitive aging, as normative performance in this age group is understudied and largely unavailable to clinicians and researchers. PMID:23379531

  2. THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND EXPERIMENT (CIBER): A SOUNDING ROCKET PAYLOAD TO STUDY THE NEAR INFRARED EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Zemcov, M.; Bock, J.; Hristov, V.; Levenson, L. R.; Mason, P.; Arai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Tsumura, K.; Wada, T.; Battle, J.; Cooray, A.; Keating, B.; Renbarger, T.; Kim, M. G.; Lee, D. H.; Nam, U. W.; Sullivan, I.; Suzuki, K.

    2013-08-15

    The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER) is a suite of four instruments designed to study the near infrared (IR) background light from above the Earth's atmosphere. The instrument package comprises two imaging telescopes designed to characterize spatial anisotropy in the extragalactic IR background caused by cosmological structure during the epoch of reionization, a low resolution spectrometer to measure the absolute spectrum of the extragalactic IR background, and a narrow band spectrometer optimized to measure the absolute brightness of the zodiacal light foreground. In this paper we describe the design and characterization of the CIBER payload. The detailed mechanical, cryogenic, and electrical design of the system are presented, including all system components common to the four instruments. We present the methods and equipment used to characterize the instruments before and after flight, and give a detailed description of CIBER's flight profile and configurations. CIBER is designed to be recoverable and has flown four times, with modifications to the payload having been informed by analysis of the first flight data. All four instruments performed to specifications during the subsequent flights, and the scientific data from these flights are currently being analyzed.

  3. The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER): A Sounding Rocket Payload to Study the near Infrared Extragalactic Background Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemcov, M.; Arai, T.; Battle, J.; Bock, J.; Cooray, A.; Hristov, V.; Keating, B.; Kim, M. G.; Lee, D. H.; Levenson, L. R.; Mason, P.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Nam, U. W.; Renbarger, T.; Sullivan, I.; Suzuki, K.; Tsumura, K.; Wada, T.

    2013-08-01

    The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER) is a suite of four instruments designed to study the near infrared (IR) background light from above the Earth's atmosphere. The instrument package comprises two imaging telescopes designed to characterize spatial anisotropy in the extragalactic IR background caused by cosmological structure during the epoch of reionization, a low resolution spectrometer to measure the absolute spectrum of the extragalactic IR background, and a narrow band spectrometer optimized to measure the absolute brightness of the zodiacal light foreground. In this paper we describe the design and characterization of the CIBER payload. The detailed mechanical, cryogenic, and electrical design of the system are presented, including all system components common to the four instruments. We present the methods and equipment used to characterize the instruments before and after flight, and give a detailed description of CIBER's flight profile and configurations. CIBER is designed to be recoverable and has flown four times, with modifications to the payload having been informed by analysis of the first flight data. All four instruments performed to specifications during the subsequent flights, and the scientific data from these flights are currently being analyzed.

  4. Using Monte Carlo Software to Teach Abstract Statistical Concepts: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffle, Holly; Brooks, Gordon P.

    2005-01-01

    Violations of assumptions, inflated Type I error rates, and robustness are important concepts for students to learn in an introductory statistics course. However, these abstract ideas can be difficult for students to understand. Monte Carlo simulation methods can provide a concrete way for students to learn abstract statistical concepts. This…

  5. English and French Journal Abstracts in the Language Sciences: Three Exploratory Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Bonn, Sarah; Swales, John M.

    2007-01-01

    This article compares French and English academic article abstracts from the language sciences in an attempt to understand how and why language choice might affect this part-genre--both in actual use and according to authors' linguistic and rhetorical perceptions. Two corpora are used: Corpus A consists of abstracts from a French linguistics…

  6. A study of understanding: Alchemy, abstraction, and circulating reference in tertiary science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Brett W.

    Understanding is widely touted to be of paramount importance for education. This is especially true in science education research and development where understanding is heralded as one of the cornerstones of reform. Teachers are expected to teach for understanding and students are expected to learn with understanding. This dissertation is an empirical study of the concept of understanding. After analyzing various constructions of understanding in current U.S. education literature, I suggest that understanding is defined by five distinct features---they are knowledge (or knowledge base), coherence, transfer, extrapolation, and cognition--- and that these features are heavily informed and shaped by the psychological sciences. This relationship is neither good nor bad, I argue, but it means that teaching for and learning with understanding are not heavily informed and shaped by, for example, the natural sciences. Drawing from historical, philosophical, and anthropological perspectives of science, but especially from the work of Bruno Latour, I enact a radical revision(ing) of psychological notions such as "abstraction" and "transfer." The two main purposes of this re-visioning are (1) to draw critical attention to particular characteristics of a cognitive learning theory that emphasizes abstract concepts, and (2) to align many of the principles and tools used in science education more closely with those used in empirical scientific research. Finally, by bringing some examples of teaching and learning from an undergraduate biology classroom into conversation with both psychological and empirical practices and perspectives, I suggest that problematizing the current construction of understanding creates much needed room in mainstream science education for more empirical forms of learning and styles of teaching. A shift to such forms and styles, I conclude, should prove to be more inclusive and less constraining for both students and teachers.

  7. Study of robot landmark recognition with complex background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuqing; Yang, Jia

    2007-12-01

    It's of great importance for assisting robot in path planning, position navigating and task performing by perceiving and recognising environment characteristic. To solve the problem of monocular-vision-oriented landmark recognition for mobile intelligent robot marching with complex background, a kind of nested region growing algorithm which fused with transcendental color information and based on current maximum convergence center is proposed, allowing invariance localization to changes in position, scale, rotation, jitters and weather conditions. Firstly, a novel experiment threshold based on RGB vision model is used for the first image segmentation, which allowing some objects and partial scenes with similar color to landmarks also are detected with landmarks together. Secondly, with current maximum convergence center on segmented image as each growing seed point, the above region growing algorithm accordingly starts to establish several Regions of Interest (ROI) orderly. According to shape characteristics, a quick and effectual contour analysis based on primitive element is applied in deciding whether current ROI could be reserved or deleted after each region growing, then each ROI is judged initially and positioned. When the position information as feedback is conveyed to the gray image, the whole landmarks are extracted accurately with the second segmentation on the local image that exclusive to landmark area. Finally, landmarks are recognised by Hopfield neural network. Results issued from experiments on a great number of images with both campus and urban district as background show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  8. Abstraction and Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, John; Ozmantar, Mehmet Fatih

    2004-01-01

    What is involved in consolidating a new mathematical abstraction? This paper examines the work of one student who was working on a task designed to consolidate two recently constructed absolute function abstractions. The study adopts an activity theoretic model of abstraction in context. Selected protocol data are presented. The initial state of…

  9. A Study of Radon Background in the XENON100 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Marc

    2011-04-27

    The XENON100 Dark Matter experiment has recently published first results from an analysis of 11.2 live days of data, setting an upper limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering cross section of 3.4x10{sup -44} cm{sup 2} at 55 GeV/c{sup 2} and 90% confidence level. This article focuses on one specific background component of the XENON100 detector by presenting two independent methods of measuring the {sup 222}Rn concentration during operation phase. A first estimate of radon activity is derived for the 11.2 days analysis, proving the feasibility of on-line radon monitoring. Remaining systematic uncertainties are discussed.

  10. Research Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotnick, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Presents research abstracts from the ERIC Clearinghouse on Information and Technology. Topics include: classroom communication apprehension and distance education; outcomes of a distance-delivered science course; the NASA/Kennedy Space Center Virtual Science Mentor program; survey of traditional and distance learning higher education members;…

  11. Research Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotnik, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Presents six research abstracts from the ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) database. Topics include: effectiveness of distance versus traditional on-campus education; improved attribution recall from diversification of environmental context during computer-based instruction; qualitative analysis of situated Web-based learning;…

  12. Abstract Constructions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietropola, Anne

    1998-01-01

    Describes a lesson designed to culminate a year of eighth-grade art classes in which students explore elements of design and space by creating 3-D abstract constructions. Outlines the process of using foam board and markers to create various shapes and optical effects. (DSK)

  13. Muon background studies for shallow depth Double - Chooz near detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gómez, H.

    2015-08-17

    Muon events are one of the main concerns regarding background in neutrino experiments. The placement of experimental set-ups in deep underground facilities reduce considerably their impact on the research of the expected signals. But in the cases where the detector is installed on surface or at shallow depth, muon flux remains high, being necessary their precise identification for further rejection. Total flux, mean energy or angular distributions are some of the parameters that can help to characterize the muons. Empirically, the muon rate can be measured in an experiment by a number of methods. Nevertheless, the capability to determine the muons angular distribution strongly depends on the detector features, while the measurement of the muon energy is quite difficult. Also considering that on-site measurements can not be extrapolated to other sites due to the difference on the overburden and its profile, it is necessary to find an adequate solution to perform the muon characterization. The method described in this work to obtain the main features of the muons reaching the experimental set-up, is based on the muon transport simulation by the MUSIC software, combined with a dedicated sampling algorithm for shallow depth installations based on a modified Gaisser parametrization. This method provides all the required information about the muons for any shallow depth installation if the corresponding overburden profile is implemented. In this work, the method has been applied for the recently commissioned Double - Chooz near detector, which will allow the cross-check between the simulation and the experimental data, as it has been done for the far detector.

  14. Geochemistry Model Abstraction and Sensitivity Studies for the 21 PWR CSNF Waste Package

    SciTech Connect

    P. Bernot; S. LeStrange; E. Thomas; K. Zarrabi; S. Arthur

    2002-10-29

    The CSNF geochemistry model abstraction, as directed by the TWP (BSC 2002b), was developed to provide regression analysis of EQ6 cases to obtain abstracted values of pH (and in some cases HCO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration) for use in the Configuration Generator Model. The pH of the system is the controlling factor over U mineralization, CSNF degradation rate, and HCO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration in solution. The abstraction encompasses a large variety of combinations for the degradation rates of materials. The ''base case'' used EQ6 simulations looking at differing steel/alloy corrosion rates, drip rates, and percent fuel exposure. Other values such as the pH/HCO{sub 3}{sup -} dependent fuel corrosion rate and the corrosion rate of A516 were kept constant. Relationships were developed for pH as a function of these differing rates to be used in the calculation of total C and subsequently, the fuel rate. An additional refinement to the abstraction was the addition of abstracted pH values for cases where there was limited O{sub 2} for waste package corrosion and a flushing fluid other than J-13, which has been used in all EQ6 calculation up to this point. These abstractions also used EQ6 simulations with varying combinations of corrosion rates of materials to abstract the pH (and HCO{sub 3}{sup -} in the case of the limiting O{sub 2} cases) as a function of WP materials corrosion rates. The goodness of fit for most of the abstracted values was above an R{sup 2} of 0.9. Those below this value occurred during the time at the very beginning of WP corrosion when large variations in the system pH are observed. However, the significance of F-statistic for all the abstractions showed that the variable relationships are significant. For the abstraction, an analysis of the minerals that may form the ''sludge'' in the waste package was also presented. This analysis indicates that a number a different iron and aluminum minerals may form in the waste package other than those

  15. Self, Mother and Abstract Other: an fMRI study of reflective social processing

    PubMed Central

    Vanderwal, Tamara; Hunyadi, Elinora; Grupe, Daniel W.; Connors, Caitlin M.; Schultz, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Using fMRI, we studied the neural correlates of self-referential processing by comparing BOLD signal changes during self and mother conditions of a self-reference effect (SRE) task. Conjunction analysis of these two conditions showed several common areas of significant activation, including the medial aspects of the superior frontal gyri, left inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral temporal poles, left superior temporal sulcus and left precuneus. The locations of the 7 strongest peak activations for the self condition and for the mother condition were compared on a subject-by-subject basis in native space. Of the 119 pairs of peaks explored, 87% were located within 2 voxels of each other, demonstrating the commonality of the brain regions subserving both self- and mother-referential processing within an individual subject. In group analyses of the self-referential vs. mother-referential contrast, small differences in activation strength were observed in the left superior frontal sulcus, right cingulate gyrus and the left fusiform gyrus. Greater activation for mother than for self was observed in bilateral temporal lobes. Subjects also performed a social attribution task (SAT) in which they inferred mental states about interacting geometric shapes. Activations from this visual theory of mind task were compared with the activations demonstrated during self-referential processing. Striking similarities were found, including overlapping activations in bilateral medial prefrontal cortices, left inferior frontal gyrus and precuneus. These data suggest that reflective analysis of self, mother and abstract others relies predominantly on the same neural architecture. PMID:18486489

  16. Computational study on SiH4 dissociation channels and H abstraction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Toshio; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    The primary dissociation channels of SiH4 were investigated using computational chemistry. The results showed properties very similar to those of CH4. The main dissociation product was SiH2 and the second dissociation product was SiH3. SiH was produced through SiH3 to SiH + H2 dissociation by electronic excitation. H abstraction reactions by H and SiH3 were also calculated for SiH4, Si2H6, Si3H8, and Si9H14(100) cluster models. The energy barriers of H abstraction reactions were lower than those of SiH3 abstraction reactions. This result is considerably important for deposition in SiH4/H2 process plasma.

  17. The Economy, Energy, and the Environment. A Background Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joint Economic Committee, Washington, DC.

    This study surveys the existing literature related to various technical aspects of electric power production, with primary emphasis on the supply of the various fuels used in the production of electricity and on the environmental consequences of energy conversion. It was prepared by the Environmental Policy Division, Legislative Reference Service,…

  18. Reading and Study Skills and Instruction: Preschool and Elementary: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," January through June 1983 (Vol. 43 Nos. 7 through 12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 18 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: (1) the effect of illustrations on third grade students' attitudes toward the elderly; (2) visual and phonological coding in word processing by fourth, sixth, and…

  19. Reading and Study Skills and Instruction: College and Adult: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," January through June 1983 (Vol. 43 Nos. 7 through 12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The eight titles deal with the following topics: (1) the relationship of training in self-generated questioning with passage difficulty and immediate and delayed retention; (2) the influence of previewing techniques on the reading…

  20. Reading and Study Skills and Instruction: Preschool and Elementary: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1979 (Vol. 40 Nos. 1 through 6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 47 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: a programed tutoring project in which older students tutored first grade students; oral reading miscues made by children in high, medium, and low reading groups;…

  1. Reading and Study Skills: Preschool and Primary: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," January through June 1979 (Vol. 39 Nos. 7 through 12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 49 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: reading instruction for elementary school children, the significance of the teacher or teacher aide in reading instruction, reading achievement, reading…

  2. Reading and Study Skills: Secondary: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July 1978 through June 1979 (Vol. 39 Nos. 1 through 12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 29 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: various factors in terms of attitudes toward reading; the effect of group counseling on self-concept and reading achievement; the effect of three modes of…

  3. Reading and Study Skills and Instruction: Preschool and Elementary: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," January through June 1981 (Vol. 41 Nos. 7 through 12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 28 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: (1) cognitive style and the reading of children in second grade; (2) the effect of increased review in teaching sight words to average and poor readers; (3)…

  4. Developmental Changes in Visual Scanning of Dynamic Faces and Abstract Stimuli in Infants: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunnius, Sabine; Geuze, Reint H.

    2004-01-01

    The characteristics of scanning patterns between the ages of 6 and 26 weeks were investigated through repeated assessments of 10 infants. Eye movements were recorded using a corneal-reflection system while the infants looked at 2 dynamic stimuli: the naturally moving face of their mother and an abstract stimulus. Results indicated that the way…

  5. Direct dynamics study on hydrogen abstraction reaction of CF 3CHOHCF 3 with OH radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Jing-Yao; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2007-05-01

    Dual-level direct dynamics method is employed to investigate the H-abstraction reaction CF 3CHOHCF 3 with OH radical. Two hydrogen-abstraction reaction channels are possible: one from the methylene (-CH-) position and the other from the hydroxyl (-OH) position. The minimum energy path is calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, and the energetic information is further refined by a new powerful and inexpensive BMC-CCSD method. To testify the accuracy of the structures and the energies, the recently developed hybrid density functional theory BB1K and higher level MC-QCISD are applied to this system. Hydrogen-bonded complexes are presented at both reactants and products sides of these two channels, which indicating that the reaction may proceed via an indirect mechanism. The rate constants for each reaction channel are evaluated by canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) with a small-curvature tunneling correction (SCT) over a wide range of temperatures from 200 to 2000 K. The calculated CVT/SCT rate constants are in good agreement with the available experimental values in the temperature region 250-430 K. The present results indicate that the two channels are competitive. At lower temperature, the reaction occurs mainly via the hydroxyl-H-abstraction channel, while the methylene-H-abstraction channel is preferred when the temperature is higher than 273 K.

  6. Overstatements in abstract conclusions claiming effectiveness of interventions in psychiatry: a study protocol for a meta-epidemiological investigation

    PubMed Central

    Suganuma, Aya M; Shinohara, Kiyomi; Imai, Hissei; Takeshima, Nozomi; Hayasaka, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Abstracts are the major and often the most important source of information for readers of the medical literature. However, there is mounting criticism that abstracts often exaggerate the positive findings and emphasise the beneficial effects of intervention beyond the actual findings mentioned in the corresponding full texts. In order to examine the magnitude of this problem, we will introduce a systematic approach to detect overstated abstracts and to quantify the extent of their prevalence in published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the field of psychiatry. Methods and analysis We will source RCTs published in 2014 from the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) that claim effectiveness of any intervention for mental disorders. The abstract conclusions will be categorised into three types: superior (only stating significant superiority of intervention to control), limited (suggesting that intervention has limited superiority to control) and equal (claiming equal effectiveness of intervention as control). The full texts will also be classified as one of the following based on the primary outcome results: significant (all primary outcomes were statistically significant in favour of the intervention), mixed (primary outcomes included both significant and non-significant results) or all non-significant results. By comparing the abstract conclusion classification and that of the corresponding full text, we will assess whether each study exhibited overstatements in its abstract conclusion. Ethics and dissemination This trial requires no ethical approval. We will publish our findings in a peer-reviewed journal. Trial registration number UMIN000018668; Pre-results. PMID:27103624

  7. US Forest Service and National Park Service Wilderness Aircraft Overflight Study: Sociological background and study plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Robin T.; Hartmann, Lawrence

    1990-01-01

    The background and sociological aspects of the combined U.S. Forest Service and National Park Service Wilderness Aircraft Overflight Study (WACOS) are presented. The WACOS broaches a new area of research by combining aspects of outdoor recreation sociology and aircraft noise response studies. The tasks faced create new challenges and require innovative solutions. Background information on the WACOS is presented with special emphasis on sociological considerations. At the time of this writing, no data have yet been collected, so this paper will present background information, related issues, and plans for data collection. Some recent studies indicate that managers of Forest Service wildernesses and National Park Service areas consider aircraft overflights to be a problem to their users in some areas. Additional relevant background research from outdoor recreation sociology is discussed, followed by presentation of the authors' opinions of the most salient sociological issues faced by this study. The goals and desired end products are identified next, followed by a review of the methods anticipated to be used to obtain these results. Finally, a discussion and conclusion section is provided.

  8. Designing for Mathematical Abstraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Dave; Noss, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Our focus is on the design of systems (pedagogical, technical, social) that encourage mathematical abstraction, a process we refer to as "designing for abstraction." In this paper, we draw on detailed design experiments from our research on children's understanding about chance and distribution to re-present this work as a case study in designing…

  9. COMPUTER-AIDED INDEXING OF A SCIENTIFIC ABSTRACTS JOURNAL BY THE UDC WITH UNIDEK--A CASE STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FREEMAN, ROBERT R.; RUSSELL, MARTIN

    THIS PAPER IS A CASE STUDY OF THE ADOPTION BY GEOSCIENCE ABSTRACTS OF UNIDEK, A COMPUTER-COMPILED SYSTEMATIC SUBJECT INDEX BASED ON THE UNIVERSAL DECIMAL CLASSIFICATION (UDC). EVENTS LEADING TO A DECISION TO ADOPT THE SYSTEM, SOME THEORY OF INDEXES, PROBLEMS INVOLVED IN CONVERSION, AND SOME OF THE RESULTS ACHIEVED ARE REVIEWED. UNIDEK MAKES…

  10. Research and Studies About the Use of Television and Film in Foreign Language Instruction: A Bibliography With Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svobodny, Dolly D., Comp.

    A compilation of 90 abstracts describes research and experimental teaching using television and film methods in foreign language instruction. The studies cover (1) a comparison of televised instruction with face-to-face presentation, (2) a comparison of filmed or kinescoped courses with direct instruction, (3) other uses of television and film…

  11. Ab initio study of the H + HONO reaction: Direct abstraction versus indirect exchange processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.C.; Lin, M.C.; Mebel, A.M.; Melius, C.F.

    1997-01-02

    The mechanism of the H + HONO reaction (for which no experimental data are available) has been elucidated by ab initio molecular orbital calculations using modified G2 and BAC-MP4 methods. These results indicate that the reaction occurs predominantly by two indirect metathetical processes. One produces OH + HNO and H{sub 2}O + NO from the decomposition of vibrationally excited hydroxyl nitroxide, HN(O)OH, formed by H atom addition to the N atom of HONO. The other produces H{sub 2}O + NO from the decomposition of vibrationally excited dihydroxylamino radical, N(OH){sub 2}, formed by H atom addition to the terminal O atom. These indirect displacement processes are much more efficient than the commonly assumed, direct H-abstraction reaction producing H{sub 2} + NO{sub 2}. A transition-state theory calculation for the direct abstraction reaction and RRKM calculations for the two indirect displacement processes give rise to the following rate constants, in units of cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} for the 300-3500 K temperature range under atmospheric conditions: k{sub H(2)} = 3.33 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.55} exp(-3328.5/T), k{sub OH} = 9.36 x 10{sup -14}T{sup 0.86} exp(-2500.8/T), k{sub H(2)O} = 1.35 x 10{sup -17}T{sup 1.89} exp-(-1935.7/T), where the rate constant for H{sub 2}O production represents the sum from both indirect displacement reactions. 32 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. X-ray Ross filter method for impurity transport studies on DIII-D (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogatu, I. N.; Kim, J. S.; Egdell, D. H.; Snider, R. T.; Brooks, N. H.; Wade, M. R.; West, W. P.

    2001-01-01

    The injection of Ar into the region of the DIII-D divertor is a promising technique for energy dissipation (through radiation and collisions) and consequently for reduction of the heat load on the plates. An important problem related to this technique, is the inherent poisoning of the core plasma by migrating Ar. The Ar core contamination seems also to improve the thermal transport in an advanced operating mode of the tokamak. It is therefore of great importance to measure the evolution of the impurity concentration profile within the core plasma. This goal could be achieved by using the Ross filter method in conjunction with the existing x-ray diagnostics on DIII-D. A basic Ross filter system consists of two identical detectors placed behind two different x-ray absorbing foils looking at the same plasma volume. The foils are made of different elements or compounds with adjacent or nearly adjacent atomic numbers. Their accurate thickness causes the x-ray transmission curves of the two foils to be effectively identical over the entire energy range except within the narrow region between their absorption edges. Since the transmission characteristics of the foils above and below their absorption edges are the same, any difference in the two detected signals is proportional to the total x-ray power of the emission spectrum between these two edge energies. An x-ray Ross filter with its energy pass band centered on the Ar XVII Kα line at 3.14 keV has been designed. This allows for the discrimination of the Ar Kα line only, regardless of Ar ionization state, against any background radiation with energies outside the energy pass band. The Ross filter was installed in front of two of the fan shaped poloidal x-ray arrays on DIII-D. The first measurements showed very good discrimination against Ne, another injected impurity. Emissivity profile evolution of the Kα lines and Ar enhanced continuum within the energy pass band of the Ross filter can be determined from the x

  13. 22 CFR 96.53 - Background studies on the child and consents in outgoing cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... United States (outgoing Cases) § 96.53 Background studies on the child and consents in outgoing cases. (a... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Background studies on the child and consents in outgoing cases. 96.53 Section 96.53 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED...

  14. 22 CFR 96.53 - Background studies on the child and consents in outgoing cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... United States (outgoing Cases) § 96.53 Background studies on the child and consents in outgoing cases. (a... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Background studies on the child and consents in outgoing cases. 96.53 Section 96.53 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED...

  15. 22 CFR 96.53 - Background studies on the child and consents in outgoing cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... United States (outgoing Cases) § 96.53 Background studies on the child and consents in outgoing cases. (a... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Background studies on the child and consents in outgoing cases. 96.53 Section 96.53 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED...

  16. 22 CFR 96.53 - Background studies on the child and consents in outgoing cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... United States (outgoing Cases) § 96.53 Background studies on the child and consents in outgoing cases. (a... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Background studies on the child and consents in outgoing cases. 96.53 Section 96.53 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED...

  17. 22 CFR 96.53 - Background studies on the child and consents in outgoing cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... United States (outgoing Cases) § 96.53 Background studies on the child and consents in outgoing cases. (a... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Background studies on the child and consents in outgoing cases. 96.53 Section 96.53 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED...

  18. Writing a successful research abstract.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Donna Z

    2012-01-01

    Writing and submitting a research abstract provides timely dissemination of the findings of a study and offers peer input for the subsequent development of a quality manuscript. Acceptance of abstracts is competitive. Understanding the expected content of an abstract, the abstract review process and tips for skillful writing will improve the chance of acceptance.

  19. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility: Fundamental studies of particle formation and interactions. Volume 2: Abstracts, candidate experiments and feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogleman, Guy (Editor); Huntington, Judith L. (Editor); Schwartz, Deborah E. (Editor); Fonda, Mark L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) project and its current status is provided. The proceedings of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility Experiments Workshop are recorded. The goal of the workshop was to define experiments for the GGSF--a small particle microgravity research facility. The workshop addressed the opportunity for performing, in Earth orbit, a wide variety of experiments that involve single small particles (grains) or clouds of particles. Twenty experiments from the fields of exobiology, planetary science, astrophysics, atmospheric science, biology, physics, and chemistry were described at the workshop and are outlined in Volume 2. Each experiment description included specific scientific objectives, an outline of the experimental procedure, and the anticipated GGSF performance requirements. Since these experiments represent the types of studies that will ultimately be proposed for the facility, they will be used to define the general science requirements of the GGSF. Also included in the second volume is a physics feasibility study and abstracts of example Gas-Grain Simulation Facility experiments and related experiments in progress.

  20. Literature Abstracts.

    PubMed

    S, P; S, A; H, A; M, J D; S, A; Foods, A; S, A; M, J D; S, A; Pharmaceuticals, B; Foods, A

    1971-05-01

    the Firming of the Crumb of Bread', by E. M. A. Willhoft (Lyons Central Labs, 149 Hammersmith Rd., London W14), Chem. Ind. 8 (1970), 1017. 3. Objdve Measurements: 'De la rhéologie des systèmes aqueux à base de gommes', by R. A. Schutz (Mulhouse-Dornach, France), Stärke 22 (1970), 116-125. 3. Objdve Measurements: 'Chopin Teleplastometer Study of Dough Consistency, Preliminary Tests', by J. J. Etienne and M. Dubois (Lab. Grands Moulins, Bobigny, France), Bull. Anciens Elèves Ecole Franç. Meunerie, No. 236 (1970), 94-100. 3. Objdve Measurements: 'The Rheological Evaluation of Semisolids', by L. H. Block and P. P. Lamy (Duquesne Univ. Pittsburgh, and Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, Md., U. S. A.), J. Soc. Cosmet. Chem. 21 (1970), 645-660. 4. Factors Affecting Texture: 'Comparison of Tennet Curd Tension with Undenatured Whey Protein as a Measure of Heat Treatment', by U. S. Ashworth and Joseph Nebe (Washington State Univ., Pullman, Wash. 99163, U. S. A.), J. Dairy Sci. 53 (1970), 415-419. 4. Factors Affecting Texture: 'Gelation Temperatures of Starch as Influenced by Polyhydric and Monohydric Alcohols, Phenols, Carboxylic Acids and Some Other Additives', by S. Y. Gersma (Technical Univ. Delft, Julianalaan 67, Delft, Netherlands), Stärke 22 (1970), 3-9. 4. Factors Affecting Texture: 'Disodium Dihydrogen Pyrophosphate Blanch and the Texture of French Fries', by A. S. Jaswal (Res. Prod. Counc., Frederickton, New Brunswick, Canada), Am. Potato J. 47 (5) (1970), 145-7. 4. Factors Affecting Texture: 'Nonstarch Polysaccharides and the Texture of French Fried Potatoes', by A. S. Jaswal (Res. Prod. Counc., Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada), Am. Potato J. 47 (1970), 311-316. 4. Factors Affecting Texture: 'Food Processing Characteristics of Soybean 11S and 7S Proteins. I. Effect of Difference of Protein Components Among Soybean Varieties on Formation of Tofu-Gel', by K. Saio, M. Kamiya, and T. Watanabe (Food Res. Inst., Ministry of Agric. and Forestry, Japan), Agr. Biol. Chem

  1. Correlation between work concentration level and background music: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yi-Nuo; Huang, Rong-Hwa; Chiang, Han-Sun

    2009-01-01

    It is a common phenomenon for office workers {to listen to music} while executing daily routines at their desks. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between work concentration level and background music. This research would first follow examples in previous researches, and then explore the influence of background music on participants' scores on attention tests. We hope to gain a preliminary understanding of the possible influence of background music on people's focus and concentration when doing work. Thirty-two college students were separated into three controlled groups; all were given the attention test. Group [a] listened to background music while being tested for 10 minutes; group [b] had no background music at all; and group [c] listened to the music for 10 minutes prior to the attention test. The test was conducted in a "noise free" environment. The means and error rates for each group were then calculated. The findings showed that, in comparison with "no music at all", those who listened to music prior to testing obtained higher scores in attentiveness (most probably a supplemental effect of the music), whereas those who listened to music during attention test showed extremely high level of variation in attention test scoring. Background music does affect people's job-site behavior. In fact, all three test conditions - no background music at all, background music before the work shift, and background music during work - have affected worker performance on different levels.

  2. Definition of tolerance to continuous hyperoxia in man - An abstract report of Predictive Studies V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambertsen, C. J.; Clark, J. M.; Gelfand, R.; Pisarello, J. B.; Cobbs, W. H.

    1987-01-01

    The overall goals, design, and procedures of Predictive Studies V are discussed as well as the specific elements of neural effects produced by prolonged hyperoxia. It is noted that Predictive Studies V study of oxygen poisoning in normal men during uninterrupted exposures to oxygen over the range of hyperbaric oxygen exposure most useful in diving, the treatment of gas lesion diseases, and general hyperbaric medicine. It is found that, throughout the study, the most striking observations were related to effects on visual function, on the lung, and the probable interactions of preconvulsive neural activity with effects on cardiovascular and respiratory-pulmonary functions.

  3. ABSTRACTS OF RESEARCH STUDIES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION COMPLETED IN 1965-66 IN THE PACIFIC REGION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LOREEN, C.O.

    THIRTY STAFF STUDIES AND MASTERS' THESES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION ARE REPORTED IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS -- AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY, CURRICULUM, EDUCATIONAL NEEDS, FARM LABORERS, GRADUATE FOLLOWUP, INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION, OCCUPATIONAL ASPIRATIONS, PROGRAM EVALUATION, AND STUDENT ACTIVITIES. THE PURPOSE, METHOD, AND FINDINGS OF EACH STUDY ARE…

  4. The cosmic infrared background experiment-2 (CIBER-2) for studying the near-infrared extragalactic background light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirahata, Mai; Arai, Toshiaki; Battle, John; Bock, James; Cooray, Asantha; Enokuchi, Akito; Hristov, Viktor; Kanai, Yoshikazu; Kim, Min Gyu; Korngut, Phillip; Lanz, Alicia; Lee, Dae-Hee; Mason, Peter; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Morford, Tracy; Ohnishi, Yosuke; Park, Won-Kee; Sano, Kei; Takeyama, Norihide; Tsumura, Kohji; Wada, Takehiko; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Zemcov, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We present the current status of the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment-2 (CIBER-2) project, whose goal is to make a rocket-borne measurement of the near-infrared Extragalactic Background Light (EBL), under a collaboration with U.S.A., Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. The EBL is the integrated light of all extragalactic sources of emission back to the early Universe. At near-infrared wavelengths, measurement of the EBL is a promising way to detect the diffuse light from the first collapsed structures at redshift z˜10, which are impossible to detect as individual sources. However, recently, the intra-halo light (IHL) model is advocated as the main contribution to the EBL, and our new result of the EBL fluctuation from CIBER-1 experiment is also supporting this model. In this model, EBL is contributed by accumulated light from stars in the dark halo regions of low- redshift (z<2) galaxies, those were tidally stripped by the interaction of satellite dwarf galaxies. Thus, in order to understand the origin of the EBL, both the spatial fluctuation observations with multiple wavelength bands and the absolute spectroscopic observations for the EBL are highly required. After the successful initial CIBER- 1 experiment, we are now developing a new instrument CIBER-2, which is comprised of a 28.5-cm aluminum telescope and three broad-band, wide-field imaging cameras. The three wide-field (2.3×2.3 degrees) imaging cameras use the 2K×2K HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG arrays, and cover the optical and near-infrared wavelength range of 0.5-0.9 μm, 1.0-1.4 μm and 1.5-2.0 μm, respectively. Combining a large area telescope with the high sensitivity detectors, CIBER-2 will be able to measure the spatial fluctuations in the EBL at much fainter levels than those detected in previous CIBER-1 experiment. Additionally, we will use a linear variable filter installed just above the detectors so that a measurement of the absolute spectrum of the EBL is also possible. In this paper, the scientific

  5. Background Speech Effects on Sentence Processing during Reading: An Eye Movement Study

    PubMed Central

    Hyönä, Jukka; Ekholm, Miia

    2016-01-01

    Effects of background speech on reading were examined by playing aloud different types of background speech, while participants read long, syntactically complex and less complex sentences embedded in text. Readers’ eye movement patterns were used to study online sentence comprehension. Effects of background speech were primarily seen in rereading time. In Experiment 1, foreign-language background speech did not disrupt sentence processing. Experiment 2 demonstrated robust disruption in reading as a result of semantically and syntactically anomalous scrambled background speech preserving normal sentence-like intonation. Scrambled speech that was constructed from the text to-be read did not disrupt reading more than scrambled speech constructed from a different, semantically unrelated text. Experiment 3 showed that scrambled speech exacerbated the syntactic complexity effect more than coherent background speech, which also interfered with reading. Experiment 4 demonstrated that both semantically and syntactically anomalous speech produced no more disruption in reading than semantically anomalous but syntactically correct background speech. The pattern of results is best explained by a semantic account that stresses the importance of similarity in semantic processing, but not similarity in semantic content, between the reading task and background speech. PMID:27003410

  6. Use study of Excerpta Medica abstract journals: to drop or not to drop?

    PubMed Central

    Alligood, E C; Russo-Martin, E; Peterson, R A

    1983-01-01

    The directors of the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, a medium-sized library serving the University of Virginia medical and nursing schools, were concerned over the increasing cost of periodical subscriptions and so studied the use of the printed copy of Excerpta Medica. This study had six parts: (1) availability in other campus libraries; (2) staff perceptions of in-library use; (3) results of studies performed by other libraries in the United States; (4) recorded in-library use; (5) users' opinions; and (6) personal interviews with library users and with selected departments tht corresponded with the forty-four subject areas of Excerpta Medica. The user-survey parts (4 and 5) elicited few responses, but personal interviews allowed a good look at levels of use and interest. The overall results convinced staff to drop some sections and publicize those that remained. PMID:6626797

  7. Baseline Study of Women in South Africa with Postgraduate Physics Degrees (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, Diane J.

    2009-04-01

    A baseline study was conducted of women in South Africa who obtained BSc (Honours), MSc, or PhD degrees in physics and astronomy between 1995 and 2005. The first step involved identifying and contacting the women, using snowball sampling. These women were then asked to complete a questionnaire by e-mail. Responses to the questionnaire yielded information about the types of schools they attended, attitudes of their teachers, family history of studying science, influences on choosing to study physics, role models and mentors, employment history and aspects of a job that are important to them, experiences of gender bias, and suggestions for improving the situation for women in physics. This information is very valuable in designing programs, projects, and advocacy to encourage and retain women in physics, from school level to senior management. The methodology and questions developed can be useful to participants interested in obtaining similar information for their own countries.

  8. FIELD-SCALE STUDIES: HOW DOES SOIL SAMPLE PRETREATMENT AFFECT REPRESENTATIVENESS ? (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples from field-scale studies are very heterogeneous and can contain large soil and rock particles. Oversize materials are often removed before chemical analysis of the soil samples because it is not practical to include these materials. Is the extracted sample representativ...

  9. Fractured rock hydrogeology: Modeling studies. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of mathematical and conceptual models in describing the hydraulic parameters of fluid flow in fractured rock. Topics include the use of tracers, solute and mass transport studies, and slug test analyses. The use of modeling techniques in injection well performance prediction is also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. SORPTION OF LEAD ON A HIGH AFFINITY OXIDE: MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDIES (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of lead (Pb) was investigated on an innovative metal oxide compound using macroscopic and microscopic techniques. The objective of this study was to elucidate the sorption mechanism of Pb on the high-affinity engineered oxide with time at pH 6 employing batch methods an...

  11. Student Project Work and Abstracts. Beaufort, North Carolina Environmental Studies Project, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carteret County Board of Education, Beaufort, NC.

    This document contains reports of 11 environmental study projects conducted by junior and senior students in a North Carolina high school. Topics range from the construction of an artificial reef and a survey of seashore changes to surveys of past and present development of various facets of the county ecology. The emphasis is on student…

  12. Analogical Scaffolding and the Learning of Abstract Ideas in Physics: Empirical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podolefsky, Noah S.; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we proposed a model of student reasoning which combines the roles of representation, analogy, and layering of meaning--analogical scaffolding [Podolefsky and Finkelstein, Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 3, 010109 (2007)]. The present empirical studies build on this model to examine its utility and demonstrate the vital intertwining of…

  13. Reading and Study Skills Instruction: College and Adult; Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," March through December 1977 (Vol. 37 No. 9 through Vol. 38 No. 6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 22 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: a remedial reading program for Marine recruits; methods for improving reading flexibility and rate, spelling ability, vocabulary comprehension, and study skills in…

  14. RESEARCH ABSTRACTS, VOLUME VI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COLETTE, SISTER M.

    THIS SIXTH VOLUME OF RESEARCH ABSTRACTS PRESENTS REPORTS OF 35 RESEARCH STUDIES COMPLETED BY CANDIDATES FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE AT THE CARDINAL STRITCH COLLEGE IN 1964. TWENTY-NINE STUDIES ARE CONCERNED WITH READING, AND SIX ARE CONCERNED WITH THE EDUCATION OF THE MENTALLY HANDICAPPED. OF THE READING STUDIES, FIVE PERTAIN TO THE JUNIOR HIGH LEVEL…

  15. Experimental study of neutron induced background noise on gated x-ray framing cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N.; Hagmann, C.; Stone, G.; Hey, D.; Glenn, S.; Conder, A.; Teruya, A.; Sorce, C.; Tommasini, R.; Stoeffl, W.; Springer, P.; Landen, O. L.; Eckart, M.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Koch, J. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bahukutumbi, R.; and others

    2010-10-15

    A temporally gated x-ray framing camera based on a proximity focus microchannel plate is one of the most important diagnostic tools of inertial confinement fusion experiments. However, fusion neutrons produced in imploded capsules interact with structures surrounding the camera and produce background to x-ray signals. To understand the mechanisms of this neutron induced background, we tested several gated x-ray cameras in the presence of 14 MeV neutrons produced at the Omega laser facility. Differences between background levels observed with photographic film readout and charge-coupled-device readout have been studied.

  16. Optical and Calorimetric Studies of Cholesterol-Rich Filamentous, Helical Ribbon and Crystal Microstructures (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnikova, Y. A.; Elsenbeck, M.; Kashuri, K.; Iannacchione, G. S.; Zastavker, Y. V.

    2009-04-01

    Formation of biological self-assemblies at all scales is a focus of studies in fields ranging from biology to physics to biomimetics. Understanding the physico-chemical properties of these self-assemblies may lead to the design of bio-inspired structures and technological applications. Here we examine self-assembled filamentous, helical ribbon, and crystal microstructures formed in chemically defined lipid concentrate (CDLC), a model system for cholesterol crystallization in gallbladder bile. CDLC consists of cholesterol, bilayer-forming amphiphiles, micelle-forming amphiphiles, and water. Phase contrast and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy indicate the presence of three microstructure types in all samples studied, and allow for an investigation of the structures' unique geometries. Additionally, confocal microscopy is used for qualitative assessment of surface and internal composition. To complement optical observations, calorimetric (differential-scanning and modulation) experiments, provide the basis for an in-depth understanding of collective and individual thermal behavior. Observed ``transition'' features indicate clustering and ``straightening'' of helical ribbons into short, increasingly thickening, filaments that dissolve with increasing temperature. These results suggest that all microstructures formed in CDLC may coexist in a metastable chemical equilibrium. Further investigation of the CDLC thermal profile should uncover the process of cholesterol crystallization as well as the unique design and function of microstructures formed in this system.

  17. A versatile instrument for structural studies of interfaces in ultrahigh vacuum (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausnitzer, M.; Pauly, T.; Materlik, G.

    1989-07-01

    Structural studies of interfaces with synchrotron x-radiation (SXR) are presently carried out with several different methods which were developed in connection with SXR over the past decade: dynamical x-ray diffraction using standing wavefields (XSW), kinematical surface diffraction (KSD), Fresnel reflection (FR), and absorption spectroscopy (SEXAFS, SXANES). These methods can determine different, and often complementary parameters of a system such as short-/long-range order, relaxation relative to bulk, structure normal/parallel to surface, valence state of surface atoms, roughness of a buried interface, etc. Accordingly, these different principles have also been combined to form new methods such as diffraction of evanescent x rays during total external reflection (DEXTER) and reflection EXAFS (REFLEXAFS). It is, therefore, highly desirable to have the opportunity to study the same interface system with different methods. On the other hand, preparation of a system in ultrahigh vacuum requires in most cases expensive bulky equipment and time consuming techniques. These considerations call for a setup which provides different experimental options. We have, therefore, installed at the beamline ROEMO I at HASYLAB a versatile UHV system for interface studies. A sample can either be prepared inside a chamber with three Knudsen cells for MBE growth and standard equipment for cleaning, heating and surface characterization by RHEED, or inside a chamber for aggressive gases. The first one is installed outside the interlock area providing access also when the ROEMO beam is on and the second one inside the interlock area. From either chamber the sample can be transferred into an analysis chamber at the ROEMO I station or into a transportable baby chamber. The analysis chamber can be used for measurements with standing waves, absorption spectroscopy and reflectivity measurements. Electrons are detected with a spherical analyzer and photons outside the vacuum through Be windows

  18. An ion microprobe study of CAIs from CO3 meteorites. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Greenwood, R. C.; Fahey, A. J.; Huss, G. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    When attempting to interpret the history of Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) it is often difficult to distinguish between primary features inherited from the nebula and those produced during secondary processing on the parent body. We have undertaken a systematic study of CAIs from 10 CO chondrites, believed to represent a metamorphic sequence with the goal of distinguishing primary and secondary features. ALHA 77307 (3.0), Colony (3.0), Kainsaz (3.1), Felix (3.2), ALH 82101 (3.3), Ornans (3.3), Lance (3.4), ALHA 77003 (3.5), Warrenton (3.6), and Isna (3.7) were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. We have identified 141 CAIs within these samples, and studied in detail the petrology of 34 inclusions. The primary phases in the lower petrologic types are spinel, melilite, and hibonite. Perovskite, FeS, ilmenite, anorthite, kirschsteinite, and metallic Fe are present as minor phases. Melilite becomes less abundant in higher petrologic types and was not detected in chondrites of type 3.5 and above, confirming previous reports that this mineral easily breaks down during heating. Iron, an element that would not be expected to condense at high temperatures, has a lower abundance in spinel from low-petrologic-type meteorites than those of higher grade, and CaTiO3 is replaced by FeTiO3 in meteorites of higher petrologic type. The abundance of CAIs is similar in each meteorite. Eight inclusions have been analyzed by ion probe. The results are summarized. The results obtained to date show that CAIs in CO meteorites, like those from other meteorite classes, contain Mg* and that Mg in some inclusions has been redistributed.

  19. Application of polarization modulation spectroscopy to the study of magnetic materials (abstract) (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Hanke, C.; Lott, D.; Stohr, J.; Kao, C.-C.

    2002-03-01

    Over the last decade, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and x-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS) have become important experimental techniques in the study of magnetic materials. In order to reduce systematic errors in these measurements, typical XMCD and XRMS experiments are carried out using magnetization switching, although there are many situations where polarization switching is clearly desirable. Recently, fast polarization modulation techniques have been developed using either polarization conversion optical elements, such as phase plate, or special insertion devices. At the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), an elliptically polarized wiggler (EPW), jointly developed by NSLS, Advanced Photon Source, and BINP of Novosibirsk, for this purpose. The EPW consists of a permanent magnet vertical wiggler and an electromagnet horizontal wiggler. The polarization of the device can be switched up to 100 Hz by switching the electromagnet. To take advantage of the fast switching capability, a phase sensitive detection system was also implemented. The sensitivity of using fast polarization modulation is demonstrated by measuring the element specific hysteresis loop and MCD spectrum of Cu induced moment at the interface of a Co/Cu multilayer. By comparing with results obtained using conventional measurements from similar samples, it clearly shows the advantages of using polarization modulation for small MCD effects. The sensitivity of this technique and the possibility of performing magnetic field dependent measurements of using polarization modulation have been applied to a number of magnetic systems. First, the spatial distribution of Cr induced moment in an ideal exchange-biased Fe/Cr multilayer was measured using soft-x-ray XRMS. Specular reflectivity was measured as a function of both angle and energy near Cr and Fe L3 edges. The Cr induced moment was clearly observed. Moreover, the spatial distribution of the induced Cr moment was determined by

  20. A study of sound transmission in an abstract middle ear using physical and finite element models

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Herrera, Antonio; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    The classical picture of middle ear (ME) transmission has the tympanic membrane (TM) as a piston and the ME cavity as a vacuum. In reality, the TM moves in a complex multiphasic pattern and substantial pressure is radiated into the ME cavity by the motion of the TM. This study explores ME transmission with a simple model, using a tube terminated with a plastic membrane. Membrane motion was measured with a laser interferometer and pressure on both sides of the membrane with micro-sensors that could be positioned close to the membrane without disturbance. A finite element model of the system explored the experimental results. Both experimental and theoretical results show resonances that are in some cases primarily acoustical or mechanical and sometimes produced by coupled acousto-mechanics. The largest membrane motions were a result of the membrane's mechanical resonances. At these resonant frequencies, sound transmission through the system was larger with the membrane in place than it was when the membrane was absent. PMID:26627771

  1. Theoretical study of the oxidation mechanisms of naphthalene initiated by hydroxyl radicals: the H abstraction pathway.

    PubMed

    Shiroudi, Abolfazl; Deleuze, Michael S

    2014-05-22

    Reaction mechanisms for the initial stages of naphthalene oxidation at high temperatures (T ≥ 600 K) have been studied theoretically using density functional theory along with various exchange-correlation functionals, as well as the benchmark CBS-QB3 quantum chemical approach. These stages correspond to the removal of hydrogen atoms by hydroxyl radical and the formation thereby of 1- and 2-naphthyl radicals. Bimolecular kinetic rate constants were estimated by means of transition state theory. The excellent agreement with the available experimental kinetic rate constants demonstrates that a two-step reaction scheme prevails. Comparison with results obtained with density functional theory in conjunction with various exchange-correlation functionals also shows that DFT remains unsuited for quantitative insights into kinetic rate constants. Analysis of the computed structures, bond orders, and free energy profiles demonstrates that the reaction steps involved in the removal of hydrogen atoms by OH radicals satisfy Hammond's principle. Computations of branching ratios also show that these reactions do not exhibit a particularly pronounced site-selectivity.

