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Sample records for abstract chronic obstructive

  1. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Lange, Peter

    2013-04-15

    The new version of the GOLD document on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), introduces a profound change in the stratification of the patients. In addition to the level of forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), the new stratification also includes the level of daily symptoms, in particular dyspnoea, and the history of exacerbations. This review describes this stratification and the treatment of stable COPD according to the GOLD document. It focuses on early diagnosis, smoking cessation, rehabilitation and medical treatment.

  2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, V K

    2013-02-01

    The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec) to FVC (forced vital capacity) ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure), hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity), bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia), stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death) and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease guidelines

  3. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna-F; Caputo, Carla; De Giorgio, Roberto; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-05-21

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases.

  4. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna F; Caputo, Carla; Giorgio, Roberto De; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases. PMID:18494042

  5. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gabbard, Scott L; Lacy, Brian E

    2013-06-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIP) is a rare and serious disorder of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract characterized as a motility disorder with the primary defect of impaired peristalsis; symptoms are consistent with a bowel obstruction, although mechanical obstruction cannot be identified. CIP is classified as a neuropathy, myopathy, or mesenchymopathy; it is a neuropathic process in the majority of patients. The natural history of CIP is generally that of a progressive disorder, although occasional patients with secondary CIP note significant symptomatic improvement when the underlying disorder is identified and treated. Symptoms vary from patient to patient depending on the location of the luminal GI tract involved and the degree of involvement; however, the small intestine is nearly always involved. Common symptoms include dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, bloating, abdominal distension, constipation or diarrhea, and involuntary weight loss. Unfortunately, these symptoms are nonspecific, which can contribute to misdiagnosis or a delay in diagnosis and treatment. Since many of the symptoms and signs suggest a mechanical bowel obstruction, diagnostic tests typically focus on uncovering a mechanical obstruction, although routine tests do not identify an obstructive process. Nutrition supplementation is required for many patients with CIP due to symptoms of dysphagia, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. This review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with CIP, with an emphasis on nutrition assessment and treatment options for patients with nutrition compromise.

  6. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... feel alone. Outlook (Prognosis) COPD is a long-term (chronic) illness. The disease will get worse more quickly if you do not stop smoking. If you have severe COPD, you will be short of breath with most activities. You may be ...

  7. Chronic Bronchitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Criner, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic bronchitis (CB) is a common but variable phenomenon in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It has numerous clinical consequences, including an accelerated decline in lung function, greater risk of the development of airflow obstruction in smokers, a predisposition to lower respiratory tract infection, higher exacerbation frequency, and worse overall mortality. CB is caused by overproduction and hypersecretion of mucus by goblet cells, which leads to worsening airflow obstruction by luminal obstruction of small airways, epithelial remodeling, and alteration of airway surface tension predisposing to collapse. Despite its clinical sequelae, little is known about the pathophysiology of CB and goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and treatment options are limited. In addition, it is becoming increasingly apparent that in the classic COPD spectrum, with emphysema on one end and CB on the other, most patients lie somewhere in the middle. It is known now that many patients with severe emphysema can develop CB, and small airway pathology has been linked to worse clinical outcomes, such as increased mortality and lesser improvement in lung function after lung volume reduction surgery. However, in recent years, a greater understanding of the importance of CB as a phenotype to identify patients with a beneficial response to therapy has been described. Herein we review the epidemiology of CB, the evidence behind its clinical consequences, the current understanding of the pathophysiology of goblet cell hyperplasia in COPD, and current therapies for CB. PMID:23204254

  8. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction].

    PubMed

    Joly, Francisca; Amiot, Aurélien; Coffin, Benoît; Lavergne-Slove, Anne; Messing, Bernard; Bouhnik, Yoram

    2006-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a disease characterized by episodes resembling mechanical obstruction in the absence of organic, systemic, or metabolic disorders. Pseudo-obstruction is an uncommon condition and can result from primary (40%) or secondary (60%) causes. The most common symptoms are nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, abdominal pain and constipation or diarrhea. These symptoms are usually present many years before CIPO diagnosis. They can lead to severe electrolyte disorders and malnutrition. Principles for management of patients with CIPO are: to establish a correct clinical diagnosis in excluding mechanical obstruction; to perform a symptomatic and physiologic assessment of the gastrointestinal tract involved; to look for extra-intestinal manifestations, especially for myopathy and neuropathy; to discuss in some cases a surgery for full-thickness intestinal biopsies, and/or a neuromuscular biopsy in case of mitochondrial cytopathy suspicion. The management is primarily focused on symptom control and nutritional support to prevent weight loss and malnutrition. Treatment of CIPO includes prokinetic agents which may help to reduce gastrointestinal symptoms Courses of antibiotics may be needed in patients with symptoms suggestive of bacterial overgrowth. When necessary, enteral nutrition is preferred. In carefully selected patients, feeding jejunostomy with or without decompression gastrostomy may be tried. Long term parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who can not tolerate enteral nutrition. Intestinal transplantation can be discussed in selected patients.

  9. Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap: asthmatic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or chronic obstructive asthma?

    PubMed

    Slats, Annelies; Taube, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are different disease entities. They are both clinical diagnoses, with diagnostic tools to discriminate between one another. However, especially in older patients (>55 years) it seems more difficult to differentiate between asthma and COPD. This has led to the definition of a new phenotype called asthma COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). However, our understanding of ACOS is at a very preliminary stage, as most research has involved subjects with existing diagnoses of asthma or COPD from studies with different definitions for ACOS. This has led to different and sometimes opposing results between studies on several features of ACOS, also depending on the comparison with COPD alone, asthma alone or both, which are summarized in this review.We suggest not using the term ACOS for a patient with features of both asthma and COPD, but to describe a patient with chronic obstructive airway disease as completely as possible, with regard to characteristics that determine treatment response (e.g. eosinophilic inflammation) and prognosis (such as smoking status, exacerbation rate, fixed airflow limitation, hyperresponsiveness, comorbidities). This will provide a far more clinically relevant diagnosis, and would aid in research on treatment in more homogenous groups of patients with chronic airways obstruction. More research is certainly needed to develop more evidence-based definitions for this patient group and to evaluate biomarkers, which will help to further classify these patients, treat them more adequately and unravel the underlying pathophysiological mechanism.

  10. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M T; Solís Herruzo, J A

    2007-02-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a syndrome characterized by the presence of recurrent episodes of clinical intestinal obstruction in the absence of obstructive lesions. Although this syndrome is rare, it causes a high morbidity. It is caused by a disturbance of the intestinal motility, that results in a failure of the progression of the intestinal content. Basically, the failure of the intestinal motility is a consequence of muscular disorder, neurological disorder or both. Usually, CIPO is secondary to other systemic disease; however, in the last years, many cases of primary CIPO have been described. The use of new manometric tecniques and specific histological procedures have allowed to clarify the pathogenesis of some of these entities including mitochondrial diseases and paraneoplasic syndromes. Clinical manifestations of CIPO are diverse, depending on the location and extension of the motility disorder. As the diagnosis of this disease is usually not an easy task, patients frecuently undergo unnecesary surgical interventions, are diagnosed of psyquiatric disorders, or the correct diagnosis is delayed several years after the first symptoms arise. The aims of the treatment are to maintain the nutritional condition and to improve symptoms using nutritional measures, drugs or, eventually, endoscopical or surgical procedures.

  11. [Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap].

    PubMed

    Müller, Veronika; Gálffy, Gabriella; Tamási, Lilla

    2011-01-16

    Asthma bronchiale and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are the most prevalent lung diseases characterized by inflammation of the airways. International and Hungarian guidelines provide proper definitions for clinical symptoms, diagnostics and therapy of both diseases. However, in everyday clinical practice, overlap of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has become more frequent. As guidelines are mainly based on large, multicenter, randomized, controlled trials that exclude overlap patients, there is a lack of diagnostic and especially therapeutic strategies for these patients. This review summarizes clinical characteristics of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap, and provides daily practical examples for its management.

  12. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction].

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Hidenori; Inoh, Yumi; Fuyuki, Akiko; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2015-05-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction(CIPO) is a rare severe digestive disease in which clinical symptoms of intestinal obstruction appear without any mechanical cause. Pathophysiologically, CIPO shows ineffective intestinal propulsion due to an impairment of intestinal smooth muscle, enteric nervous system, and interstitial cells of Cajal(ICC). Sustained increased intra-bowel pressure often causes small intestinal malabsorption and bacterial translocation, and leads to malnutrition and blood stream infection (sepsis). Key points of the medical approach for CIPO are to improve nutritional status and reduce abdominal symptoms. Dietary cure and defecation control are the main options in mild cases, whereas home-parenteral-nutrition(HPN) and decompression therapy are often needed in severe cases. Stimulant laxatives, prokinetics and herbal medicine are usually used but often in fail. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrojejunostomy(PEG-J) tube may be burdenless compared to conventional ileus tube. Most important points in the management of this disease are to make a correct diagnosis as early as possible and avoid unnecessary surgery. However, no clear diagnostic criteria have been established so far. Manometry, scintigraphy, and full-thickness biopsy are the major examination for the CIPO diagnosis in the Western countries; however these specialized examinations are not popular in Japan. Therefore the Research Group(chief investigator, Atsushi Nakajima) proposed Japanese diagnostic criteria in 2009 to facilitate the diagnosis of this rare disease by the general physician. In 2013, we have reported that cine-MRI is a non-invasive diagnostic method for CIPO. Although further data are eagerly awaited, it can become a promising diagnostic tool in CIPO patients. Furthermore the Japanese criteria have been revised, and in 2014, the comprehensive criteria from a child to an adult have been devised. In 2015, CIPO is newly certified as Specified Rare and Intractable Disease which is

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... visit when they're all better. Save Your Energy at Home Place items you use often in ... or the skin around your fingernails are blue Alternative Names COPD - adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive airways disease - ...

  14. Exacerbation phenotyping in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Martin; Korman, Tony; King, Paul; Hamza, Kais; Bardin, Philip

    2013-11-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) are crucial events but causes remain poorly defined. A method to clinically 'phenotype' AECOPD have been proposed, and 52 hospitalized chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations according to underlying aetiology have now been prospectively phenotyped. Multiple exacerbation phenotypes were identified. A subpopulation coinfected with virus and bacteria had a significantly longer length of hospital stay, and this pilot study indicates that exacerbation phenotyping may be advantageous.

  15. Acupuncture for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Junfei; Wang, Xuehui; Li, Xing; Zhao, Dejun; Xu, Jinquan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Acupuncture has been suggested to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in China. However, current evidence is insufficient to draw a firm conclusion regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture in COPD. Therefore, this multicenter, randomized, sham-controlled study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for treating patients with COPD. Methods: This is a two-arm, parallel group, multicenter, randomized, sham-controlled trial with concealed allocation, and participants, assessor, and analyst blinding. Seventy-two participants with COPD were recruited and randomly divided into 2 groups (real acupuncture group and sham acupuncture group) in a 1:1 ratio. Patients received either real or sham needling at the same acupoints 3 times weekly for 8 weeks. The primary outcome was dyspnea on exertion evaluated using the 6-minute walk test. In addition, health-related quality of life was also evaluated. Measurements were obtained at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment. Results: Six-minute walking distance measurements and health-related quality of life were significantly better in the real acupuncture group than that in the sham acupuncture group. Conclusion: The findings suggest that acupuncture can be used as an adjunctive therapy to reduce dyspnea in patients with COPD. PMID:27749542

  16. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... term that is used to include chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or a combination of both conditions. Asthma is ... they spring back to their original size. In emphysema, the walls of some of the alveoli have ...

  17. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma].

    PubMed

    Cosío, Borja G; Fiorentino, Federico; Scrimini, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma are both highly prevalent inflammatory diseases characterized by airway obstruction with distinct pathogenic mechanisms and different degrees of response to antiinflammatory therapy. However, forms of presentation that show overlap between both diseases and which are not clearly represented in clinical trials are frequently encountered in clinical practice. These patients may show accelerated loss of pulmonary function and have a worse prognosis. Therefore their early identification is essential. Biomarkers such as bronchial hyperreactivity or nitric oxide in exhaled air have yielded discrepant results. Phenotypic characterization will allow treatment with inhaled corticosteroids to be individually tailored and optimized.

  18. Iliocaval Confluence Stenting for Chronic Venous Obstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Graaf, Rick de; Wolf, Mark de; Sailer, Anna M.; Laanen, Jorinde van Wittens, Cees; Jalaie, Houman

    2015-10-15

    PurposeDifferent techniques have been described for stenting of venous obstructions. We report our experience with two different confluence stenting techniques to treat chronic bi-iliocaval obstructions.Materials and MethodsBetween 11/2009 and 08/2014 we treated 40 patients for chronic total bi-iliocaval obstructions. Pre-operative magnetic resonance venography showed bilateral extensive post-thrombotic scarring in common and external iliac veins as well as obstruction of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Stenting of the IVC was performed with large self-expandable stents down to the level of the iliocaval confluence. To bridge the confluence, either self-expandable stents were placed inside the IVC stent (24 patients, SECS group) or high radial force balloon-expandable stents were placed at the same level (16 patients, BECS group). In both cases, bilateral iliac extensions were performed using nitinol stents.ResultsRecanalization was achieved for all patients. In 15 (38 %) patients, a hybrid procedure with endophlebectomy and arteriovenous fistula creation needed to be performed because of significant involvement of inflow vessels below the inguinal ligament. Mean follow-up was 443 ± 438 days (range 7–1683 days). For all patients, primary, assisted-primary, and secondary patency rate at 36 months were 70, 73, and 78 %, respectively. Twelve-month patency rates in the SECS group were 85, 85, and 95 % for primary, assisted-primary, and secondary patency. In the BECS group, primary patency was 100 % during a mean follow-up period of 134 ± 118 (range 29–337) days.ConclusionStenting of chronic bi-iliocaval obstruction shows relatively high patency rates at medium follow-up. Short-term patency seems to favor confluence stenting with balloon-expandable stents.

  19. Cognitive Impairment in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Crişan, Alexandru F.; Oancea, Cristian; Timar, Bogdan; Fira-Mladinescu, Ovidiu; Crişan, Alexandru; Tudorache, Voicu

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially in severe forms, is commonly associated with multiple cognitive problems. Montreal Cognitive Assessment test (MoCA) is used to detect cognitive impairment evaluating several areas: visuospatial, memory, attention and fluency. Our study aim was to evaluate the impact of stable COPD and exacerbation (AECOPD) phases on cognitive status using MoCA questionnaire. Methods We enrolled 39 patients (pts), smokers with COPD group D (30 stable and 9 in AECOPD) and 13 healthy subjects (control group), having similar level of education and no significant differences regarding the anthropometric measurements. We analyzed the differences in MoCA score between these three groups and also the correlation between this score and inflammatory markers. Results Patients with AECOPD had a significant (p<0.001) decreased MoCA score (14.6±3.4) compared to stable COPD (20.2±2.4) and controls (24.2±5.8). The differences between groups were more accentuated for the language abstraction and attention (p<0.001) and delayed recall and orientation (p<0.001) sub-topics. No significant variance of score was observed between groups regarding visuospatial and naming score (p = 0.095). The MoCA score was significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume (r = 0.28) and reverse correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) (r = −0.57), fibrinogen (r = −0.58), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (r = −0.55) and with the partial pressure of CO2 (r = −0.47). Conclusions According to this study, COPD significantly decreases the cognitive status in advanced and acute stages of the disease. PMID:25033379

  20. Terminology in chronic obstructive lung diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, C H

    1978-01-01

    Until the 1960's there was great confusion, both within and between countries, on the meaning of diagnostic terms such as emphysema, asthma, and chronic brochitis. Proposals made by a group of British doctors in 1959 gradually received widespread acceptance but in recent years some new problems have developed. These include difficulties in the definition of airflow obstruction, recognition that what used to be regarded as a single disease, chronic bronchitis, comprises at least two distinct pathological processes, and uncertainty about the degree of variability which distinguishes asthmatic from more persistent forms of airflow obstruction. These are all problems which could be solved by continuance of appropriate research and of riqorous attention to the principles which determine accurate and acceptable definitions of disease. PMID:744819

  1. Future of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management.

    PubMed

    D'Urzo, Anthony; Vogelmeier, Claus

    2012-06-01

    Bronchodilators play a pivotal role in the management of symptomatic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Inhaled short-acting bronchodilators are used for all stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, primarily for the immediate relief of symptoms; inhaled long-acting bronchodilators are recommended for maintenance therapy in patients with moderate-to-very severe disease and those with daily symptoms. When symptoms are not adequately controlled by a single bronchodilator, combining bronchodilators of different classes may prove effective. Several long-acting β(2)-agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists with 24-h duration of action and inhalers combining different classes of long-acting, once-daily bronchodilators are in development. The place of these agents in the treatment algorithm will be determined by their efficacy and safety profiles and their long-term impact on relevant clinical outcomes.

  2. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy.

  3. Endocrinological disturbances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Creutzberg, E C; Casaburi, R

    2003-11-01

    In this overview, the available literature on endocrinological disturbances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is reviewed, with stress on growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), thyroid hormone and the anabolic steroids. In COPD, little is known about circulating growth hormone or IGF-I concentrations. Some authors find a decrease in growth hormone or IGF-I, others an increase. An increase of growth hormone might reflect a nonspecific response of the body to stress (for instance, hypoxaemia). Until now, only one controlled study on growth hormone supplementation has been published, which however did not reveal any functional benefits. Before growth hormone supplementation can be advised as part of the treatment in COPD, further controlled studies must be performed to investigate its functional efficacy. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in COPD and its role in pulmonary cachexia has not been extensively studied. So far, there is no evidence that thyroid function is consistently altered in COPD, except perhaps in a subgroup of patients with severe hypoxaemia. Further research is required to more extensively study the underlying mechanisms and consequences of disturbed thyroid function in this subgroup of COPD patients. A few studies have reported the results of anabolic steroid supplementation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although some studies have discerned that low circulating levels of testosterone are common in males with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, little is known about the prevalence, the underlying causes or functional consequences of hypogonadism in these patients. The use of systemic glucocorticosteroids and an influence of the systemic inflammatory response have been suggested as contributing to low testosterone levels. It can be hypothesised that low anabolic hormones will reduce muscle mass and eventually result in a diminished muscle function. Further evidence is required before testosterone

  4. Models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Groneberg, David A; Chung, K Fan

    2004-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global health problem and is predicted to become the third most common cause of death by 2020. Apart from the important preventive steps of smoking cessation, there are no other specific treatments for COPD that are as effective in reversing the condition, and therefore there is a need to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms that could lead to new therapeutic strategies. The development of experimental models will help to dissect these mechanisms at the cellular and molecular level. COPD is a disease characterized by progressive airflow obstruction of the peripheral airways, associated with lung inflammation, emphysema and mucus hypersecretion. Different approaches to mimic COPD have been developed but are limited in comparison to models of allergic asthma. COPD models usually do not mimic the major features of human COPD and are commonly based on the induction of COPD-like lesions in the lungs and airways using noxious inhalants such as tobacco smoke, nitrogen dioxide, or sulfur dioxide. Depending on the duration and intensity of exposure, these noxious stimuli induce signs of chronic inflammation and airway remodelling. Emphysema can be achieved by combining such exposure with instillation of tissue-degrading enzymes. Other approaches are based on genetically-targeted mice which develop COPD-like lesions with emphysema, and such mice provide deep insights into pathophysiological mechanisms. Future approaches should aim to mimic irreversible airflow obstruction, associated with cough and sputum production, with the possibility of inducing exacerbations. PMID:15522115

  5. The pathology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hogg, James C; Timens, Wim

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is based on the innate and adaptive inflammatory immune response to the inhalation of toxic particles and gases. Although tobacco smoking is the primary cause of this inhalation injury, many other environmental and occupational exposures contribute to the pathology of COPD. The immune inflammatory changes associated with COPD are linked to a tissue-repair and -remodeling process that increases mucus production and causes emphysematous destruction of the gas-exchanging surface of the lung. The common form of emphysema observed in smokers begins in the respiratory bronchioles near the thickened and narrowed small bronchioles that become the major site of obstruction in COPD. The mechanism(s) that allow small airways to thicken in such close proximity to lung tissue undergoing emphysematous destruction remains a puzzle that needs to be solved.

  6. Emerging drugs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Seifart, Carola; Vogelmeier, Claus

    2009-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is one of the most relevant diseases with increasing incidence, morbidity and mortality. Although there have been therapeutic advances in the past decades, there is a lot of room for improvement. There are several new therapeutic strategies and a variety of novel drugs under development that are based on established concepts. These new drugs have the following targets: i) smoking; ii) airways obstruction; iii) inflammation; iv) protease-antiprotease imbalance; and v) regeneration of lung tissue. In the next few years, there will be bronchodilators with longer duration of action that may improve adherence. In addition, there will be fixed combinations of different bronchodilators and bronchodilators with corticosteroids, which may have a positive impact on parameters such as exacerbations, dyspnea and exercise capacity. Novel anti-inflammatory concepts that go beyond corticosteroids are in early phases of development and it remains to be seen how effective they are and what side effects they may carry.

  7. Musculoskeletal Disorders in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cielen, Nele; Maes, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lung disease characterized by airway obstruction and inflammation but also accompanied by several extrapulmonary consequences, such as skeletal muscle weakness and osteoporosis. Skeletal muscle weakness is of major concern, since it leads to poor functional capacity, impaired health status, increased healthcare utilization, and even mortality, independently of lung function. Osteoporosis leads to fractures and is associated with increased mortality, functional decline, loss of quality of life, and need for institutionalization. Therefore, the presence of the combination of these comorbidities will have a negative impact on daily life in patients with COPD. In this review, we will focus on these two comorbidities, their prevalence in COPD, combined risk factors, and pathogenesis. We will try to prove the clustering of these comorbidities and discuss possible preventive or therapeutic strategies. PMID:24783225

  8. [Chronic obstructive lung disease. Systemic manifestations].

    PubMed

    Grassi, Vittorio; Carminati, Luisa; Cossi, Stefania; Marengoni, Alessandra; Tantucci, Claudio

    2003-05-01

    Chronic obstructive lung diseases (COPD) are a complex disease state which not rarely can be associated with significant systemic manifestations. These alterations, though recognized since long time, are currently under extensive research, due to the increasing appreciation of their relevant negative role in the prognosis and health-related quality of life (Hr-QoL) of the COPD patients. The most clinically important are the decrease in body weight with loss of skeletal muscle mass (cachexia), osteoporosis, hypercapnia-induced peripheral edema, neuro-psychiatric disorders, such as oxygen-related cognitive impairment and depression, excessive polycytaemia and sleep disorders. Chronic systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and chronic hypoxia are believed as the main factors involved in the pathogenesis of systemic effects seen in COPD. Their adequate control with nutritional support, change of life-style and targeted pharmacological treatment is able to improve the prognosis and Hr-QoL among these COPD patients.

  9. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Portillo, Karina; Abad-Capa, Jorge; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies have shown that the interaction between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cardiovascular comorbidity is complex and bidirectional, since each of these diseases complicates the prognosis of the other. Recent advances in imaging technology have led to better characterization of cardiac chambers and allowed the relationship between certain cardiac function parameters and COPD clinical and functional variables to be explored. Although cardiac abnormalities in COPD have been mainly associated with the right ventricle, several studies have reported that the left ventricle may also be affected in this disease. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved and their clinical implications will establish diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with both these conditions.

  10. [Triple therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Baloira, Adolfo

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most important respiratory diseases, characterized by its multicomponent complexity, with chronic inflammation, increased airway resistance and exacerbations. Several drugs are currently available for its treatment, which act on distinct targets. Bronchodilators, especially prolonged-action bronchodilators, are the most potent and there are two groups: beta-2 mimetics and anticholinergics. Inhaled corticosteroids are the main anti-inflammatory drugs but have modest efficacy and their use is reserved for patients with severe disease and frequent exacerbations and/or asthma traits. Associating these three drugs can improve symptom control, improve quality of life and reduce the number of exacerbations. The present article reviews the evidence supporting this triple combination, as well as published studies.

  11. Thyroid gland in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Miłkowska-Dymanowska, Joanna; Białas, Adam J; Laskowska, Paulina; Górski, Paweł; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2017-01-01

    The risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as thyroid diseases increases with age. COPD is a common systemic disease associated with chronic inflammation. Many endocrinological disorders, including thyroid gland diseases are related to systemic inflammation. Epidemiological studies suggest that patients with COPD are at higher risk of thyroid disorders. These associations are not well-studied and thyroid gland diseases are not included on the broadly acknowledged list of COPD comorbidities. They may seriously handicap quality of life of COPD patients. Unfortunately, the diagnosis may be difficult, as many signs are masked by the symptoms of the index disease. The comprehension of the correlation between thyroid gland disorders and COPD may contribute to better care of patients. In this review, we attempt to revise available literature describing existing links between COPD and thyroid diseases.

  12. Osteoporosis in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Bhardwaj, Rajeev; Madabhavi, Irappa; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a lifestyle-related chronic inflammatory pulmonary disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. COPD is associated with various comorbidities found in all stages of COPD. The comorbidities have significant impact in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden in COPD. Management of comorbidities should be incorporated into the comprehensive management of COPD as this will also have an effect on the outcome in COPD patients. Various comorbidities reported in COPD include cardiovascular disease, skeletal muscle dysfunction, anemia, metabolic syndrome, and osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a significant comorbidity in COPD patients. Various risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, systemic inflammation, vitamin D deficiency, and the use of oral or inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are responsible for its occurrence in patients with COPD. This review will focus on the prevalence, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis in COPD patients. PMID:25788838

  13. [Advances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Belén Arnalich; Pumarega, Irene Cano; Ausiró, Anna Mola; Izquierdo Alonso, José Luis

    2009-01-01

    Although chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by poorly reversible, chronic airflow obstruction, from the clinical point of view we must continue to make progress in the diagnosis and management of these patients so that spirometry is not the only technique used. Understanding that COPD is a heterogeneous process and that patient complexity usually increases due to the presence of comorbidities will allow more individualized strategies to be designed, which may improve control of the process. The TORCH and UPLIFT trials have shown that current treatment can improve important aspects of the disease, including mortality. However, the finalizing of these two large trials has generated a current of opinion favoring a more individually-tailored approach that should include all the factors -both pulmonary and extrapulmonary- that can modify the patient's form of presentation. Although we are witnessing a change in the therapeutic approach to COPD, future treatment will probably be based on studies performed in specific patient subgroups and on clarifying the interrelation between COPD and other diseases that are common in these patients. Greater knowledge of the pathogenesis of the disease may improve pharmacological treatment but drugs that, by themselves, alter the short- and longterm course of COPD are not on the horizon. However, a more patient-focussed approach may be the main tool available to physicians to increase quality of life -and possibly survival- in these patients.

  14. Epidemiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Antó, J M; Vermeire, P; Vestbo, J; Sunyer, J

    2001-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of world-wide mortality and disability. On average approximately 5-15% of adults in industrialized countries have COPD defined by spirometry. In 1990, COPD was considered to be at the twelfth position world-wide as a cause of combined mortality and disability but is expected to become the fifth cause by the year 2020. COPD has a chronic long-lasting course characterized by irreversible decline of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), increasing presence of dyspnoea and other respiratory symptoms, and progressive deterioration of health status. After diagnosis the 10-yr survival rate is approximately 50% with more than one-third of patients dying due to respiratory insufficiency. Several environmental exposures such as air pollution increase the risk of death in COPD patients. The aetiology of COPD is overwhelmingly dominated by smoking although many other factors could play a role. Particular genetic variants are likely to increase the susceptibility to environmental factors although little is known about which are the relevant genes. There is clear evidence about the role of the alpha-1-antitrypsin but the fraction of COPD attributable to the relevant variants is only 1%. Phenotypic traits that are considered to play a role in the development of COPD include sex, with females being at a higher risk, bronchial responsiveness and atopy. There is strong causal evidence regarding the relationship between smoking and COPD with decline in FEVI levelling off after smoking cessation. Passive smoking has been found to be associated with a small though statistically significant decline in FEV1. Other risk factors that are likely to be relevant in the development of COPD are occupation, low socioeconomic status, diet and possibly some environmental exposures in early life. Although there is accumulating evidence that oxygen therapy, pharmacological treatment and rehabilitation may improve the course of

  15. Preventing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Aronovitch, M; Groszman, M

    1980-10-01

    Chemoprophylaxis, combined with prolonged treatment of bronchospasm, in patients with incipient or minimal obstructive chest disease has shown promising results in 30 patients. Physicians should include in their regular examination some means of early detection for chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases and in suitable cases institute chemoprophylaxis during the winter, as well as preventive vaccinations. In addition, longterm treatment of bronchial problems should be continued. This combined approach will help prevent recurrent infections which accelerate the progress of chronic obstructive chest disease.

  16. Osteoporosis Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Reiko; Inoue, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have revealed that osteoporosis is closely associated with common chronic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a chronic inflammatory airway disease but now well known to be associated with various systemic comorbidities including osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are extremely common in COPD patients, which have significant impacts on their quality of life (QOL), activities of daily life (ADL), respiratory function, and possibly their prognosis. COPD-associated osteoporosis is however extremely under-recognized, hence undertreated. Recent studies have suggested that both decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compromise bone strength causing fractures in COPD. In COPD patients, various general clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are present including smoking, older age, low body weight, and physical inactivity. In addition, disease-related risk factors such as decreased pulmonary function, inflammation, glucocorticoid use and vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency have been linked to the development of osteoporosis in COPD. Increased awareness of osteoporosis in COPD, especially that of high prevalence of vertebral fractures is called upon among general physicians as well as pulmonologists. Routine screening for osteoporosis and risk assessment of fractures will enable physicians to diagnose COPD patients with comorbid osteoporosis at an early stage. Timely prevention of developing osteoporosis together with appropriate treatment of established osteoporosis may improve QOL and ADL of the COPD patients, preserve their lung function and eventually result in better prognosis in these patients. PMID:27622174

  17. Recent updates in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by chronic airways inflammation and progressive airflow limitation, is a common, preventable and treatable disease. Worldwide, COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; smoking tobacco is the most important risk factor. This translational review of recent updates in COPD care for the primary care audience, includes recommendations from the 2015 Global Initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) report on diagnosis, pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment, prevalence of comorbidities, management of exacerbations and the asthma and COPD overlap syndrome, with a focus on the importance and benefit of physical activity and exercise in COPD patients. Exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity of COPD in individual patients. Management of exacerbations includes reducing the impact of the current exacerbation and preventing development of subsequent episodes. Healthcare professionals need to be alert to comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, anxiety/depression, lung cancer, infections and diabetes, which are common in COPD patients and can have a significant impact on HRQoL and prognosis. Pulmonary rehabilitation is recommended by a number of guidelines for all symptomatic COPD patients, regardless of severity, and involves exercise training, patient education, nutritional advice and psychosocial support. At all stages of COPD, regular physical activity and exercise can aid symptom control, improve HRQoL, reduce rates of hospitalization, and improve morbidity and respiratory mortality. Healthcare professionals play a pivotal role in improving HRQoL and health-related outcomes in COPD patients to meet their specific needs and in providing appropriate diagnosis, management and advice on smoking cessation.

  18. Respiratory Conditions Update: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Karel, Daphne J

    2016-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined as persistent airflow limitation due to irritant-induced chronic inflammation. A postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio of 0.7 or less is diagnostic in a patient with dyspnea, chronic cough or sputum production, and a history of irritant exposure. Tobacco smoking is the most significant etiology, and smoking cessation is the only intervention shown to slow disease progression. Long-acting beta2-agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists are first-line treatments for patients with persistently symptomatic COPD with an FEV1 of 80% or less of predicted. When COPD is uncontrolled with a long-acting bronchodilator, combination therapy with a long-acting muscarinic antagonist-long-acting beta2-agonist or long-acting beta2-agonist-inhaled corticosteroid should be prescribed. Patients with COPD and reduced exercise tolerance should undergo pulmonary rehabilitation and be evaluated for supplemental oxygen therapy. Other treatment options for persistently symptomatic COPD include inhaler triple therapy (ie, long-acting muscarinic antagonist, long-acting beta2-agonist, inhaled corticosteroid), phosphodiesterase type 4 inhibitors, oxygen, and surgical interventions.

  19. [Anemias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Budnevsky, A V; Esaulenko, I E; Ovsyannikov, E S; Zhusina, Yu G

    2016-01-01

    According to different studies, anemia occurs in 8--33% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The paper describes the most important various causes of anemia in COPD, such as systemic inflammation and endocrine disorders, the use of some medications (theophylline, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), frequent COPD exacerbations, and long-term oxygen therapy. Lower hemoglobin levels in COPD patients are accompanied by increased shortness of breath, reduced exercise tolerance, and lower quality of life. Furthermore, some investigations have shown that anemia is an independent predictor of death in patients with COPD. In spite of the fact that anemia may be successfully in these patients, the evidence suggesting the importance of its impact on the prognosis of COPD is limited.

  20. [New treatments for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Miravitlles, Marc

    2005-06-11

    Treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has underwent a very important advance in the last five years. It has been developed a new long-lasting anticholynergic drug, tiotrope bromure, which has been found to improve lung function and exercise capacity and to decrease relapses. Also the combined treatment of long lasting beta 2 adrenergics with inhaled steroids (salmeterol/fluticasone and formoterol/budesonide) has proven similar results. However, the response to these new drugs is not the same in all patients. Individual characteristics such as gravity, degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness, frequency of relapses, comorbidity, etc will determine the response to several agents. Thus, it is necessary to perform a detailed diagnostic study in COPD patients in order to select the best treatment in an individualized form. In the future, new specific antiinflammatories such as phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors or agents with a potential action in tissue regeneration could lead to new perspectives, as well as to new questions, in COPD treatment.

  1. Extracellular Vesicles in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kadota, Tsukasa; Fujita, Yu; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Araya, Jun; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by the progression of irreversible airflow limitation and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although several crucial mechanisms of COPD pathogenesis have been studied, the precise mechanism remains unknown. Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic bodies, are released from almost all cell types and are recognized as novel cell–cell communication tools. They have been shown to carry and transfer a wide variety of molecules, such as microRNAs, messenger RNAs, and proteins, which are involved in physiological functions and the pathology of various diseases. Recently, EVs have attracted considerable attention in pulmonary research. In this review, we summarize the recent findings of EV-mediated COPD pathogenesis. We also discuss the potential clinical usefulness of EVs as biomarkers and therapeutic agents for the treatment of COPD. PMID:27801806

  2. Pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Montuschi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    None of the drugs currently available for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are able to reduce the progressive decline in lung function which is the hallmark of this disease. Smoking cessation is the only intervention that has proved effective. The current pharmacological treatment of COPD is symptomatic and is mainly based on bronchodilators, such as selective β2-adrenergic agonists (short- and long-acting), anticholinergics, theophylline, or a combination of these drugs. Glucocorticoids are not generally recommended for patients with stable mild to moderate COPD due to their lack of efficacy, side effects, and high costs. However, glucocorticoids are recommended for severe COPD and frequent exacerbations of COPD. New pharmacological strategies for COPD need to be developed because the current treatment is inadequate. PMID:18044097

  3. Gene polymorphisms and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaodan; Yuan, Bowei; López, Elena; Bai, Chunxue; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    The genetic component was suggested to contribute to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a major and growing public health burden. The present review aims to characterize the evidence that gene polymorphisms contribute to the aetiology of COPD and related traits, and explore the potential relationship between certain gene polymorphisms and COPD susceptibility, severity, lung function, phenotypes, or drug effects, even though limited results from related studies lacked consistency. Most of these studies were association studies, rather than confirmatory studies. More large-sized and strictly controlled studies are needed to prove the relationship between gene polymorphisms and the reviewed traits. More importantly, prospective confirmatory studies beyond initial association studies will be necessary to evaluate true relationships between gene polymorphisms and COPD and help individualized treatment for patients with COPD.

  4. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Deborah

    As chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the major causes of worldwide mortality, it is important to prevent, diagnose and manage it. COPD creates a huge burden on the NHS and has a significant impact on patients. This is a problem with the increase in morbidity and mortality rates. In primary care there is a lack of knowledge, under-use of quality-assured spirometry and under-diagnosis in about half of all cases. To be able to effectively diagnose, assess and manage COPD, health professionals must understand the physiology and aetiology of the disease. COPD is similar to asthma in its presentation and physiology but management of the condition can differ. The authors therefore looked at the similarities between the two conditions and what tests one can use to make a diagnosis of COPD.

  5. Skeletal Implications of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Misof, Barbara M; Moreira, Carolina A; Klaushofer, Klaus; Roschger, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with numerous comorbidities, among which osteoporosis is of high significance. Low bone mass and the occurrence of fragility fractures is a common finding in patients with COPD. Typical risk factors related directly or indirectly to these skeletal complications include systemic inflammation, tobacco smoking, vitamin D deficiency, and treatment with oral or inhaled corticosteroids. In particular, treatment with glucocorticoids appears to be a strong contributor to bone changes in COPD, but does not fully account for all skeletal complications. Additional to the effects of COPD on bone mass, there is evidence for COPD-related changes in bone microstructure and material properties. This review summarizes the clinical outcomes of low bone mass and increased fracture risk, and reports on recent observations in bone tissue and material in COPD patients.

  6. Common lung conditions: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Delzell, John E

    2013-06-01

    The etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is chronic lung inflammation. In the United States, this inflammation most commonly is caused by smoking. COPD is diagnosed when an at-risk patient presents with respiratory symptoms and has irreversible airway obstruction indicated by a forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity ratio of less than 0.7. Management goals for COPD include smoking cessation, symptom reduction, exacerbation reduction, hospitalization avoidance, and improvement of quality of life. Stable patients with COPD who remain symptomatic despite using short-acting bronchodilators should start inhaled maintenance drugs to reduce symptoms and exacerbations, avoid hospitalizations, and improve quality of life. A long-acting anticholinergic or a long-acting beta2-agonist (LABA) can be used for initial therapy; these drugs have fewer adverse effects than inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). If patients remain symptomatic despite monotherapy, dual therapy with a long-acting anticholinergic and a LABA, or a LABA and an ICS, may be beneficial. Triple therapy (ie, a long-acting anticholinergic, a LABA, and an ICS) also is used, but it is unclear if triple therapy is superior to dual therapy. Roflumilast, an oral selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 4, is used to manage moderate to severe COPD. Continuous oxygen therapy is indicated for patients with COPD who have severe hypoxemia (ie, PaO2 less than 55 mm Hg or an oxygen saturation less than 88% on room air). Nonpharmacologic strategies also are useful to improve patient outcomes. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves dyspnea and quality of life. Pulmonary rehabilitation after an acute exacerbation reduces hospitalizations and mortality, and improves quality of life and exercise capacity. Smoking cessation is the most effective management strategy for reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with COPD. Lung volume reduction surgery, bullectomy, and lung transplantation are

  7. Within-breath respiratory impedance and airway obstruction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Karla Kristine Dames; Faria, Alvaro Camilo Dias; Lopes, Agnaldo José; de Melo, Pedro Lopes

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent work has suggested that within-breath respiratory impedance measurements performed using the forced oscillation technique may help to noninvasively evaluate respiratory mechanics. We investigated the influence of airway obstruction on the within-breath forced oscillation technique in smokers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and evaluated the contribution of this analysis to the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. METHODS: Twenty healthy individuals and 20 smokers were assessed. The study also included 74 patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We evaluated the mean respiratory impedance (Zm) as well as values for the inspiration (Zi) and expiration cycles (Ze) at the beginning of inspiration (Zbi) and expiration (Zbe), respectively. The peak-to-peak impedance (Zpp=Zbe-Zbi) and the respiratory cycle dependence (ΔZrs=Ze-Zi) were also analyzed. The diagnostic utility was evaluated by investigating the sensitivity, the specificity and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01888705. RESULTS: Airway obstruction increased the within-breath respiratory impedance parameters that were significantly correlated with the spirometric indices of airway obstruction (R=−0.65, p<0.0001). In contrast to the control subjects and the smokers, the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients presented significant expiratory-inspiratory differences (p<0.002). The adverse effects of moderate airway obstruction were detected based on the Zpp with an accuracy of 83%. Additionally, abnormal effects in severe and very severe patients were detected based on the Zm, Zi, Ze, Zbe, Zpp and ΔZrs with a high degree of accuracy (>90%). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude the following: (1) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease introduces higher respiratory cycle dependence, (2) this increase is proportional to airway obstruction, and (3) the within-breath forced oscillation technique may

  8. Killer cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Lucy; Urbanowicz, Richard A; Corne, Jonathan; Lamb, Jonathan R

    2008-04-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is a treatable and preventable disease state, characterized by progressive airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. It is a current and growing cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with the WHO (World Health Organization) projecting that total deaths attributed to COPD will increase by more than 30% in the next 10 years. The pathological hallmarks of COPD are destruction of the lung parenchyma (pulmonary emphysema), inflammation of the central airways (chronic bronchitis) and inflammation of the peripheral airways (respiratory bronchiolitis). The destructive changes and tissue remodelling observed in COPD are a result of complex interactions between cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. The focus of the present review is directed towards the role of CD8(+) T-lymphocytes, NK (natural killer) cells and NKT cells (NK T-cells). These three classes of killer cell could all play an important part in the pathogenesis of COPD. The observed damage to the pulmonary tissue could be caused in three ways: (i) direct cytotoxic effect against the lung epithelium mediated by the activities of perforin and granzymes, (ii) FasL (Fas ligand)-induced apoptosis and/or (iii) cytokine and chemokine release. The present review considers the role of these killer cells in COPD.

  9. Advances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    McDonald, C F; Khor, Y

    2013-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by progressive airflow limitation in the presence of identifiable risk factors. Inflammation is the central pathological feature in the pathogenesis of COPD. In addition to its pulmonary effects, COPD is associated with significant extrapulmonary manifestations, including ischaemic heart disease, osteoporosis, stroke and diabetes. Anxiety and depression are also common. Spirometry remains the gold standard diagnostic tool. Pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapy can improve symptoms, quality of life and exercise capacity and, through their effects on reducing exacerbations, have the potential to modify disease progression. Bronchodilators are the mainstay of pharmacotherapy, with guidelines recommending a stepwise escalating approach. Smoking cessation is paramount in managing COPD, with promotion of physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation being other key factors in management. Comorbidities should be actively sought and managed in their own right. Given the chronicity and progressive nature of COPD, ongoing monitoring and support with timely discussion of advanced-care planning and end-of-life issues are recommended.

  10. Telemedicine in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Vagheggini, Guido; Mazzoleni, Stefano; Vitacca, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Telemedicine is a medical application of advanced technology to disease management. This modality may provide benefits also to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Different devices and systems are used. The legal problems associated with telemedicine are still controversial. Economic advantages for healthcare systems, though potentially high, are still poorly investigated. A European Respiratory Society Task Force has defined indications, follow-up, equipment, facilities, legal and economic issues of tele-monitoring of COPD patients including those undergoing home mechanical ventilation. Key points The costs of care assistance in chronic disease patients are dramatically increasing. Telemedicine may be a very useful application of information and communication technologies in high-quality healthcare services. Many remote health monitoring systems are available, ensuring safety, feasibility, effectiveness, sustainability and flexibility to face different patients’ needs. The legal problems associated with telemedicine are still controversial. National and European Union governments should develop guidelines and ethical, legal, regulatory, technical, administrative standards for remote medicine. The economic advantages, if any, of this new approach must be compared to a “gold standard” of homecare that is very variable among different European countries and within each European country. The efficacy of respiratory disease telemedicine projects is promising (i.e. to tailor therapeutic intervention; to avoid useless hospital and emergency department admissions, and reduce general practitioner and specialist visits; and to involve the patients and their families). Different programmes based on specific and local situations, and on specific diseases and levels of severity with a high level of flexibility should be utilised. A European Respiratory Society Task Force produced a statement on commonly accepted clinical criteria for indications

  11. [Phenotypic heterogeneity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Agustí, Alvar; Barberà, Joan A; Belda, José; Farrero, Eva; Ferrer, Antoni; Ferrer, Jaume; Gáldiz, Juan B; Gea, Joaquim; Gómez, Federico P; Monsó, Eduard; Morera, Josep; Roca, Josep; Sauleda, Jaume; Antó, Josep M

    2009-03-01

    A functional definition of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) based on airflow limitation has largely dominated the field. However, a view has emerged that COPD involves a complex array of cellular, organic, functional, and clinical events, with a growing interest in disentangling the phenotypic heterogeneity of COPD. The present review is based on the opinion of the authors, who have extensive research experience in several aspects of COPD. The starting assumption of the review is that current knowledge on the pathophysiology and clinical features of COPD allows us to classify phenotypic information in terms of the following dimensions: respiratory symptoms and health status, acute exacerbations, lung function, structural changes, local and systemic inflammation, and systemic effects. Twenty-six phenotypic traits were identified and assigned to one of the 6 dimensions. For each dimension, a summary is provided of the best evidence on the relationships among phenotypic traits, in particular among those corresponding to different dimensions, and on the relationship between these traits and relevant events in the natural history of COPD. The information has been organized graphically into a phenotypic matrix where each cell representing a pair of phenotypic traits is linked to relevant references. The information provided has the potential to increase our understanding of the heterogeneity of COPD phenotypes and help us plan future studies on aspects that are as yet unexplored.

  12. Palliative care in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Evan J; Senderovich, Helen

    2016-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the only major worldwide cause of mortality that is currently increasing in prevalence. Furthermore, COPD is incurable, and the only therapy that has been shown to increase survival is oxygen therapy in selected patients. Compared to patients with cancer, patients with COPD experience similar levels of pain, breathlessness, fatigue, depression, and anxiety and have a worse quality of life but have comparatively little access to palliative care. When these patients do receive palliative care, they tend to be referred later than patients with cancer. Many disease, patient-, and provider-related factors contribute to this phenomenon, including COPD's unpredictable course, misperceptions of palliative care among patients and physicians, and lack of advance care planning discussions outside of crisis situations. A new paradigm for palliative care would introduce palliative treatments alongside, rather than at the exclusion of disease-modifying interventions. This integrated approach would circumvent the issue of difficult prognostication in COPD, as any patient would receive individualized palliative interventions from the time of diagnosis. These points will be covered in this review, which discusses the challenges in providing palliative care to COPD patients, the strategies to mitigate the challenges, management of common symptoms, and the evidence for integrated palliative care models as well as some suggestions for future development.

  13. Smoking cessation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Tashkin, Donald P; Murray, Robert P

    2009-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is increasing in prevalence, and is predicted to become the third leading cause of deaths worldwide by 2020. The precise prevalence of COPD is not known, as many individuals with the disease are left undiagnosed, despite the requirement of only simple spirometry testing for disease detection. The major risk factor for the development of COPD is cigarette smoking, with 90% of deaths from COPD directly attributable to smoking. Therefore smoking cessation is the most effective means of halting or slowing the progress of this disease. This review summarizes and compares the differential characteristics of smokers with COPD vs. those without COPD in relation to their smoking behavior and quitting attempts, and discusses the various strategies that can be used to help patients quit and improve their likelihood of long-term smoking cessation. Of the various behavioral interventions available that can increase the likelihood of smoking cessation, one of the simplest and most effective strategies that physicians can use is simply to advise their patients to quit, particularly if this advice is combined with informing the patients of their "lung age". We also discuss the pharmacologic therapies used to enhance the likelihood of quitting, including nicotine replacement, bupropion SR and varenicline, along with novel nicotine vaccines, which are currently undergoing clinical trials.

  14. Outpatient Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Management: Going for the GOLD.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Christina R; Peters, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States with a burden of $50 billion in direct health care costs. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) defines airflow obstruction as spirometry where the ratio of forced expiratory volume in the first second to forced vital capacity after bronchodilation is less than 0.70. The guidelines also provided graded recommendations on current therapy for COPD. Treatment can be guided based on severity of disease and severity of symptoms. We review the GOLD guidelines to provide an overview of treatment modalities aimed at improving lung function, reducing hospitalization, and reducing mortality.

  15. [Chronic colonic pseudo-obstruction secondary to neuroleptics].

    PubMed

    Benlloch, S; Pérez-Aguilar, F; Ponce, J; Berenguer, J

    2001-12-01

    Colonic pseudo-obstruction is characterized by non-mechanical chronic colonic dilatation. It is an infrequent entity that can be provoked by multiple causes, among them pharmacological. We present the case of a 74-year-old female psychiatric patient who presented abdominal bloating, diarrhea, intense electrolytic alterations and marked radiographic colonic dilatation after treatment with a neuroleptic (zuclopenthixol decanoate). Organic obstruction and other causes were ruled out and the final diagnosis was chronic colonic pseudo-obstruction secondary to the use of neuroleptics. Cisapride (20 mg/8 h) produced a slight improvement in symptoms but colonic dilatation was permanent.

  16. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: The golden decade. Implications for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    López-Giraldo, Alejandra; Rodríguez-Roisin, Robert; Agustí, Alvar

    2015-06-08

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex and heterogeneous illness, which causes an important socio-economic burden. The last decade has witnessed significant advances in the understanding and knowledge of COPD with a paradigm shift in both the assessment and management of the disease. The article here reviews these changes with a particular focus on the last revision (2013) of the Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  17. Smoking Cessation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Tashkin, Donald P

    2015-08-01

    Smoking cessation is the most effective strategy for slowing down the progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and reducing mortality in the approximately 50% of patients with diagnosed COPD who continue to smoke. While behavioral interventions (including simple advice) have modest efficacy in improving smoking quit rates, the combination of counseling and pharmacotherapy is more effective than either alone. When combined with even brief counseling, nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), bupropion SR, and varenicline have all been shown to be effective in promoting smoking cessation and sustained abstinence in smokers with COPD to a degree comparable to that observed in the general smoking population. However, the recidivism rate is high after initial quitting so that at the end of 1 year, approximately 80% or more of patients are still smoking. Thus, new approaches to smoking cessation are needed. One approach is to combine different pharmacotherapies, for example, nicotine patch plus rapidly acting NRT (e.g., gum or nasal spray) and/or bupropion or even varenicline plus either NRT or bupropion, in a stepwise approach over a varying duration depending on the severity of nicotine dependence and nicotine withdrawal symptoms during the quit attempt, as proposed in the American College of Chest Physicians Tobacco Dependence Took Kit. Electronic (e)-cigarettes, which deliver vaporized nicotine without most of the noxious components in the smoke from burning tobacco cigarettes, also has potential efficacy as a smoking cessation aid, but their efficacy and safety as either substitutes for regular cigarettes or smoking cessation aids require additional study. This task is complicated because e-cigarettes are currently unregulated and hundreds of different brands are currently available.

  18. New anti-inflammatory targets for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2013-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with chronic inflammation of the peripheral airways and lung parenchyma, which leads to progressive obstruction of the airways. Current management with long-acting bronchodilators does not reduce disease progression, and there are no treatments that effectively suppress chronic inflammation in COPD. An increased understanding of the inflammatory processes that are involved in the pathophysiology of COPD has identified several new therapeutic targets. This Review discusses some of the most promising of these targets, including new antioxidants, kinase inhibitors and drugs that target cellular senescence, microbial colonization, epigenetic regulation of inflammatory gene expression and corticosteroid resistance.

  19. Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and the overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakawah, Mohammad Obadah; Hawkins, Clare; Barbandi, Farouk

    2013-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are highly prevalent chronic diseases in the general population. Both are characterized by heterogeneous chronic airway inflammation and airway obstruction. In both conditions, chronic inflammation affects the whole respiratory tract, from central to peripheral airways, with different inflammatory cells recruited, different mediators produced, and thus differing responses to therapy. Airway obstruction is typically intermittent and reversible in asthma but is progressive and largely irreversible in COPD. However, there is a considerable pathologic and functional overlap between these 2 heterogeneous disorders, particularly among the elderly, who may have components of both diseases (asthma-COPD overlap syndrome). The definitions for asthma and COPD recommended by current guidelines are useful but limited because they do not illustrate the full spectrum of obstructive airway diseases that is encountered in clinical practice. Defining asthma and COPD as separate entities neglects a considerable proportion of patients with overlapping features and is largely based on expert opinion rather than on the best current evidence. The presence of different phenotypes or components of obstructive airway diseases, therefore, needs to be addressed to individualize and optimize treatment to achieve the best effect with the fewest side effects for the patient. Although specific interventions vary by disease, the treatment goals of obstructive airway diseases are similar and driven primarily by the need to control symptoms, optimize health status, and prevent exacerbations.

  20. Are prophylactic antibiotics useful in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Arenas, Alex; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-11-10

    Bacterial infections are one of the main causes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation, so the use of prophylactic antibiotics, especially macrolides, has been proposed in these patients. However, it is unclear whether antibiotics use is worth the risk and cost. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including eight randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded prophylactic antibiotics probably decrease exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but have no effect on hospitalizations or mortality.

  1. Chronic primary intestinal pseudo-obstruction from visceral myopathy.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Yagüe, M T; Marín, J C; Colina, F; Ibarrola, C; López-Alonso, G; Martín, M A; Solís-Herruzo, J A

    2006-04-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction is an uncommon syndrome characterized by relapsing episodes suggesting intestinal obstruction during which no mechanical causes are identified to account for symptoms. Etiologic factors may be manifold. Among them a number of neurologic conditions, gastrointestinal smooth muscle myopathies, endocrino-metabolic and autoimmune diseases, and the use of selected drugs stand out. We report a case of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction originating in a sporadic, primary intestinal myopathy that corresponds to no type thus far described. A histological study of the intestinal wall showed disrupted muscle bundles and the presence of interstitial edema. Myocytes had severe degenerative changes, and no alterations were seen in submucosal and myenteric plexus neurons. The activity of enzyme complexes in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and of thymidine phosphorylase was normal. No mitochondrial DNA changes were seen.

  2. A brief review of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hogg, James C

    2012-01-01

    A recent study, based on a combination of multidetector computed tomography scanning of an intact specimen with microcomputed tomography and histological analysis of lung tissue samples, reported that the number of terminal bronchioles were reduced from approximately 44,500/lung pair in control (donor) lungs to approximately 4800/lung pair in lungs donated by individuals with very severe (Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage 4) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) treated by lung transplantation. The present short review discusses the hypothesis that a rapid rate of terminal bronchiolar destruction causes the rapid decline in lung function leading to advanced COPD. With respect to why the terminal bronchioles are targeted for destruction, the postulated mechanisms of this destruction and the possibility that new treatments are able to either prevent or reverse the underlying cause of airway obstruction in COPD are addressed.

  3. Pulmonary Strongyloidiasis Masquerading as Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Gourahari; Behera, Priyadarshini; Bhuniya, Sourin; Mohapatra, Prasanta Raghab; Turuk, Jyotirmayee; Mohanty, Srujana

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary strongyloidiasis is an uncommon presentation of Strongyloides infection, usually seen in immunocompromised hosts. The manifestations are similar to that of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Therefore, the diagnosis of pulmonary strongyloidiasis could be challenging in a COPD patient, unless a high index of suspicion is maintained. Here, we present a case of Strongyloides hyperinfection in a COPD patient mimicking acute exacerbation, who was on chronic steroid therapy. PMID:27790284

  4. [Beta-blockers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Sova, Milan; Kamasová, Monika; Václavík, Jan; Sovová, Eliška; Hajdová, Lenka; Kolek, Vítězslav

    2016-04-01

    This general article discusses the problems of beta-blockers use in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Its aim is to refute exaggerated concerns of physicians over possible undesirable effects of beta-blockers on the patient respiratory functions and present new data on the effects of beta-blockers on the extent of COPD exacerbations, bronchial reactivity and mortality of patients.

  5. Evaluation of Continuing Medical Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li Wang, Virginia; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A continuing medical education program is discussed that addresses chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and that links primary care physicians to a source of needed clinical knowledge at a relatively low cost. The educational methods, evaluation design, diagnosis of educational needs, selection of program content and behavioral outcomes are…

  6. Association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lih-Hwa; Siu, Justin Ji-Yuen; Liao, Po-Chi; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Chou, Pei-Chi; Chen, Huey-Yi; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Tsai, Ming-Yen; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Chen, Wen-Chi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory, a specific physiological and pathological relationship exists between the lungs and the large intestine. The aim of this study is to delineate the association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and hemorrhoids in order to verify the “interior–exterior” relationship between the lungs and the large intestine. A retrospective cohort study is conceived from the National Health Insurance Research Database, Taiwan. The 2 samples (COPD cohort and non-COPD cohort) were selected from the 2000 to 2003 beneficiaries of the NHI, representing patients age 20 and older in Taiwan, with the follow-up ending on December 31, 2011. The COPD cohort (n = 51,506) includes every patient newly diagnosed as having Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, ICD-9-CM: 490–492, 494, 496), who have made at least 2 confirmed visits to the hospital/clinic. The non-COPD cohort (n = 103,012) includes patients without COPD and is selected via a 1:2 (COPD: non-COPD) matching by age group (per 5 years), gender, and index date (diagnosis date of COPD for the COPD cohort). Compared with non-COPD cohorts, patients with COPD have a higher likelihood of having hemorrhoids and the age-, gender- and comorbidies-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for hemorrhoids is 1.56 (95% confidence intervals [CI]:1.50–1.62). The adjusted HR of hemorrhoids for females is 0.79 (95% CI: 0.77–0.83), which is significantly less than that for males. The elderly groups, 40 to 59 years and aged 60 or above, have higher adjusted HRs than younger age groups (20–39 years), 1.19 (95% CI: 1.14–1.26), and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.12–1.24), respectively. Patients with COPD may have a higher likelihood to have hemorrhoids in this retrospective cohort study. This study verifies the fundamental theorem of TCM that there is a definite pathogenic association between the lungs and large intestine. PMID:28272246

  7. Home Telehealth for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Franek, J

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions. After an initial review of health technology assessments and systematic reviews of COPD literature, and consultation with experts, MAS identified the following topics for analysis: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses. The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary Framework Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Community-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive

  8. A review of halotherapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Rashleigh, Rachael; Smith, Sheree MS; Roberts, Nicola J

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic, progressive disease and is treated with inhaled medication to optimize the patient’s lung health through decreasing their symptoms, especially breathlessness. Halotherapy is the inhalation of micronized dry salt within a chamber that mimics a salt cave environment. Recent media reports suggest that this therapy may help with the symptoms of COPD. Objective To critically evaluate and summarize the evidence for the use of halotherapy as a treatment for COPD. Design A review using systematic approach and narrative synthesis. Data sources Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Google Scholar were searched. Two reviewers independently reviewed abstracts and selected eligible studies based on predetermined selection criteria. Results Of the 151 articles retrieved from databases and relevant reference lists, only one randomized controlled trial met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis was unable to be conducted due to the limited number of published studies. Inclusion criteria were subsequently expanded to allow three case-control studies to be included, ensuring that a narrative synthesis could be completed. From the pooled data of the four studies, there were 1,041 participants (661 in the intervention group and 380 in the control group). The assessment of methodological quality raised issues associated with randomization and patient selection. Three themes were identified from the narrative synthesis: respiratory function, quality of life, and medication use. Conclusion Themes generated from the narrative synthesis data reflect outcome measures regularly used for interventional research associated with COPD. From this review, recommendations for inclusion of halotherapy as a therapy for COPD cannot be made at this point and there is a need for high quality studies to determine the effectiveness of this therapy. PMID:24591823

  9. COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are emphysema and chronic bronchitis, the most common causes of respiratory failure. Emphysema occurs when the walls between the lung's air sacs become weakened and collapse. Damage from COPD is usually permanent and irreversible.

  10. Anaesthesia for patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Duggappa, Devika Rani; Rao, G Venkateswara; Kannan, Sudheesh

    2015-01-01

    The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has become a disease of public health importance. Among the various risk factors, smoking remains the main culprit. In addition to airway obstruction, the presence of intrinsic positive end expiratory pressure, respiratory muscle dysfunction contributes to the symptoms of the patient. Perioperative management of these patients includes identification of modifiable risk factors and their optimisation. Use of regional anaesthesia alone or in combination with general anaesthesia improves pulmonary functions and reduces the incidence of post-operative pulmonary complications. PMID:26556916

  11. [Chronic obstructive bronchitis: definitions, risk factors and prevention (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Brille, D; Kauffmann, F; Oriol, P; Querleux, E

    1976-01-01

    Chronic obstructive bronchitis is defined as persistent diffuse airways obstruction frequently associated with chronic expectoration. This disease is particularly disabling and its medico-social burden implies that measures be taken. Risk factors of chronic obstructive bronchitis can be classified according to their presently known importance: tobacco, professional exposure, air pollution, viral and bacterial respiratory infections, poor socio-economic and cultural conditions, upper and lower airways infections during childhood, other environmental factors, genetic factors. Prevention needs that research be developed, in particular for factors, as hereditary ones, relations between childhood and adult respiratory diseases and characteristics of the "susceptible smokers". Knowledge of risk factors previously quoted allows to propose public-health actions. Firstly, true preventive action of general nature: fight against tobacco consumption, reduce atmospheric pollution, improve work and life conditions. Secondly, in order to prevent the disabling state of chronic bronchitis, it would be necessary to take care of patients at the initial state. A control trial is proposed to determine the level of symptoms and of reduction of ventilatory values at which an action is needed and the best "preventive therapeutical" protocol to be applied to these patients.

  12. Prevalence and burden of comorbidities in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Corlateanu, Alexandru; Covantev, Serghei; Mathioudakis, Alexander G; Botnaru, Victor; Siafakas, Nikolaos

    2016-11-01

    The classical definition of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) as a lung condition characterized by irreversible airway obstruction is outdated. The systemic involvement in patients with COPD, as well as the interactions between COPD and its comorbidities, justify the description of chronic systemic inflammatory syndrome. The pathogenesis of COPD is closely linked with aging, as well as with cardiovascular, endocrine, musculoskeletal, renal, and gastrointestinal pathologies, decreasing the quality of life of patients with COPD and, furthermore, complicating the management of the disease. The most frequently described comorbidities include skeletal muscle wasting, cachexia (loss of fat-free mass), lung cancer (small cell or non-small cell), pulmonary hypertension, ischemic heart disease, hyperlipidemia, congestive heart failure, normocytic anemia, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, obstructive sleep apnea, depression, and arthritis. These complex interactions are based on chronic low-grade systemic inflammation, chronic hypoxia, and multiple common predisposing factors, and are currently under intense research. This review article is an overview of the comorbidities of COPD, as well as their interaction and influence on mutual disease progression, prognosis, and quality of life.

  13. Treatment of chronic airways obstruction with indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Hume, M; Eddey, V

    1977-10-01

    The effect of indomethacin is reported in five patients with chronic asthma. There was both subjective and objective improvment and, in three of the patients, a reduction in steroid dosage. The results suggest that the drug may be of value in the treatment of this condition.