  2. Advances in Studies of Electrode Kinetics and Mass Transport in AMTEC Cells (abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; Kisor, A.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    Previous work reported from JPL has included characterization of electrode kinetics and alkali atom transport from electrodes including Mo, W, WRh(sub x), WPt(sub x)(Mn), in sodium AMTEC cells and vapor exposure cells, and Mo in potassium vapor exposure cells. These studies were generally performed in cells with small area electrodes (about 1 to 5 cm(sup 2)), and device geometry had little effect on transport. Alkali diffusion coefficients through these electrodes have been characterized, and approximate surface diffusion coefficients derived in cases of activated transport. A basic model of electrode kinetic at the alkali metal vapor/porous metal electrode/alkali beta'-alumina solid electrolyte three phase boundary has been proposed which accounts for electrochemical reaction rates with a collision frequency near the three phase boundary and tunneling from the porous electrode partially covered with adsorbed alkali metal atoms. The small electrode effect in AMTEC cells has been discussed in several papers, but quantitative investigations have described only the overall effect and the important contribution of electrolyte resistance. The quantitative characterization of transport losses in cells with large area electrodes has been limited to simulations of large area electrode effects, or characterization of transport losses from large area electrodes with significant longitudinal temperature gradients. This paper describes new investigations of electrochemical kinetics and transport, particularily with WPt(sub 3.5) electrodes, including the influence of electrode size on the mass transport loss in the AMTEC cell. These electrodes possess excellent sodium transport properties making verification of device limitations on transport much more readily attained.

  3. Metacognition and abstract reasoning.

    PubMed

    Markovits, Henry; Thompson, Valerie A; Brisson, Janie

    2015-05-01

    The nature of people's meta-representations of deductive reasoning is critical to understanding how people control their own reasoning processes. We conducted two studies to examine whether people have a metacognitive representation of abstract validity and whether familiarity alone acts as a separate metacognitive cue. In Study 1, participants were asked to make a series of (1) abstract conditional inferences, (2) concrete conditional inferences with premises having many potential alternative antecedents and thus specifically conducive to the production of responses consistent with conditional logic, or (3) concrete problems with premises having relatively few potential alternative antecedents. Participants gave confidence ratings after each inference. Results show that confidence ratings were positively correlated with logical performance on abstract problems and concrete problems with many potential alternatives, but not with concrete problems with content less conducive to normative responses. Confidence ratings were higher with few alternatives than for abstract content. Study 2 used a generation of contrary-to-fact alternatives task to improve levels of abstract logical performance. The resulting increase in logical performance was mirrored by increases in mean confidence ratings. Results provide evidence for a metacognitive representation based on logical validity, and show that familiarity acts as a separate metacognitive cue.

  4. A Comparative Study of Effect of New and Old Science Curriculum on Chinese Junior High School Students' Abstract Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Weiping; Chen, Ming

    2008-01-01

    "Teenagers' abstract thinking ability test" was designed in accordance with the structure and performance of teenagers' ability to think abstractly. 138 Chinese junior high school students who learned New curriculum and old curriculum separately were measured. A comparison between the two kinds of students shows that abstract thinking…

  5. Acquiring background knowledge for machine learning using function decomposition: a case study in rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Zupan, B; Dzeroski, S

    1998-01-01

    Domain or background knowledge is often needed in order to solve difficult problems of learning medical diagnostic rules. Earlier experiments have demonstrated the utility of background knowledge when learning rules for early diagnosis of rheumatic diseases. A particular form of background knowledge comprising typical co-occurrences of several groups of attributes was provided by a medical expert. This paper explores the possibility of automating the process of acquiring background knowledge of this kind and studies the utility of such methods in the problem domain of rheumatic diseases. A method based on function decomposition is proposed that identifies typical co-occurrences for a given set of attributes. The method is evaluated by comparing the typical co-occurrences it identifies as well as their contribution to the performance of machine learning algorithms, to the ones provided by a medical expert.

  6. Background Information on Crimes against Children Study. Information Memorandum 86-20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Shaun

    This document was prepared to assist the Wisconsin Legislative Council's Special Committee on Crimes Against Children in its study of current laws relating to crimes against children. It provides the background of the origin of the study and describes the characteristics of the Criminal Code, upon which much of the committee review will center.…

  7. A STUDY OF THE EDUCATIONAL AND EXPERIENTIAL BACKGROUNDS AND PRESENT POSITIONS OF SCHOOL PLANT SPECIALISTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DRAKE, THELBERT L.

    THIS DOCUMENT REPORTS ON INVESTIGATION OF SCHOOL PLANT SPECIALISTS' EDUCATIONAL AND EXPERIENTIAL BACKGROUNDS AND POSITIONS. THE STUDY CONVEYS BIOGRAPHICAL DATA ON AGE, SEX, ENTRY TO THE SPECIALIST FIELDS, CERTIFICATION, AND MEMBERSHIP IN PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. THE STUDY SURVEYS THE SPECIALISTS' MAJORS AND MINORS, THE HIGHEST DEGREE,…

  8. Simulation Studies of Backgrounds for the Fermilab SeaQuest Experiment (E906)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Puyang; Aidala, Christine; E906/SeaQuest Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Fermilab SeaQuest experiment uses a 120 GeV proton beam on targets of liquid hydrogen, liquid deuterium, and solid nuclear targets of carbon, iron, and tungsten. The experiment measures the Drell-Yan process of quark-antiquark annihilation to produce muon pairs, with the main physics goal of studying the sea quark distributions in the nucleon and nuclei. Since quark and antiquark annihilation to dimuons is a rare process, there are significant backgrounds due to muons from the decay of pions produced in the target and beam dump. These backgrounds are being studied via simulated proton interactions in a GEANT implementation of the experimental setup. Full simulation of these backgrounds has proved to be difficult because of the extensive computer time needed. Studies to speed up the simulation process will be presented. NSF.

  9. Study of the Residual Background Events in Ground Data from the ASTRO-HSXS Microcalorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Boyce, Kevin R.; Chiao, M. P.; Eckart, M. E.; Kelley, R. L.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porter, F. S.; Watanabe, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Yamada, S.; Tsujimoto, M.; Mitsuda, K.; Tashiro, M.

    2015-01-01

    The measured instrumental background of the XRS calorimeter spectrometer of Suzaku had several sources, including primary cosmic rays and secondary particles interacting with the pixels and with the silicon structure of the array. Prior to the launch of Suzaku, several data sets were taken without x-ray illumination to study the characteristics and timing of background signals produced in the array and anti-coincidence detector. Even though the source of the background in the laboratory was different from that in low-earth orbit (muons and environmental gamma-rays on the ground versus Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) protons and alpha particles in space), the study of correlations and properties of populations of rare events was useful for establishing the preliminary screening parameters needed for selection of good science data. Sea-level muons are singly charged minimum-ionizing particles, like the GCR protons, and thus were good probes of the effectiveness of screening via the signals from the anti-coincidence detector. Here we present the first analysis of the on-ground background of the SXS calorimeter of Astro-H. On XRS, the background prior to screening was completely dominated by coincident events on many pixels resulting from the temperature pulse arising from each large energy deposition (greater than 200 keV) into the silicon frame around the array. The improved heat-sinking of the SXS array compared with XRS eliminated these thermal disturbances, greatly reducing the measured count rate in the absence of illumination. The removal of these events has made it easier to study the nature of the residual background and to look for additional event populations. We compare the SXS residual background to that measured in equivalent ground data for XRS and discuss these preliminary results.

  10. The role of prefrontal and parietal cortices in esthetic appreciation of representational and abstract art: a TMS study.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Lega, Carlotta; Gardelli, Chiara; Merabet, Lotfi B; Cela-Conde, Camilo J; Nadal, Marcos

    2014-10-01

    To explain the biological foundations of art appreciation is to explain one of our species' distinctive traits. Previous neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies have pointed to the prefrontal and the parietal cortex as two critical regions mediating esthetic appreciation of visual art. In this study, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the left prefrontal cortex and the right posterior parietal cortex while participants were evaluating whether they liked, and by how much, a particular painting. By depolarizing cell membranes in the targeted regions, TMS transiently interferes with the activity of specific cortical areas, which allows clarifying their role in a given task. Our results show that both regions play a fundamental role in mediating esthetic appreciation. Critically though, the effects of TMS varied depending on the type of art considered (i.e. representational vs. abstract) and on participants' a-priori inclination toward one or the other.

  11. Community Background Reports: The Formal Education of Menominee Indian Children; Sociocultural and Socioeconomic Background Factors. National Study of American Indian Education, Series I, No. 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Training Center for Community Programs.

    As a part of the final report of the National Study of American Indian Education, this document contains findings of the first background study on the Menominee Indians of Wisconsin. This document reviews important sociocultural and historical factors associated with the Menominee. Socioeconomic conditions are also discussed, especially in light…

  12. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  13. Are all abstracts created equal??

    PubMed

    Weinert, Clarann

    2010-05-01

    The preparation of a strong, convincing abstract is a necessary professional skill and prized art form for nurse scientists and clinical scholars. The power and the role of an abstract are often overlooked. Abstracts are used in a variety of scholarly forums including articles submitted for publication, research proposals, and responses to "calls for abstracts" for presentations at scientific conferences. The purpose of this article is to emphasize the highlights of the "art" rather than the "cookbook" details associated with preparing an abstract. Each of the critical stages of abstract development is explored-planning, drafting, reviewing, peer reviewing, editing, and packaging. Likewise, a few, hopefully helpful, hints on developing the six key elements-background, purpose, sample, methods, results, and implications-of the scientific abstract are given. Polishing, the essential skill of preparing an abstract, takes time and persistence and will pay off in the long run. The well-crafted abstract is an initial step in the process of getting research and scholarly pursuits noticed and accepted.

  14. A Cross-National Study of the Multilevel Effects of Social Background on Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belandria, Liza C.

    Results of a study attempting to verify the extent to which social background variables affect science achievement at multiple levels of analysis are reported. Patterns of home- and SES-influenced variables potentially explaining differences in individual achievement were examined in Hungary, New Zealand, and Australia to duplicate a previous…

  15. Background study of absorbed dose in biological experiments at the Modane Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampe, Nathanael; Marin, Pierre; Castor, Jean; Warot, Guillaume; Incerti, S.; Maigne, Lydia; Sarramia, David; Breton, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Aiming to explore how biological systems respond to ultra-low background environ-ments, we report here our background studies for biological experiments in the Modane Under-ground Laboratory. We find that the minimum radioactive background for biology experiments is limited by the potassium content of the biological sample itself, coming from its nutritive me-dium, which we find in our experimental set-up to be 26 nGy hr-1. Compared to our reference radiation environment in Clermont-Ferrand, biological experiments can be conducted in the Modane laboratory with a radiation background 8.2 times lower than the reference above-ground level. As the radiation background may be further reduced by using different nutritive media, we also provide measurements of the potassium concentration by gamma spectroscopy of yeast extract (63.3±1.2 mg g-1) and tryptone (2.5±0.2 mg g-1) in order to guide media selection in future experiments.

  16. Background Neutron Studies for Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering Measurements at the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoff, Diane; Coherent Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The COHERENT collaboration has proposed to measure coherent, elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CE νNS) cross sections on several nuclear targets using neutrinos produced at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The largest background of concern arises from beam-induced, fast neutrons that can mimic a nuclear recoil signal event in the detector. Multiple technologies of neutron detection have been employed at prospective experiment sites at the SNS. Analysis of these data have produced a consistent picture of the backgrounds expected for a CE νNS measurement. These background studies show that at suitable locations, the fast neutrons of concern arrive mainly in the prompt 1.3 μs window and the neutrons in the delayed window are primarily of lower energies that are relatively easier to shield.

  17. Contemporary Theories of Oral Communication: A Collection of Abstracts, Critical Literature Reviews, and Experiments in the Study of Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert M., Ed.

    This booklet is a collection of abstracts, literature reviews, and reports on experiments in the communication field. Ninety abstracts from speech communication literature (1970-1977) are presented under the following categories: communication theory, research methodology, interpersonal communication, rhetorical theory and criticism, persuasion,…

  18. Theoretical study of dynamics for the abstraction reaction H' + HBr(v=0, j=0) --> H'H + Br.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqin; Cong, Shulin; Zhang, Cuihua; Xu, Xuesong; Chen, Maodu

    2009-04-23

    Theoretical studies of the dynamics of the abstraction reaction, H' + HBr (v=0,j=0) --> H'H + Br, have been performed with quasiclassical trajectory method (QCT) on a new ab initio potential energy surface (Y. Kurosaki and T. Takayanagi, private communication). The calculated QCT cross sections are in good agreement with earlier quantum wave packet results over most of the collision energy range from 0.1 to 2.6 eV, and the state-resolved rotational distributions of the product H'H molecule are quantitatively consistent with the experimental results. Comparisons of the QCT-calculated rotational-state-resolved cross sections on different potential energy surfaces show that the characteristics of the potential energy surface in the region far away from the minimum energy path have a large influence on the title abstraction reaction dynamics, and the indirect reactions that do not follow the minimum energy path have little influence on the differential cross sections (DCS). The DCSs are mainly governed by the direct reactions that do follow the minimum energy path, at both low and high collision energies. The degree of the rotational alignment of the product H'H molecule is strong at high collision energies, which means that the influence of the indirect reactions on the product rotational alignment is negligible, whereas the distribution of P(varphi(r)) is sensitive to the indirect reactions at high collision energies. With increasing collision energy, the polarization of the product rotational angular momentum decreases and the molecular rotation of the product prefers an in-plane reaction mechanism rather than the out-of-plane mechanism.

  19. Self-amplifying Hawking radiation and its background: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, Jeff; de Nova, Juan Ramón Muñoz

    2017-03-01

    We numerically study an analog black hole with two horizons with parameters similar to a recent experiment. We find that the Hawking radiation exists on a background which contains a density oscillation, a zero-frequency ripple. The Hawking radiation evolves from spontaneous to self-amplifying, while the background ripple grows steadily with no qualitative change. It is seen that the self-amplifying Hawking radiation has a nonzero frequency. This frequency is independent of the reference frame since it is the magnitude of the wave which oscillates, as in a standing wave. The background ripple appears even before the inner horizon is created, in contrast to predictions. Furthermore, we find that technical noise and shot-to-shot variations in the number of atoms are not sufficient to cause the observed correlation function. This work is in agreement with the recent observation of self-amplifying Hawking radiation, and explains some of the features seen. In contrast to some recent works, our study differentiates between the Hawking radiation observed, and the evolution of the background.

  20. Seismic Consequence Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    M. Gross

    2004-10-25

    The primary purpose of this model report is to develop abstractions for the response of engineered barrier system (EBS) components to seismic hazards at a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and to define the methodology for using these abstractions in a seismic scenario class for the Total System Performance Assessment - License Application (TSPA-LA). A secondary purpose of this model report is to provide information for criticality studies related to seismic hazards. The seismic hazards addressed herein are vibratory ground motion, fault displacement, and rockfall due to ground motion. The EBS components are the drip shield, the waste package, and the fuel cladding. The requirements for development of the abstractions and the associated algorithms for the seismic scenario class are defined in ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The development of these abstractions will provide a more complete representation of flow into and transport from the EBS under disruptive events. The results from this development will also address portions of integrated subissue ENG2, Mechanical Disruption of Engineered Barriers, including the acceptance criteria for this subissue defined in Section 2.2.1.3.2.3 of the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]).

  1. Hospital discharge abstracts have limited accuracy in identifying occurrence of Clostridium difficile infections among hospitalized individuals with inflammatory bowel disease: A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harminder; Nugent, Zoann; Yu, B. Nancy; Lix, Lisa M.; Targownik, Laura; Bernstein, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Background Hospital discharge databases are used to study the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) among hospitalized patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). CDI in IBD is increasingly important and accurately estimating its occurrence is critical in understanding its comorbidity. There are limited data on the reliability of the International Classification of Diseases 10th revision (ICD-10) (now widely used in North America) CDI code in determining occurrence of CDI among hospitalized patients. We compared the performance of ICD-10 CDI coding to laboratory confirmed CDI diagnoses. Methods The University of Manitoba IBD Epidemiology Database was used to identify individuals with and without IBD discharged with CDI diagnoses between 07/01/2005 and 3/31/2014. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of ICD-10 CDI code was compared to laboratory CDI diagnoses recorded in a province wide CDI dataset. Multivariable logistic regression models were performed to test the predictors of diagnostic inaccuracy of ICD-10 CDI code. Results There were 273 episodes of laboratory confirmed CDI (hospitalized and non-hospitalized) among 7396 individuals with IBD and 536 among 66,297 matched controls. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of ICD-10 CDI code in discharge abstracts was 72.8%, 99.6%, 64.1% and 99.7% among those with IBD and 70.8%, 99.9%, 79.0% and 99.9% among those without IBD. Predictors of diagnostic inaccuracy included IBD, older age, increased co-morbidity and earlier years of hospitalization. Conclusions Identification of CDI using ICD-10 CDI code in hospital discharge abstracts may not identify up to 30% of CDI cases, with worse performance among those with IBD. PMID:28199401

  2. Modeling background radiation using geochemical data: A case study in and around Cameron, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Marsac, Kara E; Burnley, Pamela C; Adcock, Christopher T; Haber, Daniel A; Malchow, Russell L; Hausrath, Elisabeth M

    2016-12-01

    This study compares high resolution forward models of natural gamma-ray background with that measured by high resolution aerial gamma-ray surveys. The ability to predict variations in natural background radiation levels should prove useful for those engaged in measuring anthropogenic contributions to background radiation for the purpose of emergency response and homeland security operations. The forward models are based on geologic maps and remote sensing multi-spectral imagery combined with two different sources of data: 1) bedrock geochemical data (uranium, potassium and thorium concentrations) collected from national databases, the scientific literature and private companies, and 2) the low spatial resolution NURE (National Uranium Resource Evaluation) aerial gamma-ray survey. The study area near Cameron, Arizona, is located in an arid region with minimal vegetation and, due to the presence of abandoned uranium mines, was the subject of a previous high resolution gamma-ray survey. We found that, in general, geologic map units form a good basis for predicting the geographic distribution of the gamma-ray background. Predictions of background gamma-radiation levels based on bedrock geochemical analyses were not as successful as those based on the NURE aerial survey data sorted by geologic unit. The less successful result of the bedrock geochemical model is most likely due to a number of factors including the need to take into account the evolution of soil geochemistry during chemical weathering and the influence of aeolian addition. Refinements to the forward models were made using ASTER visualizations to create subunits of similar exposure rate within the Chinle Formation, which contains multiple lithologies and by grouping alluvial units by drainage basin rather than age.

  3. Feasibility study of SiGHT: a novel ultra low background photosensor for low temperature operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Guan, M. Y.; Korga, G.; Pantic, E.; Razeto, A.; Renshaw, A.; Rossi, B.; Suvorov, Y.; Wang, H.; Yang, C. G.

    2017-02-01

    Rare event search experiments, such as those searching for dark matter and observations of neutrinoless double beta decay, require ultra low levels of radioactive background for unmistakable identification. In order to reduce the radioactive background of detectors used in these types of event searches, low background photosensors are required, as the physical size of these detectors become increasing larger, and hence the number of such photosensors used also increases rapidly. Considering that most dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments are turning towards using noble liquids as the target choice, liquid xenon and liquid argon for instance, photosensors that can work well at cryogenic temperatures are required, 165 K and 87 K for liquid xenon and liquid argon, respectively. The Silicon Geiger Hybrid Tube (SiGHT) is a novel photosensor designed specifically for use in ultra low background experiments operating at cryogenic temperatures. It is based on the proven photocathode plus silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) hybrid technology and consists of very few other, but also ultra radio-pure, materials like fused silica and silicon for the SiPM. The introduction of the SiGHT concept, as well as a feasibility study for its production, is reported in this paper.

  4. Touschek Background and Lifetime Studies for the SuperB Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Boscolo, M.; Biagini, M.; Raimondi, P.; Sullivan, M.; Paoloni, E.; /INFN, Pisa

    2010-08-26

    The novel crab waist collision scheme under test at the DA{Phi}NE Frascati {Phi}-factory finds its natural application to the SuperB project, the asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} flavour factory at very high luminosity with relatively low beam currents and reduced backgrounds. The SuperB accelerator design requires a careful choice of beam parameters to reach a good trade-off between different effects. We present here simulation results for the Touschek backgrounds and lifetime obtained for both the low and high energy rings for different machine designs. A first set of horizontal collimators has been studied to stop Touschek particles. A study of the distributions of the Touschek particle losses at the interaction region into the detectors for further investigations is underway.

  5. The MOON-1 detector construction and the study of backgrounds from radioactive isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogama, T.; Nakamura, H.; Ejiri, H.; Fushimi, K.; Ichihara, K.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Hazama, R.; Umehara, S.; Yoshida, S.; Sakiuchi, T.; Hai, V. H.; Sugaya, Y.; Moon Collaboration

    2006-05-01

    MOON is a multilayer system of plastic scintillators and 100Mo films for 100Mo 0νββ decays. A prototype detector MOON-1 was built with 6 layers of plastic scintillators and 142g of 100Mo films for background (BG), energy and position resolution studies of the MOON detector. No serious BG from natural radioactive isotopes (RI) for 0νββ detection was found.

  6. A select bibliography with abstracts of reports related to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant geotechnical studies (1972--1990)

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, D.W.; Martin, M.L.

    1993-08-01

    This select bibliography contains 941 entries. Each bibliographic entry contains the citation of a report, conference paper, or journal article containing geotechnical information about the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The entries cover the period from 1972, when investigation began for a WIPP Site in southeastern New Mexico, through December 1990. Each entry is followed by an abstract. If an abstract or suitable summary existed, it has been included; 316 abstracts were written for other documents. For some entries, an annotation has been provided to clarify the abstract, comment on the setting and significance of the document, or guide the reader to related reports. An index of key words/phrases is included for all entries.

  7. Neutron background studies and results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennings-Yeomans, Raul

    2006-04-01

    Non-baryonic dark matter makes one quarter of the energy density of the Universe. The Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) is a dark matter candidate with a scattering cross section with an atomic nucleus of the order of the weak interaction and a mass comparable to that of an atomic nucleus. Results of the two tower run from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II), consisting of a total exposure of 34 kg-d for germanium and 12 kg-d for silicon, at the Soudan Underground Laboratory are presented. Also we present studies of the neutron background relevant for our upcoming 10-fold more sensitive 5-tower run, as well as for other experiments in search of dark matter. During the two-tower run, no nuclear-recoil events exceeding expected background were observed for a WIMP mass of 60 GeV/c^2. The limit from Ge (Si) is a factor of 2.5 (10) lower than previous results, allowing to set further constraints on the predictions of supersymetric models. Our further studies of the muon-induced neutron background based on Monte Carlo simulations show that by replacing part of the outer polyethylene of the CDMS II shield by a neutron multiplicity meter, for example by Gd-loaded liquid scintillator (0.5% gadolinium content) with a PMT read out would allow us to better predict the absolute number of unvetoed nuclear recoils compared with present methods which rely on multiple nuclear recoil events.

  8. X-ray microprobe studies of Hungarian background and urban aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Toeroek, S.; Sandor, S. . Central Research Inst. for Physics); Xhoffer, C.; Van Grieken, R. . Dept. of Chemistry); Jones, K.W. ); Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L. )

    1991-10-01

    In order to determine the polluting atmospheric sources in urban and background areas source apportionment of the air particulate matter is necessary. Hitherto these studies were mostly based on bulk composition measurements of the aerosol. Source profiles, i.e. the concentrations of several elements for air particulate matter originating from one source, can be deduced from the receptor data using a number of multivariate techniques among which the chemical mass balance. The application is limited by the large number of observations that must be made for each of the variables. Often an elaborated sample preparation is necessary for fractionating the sample into several sub samples, according to the density, particle diameter or other relevant properties. Often this may results in poorly resolved source profiles. The aim of the present work is to find the relative abundance of the particle types originating from two different background monitoring stations in the middle of the Great Hungarian Plain. In urban areas most pollutants originate from traffic and municipal waste incineration. Since heavy metals play an important role in these samples the highly sensitive x-ray microscope (XRM) of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory was used. A feasibility study on individual aerosol particles sampled at the above background stations and in the urban area of Budapest is discussed.

  9. The influence of background music on recognition processes of Chinese characters: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baolin; Huang, Yizhou; Wang, Zhongning; Wu, Guangning

    2012-06-19

    In this paper, we employed RSS (rapid stream stimulation) paradigm to study the recognition processes of Chinese characters in background music. Real Chinese characters (upright or rotated) were used as target stimuli, while pseudo-words were used as background stimuli. Subjects were required to detect real characters while listening to Mozart's Sonata K. 448 and in silence. Both behavioral results and ERP results supported that Mozart's music mainly served as a distracter in the recognition processes of real Chinese characters in the experiment. The modulation of Mozart's music on RP (recognition potential) was different across different orientations of Chinese characters; in particular, the modulation of RP elicited by upright Chinese characters was more significant, suggesting that the music factor and orientation factor interact to affect the RP component. In brief, the simultaneous playing of Mozart's music did not improve subjects' performance in the detection of real Chinese characters.

  10. Ab initio study on the kinetics of hydrogen abstraction for the H+alkene-->H2+alkenyl reaction class.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Lam K; Panasewicz, Sylwester; Ratkiewicz, Artur; Truong, Thanh N

    2007-03-22

    Kinetics of the hydrogen abstraction reaction class of the H+alkene has been studied using the reaction class transition state theory (RC-TST) combined with the linear energy relationship (LER) and the barrier height grouping (BHG) approach. The rate constants for the reference reaction, H+C2H4, were obtained by the canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) with the small curvature tunneling (SCT) correction in the temperature range of 300-3000 K. Combined with these data, both the RC-TST/LER, where only reaction energy is needed, and RC-TST/BHG, where no other information is needed, are found to be promising methods for predicting rate constants for a large number of reactions in this reaction class. Our analysis indicates that less than 50% systematic errors on the average exist in the predicted rate constants using the RC-TST/LER or RC-TST/BHG method while in comparison to explicit rate calculations the differences are less than 100% or a factor of 2 on the average.

  11. A Study on Effect of Water Background on Canopy Spectral of Wetland Aquatic Plant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang; Tang, Peng; Cai Zhan-qing; Wang, Tian-tian; Xu, Jun-feng

    2015-10-01

    Aquatic vegetation is the core of the wetland ecosystem, and it's also the main factor influencing the wetland ecosystem functions. In recent years, satellite remote sensing technology has been widely used in the investigation, classification and protection fields of wetland vegetation resources. Because of its unique growth environment, aquatic vegetation, the canopy spectrum of aquatic vegetation will be affected by water background elements including air-water interface, plankton in the water, sediment content, transparency, water depth, sediment, and the other optically active ingredients. When the remote sensing technology for wetland aquatic vegetation canopy spectral studies, should be considered the growth environment differences between aquatic and terrestrial vegetation. However, previous studies did not get the attention it deserves. This paper choose a typical water plant (Iris tentorium Maxim) as the research object, simulate the growth environment of wetland aquatic plants, use the feature spectrometer measurements the spectral reflectance of Iris tentorium Maxim vegetation canopy under different water depth gradient background (400-2 400 nm). Experimental results show that there is a significant negative correlation between background water depth and Iris canopy reflectance. Visible light band absolute correlation coefficient is above 0.9, near infrared band absolute correlation coefficient is above 0.8. In visible light and near infrared band, with water depth increases, the Iris canopy reflectance decreases obviously. Finally based on the highest correlation band of visible light and near infrared region (505, 717, 1 075 and 2 383 nm) established the linear equation between background water depth and the canopy reflectance, obtained the related parameters.

  12. ERP investigation of study-test background mismatch during face recognition in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Fabrice; Guillem, François; Tiberghien, Guy; Stip, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Old/new effects on event-related potentials (ERP) were explored in 20 patients with schizophrenia and 20 paired comparison subjects during unfamiliar face recognition. Extrinsic perceptual changes - which influence the overall familiarity of an item while retaining face-intrinsic features for use in structural face encoding - were manipulated between the study phase and the test. The question raised here concerns whether these perceptual incongruities would have a different effect on the sense of familiarity and the corresponding behavioral and ERP measures in the two groups. The results showed that schizophrenia patients were more inclined to consider old faces shown against a new background as distractors. This drop in face familiarity was accompanied by the disappearance of ERP old/new effects in this condition, i.e., FN400 and parietal old/new effects. Indeed, while ERP old/new recognition effects were found in both groups when the picture of the face was physically identical to the one presented for study, the ERP correlates of recognition disappeared among patients when the background behind the face was different. This difficulty in disregarding a background change suggests that recognition among patients with schizophrenia is based on a global perceptual matching strategy rather than on the extraction of configural information from the face. The correlations observed between FN400 amplitude, the rejection of faces with a different background, and the reality-distortion scores support the idea that the recognition deficit found in schizophrenia results from early anomalies that are carried over onto the parietal ERP old/new effect. Face-extrinsic perceptual variations provide an opportune situation for gaining insight into the social difficulties that patients encounter throughout their lives.

  13. Background radiation and childhood leukemia: A nationwide register-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nikkilä, Atte; Erme, Sini; Arvela, Hannu; Holmgren, Olli; Raitanen, Jani; Lohi, Olli; Auvinen, Anssi

    2016-11-01

    High doses of ionizing radiation are an established cause of childhood leukemia. However, substantial uncertainty remains about the effect of low doses of radiation, including background radiation and potential differences between genetic subgroups of leukemia have rarely been explored. We investigated the effect of the background gamma radiation on childhood leukemia using a nationwide register-based case-control study. For each of the 1,093 cases, three age- and gender matched controls were selected (N = 3,279). Conditional logistic regression analyses were adjusted for confounding by Down syndrome, birth weight (large for gestational age), and maternal smoking. Complete residential histories and previously collected survey data of the background gamma radiation in Finland were used to assess the exposure of the study subjects to indoor and outdoor gamma radiation. Overall, background gamma radiation showed a non-significant association with the OR of childhood leukemia (OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.97, 1.05 for 10 nSv/h increase in average equivalent dose rate to red bone marrow). In subgroup analyses, age group 2-<7 years displayed a larger effect (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.01, 1.60 for 1 mSv increase in equivalent cumulative dose to red bone marrow). Suggestive difference in OR by genetic subtype was found. Our results provide further support to the notion that low doses of ionizing radiation increase the risk for childhood leukemia, particularly at age 2-<7 years. Our findings suggest a larger effect of radiation on leukemia with high hyperpdiploidy than other subgroups, but this result requires further confirmation.

  14. Postpartum Contraception: a Comparative Study of Berlin Women with and without Immigration Background.

    PubMed

    David, M; Brenne, S; Breckenkamp, J; Razum, O; Borde, T

    2015-09-01

    Research Questions: Are there differences in postpartum contraceptive use between women with and without immigration background? Do women more commonly use contraception following a high-risk pregnancy or caesarean section? What role does current breastfeeding play and, amongst immigrants, what is the effect of acculturation level on the frequency of contraceptive use? Study Population and Methods: Data collection was carried out as part of a larger study in three Berlin delivery units using standardised interviews (questionnaires covering e.g. sociodemographics, immigration history/acculturation and use of antenatal care); telephone interviews comprising 6 questions on postpartum contraception, breastfeeding and postpartum complications were conducted on a sample of the study population six months after delivery. Results: 247 women with, and 358 women without a background of immigration were included in the study (total study population n = 605, response rate 81.1 %). 68 % of 1st generation immigrants, 87 % of 2nd/3rd generation women and 73 % of women without immigration background (non-immigrants) used contraception. In the logistical regression analysis 1st generation immigrants were less likely than non-immigrants to be using contraception six months postpartum, and 1st generation immigrants with low acculturation level were significantly less likely to use contraception than 2nd/3rd generation women with low acculturation level. Conclusion: In the extended postpartum period there was no major difference in contraceptive use between immigrants in general and non-immigrants. It remains unclear whether the differing contraceptive behaviour of 1st generation immigrants is the result of less access to information, sociocultural factors or differing contraceptive requirements and further targeted, qualitative study is required.

  15. Postpartum Contraception: a Comparative Study of Berlin Women with and without Immigration Background

    PubMed Central

    David, M.; Brenne, S.; Breckenkamp, J.; Razum, O.; Borde, T.

    2015-01-01

    Research Questions: Are there differences in postpartum contraceptive use between women with and without immigration background? Do women more commonly use contraception following a high-risk pregnancy or caesarean section? What role does current breastfeeding play and, amongst immigrants, what is the effect of acculturation level on the frequency of contraceptive use? Study Population and Methods: Data collection was carried out as part of a larger study in three Berlin delivery units using standardised interviews (questionnaires covering e.g. sociodemographics, immigration history/acculturation and use of antenatal care); telephone interviews comprising 6 questions on postpartum contraception, breastfeeding and postpartum complications were conducted on a sample of the study population six months after delivery. Results: 247 women with, and 358 women without a background of immigration were included in the study (total study population n = 605, response rate 81.1 %). 68 % of 1st generation immigrants, 87 % of 2nd/3rd generation women and 73 % of women without immigration background (non-immigrants) used contraception. In the logistical regression analysis 1st generation immigrants were less likely than non-immigrants to be using contraception six months postpartum, and 1st generation immigrants with low acculturation level were significantly less likely to use contraception than 2nd/3rd generation women with low acculturation level. Conclusion: In the extended postpartum period there was no major difference in contraceptive use between immigrants in general and non-immigrants. It remains unclear whether the differing contraceptive behaviour of 1st generation immigrants is the result of less access to information, sociocultural factors or differing contraceptive requirements and further targeted, qualitative study is required. PMID:26500367

  16. Dual-level direct dynamics studies for the hydrogen abstraction reaction of 1,1-difluoroethane with O( 3P)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing-yao; Li, Ze-sheng; Dai, Zhen-wen; Zhang, Gang; Sun, Chia-chung

    2004-01-01

    We present dual-level direct dynamics calculations for the CH 3CHF 2 + O( 3P) hydrogen abstraction reaction in a wide temperature range, based on canonical variational transition-state theory including small curvature tunneling corrections. For this reaction, three distinct transition states, one for α-abstraction and two for β-abstraction, have been located. The potential energy surface information is obtained at the MP2(full)/6-311G(d,p) level of theory, and higher-level single-point calculations for the stationary points are preformed at several levels, namely QCISD(T)/6-311+G(3df,3pd), G2, and G3 using the MP2 geometries, as well as at the G3//MP4SDQ/6-311G(d,p) level. The energy profiles are further refined with the interpolated single-point energies method at the G3//MP2(full)/6-311G(d,p) level. The total rate constants match the experimental data reasonable well in the measured temperature range 1110-1340 K. It is shown that at low temperature α-abstraction may be the major reaction channel, while β-abstraction will have more contribution to the whole reaction rate as the temperature increases.

  17. U.S. -- EC fuel cycle study: Background document to the approach and issues

    SciTech Connect

    Cantor, Robin; Russell, Lee; Krupnick, Alan; Smith, Hilary; Schaffhauser, Jr., A.; Barnthouse, Larry; Cada, Glen; Kroodsma, Roger; Turner, Robb; Easterly, Clay; Jones, Troyce; Burtraw, Dallas; Harrington, Winston; Freeman, A. Myrick

    1992-11-01

    In February 1991, DOE and the Commission of the European Communities (EC), signed a joint statement regarding the external costs of fuel cycles. This 18-month agreement committed their respective organizations to develop a comparative analytical methodology and to develop the best range of estimates of external costs from secondary sources'' for eight fuel cycles and four conservation options. In our study, a fuel cycle is defined as the series of physical and chemical processes and activities that are required to generate electricity from a specific fuel or resource. This foundation phase of the study is primarily limited to developing and demonstrating methods for estimating impacts and their monetized value, what we term damages'' or benefits,'' leaving aside the extent to which such damages have been internalized. However, Appendix C provides the conceptual framework for evaluating the extent of internalization. This report is a background document to introduce the study approach and to discuss the major conceptual and practical issues entailed by the incremental damage problem. As a background document, the report seeks to communicate an overview of the study and the important methodological choices that were made to conduct the research. In successive sections of the report, the methodological tools used in the study are discussed; the ecological and health impacts are reviewed using the coal fuel cycle as a reference case; and, in the final chapter, the methods for valuing impacts are detailed.

  18. ForCent Model Development and Testing using the Enriched Background Isotope Study (EBIS) Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Parton, William; Hanson, Paul J; Swanston, Chris; Torn, Margaret S.; Trumbore, Susan E.; Riley, William J.; Kelly, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The ForCent forest ecosystem model was developed by making major revisions to the DayCent model including: (1) adding a humus organic pool, (2) incorporating a detailed root growth model, and (3) including plant phenological growth patterns. Observed plant production and soil respiration data from 1993 to 2000 were used to demonstrate that the ForCent model could accurately simulate ecosystem carbon dynamics for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory deciduous forest. A comparison of ForCent versus observed soil pool 14C signature (? 14C) data from the Enriched Background Isotope Study 14C experiment (1999-2006) shows that the model correctly simulates the temporal dynamics of the 14C label as it moved from the surface litter and roots into the mineral soil organic matter pools. ForCent model validation was performed by comparing the observed Enriched Background Isotope Study experimental data with simulated live and dead root biomass ? 14C data, and with soil respiration ? 14C (mineral soil, humus layer, leaf litter layer, and total soil respiration) data. Results show that the model correctly simulates the impact of the Enriched Background Isotope Study 14C experimental treatments on soil respiration ? 14C values for the different soil organic matter pools. Model results suggest that a two-pool root growth model correctly represents root carbon dynamics and inputs to the soil. The model fitting process and sensitivity analysis exposed uncertainty in our estimates of the fraction of mineral soil in the slow and passive pools, dissolved organic carbon flux out of the litter layer into the mineral soil, and mixing of the humus layer into the mineral soil layer.

  19. ForCent model development and testing using the Enriched Background Isotope Study experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Parton, W.J.; Hanson, P. J.; Swanston, C.; Torn, M.; Trumbore, S. E.; Riley, W.; Kelly, R.

    2010-10-01

    The ForCent forest ecosystem model was developed by making major revisions to the DayCent model including: (1) adding a humus organic pool, (2) incorporating a detailed root growth model, and (3) including plant phenological growth patterns. Observed plant production and soil respiration data from 1993 to 2000 were used to demonstrate that the ForCent model could accurately simulate ecosystem carbon dynamics for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory deciduous forest. A comparison of ForCent versus observed soil pool {sup 14}C signature ({Delta} {sup 14}C) data from the Enriched Background Isotope Study {sup 14}C experiment (1999-2006) shows that the model correctly simulates the temporal dynamics of the {sup 14}C label as it moved from the surface litter and roots into the mineral soil organic matter pools. ForCent model validation was performed by comparing the observed Enriched Background Isotope Study experimental data with simulated live and dead root biomass {Delta} {sup 14}C data, and with soil respiration {Delta} {sup 14}C (mineral soil, humus layer, leaf litter layer, and total soil respiration) data. Results show that the model correctly simulates the impact of the Enriched Background Isotope Study {sup 14}C experimental treatments on soil respiration {Delta} {sup 14}C values for the different soil organic matter pools. Model results suggest that a two-pool root growth model correctly represents root carbon dynamics and inputs to the soil. The model fitting process and sensitivity analysis exposed uncertainty in our estimates of the fraction of mineral soil in the slow and passive pools, dissolved organic carbon flux out of the litter layer into the mineral soil, and mixing of the humus layer into the mineral soil layer.

  20. ForCent model development and testing using the Enriched Background Isotope Study experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parton, William J.; Hanson, Paul J.; Swanston, Chris; Torn, Margaret; Trumbore, Susan E.; Riley, William; Kelly, Robin

    2010-12-01

    The ForCent forest ecosystem model was developed by making major revisions to the DayCent model including: (1) adding a humus organic pool, (2) incorporating a detailed root growth model, and (3) including plant phenological growth patterns. Observed plant production and soil respiration data from 1993 to 2000 were used to demonstrate that the ForCent model could accurately simulate ecosystem carbon dynamics for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory deciduous forest. A comparison of ForCent versus observed soil pool 14C signature (Δ 14C) data from the Enriched Background Isotope Study 14C experiment (1999-2006) shows that the model correctly simulates the temporal dynamics of the 14C label as it moved from the surface litter and roots into the mineral soil organic matter pools. ForCent model validation was performed by comparing the observed Enriched Background Isotope Study experimental data with simulated live and dead root biomass Δ 14C data, and with soil respiration Δ 14C (mineral soil, humus layer, leaf litter layer, and total soil respiration) data. Results show that the model correctly simulates the impact of the Enriched Background Isotope Study 14C experimental treatments on soil respiration Δ 14C values for the different soil organic matter pools. Model results suggest that a two-pool root growth model correctly represents root carbon dynamics and inputs to the soil. The model fitting process and sensitivity analysis exposed uncertainty in our estimates of the fraction of mineral soil in the slow and passive pools, dissolved organic carbon flux out of the litter layer into the mineral soil, and mixing of the humus layer into the mineral soil layer.

  1. Formal concept analysis with background knowledge: a case study in paleobiological taxonomy of belemnites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belohlavek, Radim; Kostak, Martin; Osicka, Petr

    2013-05-01

    We present a case study in identification of taxa in paleobiological data. Our approach utilizes formal concept analysis and is based on conceiving a taxon as a group of individuals sharing a collection of attributes. In addition to the incidence relation between individuals and their attributes, the method uses expert background knowledge regarding importance of attributes which helps to filter out correctly formed but paleobiologically irrelevant taxa. We present results of experiments carried out with belemnites-a group of extinct cephalopods which seems particularly suitable for such a purpose. We demonstrate that the methods are capable of revealing taxa and relationships among them that are relevant from a paleobiological point of view.

  2. Vague Language in Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This study examined abstracts for a British Association for Applied Linguistics conference and a Sociolinguistics Symposium, to define the genre of conference abstracts in terms of vague language, specifically universal general nouns (e.g. people) and research general nouns (e.g. results), and to discover if the language used reflected the level…

  3. Background Ionizing Radiation and the Risk of Childhood Cancer: A Census-Based Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lupatsch, Judith E.; Zwahlen, Marcel; Röösli, Martin; Niggli, Felix; Grotzer, Michael A.; Rischewski, Johannes; Egger, Matthias; Kuehni, Claudia E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to medium or high doses of ionizing radiation is a known risk factor for cancer in children. The extent to which low-dose radiation from natural sources contributes to the risk of childhood cancer remains unclear. Objectives In a nationwide census-based cohort study, we investigated whether the incidence of childhood cancer was associated with background radiation from terrestrial gamma and cosmic rays. Methods Children < 16 years of age in the Swiss National Censuses in 1990 and 2000 were included. The follow-up period lasted until 2008, and incident cancer cases were identified from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry. A radiation model was used to predict dose rates from terrestrial and cosmic radiation at locations of residence. Cox regression models were used to assess associations between cancer risk and dose rates and cumulative dose since birth. Results Among 2,093,660 children included at census, 1,782 incident cases of cancer were identified including 530 with leukemia, 328 with lymphoma, and 423 with a tumor of the central nervous system (CNS). Hazard ratios for each millisievert increase in cumulative dose of external radiation were 1.03 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.05) for any cancer, 1.04 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.08) for leukemia, 1.01 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.05) for lymphoma, and 1.04 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.08) for CNS tumors. Adjustment for a range of potential confounders had little effect on the results. Conclusions Our study suggests that background radiation may contribute to the risk of cancer in children, including leukemia and CNS tumors. Citation Spycher BD, Lupatsch JE, Zwahlen M, Röösli M, Niggli F, Grotzer MA, Rischewski J, Egger M, Kuehni CE, for the Swiss Pediatric Oncology Group and the Swiss National Cohort. 2015. Background ionizing radiation and the risk of childhood cancer: a census-based nationwide cohort study. Environ Health Perspect 123:622–628; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408548 PMID:25707026

  4. Attitudes and Perceptions of Patients, Caregivers, and Health Care Providers toward Background Music in Patient Care Areas: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Cruz, Pedro; Nguyen, Linh; Rhondali, Wadih; Hui, David; Palmer, J. Lynn; Sevy, Ingrid; Richardson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Background music can be used to distract from ordinary sounds and improve wellbeing in patient care areas. Little is known about individuals' attitudes and beliefs about music versus ordinary sound in this setting. Objectives To assess the preferences of patients, caregivers and healthcare providers regarding background music or ordinary sound in outpatient and inpatient care areas, and to explore their attitudes and perceptions towards music in general. Methods All participants were exposed to background music in outpatient or inpatient clinical settings. 99 consecutive patients, 101 caregivers and 65 out of 70 eligible healthcare providers (93%) completed a survey about music attitudes and preferences. The primary outcome was a preference for background music over ordinary sound in patient care areas. Results Preference for background music was high and similar across groups (70 patients (71%), 71 caregivers (71%) and 46 providers (71%), p=0.58). The three groups had very low disapproval for background music in patient care areas (10%, 9% and 12%, respectively; p=0.91). Black ethnicity independently predicted lower preference for background music (OR: 0.47, 95%CI: 0.23, 0.98). Patients, caregivers and providers reported recent use of music for themselves for the purpose of enjoyment (69%, 80% and 86% respectively p=0.02). Age, gender, religion and education level significantly predicted preferences for specific music styles. Conclusion Background music in patient care areas was preferred to ordinary sound by patients, caregivers and providers. Demographics of the population are strong determinants of music style preferences. PMID:22957677

  5. Agents of Change in Promoting Reflective Abstraction: A Quasi-Experimental, Study on Limits in College Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappetta, Robert W.; Zollman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    We measured student performance on the concept of limit by promoting reflection through four agents of change: instructor, peer, curriculum and individual. It is based on Piaget's four constructs of reflective abstraction: interiorization, coordination, encapsulation, and generalization, and includes the notion of reversal, as refined into a…

  6. President's Commission on Foreign Language and International Studies: Background Papers and Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Commission on Foreign Language and International Studies, Washington, DC.

    The following reports by various authors concerning foreign languages and international studies are included: (1) a personal statement on international education by Betty Bullard; (2) "Foreign Languages in the American School"; (3) "High Schools for Foreign Language and International Studies: An Interagency Paper"; (4)…

  7. Grounding Abstractness: Abstract Concepts and the Activation of the Mouth.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Anna M; Zarcone, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    One key issue for theories of cognition is how abstract concepts, such as freedom, are represented. According to the WAT (Words As social Tools) proposal, abstract concepts activate both sensorimotor and linguistic/social information, and their acquisition modality involves the linguistic experience more than the acquisition of concrete concepts. We report an experiment in which participants were presented with abstract and concrete definitions followed by concrete and abstract target-words. When the definition and the word matched, participants were required to press a key, either with the hand or with the mouth. Response times and accuracy were recorded. As predicted, we found that abstract definitions and abstract words yielded slower responses and more errors compared to concrete definitions and concrete words. More crucially, there was an interaction between the target-words and the effector used to respond (hand, mouth). While responses with the mouth were overall slower, the advantage of the hand over the mouth responses was more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts. The results are in keeping with grounded and embodied theories of cognition and support the WAT proposal, according to which abstract concepts evoke linguistic-social information, hence activate the mouth. The mechanisms underlying the mouth activation with abstract concepts (re-enactment of acquisition experience, or re-explanation of the word meaning, possibly through inner talk) are discussed. To our knowledge this is the first behavioral study demonstrating with real words that the advantage of the hand over the mouth is more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts, likely because of the activation of linguistic information with abstract concepts.

  8. Grounding Abstractness: Abstract Concepts and the Activation of the Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Anna M.; Zarcone, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    One key issue for theories of cognition is how abstract concepts, such as freedom, are represented. According to the WAT (Words As social Tools) proposal, abstract concepts activate both sensorimotor and linguistic/social information, and their acquisition modality involves the linguistic experience more than the acquisition of concrete concepts. We report an experiment in which participants were presented with abstract and concrete definitions followed by concrete and abstract target-words. When the definition and the word matched, participants were required to press a key, either with the hand or with the mouth. Response times and accuracy were recorded. As predicted, we found that abstract definitions and abstract words yielded slower responses and more errors compared to concrete definitions and concrete words. More crucially, there was an interaction between the target-words and the effector used to respond (hand, mouth). While responses with the mouth were overall slower, the advantage of the hand over the mouth responses was more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts. The results are in keeping with grounded and embodied theories of cognition and support the WAT proposal, according to which abstract concepts evoke linguistic-social information, hence activate the mouth. The mechanisms underlying the mouth activation with abstract concepts (re-enactment of acquisition experience, or re-explanation of the word meaning, possibly through inner talk) are discussed. To our knowledge this is the first behavioral study demonstrating with real words that the advantage of the hand over the mouth is more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts, likely because of the activation of linguistic information with abstract concepts. PMID:27777563

  9. Social background, bullying, and physical inactivity: National study of 11- to 15-year-olds.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, P W; Rayce, S B; Melkevik, O; Due, P; Holstein, B E

    2016-10-01

    More children from lower social backgrounds are physically inactive than those from higher ones. We studied whether bullying was a mediating factor between lower social background and physical inactivity. We also examined the combined effect of low social class and exposure to bullying on physical inactivity. The Danish sample of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study 2006 included 6269 schoolchildren in three age groups: 11-, 13-, and 15-year-olds from a random sample of 80 schools. The students answered the internationally standardized HBSC questionnaire. The applied definition leaves 4.0% in the category physically inactive. The sex and age-adjusted OR (95% CI) for physical inactivity was 2.10 (1.39-3.18) among students with low social class and unclassifiable 3.53 (2.26-5.53). Exposure to bullying was associated with physical inactivity, sex and age-adjusted OR = 2.39 (1.67-3.41). Exposure to bullying did not explain the association between social class and physical inactivity. The association between social class and physical inactivity was more pronounced among participants also exposed to bullying. In conclusion, there was a significantly increased odds ratio for physical inactivity among students from lower social classes and for students exposed to bullying. There was a combined effect of low social class and bullying on physical inactivity.

  10. The background-limited infrared-submillimeter spectrograph (BLISS) for SPICA: a design study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, C. M.; Bock, James; Holmes, Warren; Kenyon, M.; Beyer, A.; Werner, M.; Rud, M.; Prouvé, T.; Echternach, P.; Irwin, K.; Cho, S.; Harwit, M.; Stacey, G.; Helou, G.; Armus, L.; Appleton, P.; Smith, J. D.; Gorti, U.; Rieke, G.; Egami, E.; Lester, D.; Glenn, J.; Malkan, M.; Dale, D.

    2010-07-01

    We are developing the Background-Limited Infrared-Submillimeter Spectrograph (BLISS) for SPICA to provide a breakthrough capability for far-IR survey spectroscopy. SPICAs large cold aperture allows mid-IR to submm observations which are limited only by the natural backgrounds, and BLISS is designed to operate near this fundamental limit. BLISS-SPICA is 6 orders of magnitude faster than the spectrometers on Herschel and SOFIA in obtaining full-band spectra. It enables spectroscopy of dust-obscured galaxies at all epochs back to the rst billion years after the Big Bang (redshift 6), and study of all stages of planet formation in circumstellar disks. BLISS covers 35 - 433 microns range in ve or six wavelength bands, and couples two 2 sky positions simultaneously. The instrument is cooled to 50 mK for optimal sensitivity with an on-board refrigerators. The detector package is 4224 silicon-nitride micro-mesh leg-isolated bolometers with superconducting transition-edge-sensed (TES) thermistors, read out with a cryogenic time-domain multiplexer. All technical elements of BLISS have heritage in mature scientic instruments, and many have own. We report on our design study in which we are optimizing performance while accommodating SPICAs constraints, including the stringent cryogenic mass budget. In particular, we present our progress in the optical design and waveguide spectrometer prototyping. A companion paper in Conference 7741 (Beyer et al.) discusses in greater detail the progress in the BLISS TES bolometer development.

  11. Immigrant background and medicine use for aches: national representative study of adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aims of the study were to examine the association between immigrant background and medicine use for headache and stomach-ache among adolescents, and whether symptoms of headache and stomach-ache could explain the differences in medicine use. Methods We used data from the Danish contribution to the WHO-affiliated international cross-sectional survey Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) in 2006. Among boys, a total of 4170 ethnic Danes, 244 descendants of immigrants, and 224 immigrants participated. Among girls, 4310 ethnic Danes, 264 descendants of immigrants, and 232 immigrants were included. The associations between migrant background and medicine use for headache and stomach-ache by means of multilevel multivariate logistic regression analyses adjusted for age group, symptoms and the clustering effect of school and stratified by sex due to interactions. Results Among boys, the risk of medicine use for stomach-ache was higher for immigrants (odds ratio (OR), 1.54; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.99-2.44)) and descendants (OR, 1.97 (1.33-2.94)) compared to ethnic Danes. Similar associations were found for use of medicine for stomach-ache for immigrant girls (OR, 1.55 (1.12-2.15) and use of medicine for headache among boys (immigrants (OR, 1.36 (1.02-1.97 and descendants (1.48 (1.12-1.97)). Symptoms of aches were all independently associated with medicine use. After adjusting for these factors the association between immigrant background and medicine use attenuated slightly. Conclusion Among adolescents in Denmark, the risk of medicine use for headache and stomach-ache was higher for immigrants and descendants as compared to ethnic Danes, with the exception of medicine use for headache among girls. PMID:25848541

  12. Abstraction and Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, John; Ozmantar, Mehmet Fatih

    2006-01-01

    The framework for this paper is a recently developed theory of abstraction in context. The paper reports on data collected from one student working on tasks concerned with absolute value functions. It examines the relationship between mathematical constructions and abstractions. It argues that an abstraction is a consolidated construction that can…

  13. Automated Supernova Discovery (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) We are developing a system of robotic telescopes for automatic recognition of Supernovas as well as other transient events in collaboration with the Puckett Supernova Search Team. At the SAS2014 meeting, the discovery program, SNARE, was first described. Since then, it has been continuously improved to handle searches under a wide variety of atmospheric conditions. Currently, two telescopes are used to build a reference library while searching for PSN with a partial library. Since data is taken every night without clouds, we must deal with varying atmospheric and high background illumination from the moon. Software is configured to identify a PSN, reshoot for verification with options to change the run plan to acquire photometric or spectrographic data. The telescopes are 24-inch CDK24, with Alta U230 cameras, one in CA and one in NM. Images and run plans are sent between sites so the CA telescope can search while photometry is done in NM. Our goal is to find bright PSNs with magnitude 17.5 or less which is the limit of our planned spectroscopy. We present results from our first automated PSN discoveries and plans for PSN data acquisition.

  14. The International ADHD in Substance Use Disorders Prevalence (IASP) study: background, methods and study population

    PubMed Central

    Van De Glind, Geurt; Van Emmerik-Van Oortmerssen, Katelijne; Carpentier, Pieter Jan; Levin, Frances R.; Koeter, Maarten W.J.; Barta, Csaba; Kaye, Sharlene; Skutle, Arvid; Franck, Johan; Konstenius, Maija; Bu, Eli-Torild; Moggi, Franz; Dom, Geert; Demetrovics, Zolt; Fatséas, Mélina; Schillinger, Arild; Kapitány-Fövény, Máté; Verspreet, Sofie; Seitz, Andrea; Johnson, Brian; Faraone, Stephen V.; Ramos-Quiroga, J. Antoni; Allsop, Steve; Carruthers, Susan; Schoevers, Robert A.; Van Den Brink, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is an increasingly recognized comorbid condition in subjects with substance use disorders (SUDs). This paper describes the methods and study population of the International ADHD in Substance Use Disorders Prevalence (IASP) study. Objectives of the IASP are to determine the prevalence of ADHD in adult treatment seeking patients with SUD in different countries and SUD populations, determine the reliability and validity of the Adult ADHD Self-report Scale V 1.1 (ASRS) as ADHD screening instrument in SUD populations, investigate the comorbidity profile of SUD patients with and without ADHD, compare risk factors and protective factors in SUD patients with and without a comorbid diagnosis of ADHD, and increase our knowledge about the relationship between ADHD and the onset and course of SUD. In this cross-sectional, multi-centre two stage study, subjects were screened for ADHD with the ASRS, diagnosed with the Conner’s Adult ADHD Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV (CAADID), and evaluated for SUD, major depression, bipolar disorder, anti social personality disorder and borderline personality disorder. Three thousand five hundred and fifty-eight subjects from 10 countries were included. Of these 40.9% screened positive for ADHD. This is the largest international study on this population evaluating ADHD and comorbid disorders. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24022983

  15. Review of approaches to the recording of background lesions in toxicologic pathology studies in rats.

    PubMed

    McInnes, E F; Scudamore, C L

    2014-08-17

    Pathological evaluation of lesions caused directly by xenobiotic treatment must always take into account the recognition of background (incidental) findings. Background lesions can be congenital or hereditary, histological variations, changes related to trauma or normal aging and physiologic or hormonal changes. This review focuses on the importance and correct approach to recording of background changes and includes discussion on sources of variability in background changes, the correct use of terminology, the concept of thresholds, historical control data, diagnostic drift, blind reading of slides, scoring and artifacts. The review is illustrated with background lesions in Sprague Dawley and Wistar rats.

  16. A case study exploring science competence and science confidence of middle school girls from marginalized backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Yeni Violeta

    The inclusion of learners from underrepresented background in biology field research experiences has not been widely explored in the literature. Increased access and equity to experiences for groups historically underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) has been identified as a priority for many, yet little is known about the components these experiences should have and what types of transformations participants undergo as a result of these experiences. This dissertation explored the systemic creation of an intervention purposely designed to serve middle school girls from underrepresented backgrounds, the implementation of such intervention, and effect on the girls' science competence and science confidence. El Espejo, Spanish for "The Mirror," was an ongoing field ecology research program for middle schools girls founded in 2009 at a local interdisciplinary learning center. Girls from all walks of life had the opportunity to be apprentice researchers and to work with scientists and science educators from the local community. All activities were strategically designed to promote student-led inquiry, career awareness, cultural awareness, and opportunities for research and mentorship for girls from underrepresented backgrounds. An increased understanding of if, how, and why this experience was perceived by the girls to be life changing was of importance to add to the conversations that seek ways to inspire and prepare this generation of students to be the next generation of scientists. The study built on systems theory, and on theories that were embedded in the participants' system: critical race theory, identity theory, and experiential learning theory, grounded in the context of the lived experiences of girls from underrepresented backgrounds. The girls' experiences were captured through journals, observer participant notes, photo-documentation, artifacts (posters, videos) created by the girls, and by using science perception

  17. MeCP2 Related Studies Benefit from the Use of CD1 as Genetic Background

    PubMed Central

    Cobolli Gigli, Clementina; Scaramuzza, Linda; Gandaglia, Anna; Bellini, Elisa; Gabaglio, Marina; Parolaro, Daniela; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Bedogni, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    MECP2 mutations cause a number of neurological disorders of which Rett syndrome (RTT) represents the most thoroughly analysed condition. Many Mecp2 mouse models have been generated through the years; their validity is demonstrated by the presence of a broad spectrum of phenotypes largely mimicking those manifested by RTT patients. These mouse models, between which the C57BL/6 Mecp2tm1.1Bird strain probably represents the most used, enabled to disclose much of the roles of Mecp2. However, small litters with little viability and poor maternal care hamper the maintenance of the colony, thus limiting research on such animals. For this reason, past studies often used Mecp2 mouse models on mixed genetic backgrounds, thus opening questions on whether modifier genes could be responsible for at least part of the described effects. To verify this possibility, and facilitate the maintenance of the Mecp2 colony, we transferred the Mecp2tm1.1Bird allele on the stronger CD1 background. The CD1 strain is easier to maintain and largely recapitulates the phenotypes already described in Mecp2-null mice. We believe that this mouse model will foster the research on RTT. PMID:27097329

  18. A study of the use of abstract types for the representation of engineering units in integration and test applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles S.

    1986-01-01

    Physical quantities using various units of measurement can be well represented in Ada by the use of abstract types. Computation involving these quantities (electric potential, mass, volume) can also automatically invoke the computation and checking of some of the implicitly associable attributes of measurements. Quantities can be held internally in SI units, transparently to the user, with automatic conversion. Through dimensional analysis, the type of the derived quantity resulting from a computation is known, thereby allowing dynamic checks of the equations used. The impact of the possible implementation of these techniques in integration and test applications is discussed. The overhead of computing and transporting measurement attributes is weighed against the advantages gained by their use. The construction of a run time interpreter using physical quantities in equations can be aided by the dynamic equation checks provided by dimensional analysis. The effects of high levels of abstraction on the generation and maintenance of software used in integration and test applications are also discussed.

  19. Abstraction and Problem Reformulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giunchiglia, Fausto

    1992-01-01

    In work done jointly with Toby Walsh, the author has provided a sound theoretical foundation to the process of reasoning with abstraction (GW90c, GWS9, GW9Ob, GW90a). The notion of abstraction formalized in this work can be informally described as: (property 1), the process of mapping a representation of a problem, called (following historical convention (Sac74)) the 'ground' representation, onto a new representation, called the 'abstract' representation, which, (property 2) helps deal with the problem in the original search space by preserving certain desirable properties and (property 3) is simpler to handle as it is constructed from the ground representation by "throwing away details". One desirable property preserved by an abstraction is provability; often there is a relationship between provability in the ground representation and provability in the abstract representation. Another can be deduction or, possibly inconsistency. By 'throwing away details' we usually mean that the problem is described in a language with a smaller search space (for instance a propositional language or a language without variables) in which formulae of the abstract representation are obtained from the formulae of the ground representation by the use of some terminating rewriting technique. Often we require that the use of abstraction results in more efficient .reasoning. However, it might simply increase the number of facts asserted (eg. by allowing, in practice, the exploration of deeper search spaces or by implementing some form of learning). Among all abstractions, three very important classes have been identified. They relate the set of facts provable in the ground space to those provable in the abstract space. We call: TI abstractions all those abstractions where the abstractions of all the provable facts of the ground space are provable in the abstract space; TD abstractions all those abstractions wllere the 'unabstractions' of all the provable facts of the abstract space are

  20. Kinetic study on the H + SiH4 abstraction reaction using an ab initio potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianwei; Zhang, Zhijun; Zhang, Chunfang; Bian, Wensheng; Guo, Yin

    2011-01-14

    Variational transition state theory calculations with the correction of multidimensional tunneling are performed on a 12-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface for the H + SiH(4) abstraction reaction. The surface is constructed using a dual-level strategy. For the temperature range 200-1600 K, thermal rate constants are calculated and kinetic isotope effects for various isotopic species of the title reaction are investigated. The results are in very good agreement with available experimental data.

  1. Abstraction in mathematics.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Pier Luigi

    2003-01-01

    Some current interpretations of abstraction in mathematical settings are examined from different perspectives, including history and learning. It is argued that abstraction is a complex concept and that it cannot be reduced to generalization or decontextualization only. In particular, the links between abstraction processes and the emergence of new objects are shown. The role that representations have in abstraction is discussed, taking into account both the historical and the educational perspectives. As languages play a major role in mathematics, some ideas from functional linguistics are applied to explain to what extent mathematical notations are to be considered abstract. Finally, abstraction is examined from the perspective of mathematics education, to show that the teaching ideas resulting from one-dimensional interpretations of abstraction have proved utterly unsuccessful. PMID:12903658

  2. Construction of High School Students' Abstraction Levels in Understanding the Concept of Quadrilaterals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budiarto, Mega Teguh; Khabibah, Siti; Setianingsih, Rini

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the abstraction thinking or the vertical reorganization activity of mathematical concepts of high school students while taking account of the abstraction that was constructed earlier, and the socio-cultural background. This study was qualitative in nature with task-based interviews as the method of…

  3. A Cohort Study on Long-Term Adverse Effects of Parental Drinking: Background and Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Ingunn Olea; Bukten, Anne; Storvoll, Elisabet E; Moan, Inger Synnøve; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Handal, Marte; Nordfjærn, Trond; Brunborg, Geir Scott; Rossow, Ingeborg

    2015-01-01

    Although many studies have addressed adverse outcomes in children of parents with alcohol abuse/dependence, less is known about the possible long-term effects of more normative patterns of parental alcohol consumption, including drinking at lower risk levels and heavy episodic or binge drinking. The extent of harm from parental drinking may therefore be underestimated. With this research proposal, we describe a project that aims to assess possible long-term adverse effects of parental drinking by combining survey and nationwide registry data. Advantages of a longitudinal general population cohort design include that it allows for detailed information on parental drinking through survey data and identification of possible negative long-term health and social outcomes from exposure to parental drinking 1–19 years after exposure through continuously updated nationwide registers. The rich information available from combining survey and registry data allows us to take into account important confounders, mediators, and moderators. PMID:26688663

  4. A Case Study of One Instructor's Lecture-Based Teaching of Proof in Abstract Algebra: Making Sense of Her Pedagogical Moves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukawa-Connelly, Timothy Patrick

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a case study of the teaching of an undergraduate abstract algebra course, in particular the way the instructor presented proofs. It describes a framework for proof writing based on Selden and Selden (2009) and the work of Alcock (2010) on modes of thought that support proof writing. The paper offers a case study of the teaching of a…

  5. [Study of relational collusion in infertile couples with a possible psychogenic background].

    PubMed

    Bakó, Tihamér; Kulcsár, Eva

    2005-01-01

    The authors have investigated the psychodynamic background of possible psychogenic infertility in twenty couples. Four levels were studied: 1. Functioning of the relationship was measured with the Consensus Rorschach Test, following communication patterns in the couples. 2. Individual psychological functioning was investigated with the Individual Rorschach Test, positive and negative choices were asked, and titles were given to the figures. 3. Positive and negative reactions to particular image stimuli were also recorded, thus the joint psychological functioning of the couple was analysed. 4. Content analysis of Rorschach responses was also performed, and associations of the infertile couples were compared with associations of twenty couples expecting a child (matched by education level, SES and age). Results have provided evidence for the "phallic collusion" originally conceptualised by Jürg Willi. Starting from Willi's model, we can identify fixation at the Oedipal stage of development (3-6 years) in these partners living in a dysfunctional relationship. They have the same Achilles heel, a common grievance, a common "history pattern". Their common life is built on the hope that by living together, they could solve the problems originating from the childhood trauma. Generally, they have common fears of authority, and fears of adopting mature gender roles. According to maturity of communication content, their personality is in a transitional stage between childhood and adulthood. At a manifest level however, they hope to achieve fulfillment (birth of a child). The interactions are very ambivalent, strong mutual confirmation is present as well as criticism, devaluation and ignoration of the partner. Results of the study provide various new possibilities for promoting personality development through therapy in infertile couples with a possible psychogenic background.

  6. Attracting Girls into Physics (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadalla, Afaf

    2009-04-01

    A recent international study of women in physics showed that enrollment in physics and science is declining for both males and females and that women are severely underrepresented in careers requiring a strong physics background. The gender gap begins early in the pipeline, from the first grade. Girls are treated differently than boys at home and in society in ways that often hinder their chances for success. They have fewer freedoms, are discouraged from accessing resources or being adventurous, have far less exposure to problem solving, and are not encouraged to choose their lives. In order to motivate more girl students to study physics in the Assiut governorate of Egypt, the Assiut Alliance for the Women and Assiut Education District collaborated in renovating the education of physics in middle and secondary school classrooms. A program that helps in increasing the number of girls in science and physics has been designed in which informal groupings are organized at middle and secondary schools to involve girls in the training and experiences needed to attract and encourage girls to learn physics. During implementation of the program at some schools, girls, because they had not been trained in problem-solving as boys, appeared not to be as facile in abstracting the ideas of physics, and that was the primary reason for girls dropping out of science and physics. This could be overcome by holding a topical physics and technology summer school under the supervision of the Assiut Alliance for the Women.

  7. Deficiencies in structured medical abstracts.

    PubMed

    Froom, P; Froom, J

    1993-07-01

    This study was carried out to determine if the content of structured abstracts conforms with recommendations of the Ad Hoc Working Group for the critical appraisal of the medical literature as adopted by the Annals of Internal Medicine. The study design was a survey. All articles published in Annals of Internal Medicine in 1991, excluding editorials, case-reports, literature reviews, decision analysis, studies in medical education, descriptive studies of clinical and basic phenomena, and papers lacking a structured abstract, were studied. Of a total of 150 articles, 20 were excluded. The abstract and text of each article were assessed for the presence of the following items; patient selection criteria, statements concerning extrapolation of findings, need for further study, and whether or not the information should be used now. Number of refusers, drop outs and reason(s) for drop outs were assessed for intervention and prospective cohort studies only. Deficiencies of assessed items were noted in both abstracts and texts. For abstracts, patient selection criteria, numbers of refusers, number of drop outs and reason(s) for drop outs were reported in 44.6% (58/130), 3.1% (4/130), 16.9% (14/83) and 2.4% (2/83) respectively. These items were reported more frequently in the texts 87.7% (114/130), 9.2% (12/130), 60.2% (50/83) and 37.3% (31/83) respectively (p < 0.05). Statements concerning extrapolation of findings, need for further study and use of information now were also more frequent in texts than abstracts (p < 0.0001). A large number of structured abstracts published in the Annals of Internal Medicine in 1991, lack information recommended by the Ad Hoc Working Group. Our findings should not be extrapolated to other journals requiring structured abstracts.

  8. Abstract and keywords.

    PubMed

    Peh, W C G; Ng, K H

    2008-09-01

    The abstract of a scientific paper represents a concise, accurate and factual mini-version of the paper contents. Abstract format may vary according to the individual journal. For original articles, a structured abstract usually consists of the following headings: aims (or objectives), materials and methods, results and conclusion. A few keywords that capture the main topics of the paper help indexing in the medical literature.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation for background study of geophysical inspection with cosmic-ray muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Ryuichi; Taketa, Akimichi; Miyamoto, Seigo; Kasahara, Katsuaki

    2016-08-01

    Several attempts have been made to obtain a radiographic image inside volcanoes using cosmic-ray muons (muography). Muography is expected to resolve highly heterogeneous density profiles near the surface of volcanoes. However, several prior works have failed to make clear observations due to contamination by background noise. The background contamination leads to an overestimation of the muon flux and consequently a significant underestimation of the density in the target mountains. To investigate the origin of the background noise, we performed a Monte Carlo simulation. The main components of the background noise in muography are found to be low-energy protons, electrons and muons in case of detectors without particle identification and with energy thresholds below 1 GeV. This result was confirmed by comparisons with actual observations of nuclear emulsions. This result will be useful for detector design in future works, and in addition some previous works of muography should be reviewed from the view point of background contamination.

  10. The Effectiveness of Education and Schooling Activities with Respect to Learning Styles on the Learning of Abstract and Tangible Concepts of Social Studies by Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seker, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    This research reviews the effects of education and schooling activities that are conducted with respect to different learning styles on the success of teaching abstract and tangible concepts of 6th Grade Social Studies, and researches whether the demographic variables (age, gender) of the students had any effect on this success levels. To do so, 2…

  11. Mathematics Test, Numerical, and Abstraction Anxieties and Their Relation to Elementary Teachers' Views on Preparing Students for the Study of Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Martha A.; Gray, Mary W.

    1992-01-01

    Reports a correlational study to determine whether teacher's mathematics anxiety might inhibit the introduction of more problem solving and abstraction in elementary schools to enable more ninth graders to enroll in algebra. Correlations on 19 variables for 116 teachers indicated that anxiety decreased with increased mathematics content studied…

  12. The Study on the Preferences of Customer Personal Values with Chinese Culture Background in Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Yue

    Customer personal values are the important factors which affect customer behaviors, and they guide and decide the customer's attitudes and behaviors on the products or the services. The paper thinks there are only several important customer personal values to guide customer's decisions, and these values will have -strong cultural differences. This study focuses on discussing the preferences of customer personal values with Chinese culture background when customers consume service and analyzes on the customer preferences of customer personal values with the deep interview method. After interviewing 16 responders with the semi-structured questionnaires, the study finds out some interesting results: (1) Some customers have recognized the existent of customer personal values, even though customer perceived values still have the strong influences on customer behaviors. (2) As they pursue to high quality lives, customers enjoy the lives in easy and pleasure way and care about the safe of the family. Quick response, simple and professional services contribute to enhance the experiences of easy and pleasure lives. (3) Non-rational consumers need the respect from the staff and the companies seriously. In comparison, the rational customers care less about the respect. (4) The sociable requirements have become a common consuming psychology of the customers. More and more customers try to gain the friends by consuming some services. (5) The preferences of customer personal values have a close relationship with the Chinese culture, such as collective values, family conception and "face" culture. The results benefit for service companies improving service brands and service quality.

  13. Immigrant background and orthodontic treatment need. Quantitative and qualitative studies in Swedish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, Eva

    2010-01-01

    During the last three decades there has been an increased influx of refugees and immigrants into Scandinavia. The overall aim of this thesis was primarily to improve our knowledge of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment need, both normative and self-perceived, in adolescents of varying geographic origin. A further aim was to determine whether any differences with respect to perception of general appearance and psychosocial well-being were related to geographic origin. Papers I and II concerned self perceived and normative orthodontic treatment need. About 500 12-13 year-old subjects, stratified into different groups: A-Sweden, B-Eastern/Southeastern Europe, C-Asia and D-other countries, answered a questionnaire and underwent clinical examination by the author. In paper III the association between the two variables in papers I and II was investigated. Paper IV was a follow up study, at 18-19 years of age, of the relationship between geographic origin and prevalence of malocclusion, self-perceived treatment need, temporomandibular symptoms and psychosocial wellbeing. In Paper V a qualitative study of 19-20-year-old subjects was conducted, to identify the strategies they had adopted to handle the issue of persisting poor dental aesthetics. The main findings were that at 12-13 years of age, immigrant subjects had a lower perceived orthodontic treatment need than subjects of Swedish background. Girls of Swedish background had the highest self-perceived treatment need, whilst girls of non-Swedish background were most concerned that fixed appliance therapy would be painful. In a few of the clinical variables measured at 12-13 years of age, the Swedish group exhibited the greatest space deficiency and irregularity in both the maxillary and mandibular anterior segments and greater overjet, compared to the Eastern/Southeastern European and Asian groups. The clinical implications were negligible. The orthodontic treatment need according to "Index of Orthodontic Treatment

  14. QM/MM (ONIOM) study of glycerol binding and hydrogen abstraction by the coenzyme B12-independent dehydratase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuemin; Gallo, August A; Florián, Jan; Liu, Yen-Shan; Mora, Sandeep; Xu, Wu

    2010-04-29

    Glycerol binding and the radical-initiated hydrogen transfer by the coenzyme B(12)-independent glycerol dehydratase from Clostridium butyricum were investigated by using quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations based on the high-resolution crystal structure (PDB code: 1r9d). Our QM/MM calculations of enzyme catalysis considered the electrostatic coupling between the quantum-mechanical and molecular-mechanical subsystems and two alternative mechanisms. In addition to performing QM/MM calculations in the enzyme, we evaluated energetics along the same reaction pathway in aqueous solution modeled by the polarized dielectric and in the virtual enzyme site that included full steric component from the enzyme residues described by molecular mechanics but lacked the electrostatic contribution of these residues. In this way, we established significant enzyme catalytic effect with respect to reference reactions in both an aqueous solution and a nonpolar cavity. Structurally, four hydrogen bonds formed between glycerol and H164, S282, E435, and D447 anchor glycerol for hydrogen abstraction by thiyl radical on C433. These hydrogen-bond partners orient glycerol molecule to facilitate the formation of the transition state for hydrogen abstraction from carbon C1. This reaction then proceeds with the activation free energy of 6.3 kcal/mol and the reaction free energy of 6.1 kcal/mol. The polarization effects imposed by these hydrogen bonds represent a predominant contribution to a 7.5 kcal/mol enzyme catalytic effect. These results demonstrate the importance of electrostatic catalysis and hydrogen-bonding in enzyme-catalyzed radical reactions and advance our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of B(12)-independent glycerol dehydratases.

  15. Technical Abstracts, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kotowski, M.

    1989-05-01

    This document is a compilation of the abstracts from unclassified documents published by Mechanical Engineering at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during the calendar year 1988. Many abstracts summarize work completed and published in report form. These are UCRL-90,000 and 100,000 series documents, which include the full text of articles to be published in journals and of papers to be presented at meetings, and UCID reports, which are informal documents. Not all UCIDs contain abstracts: short summaries were generated when abstracts were not included. Technical Abstracts also provides brief descriptions of those documents assigned to the MISC (miscellaneous) category. These are generally viewgraphs or photographs presented at meetings. The abstracts cover the broad range of technologies within Mechanical Engineering and are grouped by the principal author's division. An eighth category is devoted to abstracts presented at the CUBE symposium sponsored jointly by LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia Laboratories. Within these areas, abstracts are listed numerically. An author index and title index are provided at the back of the book for cross referencing. The publications listed may be obtained by contacting LLNL's TID library or the National Technical Information Service, US Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161. Further information may be obtained by contacting the author directly or the persons listed in the introduction of each subject area.

  16. Paper Abstract Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutley, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Abstraction is, in effect, a simplification and reduction of shapes with an absence of detail designed to comprise the essence of the more naturalistic images being depicted. Without even intending to, young children consistently create interesting, and sometimes beautiful, abstract compositions. A child's creations, moreover, will always seem to…

  17. Leadership Abstracts, Volume 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliron, Mark D., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The abstracts in this series provide brief discussions of issues related to leadership, administration, professional development, technology, and education in community colleges. Volume 10 for 1997 contains the following 12 abstracts: (1) "On Community College Renewal" (Nathan L. Hodges and Mark D. Milliron); (2) "The Community College Niche in a…

  18. Is It Really Abstract?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kernan, Christine

    2011-01-01

    For this author, one of the most enjoyable aspects of teaching elementary art is the willingness of students to embrace the different styles of art introduced to them. In this article, she describes a project that allows upper-elementary students to learn about abstract art and the lives of some of the master abstract artists, implement the idea…

  19. Leadership Abstracts, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Larry, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    The abstracts in this series provide two-page discussions of issues related to leadership, administration, professional development, technology, and education in community colleges. Volume 9 for 1996 includes the following 12 abstracts: (1) "Tech-Prep + School-To-Work: Working Together To Foster Educational Reform," (Roderick F. Beaumont); (2)…

  20. Organizational Communication Abstracts--1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcione, Raymond L.; And Others

    This document includes nearly 700 brief abstracts of works published in 1975 that are relevant to the field of organizational communication. The introduction presents a rationale for the project, a review of research methods developed by the authors for the preparation of abstracts, a statement of limitations as to the completeness of the coverage…

  1. Abstract Datatypes in PVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owre, Sam; Shankar, Natarajan

    1997-01-01

    PVS (Prototype Verification System) is a general-purpose environment for developing specifications and proofs. This document deals primarily with the abstract datatype mechanism in PVS which generates theories containing axioms and definitions for a class of recursive datatypes. The concepts underlying the abstract datatype mechanism are illustrated using ordered binary trees as an example. Binary trees are described by a PVS abstract datatype that is parametric in its value type. The type of ordered binary trees is then presented as a subtype of binary trees where the ordering relation is also taken as a parameter. We define the operations of inserting an element into, and searching for an element in an ordered binary tree; the bulk of the report is devoted to PVS proofs of some useful properties of these operations. These proofs illustrate various approaches to proving properties of abstract datatype operations. They also describe the built-in capabilities of the PVS proof checker for simplifying abstract datatype expressions.

  2. Correlating students' educational background, study habits, and resource usage with learning success in medical histology.

    PubMed

    Selvig, Daniel; Holaday, Louisa W; Purkiss, Joel; Hortsch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Histology is a traditional core basic science component of most medical and dental education programs and presents a didactic challenge for many students. Identifying students that are likely to struggle with histology would allow for early intervention to support and encourage their learning success. To identify student characteristics that are associated with learning success in histology, three first-year medical school classes at the University of Michigan (>440 students) were surveyed about their educational background, attitudes toward learning histology, and their use of histology learning strategies and resources. These characteristics were linked with the students' quiz and examination results in histology. Students who reported previous experience in histology or pathology and hold science or biomedical science college degrees usually did well in histology. Learning success in histology was also positively associated with students' perception that histology is important for their professional career. Other positive indicators were in-person participation in teacher-guided learning experiences, specifically lecture and laboratory sessions. In contrast, students who relied on watching histology lectures by video rather than going to lectures in-person performed significantly worse. These characteristics and learning strategies of students who did well in this very visual and challenging study subject should be of help for identifying and advising students early, who might be at risk of failing a histology course or component.

  3. Experimental Background Studies in the Two Photon Exchange (TPE) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Cristian Peña, W. K. Brooks, Hayk Hakobyan

    2010-08-01

    This work is based on the improvement of an existing simulation for the two photon exchange (TPE) experiment at Jefferson Lab developed within the GEANT4 framework. This experiment will determine the ratio of the positron-proton elastic scattering cross section and the electron-proton elastic scattering cross section with high precision. To accomplish this measurement requires the use of a variety of devices and complex arrangements, creating background particles that manage to reach the detector system (CLAS). A number of test runs have identified the sources of background in the detector guided by previous simulations. Even so, the remaining background can be reduced considerably by the microscopic identification and locating of the background sources performed by our new simulation.

  4. Experimental Background Studies in the Two Photon Exchange (TPE) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, Cristian; Brooks, W. K.; Hakobyan, Hayk

    2010-08-04

    This work is based on the improvement of an existing simulation for the two photon exchange (TPE) experiment at Jefferson Lab developed within the GEANT4 framework. This experiment will determine the ratio of the positron-proton elastic scattering cross section and the electron-proton elastic scattering cross section with high precision. To accomplish this measurement requires the use of a variety of devices and complex arrangements, creating background particles that manage to reach the detector system (CLAS). A number of test runs have identified the sources of background in the detector guided by previous simulations. Even so, the remaining background can be reduced considerably by the microscopic identification and locating of the background sources performed by our new simulation.

  5. Background Studies of CANDLES for Double Beta Decays of 48Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakubata, Hidekazu; Candles Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    An underground observatory is the most effective to perform low background experiments because an underground environment avoids cosmic muon. Backgrounds still remain in this environment, so to grasp their origin and intensity is necessary. We perform the CANDLES experiment in the Kamioka Underground Laboratory to search for 0 νββ of 48Ca, which has the highest Q-value (4.27 MeV) of all ββ nuclides. Here we must consider backgrounds in the energy region around the Q-value. On the CANDLES detector, internal backgrounds from radial contamination in CaF2 crystal scintillators can be restrained to a level free from problems. However, other backgrounds were observed in the energy region higher than the Q-value and peak structure is found in 7 ~ 8 MeV. We inferred that γ-rays emitted by neutron capture reactions on Fe is the main origin of backgrounds. To confirm this hypothesis, we carried out special run using 252Cf neutron source set outside the detector. As a result, we found that the source of these backgrounds is γ-ray from neutron capture on the surrounding material of the detector, especially on the rock and the stainless. For further background reduction, we plan to install additional passive neutron and γ-ray shields. An underground observatory is the most effective to perform low background experiments because an underground environment avoids cosmic muon. Backgrounds still remain in this environment, so to grasp their origin and intensity is necessary. We perform the CANDLES experiment in the Kamioka Underground Laboratory to search for 0 νββ of 48Ca, which has the highest Q-value (4.27 MeV) of all ββ nuclides. Here we must consider backgrounds in the energy region around the Q-value. On the CANDLES detector, internal backgrounds from radial contamination in CaF2 crystal scintillators can be restrained to a level free from problems. However, other backgrounds were observed in the energy region higher than the Q-value and peak structure is found

  6. Experimental study of variations in background radiation and the effect on Nuclear Car Wash sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Church, J; Slaughter, D; Norman, E; Asztalos, S; Biltoft, P

    2007-02-07

    Error rates in a cargo screening system such as the Nuclear Car Wash [1-7] depend on the standard deviation of the background radiation count rate. Because the Nuclear Car Wash is an active interrogation technique, the radiation signal for fissile material must be detected above a background count rate consisting of cosmic, ambient, and neutron-activated radiations. It was suggested previously [1,6] that the Corresponding negative repercussions for the sensitivity of the system were shown. Therefore, to assure the most accurate estimation of the variation, experiments have been performed to quantify components of the actual variance in the background count rate, including variations in generator power, irradiation time, and container contents. The background variance is determined by these experiments to be a factor of 2 smaller than values assumed in previous analyses, resulting in substantially improved projections of system performance for the Nuclear Car Wash.

  7. Importance of tunneling in H-abstraction reactions by OH radicals. The case of CH4 + OH studied through isotope-substituted analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberts, T.; Fedoseev, G.; Kästner, J.; Ioppolo, S.; Linnartz, H.

    2017-03-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study focussing on the quantum tunneling of atoms in the reaction between CH4 and OH. The importance of this reaction pathway is derived by investigating isotope substituted analogs. Quantitative reaction rates needed for astrochemical models at low temperature are currently unavailable both in the solid state and in the gas phase. Here, we study tunneling effects upon hydrogen abstraction in CH4 + OH by focusing on two reactions: CH4 + OD → CH3 + HDO and CD4 + OH → CD3 + HDO. The experimental study shows that the solid-state reaction rate RCH4 + OD is higher than RCD4 + OH at 15 K. Experimental results are accompanied by calculations of the corresponding unimolecular and bimolecular reaction rate constants using instanton theory taking into account surface effects. For the work presented here, the unimolecular reactions are particularly interesting as these provide insight into reactions following a Langmuir-Hinshelwood process. The resulting ratio of the rate constants shows that the H abstraction (kCH4 + OD) is approximately ten times faster than D-abstraction (kCD4 + OH) at 65 K. We conclude that tunneling is involved at low temperatures in the abstraction reactions studied here. The unimolecular rate constants can be used by the modeling community as a first approach to describe OH-mediated abstraction reactions in the solid phase. For this reason we provide fits of our calculated rate constants that allow the inclusion of these reactions in models in a straightforward fashion.

  8. Structured narrative retell instruction for young children from low socioeconomic backgrounds: a preliminary study of feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Adlof, Suzanne M.; McLeod, Angela N.; Leftwich, Brianne

    2014-01-01

    Successful acquisition of literacy depends on adequate development of decoding skills as well as broader, meaning-related knowledge and skills for text comprehension. Children from low socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds are often challenged in both domains, relative to peers who are not economically disadvantaged. The efficacy of code-focused instructional programs for at-risk preliterate children is well supported, but less evidence is available regarding interventions to improve broader language and comprehension skills. This preliminary study tested the feasibility of a new intervention, “structured narrative retell instruction” (SNRI), and explored its potential to enhance meaning-related knowledge and skills, including vocabulary, listening comprehension, and narrative skills, in pre-literate, low SES children. SNRI used authentic children's books to model comprehension processes, explicitly teach story grammar, and implicitly target microstructural aspects of narratives. Participants included 9 children with a mean age of 60 months, who were randomly assigned to SNRI or to code-focused literacy instruction (CFLI). Each group received 12, 40-min instructional sessions over 6 weeks. Pre- and post-tests were administered to assess vocabulary, listening comprehension, narrative macrostructure and narrative microstructure, as well as alphabet knowledge, phonological awareness, and concepts of print. The feasibility of SNRI was demonstrated by completion of the designed study, moderately high treatment fidelity, and qualitative feedback from interventionists. The SNRI group also made significant gains on 4 of the 7 meaning-related measures (p < 0.10). In comparison, the CFLI group made significant gains on 2 of 7 meaning-related measures. We conclude that SNRI is feasible and shows potential for improving language skills related to comprehension and that further research investigating its efficacy is warranted. PMID:24847295

  9. Investigation of background acoustical effect on online surveys: A case study of a farmers' market customer survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xingdi

    Since the middle of 1990s, internet has become a new platform for surveys. Previous studies have discussed the visual design features of internet surveys. However, the application of acoustics as a design characteristic of online surveys has been rarely investigated. The present study aimed to fill that research gap. The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of background sound on respondents' engagement and satisfaction with online surveys. Two forms of background sound were evaluated; audio recorded in studios and audio edited with convolution reverb technique. The author recruited 80 undergraduate students for the experiment. These students were assigned to one of three groups. Each of the three groups was asked to evaluate their engagement and satisfaction with a specific online survey. The content of the online survey was the same. However, the three groups was exposed to the online survey with no background sound, with background sound recorded in studios; and with background sound edited with convolution reverb technique. The results showed no significant difference in engagement and satisfaction in the three groups of online surveys; without background sound, background sound recorded in studios, and background sound edited with convolution reverb technique. The author suggests that background sound does not contribute to online surveys in all the contexts. The industry practitioners should be careful to evaluate the survey context to decide whether the background sound should be added. Particularly, ear-piercing noise or acoustics which may link to respondents' unpleasant experience should be avoided. Moreover, although the results did not support the advantage of the revolution reverb technique in improving respondents' engagement and satisfaction, the author suggests that the potential of the revolution reverb technique in the applications of online surveys can't be totally denied, since it may be useful for some contexts which need further

  10. Background Studies at the Spallation Neutron Source for the COHERENT Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Matthew; Coherent Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The COHERENT experiment is attempting a first measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Lab. CEvNS is a standard model process that is important in understanding supernova neutrinos, the structure of the weak interaction, and as a background for dark matter searches. COHERENT is placing a suite of four detector technologies in a basement location at the SNS: point contact germanium detectors, CsI[Na] crystals, NaI[Tl] crystals, and single phase liquid argon. Previous attempts to measure the CEvNS process have grappled with very high rates of backgrounds due to the low energy thresholds required. Accelerator-correlated neutrons are the most troublesome background for COHERENT because a simple accelerator on/off background subtraction procedure fails to remove them. To understand these backgrounds, COHERENT features measurements from the SciBath detector and the Sandia Neutron Scatter Camera (NSC). Important neutron measurements from both SciBath and the NSC, as well as gamma measurements from the SNS basement location where the four detector technologies for COHERENT will be placed will be discussed. COHERENT collaborators are supported by the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Science, the National Science Foundation, NASA, and the Sloan Foundation.

  11. [Comparative study on objective-setting public health policy--historical background and path dependence].

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Yutaka; Kaneko, Yosihiro

    2002-05-01

    The historical background and the path dependence of objective-setting public health policy are described in this review. The New Public Health movement appeared in the 1980s and was inspired by the Ottawa Charter on Health Promotion. This movement is based on the idea that public health is mostly promoted by creating a supportive environment for health as well as by individual efforts toward a healthy life style. The first objective-setting public health policy called Healthy People was proposed in USA, 1979, under the influence of The Lalonde Report published in Canada, 1974. Goals and targets were set in order to reduce the mortality of American people. This project led to Healthy People 2000 and Healthy People 2010. In the 1990s, objective-setting public health policies prevailed in Western countries, such as United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, and also in Japan. The objective-setting public health policy is the application of the management by objectives in the health policy domain. This policy is especially accepted in Anglo-Saxon countries where public sector reform was conducted on the basis of the New Public Management theory in the 1980s, which is when the WHO Regional Office for Europe started the Healthy Cities project that emphasized a network of project cities. The Health 21 in 1999 is another model of object-setting public health policy. A comparative study of four different objective-setting public health policies (USA, United Kingdom, WHO Regional Office for Europe, and Japan) was conducted regarding the goals and domains of the targets, methods of targeting, and evaluation of the project. The goals were almost identical in the four public health policies, while the domains of the targets were different. These differences were explained by the past experience of public health policy development in each country.

  12. Bilingual, Bicultural, and Bidialectal Studies Related to Reading and Communication Skills: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1979 (Vol. 40 Nos. 1 through 6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. Among the topics covered in the 31 titles are the following: the oral English syntax of bilingual Indian children in Manitoba, Canada; linguistic style shifting in black English; oral language assessment by sentence repetition;…

  13. Reading and Study Skills and Instruction--College and Adult: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1984 (Vol. 45 Nos. 1 through 6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 13 titles deal with the following topics: (1) the development, implementation, and evaluation of a reading improvement program for business and industry; (2) how instruction in a college rapid reading course meets individual…

  14. Bilingual, Bicultural, and Bidialectal Studies Related to Reading and Communication Skills: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," January through April 1978 (Vol. 38 Nos. 7 through 10).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 12 titles deal with the following topics: the acquisition of bilingualism by infants and young children; psycholinguistic abilities of American Indian children; effects of creative dramatics on oral language abilities and self…

  15. Bilingual, Bicultural, and Bidialectal Studies Related to Reading and Communication Skills: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through October 1978 (Vol. 39 Nos. 1 through 4).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 17 titles deal with the following topics: first- and second-language oral reading of Mexican-American children; language development of Chicano and Anglo kindergarten children; teachers' perceptions of black dialect; elements of…

  16. Bilingual, Bicultural, and Bidialectal Studies Related to Reading and Communication Skills: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," November 1978 through June 1979 (Vol. 39 Nos. 5 through 12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 21 titles deal with the following topics: the language, communicative styles, and speech patterns of blacks and non-blacks; the prereading concept acquisition of Spanish-dominant kindergarten children; the self-concept and…

  17. Automatic Abstraction in Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, J.

    1991-01-01

    Traditionally, abstraction in planning has been accomplished by either state abstraction or operator abstraction, neither of which has been fully automatic. We present a new method, predicate relaxation, for automatically performing state abstraction. PABLO, a nonlinear hierarchical planner, implements predicate relaxation. Theoretical, as well as empirical results are presented which demonstrate the potential advantages of using predicate relaxation in planning. We also present a new definition of hierarchical operators that allows us to guarantee a limited form of completeness. This new definition is shown to be, in some ways, more flexible than previous definitions of hierarchical operators. Finally, a Classical Truth Criterion is presented that is proven to be sound and complete for a planning formalism that is general enough to include most classical planning formalisms that are based on the STRIPS assumption.

  18. Searching Sociological Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerbel, Sandra Sandor

    1981-01-01

    Describes the scope, content, and retrieval characteristics of Sociological Abstracts, an online database of literature in the social sciences. Sample searches are displayed, and the strengths and weaknesses of the database are summarized. (FM)

  19. Conference Abstracts: AEDS '82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Abstracts from nine selected papers presented at the 1982 Association for Educational Data Systems (AEDS) conference are provided. Copies of conference proceedings may be obtained for fifteen dollars from the Association. (MP)

  20. Abstracts of SIG Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Presents abstracts of SIG Sessions. Highlights include digital collections; information retrieval methods; public interest/fair use; classification and indexing; electronic publication; funding; globalization; information technology projects; interface design; networking in developing countries; metadata; multilingual databases; networked…

  1. Abstracts of contributed papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains 571 abstracts of contributed papers to be presented during the Twelfth US National Congress of Applied Mechanics. Abstracts are arranged in the order in which they fall in the program -- the main sessions are listed chronologically in the Table of Contents. The Author Index is in alphabetical order and lists each paper number (matching the schedule in the Final Program) with its corresponding page number in the book.