  14. Chronic obstructive lung disease and posttraumatic stress disorder: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Thad E; Blevins, Amy; Weg, Mark W Vander

    2015-01-01

    Background Several studies have reported on the co-occurrence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and psychiatric conditions, with the most robust evidence base demonstrating an impact of comorbid anxiety and depression on COPD-related outcomes. In recent years, research has sought to determine if there is a co-occurrence between COPD and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as for associations between PTSD and COPD-related outcomes. To date, there have been no published reviews summarizing this emerging literature. Objectives The primary objective of this review was to determine if there is adequate evidence to support a co-occurrence between PTSD and COPD. Secondary objectives were to: 1) determine if there are important clinical considerations regarding the impact of PTSD on COPD management, and 2) identify targeted areas for further research. Methods A structured review was performed using a systematic search strategy limited to studies in English, addressing adults, and to articles that examined: 1) the co-occurrence of COPD and PTSD and 2) the impact of PTSD on COPD-related outcomes. To be included, articles must have addressed some type of nonreversible obstructive lung pathology. Results A total of 598 articles were identified for initial review. Upon applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, n=19 articles or abstracts addressed our stated objectives. Overall, there is inconclusive evidence to support the co-occurrence between PTSD and COPD. Studies finding a significant co-occurrence generally had inferior methods of identifying COPD; in contrast, studies that utilized more robust COPD measures (such as a physician exam) generally failed to find a relationship. Among studies that examined the impact of PTSD on COPD-related outcomes, there was more consistent evidence that PTSD affects the perception of respiratory symptom burden and management. In addition, methods for measuring an important confounder (smoking) were generally

  15. Chronic deep venous obstruction: definition, prevalence, diagnosis, management.

    PubMed

    Neglén, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Ilio-caval venous obstruction has an important role in the expression of symptomatic chronic venous disease regardless of aetiology. The presence of obstruction has been more or less previously ignored and emphasis placed on reflux alone. Stenting of the ilio-femoral veins guided by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) can now be performed with low morbidity and mortality using appropriate technique. Current diagnostic modalities do not allow a definitive assessment of haemodynamically critical venous obstruction, which hampers selection of limbs for treatment. The diagnosis must be based on morphological studies (preferably IVUS) in patient selected with specific history, signs and symptoms. A high index of suspicion and generous use of morphological investigations are critical in the initial recognition of venous outflow obstruction. Stenting of the ilio-femoral vein appears to be durable with a substantial improvement in limb pain and swelling, high rate of ulcer healing, enhanced quality of life and decreased disability. The beneficial clinical outcome occurs regardless of the presence of remaining reflux, adjunct saphenous procedures or aetiology of obstruction.

  16. Animal models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rial, Sandra; Girón-Martínez, Álvaro; Peces-Barba, Germán

    2015-03-01

    Animal models of disease have always been welcomed by the scientific community because they provide an approach to the investigation of certain aspects of the disease in question. Animal models of COPD cannot reproduce the heterogeneity of the disease and usually only manage to represent the disease in its milder stages. Moreover, airflow obstruction, the variable that determines patient diagnosis, not always taken into account in the models. For this reason, models have focused on the development of emphysema, easily detectable by lung morphometry, and have disregarded other components of the disease, such as airway injury or associated vascular changes. Continuous, long-term exposure to cigarette smoke is considered the main risk factor for this disease, justifying the fact that the cigarette smoke exposure model is the most widely used. Some variations on this basic model, related to exposure time, the association of other inducers or inhibitors, exacerbations or the use of transgenic animals to facilitate the identification of pathogenic pathways have been developed. Some variations or heterogeneity of this disease, then, can be reproduced and models can be designed for resolving researchers' questions on disease identification or treatment responses.

  17. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction complicated by an eating disorder].

    PubMed

    Azzoulai, C; Djeddi, J; Chapoy, V; Boudailliez, B; Bovin, E; Pripis, C; Buisson, P; Guilé, J-M

    2015-11-01

    Chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a rare and serious chronic disease starting in childhood, which can affect the entire digestive tract. It is caused by a peristalsis intestinal disorder that leads to occlusions without any obvious obstruction. Few studies have been carried out regarding the prognosis of this illness. This disease is often diagnosed by a process of elimination, but some histological anomalies have been present in the digestive wall of certain patients. This clinical case concerns a 17-year-old girl affected by CIPO and eating disorders. It seems difficult to discriminate between digestive disorders and eating disorders. What psychological effects can this severe pathology have? Are eating disorders induced by CIPO? These questions are raised in this article through the example of this patient's somatopsychic complexity and the ensuing difficulties in her overall care.

  18. [Inhaled in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy update].

    PubMed

    Viejo-Casas, A; Bonnardeaux-Chadburn, C; Ginel-Mendoza, L; Quintano-Jimenez, J A

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has increased significantly in recent years, and today we have a more comprehensive concept of the disease. Additionally, drug development allows having a wide range of therapeutic options. The inhaled route is the choice, as it allows drugs to act directly on the bronchial tree. In the past few months, new molecules and devices have been developed that increases our options when treating, but also our doubts when choosing one or the other, so an update of inhaled medications for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is necessary. The different types of inhalers currently available are reviewed in this article, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each of them, in order to determine how to choose the right device.

  19. Managing nonmalignant chronic abdominal pain and malignant bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Bicanovsky, Lesley K; Lagman, Ruth L; Davis, Mellar P; Walsh, Declan

    2006-03-01

    Evaluation of abdominal pain requires an understanding of the possible causes(benign or malignant) and recognition of typical patterns and clinical presentation. Abdominal pain has multiple causes; associated signs and symptoms may aid in the diagnosis. Remember that some patients will not have a textbook presentation, and unusual causes for pain must be considered. Those with chronic pancreatitis with structural complications should be operated on early, whereas those with other types of chronic pancreatitis should receive medical therapy focusing on alleviating symptoms. Control of the most troublesome symptoms will provide the best management for IBS. Pharmacologic success in bowel obstruction depends on the level and degree of obstruction. Decision making is based on reasonable expectations of survival, treatment-related success, performance status, and goals of care. Quality of life will be enhanced by appropriate symptom management.

  20. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: knowing what we mean, meaning what we say.

    PubMed

    Joshi, J M

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is defined in several different ways using different criteria based on symptoms, physiological impairment and pathological abnormalities. While some use COPD to mean smoking related chronic airway disease, others include all disorders causing chronic airway obstruction. When COPD is used as a broad descriptive term, specific disorders that cause chronic airway obstruction remain under-diagnosed and the prevalence estimates vary considerably. The lack of agreement over the precise terminology and classification of COPD has resulted in widespread confusion. Terminology includes definition, diagnostic criteria, and a system for staging severity. Recently, COPD is defined more clearly and diagnosed using precise criteria that include tobacco smoking greater than 10 pack years, symptoms and airway obstruction on spirometry. A multi-dimensional severity grading system, the BODE (body mass index, obstruction, dyspnoea, and exercise tolerance) index has been designed to assess the respiratory and systemic expressions of COPD. This review proposes that the broad group of chronic disorders of the airways (with or without airway obstruction) be called chronic airway disease (CAD). The term COPD should be used exclusively for tobacco smoking related chronic airway disease. Chronic airway obstruction or obstructive lung disease may be used to define those conditions with airways obstruction caused by factors other than tobacco smoking. The aetiology may be appended to the label, for example, chronic airway obstruction/obstructive lung disease associated with bronchiectasis, chronic airway obstruction/obstructive lung disease associated with obliterative bronchiolitis or chronic airway obstruction/obstructive lung disease due to biomass fuel/occupational exposure.

  1. Inflammation and repair processes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rennard, S I

    1999-11-01

    COPD is characterized by chronic inflammation and injury of both the airways and the parenchymal structures of the lung. These processes are associated with ongoing repair. Whether repair leads to restoration of normal tissue architecture or to altered tissue structure with loss of function depends on complex interrelationships of a variety of interacting mediators. The possibility that repair processes can be modulated by exogenous agents raises the possibility that therapeutic strategies aimed at repair can be effective. Such strategies offer tremendous promise both for slowing the relentlessly progressive natural history which most often characterizes COPD and, possibly, for restoring lung function. Rennard SI. Inflammation and repair processes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  2. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with chronic inflammation affecting predominantly lung parenchyma and peripheral airways and results in largely irreversible and progressive airflow limitation. This inflammation is characterized by increased numbers of alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, and T lymphocytes, which are recruited from the circulation. Oxidative stress plays a key role in driving this inflammation. The pulmonary inflammation may enhance the development and growth of lung cancer. The peripheral inflammation extends into the circulation, resulting in systemic inflammation with the same inflammatory proteins. Systemic inflammation may worsen comorbidities. Treatment of pulmonary inflammation may therefore have beneficial effects.

  3. Variability of Spirometry in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Herpel, Laura B.; Kanner, Richard E.; Lee, Shing M.; Fessler, Henry E.; Sciurba, Frank C.; Connett, John E.; Wise, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Our goal is to determine short-term intraindividual biologic and measurement variability in spirometry of patients with a wide range of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity, using datasets from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) and the Lung Health Study (LHS). This may be applied to determine criteria that can be used to assess a clinically meaningful change in spirometry. Methods: A total of 5,886 participants from the LHS and 1,215 participants from the NETT performed prebronchodilator spirometry during two baseline sessions. We analyzed varying criteria for absolute and percent change of FEV1 and FVC to determine which criterion was met by 90% of the participants. Results: The mean ± SD FEV1 for the initial session was 2.64 ± 0.60 L (75.1 ± 8.8% predicted) for the LHS and 0.68 ± 0.22 L (23.7 ± 6.5% predicted) for the NETT. The mean ± SD number of days between test sessions was 24.9 ± 17.1 for the LHS and 85.7 ± 21.7 for the NETT. As the degree of obstruction increased, the intersession percent difference of FEV1 increased. However, the absolute difference between tests remained relatively constant despite the severity of obstruction (0.106 ± 0.10 L). Over 90% of participants had an intersession FEV1 difference of less than 225 ml irrespective of the severity of obstruction. Conclusions: Absolute changes in FEV1 rather than percent change should be used to determine whether patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have improved or worsened between test sessions. PMID:16497996

  4. Chronic partial obstructive urolithiasis causing hydronephrosis and chronic renal failure in a steer.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, B M; Garry, F B

    1992-07-01

    A 13-month-old Angus steer was examined with a 6-week history of lethargy, malaise and dribbling urine. Laboratory exam revealed crystalluria and poor renal function. Ultrasound revealed hydronephrosis and hydroureter. Euthanasia was chosen because of a poor prognosis for economic recovery. Necropsy demonstrated numerous calculi causing partial urethral obstruction approximately 25 cm from the end of the penis. Secondary renal changes were confirmed. Urolithiasis occurs commonly in ruminants. Secondary obstruction is usually complete with severe consequences. This is the first report of chronic partial obstructive urolithiasis resulting in endstage renal disease.

  5. Nutritional and metabolic modulation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management.

    PubMed

    Schols, A M W J

    2003-11-01

    In this paper the perspective for nutritional modulation of systemic impairment in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is discussed. Progressive weight loss is characterised by disease-specific elevated energy requirements unbalanced by dietary intake. Weight gain per se can be achieved by caloric supplementation while future studies may prove efficacy of amino acid modulation to stimulate protein synthesis and enhance muscle anabolism. Disproportionate muscle wasting resembles the cachexia syndrome as described in other chronic wasting diseases (cancer, chronic heart failure, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)). There is yet no adequate nutritional strategy available to treat cachexia in COPD. Muscle substrate metabolism has hardly been investigated, but the few data available point towards a decreased fat oxidative capacity that may show similarities with the "metabolic syndrome" as described in type II diabetes and obesity and could theoretically benefit from polyunsaturated fatty acid modulation. To adequately target the different therapeutic options, clearly more clinical (intervention) studies are needed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients that are adequately characterised by local and systemic impairment and in which molecular and metabolic markers are linked to functional outcome.

  6. Inhaled nitric oxide in chronic obstructive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tiihonen, J.; Hakola, P.; Paanila, J.; Turtiainen . Dept. of Forensic Psychiatry)

    1993-01-30

    During an investigation of the effect of nitric oxide on the pulmonary circulation the authors had the opportunity to give nitric oxide to a patient with longstanding obstructive airway disease, with successful results. A 72-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was referred to the institution for assessment of pulmonary vascular reactivity to acetylcholine and nitric oxide. Acetylcholine was infused into the main pulmonary artery followed 15 min later by an inhalation of 80 parts per million (ppm) nitric oxide. Heart rate and systemic arterial and pulmonary arterial pressures were continuously monitored. Throughout the study the inspired oxygen concentration was kept constant at 98%. Nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide concentrations were monitored while nitric oxide was delivered. The infusion of acetylcholine resulted in a small increase in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Nitric oxide produced a substantial fall in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance with a concomitant increase in systemic arterial oxygen tension. These results suggest that endothelium-dependent relaxation of the pulmonary vasculature was impaired in the patient and that exogenous nitric oxide was an effective pulmonary vasodilator. In-vitro investigation of explanted airways disease suggests not only that endothelium-dependent pulmonary artery relaxation is impaired but also that the dysfunction is related to pre-existing hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells and might alter the pulmonary vascular remodeling characteristic of patients with chronic obstructive airways disease.

  7. Cachexia in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: new insights and therapeutic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Karin J. C.; Kneppers, Anita E. M.; van de Bool, Coby; Langen, Ramon C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cachexia and muscle wasting are well recognized as common and partly reversible features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), adversely affecting disease progression and prognosis. This argues for integration of weight and muscle maintenance in patient care. In this review, recent insights are presented in the diagnosis of muscle wasting in COPD, the pathophysiology of muscle wasting, and putative mechanisms involved in a disturbed energy balance as cachexia driver. We discuss the therapeutic implications of these new insights for optimizing and personalizing management of COPD‐induced cachexia. PMID:27066314

  8. Updates in the management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Narsingam, Saiprasad; Bozarth, Andrew L; Abdeljalil, Asem

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a preventable and treatable disease state characterized by persistent airflow limitation that is usually progressive and associated with an enhanced chronic inflammatory process. It is increasingly recognized as a major public health problem, affecting more than 20 million adults in the US. It is also recognized as a leading cause of hospitalizations and is the fourth leading cause of death in the US. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) operates to promote evidence-based management of COPD, increase awareness and encourage research. In 2011, GOLD published a consensus report detailing evidence-based management strategies for COPD, which were last updated in 2015. In recent years, newer strategies and a growing number of new pharmacologic agents to treat symptoms of COPD have also been introduced and show promise in improving the management of COPD. We aim to provide an evidence-based review of the available and upcoming pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment options for stable COPD, with continued emphasis on evidence-based management.

  9. Innate Immune Responses and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schleimer, Robert P.

    2005-01-01

    Innate immune responses appear to be partially responsible for maintaining inflammation and tissue destruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In the early stages of the disease in smokers, the airways are bombarded with large quantities of particulate material, and activation of phagocytic cells results in the release of many of the mediators believed to remodel the airways. Ironically, failure of the innate immune defense system, either by inherited deficiency or as a result of chronic smoke inhalation, is likely to result in increased susceptibility to infectious disease and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It is well known that deficiencies in the production of collectins, pentraxins, and complement can lead to increased infections, and several studies indicate that deficiency in one or another innate defense component is associated with increased exacerbations. Corticosteroids reduce exacerbations in part because of their ability to boost the production of innate host-defense molecules. Therapeutic approaches that stimulate the generation of antimicrobial molecules in the lungs might be able to reduce disease exacerbations. PMID:16267360

  10. Approach to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Todd, David C.; McIvor, R. Andrew; Pugsley, Stewart O.; Cox, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To review the diagnosis, assessment of severity, and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and to address the systemic manifestations associated with COPD. SOURCES OF INFORMATION PubMed was searched from January 2000 to December 2007 using the key words COPD, practice guidelines, randomized controlled trials, therapy, and health outcomes. The Canadian Thoracic Society guideline on management of COPD was carefully reviewed. The authors, who have extensive experience in care of patients with COPD, provided expert opinion. MAIN MESSAGE Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a common systemic disease caused primarily by smoking. Spirometry is essential for diagnosis of COPD and should be integrated into primary care practice. Pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapy improves symptoms, capacity for exercise, and quality of life. Smoking cessation is the only intervention shown to slow disease progression. The systemic manifestations and comorbidity associated with COPD need to be identified and addressed to optimize health and quality of life. CONCLUSION An evidence-based approach to managing COPD along with a primary care chronic disease management model could improve quality of life for patients with COPD. PMID:18474704

  11. Bridging Lung Development with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Relevance of Developmental Pathways in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Boucherat, Olivier; Morissette, Mathieu C; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien; Maltais, François

    2016-02-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic airflow limitation. This generic term encompasses emphysema and chronic bronchitis, two common conditions, each having distinct but also overlapping features. Recent epidemiological and experimental studies have challenged the traditional view that COPD is exclusively an adult disease occurring after years of inhalational insults to the lungs, pinpointing abnormalities or disruption of the pathways that control lung development as an important susceptibility factor for adult COPD. In addition, there is growing evidence that emphysema is not solely a destructive process because it is also characterized by a failure in cell and molecular maintenance programs necessary for proper lung development. This leads to the concept that tissue regeneration required stimulation of signaling pathways that normally operate during development. We undertook a review of the literature to outline the contribution of developmental insults and genes in the occurrence and pathogenesis of COPD, respectively.

  12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: latest evidence and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Hammad; Sharafkhaneh, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and results in an economic and social burden that is both substantial and increasing. The natural history of COPD is punctuated by exacerbations which have major short- and long-term implications on the patient and healthcare system. Evidence-based guidelines stipulate that early detection and prompt treatment of exacerbations are essential to ensure optimal outcomes and to reduce the burden of COPD. Several factors can identify populations at risk of exacerbations. Implementing prevention measures in patients at risk is a major goal in the management of COPD. PMID:25177479

  13. Nutrition in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A review

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Gautam; Yadav, Sankalp

    2015-01-01

    Cachexia and muscle wasting is a frequent but partly reversible complication in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and affects the disease progression and prognosis. Weight loss in COPD is a consequence of increased energy requirements unbalanced by dietary intake. Nutritional supplement therapy has been shown to be effective for maintaining and improving the muscle strength and exercise tolerance in poorly nourished COPD patients, thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. This mini review discusses the role of nutritional supplement therapy in the treatment of COPD. PMID:27847905

  14. Noninvasive ventilation in patients with chronic obstructive airway disease.

    PubMed

    Khilnani, Gopi C; Banga, Amit

    2008-01-01

    Recent years have seen the emergence of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) as an important tool for management of patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Several well conducted studies in the recent years have established its role in the initial, as well as later management of these patients. However, some grey areas remain. Moreover, data is emerging on the role of long term nocturnal NIV use in patients with very severe stable COPD. This review summarizes the evidence supporting the use of NIV in various stages of COPD, discuss the merits as well as demerits of this novel ventilatory strategy and highlight the grey areas in the current body of knowledge.

  15. Adjunct treatment with yoga in chronic severe airways obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, M K

    1978-01-01

    Eleven patients with severe chronic airways obstruction were given training in yogic breathing exercises and postures. A matched group of 11 patients were given physiotherapy breathing exercises. Both groups of patients were followed up at monthly intervals for nine months with pulmonary function tests, tests of exercise tolerance, and inquiry into their symptoms. After training in yoga the mean maximum work increased significantly by 60.55 kpm; whereas no such rise occurred after training in physiotherapy. This objective improvement was associated with symptomatic improvement in a significantly higher number of patients given training in yoga. PMID:694807

  16. Tiotropium Bromide in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Bronchial Asthma.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Gonzalez, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2015-11-01

    Inhaled bronchodilators are the mainstay of pharmacological treatment for stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including β2-agonists and muscarinic antagonists. Tiotropium bromide, a long-acting antimuscarinic bronchodilator (LAMA), is a treatment choice for moderate-to-severe COPD; its efficacy and safety have been demonstrated in recent trials. Studies also point to a beneficial role of tiotropium in the treatment of difficult-to-control asthma and a potential function in the asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). Combination of different bronchodilator molecules and addition of inhaled corticosteroids are viable therapeutic alternatives. A condensation of the latest trials and the rationale behind these therapies will be presented in this article.

  17. The Contribution of Small Airway Obstruction to the Pathogenesis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Hogg, James C; Paré, Peter D; Hackett, Tillie-Louise

    2017-04-01

    The hypothesis that the small conducting airways were the major site of obstruction to airflow in normal lungs was introduced by Rohrer in 1915 and prevailed until Weibel introduced a quantitative method of studying lung anatomy in 1963. Green repeated Rohrer's calculations using Weibels new data in 1965 and found that the smaller conducting airways offered very little resistance to airflow. This conflict was resolved by seminal experiments conducted by Macklem and Mead in 1967, which confirmed that a small proportion of the total lower airways resistance is attributable to small airways <2 mm in diameter. Shortly thereafter, Hogg, Macklem, and Thurlbeck used this technique to show that small airways become the major site of obstruction in lungs affected by emphysema. These and other observations led Mead to write a seminal editorial in 1970 that postulated the small airways are a silent zone within normal lungs where disease can accumulate over many years without being noticed. This review provides a progress report since the 1970s on methods for detecting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the structural nature of small airways' disease, and the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are thought to underlie its pathogenesis.

  18. Caecal volvulus in a patient with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Tatterton, M; El-Khatib, C

    2011-10-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a rare disorder characterised by recurrent symptoms and signs of intestinal obstruction without an underlying mechanical cause. Caecal volvulus remains a rare cause of intestinal obstruction that often requires operative intervention. We describe the previously unreported case of caecal volvulus occurring in an adult patient with CIPO, together with his subsequent management.

  19. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Morbimortality and healthcare burden].

    PubMed

    Gómez Sáenz, J T; Quintano Jiménez, J A; Hidalgo Requena, A; González Béjar, M; Gérez Callejas, M J; Zangróniz Uruñuela, M R; Moreno Vilaseca, A; Hernández García, R

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an enormous public health problem and of growing importance due to its high prevalence, elevated morbimortality, and socioeconomic costs. Many Spanish epidemiological studies report a prevalence of 10% of the adult population, with its growth appearing to have stabilised. Nevertheless, over 75% of cases are still underdiagnosed. The diagnosis of mild and moderate obstruction is associated with a higher survival and lower costs (14 years and €9,730) compared to 10 years survival and €43,785 of patients diagnosed in the severe obstruction phase. COPD was the fourth cause of death in Spain in 2011, although the adjusted mortality rates have decreased more than 20% in the last decade, particularly in males. Patients with advanced COPD die from it, but patients with mild or moderate COPD die due to cardiovascular diseases or cancer (mainly of the lung). It is estimated that the annual cost of the disease is around 3,000 million Euros. These increase with the spirometric severity, and is mainly associated with exacerbations (almost 60% of the direct costs). Comorbidity, that is the presence of diseases that coexist with the studied disease, is higher in patients with COPD than in the general population and affects health results.

  20. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction related to viral infections.

    PubMed

    De Giorgio, R; Ricciardiello, L; Naponelli, V; Selgrad, M; Piazzi, G; Felicani, C; Serra, M; Fronzoni, L; Antonucci, A; Cogliandro, R F; Barbara, G; Corinaldesi, R; Tonini, M; Knowles, C H; Stanghellini, V

    2010-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO), one of the most severe gastrointestinal motility disorders, is a condition characterized by a clinical picture mimicking small bowel occlusion with related symptoms and signs in the absence of demonstrable mechanical obstruction. Analysis of full-thickness biopsy samples may unravel structural changes of the neuromuscular layer involving the whole gut, although the midgut is usually worst affected. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction can occur in association with systemic neurological, endocrine, and connective tissue diseases or malignancy but, when no recognizable etiology is found, CIPO is referred to as idiopathic (CIIPO). The latter form can be diagnosed early in life due to a genetic etiology or in adulthood when a viral origin may be considered. This review addresses the hypothesis that some systemic neurotrophic viral infections can affect the enteric nervous system thereby altering normal peristaltic activity. Available data are reviewed, focusing specifically on herpesviruses or polyomaviruses (JC virus). These suggest that in comparison to a proportion of CIIPO patients, healthy controls rarely harbor viral DNA in the myenteric plexus, leaving open the possibility that a viral infection might have an etiologic role in the development of CIIPO. The review thus provides some new perspectives in the pathophysiology and perhaps targeted treatment of CIIPO.

  1. Acute and chronic pseudo-obstruction: a current update.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Maria-Pia; Warrier, Satish; Lynch, A Craig; Heriot, Alexander G

    2015-10-01

    Acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (ACPO) and chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) are distinct clinical entities in which patients present similarly with symptoms of a mechanical obstruction without an occlusive lesion. Unfortunately, they also share the issues related to a delay in diagnosis, including inappropriate management and poor outcomes. Advancements have been made in our understanding of the aetiologies of both conditions. Several predisposing factors linked to critical illness have been implicated in ACPO. CIPO is a functional motility disorder, historically misdiagnosed, with unnecessary surgery being performed in many patients with dire consequences. This review discusses the pathophysiology, clinical and diagnostic features, and treatment of each. For ACPO, a safer pharmacological approach to treatment is presented in a modified up-to-date algorithm. The importance of CIPO as a differential diagnosis when seeing patients with recurrent admissions for abdominal pain and distention is also discussed, as well as specific indications for surgery. While surgery is often a last resort, the role of the surgeon in the management of both ACPO and CIPO cannot be undervalued. By characterizing each condition in a common review, the knowledge gleaned aims to optimize outcomes for these frequently complex patients.

  2. Treatment of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Karnak, Demet; Beder, Sumru

    2002-10-01

    Chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) is a general term for chronic, irreversible lung disease that combines qualities of emphysema and chronic bronchitis. The standard definition of chronic bronchitis is a productive cough for three months per year (for at least two consecutive years) without an underlying aetiology. Acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (AECB) represents a common complaint that leads patients to seek medical attention. COPD and AECB are directly responsible for the overuse of antibiotics in the developed world. Fifty per cent of exacerbations have either viral or non-infectious origin. For this reason, antibiotic use remains controversial. Among other bacteria, Chlamydia pneumoniae is responsible for 4 - 16% of AECB in hospitalised or out-patients, although among smokers and people using steroids, the incidence is 34%. C. pneumoniae may either be the sole causative agent or a co-agent in AECB. This paper reviews the management of COPD/AECB with respect to antibiotic use. Diagnosis and antimicrobial therapy relevant to Chlamydia in the management of AECB are also evaluated in this review.

  3. Sirtuin 1 and Aging Theory for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Conti, V.; Corbi, G.; Manzo, V.; Pelaia, G.; Filippelli, A.; Vatrella, A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory syndrome that represents an increasing health problem, especially in the elderly population. Drug therapies are symptomatic and inadequate to contrast disease progression and mortality. Thus, there is an urgent need to clarify the molecular mechanisms responsible for this condition in order to identify new biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Processes including oxidant/antioxidant, protease/antiprotease, and proliferative/antiproliferative balance and control of inflammatory response become dysfunctional during aging as well as in COPD. Recently it was suggested that Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an antiaging molecule involved in the response to oxidative stress and chronic inflammation, is implicated in both development and progression of COPD. The present review focuses on the involvement of SIRT1 in the regulation of redox state, inflammation, and premature senescence, all crucial characteristics of COPD phenotypes. Recent evidence corroborating the statement of the “aging theory for COPD” was also discussed. PMID:26236580

  4. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in non-smokers.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Sundeep S; Barnes, Peter J

    2009-08-29

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Tobacco smoking is established as a major risk factor, but emerging evidence suggests that other risk factors are important, especially in developing countries. An estimated 25-45% of patients with COPD have never smoked; the burden of non-smoking COPD is therefore much higher than previously believed. About 3 billion people, half the worldwide population, are exposed to smoke from biomass fuel compared with 1.01 billion people who smoke tobacco, which suggests that exposure to biomass smoke might be the biggest risk factor for COPD globally. We review the evidence for the association of COPD with biomass fuel, occupational exposure to dusts and gases, history of pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic asthma, respiratory-tract infections during childhood, outdoor air pollution, and poor socioeconomic status.

  5. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as disability: dilemma stories.

    PubMed

    McMillan Boyles, Christina; Hill Bailey, Patricia; Mossey, Sharolyn

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop an understanding of the meaning of disability for individuals living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a Canadian midwestern community from an emic perspective. A focused ethnographic design was used. Fifteen individuals participated in interviews. Narrative analysis was used to examine the interview data. Data analysis revealed 65 dilemma stories consisting of two structural components: the impairment, and the justification/explanation of the impairment. Participants' impairment might or might not have been known to others. In both situations, individuals were faced with choices of whether to explain/justify or attempt to conceal the impairment. Participants told these dilemma stories to convey the meaning of COPD as a disability invisible to others, and at times, to themselves. The information gained from this research will serve as an essential complement to the existing knowledge about this important yet often invisible chronic illness.

  6. Pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: An African perspective.

    PubMed

    Allwood, B; Calligaro, G

    2015-09-01

    The importance of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as a global health problem cannot be overstated. According to the latest World Health Organization statistics (2005), 210 million people suffer from COPD worldwide, and 5% of all deaths globally are estimated to be caused by this disease. This corresponds to >3 million deaths annually, of which 90% are thought to occur in low- and middle-income countries.While cigarette smoking remains the major risk factor, and much of the increase in COPD is associated with projected increases in tobacco use, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that in the majority of patients in developing countries the aetiology of COPD is multifactorial.This article summarises the epidemiology of and risk factors for COPD in Africa, including influences other than cigarette smoking that are important contributors to chronic irreversible airflow limitation in our setting.

  7. Pneumocystis: a novel pathogen in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Morris, Alison; Sciurba, Frank C; Norris, Karen A

    2008-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) results in significant morbidity and mortality. Smoking has long been recognized as the primary risk factor for development of COPD, but factors determining the severity or pattern of disease in smokers are largely unknown. Recent interest has focused on the potential role of infectious agents and the associated host response in accelerating progression of airway obstruction or in perpetuating its progression following discontinuation of tobacco exposure. Pneumocystis jirovecii is a fungal pathogen that causes pneumonia in immunocompromised individuals. Recent evidence has linked this organism with COPD. Using sensitive molecular techniques, low levels of Pneumocystis have been detected in the respiratory tract of certain individuals and termed colonization. Several findings support the theory that colonization with Pneumocystis is involved in the "vicious circle" hypothesis of COPD in which colonization with organisms perpetuates an inflammatory and lung remodeling response. Pneumocystis colonization is more prevalent in smokers and in those with severe COPD. The presence of Pneumocystis in the lungs, even at low levels, produces inflammatory changes similar to those seen in COPD, with increases in numbers of neutrophils and CD8(+) lymphocytes. HIV-infected subjects who have had PCP develop permanent airway obstruction, and HIV-infected patients have a high prevalence of both emphysema and Pneumocystis colonization. In addition, a non-human primate model of colonization shows development of airway obstruction and radiographic emphysema. Additional studies are needed to confirm the role of Pneumocystis in the pathogenesis of COPD, given that this agent might be a treatable co-factor in disease progression.

  8. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Subtypes. Transitions over Time

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Cristóbal; Arostegui, Inmaculada; Aburto, Myriam; Moraza, Javier; Quintana, José M.; García-Loizaga, Amaia; Basualdo, Luis V.; Aramburu, Amaia; Aizpiri, Susana; Uranga, Ane; Capelastegui, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Although subtypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are recognized, it is unknown what happens to these subtypes over time. Our objectives were to assess the stability of cluster-based subtypes in patients with stable disease and explore changes in clusters over 1 year. Methods Multiple correspondence and cluster analysis were used to evaluate data collected from 543 stable patients included consecutively from 5 respiratory outpatient clinics. Results Four subtypes were identified. Three of them, A, B, and C, had marked respiratory profiles with a continuum in severity of several variables, while the fourth, subtype D, had a more systemic profile with intermediate respiratory disease severity. Subtype A was associated with less dyspnea, better health-related quality of life and lower Charlson comorbidity scores, and subtype C with the most severe dyspnea, and poorer pulmonary function and quality of life, while subtype B was between subtypes A and C. Subtype D had higher rates of hospitalization the previous year, and comorbidities. After 1 year, all clusters remained stable. Generally, patients continued in the same subtype but 28% migrated to another cluster. Together with movement across clusters, patients showed changes in certain characteristics (especially exercise capacity, some variables of pulmonary function and physical activity) and changes in outcomes (quality of life, hospitalization and mortality) depending on the new cluster they belonged to. Conclusions Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease clusters remained stable over 1 year. Most patients stayed in their initial subtype cluster, but some moved to another subtype and accordingly had different outcomes. PMID:27611911

  9. Screening for Depression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Julian, Laura J.; Gregorich, Steven E.; Earnest, Gillian; Eisner, Mark D.; Chen, Hubert; Blanc, Paul D.; Yelin, Ed H.; Katz, Patricia P.

    2010-01-01

    Depression and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major causes of disability. Identifying COPD patients at risk for depression would facilitate the alleviation of an important comorbidity conferring additional risk for poor outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of a brief screening measure, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), in detecting the mood disorders in persons with COPD. This is a cross-sectional study of 188 persons with COPD, stratified by age (65 and older versus less than 65) and COPD severity using Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) staging. Screening cut-points were empirically derived using threshold selection methods and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were estimated. The GDS-15 was used as a screening measure and diagnoses of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) or other mood disorders were determined using a “gold standard” standardized structured clinical interview. Of the 188 persons with COPD, 25% met criteria for any mood disorder and 11% met criteria for MDD. Optimal threshold estimations suggested a GDS cut score of 5, which yielded adequate sensitivity and specificity in detecting MDD (81% and 87%, respectively) and correctly classified 86% of participants. To detect the presence of any mood disorder, a cut score of 4 was suggested yielding sensitivity and specificity of 67% and 82%, respectively; correctly classifying 79%. These results suggest that mood disorders are relatively common among persons with COPD. The GDS-15 is a useful screening measure to identify patients at risk for depression. PMID:19938969

  10. Screening for depression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Julian, Laura J; Gregorich, Steven E; Earnest, Gillian; Eisner, Mark D; Chen, Hubert; Blanc, Paul D; Yelin, Ed H; Katz, Patricia P

    2009-12-01

    Depression and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major causes of disability. Identifying COPD patients at risk for depression would facilitate the alleviation of an important comorbidity conferring additional risk for poor outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of a brief screening measure, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), in detecting the mood disorders in persons with COPD. This is a cross-sectional study of 188 persons with COPD, stratified by age (65 and older versus less than 65) and COPD severity using Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) staging. Screening cut-points were empirically derived using threshold selection methods and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were estimated. The GDS-15 was used as a screening measure and diagnoses of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) or other mood disorders were determined using a "gold standard" standardized structured clinical interview. Of the 188 persons with COPD, 25% met criteria for any mood disorder and 11% met criteria for MDD. Optimal threshold estimations suggested a GDS cut score of 5, which yielded adequate sensitivity and specificity in detecting MDD (81% and 87%, respectively) and correctly classified 86% of participants. To detect the presence of any mood disorder, a cut score of 4 was suggested yielding sensitivity and specificity of 67% and 82%, respectively; correctly classifying 79%. These results suggest that mood disorders are relatively common among persons with COPD. The GDS-15 is a useful screening measure to identify patients at risk for depression.

  11. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Orvoen-Frija, E; Benoit, M; Catto, M; Chambouleyron, M; Duguet, A; Emeriau, J-P; Ferry, M; Hayot, M; Jeandel, C; Morize, V; Nassih, K; Ouksel, H; Piette, F; Prefaut, C; Roche, N; de Wazieres, B; Zureik, M

    2010-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic disease characterized by incompletely reversible airflow limitation, measured by a decrease of FEV(1)/FVC ratio. International consensus does not agree on a single threshold for this ratio, which can define airflow obstruction. Although the prevalence of COPD in the elderly population varies according to the definition used, it definitely increases with age and could reach 15% in those over 65 years of age. Therefore, ageing of the population should result in increased prevalence and socioeconomical costs of COPD during coming years. In France, diagnosis of COPD in the elderly is difficult, late and insufficient. Management, which has the same goals as in younger populations, has to be global and coordinated. Some points should be considered with particular attention considering the cumulative risks related on the one hand to COPD and on the other to ageing: pharmacological side-effects, decreased physical and social autonomy, nutritional impairment, comorbidities. Given the lack of specific data in elderly populations, pharmacological indications are generally considered to be the same as in younger populations, but some additional precautionary measures are necessary. Pulmonary rehabilitation seems to be beneficial at any age. Palliative care comes up against important difficulties: an indefinite beginning of the palliative stage in COPD; insufficient palliative care resources; insufficient communication; insufficient utilization of palliative care resources. Global COPD management in elderly requires coordination, best reached in health care network organizations involving medical and/or social professionals.

  12. Understanding asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wurst, Keele E; Kelly-Reif, Kaitlin; Bushnell, Greta A; Pascoe, Steven; Barnes, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS) is a loosely-defined clinical entity referring to patients who exhibit characteristics of both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Clinical definitions and classifications for ACOS vary widely, which impacts our understanding of prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of the condition. This literature review was therefore conducted to characterize the prevalence of ACOS and the effect of different disease definitions on these estimates, as this has not previously been explored. From an analysis of English language literature published from 2000 to 2014, the estimated prevalence of ACOS ranges from 12.1% to 55.2% among patients with COPD and 13.3%-61.0% among patients with asthma alone. This variability is linked to differences in COPD and asthma diagnostic criteria, disease ascertainment methods (spirometry-based versus clinical or symptom-based diagnoses and claims data), and population characteristics including age, gender and smoking. Understanding the reasons for differences in prevalence estimates of ACOS across the literature may help guide decision making on the most appropriate criteria for defining ACOS and aid investigators in designing future ACOS clinical studies aimed at effective treatment.

  13. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Never-Smoking Dairy Farmers

    PubMed Central

    Stoleski, Saso; Minov, Jordan; Karadzinska-Bislimovska, Jovanka; Mijakoski, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Work-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents a considerable part of the disease burden globally. Objective : To assess the COPD prevalence and characteristics in never-smoking dairy farmers. Materials and Methodology : We have conducted a cross-sectional study with 75 male dairy farmers aged 26 to 59 years, and compared them with equivalent number of male office workers similar by age, and duration of employment. Data on chronic respiratory symptoms, job history and daily activities were obtained by questionnaire. Lung functional testing of the examined subjects included baseline spirometry, and bronchodilator reversibility measurement. Results : Dairy farmers showed higher prevalence of overall respiratory symptoms, but significant difference was noticed for cough, phlegm, and dyspnea. Dairy farmers had more prevalent work-related respiratory symptoms, being significant for overall symptoms, cough, and phlegm. The mean baseline values of spirometric parameters were lower in dairy farmers, but significance was reported for FEV1/FVC%, MEF50, MEF75, and MEF25-75. Dairy farmers had significantly higher COPD prevalence than office controls (10.7% vs 2.7%, P = 0,049). Dairy farmers and office controls showed significant association between COPD and age over 45 years. Dairy farmers had a significant association between COPD and employment duration of over 20 years (P = 0.023), but also between COPD and work-related chronic respiratory symptoms (P = 0.041). Conclusion : The study findings favor the cause-effect association between job exposure to respiratory hazards, and development of persistent airway obstruction among dairy farmers. PMID:25893027

  14. Regulation of Wnt4 in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Andrew L.; McLaren, Alistair; Hayes, Brian P.; Caramori, Gaetano; Clayton, Chris L.; Barnes, Peter J.; Chung, K. Fan; Adcock, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with persistent inflammation and oxidative stress in susceptible individuals. Using microarray analysis of bronchial biopsy samples from patients with COPD and controls, we identified Wnt4 as being up-regulated in COPD. Analysis of bronchial biopsy samples showed a very strong correlation between Wnt4 and IL8 gene expression, suggesting that Wnt4 plays a role in chronic lung inflammation. In vitro, Wnt4 induced proliferation and inflammation in human epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) and normal primary human bronchial epithelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was enhanced in the presence of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) as a result of activation of the p38 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Hydrogen peroxide, but not proinflammatory stimuli, up-regulated Wnt4 expression in epithelial cells. In monocytic THP-1 and primary airway smooth muscle cells, Wnt4 induced inflammation and enhanced the inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide and IL-1β but did not induce proliferation. In addition, these other cell types did not have enhanced Wnt4 expression in response to hydrogen peroxide. Our results indicate that airway epithelial activation, due to oxidative stress, may lead to Wnt4 induction. Wnt4, in turn, acts through the noncanonical pathway to activate epithelial cell remodeling and IL8 gene expression, leading to neutrophil infiltration and inflammation.—Durham, A. L., McLaren, A., Hayes, B. P., Caramori, G., Clayton, C. L., Barnes, P. J., Chung, K. F., Adcock, I. M. Regulation of Wnt4 in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:23463699

  15. Impact of diabetes, chronic heart failure, congenital heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on acute and chronic exercise responses

    PubMed Central

    Brassard, Patrice; Ferland, Annie; Marquis, Karine; Maltais, François; Jobin, Jean; Poirier, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Several chronic diseases are known to negatively affect the ability of an individual to perform exercise. However, the altered exercise capacity observed in these patients is not solely associated with the heart and lungs dysfunction. Exercise has also been shown to play an important role in the management of several pathologies encountered in the fields of cardiology and pneumology. Studies conducted in our institution regarding the influence of diabetes, chronic heart failure, congenital heart disease and chronic pulmonary obstructive disease on the acute and chronic exercise responses, along with the beneficial effects of exercise training in these populations, are reviewed. PMID:17932595

  16. Cognitive status among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, Carlos; Campuzano, Ana Isabel; Quintano, Jose Antonio; Molina, Jesús; Pérez, Joselín; Miravitlles, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the association between cognitive impairment and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), taking into account demographic and clinical variables evaluated during routine practice. Patients and methods We performed a post hoc analysis of a cross-sectional study that included subjects with stable COPD. Sociodemographic and clinical information was recorded using the Body mass index, airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea and Exacerbations index and the Charlson comorbidity index. Cognitive performance was studied by the mini-mental state examination, with a score less than 27 indicating clinical impairment. Depressive symptoms, physical activity, and quality of life (EuroQoL-5 dimensions and COPD Assessment Test) were also evaluated. Results The analysis included 940 subjects. The prevalence of cognitive impairment was 39.4%. Multivariate logistic regression models revealed that cognitive impairment was associated with educational level (odds ratio [OR] =0.096, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.011–0.447) and poorer quality of life measured by the EuroQoL-5 dimensions social tariff (OR =0.967, 95% CI =0.950–0.983). When questionnaires were not included in the analysis, cognitive impairment was associated with educational level (OR =0.063, 95% CI =0.010–0.934), number of exacerbations (OR =11.070, 95% CI =1.450–84.534), Body mass index, airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea and Exacerbations index score (OR =1.261, 95% CI =1.049–1.515), and the Charlson comorbidity index (OR =1.412, 95% CI =1.118–1.783). Conclusion Cognitive impairment is common in COPD and is associated with low educational level, higher disease severity, and increased comorbidity. This could have therapeutic implications for this population. PMID:27042043

  17. Undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients admitted to an acute assessment unit

    PubMed Central

    Eikhof, Karin D.; Olsen, Kristine R.; Wrengler, N. C. H.; Nielsen, Carl; Boedtger, Uffe; Titlestad, Ingrid L.; Weinreich, Ulla M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is very prevalent worldwide, yet underdiagnosed. Aim: This study investigates feasibility of performing spirometry in patients in need of acute hospital admission as well as the prevalence of undiagnosed COPD in the same cohort. Methods: During a two-week period, all patients admitted to three large acute assessment units were evaluated. Patients ≥ 18 years, able to perform spirometry, with no surgery to the thorax or abdomen within the last weeks and no known COPD was included. Patients with FEV1/FEV6 ≤ 0.7 or FEV1 < 80% or FEV6 < 80% were offered follow-up visit after 6 weeks. Results: Of the 1145 admitted patients, 46% were eligible: 28% of those had an abnormal spirometry. The offered follow-up visit was attended by 51% and in this group 17% were diagnosed with lung disease. COPD was the most prevalent diagnosis (73%), and 2/3 was in GOLD group A. In total, 75% of the patients with airflow obstruction at the initial examination remained obstructive. Conclusion: Performing spirometry in patients in need of acute hospital admission is feasible, abnormal findings are common, and COPD is the most prevalent diagnosis. PMID:28326181

  18. The great masquerader of malignancy: chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Taverna, Josephine A; Babiker, Hani M; Yun, Seongseok; Bishop, Maria C; Lau-Braunhut, Sarah; Meyer, Paul N; Enzler, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes can precede the initial manifestation and diagnosis of cancer. Paraneoplastic syndromes are a heterogeneous group of disorders caused by mechanisms other than the local presence of tumor cells. These phenomena are mediated by humoral factors secreted by tumor cells or by tumor mediated immune responses. Among paraneoplastic syndromes, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is rare and represents a particularly difficult clinical challenge. Paraneoplastic CIPO is a highly morbid syndrome characterized by impaired gastrointestinal propulsion with symptoms and signs of mechanical bowel obstruction. Clinical outcomes of paraneoplastic CIPO are often deleterious. The current standard of care for the management of CIPO includes supportive treatment with promotility and anti-secretory agents. However, the majority of patients with CIPO eventually require the resection of the non-functioning gut segment. Here, we present a 62-year-old patient with anti-Hu antibody associated paraneoplastic CIPO and underlying small cell lung cancer who underwent treatment with cisplatin and etoposide. Herein, we discuss diagnosis, prognosis, proposed mechanisms, treatment options, and future potential therapeutic strategies of paraneoplastic CIPO.

  19. Pseudopneumoperitoneum in chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Camera, Luigi; Calabrese, Milena; Sarnelli, Giovanni; Longobardi, Margaret; Rocco, Alba; Cuomo, Rosario; Salvatore, Marco

    2011-06-28

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a rare disease due to a severe gastrointestinal motility disorder which may mimic, on both clinical and radiological grounds, mechanical obstruction. We report a case of a 26-year-old woman who presented to our institution for plain abdominal radiography for referred long-lasting constipation with recurrent episodes of abdominal pain and distension. At X-ray, performed both in the upright and supine position, an isolated air-fluid level was depicted in the left flank, together with a number of radiological signs suggestive of pneumoperitoneum. First, subphrenic radiolucency could be observed in the upright film. Second, the intestinal wall of some jejunal loops appeared to be outlined in the right flank. Third, the inferior cardiac border was clearly depicted in the upright film. The patient however had no evidence of peritoneal signs but only hypoactive bowel movements. Unenhanced multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) of the abdomen and pelvis was therefore performed. MDCT revealed abnormal air-driven distension of the small and large bowel, without evidence of extra-luminal air. All radiological signs of pneumoperitoneum turned out to be false-positive results. The patient was submitted to pan-colonoscopy and to anorectal manometry to rule out Hirshprung's disease, and was finally discharged with a diagnosis of CIPO.

  20. [Sleep disorders in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)].

    PubMed

    Böing, Sebastian; Randerath, Winfried J

    2014-05-01

    Sleep disturbances (SD) are a frequent finding in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and have a negative impact on quality of life and the clinical course of the disease. The causes of SD are multiple and include for example respiratory symptoms and comorbidities. On the other hand sleep goes along with multiple physiological changes in respiration, so that sleep itself interacts with asthma and COPD. This interaction favors respiratory symptoms and may lead to hypoxemia and hypercapnia. A further complication of the respiratory situation and the clinical course can be found in asthma and COPD patients with coexisting obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Due to the heterogeneity of SD in asthma and COPD, a detailed patient survey is the most important diagnostical tool. Based on the survey further technical examinations should be considered. Treatment strategies for the reduction of SD in asthma and COPD include an optimized medication and treatment of comorbidities. If indicated oxygen therapy, positive pressure breathing and pulmonary rehabilitation can contribute.

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and infection. Disruption of the microbiome?

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are complex, and microbiome technology has provided us with a new research tool for its better understanding. There is compartmentalization of the microbiota in the various parts of the lung. Studies of the lower airway lumen microbiota in COPD have yielded confusing results, and additional studies with scrupulous attention to prevent and account for upper airway contamination of bronchoalveolar lavage samples are required. Lung tissue microbiota has been examined in three studies, which also demonstrate varied results based on the site of sampling (bronchial mucosa, lung parenchyma), and this variation extends to sampling sites within a lobe of the lung. The Vicious Circle Hypothesis embodies how an altered lung microbiome could contribute to COPD progression. Relating microbiota composition to airway and systemic inflammation and clinical outcomes are important research questions. Although various obstacles need to be surmounted, ultimately lung microbiome studies will provide new insights into how infection contributes to COPD.

  2. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Goudis, Christos A; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is independently associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease. Besides coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF), specific electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias seem to have a significant impact on cardiovascular prognosis of COPD patients. Disturbances of heart rhythm include premature atrial contractions (PACs), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), multifocal atrial tachycardia (MAT), and ventricular tachycardia (VT). Of note, the identification of ECG abnormalities and the evaluation of the arrhythmic risk may have significant implications in the management and outcome of patients with COPD. This article provides a concise overview of the available data regarding ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in these patients, including an elaborated description of the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The clinical impact and prognostic significance of ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in COPD as well as the appropriate antiarrhythmic therapy and interventions in this setting are also discussed.

  3. Corticospinal control of respiratory muscles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Sharshar, Tarek; Ross, Ewen T; Nickol, Annabel H; Dayer, Mark J; Porcher, Raphaël; Jonville, Sophie; Moxham, John; Polkey, Michael I

    2004-07-12

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) face an increased respiratory load and in consequence have an elevated respiratory drive. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate associated changes in corticospinal excitability both at rest and during voluntary facilitation at different levels of inspiratory effort. Diaphragm and abdominal motor thresholds were significantly lower in COPD than healthy controls, but the quadriceps response was the same. In patients there was a significant increase in diaphragm response from rest during 20% inspiratory efforts but no further increase with greater efforts. In controls there was a further stepwise increase at 40% and 60% of inspiratory effort. The cortical silent period was significantly shorter in COPD. Using paired stimulation to study intracortical inhibitory and excitatory circuits we found significantly less excitability of intracortical facilitatory circuits in patients at long (>7 ms) interstimulus intervals. These results suggest that there is a ceiling effect in motor control output to the respiratory muscles of patients with COPD.

  4. Lung Regeneration Therapy for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dong Kyu; Kim, You-Sun; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a critical condition with high morbidity and mortality. Although several medications are available, there are no definite treatments. However, recent advances in the understanding of stem and progenitor cells in the lung, and molecular changes during re-alveolization after pneumonectomy, have made it possible to envisage the regeneration of damaged lungs. With this background, numerous studies of stem cells and various stimulatory molecules have been undertaken, to try and regenerate destroyed lungs in animal models of COPD. Both the cell and drug therapies show promising results. However, in contrast to the successes in laboratories, no clinical trials have exhibited satisfactory efficacy, although they were generally safe and tolerable. In this article, we review the previous experimental and clinical trials, and summarize the recent advances in lung regeneration therapy for COPD. Furthermore, we discuss the current limitations and future perspectives of this emerging field.

  5. Weight loss in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Mechanisms and implications.

    PubMed

    Agust, Alvar G N; Gari, Patricia G; Sauleda, Jaume; Busquets, Xavier

    2002-01-01

    Weight loss occurs frequently in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although the precise cellular mechanisms underlying weight loss in COPD are unclear, this is a clinically relevant phenomenon because it contributes to limit the exercise capacity of these patients and, therefore, it jeopardizes their quality of life. More importantly, it is a negative prognostic factor that is independent of the degree of lung function impairment present. Thus, weight loss in COPD constitutes a new therapeutic target. This article reviews the mechanisms and potential consequences of weight loss in COPD and highlights areas that needed future research. It is hoped that a better understanding of its pathogenesis may eventually contribute to the development of new therapeutic strategies that contribute to improve the well-being and/or long-term prognosis of patients suffering from this devastating disease and, potentially, from others characterized also by unexplained weight loss.

  6. Inspiratory muscle strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Larson, Janet L; Covey, Margaret K; Corbridge, Susan

    2002-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with a functional weakness of the inspiratory muscles. Multiple factors contribute to the decline in functional strength including hyperinflation of the chest, deterioration in nutritional status, and the indirect effects of an exacerbation. The decreased inspiratory muscle strength contributes to sensations of dyspnea and places individuals at risk for respiratory muscle fatigue. The worsening dyspnea causes individuals to reduce their physical activities and ultimately become physically deconditioned. Maximal inspiratory pressure is commonly used to measure functional strength of the inspiratory muscles, and interventions to minimize the extent of decline include inspiratory muscle training, aerobic exercise training, nutritional supplementation, and methods to prevent exacerbations. In the critical care unit, multiple comorbid conditions contribute to further decline in inspiratory muscle strength, making it important to assess respiratory muscle function regularly.

  7. [Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) - Rational Diagnostics and Therapy].

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, R; Pankow, W

    2016-08-01

    In general chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can be diagnosed in family practice from history and spirometry. Inconclusive spirometry findings have to be assessed further by techniques available in a pulmonologist's office. Further testing is done for differential diagnostic reasons and for prognostic appraisal. Successful smoking cessation importantly alters the natural downhill course of the disease. Patient education and rehabilitative interventions (e. g. participation in lung sport groups) help to improve life quality. Medical therapies with bronchospasmolytics applied by inhalation as monotherapies, free and fixed combinations have symptomatic benefit. Considering the increase of pneumonia risk from inhaled corticosteroids their use should be restricted to patients with a straightforward indication, e. g. coexisting asthma.

  8. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Are the times changing?

    PubMed

    Almagro, P; Sangil, A; Custardoy, J; San Román Terán, C; Martín Escudero, J C; Díez-Manglano, J

    2013-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most prevalent diseases and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Spain. Currently, COPD is considered a treatable disease with an inflammatory origin that is frequently associated with other diseases. The prevalence of comorbidity is clearly increased in patients with COPD, irrespective of other confounding variables such as smoking. Current treatments have been proven to slow the loss of lung function, decrease the number of exacerbations and improve health-related quality of life and survival. New advances regarding the classics and more recent phenotypes such as patients with frequent exacerbations or COPD with associated comorbidity should allow for more individualized treatment while advances in genetic research and inflammatory mechanisms of the disease will help us to increase our knowledge of the disease and the development of new treatments.

  9. Palliative care in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Blackler, Laura; Mooney, Caroline; Jones, Christine

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a slow, debilitating, progressive disease and, as symptoms worsen, quality of life is affected and issues surrounding end of life arise. There are known difficulties about the healthcare professional's ability to manage this area and this is reflected in the literature. It is recognized that palliative care services for people with non-malignant diseases are not developed but this needs to be addressed. Within a London teaching hospital the COPD team has been working towards improving the standard of service offered to patients with advanced COPD using various strategies. The team's approach to this area of care focuses on quality of life by recognizing when an individual may need further support, and patients have reported that they feel their needs are being addressed. This article aims to review current evidence on the management of palliative care for patients with COPD and identify what steps have been taken by a London teaching hospital to address this issue.

  10. Noninvasive ventilation in patients with chronic obstructive airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Khilnani, Gopi C; Banga, Amit

    2008-01-01

    Recent years have seen the emergence of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) as an important tool for management of patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Several well conducted studies in the recent years have established its role in the initial, as well as later management of these patients. However, some grey areas remain. Moreover, data is emerging on the role of long term nocturnal NIV use in patients with very severe stable COPD. This review summarizes the evidence supporting the use of NIV in various stages of COPD, discuss the merits as well as demerits of this novel ventilatory strategy and highlight the grey areas in the current body of knowledge. PMID:18990962

  11. Quantitative computed tomography imaging in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Lalita; Fernandes, Yasmin; Mesquita, Anthony Menezes

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease having small airway inflammation, emphysema, and pulmonary hypertension. It is now clear that spirometry alone cannot differentiate each component. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) is increasingly used to quantify the amount of emphysema and small airway involvement in COPD. Inspiratory CT guides in assessing emphysema while expiratory CT identifies areas of air trapping which is a surrogate of small airway inflammation. By constructing a three-dimensional model of airways, we can also measure the airway wall thickness of segmental and subsegmental airways. The aim of this review is to present the current knowledge and methodologies in QCT of the lung that aid in identifying discrete COPD phenotypes. PMID:27890994

  12. Triple inhaled therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Montuschi, Paolo; Malerba, Mario; Macis, Giuseppe; Mores, Nadia; Santini, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    Combining individual drugs in a single inhaler is the most convenient way to deliver triple therapy. A long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonist (LAMA) added to an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS)/long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) fixed-dose combination (FDC) can improve efficacy of pharmacological treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). New inhaled ICS/LABA/LAMA FDCs, including fluticasone furoate/vilanterol/umeclidinium, budesonide/formoterol/glycopyrronium and beclometasone/formoterol/glycopyrronium, are in Phase III of clinical development for COPD. Triple inhaled therapy might be particularly useful in patients with severe to very severe COPD, above all in those with peripheral blood or sputum eosinophilia, asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) or frequent exacerbators. Future prospective studies should assess efficacy and safety of triple ICS/LABA/LAMA therapy in selected COPD phenotypes.

  13. Lung Regeneration Therapy for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dong Kyu; Kim, You-Sun

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a critical condition with high morbidity and mortality. Although several medications are available, there are no definite treatments. However, recent advances in the understanding of stem and progenitor cells in the lung, and molecular changes during re-alveolization after pneumonectomy, have made it possible to envisage the regeneration of damaged lungs. With this background, numerous studies of stem cells and various stimulatory molecules have been undertaken, to try and regenerate destroyed lungs in animal models of COPD. Both the cell and drug therapies show promising results. However, in contrast to the successes in laboratories, no clinical trials have exhibited satisfactory efficacy, although they were generally safe and tolerable. In this article, we review the previous experimental and clinical trials, and summarize the recent advances in lung regeneration therapy for COPD. Furthermore, we discuss the current limitations and future perspectives of this emerging field. PMID:28119741

  14. Depression in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Christine

    2012-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in adults in the United States and worldwide. Depression is a common comorbidity in this population, but often goes undiagnosed in persons with COPD. Because the presence of depression has the potential to negatively impact COPD-related outcomes, it is essential for health care practitioners involved in the care of patients with COPD to diagnose and treat COPD and the associated comorbidities, including depression. Although there is a lack of comprehensive guidelines for treating depression in those with COPD, an algorithm has been proposed to screen and manage depression in these patients. Several questionnaires are available that can be used to assess and assist in diagnosing depression in these patients. Following diagnosis, antidepressant therapy should be considered along with nonpharmacological strategies, such as pulmonary rehabilitation and cognitive behavioral therapy.

  15. Behavioral Medicine Approaches to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsche, Anja; Trueba, Ana F.; Meuret, Alicia E.; Ritz, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a prevalent respiratory disease and associated with considerable individual and socioeconomic burden. Recent research started examining the role of psychosocial factors for course and management of the disease. Purpose This review provides an overview on recent findings on psychosocial factors and behavioral medicine approaches in COPD. Results Research has identified several important psychosocial factors and effective behavioral medicine interventions in COPD. However, there is considerable need for future research in this field. Conclusions Although beneficial effects of some behavioral medicine interventions have been demonstrated in COPD, future research efforts are necessary to study the effects of distinct components of these interventions, to thoroughly examine promising but yet not sufficiently proven interventions, and to develop new creative interventions. PMID:22351032

  16. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease part 1: smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Donna

    2015-04-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is common in the UK and causes a significant burden to patients and the NHS. Healthcare provision for COPD is largely focused on biomedical treatment, yet research suggests the complexity of factors contributing to this disease requires a deeper understanding of the patient experience and a more holistic approach to the provision of care. Smoking cessation is the single most cost-effective and significant way to slow the disease progress and improve outcomes for patients. However, barriers to smoking cessation are higher in patients with COPD than in other groups, requiring different approaches. This is part one of a two-part article, which focuses on patients with COPD caused by smoking. The second part will focus on non-pharmacological therapy.

  17. Tiotropium Bromide in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Bronchial Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Gonzalez, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled bronchodilators are the mainstay of pharmacological treatment for stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including β2-agonists and muscarinic antagonists. Tiotropium bromide, a long-acting antimuscarinic bronchodilator (LAMA), is a treatment choice for moderate-to-severe COPD; its efficacy and safety have been demonstrated in recent trials. Studies also point to a beneficial role of tiotropium in the treatment of difficult-to-control asthma and a potential function in the asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). Combination of different bronchodilator molecules and addition of inhaled corticosteroids are viable therapeutic alternatives. A condensation of the latest trials and the rationale behind these therapies will be presented in this article. PMID:26491494

  18. [Current optimization of combined therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Popova, E N

    2015-01-01

    Testing the new combined bronchodilator Anoro Ellipta in different clinical trials gives to its high clinical efficacy and safety in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The drug contains the molecules of sustained-release selective β2-adrenergic receptor agonist (vilanterol) and a muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist (umeclidinium bromide). The bronchodilating mechanisms of umeclidinium bromide are in the competitive inhibition of the binding of acetylcholine with muscarinic acetylcholine receptors of airway smooth muscles whereas in those of vilanterol are in that with the stimulation of intracellular adenylate cyclase. On days 1 and 24 after inhalation of the first dose of vilanterol and umeclidinium bromide, there was a significant increase in the forced expiratory volume in one second as compared to placebo. No clinical effects on QT interval on an electrocardiogram and cardiac rhythm were found. The benefits of an inhalation device (Ellipta) are its innovation design ensuring the effective delivery of an aerosol dose into the airway, convenience, and simplicity.

  19. Speckle tracking echocardiography in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and overlapping obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Carmen; van Essen, Fabian; Linnhoff, Fabian; Schueler, Robert; Hammerstingl, Christoph; Nickenig, Georg; Skowasch, Dirk; Weber, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD and congestive heart failure represent two disease entities of growing global burden that share common etiological features. Therefore, we aimed to identify the degree of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in COPD as a function of COPD severity stages and concurrently placed particular emphasis on the presence of overlapping obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods A total of 85 COPD outpatients (64.1±10.4 years, 54.1% males) and 20 controls, matched for age, sex, and smoking habits, underwent speckle tracking echocardiography for LV longitudinal strain imaging. Complementary 12-lead electrocardiography, laboratory testing, and overnight screening for sleep-disordered breathing using the SOMNOcheck micro® device were performed. Results Contrary to conventional echocardiographic parameters, speckle tracking echocardiography revealed significant impairment in global LV strain among COPD patients compared to control smokers (−13.3%±5.4% vs −17.1%±1.8%, P=0.04). On a regional level, the apical septal LV strain was reduced in COPD (P=0.003) and associated with the degree of COPD severity (P=0.02). With regard to electrocardiographic findings, COPD patients exhibited a significantly higher mean heart rate than controls (71.4±13.0 beats per minute vs 60.3±7.7 beats per minute, P=0.001) that additionally increased over Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages (P=0.01). Albeit not statistically significant, COPD led to elevated N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels (453.2±909.0 pg/mL vs 96.8±70.0 pg/mL, P=0.08). As to somnological testing, the portion of COPD patients exhibiting overlapping OSA accounted for 5.9% and did not significantly vary either in comparison to controls (P=0.07) or throughout the COPD Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages (P=0.49). COPD-OSA overlap solely correlated with nocturnal hypoxemic events, whereas LV performance status was unrelated to coexisting OSA. Conclusion

  20. Comparative efficacy of indacaterol in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Marcos; Chapman, Kenneth R

    2012-01-01

    Long-acting bronchodilators have been shown to improve multiple clinical outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) including lung function, symptoms, dyspnea, quality of life, and exacerbations. Indacaterol is a novel, inhaled, long-acting β2-agonist providing 24-hour bronchodilation with once-daily dosing. It is currently approved for the maintenance treatment of COPD to be administered as 150 or 300 μg once-daily doses as licensed in many countries and 75 μg as licensed in the US by means of a single-dose dry powder inhaler. The data from clinical development support a favorable safety and tolerability profile within the β2-agonist drug class, with no relevant issues identified. Current evidence indicates that indacaterol is suitable for use as first-line monotherapy in COPD patients with moderate disease (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] stage II) and beyond that do not require an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) as per GOLD guidelines, or in combination with an ICS in severe or very severe patients with repeated exacerbations. Data from trials with the novel once-daily β2-agonist, indacaterol, indicate superior bronchodilation and clinical efficacy over twice-daily long-acting β2-agonists and at least equipotent bronchodilation as once-daily tiotropium. Bronchodilators are central in the symptomatic management of COPD. It is likely that once-daily dosing of a bronchodilator would be a significant convenience and probably a compliance-enhancing advantage, leading to improved overall clinical outcomes in patients with COPD.

  1. Treatment of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the GOLD guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hobart; Kim, Jeffrey; Tagmazyan, Karine

    2013-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common problem in primary care. COPD is diagnosed with spirometry only in clinically stable patients with a postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity ratio of less than 0.70. All patients with COPD who smoke should be counseled about smoking cessation. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations are recommended for all patients with COPD. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease assigns patients with COPD into four groups based on the degree of airflow restriction, symptom score, and number of exacerbations in one year. Pulmonary rehabilitation is recommended for patients in groups B, C, and D. Those in group A should receive a short-acting anticholinergic or short-acting beta2 agonist for mild intermittent symptoms. For patients in group B, long-acting anticholinergics or long-acting beta2 agonists should be added. Patients in group C or D are at high risk of exacerbations and should receive a long-acting anticholinergic or a combination of an inhaled corticosteroid and a long-acting beta2 agonist. For patients whose symptoms are not controlled with one of these regimens, triple therapy with an inhaled corticosteroid, long-acting beta2 agonist, and anticholinergic should be considered. Prophylactic antibiotics and oral corticosteroids are not recommended for prevention of COPD exacerbations. Continuous oxygen therapy improves mortality rates in patients with severe hypoxemia and COPD. Lung volume reduction surgery can improve survival rates in patients with severe, upper lobe-predominant COPD with heterogeneous emphysema distribution.

  2. Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in asymptomatic smokers

    PubMed Central

    Sansores, Raúl H; Velázquez-Uncal, Mónica; Pérez-Bautista, Oliver; Villalba-Caloca, Jaime; Falfán-Valencia, Ramcés; Ramírez-Venegas, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Background Physicians do not routinely recommend smokers to undergo spirometry unless they are symptomatic. Objective To test the hypothesis that there are a significant number of asymptomatic smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we estimated the prevalence of COPD in a group of asymptomatic smokers. Methods Two thousand nine hundred and sixty-one smokers with a cumulative consumption history of at least 10 pack-years, either smokers with symptoms or smokers without symptoms (WOS) were invited to perform a spirometry and complete a symptom questionnaire. Results Six hundred and thirty-seven (21.5%) smokers had no symptoms, whereas 2,324 (78.5%) had at least one symptom. The prevalence of COPD in subjects WOS was 1.5% when considering the whole group of smokers (45/2,961) and 7% when considering only the group WOS (45/637). From 329 smokers with COPD, 13.7% were WOS. Subjects WOS were younger, had better lung function and lower cumulative consumption of cigarettes, estimated as both cigarettes per day and pack-years. According to severity of airflow limitation, 69% vs 87% of subjects were classified as Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages I–II in the WOS and smokers with symptoms groups, respectively (P<0.001). A multivariate analysis showed that forced expiratory volume in 1 second (mL) was the only predictive factor for COPD in asymptomatic smokers. Conclusion Prevalence of COPD in asymptomatic smokers is 1.5%. This number of asymptomatic smokers may be excluded from the benefit of an “early” intervention, not just pharmacological but also from smoking cessation counseling. The higher forced expiratory volume in 1 second may contribute to prevent early diagnosis. PMID:26586941

  3. Management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Asia and Africa.

    PubMed

    Chan-Yeung, M; Aït-Khaled, N; White, N; Tsang, K W; Tan, W C

    2004-02-01

    This review examines whether the comprehensive programme recommended by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD), developed mostly by physicians in industrialised countries, can be applied in developing countries. In developing countries, there are several major limitations to the implementation of the programme. First, management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is not a priority in competing for health care resources. Second, only major medical centres in developing countries have spirometers; the reliance on spirometric testing for diagnosis, staging and treatment options, as recommended by the GOLD guidelines, makes it almost impossible for the programme to be implemented. Third, in many Asian and African countries, regular monitoring is often restricted to patients with severe COPD who have frequent hospitalisations or clinic visits for exacerbations and complications. Fourth, the choice of therapy usually depends on the availability and cost of drugs. Finally, given the aetiological role of sequelae of lung infections, including tuberculosis, the appropriateness and safety of using intermittent courses of oral steroids during acute exacerbations and of long-term, high-dose inhaled corticosteroids for moderate to severe COPD in developing countries has not been evaluated. Developing countries in Asia and Africa may need to adapt the GOLD guidelines according to varying aetiology, local health care resources, socio-economic and cultural factors and development of health services. Prevention programmes, especially for tobacco control, are of paramount importance. National and international efforts must be directed towards controlling the tobacco epidemic in developing countries to reduce the burden of COPD and other tobacco-induced diseases.

  4. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces cardiac inflammation and dysfunction in a rat obstructive sleep apnea model

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qin; Bian, Yeping; Yu, Fuchao; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Guanghao; Li, Yang; Song, Songsong; Ren, Xiaomei; Tong, Jiayi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic intermittent hypoxia is considered to play an important role in cardiovascular pathogenesis during the development of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We used a well-described OSA rat model induced with simultaneous intermittent hypoxia. Male Sprague Dawley rats were individually placed into plexiglass chambers with air pressure and components were electronically controlled. The rats were exposed to intermittent hypoxia 8 hours daily for 5 weeks. The changes of cardiac structure and function were examined by ultrasound. The cardiac pathology, apoptosis, and fibrosis were analyzed by H&E staining, TUNNEL assay, and picosirius staining, respectively. The expression of inflammation and fibrosis marker genes was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. Chronic intermittent hypoxia/low pressure resulted in significant increase of left ventricular internal diameters (LVIDs), end-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV), and blood lactate level and marked reduction in ejection fraction and fractional shortening. Chronic intermittent hypoxia increased TUNNEL-positive myocytes, disrupted normal arrangement of cardiac fibers, and increased Sirius stained collagen fibers. The expression levels of hypoxia induced factor (HIF)-1α, NF-kB, IL-6, and matrix metallopeptidase 2 (MMP-2) were significantly increased in the heart of rats exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia. In conclusion, the left ventricular function was adversely affected by chronic intermittent hypoxia, which is associated with increased expression of HIF-1α and NF-kB signaling molecules and development of cardiac inflammation, apoptosis and fibrosis. PMID:27924067

  5. Medical therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 2007.

    PubMed

    Ingenito, Edward P

    2007-01-01

    Medical treatment for patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has evolved significantly over the past 2 decades. Current World Health Organization recommendations suggest a stepwise approach to therapy depending upon disease severity. As-needed use of short-acting bronchodilators is recommended for patients with mild disease. Scheduled dosing of bronchodilators is recommended for patients with more advanced disease. Inhaled beta-agonists and anti-cholinergic agents in combination have proved to be more effective than either agent alone. Long-acting preparations are associated with better disease control and have not been associated with tachyphylaxis. Inhaled corticosteroids are useful for reducing the frequency of exacerbations in patients who experience one or more episodes per year. Oxygen therapy is clearly beneficial in patients with advanced COPD and chronic respiratory failure, and its potential benefits in less severe disease are currently being studied. Pulmonary rehabilitation benefits patients with mild-to-severe disease, although the greatest benefits have been demonstrated in those with moderate COPD. New ultra-long-acting inhaled bronchodilators, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, and retinoids intended to promote tissue regeneration are currently being evaluated in clinical trials as future therapeutic agents.

  6. Macrolides: a promising pharmacologic therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shilin; Zhong, Xiaoning

    2017-03-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, there are no effective anti-inflammatory pharmacologic therapies available for COPD so far. Recent evidence suggests that an immunologic mechanism has a role in the pathogenesis of COPD. Macrolides possess anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating effects may be helpful in the treatment of COPD. Several clinical studies have shown that long-term use of macrolides reduces the frequency of COPD exacerbations. However, the subgroups that most effectively respond to long-term treatment of macrolides still need to be determined. The potential adverse events to individuals and the microbial resistance in community populations raises great concern on the long-term use of macrolides. Thus, novel macrolides have anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulating effects, but without antibiotic effects, and are promising as an anti-inflammatory agent for the treatment of COPD. In addition, the combination of macrolides and other anti-inflammatory pharmacologic agents may be a new strategy for the treatment of COPD.

  7. Skeletal muscle dysfunction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Cheol; Mofarrahi, Mahroo; Hussain, Sabah NA

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a debilitating disease characterized by inflammation-induced airflow limitation and parenchymal destruction. In addition to pulmonary manifestations, patients with COPD develop systemic problems, including skeletal muscle and other organ-specific dysfunctions, nutritional abnormalities, weight loss, and adverse psychological responses. Patients with COPD often complain of dyspnea on exertion, reduced exercise capacity, and develop a progressive decline in lung function with increasing age. These symptoms have been attributed to increases in the work of breathing and in impairments in gas exchange that result from airflow limitation and dynamic hyperinflation. However, there is mounting evidence to suggest that skeletal muscle dysfunction, independent of lung function, contributes significantly to reduced exercise capacity and poor quality of life in these patients. Limb and ventilatory skeletal muscle dysfunction in COPD patients has been attributed to a myriad of factors, including the presence of low grade systemic inflammatory processes, nutritional depletion, corticosteroid medications, chronic inactivity, age, hypoxemia, smoking, oxidative and nitrosative stresses, protein degradation and changes in vascular density. This review briefly summarizes the contribution of these factors to overall skeletal muscle dysfunction in patients with COPD, with particular attention paid to the latest advances in the field. PMID:19281080

  8. Role of macrolide therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Fernando J; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Albert, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The Global Burden of Disease study has concluded that COPD will become the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2020, and will increase its ranking of disability-adjusted life years lost from 12th to 5th. Acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) are associated with impaired quality of life and pulmonary function. More frequent or severe AECOPDs have been associated with especially markedly impaired quality of life and a greater longitudinal loss of pulmonary function. COPD and AECOPDs are characterized by an augmented inflammatory response. Macrolide antibiotics are macrocyclical lactones that provide adequate coverage for the most frequently identified pathogens in AECOPD and have been generally included in published guidelines for AECOPD management. In addition, they exert broad-ranging, immunomodulatory effects both in vitro and in vivo, as well as diverse actions that suppress microbial virulence factors. Macrolide antibiotics have been used to successfully treat a number of chronic, inflammatory lung disorders including diffuse panbronchiolitis, asthma, noncystic fibrosis associated bronchiectasis, and cystic fibrosis. Data in COPD patients have been limited and contradictory but the majority hint to a potential clinical and biological effect. Additional, prospective, controlled data are required to define any potential treatment effect, the nature of this effect, and the role of bronchiectasis, baseline colonization, and other cormorbidities. PMID:18990961

  9. Preclinical murine models of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Vlahos, Ross; Bozinovski, Steven

    2015-07-15

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major incurable global health burden and is the 4th leading cause of death worldwide. It is believed that an exaggerated inflammatory response to cigarette smoke causes progressive airflow limitation. This inflammation, where macrophages, neutrophils and T lymphocytes are prominent, leads to oxidative stress, emphysema, small airway fibrosis and mucus hypersecretion. Much of the disease burden and health care utilisation in COPD is associated with the management of its comorbidities and infectious (viral and bacterial) exacerbations (AECOPD). Comorbidities, defined as other chronic medical conditions, in particular skeletal muscle wasting and cardiovascular disease markedly impact on disease morbidity, progression and mortality. The mechanisms and mediators underlying COPD and its comorbidities are poorly understood and current COPD therapy is relatively ineffective. Thus, there is an obvious need for new therapies that can prevent the induction and progression of COPD and effectively treat AECOPD and comorbidities of COPD. Given that access to COPD patients can be difficult and that clinical samples often represent a "snapshot" at a particular time in the disease process, many researchers have used animal modelling systems to explore the mechanisms underlying COPD, AECOPD and comorbidities of COPD with the goal of identifying novel therapeutic targets. This review highlights the mouse models used to define the cellular, molecular and pathological consequences of cigarette smoke exposure and the recent advances in modelling infectious exacerbations and comorbidities of COPD.

  10. Defining and targeting health disparities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Pleasants, Roy A; Riley, Isaretta L; Mannino, David M

    2016-01-01

    The global burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) continues to grow in part due to better outcomes in other major diseases and in part because a substantial portion of the worldwide population continues to be exposed to inhalant toxins. However, a disproportionate burden of COPD occurs in people of low socioeconomic status (SES) due to differences in health behaviors, sociopolitical factors, and social and structural environmental exposures. Tobacco use, occupations with exposure to inhalant toxins, and indoor biomass fuel (BF) exposure are more common in low SES populations. Not only does SES affect the risk of developing COPD and etiologies, it is also associated with worsened COPD health outcomes. Effective interventions in these people are needed to decrease these disparities. Efforts that may help lessen these health inequities in low SES include 1) better surveillance targeting diagnosed and undiagnosed COPD in disadvantaged people, 2) educating the public and those involved in health care provision about the disease, 3) improving access to cost-effective and affordable health care, and 4) markedly increasing the efforts to prevent disease through smoking cessation, minimizing use and exposure to BF, and decreasing occupational exposures. COPD is considered to be one the most preventable major causes of death from a chronic disease in the world; therefore, effective interventions could have a major impact on reducing the global burden of the disease, especially in socioeconomically disadvantaged populations. PMID:27785005

  11. Skeletal muscle response to inflammation--lessons for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, W Darlene; Rurak, Jennifer; Harris, R Luke

    2009-10-01

    To describe how inflammation affects muscle adaptation and performance in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, an increasingly sedentary lifestyle is a primary contributor to muscle dysfunction that results in a loss of mobility and independence and, ultimately, mortality. Given the systemic chronic inflammation and profound limb muscle atrophy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, it is tempting to speculate that the inflammatory process is deleterious to skeletal muscle. In healthy people, however, the inflammatory process initially is dominated by a destructive phase that is tightly regulated and modulates a reparative, regenerative phase. Although the inflammatory process and associated oxidative stress is more closely connected to muscle wasting in animal models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the causative role of inflammation toward muscle atrophy and weakness in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has not been definitively shown. Anti-inflammatory interventions aimed toward tempering muscle wasting and weakness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may not prove to be beneficial because of longer-term disruption of the regeneration of muscle tissue. Temporally and spatially targeted interventions aimed toward ameliorating oxidative stress, such as antioxidants, nutritional supplements, and chronic exercise training, may optimize outcomes toward maintaining muscle mass and performance.

  12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and glucose metabolism: a bitter sweet symphony

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus are common and underdiagnosed medical conditions. It was predicted that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease will be the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2020. The healthcare burden of this disease is even greater if we consider the significant impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be considered as a novel risk factor for new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus via multiple pathophysiological alterations such as: inflammation and oxidative stress, insulin resistance, weight gain and alterations in metabolism of adipokines. On the other hand, diabetes may act as an independent factor, negatively affecting pulmonary structure and function. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of pulmonary infections, disease exacerbations and worsened COPD outcomes. On the top of that, coexistent OSA may increase the risk for type 2 DM in some individuals. The current scientific data necessitate a greater outlook on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be viewed as a risk factor for the new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. Conversely, both types of diabetes mellitus should be viewed as strong contributing factors for the development of obstructive lung disease. Such approach can potentially improve the outcomes and medical control for both conditions, and, thus, decrease the healthcare burden of these major medical problems. PMID:23101436

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and occupational exposure to silica.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to high levels of silica has long been known to cause silicosis This paper evaluates the evidence for an increased risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in occupations and industries in which exposure to crystalline silica is the primary exposure, with a focus on the magnitude of risks and levels of exposure causing disabling health effects. The literature suggests consistently elevated risks of developing COPD associated with silica exposure in several occupations, including the construction industry; tunneling; cement industry; brick manufacturing; pottery and ceramic work; silica sand, granite and diatomaceous earth industries; gold mining; and iron and steel founding, with risk estimates being high in some, even after taking into account the effect of confounders like smoking. Average dust levels vary from about 0.5 mg.m3 to over 10 mg.m3 and average silica levels from 0.04 to over 5 mg.m3, often well above occupational standards. Factors influencing the variation from industry to industry in risks associated with exposure to silica-containing dusts include (a) the presence of other minerals in the dust, particularly when associated with clay minerals; (b) the size of the particles and percentage of quartz; (c) the physicochemical characteristics, such as whether the dust is freshly fractured. Longitudinal studies suggest that loss of lung function occurs with exposure to silica dust at concentrations of between 0.1 and 0.2 mg.m3, and that the effect of cumulative silica dust exposure on airflow obstruction is independent of silicosis. Nevertheless, a disabling loss of lung function in the absence of silicosis would not occur until between 30 and 40 years exposure.

  14. [Morphological changes in the respiratory organs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Malykhin, F T; Kostornaya, I V

    2016-01-01

    The basis for airway remoldeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is tissue changes contributing to thickening of the walls of the airway and its obstruction. As the disease becomes severer, there are increases in mucosal metaplasia, submucosal hypertrophy, peribronchial fibrosis, and airway smooth muscle mass. Drug therapy for COPD does not virtually lead to regression of airway obstruction, except when eosinophilia is present.

  15. Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Included are over 50 abstracts of papers being presented at the 1977 National Association of Biology Teachers Convention. Included in each abstract are the title, author, and summary of the paper. Topics include photographic techniques environmental studies, and biological instruction. (MA)

  16. Nano-based theranostics for chronic obstructive lung diseases: challenges and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Vij, Neeraj

    2011-09-01

    The major challenges in the delivery and therapeutic efficacy of nano-delivery systems in chronic obstructive airway conditions are airway defense, severe inflammation and mucous hypersecretion. Chronic airway inflammation and mucous hypersecretion are hallmarks of chronic obstructive airway diseases, including asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and CF (cystic fibrosis). Distinct etiologies drive inflammation and mucous hypersecretion in these diseases, which are further induced by infection or components of cigarette smoke. Controlling chronic inflammation is at the root of treatments such as corticosteroids, antibiotics or other available drugs, which pose the challenge of sustained delivery of drugs to target cells or tissues. In spite of the wide application of nano-based drug delivery systems, very few are tested to date. Targeted nanoparticle-mediated sustained drug delivery is required to control inflammatory cell chemotaxis, fibrosis, protease-mediated chronic emphysema and/or chronic lung obstruction in COPD. Moreover, targeted epithelial delivery is indispensable for correcting the underlying defects in CF and targeted inflammatory cell delivery for controlling other chronic inflammatory lung diseases. We propose that the design and development of nano-based targeted theranostic vehicles with therapeutic, imaging and airway-defense penetrating capability, will be invaluable for treating chronic obstructive lung diseases. This paper discusses a novel nano-theranostic strategy that we are currently evaluating to treat the underlying cause of CF and COPD lung disease.

  17. Mortality from respiratory infections and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and associations with environmental quality.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Respiratory infections (RI) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been identified by the World Health Organization as conditions which may be strongly influenced by environmental factors. We examined the associations between environmental quality and U.S. county m...

  18. Ambient air pollution particles and the acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation has repeatedly demonstrated an association between exposure to ambient air pollution particles and numerous indices of human morbidity and mortality. Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are among those with an increased sensitivity to air p...

  19. Pharmacology Update on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Major Depression.

    PubMed

    Weatherspoon, Deborah; Weatherspoon, Christopher A; Abbott, Brianna

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a brief review and summarizes current therapies for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, major depression, and rheumatoid arthritis. One new pharmaceutical agent is highlighted for each of the topics.

  20. Inflammatory mechanisms in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with chronic inflammation affecting predominantly the lung parenchyma and peripheral airways that results in largely irreversible and progressive airflow limitation. This inflammation is characterized by increased numbers of alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, T lymphocytes (predominantly TC1, TH1, and TH17 cells), and innate lymphoid cells recruited from the circulation. These cells and structural cells, including epithelial and endothelial cells and fibroblasts, secrete a variety of proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and lipid mediators. Although most patients with COPD have a predominantly neutrophilic inflammation, some have an increase in eosinophil counts, which might be orchestrated by TH2 cells and type 2 innate lymphoid cells though release of IL-33 from epithelial cells. These patients might be more responsive to corticosteroids and bronchodilators. Oxidative stress plays a key role in driving COPD-related inflammation, even in ex-smokers, and might result in activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), impaired antiprotease defenses, DNA damage, cellular senescence, autoantibody generation, and corticosteroid resistance though inactivation of histone deacetylase 2. Systemic inflammation is also found in patients with COPD and can worsen comorbidities, such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Accelerated aging in the lungs of patients with COPD can also generate inflammatory protein release from senescent cells in the lung. In the future, it will be important to recognize phenotypes of patients with optimal responses to more specific therapies, and development of biomarkers that identify the therapeutic phenotypes will be important.

  1. Epigenetics and muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Esther; Gea, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, preventable, and treatable disease and a major leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In COPD, comorbidities, acute exacerbations, and systemic manifestations negatively influence disease severity and progression regardless of the respiratory condition. Skeletal muscle dysfunction, which is one of the commonest systemic manifestations in patients with COPD, has a tremendous impact on their exercise capacity and quality of life. Several pathophysiological and molecular underlying mechanisms including epigenetics (the process whereby gene expression is regulated by heritable mechanisms that do not affect DNA sequence) have been shown to participate in the etiology of COPD muscle dysfunction. The epigenetic modifications identified so far in cells include DNA methylation, histone acetylation and methylation, and noncoding RNAs such as microRNAs. Herein, we first review the role of epigenetic mechanisms in muscle development and adaptation to environmental factors in several models. Moreover, the epigenetic events reported so far to be potentially involved in muscle dysfunction and mass loss of patients with COPD are also discussed. Furthermore, the different expression profile of several muscle-enriched microRNAs in the diaphragm and vastus lateralis muscles of patients with COPD are also reviewed from results recently obtained in our group. The role of protein hyperacetylation in enhanced muscle protein catabolism of limb muscles is also discussed. Future research should focus on the full elucidation of the triggers of epigenetic mechanisms and their specific downstream biological pathways in COPD muscle dysfunction and wasting.

  2. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction: a diagnosis to be considered.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Yagüe, M T; Solís-Muñoz, P; Salces, I; Ballestín, C; Colina, F; Ibarrola, C; López-Alonso, G; Carreira, P; Cruz Vigo, F; Solís Herruzo, J A

    2009-05-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPO) is a rare entity characterized by recurrent clinical episodes of intestinal obstruction in which no mechanical cause is identified. There are multiple causes for this syndrome but two main groups can be distinguished: a) secondary to a systemic non-gastrointestinal disease; and b) primary or idiopathic originated from alterations in the components of the intestinal wall. The latter forms are the most uncommon and their diagnosis is generally difficult. In the present article, we describe nine patients with CIPO that were diagnosed in our center over the last six years. Four of them were diagnosed with primary or idiopathic form of CIPO and another four were clearly secondary to a systemic disease. The ninth case, which was initially diagnosed as secondary, is probably also a primary form of the disease. The number of patients diagnosed in our center, even thought small, makes us to hypothesize that the prevalence of CIPO is probably greater than is generally believed and that the reasons of its rarity are the incomplete understanding of its physiopathology and the difficulties to achieve a correct diagnosis.

  3. Periodontal disease increases risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ledić, Karla; Marinković, Sonja; Puhar, Ivan; Spalj, Stjepan; Popović-Grle, Sanja; Ivić-Kardum, Marija; Samarzija, Miroslav; Plancak, Darije

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether a periodontal disease could be a risk indicator for a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The examined group comprised 93 patients with COPD (mean age 65.8 years). The control group comprised 43 systemically healthy individuals (mean age 62.1 years). Respiratory and periodontal conditions were examined in both groups. COPB subjects had significantly worse periodontal conditions than controls (p < 0.05) with regard to each parameter of periodontal condition, except for gingival inflammation. COPD patients had higher Plaque Index than control patients (82.84 +/- 22.81 vs. 57.15 +/- 26.96; p < 0.001), higher periodontal depth (3.02 +/- 0.92 vs. 2.57 +/- 0.79 mm; p = 0.007), higher gingival recession (1.97 +/- 1.09 vs. 0.91 +/- 0.79 mm; p < 0.001), and higher mean clinical attachment loss (CAL) (4.12 +/- 1.74 vs. 2.91 +/- 1.27 mm; p < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression model, after controlling for other risk indicators, showed that periodontal disease, presented as CAL > or = 4 mm at > or = 60% sites, was associated with odds ratio of 3.2 (95% CI 1.0-9.8) for the COPB group. Data suggest that periodontal disease could be a risk indicator for COPD.

  4. Bronchodilator reversibility testing in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Calverley, P; Burge, P; Spencer, S; Anderson, J; Jones, P

    2003-01-01

    Background: A limited or absent bronchodilator response is used to classify chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and can determine the treatment offered. The reliability of the recommended response criteria and their relationship to disease progression has not been established. Methods: 660 patients meeting European Respiratory Society (ERS) diagnostic criteria for irreversible COPD were studied. Spirometric parameters were measured on three occasions before and after salbutamol and ipratropium bromide sequentially or in combination over 2 months. Responses were classified using the American Thoracic Society/GOLD (ATS) and ERS criteria. Patients were followed for 3 years with post-bronchodilator FEV1 and exacerbation history recorded 3 monthly and health status 6 monthly. Results: FEV1 increased significantly with each bronchodilator, a response that was normally distributed. Mean post-bronchodilator FEV1 was reproducible between visits (intraclass correlation 0.93). The absolute change in FEV1 was independent of the pre-bronchodilator value but the percentage change correlated with pre-bronchodilator FEV1 (r=-0.44; p<0.0001). Using ATS criteria, 52.1% of patients changed responder status between visits compared with 38.2% using ERS criteria. Smoking status, atopy, and withdrawing inhaled corticosteroids were unrelated to bronchodilator response, as was the rate of decline in FEV1, decline in health status, and exacerbation rate. Conclusion: In moderate to severe COPD bronchodilator responsiveness is a continuous variable. Classifying patients as "responders" and "non-responders" can be misleading and does not predict disease progression. PMID:12885978

  5. New drugs for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Trevor T; Barnes, Peter J

    2009-08-29

    Tobacco smoking is the dominant risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but viral and bacterial infections are the major causes of exacerbations in later stages of disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) activate families of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that include the toll-like receptors (TLRs). This understanding has led to the hypothesis that COPD is an archetypal disease of innate immunity. COPD is characterised by abnormal response to injury, with altered barrier function of the respiratory tract, an acute phase reaction, and excessive activation of macrophages, neutrophils, and fibroblasts in the lung. The activated non-specific immune system then mediates the processes of inflammation and repair, fibrosis, and proteolysis. COPD is also associated with corticosteroid resistance, abnormal macrophage and T-cell populations in the airway, autoinflammation and autoimmunity, aberrant fibrosis, accelerated ageing, systemic and concomitant disease, and defective regeneration. Such concepts have been used to generate a range of molecular targets, and clinical trials are taking place to identify effective drugs for the prevention and treatment of COPD exacerbations.

  6. Rat models of asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Martin, James G; Tamaoka, Meiyo

    2006-01-01

    The rat has been extensively used to model asthma and somewhat less extensively to model chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The features of asthma that have been successfully modeled include allergen-induced airway constriction, eosinophilic inflammation and allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. T-cell involvement has been directly demonstrated using adoptive transfer techniques. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are activated in response to allergen challenge in the sensitized rat and express Thelper2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13). Repeated allergen exposure causes airway remodeling. Dry gas hyperpnea challenge also evokes increases in lung resistance, allowing exercise-induced asthma to be modeled. COPD is modeled using elastase-induced parenchymal injury to mimic emphysema. Cigarette smoke-induced airspace enlargement occurs but requires months of cigarette exposure. Inflammation and fibrosis of peripheral airways is an important aspect of COPD that is less well modeled. Novel approaches to the treatment of COPD have been reported including treatments aimed at parenchymal regeneration.

  7. [Pharmacological treatment of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Allain, Yves-Marie; Giraud, Frédérique; Huchon, Gérard; Roche, Nicolas

    2009-03-01

    The pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can significantly improve quality of life by reducing exacerbations, dyspnea and exercise intolerance, thereby limiting the degree of handicap and improving daily activities. Recently, large randomised trials showed that some treatments can alter the decline in FEV1, which was previously only accessible to smoking cessation, and maybe reduce mortality. Bronchodilators are the first-line pharmacological treatment of COPD. Their clinical efficacy cannot be predicted by the inconstant changes in FEV(1.) Their main mechanism of action is the reduction in lung hyperinflation. Theophylline has a lower efficacy/tolerance ratio than inhaled bronchodilators. In symptomatic patients with FEV1 <50/60% predicted and repeated exacerbations despite bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids combined with long acting beta-agonists can be used. Several other approaches targeting inflammation and oxidative stress, remodelling and lung regeneration are also being studied. Medications must be associated with non-pharmacological measures (including help towards smoking cessation, education, exercise training...). Systemic manifestations of COPD must also be taken into account.

  8. Systemic inflammation after inspiratory loading in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuster, Antonia; Sauleda, Jaume; Sala, Ernest; Barceló, Bernardí; Pons, Jaume; Carrera, Miguel; Noguera, Aina; Togores, Bernat; Agustí, Alvar GN

    2008-01-01

    Objective Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present systemic inflammation. Strenuous resistive breathing induces systemic inflammation in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that the increased respiratory load that characterizes COPD can contribute to systemic inflammation in these patients. Patients and methods To test this hypothesis, we compared leukocyte numbers and levels of circulating cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNFα], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10), before and 1 hour after maximal incremental inspiratory loading in 13 patients with stable COPD (forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1] 29 ± 2.5% ref) and in 8 healthy sedentary subjects (FEV1 98 ± 5% ref). Results We found that: (1) at baseline, patients with COPD showed higher leukocyte counts and IL-8 levels than controls (p < 0.01); and, (2) one hour after maximal inspiratory loading these values were unchanged, except for IL-10, which increased in controls (p < 0.05) but not in patients with COPD. Conclusions This study confirms the presence of systemic inflammation in COPD, shows that maximal inspiratory loading does not increase the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-8) in COPD patients or controls, but suggests that the former may be unable to mount an appropriate systemic anti-inflammatory response to exercise. PMID:18488438

  9. Emerging concepts and therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Natya; McIvor, R Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although considerable advances have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of COPD, much remains to be done both to alleviate symptoms and reduce mortality associated with this condition. Previously, diagnosis, management, and research all centred on staging based on the forced expiratory flow in 1 second. It is now becoming apparent that this is inadequate to truly capture current disease burden and future deterioration. Fortunately, new approaches to care are constantly being identified. It is now known that symptoms and, in particular, exacerbations represent pivotal events in the patient's life that should trigger optimization of care. Much work is currently underway to identify various phenotypes in COPD because it has become obvious that this is a heterogeneous disease and applying the same management algorithms for all patients is insufficient. Several new medications are at various stages of development, some being approved and on the market, while others are undergoing clinical trials. These allow for more options for individualized care of patients. In addition, new applications of old medications, such as long‑term antibiotics, also provide new options for patients struggling with recurrent symptoms. Finally, the growing awareness that this is a heterogeneous disease composed not only of differing phenotypes but also having significant extrapulmonary comorbidities have opened new avenues of research and interdisciplinary collaboration that will further enable us to offer personalized care to patients.

  10. Gene-environment interactions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Molfino, Nestor A; Coyle, Anthony J

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of death throughout the world and is largely associated with cigarette smoking. Despite the appreciation of the central role of smoking in the development of COPD, only a relatively small number of smokers (15%-20%) develop COPD. Recent studies depicting familial aggregation suggest that some subjects may have a genetic predisposition to developing COPD. In this respect, a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms have been reported in association with different COPD features (subphenotypes), although much of this data remains controversial. Classical genetic studies (including twin and family studies) assume an "equal-environment" scenario, but as gene-environment interactions occur in COPD, this assumption needs revision. Thus, new integrated models are needed to examine the major environmental factors associated with COPD which include smoking as well as air pollution, and respiratory infections, and not only genetic predisposition. Revisiting this area, may help answer the question of what has more bearing in the pathogenesis of COPD--the environment or the genomic sequence of the affected subjects. It is anticipated that an improved understanding of this interaction will both enable improved identification of individuals susceptible to developing this disease, as well as improved future treatments for this disease.

  11. CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C.

    1994-09-01

    In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normal controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.

  12. Targeting the issues in chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jean

    2003-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a disease of unclear aetiology and variable pathology among patients. Little is known about the cellular mechanisms which cause this condition and, although the incidence of COPD has been rising worldwide for some time, research efforts have only very recently increased. Medication thus far has focused on symptom treatment rather than targeting identifiable disease mechanisms. Such treatment has consisted primarily of bronchodilators, both beta-agonists and anticholinergic in action. Treatment with steroids has been disappointing, except in the case of acute exacerbation, and this has shifted the research focus to characterising the inflammatory process in COPD as distinct from that in asthma. New targets for pharmacotherapy are coming to light as information is gained about specific inflammatory mediators active in COPD and the role of oxidative stress in this disease. In addition, new approaches include describing the role of exogenous antiproteases in restoring the balance between protease-antiprotease mechanisms that may be defective in this disease. Ultimately, exploration of the molecular genetics of COPD will provide new targets for future pharmacological agents.

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: nature-nurture interactions.

    PubMed

    Clancy, John; Nobes, Maggie

    A person's health status is rarely constant, it is usually subject to continual change as a person moves from health to illness and usually back to health again; the health-illness continuum illustrates this dynamism. This highlights the person's various states of health and illness (ranging from extremely good health to clinically defined mild, moderate and severe illness) and their fluctuations throughout the life span, until ultimately leading to the pathology associated with the person's death. Maintenance of a stable homeostatic environment within the body to support the stability of this continuum depends on a complex series of ultimately intracellular chemical reactions. These reactions are activated by environmental factors that cause the expression of genes associated with healthy phenotypes as well as illness susceptibility genes associated with homeostatic imbalances. Obviously, the body aims to support intracellular and extracellular environments allied with health; however, the complexity of these nature-nurture interactions results in illness throughout an individual's life span. This paper will discuss the nature-nurture interactions of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  14. [Smoking cessation in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Underner, M; Perriot, J; Peiffer, G

    2014-12-01

    One out of two smokers who smoke throughout their lifetime will die from a disease related to smoking. Tobacco smoking therefore represents a major global public health issue. Smoking is the leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Projections for 2020 indicate that by then, COPD will have become the third cause of death and the fifth cause of disability worldwide. Stopping smoking reduces the risk of developing COPD and is an essential treatment for this inflammatory disease. Smoking cessation decreases the prevalence of respiratory symptoms, number of hospitalizations, and decline in FEV1, as well as exacerbation frequency and overall mortality. Among the patients, 38-77% with COPD are smokers. Their daily cigarette consumption and level of nicotine dependence are often high. The combination of high intensity behavioral interventions and medication treatments (nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline, bupropion) is the most effective strategy for smokers with COPD. In contrast, behavioral interventions without medication are not more effective than simple advice to stop. Two factors seem to predict the success of the attempt to quit in smokers with COPD: a strong motivation to quit and the use of smoking cessation medications.

  15. Penalizing Hospitals for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Readmissions

    PubMed Central

    Au, David H.

    2014-01-01

    In October 2014, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) will expand its Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP) to include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Under the new policy, hospitals with high risk-adjusted, 30-day all-cause unplanned readmission rates after an index hospitalization for a COPD exacerbation will be penalized with reduced reimbursement for the treatment of Medicare beneficiaries. In this perspective, we review the history of the HRRP, including the recent addition of COPD to the policy. We critically assess the use of 30-day all-cause COPD readmissions as an accountability measure, discussing potential benefits and then highlighting the substantial drawbacks and potential unintended consequences of the measure that could adversely affect providers, hospitals, and patients with COPD. We conclude by emphasizing the need to place the 30-day COPD readmission measure in the context of a reconceived model for postdischarge quality and review several frameworks that could help guide this process. PMID:24460431

  16. Persistent disabling breathlessness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Sundh, Josefin; Ekström, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence, change in breathlessness status over time, and risk factors for disabling and persistent disabling breathlessness in relation to treatments in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Materials and methods Longitudinal analysis of data from the Swedish National Register of COPD with breathlessness measured using modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) scores at two subsequent visits. Prevalence of disabling breathlessness (mMRC ≥2 at baseline) and persistent disabling breathlessness (disabling breathlessness at baseline and follow-up) was investigated in relation to COPD treatment. Risk factors for disabling breathlessness, change from non-disabling to disabling breathlessness, and persistent disabling breathlessness were analyzed using multiple logistic regression. Results A total of 1,689 patients were included in the study with a median follow-up of 12 months (interquartile range: 4 months). Prevalence of disabling breathlessness was 54% at baseline. Persistent disabling breathlessness was present in 43% of patients despite treatment and in 74% of patients despite combined inhaled triple therapy and physiotherapy. Risk factors for disabling breathlessness or change to disabling breathlessness were higher age, lower lung function, frequent exacerbations, obesity, heart failure, depression, and hypoxic respiratory failure (all P<0.05). Persistent disabling breathlessness was associated with lower lung function and ischemic heart disease (all P<0.05). Conclusion Disabling breathlessness is common in COPD despite treatment, which calls for improved symptomatic treatments and consideration of factors influencing disabling breathlessness. Factors influencing disabling breathlessness should be considered for COPD management. PMID:27877034

  17. Biopersistent Granular Dust and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brüske, Irene; Thiering, Elisabeth; Heinrich, Joachim; Huster, Katharina; Nowak, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Objective Applying a systematic review to identify studies eligible for meta-analysis of the association between occupational exposure to inorganic dust and the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and conducting a meta-analysis. Data Sources Searches of PubMed and Embase for the time period 1970–2010 yielded 257 cross-sectional and longitudinal studies on people exposed to inorganic dust at the workplace with data on lung function. These studies were independently abstracted and evaluated by two authors; any disagreement was resolved by a third reviewer. Of 55 publications accepted for meta-analysis, 27 investigated the effects of occupational exposure to biopersistent granular dust (bg-dust). Methods A random effects meta-analysis allowed us to provide an estimate of the average exposure effect on spirometric parameters presented in forest plots. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed by using I2 statistics, with I2>25% indicating significant heterogeneity. Publication bias was investigated by visual inspection of funnel plots. The influence of individual studies was assessed by dropping the respective study before pooling study-specific estimates. Results The mean FEV1 of workers exposed to bg-dust was 160 ml lower or 5.7% less than predicted compared to workers with no/low exposure. The risk of an obstructive airway disease—defined as FEV1/FVC < 70%—increased by 7% per 1 mg· m-3 respirable bg-dust. Conclusion Occupational inhalative exposure to bg-dust was associated with a statistically significant decreased FEV1 and FEV1/FVC revealing airway obstruction consistent with COPD. PMID:24278358

  18. [CERTAIN PROBLEMS OF DIAGNOSTICS OF CHRONIC CARDIAC INSUFFICIENCY IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Karoli, N A; Borodkin, A V; Rebrov, A P

    2015-01-01

    Apnea is a commonest complaint in aged patients. It may be due to chronic cardiac insufficiency (CCI) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The prevalence of CCI in the general populations and among 65 year old subjects is 1.8 and 6-10% respectively, decompensation being the most frequent cause of hospitalization of elderly patients. Different authors report CCI in 30-62% of the elderly patients with COPD. Combination of CCI and COPD create difficulties for diagnostics and treatment due to late detection of CCI, common risk factors and pathogenetic features of the two conditions their similar clinical picture. This paper is designed to consider methods of CCI diagnostics in patients with COPD. Special emphasis is laid on the thorough analysis of medical histories, specific laboratory tests (BNP NT-proBNP), and instrumental methods (echocardiogram, MRI, spirography, X-ray studies).

  19. [Cell senescence and pathophysiology of chronic lung diseases: role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Adnot, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the biology of cellular senescence has improved markedly in recent years, helping us to understand the aging process. It is now clear that cellular senescence is involved in the pathogenesis of many age-related diseases, including respiratory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD occupies a special place among chronic respiratory diseases because of its frequency and socio-economic impact. The high morbidity and mortality associated with COPD are related to multiple systemic manifestations independent of the severity of airway obstruction. COPD, although most often due to smoking, is also an aging-related respiratory disease. According to a newly developed concept, lung-cell senescence could play a key role in the pathophysiology of COPD, including remodeling of blood vessels and lung parenchyma, as well as the characteristic inflammatory process. Systemic manifestations of COPD, including cardiovascular disease, weight loss, bone demineralization and muscle dysfunction, may reflect a general process of premature aging secondary to the pulmonary changes.

  20. Airway microbiome dynamics in exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yvonne J; Sethi, Sanjay; Murphy, Timothy; Nariya, Snehal; Boushey, Homer A; Lynch, Susan V

    2014-08-01

    Specific bacterial species are implicated in the pathogenesis of exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, recent studies of clinically stable COPD patients have demonstrated a greater diversity of airway microbiota, whose role in acute exacerbations is unclear. In this study, temporal changes in the airway microbiome before, at the onset of, and after an acute exacerbation were examined in 60 sputum samples collected from subjects enrolled in a longitudinal study of bacterial infection in COPD. Microbiome composition and predicted functions were examined using 16S rRNA-based culture-independent profiling methods. Shifts in the abundance (≥ 2-fold, P < 0.05) of many taxa at exacerbation and after treatment were observed. Microbiota members that were increased at exacerbation were primarily of the Proteobacteria phylum, including nontypical COPD pathogens. Changes in the bacterial composition after treatment for an exacerbation differed significantly among the therapy regimens clinically prescribed (antibiotics only, oral corticosteroids only, or both). Treatment with antibiotics alone primarily decreased the abundance of Proteobacteria, with the prolonged suppression of some microbiota members being observed. In contrast, treatment with corticosteroids alone led to enrichment for Proteobacteria and members of other phyla. Predicted metagenomes of particular microbiota members involved in these compositional shifts indicated exacerbation-associated loss of functions involved in the synthesis of antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory products, alongside enrichment in functions related to pathogen-elicited inflammation. These trends reversed upon clinical recovery. Further larger studies will be necessary to determine whether specific compositional or functional changes detected in the airway microbiome could be useful indicators of exacerbation development or outcome.

  1. The Sputum Microbiome in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yvonne J; Boushey, Homer A

    2015-11-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are thought to be associated with--and perhaps to mediate--accelerated loss of lung function in COPD. Although the application of culture-independent methods for detection of bacteria have shown COPD to be associated with marked differences in the burden, diversity, and composition of the bronchial bacterial microbiome, few studies have examined the changes associated with community-acquired exacerbations of the disease. In a longitudinal cohort study of COPD, the availability of sputum samples from subjects obtained at the onset of an exacerbation and during periods of clinical stability before and after the event enabled us to recently address this gap in knowledge, using culture-independent, 16S rRNA-based analysis methods combined with in silico inference of metagenomic functions. We observed sputum bacterial composition to be generally stable over the preexacerbation period of clinical stability, but to change at the time of exacerbation, with specific enrichment in not only typical COPD-associated bacterial species (e.g., Haemophilus influenzae) but also other phylogenetically related species with pathogenic potential. Concurrently, we observed depleted abundance of other bacteria whose predicted metagenomes suggest functional capacities to produce a variety of antiinflammatory compounds. Most strikingly, we found that resolution of these exacerbation-related changes in sputum microbiota composition differed significantly, depending on the exacerbation treatments prescribed. Treatment with corticosteroids resulted in microbiome enrichment for a number of bacterial communities, mostly members of the Proteobacteria phylum, whereas prolonged suppression of microbiota was seen in those treated with antibiotics alone. Taken together, our findings suggest that exacerbations of COPD are associated with heterogeneous changes in the bronchial microbiome, with increases in the abundance of species

  2. The role of indacaterol for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Bardaro, Floriana; Stirpe, Emanuele

    2013-08-01

    Indacaterol is the first long-acting β2-agonist (LABAs) approved for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that allows for once-daily (OD) administration. It is rapidly acting, with an onset of action in 5 minutes, like salbutamol and formoterol but with a sustained bronchodilator effect, that last for 24 hours, like tiotropium. In long-term clinical studies (12 weeks to 1 year) in patients with moderate to severe COPD, OD indacaterol 150 or 300 μg improved lung function (primary endpoint) significantly more than placebo, and improvements were significantly greater than twice-daily formoterol 12 μg or salmeterol 50 μg, and noninferior to OD tiotropium bromide 18 μg. Indacaterol was well tolerated at all doses and with a good overall safety profile. Cost-utility analyses show that indacaterol 150 μg has lower total costs and better outcomes than tiotropium and salmeterol. These findings suggest that indacaterol can be considered a first choice drug in the treatment of the patient with mild/moderate stable COPD. However, in people with COPD who remain symptomatic on treatment with indacaterol, adding a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) is the preferable option. In any case, it is advisable to combine indacaterol with a OD inhaled corticosteroid (ICS), such as mometasone furoate or ciclesonide, in patients with low FEV1, and, in those patients who have many symptoms and a high risk of exacerbations, to combine it with a LAMA and a OD ICS.

  3. Cell death, remodeling, and repair in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Henson, Peter M; Vandivier, R William; Douglas, Ivor S

    2006-11-01

    Apoptotic cells can be detected in the parenchyma and airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in greater numbers than seen in normal lungs or those from smokers without COPD. Implications include more apoptosis and/or decreased clearance of apoptotic cells. Both epithelial and endothelial cells become apoptotic. What role does the apoptosis play in the emphysema or small airway alterations seen in COPD? In simple terms, loss of cells by apoptosis would be expected to accompany, or perhaps initiate, the overall tissue destruction normally believed responsible. Indeed, direct induction of apoptosis in pulmonary endothelial or epithelial cells in rodents is accompanied by emphysematous changes. On the other hand, apoptotic cells are normally removed from tissues rapidly with minimal tissue response, to be followed by cell replacement to maintain homeostasis. The presence of detectable apoptotic cells, therefore, may imply defects in these clearance mechanisms, and, in keeping with this hypothesis, there is increasing evidence for such defects in patients with COPD. Mice with abnormalities in apoptotic cell removal also tend to develop spontaneous "emphysema." A reconciling hypothesis is that recognition of apoptotic cells not only leads to removal but also, normally, to signals for cell replacement. If this latter response is lacking in COPD-susceptible smokers, defects in normal alveolar or small airway repair could significantly contribute to the structural disruption. The concept puts emphasis on defective repair as well as initial injury (i.e., persistent alteration of dynamic tissue homeostasis, as a key contributor to COPD), with, it is hoped, additional approaches for mitigation.

  4. Illness perception in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Borge, Christine Råheim; Moum, Torbjørn; Puline Lein, Martha; Austegard, Elise Lynn; Wahl, Astrid Klopstad

    2014-10-01

    Illness perception (IP) concerns how patients evaluate living with a disease. To get a broader understanding of IP in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we investigated whether breathlessness is an important precursor of IP and whether IP in its turn is related to mental health, physical health and global quality of life (QOL). One hundred and fifty-four patients with COPD participated in a cross-sectional survey. Participants underwent pulmonary function testing, provided socio-demographic and clinical information, and completed the following standardized instruments: Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, Respiratory Quality of Life Questionnaire, Short-Form 12 Health Survey and the Quality of Life Scale. Multiple regression analyses were performed. A high IP score indicates that a patient believes that his/her illness represents a threat. Participants with a high score on the IP dimensions consequences, identity, concern and emotional representation, experienced more breathlessness. High scores on the IP dimensions consequences, identity and concern were associated with impaired physical health and high scores on the IP dimensions consequences, identity and emotional representation were associated with impaired mental health. Impaired global QOL was associated with high scores on the IP dimensions consequences, identity, concern, coherence and emotional representation. The strength of the associations between breathlessness and physical/mental health and global QOL decreased when certain dimensions of IP were included as predictors, indicating that IP to some extent acts as a mediating factor. These findings may have practical implications of patient counselling by helping COPD patients to cope with their disease by restructuring their personal models of illness.

  5. Abdominal muscle and quadriceps strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Man, W; Hopkinson, N; Harraf, F; Nikoletou, D; Polkey, M; Moxham, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Quadriceps muscle weakness is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but is not observed in a small hand muscle (adductor pollicis). Although this could be explained by reduced activity in the quadriceps, the observation could also be explained by anatomical location of the muscle or fibre type composition. However, the abdominal muscles are of a similar anatomical and fibre type distribution to the quadriceps, although they remain active in COPD. Cough gastric pressure is a recently described technique that assesses abdominal muscle (and hence expiratory muscle) strength more accurately than traditional techniques. A study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that more severe weakness exists in the quadriceps than in the abdominal muscles of patients with COPD compared with healthy elderly controls. Methods: Maximum cough gastric pressure and quadriceps isometric strength were measured in 43 patients with stable COPD and 25 healthy elderly volunteers matched for anthropometric variables. Results: Despite a significant reduction in mean quadriceps strength (29.9 kg v 41.2 kg; 95% CI –17.9 to –4.6; p = 0.001), cough gastric pressure was preserved in patients with COPD (227.3 cm H2O v 204.8 cm H2O; 95% CI –5.4 to 50.6; p = 0.11). Conclusions: Abdominal muscle strength is preserved in stable COPD outpatients in the presence of quadriceps weakness. This suggests that anatomical location and fibre type cannot explain quadriceps weakness in COPD. By inference, we conclude that disuse and consequent deconditioning are important factors in the development of quadriceps muscle weakness in COPD patients, or that activity protects the abdominal muscles from possible systemic myopathic processes. PMID:15923239

  6. Plasma sphingolipids in HIV-associated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Shane; Griffin, Timothy J; Reilly, Cavan; Harvey, Stephen; Witthuhn, Bruce A; Sandri, Brian J; Wendt, Chris H

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a significant cause of morbidity in persons living with HIV (PLWH) and HIV appears to uniquely cause COPD, independent of smoking. The mechanisms by which HIV leads to COPD are not clear. The objective of this study was to identify metabolomic biomarkers and potential mechanistic pathways of HIV-associated COPD (HIV-COPD). Methods We performed case–control metabolite profiling via mass spectrometry in plasma from 38 individuals with HIV-COPD (cases), comparing to matched controls with/without HIV and with/without COPD. Untargeted metabolites of interest were identified with liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (LC-MS/mass spectrometry (MS)), and targeted metabolomics for tryptophan (Trp) and kynurenine (Kyn) were measured by selective reaction monitoring (SRM) with LC-MS/MS. We used mixed-effects models to compare metabolite concentrations in cases compared with controls while controlling for relevant biological variables. Results We identified 1689 analytes associated with HIV-COPD at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 10%. In PLWH, we identified 263 analytes (10% FDR) between those with and without COPD. LC MS/MS identified Trp and 17 lipids, including sphingolipids and diacylglycerol. After adjusting for relevant covariates, the Kyn/Trp ratio measured by SRM was significantly higher in PLWH (p=0.022), but was not associated with COPD status (p=0.95). Conclusions There is a unique metabolite profile in HIV-COPD that includes sphingolipids. Trp metabolism is increased in HIV, but does not appear to independently contribute to HIV-COPD. Trial registration numbers NCT01810289, NCT01797367, NCT00608764.

  7. The role of indacaterol for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Bardaro, Floriana; Stirpe, Emanuele

    2013-01-01

    Indacaterol is the first long-acting β2-agonist (LABAs) approved for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that allows for once-daily (OD) administration. It is rapidly acting, with an onset of action in 5 minutes, like salbutamol and formoterol but with a sustained bronchodilator effect, that last for 24 hours, like tiotropium. In long-term clinical studies (12 weeks to 1 year) in patients with moderate to severe COPD, OD indacaterol 150 or 300 μg improved lung function (primary endpoint) significantly more than placebo, and improvements were significantly greater than twice-daily formoterol 12 μg or salmeterol 50 μg, and noninferior to OD tiotropium bromide 18 μg. Indacaterol was well tolerated at all doses and with a good overall safety profile. Cost-utility analyses show that indacaterol 150 μg has lower total costs and better outcomes than tiotropium and salmeterol. These findings suggest that indacaterol can be considered a first choice drug in the treatment of the patient with mild/moderate stable COPD. However, in people with COPD who remain symptomatic on treatment with indacaterol, adding a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) is the preferable option. In any case, it is advisable to combine indacaterol with a OD inhaled corticosteroid (ICS), such as mometasone furoate or ciclesonide, in patients with low FEV1, and, in those patients who have many symptoms and a high risk of exacerbations, to combine it with a LAMA and a OD ICS. PMID:23991316

  8. Oscillatory Positive Expiratory Pressure in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Svenningsen, Sarah; Paulin, Gregory A; Sheikh, Khadija; Guo, Fumin; Hasany, Aasim; Kirby, Miranda; Rezai, Roya Etemad; McCormack, David G; Parraga, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based guidance for the use of airway clearance techniques (ACT) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is lacking in-part because well-established measurements of pulmonary function such as the forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1) are relatively insensitive to ACT. The objective of this crossover study was to evaluate daily use of an oscillatory positive expiratory pressure (oPEP) device for 21-28 days in COPD patients who were self-identified as sputum-producers or non-sputum-producers. COPD volunteers provided written informed consent to daily oPEP use in a randomized crossover fashion. Participants completed baseline, crossover and study-end pulmonary function tests, St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), Patient Evaluation Questionnaire (PEQ), Six-Minute Walk Test and (3)He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the measurement of ventilation abnormalities using the ventilation defect percent (VDP). Fourteen COPD patients, self-identified as sputum-producers and 13 COPD-non-sputum-producers completed the study. Post-oPEP, the PEQ-ease-bringing-up-sputum was improved for sputum-producers (p = 0.005) and non-sputum-producers (p = 0.04), the magnitude of which was greater for sputum-producers (p = 0.03). There were significant post-oPEP improvements for sputum-producers only for FVC (p = 0.01), 6MWD (p = 0.04), SGRQ total score (p = 0.01) as well as PEQ-patient-global-assessment (p = 0.02). Clinically relevant post-oPEP improvements for PEQ-ease-bringing-up-sputum/PEQ-patient-global-assessment/SGRQ/VDP were observed in 8/7/9/6 of 14 sputum-producers and 2/0/3/3 of 13 non-sputum-producers. The post-oPEP change in (3)He MRI VDP was related to the change in PEQ-ease-bringing-up-sputum (r = 0.65, p = 0.0004) and FEV1 (r = -0.50, p = 0.009). In COPD patients with chronic sputum production, PEQ and SGRQ scores, FVC and 6MWD improved post-oPEP. FEV1 and PEQ-ease-bringing-up-sputum improvements were related to improved ventilation providing

  9. [The use of an artificial microclimate chamber in the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Chernenkov, R A; Chernenkova, E A; Zhukov, G V

    1997-01-01

    Halotherapy was used for sanatorium rehabilitation in 29 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (chronic bronchitis and asthma). Significant positive effects of this method resulted in the improvement of the flow-volume parameters curve of lung function and in hypotensive effects on blood pressure. Halotherapy is recommended for use in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases with hypertension or coronary heart disease.

  10. Adipokine CTRP-5 as a Potential Novel Inflammatory Biomarker in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Diandian; Wu, Yanqiu; Tian, Panwen; Zhang, Xue; Wang, Hao; Wang, Tao; Ying, Binwu; Wang, Lanlan; Shen, Yongchun; Wen, Fuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Local and systemic inflammation often present in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Adipokines are secretory protein mediators by adipose tissue, which have been found to involve in inflammatory responses in many chronic inflammatory diseases. Therefore, we performed this preliminary clinical study to investigate the possible association between 2 adipokines, C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein-3 and -5 (CTRP-3 and CTRP-5), with lung function and other markers of inflammation in COPD. Serum CTRP-3 and CTRP-5 levels were measured in 73 COPD patients and 54 health controls, together with lung function and levels of adiponectin, CRP, TNF-α, and MPO in both groups. Pearson's partial correlation was used to analyze the correlations between CTRPs and other serum markers or lung function. Serum CTRP-5 was significantly elevated in COPD patients (0.41 ± 0.35 versus 0.29 ± 0.28 μg/ml, P = 0.01) and correlated inversely with FEV1/FVC ratio in all patients (r = −0.31, P = 0.001). In COPD patients, CTRP-5 was also correlated negatively with FEV1% predicted (r = −0.464, P < 0.001) and had a positive association with CRP levels (r = 0.262, P = 0.04). However, serum CTRP-3 levels were not correlated with measures of lung function or systemic inflammation. In conclusion, circulating CTRP-5 was associated with the severity of airflow obstruction and systemic inflammation in patients with COPD, which suggests that it may be used as a potential novel inflammatory biomarker in COPD. Further studies should be performed to clarify the exact role of CTRP-5 on the pathogenesis and outcomes of COPD. PMID:26356719

  11. A Persistent and Diverse Airway Microbiota Present during Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yvonne J.; Kim, Eugenia; Cox, Michael J.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Brown, Ron; Wiener-Kronish, Jeanine P.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are a major source of morbidity and contribute significantly to healthcare costs. Although bacterial infections are implicated in nearly 50% of exacerbations, only a handful of pathogens have been consistently identified in COPD airways, primarily by culture-based methods, and the bacterial microbiota in acute exacerbations remains largely uncharacterized. The aim of this study was to comprehensively profile airway bacterial communities using a culture-independent microarray, the 16S rRNA PhyloChip, of a cohort of COPD patients requiring ventilatory support and antibiotic therapy for exacerbation-related respiratory failure. PhyloChip analysis revealed the presence of over 1,200 bacterial taxa representing 140 distinct families, many previously undetected in airway diseases; bacterial community composition was strongly influenced by the duration of intubation. A core community of 75 taxa was detected in all patients, many of which are known pathogens. Bacterial community diversity in COPD airways is substantially greater than previously recognized and includes a number of potential pathogens detected in the setting of antibiotic exposure. Comprehensive assessment of the COPD airway microbiota using high-throughput, culture-independent methods may prove key to understanding the relationships between airway bacterial colonization, acute exacerbation, and clinical outcomes in this and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:20141328

  12. Nutrition therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and related nutritional complications.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Amanda Carla; Bezerra, Olívia Maria de Paula Alves

    2006-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is characterized by progressive and partially reversible airway obstruction. The innumerable complications that occur during the progression of the disease can affect the nutritional state of patients suffering from this illness. The objective of this study was to present a brief review of the literature regarding the nutrition therapy used in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. To that end, we performed a bibliographic search for related articles published within the last 18 years and indexed for the Literatura Latinoamericana y del Caribe en Ciencias de la Salud (LILACS, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature) and Medline databases. Malnutrition is associated with a poor prognosis for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, since it predisposes such patients to infections, as well as reducing respiratory muscle force, exercise tolerance and quality of life. Despite the fact that such malnutrition is extremely common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, it should be recognized as an independent risk factor, since it can be modified through appropriate and efficacious diet therapy and monitoring. For patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, nutrition therapy is initiated after the evaluation of the nutritional state of the patient, which identifies nutritional risk, thereby allowing the proper level of treatment to be established. In this evaluation, anthropometric and biochemical markers, as well as indicators of dietary consumption and body composition, should be used. The prescribed diet should contain appropriate proportions of macronutrients, micronutrients and immunonutrients in order to regain or maintain the proper nutritional state and to avoid complications. The physical characteristics of the diet should be tailored to the individual needs and tolerances of each patient. In the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  13. Two Cases of Chronic Idiopathic Intestinal Pseudo-obstruction with Different Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoung Hwan; Kang, Sung-Bum; Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Oh, Jane C.; Kim, Sun-Mi; Park, Young Soo; Lee, Dong Ho

    2010-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a rare disorder characterized by a severe impairment of gastrointestinal propulsion in the absence of mechanical obstruction. We experienced a case of chronic pseudo-obstruction in the initial phase mimicking acute pseudo-obstruction, which was treated medically. This ongoing case was compared to another recurrent and intractable case successfully treated with surgery and diagnosed as hypoganglionosis. These two cases showed different clinical features and therapeutic approaches for CIPO; one with the first episode of CIPO mimicking Ogilvie's syndrome; the other with recurrent episodes of CIPO with typical features. In conclusion, CIPO is a difficult disorder with various clinical manifestations and different treatment modalities, therefore individualized diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are needed. PMID:20535331

  14. Two Cases of Chronic Idiopathic Intestinal Pseudo-obstruction with Different Clinical Features.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoung Hwan; Kim, Nayoung; Kang, Sung-Bum; Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Oh, Jane C; Kim, Sun-Mi; Park, Young Soo; Lee, Dong Ho

    2010-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a rare disorder characterized by a severe impairment of gastrointestinal propulsion in the absence of mechanical obstruction. We experienced a case of chronic pseudo-obstruction in the initial phase mimicking acute pseudo-obstruction, which was treated medically. This ongoing case was compared to another recurrent and intractable case successfully treated with surgery and diagnosed as hypoganglionosis. These two cases showed different clinical features and therapeutic approaches for CIPO; one with the first episode of CIPO mimicking Ogilvie's syndrome; the other with recurrent episodes of CIPO with typical features. In conclusion, CIPO is a difficult disorder with various clinical manifestations and different treatment modalities, therefore individualized diagnostic and therapeutic approaches are needed.