  2. Achievement, Agency, Gender, and Socioeconomic Background as Predictors of Postschool Choices: A Multicontext Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Philip D.; Schoon, Ingrid; Tsai, Yi-Miau; Nagy, Gabriel; Trautwein, Ulrich; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors develop and test a differential effects model of university entry versus major selection using a set of common predictors, including background factors (gender and socioeconomic status), academic achievement, and academic self-concept. The research used data from 2 large longitudinal databases from Germany (N = 5,048)…

  3. Environmental Concern and Lake Tahoe: A Study of Elite Perceptions, Backgrounds, and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costantini, Edmond; Hanf, Kenneth

    1972-01-01

    The degree of concern for environmental problems by environmental decision-makers is often reflected in environmental policies. In profile fashion, the perceptions, attitudes, and background of persons affecting environmental decision-making in the Lake Tahoe Basin, California/Nevada, are explored. An environmental concern scale is developed. (BL)

  4. Technical and Symbolic Knowledge in CNC Machining: A Study of Technical Workers of Different Backgrounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Laura M. W.; Beach, King

    Performances of 45 individuals with varying degrees of formal and informal training in machining and programming were compared on tasks designed to tap intellectual changes that may occur with the introduction of computer numerical control (CNC). Participants--30 machinists, 8 machine operators, and 7 engineers--were asked background questions and…

  5. A Case Study Exploring Science Competence and Science Confidence of Middle School Girls from Marginalized Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Yeni Violeta

    2013-01-01

    The inclusion of learners from underrepresented background in biology field research experiences has not been widely explored in the literature. Increased access and equity to experiences for groups historically underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) has been identified as a priority for many, yet little is…

  6. Experimental and theoretical studies of particle generation afterlaser ablation of copper with background gas at atmosphericpressure

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2007-05-31

    Laser ablation has proven to be an effective method for generating nanoparticles; particles are produced in the laser induced vapor plume during the cooling stage. To understand the in-situ condensation process, a series of time resolved light scattering images were recorded and analyzed. Significant changes in the condensation rate and the shape of the condensed aerosol plume were observed in two background gases, helium and argon. The primary particle shape and size distribution were measured using a transmission electron microscope (TEM), a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a differential mobility analyzer (DMA). The gas dynamics simulation included nucleation and coagulation within the vapor plume, heat and mass transfer from the vapor plume to the background gas, and heat transfer to the sample. The experimental data and the calculated evolution of the shape of the vapor plume showed the same trend for the spatial distribution of the condensed particles in both background gases. The simulated particle size distribution also qualitatively agreed with the experimental data. It was determined that the laser energy, the physical properties of the background gas (conductivity, diffusivity and viscosity), and the shape of the ablation system (ablation chamber and the layout of the sample) have strong effects on the condensation process and the subsequent sizes, shapes and degree of aggregation of the particles.

  7. A STUDY OF THE MASS BALANCE OF DIOXINS AND FURANS IN LACTATING COWS IN BACKGROUND CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Consumption of animal fats account for as much as 95% of the human background exposure to compounds with dioxin-like activity. Although it is generally believed that most domestic meat and dairy animals receive most of their exposure from their feed, there is limited data availa...

  8. Tanzania at the Turn of the Century: Background Papers and Statistics. A World Bank Country Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Bank, Washington, DC.

    This report presents lessons from Tanzania's development experience of the past four decades, with emphasis on the period since the last report (1996), and assesses the imperatives for higher sustained growth and better livelihood for its citizens in the future. The background papers review and assess Tanzania's actual growth and poverty reduction…

  9. Studies of Background Levels for the NIF Yield Diagnostics from Neutron and Gamma Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Song, P; Eder, D; Moran, M; Landen, O; O'Brien, D; Hsing, W

    2007-08-27

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is nearing completion of construction and is preparing for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) with potentially significant yield in 2010. The design of a wide range of yield diagnostics in and outside the target-bay of the NIF must consider scattered background neutrons and neutron-induced gamma rays to measure neutrons and x-rays from target. The large and complex target chamber and facility make the calculation of scattered neutrons and gamma rays extremely challenging. The NIF was designed with shielded locations for many of the yield diagnostics including the neutron alcove and four diagnostic mezzanines. Accurate calculation of the background levels in these shielded locations requires advanced Monte Carlo techniques, e.g., variance reduction. Placement, size, and materials of collimators on the line of sight (LOS) through the shielding must be evaluated to trade off signal levels and unwanted backgrounds. The background at these locations is also affected by neutrons that pass through the laser beam tubes and scatter off of structures and walls in the switch yards. Detailed 3D Monte Carlo analyses are performed to determine neutron and gamma fluxes for some of the yield diagnostics.

  10. Abstracts: Papers to be Presented at the Joint Conference for Social Studies of Science (4S) and the European Association for the Study of Science and Technology (EASST) Amsterdam, 16-19 November 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents about 200 abstracts of papers presented at the joint conference of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) and the European Association for the Study of Science and Technology (EASST) Amsterdam, 16-19 November 1988. (YP)

  11. Laboratory Studies of Lead Removal from Liquid Scintillator in Preparation for KamLAND's Low Background Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, Gregory

    2011-04-27

    The removal of Radon induced Lead from liquid scintillator was extensively studied in preparation for KamLAND's low background phase. This work presents the results from laboratory experiments performed at the University of Alabama and their implications for KamLAND and future low background experiments using carbon based liquid scintillator. It was observed that distillation was the most effective purification procedure and that one must consider a non-polar and non-ionic component of Lead in order to reach the levels of radio-purity required for these new class of ultra-low background experiments.

  12. Site Study Plan for background environmental radioactivity, Deaf Smith County site, Texas: Environmental Field Program: Preliminary draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The Background Environmental Radioactivity Site Study Plan describes a field program consisting of an initial radiological survey and a radiological sampling program. The field program includes measurement of direct radiation and collection and analysis of background radioactivity samples of air, precipitation, soil, water, milk, pasture grass, food crops, meat, poultry, game, and eggs. The plan describes for each study: the need for the study, the study design, data management and use, schedule of proposed activities, and quality assurance requirements. These studies will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from, the Salt Repository Project (SRP) Requirements Document. 50 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Validity of AHRQ patient safety indicators derived from ICD-10 hospital discharge abstract data (chart review study)

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Hude; Eastwood, Cathy; Cunningham, Ceara Tess; Liu, Mingfu; Flemons, Ward; De Coster, Carolyn; Ghali, William A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess if the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality  patient safety indictors (PSIs) could be used for case findings in the International Classification of Disease 10th revision (ICD-10) hospital discharge abstract data. Design We identified and randomly selected 490 patients with a foreign body left during a procedure (PSI 5—foreign body), selected infections (IV site) due to medical care (PSI 7—infection), postoperative pulmonary embolism (PE) or deep vein thrombosis (DVT; PSI 12—PE/DVT), postoperative sepsis (PSI 13—sepsis)and accidental puncture or laceration (PSI 15—laceration) among patients discharged from three adult acute care hospitals in Calgary, Canada in 2007 and 2008. Their charts were reviewed for determining the presence of PSIs and used as the reference standard, positive predictive value (PPV) statistics were calculated to determine the proportion of positives in the administrative data representing ‘true positives’. Results The PPV for PSI 5—foreign body was 62.5% (95% CI 35.4% to 84.8%), PSI 7—infection was 79.1% (67.4% to 88.1%), PSI 12—PE/DVT was 89.5% (66.9% to 98.7%), PSI 13—sepsis was 12.5% (1.6% to 38.4%) and PSI 15—laceration was 86.4% (75.0% to 94.0%) after excluding those who presented to the hospital with the condition. Conclusions Several PSIs had high PPV in the ICD administrative data and are thus powerful tools for true positive case finding. The tools could be used to identify potential cases from the large volume of admissions for verification through chart reviews. In contrast, their sensitivity has not been well characterised and users of PSIs should be cautious if using them for ‘quality of care reporting’ presenting the rate of PSIs because under-coded data would generate falsely low PSI rates. PMID:24114372

  14. Does "Social Work Abstracts" Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Gary; Barker, Kathleen; Covert-Vail, Lucinda; Rosenberg, Gary; Cohen, Stephanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The current study seeks to provide estimates of the adequacy of journal coverage in the Social Work Abstracts (SWA) database. Method: A total of 23 journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports social work category during the 1997 to 2005 period were selected for study. Issue-level coverage estimates were obtained for SWA and…

  15. Cosmic background anisotropy studies at 10 degree angular scales with a HEMT radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Gaier, T.; Schuster, J.; Lubin, P. )

    1990-01-15

    An expedition to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station was recently mounted to measure medium to large angular scale fluctuations in the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at 15 and 25 GHz. Preliminary results are reported in this paper. No fluctuations have been detected as yet and data analysis is proceeding using likelihood ratio tests to set upper limits of {Delta}{ital T}/{ital T} for models which may be constrained by this experiment.

  16. Assessment study of infrared detector arrays for low-background astronomical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ando, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art of infrared detector arrays employing charge coupled devices (CCD) or charge injection devices (CID) readout are assessed. The applicability, limitations and potentials of such arrays under the low-background astronomical observing conditions of interest for SIRFT (Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility) are determined. The following are reviewed: (1) monolithic extrinsic arrays; (2) monolithic intrinsic arrays; (3) charge injection devices; and (4) hybrid arrays.

  17. Simbol-X Background Minimization: Mirror Spacecraft Passive Shielding Trade-off Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioretti, V.; Malaguti, G.; Bulgarelli, A.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Ferri, A.; Attinà, P.

    2009-05-01

    The present work shows a quantitative trade-off analysis of the Simbol-X Mirror Spacecraft (MSC) passive shielding, in the phase space of the various parameters: mass budget, dimension, geometry and composition. A simplified physical (and geometrical) model of the sky screen, implemented by means of a GEANT4 simulation, has been developed to perform a performance-driven mass optimization and evaluate the residual background level on Simbol-X focal plane.

  18. Efficiency Studies and Simulations of a Neutron Background Veto for Dark Matter Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerdale, Shawn; Shields, Emily; Xu, Jingke; Calaprice, Frank

    2013-04-01

    In direct WIMP dark matter detection experiments, neutrons from cosmogenic sources and nuclear reactions in detector materials can provide backgrounds indistinguishable from WIMP signals. To reduce this background, an active neutron veto filled with a boron-loaded scintillator is being developed. The scintillator used will be pseudocumene, mixed with trimethyl borate as a boron source, and a PPO wavelength shifter. Such a veto would detect neutrons in the volume surrounding the detector, allowing coincident background events in the detector to be rejected. Neutrons are captured by the ^10B with a high cross section, resulting in an α and ^7Li. The scintillation from the nuclear products is heavily quenched to an equivalent electron energy as low as 50 keV. To detect this, it is necessary to have high light collection efficiency. To model the neutron veto concept, light yield measurements were taken for a small prototype filled with the scintillator mixture and lined with a Lumirror reflector. These results were reproduced in GEANT4 and in an independent simulation. We then applied the simulations to the DarkSide-50 neutron veto to predict its neutron rejection power. Results from measurements taken with the prototype and from the simulation will be presented.

  19. Household characteristics for older adults and study background from SAGE Ghana Wave 1

    PubMed Central

    Biritwum, Richard B.; Mensah, George; Minicuci, Nadia; Yawson, Alfred E.; Naidoo, Nirmala; Chatterji, Somnath; Kowal, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background Globally, the population aged 60 years and older is projected to reach 22% by 2050. In sub-Saharan Africa, this figure is projected to exceed 8%, while in Ghana, the older adult population will reach 12% by 2050. The living arrangements and household characteristics are fundamental determinants of the health and well-being of this population, data sources about which are increasingly available. Methods The World Health Organization's Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave 1 was conducted in China, Ghana, India, Russian Federation, Mexico, and South Africa between 2007 and 2010. SAGE Ghana Wave 1 was implemented in 2007/08 using face-to-face interviews in a nationally representative sample of persons aged 50-plus, along with a smaller cohort aged 18–49 years for comparison purposes. Household information included a household roster including questions about health insurance coverage for all household members, household and sociodemographic characteristics, status of the dwelling, and economic situation. Re-interviews were done in a random 10% of the sample and proxy interviews done where necessary. Verbal autopsies were conducted for deaths occurring in older adult household members in the 24 months prior to interview. Results The total household population was 27,270 from 5,178 households. The overall household response rate was 86% and household cooperation rate was 98%. Thirty-four percent of household members were under 15 years of age while 8.3% were aged 65-plus years. Households with more than 11 members were more common in rural areas (57.2%) and in the highest income quintile (30.6%). Household members with no formal education formed 24.7% of the sample, with Northern and Upper East regions reaching more than 50%. Only 26.8% of the household members had insurance coverage. Households with hard floors ranged from 25.7% in Upper West to 97.7% in Ashanti region. Overall, 84.9% of the households had access to improved sources of

  20. Household characteristics for older adults and study background from SAGE Ghana Wave 1.

    PubMed

    Biritwum, Richard B; Mensah, George; Minicuci, Nadia; Yawson, Alfred E; Naidoo, Nirmala; Chatterji, Somnath; Kowal, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background Globally, the population aged 60 years and older is projected to reach 22% by 2050. In sub-Saharan Africa, this figure is projected to exceed 8%, while in Ghana, the older adult population will reach 12% by 2050. The living arrangements and household characteristics are fundamental determinants of the health and well-being of this population, data sources about which are increasingly available. Methods The World Health Organization's Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) Wave 1 was conducted in China, Ghana, India, Russian Federation, Mexico, and South Africa between 2007 and 2010. SAGE Ghana Wave 1 was implemented in 2007/08 using face-to-face interviews in a nationally representative sample of persons aged 50-plus, along with a smaller cohort aged 18-49 years for comparison purposes. Household information included a household roster including questions about health insurance coverage for all household members, household and sociodemographic characteristics, status of the dwelling, and economic situation. Re-interviews were done in a random 10% of the sample and proxy interviews done where necessary. Verbal autopsies were conducted for deaths occurring in older adult household members in the 24 months prior to interview. Results The total household population was 27,270 from 5,178 households. The overall household response rate was 86% and household cooperation rate was 98%. Thirty-four percent of household members were under 15 years of age while 8.3% were aged 65-plus years. Households with more than 11 members were more common in rural areas (57.2%) and in the highest income quintile (30.6%). Household members with no formal education formed 24.7% of the sample, with Northern and Upper East regions reaching more than 50%. Only 26.8% of the household members had insurance coverage. Households with hard floors ranged from 25.7% in Upper West to 97.7% in Ashanti region. Overall, 84.9% of the households had access to improved sources of drinking

  1. Direct dynamics study on the hydrogen abstraction reactions N2H4+R→N2H3+RH (R=NH2,CH3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian Shu; Zhang, Xin

    2006-08-01

    We present a direct ab initio dynamics study on the hydrogen abstraction reactions N2H4+R→N2H3+RH (R=NH2,CH3), which are predicted to have six possible reaction channels for NH2 abstraction and four for CH3 abstraction caused by the different N2H4 isomers and various attacking orientations of foreign radical to N2H4. The structures and frequencies at the stationary points and the points along the minimum energy paths (MEPs) of all reaction channels are obtained at the UMP2(full)/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. Energetic information of stationary points and the points along the MEPs is further refined by means of MC-QCISD method. The rate constants of these channels are calculated using the improved canonical variational transition-state theory with the small-curvature tunneling correction (ICVT/SCT) method. The calculated results show that the favorable reaction channels are channels (n1) and (n4) as well as (c1) and (c3) (refer to Scheme 1) in the whole temperature range. The total ICVT/SCT rate constants of all channels for the two reactions at the MC-QCISD //UMP2(full)/6-31+G(d,p) level are both in good agreement with the available experimental data, and corresponding three-parameter expressions of kICVT /SCT in 220-3000K are fitted as 6.46×10-15(T/298)3.60exp(-386/T)cm3mol-1s-1 for NH2 abstraction and 1.04×10-14 (T/298)4.00exp(-2037/T)cm3mol-1s-1 for CH3 abstraction. Additionally, the long range interaction between the H atom of X -H bond in foreign radicals and the lone pair on the nonreactive N atom of the transition states is further discussed to explain the various transition-state numbers of the two similar hydrogen abstraction reactions.

  2. A longitudinal daily diary study of family assistance and academic achievement among adolescents from Mexican, Chinese, and European backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Telzer, Eva H; Fuligni, Andrew J

    2009-04-01

    A longitudinal daily diary method was employed to examine the implications of family assistance for the academic achievement of 563 adolescents (53% female) from Mexican (n = 217), Chinese (n = 206), and European (n = 140) backgrounds during the high school years (mean age 14.9 years in 9th grade to 17.8 years in 12th grade). Although changes in family assistance time within individual adolescents were not associated with simultaneous changes in their Grade Point Averages (GPAs), increases in the proportion of days spent helping the family were linked to declines in the GPAs of students from Mexican and Chinese backgrounds. The negative implications of spending more days helping the family among these two groups was not explained by family background factors or changes in study time or school problems. These results suggest that the chronicity rather than the amount of family assistance may be difficult for adolescents from Mexican and Chinese backgrounds.

  3. Culture and importance of backgrounds: a cross-cultural study of photograph taking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Li, Chen; Smithson, Adam; Spann, Ethan; Ruan, Fang

    2010-10-01

    To compare the focus on targeted people while taking a photograph, samples of American and Chinese college students were randomly selected and asked to take casual pictures of people around them with digital cameras. About 200 photographs were rated for the focus on the intended target in the picture. American students were more likely to focus on the targeted individual, while the Chinese students were more likely to attend to the background and the environment of the targeted individual. The findings imply that for the Chinese college students, the environment can be equally important as the person. Possibly for Americans the environment is less important due to the more individualistic culture.

  4. Leadership Abstracts, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Cynthia, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This is volume 14 of Leadership Abstracts, a newsletter published by the League for Innovation (California). Issue 1 of February 2001, "Developmental Education: A Policy Primer," discusses developmental programs in the community college. According to the article, community college trustees and presidents would serve their constituents well by…

  5. Abstract Film and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grice, Malcolm

    A theoretical and historical account of the main preoccupations of makers of abstract films is presented in this book. The book's scope includes discussion of nonrepresentational forms as well as examination of experiments in the manipulation of time in films. The ten chapters discuss the following topics: art and cinematography, the first…

  6. Leadership Abstracts, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doucette, Don, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This document includes 10 issues of Leadership Abstracts (volume 6, 1993), a newsletter published by the League for Innovation in the Community College (California). The featured articles are: (1) "Reinventing Government" by David T. Osborne; (2) "Community College Workforce Training Programs: Expanding the Mission to Meet Critical Needs" by…

  7. Leadership Abstracts, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leadership Abstracts, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This document contains five Leadership Abstracts publications published February-December 1999. The article, "Teaching the Teachers: Meeting the National Teacher Preparation Challenge," authored by George R. Boggs and Sadie Bragg, examines the community college role and makes recommendations and a call to action for teacher education.…

  8. Computers in Abstract Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwabueze, Kenneth K.

    2004-01-01

    The current emphasis on flexible modes of mathematics delivery involving new information and communication technology (ICT) at the university level is perhaps a reaction to the recent change in the objectives of education. Abstract algebra seems to be one area of mathematics virtually crying out for computer instructional support because of the…

  9. 2002 NASPSA Conference Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Contains abstracts from the 2002 conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. The publication is divided into three sections: the preconference workshop, "Effective Teaching Methods in the Classroom;" symposia (motor development, motor learning and control, and sport psychology); and free…

  10. Reasoning abstractly about resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, B.; Barrett, A.

    2001-01-01

    r describes a way to schedule high level activities before distributing them across multiple rovers in order to coordinate the resultant use of shared resources regardless of how each rover decides how to perform its activities. We present an algorithm for summarizing the metric resource requirements of an abstract activity based n the resource usages of its potential refinements.

  11. Conference Abstracts: AEDS '84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, William E.

    1985-01-01

    The Association of Educational Data Systems (AEDS) conference included 102 presentations. Abstracts of seven of these presentations are provided. Topic areas considered include LOGO, teaching probability through a computer game, writing effective computer assisted instructional materials, computer literacy, research on instructional…

  12. Leadership Abstracts, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Cynthia, Ed.; Milliron, Mark David, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This 2002 volume of Leadership Abstracts contains issue numbers 1-12. Articles include: (1) "Skills Certification and Workforce Development: Partnering with Industry and Ourselves," by Jeffrey A. Cantor; (2) "Starting Again: The Brookhaven Success College," by Alice W. Villadsen; (3) "From Digital Divide to Digital Democracy," by Gerardo E. de los…

  13. Abstraction and art.

    PubMed Central

    Gortais, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    In a given social context, artistic creation comprises a set of processes, which relate to the activity of the artist and the activity of the spectator. Through these processes we see and understand that the world is vaster than it is said to be. Artistic processes are mediated experiences that open up the world. A successful work of art expresses a reality beyond actual reality: it suggests an unknown world using the means and the signs of the known world. Artistic practices incorporate the means of creation developed by science and technology and change forms as they change. Artists and the public follow different processes of abstraction at different levels, in the definition of the means of creation, of representation and of perception of a work of art. This paper examines how the processes of abstraction are used within the framework of the visual arts and abstract painting, which appeared during a period of growing importance for the processes of abstraction in science and technology, at the beginning of the twentieth century. The development of digital platforms and new man-machine interfaces allow multimedia creations. This is performed under the constraint of phases of multidisciplinary conceptualization using generic representation languages, which tend to abolish traditional frontiers between the arts: visual arts, drama, dance and music. PMID:12903659

  14. Abstracts of SIG Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Includes abstracts of 18 special interest group (SIG) sessions. Highlights include natural language processing, information science and terminology science, classification, knowledge-intensive information systems, information value and ownership issues, economics and theories of information science, information retrieval interfaces, fuzzy thinking…

  15. Learning Abstracts, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    League for Innovation in the Community Coll.

    This document contains volume two of Learning Abstracts, a bimonthly newsletter from the League for Innovation in the Community College. Articles in these seven issues include: (1) "Get on the Fast Track to Learning: An Accelerated Associate Degree Option" (Gerardo E. de los Santos and Deborah J. Cruise); (2) "The Learning College:…

  16. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineering Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presents the abstracts of 158 papers presented at the American Society for Engineering Education's annual conference at Knoxville, Tennessee, June 14-17, 1976. Included are engineering topics covering education, aerospace, agriculture, biomedicine, chemistry, computers, electricity, acoustics, environment, mechanics, and women. (SL)

  17. Making the Abstract Concrete

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2005-01-01

    President Ronald Reagan nominated a woman to serve on the United States Supreme Court. He did so through a single-page form letter, completed in part by hand and in part by typewriter, announcing Sandra Day O'Connor as his nominee. While the document serves as evidence of a historic event, it is also a tangible illustration of abstract concepts…

  18. Abstracts of SIG Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Presents abstracts of 15 special interest group (SIG) sessions. Topics include navigation and information utilization in the Internet, natural language processing, automatic indexing, image indexing, classification, users' models of database searching, online public access catalogs, education for information professions, information services,…

  19. Abstraction through Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avraamidou, Antri; Monaghan, John; Walker, Aisha

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the computer game play of an 11-year-old boy. In the course of building a virtual house he developed and used, without assistance, an artefact and an accompanying strategy to ensure that his house was symmetric. We argue that the creation and use of this artefact-strategy is a mathematical abstraction. The discussion…

  20. Using Resilience Characteristics and Traditional Background Factors to Study Adjustment of International Graduate Students in U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jing

    2004-01-01

    This research introduced resilience characteristics to study the adjustment of international graduate students at American universities. The purpose of the study was to explore relationships among resilience characteristics and background factors; among resilience characteristics and adjustment problem areas; and among adjustment problem areas and…

  1. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    R. Schreiner

    2001-06-27

    The purpose of this work is to develop the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, as directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a). This abstraction is the conceptual model that will be used to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ) in the total system performance assessment-license application (TSPA-LA). In particular, this model will be used to quantify the time-dependent radionuclide releases from a failed waste package (WP) and their subsequent transport through the EBS to the emplacement drift wall/UZ interface. The development of this conceptual model will allow Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department to provide a more detailed and complete EBS flow and transport abstraction. The results from this conceptual model will allow PA0 to address portions of the key technical issues (KTIs) presented in three NRC Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs): (1) the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (ENFE), Revision 2 (NRC 1999a), (2) the Container Life and Source Term (CLST), Revision 2 (NRC 1999b), and (3) the Thermal Effects on Flow (TEF), Revision 1 (NRC 1998). The conceptual model for flow and transport in the EBS will be referred to as the ''EBS RT Abstraction'' in this analysis/modeling report (AMR). The scope of this abstraction and report is limited to flow and transport processes. More specifically, this AMR does not discuss elements of the TSPA-SR and TSPA-LA that relate to the EBS but are discussed in other AMRs. These elements include corrosion processes, radionuclide solubility limits, waste form dissolution rates and concentrations of colloidal particles that are generally represented as boundary conditions or input parameters for the EBS RT Abstraction. In effect, this AMR provides the algorithms for transporting radionuclides using the flow geometry and radionuclide concentrations determined by other

  2. Study of Scattered Background Neutron in NIF and Time-of Flight (TOF) to Measure Neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Song, P; Moran, M; Phillips, T; Lerche, R; Koch, J; Eder, D

    2005-08-31

    Some of the planned core diagnostics for National Ignition Facility (NIF) will use neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectroscopy techniques to gather information for primary neutron yield measurement or neutron imaging. This technique has been widely and routinely used at other laser facilities including Nova and Omega. TOF methods will also be used to observe target fuel areal density <{rho}R> (radial integral of density) via measuring the number of primary 14.1 MeV neutrons that are down-scattered to lower energies by nuclear collisions inside the compressed target core. The substantially larger target chamber size and higher neutron yield for NIF raises issues related to the large number of scattered neutrons produced by high yield deuterium-tritium (D-T) shots at NIF. The effect of primary neutrons scattered by the walls of the massive target chamber and structures both inside and outside the chamber will contribute a significant scattered background signal when trying to determine the number of neutrons down-scattered from the target core. The optimum detector locations outside the target chamber or target bay wall will be proposed. Appropriate collimators at the chamber port and the bay wall (between the neutron source at target chamber center (TCC) and detector) that maximize detection of signal neutrons while minimizing the background from scattered neutrons and neutron induced gamma rays will also be presented.

  3. Studying the numeration methods of signals with unstable background for in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Suo, Yuanzhen; Wei, Dan; He, Hao; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, the in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) has been a useful technology in detecting and quantifying the circulating cells dynamically in living animals, especially in the research related to the cell tracking and the cancer metastasis. In practice, however, the unstable background signals caused by the experiment animals' respiratory movement, limb movement and photo-bleaching of tissues' auto-fluorescence exist in many IVFC data, which could affect the accuracy of cell counting results in the following post-processing procedure, making the IVFC signals less available. Here we developed a signal processing method that could effectively correct the unstable background signals by using methods combining interpolating, fitting, automatic segmenting and wavelet-based denoising. Compared with the previously used non-correction methods, i.e., the "line-gating" method or the automatic threshold method, this method showed a higher accuracy and efficiency in counting cell numbers of IVFC signals, as well as demonstrating a better statistic results in the Pearson's correlation coefficient R2 and the mean-squared error (MSE).

  4. Aerial photography: Applications in the study of coastal erosion and pollution. (Latest citations from Oceanic abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the applications of aerial photography in the study of coastal shoreline problems such as erosion and pollution. Topics include ocean wave direction and measurement, oil pollution detection and direction forecasting, shoreline change measurements, coastal mapping, and coastal topographic features. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Achievement, agency, gender, and socioeconomic background as predictors of postschool choices: a multicontext study.

    PubMed

    Parker, Philip D; Schoon, Ingrid; Tsai, Yi-Miau; Nagy, Gabriel; Trautwein, Ulrich; Eccles, Jacquelynne S

    2012-11-01

    In this article, the authors develop and test a differential effects model of university entry versus major selection using a set of common predictors, including background factors (gender and socioeconomic status), academic achievement, and academic self-concept. The research used data from 2 large longitudinal databases from Germany (N = 5,048) and England (N = 15,995) to explore the generalizability of the hypothesized model in 2 cultural contexts. For both countries, the results suggested that (a) socioeconomic status was a key predictor of university entry, whereas gender was a key predictor of major selection; (b) achievement and self-concept in both math and English were positive predictors of university entry; and (c) math achievement and self-concept predicted math-intensive major choice and lower likelihood of entering verbal-intensive majors (and vice versa). Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  6. Design Studies for a Far Infrared Absolute Spectrometer for the Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, N. J. E.

    1980-01-01

    Unrelenting symmetry of design is required to assure the thermal balance of a cryogenically cooled, rapid scan interferometer spectrometer to be mounted in vacuum with the Cosmic Background Explorer liquid helium dewar. The instrument receives inputs from Winston cone optical flux collectors, one open to space and a second coupled to a black body reference source. A differential instrument, the spectrometer produces outputs corresponding to the Fourier transform of the spectral radiance difference between the two inputs. The two outputs are sensed by four detectors, two optimized for shorter wavelength response, and two optimized for longer wavelengths. The optical design, detector and signal channel, system sensitivity, mechanics, thermal control and cryogenics, electronics and power systems, command and control, calibration, system test requirements, and the instrument interface are discussed. Recommendations for continued work are indicated for the superconducting reflective horns, the motor bearing and drive, and design detail.

  7. The software IDA for investigation of asteroid dynamics and its use for study of some asteroid motion (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galushina, T.; Bykova, L.; Letner, O.; Baturin, A.

    2015-08-01

    This work is devoted to description of the application suite IDA that is designed for investigation of dynamics and probability orbital evolution of asteroids. IDA allows to predict asteroid motion, to reveal close encounters, possible collisions and orbital resonance with planets, to estimate impact probability, to demonstrate asteroid and planets motion on a computer screen and to solve some additional problems. The features of the suite are multifunctionality, high efficiency and a convenient interface. The application suite IDA consists of following subsystems: subsystem "Assol" which allows to study orbital evolution of the nominal orbit and to demonstrate the asteroid and planets motion on a computer screen; subsystem "Observations" which intended to asteroid orbit fitting to positional observations and construction of initial probability domain with non-linear methods; subsystem "Distribution" which developed for the visualization of distribution of observations along an asteroid orbit; subsystem "Clones ensemble" which allows to construct an initial probability domain with the linear method; subsystem "Evolution" which designed for the study of the orbital evolution of an ensemble of asteroid clones; subsystem "Megno" which intended to estimate of predictability time of asteroid motion by means of average MEGNO parameter. The results of the motion investigation of the asteroid 2012 MF7 are given to demonstrate use of the application suite. This object has nonzero collision probability with the Earth in 2046.

  8. Meeting Abstracts - Annual Meeting 2016.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    The AMCP Abstracts program provides a forum through which authors can share their insights and outcomes of advanced managed care practice through publication in AMCP's Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy (JMCP). Most of the reviewed and unreviewed abstracts are presented as posters so that interested AMCP meeting attendees can review findings and query authors. The Student/Resident/ Fellow poster presentation (unreviewed) is Wednesday, April 20, 2016, and the Professional poster presentation (reviewed) is Thursday, April 21. The Professional posters will also be displayed on Friday, April 22. The reviewed abstracts are published in the JMCP Meeting Abstracts supplement. The AMCP Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy Annual Meeting 2016 in San Francisco, California, is expected to attract more than 3,500 managed care pharmacists and other health care professionals who manage and evaluate drug therapies, develop and manage networks, and work with medical managers and information specialists to improve the care of all individuals enrolled in managed care programs. Abstracts were submitted in the following categories: Research Report: describe completed original research on managed care pharmacy services or health care interventions. Examples include (but are not limited to) observational studies using administrative claims, reports of the impact of unique benefit design strategies, and analyses of the effects of innovative administrative or clinical programs. Economic Model: describe models that predict the effect of various benefit design or clinical decisions on a population. For example, an economic model could be used to predict the budget impact of a new pharmaceutical product on a health care system. Solving Problems in Managed Care: describe the specific steps taken to introduce a needed change, develop and implement a new system or program, plan and organize an administrative function, or solve other types of problems in managed care settings. These

  9. More insight into the fate of biomedical meeting abstracts: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    von Elm, Erik; Costanza, Michael C; Walder, Bernhard; Tramèr, Martin R

    2003-01-01

    Background It has been estimated that about 45% of abstracts that are accepted for presentation at biomedical meetings will subsequently be published in full. The acceptance of abstracts at meetings and their fate after initial rejection are less well understood. We set out to estimate the proportion of abstracts submitted to meetings that are eventually published as full reports, and to explore factors that are associated with meeting acceptance and successful publication. Methods Studies analysing acceptance of abstracts at biomedical meetings or their subsequent full publication were searched in MEDLINE, OLDMEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, BIOSIS, Science Citation Index Expanded, and by hand searching of bibliographies and proceedings. We estimated rates of abstract acceptance and of subsequent full publication, and identified abstract and meeting characteristics associated with acceptance and publication, using logistic regression analysis, survival-type analysis, and meta-analysis. Results Analysed meetings were held between 1957 and 1999. Of 14945 abstracts that were submitted to 43 meetings, 46% were accepted. The rate of full publication was studied with 19123 abstracts that were presented at 234 meetings. Using survival-type analysis, we estimated that 27% were published after two, 41% after four, and 44% after six years. Of 2412 abstracts that were rejected at 24 meetings, 27% were published despite rejection. Factors associated with both abstract acceptance and subsequent publication were basic science and positive study outcome. Large meetings and those held outside the US were more likely to accept abstracts. Abstracts were more likely to be published subsequently if presented either orally, at small meetings, or at a US meeting. Abstract acceptance itself was strongly associated with full publication. Conclusions About one third of abstracts submitted to biomedical meetings were published as full reports. Acceptance at meetings and

  10. Learning new movement patterns: a study on good and poor writers comparing learning conditions emphasizing spatial, timing or abstract characteristics.

    PubMed

    Overvelde, Anneloes; Hulstijn, Wouter

    2011-08-01

    In the earliest stages of motor-skill learning cognitive, visuo-spatial and dynamic processes play an important role. Which of these should be addressed first when children need to learn a new complex movement sequence? This study compares three learning methods in a within-subject design by having 18 good and 18 poor 8-year-old writers master unfamiliar, letter-like patterns by (1) tracing a trajectory on a screen, (2) tracking a moving target (pursuit), and (3) performing the pattern using written explicit instructions. Following each 10-trial learning phase, the children completed a short test phase. Besides errors and kinematic data, Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) was used to calculate the deviation for each pattern from the ideal shape (DTW-distance). As predicted, the number of errors and DTW-distance were very low during the learning phase of the tracing and pursuit conditions and higher in the explicit condition. Conversely, in the test phase, tracing yielded the highest DTW-distance and the explicit condition the lowest DTW-distance and error percentages. The results were remarkably similar for the good and poor writers. The poor learning results of the tracing condition and the good results of the explicit condition have important implications for the teaching of handwriting and remedial therapy.

  11. A full-dimensional quantum dynamics study of the mode specificity in the H + HOD abstraction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Bina Zhang, Dong H.

    2015-02-14

    We employ the initial state-selected time-dependent wave packet approach to an atom-triatom reaction to study the H + HOD → OH + HD/OD + H{sub 2} reaction without the centrifugal sudden approximation, based on an accurate potential energy surface which was recently developed by neural network fitting to high level ab initio energy points. The total reaction probabilities and integral cross sections, which are the exact coupled-channel results, are calculated for the HOD reactant initially in the ground and several vibrationally excited states, including the bending excited state, OD stretching excited states, OH stretching excited states, and combined excitations of them. The reactivity enhancements from different initial states of HOD are presented, which feature strong bond-selective effects of the reaction dynamics. The current results for the product branching ratios, reactivity enhancements, and relative cross sections are largely improved over the previous calculations, in quantitatively good agreement with experiment. The thermal rate constant for the title reaction and the contributions from individual vibrational states of HOD are also obtained.

  12. Dynamics study of the OH + NH3 hydrogen abstraction reaction using QCT calculations based on an analytical potential energy surface.

    PubMed

    Monge-Palacios, M; Corchado, J C; Espinosa-Garcia, J

    2013-06-07

    To understand the reactivity and mechanism of the OH + NH3 → H2O + NH2 gas-phase reaction, which evolves through wells in the entrance and exit channels, a detailed dynamics study was carried out using quasi-classical trajectory calculations. The calculations were performed on an analytical potential energy surface (PES) recently developed by our group, PES-2012 [Monge-Palacios et al. J. Chem. Phys. 138, 084305 (2013)]. Most of the available energy appeared as H2O product vibrational energy (54%), reproducing the only experimental evidence, while only the 21% of this energy appeared as NH2 co-product vibrational energy. Both products appeared with cold and broad rotational distributions. The excitation function (constant collision energy in the range 1.0-14.0 kcal mol(-1)) increases smoothly with energy, contrasting with the only theoretical information (reduced-dimensional quantum scattering calculations based on a simplified PES), which presented a peak at low collision energies, related to quantized states. Analysis of the individual reactive trajectories showed that different mechanisms operate depending on the collision energy. Thus, while at high energies (E(coll) ≥ 6 kcal mol(-1)) all trajectories are direct, at low energies about 20%-30% of trajectories are indirect, i.e., with the mediation of a trapping complex, mainly in the product well. Finally, the effect of the zero-point energy constraint on the dynamics properties was analyzed.

  13. Ab initio based potential energy surface and kinetics study of the OH + NH3 hydrogen abstraction reaction.

    PubMed

    Monge-Palacios, M; Rangel, C; Espinosa-Garcia, J

    2013-02-28

    A full-dimensional analytical potential energy surface (PES) for the OH + NH3 → H2O + NH2 gas-phase reaction was developed based exclusively on high-level ab initio calculations. This reaction presents a very complicated shape with wells along the reaction path. Using a wide spectrum of properties of the reactive system (equilibrium geometries, vibrational frequencies, and relative energies of the stationary points, topology of the reaction path, and points on the reaction swath) as reference, the resulting analytical PES reproduces reasonably well the input ab initio information obtained at the coupled-cluster single double triple (CCSD(T)) = FULL/aug-cc-pVTZ//CCSD(T) = FC/cc-pVTZ single point level, which represents a severe test of the new surface. As a first application, on this analytical PES we perform an extensive kinetics study using variational transition-state theory with semiclassical transmission coefficients over a wide temperature range, 200-2000 K. The forward rate constants reproduce the experimental measurements, while the reverse ones are slightly underestimated. However, the detailed analysis of the experimental equilibrium constants (from which the reverse rate constants are obtained) permits us to conclude that the experimental reverse rate constants must be re-evaluated. Another severe test of the new surface is the analysis of the kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), which were not included in the fitting procedure. The KIEs reproduce the values obtained from ab initio calculations in the common temperature range, although unfortunately no experimental information is available for comparison.

  14. Generalized Abstract Symbolic Summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Person, Suzette; Dwyer, Matthew B.

    2009-01-01

    Current techniques for validating and verifying program changes often consider the entire program, even for small changes, leading to enormous V&V costs over a program s lifetime. This is due, in large part, to the use of syntactic program techniques which are necessarily imprecise. Building on recent advances in symbolic execution of heap manipulating programs, in this paper, we develop techniques for performing abstract semantic differencing of program behaviors that offer the potential for improved precision.

  15. Abstraction Augmented Markov Models.

    PubMed

    Caragea, Cornelia; Silvescu, Adrian; Caragea, Doina; Honavar, Vasant

    2010-12-13

    High accuracy sequence classification often requires the use of higher order Markov models (MMs). However, the number of MM parameters increases exponentially with the range of direct dependencies between sequence elements, thereby increasing the risk of overfitting when the data set is limited in size. We present abstraction augmented Markov models (AAMMs) that effectively reduce the number of numeric parameters of k(th) order MMs by successively grouping strings of length k (i.e., k-grams) into abstraction hierarchies. We evaluate AAMMs on three protein subcellular localization prediction tasks. The results of our experiments show that abstraction makes it possible to construct predictive models that use significantly smaller number of features (by one to three orders of magnitude) as compared to MMs. AAMMs are competitive with and, in some cases, significantly outperform MMs. Moreover, the results show that AAMMs often perform significantly better than variable order Markov models, such as decomposed context tree weighting, prediction by partial match, and probabilistic suffix trees.

  16. Research & writing basics: elements of the abstract.

    PubMed

    Krasner, D; Van Rijswijk, L

    1995-04-01

    Writing an abstract is a challenging skill that requires precision and care. Criteria for well-formulated abstracts and abstract guidelines for 2 types of articles (empirical studies and reviews or theoretical articles) as well as a description of the content of a structured abstract are presented. Details were gleaned from a review of the literature including the American Medical Association Manual of Style, Eighth Edition and the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, Fourth Edition. A good abstract is like a crystal: it is a clear, sharp synthesis that elucidates meaning for the reader.

  17. Abstract thinking following severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Scherzer, B P; Charbonneau, S; Solomon, C R; Lepore, F

    1993-01-01

    Abstract abilities were studied in a sample of 34 individuals with severe TBI and a control group. The results indicate that TBI interferes with performance on tests requiring individuals to process information into new categories. There appears to be a dissociation between verbal abstract abilities and visual-perceptual abstract abilities. There is evidence that Goldstein and Sheerer's [1] postulate of a general 'abstract attitude' was at least partially correct. This attitude does not appear to be related to a general verbal ideational process, as dysphasic subjects were only deficient on a purely verbal abstract task.

  18. Progress in the Inductive Strategy-Use of Children from Different Ethnic Backgrounds: A Study Employing Dynamic Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resing, Wilma C. M.; Touw, Kirsten W. J.; Veerbeek, Jochanan; Elliott, Julian G.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated potential differences in inductive behavioural and verbal strategy-use between children (aged 6-8 years) from indigenous and non-indigenous backgrounds. This was effected by the use of an electronic device that could present a series of tasks, offer scaffolded assistance and record children's responses. Children from…

  19. Two-year study: Effect of backgrounding system on growing and finishing performance, and carcass characteristics of beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 2-yr study evaluated growing and finishing performance, as well as carcass characteristics of spring-born calves backgrounded using 1 of 3 treatments: 1) corn residue grazing supplemented 6 d/wk with 2.77 kg DM/head of distillers (CRD), 2) oat-brassica forage grazing (OBF), or 3) drylotting on a g...

  20. A Case Study of the Experiences of Instructors and Students in a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) with Different Cultural Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Keol; Kim, Mi Hwa

    2015-01-01

    The use of virtual learning environments (VLEs) has become more common and educators recognized the potential of VLEs as educational environments. The learning community in VLEs can be a mixture of people from all over the world with different cultural backgrounds. However, despite many studies about the use of virtual environments for learning,…

  1. Self-Concept and Native Language Background: A Study of Measurement Invariance and Cross-Group Comparisons in Third Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niehaus, Kate; Adelson, Jill L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the measurement and interpretation of self-concept among the growing population of children who are English Language Learners (ELLs). More specifically, a 3-group analysis was conducted comparing native English-speaking children, Spanish-speaking ELLs, and ELLs from Asian language backgrounds. Data were drawn from the Early…

  2. Community Background Reports: Taholah, Quinault Reservation, Washington. National Study of American Indian Education, Series I, No. 14, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, John; Barnhardt, Ray

    Number 14 of the 1st series of the Final Report of the National Study of American Indian Education, this community background report concerns itself with the Taholah, Quinault Reservation in Washington State. Information was collected via observation, interviews, and questionnaires. Described are the community of Taholah; population…

  3. A Descriptive Study of a Select Group of Learning Disabled Children: Their Family Backgrounds, Attentional Patterns and Interpersonal Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willing, Kathlene R.

    The study examined the family backgrounds, attentional patterns, and interpersonal styles of 20 Canadian learning disabled (LD students (10-22 years old). Using the Test for Attentional and Interpersonal Styles and a questionnaire, 94 family members, including the 20 Ss, were interviewed. Although no strong familial patterns of import were…

  4. PERCEPTION AND CEREBRAL PALSY, STUDIES IN FIGURE-BACKGROUND RELATIONSHIP. SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION MONOGRAPH SERIES 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRUICKSHANK, WILLIAM M.; AND OTHERS

    A STUDY OF PERCEPTION USED A SAMPLE OF 325 CEREBRAL PALSIED CHILDREN (211 WERE SPASTIC, 114 WERE ATHETOID) AND 110 NORMAL CHILDREN. ALL CHILDREN WERE BETWEEN SIX AND 16 YEARS OF AGE AND OF NORMAL INTELLIGENCE. TO INVESTIGATE PERCEPTUAL DISTURBANCES, SIX TESTS WERE ADMINISTERED--THE TACTUAL MOTOR TEST, THE SYRACUSE VISUAL FIGURE BACKGROUND TEST…

  5. Background Oriented Schlieren Applied to Study Shock Spacing in a Screeching Circular Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clem, Michelle M.; Zaman, Khairul B. M. Q.; Fagan, Amy F.

    2012-01-01

    Background oriented schlieren (BOS) is a recent development of the schlieren and shadowgraph methods. The BOS technique has the ability to provide visualizations of the density gradient in both the axial and radial directions. The resultant magnitude of the density gradients allows for comparison with shadowgraph images. This paper first compares data obtained by the BOS and shadowgraph techniques at identical conditions in a free jet. The patterns and spacing of the shock trains obtained by the two techniques are found to be consistent with one another. This provides confidence in the shock spacing measurement by the BOS technique. Due to its simpler setup, BOS is then applied to investigate the shock spacing associated with the screech phenomenon, especially during stage jumps. Screech frequencies from a 37.6 mm convergent nozzle, as a function of jet Mach number (M(sub j)), are shown to exhibit various stages. As many as eight stages are identified with the present nozzle over the range 1.0 < M(sub j) <1.7. BOS images are acquired at various screech conditions and the shock spacing is examined as a function of M(sub j).

  6. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  7. Laser flash photolysis of 1,2-diketopyracene and a theoretical study of the phenolic hydrogen abstraction by the triplet state of cyclic alpha-diketones.

    PubMed

    de Lucas, Nanci C; Correa, Rodrigo J; Albuquerque, Ana Carla C; Firme, Caio L; Garden, Simon J; Bertoti, Ada Ruth; Netto-Ferreira, José C

    2007-02-15

    Laser flash photolysis (LFP) studies, atoms in molecules (AIM) studies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed in order to study the mechanism of the hydrogen abstraction by alpha-diketones in the presence of phenols. Laser irradiation of a degassed solution of 1,2-diketopyracene in acetonitrile resulted in the formation of a readily detectable transient with absorption at 610 nm, but with very low absorptivity. This transient decays with a lifetime of around 2 micros. The quenching rate constant for substituted phenols, kq, ranged from 1.10x10(8) L mol-1 s-1 (4-cyanophenol) to 3.87x10(9) L mol-1 s-1 (4-hydroxyphenol). The Hammett plot for the reaction of the triplet of 1,2-diketopyracene with phenols gave a reaction constant rho=-0.9. DFT calculations (UB3LYP/6-311++G**//UB3LYP/6-31G*) of the triplet complex ketone-phenol revealed that hydrogen transfer has predominantly occurred and that the reaction with alpha-diketones are generally 7 kcal/mol less endothermic than the respective reactions of the monoketones. These results together with the geometries obtained from the DFT calculations, natural bond order (NBO) analysis, and AIM results indicate that hydrogen abstraction for alpha-diketones is facilitated by the electrophilicity of the ketone, instead of neighboring group participation by the second carbonyl group.

  8. Background sources at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Toner, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Important sources of background for PEP experiments are studied. Background particles originate from high-energy electrons and positrons which have been lost from stable orbits, ..gamma..-rays emitted by the primary beams through bremsstrahlung in the residual gas, and synchrotron radiation x-rays. The effect of these processes on the beam lifetime are calculated and estimates of background rates at the interaction region are given. Recommendations for the PEP design, aimed at minimizing background are presented. 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Methods and background characteristics of the TOHNN study: a population-based study of oral health conditions in northern Norway

    PubMed Central

    Holde, Gro Eirin; Oscarson, Nils; Tillberg, Anders; Marstrander, Peter; Jönsson, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the Tromstannen – Oral Health in Northern Norway (TOHNN) study was to investigate oral health and dental-related diseases in an adult population. This article provides an overview of the background of the study and a description of the sample characteristics and methods employed in data collection. Study design Cross-sectional population-based study including a questionnaire and clinical dental examination. Methods A randomly selected sample of 2,909 individuals (20–79 years old) drawn from the population register was invited to participate in the study. The data were collected between October 2013 and November 2014 in Troms County in northern Norway. The questionnaire focused on oral health-related behaviours and attitudes, oral health-related quality of life, sense of coherence, dental anxiety and symptoms from the temporomandibular joint. The dental examinations, including radiographs, were conducted by 11 dental teams in 5 dental offices. The examination comprised of registration of dental caries, full mouth periodontal status, temporomandibular disorders, mucosal lesions and height and weight. The participants were grouped by age (20–34, 35–49, 50–64 and 65–79) and ethnicity (Norwegian, Sámi, other European and other world). Results From the original sample of 2,909 individuals, 1,986 (68.3%) people participated, of whom 1,019 (51.3%) were women. The highest attendance rate was among women 20–34 years old (80.3%) and the lowest in the oldest age group of women (55.4%). There was no difference in response rate between rural and urban areas. There was a positive correlation between population size and household gross income (p < 0.001) and education level (p < 0.001). The majority of Sámi resided in smaller municipalities. In larger cities, most participants used private dental health care services, whereas, in rural areas, most participants used the public dental health care service. Conclusion The TOHNN study has the

  10. Background Material for the Human Studies Review Board's Review of Ezratty 2014

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Journal article and details of EPA's science and ethics reviews of the study by Ezratty et al. from 2014: Repeated Nitrogen Dioxide Exposures and Eosinophilic Airway Inflammation in Asthmatics: A Randomized Crossover Study.

  11. Background Material for the Human Studies Review Board's Review of Hansson and Roos 1987

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Journal article and details of EPA's science and ethics reviews of the study by Hansson and Roos from 1987: The Effect of Fluoride and Calcium on Spinal Bone Mineral Content: A Controlled, Prospective (3 Years) Study.

  12. How do patients with a Turkish background evaluate their medical care in Germany? An observational study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Katja; Bungartz, Jessica; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Steinhaeuser, Jost

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients’ evaluation of medical care is an essential dimension of quality of care and an important aspect of the feedback cycle for health care providers. The aim of this study was to document how patients with a Turkish background evaluate primary care in Germany and determine which aspects of care are associated with language abilities. Methods The study was based on an observational design. Patients with a Turkish background from German primary care practices completed the EUROPEP (European Project on Patient Evaluation of General Practice Care) questionnaire consisting of 23 items. Seventeen primary care practices were involved with either German (n=8) or Turkish (n=9) general practitioners (GPs). Results A convenience sample of 472 patients with a Turkish background from 17 practices participated in the study (response rate 39.9%). Practices with a German GP had a lower response rate (19.6%) than those with a Turkish GP (57.5%). Items evaluated the highest were “keeping data confidential” (73.4%) and “quick services for urgent health problems” (69.9%). Subgroup analysis showed lower evaluation scores from patients with good or excellent German language abilities. Patients who consulted a Turkish GP had higher evaluation scores. Conclusion The evaluation from patients with a Turkish background living in Germany with either Turkish or German GPs showed lower scores than patients in other studies in Europe using EUROPEP. However, our results had higher evaluation scores than those of Turkish patients evaluating GPs in Turkey. Therefore, different explanation models for these findings should be explored in future studies. PMID:26604710

  13. Exploring Disciplinary Background Effect on Social Studies Teachers' Knowledge and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Pei-Fen; Yang, Meng-Li

    2013-01-01

    Case studies have pointed out that teachers' disciplinary knowledge affects their pedagogy; however, the results are not consistent. There is a need for quantitative research to examine the relationship between teacher knowledge and practice, particularly in social studies where content-specific studies are mostly qualitative. The authors used…

  14. Hotspots and social background of urban traffic crashes: A case study in Cluj-Napoca (Romania).

    PubMed

    Benedek, József; Ciobanu, Silviu Marian; Man, Titus Cristian

    2016-02-01

    Mobility practices have changed dramatically in Romanian towns over the last 25 years, following the collapse of socialist mobility restrictions. Urban areas like Cluj-Napoca are facing both increasing immigration and car mobility, and therefore increasing levels of road traffic crashes. The analysis of traffic crashes is one of the most important elements for improving the road safety policy. This paper is divided in two parts. In the first one, the authors focus on identifying the traffic crash hotspots along the street network, while in the second part they discuss the social background of road traffic crash occurrence. The first step in analyzing traffic crashes is to determine crash hotspots. A four-year record (2010-2013) provided by the Traffic Department of the General Inspectorate of Romanian Police (GIRPTD) was used. As a method of hotspot determination, the Kernel Density Estimation tool was employed, in the frame of the spatial analysis along network (SANET). The outcome was the hotspot map of traffic crashes in Cluj-Napoca. The results have revealed 4 categories of street segments: not-dangerous, low-dangerous, medium-dangerous and high-dangerous. Based on this classification, at least 4 dangerous areas were identified, located at the city entrances-exits (in the West, North-West and East) and the city center (the most dangerous zone). The second part of the paper focuses on social groups involved in car crashes. The following are considered: age, gender and blood alcohol concentration of the person (driver or pedestrian) found guilty for every individual crash.

  15. Ultrafast time resolved spectroscopic studies on the generation of the ketyl-sugar biradical by intramolecular hydrogen abstraction among ketoprofen and purine nucleoside dyads.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-De; Dang, Li; Liu, Mingyue; Du, Lili; Zheng, Xuming; Phillips, David Lee

    2015-04-03

    Intramolecular hydrogen abstraction reactions among ketoprofen (KP) and purine nucleoside dyads have been proposed to form ketyl-sugar biradical intermediates in acetonitrile. Femtosecond transient absorption studies on KP and purine nucleoside dyads reveal that the triplet state of the KP moiety of the dyads with cisoid structure decay faster (due to an intramolecular hydrogen abstraction reaction to produce a ketyl-sugar biradical intermediate) than the triplet state of the KP moiety of the dyads with transoid structure detected in acetonitrile solvent. For the cisoid 5-KP-dG dyad, the triplet state of the KP moiety decays too fast to be observed by ns-TR(3); only the ketyl-sugar biradical intermediates are detected by ns-TR(3) in acetonitrile. For the cisoid 5-KP-dA dyad, the triplet states of the KP moiety could be observed at early nanosecond delay times, and then it quickly undergoes intramolecular hydrogen abstraction to produce a ketyl-sugar biradical intermediate. For the cisoid 5-KPGly-dA and transoid 3-KP-dA dyads, the triplet state of the KP moiety had a longer lifetime due to the long distance chain between the KP moiety and the purine nucleoside (5-KPGly-dA) and the transoid structure (3-KP-dA). The experimental and computational results suggest that the ketyl-sugar biradical intermediate is generated with a higher efficiency for the cisoid dyad. However, the transoid dyad exhibits similar photochemistry behavior as the KP molecule, and no ketyl-sugar biradical intermediate was observed in the ns-TR(3) experiments for the transoid 3-KP-dA dyad.

  16. High-impedance NbSi TES sensors for studying the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nones, C.; Marnieros, S.; Benoit, A.; Bergé, L.; Bideaud, A.; Camus, P.; Dumoulin, L.; Monfardini, A.; Rigaut, O.

    2012-12-01

    Precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are crucial in cosmology because any proposed model of the universe must account for the features of this radiation. The CMB has a thermal blackbody spectrum at a temperature of 2.725 K, i.e. the spectrum peaks in the microwave range frequency of 160.2 GHz, corresponding to a 1.9-mm wavelength. Of all CMB measurements that the scientific community has not yet been able to perform, the CMB B-mode polarization is probably the most challenging from the instrumental point of view. The signature of primordial gravitational waves, which give rise to a B-type polarization, is one of the goals in cosmology today and amongst the first objectives in the field. For this purpose, high-performance low-temperature bolometric cameras, made of thousands of pixels, are currently being developed by many groups, which will improve the sensitivity to B-mode CMB polarization by one or two orders of magnitude compared to the Planck satellite HFI detectors. We present here a new bolometer structure that is able to increase the pixel sensitivities and to simplify the fabrication procedure. This innovative device replaces delicate membrane-based structures and eliminates the mediation of phonons: the incoming energy is directly captured and measured in the electron bath of an appropriate sensor and the thermal decoupling is achieved via the intrinsic electron-phonon decoupling of the sensor at very low temperature. Reported results come from a 204-pixel array of NbxSi1-x transition edge sensors with a meander structure fabricated on a 2-inch silicon wafer using electron-beam co-evaporation and a cleanroom lithography process. To validate the application of this device to CMB measurements, we have performed an optical calibration of our sample in the focal plane of a dilution cryostat test bench. We have demonstrated a light absorption close to 20% and an optical noise equivalent power of about 7×10-16 W/√Hz, which is highly

  17. Research Abstracts of 1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    ABSTRACTS OF 1980. 9 - DTIC ELECTEf ii S AN3O 1981j _NAVAL DISTRIBUTION SMT:MIT DENTAL RESEARCH Approved for PUbDiC T INSTITE iii~2 YA3 It81 Naval...Medical Research apd Development Command 30 £ Bethesda, Maryland ( *- i - NTIS - GRA&I DTIC TAB - Urrannouneed NAVAL DENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE...r1 w American Assoctat/ion for Dental Research, 58th Annual Session, Los Angeles, California, March 20-23, 1980. 1. AV6ERSON*, D. N., LANGELAND, K

  18. Research Abstracts of 1979.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    7 AD-AO82 309 NAVAL DENTAL RESEARCH INST GREAT LAKES IL F/6 6/9 RESCH ABTAT79 991 UNCLASSIFIED NORI-PR-79-11 NL ’NDRI-PR 79-11 December 1979...RESEARCH ABSTRACTS OF 1979 OTICSELZCreD MAR 2?718 S A NAVAL DENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE Naval Medical Research and Development Command Bethesda, Maryland...8G 3 23 O4ൌ p.,. ... ....-- - I -- - ’.... .I l l ---,, .. . = ., , ." .;’.- I 1 IV NAVAL DENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE NAVAL BASE, BLDG. I-H GREAT LAKES

  19. Exploring Anti-Semitism in the Classroom: A Case Study among Norwegian Adolescents from Minority Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This study explores high school students' views of Jews in one minority-dominated school in Oslo, Norway. Employing a qualitative approach, semistructured interview guides and classroom-based discussions teased out attitudes toward Jews drawing on questions from a nationwide research conducted by The Center for Studies of the Holocaust and…

  20. In Search of Permeable Boundaries: A Case Study of Teacher Background, Student Resistance, and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mthethwa-Sommers, S.

    2012-01-01

    This article draws from an action research case study undertaken by an African-born faculty member who speaks English with a foreign accent. The study employed co-teaching as an intervention method to (a) test the hypothesis that co-teaching with an instructor born in the United States from the dominant racial and linguistic group might reduce…

  1. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers

  2. The Pittsburgh Oral-Facial Cleft study: expanding the cleft phenotype. Background and justification.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Seth M; Neiswanger, Katherine; Martin, Rick A; Mooney, Mark P; Kane, Alex A; Wenger, Sharon L; Losee, Joseph; Deleyiannis, Frederick; Ma, Lian; De Salamanca, Javier E; Czeizel, Andrew E; Marazita, Mary L

    2006-01-01

    The Pittsburgh Oral-Facial Cleft study was begun in 1993 with the primary goal of identifying genes involved in nonsyndromic orofacial clefts in a variety of populations worldwide. Based on the results from a number of pilot studies and preliminary genetic analyses, a new research focus was added to the Pittsburgh Oral-Facial Cleft study in 1999: to elucidate the role that associated phenotypic features play in the familial transmission patterns of orofacial clefts in order to expand the definition of the nonsyndromic cleft phenotype. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of phenotypic features associated with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts. These features include fluctuating and directional asymmetry, non-right-handedness, dermatoglyphic patterns, craniofacial morphology, orbicularis oris muscle defects, dental anomalies, structural brain and vertebral anomalies, minor physical anomalies, and velopharyngeal incompetence.

  3. The Writing of Non-English Background Students--Part 2: The Study of the Chinese-Background Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Sau-ling; Zou, John

    A study investigated the writing of incipient bilinguals (students who were in the initial process of acquiring a second language). A total of four Chinese-speaking children were chosen for final, in-depth study over a 2-year period at a middle school in the San Francisco Bay Area in California. Data included initial interviews and observations,…

  4. Input Processing: A Study of "Ab Initio" Learners with Multilingual Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong; Peverly, Stephen T.

    2007-01-01

    Research on input processing in the acquisition of a non-primary language has rested largely on the assumption that learners use a meaning-based approach as the "default" when processing input (VanPatten, 1996). The study reported here poses a challenge to this assumption: findings show that participants who were absolute beginners used a…

  5. The Influence of Cultural Background on Parental Perceptions of Adolescent Gambling Behaviour: A Canadian Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Colin A.; Derevensky, Jeffrey L.; Meerkamper, Eric; Cutajar, Jo

    2012-01-01

    Considerable research has begun to address youth gambling issues from a bio-psycho-social perspective. The current Canadian national study adds to this body of knowledge by examining the cultural influences impacting parent's attitudes, behaviors and perceptions of youth gambling. A total of 3,279 parents with a child between the ages of 13 and 18…

  6. Albanian: A Survey of Albanian Language and Literature. Area Background Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This survey of Albanian language and literature is a synopsis of linguistic studies and literary achievements in Albania. The first chapter discusses the origin of the Albanian language. The next chapters deal with the Greek, Latin, Slavic, and Turkish influences on the Albanian language. The influence of Albanian on other Balkan languages and the…

  7. A Study of Disruptive Behavior Disorders in Puerto Rican Youth: I. Background, Design, and Survey Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Hector R.; Canino, Glorisa J.; Davies, Mark; Duarte, Cristiane S.; Febo, Vivian; Ramirez, Rafael; Hoven, Christina; Wicks, Judith; Musa, George; Loeber, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This is the first of two related articles on a study carried out between 2000 and 2003 designed to assess the prevalence, associated comorbidities, and correlates of disruptive behavior disorders in two populations of Puerto Rican children: one in the Standard Metropolitan Areas of San Juan and Caguas in Puerto Rico, and the other in…

  8. The Study of the Role of the Background Languages in Third Language Acquisition. the State of the Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Ylva; Bardel, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to give an up-to-date picture of study of the role of the background languages (the first language, L1, and the second language, L2) in third language (L3) acquisition, mainly in the two areas of vocabulary and syntax. These seem to be the two linguistic levels on which there has so far been most research concerning…

  9. The Associations Between the Religious Background, Social Supports, and Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders in Taiwan: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan-Han; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Huang, Sheng-Jean; Wu, Chau-Chung; Chen, Yen-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated important implications related to religiosity and a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) decision. However, the association between patients' religious background and DNR decisions is vague. In particular, the association between the religious background of Buddhism/Daoism and DNR decisions has never been examined. The objective of this study was to examine the association between patients' religious background and their DNR decisions, with a particular focus on Buddhism/Daoism.The medical records of the patients who were admitted to the 3 surgical intensive care units (SICU) in a university-affiliated medical center located at Northern Taiwan from June 1, 2011 to December 31, 2013 were retrospectively collected. We compared the clinical/demographic variables of DNR patients with those of non-DNR patients using the Student t test or χ test depending on the scale of the variables. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to examine the association between the religious backgrounds and DNR decisions.A sample of 1909 patients was collected: 122 patients had a DNR order; and 1787 patients did not have a DNR order. Old age (P = 0.02), unemployment (P = 0.02), admission diagnosis of "nonoperative, cardiac failure/insufficiency" (P = 0.03), and severe acute illness at SICU admission (P < 0.01) were significantly associated with signing of DNR orders. Patients' religious background of Buddhism/Daoism (P = 0.04), married marital status (P = 0.02), and admission diagnosis of "postoperative, major surgery" (P = 0.02) were less likely to have a DNR order written during their SICU stay. Furthermore, patients with poor social support, as indicated by marital and working status, were more likely to consent to a DNR order during SICU stay.This study showed that the religious background of Buddhism/Daoism was significantly associated with a lower likelihood of consenting to a DNR, and poor social support was significantly

  10. Acoustic studies for alpha background rejection in dark matter bubble chamber detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bou-Cabo, M.; Felis, I.; Ardid, M.; Collaboration: COUPP Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    COUPP (Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle Physics) is an experiment with bubble chambers able to detect dark matter directly either with Spin-Dependent or with Spin-Independent interactions. The target material is a superheated liquid (usually CF3I) that can be bubble nucleated due to nuclear recoils produced by elastic collisions of dark matter particles. The bubble growth inside the chamber is accompanied with an acoustic signature. The acoustic technique has been successfully used to have a good alpha discrimination (about 99%). In this paper, we present different studies and results related with the characterization of the acoustic properties of the detector and the different phenomena involved in the acoustic measurements of the bubble growth, such as sound generation, sound transmission and optimization of piezoelectric transducers.

  11. Adolescents with Turkish background in Norway and Sweden: a comparative study of their psychological adaptation.

    PubMed

    Virta, Erkki; Sam, David L; Westin, Charles

    2004-02-01

    Using a questionnaire survey, this study compared psychological adaptation (self-esteem, life satisfaction, and mental health problems) of Turkish adolescents in Norway and Sweden, and examined to what extent ethnic and majority identities, acculturation strategies, and perceived discrimination accounted for adaptation among Turkish adolescents. The samples consisted of 407 Turks (111 in Norway and 296 in Sweden) with a mean age of 15.2 years and 433 host adolescents (207 in Norway, 226 in Sweden) with a mean age of 15.6 years. Turks in Norway reported poorer psychological adaptation than Turks in Sweden. Predictors of good adaptation were Turkish identity and integration, whereas poor adaptation was related to marginalization and perceived discrimination. The results indicated that the poorer adaptation of Turks in Norway compared to that of Turks in Sweden could be due to lower degree of Turkish identity and higher degree of perceived discrimination.

  12. Density functional theory direct dynamics study on the hydrogen abstraction reaction of CF 3CHFCF 3+OH→CF 3CFCF 3+H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing-yao; Li, Ze-sheng; Dai, Zhen-wen; Huang, Xu-ri; Sun, Chia-chung

    2002-08-01

    The hydrogen abstraction reaction CF 3CHFCF 3+OH has been studied by a dual-level direct dynamics method. The variational transition state calculations are performed with small curvature tunneling (SCT), and the interpolated single-point energies (ISPE) approach is employed to correct the classical energy profile. The rate constants are evaluated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df, 2p)//B3LYP/6-311G(d, p) level over the temperature range of 270-2000 K. The calculated results show reasonable agreement with the available experimental data in the 270-463 K range. It is found that the variational effect is significant for this reaction, and the tunneling effect is smaller.

  13. Background studies in the modeling of extrusion cooking processes for soy flour doughs.

    PubMed

    Luxenburg, L A; Baird, D G; Joseph, E G

    1985-03-01

    Soy flour is processed in single screw extruders to yield textured vegetable protein used as meat extenders and replacements. The fundamental processes which take place in extrusion cooking of soy doughs are poorly understood from an engineering point of view. This paper is concerned with gaining an understanding of extrusion cooking in order to develop a quantitative model of this process in single screw extruders. Rheological and thermodynamic data are obtained over a range of conditions found in the extrusion process and this data is used both in understanding and modeling the extrusion cooking process.In particular, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has been used to determine changes in the enthalpy of soy doughs at various moisture levels. It is observed that in general the enthalpy changes are small (e.g. of the order of 1.0 cal/g) and endothermic. However, if the dough is subjected to shear and thermal history, then the enthalpy changes become significant. The viscosity of the dough exhibits a mild increase in the temperature range where the endotherms are observed in the DSC data. Based on the results of this study, it is concluded that cooking does not involve cross-linking of the proteins but more likely a conformation change of the molecules. Also, it is found that for the 40% to 60% added moisture soy flour dough systems, the rheological properties can be modeled using a Bingham model modified with a shear rate dependent viscosity.

  14. Background Rejection of Charged Particles in the Simbol-X Telescope: Preliminary Study of Protons Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Orto, E.; Barbera, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Fioretti, V.; Malaguti, G.; Mineo, T.; Pareschi, G.; Rigato, V.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2009-05-01

    X-ray telescopes equipped with focusing optics in high eccentric orbit, as e.g. Newton-XMM and Chandra, showed a degradation of the detector performance and an important increase of the noise due to soft protons with energy between a few tens of keV and a few MeV, that are focused on the detector through the mirror module. It should be noted that the focusing of the protons by Wolter optics was an unexpected phenomenon. In Simbol-X a magnetic diverter will be implemented to deflect protons, in order to reduce the flux of charged particles impinging upon the focal plane. Obviously the design of the diverter should take into consideration the protons distribution at the exit of the mirror module; for this reason a detailed simulation about the interaction of particles with the mirror surface is necessary. Here we will present the scattering protons models currently under consideration, suggesting a preliminary solution for the design of the magnetic diverter. We will also discuss an ad hoc experiment to study this problem.

  15. Background Rejection of Charged Particles in the Simbol-X Telescope: Preliminary Study of Protons Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Orto, E.; Barbera, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Fioretti, V.; Malaguti, G.; Mineo, T.; Pareschi, G.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Rigato, V.

    2009-05-11

    X-ray telescopes equipped with focusing optics in high eccentric orbit, as e.g. Newton-XMM and Chandra, showed a degradation of the detector performance and an important increase of the noise due to soft protons with energy between a few tens of keV and a few MeV, that are focused on the detector through the mirror module. It should be noted that the focusing of the protons by Wolter optics was an unexpected phenomenon. In Simbol-X a magnetic diverter will be implemented to deflect protons, in order to reduce the flux of charged particles impinging upon the focal plane. Obviously the design of the diverter should take into consideration the protons distribution at the exit of the mirror module; for this reason a detailed simulation about the interaction of particles with the mirror surface is necessary. Here we will present the scattering protons models currently under consideration, suggesting a preliminary solution for the design of the magnetic diverter. We will also discuss an ad hoc experiment to study this problem.

  16. Theoretical investigation of the hydrogen abstraction reaction of the OH radical with CH3CHF2 (HFC152-a): a dual level direct density functional theory dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Taghikhani, Mahdi; Parsafar, G A; Sabzyan, Hassan

    2005-09-15

    The hydrogen abstraction reaction of the OH radical with CH(3)CHF(2) (HFC152-a) has been studied theoretically over a wide temperature range, 200-3000 K. Two different reactive sites of the molecule, CH(3) and CHF(2) groups have been investigated precisely, and results confirm that CHF(2) position of the molecule is a highly reactive site. In this study, three recently developed hybrid density functional theories, namely, MPWB1K, MPW1B95, and MPW1K, are used. The MPWB1K/6-31+G(d,p) method gives the best result for kinetic calculations, including barrier heights, reaction path information and geometry of transition state structures and other stationary points. To refine the barrier height of each channel, a single point energy calculation was performed in MPWB1K/MG3S method. The obtained rate constants by dual level direct dynamics with the interpolated single point energy method (VTST-ISPE) using DFT quantum computational methods, are consistent with available experimental data. The canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) with the zero-curvature and also the small-curvature tunneling correction methods is used to calculate the rate constants. Over the temperature range 200-3000 K, the variation effect, tunneling contribution, branching ratio of each channel are calculated. The rate constants and their temperature dependency in the form of a fitted three-parameter Arrhenius expression are k(1)(T) = 2.00 x 10(-19)(T)(2.24) exp(-1273/T), k(2)(T) = 1.95 x 10(-19)(T)(2.46) exp(-2374/T), and k(T) = 3.13 x 10(-19)(T)(2.47) exp(- 1694/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). For the H abstraction from the CHF(2) group, a nonclassical reflection effect is detected as a dominant quantum effect.

  17. Genome-wide association study of serum minerals levels in children of different ethnic background.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiao; Li, Jin; Guo, Yiran; Wei, Zhi; Mentch, Frank D; Hou, Cuiping; Zhao, Yan; Qiu, Haijun; Kim, Cecilia; Sleiman, Patrick M A; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2015-01-01

    Calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chloride and phosphorus are the major dietary minerals involved in various biological functions and are commonly measured in the blood serum. Sufficient mineral intake is especially important for children due to their rapid growth. Currently, the genetic mechanisms influencing serum mineral levels are poorly understood, especially for children. We carried out a genome-wide association (GWA) study on 5,602 European-American children and 4,706 African-American children who had mineral measures available in their electronic medical records (EMR). While no locus met the criteria for genome-wide significant association, our results demonstrated a nominal association of total serum calcium levels with a missense variant in the calcium -sensing receptor (CASR) gene on 3q13 (rs1801725, P = 1.96 × 10(-3)) in the African-American pediatric cohort, a locus previously reported in Caucasians. We also confirmed the association result in our pediatric European-American cohort (P = 1.38 × 10(-4)). We further replicated two other loci associated with serum calcium levels in the European-American cohort (rs780094, GCKR, P = 4.26 × 10(-3); rs10491003, GATA3, P = 0.02). In addition, we replicated a previously reported locus on 1q21, demonstrating association of serum magnesium levels with MUC1 (rs4072037, P = 2.04 × 10(-6)). Moreover, in an extended gene-based association analysis we uncovered evidence for association of calcium levels with the previously reported gene locus DGKD in both European-American children and African-American children. Taken together, our results support a role for CASR and DGKD mediated calcium regulation in both African-American and European-American children, and corroborate the association of calcium levels with GCKR and GATA3, and the association of magnesium levels with MUC1 in the European-American children.

  18. Dietary education must fit into everyday life: a qualitative study of people with a Pakistani background and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hempler, Nana F; Nicic, Sara; Ewers, Bettina; Willaing, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Background The high prevalence of diabetes among South Asian populations in European countries partially derives from unhealthy changes in dietary patterns. Limited studies address perspectives of South Asian populations with respect to utility of diabetes education in everyday life. This study explores perspectives on dietary diabetes education and healthy food choices of people living in Denmark who have a Pakistani background and type 2 diabetes. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted between October 2012 and December 2013 with 12 participants with type 2 diabetes who had received dietary diabetes education. Data analysis was systematic and was based on grounded theory principles. Results Participants described the process of integrating and utilizing dietary education in everyday life as challenging. Perceived barriers of the integration and utilization included a lack of a connection between the content of the education and life conditions, a lack of support from their social networks for dietary change, difficulty integrating the education into everyday life, and failure to include the participants’ taste preferences in the educational setting. Conclusion Dietary education that is sensitive to the attitudes, wishes, and preferences of the participants and that aims at establishing a connection to the everyday life of the participants might facilitate successful changes in dietary practices among people with a Pakistani background and type 2 diabetes. The findings suggest that more focus should be placed on collaborative processes in the dietary educational setting in order to achieve appropriate education and to improve communication between this population and health care professionals. PMID:25750523

  19. Background radiation, electrical work, and some other exposures associated with acute myeloid leukemia in a case-referent study.

    PubMed

    Flodin, U; Fredriksson, M; Persson, B; Hardell, L; Axelson, O

    1986-01-01

    The effect of potential risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia was evaluated in a case-referent study encompassing 59 cases and 354 referents, all of whom were alive. Information on exposure was obtained through a questionnaire mailed to the subjects. The possible effect of background radiation was evaluated by means of a gamma radiation index, which accounted for the differences between cases and referents in this respect, i.e., in time spent in concrete buildings both at home and at work places. In the 20-54 yr old age group, there was an association between leukemia morbidity and index of background radiation. X-ray treatment and electrical work were also associated with increased rate ratios. With regard to solvents, only styrene appeared as a risk factor, but the number of exposed subjects was small. Other exposures were less clearly associated with increased risks.

  20. Groundwater abstraction pollution risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Lytton, L; Howe, S; Sage, R; Greenaway, P

    2003-01-01

    A generic groundwater pollution risk assessment methodology has been developed to enable the evaluation and ranking of the potential risk of pollution to groundwater abstractions. The ranking can then be used to prioritise risk management or mitigation procedures in a robust and quantifiable framework and thus inform business investment decisions. The risk assessment consider the three components of the pollution transport model: source-pathway-receptor. For groundwater abstractions these correspond to land use (with associated pollutants and shallow subsurface characteristics), aquifer and the abstraction borehole. An hierarchical approach was chosen to allow the risk assessment to be successfully carried out with different quality data for different parts of the model. The 400-day groundwater protection zone defines the catchment boundary that form the spatial limit of the land use audit for each receptor. A risk score is obtained for each land use (potential pollution source) within the catchment. These scores are derived by considering the characteristics (such as load, persistence and toxicity) of all pollutants pertaining to each land use, their on-site management and the potential for the unsaturated subsurface to attenuate their effects in the event of a release. Risk scores are also applied to the aquifer characteristics (as pollutant pathway) and to the abstraction borehole (as pollutant receptor). Each risk score is accompanied by an uncertainty score which provides a guide to the confidence in the data used to compile the risk assessment. The application of the methodology has highlighted a number of problems in this type of work and results of initial case studies are being used to trial alternative scoring methods and a more simplified approach to accelerate the process of pollution risk assessment.

  1. Exoplanets and Multiverses (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, V.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) To the ancients, the Earth was the Universe, of a size to be crossed by a god in a day, by boat or chariot, and by humans in a lifetime. Thus an exoplanet would have been a multiverse. The ideas gradually separated over centuries, with gradual acceptance of a sun-centered solar system, the stars as suns likely to have their own planets, other galaxies beyond the Milky Way, and so forth. And whenever the community divided between "just one' of anything versus "many," the "manies" have won. Discoveries beginning in 1991 and 1995 have gradually led to a battalion or two of planets orbiting other stars, very few like our own little family, and to moderately serious consideration of even larger numbers of other universes, again very few like our own. I'm betting, however, on habitable (though not necessarily inhabited) exoplanets to be found, and habitable (though again not necessarily inhabited) universes. Only the former will yield pretty pictures.

  2. Stellar Presentations (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) The AAVSO is in the process of expanding its education, outreach and speakers bureau program. powerpoint presentations prepared for specific target audiences such as AAVSO members, educators, students, the general public, and Science Olympiad teams, coaches, event supervisors, and state directors will be available online for members to use. The presentations range from specific and general content relating to stellar evolution and variable stars to specific activities for a workshop environment. A presentation—even with a general topic—that works for high school students will not work for educators, Science Olympiad teams, or the general public. Each audience is unique and requires a different approach. The current environment necessitates presentations that are captivating for a younger generation that is embedded in a highly visual and sound-bite world of social media, twitter and U-Tube, and mobile devices. For educators, presentations and workshops for themselves and their students must support the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the Common Core Content Standards, and the Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) initiative. Current best practices for developing relevant and engaging powerpoint presentations to deliver information to a variety of targeted audiences will be presented along with several examples.

  3. Abstracts in high profile journals often fail to report harm

    PubMed Central

    Bernal-Delgado, Enrique; Fisher, Elliot S

    2008-01-01

    Background To describe how frequently harm is reported in the abstract of high impact factor medical journals. Methods Design and population: We carried out a blinded structured review of a random sample of 363 Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) carried out on human beings, and published in high impact factor medical journals in 2003. Main endpoint: 1) Proportion of articles reporting harm in the abstract; and 2) Proportion of articles that reported harm in the abstract when harm was reported in the main body of the article. Analysis: Corrected Prevalence Ratio (cPR) and its exact confidence interval were calculated. Non-conditional logistic regression was used. Results 363 articles and 407 possible comparisons were studied. Overall, harm was reported in 135 abstracts [37.2% (CI95%:32.2 to 42.4)]. Harm was reported in the main text of 243 articles [66.9% (CI95%: 61.8 to 71.8)] and was statistically significant in 54 articles [14.9% (CI95%: 11.4 to 19.0)]. Among the 243 articles that mentioned harm in the text, 130 articles [53.5% (CI95% 47.0 to 59.9)] reported harm in the abstract; a figure that rose to 75.9% (CI95%: 62.4 to 86.5) when the harm reported in the text was statistically significant. Harm in the abstract was more likely to be reported when statistically significant harm was reported in the main body of the article [cPR = 1.70 (CI95% 1.47 to 1.92)] and when drug companies (not public institutions) funded the RCTs [cPR = 1.29 (CI95% 1.03 to 1.67)]. Conclusion Abstracts published in high impact factor medical journals underreport harm, even when harm is reported in the main body of the article. PMID:18371200

  4. Long-term study on the impact of new particle formation on CCN in an urban background location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dameto de Espana, María del Carmen; Wonaschuetz, Anna; Demattio, Anselm; Steiner, Gerhard; Hitzenberger, Regina

    2015-04-01

    New Particles Formation (NPF) events and Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) have been investigated intensively over the last years. Measurements have been performed at many different locations. Several studies suggest that NPF significantly enhance atmospheric CCN concentrations. Only few studies, however, linked nucleation measurements directly to increases in measured CCN concentrations. Most of these studies were performed in remote or background locations. There is a lack of continuous long-term measurements of CCN concentrations in the urban background. In order to provide more information about NPF acting as a source of CCN, a long term study was started in June 2014 in the urban background of Vienna and is planned to continue for the foreseeable future. The measurements are performed at the aerosol laboratory located on the rooftop (35m above ground) of the Physics building of the University of Vienna, located in central Vienna. Concentrations as well as seasonal characteristics of CCN concentrations and NPF events will be investigated. A CCNC (Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter) designed at the University of Vienna operating on the principle of a static thermal diffusion chamber (Giebl et al., 2002), is used to measure CCN concentrations and activation ratios for low supersaturations (0,5%). NPF events are determined with a Vienna-type DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer, Winkelmayr et al., 1991) and classified using the criteria of Dal Maso et al., (2005). NPF events cannot always be identified completely clearly because of local pollution plumes. Traffic emissions could additionally increase the concentration of organic particles during a NPF event. A Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) measuring black carbon concentration is therefore used to monitor the contribution of traffic emissions to the aerosol at the station.

  5. Voyager backgrounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Voyager spacecraft and experiments are described. The spacecraft description includes the structure and configuration, communications systems, power supplies, computer command subsystems, and the science platform. The experiments discussed are investigations of cosmic rays, low-energy charged particles, magnetic fields, and plasma waves, along with studies in radio astronomy photopolarimetry. The tracking and data acquisition procedures for the missions are presented.

  6. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-11-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package corrosion or radionuclide transport.

  7. Abstract conceptual feature ratings: the role of emotion, magnitude, and other cognitive domains in the organization of abstract conceptual knowledge.

    PubMed

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Troche, Joshua; Reilly, Jamie; Ridgway, Gerard R

    2013-01-01

    This study harnessed control ratings of the contribution of different types of information (sensation, action, emotion, thought, social interaction, morality, time, space, quantity, and polarity) to 400 individual abstract and concrete verbal concepts. These abstract conceptual feature (ACF) ratings were used to generate a high dimensional semantic space, from which Euclidean distance measurements between individual concepts were extracted as a metric of the semantic relatedness of those words. The validity of these distances as a marker of semantic relatedness was then tested by evaluating whether they could predict the comprehension performance of a patient with global aphasia on two verbal comprehension tasks. It was hypothesized that if the high-dimensional space generated from ACF control ratings approximates the organization of abstract conceptual space, then words separated by small distances should be more semantically related than words separated by greater distances, and should therefore be more difficult to distinguish for the comprehension-impaired patient, SKO. SKO was significantly worse at identifying targets presented within word pairs with low ACF distances. Response accuracy was not predicted by Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) cosines, any of the individual feature ratings, or any of the background variables. It is argued that this novel rating procedure provides a window on the semantic attributes of individual abstract concepts, and that multiple cognitive systems may influence the acquisition and organization of abstract conceptual knowledge. More broadly, it is suggested that cognitive models of abstract conceptual knowledge must account for the representation not only of the relationships between abstract concepts but also of the attributes which constitute those individual concepts.

  8. Analysis of complex networks using aggressive abstraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Colbaugh, Richard; Glass, Kristin.; Willard, Gerald

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a new methodology for analyzing complex networks in which the network of interest is first abstracted to a much simpler (but equivalent) representation, the required analysis is performed using the abstraction, and analytic conclusions are then mapped back to the original network and interpreted there. We begin by identifying a broad and important class of complex networks which admit abstractions that are simultaneously dramatically simplifying and property preserving we call these aggressive abstractions -- and which can therefore be analyzed using the proposed approach. We then introduce and develop two forms of aggressive abstraction: 1.) finite state abstraction, in which dynamical networks with uncountable state spaces are modeled using finite state systems, and 2.) onedimensional abstraction, whereby high dimensional network dynamics are captured in a meaningful way using a single scalar variable. In each case, the property preserving nature of the abstraction process is rigorously established and efficient algorithms are presented for computing the abstraction. The considerable potential of the proposed approach to complex networks analysis is illustrated through case studies involving vulnerability analysis of technological networks and predictive analysis for social processes.

  9. Disruptive camouflage tricks the human eye: a study of detection times of two near-similar targets in natural backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selj, Gorm K.

    2015-10-01

    Our understanding of camouflage, in military as well as in evolutionary perspectives, has been developing over the last 100 years. In that period of time several underlying principles have emerged. It has turned out in the recent decade that background pattern matching alone may not be sufficient to conceal targets because of the ubiquitous and revealing information contained by the edges of a target. In this paper we have studied one concealment strategy, the so-called disruptive coloration, further as it predicts that high contrast patches placed at the target's outline will impede detection, by creating false target edges when exposed to the observer. Such disruptive coloration is contra-intuitive as it may impede detection in spite of the fact that the patches themselves may be poorly concealed. In military environments the "disruptive approach" within camouflage has been textbook material for decades. Still, very little has been reported, supporting this idea, especially when it comes to the concealment of human targets in natural sceneries. We report here experimental evidence from a field study, containing detection data from 12 unique natural scenes (5 testing the disruptive effect, 7 as reference tests), with both human targets and human observers, showing that disruptively colored camouflage patches along a human's outline (its head) may increase detection time significantly as when compared to a similar (human) target concealed only with background matching. Hence, our results support the idea that disruptive coloration may impede detection and similarly that the best concealment is achieved when disruptive coloration is added to a target that matches the background (reasonably) well. This study raises important question to the current understanding of human vision and concealment as well as to any approach to describe the human visual system mathematically.

  10. Background Pressure Effects on Krypton Hall Effect Thruster Internal Acceleration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Technical Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) August 2013- September 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Background Pressure Effects on Krypton Hall Effect...Conference 2013, Washington, D.C., 6-10 October 2013. 14. ABSTRACT This study uses krypton propellant in a medium power Hall effect to amplify the...effect of background pressure due to the greater mobility of neutral krypton compared to neutral xenon. The use of krypton amplifies the effect of

  11. Theoretical investigation of the hydrogen abstraction reaction of the OH radical with CH2FCH2F (HFC-152): a dual-level direct dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Taghikhani, Mahdi; Parsafar, G A

    2007-08-23

    The hydrogen abstraction reaction of the OH radical with CH(2)FCH(2)F (HFC-152) is studied theoretically over the 150-3000 K temperature range. In this study, the two most recently developed hybrid density functional theories, namely, BB1K and MPWB1K, are applied, and their efficiency in reaction dynamics calculation is discussed. The BB1K/6-31+G(d,p) method gives the best result for the potential energy surface (PES) calculations, including barrier heights, reaction path information (the first and second derivatives of PES), geometry of transition state structures, and even weak hydrogen bond orientations. The rate constants were obtained by the dual-level direct dynamics with the interpolated single-point energy method (VTST-ISPE) using the BB1K/MG3S//BB1K/6-31+G(d,p) quantum model. The canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) with the small-curvature tunneling correction methods are used to calculate the rate constants in comparison to the experimental data. The total rate constant and its temperature dependency in the form of a fitted three-parameter Arrhenius expression is k(T) = 5.4 x 10(-13)(T/298)3.13 exp{-322/T} cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1). A significant variational effect, which is not common generally for hydrogen-transfer reactions, is reported and analyzed.

  12. ACHESS – The Australian study of child health in same-sex families: background research, design and methodology

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are an increasing number of children in Australia growing up with same-sex attracted parents. Although children from same-sex parent families do in general perform well on many psychosocial measures recent research is beginning to consider some small but significant differences when these children are compared with children from other family backgrounds. In particular studies suggest that there is an association between the stigma that same-sex parent families experience and child wellbeing. Research to date lacks a holistic view with the complete physical, mental and social wellbeing of children not yet addressed. In addition, most studies have focused only on families with lesbian parents and have studied only small numbers of children. Methods/design The Australian Study of Child Health in Same-Sex Families (ACHESS) is a national study that aims to determine the complete physical, mental and social wellbeing of Australian children under the age 18 years with at least one parent who self identifies as being same-sex attracted. There will be a particular focus on the impact that stigma and discrimination has on these families. Parent and child surveys will be used to collect data and will be available both online and in paper form. Measures have been chosen whenever possible that have sound conceptual underpinnings, robust psychometric properties and Australian normative data, and include the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ), the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10). Discussion ACHESS aims to be the largest study of its kind and will for the first time produce a detailed quantitative analysis of Australian children with same-sex attracted parents. By inviting participants to take part in further research it will also establish a valuable cohort of children, and their families, to launch future waves of research that will help us better understand the health and wellbeing of children

  13. Detectable change of lung nodule volume with CT in a phantom study with high and low signal to background contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrielides, Marios A.; Li, Qin; Zeng, Rongping; Gong, Qi; Myers, Kyle; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    In previous work we developed a method for predicting the minimum detectable change (MDC) in nodule volume based on volumetric CT measurements. MDC was defined as the minimum increase/decrease in a nodule volume distinguishable from the baseline measurement at a specified level of detection performance, assessed using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). In this work we derived volume estimates of a set of synthetic nodules and calculated the detection performance for distinguishing them from baseline measurements. Eight spherical objects of 100HU radio density ranging in diameter from 5.0mm to 5.75mm and 8.0mm to 8.75mm with 0.25mm increments were placed in an anthropomorphic phantom with either no background (high-contrast task) or gelatin background (low-contrast task). The baseline was defined as 5.0mm for the first set of nodules and 8.0mm for the second set. The phantom was scanned using varying exposures, and reconstructed with slice thickness of 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0mm and two reconstruction kernels (standard and smooth). Volume measurements were derived using a previously developed matched- filter approach. Results showed that nodule size, slice thickness, and nodule-to-background contrast affected detectable change in nodule volume when using our volume estimator and the acquisition settings from our study. We also compared our experimental results to the values estimated by our previously-developed MDC prediction method. We found that experimental data for the 8mm baseline nodules matched very well with our predicted values of MDC. These results support considering the use of this metric when standardizing imaging protocols for lung nodule size change assessment.

  14. Perceptions and employment intentions among aged care nurses and nursing assistants from diverse cultural backgrounds: A qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fengsong; Tilse, Cheryl; Wilson, Jill; Tuckett, Anthony; Newcombe, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The residential aged care industry faces shortages and high turnover rates of direct care workers. This situation is further complicated by the increasing cultural diversity of residents and staff. To retain direct care workers, it is crucial to explore their perceptions of the rewards and difficulties of care work, and their employment intentions in multicultural environments. A qualitative descriptive study was used to understand perceptions of the rewards and difficulties of residential aged care work for core direct care workers (i.e. nurses and nursing assistants), how these were related to their intentions to stay or leave, and how these varied between nurses and nursing assistants, and between locally and overseas born workers. Individual interviews were conducted between June and September 2013 with 16 direct care workers in an Australian residential aged care facility with a specific focus on people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. It was found that direct care workers' employment intentions were related to their perceptions and management of the rewards and difficulties of care work. Their experiences of care work, the employment characteristics, and the organizational resources that fitted their personality, ability, expectations, and essential needs were viewed as rewards. Evaluating their jobs as meaningful was a shared perception for direct care workers who intended to stay. Individual workers' perceptions of the rewarding aspects of care work served to counterbalance the challenges of care work, and promoted their intentions to stay. Perceptions and employment intentions varied by occupational groups and by cultural backgrounds. Overseas born direct care workers are valuable resources in residential aged care facility rather than a limitation, but they do require organizational support, such as cultural awareness of the management, English language support, a sense of family, and appropriate job responsibility. The findings

  15. Using abstract language signals power.

    PubMed

    Wakslak, Cheryl J; Smith, Pamela K; Han, Albert

    2014-07-01

    Power can be gained through appearances: People who exhibit behavioral signals of power are often treated in a way that allows them to actually achieve such power (Ridgeway, Berger, & Smith, 1985; Smith & Galinsky, 2010). In the current article, we examine power signals within interpersonal communication, exploring whether use of concrete versus abstract language is seen as a signal of power. Because power activates abstraction (e.g., Smith & Trope, 2006), perceivers may expect higher power individuals to speak more abstractly and therefore will infer that speakers who use more abstract language have a higher degree of power. Across a variety of contexts and conversational subjects in 7 experiments, participants perceived respondents as more powerful when they used more abstract language (vs. more concrete language). Abstract language use appears to affect perceived power because it seems to reflect both a willingness to judge and a general style of abstract thinking.

  16. Research Abstracts of 1974.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    mutans SL-1 under various culture conditions; Prevalence and localization of Streptococcus mutans in infants and children; Inherited skeletal disorder in...the albino rat; Attempted interference with intrafamily transmission of Streptococcus mutans in monkeys; Effect of SnF2, dental floss treatment on...prevalence of Streptococcus mutans ; Infrared spectroscopic studies of glucans from cariogenic Streptococci; Proton magnetic resonance studies of

  17. Assessment of Prevalence, Beliefs, and Habits of Hookah Smoking Among People with a Medical Background Compared to People with a Non-medical Background: A Cross-sectional Self-administered Questionnaire-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ashna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hookah smoking has seen a reemergence in popularity in the last 30 years, particularly in the young urban population. This study aimed to compare the prevalence of and the attitude and beliefs about hookah smoking of people with a medical background and compare it with people from a non-medical background. Materials and methods: An anonymous questionnaire with ten questions about various aspects of hookah smoking was formulated using Google forms®, which was then circulated via Facebook®, Whatsapp® and emails to the intended participants and all responses were recorded and analyzed. Results: The total number of respondents were 470. The number of respondents with a medical background was 45.31%. The percentage of the respondents with a medical background who smoked a hookah was 28.63%, while the same percentage of the respondents with a non-medical background was 63.42. The perception of hookah being less harmful than a cigarette was not found to be statistically different between the two groups. Respondents with a medical background were more ignorant of the presence or absence of tobacco in the hookah they smoked. The average duration of the hookah smoking habit, the frequency of its use per month, and the average lengths of the hookah smoking session were 3.52 years (95% CI of 3.21 to 3.82), 1.946 (95% CI 1.799 to 2.093), and 58.90 minutes (95% CI of 54.42 to 63.37), respectively. Conclusion: The knowledge about the ill effects of smokeless tobacco should be integrated into the structured teaching curriculum of undergraduate medical and dental courses as they prepare future physicians and dental surgeons for an anti-tobacco campaign. PMID:27660734

  18. Anthropometry. A Bibliography with Abstracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    GeneralIy Recognized as Safe) Food Ingredients (253) April 75 Medical Entomology . Vol. 2. 1970-1975 (192) 1970-Jan 1975...Medical Entomology . Vol.1.1964-1969 (157) 1964-1969 NTIS/PS-75/380 Food Packaging and Storage (187) 1970-Apr 75 NTIS/PS-75/A60...Jan 75 Forensic Medicine (39) Jan 75 Historical Background Studies of the National Service (168) Jan 75 Ado Iescents Park

  19. Innovation Abstracts, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, Suanne D., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document is a series of short papers (47) on topics of interest to community college instructors and practitioners. The topics covered in the papers include: study and writing tips for students, teaching strategies and tips, descriptions of innovative programs, using technology in teaching and learning, interacting with students, and…

  20. Front Range Report, Abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, William

    The second regional conference of the Front Range Branch, AGU, was attended by more than 80 professionals and some 20 outstanding high school students. The conference included 2 days of interdisciplinary talks, and lots of discussion, that primarily were keyed to geophysical studies of Colorado, Wyoming, and New Mexico. Other talks reported on nonregional, and sometimes global, studies being done by geophypsicists of the Front Range region.Topics included tectonics of the Front Range and the Colorado Plateau, pollution of the Arkansas and Mississippi rivers, and a supreme polluting event that caused the late-Cretaceous extinctions. Other notable talks were on toxic cleanup, microburst (wind shear) detection at U.S. airports, and other meteorological studies. Several talks treated the audience to the excitement of new work and surprise discoveries. The meeting was multimedia, including the playing of two videos through a projection TV and the playing of a fascinating tape between an airport control tower and incoming pilots during a severe microburst event.