  15. Relationship between Dysphagia and Exacerbations in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Steidl, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Carla Simone; Gonçalves, Bruna Franciele; Fernandes, Natália; Antunes, Vívian; Mancopes, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The literature presents studies correlating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to dysphagia and suggesting that the aspiration laryngeal phenomenon related to changes in the pharyngeal phase contributes significantly to the exacerbation of symptoms of lung disease. Objectives This study aimed to conduct a literature review to identify the relation between dysphagia and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Data Synthesis We found 21 studies and included 19 in this review. The few studies that related to the subject agreed that the presence of dysphagia, due to lack of coordination between swallowing and breathing, may be one of the triggering factors of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. Conclusions The review noted that there is a relationship between dysphagia and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, identified by studies demonstrating that the difficulties associated with swallowing may lead to exacerbation of the disease. There was difficulty in comparing studies by their methodological differences. More research is needed to clarify the relationship between dysphagia and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, making it possible to develop multiprofessional treatment strategies for these patients, catered to specific needs due to the systemic manifestations of the disease. PMID:25992155

  16. Comparative effectiveness of drugs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, M; Segreti, A; Rogliani, P

    2012-12-01

    Current guidelines for the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) recommend the use of inhaled long-acting bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and their combinations for maintenance treatment of moderate to severe COPD. However, doctors still wonder if in patients with mild/moderate stable COPD it is best to start with a β-adrenoceptor agonist or an antimuscarinic agent. They also wonder if once- or twice-daily dosing is preferable, and if it is enough to develop a novel therapy that is dosed once daily rather than twice daily if the agents are both equally safe and effective. It also remains unclear whether and when a second bronchodilator with a different mechanism of action should be used in patients with stable COPD and when, in its place, an ICS must be added, and also whether long-acting antimuscarinic agent (LAMA)/long-acting β-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) combination therapy is preferred over LAMA plus LABA/ICS. Moreover, there is no solid evidence of the best way to administer a triple combination product: should drugs be delivered concomitantly or sequentially? In any case, the growing evidence that COPD is a heterogeneous disease with characteristics that occur with different phenotypes suggests that a specific therapy may not be ultimately identified for every phenotype. Therefore, there is a clear need to move toward personalized treatment in COPD because phenotypic heterogeneity may affect treatment response and the clinical course of the disease. Unfortunately, however, there is not enough money or time to examine the impact of each treatment step or combination of treatments in each specific phenotype using randomized controlled trials. Consequently, doctors wonder if there is a role for comparative effectiveness research (CER), which can be considered a subset of patient-oriented research that examines available therapeutic options in particular patients to determine relevant health outcomes. There is a strong

  17. Use of nitric oxide inhalation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Ashutosh, K.; Phadke, K.; Jackson, J. F.; Steele, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Inhalation of nitric oxide with oxygen could be a promising treatment in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pulmonary hypertension. However, the current methods of delivery of NO are cumbersome and unsuitable for long term use. The present study was undertaken to investigate the safety and efficacy of a mixture of nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen administered via a nasal cannula for 24 hours in patients with oxygen dependent COPD.
METHODS—Twenty five parts per million (ppm) of NO was administered by inhalation combined with supplemental oxygen at a flow rate of 2 l/min via a nasal cannula for 24 hours to 11 ambulatory men with stable, oxygen dependent COPD. Room air with supplemental oxygen at 2 l/min was administered in an identical manner for another 24 hours as control therapy in a randomised, double blind, crossover fashion to all patients. Pulmonary function tests, exercise tolerance, dyspnoea grade, and lung volumes were measured at baseline, 24, and 48 hours. Pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), cardiac output (CO), pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), arterial blood gas tensions, and minute ventilation were measured at baseline, after 30 minutes and 24 hours of breathing NO and oxygen. Venous admixture ratio (Qs/Qt) and dead space ratio (Vd/Vt) were also calculated. Concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and NO in the inhaled and ambient air were monitored continuously. Differences in pulmonary function, arterial blood gas tensions, pulmonary haemodynamics, exercise tolerance, and dyspnoea between oxygen and NO breathing periods were analysed for significance using paired t tests.
RESULTS—A significant (p<0.05) fall was observed in PVR (183.1 (116.05) and 137.2 (108.4) dynes.s.cm-3 before and after breathing NO for 24 hours, respectively) with NO administration without significant changes in symptoms, pulmonary function, arterial oxygen tension, or exercise tolerance.
CONCLUSIONS—NO at a concentration of 25 ppm

  18. Respiratory viruses in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Parvaiz A; Mir, Hyder; Akram, Shabir; Potdar, Varsha; Chadha, Mandeep S

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) cause significant morbidity, mortality, and an inexorable decline of lung function. Data from developed countries have shown viruses to be important causes of AECOPD, but data from developing countries like India are scant. We set out to determine the contribution of viruses in the causation of hospitalized patients with AECOPD. Methods: Twin nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs collected from 233 patients admitted with an acute AECOPD and tested for respiratory viruses including respiratory syncytial virus A and B, parainfluenza were (PIV) 1, 2, 3, and 4, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) A and B, influenza A and B, enterovirus, corona NL65, OC43, and 229E viruses, adenovirus 2 and 4, rhinovirus, and bocavirus, by duplex real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) using CDC approved primers and probes. Samples positive for influenza A were subtyped for A/H1N1pdm09 and A/H3N2 whereas influenza B samples were subtyped into B/Yamagata and B/Victoria subtypes, using primers and probes recommended by CDC, USA. Results: Respiratory viruses were detected in 46 (19.7%) cases, influenza A/H3N2 and rhinoviruses being the most common viruses detected. More than one virus was isolated in four cases consisting of hMPV-B + adeno-2 + Inf-B; rhino + H3N2, PIV-1 + rhino; and PIV-1+ hMPV-B in one case each. Ancillary supportive therapeutic measures included bronchodilators, antibiotics, steroids, and ventilation (noninvasive in 42 and invasive in 4). Antiviral therapy was instituted in influenza-positive patients. Three patients with A/H3N2 infection died during hospitalization. Conclusions: We conclude that respiratory viruses are important contributors to AECOPD in India. Our data calls for prompt investigation during an exacerbation for viruses to obviate inappropriate antibiotic use and institute antiviral therapy in viral disease amenable to antiviral therapy. Appropriate

  19. The disease burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Kourlaba, Georgia; Hillas, Georgios; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros; Maniadakis, Nikos

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to estimate the self-reported prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Greece and to quantify its burden on patients’ daily activities, productivity, and psychological status. Methods A population-based, random digit-dialed telephone nationwide survey was conducted between July 10, 2015 and July 31, 2015 in order to recruit patients with COPD in Greece. Among the 11,471 persons contacted, 3,414 met the inclusion criterion of age ≥40 years and completed the screening questions regarding COPD. Of the 362 subjects who reported that they had been diagnosed with COPD, 351 completed the survey. Data on demographic and lifestyle characteristics, comorbidities, disease history, perceived disease severity, breathlessness severity, symptoms severity, limitations in daily activities, psychological distress, and productivity were collected. All data were collected through the telephone interview method using a structured questionnaire. Results The overall self-reported COPD prevalence was 10.6%. Among 351 participants, only 9% reported that they suffered from severe breathlessness. The mean COPD assessment test score was 19.0, with 84% of participants having a COPD assessment test score ≥10. As for the perceived severity of COPD, the majority of subjects considered that their respiratory condition was of moderate (34.2%) or mild severity (33.9%). Overall, the participants reported a significant impact of COPD on their daily life. For instance, 61.5% of them reported that their respiratory condition has affected their sports activities. Moreover, 73% of subjects considered that the health care system could do more for them than it actually does. Almost one-fourth of the participants reported that they had missed work during the past 12 months due to their respiratory symptoms, with the mean number of days lost being 10. Conclusion This survey provides insightful data regarding the impact of COPD on Greek

  20. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Did you search for lysosomal storage diseases?

    PubMed

    Politei, J; Durand, C; Schenone, A B; Torres, A; Mukdsi, J; Thurberg, B L

    2017-06-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction results in clinical manifestations that resemble intestinal obstruction but in the absence of any physical obstructive process. Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease characterized by the dysfunction of multiple systems, including significant gastrointestinal involvement. We report the occurrence of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in two unrelated patients with Fabry disease and the possible explanation of a direct relation of these two disorders. In Fabry disease, gastrointestinal symptoms occur in approximately 70% of male patients, but the frequency ranges from 19% to 69% in different series. In some patients, colonic dysmotility due glycolipid deposition in autonomic plexus and ganglia can lead to the pseudo-obstruction syndrome, simulating intestinal necrosis. That is why up to this date colostomy has been performed in some cases, even for children with FD without cardiac, renal or cerebrovascular compromise. Early treatment with enzyme replacement therapy in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients may be justified in order to prevent disease progression. Several studies have demonstrated that enzyme replacement therapy alleviates GI manifestations. Because of the non-specific nature of the gastrointestinal symptoms, diagnosis of Fabry disease is often delayed for several years. Gastrointestinal involvement is often misdiagnosed or under-reported. It is therefore very important to consider Fabry disease in the differential diagnosis of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

  1. Impaired contractility of colonic muscle cells in a patient with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Guarino, M P L; Carotti, S; Cogliandro, R; Stanghellini, V; De Giorgio, R; Barbara, G; Alloni, R; Altomare, A; Tarquini, E; Coppola, R; Corinaldesi, R; Cicala, M

    2008-03-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction represents a cause of persistent functional intestinal failure either "secondary" to specific conditions or "chronic intestinal idiopathic pseudo-obstruction" in origin. The diagnosis is mainly clinical, supported by radiological and/or endoscopic findings excluding any mechanical cause of intestinal obstruction. We reported a case of a 39-year-old woman with chronic intestinal idiopathic pseudo-obstruction, who underwent colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis; histological examination of the surgical specimen did not reveal myogenic or neurogenic defects or other pathological abnormalities indicative of an underlying neuromuscular impairment. Because of the apparent integrity of the gut neuromuscular layer, we tested whether a functional impairment affected colonic single smooth muscle cells. Muscle cells were isolated from the right colon and their contractile response to a receptor-dependent agonist evaluated in comparison to that obtained from controls. The cell contraction induced by acetylcholine in a dose response manner was markedly decreased in the patient affected by chronic intestinal idiopathic pseudo-obstruction compared with cells from controls (percentage of cell shortening with maximal dose of acetylcholine [10(-6)M]: 10.7+/-3% versus 34.2+/-4%, respectively). The present findings indicate a specific defect of colonic smooth muscle cells likely related to an ineffective response to acetylcholine.

  2. Citric acid cough threshold and airway responsiveness in asthmatic patients and smokers with chronic airflow obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Auffarth, B; de Monchy, J G; van der Mark, T W; Postma, D S; Koëter, G H

    1991-01-01

    The relation between citric acid cough threshold and airway hyperresponsiveness was investigated in 11 non-smoking patients with allergic asthma (mean FEV1 94% predicted) and 25 non-atopic smokers with chronic airflow obstruction (mean FEV1 65% predicted). Cough threshold was determined on two occasions by administering doubling concentrations of citric acid. Seven of the 11 asthmatic subjects and 14 of 25 smokers with chronic airflow obstruction had a positive cough threshold on both test days. Cough threshold measurements were reproducible in both groups (standard deviation of duplicate measurements 1.2 doubling concentrations in asthma, 1.1 doubling concentrations in chronic airflow obstruction). Citric acid provocation did not cause bronchial obstruction in most patients, though four patients had a fall in FEV1 of more than 20% for a short time on one occasion only. No significant difference in cough threshold was found between the two patient groups despite differences in baseline FEV1 values. There was no significant correlation between cough threshold and the provocative concentration of histamine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) histamine in either group. Thus sensory nerves can be activated with a tussive agent in patients with asthma and chronic airflow obstruction without causing bronchial smooth muscle contraction. PMID:1948792

  3. Chronic kidney disease in European patients with obstructive sleep apnea: the ESADA cohort study.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Oreste; Battaglia, Salvatore; Steiropoulos, Paschalis; Basoglu, Ozen K; Kvamme, John A; Ryan, Silke; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Verbraecken, Johan; Grote, Ludger; Hedner, Jan; Bonsignore, Maria R

    2016-12-01

    The cross-sectional relationship of obstructive sleep apnea with moderate to severe chronic kidney disease, defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL min(-1) ∙1.73 m(-2) , was investigated in a large cohort of patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea studied by nocturnal polysomnography or cardiorespiratory polygraphy. Data were obtained from the European Sleep Apnea Database, where information from unselected adult patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea afferent to 26 European sleep centres had been prospectively collected. Both the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease and the Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration equations were used for the assessment of estimated glomerular filtration rate. The analysed sample included 7700 subjects, 71% male, aged 51.9 ± 12.5 years. Severe obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index ≥30) was found in 34% of subjects. The lowest nocturnal oxygen saturation was 81 ± 10.2%. Chronic kidney disease prevalence in the whole sample was 8.7% or 6.1%, according to the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease or the Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration equations, respectively. Subjects with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate were older, more obese, more often female, had worse obstructive sleep apnea and more co-morbidities (P < 0.001, each). With both equations, independent predictors of estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 were: chronic heart failure; female gender; systemic hypertension; older age; higher body mass index; and worse lowest nocturnal oxygen saturation. It was concluded that in obstructive sleep apnea, chronic kidney disease is largely predicted by co-morbidities and anthropometric characteristics. In addition, severe nocturnal hypoxaemia, even for only a small part of the night, may play an important role as a risk factor for kidney dysfunction.

  4. [The effect of continuous peri-thoracic negative pressure on nocturnal desaturation of chronic obstructive bronchopneumopathies].

    PubMed

    Pison, C; Bédard, M A; Malo, J; Montplaisir, J

    1991-01-01

    The fall of functional residual capacity (FRC) in the genesis of nocturnal desaturation in chronic airflow obstruction (COPD) continues to be discussed. This hypothesis is being tested by applying a negative continuous thoracic pressure using a cuirass/poncho attached to a pump for one night (night II) after a control night with a cuirass/poncho at atmospheric pressure (night 1). Seven subjects with a mean age of 61 +/- 9, with a mean weight of 108 +/- 21% of their ideal weight, who were suffering from severe airflow obstruction with a mean forced expired volume (FEV1: 39 +/- 20% th., FEV1/FVC: 35 +/- 9%, PaO2: 60 +/- 3 mmHg, PaCO2: 42 +/- 4 mmHg). These seven subjects had two polysomnographies on the two successive nights. During night II, the FRC was increased by 0.33 +/- 0.6 L by applying a continuous negative thoracic pressure of 10 +/- 1 cm of water. A significant decrease in the sleep time was noted (248 +/- 86 min vs 316 +/- 74 min, p less than 0.02) also the efficacy of sleep (54 +/- 9% vs 71 +/- 15% vm p less than 0.02). There was no difference between the two nights as regards the distribution of the sleep stages. In 2 subjects, the hypopnoea-apnoea index passed from 0 to 11 and from 4 to 22 respectively. The principal result was the absence of any significant difference in mean nocturnal oxygen saturation between the two nights.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. The role of neural inflammation in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Joos, Guy F; De Swert, Katelijne O; Schelfhout, Vanessa; Pauwels, Romain A

    2003-05-01

    The tachykinins substance P and neurokinin A are found within airway nerves and immune cells. They have various effects on the airways that can contribute to the changes observed in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Both tachykinin NK(1) and NK(2) receptors have been involved in the bronchoconstriction and the proinflammatory changes induced by substance P and neurokinin A. Tachykinin NK(1) and NK(2) receptor antagonists have activity in various animal models of allergic asthma and chronic bronchitis. It is suggested that dual NK(1)/NK(2) and triple NK(1)/NK(2)/NK(3) tachykinin receptor antagonists have potential in the treatment of obstructive airway diseases.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus obstructivus VT-16-70 Isolated from the Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid of a Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tetz, Victor

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the draft genome sequence of Bacillus obstructivus VT-16-70, a novel spore-forming bacterium isolated from the lungs of a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The genome comprised 5,220,753 bp, with 35.2% G+C content. There were 4,972 predicted protein-coding genes, including those associated with antibiotic resistance and virulence. PMID:28254994

  7. Effects of hypercapnia and inspiratory flow-resistive loading on respiratory activity in chronic airways obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Altose, M D; McCauley, W C; Kelsen, S G; Cherniack, N S

    1977-01-01

    The respiratory responses to hypercapnia alone and to hypercapnia and flow-resistive loading during inspiration were studied in normal individuals and in eucapnic and hypercapnic patients with chronic airways obstruction. Responses were assessed in terms of minute ventilation and occlusion pressure (mouth pressure during airway occlusion 100 ms after the onset of inspiration). Ventilatory responses to CO2 (deltaV/deltaPCO2) were distinctly subnormal in both groups of patients with airways obstruction. The two groups of patients, however, showed different occlusion pressure responses to CO2 (deltaP100/deltaPCO2): deltaP100/deltaPCO2 was normal in the eucapnic patients but subnormal in the hypercapnic patients. Flow-resistive loading during inspiration reduced deltaV/deltaPCO2 both in normal subjects and in patients with airways obstruction. The occlusion pressure response to CO2 increased in normal subjects during flow-resistive loading but remained unchanged in both groups of patients with chronic airways obstruction. These results indicate that while chemosensitivity as determined by deltaP100/deltaPCO2 is impaired only in hypercapnic patients with chronic airways obstruction, an acute increase in flow resistance elicits a subnormal increase in respiratory efferent activity in both eucapnic and hypercapnic patients. PMID:838862

  8. The economic impact of exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and exacerbation definition: a review.

    PubMed

    Toy, Edmond L; Gallagher, Kevin F; Stanley, Elizabeth L; Swensen, Andrine R; Duh, Mei Sheng

    2010-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) poses a significant economic burden on society, and a substantial portion is related to exacerbations of COPD. A literature review of the direct and indirect costs of COPD exacerbations was performed. A systematic search of the MEDLINE database from 1998-2008 was conducted and supplemented with searches of conference abstracts and article bibliographies. Articles that contained cost data related to COPD exacerbations were selected for in-depth review. Eleven studies examining healthcare costs associated with COPD exacerbations were identified. The estimated costs of exacerbations vary widely across studies: $88 to $7,757 per exacerbation (2007 US dollars). The largest component of the total costs of COPD exacerbations was typically hospitalization. Costs were highly correlated with exacerbation severity. Indirect costs have rarely been measured. The wide variability in the cost estimates reflected cross-study differences in geographic locations, treatment patterns, and patient populations. Important methodological differences also existed across studies. Researchers have used different definitions of exacerbation (e.g., symptom- versus event-based definitions), different tools to identify and measure exacerbations, and different classification systems to define exacerbation severity. Unreported exacerbations are common and may influence the long-term costs of exacerbations. Measurement of indirect costs will provide a more comprehensive picture of the burden of exacerbations. Evaluation of pharmacoeconomic analyses would be aided by the use of more consistent and comprehensive approaches to defining and measuring COPD exacerbations.

  9. Periodontal Treatment Reduces Risk of Adverse Respiratory Events in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of periodontal diseases has been associated with benefit outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, no population-based cohort study has been conducted. We evaluated this relationship by retrospective cohort study using a large population data. Using the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 5562 COPD patients with periodontal diseases who had received periodontal treatment as the treatment group. The comparison group was selected at a 1:1 ratio matched by the propensity score estimated with age, sex, date of COPD diagnosis and periodontal treatment, and comorbidities. Both groups were followed up for 5 years to compare risks of acute exacerbation, pneumonia, and acute respiratory failure. The incidence rates of adverse respiratory events were significantly lower in the treatment group than in the comparison group: 3.79 versus 4.21 per 100 person-years for emergency room visits, 2.75 versus 3.65 per 100 person-years for hospitalizations, and 0.66 versus 0.75 per 100 person-years for intensive care unit admissions. The treatment group also had a 37% reduced risk of deaths (1.81 vs 2.87 per 100 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.57 (95% confidence interval 0.52–0.62). Periodontal treatment for COPD patients could reduce the risk of adverse respiratory events and mortality. The adequate periodontal health care is important for COPD patients with periodontal diseases. PMID:27196497

  10. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Ghannouchi Jaafoura, N; Khalifa, M; Atig, A; Ben Jazia, E; Alaoua, A; Braham Krifa, A; Letaief, A; Bahri, F

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO) is an uncommon and severe complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We report a 24-year-old female with a 2 year SLE duration who presented with abdominal pain, vomiting, constipation and abdominal distention. Plain abdominal radiograph showed multiple air-fluid levels of the small bowel. Computed tomographic scan of the abdomen revealed dilated small bowel loops without mechanical obstruction. Urinary tract involvement was also demonstrated. IPO was diagnosed and the patient responded well to immunosuppressive treatment. IPO is a recently recognized manifestation of SLE that may be the presenting manifestation of the systemic disease or occur more commonly during disease course. Early recognition of IPO is necessary to institute appropriate medical treatment and to avoid inappropriate surgical intervention.

  11. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a horse: a case of myenteric ganglionitis.

    PubMed

    Chénier, Sonia; Macieira, Susana M; Sylvestre, Doris; Jean, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    An 11-year-old Quarter horse mare was presented for recurrent episodes of colic. A chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction was diagnosed. Medical treatment and surgical resection of the colon were performed but the condition did not improve and the horse was euthanized. Histopathological examination revealed a myenteric ganglionitis of the small intestine and ascending colon.

  12. Outcome assessment in patients with chronic obstructive rhinitis CO2 laser treated

    PubMed Central

    Testa, D; Motta, G; Galli, V; Iovine, R; Guerra, G; Marenzi, G; Testa, B

    2006-01-01

    Summary Surgical lasers have been used to restore nasal flow in chronic obstructive rhinitis, with a significant improvement in symptoms having been reported in almost all cases. However, evidence supporting the efficacy at long-term, and studies on the assessment of quality of life remain limited. In the present study, efficacy at long term and improvement in the quality of life were assessed in patients with chronic obstructive rhinitis, treated with CO2 laser. A total of 308 patients with chronic obstructive rhinitis were enrolled. The primary outcome measure assessed was the change in score regarding specific and general symptoms, between baseline to 2-4.5 and 7.8 mean years follow-up. Laser turbinotomy restored nasal flow and induced a change in total score which was statistically significant, for specific and general symptoms at the first, second and third follow-up, p < 0.01. CO2 laser turbinate surgery improved symptoms and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive rhinitis as observed at 2-4.5 and 7.8 mean years follow-up. PMID:18383755

  13. Behavioral Exercise Programs in the Management of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Catherine J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of behavior modification, cognitive modification, and cognitive-behavior modification in increasing compliance with an exercise prescription for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients (N=96). Although all treatment groups showed improvement, the cognitive-behavior modification strategy produced the most…

  14. Anesthetic management of nephrectomy in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient with recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappaji; Bhat Pai, Rohini; Rao, Raghavendra P

    2016-01-01

    Nephrectomies are usually performed under general anesthesia alone or in combination with regional anesthesia and rarely under regional anesthesia alone. We report the management of a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a history of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax undergoing nephrectomy under regional anesthesia alone.

  15. [Anesthetic management of nephrectomy in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient with recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Mysore Chandramouli Basappaji; Bhat Pai, Rohini; Rao, Raghavendra P

    2016-01-01

    Nephrectomies are usually performed under general anesthesia alone or in combination with regional anesthesia and rarely under regional anesthesia alone. We report the management of a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a history of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax undergoing nephrectomy under regional anesthesia alone.

  16. The Care Needs of Community-Dwelling Seniors Suffering from Advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donna M.; Ross, Carolyn; Goodridge, Donna; Davis, Penny; Landreville, Alison; Roebuck, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Aim: This study was undertaken to determine the care needs of Canadian seniors living at home with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Background: COPD is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although hospitalizations for illness exacerbations and end-stage care may be common, most persons with COPD live out…

  17. Anxiety and Depression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A New Intervention and Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Melinda A.; Veazey, Connie; Hopko, Derek; Diefenbach, Gretchen; Kunik, Mark E.

    2005-01-01

    Anxiety and depression coexist frequently in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and compound the impact of the disease on quality of life and functional status. However, little attention has been given to the development of treatment strategies for this subset of patients. The current article describes the development of a new, multicomponent…

  18. Sample Survey of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Associated Risk Factors in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Golshan, Mohammad; Welte, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the number of individuals with chronic bronchitis and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Isfahan. Our study results were compared with those of previous studies in Iran and similar studies in other countries. Materials and Methods As a part of a population-based, cross-sectional study, 2,200 randomly selected individuals aged 40 years or older were asked to take part in the survey; among whom, 1308 individuals (59.45%) agreed to fill out the respiratory questionnaire. This group consisted of 636 (48.6%) males and 672 (51.4%) females. Spirometric measurements were performed in 279 cases. COPD was defined by the “Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease” criteria. Results One hundred-seven individuals (8.1%) fulfilled the clinical criteria for chronic bronchitis as the main sign of COPD. Multivariate analysis revealed that age and smoking were independent predictors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Conclusion It is concluded that the prevalence of chronic bronchitis symptoms is approximately the same in our population as compared with western countries. The frequency of clinical chronic bronchitis has risen in comparison to a previous study in Isfahan. PMID:25191373

  19. Asthma-Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Overlap Syndrome: Nothing New Under the Sun.

    PubMed

    Putcha, Nirupama; Wise, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    The debate about whether asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are distinct clinical syndromes is not new; there is heightened interest in understanding the group of individuals with obstructive lung disease who seem to have elements of both conditions because recent studies have demonstrated increased risk for respiratory events and exacerbations. We describe the clinical characteristics of this subtype of disease and suggest 4 working definitions of individuals who would fall into the asthma-COPD overlap category. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these subtypes will hopefully lead into a better understanding of therapeutic strategies that can target specific pathobiologic pathways.

  20. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha gene promoter polymorphism in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Higham, M A; Pride, N B; Alikhan, A; Morrell, N W

    2000-02-01

    Tumour necrosis factor(TNF)-alpha levels are elevated in airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and may contribute to its pathogenesis. A guanine to adenine substitution at position -308 of the TNF-alpha gene promoter (TNF1/2) has been associated with chronic bronchitis of various aetiologies in a Taiwanese population. The authors performed a study investigating association of the polymorphism with smoking-related COPD in Caucasians. Frequencies of TNF1/2 alleles in 86 Caucasians (52 males) with COPD were compared with 63 (52 males) asymptomatic smoker/exsmoker control subjects and a population control of 199 (99 males) blood donors. Genotyping was performed by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique on genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) obtained from peripheral blood. There were no significant differences in TNF1/2 allele frequencies between groups: 0.85/0.15 in COPD, 0.85/0.15 in smoker control subjects, 0.83/0.17 in population control subjects. Within the COPD group there was no association of TNF1/2 alleles with indices of airflow obstruction (% predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and % predicted FEV1/vital capacity ratio) nor gas transfer (% predicted carbon monoxide transfer coefficient and % predicted carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lung). It is concluded that: 1) the tumour necrosis factor gene promoter allele does not influence the risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a Caucasian population of smokers; and 2) there is no association of the tumour necrosis factor gene promoter genotype with severity of airflow obstruction nor degree of emphysema in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  1. The effect of increased lung volume in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on upper airway obstruction during sleep

    PubMed Central

    Biselli, Paolo; Grossman, Peter R.; Kirkness, Jason P.; Patil, Susheel P.; Smith, Philip L.; Schwartz, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exhibit increases in lung volume due to expiratory airflow limitation. Increases in lung volumes may affect upper airway patency and compensatory responses to inspiratory flow limitation (IFL) during sleep. We hypothesized that COPD patients have less collapsible airways inversely proportional to their lung volumes, and that the presence of expiratory airflow limitation limits duty cycle responses to defend ventilation in the presence of IFL. We enrolled 18 COPD patients and 18 controls, matched by age, body mass index, sex, and obstructive sleep apnea disease severity. Sleep studies, including quantitative assessment of airflow at various nasal pressure levels, were conducted to determine upper airway mechanical properties [passive critical closing pressure (Pcrit)] and for quantifying respiratory timing responses to experimentally induced IFL. COPD patients had lower passive Pcrit than their matched controls (COPD: −2.8 ± 0.9 cmH2O; controls: −0.5 ± 0.5 cmH2O, P = 0.03), and there was an inverse relationship of subject's functional residual capacity and passive Pcrit (−1.7 cmH2O/l increase in functional residual capacity, r2 = 0.27, P = 0.002). In response to IFL, inspiratory duty cycle increased more (P = 0.03) in COPD patients (0.40 to 0.54) than in controls (0.41 to 0.51) and led to a marked reduction in expiratory time from 2.5 to 1.5 s (P < 0.01). COPD patients have a less collapsible airway and a greater, not reduced, compensatory timing response during upper airway obstruction. While these timing responses may reduce hypoventilation, it may also increase the risk for developing dynamic hyperinflation due to a marked reduction in expiratory time. PMID:26048975

  2. Oral mucolytic drugs for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Phillippa J; Black, Peter N

    2001-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of oral mucolytics in adults with stable chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Design Systematic review of randomised controlled trials that compared at least two months of regular oral mucolytic drugs with placebo. Studies Twenty three randomised controlled trials in outpatients in Europe and United States. Main outcome measures Exacerbations, days of illness, lung function, adverse events. Results Compared with placebo, the number of exacerbations was significantly reduced in subjects taking oral mucolytics (weighted mean difference −0.07 per month, 95% confidence interval −0.08 to −0.05, P<0.0001). Based on the annualised rate of exacerbations in the control subjects of 2.7 a year, this is a 29% reduction. The number needed to treat for one subject to have no exacerbation in the study period would be 6. Days of illness also fell (weighted mean difference −0.56, −0.77 to −0.35, P<0.0001). The number of subjects who had no exacerbations in the study period was greater in the mucolytic group (odds ratio 2.22, 95% confidence interval 1.93 to 2.54, P<0.0001). There was no difference in lung function or in adverse events reported between treatments. Conclusions In chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, treatment with mucolytics is associated with a reduction in acute exacerbations and days of illness. As these drugs have to be taken long term, they could be most useful in patients who have repeated, prolonged, or severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. What is already know on this topicMucolytic drugs have properties that may be beneficial in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseaseThese drugs are not prescribed in the United Kingdom and Australasia, although they are widely used in many other countriesDrugs that reduce exacerbations may reduce the morbidity and healthcare costs associated with progressively severe diseaseWhat this study addsRegular use of

  3. Anesthetic considerations in the patients of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing laparoscopic surgeries.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Ranjana; Bali, Kusum; Chatrath, Veena; Bansal, Divya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the various anesthetic options which can be considered for laparoscopic surgeries in the patients with the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The literature search was performed in the Google, PubMed, and Medscape using key words "analgesia, anesthesia, general, laparoscopy, lung diseases, obstructive." More than thirty-five free full articles and books published from the year 1994 to 2014 were retrieved and studied. Retrospective data observed from various studies and case reports showed regional anesthesia (RA) to be valid and safer option in the patients who are not good candidates of general anesthesia like patients having obstructive pulmonary diseases. It showed better postoperative patient outcome with respect to safety, efficacy, postoperative pulmonary complications, and analgesia. So depending upon disease severity RA in various forms such as spinal anesthesia, paravertebral block, continuous epidural anesthesia, combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA), and CSEA with bi-level positive airway pressure should be considered.

  4. Can a normal peak expiratory flow exclude severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Padilla, R.; Vollmer, W. M.; Vázquez-García, J. C.; Enright, P. L.; Menezes, A. M. B.; Buist, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is underdiagnosed. One barrier to diagnosis is the limited availability of spirometry testing, but in adults at risk for COPD, a normal pre-bronchodilator (pre-BD) peak expiratory flow (PEF) may rule out clinically significant COPD. OBJECTIVE To identify post-BD airway obstruction using data from 13 708 individuals aged ≥40 years from the PLATINO and BOLD studies. METHODS We evaluated different cut-off points of pre-BD. The PEF was obtained from a diagnostic-quality spirometer (not a mechanical PEF meter). At least one of the following COPD risk factors was present in 77% of the subjects: chronic respiratory symptoms; exposure to tobacco smoke, biomass smoke or dust in the workplace; or a previous diagnosis of asthma, COPD, emphysema or chronic bronchitis. RESULTS Although the positive predictive value was low as expected, a pre-BD PEF of ≥70% predicted effectively ruled out Stages III and IV COPD of the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease. Among those with at least one risk factor, only 12% would require confirmatory spirometry using this criterion. CONCLUSIONS Adding PEF measurement to a screening questionnaire may rule out severe to very severe COPD without the need for pre- and post-BD spirometry testing. Confirmation is needed from a study using inexpensive PEF meters or pocket spirometers with a staged screening protocol. PMID:19275802

  5. Some anamnestic and clinical parameters correlated to longterm pulmonary hypertension development in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, C; Ghiringhelli, G; Caspani, F; Cavallaro, G F

    1976-01-01

    A statistical correlation between anamnestic and hemodynamic data was performed in 40 patients with chronic obstructive lung disease and pulmonary hypertension at rest. Cardiopulmonary hemodynamic performance was significantly correlated with some of the assessed parameters, especially duration of illness and symptoms generally related with airway obstruction as dyspnea, cough and sputum.

  6. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Health-Related Quality of Life in the 2009 Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Bradford E.; Suzuki, Sumihiro; Coultas, David; Singh, Karan P.; Bae, Sejong

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience irreversible airflow obstruction, dyspnea, coughing, and fatigue. One of the goals of treating individuals with COPD is to improve their quality of life. The aim of this research was to evaluate the 2009 Texas Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS)…

  7. Radionuclide determination of individual kidney function in the treatment of chronic renal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Belis, J A; Belis, T E; Lai, J C; Goodwin, C A; Gabriele, O F

    1982-04-01

    Differential radionuclide renal scans can be useful in the management of patients with chronic partial obstruction of 1 kidney. The 99mtechnetium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid perfusion scan can be used to assess glomerular blood flow. The 131iodine orthoiodohippurate renal scan provides qualitative functional information from scintigrams and quantitative evaluation of effective renal plasma flow to each kidney, as well as a total excretory index. Sequential 99mtechnetium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and 131iodine orthoiodohippurate renal scans were used to assess individual renal function before and after surgical correction of unilateral chronic renal obstruction in 31 patients. The preservation of cortical perfusion on 99mtechnetium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans indicated that potential existed for partial recovery of renal function. Effective renal plasma flow and excretory index determined in conjunction with the 131iodine orthoiodohippurate scans provided a quantitative assessment of preoperative renal function, an evaluation of the effect of surgery and a sensitive method for long-term evaluation of differential renal function. Correction of ureteropelvic junction obstruction usually resulted in improvement in unilateral renal function. Neither nephrolithotomy nor extended pyelolithotomy diminished renal function in the kidney subjected to an operation and often improved it. Patients with long-standing distal ureteral obstruction had the least improvement in renal function postoperatively.

  8. Radionuclide determination of individual kidney function in the treatment of chronic renal obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Belis, J.A.; Belis, T.E.; Lai, J.C.; Goodwin, C.A.; Gabriele, O.F.

    1982-04-01

    Differential radionuclide renal scans can be useful in the management of patients with chronic partial obstruction of 1 kidney. The /sup 99m/Tc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid perfusion scan can be used to assess glomerular blood flow. The /sup 131/I orthoiodohippurate renal scan provides qualitative functional information from scintigrams and quantitative evaluation of effective renal plasma flow to each kidney, as well as a total excretory index. Sequential /sup 99m/Tc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and /sup 131/I orthoiodohippurate renal scans were used to assess individual renal function before and after surgical correction of unilateral chronic renal obstruction in 31 patients. The preservation of cortical perfusion on /supb 99m/Tc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans indicated that potential existed for partial recovery of renal function. Effective renal plasma flow and excretory index determined in conjunction with the /sup 131/I orthoiodohippurate scans provided a quantitative assessment of preoperative renal function, an evaluation of the effect of surgery and a sensitive method for long-term evaluation of differential renal function. Correction of ureteropelvic junction obstruction usually resulted in improvement in unilateral renal function. Neither nephrolithotomy nor extended pyelolithotomy diminished renal function in the kidney subjected to an operation and often improved it. Patients with long-standing distal ureteral obstruction had the least improvement in renal function postoperatively.

  9. [Airway clearance techniques in chronic obstructive pulmonary syndrome : 2011 update].

    PubMed

    Opdekamp, C

    2011-09-01

    For many years the airway clearance techniques used in chest physical therapy were assimilated with the singular technique of postural drainage, percussions and vibrations. However the side effects and counter indications and the lack of scientific proof regarding this technique have forced reflection and development of other techniques more comfortable and without deleterious effects. If all these techniques show a high efficiency in terms of improved mucociliary clearance, the literature is unanimous on how little effect these techniques have in the short and the long-term with regards to lung function and arterial blood gases. In view of the scientific literature, it is clear that the airway clearance techniques don't have the same recognition concerning their efficiency in all obstructive pulmonary diseases. As the cornerstone in the management of cystic fibrosis, the efficiency of the bronchial hygiene techniques are in general poorly documented in the management of the non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, bronchitis or emphysema. The use of the chest physical therapy seems more to do with the interpretation of the imagery and symptomatology. The airway clearance techniques should be individualised according to symptoms, the amount of expectorated mucus and the objectives signs of secretions retention or subjective signs of difficulty expectorating secretions with progression of the disease.

  10. A National Analysis of Complications Following Total Hip Replacement in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuang-Ming; Lu, Hsueh-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of osteoporosis and fractures. The incidence rate of hip fracture has steadily increased over time and is a major common event in patients with osteoporosis and COPD. Total hip replacement (THR) is commonly performed in patients with hip fracture. Our aim was to compare the complications of THR between patients with and without COPD. Longitudinally linked data from the National Health Insurance Research Database, which consists of registration, claims, and reimbursement records, for a cohort of 1,000,000 randomly selected enrollees traced retrospectively from 1996 to 2000 in Taiwan. Patients who had undergone THR surgery between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2008, were identified and divided into COPD and non-COPD cohorts. Outcomes and complications, including 90-day mortality, 1-year mortality, 1-year wound infection, 30-day readmission for hospitalization, 30-day pneumonia, 30-day acute respiratory failure, 30-day cerebrovascular accident, and length of stay during hospitalization, were measured after THR. The COPD group had a significantly higher ratio of complications, including 30-day readmission (14.0% vs 8.4%), 30-day pneumonia (10.4% vs 4.4%), 30-day acute respiratory failure (1.5% vs 0.5%), 1-year mortality (6.9% vs 2.7%), and length of stay in the hospital (10.6% vs 0.8%) than the non-COPD group. In addition to airway diseases, patients in the COPD group had higher mortality than those in non-COPD group after THR. Surgeons should give more attention to airway evaluation and selection of patients with COPD for THR. PMID:27015210

  11. Functional connectivity and information flow of the respiratory neural network in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lianchun; De Mazancourt, Marine; Hess, Agathe; Ashadi, Fakhrul R.; Klein, Isabelle; Mal, Hervé; Courbage, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breathing involves a complex interplay between the brainstem automatic network and cortical voluntary command. How these brain regions communicate at rest or during inspiratory loading is unknown. This issue is crucial for several reasons: (i) increased respiratory loading is a major feature of several respiratory diseases, (ii) failure of the voluntary motor and cortical sensory processing drives is among the mechanisms that precede acute respiratory failure, (iii) several cerebral structures involved in responding to inspiratory loading participate in the perception of dyspnea, a distressing symptom in many disease. We studied functional connectivity and Granger causality of the respiratory network in controls and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), at rest and during inspiratory loading. Compared with those of controls, the motor cortex area of patients exhibited decreased connectivity with their contralateral counterparts and no connectivity with the brainstem. In the patients, the information flow was reversed at rest with the source of the network shifted from the medulla towards the motor cortex. During inspiratory loading, the system was overwhelmed and the motor cortex became the sink of the network. This major finding may help to understand why some patients with COPD are prone to acute respiratory failure. Network connectivity and causality were related to lung function and illness severity. We validated our connectivity and causality results with a mathematical model of neural network. Our findings suggest a new therapeutic strategy involving the modulation of brain activity to increase motor cortex functional connectivity and improve respiratory muscles performance in patients. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2736–2754, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27059277

  12. Self-management education for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Monninkhof, E; van der Valk, P; van der Palen, J; van Herwaarden, C; Partridge, M; Zielhuis, G

    2003-01-01

    Background: The idea of self-management is to teach patients how to carry out the activities of daily living optimally in the face of their physiological impairment, and to prevent or decrease the severity of exacerbations by means of life style adaptation. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) the value of self-management education is not clear. This review was undertaken to clarify the effectiveness of self-management programmes in COPD. Methods: A search was made of the Cochrane Airways Group trial registers, Medline, reference lists, and abstracts of medical conferences for controlled trials of self-management education in patients with COPD. Two reviewers independently assessed each paper for methodological quality and extracted the data. Results: The reviewers included 12 articles describing eight randomised controlled trials and one controlled clinical trial in which self-management education was compared with usual care. The studies assessed a broad spectrum of outcome measures with different follow up times so meta-analysis could not be undertaken. Self-management education had no effect on hospital admissions, emergency room visits, days lost from work, and lung function. Inconclusive results were observed on health related quality of life, COPD symptoms, and use of healthcare facilities such as doctor and nurse visits. Self-management education reduced the need for rescue medication and led to increased use of courses of oral steroids and antibiotics for respiratory symptoms. Conclusions: Insufficient data were obtained to make recommendations because of the wide variation in outcome measures used and other limitations to generalisations in the current published literature. Further research in this area is needed. PMID:12728158

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and the risk of stroke: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Ann D; Sharma, Chetna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is good evidence to suggest that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) increases the risk of ischaemic heart disease, in particular myocardial infarction (MI). The relationship between stroke and COPD, however, is not as well established, and studies conducted to date have generated conflicting results. Methods and analysis MEDLINE and Embase will be searched for relevant articles using a prespecified search strategy. We will target observational studies conducted in the general population that employ either a longitudinal cohort or case–control study design to estimate ORs, HRs or incident rate ratios for the association between COPD and a subsequent first stroke. Both stages of screening, title and abstract followed by full-text screening, will be conducted independently by two reviewers. The Population, Exposure, Comparator, Outcomes, Study characteristics (PECOS) framework will be used to systematise the process of extracting data from those studies meeting our selection criteria. Study quality will be assessed using an adapted version of the Newcastle-Ottawa risk of bias tool. The data extraction and the risk of bias assessment will also be conducted in duplicate. A meta-analysis will be considered if there is sufficient homogeneity across selected studies or groups of studies. If a meta-analysis is not justified, a narrative synthesis will be conducted. Selected Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria will be used to assess the quality of the cumulative evidence. Dissemination Currently ranking second and fourth in the list of global causes of mortality, respectively, stroke and COPD are important non-communicable diseases. With this review, we hope to clarify some of the current uncertainty that surrounds the COPD–stroke relationship and in turn improve understanding of the nature of the role of COPD in comorbid stroke. Prospero registration number CRD42016035932. PMID:27899397

  14. Risk of Periodontal Diseases in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have reported an association between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and periodontal diseases. However, a large-scale population-based cohort study was previously absent from the literature. Therefore, we evaluated the risk of periodontal diseases in patients with COPD in a nationwide population. From the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 22,332 patients with COPD who were newly diagnosed during 2000 to 2010. For each case, two individuals without COPD were randomly selected and frequency matched by age, sex, and diagnosis year. Both groups were followed up till the end of 2011. The overall incidence of periodontal diseases was 1.19-fold greater in the COPD group than in the comparison group (32.2 vs 26.4 per 1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–1.24). Compared with non-COPD patients, the adjusted hazard ratios of patients with COPD increased with the number of emergency room visits (from 1.14 [95% CI 1.10–1.19] to 5.09 [95% CI 4.53–5.72]) and admissions (from 1.15 [95% CI 1.10–1.20] to 3.17 [95% CI 2.81–3.57]). In addition, the adjusted hazard ratios of patients with COPD treated with inhaled corticosteroids (1.22, 95% CI 1.11–1.34) and systemic corticosteroids (1.15, 95% CI 1.07–1.23) were significantly higher than those of patients not treated with corticosteroids. Patient with COPD are at a higher risk of developing periodontal diseases than the general population. Our results also support that the risk of periodontal diseases is proportional to COPD control. In addition, patients who receive corticosteroid treatment are at a higher risk of developing periodontal diseases. PMID:26579813

  15. Adverse Respiratory Events Associated With Hypnotics Use in Patients of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wei-Sheng; Lai, Ching-Yuan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Insomnia is prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We conducted a population-based case-control study to evaluate the effects of hypnotics on the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD. The case-control study was investigated using data retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with newly diagnosed adverse respiratory events (pneumonia, COPD with acute exacerbation, acute respiratory failure, and cardiopulmonary arrest) were included in the case group. Patients with COPD and no history of adverse respiratory events were randomly selected for the control group, which was frequency-matched with the case group according to index date, age (per 10 years), and sex. Patients who had used hypnotics within 1 month meant active users. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of were calculated using univariable and multivariable logistic regression models. Most of the study participants were male (71.6%), and the mean ages of the participants in the case and control groups were 69.2 (±12.4) and 67.5 (±12.3) years, respectively. After potential confounding factors were adjusting for, the adjusted ORs of adverse respiratory events were 12.0 for active users of benzodiazepines (95% CI, 8.11–17.6) and 10.5 for active users of nonbenzodiazepines (95% CI, 7.68–14.2) compared with the adjusted ORs of those who never used hypnotics. The results of this epidemiological study suggested that hypnotics increased the risk of adverse respiratory events in patients with COPD. PMID:26166105

  16. Exercise adherence in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an exploration of motivation and goals.

    PubMed

    Davis, Amy H T

    2007-01-01

    Adherence to an exercise regimen is challenging. Motivation is an important factor that can enhance exercise adherence. A key component of motivation is the setting and accomplishment of specified goals. Therefore, it is important to understand the relationship between patients' motivation and goals. Motivation and goal orientation in 14 participants with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were assessed. Participants were also interviewed to explore their exercise and activity goals. Motivation was significantly associated with goal orientation. In addition, participants reported many explicit activity goals, but few participants had set specific exercise goals. The inconsistency between activity and exercise goals has not been reported previously. Findings from this preliminary study provide novel and relevant information that may help care providers understand factors that may influence exercise adherence in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  17. Herbal Formula, PM014, Attenuates Lung Inflammation in a Murine Model of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyojung; Kim, Youngeun; Kim, Hye Jin; Park, Soojin; Jang, Young Pyo; Jung, Sungki; Jung, Heejae; Bae, Hyunsu

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is characterized by airway obstruction, leads to, as the two major forms of COPD, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of herbal formula, PM014, in a murine model of COPD. Balb/c mice were treated once with each herb extract in PM014 or PM014 mixture via an oral injection. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or elastase/LPS were administrated to the mice to induce a disease that resembles COPD. PM014 treatment significantly attenuated the increased accumulation of immune cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) compared to control mice. In addition, the TNF-α and IL-6 levels in BALF were decreased in the PM014 mice. Furthermore, histological analysis demonstrated that PM014 attenuated the hazardous effects of lung inflammation. These data suggest that PM014 exerts beneficial effects against forms of COPD such as lung inflammation. PMID:22778777

  18. Biological effects and mechanisms of action of mesenchymal stem cell therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhixian; Pan, Xinghua; Zhou, Kaihua; Bi, Hong; Wang, Liyan; Yu, Lu; Wang, Qing

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the most frequent chronic respiratory disease and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, worldwide. Given that the foremost risk factor leading to the development of COPD is cigarette smoke, the initial treatment for COPD is smoking cessation. Even after smoking cessation, inflammation, apoptosis and oxidative stress can persist and continue to contribute to COPD. Although current therapies for COPD (which are primarily based on anti-inflammatory drugs such as corticosteroids, theophylline and bronchodilators) reduce airway obstruction, limit COPD exacerbation and improve the patient's health-related quality-of-life, none can prevent disease progression or reduce mortality. Recent advances in stem cell research have provided novel insight into the potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the treatment of several pulmonary diseases. This review article discusses the biological effects and mechanisms of action of MSC transplantation in COPD, and highlights the foundation that MSCs provide for novel therapeutic approaches in COPD.

  19. Mortality from lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in New Mexico, 1958-82.

    PubMed

    Samet, J M; Wiggins, C L; Key, C R; Becker, T M

    1988-09-01

    We examined mortality from lung cancer and from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Hispanic White, Other White, and Native American residents of New Mexico during the period 1958-82. Age-specific mortality was calculated by combining death certificate data with population estimates based on the 1960, 1970, and 1980 censuses that were adjusted for inconsistencies in the designation of race and ethnicity. In Other Whites, age-adjusted mortality rates from lung cancer and from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease increased progressively in males and females. Mortality rates for both diseases also increased in Hispanics during the study period, but the most recent rates for Hispanics were well below those for Other Whites. Age-specific mortality rates for lung cancer declined for more recently born Hispanic women at older ages. In Native Americans, rates for both diseases were low throughout the study period and did not show consistent temporal trends.

  20. European hospital adherence to GOLD recommendations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation admissions.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C Michael; Lopez-Campos, Jose Luis; Pozo-Rodriguez, Francisco; Hartl, Sylvia

    2013-12-01

    Understanding how European care of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) admissions vary against guideline standards provides an opportunity to target appropriate quality improvement interventions. In 2010-2011 an audit of care against the 2010 'Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease' (GOLD) standards was performed in 16 018 patients from 384 hospitals in 13 countries. Clinicians prospectively identified consecutive COPD admissions over a period of 8 weeks, recording clinical care measures on a web-based data tool. Data were analysed comparing adherence to 10 key management recommendations. Adherence varied between hospitals and across countries. The lack of available spirometry results and variable use of oxygen and non-invasive ventilation (NIV) are high impact areas identified for improvement.

  1. Myopathological features in skeletal muscle of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Gosker, H R; Kubat, B; Schaart, G; van der Vusse, G J; Wouters, E F M; Schols, A M W J

    2003-08-01

    Despite the fact that muscle weakness is a major problem in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), detailed information on myopathological changes at the microscopic level in these patients is scarce, if indeed available at all. Vastus lateralis biopsies of 15 COPD weight-stable patients (body mass index (BMI) 23.9+/-1.0 kg x m(-2); fat-free mass index (FFMI) 17.2+/-1.7 kg x m(-2)) and 16 healthy age-matched controls (BMI 26.3+/-0.8 kg x m(-2); FFMI 19.6+/-2.2 kg x m(-2)) were evaluated. Histochemistry was used to evaluate myopathological features. Immunohistochemistry was used for the detection of macrophages and leukocytes, and active caspase 3 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick-end labelling (TUNEL) as markers of apoptosis. Fatty cell replacement and fibrosis were observed in both groups, the latter being slightly, but significantly, more pronounced in COPD. No differences between COPD and controls were found with respect to central nuclei, necrosis, regeneration, or fibre splitting. Signs of mitochondrial abnormalities were absent and normal numbers of inflammatory cells were found. Active caspase 3 positive myocytes were not observed and no difference was found in the number of TUNEL-positive myonuclei between controls and COPD patients (1.1% versus 1.0%, respectively). The cross-sectional area of type-IIX muscle fibres was smaller in COPD than in controls (2,566 versus 4,248 microm2). Except for the I to IIX shift in fibre types, the selective type-IIX atrophy and a slight accompanying increase in fibrosis and fat cell replacement in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease relative to age-matched controls, no other morphological abnormalities were observed in the muscle biopsies of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Also, in this group of clinically and weight stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, apoptosis appeared not to be involved in muscle pathology.

  2. Urinary balantidiasis: A rare incidental finding in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sukhpreet; Gupta, Avinash

    2016-01-01

    Balantidiasis is a rare zoonotic disease in humans. Balantidium coli is the causative ciliated protozoan. We present a case of urinary balantidiasis in a patient having chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who was on steroids for a long time. He has no symptoms of bowel or urinary involvement. We are reporting this case because of its rarity in human urine and also for future references. PMID:27756993

  3. [Possible side effects of drugs in elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and comorbidity].

    PubMed

    Malykhin, F T; Baturin, V A

    2016-01-01

    the papers gives data on the positive effects and adverse reactions of drugs used to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and its comorbidity, first of all cardiovascular disease. The authors present alternative points of views based on both the data available in the literature and their findings. they propose to modify pharmacotherapy for COPD in the presence of comorbidity in patients of old age groups.

  4. [Physiotherapy with rotating pulse magnetic field in combined therapy of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Lobanov, A Iu; Gilinskaia, N Iu; Chereĭskaia, N K

    2005-01-01

    Rationale and technique are proposed and clinical trial has been made of efficacy of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) treatment with impacts of rotating impulse magnetic field (RIMF) from the device Polyus-VIEM (two fields, induction 48-72 mTe, reversive rotation, 4-6 s reversion duration, 20-30 Hz, 7-10 min exposure of each field, 7-10 procedures). The addition of RIMF in combined treatment of COPD improves treatment and shortens its duration.

  5. Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, S

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions. After an initial review of health technology assessments and systematic reviews of COPD literature, and consultation with experts, MAS identified the following topics for analysis: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses. The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary Framework Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Community-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive

  6. Hyperpolarized 3He functional magnetic resonance imaging of bronchoscopic airway bypass in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Lindsay; Kirby, Miranda; Farquhar, Donald; Licskai, Christopher; Santyr, Giles; Etemad-Rezai, Roya; Parraga, Grace; McCormack, David G

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year-old exsmoker with Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage III chronic obstructive pulmonary disease underwent airway bypass (AB) as part of the Exhale Airway Stents for Emphysema (EASE) trial, and was the only EASE subject to undergo hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of lung function pre- and post-AB. 3He magnetic resonance imaging was acquired twice previously (32 and eight months pre-AB) and twice post-AB (six and 12 months post-AB). Six months post-AB, his increase in forced vital capacity was <12% predicted, and he was classified as an AB nonresponder. However, post-AB, he also demonstrated improvements in quality of life scores, 6 min walk distance and improvements in 3He gas distribution in the regions of stent placement. Given the complex relationship between well-established pulmonary function and quality of life measurements, the present case provides evidence of the value-added information functional imaging may provide in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease interventional studies. PMID:22332133

  7. Hyperpolarized 3He functional magnetic resonance imaging of bronchoscopic airway bypass in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Lindsay; Kirby, Miranda; Farquhar, Donald; Licskai, Christopher; Santyr, Giles; Etemad-Rezai, Roya; Parraga, Grace; McCormack, David G

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year-old exsmoker with Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage III chronic obstructive pulmonary disease underwent airway bypass (AB) as part of the Exhale Airway Stents for Emphysema (EASE) trial, and was the only EASE subject to undergo hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of lung function pre- and post-AB. 3He magnetic resonance imaging was acquired twice previously (32 and eight months pre-AB) and twice post-AB (six and 12 months post-AB). Six months post-AB, his increase in forced vital capacity was <12% predicted, and he was classified as an AB nonresponder. However, post-AB, he also demonstrated improvements in quality of life scores, 6 min walk distance and improvements in 3He gas distribution in the regions of stent placement. Given the complex relationship between well-established pulmonary function and quality of life measurements, the present case provides evidence of the value-added information functional imaging may provide in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease interventional studies.

  8. Triggers and mechanisms of skeletal muscle wasting in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Langen, R C J; Gosker, H R; Remels, A H V; Schols, A M W J

    2013-10-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting contributes to impaired exercise capacity, reduced health-related quality of life and is an independent determinant of mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. An imbalance between protein synthesis and myogenesis on the one hand, and muscle proteolysis and apoptosis on the other hand, has been proposed to underlie muscle wasting in this disease. In this review, the current understanding of the state and regulation of these processes governing muscle mass in this condition is presented. In addition, a conceptual mode of action of disease-related determinants of muscle wasting including disuse, hypoxemia, malnutrition, inflammation and glucocorticoids is provided by overlaying the available associative clinical data with causal evidence, mostly derived from experimental models. Significant progression has been made in understanding and managing muscle wasting in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Further examination of the time course of muscle wasting and specific disease phenotypes, as well as the application of systems biology and omics approaches in future research will allow the development of tailored strategies to prevent or reverse muscle wasting in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting.

  9. Air pollution and emergency room admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A 5-year study

    SciTech Connect

    Sunyer, J.; Saez, M.; Murillo, C.; Castellsague, J.; Martinez, F.; Anto, J.M. )

    1993-04-01

    An association between sulfur dioxide levels in urban air and the daily number of emergency room admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was previously reported in Barcelona, Spain, for the period 1985-1986. The present study assesses this association over a longer period of time, 1985-1989. This made it possible to carry out separate analyses for the winter and summer seasons and thus to control more adequately for weather and influenza epidemics. An increase of 25 micrograms/m3 in sulfur dioxide (24-hour average) produced adjusted changes of 6% and 9% in emergency room admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during winter and summer, respectively. For black smoke, a similar change was found during winter, although the change was smaller in summer. The association of each pollutant with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admissions remained significant after control for the other pollutant. The present findings support the conclusion that current levels of sulfur dioxide and black smoke may have an effect on the respiratory health of susceptible persons.

  10. The role of atypical respiratory pathogens in exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Diederen, B M W; van der Valk, P D L P M; Kluytmans, J A W J; Peeters, M F; Hendrix, R

    2007-08-01

    The aetiology of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is heterogeneous and still under discussion. Serological studies have suggested that Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila may play a role in acute exacerbations of COPD. The presence of these atypical pathogens in sputum samples was investigated in patients with stable COPD and with acute exacerbations of COPD using real-time PCR. The present study was part of a randomised, double-blind, single-centre study and a total of 248 sputum samples from 104 COPD patients were included. In total, 122 samples obtained during stable disease (stable-state sputa) and 126 samples obtained during acute exacerbations of COPD (exacerbation sputa) were tested. Of the 122 stable-state sputa, all samples were negative for M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae DNA, whereas one sample was positive for Legionella non-pneumophila DNA. Of the 126 exacerbation sputa, all samples were negative for M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae DNA, whereas one sample was positive for Legionella non-pneumophila DNA. The possible relationship between the presence of atypical pathogens and the aetiology of acute exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was investigated in patients with stable disease and in those with acute exacerbations using real-time PCR. No indication was found of a role for Legionella spp., Chlamydia pneumoniae or Mycoplasma pneumoniae in stable, moderately severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in its exacerbations.

  11. Effect of ultrasonic nebulization on arterial oxygen saturation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Flick, M R; Moody, L E; Block, A J

    1977-03-01

    Twenty patients with mild to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease received ultrasonic nebulization to assess the danger of short-term changes in blood gas levels during this therapy. The status of arterial oxygenation was monitored during 20 minutes of therapy and for 20 minutes following therapy. In nine patients with periodic studies of arterial blood, the mean change in arterial oxygen pressure from base line was a decrease of 0.8 mm Hg at ten minutes into therapy, 2.8 mm Hg at the conclusion of therapy, and 2.9 mm Hg 20 minutes after therapy. In all 20 patients, ear oximetric studies showed only a small mean change at ten minutes into therapy, at the end of therapy, and at 20 minutes after therapy. Changes in the status of arterial oxygenation during and after therapy with ultrasonic nebulization in a group of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are generally small and of no statistical and limited clinical significance; however, alarming falls in arterial oxygenation can occur and cannot be predicted by base-line testing of pulmonary function or studies of arterial blood. It would be prudent to monitor patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during therapy with ultrasonic nebulization or to withhold therapy altogether.

  12. Fatigue, anxiety and depression levels, activities of daily living of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Karakurt, Papatya; Ünsal, Ayla

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the fatigue, anxiety and depression levels, activities of daily living of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 255). It was found that there was significant difference between Visual Analogue Scale for Fatigue (VAS-F) point averages and gender, education levels, marital status and economical status of patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the participants in this study, 36.5% had an anxiety disorder whereas 69.0% exhibited depression. In the study, it was determined that 85.5% of those were independent in their Katz's Index of Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and 49.4% of those were independent in their Lawton and Brody's Index of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs). This study has shown that VAS-F, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, ADL and IADL instruments that measure the various aspects of health-related quality of living can contribute considerably to a more diversified understanding of the patients' situation with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  13. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive and interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Charlotte U; Mellemkjær, Søren; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Hilberg, Ole; Simonsen, Ulf

    2013-10-03

    The purpose of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge on PH in relation to COPD and ILD from a clinical perspective with emphasis on diagnosis, biomarkers, prevalence, impact, treatment, and practical implications. PH in COPD and ILD is associated with a poor prognosis, and is considered one of the most frequent types of PH. However, the prevalence of PH among patients with COPD and ILD is not clear. The diagnosis of PH in chronic lung disease is often established by echocardiographic screening, but definitive diagnosis requires right heart catheterization, which is not systematically performed in clinical practice. Given the large number of patients with chronic lung disease, biomarkers to preclude or increase suspicion of PH are needed. NT-proBNP may be used as a rule-out test, but biomarkers with a high specificity for PH are still required. It is not known whether specific treatment with existent drugs effective in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is beneficial in lung disease related PH. Studies investigating existing PAH drugs in animal models of lung disease related PH have indicated a positive effect, and so have case reports and open label studies. However, treatment with systemically administered pulmonary vasodilators implies the risk of worsening the ventilation-perfusion mismatch in patients with lung disease. Inhaled vasodilators may be better suited for PH in lung disease, but new treatment modalities are also required.

  14. Anxiety and depression in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an open agenda for research.

    PubMed

    Postolache, Paraschiva; Costin, Melania; Dumbravă, Emilia-Lidia; Cojocaru, Doina-Clementina

    2014-01-01

    Depression andnxiety are psychiatric conditions often associated with poor survival rate and impaired social functioning in chronic illnesses, like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is a major cause of chronic morbidity and mortality, being nowadays the fourth leading cause of mortality worldwide and the burden of this disease is increasing as the population is ageing and it is continuously exposed to risk factors. Common mechanisms for explaining the association of anxiety, depression and COPD include cigarette smoke exposure, physical inactivity, social isolation, multiple episodes of dyspnea and chronic hypoxia. BODE index and MMRC dyspnea score could be associated with anxiety and depression in COPD patients and the screening usually implies administration of simple questionnaires. Therapeutic options for anxiety include serotonin-reuptake inhibitors, which decrease the perception of dyspnea, while newer antidepressants, such as venlafaxine, duloxetine and mirtazapine are particularly useful in depression, since they do not produce respiratory depression.

  15. Multiple Circulating Cytokines Are Coelevated in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Ian; John, Michelle; Bolton, Charlotte E.; Harrison, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory biomarkers, including cytokines, are associated with COPD, but the association of particular circulating cytokines with systemic pathology remains equivocal. To investigate this, we developed a protein microarray system to detect multiple cytokines in small volumes of serum. Fourteen cytokines were measured in serum from never-smokers, ex-smokers, current smokers, and COPD patients (GOLD stages 1–3). Certain individual circulating cytokines (particularly TNFα and IL-1β) were significantly elevated in concentration in the serum of particular COPD patients (and some current/ex-smokers without COPD) and may serve as markers of particularly significant systemic inflammation. However, numerous circulating cytokines were raised such that their combined, but not individual, elevation was significantly associated with severity of disease, and these may be further indicators of, and contributors to, the systemic inflammatory manifestations of COPD. The coelevation of numerous circulating cytokines in COPD is consistent with the insidious development, chronic nature, and systemic comorbidities of the disease. PMID:27524865

  16. Multiple Circulating Cytokines Are Coelevated in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Senthooran; Todd, Ian; Tighe, Patrick J; John, Michelle; Bolton, Charlotte E; Harrison, Timothy; Fairclough, Lucy C

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory biomarkers, including cytokines, are associated with COPD, but the association of particular circulating cytokines with systemic pathology remains equivocal. To investigate this, we developed a protein microarray system to detect multiple cytokines in small volumes of serum. Fourteen cytokines were measured in serum from never-smokers, ex-smokers, current smokers, and COPD patients (GOLD stages 1-3). Certain individual circulating cytokines (particularly TNFα and IL-1β) were significantly elevated in concentration in the serum of particular COPD patients (and some current/ex-smokers without COPD) and may serve as markers of particularly significant systemic inflammation. However, numerous circulating cytokines were raised such that their combined, but not individual, elevation was significantly associated with severity of disease, and these may be further indicators of, and contributors to, the systemic inflammatory manifestations of COPD. The coelevation of numerous circulating cytokines in COPD is consistent with the insidious development, chronic nature, and systemic comorbidities of the disease.