  1. DOE Ofice of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Systems studies plan, fiscal years 1991 and 1992. [Appendix lists system studies with respective abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, T W; Haffner, D R; Fletcher, J F

    1991-08-01

    The Systems Engineering Management Plan for the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, which defines the systems engineering process for the Federal Radioactive Waste System (FWMS), requires that systems studies to support the integration, evaluation, and optimization of the system be identified. These studies are generally directed toward further defining system or system-element functional requirements, including interface requirements, evaluating alternative system configurations or operational rules, or optimizing design features to achieve system integration. Because the decisions based on these studies are conducted within the overall configuration management process, a consistent and documented framework for the identification and conduct of systems studies must be available. A planned approach is needed so that results from defensible and referenceable systems analyses are available to make informed decisions in a timely manner. This Plan covers top level'' studies (i.e., those involving system requirements generally and the definition of requirements for system elements). This Plan is focused on the FY 1991 and 1992 period, and will be updated periodically as required to ensure its currency. Proposed systems studies for FY 1991 and 1992, their recommended timing, and their relations to one another, current studies, and major program milestones are identified. In general, only those studies supporting monitored retrievable storage (MRS) design requirements are recommended for immediate initiation. The studies are grouped into five major decision groups to allow scheduling to support specific decision windows. The proposed system studies schedule is generally a conservative one, with studies occurring early in or before the associated decision window. These proposed studies are described in this Plan. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Direct ab initio dynamics studies of the hydrogen abstraction reactions of hydrogen atom with n-propyl radical and isopropyl radical.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian Shu; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Shaowen

    2005-02-01

    The kinetics of the hydrogen abstraction reactions of hydrogen atom with n-propyl radical and isopropyl radical were studied using the direct ab initio dynamics approach. BHandHLYP/cc-pVDZ method was employed to optimize the geometries of stationary points as well as the points on the minimum energy path (MEP). The energies of all the points for the two reactions were further refined at the QCISD(T)/cc-pVTZ level of theory. No barrier was found at the QCISD(T)/cc-pVTZ//BHandHLYP/cc-pVDZ level of theory for both reactions. The forward and reverse rate constants were evaluated with both canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) and microcanonical variational transition state theory (mu VT) in the temperature range of 300-2,500 K. The fitted three-parameter Arrhenius expression of the calculated CVT rate constants at the QCISD(T)/cc-pVTZ//BHandHLYP/cc-pVDZ level of theory are k(CVT) (n-C3H7) = 1.68 x 10(-14) T(0.84) e((319.5/T)) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) and k(CVT) (iso-C3H7)=4.99 x 10(-14) T(0.90) e((159.5/T)) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) for reactions of n-C3H7 + H and iso-C3H7 + H, respectively, which are in good agreement with available literature data. The variational effects were analysed.

  3. Direct ab initio dynamics studies on the hydrogen-abstraction reactions of OH radicals with HOX (X = F, Cl, and Br).

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Jing-Yao; Li, Ze-Sheng; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2004-03-01

    The hydrogen abstract reactions of OH radicals with HOF (R1), HOCl (R2), and HOBr (R3) have been studied systematically by a dual-level direct-dynamics method. The geometries and frequencies of all the stationary points are optimized at the MP2/6-311+G(2d, 2p) level of theory. A hydrogen-bonded complex is located at the product channel for the OH + HOBr reaction. To improve the energetics information along the minimum energy path (MEP), single-point energy calculations are carried out at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df, 3pd) level of theory. Interpolated single-point energy (ISPE) method is employed to correct the energy profiles for the three reactions. It is found that neither the barrier heights (DeltaE) nor the H-O bond dissociation energies [D(H-O)] exhibit any clear-cut linear correlations with the halogen electronegative. The decrease of DeltaE and D(H-O) for the three reactions are in order of HOF > HOBr > HOCl. Rate constants for each reaction are calculated by canonical variational transition-state theory (CVT) with a small-curvature tunneling correction (SCT) within 200-2000 K. The agreement of the rate constants with available experimental values for reactions R2 and R3 at 298 K is good. Our results show that the variational effect is small while the tunneling correction has an important contribution in the calculation of rate constants in the low-temperature range. Due to the lack of the kinetic data of these reactions, the present theoretical results are expected to be useful and reasonable to estimate the dynamical properties of these reactions over a wide temperature range where no experimental value is available.

  4. Abstract Spatial Reasoning as an Autistic Strength

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Jennifer L.; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2013-01-01

    Autistic individuals typically excel on spatial tests that measure abstract reasoning, such as the Block Design subtest on intelligence test batteries and the Raven’s Progressive Matrices nonverbal test of intelligence. Such well-replicated findings suggest that abstract spatial processing is a relative and perhaps absolute strength of autistic individuals. However, previous studies have not systematically varied reasoning level – concrete vs. abstract – and test domain – spatial vs. numerical vs. verbal, which the current study did. Autistic participants (N = 72) and non-autistic participants (N = 72) completed a battery of 12 tests that varied by reasoning level (concrete vs. abstract) and domain (spatial vs. numerical vs. verbal). Autistic participants outperformed non-autistic participants on abstract spatial tests. Non-autistic participants did not outperform autistic participants on any of the three domains (spatial, numerical, and verbal) or at either of the two reasoning levels (concrete and abstract), suggesting similarity in abilities between autistic and non-autistic individuals, with abstract spatial reasoning as an autistic strength. PMID:23533615

  5. Mechanical Engineering Department technical abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, R.M.

    1982-07-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department publishes listings of technical abstracts twice a year to inform readers of the broad range of technical activities in the Department, and to promote an exchange of ideas. Details of the work covered by an abstract may be obtained by contacting the author(s). Overall information about current activities of each of the Department's seven divisions precedes the technical abstracts.

  6. Study of the Kroll-process to produce ultra-pure Ti for the low background experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mozhevitina, Elena; Chepurnov, Alexander; Chub, Alexander; Avetissov, Igor; Glebovsky, Vadim; Nisi, Stefano; Di Vacri, Maria Laura; Suvorov, Yury

    2015-08-17

    To construct G2 & G3 low background experiments for direct Dark Matter search, a lot of ultra-pure construction materials will be needed. Our study of various Ti samples shows that the levels of contaminations of commercially available industrial Ti can varies from 0.2 to 100 mBq/kg for U/Th. It means that the metal Ti is such a promising material for future experiments if the way of production in bulk quantities with very low level of contaminations (below ∼1 mBq/kg of {sup 238}U /{sup 232}Th) would be developed. Our study of the industrial Kroll-process is focused on the possible sources of U and Th and their migration during the multistage Kroll process. To understand migration of U and Th during the Kroll process the set of other impurities available due to precise ICP-MS analysis have been studied. Preliminary results confirm that the Kroll process could be used for the ultra pure Ti sponge production while the following stages of the metal Ti production of from the Ti sponge with necessary mechanical properties need to be additionally studied.

  7. Long-term ELF background noise measurements, the existence of window regions, and applications to earthquake precursor emission studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dea, Jack Y.; Hansen, Peder M.; Boerner, Wolfgang-M.

    1993-04-01

    A Low Frequency Monitoring Network has been under development at Naval Command, Control and Ocean Surveillance Center (NCCOSC), Research, Development, Test and Evaluation Division (RDT & E), San Diego, CA, for the last 2 years. Originally developed to monitor space vehicle induced signatures in the 5-12 Hz region, the network now includes monitoring of anomolous broadband signals in the 0.1-20 Hz region that often precede the occurrence of nearby earthquakes. Observations of such events have led to a hypothesis that geological signals are normally present in the ULF (ultra-low frequency, less than 3 Hz) and ELF (extremely low frequency, 3-3000 Hz) bands in addition to the generally accepted signals from micropulsations and lightning discharges. In Southern California, the geological signals are best observed in the 'polarimetric window' regions of (i) 2-5 Hz using horizontally oriented magnetic sensors and, (ii) 2-20 Hz using vertically oriented magnetic sensors. To determine the significance of anomalous events, we conducted a statistical study of the background noise levels. Observations of daily records over a span of several months indicated that the background level in the 1-20 Hz region is stationary. Stationarity is not true below 1 Hz. The APD (amplitude probability density) of 2-12 Hz signals was found to be surprisingly close to a Gaussian distribution. These two results indicated that a determination of long-term averages and variances would be meaningful. Long-term averages and variances were obtained and were used to develop alert-level criteria. Typical deviations over the course of several hours are 1 to 2 dB. The alert-level criteria are used as input parameters in our Automated Monitoring System (AMS), a computerized monitoring and real-time analysis system. The alert levels warn the operator when unusual events are occurring. High alert-levels in conjunction with the fulfilment of several other conditions often presage the occurrence of an

  8. Replace with abstract title

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Tracey; Sato, Yu; Chiang, Shirley; Hochstrasser, Michael; Tobin, Jim; Giacomo, Jason; Shine, Jacob; Zhu, Xiangdong; Land, Donald; Arena, Dario; Morton, Simon; Waddill, George

    2002-03-01

    We are studying layer-by-layer synthesis of ultra-thin metal films by controlling at the monolayer level the composition and structure of these films, including the interfacial region. We have prepared Fe_xNi_1-x multilayers using simultaneous evaporation of pure Fe and Ni on Cu(111) in order to better understand the Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) effect in FeNi/Cu systems that are relevant to magnetic disk drive heads. Using Undulator Beamline 7.0 and the Spin Spectroscopy Facility (7.0.1.2) at the ALS, we have measured X-ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism (XMLD) signals for twenty three different thin Fe-Ni alloys films on Cu(111) for different thicknesses and with Fe concentration ranging from 9% to 84%. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) with 1250 eV photon energy was utilized to determine both thickness and elemental composition. The Fe3p and Ni3p lines were measured for magnetization up and down, and the difference is the XMLD signal. Our XMLD spectra clearly indicate that samples of specific thicknesses and Fe concentrations are ferromagnetic. XMLD has previously been used to characterize Fe_xNi_1-x alloy fcc multilayers on Cu(100) .

  9. PS2-06: Best Practices for Advancing Multi-site Chart Abstraction Research

    PubMed Central

    Blick, Noelle; Cole, Deanna; King, Colleen; Riordan, Rick; Von Worley, Ann; Yarbro, Patty

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Multi-site chart abstraction studies are becoming increasingly common within the HMORN. Differences in systems among HMORN sites can pose significant obstacles to the success of these studies. It is therefore crucial to standardize abstraction activities by following best practices for multi-site chart abstraction, as consistency of processes across sites will increase efficiencies and enhance data quality. Methods Over the past few months the authors have been meeting to identify obstacles to multi-site chart abstraction and to address ways in which multi-site chart abstraction processes can be systemized and standardized. The aim of this workgroup is to create a best practice guide for multi-site chart abstraction studies. Focus areas include: abstractor training, format for chart abstraction (database, paper, etc), data quality, redaction, mechanism for transferring data, site specific access to medical records, IRB/HIPAA concerns, and budgetary issues. Results The results of the workgroup’s efforts (the best practice guide) will be presented by a panel of experts at the 2012 HMORN conference. The presentation format will also focus on discussion among attendees to elicit further input and to identify areas that need to be further addressed. Subsequently, the best practice guide will be posted on the HMORN website. Discussion The best practice guide for multi-site chart abstraction studies will establish sound guidelines and serve as an aid to researchers embarking on multi-site chart abstraction studies. Efficiencies and data quality will be further enhanced with standardized multi-site chart abstraction practices.

  10. Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The increasing scale-up of fast pyrolysis in North America and Europe, as well as the exploration and expansion of markets for the energy use of biocrude oils that now needs to take place, suggested that it was timely to convene an international meeting on the properties and combustion behavior of these oils. A common understanding of the state-of-the-art and technical and other challenges which need to be met during the commercialization of biocrude fuel use, can be achieved. The technical issues and understanding of combustion of these oils are rapidly being advanced through R&D in the United States, Canada, Europe and Scandinavia. It is obvious that for the maximum economic impact of biocrude, it will be necessary to have a common set of specifications so that oils can be used interchangeably with engines and combustors which require minimal modification to use these renewable fuels. Fundamental and applied studies being pursued in several countries are brought together in this workshop so that we can arrive at common strategies. In this way, both the science and the commercialization are advanced to the benefit of all, without detracting from the competitive development of both the technology and its applications. This United States-Canada-Finland collaboration has led to the two and one half day specialists meeting at which the technical basis for advances in biocrude development is discussed. The goal is to arrive at a common agenda on issues that cross national boundaries in this area. Examples of agenda items are combustion phenomena, the behavior of trace components . of the oil (N, alkali metals), the formation of NO{sub x}, in combustion, the need for common standards and environmental safety and health issues in the handling, storage and transportation of biocrudes.

  11. Writing a research abstract: eloquence in miniature.

    PubMed

    Papanas, N; Georgiadis, G S; Maltezos, E; Lazarides, M K

    2012-06-01

    Abstracts are summaries, usually of a full article or conference presentation, and may be classified into structured and unstructured ones. The former have a predefined layout necessitating the use of headings. Most journals and conferences now use the structured abstract format. Research abstracts are increasingly vital for scientific communication and are expected to continue playing a key role for the dissemination of medicine in the near future. Abstracts take time and need meticulous preparation. They must aptly summarise the content of the study or presentation and avoid vague statements and poor style. Moreover, they must comply with provided instructions. Finally, they should be pleasant to read and encourage study of the corresponding full work.

  12. Leadership Abstracts; Volume 4, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doucette, Don, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    "Leadership Abstracts" is published bimonthly and distributed to the chief executive officer of every two-year college in the United States and Canada. This document consists of the 15 one-page abstracts published in 1991. Addressing a variety of topics of interest to the community college administrators, this volume includes: (1) "Delivering the…

  13. Innovation Abstracts, Volume XV, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, Suanne D., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This volume of 30 one- to two-page abstracts from 1993 highlights a variety of innovative approaches to teaching and learning in the community college. Topics covered in the abstracts include: (1) role-playing to encourage critical thinking; (2) team learning techniques to cultivate business skills; (3) librarian-instructor partnerships to create…

  14. An ab initio/rice--Ramsperger--Kassel--Marcus study of the reactions of propenols with OH. Mechanism and kinetics of H abstraction channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Mebel, Alexander M; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2009-10-08

    Propenols have been found to be common intermediates in the hydrocarbon combustion and they are present in substantial concentrations in a wide range of flames. However, the kinetics properties of these species in combustion flames have not received much attention. In this work, the mechanism and kinetics of the OH hydrogen abstraction from propenols are investigated. Three stable conformations of propenols, (E)-1-propenol, (Z)-1-propenol, and syn-propen-2-ol, are taken into consideration. The potential energy profiles for the three reaction systems have been first investigated by the CCSD(T) method. The geometric parameters and relative energies of the reactants, reactant complexes, transition states, product complexes, and products have been investigated theoretically. The rate constants are calculated in the temperature range of 200-3000 K by the Variflex code based on the weak collision master equation/microcanonical variational RRKM theory. For all considered reactions, our results support a stepwise mechanism involving the formation of a reactant complex in the entrance channel and a product complex in the exit channel. In the reaction of OH with (E)-1-propenol, the hydrogen abstractions from the -CH(3) and -OH sites are dominant and competitive with each other in the temperature range from 500 to 2000 K. Above 2000 K, the hydrogen abstraction from the -CH group bonded to O atom becomes dominant with a relative yield of 51.1% at 3000 K. In the reaction of OH with (Z)-1-propenol, the hydrogen abstractions from -CH(3), -CH bonded to O atom, and -OH are preferable in the temperature range from 500 to 1800 K, with the first two channels being competitive with each other. Above 1800 K, the hydrogen abstraction reaction from the CH group bonded to the CH(3) group becomes dominant with the branching ratio of 90.3% at 3000 K. In the reaction of OH with syn-propen-2-ol, the abstractions from the -CH(3) and -OH sites are competitive with each other when the temperature

  15. [Genetic background in common forms of obesity - from studies on identical twins to candidate genes of obesity].

    PubMed

    Bendlová, Běla; Lukášová, Petra; Vaňková, Markéta; Vejražková, Daniela; Bradnová, Olga; Včelák, Josef; Stanická, Soňa; Zamrazilová, Hana; Aldhoon-Hainerová, Irena; Dušátková, Lenka; Kunešová, Marie; Hainer, Vojtěch

    2014-01-01

    Common obesity is a result of interaction between genes and environmental/lifestyle factors, with heritability estimates 40-70%. Not only the susceptibility to obesity but also the success of weight management depends on the genetic background of each individual. This paper summarizes the up-to-date knowledge on genetic causes of common obesities. Introduction of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) led to an identification of a total of 32 variants associated with obesity/BMI and 14 with body fat distribution. Further, a great progress in revealing the mechanisms regulating the energy balance was also noted. However, the proportion of explained variance for BMI is still low, suggesting other mechanisms such as gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, rare gene variants, copy number variants polymorphisms, or epigenetic modifications and microRNAs regulating gene transcription. In summary, we present results of our studies on obesity risk variants in Czech adults, children and adolescents including those evaluating the influence of selected gene variants on the outcomes of weight management.

  16. Technical abstracts: Mechanical engineering, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Broesius, J.Y.

    1991-03-01

    This document is a compilation of the published, unclassified abstracts produced by mechanical engineers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during the calendar year 1990. Many abstracts summarize work completed and published in report form. These are UCRL-JC series documents, which include the full text of articles to be published in journals and of papers to be presented at meetings, and UCID reports, which are informal documents. Not all UCIDs contain abstracts: short summaries were generated when abstracts were not included. Technical Abstracts also provides descriptions of those documents assigned to the UCRL-MI (miscellaneous) category. These are generally viewgraphs or photographs presented at meetings. An author index is provided at the back of this volume for cross referencing.

  17. Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsegian, V. L., Ed.

    1972-01-01

    Includes summaries of six articles dealing with engineering education, population management, blood sampling, international pollution control, environmental quality index, and scientific phases in political science. (CC)

  18. Cesarean section and increased body mass index in school children: two cohort studies from distinct socioeconomic background areas in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have raised controversy regarding the association between cesarean section and later obesity in the offspring. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of cesarean section with increased body mass index (BMI) and obesity in school children from two Brazilian cities with distinct socioeconomic backgrounds. Methods Two birth cohorts respectively born in 1994 in Ribeirao Preto, a wealthy city in Southeast, and in 1997/98 in Sao Luis, a less wealthy city in Northeast of Brasil, were evaluated. After birth, 2,846 pairs of mothers-newborns were evaluated in Ribeirao Preto and 2,542 in Sao Luis. In 2004/05, 790 children aged 10/11 years were randomly reassessed in Ribeirao Preto and 673 at 7/9 years in Sao Luis. Information on type of delivery, maternal and child characteristics, socioeconomic position and anthropometric measurements were collected after birth and at school age. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥ 95th percentile at school age. Results Obesity rate was 13.0% in Ribeirao Preto and 2.1% in Sao Luis. Cesarean section was associated with obesity and remained significant after adjustment only in Ribeirao Preto [OR = 1.74 (95% CI: 1.04; 2.92)]. The association between cesarean section and BMI remained significant after adjustment for maternal schooling, maternal smoking during pregnancy, duration of breastfeeding, gender, birth weight and gestational age, type of school and, only in Sao Luis, pre-pregnancy maternal weight. In Ribeirao Preto children born by cesarean section had BMI 0.31 kg/m2 (95%CI: 0.11; 0.51) higher than those born by vaginal delivery. In Sao Luis BMI of children born by cesarean section was 0.28 kg/m2 higher (95%CI: 0.08; 0.49) than those born by vaginal delivery. Conclusion A positive association between cesarean section and increased BMI z-score was demonstrated in areas with different socioeconomic status in a middle-income country. PMID:23886115

  19. Issues and Methodologies in Large-Scale Assessments. Special Issue 2: Measuring Students' Family Background in Large-Scale International Education Studies. IERI Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brese, Falk; Mirazchiyski, Plamen

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between students' family background and achievement is often seen as an important topic in regard to equality and equity of educational provision. The results of various education studies show that the family background of students correlates with students' academic achievement at school. This paper focuses on the measurement of…

  20. Neurobiological background of negative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Galderisi, Silvana; Merlotti, Eleonora; Mucci, Armida

    2015-10-01

    Studies investigating neurobiological bases of negative symptoms of schizophrenia failed to provide consistent findings, possibly due to the heterogeneity of this psychopathological construct. We tried to review the findings published to date investigating neurobiological abnormalities after reducing the heterogeneity of the negative symptoms construct. The literature in electronic databases as well as citations and major articles are reviewed with respect to the phenomenology, pathology, genetics and neurobiology of schizophrenia. We searched PubMed with the keywords "negative symptoms," "deficit schizophrenia," "persistent negative symptoms," "neurotransmissions," "neuroimaging" and "genetic." Additional articles were identified by manually checking the reference lists of the relevant publications. Publications in English were considered, and unpublished studies, conference abstracts and poster presentations were not included. Structural and functional imaging studies addressed the issue of neurobiological background of negative symptoms from several perspectives (considering them as a unitary construct, focusing on primary and/or persistent negative symptoms and, more recently, clustering them into factors), but produced discrepant findings. The examined studies provided evidence suggesting that even primary and persistent negative symptoms include different psychopathological constructs, probably reflecting the dysfunction of different neurobiological substrates. Furthermore, they suggest that complex alterations in multiple neurotransmitter systems and genetic variants might influence the expression of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. On the whole, the reviewed findings, representing the distillation of a large body of disparate data, suggest that further deconstruction of negative symptomatology into more elementary components is needed to gain insight into underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

  1. Choosing a Database for Social Work: A Comparison of Social Work Abstracts and Social Service Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flatley, Robert K.; Lilla, Rick; Widner, Jack

    2007-01-01

    This study compared Social Work Abstracts and Social Services Abstracts databases in terms of indexing, journal coverage, and searches. The authors interviewed editors, analyzed journal coverage, and compared searches. It was determined that the databases complement one another more than compete. The authors conclude with some considerations.

  2. Violence against the adolescents of Kolkata: A study in relation to the socio-economic background and mental health.

    PubMed

    Deb, Sibnath; Ray, Mrinalkanti; Bhattacharyya, Banhishikha; Sun, Jiandong

    2016-02-01

    This study attempts to understand the nature of violence suffered by the adolescents of Kolkata (erstwhile Calcutta) and to identify its relation with their socio-economic background and mental health variables such as anxiety, adjustment, and self-concept. It is a cross-sectional study covering a total of 370 adolescents (182 boys and 188 girls) from six higher secondary schools in Kolkata. The data was gathered by way of a semi-structured questionnaire and three standard psychological tests. Findings revealed that 52.4%, 25.1%, and 12.7% adolescents suffered psychological, physical, and sexual violence in the last year. Older adolescents (aged 17-18 years) suffered more psychological violence than the younger ones (15-16 years) (p<0.05). Sixty nine (18.6%) adolescent students stood witness to violence between adult members in the family. More than three-fifth (61.9%) adolescents experienced at least one type of violence, while one-third (32.7%) experienced physical or sexual violence or both. Whatever its nature is, violence leaves a scar on the mental health of the victims. Those who have been through regular psychological violence reported high anxiety, emotional adjustment problem, and low self-concept. Sexual abuse left a damaging effect on self-concept (p<0.05), while psychological violence or the witnessing of violence prompted high anxiety scores (p<0.05), poor emotional adjustment (p<0.05), and low self-concept (p<0.05). This study stresses the need to provide individual counselling services to the maltreated adolescents of Kolkata so that their psychological traumas can heal and that they can move on in life with new hopes and dreams.

  3. Contexts as moderators of observed interactions: a study of Costa Rican mothers and infants from differing socioeconomic backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Leyendecker, B; Lamb, M E; Scholmerich, A; Fricke, D M

    1997-03-01

    20 first-born infants from low socioeconomic status (SES) families and 20 first-born infants from middle SES families in Costa Rica were observed for 12 hours when they were 14 weeks old. The goals of this study were the following: 1) to study the impact of length of observation and context on the authors measures of interactional engagement; 2) to compare the interactional experiences of the infants in the two groups in various functional (e.g. feeding, object play) and social (e.g. with mother, with mother and others) contexts. Attuned and disharmonious interactions, as well as the frequency of positive affect, soothing, and vocalization, varied considerably across the functional contexts. In addition, disharmonious interactions increased and interactional engagement decreased when mothers and infants were joined by others. Highly unstable measures of individual differences were obtained when observations were limited to 45-minute blocks, but stability increased considerably as the duration of the observations expanded. The groups did not differ with respect to amounts of time spent in various functional and social contexts, in attuned or disharmonious states, or in high levels of interactional engagement. Within some of the functional contexts, however, significant group differences in levels of attuned interactions, infant vocalization, and maternal response vocalization were found. Overall, functional and social contexts clearly moderated interactional experiences. SES effects on verbal and other interactional measures were limited to some contexts and may thus represent the infants' overall experiences quite poorly. Consequently, comparisons based on a single context may be inadequate for studies of subjects from differing socioeconomic backgrounds.

  4. Simulation studies of muon-produced background events deep underground and consequences for double beta decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massarczyk, Ralph; Majorana Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Cosmic radiation creates a significant background for low count rate experiments. The Majorana demonstrator experiment is located at the Sanford Underground Research Facility at a depth of 4850ft below the surface but it can still be penetrated by cosmic muons with initial energies above the TeV range. The interaction of muons with the rock, the shielding material in the lab and the detector itself can produce showers of secondary particles, like fast neutrons, which are able to travel through shielding material and can produce high-energy γ-rays via capture or inelastic scattering. The energy deposition of these γ rays in the detector can overlap with energy region of interest for the neutrino-less double beta decay. Recent studies for cosmic muons penetrating the Majorana demonstrator are made with the Geant4 code. The results of these simulations will be presented in this talk and an overview of the interaction of the shower particles with the detector, shielding and veto system will be given. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics Program of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program.

  5. Environmental and school influences on physical activity in South Asian children from low socio-economic backgrounds: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Emma Lisa Jane; Duncan, Michael J; Birch, Samantha L; Cox, Val

    2015-09-01

    South Asian (SA) children are less active but have enhanced metabolic risk factors. Physical activity (PA) is a modifiable risk factor for metabolic disease. Evidence suggests that environmental factors and socio-economic status influence PA behaviour. The purpose of this study was to understand PA environments, barriers and facilitators of PA in deprived environments for children from SA backgrounds. Focus groups were conducted with 5 groups of children aged 7-9 years (n = 33; male = 16, female = 17; SA = 17, White = 8 and Black = 8) from two schools in deprived wards of Coventry, England. Thematic analysis was used to identify key themes and subthemes across all transcripts. From the results, emergent themes included school and home environment, outdoor activity, equipment, weather, parental constraints and safety. Ethnic differences were apparent for sources of beliefs and knowledge and religious practice as constraints for PA. The findings suggest that school provides a good foundation for PA attitude, knowledge and behaviour, especially for SA children. To increase PA, multi-component interventions are needed, which focus on changing the home environment (i.e. junk food and media time), encouraging outdoors activity, changing perceptions of safety and weather conditions, which provide parental constraints for children. Interventions also need to be considerate to religious practices that might constrain time.

  6. Estimation of contingency of parameters of human EEG and background infrasonic vibrations of pressure revealed in monitoring studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnik, A. G.; Pobachenko, S. V.; Solov'yov, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    The contingency of variations in parameters of the background infrasonic waves and changes in parameters of human EEG during different time intervals has been revealed with the use of synchronized monitoring. The results suggest that the variations of the background infrasound could be considered an external pacemaker (synchronizing factor). It has been established that there is a significant contingency of changes in a sufficiently wide range of infra- and ultradian periodicities; for different ranges the positive and negative correlations alternate.

  7. Newborn infants perceive abstract numbers.

    PubMed

    Izard, Véronique; Sann, Coralie; Spelke, Elizabeth S; Streri, Arlette

    2009-06-23

    Although infants and animals respond to the approximate number of elements in visual, auditory, and tactile arrays, only human children and adults have been shown to possess abstract numerical representations that apply to entities of all kinds (e.g., 7 samurai, seas, or sins). Do abstract numerical concepts depend on language or culture, or do they form a part of humans' innate, core knowledge? Here we show that newborn infants spontaneously associate stationary, visual-spatial arrays of 4-18 objects with auditory sequences of events on the basis of number. Their performance provides evidence for abstract numerical representations at the start of postnatal experience.

  8. Long-term comparative study of columnar and surface mass concentration aerosol properties in a background environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennouna, Y. S.; Cachorro, V. E.; Mateos, D.; Burgos, M. A.; Toledano, C.; Torres, B.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between columnar and surface aerosol properties is not a straightforward problem. The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (AE), and ground-level Particulate Matter (PMX, x = 10 or 2.5 μm) data have been studied from a climatological point of view. Despite the different meanings of AOD and PMx both are key and complementary quantities that quantify aerosol load in the atmosphere and many studies intend to find specific relationships between them. Related parameters such as AE and PM ratio (PR = PM2.5/PM10), giving information about the predominant particle size, are included in this study on the relationships between columnar and surface aerosol parameters. This study is based on long measurement records (2003-2014) obtained at two nearby background sites from the AERONET and EMEP networks in the north-central area of Spain. The climatological annual cycle of PMx shows two maxima along the year (one in late-winter/early-spring and another in summer), but this cycle is not followed by the AOD which shows only a summer maximum and a nearly bell shape. However, the annual means of both data sets show strong correlation (R = 0.89) and similar decreasing trends of 40% (PM10) and 38% (AOD) for the 12-year record. PM10 and AOD daily data are moderately correlated (R = 0.58), whereas correlation increases for monthly (R = 0.74) and yearly (R = 0.89) means. Scatter plots of AE vs. AOD and PR vs. PM10 have been used to characterize aerosols over the region. The PR vs. AE scatterplot of daily data shows no correlation due to the prevalence of intermediate-sized particles. As day-to-day correlation is low (especially for high turbidity events), a binned analysis was also carried out to establish consistent relationships between columnar and surface quantities, which is considered to be an appropriate approach for environmental and climate studies. In this way the link between surface concentrations and columnar remote sensing data is shown to

  9. Generative electronic background music system

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurowski, Lukasz

    2015-03-10

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions.

  10. A Longitudinal Daily Diary Study of Family Assistance and Academic Achievement among Adolescents from Mexican, Chinese, and European Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telzer, Eva H.; Fuligni, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    A longitudinal daily diary method was employed to examine the implications of family assistance for the academic achievement of 563 adolescents (53% female) from Mexican (n = 217), Chinese (n = 206), and European (n = 140) backgrounds during the high school years (mean age 14.9 years in 9th grade to 17.8 years in 12th grade). Although changes in…

  11. University Transition Challenges for First Year Domestic CALD Students from Refugee Backgrounds: A Case Study from an Australian Regional University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kong, Eric; Harmsworth, Sarah; Rajaeian, Mohammad Mehdi; Parkes, Geoffrey; Bishop, Sue; AlMansouri, Bassim; Lawrence, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) is used broadly and inclusively to describe communities with diverse language, ethnic background, nationality, dress, traditions, food, societal structures, art and religion characteristics. Domestic CALD people are either refugees or voluntary migrants and have obtained permanent residency or…

  12. Laser-ablation-plume thermalization dynamics in background gases studied by time-resolved imaging, spectroscopic, and ion probe diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geohegan, David B.; Puretzky, Alexander A.

    1995-04-01

    A combination of fast plasma diagnostics are utilized to probe the propagation of laser ablation plumes in vacuum and low-pressure background gases in order to understand key gas dynamic processes relevant to film growth by pulsed laser deposition. During expansion into low-pressure background gases, the ion flux in the plasma plume splits into fast and slow components over a limited range of distances and times. This general effect is presented here for the case of yttrium ablation into argon, a single-element target into an inert gas. Time- resolved optical absorption spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy are employed to simultaneously view the populations of both excited and ground states of Y and Y+ for comparison with intensified-CCD photography of the visible plume luminescence and ion flux measurements made with fast ion probes during this phenomenon. These measurements indicate that plume-splitting in background gases is consistent with momentum transfer from an initial, vacuum velocity distribution into a second, slowed velocity distribution initiated by scattering collisions between plume and background gas atoms. The fast distribution is exponentially attenuated in accordance with Beer's law, and the second, slowed distribution coalesces into a stable, propagating shock structure.

  13. Development of Abstract Grammatical Categorization in Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyr, Marilyn; Shi, Rushen

    2013-01-01

    This study examined abstract syntactic categorization in infants, using the case of grammatical gender. Ninety-six French-learning 14-, 17-, 20-, and 30-month-olds completed the study. In a preferential looking procedure infants were tested on their generalized knowledge of grammatical gender involving pseudonouns and gender-marking determiners.…

  14. Hydrogen abstraction reactions of OH radicals with CH₃CH₂CH₂Cl and CH₃CHClCH₃: a mechanistic and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Li, Yanjie; He, Hongqing; Zhang, Jinglai

    2012-01-05

    The hydrogen abstraction reactions of OH radicals with CH₃CH₂CH₂Cl and CH₃CHClCH₃ (R2) have been investigated theoretically by a dual-level direct dynamics method. The optimized geometries and frequencies of the stationary points are calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. To improve the reaction enthalpy and potential barrier of each reaction channel, the single point energy calculation is performed by the BMC-CCSD method. Using canonical variational transition-state theory (CVT) with the small-curvature tunneling correction, the rate constants are evaluated over a wide temperature range of 200-2000 K at the BMC-CCSD//B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. For the reaction channels with the negative barrier heights, the rate constants are calculated by using the CVT. The calculated total rate constants are consistent with available experimental data. The results show that at lower temperatures, the tunneling correction has an important contribution in the calculation of rate constants for all the reaction channels with the positive barrier heights, while the variational effect is found negligible for some reaction channels. For reactions OH radicals with CH₃CH₂CH₂Cl (R1) and CH₃CHClCH₃ (R2), the channels of H-abstraction from -CH₂ - and -CHCl groups are the major reaction channels, respectively, at lower temperatures. With temperature increasing, contributions from other channels should be taken into account. Finally, the total rate constants are fitted by two models, i.e., three-parameter and four-parameter expressions. The enthalpies of formation of the species CH₃CHClCH₂, CH₃CHCH₂Cl, and CH₃CH₂CH₂Cl are evaluated by isodesmic reactions.

  15. A study of the galaxy redshift distribution towards the cosmic microwave background cold spot in the Corona Borealis supercluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génova-Santos, Ricardo; Padilla-Torres, Carmen Pilar; Rubiño Martín, José Alberto; Gutiérrez, Carlos M.; Rebolo, Rafael

    2010-04-01

    We present a study of the spatial and redshift distributions of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies towards the position of CrB-H, a very deep and extended decrement in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), located within the Corona Borealis supercluster (CrB-SC). It was found in a survey with the Very Small Array (VSA) interferometer at 33 GHz, with a peak negative brightness temperature of -230μK, and deviates 4.4σ from the Gaussian CMB (Génova-Santos et al.). Observations with the Millimeter and Infrared Testa Grigia Observatory (MITO) suggested that 25+21-18 per cent of this decrement may be caused by the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect (Battistelli et al.). Here, we investigate whether the galaxy distribution could be tracing either a previously unnoticed galaxy cluster or a warm/hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) filament that could build up this tSZ effect. We find that the projected density of galaxies outside Abell clusters and with redshifts 0.05 < z < 0.12 at the position of CrB-H is the highest in the area encompassed by the CrB-SC. Most of these galaxies are located around redshifts z = 0.07 and 0.11, but no clear connection in the form of a filamentary structure is appreciable in between. While the galaxy distribution at z = 0.07 is sparse, we find evidence at z = 0.11 of a galaxy group or a low-mass galaxy cluster. We estimate that this structure could produce a thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect of ~ -18μK. The remaining VSA signal of ~ -212μK is still a significant 4.1σ deviation from the Gaussian CMB. However, the MITO error bar allows for a larger tSZ effect, which could be produced by galaxy clusters or superclusters beyond the sensitivity of the SDSS. Contributions from other possible secondary anisotropies associated with these structures are also discussed.

  16. Changes in background aerosol composition in Finland during polluted and clean periods studied by TEM/EDX individual particle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, J. V.; Saarikoski, S.; Tervahattu, H.; Mäkelä, T.; Hillamo, R.; Vehkamäki, H.; Sogacheva, L.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-07-01

    Aerosol samples were collected at a rural background site in southern Finland in May 2004. The elemental composition, morphology and mixing state of individual aerosol particles in three size fractions were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalyses. The TEM/EDX results were complemented with the size-segregated bulk chemical measurements of selected ions and organic and elemental carbon. Many of the particles in PM0.2-1 and PM1-3.3 size fractions were strongly internally mixed with S, C and/or N. The major particle types in all PM0.2-1 samples were ammonium sulphates with/without carbon and dark inclusion(s) (number proportion of particles 54-86%), carbon/sulphate mixture with dark inclusions(s) (4-10%), internally mixed soot/sulphate particles (2-22%), soot (0-12%) and K-rich particles with S and/or C (0-9%). During the pollution episode (PM1.6~18 μg m-3, the proportion of Ca-rich particles was very high (26-48%) in the PM1-3.3 and PM3.3-11 samples, while the PM0.2-1 and PM1-3.3 samples contained elevated proportions of silicates (22-33%, also fly ash particles), metal oxides/hydroxides (1-9%) and tar balls (1-4%). These aerosols originated mainly from polluted areas of Eastern Europe, and some open biomass burning smoke was also brought by long-range transport. During the clean period (PM1.6~2 μg m-3, when air masses arrived from the Arctic Ocean, PM1-3.3 samples contained mainly sea salt particles (67-89%) with a variable rate of Cl substitution (mainly by NO3-. During the intermediate period (PM1.6~5 μg m-3, the PM1-3.3 sample contained porous (sponge-like) Na-rich particles (35%) with abundant S, K and O. They might originate from the burning of wood pulp wastes of paper industry. The proportion of biological particles and C-rich fragments (probably also biological origin) were highest in the PM3.3-11 samples (0-81% and 0-22%, respectively). The origin of different particle types and the

  17. Changes in background aerosol composition in Finland during polluted and clean periods studied by TEM/EDX individual particle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, J. V.; Saarikoski, S.; Tervahattu, H.; Mäkelä, T.; Hillamo, R.; Vehkamäki, H.; Sogacheva, L.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-11-01

    Aerosol samples were collected at a rural background site in southern Finland in May 2004 during pollution episode (PM1~16 µg m-3, backward air mass trajectories from south-east), intermediate period (PM1~5 µg m-3, backtrajectories from north-east) and clean period (PM1~2 µg m-3, backtrajectories from north-west/north). The elemental composition, morphology and mixing state of individual aerosol particles in three size fractions were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalyses. The TEM/EDX results were complemented with the size-segregated bulk chemical measurements of selected ions and organic and elemental carbon. Many of the particles in PM0.2-1 and PM1-3.3 size fractions were strongly internally mixed with S, C and/or N. The major particle types in PM0.2-1 samples were 1) soot and 2) (ammonium)sulphates and their mixtures with variable amounts of C, K, soot and/or other inclusions. Number proportions of those two particle groups in PM0.2-1 samples were 0-12% and 83-97%, respectively. During the pollution episode, the proportion of Ca-rich particles was very high (26-48%) in the PM1-3.3 and PM3.3-11 samples, while the PM0.2-1 and PM1-3.3 samples contained elevated proportions of silicates (22-33%), metal oxides/hydroxides (1-9%) and tar balls (1-4%). These aerosols originated mainly from polluted areas of Eastern Europe, and some open biomass burning smoke was also brought by long-range transport. During the clean period, when air masses arrived from the Arctic Ocean, PM1-3.3 samples contained mainly sea salt particles (67-89%) with a variable rate of Cl substitution (mainly by NO3-). During the intermediate period, the PM1-3.3 sample contained porous (sponge-like) Na-rich particles (35%) with abundant S, K and O. They might originate from the burning of wood pulp wastes of paper industry. The proportion of biological particles and C-rich fragments (probably also biological origin) were highest

  18. Mechanical Engineering Department technical abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-07-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department publishes abstracts twice a year to inform readers of the broad range of technical activities in the Department, and to promote an exchange of ideas. Details of the work covered by an abstract may be obtained by contacting the author(s). General information about the current role and activities of each of the Department's seven divisions precedes the technical abstracts. Further information about a division's work may be obtained from the division leader, whose name is given at the end of each divisional summary. The Department's seven divisions are as follows: Nuclear Test Engineering Division, Nuclear Explosives Engineering Division, Weapons Engineering Division, Energy Systems Engineering Division, Engineering Sciences Division, Magnetic Fusion Engineering Division and Materials Fabrication Division.

  19. Abstraction and natural language semantics.

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    According to the traditional view, a word prototypically denotes a class of objects sharing similar features, i.e. it results from an abstraction based on the detection of common properties in perceived entities. I explore here another idea: words result from abstraction of common premises in the rules governing our actions. I first argue that taking 'inference', instead of 'reference', as the basic issue in semantics does matter. I then discuss two phenomena that are, in my opinion, particularly difficult to analyse within the scope of traditional semantic theories: systematic polysemy and plurals. I conclude by a discussion of my approach, and by a summary of its main features. PMID:12903662

  20. Temporal and comparative outcomes of cardiac electrophysiology abstracts.

    PubMed

    Wong, Christopher X; Sun, Michelle T; Cheng, Yi Han; Dang, Jerry; Barlow, David S; Chia, Nicholas H; Wong, Nicole X; Wong, Michelle X; Lau, Dennis H; Brooks, Anthony G; Roberts-Thomson, Kurt C; Sanders, Prashanthan

    2013-07-15

    Although conferences are important vehicles for discussing scientific findings, the translation of presented research into peer-reviewed manuscripts is a crucial subsequent step in the research process. Given the evolving subspecialization of cardiology, we sought to characterize the temporal and comparative outcomes of abstracts presented at a subspecialty cardiac electrophysiology conference. Abstracts presented at the Heart Rhythm Society conference (1994 through 2006; HRS abstracts) and abstracts presented at the American Heart Association conference (2003; AHA abstracts) were studied. Subsequent publications, impact factors, and citation rates were determined. A total of 3,850 HRS and 1,000 AHA abstracts were studied. More human abstracts were presented at HRS than AHA (p <0.05). Compared with HRS abstracts, more AHA abstracts were published (p <0.001) and had higher impact factors and citation rates (p <0.001 for both). These differences were attributable in part to the greater proportion of human HRS abstracts. Compared with HRS abstracts, electrophysiology-related AHA abstracts were published less (p <0.001), and these publications had similar impact factors (p = 0.38) although greater citation rates (p = 0.001). The number and publication rate of HRS abstracts increased over the 15-year period, as did their publication impact factors and citation rates (p <0.001 for all). In conclusion, there are significant differences between AHA and HRS abstracts. Although AHA abstracts were more likely to be published overall, the publication rate and impact of electrophysiology abstracts presented at both a subspecialty (HRS) and a major cardiovascular conference (AHA) were comparable. There has also been a growth in the number and impact of cardiac electrophysiology abstracts presented at HRS in recent years.

  1. Study for collecting background data on Wistar Hannover [Crl:WI(Han)] rats in embryo-fetal development studies--comparative data to Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Noritake, Ken-ichi; Ikeda, Takashi; Ito, Keiichi; Miwa, Yoji; Senuma, Mika; Takashima, Hiromasa; Tateishi, Taishi; Hisada, Shigeru; Maki, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to collect the background data on Wistar Hannover [Crl:WI(Han)] (hereafter Wistar Han) rats in embryo-fetal development studies from the 6 safety research facilities of pharmaceutical companies and contract research organizations. In each facility, 20 or 22 female rats were dosed with vehicle solution during the organogenesis period. As a result, no abnormalities in clinical signs and necropsy findings in dams were found. Body weights and food consumption in dams were lower than those in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. The number of corpora lutea (13.3 vs. 16.0 in SD) and implantations (11.8 vs. 14.7) were fewer, and fetal body weights (3.66 vs. 3.70) and placental weights (0.42 vs. 0.45) tended to be lower than those in SD rats. Regarding the fetal abnormalities, the incidence of several findings such as the persistent left umbilical artery (10.4% vs. 1.1%) and cervical (5.2% vs. 0.4%), full (7.4% vs. 0.9%) or short supernumerary (64.5% vs. 9.9%) and wavy ribs (6.6% vs. 0.3%) was higher than that in SD rats. Our present study showed that they maintained a sufficient number of live fetuses and the difference in the fetal sex ratio was not observed. In conclusion, Wistar Han rats were considered to be a suitable strain for embryo-fetal development toxicity study. Since the incidence of several abnormalities was higher than that in SD rats, it may be said that to accumulate background control data is important to evaluate the embryo-fetal development toxicity study using Wistar Han rats.

  2. Metaphoric Images from Abstract Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vizmuller-Zocco, Jana

    1992-01-01

    Discusses children's use of metaphors to create meaning, using as an example the pragmatic and "scientific" ways in which preschool children explain thunder and lightning to themselves. Argues that children are being shortchanged by modern scientific notions of abstractness and that they should be encouraged to create their own explanations of…

  3. Carry Groups: Abstract Algebra Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Cheryl Chute; Madore, Blair F.

    2004-01-01

    Carry Groups are a wonderful collection of groups to introduce in an undergraduate Abstract Algebra course. These groups are straightforward to define but have interesting structures for students to discover. We describe these groups and give examples of in-class group projects that were developed and used by Miller.

  4. ERGONOMICS ABSTRACTS 48347-48982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Technology, London (England). Warren Spring Lab.