  17. Chronic Airflow Obstruction in a Black African Population: Results of BOLD Study, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Obaseki, Daniel O; Erhabor, Gregory E; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Adewole, Olufemi O; Buist, Sonia A; Burney, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    Global estimates suggest that Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is emerging as a leading cause of death in developing countries but there are few spirometry-based general population data on its prevalence and risk factors in sub-Saharan Africa. We used the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) protocol to select a representative sample of adults aged 40 years and above in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. All the participants underwent spirometry and provided information on smoking history, biomass and occupational exposures as well as diagnosed respiratory diseases and symptoms. Chronic Airflow Obstruction (CAO) was defined as the ratio of post-bronchodilator (BD) one second Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1) to Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) below the lower limit of normal (LLN) of the population distribution for FEV1/FVC. The overall prevalence of obstruction (post-BD FEV1/FVC < LLN) was 7.7% (2.7% above LLN) using Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI) equations. It was associated with few respiratory symptoms; 0.3% reported a previous doctor-diagnosed chronic bronchitis, emphysema or COPD. Independent predictors included a lack of education (OR 2.5, 95% CI: 1.0, 6.4) and a diagnosis of either TB (OR 23.4, 95% CI: 2.0, 278.6) or asthma (OR 35.4, 95%CI: 4.9, 255.8). There was no association with the use of firewood or coal for cooking or heating. The vast majority of this population (89%) are never smokers. We conclude that the prevalence of CAO is low in Ile-Ife, Nigeria and unrelated to biomass exposure. The key independent predictors are poor education, and previous diagnosis of tuberculosis or asthma.

  18. Readmission patterns in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic heart failure and diabetes mellitus: an administrative dataset analysis.

    PubMed

    Brand, C; Sundararajan, V; Jones, C; Hutchinson, A; Campbell, D

    2005-05-01

    Comprehensive disease management programmes for chronic disease aim to improve patient outcomes and reduce health-care utilization. Readmission rates are often used as an outcome measure of effectiveness. This study aimed to document readmission rates, and risk for early and late readmission, for patients discharged from the Royal Melbourne Hospital with a disease diagnosis of chronic heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or diabetes mellitus compared to those with other general medical conditions. Eighty five (8.6%) of patients were readmitted within 28 days and 183 (20.8%) were readmitted between 29 and 180 days. No risk factors for early readmission were identified. Patients with a primary disease diagnosis of CHF and COPD are at increased risk of late readmissions (29-180 days).

  19. A Fuzzy Rule-Base Model for Classification of Spirometric FVC Graphs in Chronical Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of distinguishing COPD group diseases (chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma ) by using fuzzy theory and to put into practice a “fuzzy rule-base...FVC Plots”. Keywords - asthma , chronic bronchitis, COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease), emphysema , expert systems, FVC (forced vital...the group of chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma because of these reasons [4-7]. Additionally, similar symptoms may cause fuzziness in

  20. [Clinical consequences of muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Sauleda Roig, J

    2006-05-01

    The function of respiratory muscles, and mainly inspiratory muscles, is impaired in COPD patients. Most of these impairments are essentially due to pulmonary hyperinflation that puts these muscles in a disadvantageous situation. The main consequence of this dysfunction is respiratory muscle fatigue that may cause shortness of breath, exertion intolerance, and hypoventilation with onset of hypercapnic respiratory failure. This function may be measured at the pulmonary function laboratory by means of unspecific (spirometry, pulmonary volumes) or specific tests (maxim respiratory pressures [MIP - M], transdiaphragmatic pressure, tension-time index of the diaphragm, electromyography, or endura tests). Therapy should aim at improving hyperinflation with bronchodilator therapy, improving muscular strength with rehabilitation, and in severe cases muscle rest with mechanical ventilation. Peripheral muscle dysfunction is a common complication in moderate-severe COPD, and it may be the result of chronic inactivity, hypoxemia, electrolytic impairments, under nutrition, steroids, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammation. Besides, it may contribute to patients' quality of life worsening, disability, and even an increase in morbimortality. It may tested by impedanciometry, muscle strength tests (dynamometry), imaging tests, and even muscle biopsy in research studies. Peripheral muscle dysfunction is potentially manageable with rehabilitation, nutritional supplementation, and anabolic drugs. However, therapeutic success is often incomplete, so that further studies with new therapeutic strategies are needed.

  1. The nature and causes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Warren, C Peter W

    2009-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the currently favoured name for the diseases formerly known as emphysema and bronchitis. COPD has been recognized for more than 200 years. Its cardinal symptoms are cough, phlegm and dyspnea, and its pathology is characterized by enlarged airspaces and obstructed airways. In the 19th century, the diagnosis of COPD depended on its symptoms and signs of a hyperinflated chest, and reduced expiratory breath sounds. The airflow obstruction evident on spirometry was identified in that century, but did not enter into clinical practice. Bronchitis, and the mechanical forces required to overcome its obstruction, was believed to be responsible for emphysema, although the inflammation present was recognized. The causes of bronchitis, and hence emphysema, included atmospheric and domestic air pollution, as well as dusty occupations. Cigarette smoking only became recognized as the dominant cause in the 20th century. The lessons learned of the risks for COPD in 19th-century Britain are very pertinent to the world today. PMID:19262908

  2. Attributions about Cause of Illness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoth, Karin F.; Wamboldt, Frederick S.; Bowler, Russell; Make, Barry; Holm, Kristen

    2010-01-01

    Objective Patients’ beliefs about the causes of their illness have been associated with emotional adjustment and behavioral outcomes in several medical conditions; however, few studies have examined illness attributions among patients with COPD. In the current study, patterns of patients’ causal attributions for COPD were identified and examined in relation to health behaviors and symptoms. Method Three-hundred and ninety-four patients with COPD and ≥10 pack year history of smoking completed a self-report questionnaire that included the Illness Perception Questionnaire- Revised (IPQ-R). Results A factor analysis of the IPQ-R cause items using principal axis factoring yielded four individual items (i.e., smoking, heredity, pollution, and personal behavior) and one large factor that was primarily driven by psychological attributions. Ninety-three percent of patients agreed or strongly agreed that smoking was a cause of their COPD. Higher scores on the large IPQ-R factor were associated with reduced quality of life (r=.25, p<.001) and symptoms of anxiety (r=.33, p<.001) and depression (r=.31, p<.001), indicating that patients who attributed their COPD to psychological factors were more likely to have poorer emotional adjustment and quality of life. Conclusions Our finding of one large factor with several stand-alone items is in contrast with previous research that has derived a multi-factor structure for the cause items of the IPQ-R in other chronic illness populations. This difference may be due to the importance of smoking, environmental exposures, and heredity in the development of COPD. Future research should expand upon these specific attributions in COPD‥ PMID:21511077

  3. A causal model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) risk.

    PubMed

    Cox, Louis Anthony Tony

    2011-01-01

    Research on the etiology of chronic pulmonary disease (COPD), an irreversible degenerative lung disease affecting 15% to 20% of smokers, has blossomed over the past half-century. Profound new insights have emerged from a combination of in vitro and -omics studies on affected lung cell populations (including cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes, regulatory CD4(+) helper T cells, dendritic cells, alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, goblet cells, and fibroblasts) and extracellular matrix components (especially, elastin and collagen fibers); in vivo studies on wild-type and genetically engineered mice and other rodents; clinical investigation of cell- and molecular-level changes in asymptomatic smokers and COPD patients; genetic studies of susceptible and rapidly-progressing phenotypes (both human and animal); biomarker studies of enzyme and protein degradation products in induced sputum, bronchiolar lavage, urine, and blood; and epidemiological and clinical investigations of the time course of disease progression. To this rich mix of data, we add a relatively simple in silico computational model that incorporates recent insights into COPD disease causation and progression. Our model explains irreversible degeneration of lung tissue as resulting from a cascade of positive feedback loops: a macrophage inflammation loop, a neutrophil inflammation loop, and an alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis loop. Unrepaired damage results in clinical symptoms. The resulting model illustrates how to simplify and make more understandable the main aspects of the very complex dynamics of COPD initiation and progression, as well as how to predict the effects on risk of interventions that affect specific biological responses.

  4. Body composition and exercise performance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Schols, A M; Mostert, R; Soeters, P B; Wouters, E F

    1991-01-01

    To investigate whether a compromised nutritional state may limit exercise performance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease we studied 54 such patients (FEV1 less than 50% and arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) greater than 7.3 kPa) whose clinical condition was stable and who were admitted to a pulmonary rehabilitation centre. Fat free mass was assessed anthropometrically (from skinfold measurements at four sites) and by bioelectrical impedance; creatinine height index and arm muscle circumference were also assessed. The mean (SD) distance walked in 12 minutes was 845 (178) m. No association was established between the distance walked and spirometric measures. A good correlation was found between the distance walked and fat free mass in the whole group (r = 0.73 for impedance measurements and 0.65 for skinfold thickness) and in a subgroup of 23 lean patients (body weight less than 90% of ideal weight; r = 0.66 for impedance measurements and 0.46 for skinfold thickness). Body weight correlated with the distance walked only in the whole group (r = 0.61). On stepwise regression analysis fat free mass measured by bioelectrical impedance, maximal inspiratory mouth pressure, and PaO2 accounted for 60% of the variation in the distance walked in 12 minutes. We conclude that fat free mass, independently of airflow obstruction, is an important determinant of exercise performance in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:1750015

  5. Abnormal heart rate recovery and chronotropic incompetence on exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mansi; Bansal, Vishal; Chhabra, Sunil K

    2013-08-01

    Chronotropic incompetence (CI; failure to reach the targeted heart rate (HR) on exercise) and a delayed HR recovery (HRR; ≤12 beats decline within the first minute after cessation) reflect autonomic dysfunction (AD) and predict adverse cardiac prognosis. As chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is known to be associated with AD, we hypothesized that these patients may manifest these responses on exercise. The prevalence and predictors of these responses in COPD and their association with its severity have not been evaluated. Normoxemic, stable male patients with COPD (n = 39) and 11 healthy controls underwent lung function testing and incremental leg ergometry. HR responses were monitored during exercise and recovery to compute the HRR and CI. Of all the patients, 33 (84.6%) had at least one of the two exercise responses as abnormal, with the majority (23, 58.9%) having both an abnormal HRR and CI. The frequency of abnormal responses increased with increasing Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage and body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnoea and exercise capacity index. After adjusting for smoking history and post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second, only a reduced diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide predicted abnormal HRR, though weakly. We concluded that abnormal HRR and CI are common in patients with COPD. These responses are observed with increasing frequency as the severity of disease increases.

  6. Natural history of intestinal failure induced by chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Stanghellini, V; Cogliandro, R F; De Giorgio, R; Barbara, G; Cremon, C; Antonucci, A; Fronzoni, L; Cogliandro, L; Naponelli, V; Serra, M; Corinaldesi, R

    2010-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a severe, often unrecognized disease characterized by disabling and potentially life-threatening complications over time. The diagnosis is based on the evidence of typical clinical manifestations, radiological evidence of distended bowel loops with air-fluid levels, and the exclusion of any organic obstruction of the gut lumen. The radiological sign of intestinal occlusion allows the distinction from enteric dysmotility, which is characterized by better outcomes. Manometry can play a supportive role in defining the diagnosis, and differences in the manometric pattern of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and enteric dysmotility have been shown. The disease is often unrecognized, and the diagnosis, therefore, delayed by several years. Thus, the majority of patients undergo useless and potentially dangerous surgeries. Long-term outcomes are generally poor despite surgical and medical therapies characterized by disabling and potentially life-threatening complications over time. A substantial percentage of patients requires parenteral nutrition. Failure of this nutritional support represents an indication for small bowel transplantation.

  7. The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease comorbidity spectrum in Japan differs from that in western countries.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Saeko; Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2015-11-01

    Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) frequently suffer from various comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, depression, malnutrition, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and lung cancer. These comorbidities have a significant impact on disease severity and survival. In fact, guidelines from both the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease and the Japanese Respiratory Society recommend that physicians take comorbidities into account when they evaluate COPD severity. These guidelines also emphasize the importance of managing comorbidities alongside airway obstruction in COPD. The mechanisms by which the many COPD-related comorbidities develop are still unclear. Aging and smoking are well-established as major factors. However, systemic inflammation may also contribute to the disease process. Having developed from the classical theory to differentiate COPD patients into "pink puffers" and "blue bloaters", COPD is now generally considered as a heterogeneous condition. On this point, we have noticed that the characteristics of Japanese COPD patients tend to differ from those of Westerners. Specifically, Japanese patients tend to be older, to have lower body mass index, to suffer from emphysema-dominant lung disease, and to experience exacerbations less frequently. The comorbidity spectrum of Japanese COPD patients also seems to differ from that of Westerners. For instance, in Japanese patients, cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome are less prevalent, whereas osteoporosis and malnutrition are more frequent. In order to treat Japanese COPD patients optimally, we must pay particular attention to their unique demographics and comorbidity spectrum, which contrast with those of Western COPD patients.

  8. A longitudinal study of CPAP therapy for patients with chronic cough and obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic cough patients are rendered therapies for gastro-esophageal reflux (GERD), upper airway cough syndrome (UACS) and cough-variant asthma (CVA) with varying benefit. Idiopathic or unexplained cough has emerged as an important clinical entity in both primary care and subspecialty clinics. Recent evidence points to a link between chronic cough and untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods A prospective observational study was done to evaluate the effect of OSA therapy in patients with chronic cough. Patients enrolled into the study underwent questionnaires to evaluate for GERD, UACS and CVA along with screening questionnaires for OSA and daytime sleepiness. The Leicester cough questionnaire (LCQ) was done at baseline and during serial visits to evaluate cough intensity and was used as the primary outcome measure of the effect of CPAP therapy on chronic cough. Results Out of 37 patients enrolled into the study, only 28 patients had follow up LCQ scores available and therefore underwent analysis. 22/28 patients were suspected to have OSA based on abnormal STOP-BANG screening questionnaire scores and overnight oximetry abnormalities. Of these 19/28 patients had overnight attended polysomnography with definitive diagnosis of OSA yielding a 68% prevalence of OSA in our chronic cough population. Chronic cough patients treated for OSA tended to be older with a significantly higher BMI than chronic cough patients without OSA. Significant improvement of LCQ scores occurred with CPAP therapy for OSA in chronic cough patients. Conclusion OSA is significantly prevalent in chronic cough patients. Subjects with chronic cough and OSA tend to be older and obese. Treatment of OSA in chronic cough patients yields significant improvement in their health status. PMID:23845135

  9. Urinary glutamine/glutamate ratio as a potential biomarker of pediatric chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun-Kai; Zhou, Ke-Jun; Huang, Jian-Hu; Wu, Qing-Qing; Zhang, Tian; Wang, Chao-Chen; Cai, Wei

    2017-03-28

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a rare intestinal motility disorder with significant morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients. The diagnosis of CIPO is difficult, because it is clinically based on the symptoms and signs of bowel obstruction which are similar to the clinical manifestations of other gastrointestinal diseases like short bowel syndrome (SBS). Therefore, it is desirable to identify and establish new laboratory diagnostic markers for CIPO that are reliable and easily accessible. In our study we have identified the ratio of the urinary glutamine and glutamic acid as a promising biomarker for distinguishing suspected CIPO cases and simple SBS cases. The area under ROC curve was 0.83, at cutoff value = 7.04 with sensitivity of 65% and specificity of 92%.

  10. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction: a rare first manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Khairullah, S; Jasmin, R; Yahya, F; Cheah, T E; Ng, C T; Sockalingam, S

    2013-08-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a rare clinical syndrome of ineffective intestinal motility characterised by clinical and radiological evidence of intestinal obstruction with no identifiable mechanical lesion. CIPO can either be idiopathic or secondary to a systemic disease, like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Fewer than 30 cases of CIPO secondary to SLE have been reported so far. Here we describe a case of SLE with the initial presentation of CIPO. In SLE-related CIPO, treatment includes a combination of high-dose intravenous corticosteroids, immunosuppressants and supportive care. With awareness of this condition, unnecessary surgical intervention and repeated invasive procedures could be avoided. Early initiation of treatment would avoid complications and bring about resolution of symptoms.

  11. Clinical recovery of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction with cisapride in a complex pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jean-Christy F; Vaillancourt, Régis; Major-Cook, Nathalie; Boland, Margaret; Zucker, Marc; Lariviere, Doris

    2013-06-01

    Cisapride is a gastrointestinal prokinetic that facilitates or restores motility along the entire gastrointestinal tract. It has been used successfully to treat acute and chronic intestinal pseudo-obstructions (CIPs) in adults, but there is a paucity of literature surrounding the treatment of CIP in pediatric patients and therapies for CIP are limited and their impact is often unsatisfactory. This case report presents the use of cisapride in the management of pseudo-obstruction. Treatment with cisapride substantially improved the patient's symptoms and improved feeding tolerance. It improved his prognosis remarkably and prevented the need for end-of-life care. He experienced no adverse effects throughout the course of therapy. The treatment regimen is discussed in this case report.

  12. United in Prevention–Electrocardiographic Screening for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mazic, Sanja; Stajic, Zoran; Djelic, Marina; Zlatkovic-Svenda, Mirjana; Putnikovic, Biljana

    2013-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED Introduction P-wave abnormalities on the resting electrocardiogram have been associated with cardiovascular or pulmonary disease. So far, “Gothic” P wave and verticalization of the frontal plane axis is related to lung disease, particularly obstructive lung disease. Aim We tested if inverted P wave in AVl as a lone criteria of P wave axis >70° could be screening tool for emphysema. Material and method 1095 routine electrocardiograms (ECGs) were reviewed which yielded 478 (82,1%) ECGs with vertical P-axis in sinus rhythm. Charts were reviewed for the diagnosis of COPD and emphysema based on medical history and pulmonary function tests. Conclusion Electrocardiogram is very effective screening tool not only in cardiovascular field but in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The verticality of the P axis is usually immediately apparent, making electrocardiogram rapid screening test for emphysema. PMID:24058253

  13. [Reflux and obstructive nephropathy as a cause of renal failure in chronic dialysis children].

    PubMed

    Kałuzyńska, Anna; Jander, Anna; Puczko-Nogal, Barbara; Nowicki, Michał

    2008-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective analysis of medical files to evaluate causes of chronic renal failure in 80 children (M--49, F--31), age 1 month to 20 years) who started renal replacement therapy in the Department of Nephrology and Dialysis of the Polish Mothers Memorial Hospital in the years 1990-2007. In 28 children (35%) reflux and obstructive nephropathy was a cause of renal failure. In 5 children the disease was secondary to the neurogenic bladder. The incidence of these nephropathies in our population was constant in the analyzed years. In our group there were 2 neonates and 7 adolescent who were diagnosed with nephropathy as late as in the endstage phase. Boys with posterior urethral valve required renal replacement therapy earlier (146 +/- 55 months). We conclude that obstructive and reflux nephropathy are still the essential cause of end stage renal disease in children.

  14. Impact of anxiety and depression on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation risk.

    PubMed

    Laurin, Catherine; Moullec, Grégory; Bacon, Simon L; Lavoie, Kim L

    2012-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality. COPD is also associated with high levels of psychological distress, which has been linked with higher exacerbation rates. At a recent American Thoracic Society conference symposium titled "Depression and Obstructive Lung Disease: State of the Science and Future Directions" held in 2010 in New Orleans, clinicians and researchers identified a number of important research priorities related to psychiatric comorbidities, including the need to better understand their impact on COPD outcomes, such as exacerbations. This article reviews the current literature and quantifies the prospective impact of anxiety and depression on exacerbation risk in patients with COPD. The limitations of the existing literature and the perspectives for future research are addressed.

  15. [Cigarette smoking is the most important causal factor for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)].

    PubMed

    Muro, Shigeo

    2011-10-01

    Cigarette smoking is the most important causal factor for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD). On the other hand, a substantial proportion of COPD cases suffer from obstructive disorder by other causes than smoking, especially among younger persons, females, and residents of developing countries. There are evidences that several rare genetic syndromes(such as alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency) and occupational exposures as causes of COPD. Environmental tobacco smoke, biomass smoke, and dietary factors are likely causes of COPD, although their contribution is much less compared to active smoking. Smoking during pregnancy may also pose a risk for the fetus, by affecting lung growth and development in uterus. The quicker the smoking cessation is achieved, the more improvements in the lung functions the COPD patients can obtain. Smoking should be avoided as soon as possible in all the COPD subjects and those who are at risk for developing COPD.

  16. Patterns of venous reflux and obstruction in patients with skin damage due to chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Labropoulos, Nicos; Patel, Parag J; Tiongson, Jay E; Pryor, Landon; Leon, Luis R; Tassiopoulos, Apostolos K

    2007-01-01

    Identified were characteristics of individuals with skin damage related to chronic venous disease. Patients with chronic venous disease (n = 164) were evaluated with duplex ultrasound imaging and were placed in classes 4, 5, and 6 according to the CEAP classification. Their findings were compared with 100 class 2 controls. The prevalence of deep venous thrombosis was higher in the study group (23.7%) versus controls (5.1%; P < .0001), as was the prevalence of deep, perforator, and combined patterns of disease (P < .0001, P < .0007, and P < .0001). The mean duration of disease in controls 2 was shorter compared with the study group (P = .0019). The prevalence of reflux and obstruction within the study group was higher than in controls (P = .0021). Skin changes accurately reflect severity of chronic venous disease. Superficial and perforator vein reflux is the major cause of disease.

  17. The importance of movement for people living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Williams, Veronika; Bruton, Anne; Ellis-Hill, Caroline; McPherson, Kathryn

    2011-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic respiratory disease that gives rise to symptoms of breathlessness, chronic fatigue, and cough. The impact of COPD on people's activity has been widely acknowledged, yet it appears that we know little about how individuals experience activity. We employed a grounded theory study with 18 participants with COPD to explore their dimensions of activity. We identified two core concepts that captured participants' experience of activity; these were stagnation and movement. We found fresh air to be the single most important aspect affecting participants' experience of stagnation and movement; this was linked to a changed perception of symptoms. We identified the environment as an important context influencing the experience of COPD and activity. Our stagnation-movement theory explains the experience of activity within its environmental context, and how this experience might be affected on physical, social, and psychological levels.

  18. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Current concepts and new therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Klemmer, A; Greulich, T; Koczulla, A R; Vogelmeier, C F

    2014-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a very common chronic disease with increasing prevalence. Inhaled particles and gases (in particular tobacco smoke) induce chronic inflammation of the airways accompanied by a not fully reversible airflow limitation. Destruction of lung tissue and deterioration of gas exchange may follow. In parallel, several comorbidities can be observed. The COPD assessment was revised and now takes into account lung function, the patients' symptoms, and history of exacerbations. More recently, several new long-acting bronchodilators received approval. Combination products, consisting of long-acting β2-agonists and long-acting anticholinergics, and a new combination of a long-acting β-agonist and an inhaled corticosteroid will follow in the near future. Smoking cessation is of central importance.

  19. Relation of ventilatory impairment and of chronic mucus hypersecretion to mortality from obstructive lung disease and from all causes.

    PubMed Central

    Lange, P; Nyboe, J; Appleyard, M; Jensen, G; Schnohr, P

    1990-01-01

    The relation of ventilatory impairment and chronic mucus hypersecretion to death from all causes and death from obstructive lung disease (chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma) was studied in 13,756 men and women randomly selected from the general population of the City of Copenhagen. During the 10 year follow up 2288 subjects died. In 164 subjects obstructive lung disease was considered to be an underlying or a contributory cause of death (obstructive lung disease related death); in 73 subjects it was considered to be the underlying cause of death (obstructive lung disease death). Forced expiratory volume in one second, expressed as a percentage of the predicted value (FEV1% pred), and the presence of chronic phlegm were used to characterise ventilatory function and chronic mucus hypersecretion respectively. For mortality analysis the proportional hazards regression model of Cox was used; it included age, sex, pack years, inhalation habit, body mass index, alcohol consumption, and the presence or absence of asthma, heart disease, and diabetes mellitus as confounding factors. By comparison with subjects with an FEV1 of 80% pred or more, subjects with an FEV1 below 40% pred had increased risk of dying from all causes (relative risk (RR) = 5.0 for women, 2.7 for men), a higher risk of obstructive lung disease related death (RR = 57 for women, 34 for men), and a higher risk of obstructive lung disease death (RR = 101 for women, 77 for men). Chronic mucus hypersecretion was associated with only a slightly higher risk of death from all causes (RR = 1.1 for women, 1.3 for men). The association between chronic mucus hypersecretion and obstructive lung disease death varied with the level of ventilatory function, being weak in subjects with normal ventilatory function (for an FEV1 of 80% pred the RR was 1.2), but more pronounced in subjects with reduced ventilatory function (for an FEV1 of 40% pred the RR was 4.2). A similar though statistically non-significant trend was

  20. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management considerations for the dental team.

    PubMed

    Devlin, J

    2014-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects an estimated 3 million people in the United Kingdom, and is most common among elderly smokers. Patients may present with recurrent coughing of mucoid secretions (chronic bronchitis) or breathlessness caused by destruction of the airways (emphysema). If possible, it is advisable to treat the severely affected patients with them sitting upright in the dental chair as they may find it difficult to breathe when lying in the horizontal position. Periodontal bacteria can be carried into the lung where they can cause respiratory infection; therefore oral hygiene instruction should be emphasised in these patients. The objective of this article is to describe the oral and dental implications of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In particular, there have been a number of recent developments in the management of patients with COPD that have direct relevance to the dentist. The drug regime used in the treatment of patients with COPD can have profound implications for clinical dental practice, manifested as dry mouth or oral candidiasis. There is also increasing evidence of a link between COPD and both gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and periodontal disease.

  1. Factors associated with plasma IL-33 levels in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sei Won; Rhee, Chin Kook; Kim, Ki Uk; Lee, Sang Haak; Hwang, Hun Gyu; Kim, Yu Il; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Lee, Sang Do; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu

    2017-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL)-33 promotes T helper (Th)2 immunity and systemic inflammation. The role of IL-33 in asthma has been widely investigated. IL-33 has also been suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study investigated the clinical significance and usefulness of plasma IL-33 level in patients with COPD. Methods A total of 307 patients with stable COPD from 15 centers, who were in the Korean Obstructive Lung Disease cohort, were enrolled in this study. Plasma IL-33 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We analyzed the association between IL-33 level and other clinical characteristics related to COPD. We also examined the features of patients with COPD who exhibited high IL-33 levels. Results IL-33 levels varied, but were very low in most patients. Eosinophil count was significantly correlated with a plasma IL-33 level. In addition, old age and current smoking were related to a low IL-33 level. Significantly more patients with a higher IL-33 level had chronic bronchitis compared with those with a low IL-33 level. Conclusion Plasma IL-33 level in patients with stable COPD was related to eosinophil count and chronic bronchitis phenotype. Further studies are needed to identify the precise mechanisms of IL-33/ST2 pathway in patients with COPD. PMID:28176939

  2. Re-emergence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: it is time to think COPDifferently.

    PubMed

    Tee, Augustine

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as a common, preventable and treatable condition has advanced in the last two decades, as evidenced by the increase in scientific literature. Tobacco smoking still remains a predominant risk factor for COPD. Thus smoking cessation management should be obligatory in every case. Although spirometry is integral to the diagnosis of COPD, one should also be aware of its limitations. COPD is a chronic disease associated with comorbidities that define its extrapulmonary manifestations. Systemic inflammation provides the biological link, while exacerbations play a prominent role in the current approach to disease evaluation. This paper reviews the latest Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease revision, focusing on the paradigm shift in assessment that would directly influence therapeutic decisions. Also discussed are the newer drugs and combinations of existing inhaler therapies that now present clinicians with more options, as well as bronchoscopic interventions that may perhaps offer a lower-morbidity alternative than surgical lung volume reduction. Finally, this review highlights how integrated care models can bridge the gap between components and complete a comprehensive sphere of COPD care.

  3. Comparison of effects of strength and endurance training in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Francisco; Toral, Javier; Cejudo, Pilar; Villagomez, Rafael; Sánchez, Hildegard; Castillo, José; Montemayor, Teodoro

    2002-09-01

    We determined the effect of different exercise training modalities in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, including strength training (n = 17), endurance training (n = 16), and combined strength and endurance (n = 14) (half of the endurance and half of the strengthening exercises). Data were compared at baseline, the end of the 12-week exercise-training program, and 12 weeks later. Improvement in the walking distance was only significant in the strength group. Increases in submaximal exercise capacity for the endurance group were significantly higher than those observed in the strength group but were of similar magnitude than those in the combined training modality, which in turn were significantly higher than for the strength group. Increases in the strength of the muscle groups measured in five weight lifting exercises were significantly higher in the strength group than in the endurance group but were of similar magnitude than in the combined training group, which again showed significantly higher increases than subjects in the endurance group. Any training modality showed significant improvements of the breathlessness score and the dyspnea dimension of the chronic respiratory questionnaire. In conclusion, the combination of strength and endurance training seems an adequate training strategy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

  4. Active case finding strategy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with handheld spirometry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Kyung; Lee, Chang Min; Park, Ji Young; Kim, Joo Hee; Park, Sung-hoon; Jang, Seung Hun; Jung, Ki-Suck; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Park, Yong Bum; Rhee, Chin Kook; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Hwang, Yong Il

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The early detection and diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is critical to providing appropriate and timely treatment. We explored a new active case-finding strategy for COPD using handheld spirometry. We recruited subjects over 40 years of age with a smoking history of more than 10 pack-years who visited a primary clinic complaining of respiratory symptoms. A total of 190 of subjects were enrolled. Medical information was obtained from historical records and physical examination by general practitioners. All subjects had their pulmonary function evaluated using handheld spirometry with a COPD-6 device. Because forced expiratory volume in 6 seconds (FEV6) has been suggested as an alternative to FVC, we measured forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/FEV6 for diagnosis of airflow limitation. All subjects were then referred to tertiary referral hospitals to complete a “Could it be COPD?” questionnaire, handheld spiromtery, and conventional spirometry. The results of each instrument were compared to evaluate the efficacy of both handheld spirometry and the questionnaire. COPD was newly diagnosed in 45 (23.7%) patients. According to our receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, sensitivity and specificity were maximal when the FEV1/FEV6 ratio was less than 77%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.759. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 72.7%, 77.1%, 50%, and 90%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve of respiratory symptoms listed on the questionnaire ranged from 0.5 to 0.65, which indicates that there is almost no difference compared with the results of handheld spirometry. The present study demonstrated the efficacy of handheld spirometry as an active case-finding tool for COPD in a primary clinical setting. This study suggested that physicians should recommend handheld spirometry for people over the age of 40, who have a smoking history of more than

  5. Acute effects of external negative pressure ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease compared with normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Cooper, C B; Harris, N D; Howard, P

    1991-01-01

    This study compares the acute physiological effects of external negative pressure ventilation (ENPV) in normal subjects and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The equipment consisted of an airtight jacket (Pneumosuit) and vacuum pump. Minute ventilation (Ve) was recorded using a light-emitting turbine transducer. Oxygen uptake (VO2) and carbon dioxide output (VCO2) were calculated every 30 s. Measurements were made at rest and during ENPV with pressures of -20 cmH2O and -40 cmH2O. The ventilator rate was fixed at 16.min-1. In 10 normal subjects, Ve increased from 8.6 to 22.9 l.min-1 (p less than 0.01) accompanied by an increase in VCO2 from 0.25 to 0.39 l.min-1 (p less than 0.01). In 10 normocapnic COPD patients (arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) less than 6.0 kPa) Ve increased from 11.5 to 17.1 l.min-1 (p less than 0.01) whilst in 10 hypercapnic patients (PaCO2 greater than 6.0 kPa) Ve increased from 9.7 to 12.4 l.min-1 (p less than 0.01). A change in VCO2 was not detected in the COPD patients, and VO2 did not change in any group. Arterial blood samples were obtained in eight hypercapnic patients. Baseline mean physiological deadspace ventilation (VD) was calculated to be 4.9 l.min-1 (56% of Ve) whilst Ve was 8.8 l.min-1 in this subgroup. During ENPV, arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) increased from 6.8 to 8.2 kPa (p less than 0.01) whilst PaCO2 decreased from 6.8 to 5.8 kPa (p less than 0.01) suggesting that despite the large physiological deadspace, a significant increase in alveolar ventilation had occurred. In advanced COPD, thoracic compliance falls and limits the ventilatory response to ENPV.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Frequency and time domain analysis of airflow breath patterns in patients with chronic obstructive airway disease.

    PubMed

    Abboud, S; Bruderman, I; Sadeh, D

    1986-06-01

    Airflow patterns from patients with chronic obstructive airway diseases (COAD) and normal subjects were analyzed using time and frequency domain analysis. Data were recorded during tidal breathing with a pause between the breaths, digitized at 320 samples per second (10-bit resolution), and processed with a CDC 6600 computer. The appearance of high-frequency components (10-20 Hz) in the time domain waveform and the spectral curve in the power spectrum were studied. One complete waveform was taken as a reference signal and all subsequent waves were analyzed using the cross-correlation function which was employed via the cross spectrum and the fast Fourier transform algorithm. The energy content from the averaged spectrum and the root mean square (RMS) value from the filtered waveforms were calculated. Our study indicated that the RMS and the power content estimated from a part of the filtered wave (10-20 Hz) which included the time interval from the peak of the expiratory flow (tE) to the end of the flow curve (tN) were significantly greater in normal subjects (n = 13; 0.86 +/- 0.30 X 10(-2) I/s; P less than 0.00005 for RMS value, and 0.76 +/- 0.32 I/s; P less than 0.00005 for the power content) than in patients with chronic airways obstruction (n = 19; 0.40 +/- 0.13 X 10(-2) I/s; for RMS value and 0.35 +/- 0.16 I/s; for the power content). It is concluded that the RMS and the power values of the filtered flow curve during tidal breathing over the time interval tE-tN can detect chronic airway obstruction.

  7. [Hemodynamics, blood gas composition and viscosity in patients with chronic obstructive bronchitis complicated by chronic cor pulmonale].

    PubMed

    Verbitskiĭ, O N; Buturov, I V; Purkh, T Iu; Mohamed Fadi Fanari; Paraska, V I

    2004-01-01

    Hemodynamics, external respiratory function (ERF), blood gas composition and viscosity were studied in 120 patients with chronic obstructive bronchitis at different developmental stage of cor pulmonale. In pulmonary hypertension, there were moderate ERF disorders that became more marked in the compensatory and particularly decompensatory cor pulmonale. As bronchial patency deteriorated, the index of right ventricular performance increased from 0.76+0.081 to 1.23+0.022 in the examinees. Examination of blood gas composition revealed insignificant hypoxemia in pulmonary hypertension and compensatory cor pulmonale, which progressed with decompensation of chronic cor pulmonale (CCP). As bronchial obstruction progressed, there were increases in systolic, diastolic, and mean pressure in the pulmonary artery. The viscosity of blood and plasma and the indices of red blood cell aggregation and deformability were in the normal range in pulmonary hypertension and compensatory CCP. In CCP decompensation, the viscosity of blood and plasma and the index of red blood cell aggregation were increased and the index of red blood cell deformability was decreased.

  8. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the clinical management of an acute exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, J; Wedzicha, J

    2004-01-01

    Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease impose a considerable burden of morbidity, mortality, and health care cost. Management guidelines outlining best practice, based largely on consensus expert opinion, were produced by a number of organisations during the last decade. Current interest in the field is high. This has resulted in the publication of many further studies which have extended our understanding of the pathology involved and provided, for the first time, an evidence base for many of the therapeutic options. In this review we aim to bring the non-specialist reader up to date with current management principles and the evidence underlying such interventions. PMID:15356350

  9. [Varying effect of telemedicine in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease--a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Anna Svarre; Laursen, Lars Christian; Schou, Lone; Emme, Chistina; Phanareth, Klaus Viengpheth

    2012-04-02

    A systematic review of existing evidence on the efficiency of telemedicine solutions for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was performed. A systematic literature search was conducted in five relevant databases followed by evaluation of methodology and results in selected studies. Nine RCT trials of varying quality were identified. The selected studies were mostly multimodal with telemedicine as part of a more complex intervention. Benefits of using telemedicine solutions for patients with COPD are not yet clear, but in some multimodal studies with telemedicine as part of the solution a positive effect on hospital admissions, emergency room visits and contacts to primary care may be seen. Larger studies are needed.

  10. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction due to lymphocytic intestinal leiomyositis: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Keiichi; Otake, Kohei; Inoue, Mikihiro; Koike, Yuhki; Matsushita, Kohei; Araki, Toshimitsu; Okita, Yoshiki; Tanaka, Koji; Uchida, Katsunori; Yodoya, Noriko; Iwamoto, Shotaro; Arai, Katsuhiro; Kusunoki, Masato

    2012-02-01

    Lymphocytic intestinal leiomyositis is a rare entity, which causes chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) in children. We present the first case of a boy who had pure red cell anemia 1 year before onset. Prolonged ileus developed after gastroenteritis and the patient was diagnosed using a biopsy of the intestinal wall. Findings from the present case indicate that there are three important factors for accurate diagnosis: history of enteritis, positive serum smooth muscle antibody, and lymphocyte infiltration with muscle destruction in the muscularis propria in the intestinal wall. Earlier diagnosis and induction of immunosuppressive therapy may be essential for a better outcome.

  11. Variability and reversibility of the slow and forced vital capacity in chronic airflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gove, R I; Shepherd, J; Burge, P S

    1987-04-01

    The variability of the forced (FVC) and slow vital capacity (SVC) manoeuvres were compared in 33 adult patients with chronic airflow obstruction. The reversibility of the two manoeuvres to nebulized salbutamol were compared in 18 of the patients. Both manoeuvres had equally small variances both before and after bronchodilator. The degree of reversibility of the FVC was however significantly greater (P less than 0.05) than the SVC. Although both measurements are equally variable, the FVC has a greater capacity for reversibility, which may have clinical significance.

  12. Role of elastases in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Implications for treatment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophil elastase, metalloproteinases, and their inhibitors play an important role in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), resulting in extensive tissue damage and malfunctioning of the airways. Nearly fifty years after the protease-antiprotease imbalance hypothesis has been suggested for the cause of emphysema, it is still appealing, but it does not explain the considerable variation in the clinical expressions of emphysema. However, there are many recent research findings to support the imbalance hypothesis as will be shown in this review. Although limited, there might be openings for the treatment of the disease. PMID:21147616

  13. [Chronic obstructive lung disease management programmes do not benefit the coordination of care pathways].

    PubMed

    Gjersøe, Peter; Morsø, Lars; Jensen, Morten Sall; Qvist, Peter

    2014-09-29

    Chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD) is a challenging condition for both primary and secondary health-care providers. Disease management programmes (DMP's) have been expected to lead to evident improvements in the continuum of care for COLD. The utility of a COLD management programme was evaluated in a study based on interviews among general practitioners and COLD specialists. Clinicians preferred short practical guidelines to the DMP. The DMP was found useless as a tool to improve the coordination of care pathways. Complimentary interventions to improve clinical cooperation across sectors are recommended.

  14. [Role of antibiotherapy in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Cavassini, M; Calandra, T; Bridevaux, P O

    2007-04-11

    Two thirds of the exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are caused by infections of the respiratory tract. The causative microorganisms differ according to the degree of COPD severity, previous antibiotic therapy and prior bacterial infections. Antibiotics and intensification of bronchodilator therapy are the cornerstones of the management of moderate and severe exacerbations of COPD. Prompt therapy of COPD exacerbations has been shown to reduce the likelihood of hospitalisation and improve the quality of life. In this article, we have reviewed current recommendations regarding the use of antibiotics in the treatment of COPD exacerbations.

  15. Cachexia in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: new insights and therapeutic perspective.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Karin J C; Kneppers, Anita E M; van de Bool, Coby; Langen, Ramon C J; Schols, Annemie M W J

    2016-03-01

    Cachexia and muscle wasting are well recognized as common and partly reversible features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), adversely affecting disease progression and prognosis. This argues for integration of weight and muscle maintenance in patient care. In this review, recent insights are presented in the diagnosis of muscle wasting in COPD, the pathophysiology of muscle wasting, and putative mechanisms involved in a disturbed energy balance as cachexia driver. We discuss the therapeutic implications of these new insights for optimizing and personalizing management of COPD-induced cachexia.

  16. Clinical significance of airway mucus hypersecretion in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Pan-wen; Wen, Fu-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is one of the most important features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Airway mucus hypersecretion in COPD patients results in outcomes such as rapid decline of lung function, poor quality of life, and high rate of acute exacerbation, hospitalization and mortality. Nonpharmacologic treatments for airway mucus hypersecretion in COPD include smoking cessation and physical rehabilitation. Pharmacologic therapies include expectorants, mucolytics, methylxanthines, beta-adrenergic receptor agonists, anticholinergics, glucocorticoids, phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, antioxidants, and antibiotics. Novel drugs with promising prospects are currently under clinical trials. PMID:27847895

  17. [Problems of Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension in Old Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease].

    PubMed

    Malykhin, F T; Baturin, V A

    2016-03-01

    The article contains consideration of risk factors of pulmonary hypertension (PH), clinical states associated with PH, and effect of age on susceptibility to PH in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We have analyzed the prevalence of PH associated with COPD, its importance in the structure of diseases in patients of older age groups. Frequency of PH in old patients is associated with prevalence of concomitant diseases. Addition of LH to polymorbid complex of old age worsens quality of life and increases mortality. We also present in this article data on the use of modern drugs for the treatment of LH in COPD patients aged 60 years and older.

  18. [Sparse effect of long-term treatment with macrolides in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Jersild Jespersen, Maria; Mygind, Lone H; Vestbo, Jørgen; Sonne, Jesper

    2013-03-04

    Macrolides have been proposed to have a positive effect in patients with inflammatory lung diseases, including patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), who suffer from acute exacerbations. Increased use of macrolides for long-term treatment of patients with COPD has been observed. The evidence of a treatment effect of macrolides in this area is sparse, but some studies suggest that it might be beneficial on the number of exacerbations and the length between them. At present there is not sufficient evidence to issue a general recommendation for prescribing macrolides for the long-term treatment of COPD.

  19. Candida glabrata Pneumonia in a Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Onur; Casim, Hasan; Cetinkaya, Erdogan; Mert, Ali; Benli, Ali Ramazan

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality among infectious diseases. Streptococcus pneumoniae and viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia. Candidiasis in such patients has been associated with haemodialysis, fungal colonization, exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics, intensive care unit (ICU) hospitalization, and immunocompromised patients. The most common cause of infection is C. albicans. The case presented here is of a 66-year-old male patient diagnosed with C. glabrata. The patient suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:27882253

  20. Repetitive Colonoscopic Decompression as a Bridge Therapy before Surgery in a Pregnant Patient with Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Lee, Bo-In; Kim, Byung-Wook; Choi, Hwang; Lee, Yun-Seok; Maeng, Leeso

    2013-09-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a rare clinical syndrome which is characterized by intestinal obstruction without occluding lesions in the intestinal lumen and pregnancy is one of the important aggravating factors. Here, we report a case of a woman with intractable intestinal pseudo-obstruction that was precipitated by pregnancy. She could not make any stool passage for more than 4 weeks until a fetal gestational age of 17 weeks was reached. However, the patient could be maintained by repetitive colonoscopic decompressions and finally total colectomy could be performed successfully at a fetal gestational age of 21 weeks.

  1. Anesthetic considerations in the patients of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing laparoscopic surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Khetarpal, Ranjana; Bali, Kusum; Chatrath, Veena; Bansal, Divya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the various anesthetic options which can be considered for laparoscopic surgeries in the patients with the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The literature search was performed in the Google, PubMed, and Medscape using key words “analgesia, anesthesia, general, laparoscopy, lung diseases, obstructive.” More than thirty-five free full articles and books published from the year 1994 to 2014 were retrieved and studied. Retrospective data observed from various studies and case reports showed regional anesthesia (RA) to be valid and safer option in the patients who are not good candidates of general anesthesia like patients having obstructive pulmonary diseases. It showed better postoperative patient outcome with respect to safety, efficacy, postoperative pulmonary complications, and analgesia. So depending upon disease severity RA in various forms such as spinal anesthesia, paravertebral block, continuous epidural anesthesia, combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSEA), and CSEA with bi-level positive airway pressure should be considered. PMID:26957682

  2. Guidelines for the assessment and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Canadian Thoracic Society Workshop Group.

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fifth commonest cause of death in North America and is the only leading cause of death that is increasing in prevalence. Early detection and prevention through smoking cessation are essential to stem this epidemic. Once COPD is diagnosed there is a compelling rationale for vaccination against influenza and possibly pneumococcal pneumonia, although proof of efficacy is lacking. If airways obstruction is present, inhaled quaternary anticholinergic bronchodilators or inhaled beta 2 agonists or both may be of benefit, the former agents showing fewer side effects and often greater efficacy in elderly patients. Theophylline may enhance the effect or increase the duration of the bronchodilatation produced by an inhaled agent and may offer added nonbronchodilatory effects such as improved respiratory muscle endurance and ventilatory stimulation. If significant airflow obstruction persists, an objectively monitored trial of oral steroid therapy is required. Limitation of activity despite optimum medical therapy may be alleviated in selected patients by a supervised exercise rehabilitation program. If hypoxemia is present supplemental oxygen therapy will improve the patient's survival and quality of life. Additional therapies, from respiratory stimulants to lung transplantation, remain under investigation. PMID:1498754

  3. Targeting immune pathways for therapy in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Brusselle, Guy; Bracke, Ken

    2014-12-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are highly prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases of the airways, with differences in etiology, pathogenesis, immunologic mechanisms, clinical presentation, comorbidities, prognosis, and response to treatment. In mild to moderate early-onset allergic asthma, the Th2-driven eosinophilic airway inflammation and the ensuing disease can be well controlled with maintenance treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). In real-life settings, asthma control can be improved by facilitating adherence to ICS treatment and by optimizing inhaler technique. In patients with uncontrolled severe asthma, old and novel therapies targeting specific immunologic pathways should be added according to the underlying endotype/phenotype. In COPD, there is a high unmet need for safe and effective antiinflammatory treatments that not only prevent exacerbations but also have a beneficial impact on the course of the disease and improve survival. Although several new approaches aim to target the chronic neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation per se in patients with COPD, strategies that target the underlying causes of the pulmonary neutrophilia (e.g., smoking, chronic infection, and oxidative stress) might be more successful. In both chronic airway diseases (especially in more difficult, complex cases), the choice of the optimal treatment should be based not only on arbitrary clinical labels but also on the underlying immunopathology.

  4. Optimal patterns of care in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Martin-Harris, B

    2000-01-01

    An intimate relationship exists between the physiological processes of respiration and swallowing at all levels of neuromotor control and peripheral function in healthy adults. Little is known regarding the potential alterations in these patterns in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), yet the impact of swallowing impairment and aspiration on the health outcomes of patients with COPD may be significant. COPD is a common comorbidity in patients with head and neck cancer and neurological disorders seen by swallowing clinicians, and warrants consideration during swallowing treatment. This article summarizes reports of alterations in the nutritional status, airway protective mechanisms, and swallowing efficiency that potentially contribute to or exacerbate the chronic and debilitating pulmonary condition. Care guidelines are given for modification of eating and swallowing behavior to optimize the health status of the patient with COPD. The need for controlled clinical trials for validation of the impact of these care guidelines on clinical outcomes is explained.

  5. Is Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Caused by Wood Smoke a Different Phenotype or a Different Entity?

    PubMed

    Torres-Duque, Carlos A; García-Rodriguez, María Carmen; González-García, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    Around 40% of the world's population continue using solid fuel, including wood, for cooking or heating their homes. Chronic exposure to wood smoke is a risk factor for developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In some regions of the world, this can be a more important cause of COPD than exposure to tobacco smoke from cigarettes. Significant differences between COPD associated with wood smoke (W-COPD) and that caused by smoking (S-COPD) have led some authors to suggest that W-COPD should be considered a new COPD phenotype. We present a review of the differences between W-COPD and S-COPD. On the premise that wood smoke and tobacco smoke are not the same and the physiopathological mechanisms they induce may differ, we have analyzed whether W-COPD can be considered as another COPD phenotype or a distinct nosological entity.

  6. The Role of Innate and Adaptive Immune Cells in the Immunopathogenesis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Damayanti, Triya; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disease of the airways and lungs that results in limitations of continuous airflow and is caused by exposure to noxious gasses and particles. A major cause of morbidity and mortality in adults, COPD is a complex disease pathologically mediated by many inflammatory pathways. Macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and CD8+ T-lymphocytes are the key inflammatory cells involved in COPD. Recently, the non-coding small RNA, micro-RNA, have also been intensively investigated and evidence suggest that it plays a role in the pathogenesis of COPD. Here, we discuss the accumulated evidence that has since revealed the role of each inflammatory cell and their involvement in the immunopathogenesis of COPD. Mechanisms of steroid resistance in COPD will also be briefly discussed. PMID:26770229

  7. Systematic review of anaemia and inflammatory markers in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hoepers, Andrea Thives de Carvalho; Menezes, Marcia Margarete; Fröde, Tânia Silvia

    2015-03-01

    This systematic review synthesizes the relevant published articles on the prevalence of anaemia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and its relationship with inflammatory markers. The upregulation of erythropoietin in anaemia maintains homeostasis. However, anaemic COPD patients do not respond to increased levels of erythropoietin. The increased levels could be an indicator of the peripheral erythropoietin resistance in COPD. Anaemia and inflammation are associated with an increased risk of hospitalization and mortality in these patients. The understanding of anaemia in chronic inflammation is that anaemia is at least partially due to the excessive production of inflammatory cytokines, which can contribute to improvements in the management, prognosis, and survival of patients with COPD and anaemia.

  8. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and erectile dysfunction (ED): Results of the BRED observational study.

    PubMed

    Lauretti, Stefano; Cardaci, Vittorio; Barrese, Francesco; Calzetta, Luigino

    2016-10-05

    Most patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) share many risk factors and similar aetiological agents with erectile dysfunction (ED). Both conditions also cause serious interference with quality of life and sexual relationships. In general, ageing and chronic illness decrease sexual interest, sexual function, and testosterone levels. This observational study included 66 male patients referred to our centre with different grades of COPD. We studied the different correlations between COPD and ED. The data collected from each patient regarded the following features: demographic and social condition; smoking status; clinical status; spirometric measurements. In this group, COPD was diagnosed in 78.8% and ED was present in 83.3% with increased severity in presence of LUTS and nicotinism.

  9. The Role of Innate and Adaptive Immune Cells in the Immunopathogenesis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Damayanti, Triya; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disease of the airways and lungs that results in limitations of continuous airflow and is caused by exposure to noxious gasses and particles. A major cause of morbidity and mortality in adults, COPD is a complex disease pathologically mediated by many inflammatory pathways. Macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and CD8+ T-lymphocytes are the key inflammatory cells involved in COPD. Recently, the non-coding small RNA, micro-RNA, have also been intensively investigated and evidence suggest that it plays a role in the pathogenesis of COPD. Here, we discuss the accumulated evidence that has since revealed the role of each inflammatory cell and their involvement in the immunopathogenesis of COPD. Mechanisms of steroid resistance in COPD will also be briefly discussed.

  10. Adiponectin: an attractive marker for metabolic disorders in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Bianco, Andrea; Mazzarella, Gennaro; Turchiarelli, Viviana; Nigro, Ersilia; Corbi, Graziamaria; Scudiero, Olga; Sofia, Matteo; Daniele, Aurora

    2013-10-14

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a chronic inflammatory lung disease which may be complicated by development of co-morbidities including metabolic disorders. Metabolic disorders commonly associated with this disease contribute to lung function impairment and mortality. Systemic inflammation appears to be a major factor linking COPD to metabolic alterations. Adipose tissue seems to interfere with systemic inflammation in COPD patients by producing a large number of proteins, known as "adipokines", involved in various processes such as metabolism, immunity and inflammation. There is evidence that adiponectin is an important modulator of inflammatory processes implicated in airway pathophysiology. Increased serum levels of adiponectin and expression of its receptors on lung tissues of COPD patients have recently highlighted the importance of the adiponectin pathway in this disease. Further, in vitro studies have demonstrated an anti-inflammatory activity for this adipokine at the level of lung epithelium. This review focuses on mechanisms by which adiponectin is implicated in linking COPD with metabolic disorders.

  11. Epidemiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Prevalence, Morbidity, Mortality, and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Sharon R; Kalhan, Ravi; Mannino, David M

    2015-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains a common and important cause of morbidity and mortality both in the United States and globally. The increasing trends of COPD prevalence, morbidity, and mortality seen in the later part of last century have not continued in the United States. COPD prevalence, hospitalizations, and deaths have remained stable or are decreasing over the last decade. This is likely a function of the overall decreasing prevalence of tobacco use over the past 50 years, along with improved therapies for COPD. Future trends in COPD will probably be driven by factors in addition to tobacco use, such as longer survival in the population, other occupational and environmental exposures, and the increasing prevalence of asthma. Globally, factors such as air pollution and chronic respiratory infections, such as tuberculosis, will remain important predictors of future trends.

  12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in blacks and whites: mortality and morbidity.

    PubMed Central

    Gillum, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    Previous reports cite puzzling racial differences in several indicators of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). An extensive review of data from the National Center for Health Statistics and from population-based studies confirmed lower overall COPD but higher asthma mortality in blacks compared with whites, and lower chronic bronchitis and emphysema but similar or higher asthma prevalence in blacks compared with whites. The excess of asthma mortality and hospitalization out of proportion to the excess prevalence in blacks may be due to greater disease severity, poorer outcomes of outpatient treatment in blacks than whites, or both. Further investigations of racial differences may enhance understanding of COPD etiology and prevention. Physicians and public health organizations should vigorously strive for smoking prevention and cessation in blacks and whites. PMID:2362298

  13. Frequency of Bacterial Samples from Patients with Chronic Acquired Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Kourosh; Makateb, Ali; Shirzadi, Keyvan; Khosravifard, Keivan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dacryocystitis is an infection of lacremical sac due to obstruction of nasolacrimal duct which has primary or secondary causes. Idiopathic inflammatory obstruction is the primary cause. Trauma, infection, inflammation, neoplasia, and mechanical obstruction are secondary one. Aim: The objective of this study is determination of bacterial samples from patients with chronic acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction. Methods: This cross-sectional study was contained 90 patients with dacryocystitis from 2010 to 2011, in Besat hospital. Convenience sampling in sterile condition sampling was performed by sterile swab from the pus out of the lacrimal sac. Blood agar, EMB, chocolate agar, and thioglycolate broth were used for bacterial cultivation. Various antibiotics were used for antibiotic resistance study. Finally, statistical analysis was done by SPSS ver. 15. Results: In this study, the mean age of participants was 49.36 ± 12.18 years. Number of male and female patients was equal and Sampling was performed in 53.3% of patients from the right eye. The most frequent bacteria were Staphylococcus, E. coli, and Enterobacteriaceae, respectively. Also, our results show most of bacteria obtained from patients eye pus are sensitive to chloramphenicol and the most antibiotic resistance was for co-trimoxazole. Conclusion: Our results illustrated gram-positive bacteria have an important role in dacryocystitis which is confirm previous studies. Although our results indicated chloramphenicol is the best choice for treatment process, but it is notable due to the variety of bacteria which can cause this disease, identification of bacterial contamination can be a great help to choose the best treatment process. PMID:28210015

  14. Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-obstruction: Clinical and Manometric Characteristics in the Chilean Population

    PubMed Central

    de Arce, Edith Pérez; Landskron, Glauben; Hirsch, Sandra; Defilippi, Carlos; Madrid, Ana María

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a rare syndrome characterized by a failure of the propulsion of intraluminal contents and recurrent symptoms of partial bowel obstruction in the absence of mechanical obstruction. Regional variations of the intestinal compromise have been described. Intestinal manometry can indicate the pathophysiology and prognosis. Our objective is to establish the demographic and clinical characteristics of group Chilean patients and analyze the motility of the small intestine and its prognostic value. Methods Patients with symptoms of intestinal pseudo-obstruction with dilated bowel loops were included, in all of whom a manometry of the small intestine was performed using perfused catheters. Results Of the 64 patients included, 51 women (average age 41.5 ± 17.6 years), 54 primary and 10 secondary CIPO were included. Dilatation of the small intestine was the only finding in 38 patients; in the remaining, the compromise was associated with other segments, primarily the colon. Forty-nine patients underwent 65 surgeries, mainly exploratory laparotomies and colectomies. Intestinal manometry was performed on all patients; 4 “patterns” were observed: neuropathic (n = 26), myopathic (n = 3), mixed (n = 24), and a group without motor activity (n = 11). The most relevant findings were the complex migrating motor disorders and decreased frequency and propagation of contractions. The 9 patients who died had a severe myopathic compromise. Conclusions In our series, isolated small bowel compromise was the most common disorder. Neuropathic motor compromise was observed in most of the patients. Mortality was associated with severe myopathic compromise. PMID:27669829

  15. Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2017 Report. GOLD Executive Summary.

    PubMed

    Vogelmeier, Claus F; Criner, Gerard J; Martinez, Fernando J; Anzueto, Antonio; Barnes, Peter J; Bourbeau, Jean; Celli, Bartolome R; Chen, Rongchang; Decramer, Marc; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Frith, Peter; Halpin, David M G; López Varela, M Victorina; Nishimura, Masaharu; Roche, Nicolas; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Sin, Don D; Singh, Dave; Stockley, Robert; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Agustí, Alvar

    2017-03-01

    This Executive Summary of the Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of COPD, Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 2017 report focuses primarily on the revised and novel parts of the document. The most significant changes include: (1) the assessment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been refined to separate the spirometric assessment from symptom evaluation. ABCD groups are now proposed to be derived exclusively from patient symptoms and their history of exacerbations; (2) for each of the groups A to D, escalation strategies for pharmacologic treatments are proposed; (3) the concept of deescalation of therapy is introduced in the treatment assessment scheme; (4) nonpharmacologic therapies are comprehensively presented; and (5) the importance of comorbid conditions in managing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is reviewed.

  16. Six-Minute-Walk Distance and Accelerometry Predict Outcomes in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Independent of Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2011 Group

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Patrick J.; Babyak, Michael A.; Mabe, Stephanie K.; Martinu, Tereza; Welty-Wolf, Karen E.; Emery, Charles F.; Palmer, Scott M.; Blumenthal, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The 2011 combined Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) assessment incorporates symptoms, exacerbation history, and spirometry in discriminating risk of exacerbations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Six-minute-walk distance (6MWD) and accelerometry also have been used to assess disease severity in COPD. The association between these measures and the risks of hospitalization and mortality in the context of GOLD 2011 is unknown. Objectives: To describe changes in exercise tolerance and physical activity over time in patients with COPD and to test the hypothesis that lower baseline 6MWD or accelerometry step count is associated with increased risk of COPD-related hospitalization or all-cause mortality, independent of GOLD 2011 group. Methods: Physical function and medical outcomes were prospectively assessed in 326 patients with moderate to severe COPD in INSPIRE-II, a randomized controlled trial of a coping skills training intervention. Cox models were used to determine if GOLD 2011 group, 6MWD, or accelerometry steps were associated with risk of COPD-related hospitalization or all-cause mortality. Measurements and Main Results: Physical function declined over time in GOLD group D but remained stable in groups A, B, and C. GOLD classification was associated with time to death or first COPD-related hospitalization. Baseline 6MWD was more strongly associated with time to death or first COPD-related hospitalization (hazard ratio, 0.50 [95% confidence interval, 0.34, 0.73] per 150 m, P = 0.0003) than GOLD 2011 classification. A similar relationship was observed for accelerometry steps (hazard ratio, 0.80 [95% confidence interval, 0.70, 0.92] per 1,000 steps, P = 0.002). Conclusions: Exercise tolerance and daily physical activity are important predictors of hospitalization and mortality in COPD, independent of GOLD 2011 classification. Physical function may represent a modifiable risk factor that

  17. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations in the COPDGene Study: Associated Radiologic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kazerooni, Ella A.; Lynch, David A.; Liu, Lyrica X.; Murray, Susan; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Criner, Gerard J.; Kim, Victor; Bowler, Russell P.; Hanania, Nicola A.; Anzueto, Antonio R.; Make, Barry J.; Hokanson, John E.; Crapo, James D.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Washko, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis—given the increasing emphasis on quantitative computed tomographic (CT) phenotypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)—that a relationship exists between COPD exacerbation frequency and quantitative CT measures of emphysema and airway disease. Materials and Methods: This research protocol was approved by the institutional review board of each participating institution, and all participants provided written informed consent. One thousand two subjects who were enrolled in the COPDGene Study and met the GOLD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) criteria for COPD with quantitative CT analysis were included. Total lung emphysema percentage was measured by using the attenuation mask technique with a −950-HU threshold. An automated program measured the mean wall thickness and mean wall area percentage in six segmental bronchi. The frequency of COPD exacerbation in the prior year was determined by using a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed to examine the relationship of exacerbation frequency with lung function and quantitative CT measurements. Results: In a multivariate analysis adjusted for lung function, bronchial wall thickness and total lung emphysema percentage were associated with COPD exacerbation frequency. Each 1-mm increase in bronchial wall thickness was associated with a 1.84-fold increase in annual exacerbation rate (P = .004). For patients with 35% or greater total emphysema, each 5% increase in emphysema was associated with a 1.18-fold increase in this rate (P = .047). Conclusion: Greater lung emphysema and airway wall thickness were associated with COPD exacerbations, independent of the severity of airflow obstruction. Quantitative CT can help identify subgroups of patients with COPD who experience exacerbations for targeted research and therapy development for individual phenotypes. © RSNA, 2011 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10

  18. Relationship of Bode Index to Functional Tests in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Regueiro, Eloisa Maria Gatti; Di Lorenzo, Valéria Amorim Pires; Basso, Renata Pedrolongo; Pessoa, Bruna Varanda; Jamami, Mauricio; Costa, Dirceu

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine if there is a correlation between the BODE Index and variables assessed during the Activities of Daily Living assessment, performance on lower limber tests, and peripheral muscle impairment of the upper limb in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ten men (aged 58 to 80 years old) with moderate to very severe obstruction were evaluated and classified by the BODE Index. They were evaluated by pulmonary ventilation (V̇E), oxygen consumption (V̇O2), and carbonic gas production (V̇CO2) on the ADL assessment; Distance Walking (DW) in the Six Minute Walking Test (6MWT) and the Six Minute Walking Test on Treadmill (6MWTT); number of repetitions in the Sit-to-Stand Test; and the Hand Grip Strength Test. Correlations were evaluated between the classification and the tests performed (Pearson and Spearman test, p<0.05). RESULTS The mean of the total score for the BODE Index was 2.80 (±1.03), with three patients scoring in the first quartile (Q1) and seven scoring in the second quartile (Q2). This Index showed a negative correlation with the 6MWTT (r=−0.86), the Sit-to-Stand Test (r=−0.66), and the Hand Grip Strength Test (r=−0.83). CONCLUSIONS Our results show that there is no correlation between the BODE Index and the ventilatory and metabolic responses in the Activities of Daily Living assessment. On the other hand, a correlation was observed between the BODE Index and the variables assessed in the 6MWTT, Sit-to-Stand Test, and Hand Grip Strength Test in moderate to very severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease patients. This suggests that these tests can be employed as predictors of physical exercise capacity, perhaps as complementary tests to the BODE Index. PMID:19841705

  19. Improving quality of care for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Deprez, Ronald; Kinner, Amy; Millard, Peter; Baggott, Leeann; Mellett, Jean; Loo, Jia Ling

    2009-08-01

    A chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) project was initiated at 18 primary care clinical practices located in rural areas of northeastern Maine to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients with COPD through the adoption of evidence-based and best practice clinical guidelines for care management. Clinical guidelines based on the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) were implemented by the practices using the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Breakthrough Series learning session model. Practice barriers and patient barriers were identified through focus groups and were then addressed at the learning sessions and through direct contact with the practices. To evaluate the improvements that were a result of the project, changes in clinical practice and patient care were measured pre and post initiative. The greatest improvements in COPD patient care were in the areas of smoking cessation counseling, annual influenza vaccinations, discussion of self-management goals, and diet/exercise counseling. Participants reported that the collaborative nature of the project allowed for mutual learning, provided teams with support to identify and overcome barriers, and fostered teamwork to find solutions to shared problems.

  20. Self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Time for a paradigm shift?

    PubMed

    Nici, Linda; Bontly, Thomas D; Zuwallack, Richard; Gross, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, centering on an action plan for the exacerbation and enhanced communication between the patient and health care providers, makes good clinical sense. However, five relatively large trials of self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have had inconsistent results: only two demonstrated reductions in health care utilization and one had to be discontinued prematurely because of increased mortality. Do these discordant findings require a paradigm shift in our concept of self-management? Probably not-but an analysis of the negative studies can give us valuable insights. There are data to support the idea that patients in the trial that showed increased mortality did not self-manage appropriately. Only 4.5% of these patients called in before starting treatment for their exacerbation, the time to initiation of antibiotics or steroids was unsatisfactorily long, and the intervention arm used minimally more prednisone and antibiotics than the control arm. The reasons for a higher mortality will likely never be known, but it is possible that these high-risk patients may have needed earlier assessment by a trained professional, or that self-management led to overconfidence and treatment delays. We clearly need more effective ways to implement self-management and better define which groups of patients stand to benefit (or be harmed) by this intervention. This will require an investment in well-thought-out clinical trials.

  1. Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) – Differences and Similarities

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna; Lovre, Vladimir; Dragisic, Dejan; Ustamujic, Aida

    2012-01-01

    Bronchial asthma and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) are obstructive pulmonary diseases that affected millions of people all over the world. Asthma is a serious global health problem with an estimated 300 million affected individuals. COPD is one of the major causes of chronic morbidity and mortality and one of the major public health problems worldwide. COPD is the fourth leading cause of death in the world and further increases in its prevalence and mortality can be predicted. Although asthma and COPD have many similarities, they also have many differences. They are two different diseases with differences in etiology, symptoms, type of airway inflammation, inflammatory cells, mediators, consequences of inflammation, response to therapy, course. Some similarities in airway inflammation in severe asthma and COPD and good response to combined therapy in both of these diseases suggest that they have some similar patophysiologic characteristics. The aim of this article is to show similarities and differences between these two diseases. Today asthma and COPD are not fully curable, not identified enough and not treated enough and the therapy is still developing. But in future better understanding of pathology, adequate identifying and treatment, may be and new drugs, will provide a much better quality of life, reduced morbidity and mortality of these patients. PMID:23678316

  2. Psychological distress and social factors in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Karolina; Bratek, Agnieszka; Krysta, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases which embrace asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are common in the population. In a large number of cases they are diagnosed very late. Statistics of deaths, especially in the case of COPD, are underestimated because morbidity and mortality can be affected by other comorbid conditions, for example cardiovascular disease. Asthma and COPD impair not only physical functioning of patients but also affect their psychological state. Mood disorders and cognitive function impairment are more often observed in this group than in the general population. It has been proven that the coexistence of psychological dysfunction significantly worsens the functioning of patients (affects, among others, their work, family and social lives) and has an impact on the course of the treatment of the somatic illness. First of all, patients with cognitive deficits have greater problems in applying treatment recommendations. Accordingly, it seems to be important to pay more attention to the problem of mental disorders in patients with obstructive lung diseases. There is a clear need for a multidisciplinary approach that will enable prevention, early detection and effective treatment of the psychological disorders in that group of patients.

  3. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management, and prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: GOLD executive summary.

    PubMed

    Vestbo, Jørgen; Hurd, Suzanne S; Agustí, Alvar G; Jones, Paul W; Vogelmeier, Claus; Anzueto, Antonio; Barnes, Peter J; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Martinez, Fernando J; Nishimura, Masaharu; Stockley, Robert A; Sin, Don D; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto

    2013-02-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a global health problem, and since 2001, the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) has published its strategy document for the diagnosis and management of COPD. This executive summary presents the main contents of the second 5-year revision of the GOLD document that has implemented some of the vast knowledge about COPD accumulated over the last years. Today, GOLD recommends that spirometry is required for the clinical diagnosis of COPD to avoid misdiagnosis and to ensure proper evaluation of severity of airflow limitation. The document highlights that the assessment of the patient with COPD should always include assessment of (1) symptoms, (2) severity of airflow limitation, (3) history of exacerbations, and (4) comorbidities. The first three points can be used to evaluate level of symptoms and risk of future exacerbations, and this is done in a way that splits patients with COPD into four categories-A, B, C, and D. Nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic management of COPD match this assessment in an evidence-based attempt to relieve symptoms and reduce risk of exacerbations. Identification and treatment of comorbidities must have high priority, and a separate section in the document addresses management of comorbidities as well as COPD in the presence of comorbidities. The revised document also contains a new section on exacerbations of COPD. The GOLD initiative will continue to bring COPD to the attention of all relevant shareholders and will hopefully inspire future national and local guidelines on the management of COPD.

  4. Lead Screening for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease of IKK2 Inhibited by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Yung-An; Huang, Hung-Jin; Lin, Wesley Wen-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic obstructive lung disease and is frequently found in well-developed countries due to the issue of aging populations. Not all forms of medical treatment are unable to return a patient's limited pulmonary function back to normal and eventually they could require a lung transplant. At this time, COPD is the leading cause of death in the world. Studies surveying I-kappa-B-kinase beta (IKK2) are very relevant to the occurrence and deterioration of the condition COPD. The sinapic acid-4-O-sulfate, kaempferol, and alpha-terpineol were found to be IKK2 inhibitors and helped prevent COPD occurrence and worsening according to a screening of the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) database. The protein-ligand interaction of these three compounds with regard to IKK2 was also done by molecular dynamics. The docking poses, hydrogen bond variation, and hydrophobic interactions found Asp103 and Lys106 are crucial to IKK2 binding areas for IKK2 inhibition. Finally, we found the three compounds that have an equally strong effect in terms of IKK2 binding proven by the TCM database and perhaps these may be an alternative treatment for COPD in the future. PMID:24987428

  5. Concise review: clinical prospects for treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with regenerative approaches.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is becoming a major cause of death worldwide. COPD is characterized by a progressive and not fully reversible airflow limitation caused by chronic small airway disease and lung parenchymal destruction. Clinically available drugs improve airflow obstruction and respiratory symptoms but cannot cure the disease. Slowing the progressive lung destruction or rebuilding the destroyed lung structure is a promising strategy to cure COPD. In contrast to small animal models, pharmacological lung regeneration is difficult in human COPD. Maturation, aging, and senescence in COPD lung cells, including endogenous stem cells, may affect the regenerative capacity following pharmacological therapy. The lung is a complex organ composed of more than 40 different cell types; therefore, detailed analyses, such as epigenetic modification analysis, in each specific cell type have not been performed in lungs with COPD. Recently, a method for the direct isolation of individual cell types from human lung has been developed, and fingerprints of each cell type in COPD lungs can be analyzed. Research using this technique combined with the recently discovered lung endogenous stem-progenitor populations will give a better understanding about the fate of COPD lung cells and provide a future for cell-based therapy to treat this intractable disease.

  6. Dysfunction of pulmonary vascular endothelium in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: basic considerations for future drug development.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Underwood, Malcolm J; Hsin, Michael K Y; Liu, Xiao-Cheng; He, Guo-Wei

    2008-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading health problems worldwide and continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. The clinical features of COPD are chronic obstructive bronchiolitis and emphysema. Pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction is a characteristic pathological finding of COPD at different stages of the disease. Functional changes of pulmonary endothelial cells in COPD include antiplatelet abnormalities, anticoagulant disturbances, endothelial activation, atherogenesis, and compromised regulation of vascular tone which may adversely affect the ventilation-perfusion match in COPD. As the most important risk factor of COPD, cigarette smoking may initiate pulmonary vascular impairment through direct injury of endothelial cells or release of inflammatory mediators. Morphological changes such as denudation of endothelium and endothelial cell apoptosis have been observed in the pulmonary vasculature in COPD patients as well as functional alterations. Changes in the expression of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), thrombomodulin, selectins, and adhesion molecules in pulmonary endothelial cells as well as complex regulation and interaction of vasoactive substances and growth factors released from endothelium may underlie the mechanisms of pulmonary endothelial dysfunction in COPD. The mechanism of endothelial repair/regeneration in COPD, although not fully understood, may involve upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factors in the early stages along with an increased number of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells. These factors should be taken into account when developing new strategies for the pharmacological therapy of patients with COPD.

  7. Pulmonary Function Reduction in Diabetes With and Without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Gregory L.; Black-Shinn, Jennifer L.; Wan, Emily S.; Make, Barry; Regan, Elizabeth; Lutz, Sharon; Soler, Xavier; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James; Hokanson, John E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetes damages major organ systems through disrupted glycemic control and increased inflammation. The effects of diabetes on the lung have been of interest for decades, but the modest reduction in pulmonary function and its nonprogressive nature have limited its investigation. A recent systematic review found that diabetes was associated with reductions in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide of the lung and increased FEV1/FVC. They reported pooled results including few smokers. This study will examine measures of pulmonary function in participants with extensive smoking exposure. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We examined pulmonary function in participants with a >10–pack-year history of smoking with and without diabetes with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We measured pulmonary function, exercise capacity, and pulmonary-related quality of life in 10,129 participants in the Genetic Epidemiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPDGene) Study. RESULTS Participants with diabetes were observed to have reduced pulmonary function after controlling for known risk factors and also significant reductions in exercise capacity and quality of life across functional stages of COPD. CONCLUSIONS Pulmonary function in patients with ≥10 pack-years of smoking and diabetes is reduced, and this decrease is associated with significant reductions in activity-related quality of life and exercise capacity. PMID:24026562

  8. The role of viral infections in exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Richard; Farne, Hugo; Ritchie, Andrew; Luke, Emma; Johnston, Sebastian L; Mallia, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major causes of global morbidity and mortality worldwide. The clinical course of both asthma and COPD are punctuated by the occurrence of exacerbations, acute events characterized by increased symptoms and airflow obstruction. Exacerbations contribute most of the morbidity, mortality and excess healthcare costs associated with both asthma and COPD. COPD and asthma exacerbations are frequently associated with respiratory virus infections and this has led to an intense research focus into the mechanisms of virus-induced exacerbations over the past decade. Current therapies are effective in reducing chronic symptoms but are less effective in preventing exacerbations, particularly in COPD. Understanding the mechanisms of virus-induced exacerbation will lead to the development of new targeted therapies that can reduce the burden of virus-induced exacerbations. In this review we discuss current knowledge of virus-induced exacerbations of asthma and COPD with a particular focus on mechanisms, human studies, virus-bacteria interactions and therapeutic advances.

  9. The Prevalence of Oral Inflammation Among Denture Wearing Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Przybyłowska, D; Rubinsztajn, R; Chazan, R; Swoboda-Kopeć, E; Kostrzewa-Janicka, J; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E

    2015-01-01

    Oral inflammation is an important contributor to the etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which can impact patient's health status. Previous studies indicate that people with poor oral health are at higher risk for nosocomial pneumonia. Denture wearing is one promoting factor in the development of mucosal infections. Colonization of the denture plaque by Gram-negative bacteria, Candida spp., or other respiratory pathogens, occurring locally, may be aspirated to the lungs. The studies showed that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients treated with combinations of medicines with corticosteroids more frequently suffer from Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Treatment of oral candidiasis in patients with COPD constitutes a therapeutic problem. Therefore, it is essential to pay attention to the condition of oral mucosal membrane and denture hygiene habits. The guidelines for care and maintenance of dentures for COPD patients are presented in this paper. The majority of patients required improvement of their prosthetic and oral hygiene. Standard oral hygiene procedures in relation to dentures, conducted for prophylaxis of stomatitis complicated by mucosal infection among immunocompromised patients, are essential to maintain healthy oral tissues. The elimination of traumatic denture action in dental office, compliance with oral and denture hygiene, proper use and storage of prosthetic appliances in a dry environment outside the oral cavity can reduce susceptibility to infection. Proper attention to hygiene, including brushing and rinsing the mouth, may also help prevent denture stomatitis in these patients.

  10. Effect of Personality on Alveolar Ventilation in Patients with Chronic Airways Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Clark, T. J. H.; Cochrane, G. M.

    1970-01-01

    A study has been made of the personality of 44 patients with chronic airways obstruction (using the Eysenck Personality Inventory), this being related to the difference between their observed Pv̄co2 and that predicted from their F.E.V.1. This was designed to test the hypothesis that those patients with a lower Pv̄co2 than predicted were the more extravert. The results showed a significant correlation between extraversion and the departure of Pv̄co2 from predicted Those patients having a lower Pv̄co2 than predicted were more extravert than those with a Pv̄co2 higher than predicted. There was no correlation between neuroticism and the Pv̄co2. These results support the hypothesis that the personality of a patient may play an important part in determining the alveolar ventilation found in patients with chronic airways obstruction. Patients known as “pink puffers” could more appropriately be named “pugnacious pink puffers.” PMID:5416616

  11. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease assessment test can predict depression: a prospective multi-center study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Seok; Park, Sunghoon; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do; Park, Sung-Woo; Kim, Young Sam; In, Kwang Ho; Jung, Bock Hyun; Lee, Kwan Ho; Ra, Seung Won; Hwang, Yong Il; Park, Yong-Bum; Jung, Ki-Suck

    2013-07-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the association between the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) assessment test (CAT) and depression in COPD patients. The Korean versions of the CAT and patient health questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) were used to assess COPD symptoms and depressive disorder, respectively. In total, 803 patients with COPD were enrolled from 32 hospitals and the prevalence of depression was 23.8%. The CAT score correlated well with the PHQ-9 score (r=0.631; P<0.001) and was significantly associated with the presence of depression (β±standard error, 0.452±0.020; P<0.001). There was a tendency toward increasing severity of depression in patients with higher CAT scores. By assessment groups based on the 2011 Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines, the prevalence of depression was affected more by current symptoms than by airway limitation. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the CAT was 0.849 for predicting depression, and CAT scores ≥21 had the highest accuracy rate (80.6%). Among the eight CAT items, energy score showed the best correlation and highest power of discrimination. CAT scores are significantly associated with the presence of depression and have good performance for predicting depression in COPD patients.

  12. Umeclidinium bromide + vilanterol for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Matera, Maria Gabriella; Rogliani, Paola; Rinaldi, Barbara; Cazzola, Mario

    2015-01-01

    A solid scientific rationale and an increasing body of clinical evidence fully support the use of an antimuscarinic agent combined with a β-agonist in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this article, we focus on the development of an inhaled fixed dose combination (FDC) of two 24-h bronchodilators, umeclidinium bromide and vilanterol (UMEC/VI) (ANORO). Several pivotal clinical trials have documented the impact of this combination on lung function and other outcome measures such as quality of life, dyspnea, rescue medication use and exercise capacity, with no clinically meaningful treatment-related changes in vital signs or clinical laboratory parameters. These results allow us to predict that UMEC/VI will have a role in the maintenance treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It remains to determine its impact on exacerbations. In any case, trials comparing UMEC/VI with other dual bronchodilator FDCs, and also with inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β-agonist FDCs, are needed to assess the advantages, if any, of UMEC/VI FDC over other therapies.

  13. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): expression of a chronic inflammatory reaction].

    PubMed

    Ziesche, Rolf

    2005-03-01

    Our understanding of chronic inflammation in COPD has been profoundly changed as a result of findings which suggest that airway inflammation in COPD consists not only of a chronic cellular inflammatory reaction dominated by lymphocytes and neutrophil granulocytes, but also of an intensified secondary wound healing reaction. Unfortunately, little is known about the impact of both reactions on the maintenance of chronic airway inflammation in COPD. Systematic biological evaluation under clinical circumstances will be necessary in order to realize new therapeutic options in COPD.

  14. Chronic intermittent hypoxia and obstructive sleep apnea: an experimental and clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Emilia; Roche, Fréderic

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent sleep disorder considered as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular consequences, such as systemic arterial hypertension, ischemic heart disease, cardiac arrhythmias, metabolic disorders, and cognitive dysfunction. The pathogenesis of OSA-related consequence is assumed to be chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) inducing alterations at the molecular level, oxidative stress, persistent systemic inflammation, oxygen sensor activation, and increase of sympathetic activity. Overall, these mechanisms have an effect on vessel permeability and are considered to be important factors for explaining vascular, metabolic, and cognitive OSA-related consequences. The present review attempts to examine together the research paradigms and clinical studies on the effect of acute and chronic IH and the potential link with OSA. We firstly describe the literature data on the mechanisms activated by acute and chronic IH at the experimental level, which are very helpful and beneficial to explaining OSA consequences. Then, we describe in detail the effect of IH in patients with OSA that we can consider “the human model” of chronic IH. In this way, we can better understand the specific pathophysiological mechanisms proposed to explain the consequences of IH in OSA. PMID:27800512

  15. Plasma Fibrinogen Qualification as a Drug Development Tool in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Perspective of the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Biomarker Qualification Consortium.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bruce E; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Rennard, Stephen I; Furtwaengler, Armin; Leidy, Nancy; Lowings, Michael; Martin, Ubaldo J; Martin, Thomas R; Merrill, Debora D; Snyder, Jeffrey; Walsh, John; Mannino, David M

    2016-03-15

    The COPD Foundation Biomarker Qualification Consortium (CBQC) is a unique public-private partnership established in 2010 between the COPD Foundation, the pharmaceutical industry, and academic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experts with advisors from the U.S. NHLBI and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This was a direct response to the 2009 publication of a guidance on qualification of drug development tools by the FDA. Although data were believed to be available from publicly funded and industry-funded studies that could support qualification of several tools, the necessary data resided in disparate databases. The initial intent of the CBQC was to integrate these data and submit a dossier for the qualification. This led to the FDA qualification of plasma fibrinogen as a prognostic or enrichment biomarker for all-cause mortality and COPD exacerbations in July 2015. It is the first biomarker drug development tool qualified for use in COPD under the FDA's drug development tool qualification program. This perspective summarizes the FDA's qualification process, the formation of the CBQC, and the effort that led to a successful outcome for plasma fibrinogen and discusses implications for future biomarker qualification efforts.

  16. Changes in prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma in the US population and associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Halldin, Cara N; Doney, Brent C; Hnizdo, Eva

    2015-02-01

    Chronic lower airway diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma, are currently the third leading cause of death in the United States. We aimed to evaluate changes in prevalence of and risk factors for COPD and asthma among the US adult population. We evaluated changes in prevalence of self-reported doctor-diagnosed COPD (i.e. chronic bronchitis and emphysema) and asthma and self-reported respiratory symptoms comparing data from the 1988-1994 and 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. To investigate changes in the severity of each outcome over the two periods, we calculated changes in the proportions of spirometry-based airflow obstruction for each outcome. Prevalence of doctor-diagnosed chronic bronchitis and emphysema decreased significantly mainly among males, while asthma increased only among females. The self-reported disease and the respiratory symptoms were associated with increased prevalence of airflow obstruction for both periods. However, the prevalence of airflow obstruction decreased significantly in the second period among those with shortness of breath and doctor-diagnosed respiratory conditions (chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and asthma). COPD outcomes and asthma were associated with lower education, smoking, underweight and obesity, and occupational dusts and fumes exposure. Chronic lower airway diseases continue to be major public health problems. However, decreased prevalence of doctor-diagnosed chronic bronchitis and emphysema (in males) and decreased prevalence of airflow obstruction in those with respiratory symptoms and doctor-diagnosed respiratory diseases may indicate a declining trend and decrease in disease severity between the two periods. Continued focus on prevention of these diseases through public health interventions is prudent.

  17. Establishment of a Rabbit Model of Chronic Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Application in Cardiovascular Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li-Fang; Zhou, Xiu-Fang; Hu, Ke; Tang, Si; Luo, Yu-Chuan; Lu, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been recognized as a major risk factor for cardiovascular complications and its clinical features are well characterized, it is difficult to replicate the OSA hypoxic model in humans. We aimed to establish an experimental rabbit model for chronic OSA and to explore its application to measure blood pressure (BP), myocardial systolic function, and oxidative stress. Methods: The rabbit model for OSA was established by repeatedly closing the airway and then reopening it. A tube specially designed with a bag that could be alternately inflated and deflated according to a predetermined time schedule, resulting in recurrent airway occlusions and chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) imitating OSA patterns in humans, was used. Twenty-four rabbits were randomly divided into obstruction, sham, and control groups, and their upper airways were alternately closed for 15 s and then reopened for 105 s in a 120-s-long cycle, for 8 h each day over 12 consecutive weeks. Before and after the experiment, the BP of each rabbit was monitored. Levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the serum, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents, as well as Na+-K+-ATPase/Ca2+-ATPase activities in cardiac muscle were examined. In addition, cardiac functional parameters were measured using echocardiography. Results: After 3 months, all rabbits in the obstruction group manifested sleepiness performance similar to that observed in OSA patients. Traces of airflow and SpO2 showed that this model mimicked the respiratory events involved in OSA, including increased respiratory effort and decreased oxygen saturation. Gradually, the BP rose each month. CIH led to obvious oxidative stress and injured myocardial systolic performance. The serum levels of IL-6 and TNF-α increased significantly (64.75 ± 9.05 pg/ml vs. 147.00 ± 19.24 pg/ml and 59.38 ± 8.21 pg/ml vs. 264

  18. Integrating Murine Gene Expression Studies to Understand Obstructive Lung Disease Due to Chronic Inhaled Endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Peggy S.; Hofmann, Oliver; Baron, Rebecca M.; Cernadas, Manuela; Meng, Quanxin Ryan; Bresler, Herbert S.; Brass, David M.; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.; Christiani, David C.; Hide, Winston

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Endotoxin is a near ubiquitous environmental exposure that that has been associated with both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These obstructive lung diseases have a complex pathophysiology, making them difficult to study comprehensively in the context of endotoxin. Genome-wide gene expression studies have been used to identify a molecular snapshot of the response to environmental exposures. Identification of differentially expressed genes shared across all published murine models of chronic inhaled endotoxin will provide insight into the biology underlying endotoxin-associated lung disease. Methods We identified three published murine models with gene expression profiling after repeated low-dose inhaled endotoxin. All array data from these experiments were re-analyzed, annotated consistently, and tested for shared genes found to be differentially expressed. Additional functional comparison was conducted by testing for significant enrichment of differentially expressed genes in known pathways. The importance of this gene signature in smoking-related lung disease was assessed using hierarchical clustering in an independent experiment where mice were exposed to endotoxin, smoke, and endotoxin plus smoke. Results A 101-gene signature was detected in three murine models, more than expected by chance. The three model systems exhibit additional similarity beyond shared genes when compared at the pathway level, with increasing enrichment of inflammatory pathways associated with longer duration of endotoxin exposure. Genes and pathways important in both asthma and COPD were shared across all endotoxin models. Mice exposed to endotoxin, smoke, and smoke plus endotoxin were accurately classified with the endotoxin gene signature. Conclusions Despite the differences in laboratory, duration of exposure, and strain of mouse used in three experimental models of chronic inhaled endotoxin, surprising similarities in gene expression were observed

  19. Complexity of chronic asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: implications for risk assessment, and disease progression and control

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Urs; Suki, Béla

    2009-01-01

    Although assessment of asthma control is important to guide treatment, it is difficult since the temporal pattern and risk of exacerbations are often unpredictable. In this Review, we summarise the classic methods to assess control with unidimensional and multidimensional approaches. Next, we show how ideas from the science of complexity can explain the seemingly unpredictable nature of bronchial asthma and emphysema, with implications for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We show that fluctuation analysis, a method used in statistical physics, can be used to gain insight into asthma as a dynamic disease of the respiratory system, viewed as a set of interacting subsystems (eg, inflammatory, immunological, and mechanical). The basis of the fluctuation analysis methods is the quantification of the long-term temporal history of lung function parameters. We summarise how this analysis can be used to assess the risk of future asthma episodes, with implications for asthma severity and control both in children and adults. PMID:18805337

  20. Complexity of chronic asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: implications for risk assessment, and disease progression and control.

    PubMed

    Frey, Urs; Suki, Béla

    2008-09-20

    Although assessment of asthma control is important to guide treatment, it is difficult since the temporal pattern and risk of exacerbations are often unpredictable. In this Review, we summarise the classic methods to assess control with unidimensional and multidimensional approaches. Next, we show how ideas from the science of complexity can explain the seemingly unpredictable nature of bronchial asthma and emphysema, with implications for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We show that fluctuation analysis, a method used in statistical physics, can be used to gain insight into asthma as a dynamic disease of the respiratory system, viewed as a set of interacting subsystems (eg, inflammatory, immunological, and mechanical). The basis of the fluctuation analysis methods is the quantification of the long-term temporal history of lung function parameters. We summarise how this analysis can be used to assess the risk of future asthma episodes, with implications for asthma severity and control both in children and adults.

  1. Comorbidity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in family practice: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequent and often coexists with other diseases. The aim of this study was to quantify the prevalence of COPD and related chronic comorbidity among patients aged over 40 years visiting family practices in an area of Madrid. Methods An observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in a health area of the Madrid Autonomous Region (Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid). The practice population totalled 198,670 persons attended by 129 Family Physicians (FPs), and the study population was made up of persons over the age of 40 years drawn from this practice population. Patients were deemed to have COPD if this diagnosis appeared on their clinical histories. Prevalence of COPD; prevalence of a further 25 chronic diseases in patients with COPD; and standardised prevalence ratios, were calculated. Results Prevalence of COPD in family medicine was 3.2% (95% CI 3.0–3.3) overall, 5.3% among men and 1.4% among women; 90% of patients presented with comorbidity, with a mean of 4 ± 2.04 chronic diseases per patient, with the most prevalent related diseases being arterial hypertension (52%), disorders of lipid metabolism (34%), obesity (25%), diabetes (20%) and arrhythmia (15%). After controlling for age and sex, the observed prevalence of the following ten chronic diseases was higher than expected: heart failure; chronic liver disease; asthma; generalised artherosclerosis; osteoporosis; ischaemic heart disease; thyroid disease; anxiety/depression; arrhythmia; and obesity. Conclusions Patients with COPD, who are frequent in family practice, have a complex profile and pose a clinical and organisational challenge to FPs. PMID:23324308

  2. An impacted pancreatic stone in the papilla induced acute obstructive cholangitis in a patient with chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Kwang-Ho; Kwon, Chang-Il; Yoon, Sang-Wook; Kim, Won Hee; Lee, Jung Min; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hong, Sung Pyo; Park, Pil Won

    2012-03-01

    Obstructive jaundice is very rarely caused by impaction of a pancreatic stone in the papilla. We report here on a case of obstructive jaundice with acute cholangitis that was caused by an impacted pancreatic stone in the papilla in a patient with chronic pancreatitis. A 48-year-old man presented with acute obstructive cholangitis. Abdominal computed tomography with the reconstructed image revealed distal biliary obstruction that was caused by a pancreatic stone in the pancreatic head, and there was also pancreatic ductal dilatation and parenchymal atrophy of the pancreatic body and tail with multiple calcifications. Emergency duodenoscopy revealed an impacted pancreatic stone in the papilla. Precut papillotomy using a needle knife was performed, followed by removal of the pancreatic stone using grasping forceps. After additional sphincterotomy, a large amount of dark-greenish bile juice gushed out. The patient rapidly improved and he has remained well.

  3. The effect of pulmonary rehabilitation on mortality, balance, and risk of fall in stable patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hakamy, Ali; Bolton, Charlotte E; McKeever, Tricia M

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to conduct a systematic review of published studies that evaluate the impact of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) on survival and fall (including balance) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at stability. OVID, Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane collaboration library were searched for literature dating from January 1980 up to November 2014 as well as an update in October 2015. Two reviewers screened titles, abstracts and full text records, extracted data, and assessed studies for risk of bias; any disagreements were resolved by a third member of the team, and consensus was always sought. Initial searches yielded 3216 records but after review only seven studies were included and there were no studies focused solely on falls. Two cohort studies found some positive benefits of PR on balance, but the results were inconsistent across the studies. Regarding survival, two randomized controlled trials were conducted; one study showed significant survival benefit at 1 year, while the other one showed nonsignificant survival benefit at 3 years. Neither were adequately powered and in both, survival was a secondary outcome. There was only limited inconclusive evidence to show that PR has a significant beneficial effect on balance or survival.

  4. Oscillating Positive Expiratory Pressure on Respiratory Resistance in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease With a Small Amount of Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Gastaldi, Ada Clarice; Paredi, Paolo; Talwar, Anjana; Meah, Sally; Barnes, Peter J.; Usmani, Omar S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to evaluate the acute effects of an oscillating positive expiratory pressure device (flutter) on airways resistance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Randomized crossover study: 15 COPD outpatients from Asthma Lab–Royal Brompton Hospital underwent spirometry, impulse oscillometry (IOS) for respiratory resistance (R) and reactance (X), and fraction exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measures. Thirty minutes of flutter exercises: a “flutter-sham” procedure was used as a control, and airway responses after a short-acting bronchodilator were also assessed. Respiratory system resistance (R): in COPD patients an increase in X5insp (−0.21 to −0.33 kPa/L/s) and Fres (24.95 to 26.16 Hz) occurred immediately after flutter exercises without bronchodilator. Following 20 min of rest, a decrease in the R5, ΔR5, R20, X5, and Ax was observed, with R5, R20, and X5 values lower than baseline, with a moderate effect size; there were no changes in FeNO levels or spirometry. The use of flutter can decrease the respiratory system resistance and reactance and expiratory flow limitation in stable COPD patients with small amounts of secretions. PMID:26496331

  5. Diaphragm efficiency estimated as power output relative to activation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Finucane, Kevin E; Singh, Bhajan

    2012-11-01

    Muscle efficiency increases with fiber length and decreases with load. Diaphragm efficiency (Eff(di)) in healthy humans, measured as power output (Wdi) relative to the root mean square of diaphragm electromyogram (RMS(di)), increases with hyperpnea due to phasic activity of abdominal muscles acting to increase diaphragm length at end expiration (L(di ee)) and decrease inspiratory load. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), hyperpnea may decrease Eff(di) if L(di ee) decreases and load increases due to airflow obstruction and dynamic hyperinflation. To examine this hypothesis, we measured Eff(di) in six COPD subjects (mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s: 54% predicted) when breathing air and at intervals during progressive hypercapnic hyperpnea. Wdi was measured as the product of mean inspiratory transdiaphragmatic pressure (ΔPdi(mean)), diaphragm tidal volume measured fluoroscopically, and 1/inspiratory duration. Results were compared with those of six healthy subjects reported previously. In COPD, L(di ee) was normal when breathing air. ΔPdi(mean) and Wdi increased normally, and RMS(di) increased disproportionately (P = 0.01) with hyperpnea, and, unlike health, inspiratory capacity (IC), L(di ee), and Eff(di) did not increase. IC and L(di ee) were constant with hyperpnea because mean expiratory flow increased as expiratory duration decreased (r(2) = 0.65), and because expiratory flow was terminated actively by the balance between expiratory and inspiratory muscle forces near end expiration, and these forces increased proportionately with hyperpnea (r(2) = 0.49). At maximum ventilation, diaphragm radius of curvature at end inspiration increased in COPD (P = 0.04) but not controls; diaphragm radius of curvature at end inspiration and ln(Eff(di)) were negatively correlated (P = 0.01). Thus in COPD with modest airflow obstruction, Eff(di) did not increase normally with hyperpnea due to a constant L(di ee) and inspiratory flattening of the diaphragm.

  6. Risk Factors and Impact of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Candidates for Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, Debbie; Fallon, Michael B.; Krowka, Michael J.; Brown, Robert S.; Reinen, Jenna; Stadheim, Linda; Faulk, Dorothy; Nielsen, Carrie; Al-Naamani, Nadine; Roberts, Kari; Zacks, Steven; Perry, Ted; Trotter, James; Kawut, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may cause significant symptoms and have an impact on survival. Smoking is an important risk factor for COPD and is common in candidates for liver transplantation; however, the risk factors for and outcomes of COPD in this population are unknown. We performed a prospective cohort study of 373 patients being evaluated for liver transplantation at 7 academic centers in the United States. COPD was characterized by expiratory airflow obstruction and defined as follows: prebronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity < 0.70. Patients completed the Liver Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire 1.0, which included the Short Form-36. The mean age of the study sample was 53 ± 9 years, and 234 (63%) were male. Sixty-seven patients (18%, 95% confidence interval 14%–22%) had COPD, and 224 (60%) had a history of smoking. Eighty percent of patients with airflow obstruction did not previously carry a diagnosis of COPD, and 27% were still actively smoking. Older age and any smoking (odds ratio = 3.74, 95% confidence interval 1.94–7.23, P < 0.001) were independent risk factors for COPD. Patients with COPD had worse New York Heart Association functional class and lower physical component summary scores on the 36-Item Short Form but had short-term survival similar to that of patients without COPD. In conclusion, COPD is common and often undiagnosed in candidates for liver transplantation. Older age and smoking are significant risk factors of COPD, which has adverse consequences on functional status and quality of life in these patients. PMID:18756494

  7. Risk factors and impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in candidates for liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rybak, Debbie; Fallon, Michael B; Krowka, Michael J; Brown, Robert S; Reinen, Jenna; Stadheim, Linda; Faulk, Dorothy; Nielsen, Carrie; Al-Naamani, Nadine; Roberts, Kari; Zacks, Steven; Perry, Ted; Trotter, James; Kawut, Steven M

    2008-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may cause significant symptoms and have an impact on survival. Smoking is an important risk factor for COPD and is common in candidates for liver transplantation; however, the risk factors for and outcomes of COPD in this population are unknown. We performed a prospective cohort study of 373 patients being evaluated for liver transplantation at 7 academic centers in the United States. COPD was characterized by expiratory airflow obstruction and defined as follows: prebronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity < 0.70. Patients completed the Liver Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire 1.0, which included the Short Form-36. The mean age of the study sample was 53 +/- 9 years, and 234 (63%) were male. Sixty-seven patients (18%, 95% confidence interval 14%-22%) had COPD, and 224 (60%) had a history of smoking. Eighty percent of patients with airflow obstruction did not previously carry a diagnosis of COPD, and 27% were still actively smoking. Older age and any smoking (odds ratio = 3.74, 95% confidence interval 1.94-7.23, P < 0.001) were independent risk factors for COPD. Patients with COPD had worse New York Heart Association functional class and lower physical component summary scores on the 36-Item Short Form but had short-term survival similar to that of patients without COPD. In conclusion, COPD is common and often undiagnosed in candidates for liver transplantation. Older age and smoking are significant risk factors of COPD, which has adverse consequences on functional status and quality of life in these patients.

  8. Clinical assessment tests in evaluating patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ming-Lung; Lin, I-Feng; Lee, Chai-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Exertional dyspnea scales (EDS) and health-related quality-of-life questionnaires (HRQoLQs) are used to assess chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The GOLD guidelines categorize patients according to either 1 of these 2 domains, the lung function and the frequency of acute exacerbations in the preceding year, however with inconsistent results. Combining EDS and HRQoLQs may yield better results; however, the best combination is unclear. Whether the EDS quantifies the exercise capacity or the dyspnea perception is also unclear. The study was designed to correlate the EDS with exercise capacity and dyspnea perception and to evaluate the best combination of the EDS and HRQoLQ. Three EDS were compared by exercise capacity and Borg scores at rest and during exercise in 57 patients with COPD. Three HRQoLQs were compared by 4 domains of clinical assessments, and 2 types of exercise. The strength of correlation |r| was categorized by quartiles from <0.3 to ≥0.6. The EDS was better correlated with exercise capacities (|r| = 0.29–0.65, P < 0.05–<0.0001) than with the resting and exertional Borg scores (|r| = 0.08–0.55, P = NS- <0.0001). The EDS were moderately to strongly interrelated, but this correlation was weaker when including Oxygen-cost Diagram (OCD) (with the modified Medical Research Council, mMRC r = −0.56, with the baseline dyspnea index, BDI r = 0.49 vs. mMRC with BDI r = −0.73); however, the OCD had the strongest correlation with walking distance (r = 0.65, vs mMRC r = −0.59, BDI r = 0.5) and peak oxygen uptake (r = 0.39 vs mMRC r = −0.29, BDI r = 0.36). Among the HRQoLQs, the COPD assessment test (CAT) was most strongly correlated with the St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) (r = 0.77) and similar to the SGRQ regarding significant correlations with the other instruments (|r| = 0.29–0.67 vs. 0.36–0.77) but poorly with walking distance (r = −0.02). The

  9. Pinterest as a Resource for Health Information on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): A Social Media Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paige, Samantha R.; Stellefson, Michael; Chaney, Beth H.; Alber, Julia M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore how Pinterest group pinboards are used to communicate health information on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Method A nonprobability census sampling method retrieved 399 pins from the 10 most followed COPD group pinboards. Pins were coded according to COPD information categories,…

  10. [The influence of smoking and occupational factors on the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in oil industry workers].

    PubMed

    Abdullaev, A Iu

    2012-01-01

    The influence of smoking and occupational factors on the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in employees of a sea oil and gas company is considered. The primary role of smoking in pathogenesis of COPD is confirmed Direct and indirect influence of smoking is enhanced by occupational and climatic factors leading to the development of persistent disturbances of ventilation.

  11. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a child harboring a founder Hirschsprung RET mutation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Valentina; Mosconi, Manuela; Nozza, Paolo; Murgia, Daniele; Mattioli, Girolamo; Ceccherini, Isabella; Pini Prato, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo obstruction (CIPO) is a rare clinical entity characterized by symptoms and signs of intestinal obstruction without either recognizable anatomical abnormalities or intestinal aganglionosis. A Chinese female infant presented to our institution with a clinical diagnosis of CIPO. Aganglionosis was ruled out by full thickness colonic and ileal biopsies and by rectal suction biopsies. Unexpectedly, direct sequencing and PCR amplification of RET proto-oncogene from peripheral blood extracted DNA identified a RET R114H mutation. This mutation has already been reported as strongly associated with Asian patients affected by Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) and is considered a founder mutation in Asia. The same mutation has never been reported in patients with CIPO, so far. These findings support the role of RET in the development of the enteric nervous system but underline the importance of other genetic or environmental factors contributing to the gastrointestinal phenotype of the disease. Somehow, this RET R114H mutation proved to have a role in the etiology of both CIPO and HSCR and could contribute to a more diffuse imbalance of gut dysmotility. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Natural and disease-specific autoantibodies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Daffa, N I; Tighe, P J; Corne, J M; Fairclough, L C; Todd, I

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity may contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Studies have identified disease-specific autoantibodies (DSAAbs) in COPD patients, but natural autoantibodies (NAAbs) may also play a role. Previous studies have concentrated on circulating autoantibodies, but lung-associated autoantibodies may be most important. Our aim was to investigate NAAbs and DSAAbs in the circulation and lungs of COPD smoking (CS) patients compared to smokers (S) without airway obstruction and subjects who have never smoked (NS). Immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies that bind to lung tissue components were significantly lower in the circulation of CS patients than NS (with intermediate levels in S), as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The levels of antibodies to collagen-1 (the major lung collagen) detected by ELISA were also reduced significantly in CS patients’ sera compared to NS. The detection of these antibodies in NS subjects indicates that they are NAAbs. The occurrence of DSAAbs in some CS patients and S subjects was indicated by high levels of serum IgG antibodies to cytokeratin-18 and collagen-5; furthermore, antibodies to collagen-5 eluted from homogenized lung tissue exposed to low pH (0·1 M glycine, pH 2·8) were raised significantly in CS compared to S and NS. Thus, this study supports a role in COPD for both NAAbs and DSAAbs. PMID:25469980

  13. Sex differences in function and structure of the quadriceps muscle in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    Ausín, Pilar; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Sabaté-Bresco, Marina; Casadevall, Carme; Barreiro, Esther; Gea, Joaquim

    2016-12-06

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex disorder with extrapulmonary manifestations. Even though there is some knowledge regarding sex differences in the lung disease, little is known about extrapulmonary manifestations. Our aim was to analyze the specific profile of muscle dysfunction, structure, and biology in COPD women. Twenty-one women and 19 men with stable COPD as well as 15 controls were included. Nutritional status, physical activity, lung and muscle function, exercise capacity, and quality of life were assessed. In addition, blood, breath condensate, and quadriceps muscle samples were tested for inflammatory markers. Moreover, fiber phenotype, signs of damage-regeneration, and the expression of key genes linked to myogenesis and inflammation were assessed in the muscle. Inflammatory markers were increased in all body compartments but no correlation was found among them. Muscle dysfunction was present in both COPD groups but was more marked in women. The opposite occurred with the increase in the percentage of type II fibers that was lower in women despite a similar level of airway obstruction as in men. Female COPD also showed higher signs of muscle damage than COPD men who, in contrast, exhibited slightly higher signs of regeneration. We conclude that sex influences muscle phenotype and function in COPD.

  14. Therapeutic approaches to asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndromes.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    The recognition that there are some patients with features of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has highlighted the need to develop more specific treatments for these clinical phenotypes. Some patients with COPD have predominantly eosinophilic inflammation and might respond to high doses of inhaled corticosteroids and newly developed specific antieosinophil therapies, including blocking antibodies against IL-5, IL-13, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin, as well as oral chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells antagonists. Other patients have severe asthma or are asthmatic patients who smoke with features of COPD-induced inflammation and might benefit from treatments targeting neutrophils, including macrolides, CXCR2 antagonists, phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors, p38 mitogen-activating protein kinase inhibitors, and antibodies against IL-1 and IL-17. Other patients appear to have largely fixed obstruction with little inflammation and might respond to long-acting bronchodilators, including long-acting muscarinic antagonists, to reduce hyperinflation. Highly selected patients with severe asthma might benefit from bronchial thermoplasty. Some patients with overlap syndromes can be conveniently treated with triple fixed-dose combination inhaler therapy with an inhaled corticosteroid, long-acting β2-agonist, and long-acting muscarinic antagonist, several of which are now in development. Corticosteroid resistance is a feature of asthma-COPD overlap syndrome, and understanding the various molecular mechanisms of this resistance has identified novel therapeutic targets and presented the prospect of therapies that can restore corticosteroid responsiveness.

  15. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiang-nan; Zhang, Xian-xin; He, Xiao-chun; Yang, Guo-ru; Zhang, Xiao-qi; Xin, Wen-gen; Li, Huai-chen

    2015-01-01

    Background Relatively little is known about the specific relationship and impact from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on multidrug-resistant tuberculsosis (MDR-TB). Methods We conducted a retrospective study included patients aged ≥40 years with a confirmed pulmonary TB at three tertiary hospitals (Shandong, China) between January 2011 and October 2014. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to identify the relationship of MDR-TB and COPD. Results A total of 2164 patients aged ≥ 40 years with available results of drug susceptibility test (DST) and medical records were screened for this study: 268 patients with discharge diagnosis of COPD and 1896 patients without COPD. Overall, 14.2% of patients with COPD and 8.5% patients without COPD were MDR-TB. The rate of MDR-TB were significantly higher in patients with COPD (P<0.05). Migrant (odds ratios (OR) 1.32, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02–1.72), previous anti-TB treatment (OR 4.58, 95% CI 1.69–12.42), cavity (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.14–4.75), and GOLD stage (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.01–2.93) were the independent predictors for MDR-TB among patients with COPD. Conclusions MDR-TB occurs more frequently in patients with underlying COPD, especially those with being migrant, previous anti-TB therapy, cavity and severe airway obstruction. PMID:26284920

  16. The Lung Microbiome in Moderate and Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pragman, Alexa A.; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Reilly, Cavan S.; Wendt, Christine; Isaacson, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory disorder characterized by incompletely reversible airflow obstruction. Bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract contributes to approximately 50% of COPD exacerbations. Even during periods of stable lung function, the lung harbors a community of bacteria, termed the microbiome. The role of the lung microbiome in the pathogenesis of COPD remains unknown. The COPD lung microbiome, like the healthy lung microbiome, appears to reflect microaspiration of oral microflora. Here we describe the COPD lung microbiome of 22 patients with Moderate or Severe COPD compared to 10 healthy control patients. The composition of the lung microbiomes was determined using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA found in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Sequences were analyzed using mothur, Ribosomal Database Project, Fast UniFrac, and Metastats. Our results showed a significant increase in microbial diversity with the development of COPD. The main phyla in all samples were Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. Principal coordinate analyses demonstrated separation of control and COPD samples, but samples did not cluster based on disease severity. However, samples did cluster based on the use of inhaled corticosteroids and inhaled bronchodilators. Metastats analyses demonstrated an increased abundance of several oral bacteria in COPD samples. PMID:23071781

  17. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mortality in Diesel-Exposed Railroad Workers

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Jaime E.; Laden, Francine; Schenker, Marc B.; Garshick, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Diesel exhaust is a mixture of combustion gases and ultrafine particles coated with organic compounds. There is concern whether exposure can result in or worsen obstructive airway diseases, but there is only limited information to assess this risk. U.S. railroad workers have been exposed to diesel exhaust since diesel locomotives were introduced after World War II, and by 1959, 95% of the locomotives were diesel. We conducted a case–control study of railroad worker deaths between 1981 and 1982 using U.S. Railroad Retirement Board job records and next-of-kin smoking, residential, and vitamin use histories. There were 536 cases with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and 1,525 controls with causes of death not related to diesel exhaust or fine particle exposure. After adjustment for age, race, smoking, U.S. Census region of death, vitamin use, and total years off work, engineers and conductors with diesel-exhaust exposure from operating trains had an increased risk of COPD mortality. The odds of COPD mortality increased with years of work in these jobs, and those who had worked ≥ 16 years as an engineer or conductor after 1959 had an odds ratio of 1.61 (95% confidence interval, 1.12–2.30). These results suggest that diesel-exhaust exposure contributed to COPD mortality in these workers. Further study is needed to assess whether this risk is observed after exposure to exhaust from later-generation diesel engines with modern emission controls. PMID:16835052

  18. Influence of sex on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease risk and treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Shambhu; Diaz-Guzman, Enrique; Mannino, David M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), one of the most common chronic diseases and a leading cause of death, has historically been considered a disease of men. However, there has been a rapid increase in the prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of COPD in women over the last two decades. This has largely been attributed to historical increases in tobacco consumption among women. But the influence of sex on COPD is complex and involves several other factors, including differential susceptibility to the effects of tobacco, anatomic, hormonal, and behavioral differences, and differential response to therapy. Interestingly, nonsmokers with COPD are more likely to be women. In addition, women with COPD are more likely to have a chronic bronchitis phenotype, suffer from less cardiovascular comorbidity, have more concomitant depression and osteoporosis, and have a better outcome with acute exacerbations. Women historically have had lower mortality with COPD, but this is changing as well. There are also differences in how men and women respond to different therapies. Despite the changing face of COPD, care providers continue to harbor a sex bias, leading to underdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis of COPD in women. In this review, we present the current knowledge on the influence of sex on COPD risk factors, epidemiology, diagnosis, comorbidities, treatment, and outcomes, and how this knowledge may be applied to improve clinical practices and advance research. PMID:25342899

  19. Optimizing nonpharmacological management following an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Samantha L; Goldstein, Roger; Desveaux, Laura; Tulloch, Verity; Brooks, Dina

    2014-01-01

    Though the guidelines for the optimal management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) following an acute exacerbation (AE) are well established, issues associated with poor adherence to nonpharmacological interventions such as self-management advice and pulmonary rehabilitation will impact on hospital readmission rates and health care costs. Systems developed for clinically stable patients with COPD may not be sufficient for those who are post-exacerbation. A redesign of the manner in which such interventions are delivered to patients following an AECOPD is necessary. Addressing two or more components of the chronic care model is effective in reducing health care utilization in patients with COPD, with self-management support contributing a key role. By refining self-management support to incorporate the identification and treatment of psychological symptoms and by providing health care professionals adequate time and training to deliver respiratory-specific advice and self-management strategies, adherence to nonpharmacological therapies following an AE may be enhanced. Furthermore, following up patients in their own homes allows for the tailoring of advice and for the delivery of consistent health care messages which may enable knowledge to be retained. By refining the delivery of nonpharmacological therapies following an AECOPD according to components of the chronic care model, adherence may be improved, resulting in better disease management and possibly reducing health care utilization.

  20. Animal models of cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Wright, Joanne L; Churg, Andrew

    2010-12-01

    Chronic exposure of laboratory animals to cigarette smoke reproduces many of the anatomic/physiologic lesions (emphysema, small-airway remodeling and pulmonary hypertension) of human chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, although smoke-exposed laboratory animals are not good models of chronic bronchitis or acute exacerbations, as these are conditions based upon symptoms that are not recapitulated in animals. Many types of antiproteolytic and anti-inflammatory interventions, such as use of drugs or genetic modifications, are highly effective in preventing emphysema in these models, and some also prevent small-airway remodeling and pulmonary hypertension. However, the few attempts to translate these therapies into humans have been unsuccessful, probably because the animal models typically start therapy from day 1 of smoke exposure, whereas most humans are treated late in the course of their disease. Recent data from our laboratory suggest that the parenchyma can repair smoke-induced damage for some period, but then switches to a mode where it fails to repair; these observations suggest that the timing of an intervention in humans may be crucial to its success. The various different anatomic lesions induced by smoke appear to be largely independent effects and may require different therapeutic approaches.

  1. Implementing clinical guidelines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: barriers and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Overington, Jeff D.; Huang, Yao C.; Abramson, Michael J.; Brown, Juliet L.; Goddard, John R.; Bowman, Rayleen V.; Fong, Kwun M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex chronic lung disease characterised by progressive fixed airflow limitation and acute exacerbations that frequently require hospitalisation. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and management of COPD are now widely available. However, the uptake of these COPD guidelines in clinical practice is highly variable, as is the case for many other chronic disease guidelines. Studies have identified many barriers to implementation of COPD and other guidelines, including factors such as lack of familiarity with guidelines amongst clinicians and inadequate implementation programs. Several methods for enhancing adherence to clinical practice guidelines have been evaluated, including distribution methods, professional education sessions, electronic health records (EHR), point of care reminders and computer decision support systems (CDSS). Results of these studies are mixed to date, and the most effective ways to implement clinical practice guidelines remain unclear. Given the significant resources dedicated to evidence-based medicine, effective dissemination and implementation of best practice at the patient level is an important final step in the process of guideline development. Future efforts should focus on identifying optimal methods for translating the evidence into everyday clinical practice to ensure that patients receive the best care. PMID:25478199

  2. Influence of sex on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease risk and treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Shambhu; Diaz-Guzman, Enrique; Mannino, David M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), one of the most common chronic diseases and a leading cause of death, has historically been considered a disease of men. However, there has been a rapid increase in the prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of COPD in women over the last two decades. This has largely been attributed to historical increases in tobacco consumption among women. But the influence of sex on COPD is complex and involves several other factors, including differential susceptibility to the effects of tobacco, anatomic, hormonal, and behavioral differences, and differential response to therapy. Interestingly, nonsmokers with COPD are more likely to be women. In addition, women with COPD are more likely to have a chronic bronchitis phenotype, suffer from less cardiovascular comorbidity, have more concomitant depression and osteoporosis, and have a better outcome with acute exacerbations. Women historically have had lower mortality with COPD, but this is changing as well. There are also differences in how men and women respond to different therapies. Despite the changing face of COPD, care providers continue to harbor a sex bias, leading to underdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis of COPD in women. In this review, we present the current knowledge on the influence of sex on COPD risk factors, epidemiology, diagnosis, comorbidities, treatment, and outcomes, and how this knowledge may be applied to improve clinical practices and advance research.

  3. Controlled exposure of volunteers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Linn, W.S.; Fischer, D.A.; Shamoo, D.A.; Spier, C.E.; Valencia, L.M.; Anzar, U.T.; Hackney, J.D.

    1985-08-01

    Twenty-four volunteers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were exposed to sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) at 0, 0.4, and 0.8 ppm in an environmental control chamber. Exposures lasted 1 hr and included two 15-min exercise periods (mean exercise ventilation rate 18 liter/min). Pulmonary mechanical function was evaluated before exposures, after initial exercise, and at the end of exposure. Blood oxygenation was measured by ear oximetry before exposure and during the second exercise period. Symptoms were recorded throughout exposure periods and for 1 week afterward. No statistically significant changes in physiology or symptoms could be attributed to SO/sub 2/ exposure. Older adults with COPD seem less reactive to a given concentration of SO/sub 2/ than heavily exercising young adult asthmatics. This may be due to lower ventilation rates (i.e., lower SO/sub 2/ dose rates) and/or to lower airway reactivity in the COPD group.

  4. Inhaled corticosteroids in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a pro-con perspective.

    PubMed

    Babu, K Suresh; Kastelik, Jack A; Morjaria, Jaymin B

    2014-08-01

    Current guidelines limit regular use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) to a specific subgroup of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in whom the forced expiratory volume in 1 s is <60% of predicted and who have frequent exacerbations. In these patients, there is evidence that ICS reduce the frequency of exacerbations and improve lung function and quality of life. However, a review of the literature suggests that the evidence available may be interpreted to favour or contradict these observations. It becomes apparent that COPD is a heterogeneous condition. Clinicians therefore need to be aware of the heterogeneity as well as having an understanding of how ICS may be used in the context of the specific subgroups of patients with COPD. This review argues for and against the use of ICS in COPD by providing an in-depth analysis of the currently available evidence.

  5. Triple combinations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - is three better than two?

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Matera, Maria Gabriella

    2014-12-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that triple therapy with an antimuscarinic agent, a long-acting β2-agonist, and an inhaled corticosteroid is efficacious in patients with more severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), such as those with frequent exacerbations. Moreover, this therapy is often prescribed in real-life management of COPD, even in patients who are not suffering from severe COPD. All this makes triple therapy an attractive therapeutic approach. Therefore, a variety of triple combinations are currently under development. However, there are a number of issues that need to be addressed in order to optimize the use of triple therapy in COPD because data are still too scarce and studies too short to generate a strong recommendation.

  6. Medical Nutrition Therapy based on Nutrition Intervention for a Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of disability, and according to statistics from the World Health Organization, COPD is the fourth leading cause of death overall in the face of decades, and expected to be increased. In 2005, the reported prevalence of COPD in Korea was 17.2% of adults over the age of 45. Malnutrition is a common problem in papatients with COPD. And several nutritional intervention studies showed a significant improvement in physical and functional outcomes. According to the results of previous studies, the nutritional support is important. This is a case report of a patient with COPD who was introduced to a proper diet through nutrition education based on the medical nutrition therapy protocol for COPD. PMID:25136543

  7. [Recent progress in genetic background of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)].

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    A genetic contribution to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD) is estimated. However, candidate gene studies on COPD and related phenotypes have not been well replicated. Research on the genetic pathologic background of COPD using genome-wide association studies (GWASs) has progressed in recent years. The novel candidate genes including CHRNA3/5 (cholinergic nicotine receptor alpha 3/5), IREB2 (iron regulatory binding protein 2), HHIP (hedgehog-interacting protein), and FAM13A (family with sequence similarity 13, member A) are identified in multiple populations. However, their pathological roles remain poorly understood. The nicotine dependency, pulmonary development, and pulmonary/systemic inflammatory diathesis may be involved in genetic background of COPD.

  8. Management of refractory breathlessness with morphine in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, N; Le, B; Currow, D; Irving, L; Philip, J

    2015-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive, incurable illness, which leads to significant morbidity over long periods of time and mortality. Treatment aims to reduce symptoms, improve exercise capacity and quality of life, reduce exacerbations, slow disease progression and reduce mortality. However, breathlessness is common in patients with advanced COPD and remains undertreated. As all reversible causes of breathlessness are being optimally managed, consideration should be given to specific non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment strategies for breathlessness. Low dose morphine has been shown to reduce safely and effectively breathlessness in patients with severe COPD and refractory dyspnoea. However, despite numerous guidelines recommending opioids in this clinical setting, many barriers limit their uptake by clinicians. Integration of palliative care earlier in the disease course can help to improve symptom control for people with severe COPD and refractory breathlessness. A multidisciplinary approach involving both respiratory and palliative care teams offers a new model of care for these patients.

  9. [Measurement of physical activity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Helgo; Waschki, Benjamin; Watz, Henrik

    2009-04-15

    Physical activity is an important parameter related to morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome/diabetes, mental disorders, cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In COPD, lower levels of physical activity as reported by the patients are associated with a faster annual lung function decline, increased number of hospitalizations, and higher risk of mortality. Self-reported physical activity, however, correlates only poorly with objectively quantified physical activity in patients with COPD. Recent data show that physical activity can reliably be measured in a substantial number of patients with COPD. Extrapulmonary effects of COPD are associated with reduced physical activity. Clinical characteristics commonly used to assess disease severity like the forced expiratory volume in 1 s or the 6-min walk distance only incompletely reflect the physical activity of patients with COPD.

  10. Mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV deficiency complicated with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Hashimura, Yuya; Morioka, Ichiro; Hisamatsu, Chieko; Yokoyama, Naoki; Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Yokozaki, Hiroshi; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Itoh, Kyoko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2016-07-01

    A female infant born at 36 weeks gestational age with birthweight 2135 g, and who developed respiratory disorder, hyperlactacidemia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy after birth, was admitted to hospital at 3 days of age. After admission, bilious emesis, abdominal distention, and passage disorder of the gastrointestinal tract were resistant to various drugs. Exploratory laparotomy was performed at 93 days of age, but no organic lesions were identified and normal Meissner/Auerbach nerve plexus was confirmed, which led to a clinical diagnosis of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO). She was diagnosed with mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV deficiency on histopathology of the abdominal rectus muscle and enzyme activity measurement. This is the first report of a neonate with mitochondrial respiratory chain complex deficiency with intractable CIPO. CIPO can occur in neonates with mitochondrial respiratory chain disorder, necessitating differential diagnosis from Hirschsprung disease.

  11. Accuracy of inhaler use in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haejung; Boo, Sunjoo; Lim, Yeonjung; Kim, Sungmin; Kim, In-Ah

    2014-10-01

    Inaccurate use of medication inhalers can reduce effectiveness, patient adherence, and disease stability. Therefore, the accurate use of inhalers in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is crucial. This cross-sectional study evaluated 196 Korean patients with COPD for step-by-step accuracy of inhaler use with four different types of inhalers (metered-dose inhaler [MDI], Turbuhaler, Diskus, and HandiHaler); differences in accuracy levels by sociodemographic or clinical characteristics were evaluated. Descriptive statistics and t tests were used for data analysis. The proportion of patients with completely accurate inhaler use was low, ranging from 21.9% (Turbuhaler) to 46.2% (MDI). Errors with all types of inhalers were most commonly seen in the "breathing out" steps, before and after medication inhalation. Personalized nursing educational programs, correcting errors individually for each patient, could dramatically increase the accuracy of inhaler use and the effectiveness of the inhaled medications in patients with COPD.

  12. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Rialp Cervera, G; del Castillo Blanco, A; Pérez Aizcorreta, O; Parra Morais, L

    2014-03-01

    Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) with conventional therapy improves the outcome of patients with acute respiratory failure due to hypercapnic decompensation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE). This review summarizes the main effects of NIV in these pathologies. In COPD, NIV improves gas exchange and symptoms, reducing the need for endotracheal intubation, hospital mortality and hospital stay compared with conventional oxygen therapy. NIV may also avoid reintubation and may decrease the length of invasive mechanical ventilation. In ACPE, NIV accelerates the remission of symptoms and the normalization of blood gas parameters, reduces the need for endotracheal intubation, and is associated with a trend towards lesser mortality, without increasing the incidence of myocardial infarction. The ventilation modality used in ACPE does not affect the patient prognosis.

  13. Pathogenic mechanisms in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease due to biomass smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rafael; Oyarzún, Manuel; Olloquequi, Jordi

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality and morbidity have increased significantly worldwide in recent decades. Although cigarette smoke is still considered the main risk factor for the development of the disease, estimates suggest that between 25% and 33% of COPD patients are non-smokers. Among the factors that may increase the risk of developing COPD, biomass smoke has been proposed as one of the most important, affecting especially women and children in developing countries. Despite the epidemiological evidence linking exposure to biomass smoke with adverse health effects, the specific cellular and molecular mechanisms by which this pollutant can be harmful for the respiratory and cardiovascular systems remain unclear. In this article we review the main pathogenic mechanisms proposed to date that make biomass smoke one of the major risk factors for COPD.

  14. [Opportunistic lung infections in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease; a side effect of inhalation corticosteroids?].

    PubMed

    Smeenk, F W; Klinkhamer, P J; Breed, W; Jansz, A R; Jansveld, C A

    1996-01-13

    In four patients, men of 64, 66 and 69 years old and a woman of 65 years, who suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and used inhalation corticosteroids in a relatively high dose (800-1600 micrograms of budesonide per day), a pulmonary infection was diagnosed caused by Mycobacterium malmoense (the first two patients) and Aspergillus (the other two) respectively. Inhalation corticosteroids are of great importance in the treatment of asthmatic patients. Their place in the treatment of patients with COPD is much less clear. The patients did not have an immunological deficiency or anatomical pulmonary or bronchial deformation which could have explained the occurrence of these infections. The high dosages of inhalation corticosteroids may have been involved in the cause of these infections by suppressing the T-cell response locally. In view of this, longterm inhalation corticosteroid treatment should be prescribed in COPD patients only if the efficacy of the medication has been proved in the individual patient involved.