    IN THIS COLLECTION OF ERGONOMICS ABSTRACTS AND ANNOTATIONS THE FOLLOWING AREAS OF CONCERN ARE REPRESENTED--GENERAL REFERENCES, METHODS, FACILITIES, AND EQUIPMENT RELATING TO ERGONOMICS, SYSTEMS OF MAN AND MACHINES, VISUAL, AUDITORY, AND OTHER SENSORY INPUTS AND PROCESSES (INCLUDING SPEECH AND INTELLIGIBILITY), INPUT CHANNELS, BODY MEASUREMENTS,…

  5. Typographic Settings for Structured Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, James

    2000-01-01

    Lists some of the major typographic variables involved in structured abstracts (containing sub-headings). Illustrates how typography can affect clarity by presenting seven examples that illustrate the effects of these typographic variables in practice. Concludes with a final example of an effective approach. (SR)

  6. Handedness Shapes Children's Abstract Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casasanto, Daniel; Henetz, Tania

    2012-01-01

    Can children's handedness influence how they represent abstract concepts like "kindness" and "intelligence"? Here we show that from an early age, right-handers associate rightward space more strongly with positive ideas and leftward space with negative ideas, but the opposite is true for left-handers. In one experiment, children indicated where on…

  7. Innovation Abstracts, Volume XVII, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, Suanne D., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    The abstracts in this volume describe innovative approaches to teaching and learning in the community college. Topics covered include: (1) the use of message mapping for speaking and writing instruction; (2) group projects and portfolios as evaluation tools; (3) helping students become strategic learners; (4) using writing assignments to ensure…

  8. Chemical Abstracts' Document Delivery Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Stephen

    1984-01-01

    The Document Delivery Service offered by Chemical Abstracts is described in terms of the DIALORDER option on the Dialog information retrieval system, mail requests, and requests transmitted through OCLC's Interlibrary Loan system. Transmission costs, success rates, delivery rates, and other considerations in utilizing the service are included.…

  9. Direct dynamics study of hydrogen abstraction using density functional theory: CF3CHFCF3+ O( 3P)→ CF3CFCF3+ OH reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing-Yao; Li, Ze-Sheng; Dai, Zhen-Wen; Huang, Xu-Ri; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2003-01-01

    A dual-level direct dynamics method is employed for the dynamics of the hydrogen abstraction reaction CF3CHFCF3+ O( 3P) using density functional theory with the 6-311G(d, p) and 6-311++G(3df, 2p) (single-point) basis sets. Two DFT methods, B3LYP and B3PW91, produce similar results for the geometries, frequencies, and energetics of the stationary points, in good agreement with the corresponding experimental values. The classical energy profile is corrected with the interpolated single-point energy (ISPE) approach. The variational transition-state calculations are carried out with small curvature tunneling (SCT) at 300-2000 K. Agreement between the theoretical and experimental values is good for the rate constants and activation energy calculated at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df, 2p)//B3LYP/6-311G(d, p) level in the measured temperature range 586-726 K. It is shown that the variational effect is significant for this reaction, and the tunneling effect is small.

  10. Ring-polymer molecular dynamics studies on the rate coefficient of the abstraction channel of hydrogen plus ethane, propane, and dimethyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingyong; Chen, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To accurately compute the rates of the abstraction channels of hydrogen plus ethane (Et), propane (Pr), and dimethyl ether (DME), ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method is used in conjunction with the recently constructed local permutation invariant polynomial neural-networks potential energy surface of the parent H + CH4 system [Q. Meng et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 154312 (2016)]. For H + Et, one of the H atoms in CH4 of the parent system is replaced by a methyl group, while for the H + DME reaction, it is replaced by the methoxyl group. For the H + Pr reaction, replacing one of the H atoms in CH4 by an ethyl group, the terminal channel is built, meanwhile the middle channel is considered through replacing two H atoms in CH4 by two methyl groups. Since the potential energy barriers of the title reactions must differ from the H + CH4 barrier, the corrections have to be made by computing the ratio of free-energy barriers between H + CH4 and the title reactions at coupled cluster with a full treatment singles and doubles (where the triples contribution is calculated by perturbation theory, that is, CCSD(T)) level. Comparing the present RPMD rates with the previous theoretical and experimental results, good agreement can be found. Moreover, probable reasons for the deviation between the present RPMD rates and the previous experimental ones are discussed.

  11. Using Group Explorer in Teaching Abstract Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Claus; Gfeller, Mary; Donohue, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the use of Group Explorer in an undergraduate mathematics course in abstract algebra. The visual nature of Group Explorer in representing concepts in group theory is an attractive incentive to use this software in the classroom. However, little is known about students' perceptions on this technology in learning concepts in…

  12. Adult Education Dissertation Abstracts: 1968-1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Stanley M., Ed.; Loague, Nehume, Ed.

    This bibliography contains citations, abstracts, and ordering information for 303 dissertations pertinent to the education or training of adults. Studies are classified by broad subject headings used in the ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult Education. Each section of the classification is identified by a four-digit number, with a one-, two-, or…

  13. Contextualising Numeracy: Abstract Tools at the Coalface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukin, Annabelle

    1998-01-01

    A social semiotic approach to math is necessary because of the increasing significance of abstract tools in the workplace. A case study from the coal mining industry illustrates the need to recognize mathematics as a socially constructed system and to contextualize math instruction. (SK)

  14. Spectroscopic studies of the parameters of plasma jets during their propagation in the background plasma on the PF-3 facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan’ko, S. A.; Ananyev, S. S.; Kalinin, Yu G.; Krauz, V. I.; Myalton, V. V.

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents measurement results of neon and helium plasma parameters in axial jets generated in plasma focus discharge. They were obtained in the course of experiments on laboratory modeling of astrophysical jets performed at the PF-3 facility. The plasma concentration was determined according to Stark broadening of spectral lines; the ionization temperature was determined by the average ion charge. The values of the concentration and temperature of jet plasma and background plasma at two distances from the pinch are also presented. In addition, an estimation was made of the heat content losses of the neon and helium jets during their movement through the surrounding medium.

  15. EVIDENCE OF FEED CONTAMINATION DUE TO SAMPLE HANDLING AND PREPARATION DURING A MASS BALANCE STUDY OF DIOXINS IN LACTATING COWS IN BACKGROUND CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1997, the United States (US) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a mass balance study of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (CDDs) and dibenzofurans (CDFs) in lactating cows in background conditions. The field portion of the study occurred at the US Department of A...

  16. [Factors influencing the uptake of vaccines by adolescents with migration background. A qualitative study of adolescents, mothers, and physicians].

    PubMed

    Walter, D; Atzpodien, K; Pins, C; Wichmann, O; Reiter, S

    2013-10-01

    One of the special challenges in immunization policy is communication and access to adolescents. To identify barriers and enablers for the immunization of this specific target group, we conducted 11 focus group discussions with adolescents with and without migration background, mothers with Turkish and Russian migration background, and physicians in private practice in March 2011. The results showed that for adolescents, the utilization of immunization was guided by informational and organizational processes in families and by the consulting physician. The low awareness of immunization-related issues that was observed among adolescents is especially challenging, because routine visits to the doctor often stop with the transition from pediatric to adult health care. Immigration-related factors may additionally affect the utilization of immunization services. Besides improving access to information and lowering the barriers to immunization for adolescents in general, culturally sensitive interventions may be a promising approach for improving communication between mothers and the immunizing physician and thereby improving vaccination coverage in the adolescent target group.

  17. High temporal resolution measurements of ozone precursors in a rural background station. A two-year study.

    PubMed

    Navazo, M; Durana, N; Alonso, L; Gómez, M C; García, J A; Ilardia, J L; Gangoiti, G; Iza, J

    2008-01-01

    We present a very complete database of individual non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) measurements with high temporal resolution (hourly) in a rural background atmosphere. We show their use to characterize the biogenic NMHC as well as to identify the transport and impact of anthropogenic NMHC on rural areas. In January 2003 an automatic GC-FID analyzer of volatile organic compounds between 2 and 10 carbon atoms (C2-C10 VOCs) was placed in the centre of the Valderejo Natural Park in northern Iberia (42.87 degrees N, 3.22 degrees W), far away from important cities. The system operated continuously until December 2004. Data coverage was higher than 70% for a total of 59 VOC of both anthropogenic and biogenic origin, with detection limits in the range of pptv. Our results allow for the description of the behaviour of these compounds, in order to identify external impacts arriving to the sampling site which has been recognized to be highly representative of a rural background atmosphere. Biogenic VOC concentrations have been compared also with the calculated emissions, using Guenther's algorithm, and the discrepancies interpreted in terms of the different reactivity of such compounds.

  18. A modeling study of SO(x)-NO(x)-hydrocarbon plumes and their transport to the background troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balko, J. A.; Peters, L. K.

    1983-01-01

    The behavior of a complex urban plume and its transport to the background troposphere are analyzed in terms of a model including sulfur oxide, nitrogen oxide and hydrocarbon (HC) photochemistry. A reaction mechanism consisting of 73 NO(x), SO(x) and HC reactions is employed in a model taking account of plume dilution, entrainment, deposition and the development of a diurnal mixing layer from a ground-based nocturnal inversion. When simulation results are compared with field measurements of the urban plumes leaving St. Louis and Milwaukee, and a power plant within the Milwaukee plume, the predicted concentration profiles of NO(x), SO2 and O3 are found to be in close agreement with the measurement, although agreement with the rate of transformation of SO2 to SO4(2-) is less good. Simulations made for a hypothetical urban location under a range of background concentrations and initial HC concentrations show particulate sulfate concentrations to depend strongly on the HC/NO(x) ratio, indicating that the homogeneous gas-phase transformation may occur at night.

  19. Adopting Abstract Images for Semantic Scene Understanding.

    PubMed

    Zitnick, C Lawrence; Vedantam, Ramakrishna; Parikh, Devi

    2016-04-01

    Relating visual information to its linguistic semantic meaning remains an open and challenging area of research. The semantic meaning of images depends on the presence of objects, their attributes and their relations to other objects. But precisely characterizing this dependence requires extracting complex visual information from an image, which is in general a difficult and yet unsolved problem. In this paper, we propose studying semantic information in abstract images created from collections of clip art. Abstract images provide several advantages over real images. They allow for the direct study of how to infer high-level semantic information, since they remove the reliance on noisy low-level object, attribute and relation detectors, or the tedious hand-labeling of real images. Importantly, abstract images also allow the ability to generate sets of semantically similar scenes. Finding analogous sets of real images that are semantically similar would be nearly impossible. We create 1,002 sets of 10 semantically similar abstract images with corresponding written descriptions. We thoroughly analyze this dataset to discover semantically important features, the relations of words to visual features and methods for measuring semantic similarity. Finally, we study the relation between the saliency and memorability of objects and their semantic importance.

  20. An Abstract Plan Preparation Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Munoz, Cesar A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a new planning language that is more abstract than most existing planning languages such as the Planning Domain Definition Language (PDDL) or the New Domain Description Language (NDDL). The goal of this language is to simplify the formal analysis and specification of planning problems that are intended for safety-critical applications such as power management or automated rendezvous in future manned spacecraft. The new language has been named the Abstract Plan Preparation Language (APPL). A translator from APPL to NDDL has been developed in support of the Spacecraft Autonomy for Vehicles and Habitats Project (SAVH) sponsored by the Explorations Technology Development Program, which is seeking to mature autonomy technology for application to the new Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) that will replace the Space Shuttle.

  1. Object Classification via Planar Abstraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oesau, Sven; Lafarge, Florent; Alliez, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    We present a supervised machine learning approach for classification of objects from sampled point data. The main idea consists in first abstracting the input object into planar parts at several scales, then discriminate between the different classes of objects solely through features derived from these planar shapes. Abstracting into planar shapes provides a means to both reduce the computational complexity and improve robustness to defects inherent to the acquisition process. Measuring statistical properties and relationships between planar shapes offers invariance to scale and orientation. A random forest is then used for solving the multiclass classification problem. We demonstrate the potential of our approach on a set of indoor objects from the Princeton shape benchmark and on objects acquired from indoor scenes and compare the performance of our method with other point-based shape descriptors.

  2. Abstraction Techniques for Parameterized Verification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    difference, consider an example frequently discussed in the history of science, namely the Ptolemaic system in which the planet earth is surrounded by...tend to imagine systems with the human observer in the center. While a Ptolemaic viewpoint is known to be wrong (or, more precisely, infeasible) in...physics, it naturally appears in the systems we construct. Consequently, the Ptolemaic viewpoint yields a natural abstraction principle for computer

  3. Cryogenic foam insulation: Abstracted publications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. R.

    1977-01-01

    A group of documents were chosen and abstracted which contain information on the properties of foam materials and on the use of foams as thermal insulation at cryogenic temperatures. The properties include thermal properties, mechanical properties, and compatibility properties with oxygen and other cryogenic fluids. Uses of foams include applications as thermal insulation for spacecraft propellant tanks, and for liquefied natural gas storage tanks and pipelines.

  4. Study of shock shape and strength as a function of plasma energy using background oriented schlieren and shadowgraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bhavini; Rajendran, Lalit; Giarra, Matthew; Bane, Sally; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2016-11-01

    The formation of a spark is a random, chaotic process. The flow field generated by this spark can be used in flow control and plasma assisted combustion applications. In order to understand the flow field some time after spark discharge (approximately 1 microsecond), it is important to observe the shape and strength of the shockwave immediately following the plasma discharge. It is also important to understand the effect that the energy deposited in the spark gap has on the shock strength and shock shape. We therefore propose a background oriented schlieren (BOS) technique to measure density gradients associated with the spark discharge and hence quantify shock strength. Simultaneous shadowgraph measurements will be used to observe the shape of the shock and compare it with the reconstructed density gradients obtained from BOS measurements.

  5. Deaf persons of asian american, Hispanic american, and african american backgrounds: a study of intraindividual diversity and identity.

    PubMed

    Foster, Susan; Kinuthia, Waithera

    2003-01-01

    This article explores the ways in which deaf college students who are members of minority racial groups think about and describe their identities. In-depth, semistructured interviews with 33 deaf students of Asian American, Hispanic American, and African American background were analyzed for themes regarding the self-reported identities of respondents. Results suggest that each person is a constellation of many parts, some of which are stronger than others but any of which can be drawn out in response to a particular set of circumstances, resulting in a contextual and interactive model of identity. Four factors are described as central to this "intraindividual" model: individual characteristics, situational conditions, social conditions, and societal conditions. Additionally, the model includes a biographical component reflected in changes in identity that occur over time. Findings are discussed as they relate to identity theory. The article is concluded with recommendations for further research, as well as considerations for educators and counselors of deaf minority students.

  6. Diving Deep: A Comparative Study of Educator Undergraduate and Graduate Backgrounds and Their Effect on Student Understanding of Engineering and Engineering Careers, Utilizing an Underwater Robotics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scribner, J. Adam

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that educators having degrees in their subjects significantly enhances student achievement, particularly in secondary mathematics and science (Chaney, 1995; Goe, 2007; Rowan, Chiang, & Miller, 1997; Wenglinsky, 2000). Yet, science teachers in states that adopt the Next Generation Science Standards will be facilitating classroom engineering activities despite the fact that few have backgrounds in engineering. This quantitative study analyzed ex-post facto WaterBotics (an innovative underwater robotics curriculum for middle and high school students) data to determine if educators having backgrounds in engineering (i.e., undergraduate and graduate degrees in engineering) positively affected student learning on two engineering outcomes: 1) the engineering design process, and 2) understanding of careers in engineering (who engineers are and what engineers do). The results indicated that educators having backgrounds in engineering did not significantly affect student understanding of the engineering design process or careers in engineering when compared to educators having backgrounds in science, mathematics, technology education, or other disciplines. There were, however, statistically significant differences between the groups of educators. Students of educators with backgrounds in technology education had the highest mean score on assessments pertaining to the engineering design process while students of educators with disciplines outside of STEM had the highest mean scores on instruments that assess for student understanding of careers in engineering. This might be due to the fact that educators who lack degrees in engineering but who teach engineering do a better job of "sticking to the script" of engineering curricula.

  7. Treatment for lexical retrieval using abstract and concrete words in persons with aphasia: Effect of complexity

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, Swathi; Sandberg, Chaleece; Abbott, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Background The significance of imageability and concreteness as factors for lexical tasks in aphasic individuals is under debate. No previous treatment studies have looked specifically at training abstract words compared to concrete for improved lexical retrieval in patients with chronic aphasia. Aim The goal of the present study was to determine the efficacy of a treatment for lexical retrieval that is based on models of lexical processing by utilizing abstractness as a mode of complexity. It was hypothesized that training abstract words in a category will result in improvement of those words and generalization to untrained target concrete words in the same category. Training concrete words in a category, however, will result in the retrieval of trained concrete words, but not generalization to target abstract words. Methods & Procedures A single subject experimental design across participants and behaviors was used to examine treatment and generalization. Generative naming for three categories (church, hospital, courthouse) was tested during baseline and treatment. Each treatment session was carried out in five steps: (1) category sorting, (2) feature selection, (3) yes/no feature questions, (4) word recall, and (5) free generative naming. Results Although participant 1 demonstrated neither significant learning nor generalization during abstract or concrete word training, participants 2, 3, and 4 showed significant learning during abstract word training and generalization to untrained concrete words. Participants 3 and 4 were also trained on concrete words which they improved on but did not show generalization to untrained abstract words. Conclusions The results of the present experiment support our hypothesis that training abstract words would result in greater learning and generalization to untrained concrete words. They also tentatively support the idea that generalization is facilitated by treatment focusing on more complex constructions (Kiran & Thompson

  8. A Comparison Study of the Amplification Characteristics of the Seismic Observation Sites Using Coda Wave, Background Noise, and S-Wave Energy from Fukuoka Earthquakes Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.

    2014-12-01

    Since design response spectrum does not reflect local soil characteristics, site specific response spectrum from observed ground motions appears relatively higher than design response spectrum at high frequency range. These problems have been pointed out from the domestic seismic design industry. Among various estimation methods, this study used the method H/V ratio of ground motion for estimating site amplification. The method has been extended to background noise, Coda waves and S waves recently for estimating site amplification. This study applied the method to the 3 kinds of seismic energy simultansously, that is, background noise, Coda wave energy and S waves. This study analysed more than 267 background noises from 15 macro earthquakes including main Fukuoka earthquake (2005/03/20, M=6.5) and then compared results from background noise, Coda wave energy, and S waves, at the specific seismic station, for all the 8 main domestic seismic stations(KRA, GSU, GKP1, TJN, HKU, HSB, SNU, and KHD). The results showed that, at the specific sesimic station, most of the domestic seismic stations showed similar results among 3 different seismic energies. Each station showed its own characteristics of site amplification property in low, high and specific resonance frequency ranges. Comparison of this study to other studies using different method can give us much information about dynamic amplification of domestic sites characteristics and site classification.

  9. Abstract models of molecular walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Oleg

    Recent advances in single-molecule chemistry have led to designs for artificial multi-pedal walkers that follow tracks of chemicals. The walkers, called molecular spiders, consist of a rigid chemically inert body and several flexible enzymatic legs. The legs can reversibly bind to chemical substrates on a surface, and through their enzymatic action convert them to products. We study abstract models of molecular spiders to evaluate how efficiently they can perform two tasks: molecular transport of cargo over tracks and search for targets on finite surfaces. For the single-spider model our simulations show a transient behavior wherein certain spiders move superdiffusively over significant distances and times. This gives the spiders potential as a faster-than-diffusion transport mechanism. However, analysis shows that single-spider motion eventually decays into an ordinary diffusive motion, owing to the ever increasing size of the region of products. Inspired by cooperative behavior of natural molecular walkers, we propose a symmetric exclusion process (SEP) model for multiple walkers interacting as they move over a one-dimensional lattice. We show that when walkers are sequentially released from the origin, the collective effect is to prevent the leading walkers from moving too far backwards. Hence, there is an effective outward pressure on the leading walkers that keeps them moving superdiffusively for longer times. Despite this improvement the leading spider eventually slows down and moves diffusively, similarly to a single spider. The slowdown happens because all spiders behind the leading spiders never encounter substrates, and thus they are never biased. They cannot keep up with leading spiders, and cannot put enough pressure on them. Next, we investigate search properties of a single and multiple spiders moving over one- and two-dimensional surfaces with various absorbing and reflecting boundaries. For the single-spider model we evaluate by how much the

  10. The Paradox of Abstraction: Precision Versus Concreteness.

    PubMed

    Iliev, Rumen; Axelrod, Robert

    2016-11-22

    We introduce a novel measure of abstractness based on the amount of information of a concept computed from its position in a semantic taxonomy. We refer to this measure as precision. We propose two alternative ways to measure precision, one based on the path length from a concept to the root of the taxonomic tree, and another one based on the number of direct and indirect descendants. Since more information implies greater processing load, we hypothesize that nouns higher in precision will have a processing disadvantage in a lexical decision task. We contrast precision to concreteness, a common measure of abstractness based on the proportion of sensory-based information associated with a concept. Since concreteness facilitates cognitive processing, we predict that while both concreteness and precision are measures of abstractness, they will have opposite effects on performance. In two studies we found empirical support for our hypothesis. Precision and concreteness had opposite effects on latency and accuracy in a lexical decision task, and these opposite effects were observable while controlling for word length, word frequency, affective content and semantic diversity. Our results support the view that concepts organization includes amodal semantic structures which are independent of sensory information. They also suggest that we should distinguish between sensory-based and amount-of-information-based abstractness.

  11. Food-group and nutrient-density intakes by Hispanic and Latino backgrounds in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos123

    PubMed Central

    Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Ayala, Guadalupe X; Ginsberg, Mindy; Himes, John H; Liu, Kiang; Loria, Catherine M; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Rock, Cheryl L; Rodriguez, Brendaly; Gellman, Marc D; Van Horn, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hispanics are a heterogeneous group of individuals with a variation in dietary habits that is reflective of their cultural heritage and country of origin. It is important to identify differences in their dietary habits because it has been well established that nutrition contributes substantially to the burden of preventable diseases and early deaths in the United States. Objective: We estimated the distribution of usual intakes (of both food groups and nutrients) by Hispanic and Latino backgrounds by using National Cancer Institute methodology. Design: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos is a population-based cohort study that recruited participants who were 18–74 y of age from 4 US cities in 2008–2011 (Miami, Bronx, Chicago, and San Diego). Participants who provided at least one 24-h dietary recall and completed a food propensity questionnaire (n = 13,285) were included in the analyses. Results were adjusted for age, sex, field center, weekend, sequencing, and typical amount of intake. Results: Overall, Cubans (n = 2128) had higher intakes of total energy, macronutrients (including all subtypes of fat), and alcohol than those of other groups. Mexicans (n = 5371) had higher intakes of vitamin C, calcium, and fiber. Lowest intakes of total energy, macronutrients, folate, iron, and calcium were reported by Dominicans (n = 1217), whereas Puerto Ricans (n = 2176) had lowest intakes of vitamin C and fiber. Food-group servings reflected nutrient intakes, with Cubans having higher intakes of refined grains, vegetables, red meat, and fats and Dominicans having higher intakes of fruit and poultry, whereas Puerto Ricans had lowest intakes of fruit and vegetables. Central and South Americans (n = 1468 and 925, respectively) were characterized by being second in their reported intakes of fruit and poultry and the highest in fish intake in comparison with other groups. Conclusion: Variations in diet noted in this study, with additional analysis

  12. An Exploratory Study of the Effects of Mindfulness on Perceived Levels of Stress among School-Children from Lower Socioeconomic Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Elizabeth; Lawler, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds are at increased risk of experiencing stress and associated social-emotional difficulties and behavioural problems, which can undermine academic performance and lead to school drop-out. Previous studies investigating the effects of mindfulness have evidenced positive outcomes among children pertaining…

  13. Pupil Home Background Characteristics and Academic Performance in Senior Secondary Schools: A Case Study of Selected Secondary Schools in Kitwe District, Zambia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakumbi, Zonic; Samuel, Elizabeth B.; Mulendema, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate pupil background characteristics and academic performance in senior secondary schools in Kitwe district with a view of recommending on how to improve pupils' performance. The study was conducted in Kitwe district because in the past years pupils' performance in senior secondary schools has been…

  14. Appropriating Scientific Vocabulary in Chemistry Laboratories: A Multiple Case Study of Four Community College Students with Diverse Ethno-Linguistic Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cink, Ruth B.; Song, Youngjin

    2016-01-01

    This multiple case study investigated how college students with diverse ethno-linguistic backgrounds used chemistry vocabulary as a way to look at their discursive identities and cultural border crossings during first semester general chemistry laboratories. The data were collected in two major forms: video-taped laboratory observations and…

  15. Personal Best (PB) Goal Structure, Individual PB Goals, Engagement, and Achievement: A Study of Chinese- and English-Speaking Background Students in Australian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.; Collie, Rebecca J.; Mok, Magdalena M. C.; McInerney, Dennis M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prior cross-cultural research with students in different national contexts (Australia and China) has shown consistency in the extent to which individual personal best (PB) goals are associated with engagement at school. Aims: This study extends this work to a multicultural context, assessing perceived PB goal structure in school and…

  16. A Quasi-Experimental Study into the Relations between Families' Social and Cultural Background and Children's Creche Experience and Global Cognitive Competence in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burger, Kaspar

    2012-01-01

    This study analysed the role of both sociocultural background and exposure to a creche on children's development of cognitive competence in Switzerland. Data were derived from a survey on children's cognitive proficiency after enrolment to primary school. Correlations and multiple linear regressions indicate that creche experience was not related…

  17. [Hydrochemical Characteristics and Influencing Factors in Different Geological Background: A Case Study in Darongjiang and Lingqu Basin, Guangxi, China].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping-an; Yu, Shi; Mo, Fu-zhen; He, Shi-yi; Lu, Ju-fang; Yuan, Ya-qiong

    2016-01-15

    The observation and sampling were carried out in May 2013 to April 2014 in a hydrological year for two river basins with different geological background in upstream of Li river basin. The seasonal variations of river water chemistry and its main influencing factors were discussed in this paper. The results showed that the hydrochemistry types of both Darongjiang basin with 9% of carbonates and Lingqu basin with nearly 50% of carbonates in area belonged to Ca-HCO3 type. Ca2+ and HCO3- were the main cations and anions. The main ion concentrations were higher in winter and lower in summer, affected by the change of the flow. Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3- were mainly sourced from the weathering of carbonates by carbonic acid. The weathering of carbonates by sulfuric acid and the weathering of silicate rocks also had contribution to the river water chemistry. In addition, comparing to the Lingqu basin, the contribution of the weathering of carbonates was much more than the percent of carbonates area, because the carbonate rocks were eroded by the allogenic water. On the other hand, K+, Na+, Cl-, NO3-, SO4(2-) were mainly affected by the atmospheric precipitation and human activities. Comparing to the Darongjiang Basin, the effects of human activities on the changes of K+, Na+, Cl-, NO3-, SO4(2-) were more significant in Lingqu Basin.

  18. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Study on spatial resolution of micromegas as a neutron detector under condition of high neutron flux and γ ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Xin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Ji-Jin; Hu, Bi-Tao

    2009-02-01

    In this paper Micromegas has been designed to detect neutrons. The simulation of the spatial resolution of Micromegas as neutron detector is carried out by GEANT4 toolkit. The neutron track reconstruction method based on the time coincidence technology is employed in the present work. The influence of the flux of incident 14 MeV neutron and high gamma background on the spatial resolution is carefully studied. Our results show that the spatial resolution of the detector is sensitive to the neutron flux, but insensitive to the intensity of γ background if the neutron track reconstruction method proposed by our group is used. The γ insensitivity makes it possible for us to use the Micromegas detector under condition which has high γ-rays background.

  19. Operating System Abstraction Layer (OSAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanchik, Nicholas J.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the concept of the Operating System Abstraction Layer (OSAL) and its benefits. The OSAL is A small layer of software that allows programs to run on many different operating systems and hardware platforms It runs independent of the underlying OS & hardware and it is self-contained. The benefits of OSAL are that it removes dependencies from any one operating system, promotes portable, reusable flight software. It allows for Core Flight software (FSW) to be built for multiple processors and operating systems. The presentation discusses the functionality, the various OSAL releases, and describes the specifications.

  20. A Method for Estimating Urban Background Concentrations in Support of Hybrid Air Pollution Modeling for Environmental Health Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure studies rely on detailed characterization of air quality, either from sparsely located routine ambient monitors or from central monitoring sites that may lack spatial representativeness. Alternatively, some studies use models of various complexities to characterize local...

  1. Publication Rates and Inconsistencies of the Abstracts Presented at the National Anatomy Congresses in 2007 and 2008

    PubMed Central

    Gürses, İlke Ali; Gayretli, Özcan; Gürtekin, Başak; Öztürk, Adnan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite significant efforts made for, most abstracts presented during a meeting do not proceed and publish as a manuscript in scientific journals. Aims: To investigate publication rates of national anatomy congresses. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: All abstracts presented at two annual meetings in 2007 and 2008 were extracted. PubMed and Google Scholar database search used for publication history. Presentation and study types, publication rates and mean publishing times were evaluated. Inconsistency rates between meeting abstract and final published article were also considered. Results: Among 342 abstracts, 195 (57%) were followed by a full-text article. Publication rates for oral and poster presentations were 75% and 52.2%, respectively. The mean publication time was 23.7±23 months. Overall, 89.2% of the articles were published within 5 years. There were no inconsistencies in 50 (25.6%) articles, while 145 (74.4%) had inconsistencies compared to the abstracts presented at the congress. Getting adequate information for 45 (23.1%) articles was not possible. There was no standard reporting format for the abstracts. Conclusion: Our study shows that, overall publication rates for abstracts presented at national anatomy meetings were higher than those presented at national meetings for clinical specialties. PMID:28251026

  2. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  3. 2013 SYR Accepted Poster Abstracts.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    SYR 2013 Accepted Poster abstracts: 1. Benefits of Yoga as a Wellness Practice in a Veterans Affairs (VA) Health Care Setting: If You Build It, Will They Come? 2. Yoga-based Psychotherapy Group With Urban Youth Exposed to Trauma. 3. Embodied Health: The Effects of a Mind�Body Course for Medical Students. 4. Interoceptive Awareness and Vegetable Intake After a Yoga and Stress Management Intervention. 5. Yoga Reduces Performance Anxiety in Adolescent Musicians. 6. Designing and Implementing a Therapeutic Yoga Program for Older Women With Knee Osteoarthritis. 7. Yoga and Life Skills Eating Disorder Prevention Among 5th Grade Females: A Controlled Trial. 8. A Randomized, Controlled Trial Comparing the Impact of Yoga and Physical Education on the Emotional and Behavioral Functioning of Middle School Children. 9. Feasibility of a Multisite, Community based Randomized Study of Yoga and Wellness Education for Women With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy. 10. A Delphi Study for the Development of Protocol Guidelines for Yoga Interventions in Mental Health. 11. Impact Investigation of Breathwalk Daily Practice: Canada�India Collaborative Study. 12. Yoga Improves Distress, Fatigue, and Insomnia in Older Veteran Cancer Survivors: Results of a Pilot Study. 13. Assessment of Kundalini Mantra and Meditation as an Adjunctive Treatment With Mental Health Consumers. 14. Kundalini Yoga Therapy Versus Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Co-Occurring Mood Disorder. 15. Baseline Differences in Women Versus Men Initiating Yoga Programs to Aid Smoking Cessation: Quitting in Balance Versus QuitStrong. 16. Pranayam Practice: Impact on Focus and Everyday Life of Work and Relationships. 17. Participation in a Tailored Yoga Program is Associated With Improved Physical Health in Persons With Arthritis. 18. Effects of Yoga on Blood Pressure: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. 19. A Quasi-experimental Trial of a Yoga based Intervention to Reduce Stress and

  4. A grounded theory of abstraction in artificial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Jean-Daniel

    2003-07-29

    In artificial intelligence, abstraction is commonly used to account for the use of various levels of details in a given representation language or the ability to change from one level to another while preserving useful properties. Abstraction has been mainly studied in problem solving, theorem proving, knowledge representation (in particular for spatial and temporal reasoning) and machine learning. In such contexts, abstraction is defined as a mapping between formalisms that reduces the computational complexity of the task at stake. By analysing the notion of abstraction from an information quantity point of view, we pinpoint the differences and the complementary role of reformulation and abstraction in any representation change. We contribute to extending the existing semantic theories of abstraction to be grounded on perception, where the notion of information quantity is easier to characterize formally. In the author's view, abstraction is best represented using abstraction operators, as they provide semantics for classifying different abstractions and support the automation of representation changes. The usefulness of a grounded theory of abstraction in the cartography domain is illustrated. Finally, the importance of explicitly representing abstraction for designing more autonomous and adaptive systems is discussed.

  5. A grounded theory of abstraction in artificial intelligence.

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Jean-Daniel

    2003-01-01

    In artificial intelligence, abstraction is commonly used to account for the use of various levels of details in a given representation language or the ability to change from one level to another while preserving useful properties. Abstraction has been mainly studied in problem solving, theorem proving, knowledge representation (in particular for spatial and temporal reasoning) and machine learning. In such contexts, abstraction is defined as a mapping between formalisms that reduces the computational complexity of the task at stake. By analysing the notion of abstraction from an information quantity point of view, we pinpoint the differences and the complementary role of reformulation and abstraction in any representation change. We contribute to extending the existing semantic theories of abstraction to be grounded on perception, where the notion of information quantity is easier to characterize formally. In the author's view, abstraction is best represented using abstraction operators, as they provide semantics for classifying different abstractions and support the automation of representation changes. The usefulness of a grounded theory of abstraction in the cartography domain is illustrated. Finally, the importance of explicitly representing abstraction for designing more autonomous and adaptive systems is discussed. PMID:12903672

  6. Content and accuracy of abstracting services: clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Michel, D J

    1988-07-01

    Abstracts in Inpharma, deHaen Drugs-in-Use, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA), Reactions, and Clin-Alert were evaluated using the number of omissions and errors as endpoints. Fifty-one abstracts were compared with original articles by pharmacy students using a standardized checklist for drug therapy and adverse drug reaction articles. The overall omission rate per abstract was 3.2 +/- 2.5. There were no significant differences in omission rates in drug therapy abstracts between Inpharma, deHaen, or IPA abstracting services. For adverse drug reaction abstracts, IPA had significantly more omissions than Clin-Alert (p less than 0.001) and Reactions (p less than 0.01). One error occurred in approximately every fifth abstract. No differences were shown between abstracting services in this regard. Although abstracts and abstracting services can provide useful information--particularly when information is needed in a timely fashion, when an original article is difficult to obtain, or when written in a foreign language--they should not be considered a consistently reliable source of information upon which to base decisions, as evidenced by the number and types of omissions and errors described in this study.

  7. Abstraction of Seepage into Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Wilson; C.K. Ho

    2000-09-26

    A total-system performance assessment (TSPA) for a potential nuclear-waste repository requires an estimate of the amount of water that might contact waste. This paper describes the model used for part of that estimation in a recent TSPA for the Yucca Mountain site. The discussion is limited to estimation of how much water might enter emplacement drifts; additional considerations related to flow within the drifts, and how much water might actually contact waste, are not addressed here. The unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain is being considered for the potential repository, and a drift opening in unsaturated rock tends to act as a capillary barrier and divert much of the percolating water around it. For TSPA, the important questions regarding seepage are how many waste packages might be subjected to water flow and how much flow those packages might see. Because of heterogeneity of the rock and uncertainty about the future (how the climate will evolve, etc.), it is not possible to predict seepage amounts or locations with certainty. Thus, seepage is treated as a stochastic quantity in TSPA simulations, with the magnitude and spatial distribution of seepage sampled from uncertainty distributions. The distillation of the essential components of process modeling into a form suitable for use in TSPA simulations is referred to as abstraction. In the following sections, seepage process models and abstractions will be summarized and then some illustrative results are presented.

  8. Abstract art by shape classification.

    PubMed

    Song, Yi-Zhe; Pickup, David; Li, Chuan; Rosin, Paul; Hall, Peter

    2013-08-01

    This paper shows that classifying shapes is a tool useful in nonphotorealistic rendering (NPR) from photographs. Our classifier inputs regions from an image segmentation hierarchy and outputs the "best" fitting simple shape such as a circle, square, or triangle. Other approaches to NPR have recognized the benefits of segmentation, but none have classified the shape of segments. By doing so, we can create artwork of a more abstract nature, emulating the style of modern artists such as Matisse and other artists who favored shape simplification in their artwork. The classifier chooses the shape that "best" represents the region. Since the classifier is trained by a user, the "best shape" has a subjective quality that can over-ride measurements such as minimum error and more importantly captures user preferences. Once trained, the system is fully automatic, although simple user interaction is also possible to allow for differences in individual tastes. A gallery of results shows how this classifier contributes to NPR from images by producing abstract artwork.

  9. Using Group Explorer in teaching abstract algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Claus; Gfeller, Mary; Donohue, Christopher

    2013-04-01

    This study explores the use of Group Explorer in an undergraduate mathematics course in abstract algebra. The visual nature of Group Explorer in representing concepts in group theory is an attractive incentive to use this software in the classroom. However, little is known about students' perceptions on this technology in learning concepts in abstract algebra. A total of 26 participants in an undergraduate course studying group theory were surveyed regarding their experiences using Group Explorer. Findings indicate that all participants believed that the software was beneficial to their learning and described their attitudes regarding the software in terms of using the technology and its helpfulness in learning concepts. A multiple regression analysis reveals that representational fluency of concepts with the software correlated significantly with participants' understanding of group concepts yet, participants' attitudes about Group Explorer and technology in general were not significant factors.

  10. Present Practices and Background to Teaching and Learning at the Royal University of Bhutan (RUB): A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gyamtso, Deki; Maxwell, T. W.

    2012-01-01

    In Bhutan relatively few studies at the higher education level have been done and fewer still reported in international journals. This pilot study highlights the present practices and culture of teaching and learning at one of the teacher education colleges of the Royal University of Bhutan (RUB). It looks broadly across the issues of…

  11. The Age of Studies and Reports: Selected Elements Concerning the Background of Encounters Defining the Power of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tašner, Veronika; Gaber, Slavko

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, we discuss the time before the "age of reports". Besides the Coleman Report in the period of Coleman, the Lady Plowden Report also appeared, while there were important studies in France (Bourdieu & Passeron, 1964; Peyre, 1959) and studies that inaugurated comprehensive education in Nordic countries. We focus on…

  12. Are Public or Private Schools Doing Better? How the NCES Study Is Being Misinterpreted. Backgrounder No. 1968

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Shanea

    2006-01-01

    The results of a recent National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) study that finds that public school students are performing better then private school students should be interpreted cautiously. The National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) data used in the study provide a snapshot of student achievement at the time the NAEP tests…

  13. Fractured-rock hydrogeology: modeling studies. January 1977-February 1989 (Citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts data base). Report for January 1977-February 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the utilization of mathematical and conceptual models in describing the hydraulic parameters of fluid flow in fractured media. Topics include the use of tracers, solute and mass transport studies, and slug test analyses. The use of modeling techniques in injection-well performance prediction is also discussed. (Contains 117 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  14. Ground water pollution transport: model studies. January 1975-March 1989 (Citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts data base). Report for January 1975-March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning analytical and numerical simulations of the movement and distribution of contaminants in ground water. Pollutant transport and dispersion, two- and three-dimensional modeling in homogeneous and heterogeneous materials, and site studies in specific hydrogeologic environments are among the topics discussed. Theoretical analyses and practical applications are included. (Contains 171 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  15. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: ABSTRACT ON-SITE INCINERATION TESTING OF SHIRCO INFRARED SYSTEMS PORTABLE DEMONSTRATION UNIT-CONTAMINATED SOILS TREATABILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In August of 1986, Shirco was contracted by Dekonta GmbH, a Vest German hazardous waste treatment company, to perform treatability studies at one of the largest dioxin-contaminated sites in the world. The Shirco Infrared process was selected by Dekonta after a two year stud...

  16. A trans-disciplinary study on the health risks of cryptosporidiosis from dairy systems in Dagoretti, Nairobi, Kenya: study background and farming system characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kang'ethe, Erastus K; Kimani, Violet N; McDermott, Brigid; Grace, Delia; Lang'at, Alfred K; Kiragu, Monica W; Karanja, Nancy; Njehu, Alice N; Randolph, Thomas; Mbugua, Gabriel; Irungu, Tabitha W; Ombutu, Peninnah

    2012-09-01

    This paper characterises the dairy farming system in Dagoretti, Nairobi. Characterisation was part of a broader ecohealth project to estimate the prevalence and risk of cryptosporidiosis and develop risk mitigation strategies. In the project a trans-disciplinary team addressed epidemiological, socioeconomic, environmental and policy aspects of cryptosporidiosis, an emerging zoonosis. This paper also provides background and describes sampling methods for the wider project. Three hundred dairy households were probabilistically sampled from a sampling frame of all dairy households in five of the six locations of Dagoretti, one of the eight districts of Nairobi Province. Randomly selected households identified 100 non-dairy-keeping households who also took part in the study. A household questionnaire was developed, pre-tested and administered in the dry and wet seasons of 2006. An additional study on livelihood and economic benefits of dairying took place with 100 dairy farmers randomly selected from the 300 farms (as well as 40 non-dairy neighbours as a control group), and a risk-targeted survey of environmental contamination with Cryptosporidium was conducted with 20 farmers randomly selected from the 29 farmers in the wider survey who were considered at high risk because of farming system. We found that around 1 in 80 urban households kept dairy cattle with an average of three cattle per household. Cross-breeds of exotic and local cattle predominate. Heads of dairy-keeping households were significantly less educated than the heads of non-dairy neighbours, had lived in Dagoretti for significantly longer and had significantly larger households. There was a high turnover of 10 % of the cattle population in the 3-month period of the study. Cattle were zero grazed, but productivity parameters were sub-optimal as were hygiene and husbandry practices. In conclusion, dairy keeping is a minor activity in urban Nairobi but important to households involved and their community

  17. Study of neutron-induced background and its effect on the search of 0νββ decay in 124Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokania, N.; Singh, V.; Mathimalar, S.; Ghosh, C.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Pal, S.; Bhushan, K. G.; Shrivastava, A.

    2014-11-01

    Neutron-induced background has been studied in various components of the TIN.TIN detector, which is under development for the search of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in 124Sn. Fast neutron flux ~106 n cm-2s-1 covering a broad energy range ~0.1 to ( ~18 MeV) was generated using 9Be(p,n)9B reaction. In addition, reactions with quasi-monoenergetic neutrons were also studied using 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. Among the different cryogenic support structures studied, Teflon is found to be preferable compared to Torlon as there is no high energy gamma background Eγ > 1 MeV) . Contribution of neutron-induced reactions in nat, 124Sn from other Sn isotopes (A = 112-122) in the energy region of interest, namely, around the Qββ of 124Sn (E ~ 2.293 MeV), is also investigated.

  18. Direct Energy Conversion Literature Abstracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1963-12-01

    for single and multiloop first in handy packages for use anywhere Carnot cycles. Parameters related to on earth or in space, and eventually in...by Various inorganic fluids which may be o F.X. Dobler, and others.306p., Feb.8,1962. potential value for energy conversion or (Prog. Rept.- First Q...during the first three months. background material is discussed, including thermodynamic cycle, heat transfer, compati- 4679 bility, and working

  19. The U. S. Geological Survey's Albemarle-Pamlico National Water-Quality Assessment Study; background and design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spruill, T.B.; Harned, Douglas A.; McMahon, Gerard

    1995-01-01

    The Albemarle-Pamlico Study Unit is one of 20 National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) studies begun in 1991 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to assess the Nation's water quality. One of the missions of the USGS is to assess the quantity and quality of the Nation's water resources. The NAWQA program was established to help accomplish this mission. The Albemarle-Pamlico Study Unit, located in Virginia and North Carolina, drains an area of about 28,000 square miles. Four major rivers, the Chowan, the Roanoke, the Tar-Pamlico and the Neuse, all drain into the Albemarle-Pamlico Sound in North Carolina. Four physiographic regions (areas of homogeneous climatic, geologic, and biological characteristics), the Valley and Ridge, Blue Ridge, Piedmont and Coastal Plain Physiographic Provinces are included within the Albemarle-Pamlico Study Unit. Until 1991, there was no single program that could answer the question, 'Are the Nation's ground and surface waters getting better, worse, or are they staying the same?' A program was needed to evaluate water quality by using standard techniques to allow assessment of water quality at local, regional, and national scales. The NAWQA Program was implemented to answer questions about the Nation's water quality using consistent and comparable methods. A total of 60 basins, or study units, will be in place by 1997 to assess the Nation's water quality.

  20. Experience with abstract notation one

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, James D.; Weaver, Alfred C.

    1990-01-01

    The development of computer science has produced a vast number of machine architectures, programming languages, and compiler technologies. The cross product of these three characteristics defines the spectrum of previous and present data representation methodologies. With regard to computer networks, the uniqueness of these methodologies presents an obstacle when disparate host environments are to be interconnected. Interoperability within a heterogeneous network relies upon the establishment of data representation commonality. The International Standards Organization (ISO) is currently developing the abstract syntax notation one standard (ASN.1) and the basic encoding rules standard (BER) that collectively address this problem. When used within the presentation layer of the open systems interconnection reference model, these two standards provide the data representation commonality required to facilitate interoperability. The details of a compiler that was built to automate the use of ASN.1 and BER are described. From this experience, insights into both standards are given and potential problems relating to this development effort are discussed.

  1. Keynote Address and Background Papers. National Assembly on Foreign Language and International Studies (Racine, Wisconsin, October 30-November 1, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Colleges, Washington, DC.

    The conference papers presented here discuss the need for and means of implementing changes in educational design and emphasis that will recognize the need for Americans to incorporate foreign language and international studies into their education. In addition to the opening address by Richard Berendzen, the following papers are included: (1)…

  2. Music Preferences and Family Language Background: A Computer-Supported Study of Children's Listening Behavior in the Context of Migration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakai, Winfried

    2011-01-01

    Turkish migrants are the largest national group in Germany. Nevertheless, neither in music psychology research nor in intercultural research can empirical data on the music preferences of Turkish-German primary schoolchildren in the migrational context be found. This study thus examined the music preference responses of children with Turkish…

  3. Learning Process in Terms of Styles and Strategies: Theoretical Background and Pilot Study. Research Bulletin. No. 54.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leino, Anna-Liisa

    A pilot study was conducted to determine effective methods for testing students' learning processes. The theoretical framework within which learning processes were investigated is based on the B-P-E paradigm. This states that "Behavior (B) is a function of the Person (P) and the Environment (E)". After reviewing research done in related…

  4. Case Studies of Success: Supporting Academic Success for Students with High Potential from Ethnic Minority and Economically Disadvantaged Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Carol Ann; Jarvis, Jane M.