  15. The role for S-carboxymethylcysteine (carbocisteine) in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hooper, C; Calvert, J

    2008-01-01

    Prescription of mucoactive drugs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is increasing. This development in clinical practice arises, at least in part, from a growing understanding of the important role that exacerbation frequency, systemic inflammation and oxidative stress play in the pathogenesis of respiratory disease. S-carboxymethylcysteine (carbocisteine) is the most frequently prescribed mucoactive agent for long-term COPD use in the UK. In addition to its mucoregulatory activity, carbocisteine exhibits free-radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory properties. These characteristics have stimulated interest in the potential that this and other mucoactive drugs may offer for modification of the disease processes present in COPD. This article reviews the pharmacology, in vivo and in vitro properties, and clinical trial evidence for carbocisteine in the context of guidelines for its use and the current understanding of the pathogenic processes that underlie COPD.

  16. The role for S-carboxymethylcysteine (carbocisteine) in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, C; Calvert, J

    2008-01-01

    Prescription of mucoactive drugs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is increasing. This development in clinical practice arises, at least in part, from a growing understanding of the important role that exacerbation frequency, systemic inflammation and oxidative stress play in the pathogenesis of respiratory disease. S-carboxymethylcysteine (carbocisteine) is the most frequently prescribed mucoactive agent for long-term COPD use in the UK. In addition to its mucoregulatory activity, carbocisteine exhibits free-radical scavenging and anti-inflammatory properties. These characteristics have stimulated interest in the potential that this and other mucoactive drugs may offer for modification of the disease processes present in COPD. This article reviews the pharmacology, in vivo and in vitro properties, and clinical trial evidence for carbocisteine in the context of guidelines for its use and the current understanding of the pathogenic processes that underlie COPD. PMID:19281081

  17. Review of ventilatory techniques to optimize mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raghu M; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global healthcare problem. Studies vary widely in the reported frequency of mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbations of COPD. Invasive intubation and mechanical ventilation may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A good understanding of the airway pathophysiology and lung mechanics in COPD is necessary to appropriately manage acute exacerbations and respiratory failure. The basic pathophysiology in COPD exacerbation is the critical expiratory airflow limitation with consequent dynamic hyperinflation. These changes lead to further derangement in ventilatory mechanics, muscle function and gas exchange which may result in respiratory failure. This review discusses the altered respiratory mechanics in COPD, ways to detect these changes in a ventilated patient and formulating ventilatory techniques to optimize management of respiratory failure due to exacerbation of COPD.

  18. Review of ventilatory techniques to optimize mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Raghu M; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global healthcare problem. Studies vary widely in the reported frequency of mechanical ventilation in acute exacerbations of COPD. Invasive intubation and mechanical ventilation may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A good understanding of the airway pathophysiology and lung mechanics in COPD is necessary to appropriately manage acute exacerbations and respiratory failure. The basic pathophysiology in COPD exacerbation is the critical expiratory airflow limitation with consequent dynamic hyperinflation. These changes lead to further derangement in ventilatory mechanics, muscle function and gas exchange which may result in respiratory failure. This review discusses the altered respiratory mechanics in COPD, ways to detect these changes in a ventilated patient and formulating ventilatory techniques to optimize management of respiratory failure due to exacerbation of COPD. PMID:18268918

  19. [Physical and chemical markers of chronic obstructive lung disease development in industrial workers].

    PubMed

    Muravlyova, L E; Molotov-Luchanskyi, V B; Bakirova, R E; Kliuev, D A; Kolesnikova, E A; Demidchik, L A; Beinikova, I V

    2015-01-01

    The article demonstrates that patients with chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD) of both mixed and bronchitis forms with medium severity grade appeared to have 2 types of changes in morphologic types of serum faces. Patients with various clinical forms of severe COLD presented unidirectional change in morphologic types of serum faces. Patients with various forms of moderate COLD had one variant of morphologic types of serum faces was close to that in the patients with more severe clinical course--so that face can be considered as a "transitional form" between moderate and severe COLD. These results are interesting in specifying diagnostic criteria of COLD severity and additional diagnostic criteria of the severity grade.

  20. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: current theories of pathogenesis and their implications for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J; Levy, R; Churg, A

    2005-01-01

    The development of pulmonary hypertension is a poor prognostic sign in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), affecting both mortality and quality of life. Although pulmonary hypertension in COPD is traditionally viewed as a result of emphysematous destruction of the vascular bed and/or hypoxia, recent studies indicate that neither of these factors correlates very well with pulmonary artery pressures. New human and animal experimental data are beginning to show that pulmonary hypertension in this setting is probably a result of the direct effect of tobacco smoke on the intrapulmonary vessels with abnormal production of mediators that control vasoconstriction, vasodilatation, and vascular cell proliferation, ultimately leading to aberrant vascular remodelling and aberrant vascular physiology. These changes are in many ways similar to those seen in other forms of pulmonary hypertension and suggest that the treatments used for primary pulmonary hypertension may be beneficial in patients with COPD. PMID:15994270

  1. Myocardial perfusion defect on thallium-201 imaging in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrotra, P.P.; Weaver, Y.J.; Higginbotham, E.A.

    1983-08-01

    Six patients with angina pectoris had reversible perfusion defects on stress and redistribution thallium imaging. Three patients had a positive electrocardiographic response to exercise. No significant coronary artery lesions were seen on coronary arteriography in any of the six patients. All had mild to moderate hypoxemia at rest and physiologic evidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as defined by the decrease in the ratio of forced expiratory volume at 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC X 100) or decrease in the forced midexpiratory flow rate (FEF25-75), or both. None had clinical findings suggestive of any of the reported causes of positive thallium scans in patients with normal coronary arteriograms. Cellular dysfunction produced by hypoxemia affecting the uptake of thallium seems to be the most likely mechanism of this abnormality.

  2. [Asthma, bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in occupational exposure to wood].

    PubMed

    Schlünssen, V; Schaumburg, I

    1998-01-26

    Two million workers worldwide are regularly exposed to wood dust in the work place. In Denmark alone approximately 40,000 workers are employed in the furniture industry where they are exposed to wood dust on a daily basis. This article reviews epidemiological at studies concerning the relationship between wood dust and the development of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchitis. Fourteen cross-sectional studies and one register-based cohort study form the basis of this review. The conclusion is that despite possible methodological problems there seems to be a relationship between occupational exposure to the types of wood dust used in Denmark and the development of these pulmonary diseases. The results would indicate that further studies are clearly needed in order to study the incidence of these diseases and the relation to the specific types and amount of wood dust.

  3. Depression and sleep disturbance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haejung; Kim, InAh; Lim, Yeonjung; Jung, Hee Young; Park, Hye-Kyung

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the unique contributions of sleep disturbance to depression in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) after controlling for other contributing variables, including patient characteristics, self-efficacy, and physical activity. One hundred thirty-one outpatients diagnosed with COPD from 3 hospitals in South Korea participated in the study. Data were collected from March to June 2010 and analyzed with descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation, and hierarchical multiple regression using the SPSS WIN program. The level of depression reported in this study was 13.84. Sleep disturbance, not living with a spouse, and self-efficacy were all predictors of depression and accounted for 45% of the variance. These findings show the need to screen routinely for sleep disturbance in patients with COPD and support potential benefits of interventions to enhance self-efficacy and quality of sleep in reducing depression in COPD patients.

  4. Principles of confrontational counselling in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Kotz, D; Huibers, M J H; Vos, R; van Schayck, C P; Wesseling, G

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem. The use of spirometry for early detection of COPD is a current issue of debate because of lack of convincing evidence of the additional positive effect of spirometry on smoking cessation. In this article, we present conditions under which early detection of COPD and confrontation may be effective, highlighting the principles of "confrontational counselling". Confronting patients with COPD is not an isolated approach but should be integrated into state-of-the-art smoking cessation treatment. Confrontational counselling should consist of several counselling sessions on an individual, face-to-face level, under supervision of a trained smoking cessation specialist, and in combination with evidence-based pharmacological treatment for smoking cessation.

  5. Improving outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the role of the interprofessional approach.

    PubMed

    Amalakuhan, Bravein; Adams, Sandra G

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with significant morbidity, places substantial time and cost burden on the health care system, and is now the third leading cause of death in the US. Many interventions are available to appropriately manage patients with COPD; however, fully implementing these strategies to help improve outcomes may be difficult. Collaboration between an interprofessional team of health care professionals (which includes physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, physical therapists, dietitians, pharmacists, and many others) and COPD patients and caregivers is necessary to optimally manage these patients and to truly impact outcomes in this devastating disease. Prescribing evidence-based non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies is an important start, but a true team-based approach is critical to successfully implement comprehensive care in patients with COPD. The goal of this review is to employ a case-based approach to provide practical information regarding the roles of the interprofessional team in implementing strategies to optimally manage COPD patients.

  6. Non-invasive ventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management of acute type 2 respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C M; Brown, J L; Reinhardt, A K; Kaul, S; Scales, K; Mikelsons, C; Reid, K; Winter, R; Young, K; Restrick, L; Plant, P K

    2008-10-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in the management of acute type 2 respiratory failure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) represents one of the major technical advances in respiratory care over the last decade. This document updates the 2002 British Thoracic Society guidance and provides a specific focus on the use of NIV in COPD patients with acute type 2 respiratory failure. While there are a variety of ventilator units available most centres now use bi-level positive airways pressure units and this guideline refers specifically to this form of ventilatory support although many of the principles encompassed are applicable to other forms of NIV. The guideline has been produced for the clinician caring for COPD patients in the emergency and ward areas of acute hospitals.

  7. Strategies to decrease ongoing oxidant burden in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Irfan; Kinnula, Vuokko L

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity globally, and its development is mainly associated with tobacco/biomass smoke-induced oxidative stress. Hence, targeting systemic and local oxidative stress with agents that can balance the antioxidant/redox system can be expected to be useful in the treatment of COPD. Preclinical and clinical trials have revealed that antioxidants/redox modulators can detoxify free radicals and oxidants, control expression of redox and glutathione biosynthesis genes, chromatin remodeling and inflammatory gene expression; and are especially useful in preventing COPD exacerbations. In this review, various novel approaches and problems associated with these approaches in COPD are reviewed. PMID:22697592

  8. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Seyed Javad; Ochoa, Cesar E; Sethi, Sanjay; Dickey, Burton F

    2011-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is predicted to become the third leading cause of death in the world by 2020. It is characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. The airflow limitation is usually progressive and associated with an abnormal inflammatory response of the lungs to noxious particles and gases, most commonly cigarette smoke. Among smokers with COPD, even following withdrawal of cigarette smoke, inflammation persists and lung function continues to deteriorate. One possible explanation is that bacterial colonization of smoke-damaged airways, most commonly with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), perpetuates airway injury and inflammation. Furthermore, COPD has also been identified as an independent risk factor for lung cancer irrespective of concomitant cigarette smoke exposure. In this article, we review the role of NTHi in airway inflammation that may lead to COPD progression and lung cancer promotion.

  9. Trends in hospitalization with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-United States, 1990-2005.

    PubMed

    Brown, David W; Croft, Janet B; Greenlund, Kurt J; Giles, Wayne H

    2010-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and a major cause of morbidity and disability. To update national estimates and examine trends for hospitalization with COPD between 1990 and 2005, we analyzed data from the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS). The results indicated that an estimated 715,000 hospitalizations with COPD, or 23.6 per 10,000 population, occurred during 2005, an increase in the number and the rate of COPD hospitalizations since 1990 (370,000 hospitalizations; rate = 15.9 per 10,000 population). To reverse increases in the number of COPD hospitalizations and decrease the burden of COPD, public health programs should continue focused efforts to reduce total personal exposure to tobacco smoke, including passive smoke exposure; to occupational dusts and chemicals; and to other indoor and outdoor air pollutants linked to COPD.

  10. Growth differentiation factor‐15 is associated with muscle mass in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and promotes muscle wasting in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mehul S.; Lee, Jen; Baz, Manuel; Wells, Claire E.; Bloch, Susannah; Lewis, Amy; Donaldson, Anna V.; Garfield, Benjamin E.; Hopkinson, Nicholas S.; Natanek, Amanda; Man, William D‐C; Wells, Dominic J.; Baker, Emma H.; Polkey, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Loss of muscle mass is a co‐morbidity common to a range of chronic diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Several systemic features of COPD including increased inflammatory signalling, oxidative stress, and hypoxia are known to increase the expression of growth differentiation factor‐15 (GDF‐15), a protein associated with muscle wasting in other diseases. We therefore hypothesized that GDF‐15 may contribute to muscle wasting in COPD. Methods We determined the expression of GDF‐15 in the serum and muscle of patients with COPD and analysed the association of GDF‐15 expression with muscle mass and exercise performance. To determine whether GDF‐15 had a direct effect on muscle, we also determined the effect of increased GDF‐15 expression on the tibialis anterior of mice by electroporation. Results Growth differentiation factor‐15 was increased in the circulation and muscle of COPD patients compared with controls. Circulating GDF‐15 was inversely correlated with rectus femoris cross‐sectional area (P < 0.001) and exercise capacity (P < 0.001) in two separate cohorts of patients but was not associated with body mass index. GDF‐15 levels were associated with 8‐oxo‐dG in the circulation of patients consistent with a role for oxidative stress in the production of this protein. Local over‐expression of GDF‐15 in mice caused wasting of the tibialis anterior muscle that expressed it but not in the contralateral muscle suggesting a direct effect of GDF‐15 on muscle mass (P < 0.001). Conclusions Together, the data suggest that GDF‐15 contributes to the loss of muscle mass in COPD. PMID:27239406

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: characterization and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are at increased risk of infection by P. aeruginosa. The specific role of bronchiectasis in both infection and chronic colonization by this microorganism in COPD, however, remains ill defined. To evaluate the prevalence and risk factors for P. aeruginosa recovery from sputum in outpatients with severe COPD, characterizing P. aeruginosa isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and focusing on the influence of bronchiectasis on chronic colonization in these patients. Methods A case-cohort study of 118 patients with severe COPD attended at a Respiratory Day Unit for an acute infectious exacerbation and followed up over one year. High-resolution CT scans were performed during stability for bronchiectasis assessment and sputum cultures were obtained during exacerbation and stability in all patients. P. aeruginosa isolates were genotyped by PFGE. Determinants of the recovery of P. aeruginosa in sputum and chronic colonization by this microorganism were assessed by multivariate analysis. Results P. aeruginosa was isolated from 41 of the 118 patients studied (34.7%). Five of these 41 patients (12.2%) with P. aeruginosa recovery fulfilled criteria for chronic colonization. In the multivariate analysis, the extent of bronchiectasis (OR 9.8, 95% CI: 1.7 to 54.8) and the number of antibiotic courses (OR 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1 to 2.5) were independently associated with an increased risk of P. aeruginosa isolation. Chronic colonization was unrelated to the presence of bronchiectasis (p=0.75). In patients with chronic colonization the isolates of P. aeruginosa retrieved corresponded to the same clones during the follow-up, and most of the multidrug resistant isolates (19/21) were harbored by these patients. Conclusions The main risk factors for P. aeruginosa isolation in severe COPD were the extent of bronchiectasis and exposure to antibiotics. Over 10% of these patients fulfilled criteria for

  12. Current concepts in targeting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease pharmacotherapy: making progress towards personalised management.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Prescott G; Agusti, Alvar; Roche, Nicolas; Singh, Dave; Martinez, Fernando J

    2015-05-02

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, complex, and heterogeneous disorder that is responsible for substantial and growing morbidity, mortality, and health-care expense worldwide. Of imperative importance to decipher the complexity of COPD is to identify groups of patients with similar clinical characteristics, prognosis, or therapeutic needs, the so-called clinical phenotypes. This strategy is logical for research but might be of little clinical value because clinical phenotypes can overlap in the same patient and the same clinical phenotype could result from different biological mechanisms. With the goal to match assessment with treatment choices, the latest iteration of guidelines from the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease reorganised treatment objectives into two categories: to improve symptoms (ie, dyspnoea and health status) and to decrease future risk (as predicted by forced expiratory volume in 1 s level and exacerbations history). This change thus moves treatment closer to individualised medicine with available bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory drugs. Yet, future treatment options are likely to include targeting endotypes that represent subtypes of patients defined by a distinct pathophysiological mechanism. Specific biomarkers of these endotypes would be particularly useful in clinical practice, especially in patients in which clinical phenotype alone is insufficient to identify the underlying endotype. A few series of potential COPD endotypes and biomarkers have been suggested. Empirical knowledge will be gained from proof-of-concept trials in COPD with emerging drugs that target specific inflammatory pathways. In every instance, specific endotype and biomarker efforts will probably be needed for the success of these trials, because the pathways are likely to be operative in only a subset of patients. Network analysis of human diseases offers the possibility to improve understanding of disease pathobiological

  13. What is in the guidelines about the pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    López-Campos, José Luis; Calero Acuña, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    With the publication of the new guidelines (The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2011 and Guía Española de la COPD) on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the pharmacological treatment of this disease has changed substantially. In this article, the evidence supporting the use of pharmacological groups in COPD is summarized and the place of each of these drugs among the new therapeutic strategies is established. Although short-acting bronchodilators have been used as maintenance therapy for COPD for many years, few clinical trials are available on the efficacy and safety of these agents, whose role was defined at the very early stages of treatment. The introduction of long-acting bronchodilators, administered every 12 or 24 h, led to an increase in therapeutic effects and an improvement in both treatment adherence and dosage; therefore, both guidelines consider these drugs as the standard therapy for all types of patients and clinical phenotypes. The combination of long-acting bronchodilators from different families has been established as a new therapeutic approach for patients with persistent symptoms despite an appropriate bronchodilator treatment. Anti-inflammatory therapy with inhaled corticosteroids has been discussed at length, and is considered in the current guidelines as the treatment of choice in patients with a high risk of exacerbations associated with an impaired lung function or previous exacerbations, or presenting with phenotypes that are susceptible to the effect of corticosteroids. Roflumilast is a novel drug with a clearly defined indication. Finally, further evidence about other therapies, such as antibiotics or mucolytics, is emerging that will help define their appropriate use in selected patients. At present, pharmacological management of COPD is being re-evaluated. As long as we are able to apply the new treatment approaches to the clinical reality of our patients we will achieve greater benefits in both the

  14. Pulmonary rehabilitation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a scientific and political agenda.

    PubMed

    Fahy, Bonnie F

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is the standard of care for patients suffering chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This report describes and defines PR and reviews the evidence regarding the efficacy of PR. COPD management guidelines that include PR have been published by the European Respiratory Society, the American Thoracic Society, and the British Thoracic Society, and those guidelines were supported by evidence-based guidelines published jointly by the American College of Chest Physicians and the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, which is also evidence-based, included the recommendation for referral to PR. Despite those recommendations, the availability of comprehensive PR programs (defined as being compliant with national practice standards) is limited. In the United States the lack of a national policy for PR reimbursement has led to differences in compensation among insurance providers, based on differences in the Local Medical Review Policies established by the "fiscal intermediaries." Since 1998 the American Association for Respiratory Care, the American College of Chest Physicians, the American Thoracic Society, and the National Association for Medical Direction of Respiratory Care have jointly lobbied for clear, consistent guidelines from the United States Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA, which was recently renamed the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services [CMS]). In 2002 new Medicare/Medicaid billing codes ("G codes") became available for billing PR procedures, but unfortunately the instructions for the use of those codes differ among the Local Medical Review Policies. There has been little success in the effort to establish a national coverage policy for PR. The respiratory therapist holds a unique role in PR. In the respiratory therapist's training curriculum PR is specifically addressed, making the respiratory therapist an asset to

  15. Bringing Stability to the Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patient: Clinical and Pharmacological Considerations for Frequent Exacerbators.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Swati; Wells, J Michael

    2017-03-03

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) are critical events associated with an accelerated loss of lung function, increased morbidity, and excess mortality. AECOPD are heterogeneous in nature and this may directly impact clinical decision making, specifically in patients with frequent exacerbations. A 'frequent exacerbator' is a sub-phenotype of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is defined as an individual who experiences two or more moderate-to-severe exacerbations per year. This distinct subgroup has higher mortality and accounts for more than half of COPD-related hospitalizations annually. Thus, it is imperative to identify individuals at risk for frequent exacerbations and choose optimal strategies to minimize risk for these events. New paradigms for using combination inhalers and the introduction of novel oral compounds provide expanded treatment options to reduce the risk and frequency of exacerbations. The goals of managing frequent exacerbators or patients at risk for AECOPD are: (1) maximizing bronchodilation; (2) reducing inflammation; and (3) targeting specific molecular pathways implicated in COPD and AECOPD pathogenesis. Novel inhaler therapies including combination long-acting muscarinic agents plus long-acting beta agonists show promising results compared with monotherapy or a long-acting beta agonist inhaled corticosteroid combination in reducing exacerbation risk among individuals at risk for exacerbations and among frequent exacerbators. Likewise, oral medications including macrolides and phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors reduce the risk for AECOPD in select groups of individuals at high risk for exacerbation. Future direction in COPD management is based on the identification of various subtypes or 'endotypes' and targeting therapies based on their pathophysiology. This review describes the impact of AECOPD and the challenges posed by frequent exacerbators, and explores the rationale for different

  16. Acute effect of oral steroids on muscle function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hopkinson, N S; Man, W D C; Dayer, M J; Ross, E T; Nickol, A H; Hart, N; Moxham, J; Polkey, M I

    2004-07-01

    Prospective data to support the hypothesis that corticosteroids are a significant cause of muscle weakness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are lacking. The authors studied respiratory and quadriceps muscle function, using both volitional techniques and magnetic nerve stimulation, as well as measuring metabolic parameters during incremental cycle ergometry, in 25 stable COPD patients. The forced expiratory volume in one second was 37.6 +/- 21.4% predicted, before and after a 2-week course of o.d. prednisolone 30 mg. Quadriceps strength was also assessed in 15 control patients on two occasions. Only two patients met the British Thoracic Society definition of steroid responsiveness. There was no change either in sniff transdiaphragmatic pressure (pre: 96.8 +/- 19.7 cmH2O; post: 98.6 +/- 22.4 cmH2O) or in twitch transdiaphragmatic pressure elicited by bilateral anterolateral magnetic phrenic-nerve stimulation (pre: 16.8 +/- 9.1 cmH2O; post: 17.9 +/- 10 cmH2O). Quadriceps twitch force did not change significantly either in the steroid group (pre: 9.5 +/- 3.1 kg; post: 8.9 +/- 3.7 kg) or in the control patients (pre: 8.1 +/- 2.7 kg; post: 7.9 +/- 2.2 kg). There were no changes in either peak or isotime ventilatory and metabolic parameters during exercise. In conclusion, in stable patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a 2-week course of 30 mg prednisolone daily does not cause significant skeletal muscle dysfunction or alter metabolic parameters during exercise.

  17. Meaning of living with severe chronic obstructive lung disease: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Gabriella; Nasse, Maximilian; Stanze, Henrikje; Boakye, Sonja Owusu; Nauck, Friedemann; Schneider, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore what it means for patients to live with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as an incurable and constantly progressing disease. Design Qualitative longitudinal study using narrative and semistructured interviews. This paper presents findings of the initial interviews. Analysis using grounded theory. Setting Lung care clinics and community care in Lower Saxony, Germany. Participants 17 patients with advanced-stage COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) III/IV). Findings Analysis shows that these patients have difficulties accepting their life situation and feel at the mercy of the disease, which could be identified as a core-experienced phenomenon. Over a long period of time, patients have only a vague feeling of being ill, caused by uncertain knowledge, slow progress and doubtful attribution of clinical symptoms of the disease (causal conditions). As an action strategy, patients try to maintain daily routines for as long as possible after diagnosis. Both effective standard and rescue medication, which helps to reduce breathlessness and other symptoms, and the feeling of being faced with one's own responsibility (intervening conditions) support this strategy, whereby patients' own responsibility is too painful to acknowledge. As a consequence, patients try to deny the threat to life for a long period of time. Frequently, they need to experience facing their own limits, often in the form of an acute crisis, to realise their health situation. The experience of the illness is contextualised by a continuous increase in limited mobility and social isolation. Conclusion In order to help patients to improve disease awareness, to accept their life situation and to improve their reduced quality of life, patients may benefit from the early integration of palliative care (PC), considering its multiprofessional patient-centred and team-centred approach. Psychological support and volunteer work, which are relevant

  18. Multidimensional analyses of long-term clinical courses of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Oga, Toru; Tsukino, Mitsuhiro; Hajiro, Takashi; Ikeda, Akihiko; Koyama, Hiroshi; Mishima, Michiaki; Chin, Kazuo; Nishimura, Koichi

    2010-09-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic respiratory disorders involving obstructive airway defects. There have been many discussions on their similarities and differences. Although airflow limitation expressed as forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)) has been considered to be the main diagnostic assessment in both diseases, it does not reflect the functional impairment imparted to the patients by these diseases. Therefore, multidimensional approaches using multiple measurements in assessing disease control or severity have been recommended, and multiple endpoints in addition to FEV(1) have been set recently in clinical trials so as not to miss the overall effects. In particular, as improving symptoms and health status as well as pulmonary function are important goals in the management of asthma and COPD, some patient-reported measurements such as health-related quality of life or dyspnea should be included. Nonetheless, there have been few reviews on the long-term clinical course comparing asthma and COPD as predicted by measurements other than airflow limitation. Here, we therefore analyzed and compared longitudinal changes in both physiological measurements and patient-reported measurements in asthma and COPD. Although both diseases showed similar long-term progressive airflow limitation similarly despite guideline-based therapies, disease progression was different in asthma and COPD. In asthma, patient-reported assessments of health status, disability and psychological status remained clinically stable over time, in contrast to the significant deterioration of these parameters in COPD. Thus, because a single measurement of airflow limitation is insufficient to monitor these diseases, multidimensional analyses are important not only for disease control but also for understanding disease progression in asthma and COPD.

  19. Predictors of Hospitalized Exacerbations and Mortality in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Santibáñez, Miguel; Garrastazu, Roberto; Ruiz-Nuñez, Mario; Helguera, Jose Manuel; Arenal, Sandra; Bonnardeux, Cristina; León, Carlos; García-Rivero, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) carry significant consequences for patients and are responsible for considerable health-care costs—particularly if hospitalization is required. Despite the importance of hospitalized exacerbations, relatively little is known about their determinants. This study aimed to analyze predictors of hospitalized exacerbations and mortality in COPD patients. Methods This was a retrospective population-based cohort study. We selected 900 patients with confirmed COPD aged ≥35 years by simple random sampling among all COPD patients in Cantabria (northern Spain) on December 31, 2011. We defined moderate exacerbations as events that led a care provider to prescribe antibiotics or corticosteroids and severe exacerbations as exacerbations requiring hospital admission. We observed exacerbation frequency over the previous year (2011) and following year (2012). We categorized patients according to COPD severity based on forced expiratory volume in 1 second (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] grades 1–4). We estimated the odds ratios (ORs) by logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, COPD severity, and frequent exacerbator phenotype the previous year. Results Of the patients, 16.4% had ≥1 severe exacerbations, varying from 9.3% in mild GOLD grade 1 to 44% in very severe COPD patients. A history of at least two prior severe exacerbations was positively associated with new severe exacerbations (adjusted OR, 6.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.53–12.83) and mortality (adjusted OR, 7.63; 95%CI, 3.41–17.05). Older age and several comorbidities, such as heart failure and diabetes, were similarly associated. Conclusions Hospitalized exacerbations occurred with all grades of airflow limitation. A history of severe exacerbations was associated with new hospitalized exacerbations and mortality. PMID:27362765

  20. BIOBEHAVIORAL PROGNOSTIC FACTORS IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE: Results from the INSPIRE-II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, James A.; Smith, Patrick J.; Durheim, Michael; Mabe, Stephanie; Emery, Charles F.; Martinu, Tereza; Diaz, Philip T.; Babyak, Michael; Welty-Wolf, Karen; Palmer, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the prognostic value of select biobehavioral factors in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a secondary analysis of participants from the INSPIRE-II trial. Methods Three hundred twenty six outpatients with COPD underwent assessments of pulmonary function, physical activity, body mass index, inflammation, pulmonary symptoms, depression, and pulmonary quality of life, and were followed for up to 5.4 years for subsequent clinical events. The prognostic value of each biobehavioral factor, considered individually and combined, also was examined in the context of existing Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 2011 risk stratification. Results Sixty-nine individuals experienced a hospitalization or died over a mean follow-up time period of 2.4 (interquartile range = 1.6) years. GOLD classification was associated with an increased risk of clinical events (HR = 2.72 [95% CI 1.63, 4.54], per stage); Six Minute Walk (HR = 0.50 [0.34, 0.73] per 500 feet), total steps (HR = 0.82 [0.71, 0.94] per 1,000 steps), hsC-reactive protein (HR = 1.44 [1.01, 2.06] per 4.5 mg/L), depression (HR = 1.12 [1.01, 1.25] per 4 points), and pulmonary quality of life (HR = 1.73 [1.14, 2.63] per 25 points) were each predictive over and above the GOLD assessment. However, only GOLD group and Six Minute Walk were predictive of all-cause mortality and COPD hospitalization when all biobehavioral variables were included together in a multivariable model. Conclusion Biobehavioral factors provide added prognostic information over and above measures of COPD severity in predicting adverse events in patients with COPD. PMID:26780299

  1. Impact of farm modernity on the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in dairy farmers.

    PubMed

    Marescaux, Alexia; Degano, Bruno; Soumagne, Thibaud; Thaon, Isabelle; Laplante, Jean-Jacques; Dalphin, Jean-Charles

    2016-02-01

    Dairy farming is associated with an excess of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The dairy industry has been changing for the past three decades with larger, more efficient farms and potentially less exposure to agents involved in COPD development. However, the impact of farm modernisation on COPD prevalence is unknown. We studied respiratory symptoms, respiratory function by spirometry and tobacco smoking in 575 male dairy farmers working either in traditional or in modern farms in the French Doubs region. COPD was defined by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criterion (forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) <0.70) and by the Quanjer reference equation (FEV1/FVC

  2. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Fernanda Dultra; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; da Silva, Graziela Alves; Gomes, Évelim LF Dantas; do Nascimento, Eloisa Sanches Pereira; Alves, Vera Lucia Santos; Stirbulov, Roberto; Costa, Dirceu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is a multidisciplinary program of care for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with the goal of improving the functional capacity and quality of life, as well as maintaining the clinical stability of COPD sufferers. However, not all patients are available for such a program despite discomfort with their condition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a home-based PR (HBPR) program on functional ability, quality of life, and respiratory muscle strength and endurance. Patients and methods Patients with COPD according to the Global Initiative of Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease were randomized (double-blind) into two groups. One group performed a protocol at home with aerobic and muscle strength exercises and was called the intervention group; the other group received only instructions to perform breathing and stretching exercises, characterizing it as the control group (CG). We assessed the following variables at baseline and 2 months: exercise tolerance (incremental shuttle walk test and upper limb test), respiratory muscle (strength and endurance test), and health-related quality of life (Airways Questionnaire 20). Results There were no significant changes after the intervention in either of the two groups in exercise tolerance and quality of life. However, the intervention group had improved respiratory endurance compared with the CG, while the CG presented a decrease in the load sustained by the respiratory muscles after the HBPR. Conclusion A program of HBPR with biweekly supervision (although not enough to provide significant improvements in physical capacity or quality of life) played an important role in maintaining the stability of the clinical features of patients with COPD; the patients had no worsening of symptoms during the intervention period according to the daily log. PMID:24235824

  3. Outcomes of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease diagnosed with or without pulmonary function testing

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Andrea; Mecredy, Graham; Croxford, Ruth; To, Teresa; Stanbrook, Matthew B.; Aaron, Shawn D.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A small number of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) receive pulmonary function testing around the time of diagnosis. Because omitting testing increases misdiagnosis, we sought to determine whether health outcomes differed between patients whose COPD was diagnosed with or without pulmonary function testing. METHODS: We conducted a longitudinal population study of patients with physician-diagnosed COPD from 2005 to 2012 using health administrative data from Ontario, Canada. We assessed whether having pulmonary function testing around the time of diagnosis was associated with the composite outcome of admission to hospital for COPD or all-cause death, using adjusted survival analysis. RESULTS: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was diagnosed in 68 898 patients during the study period; 41.2% of patients received peridiagnostic pulmonary function testing. In adjusted analysis, patients who underwent testing were less likely to die or be admitted to hospital for COPD (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.89–0.94) and were more likely to be prescribed an inhaled long-acting bronchodilator than patients who did not undergo testing. Subgroup analysis suggested that the association of testing and outcomes was confined to patients with COPD diagnosed in the ambulatory care setting (adjusted HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.76–0.84). INTERPRETATION: Confirmation of a COPD diagnosis using pulmonary function testing is associated with a decreased risk of death and admission to hospital for COPD. In ambulatory patients, this effect may be from increased use of appropriate COPD medications. The findings of this study validate current guideline recommendations that encourage pulmonary function testing for diagnosis in all patients with suspected COPD.

  4. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in women with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease related to wood smoke

    PubMed Central

    González-García, Mauricio; Torres-Duque, Carlos A; Bustos, Adriana; Jaramillo, Claudia; Maldonado, Darío

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) related to wood smoke exposure is characterized by important inflammation of the central and peripheral airways without significant emphysema. The objective of this study is to describe the bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) level in women with COPD related to wood smoke exposure and to compare it with the BHR in women with COPD related to tobacco smoking. Materials and methods Two groups of women with stable COPD were studied: (1) wood smoke exposed (WS-COPD); and (2) tobacco smoke exposed (TS-COPD). A methacholine challenge test (MCT) was performed in all patients according to American Thoracic Society criteria. BHR levels were compared using the methacholine concentration, which caused a 20% fall in the FEV1 (PC20). Results Thirty-one patients, 19 with WS-COPD and 12 with TS-COPD, were included. There were no significant differences between the groups in baseline FVC, FEV1, IC, FEF25–75, and FEF25–75/FVC. All 31 patients had a positive MCT (PC20 < 16 mg/mL) and the fall in the FEV1 and IC was similar in both groups. The severity of BHR was significantly higher in the WS-COPD patients (PC20: 0.39 mg/mL) than in the TS-COPD patients (PC20: 1.24 mg/mL) (P = 0.028). The presence of cough, phlegm, and dyspnea during the test were similar in both groups. Conclusion We found moderate to severe BHR in women with WS-COPD, which was more severe than in the TS-COPD women with similar age and airflow obstruction. This paper suggests that the structural and inflammatory changes induced by the chronic exposure to wood smoke, described in other studies, can explain the differences with TS-COPD patients. Future studies may clarify our understanding of the impact of BHR on COPD physiopathology, phenotypes, and treatment strategies. PMID:22791990

  5. Coronary Artery Calcification, Epicardial Fat Burden, and Cardiovascular Events in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Esther I.; Possner, Mathias; Stehli, Julia; Sievi, Noriane A.; Clarenbach, Christian F.; Dey, Damini; Slomka, Piotr J.; Kaufmann, Philipp A.; Kohler, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) suffer from significantly more cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality than would be anticipated from conventional risk factors. The aim of this study was to determine whether COPD patients have a higher coronary artery calcium score (CACS) and epicardial fat burden, compared to control subjects, and their association with cardiovascular events. Methods From a registry of 1906 patients 81 patients with clinically diagnosed COPD were one-to-one matched to 81 non-COPD control subjects with a smoking history, according to their age, sex, and the number of classic cardiovascular risk factors (arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, family history of premature coronary artery disease). CACS, epicardial fat, and subsequent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) during follow-up were compared between groups. Results Patients with COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease-classification I: 5%, II: 23%, III: 16% and IV: 56%) showed no difference in CACS (median difference 68 Agatston Units [95% confidence interval -176.5 to 192.5], p=0.899) or epicardial fat volume (mean difference -0.5 cm3 [95% confidence interval -20.9 to 21.9], p=0.961) compared with controls. After a median follow-up of 42.6 months a higher incidence of MACE was observed in COPD patients (RR=2.80, p=0.016) compared with controls. Cox proportional hazard regression identified cardiac ischemias and CACS as independent predictors for MACE. Conclusion COPD patients experienced a higher MACE incidence compared to controls despite no baseline differences in coronary calcification and epicardial fat burden. Other mechanisms such as undersupply of medication seem to account for an excess cardiovascular comorbidity in COPD patients. PMID:26011039

  6. Annual direct medical costs of bronchiectasis treatment: Impact of severity, exacerbations, chronic bronchial colonization and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease coexistence.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, David; Martínez-Garcia, Miguel-Angel; Olveira, Casilda; Girón, Rosa; Máiz, Luis; Prados, Concepción

    2016-04-12

    Patients with bronchiectasis (BE) present exacerbations that increase with severity of the disease. We aimed to determine the annual cost of BE treatment according to its severity, determined by FACED score, as well as the parameters associated with higher costs. Multicentre historical cohorts study with patients from six hospitals in Spain. The costs arising during the course of a year from maintenance treatment, exacerbations, emergency visits and hospital admissions were analysed. In total, 456 patients were included (56.4% mild BE, 26.8% moderate BE and 16.9% severe BE). The mean cost was €4671.9 per patient, which increased significantly with severity. In mild BE, most of the costs were due to bronchodilators and inhaled steroids; in severe BE, most were due to exacerbations and inhaled antibiotics. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%), age, colonization byPseudomonas aeruginosaand the number of admissions were independently related to higher costs. The highest costs were found in patients with BE associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, with the most exacerbations and with chronic bronchial colonization byPseudomonas aeruginosa(PA). In conclusion, BE patients gave rise to high annual costs, and these were doubled on each advance in severity on the FACED score. FEV1%, age, colonization by PA and the number of admissions were independently related to higher costs.

  7. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is associated with risk of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Nationwide Case-Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chung-Yu; Liao, Kuang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) share common risk factors. However, there is limited information about COPD and CKD. This is case-cohort study was carried out using the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database to evaluate the correlation between COPD and CKD. We identified cases aged older than 40 years who had an inpatient hospitalization with a first-time COPD diagnosis between 1998 and 2008. Control were selected from hospitalized patients without COPD or CKD and were matched according to age, gender, and year of admission at a 2:1 ratio. Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the association of CKD and COPD. The overall incidence of CKD was higher in the COPD group (470.9 per 104 person-years) than in the non-COPD group (287.52 per 104 person-years). The adjusted hazard ratio of case was 1.61 (P < 0.0001) times that of control. COPD was found to be associated with kidney disease from our follow-up. To detect CKD early, early diagnosis of CKD in patients with COPD and prompt initiation of monitoring and treatment are imperative. PMID:27166152

  8. Improving in-office discussion of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: results and recommendations from an in-office linguistic study in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Meaghan; Hamilton, Heidi E

    2007-08-01

    Effective management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) requires successful physician-patient communication. Unfortunately, however, both parties often report problematic communication. Accommodating patients' desire for more information and an increased role in decision-making can increase their satisfaction surrounding the dialogue. This study analyzed naturally occurring interactions to assess in-office COPD discussions, identifying best practices and gaps in communication. In-office discussions of a study population of 17 community-based physicians and 32 outpatients with COPD (59% women; mean age, 69.5 years) were recorded during regularly scheduled visits. Individual postvisit interviews were conducted to clarify health history and perceptions of the office visit. Recordings were transcribed and analyzed using validated sociolinguistic techniques. Physicians initiated discussions of COPD with the term "breathing" in 56% of visits; these discussions focused on the acute nature of the disease, including an average of 6.4 physician-initiated, symptom-related questions. In postvisit interviews, participants (patients versus physicians) were frequently misaligned about the severity of, as well as the patient's level of concern about, the disease. Quality-of-life discussions were largely absent from visits, although patients offered emotionally charged responses postvisit about the impact of COPD in their lives. Despite accepted guidelines, discussions on smoking cessation, spirometry, and inhaler technique were underused. To reduce observed gaps in communication, physicians can focus on 4 topic areas: (1) communicating COPD diagnosis and test results, (2) optimizing disease education, (3) prioritizing smoking cessation, and (4) demonstrating correct inhaler use. Simple communication techniques, including consistent vocabulary, perspective display series, the 5 As of smoking cessation (ask about tobacco use, advise to quit, assess willingness to make a

  9. The clinical and economic burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the USA.

    PubMed

    Guarascio, Anthony J; Ray, Shauntá M; Finch, Christopher K; Self, Timothy H

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third most common cause of death in the USA. In 2010, the cost of COPD in the USA was projected to be approximately US$50 billion, which includes $20 billion in indirect costs and $30 billion in direct health care expenditures. These costs can be expected to continue to rise with this progressive disease. Costs increase with increasing severity of disease, and hospital stays account for the majority of these costs. Patients are diagnosed with COPD following a multifactorial assessment that includes spirometry, clinical presentation, symptomatology, and risk factors. Smoking cessation interventions are the most influential factor in COPD management. The primary goal of chronic COPD management is stabilization of chronic disease and prevention of acute exacerbations. Bronchodilators are the mainstay of COPD therapy. Patients with few symptoms and low exacerbation risk should be treated with a short-acting bronchodilator as needed for breathlessness. Progression of symptoms, as well as possible decline in forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration (FEV1), warrant the use of long-acting bronchodilators. For patients with frequent exacerbations with or without consistent symptoms, inhaled corticosteroids should be considered in addition to a long-acting beta2-agonist (LABA) or long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) and may even consist of "triple therapy" with all three agents with more severe disease. Phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors may be an option in patients with frequent exacerbations and symptoms of chronic bronchitis. In addition to a variety of novel ultra-LABAs, LAMAs and combination bronchodilator and inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapies, other bronchodilators with a variety of mechanisms are also being considered, to expand therapeutic options for the treatment of COPD. With more than 50 new medications in the pipeline for the treatment of COPD, optimal management will continue to evolve

  10. Chronic obstructive lung diseases and risk of non-small cell lung cancer in women

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Ann G.; Cote, Michele L.; Wenzlaff, Angela S.; Van Dyke, Alison; Chen, Wei; Ruckdeschel, John C.; Gadgeel, Shirish; Soubani, Ayman O.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The link between lung cancer and chronic obstructive lung diseases (COPD) has not been well studied in women even though lung cancer and COPD account for significant and growing morbidity and mortality among women. Methods We evaluated the relationship between COPD and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a population-based case-control study of women and constructed a time course of chronic lung diseases in relation to onset of lung cancer. Five hundred sixty-two women aged 18–74, diagnosed with NSCLC and 564 population-based controls matched on race and age participated. Multivariable unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate risk associated with a history of COPD, chronic bronchitis or emphysema. Results Lung cancer risk increased significantly for white women with a history of COPD (OR=1.85; 95% CI 1.21–2.81), but this was not seen in African American women. Risk associated with a history of chronic bronchitis was strongest when diagnosed at age 25 or earlier (OR=2.35, 95% CI 1.17–4.72); emphysema diagnosed within nine years of lung cancer was also associated with substantial risk (OR=6.36, 95% CI 2.36–17.13). Race, pack-years of smoking, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke as an adult, childhood asthma and exposure to asbestos were associated with a history of COPD among lung cancer cases. Conclusions In women, COPD is associated with risk of lung cancer differentially by race. Untangling whether COPD is in the causal pathway or simply shares risk factors will require future studies to focus on specific COPD features while exploring underlying genetic susceptibility to these diseases. PMID:19190518

  11. Role of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Wang, Fa-Ping; Wang, Geng; Mao, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are representative chronic inflammatory airway diseases responsible for a considerable burden of disease. In this article, we reviewed the relationship between neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Data Sources: Articles published up to January 1, 2017, were selected from the PubMed, Ovid Medline, Embase databases, with the keywords of “asthma” or “pulmonary disease, chronic obstructive”, “neutrophils” and “extracellular traps.” Study Selection: Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the role of NETs in asthma and COPD. Results: NETs are composed of extracellular DNA, histones, and granular proteins, which are released from activated neutrophils. Multiple studies have indicated that there are a large amount of NETs in the airways of asthmatics and COPD patients. NETs can engulf and kill invading pathogens in the host. However, disordered regulation of NET formation has shown to be involved in the development of asthma and COPD. An overabundance of NETs in the airways or lung tissue could cause varying degrees of damage to lung tissues by inducing the death of human epithelial and endothelial cells, and thus resulting in impairing pulmonary function and accelerating the progress of the disease. Conclusions: Excessive NETs accumulate in the airways of asthmatics and COPD patients. Although NETs play an essential role in the innate immune system against infection, excessive components of NETs can cause lung tissue damage and accelerate disease progression in asthmatics and COPD patients. These findings suggest that administration of NETs could be a novel approach to treat asthma and COPD. Mechanism studies, clinical practice, and strategies to regulate neutrophil activation or directly interrupt NET function in asthmatics and COPD patients are desperately needed. PMID:28303858

  12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality and prevalence: the associations with smoking and poverty—a BOLD analysis

    PubMed Central

    Burney, Peter; Jithoo, Anamika; Kato, Bernet; Janson, Christer; Mannino, David; Niżankowska-Mogilnicka, Ewa; Studnicka, Michael; Tan, Wan; Bateman, Eric; Koçabas, Ali; Vollmer, William M; Gislason, Thorarrin; Marks, Guy; Koul, Parvaiz A; Harrabi, Imed; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Buist, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a commonly reported cause of death and associated with smoking. However, COPD mortality is high in poor countries with low smoking rates. Spirometric restriction predicts mortality better than airflow obstruction, suggesting that the prevalence of restriction could explain mortality rates attributed to COPD. We have studied associations between mortality from COPD and low lung function, and between both lung function and death rates and cigarette consumption and gross national income per capita (GNI). Methods National COPD mortality rates were regressed against the prevalence of airflow obstruction and spirometric restriction in 22 Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) study sites and against GNI, and national smoking prevalence. The prevalence of airflow obstruction and spirometric restriction in the BOLD sites were regressed against GNI and mean pack years smoked. Results National COPD mortality rates were more strongly associated with spirometric restriction in the BOLD sites (<60 years: men rs=0.73, p=0.0001; women rs=0.90, p<0.0001; 60+ years: men rs=0.63, p=0.0022; women rs=0.37, p=0.1) than obstruction (<60 years: men rs=0.28, p=0.20; women rs=0.17, p<0.46; 60+ years: men rs=0.28, p=0.23; women rs=0.22, p=0.33). Obstruction increased with mean pack years smoked, but COPD mortality fell with increased cigarette consumption and rose rapidly as GNI fell below US$15 000. Prevalence of restriction was not associated with smoking but also increased rapidly as GNI fell below US$15 000. Conclusions Smoking remains the single most important cause of obstruction but a high prevalence of restriction associated with poverty could explain the high ‘COPD’ mortality in poor countries. PMID:24353008

  13. The unique alterations of hippocampus and cognitive impairment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment has been found in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. However, the structural alteration of the brain and underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Methods Thirty-seven mild-to-moderate COPD patients, forty-eight severe COPD patients, and thirty-one control subjects were recruited for cognitive test and neuroimaging studies. Serum levels of S100B,pulmonary function and arterial blood gas levels were also evaluated in each subject. Results The hippocampal volume was significantly smaller in COPD patients compared to the control group. It is positively correlated with a mini mental state examination (MMSE) score, SaO2 in mild-to-moderate COPD patients, the levels of PaO2 in both mild-to-moderate and severe COPD patients. Higher S100B concentrations were observed in mild-to-moderate COPD patients, while the highest S100B level was found in severe COPD patients when compared to the control subjects. S100B levels are negatively associated with MMSE in both mild-to-moderate and severe COPD patients and also negatively associated with the hippocampal volume in the total COPD patients. Conclusions Hippocampal atrophy based on quantitative assessment by magnetic resonance imaging does occur in COPD patients, which may be associated with cognitive dysfunction and the most prevalent mechanism accountable for hippocampal atrophy is chronic hypoxemia in COPD. Higher serum S100B levels may be peripheral biochemical marker for cognitive impairment in COPD. PMID:24359080

  14. Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Physical Activity in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Spruit, Martijn A; Pitta, Fabio; McAuley, Edward; ZuWallack, Richard L; Nici, Linda

    2015-10-15

    Physical inactivity is common in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) compared with age-matched healthy individuals or patients with other chronic diseases. Physical inactivity independently predicts poor outcomes across several aspects of this disease, but it is (at least in principle) treatable in patients with COPD. Pulmonary rehabilitation has arguably the greatest positive effect of any current therapy on exercise capacity in COPD; as such, gains in this area should facilitate increases in physical activity. Furthermore, because pulmonary rehabilitation also emphasizes behavior change through collaborative self-management, it may aid in the translation of increased exercise capacity to greater participation in activities involving physical activity. Both increased exercise capacity and adaptive behavior change are necessary to achieve significant and lasting increases in physical activity in patients with COPD. Unfortunately, it is readily assumed that this translation occurs naturally. This concise clinical review will focus on the effects of a comprehensive pulmonary rehabilitation program on physical activity in patients with COPD. Changing physical activity behavior in patients with COPD needs an interdisciplinary approach, bringing together respiratory medicine, rehabilitation sciences, social sciences, and behavioral sciences.

  15. Pulmonary CT and MRI phenotypes that help explain chronic pulmonary obstruction disease pathophysiology and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Eric A; Lynch, David A; Barr, R Graham; van Beek, Edwin J R; Parraga, Grace

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary x-ray computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research and development has been motivated, in part, by the quest to subphenotype common chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). For thoracic CT and MRI, the main COPD research tools, disease biomarkers are being validated that go beyond anatomy and structure to include pulmonary functional measurements such as regional ventilation, perfusion, and inflammation. In addition, there has also been a drive to improve spatial and contrast resolution while at the same time reducing or eliminating radiation exposure. Therefore, this review focuses on our evolving understanding of patient-relevant and clinically important COPD endpoints and how current and emerging MRI and CT tools and measurements may be exploited for their identification, quantification, and utilization. Since reviews of the imaging physics of pulmonary CT and MRI and reviews of other COPD imaging methods were previously published and well-summarized, we focus on the current clinical challenges in COPD and the potential of newly emerging MR and CT imaging measurements to address them. Here we summarize MRI and CT imaging methods and their clinical translation for generating reproducible and sensitive measurements of COPD related to pulmonary ventilation and perfusion as well as parenchyma morphology. The key clinical problems in COPD provide an important framework in which pulmonary imaging needs to rapidly move in order to address the staggering burden, costs, as well as the mortality and morbidity associated with COPD.

  16. Targeted anti-inflammatory therapeutics in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Andrew L.; Caramori, Gaetano; Chung, Kian F.; Adcock, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the airway, although the drivers and site of the inflammation differ between diseases. Asthmatics with a neutrophilic airway inflammation are associated with a poor response to corticosteroids, whereas asthmatics with eosinophilic inflammation respond better to corticosteroids. Biologicals targeting the Th2-eosinophil nexus such as anti–interleukin (IL)-4, anti–IL-5, and anti–IL-13 are ineffective in asthma as a whole but are more effective if patients are selected using cellular (eg, eosinophils) or molecular (eg, periostin) biomarkers. This highlights the key role of individual inflammatory mediators in driving the inflammatory response and for accurate disease phenotyping to allow greater understanding of disease and development of patient-oriented antiasthma therapies. In contrast to asthmatic patients, corticosteroids are relatively ineffective in COPD patients. Despite stratification of COPD patients, the results of targeted therapy have proved disappointing with the exception of recent studies using CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)2 antagonists. Currently, several other novel mediator-targeted drugs are undergoing clinical trials. As with asthma specifically targeted treatments may be of most benefit in specific COPD patient endotypes. The use of novel inflammatory mediator-targeted therapeutic agents in selected patients with asthma or COPD and the detection of markers of responsiveness or nonresponsiveness will allow a link between clinical phenotypes and pathophysiological mechanisms to be delineated reaching the goal of endotyping patients. PMID:26334389

  17. A microsimulation model for the development and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Tan, Emma; Boessen, Ruud; Fishwick, David; Klein Entink, Rinke; Meijster, Tim; Pronk, Anjoeka; van Duuren-Stuurman, Birgit; Warren, Nick

    2015-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease that is thought to affect over one million people in Great Britain. The main factor contributing to the development of COPD is tobacco smoke. This paper presents a microsimulation model for the development of COPD, incorporating population dynamics and trends in smoking. The model simulates a population longitudinally throughout their lifetimes, providing projections of future COPD prevalence and evaluation of the effects of changes in risk factor prevalence such as smoking. Sensitivity analysis provides information on the most influential model parameters. The model-predicted prevalence of COPD in 2040 was 17% in males over the age of 35 years (13% amongst non-smokers and 22% amongst smokers), and a modest decline over the next 25 years due to recent trends in smoking rates. The simulation model provides us with valuable information on current and future trends in COPD in Great Britain. It was developed primarily to enable easy extension to evaluate the effects of occupational and environmental exposures on lung function and the prevalence of COPD and to allow evaluation of interventions, such as introducing health surveillance or policy changes. As longitudinal studies for investigating COPD are difficult due to the lengthy follow-up time required and the potentially large number of drop-outs, we anticipate that the model will provide a valuable tool for health impact assessment. An extended model for occupational exposures is under development and will be presented in a subsequent paper.

  18. Caveolin-1 Promotes the Imbalance of Th17/Treg in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Nina; Wei, Xiaofang; Wang, Jingluan; Cheng, Zhaozhong; Sun, Weihong

    2016-12-01

    The imbalance of Th17/Treg cells plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) has been regarded as a potential critical regulatory protein in pathological mechanisms of chronic inflammatory respiratory diseases. Therefore, we investigated whether the loss of Cav-1 is involved in the homeostasis of Th17/Treg cells in COPD. We examined the expressions of plasma Cav-1 and circulating Th17, Treg cells, and the related cytokines in patients with COPD. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analyses showed a significant reduction of plasma Cav-1 levels in patients with stable COPD (SCOPD) and acutely exacerbated COPD (AECOPD) compared to smokers without COPD. This loss was associated with an increase in frequency of Treg and decreased in frequency of Th17 cells. To further identify the role of Cav-1, we studied the effects of Cav-1 overexpression or downregulation on frequencies of Treg and Th17 cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from subjects. Interestingly, small interfering RNA (siRNA) downregulation of Cav-1 was accompanied by an augmentation of Treg and reduction of Th17 expression. Together, our study demonstrated that the loss of Cav-1 contributed to the imbalance of Th17/Treg cells in patients with COPD.

  19. IL-22 Defect During Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection Triggers Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pichavant, Muriel; Sharan, Riti; Le Rouzic, Olivier; Olivier, Cécile; Hennegrave, Florence; Rémy, Gaëlle; Pérez-Cruz, Magdiel; Koné, Bachirou; Gosset, Pierre; Just, Nicolas; Gosset, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is linked to episodes of exacerbations caused by bacterial infections due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Our objective was to identify during COPD, factors of susceptibility to bacterial infections among cytokine network and their role in COPD exacerbations. S. pneumoniae was used to sub-lethally challenge mice chronically exposed to air or cigarette smoke (CS) and to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from non-smokers, smokers and COPD patients. The immune response and the cytokine production were evaluated. Delayed clearance of the bacteria and stronger lung inflammation observed in infected CS-exposed mice were associated with an altered production of IL-17 and IL-22 by innate immune cells. This defect was related to a reduced production of IL-1β and IL-23 by antigen presenting cells. Importantly, supplementation with recombinant IL-22 restored bacterial clearance in CS-exposed mice and limited lung alteration. In contrast with non-smokers, blood NK and NKT cells from COPD patients failed to increase IL-17 and IL-22 levels in response to S. pneumoniae, in association with a defect in IL-1β and IL-23 secretion. This study identified IL-17 and IL-22 as susceptibility factors in COPD exacerbation. Therefore targeting such cytokines could represent a potent strategy to control COPD exacerbation. PMID:26870795

  20. Targeted anti-inflammatory therapeutics in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Durham, Andrew L; Caramori, Gaetano; Chung, Kian F; Adcock, Ian M

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the airway, although the drivers and site of the inflammation differ between diseases. Asthmatics with a neutrophilic airway inflammation are associated with a poor response to corticosteroids, whereas asthmatics with eosinophilic inflammation respond better to corticosteroids. Biologicals targeting the Th2-eosinophil nexus such as anti-interleukin (IL)-4, anti-IL-5, and anti-IL-13 are ineffective in asthma as a whole but are more effective if patients are selected using cellular (eg, eosinophils) or molecular (eg, periostin) biomarkers. This highlights the key role of individual inflammatory mediators in driving the inflammatory response and for accurate disease phenotyping to allow greater understanding of disease and development of patient-oriented antiasthma therapies. In contrast to asthmatic patients, corticosteroids are relatively ineffective in COPD patients. Despite stratification of COPD patients, the results of targeted therapy have proved disappointing with the exception of recent studies using CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)2 antagonists. Currently, several other novel mediator-targeted drugs are undergoing clinical trials. As with asthma specifically targeted treatments may be of most benefit in specific COPD patient endotypes. The use of novel inflammatory mediator-targeted therapeutic agents in selected patients with asthma or COPD and the detection of markers of responsiveness or nonresponsiveness will allow a link between clinical phenotypes and pathophysiological mechanisms to be delineated reaching the goal of endotyping patients.

  1. Respiratory viruses, symptoms, and inflammatory markers in acute exacerbations and stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Seemungal, T; Harper-Owen, R; Bhowmik, A; Moric, I; Sanderson, G; Message, S; Maccallum, P; Meade, T W; Jeffries, D J; Johnston, S L; Wedzicha, J A

    2001-11-01

    The effects of respiratory viral infection on the time course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation were examined by monitoring changes in systemic inflammatory markers in stable COPD and at exacerbation. Eighty-three patients with COPD (mean [SD] age, 66.6 [7.1] yr, FEV(1), 1.06 [0.61] L) recorded daily peak expiratory flow rate and any increases in respiratory symptoms. Nasal samples and blood were taken for respiratory virus detection by culture, polymerase chain reaction, and serology, and plasma fibrinogen and serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) were determined at stable baseline and exacerbation. Sixty-four percent of exacerbations were associated with a cold occurring up to 18 d before exacerbation. Seventy-seven viruses (39 [58.2%] rhinoviruses) were detected in 66 (39.2%) of 168 COPD exacerbations in 53 (64%) patients. Viral exacerbations were associated with frequent exacerbators, colds with increased dyspnea, a higher total symptom count at presentation, a longer median symptom recovery period of 13 d, and a tendency toward higher plasma fibrinogen and serum IL-6 levels. Non-respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) respiratory viruses were detected in 11 (16%), and RSV in 16 (23.5%), of 68 stable COPD patients, with RSV detection associated with higher inflammatory marker levels. Respiratory virus infections are associated with more severe and frequent exacerbations, and may cause chronic infection in COPD. Prevention and early treatment of viral infections may lead to a decreased exacerbation frequency and morbidity associated with COPD.

  2. Senescence hypothesis for the pathogenetic mechanism of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Aoshiba, Kazutetsu; Nagai, Atsushi

    2009-12-01

    We report herein that pulmonary emphysematous lesions appear to be a dynamic phenomenon that involves not only the gradual loss of alveolar structure but also apoptosis, cellular proliferation, and cellular senescence. Cellular proliferation compensates for increased alveolar cell apoptosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, smoking, age, and the increased cell cycle turnover that compensates for apoptosis accelerate alveolar cell senescence, thereby halting cellular proliferation and tipping the balance toward apoptosis, which, in turn, promotes the formation of emphysematous lesions. As a result, alveolar cells disappear and the emphysematous lesions progress. At the same time, cellular senescence is believed to induce inflammation. More specifically, senescent alveolar cells induce inflammation by producing various inflammatory cytokines in tissue. Lymphocytes and Clara cells may also age more rapidly in the lungs of patients with COPD. Lymphocyte senescence may induce an autoimmune reaction and increase susceptibility to infection, and Clara cell senescence may impair airway regeneration as well as sustain airway inflammation. Thus, cellular senescence may be involved in arrested tissue repair, chronic inflammation, and increased susceptibility to infection, which are the typical features of COPD.

  3. Eosinophilic airway inflammation: role in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    George, Leena; Brightling, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    The chronic lung diseases, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are common affecting over 500 million people worldwide and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Asthma is typically associated with Th2-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation, in contrast to neutrophilic inflammation observed commonly in COPD. However, there is increasing evidence that the eosinophil might play an important role in 10–40% of patients with COPD. Consistently in both asthma and COPD a sputum eosinophilia is associated with a good response to corticosteroid therapy and tailored strategies aimed to normalize sputum eosinophils reduce exacerbation frequency and severity. Advances in our understanding of the multistep paradigm of eosinophil recruitment to the airway, and the consequence of eosinophilic inflammation, has led to the development of new therapies to target these molecular pathways. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of eosinophilic trafficking, the tools to assess eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthma and COPD during stable disease and exacerbations and review current and novel anti-eosinophilic treatments. PMID:26770668

  4. Bacterial infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 2000: a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Sethi, S; Murphy, T F

    2001-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. The precise role of bacterial infection in the course and pathogenesis of COPD has been a source of controversy for decades. Chronic bacterial colonization of the lower airways contributes to airway inflammation; more research is needed to test the hypothesis that this bacterial colonization accelerates the progressive decline in lung function seen in COPD (the vicious circle hypothesis). The course of COPD is characterized by intermittent exacerbations of the disease. Studies of samples obtained by bronchoscopy with the protected specimen brush, analysis of the human immune response with appropriate immunoassays, and antibiotic trials reveal that approximately half of exacerbations are caused by bacteria. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the most common causes of exacerbations, while Chlamydia pneumoniae causes a small proportion. The role of Haemophilus parainfluenzae and gram-negative bacilli remains to be established. Recent progress in studies of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of infection in the human respiratory tract and in vaccine development guided by such studies promises to lead to novel ways to treat and prevent bacterial infections in COPD.

  5. Ubiquitination and proteolysis in limb and respiratory muscles of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Debigaré, Richard; Côté, Claude H; Maltais, François

    2010-02-01

    Peripheral muscle dysfunction associated with chronic diseases is undeniably a growing problem as one of its main causes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), progresses. Among others, muscle atrophy is one component building the concept of muscle dysfunction. Muscle atrophy has a significant impact on patient clinical status, independent of the impairment in lung function. A lot of effort has been devoted lately to increasing our understanding of the relationship between COPD and the initiation and the development of muscle atrophy. A growing body of evidence is showing that the ubiquitin-proteasome system, an ATP-dependent proteolytic pathway, is playing a crucial role in the cascade leading to degradation of contractile proteins, thus promoting the development of muscle atrophy. Interestingly, this system is also involved in essential cellular processes such as response to hypoxemia and muscle tissue regeneration. In this review, existing evidence linking the activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the cellular events taking place in respiratory and peripheral muscles of patients with COPD are reported. Based on this information, the reader should be able to understand the essential role of this pathway in the context of muscle homeostasis and to picture the coming research in this area.