    2014-01-01

    The underrepresentation of ethnic minority and economically disadvantaged students in gifted education must be understood in terms of broader school contexts and practices. This qualitative study investigated how teachers and schools contributed to the academic success of minority students of high potential from economically disadvantaged…

  5. Hydrogen Abstraction from Hydrocarbons by NH2.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Kamal; Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Gore, Jeff; Westmoreland, Phillip R; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z

    2017-03-23

    This contribution investigates thermokinetic parameters of bimolecular gas-phase reactions involving the amine (NH2) radical and a large number of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. These reactions play an important role in combustion and pyrolysis of nitrogen-rich fuels, most notably biomass. Computations performed at the CBS-QB3 level and based on the conventional transition-state theory yield potential-energy surfaces and reaction rate constants, accounting for tunnelling effects and the presence of hindered rotors. In an analogy to other H abstraction systems, we demonstrate only a small influence of variational effects on the rate constants for selected reaction. The studied reactions cover the abstraction of hydrogen atoms by the NH2 radical from the C-H bonds in C1-C4 species, and four C5 hydrocarbons of 2-methylbutane, 2-methyl-1-butene, 3-methyl-1-butene, 3-methyl-2-butene, and 3-methyl-1-butyne. For the abstraction of H from methane, in the temperature windows 300-500 and 1600-2000 K, the calculated reaction rate constants concur with the available experimental measurements, i.e., kcalculated/kexperimetal = 0.3-2.5 and 1.1-1.4, and the previous theoretical estimates. Abstraction of H atom from ethane attains the ratio of kcalculated/kexperimetal equal to 0.10-1.2 and 1.3-1.5 over the temperature windows of available experimental measurements, i.e., 300-900 K and 1500-2000 K, respectively. For the remaining alkanes (propane and n-butane), the average kexperimental/kcalculated ratio remains 2.6 and 1.3 over the temperature range of experimental data. Also, comparing the calculated standard enthalpy of reaction (ΔrH°298) with the available experimental measurements for alkanes, we found the mean unsigned error of computations as 3.7 kJ mol(-1). This agreement provides an accuracy benchmark of our methodology, affording the estimation of the unreported kinetic parameters for H abstractions from alkenes and alkynes. On the basis of the Evans

  6. (abstract) Experimental and Modeling Studies of the Exchange Current at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    The microscopic mechanism of the alkali ion-electron recombination reaction at the three phase boundary zone formed by a porous metal electrode in the alkali vapor on the surface of an alkali beta'-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) ceramic has been studied by comparison of the expected rates for the three simplest reaction mechanisms with known temperature dependent rate data; and the physical parameters of typical porous metal electrode/BASE/alkali metal vapor reaction zones. The three simplest reactions are tunneling of electrons from the alkali coated electrode to a surface bound alkali metal ion; emission of an electron from the electrode with subsequent capture by a surface bound alkali metal ion; and thermal emission of an alkali cation from the BASE and its capture on the porous metal electrode surface where it may recombine with an electron. Only the first reaction adequately accounts for both the high observed rate and its temperature dependence. New results include crude modeling of simple, one step, three phase, solid/solid/gas electrochemical reaction.

  7. Regulation of nucleic acid and protein synthesis: a background study related to the biological effects of radiation. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, P.

    1984-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas in defining the varied roles of diadenosine 5', 5'''-P/sup 1/, P/sup 4/-tetraphosphate (Ap/sub 4/A) in metabolic events within the living cell: (1) Ap/sub 4/A association with a subunit of DNA polymerase ..cap alpha..; (2) studies on the unusual ordered structure of Ap/sub 4/A and of related bisnucleoside oligophosphates; (3) the utilization of technetium labeled Ap/sub 4/A as a radionuclide diagnostic reagent; and (4) the role of Ap/sub 4/A in the blood clotting mechanism. (ACR)

  8. Great Power Interests and Conflicting Objectives in the Mediterranean-Middle East-Persian Gulf Region. Part I. Background Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    AD-A079 602 STANFORD RESEARCH INST MENLO PARK CALIF STRATEGIC S--ETC F/S 5/4 GREAT POWER INTERESTS AND CONFLICTING OBJECTIVES IN THE MEDITER--EYTC(U...D.C. 20310 1 jF-fl -U Ir ! CONTRACT DAAG39 --74- C 0082 LJU~ ±Li’AELNT A 1-.1pblic releaaej lion Unlimted SRI STANFORD RESEARCH INSTITUTE Menlo Park...California 94025 • U.S.A. 80 1 15 076 I Report Categories.":;i The research output by the Strategic Studies Center is published in four formats: 1

  9. The Common Element Effect of Abstract-to-Abstract Mapping in Language Processing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuqian; Wang, Guixiang; Liang, Yuchan

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990s, there has been much discussion about how concepts are learned and processed. Many researchers believe that the experienced bodily states (i.e., embodied experiences) should be an important factor that affects concepts' learning and use, and metaphorical mappings between abstract concepts, such as TIME and POWER, and concrete concepts, such as SPATIAL ORIENTATION, STRUCTURED EXPERIENCEs, etc., suggest the abstract-concrete concepts' connections. In most of the recent literature, we can find common elements (e.g., concrete concepts) shared by different abstract-concrete metaphorical expressions. Therefore, we assumed that mappings might also be found between two abstract concepts that share common elements, though they have no symbolic connections. In the present study, two lexical decision tasks were arranged and the priming effect between TIME and ABSTRACT ACTIONs was used as an index to test our hypothesis. Results showed a robust priming effect when a target verb and its prime belonged to the same duration type (TIME consistent condition). These findings suggest that mapping between concepts was affected by common elements. We propose a dynamic model in which mappings between concepts are influenced by common elements, including symbolic or embodied information. What kind of elements (linguistic or embodied) can be used would depend on how difficult it is for a concept to be learned or accessed.

  10. The Common Element Effect of Abstract-to-Abstract Mapping in Language Processing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuqian; Wang, Guixiang; Liang, Yuchan

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990s, there has been much discussion about how concepts are learned and processed. Many researchers believe that the experienced bodily states (i.e., embodied experiences) should be an important factor that affects concepts’ learning and use, and metaphorical mappings between abstract concepts, such as TIME and POWER, and concrete concepts, such as SPATIAL ORIENTATION, STRUCTURED EXPERIENCEs, etc., suggest the abstract-concrete concepts’ connections. In most of the recent literature, we can find common elements (e.g., concrete concepts) shared by different abstract-concrete metaphorical expressions. Therefore, we assumed that mappings might also be found between two abstract concepts that share common elements, though they have no symbolic connections. In the present study, two lexical decision tasks were arranged and the priming effect between TIME and ABSTRACT ACTIONs was used as an index to test our hypothesis. Results showed a robust priming effect when a target verb and its prime belonged to the same duration type (TIME consistent condition). These findings suggest that mapping between concepts was affected by common elements. We propose a dynamic model in which mappings between concepts are influenced by common elements, including symbolic or embodied information. What kind of elements (linguistic or embodied) can be used would depend on how difficult it is for a concept to be learned or accessed. PMID:27822192

  11. Evolutionary aspects of non-cell-autonomous regulation in vascular plants: structural background and models to study

    PubMed Central

    Evkaikina, Anastasiia I.; Romanova, Marina A.; Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) serve for the exchange of information in form of miRNA, proteins, and mRNA between adjacent cells in the course of plant development. This fundamental role of PD is well established in angiosperms but has not yet been traced back to the evolutionary ancient plant taxa where functional studies lag behind studies of PD structure and ontogenetic origin. There is convincing evidence that the ability to form secondary (post-cytokinesis) PD, which can connect any adjacent cells, contrary to primary PD which form during cytokinesis and link only cells of the same lineage, appeared in the evolution of higher plants at least twice: in seed plants and in some representatives of the Lycopodiophyta. The (in)ability to form secondary PD is manifested in the symplasmic organization of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) which in most taxa of seedless vascular plants differs dramatically from that in seed plants. Lycopodiophyta appear to be suitable models to analyze the transport of developmental regulators via PD in SAMs with symplasmic organization both different from, as well as analogous to, that in angiosperms, and to understand the evolutionary aspects of the role of this transport in the morphogenesis of vascular plant taxa. PMID:24575105

  12. Evolutionary aspects of non-cell-autonomous regulation in vascular plants: structural background and models to study.

    PubMed

    Evkaikina, Anastasiia I; Romanova, Marina A; Voitsekhovskaja, Olga V

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) serve for the exchange of information in form of miRNA, proteins, and mRNA between adjacent cells in the course of plant development. This fundamental role of PD is well established in angiosperms but has not yet been traced back to the evolutionary ancient plant taxa where functional studies lag behind studies of PD structure and ontogenetic origin. There is convincing evidence that the ability to form secondary (post-cytokinesis) PD, which can connect any adjacent cells, contrary to primary PD which form during cytokinesis and link only cells of the same lineage, appeared in the evolution of higher plants at least twice: in seed plants and in some representatives of the Lycopodiophyta. The (in)ability to form secondary PD is manifested in the symplasmic organization of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) which in most taxa of seedless vascular plants differs dramatically from that in seed plants. Lycopodiophyta appear to be suitable models to analyze the transport of developmental regulators via PD in SAMs with symplasmic organization both different from, as well as analogous to, that in angiosperms, and to understand the evolutionary aspects of the role of this transport in the morphogenesis of vascular plant taxa.

  13. Risk factors in multiple sclerosis: a population-based case-control study in Sicily. Background and methods.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Alessandra; Messina, Silvia; Bruno, Elisa; Mostile, Giovanni; Quattrocchi, Graziella; Raciti, Loredana; Dibilio, Valeria; Cappellani, Roberto; D'Amico, Emanuele; Sciacca, Giorgia; Lo Fermo, Salvatore; Paradisi, Vincenza; Patti, Francesco; Zappia, Mario

    2016-12-01

    Incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) has steeply increased over time during the last 30 years in the city of Catania. We carried out a population-based case-control study to evaluate the possible role of both environmental and genetic factors. From 1975 to 2004 in Catania, 367 MS patients diagnosed according to the Poser's criteria had the onset of disease. A sample of MS patients was randomly selected from this incident cohort. Three controls matched by age and sex were randomly selected from the rosters of 14 GPs. Controls were proportionally selected according to the distribution by municipality of the target population using a multistage sampling methods. All cases and controls underwent a face-to-face interview to record information concerning environmental factors and a blood sample was taken for serological and genetic analysis. 164 MS patients (64 % women; mean age of 46.4 ± 10.7) and 481 controls (69 % women; mean age of 47.7 ± 14.8) were enrolled in the study. The distribution of the whole population and the selected controls by municipalities was similar. A blood sample was taken from 150 MS cases and from 337 controls. At the end of the enrolment, we obtained a representative sample of the MS cases and population controls avoiding possible selection bias. Participation rate was very high also concerning the collection of biological specimens.

  14. Electroweak Corrections to pp→μ^{+}μ^{-}e^{+}e^{-}+X at the LHC: A Higgs Boson Background Study.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, B; Denner, A; Dittmaier, S; Hofer, L; Jäger, B

    2016-04-22

    The first complete calculation of the next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to four-lepton production at the LHC is presented, where all off-shell effects of intermediate Z bosons and photons are taken into account. Focusing on the mixed final state μ^{+}μ^{-}e^{+}e^{-}, we study differential cross sections that are particularly interesting for Higgs boson analyses. The electroweak corrections are divided into photonic and purely weak corrections. The former exhibit patterns familiar from similar W- or Z-boson production processes with very large radiative tails near resonances and kinematical shoulders. The weak corrections are of the generic size of 5% and show interesting variations, in particular, a sign change between the regions of resonant Z-pair production and the Higgs signal.

  15. Study of the correlation between columnar aerosol burden, suspended matter at ground and chemical components in a background European environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EstelléS, VíCtor; MartíNez-Lozano, José A.; Pey, Jorge; Sicard, MichaëL.; Querol, Xavier; Esteve, Anna R.; Utrillas, MaríA. P.; Sorribas, Mar; Gangoiti, Gotzon; Alastuey, AndréS.; Rocadenbosch, Francesc

    2012-02-01

    Although routinely monitored by ground based air quality networks, the particulate matter distribution could be eventually better described with remote sensing techniques. However, valid relationships between ground level and columnar ground based quantities should be known beforehand. In this study we have performed a comparison between particulate matter measurements at ground level at different cut sizes (10, 2.5 and 1.0 μm), and the aerosol optical depth obtained by means of a ground based sunphotometer during a multiinstrumental field campaign held in El Arenosillo (Huelva, Spain) from 28 June to 4 July 2006. All the PM fractions were very well correlated with AOD with correlation coefficients that ranged from 0.71 to 0.81 for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1. Furthermore, the influence of the mixing layer height in the correlations was explored. The improvement in the correlation when the vertical distribution is taken into account was significant for days with a homogeneous mixing layer. Moreover, the chemical analysis of the individual size fractions allowed us to study the origin of the particulate matter. Secondary components were the most abundant and also well correlated in the three size fractions; but for PM10 fraction, chemical species related to marine origin were best correlated. Finally, we obtained a relationship between MODIS L3 AOD from collection 5.1 and the three PM cut sizes. In spite of being a relatively clean environment, all the techniques were able to capture similar day to day variations during this field campaign.

  16. An evaluation of 'Inpharma', a drug literature abstracting service.

    PubMed

    Milne, A

    1981-09-01

    This study aimed to provide data on the characteristics of the drug literature abstracting service 'Inpharma'. Journal coverage, article yield and timeliness for a 3-year period were examined; the reliability and information content of 100 abstracts were also assessed. It was found that although 'Inpharma' is claimed to monitor a very large number of journals, over 98% of the abstracts were from 'core' journals of which there are approximately 350. Over 80% of the abstracts appeared within 4 months of publications of the original and abstracts from some of the American journals were available in the United Kingdom before the relevant primary journal. Sixteen errors were detected in 100 abstracts; five of these were typographical errors and nine deviations in accuracy. The publication is a good 'current awareness tool' but it should not be used where a comprehensive coverage of the literature is required. It is also important that the primary journal is consulted when detailed information is required.

  17. A Case Study Perspective on Working with ProUCL and a State Environmental Agency in Determining Background Threshold Values

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, David L.

    2015-01-01

    ProUCL is a software package made available by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to provide environmental scientists with better tools with which to conduct statistical analyses. ProUCL has been in production for over ten years and is in its fifth major version. In time, it has included more sophisticated and appropriate analysis tools. However, there is still substantial criticism of it among statisticians for its various omissions and even its philosophical approach. Due to limited resources, some state agencies have set ProUCL as a standard by which all state-mandated environmental analyses are compared, despite the EPA’s more open acceptance of other software products and methodologies. As such, it can be difficult for state-supervised sites to convince the state to allow the use of more appropriate methodologies or different software. In the current case study, several such instances arose and substantial resources were invested to demonstrate the appropriateness of alternative methodologies, sometimes without acquiring acceptance by the state despite sound statistical demonstration. In particular, efforts were made to address: inappropriate outlier detection, upper tolerance limit (UTL) calculations based on gamma distributions when non-detects were present, and inappropriate use of nonparametric UTL formulas. PMID:26501299

  18. A Case Study Perspective on Working with ProUCL and a State Environmental Agency in Determining Background Threshold Values.

    PubMed

    Daniel, David L

    2015-10-15

    ProUCL is a software package made available by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to provide environmental scientists with better tools with which to conduct statistical analyses. ProUCL has been in production for over ten years and is in its fifth major version. In time, it has included more sophisticated and appropriate analysis tools. However, there is still substantial criticism of it among statisticians for its various omissions and even its philosophical approach. Due to limited resources, some state agencies have set ProUCL as a standard by which all state-mandated environmental analyses are compared, despite the EPA's more open acceptance of other software products and methodologies. As such, it can be difficult for state-supervised sites to convince the state to allow the use of more appropriate methodologies or different software. In the current case study, several such instances arose and substantial resources were invested to demonstrate the appropriateness of alternative methodologies, sometimes without acquiring acceptance by the state despite sound statistical demonstration. In particular, efforts were made to address: inappropriate outlier detection, upper tolerance limit (UTL) calculations based on gamma distributions when non-detects were present, and inappropriate use of nonparametric UTL formulas.

  19. Long-length, long-lived flow-shear stabilized Z-pinches: Background and Experimental plans for scaling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. A.; Shumlak, U.; Golingo, R. P.; Claveau, E. L.; McLean, H. S.; Schmidt, A. E.

    2015-11-01

    The ZaP experiment produces long-lived sheared-flow-stabilized Z-pinch plasmas up to 126 cm in length for several flow-through times, and up to thousands of Alfvén times. Experimental measurements of the magnetic structure along the full length of the plasma column show an axially uniform Z-pinch plasma during the observed quiescent period. Interferometry, fast-framing images, and Rogowskii coils corroborate the existence of a pinched plasma during this quiescent period of time. Detailed two-dimensional non-linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) calculations have been performed showing the formation and assembly of long-length, long-lived Z-pinches. Experimentally-observed plasma lifetimes and velocity-shear profiles are shown to be consistent with calculations of viscous-damping timescales based on the measured plasma parameters. A newly-funded ARPA-E ALPHA project, the Fusion Z-pinch Experiment ``FuZE'' is being constructed at the University of Washington, in collaboration with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. FuZE will study scaling and stability of the successful ZaP experiment to higher pinch currents. The FuZE experimental design, goals, and plans, based on ZaP experimental results, will be presented.

  20. Studies on geological background and source of fluorine in drinking water in the North China Plate fluorosis areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, K.; Feng, F.; Li, H.; Chou, C.-L.; Feng, Z.; Yunshe, D.

    2008-01-01

    Endemic fluorosis in northern China is usually produced by high fluorine (F) content in drinking water. Thirty-one samples of drinking waters, mainly well waters and nearly 200 samples of rocks, loess, and coal were analyzed for F content using the combustion hydrolysis-fluoride-ion selective electrode (ISE) method. The geologic cross sections of two well-known fluorosis basins were studied. The solubility of F in different rock types collected from fluorosis areas was determined. Results showed that areas of endemic fluorosis in northern China are located in coal-bearing basins which are comprised of three stratagraphic portions. The lowest portion is Precambrian granitic rocks or Cambrian-Ordovician carbonates. The middle portion consists of Permo-Carboniferous or Jurassic coal-bearing sequences. The upper portion is 0-400 m Pleistocene loess. Flourine content in the Precambrian granite-gneiss contained (a) 1090-1460 ppm, in the Cambrian-Ordovician limestone and dolomite, (b) 52-133 ppm, in black shales and coal gob of Permo-Carboniferous coal-bearing strata, (c) 200-700 ppm, and (d) Pleistocene loess 454-542 ppm. The solubility of F in black shales of coal-bearing sequences was higher than in Precambrian granitic rocks, and both were more soluble than loess. F solubility from Precambrian granitic rocks was moderate, but Precambrian granitic rocks have high F content and thus contribute an appreciable amount of ion to the shallow groundwater (well water). Varying F content in shallow groundwater is controlled by geological conditions. The sources of F in the shallow groundwater from fluorosis areas in northern China are mainly derived from black shales of coal-bearing sequences and Precambrian granitic basement in the basins of northern China. ?? 2008 Taylor & Francis.

  1. A quantitative empirical analysis of the abstract/concrete distinction.

    PubMed

    Hill, Felix; Korhonen, Anna; Bentz, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This study presents original evidence that abstract and concrete concepts are organized and represented differently in the mind, based on analyses of thousands of concepts in publicly available data sets and computational resources. First, we show that abstract and concrete concepts have differing patterns of association with other concepts. Second, we test recent hypotheses that abstract concepts are organized according to association, whereas concrete concepts are organized according to (semantic) similarity. Third, we present evidence suggesting that concrete representations are more strongly feature-based than abstract concepts. We argue that degree of feature-based structure may fundamentally determine concreteness, and we discuss implications for cognitive and computational models of meaning.

  2. 1986 annual information meeting. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Abstracts are presented for the following papers: Geohydrological Research at the Y-12 Plant (C.S. Haase); Ecological Impacts of Waste Disposal Operations in Bear Creek Valley Near the Y-12 Plant (J.M. Loar); Finite Element Simulation of Subsurface Contaminant Transport: Logistic Difficulties in Handling Large Field Problems (G.T. Yeh); Dynamic Compaction of a Radioactive Waste Burial Trench (B.P. Spalding); Comparative Evaluation of Potential Sites for a High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository (E.D. Smith); Changing Priorities in Environmental Assessment and Environmental Compliance (R.M. Reed); Ecology, Ecotoxicology, and Ecological Risk Assessment (L.W. Barnthouse); Theory and Practice in Uncertainty Analysis from Ten Years of Practice (R.H. Gardner); Modeling Landscape Effects of Forest Decline (V.H. Dale); Soil Nitrogen and the Global Carbon Cycle (W.M. Post); Maximizing Wood Energy Production in Short-Rotation Plantations: Effect of Initial Spacing and Rotation Length (L.L. Wright); and Ecological Communities and Processes in Woodland Streams Exhibit Both Direct and Indirect Effects of Acidification (J.W. Elwood).

  3. Ozone Conference II: Abstract Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    Ozone Conference II: Pre- and Post-Harvest Applications Two Years After Gras, was held September 27-28, 1999 in Tulare, California. This conference, sponsored by EPRI's Agricultural Technology Alliance and Southern California Edison's AgTAC facility, was coordinated and organized by the on-site ATA-AgTAC Regional Center. Approximately 175 people attended the day-and-a-half conference at AgTAC. During the Conference twenty-two presentations were given on ozone food processing and agricultural applications. Included in the presentations were topics on: (1) Ozone fumigation; (2) Ozone generation techniques; (3) System and design applications; (4) Prewater treatment requirements; (5) Poultry water reuse; (6) Soil treatments with ozone gas; and (7) Post-harvest aqueous and gaseous ozone research results. A live videoconference between Tulare and Washington, D.C. was held to discuss the regulators' view from inside the beltway. Attendees participated in two Roundtable Question and Answer sessions and visited fifteen exhibits and demonstrations. The attendees included university and governmental researchers, regulators, consultants and industry experts, technology developers and providers, and corporate and individual end-users. This report is comprised of the Abstracts of each presentation, biographical sketches for each speaker and a registration/attendees list.

  4. SLAS Library Telescope Program (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) In the fall of 2014, I submitted to the members of the St. Louis Astronomical Society to take the $1,000 profit we had from a convention we had hosted and use it to purchase three telescopes to modify for a Library Telescope program that was invented by Mark Stowbridge and promoted by the New Hampshire Astronomical Society. I had met Mark at NEAF in 2012 when he was walking the floor demonstrating the telescope. We held meetings with three libraries, the St. Louis County Library system, the St. Louis Public Library system and an independent library in Kirkwood, Missouri. The response was overwhelming! SLCL responded with a request for ten telescopes and SLPL asked for five. We did our first build in October, 2014 and placed a total of eighteen telescopes. Since that time, SLAS has placed a total of eighty-eight telescopes in library systems around the St. Louis Metro area, expanding into neighboring counties and across the river in Illinois. In this talk, I will discuss how to approach this project and put it in place in your libraries!

  5. An abstract approach to music.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, H. G.; Tipei, S.

    1999-04-19

    In this article we have outlined a formal framework for an abstract approach to music and music composition. The model is formulated in terms of objects that have attributes, obey relationships, and are subject to certain well-defined operations. The motivation for this approach uses traditional terms and concepts of music theory, but the approach itself is formal and uses the language of mathematics. The universal object is an audio wave; partials, sounds, and compositions are special objects, which are placed in a hierarchical order based on time scales. The objects have both static and dynamic attributes. When we realize a composition, we assign values to each of its attributes: a (scalar) value to a static attribute, an envelope and a size to a dynamic attribute. A composition is then a trajectory in the space of aural events, and the complex audio wave is its formal representation. Sounds are fibers in the space of aural events, from which the composer weaves the trajectory of a composition. Each sound object in turn is made up of partials, which are the elementary building blocks of any music composition. The partials evolve on the fastest time scale in the hierarchy of partials, sounds, and compositions. The ideas outlined in this article are being implemented in a digital instrument for additive sound synthesis and in software for music composition. A demonstration of some preliminary results has been submitted by the authors for presentation at the conference.

  6. Handedness shapes children's abstract concepts.

    PubMed

    Casasanto, Daniel; Henetz, Tania

    2012-03-01

    Can children's handedness influence how they represent abstract concepts like kindness and intelligence? Here we show that from an early age, right-handers associate rightward space more strongly with positive ideas and leftward space with negative ideas, but the opposite is true for left-handers. In one experiment, children indicated where on a diagram a preferred toy and a dispreferred toy should go. Right-handers tended to assign the preferred toy to a box on the right and the dispreferred toy to a box on the left. Left-handers showed the opposite pattern. In a second experiment, children judged which of two cartoon animals looked smarter (or dumber) or nicer (or meaner). Right-handers attributed more positive qualities to animals on the right, but left-handers to animals on the left. These contrasting associations between space and valence cannot be explained by exposure to language or cultural conventions, which consistently link right with good. Rather, right- and left-handers implicitly associated positive valence more strongly with the side of space on which they can act more fluently with their dominant hands. Results support the body-specificity hypothesis (Casasanto, 2009), showing that children with different kinds of bodies think differently in corresponding ways.

  7. Greater need for background checks.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1999-11-01

    The push is on for a more uniform system of background checks for health care employees. Studies and crimes against patients have prompted regulation by the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), state governments, hospitals, and Congress.

  8. From Cleanup to Stewardship. A companion report to Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure and background information to support the scoping process required for the 1998 PEIS Settlement Study

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1999-10-01

    Long-term stewardship is expected to be needed at more than 100 DOE sites after DOE's Environmental Management program completes disposal, stabilization, and restoration operations to address waste and contamination resulting from nuclear research and nuclear weapons production conducted over the past 50 years. From Cleanup to stewardship provides background information on the Department of Energy (DOE) long-term stewardship obligations and activities. This document begins to examine the transition from cleanup to long-term stewardship, and it fulfills the Secretary's commitment to the President in the 1999 Performance Agreement to provide a companion report to the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure report. It also provides background information to support the scoping process required for a study on long-term stewardship required by a 1998 Settlement Agreement.

  9. Research Article Abstracts in Two Related Disciplines: Rhetorical Variation between Linguistics and Applied Linguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suntara, Watinee; Usaha, Siriluck

    2013-01-01

    The previous studies on abstracts (e.g., Santos, 1996; Samraj, 2002; Pho, 2008) illustrate that disciplinary variation in research article abstracts is discernible. However, the studies of abstracts from two related disciplines are still limited. The present study aimed to explore the rhetorical moves of abstracts in the fields of linguistics and…

  10. Identifying Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Using Background Parenchymal Enhancement Heterogeneity on Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Radiomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jeff; Kato, Fumi; Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Li, Ruijiang; Cui, Yi; Tha, Khin Khin; Yamashita, Hiroko; Kudo, Kohsuke; Shirato, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the added discriminative value of detailed quantitative characterization of background parenchymal enhancement in addition to the tumor itself on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI at 3.0 Tesla in identifying “triple-negative" breast cancers. Materials and Methods In this Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective study, DCE-MRI of 84 women presenting 88 invasive carcinomas were evaluated by a radiologist and analyzed using quantitative computer-aided techniques. Each tumor and its surrounding parenchyma were segmented semi-automatically in 3-D. A total of 85 imaging features were extracted from the two regions, including morphologic, densitometric, and statistical texture measures of enhancement. A small subset of optimal features was selected using an efficient sequential forward floating search algorithm. To distinguish triple-negative cancers from other subtypes, we built predictive models based on support vector machines. Their classification performance was assessed with the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) using cross-validation. Results Imaging features based on the tumor region achieved an AUC of 0.782 in differentiating triple-negative cancers from others, in line with the current state of the art. When background parenchymal enhancement features were included, the AUC increased significantly to 0.878 (p<0.01). Similar improvements were seen in nearly all subtype classification tasks undertaken. Notably, amongst the most discriminating features for predicting triple-negative cancers were textures of background parenchymal enhancement. Conclusions Considering the tumor as well as its surrounding parenchyma on DCE-MRI for radiomic image phenotyping provides useful information for identifying triple-negative breast cancers. Heterogeneity of background parenchymal enhancement, characterized by quantitative texture features on DCE-MRI, adds value to such differentiation models as they are strongly

  11. An ab initio/Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus study of the hydrogen-abstraction reactions of methyl ethers, H(3)COCH(3-x)(CH(3))(x), x = 0-2, by OH; mechanism and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chong-Wen; Simmie, John M; Curran, Henry J

    2010-07-14

    A theoretical study of the mechanism and kinetics of the H-abstraction reaction from dimethyl (DME), ethylmethyl (EME) and iso-propylmethyl (IPME) ethers by the OH radical has been carried out using the high-level methods CCSD(T)/CBS, G3 and G3MP2BH&H. The computationally less-expensive methods of G3 and G3MP2BH&H yield results for DME within 0.2-0.6 and 0.7-0.9 kcal mol(-1), respectively, of the coupled cluster, CCSD(T), values extrapolated to the basis set limit. So the G3 and G3MP2BH&H methods can be confidently used for the reactions of the higher ethers. A distinction is made between the two different kinds of H-atoms, classified as in/out-of the symmetry plane, and it is found that abstraction from the out-of-plane H-atoms proceeds through a stepwise mechanism involving the formation of a reactant complex in the entrance channel and product complex in the exit channel. The in-plane H-atom abstractions take place through a more direct mechanism and are less competitive. Rate constants of the three reactions have been calculated in the temperature range of 500-3000 K using the Variflex code, based on the weak collision, master equation/microcanonical variational RRKM theory including tunneling corrections. The computed total rate constants (cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)) have been fitted as follows: k(DME) = 2.74 xT(3.94) exp (1534.2/T), k(EME) = 20.93 xT(3.61) exp (2060.1/T) and k(IPME) = 0.55 xT(3.93) exp (2826.1/T). Expressions of the group rate constants for the three different carbon sites are also provided.

  12. Free radical hydrogen atom abstraction from saturated hydrocarbons: A crossed-molecular-beams study of the reaction Cl + C{sub 3}H{sub 8} {yields} HCl + C{sub 3}H{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, D.A.; Hemmi, N.; Suits, A.G.; Lee, Y.T.

    1997-04-01

    The abstraction of hydrogen atoms from saturated hydrocarbons are reactions of fundamental importance in combustion as well as often being the rate limiting step in free radical substitution reactions. The authors have begun studying these reactions under single collision conditions using the crossed molecular beam technique on beamline 9.0.2.1, utilizing VUV undulator radiation to selectively ionize the scattered hydrocarbon free radical products (C{sub x}H{sub 2x+1}). The crossed molecular beam technique involves two reactant molecular beams fixed at 90{degrees}. The molecular beam sources are rotatable in the plane defined by the two beams. The scattered neutral products travel 12.0 cm where they are photoionized using the VUV undulator radiation, mass selected, and counted as a function of time. In the authors initial investigations they are using halogen atoms as protypical free radicals to abstract hydrogen atoms from small alkanes. Their first study has been looking at the reaction of Cl + propane {r_arrow} HCl + propyl radical. In their preliminary efforts the authors have measured the laboratory scattering angular distribution and time of flight spectra for the propyl radical products at collision energies of 9.6 kcal/mol and 14.9 kcal/mol.

  13. The Cosmic Background Explorer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulkis, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Outlines the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission to measure celestial radiation. Describes the instruments used and experiments involving differential microwave radiometers, and a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer. (YP)

  14. Annotating user-defined abstractions for optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D; Schordan, M; Vuduc, R; Yi, Q

    2005-12-05

    This paper discusses the features of an annotation language that we believe to be essential for optimizing user-defined abstractions. These features should capture semantics of function, data, and object-oriented abstractions, express abstraction equivalence (e.g., a class represents an array abstraction), and permit extension of traditional compiler optimizations to user-defined abstractions. Our future work will include developing a comprehensive annotation language for describing the semantics of general object-oriented abstractions, as well as automatically verifying and inferring the annotated semantics.

  15. Abstraction and reformulation in artificial intelligence.

    PubMed Central

    Holte, Robert C.; Choueiry, Berthe Y.

    2003-01-01

    This paper contributes in two ways to the aims of this special issue on abstraction. The first is to show that there are compelling reasons motivating the use of abstraction in the purely computational realm of artificial intelligence. The second is to contribute to the overall discussion of the nature of abstraction by providing examples of the abstraction processes currently used in artificial intelligence. Although each type of abstraction is specific to a somewhat narrow context, it is hoped that collectively they illustrate the richness and variety of abstraction in its fullest sense. PMID:12903653

  16. Core foundations of abstract geometry.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Moira R; Huang, Yi; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2013-08-27

    Human adults from diverse cultures share intuitions about the points, lines, and figures of Euclidean geometry. Do children develop these intuitions by drawing on phylogenetically ancient and developmentally precocious geometric representations that guide their navigation and their analysis of object shape? In what way might these early-arising representations support later-developing Euclidean intuitions? To approach these questions, we investigated the relations among young children's use of geometry in tasks assessing: navigation; visual form analysis; and the interpretation of symbolic, purely geometric maps. Children's navigation depended on the distance and directional relations of the surface layout and predicted their use of a symbolic map with targets designated by surface distances. In contrast, children's analysis of visual forms depended on the size-invariant shape relations of objects and predicted their use of the same map but with targets designated by corner angles. Even though the two map tasks used identical instructions and map displays, children's performance on these tasks showed no evidence of integrated representations of distance and angle. Instead, young children flexibly recruited geometric representations of either navigable layouts or objects to interpret the same spatial symbols. These findings reveal a link between the early-arising geometric representations that humans share with diverse animals and the flexible geometric intuitions that give rise to human knowledge at its highest reaches. Although young children do not appear to integrate core geometric representations, children's use of the abstract geometry in spatial symbols such as maps may provide the earliest clues to the later construction of Euclidean geometry.

  17. Logistics background study: underground mining

    SciTech Connect

    Hanslovan, J. J.; Visovsky, R. G.

    1982-02-01

    Logistical functions that are normally associated with US underground coal mining are investigated and analyzed. These functions imply all activities and services that support the producing sections of the mine. The report provides a better understanding of how these functions impact coal production in terms of time, cost, and safety. Major underground logistics activities are analyzed and include: transportation and personnel, supplies and equipment; transportation of coal and rock; electrical distribution and communications systems; water handling; hydraulics; and ventilation systems. Recommended areas for future research are identified and prioritized.

  18. Effects of Abstract and Concrete Simulation Elements on Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaakkola, T.; Veermans, K.

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary evidence on the effectiveness of concrete and abstract representations in science education is based solely on studies conducted in college context. There it has been found that learning with abstract representations produces predominantly better outcomes than learning with concrete representations and combining the representations…

  19. A Quantitative Empirical Analysis of the Abstract/Concrete Distinction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Felix; Korhonen, Anna; Bentz, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This study presents original evidence that abstract and concrete concepts are organized and represented differently in the mind, based on analyses of thousands of concepts in publicly available data sets and computational resources. First, we show that abstract and concrete concepts have differing patterns of association with other concepts.…

  20. Tense Use and Move Analysis in Journal Article Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shih-ping; Tu, Pin-ning

    2014-01-01

    There has long been a growing interest in journal article (JA) abstract writing, and this pervading interest has boosted the exigency for further research. This current study therefore aims to investigate both the various applications of verb tense and the rhetorical structure within JA abstracts. A corpus of 1,000 JAs was collected from four…

  1. Diet and growth in infancy: relationship to socioeconomic background and to health and development in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children.

    PubMed

    Emmett, Pauline M; Jones, Louise R

    2014-08-01

    To assess the relationship between diet and growth in infancy and socioeconomic background, all publications from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) covering breastfeeding, diet and growth in infancy, and the associations of these factors with socioeconomic background and later health and developmental outcomes were reviewed. Diet was assessed by parent-completed food records and parent-completed food frequency questionnaires covering infant feeding practices. Infancy growth was monitored through routine screening and by standardized measurements. Indicators of socioeconomic background were obtained by parent-completed questionnaires. Childhood outcomes were measured by standardized procedures. Rapid early weight gain was associated with later obesity. Longer breastfeeding duration was associated with lower body fat, but not lower body mass index, and with higher IQ in mid-childhood. Breastfed infants were better at regulating their energy intake than bottle-fed infants. In bottle-fed infants, energy intake at 4 months was associated with greater weight gain up to 5 years of age. Feeding cow's milk as a main drink in infancy was associated with anemia and high salt intake. Maternal education was a strong determinant of dietary differences: low education was associated with never breastfeeding and not following feeding guidelines. ALSPAC has provided unique insights into the relationship between diet and growth in infancy and later developmental outcomes.

  2. Accounting for conformational flexibility and torsional anharmonicity in the H + CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH hydrogen abstraction reactions: A multi-path variational transition state theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Fernández-Ramos, Antonio

    2014-05-07

    This work reports a detailed theoretical study of the hydrogen abstraction reactions from ethanol by atomic hydrogen. The calculated thermal rate constants take into account torsional anharmonicity and conformational flexibility, in addition to the variational and tunneling effects. Specifically, the kinetics calculations were performed by using multi-path canonical variational transition state theory with least-action path tunneling corrections, to which we have added the two-dimensional non-separable method to take into account torsional anharmonicity. The multi-path thermal rate constant is expressed as a sum over conformational reaction channels. Each of these channels includes all the transition states that can be reached by internal rotations. The results show that, in the interval of temperatures between 250 and 2500 K, the account for multiple paths leads to higher thermal rate constants with respect to the single path approach, mainly at low and at high temperatures. In addition, torsional anharmonicity enhances the slope of the Arrhenius plot in this range of temperatures. Finally, we show that the incorporation of tunneling into the hydrogen abstraction reactions substantially changes the contribution of each of the transition states to the conformational reaction channel.

  3. Correlators in nontrivial backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Stephanou, Michael

    2009-01-15

    Operators in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory with an R-charge of O(N{sup 2}) are dual to backgrounds which are asymtotically AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. In this article we develop efficient techniques that allow the computation of correlation functions in these backgrounds. We find that (i) contractions between fields in the string words and fields in the operator creating the background are the field theory accounting of the new geometry, (ii) correlation functions of probes in these backgrounds are given by the free field theory contractions but with rescaled propagators and (iii) in these backgrounds there are no open string excitations with their special end point interactions; we have only closed string excitations.

  4. The Athena Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Luigi; Lotti, Simone; Macculi, Claudio; Molendi, Silvano; Eraerds, Tanja; Laurent, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Estimating, reducing and controlling the residual particle background is fundamental for achieving the objectives of several science topics of Athena, in particular those connected with background dominated observations of faint and/or diffuse sources. This requires assessing the particle environment in L2, propagating the various particle components throughout the mirror, spacecraft, and instruments via proper modelling and simulations of various physical processes, implementing design and h/w measures at instrument and mission level to reduce the un-rejected background and identifying proper calibration methods to control the background variations. Likewise, an adequate knowledge of the XRB, made of components that may vary spatially or temporally, is required as well. Here we will review the present status of the background knowledge, and summarize the activities on-going within Athena at various levels.

  5. Low background counting at the LBNL low background facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Chan, Y. D.; Hurley, D. L.; Wang, B. S.

    2013-08-08

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to end-users in two unique facilities: locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory space; and a satellite underground station (600 m.w.e) in Oroville, CA. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic and anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via neutron activation analysis for specific applications. A general overview of the facilities, services, and capabilities will be discussed. Recent activities will also be presented, including the recent installation of a 3π muon veto at the surface facility, cosmogenic activation studies of TeO{sub 2} for CUORE, and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout.

  6. 37 CFR 1.438 - The abstract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The abstract. 1.438 Section 1... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES International Processing Provisions The International Application § 1.438 The abstract. (a) Requirements as to the content and form of the abstract are set forth...

  7. EDUCATIONAL MEDIA RESEARCH ABSTRACTING PROJECT. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HYER, ANNA L.

    THIS PROJECT PROVIDED ABSTRACTING COVERAGE OF 33 FINAL REPORTS OF U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION FINANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS IN EDUCATIONAL MEDIA. AN ABSTRACTOR, DR. WILLIAM ALLEN, WAS HIRED TO EVALUATE AND EDIT OR REWRITE ABSTRACTS SUBMITTED BY RESEARCHERS, AND TO PREPARE ABSTRACTS IF NECESSARY. TWO ANALYTICAL REVIEWS ON SELECTED AREAS OF MEDIA RESEARCH…

  8. Writing a Structured Abstract for the Thesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, James

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the author's suggestions on how to improve thesis abstracts. The author describes two books on writing abstracts: (1) "Creating Effective Conference Abstracts and Posters in Biomedicine: 500 tips for Success" (Fraser, Fuller & Hutber, 2009), a compendium of clear advice--a must book to have in one's hand as one prepares a…

  9. At the HeART of Abstraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berdit, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Abstraction has long been a concept difficult to define for students. Students often feel the pressure of making their artwork "look real" and frustration can often lead to burnout in the classroom. In this article, the author describes how her lesson on abstraction has alleviated much of that pressure as students created an abstract acrylic…

  10. 37 CFR 1.438 - The abstract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The abstract. 1.438 Section 1... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES International Processing Provisions The International Application § 1.438 The abstract. (a) Requirements as to the content and form of the abstract are set forth...

  11. 37 CFR 1.438 - The abstract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false The abstract. 1.438 Section 1... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES International Processing Provisions The International Application § 1.438 The abstract. (a) Requirements as to the content and form of the abstract are set forth...

  12. 37 CFR 1.438 - The abstract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The abstract. 1.438 Section 1... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES International Processing Provisions The International Application § 1.438 The abstract. (a) Requirements as to the content and form of the abstract are set forth...

  13. A study of the effect of flight density and background noise on V/STOL acceptability. [effective perceived noise level as measure of annoyance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sternfeld, H., Jr.; Hinterkeuser, E. G.; Hackman, R. B.; Davis, J.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted in which test subjects evaluated the sounds of a helicopter, a turbofan STOL and a turbojet airplane while engaged in work and leisure activities. Exposure to a high repetitive density of the aircraft sounds did not make the individual sounds more annoying but did create an unacceptable environment. The application of a time duration term to db(A) resulted in a measure which compared favorably with EPNL as a predictor of annoyance. Temporal variations in background noise level had no significant effect on the rated annoyance.

  14. [Special methodology, qualitative methods and abstract concepts].

    PubMed

    Delgado, Ana R

    2010-08-01

    Generally speaking, this paper comments on the role of qualitative methods in scientific psychology. To begin with, general and special methodology are defined; then, the main uses of qualitative methods are described and the focus of the paper on the study of meaning and of abstract concepts in the context of embodied cognition is justified. It is emphasized that three uses of qualitative methods converge in the study of embodied cognition: (1) classification, given that it is centered on concepts, (2) discovery, because theories are not yet well articulated and inductive effort is required, and (3) the study of meaning. The final recommendation is to profit from the opportunity of constructing special techniques that the transformation of cognitive psychology is favoring; in this context, varieties of emotion become a privileged object of study.

  15. The cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dar, Arnon

    1991-01-01

    The cosmic neutrino background is expected to consist of relic neutrinos from the big bang, of neutrinos produced during nuclear burning in stars, of neutrinos released by gravitational stellar collapse, and of neutrinos produced by cosmic ray interactions with matter and radiation in the interstellar and intergalactic medium. Formation of baryonic dark matter in the early universe, matter-antimatter annihilation in a baryonic symmetric universe, and dark matter annihilation could have also contributed significantly to the cosmic neutrino background. The purpose of this paper is to review the properties of these cosmic neutrino backgrounds, the indirect evidence for their existence, and the prospects for their detection.

  16. Background Underground at WIPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esch, Ernst-Ingo; Hime, A.; Bowles, T. J.

    2001-04-01

    Recent interest to establish a dedicated underground laboratory in the United States prompted an experimental program at to quantify the enviromental backgrounds underground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. An outline of this program is provided along with recent experimental data on the cosmic ray muon flux at the 650 meter level of WIPP. The implications of the cosmic ray muon and fast neutron background at WIPP will be discussed in the context of new generation, low background experiments envisioned in the future.

  17. Don’t forget the posters! Quality and content variables associated with accepted abstracts at a national trauma meeting

    PubMed Central

    Dossett, Lesly A.; Fox, Erin E.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Zaydfudim, Victor; Kauffmann, Rondi; Shelton, Julia; Wang, Weiwei; Cioffi, William G.; Holcomb, John B.; Cotton, Bryan A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND As a primary venue for presenting research results, abstracts selected for presentation at national meetings should be of the highest scientific merit and research quality. It is uncertain to what degree this is achieved as the methodological quality of abstracts submitted to national surgical meetings has not been previously described. The objective of this study was to evaluate abstracts presented at a leading trauma meeting for methodological quality. METHODS All abstracts accepted for the 2009 American Association for the Surgery of Trauma meeting were reviewed and scored for methodological quality based on 10 criteria (scores, 0–10; 10 being the highest). Criteria were based on nationally published methodology guidelines. Two independent reviewers who were blinded to institution, region, and author reviewed each abstract. RESULTS A total of 187 abstracts were accepted for presentation (67 oral and 120 posters). The most frequent clinical topics were shock/transfusion (23%), abdomen (12%), and nervous system (11%). Shock/transfusion abstracts were more common in the oral presentations (31% vs. 19%; p =0.06). Abstracts from the northeast and south regions were the most common in both oral (26% and 29%) and posters (25% and 24%). Basic science accounted for 12% of accepted studies, while 51% were clinical and 28% were health services/outcomes. Only 8% of abstracts presented randomized data and only 11% reported null findings. Overall abstract scores ranged from 3 to 10 (median, 7; mean, 7.4). Abstracts selected for poster presentation had an overall higher score than those selected for oral presentation (7.4 ±1.7 vs. 6.8 ±1.7; p =0.02). CONCLUSION Although oral presentations traditionally receive the most attention and interest, the methodological quality of abstracts accepted for poster presentation equals (and sometimes exceeds) that of oral abstracts. Attendees of these national meetings should reconsider their time spent in viewing and visiting

  18. Processing abstract language modulates motor system activity.

    PubMed

    Glenberg, Arthur M; Sato, Marc; Cattaneo, Luigi; Riggio, Lucia; Palumbo, Daniele; Buccino, Giovanni

    2008-06-01

    Embodiment theory proposes that neural systems for perception and action are also engaged during language comprehension. Previous neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies have only been able to demonstrate modulation of action systems during comprehension of concrete language. We provide neurophysiological evidence for modulation of motor system activity during the comprehension of both concrete and abstract language. In Experiment 1, when the described direction of object transfer or information transfer (e.g., away from the reader to another) matched the literal direction of a hand movement used to make a response, speed of responding was faster than when the two directions mismatched (an action-sentence compatibility effect). In Experiment 2, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to study changes in the corticospinal motor pathways to hand muscles while reading the same sentences. Relative to sentences that do not describe transfer, there is greater modulation of activity in the hand muscles when reading sentences describing transfer of both concrete objects and abstract information. These findings are discussed in relation to the human mirror neuron system.

  19. The cosmic background explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Gulkis, G. ); Lubin, P.M. ); Meyer, S.S. ); Silverberg, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Late last year the National Aeronautics and Space Administration launched its first satellite dedicated to the study of phenomena related to the origins of the universe. The satellite, called the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), carries three complementary detectors that will make fundamental measurements of the celestial radiation. Part of that radiation is believed to have originated in processes that occurred at the very dawn of the universe. By measuring the remnant radiation at wavelengths from one micrometer to one centimeter across the entire sky, scientists hope to be able to solve many mysteries regarding the origin and evolution of the early universe. Unfortunately, these radiative relics of the early universe are weak and veiled by local astrophysical and terrestrial sources of radiation. The wavelengths of the various cosmic components may also overlap, thereby making the understanding of the diffuse celestial radiation a challenge. Nevertheless, the COBE instruments, with their full-sky coverage, high sensitivity to a wide range of wavelengths and freedom from interference from the earth's atmosphere, will constitute for astrophysicists an observatory of unprecedented sensitivity and scope. The interesting cosmic signals will then be separated from one another and from noncosmic radiation sources by a comprehensive analysis of the data.

  20. Modeling F region gravity waves observed during the WAGS campaign. I. Special event. II. Background wave spectra. [Worldwide Atmospheric Gravity wave Studies on traveling ionospheric disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, D.R.; Liu, C.H.

    1988-12-01

    Two types of disturbances observed in the ionization density and the line-of-sight ion velocity data from the Worldwide Atmospheric Gravity Wave Study are analyzed and compared with theoretical studies. The study concentrates on the source-response relationship between auroral activities and gravity waves observed in the F-region. In the first section, the measured and derived wave parameters for a semiperiodic TID observed on October 18, 1985 during a moderately magnetically active period are shown to be consistent with predictions from wave theory. In the second section, the background wave spectra observed during several magnetically quiet days are analyzed. It is shown that the neutral vertical velocity spectrum can be modeled as a power law type spectrum. The overall kinetic energy of this spectrum is calculated and compared with the TID. 32 references.