  6. Physical activity and sedentary behaviour: applying lessons to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hill, K; Gardiner, P A; Cavalheri, V; Jenkins, S C; Healy, G N

    2015-05-01

    In health and disease, the benefits of regular participation in moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity are well documented. However, individuals with chronic conditions, such as those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), typically do very little activity at a moderate or vigorous intensity. Much of their day is instead spent in sedentary behaviour, such as sitting or reclining, which requires very little energy expenditure. This high level of time spent in sedentary behaviour can have serious health consequences, including increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and premature mortality. There is emerging evidence to suggest that participation in light intensity physical activities (e.g. standing or slow walking) may have benefits for cardio-metabolic health. Given the low aerobic capacity of individuals with moderate to severe COPD, increasing light intensity activity (through reducing sedentary time) may be a feasible additional strategy to improve health in this population, alongside traditional recommendations to increase the time spent in moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity. This review provides an overview of physical activity and sedentary behaviour, with a particular emphasis on these behaviours for people with COPD. It provides suggestions for the measurement of these behaviours within the clinical setting, as well as for interventions that may be effective at increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviour in this population.

  7. Spatial Clustering and Local Risk Factors of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ta-Chien; Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Tseng, Tzu-Jung; Chiang, Po-Huang

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality has been steadily increasing in Taiwan since 2009. In order to understand where the hotspot areas are and what the local risk factors are, we integrated an ecological and a case-control study. We used a two-stage approach to identify hotspots and explore the possible risk factors for developing COPD. The first stage used the annual township COPD mortality from 2000 to 2012 and applied the retrospective space-time scan statistic to calculate the local relative risks in each township. In the second stage, we conducted a case-control study, recruiting 200 patients from one local hospital within the one identified hotspot area located in southern Taiwan. Logistic regression was applied for analyzing the personal risk factors of COPD. The univariate analyses showed that higher percentages of aborigines, patients with tuberculosis (TB) history, and those with smoking history had COPD (p < 0.05). After controlling for demographic variables, aboriginal status (adjusted odds ratios (AORs): 3.01, 95% CI: 1.52–5.93) and smoking history (AORs: 2.64, 95% CI: 1.46–4.76) were still the two significant risk factors. This two-stage approach might be beneficial to examine and cross-validate the findings from an aggregate to an individual scale, and can be easily extended to other chronic diseases. PMID:26690457

  8. [Incidence, pathogenesis and importance of nocturnal hypoxaemia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Lewczuk, Jerzy; Piszko, Piotr

    2006-01-01

    Noctural hypoxaemia (NH) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was first described over 40 years ago, however, its importance is not fully established. NH is defined most frequently as a drop in oxygen saturation below 90% and it occurs in almost all COPD patients PaO2 < 55 mmHg and in 30-40% of those with PaO2 < 60 mmHg. The main reason for NH is alveolar hypoventilation which is most pronounced during ohase REM. It is known that even short term episodes of NH increase pulmonary artery pressure, yet, the impact of chronic, isolated NH on pulmonary hypertension development was not found. Also, the relationship of induced by NH cardiac arrythmias with sudden death in COPD was not documented and association of NH with prognosis in COPD was not proved. Actually, there is no need to perform NH examination routinely. According to the ATS/ERS latest standards, the determination of NH can be helpful to qualify COPD patients with PaO2 55-65 mmHg to longterm oxygen therapy.

  9. Are improvements maintained after in-home pulmonary telerehabilitation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed

    Marquis, Nicole; Larivée, Pierre; Dubois, Marie-France; Tousignant, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated if improvements can be maintained over 24 weeks when in-home pulmonary telerehabilitation is combined with asynchronous self-management education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Twenty-three community-living elders with moderate to very severe COPD participated in a pre/post-intervention study. Over 8 weeks, they had access to self-learning capsules on self-management, received 15 in-home teletreatment sessions and were encouraged to gradually engage in unsupervised sessions. Participants were assessed before the intervention (T1), immediately after the intervention (T2), and 6 months later (T3). Outcome measures were (1) exercise tolerance (6-minute walk test [6MWT]), Cycle Endurance Test [CET]), and (2) quality of life (Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire [CRQ]). Although there were significant improvements after 8 weeks of pulmonary telerehabilitation on the 6MWT, CET and three of four CRQ domains, none of these improvements were maintained after 6 months and scores returned to their baseline values (all p values > 0.05 when comparing T3 with T1). While pulmonary telerehabilitation is possible and has a positive impact on patients with moderate to very severe COPD, improvements were not maintained in the long-term even when physical therapy was accompanied by self-management education.

  10. Kinases as Novel Therapeutic Targets in Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    Multiple kinases play a critical role in orchestrating the chronic inflammation and structural changes in the respiratory tract of patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Kinases activate signaling pathways that lead to contraction of airway smooth muscle and release of inflammatory mediators (such as cytokines, chemokines, growth factors) as well as cell migration, activation, and proliferation. For this reason there has been great interest in the development of kinase inhibitors as anti-inflammatory therapies, particular where corticosteroids are less effective, as in severe asthma and COPD. However, it has proven difficult to develop selective kinase inhibitors that are both effective and safe after oral administration and this has led to a search for inhaled kinase inhibitors, which would reduce systemic exposure. Although many kinases have been implicated in inflammation and remodeling of airway disease, very few classes of drug have reached the stage of clinical studies in these diseases. The most promising drugs are p38 MAP kinases, isoenzyme-selective PI3-kinases, Janus-activated kinases, and Syk-kinases, and inhaled formulations of these drugs are now in development. There has also been interest in developing inhibitors that block more than one kinase, because these drugs may be more effective and with less risk of losing efficacy with time. No kinase inhibitors are yet on the market for the treatment of airway diseases, but as kinase inhibitors are improved from other therapeutic areas there is hope that these drugs may eventually prove useful in treating refractory asthma and COPD.

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Administration in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: State of the Science.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shih-Lung; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Yao, Chao-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have chronic, irreversible airway inflammation; currently, there is no effective or curative treatment and the main goals of COPD management are to mitigate symptoms and improve patients' quality of life. Stem cell based therapy offers a promising therapeutic approach that has shown potential in diverse degenerative lung diseases. Preclinical studies have demonstrated encouraging outcomes of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) therapy for lung disorders including emphysema, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, fibrosis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. This review summarizes available data on 15 studies currently registered by the ClinicalTrials.gov repository, which used different stem cell therapy protocols for COPD; these included bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs), bone marrow-derived MSCs, adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ADSCs), and adipose-derived MSCs. Published results of three trials indicate that administering BMMCs or MSCs in the setting of degenerative lung disease is safe and may improve patients' condition and quality of life; however, larger-scale studies are needed to evaluate efficacy. Results of another completed trial (NCT01872624) are not yet published, and eleven other studies are ongoing; these include MSCs therapy in emphysema, several studies of ADSCs in COPD, another in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and plerixafor mobilization of CD117 stem cells to peripheral blood.

  12. Bacterial Infection in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in 2000: a State-of-the-Art Review

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sanjay; Murphy, Timothy F.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. The precise role of bacterial infection in the course and pathogenesis of COPD has been a source of controversy for decades. Chronic bacterial colonization of the lower airways contributes to airway inflammation; more research is needed to test the hypothesis that this bacterial colonization accelerates the progressive decline in lung function seen in COPD (the vicious circle hypothesis). The course of COPD is characterized by intermittent exacerbations of the disease. Studies of samples obtained by bronchoscopy with the protected specimen brush, analysis of the human immune response with appropriate immunoassays, and antibiotic trials reveal that approximately half of exacerbations are caused by bacteria. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the most common causes of exacerbations, while Chlamydia pneumoniae causes a small proportion. The role of Haemophilus parainfluenzae and gram-negative bacilli remains to be established. Recent progress in studies of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of infection in the human respiratory tract and in vaccine development guided by such studies promises to lead to novel ways to treat and prevent bacterial infections in COPD. PMID:11292642

  13. The Role of Mitochondria and Oxidative/Antioxidative Imbalance in Pathobiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sitarek, Przemysław; Miłkowska-Dymanowska, Joanna; Piotrowski, Wojciech Jerzy; Górski, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common preventable and treatable disease, characterized by persistent airflow limitation that is usually progressive and associated with an enhanced chronic inflammatory response in the airways and the lung to noxious particles or gases. The major risk factor of COPD, which has been proven in many studies, is the exposure to cigarette smoke. However, it is 15–20% of all smokers who develop COPD. This is why we should recognize the pathobiology of COPD as involving a complex interaction between several factors, including genetic vulnerability. Oxidant-antioxidant imbalance is recognized as one of the significant factors in COPD pathogenesis. Numerous exogenous and endogenous sources of ROS are present in pathobiology of COPD. One of endogenous sources of ROS is mitochondria. Although leakage of electrons from electron transport chain and forming of ROS are the effect of physiological functioning of mitochondria, there are various intra- and extracellular factors which may increase this amount and significantly contribute to oxidative-antioxidative imbalance. With the coexistence with impaired antioxidant defence, all these issues lead to oxidative and carbonyl stress. Both of these states play a significant role in pathobiology of COPD and may account for development of major comorbidities of this disease. PMID:28105251

  14. Pharmacology and clinical efficacy of erdosteine in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Maurizio

    2007-12-01

    Erdosteine is a multimechanism, mucolytic agent that decreases the sputum viscoelastic properties and bacterial adhesion to the cell membrane, endowed with bronchial anti-inflammatory activity and a scavenging effect on free oxidant radicals. Erdosteine is a prodrug and metabolite I is the active metabolite of erdosteine owing to its free thiol group. In acute infective exacerbation of chronic bronchitis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), adding erdosteine to standard treatment significantly modified the outcome by improving the symptoms and reducing the length of disease. Furthermore, erdosteine has shown a synergism with antibiotic therapy. In stable COPD patients, long-term treatment with erdosteine had a protective effect against exacerbations by reducing the rate of exacerbations and hospitalizations in the study period. A total of 8 months of treatment with erdosteine significantly improved the patients' health status and preserved lung function. Erdosteine has a scavenging effect on free oxidant radicals by a direct and indirect antioxidative effect and the final result is a protective effect against tissue damage, as demonstrated in animal studies. In view of the persuasive evidence that oxidative stress is important in the pathophysiology of COPD, erdosteine appears to be a logical approach to therapy.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Administration in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: State of the Science

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shih-Lung

    2017-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have chronic, irreversible airway inflammation; currently, there is no effective or curative treatment and the main goals of COPD management are to mitigate symptoms and improve patients' quality of life. Stem cell based therapy offers a promising therapeutic approach that has shown potential in diverse degenerative lung diseases. Preclinical studies have demonstrated encouraging outcomes of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) therapy for lung disorders including emphysema, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, fibrosis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. This review summarizes available data on 15 studies currently registered by the ClinicalTrials.gov repository, which used different stem cell therapy protocols for COPD; these included bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs), bone marrow-derived MSCs, adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ADSCs), and adipose-derived MSCs. Published results of three trials indicate that administering BMMCs or MSCs in the setting of degenerative lung disease is safe and may improve patients' condition and quality of life; however, larger-scale studies are needed to evaluate efficacy. Results of another completed trial (NCT01872624) are not yet published, and eleven other studies are ongoing; these include MSCs therapy in emphysema, several studies of ADSCs in COPD, another in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and plerixafor mobilization of CD117 stem cells to peripheral blood. PMID:28303154

  16. Exogenous surfactant therapy and mucus rheology in chronic obstructive airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, R; Puniyani, R R

    2000-01-01

    Exogenous surfactant is a specialized biomaterial used for substitution of the lipoprotein mixture normally present in the lungs-pulmonary surfactant. Respiratory Distress Syndrome is a disease of preterm infants mainly caused by pulmonary immaturity as evidenced by a deficiency of mature lung surfactant. Pulmonary surfactant is known to stabilize small alveoli and prevent them from collapsing during expiration. However, apart from alveoli, surfactant also lines the narrow conducting airways of the tracheobronchial tree. This paper reviews the role of this surfactant in the airways and its effect on mucus rheology and mucociliary clearance. Its potential role as a therapeutic biomaterial in chronic obstructive airway diseases, namely asthma, chronic bronchitis, and respiratory manifestations of cystic fibrosis, are discussed. This paper also attempts to elucidate the exact steps in the pathogenic pathway of these diseases which could be reversed by supplementation of exogenous surfactant formulations. It is shown that there is great potential for the use of present day surfactants (which are actually formulated for use in Respiratory Disease Syndrome) as therapy in the aforementioned diseases of altered mucus viscoelasticity and mucociliary clearance. However, for improved effectiveness, specific surfactant formulations satisfying certain specific criteria should be tailor-made for the clinical condition for which they are intended. The properties required to be fulfilled by the optimal exogenous surfactant in each of the above clinical conditions are enumerated in this paper.

  17. Epidemiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a population-based study in Krasnoyarsk region, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Artyukhov, Ivan P; Arshukova, Irina L; Dobretsova, Elena A; Dugina, Tatyana A; Shulmin, Andrey V; Demko, Irina V

    2015-01-01

    Background Krasnoyarsk region is a territory with the widespread risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) such as tobacco smoke, air pollution, and occupational exposure. An assessment of COPD prevalence based on medical diagnosis statistics underestimates the true COPD prevalence. This study aims to evaluate how medical examinations may increase the accuracy of estimates of COPD prevalence. Methods True COPD prevalence was estimated as a number of patients with the established disease diagnosis supplemented by the additional disease cases detected during medical examinations per 1,000 inhabitants of the region. Official medical statistics data and the data collected from the Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases program 2011 among 15,000 inhabitants of the region aged 18 years and older were analyzed. Results This study revealed the COPD cases without official medical diagnosis. The true prevalence of COPD is estimated to be two times higher than the prevalence estimates based on medical diagnosis statistics. Conclusion Undiagnosed and untreated cases of COPD result in severe COPD forms as well as addition of severe comorbidities. Because of this, there is an increase in the index of potential years of life lost. Conducting special medical examinations may increase the number of COPD cases detected at the early stages of the disease. This, in turn, may reduce the overall burden of the disease for the population of the region. PMID:26366070

  18. Spatial Clustering and Local Risk Factors of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Chan, Ta-Chien; Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Tseng, Tzu-Jung; Chiang, Po-Huang

    2015-12-10

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality has been steadily increasing in Taiwan since 2009. In order to understand where the hotspot areas are and what the local risk factors are, we integrated an ecological and a case-control study. We used a two-stage approach to identify hotspots and explore the possible risk factors for developing COPD. The first stage used the annual township COPD mortality from 2000 to 2012 and applied the retrospective space-time scan statistic to calculate the local relative risks in each township. In the second stage, we conducted a case-control study, recruiting 200 patients from one local hospital within the one identified hotspot area located in southern Taiwan. Logistic regression was applied for analyzing the personal risk factors of COPD. The univariate analyses showed that higher percentages of aborigines, patients with tuberculosis (TB) history, and those with smoking history had COPD (p < 0.05). After controlling for demographic variables, aboriginal status (adjusted odds ratios (AORs): 3.01, 95% CI: 1.52-5.93) and smoking history (AORs: 2.64, 95% CI: 1.46-4.76) were still the two significant risk factors. This two-stage approach might be beneficial to examine and cross-validate the findings from an aggregate to an individual scale, and can be easily extended to other chronic diseases.

  19. IL-22 Defect During Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection Triggers Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Pichavant, Muriel; Sharan, Riti; Le Rouzic, Olivier; Olivier, Cécile; Hennegrave, Florence; Rémy, Gaëlle; Pérez-Cruz, Magdiel; Koné, Bachirou; Gosset, Pierre; Just, Nicolas; Gosset, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is linked to episodes of exacerbations caused by bacterial infections due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Our objective was to identify during COPD, factors of susceptibility to bacterial infections among cytokine network and their role in COPD exacerbations. S. pneumoniae was used to sub-lethally challenge mice chronically exposed to air or cigarette smoke (CS) and to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from non-smokers, smokers and COPD patients. The immune response and the cytokine production were evaluated. Delayed clearance of the bacteria and stronger lung inflammation observed in infected CS-exposed mice were associated with an altered production of IL-17 and IL-22 by innate immune cells. This defect was related to a reduced production of IL-1β and IL-23 by antigen presenting cells. Importantly, supplementation with recombinant IL-22 restored bacterial clearance in CS-exposed mice and limited lung alteration. In contrast with non-smokers, blood NK and NKT cells from COPD patients failed to increase IL-17 and IL-22 levels in response to S. pneumoniae, in association with a defect in IL-1β and IL-23 secretion. This study identified IL-17 and IL-22 as susceptibility factors in COPD exacerbation. Therefore targeting such cytokines could represent a potent strategy to control COPD exacerbation.

  20. A persistent and diverse airway microbiota present during chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yvonne J; Kim, Eugenia; Cox, Michael J; Brodie, Eoin L; Brown, Ron; Wiener-Kronish, Jeanine P; Lynch, Susan V

    2010-02-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are a major source of morbidity and contribute significantly to healthcare costs. Although bacterial infections are implicated in nearly 50% of exacerbations, only a handful of pathogens have been consistently identified in COPD airways, primarily by culture-based methods, and the bacterial microbiota in acute exacerbations remains largely uncharacterized. The aim of this study was to comprehensively profile airway bacterial communities using a culture-independent microarray, the 16S rRNA PhyloChip, of a cohort of COPD patients requiring ventilatory support and antibiotic therapy for exacerbation-related respiratory failure. PhyloChip analysis revealed the presence of over 1,200 bacterial taxa representing 140 distinct families, many previously undetected in airway diseases; bacterial community composition was strongly influenced by the duration of intubation. A core community of 75 taxa was detected in all patients, many of which are known pathogens. Bacterial community diversity in COPD airways is substantially greater than previously recognized and includes a number of potential pathogens detected in the setting of antibiotic exposure. Comprehensive assessment of the COPD airway microbiota using high-throughput, culture-independent methods may prove key to understanding the relationships between airway bacterial colonization, acute exacerbation, and clinical outcomes in this and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases.

  1. Chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The Finnish Action Programme, interim report.

    PubMed

    Pietinalho, A; Kinnula, V L; Sovijärvi, A R A; Vilkman, S; Säynäjäkangas, O; Liippo, K; Kontula, E; Laitinen, L A

    2007-07-01

    The Finnish National Prevention and Treatment Programme for Chronic Bronchitis and COPD, launched in 1998, has, to date, been running for 6 years (2003). The goals of this action programme were to reduce the incidence of COPD and the number of moderate and severe cases of the disease, and to reduce both the number of days of hospitalisation and treatment costs. A prevalent implementation of over 250 information and training events started. Health centres and pharmacies appointed a person in charge of COPD patients. In order to improve the cooperation between primary and specialised care, two thirds of hospital districts created local COPD treatment chains. The early diagnosis of COPD by spirometric examination was activated during the programme. Number of health centres with available spirometric services increased to 95%. Before the start of the programme, approximately 5-9% of the adult population had COPD. During the whole programme, the proportion of male and female smokers decreased from 30% to 26% and from 20% to 19%, respectively. The total number of hospitalisation periods and days due to COPD decreased by 15% and 18%, respectively. Both the number of pensioners and daily sickness days due to COPD also decreased by 18%. Registered COPD induced deaths remained at their previous levels during the monitoring period, i.e. around 1000 deaths out of 5.2 millions annually. The measures recommended by the programme have been widely introduced but they need to be still more effective.

  2. Lung function decline rates according to GOLD group in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joohae; Yoon, Ho Il; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lim, Seong Yong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Lee, Sang Yeub; Lee, Jin Hwa; Lee, Sang-Do; Lee, Chang-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) groups A–D were introduced, the lung function changes according to group have been evaluated rarely. Objective We investigated the rate of decline in annual lung function in patients categorized according to the 2014 GOLD guidelines. Methods Patients with COPD included in the Korean Obstructive Lung Disease (KOLD) prospective study, who underwent yearly postbronchodilator spirometry at least three times, were included. The main outcome was the annual decline in postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), which was analyzed by random-slope and random-intercept mixed linear regression. Results A total 175 participants were included. No significant postbronchodilator FEV1 decline was observed between the groups (−34.4±7.9 [group A]; −26.2±9.4 [group B]; −22.7±16.0 [group C]; and −24.0±8.7 mL/year [group D]) (P=0.79). The group with less symptoms (−32.3±7.2 vs −25.0±6.5 mL/year) (P=0.44) and the low risk group (−31.0±6.1 vs −23.6±7.7 mL/year) (P=0.44) at baseline showed a more rapid decline in the postbronchodilator FEV1, but the trends were not statistically significant. However, GOLD stages classified by FEV1 were significantly related to the annual lung function decline. Conclusion There was no significant difference in lung function decline rates according to the GOLD groups. Prior classification using postbronchodilator FEV1 predicts decline in lung function better than does the new classification. PMID:26379432

  3. Unicentric study of cell therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/pulmonary emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu; Bilaqui, Aldemir; Greco, Oswaldo T; Ruiz, Milton Artur; Marcelino, Monica Y; Stessuk, Talita; de Faria, Carolina A; Lago, Mario R

    2011-01-01

    Within the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) spectrum, lung emphysema presents, as a primarily histopathologic feature, the destruction of pulmonary parenchyma and, accordingly, an increase in the airflow obstruction distal to the terminal bronchiole. Notwithstanding the significant advances in prevention and treatment of symptoms, no effective or curative therapy has been accomplished. In this context, cellular therapy with stem cells (SCs) arises as a new therapeutic approach, with a wide application potential. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of SCs infusion procedure in patients with advanced COPD (stage IV dyspnea). After selection, patients underwent clinical examination and received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, immediately prior to the bone marrow harvest. The bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) were isolated and infused into a peripheral vein. The 12-month follow-up showed a significant improvement in the quality of life, as well as a clinical stable condition, which suggest a change in the natural process of the disease. Therefore, the proposed methodology in this study for BMMC cell therapy in sufferers of advanced COPD was demonstrated to be free of significant adverse effects. Although a larger sample and a greater follow-up period are needed, it is possible to infer that BMMC cell therapy introduces an unprecedented change in the course or in the natural history of emphysema, inhibiting or slowing the progression of disease. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01110252) and was approved by the Brazilian National Committee of Ethics in Research (registration no. 14764, CONEP report 233/2009). PMID:21311694

  4. Computed tomography phenotypes in severe, early-onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Craig P; Jacobson, Francine L; Gill, Ritu; Silverman, Edwin K

    2007-12-01

    Subjects with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may have marked differences in emphysema severity on chest computed tomography (CT) scans. Although many patients with severe COPD will have chest CTs performed during their clinical care, chest CTs have not been widely included in epidemiologic and genetic studies of COPD. We sought to determine whether chest CT scans performed for clinical indications can provide useful data in an epidemiologic study of COPD and to determine whether chest CT scans can be used to define subtypes of severe, early-onset COPD. Clinical chest CT scans on 91 probands in the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study were retrospectively reviewed by 2 pulmonologists and 1 to 2 chest radiologists, using a semi-quantitative emphysema severity score, ranging from 0-24. 88 of 91 chest CT scans were suitable for emphysema analysis. There was a wide range of emphysema severity, from mild to severe (1.3-23.7). Emphysema-predominant subjects (upper 3 quartiles of emphysema scores) had more severe airflow obstruction than airway-predominant subjects (lowest quartile of emphysema scores): FEV(1) 17.4% vs. 22.4% predicted, p=0.009. A higher percentage of airway-predominant subjects had a positive bronchodilator response (28.6% vs. 6.7%, p=0.009). Airway-predominant subjects also had a higher frequency of physician-diagnosed asthma (p=0.04) and a trend towards higher serum immunoglobulin E levels (p=0.09). Analysis of siblings of early-onset COPD probands suggested a genetic contribution to the subgroups. Using clinical chest CT scans, we were able to identify an airway-predominant subgroup with asthma-like features among subjects with severe, early-onset COPD.

  5. Prevalence and risk factors of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Dhaka city population.

    PubMed

    Islam, M S; Hossain, M M; Pasha, M M; Azad, A K; Murshed, K M

    2013-07-01

    This prospective, cross-sectional population based survey was carried out in the Respiratory wing, Department of Medicine, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh to see the prevalence and risk factors of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among Dhaka City Population in Bangladesh. The total sample size was 900 at the age of 35 years or above. Spirometry was performed according to ATS criteria. Data related to smoking history, respiratory symptoms, co-morbidities, physical examination findings, spirometry values and other investigation reports were noted in the questionnaire. The mean age was 45.26±10.08 (Mean±SD); of them, male 76.9% and female 23.1%. Among them, smoker was 481 with a smoking duration of 10 pack year 27.8% and non smoker were 419. Spirometric screening yielded diagnosis of COPD in 11.4% (103/900). Using operational severity criteria adopted from Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) mild, moderate, severe and very severe COPD were found in 42.7%, 27.2%, 20.4% and 9.7% respectively. The hall mark symptom of COPD exertional dyspnea was seen in 10.4%, non-specific symptoms like cough and sputum were found in 40% and 19% respectively. Physical sign like vesicular breath sound with prolonged expiration and ronchi were found in 6.1% and 4.1% respectively. In this study, age (Mean±SD in years) (57.34±11.74), Sex (Male: Female = 4:1), low BMI (Mean±SD) (21.56±3.83), Smoker 56(20.2%) and low Socio-economic condition 54(13.6%) found to be risk factor of COPD. Regression analysis revealed that age (p<0.001), sex (p<0.001), smoking duration (p<0.001) and low socioeconomic condition (p<0.05) as independent risk factors for COPD.

  6. Sex differences in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease evaluated using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Miranda; Zhang, Wei; Laratta, Peter K.; Sin, Don D.; Lam, Stephen; Coxson, Harvey O.

    2014-03-01

    Although there are more women than men dying of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the United States and elsewhere, we still do not have a clear understanding of the differences in the pathophysiology of airflow obstruction between the sexes. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging technology that has the capability of imaging small bronchioles with resolution approaching histology. Therefore, our objective was to compare OCT-derived airway wall measurements between males and females matched for lung size and in anatomically matched small airways. Subjects 50-80 yrs were enrolled in the British Columbia Lung Health Study and underwent OCT and spirometry. OCT was performed using a 1.5mm diameter probe/sheath in anatomically matched airways for males and females; the right lower lobe (RB8 or RB9) or left lower lobe (LB8 or LB9) during end-expiration. OCT airway wall area (Aaw) was obtained by manual segmentation. For males and females there was no significant difference in OCT Aaw (p=0.12). Spearman correlation coefficients indicated that the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and Aaw were significantly correlated for males (r=-0.78, p=0.004) but not for females (r=-0.20, p=0.49) matched for lung size. These novel OCT findings demonstrate that while there were no overall sex differences in airway wall thickness, the relationship between lung function and airway wall thickness was correlated only in men. Therefore, factors other than airway remodeling may be driving COPD pathogenesis in women and OCT may provide important information for investigating airway remodeling and its relationship with COPD progression.

  7. Comparison of health-related quality of life measures in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were: (1) to compare the discriminative ability of a disease-specific instrument, the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) to generic instruments (i.e., EQ-5D and SF-36); and (2), to evaluate the strength of associations among clinical and health-related quality of life (HRQL) measures in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods We analyzed data collected from 120 COPD patients in a Veterans Affairs hospital. Patients self-completed two generic HRQL measures (EQ-5D and SF-36) and the disease-specific SGRQ. The ability of the summary scores of these HRQL measures to discriminate COPD disease severity based on Global Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage was assessed using relative efficiency ratios (REs). Strength of correlation was used to further evaluate associations between clinical and HRQL measures. Results Mean total scores for PCS-36, EQ-VAS and SGRQ were significantly lower for the more severe stages of COPD (p < 0.05). Using SGRQ total score as reference, the summary scores of the generic measures (PCS-36, MCS-36, EQ index, and EQ-VAS) all had REs of <1. SGRQ exhibited a stronger correlation with clinical measures than the generic summary scores. For instance, SGRQ was moderately correlated with FEV1 (r = 0.43), while generic summary scores had trivial levels of correlation with FEV1 (r < 0.2). Conclusions The SGRQ demonstrated greater ability to discriminate among different levels of severity stages of COPD than generic measures of health, suggestive that SGRQ may provide COPD studies with greater statistical power than EQ-5D and SF-36 summary scores to capture meaningful differences in clinical severity. PMID:21501522

  8. Association between markers of emphysema and more severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Boschetto, P; Quintavalle, S; Zeni, E; Leprotti, S; Potena, A; Ballerin, L; Papi, A; Palladini, G; Luisetti, M; Annovazzi, L; Iadarola, P; De Rosa, E; Fabbri, L M; Mapp, C E

    2006-01-01

    Background The predominant emphysema phenotype is associated with more severe airflow limitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A study was undertaken to investigate whether COPD patients, with or without emphysema quantitatively confirmed by high resolution computed tomography (HRCT), have different COPD severity as assessed by the BODE index (body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnoea, exercise performance) and inspiratory capacity to total lung capacity ratio (IC/TLC), and by different biological markers of lung parenchymal destruction. Methods Twenty six outpatients with COPD and eight healthy non‐smokers were examined. Each subject underwent HRCT scanning, pulmonary function tests, cell counts, and measurements of neutrophil elastase, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‐9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)‐1 in induced sputum, as well as measurement of desmosine, a marker of elastin degradation in urine, plasma and sputum. Results Patients with HRCT confirmed emphysema had a higher BODE index and lower IC/TLC ratio than subjects without HRCT confirmed emphysema and controls. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/forced vital capacity ratio, and carbon monoxide transfer coefficient were lower, whereas the number of eosinophils, MMP‐9, and the MMP‐9/TIMP‐1 ratio in sputum were higher in patients with emphysema. In COPD patients the number of sputum eosinophils was the biological variable that correlated positively with the HRCT score of emphysema (p = 0.04). Conclusions These results suggest that COPD associated with HRCT confirmed emphysema is characterised by more severe lung function impairment, more intense airway inflammation and, possibly, more serious systemic dysfunction than COPD not associated with HRCT confirmed emphysema. PMID:16769715

  9. Pneumothorax Risk Factors in Smokers with and without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Brian D.; Foreman, Marilyn G.; Bowler, Russell; Jacobson, Francine; Make, Barry J.; Castaldi, Peter J.; San José Estépar, Raúl; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: The demographic, physiological, and computed tomography (CT) features associated with pneumothorax in smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are not clearly defined. Objectives: We evaluated the hypothesis that pneumothorax in smokers is associated with male sex, tall and thin stature, airflow obstruction, and increased total and subpleural emphysema. Methods: The study included smokers with and without COPD from the COPDGene Study, with quantitative chest CT analysis. Pleural-based emphysema was assessed on the basis of local histogram measures of emphysema. Pneumothorax history was defined by subject self-report. Measurements and Main Results: Pneumothorax was reported in 286 (3.2%) of 9,062 participants. In all participants, risk of prior pneumothorax was significantly higher in men (odds ratio [OR], 1.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08–2.22) and non-Hispanic white subjects (OR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.34–2.69). Risk of prior pneumothorax was associated with increased percent CT emphysema in all participants and participants with COPD (OR, 1.04 for each 1% increase in emphysema; 95% CI, 1.03–1.06). Increased pleural-based emphysema was independently associated with risk of past pneumothorax in all participants (OR, 1.05 for each 1% increase; 95% CI, 1.01–1.10). In smokers with normal spirometry, risk of past pneumothorax was associated with non-Hispanic white race and lifetime smoking intensity (OR, 1.20 for every 10 pack-years; 95% CI, 1.09–1.33). Conclusions: Among smokers, pneumothorax is associated with male sex, non-Hispanic white race, and increased percentage of total and subpleural CT emphysema. Pneumothorax was not independently associated with height or lung function, even in participants with COPD. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00608764). PMID:25295410

  10. Unicentric study of cell therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu; Bilaqui, Aldemir; Greco, Oswaldo T; Ruiz, Milton Artur; Marcelino, Monica Y; Stessuk, Talita; de Faria, Carolina A; Lago, Mario R

    2011-01-01

    Within the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) spectrum, lung emphysema presents, as a primarily histopathologic feature, the destruction of pulmonary parenchyma and, accordingly, an increase in the airflow obstruction distal to the terminal bronchiole. Notwithstanding the significant advances in prevention and treatment of symptoms, no effective or curative therapy has been accomplished. In this context, cellular therapy with stem cells (SCs) arises as a new therapeutic approach, with a wide application potential. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of SCs infusion procedure in patients with advanced COPD (stage IV dyspnea). After selection, patients underwent clinical examination and received granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, immediately prior to the bone marrow harvest. The bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) were isolated and infused into a peripheral vein. The 12-month follow-up showed a significant improvement in the quality of life, as well as a clinical stable condition, which suggest a change in the natural process of the disease. Therefore, the proposed methodology in this study for BMMC cell therapy in sufferers of advanced COPD was demonstrated to be free of significant adverse effects. Although a larger sample and a greater follow-up period are needed, it is possible to infer that BMMC cell therapy introduces an unprecedented change in the course or in the natural history of emphysema, inhibiting or slowing the progression of disease. This clinical trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01110252) and was approved by the Brazilian National Committee of Ethics in Research (registration no. 14764, CONEP report 233/2009).

  11. Primary care of the patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Italy.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Bettoncelli, Germano; Sessa, Emiliano; Cricelli, Claudio

    2009-04-01

    Using a general practice research database with general practitioner (GP) clinical records, it has been observed that among the 617,280 subjects registered with 400 Italian GPs, 15,229 (2.47%) patients were suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Of these, 67.7% had a chest radiograph at least once in a period of 10 years (1997-2006), while in the same period only 31.9% had a spirometry, 29.9% had a visit to a specialist, and 0.94% had a visit to an allergologist. From 1997 to 2006, 7.5% of patients with COPD, especially the oldest ones, were hospitalized at least once for the disease, although 44.0% of all patients with COPD were hospitalized for other pathologies. With regard to treatment, in 2006, 10,936 (71.1%) of COPD patients received at least one drug for their disease (drugs classified within the R03 therapeutic pharmacological subgroup of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification). In particular, salmeterol/fluticasone was prescribed 6441 times, tiotropium 4962, theophylline 3142, beclomethasone 2853, salbutamol 2256, formoterol 2191, salbutamol/beclomethasone 2129, oxitropium 1802 and formoterol/budesonide 1741 times. Based on these findings, the level of COPD management in Italy seems to fall short of recommended international COPD guidelines. In particular, it appears that GPs usually prescribe treatment without the use of spirometry, and/or without taking into account the severity of airway obstruction. It must also be noted that, in general, patients with COPD are undertreated.

  12. Acute effects of 0. 2 ppm ozone in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Solic, J.J.; Hazucha, M.J.; Bromberg, P.A.

    1982-06-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) might be more sensitive than normal persons to the respiratory effects of oxidant pollutant exposure. Our study was designed to determine the response of patients with COPD to ozone. Thirteen white men with nonreversible airways obstruction (mean FEV1/FVC, 58%), of whom 8 were current smokers, were randomly exposed for 2 h to air and to 0.2 ppm ozone on 2 consecutive days using a single-blind crossover design. During either exposure, subjects exercised for 7.5 min every 30 min. Measures of respiratory mechanics obtained pre-exposure and postexposure were not significantly affected by either exposure. Similarly, ventilation and gas exchange measured during exercise showed no difference either between exercise periods or exposure days. However, arterial O/sub 2/ saturation (SaO/sub 2/), measured by ear oximetry during the final exercise period each day was lower (94.8%) at the end of O/sub 2/ exposure, than SaO/sub 2/ obtained at the end of air exposure (95.3%), the difference (0.48%) being significant (p . 0.008). Because normal subjects undergoing comparable exposures show a threshold for respiratory mechanical effects at about 0.3 ppm ozone, our data suggest that mild to moderate COPD is not associated with increased sensitivity to low ozone concentrations. However, our data do not rule out the possibility that the response of such subjects might be exaggerated at higher ozone concentrations. The consistent (in 11 of 13 subjects), though small, decrease in SaO/sub 2/ may indicate that indexes of ventilation/perfusion distribution might be more sensitive measures of ozone effect in this compromised patient group than are conventional respiratory mechanics measures.

  13. [Epidemiological study of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Spain (IBERPOC): prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms and airflow limitation].

    PubMed

    Sobradillo, V; Miravitlles, M; Jiménez, C A; Gabriel, R; Viejo, J L; Masa, J F; Fernández-Fau, L; Villasante, C

    1999-04-01

    The prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms and chronic airflow limitation (CAFL) was determined in a multicentric epidemiological study carried out in seven different areas of Spain. Based on a target population of 236,412 persons, a random census sample of 4,035 individuals between 40 and 69 years of age was chosen. Subjects answered several questionnaires and performed spirometric tests followed by a bronchodilation test if bronchial obstruction was detected. Respiratory symptoms were reported by 48% of the population (95% CI: 46.4-49.5%) with greater frequency of symptoms among men than women (55.2% versus 41%, p < 0.001). The following levels of prevalence of chronic symptoms were found: cough, 13.5% (95% CI: 12.5-14.6%); expectoration, 10.7% (95% CI: 9.7-11.6%); dyspnea after one flight of stairs, 10.4% (95% CI: 9.5-11.4%); and wheezing, 40.2% (95% CI: 38.7-41.7%). The prevalence of chronic bronchitis (CB) was 4.8% (95% CI: 4.1-5.4%) and was more frequent among men than among women (8.3% and 1.4%, respectively; p < 0.001). Asthma had been diagnosed previously in 4.9% (95% CI: 4.2-5.5%), more often in women than in men (5.8% and 3.8%, respectively; p < 0.003). CAFL was found in 10.6% (95% CI: 9.6-11.5%), 15.8% in men and 5.5% in women (p < 0.001). All respiratory symptoms except asthma were more frequent among smokers than among ex-smokers, and in turn were more common among ex-smokers than non-smokers. The frequency of symptoms increased in accordance with accumulated smoking. The prevalence of CB and CAFL was vastly different from one region to another. Multivariate analysis showed that factors associated independently with the appearance of CB were smoking, age over 60 years, male sex and having worked in industry. In conclusion, respiratory symptoms, including CB and CAFL, are common in the Spanish population. Smoking and amount of smoking are directly related to the frequency of such symptoms. Substantial differences were found in the prevalence of CB

  14. Prevalence and Correlates of Insomnia and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shahbaj; Gupta, Manan; Gupta, Ravi; Dhyani, Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Poor sleep quality, insomnia, and restless legs syndrome (RLS) and sleep apnea are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinical correlates of these problems are poorly understood. Aims: This study was to find out the prevalence and correlates of insomnia and subjects with ‘high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)’ in adults with chronic kidney disease. Materials and Methods: One hundred and four adults with CKD were included. Their demographic data, details regarding kidney disease and hemodialysis (HD) were recorded. Presence of insomnia and its severity was assessed. They were screened for sleep apnea using a validated questionnaire. Results: Average age was 54.17 (± 12.96) years. 89.4% had stage 5 nephropathy and 78.8% subjects were on regular HD. Males outnumbered females. Insomnia was reported by 35.5%. Among these, 50% had chronic insomnia. Insomnia subjects had higher prevalence of diabetes (P = 0.01) and depression (P < 0.001). Fifty-one percent subjects were at “high risk for sleep apnea”. They had higher prevalence of diabetes (P < 0.001), coronary disease (P = 0.02), insomnia (P = 0.008), and experienced daytime symptoms of insomnia (P < 0.001). However, in the logistic regression, only male gender (odds ratio, OR = 13.59) and daytime symptoms of insomnia (OR = 7.34) were found to be associated with “higher risk for sleep apnea”. Conclusion: Insomnia was prevalent in CKD. Nearly half of these patients are at high risk for sleep apnea and a third of them suffer from insomnia. Hence, these patients should be screened for sleep disorders. PMID:24404542

  15. Therapeutic strategies to correct proteostasis-imbalance in chronic obstructive lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Bodas, M; Tran, I; Vij, N

    2012-08-01

    Proteostasis is a critical cellular homeostasis mechanism that regulates the concentration of all cellular proteins by controlling protein- synthesis, processing and degradation. This includes protein-conformation, binding interactions and sub-cellular localization. Environmental, genetic or age-related pathogenetic factors can modulate the proteostasis (proteostasis-imbalance) through transcriptional, translational and post-translational changes that trigger the development of several complex diseases. Although these factors are known to be involved in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the role of proteostasis mechanisms in COPD is scarcely investigated. As a proof of concept, our recent data reveals a novel role of proteostasis-imbalance in COPD pathogenesis. Briefly, cigarette- and biomass- smoke induced proteostasis-imbalance may aggravate chronic inflammatory-oxidative stress and/or protease-anti-protease imbalance resulting in pathogenesis of severe emphysema. In contrast, pathogenesis of other chronic lung diseases like ΔF508-cystic fibrosis (CF), α1-anti-trypsin-deficiency (α-1 ATD) and pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is regulated by other proteostatic mechanisms, involving the degradation of misfolded proteins (ΔF508-CFTR/α1-AT- Z variant) or regulating the concentration of signaling proteins (such as TGF-β1) by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). The therapeutic strategies to correct proteostasis-imbalance in misfolded protein disorders such as ΔF508-CF have been relatively well studied and involve strategies that rescue functional CFTR protein to treat the underlying cause of the disease. While in the case of COPD-emphysema and/or PF, identification of novel proteostasis-regulators that can control inflammatory-oxidative stress and/or protease-anti-protease balance is warranted.

  16. Microbiology of primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction: simple epiphora, acute dacryocystitis, and chronic dacryocystitis

    PubMed Central

    Pornpanich, Kanograt; Luemsamran, Panitee; Leelaporn, Amornrut; Santisuk, Jiraporn; Tesavibul, Nattaporn; Lertsuwanroj, Buntitar; Vangveeravong, Sumalee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the microbiology of primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction (PANDO) and its antimicrobial susceptibilities. Methods Ninety-three patients (100 eyes) diagnosed with PANDO, categorized as acute, chronic dacryocystitis, or simple epiphora, were prospectively enrolled. Lacrimal sac contents were cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and fungi. Cultured organisms were identified, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for aerobic bacteria. Results Seventy-nine of the 100 samples were culture positive. One hundred twenty-seven organisms were isolated, and 29 different species were identified. Most microorganisms were Gram-positive bacteria (45 samples or 57.0% of all positive culture samples), whereas Gram-negative bacteria, anaerobic bacteria, and fungi were found in 39 (49.4%), 24 (30.4%), and four samples (5.1%), respectively. The most frequently isolated group was coagulase-negative staphylococci (27.8%), followed by nonspore-forming Gram-positive rods (anaerobe) (17.7%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (15.2%). Of the 100 samples, five, 45, and 50 samples were obtained from patients with acute dacryocystitis, chronic dacryocystitis, and simple epiphora, respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that Gram-negative organisms were isolated more frequently from the chronic dacryocystitis subgroup than from the simple epiphora subgroup (P=0.012). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing demonstrated that ciprofloxacin was the most effective drug against all Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. Conclusion Patients with PANDO, with or without clinical signs of lacrimal infection, were culture positive. Gram-negative organisms were frequently isolated, which were different from previous studies. Ciprofloxacin was the most effective agent against all Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. PMID:26955261

  17. Lower diffusing capacity with chronic bronchitis predicts higher risk of acute exacerbation in chronic obstructive lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwa Young; Kim, Jin Woo; Lee, Sang Haak; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu; Shim, Jae Jeong; Park, Jeong-Woong; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Jung, Ki-Suck

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was designed to evaluate the effect of chronic bronchitis (CB) symptoms and degree of emphysema in a multicenter Korean cohort. Methods From April 2012 to May 2015, patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) who were aged above 40 years at 46 hospitals throughout Korea were enrolled. All of the patients were classified according to CB symptoms and the diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO); demographic data, symptom scores, and the result of lung function tests and exacerbations were then analyzed. Results A total of 812 patients were enrolled. Among these patients, 285 (35.1%) had CB symptoms. A total of 51% of patients had high DLCO without CB symptoms [CB (−) high DLCO], 24.9% had CB symptoms only [CB (+) high DLCO], 14.2% had low DLCO only [CB (−) low DLCO], and 10.2% had both low DLCO and CB [CB (+) low DLCO]. Patients with CB (+) low DLCO showed a significantly lower post-bronchodilator (BD) forced expiratory volume for 1 second (FEV1) and more severe dyspnea than patients with CB (−) high DLCO. On multivariate analysis, the risk of acute exacerbation was two times higher [odds ratio (OR) 2.06; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18–3.62; P=0.01] in the CB (+) low DLCO group than in the CB (−) high DLCO group. Conclusions In this COPD cohort, patients showed distinct clinical characteristics and outcomes according to the presence of CB and degree of DLCO. CB and low DLCO were associated with the risk of acute exacerbation. PMID:27293847

  18. Approaches to chronic disease management for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: strategies through the continuum of care.

    PubMed

    Hart, Mary K; Millard, Mark W

    2010-07-01

    Investigator-initiated research in both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease conducted at the Baylor Martha Foster Lung Care Center has sought to improve management throughout the continuum of respiratory care using a multidisciplinary approach. Respiratory care therapists employed in the primary care setting were shown to improve the quality of asthma care: rescue inhaler use decreased by 75% and respiratory symptom score decreased by 49% in patients who were seen by this midlevel specialty provider. In addition to similar results in a geriatric population, patients' diagnosis was changed in 48% of cases and treatment was changed in 76% of cases after the intervention. For pulmonary rehabilitation, an activity of daily living assessment form was created, and rehabilitation-whether traditional or water-based-was shown to improve patients' ability to perform activities of daily living and improve quality of life scores. The Rules of Two((R)), developed by Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas to simplify understanding of good asthma control, continues to be taught, and patient education has also been offered through asthma summer camps for children. Finally, a multidisciplinary team worked to develop a protocol for treatment of asthma patients in the emergency department and, through this effort, was able to reduce length of stay from an average of 278 minutes to an average of 168 minutes. These efforts aim to overcome the gap between recommended care and actual practice, so that patients benefit from evidence-based medicine and continuing refinements to diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Tracheobronchomalacia/excessive dynamic airway collapse in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with persistent expiratory wheeze: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sindhwani, Girish; Sodhi, Rakhee; Saini, Manju; Jethani, Varuna; Khanduri, Sushant; Singh, Baltej

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) refers to a condition in which structural integrity of cartilaginous wall of trachea is lost. Excessive dynamic airway collapse (EDAC) is characterized by excessive invagination of posterior wall of trachea. In both these conditions, airway lumen gets compromised, especially during expiration, which can lead to symptoms such as breathlessness, cough, and wheezing. Both these conditions can be present in obstructive lung diseases; TBM due to chronic airway inflammation and EDAC due to dynamic compressive forces during expiration. The present study was planned with the hypothesis that TBM/EDAC could also produce expiratory wheeze in patients with obstructive airway disorders. Hence, prevalence and factors affecting presence of this entity in patients with obstructive airway diseases were the aims and objectives of this study. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients with obstructive airway disorders (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] or bronchial asthma), who were stable on medical management, but having persistent expiratory wheezing, were included in the study. They were evaluated for TBM/EDAC by bronchoscopy and computed tomographic scan of chest. The presence of TBM/EDAC was correlated with variables including age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking index, level of dyspnea, and severity of disease. Results: Mean age of the patients was 62.7 ± 7.81 years. Out of 25 patients, 14 were males. TBM/EDAC was found in 40% of study subjects. Age, sex, BMI, severity of disease, frequency of exacerbations and radiological findings etc., were not found to have any association with presence of TBM/EDAC. Conclusion: TBM/EDAC is common in patients with obstructive airway disorders and should be evaluated in these patients, especially with persistent expiratory wheezing as diagnosis of this entity could provide another treatment option in these patients with persistent symptoms despite medical management. PMID:27578929

  20. Time spent by people managing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease indicates biographical disruption.

    PubMed

    Jowsey, Tanisha; Yen, Laurann E; Bagheri, Nasser; McRae, Ian S

    2014-01-01

    Since Bury's 1982 proposal that chronic illness creates biographical disruption for those who are living with it, there has been no effort to quantitatively measure such disruption. "Biographical disruption" refers to the substantial and directive influence that chronic illness can have over the course of a person's life. Qualitative research and time use studies have demonstrated that people with chronic illnesses spend considerable amounts of time managing their health, and that these demands may change over time. This study was designed to measure the time that older people with chronic illnesses spend on selected health practices as one indicator of biographical disruption. We look specifically at the time use of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). As part of a larger time use survey, a recall questionnaire was mailed to 3,100 members of Lung Foundation Australia in 2011. A total of 681 responses were received (22.0% response rate), 611 of which were from people with COPD. Descriptive analyses were undertaken on the amount of time spent on selected health-related activities including personal care, nonclinical health-related care, and activity relating to health services. Almost all people with COPD report spending some time each day on personal or home-based health-related tasks, with a median time of 15 minutes per day spent on these activities. At the median, people also report spending about 30 minutes per day exercising, 2.2 hours per month (the equivalent of 4.4 minutes per day) on nonclinical health-related activities, and 4.1 hours per month (equivalent to 8.2 minutes per day) on clinical activities. Excluding exercise, the median total time spent on health-related activities was 17.8 hours per month (or 35.6 minutes per day). For people in the top 10% of time use, the total amount of time was more than 64.6 hours per month (or 2.2 hours per day) excluding exercise, and 104 hours per month (or 3.5 hours per day) including exercise

  1. Association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hemorrhoids: A nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lih-Hwa; Siu, Justin Ji-Yuen; Liao, Po-Chi; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Chou, Pei-Chi; Chen, Huey-Yi; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Tsai, Ming-Yen; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Chen, Wen-Chi

    2017-03-01

    According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory, a specific physiological and pathological relationship exists between the lungs and the large intestine. The aim of this study is to delineate the association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and hemorrhoids in order to verify the "interior-exterior" relationship between the lungs and the large intestine. A retrospective cohort study is conceived from the National Health Insurance Research Database, Taiwan. The 2 samples (COPD cohort and non-COPD cohort) were selected from the 2000 to 2003 beneficiaries of the NHI, representing patients age 20 and older in Taiwan, with the follow-up ending on December 31, 2011. The COPD cohort (n = 51,506) includes every patient newly diagnosed as having Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, ICD-9-CM: 490-492, 494, 496), who have made at least 2 confirmed visits to the hospital/clinic. The non-COPD cohort (n = 103,012) includes patients without COPD and is selected via a 1:2 (COPD: non-COPD) matching by age group (per 5 years), gender, and index date (diagnosis date of COPD for the COPD cohort). Compared with non-COPD cohorts, patients with COPD have a higher likelihood of having hemorrhoids and the age-, gender- and comorbidies-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for hemorrhoids is 1.56 (95% confidence intervals [CI]:1.50-1.62). The adjusted HR of hemorrhoids for females is 0.79 (95% CI: 0.77-0.83), which is significantly less than that for males. The elderly groups, 40 to 59 years and aged 60 or above, have higher adjusted HRs than younger age groups (20-39 years), 1.19 (95% CI: 1.14-1.26), and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.12-1.24), respectively. Patients with COPD may have a higher likelihood to have hemorrhoids in this retrospective cohort study. This study verifies the fundamental theorem of TCM that there is a definite pathogenic association between the lungs and large intestine.

  2. Increased serum levels of lipocalin-1 and -2 in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-ru; Li, Yong-pu; Gao, Shui; Xia, Wei; Gao, Kun; Kong, Qing-hua; Qi, Hui; Wu, Ling; Zhang, Jing; Qu, Jie-ming; Bai, Chun-xue

    2014-01-01

    Despite a number of studies on biomarkers in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), only a few disease-related markers have been identified, yet we still have no satisfactory markers specific to innate immune system and neutrophil activation, which is essential in airway inflammation in COPD. Recent biological studies indicated that lipocalins (LCNs) might be involved in airway inflammation and innate immunity; however, results from available studies on the association of LCNs with COPD are not consistent. We carried out a multicenter prospective observational cohort study to investigate the differences in serum levels of LCN1 and LCN2 between subjects with COPD (n=58) and healthy controls (n=29). Several validated inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-8, were measured. The correlation of LCN1 and LCN2 with clinical features such as smoking habits, lung function, symptoms, and disease category was also analyzed. When comparing with healthy controls, serum levels of LCN1 (66.35±20.26 ng/mL versus 41.16±24.19 ng/mL, P<0.001) and LCN2 (11.29±3.92 ng/mL versus 6.09±5.13 ng/mL, P<0.001) were both elevated in subjects with COPD after adjusting for age, sex, smoking habits, and inflammatory biomarkers. Smoking history and tobacco exposure, as quantified by pack-year, had no impact on systemic expressions of LCN1 and LCN2 in our study. Blood levels of LCN1 and LCN2, respectively, were negatively correlated to COPD Assessment Test and Modified Medical British Research Council score (P<0.001). Disease category by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease grade 1-4 or group A-D was not associated with levels of LCNs. Patient-reported exacerbations and body mass index were also tested, but no relationship with LCNs was found. In summary, serum concentrations of LCN1 and LCN2 were both elevated in patients with COPD, with their levels correlating to COPD Assessment Test and Modified

  3. The burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease associated with maintenance monotherapy in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Susan C; Fairbrother, Sian E; Scowcroft, Anna; Chiu, Gavin; Ternouth, Andrew; Lipworth, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    Background This study characterized a cohort of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients on maintenance bronchodilator monotherapy for ≥6 months to establish their disease burden, measured by health care utilization. Methods Data were extracted from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink and linked to Hospital Episode Statistics. The monotherapy period spanned the first prescription of a long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist or a long-acting muscarinic antagonist until the end of the study (December 31, 2013) or until step up to dual/triple therapy, for example, addition of another long-acting bronchodilator, an inhaled corticosteroid, or both. A minimum of four consecutive prescriptions and 6 months on continuous monotherapy were required. Patients <50 years old at first COPD diagnosis or with another significant respiratory disease before starting monotherapy were excluded. Disease burden was evaluated by measuring patients’ rate of face-to-face interactions with a health care professional (HCP), COPD-related exacerbations, hospitalizations, and referrals. Results A cohort of 8,811 COPD patients (95% Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage A/B) on maintenance monotherapy was identified between 2002 and 2013; 45% of these patients were still on monotherapy by the end of the study. Median time from first COPD diagnosis to first monotherapy prescription was 56 days, while the median time on maintenance bronchodilator monotherapy was 2 years. The median number of prescriptions was 14. On average, patients had 15 HCP interactions per year, and one in ten patients experienced a COPD exacerbation (N=8,811). One in 50 patients were hospitalized for COPD per year (n=4,848). Conclusion The average monotherapy-treated patient had a higher than average HCP interaction rate. We also identified a large cohort of patients who were stepped up to triple therapy despite a low rate of exacerbations. The use of the new class of long

  4. Guideline-Based Early Detection of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Eight Danish Municipalities: The TOP-KOM Study

    PubMed Central

    Hemmingsen, Ulla Borup; Stycke, Margit; Dollerup, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Background. Early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and prevention of disease progression are important. Only 40% of COPD cases are diagnosed in Denmark. Recommendations for early case finding have been established. This study investigates early detection of pulmonary obstruction in a Danish municipality setting. Methods. Eight municipalities participated. Citizens fulfilling national case finding recommendations, age ≥35 years, smokers/ex-smokers/relevant occupational exposure, and at least one respiratory symptom, were invited to spirometry. Citizens with indication of pulmonary obstruction, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) < 0.70, were referred to their general practitioner (GP). Results. 1,499 citizens were examined (53.6% male, mean age 57.2 years). 44.8% were current smokers with 57% planning for smoking cessation. The citizens recorded significant airway symptoms with dyspnea being the most important (71%). The mean FEV1/FVC score was 73.54 (SD 22.84). 456 citizens (30.4%) were found to have indication for pulmonary obstruction and were referred to GP for further diagnosis. Conclusion. Early detection in Danish municipalities proved effective finding nearly 1/3 being pulmonary obstructive. It seems to be of value to have municipalities to perform case finding together with smoking cessation as a primary intervention in COPD management. PMID:28321336

  5. Ventilatory demand and dynamic hyperinflation induced during ADL-based tests in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease patients

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Karoliny; Gulart, Aline A.; Munari, Anelise B.; Karloh, Manuela; Mayer, Anamaria F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Airflow limitation frequently leads to the interruption of activities of daily living (ADL) in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). These patients commonly show absence of ventilatory reserve, reduced inspiratory reserve volume, and dynamic hyperinflation (DH). Objective To investigate ventilatory response and DH induced by three ADL-based protocols in COPD patients and compare them to healthy subjects. Method Cross-sectional study. COPD group: 23 patients (65±6 years, FEV1 37.2±15.4%pred); control group: 14 healthy subjects (64±4 years) matched for age, sex, and body mass index. Both groups performed all three tests: Glittre-ADL test; an activity test that involved moving objects on a shelf (TSHELF); and a modified shelf protocol isolating activity with upper limbs (TSHELF-M). Ventilatory response and inspiratory capacity were evaluated. Results Baseline ventilatory variables were similar between groups (p>0.05). The ventilatory demand increased and the inspiratory capacity decreased significantly at the end of the tests in the COPD group. Ventilatory demand and DH were higher (p<0.05) in the TSHELF than in the TSHELF–M in the COPD group (p<0.05). There were no differences in DH between the three tests in the control group (p>0.05) and ventilatory demand increased at the end of the tests (p<0.05) but to a lower extent than the COPD group. Conclusion The TSHELF induces similar ventilatory responses to the Glittre-ADL test in COPD patients with higher ventilatory demand and DH. In contrast, the ventilatory response was attenuated in the TSHELF-M, suggesting that squatting and bending down during the Glittre-ADL test could trigger significant ventilatory overload. PMID:27333482

  6. Chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and the relationship between sleep disorder and pain level, quality of life, and disability

    PubMed Central

    Aytekin, Ebru; Demir, Saliha Eroglu; Komut, Ece Akyol; Okur, Sibel Caglar; Burnaz, Ozer; Caglar, Nil Sayiner; Demiryontar, Dilay Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and to assess the relationship between sleep disorder and pain, quality of life, and disability. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy-four patients were included in the study and classified as having mild, moderate, or severe obstructive sleep apnea. Chronic widespread pain, quality of life, and disability were evaluated. [Results] Forty-one patients (55.4%) had chronic widespread pain. Female patients had a higher incidence of chronic pain, and female patients with chronic pain had higher body mass indexes, pain levels, and disability scores than did male patients. Physical component scores of female patients with chronic pain were lower than those of male patients. No correlation was observed between the degree of sleep disorder and severity of pain, pain duration, disability, or quality of life in obstructive sleep apnea patients with pain. [Conclusion] This study showed a 55.4% prevalence of chronic widespread pain in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and a greater risk of chronic pain in female than in male patients. Female patients with obstructive sleep apnea and chronic pain have higher pain and disability levels and a lower quality of life. PMID:26504332

  7. CHRONIOUS: an open, ubiquitous and adaptive chronic disease management platform for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Rosso, R; Munaro, G; Salvetti, O; Colantonio, S; Ciancitto, F

    2010-01-01

    CHRONIOUS is an highly innovative Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) research Initiative that aspires to implement its vision for ubiquitous health and lifestyle monitoring. The 17 European project partners are strictly working together since February 2008 to realize and open platform to manage and monitor elderly patients with chronic diseases and many difficulties to reach hospital centers for routine controls. The testing activities will be done in Italy and Spain involving COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) and CKD (Chronic Kidney Disease) patients, these being widespread and highly expensive in terms of social and economic costs. Patients, equipped by wearable technologies and sensors and interacting with lifestyle interfaces, will be assisted by healthcare personnel able to check the health record and critical conditions through the Chronious platform data analysis and decision support system. Additionally, the new ontology based literature search engine will help the clinicians in the standardization of care delivery process. This paper is to present the main project objectives and its principal components from the intelligent system point of view.

  8. Abnormal layering of muscularis propria as a cause of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Angkathunyakul, Napat; Treepongkaruna, Suporn; Molagool, Sani; Ruangwattanapaisarn, Nichanan

    2015-06-14

    Visceral myopathy is one of the causes of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Most cases pathologically reveal degenerative changes of myocytes or muscularis propia atrophy and fibrosis. Abnormal layering of muscularis propria is extremely rare. We report a case of a 9-mo-old Thai male baby who presented with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Histologic findings showed abnormal layering of small intestinal muscularis propria with an additional oblique layer and aberrant muscularization in serosa. The patient also had a short small bowel without malrotation, brachydactyly, and absence of the 2(nd) to 4(th) middle phalanges of both hands. The patient was treated with cisapride and combined parenteral and enteral nutritional support. He had gradual clinical improvement and gained body weight. Subsequently, the parenteral nutrition was discontinued. The previously reported cases are reviewed and discussed.

  9. Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management and Prevention of Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2017 Report: GOLD Executive Summary.

    PubMed

    Vogelmeier, Claus F; Criner, Gerard J; Martinez, Fernando J; Anzueto, Antonio; Barnes, Peter J; Bourbeau, Jean; Celli, Bartolome R; Chen, Rongchang; Decramer, Marc; Fabbri, Leonardo M; Frith, Peter; Halpin, David M G; López Varela, M Victorina; Nishimura, Masaharu; Roche, Nicolas; Rodriguez-Roisin, Roberto; Sin, Don D; Singh, Dave; Stockley, Robert; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Agusti, Alvar

    2017-04-01

    This Executive Summary of the Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management and Prevention of COPD, Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 2017 Report focuses primarily on the revised and novel parts of the document. The most significant changes include: (i) the assessment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been refined to separate the spirometric assessment from symptom evaluation. ABCD groups are now proposed to be derived exclusively from patient symptoms and their history of exacerbations; (ii) for each of the groups A to D, escalation strategies for pharmacological treatments are proposed; (iii) the concept of de-escalation of therapy is introduced in the treatment assessment scheme; (iv)non-pharmacological therapies are comprehensively presented and (v) the importance of co-morbid conditions in managing COPD is reviewed.

  10. [Sylvinite speleochamber and general chloride sodium baths in medical rehabilitation of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Rassulova, M A

    2008-01-01

    Clinico-laboratory, functional and bronchoscopic examinations were performed in 120 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. 50 patients (41.7%) were in stage of low-intensity exacerbation, 70 patients (58.3%)--in remission stage. 55 patients (45.8%) had I degree respiratory failure, 65 patients (54.2%)--II degree respiratory failure. Easy degree of disease was detected in 58 patients (48.3%), mid degree--in 62 patients (51.7%). Possibility and reasonability of the use of artificial sylvinite speleotherapy and general chloride sodium baths in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were proved. Clinical results were confirmed by data of blood morphology and biochemical analysis, microscopy of sputum, spirometry, bronchoscopy, dynamics of immunological indices.

  11. Abnormal layering of muscularis propria as a cause of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Angkathunyakul, Napat; Treepongkaruna, Suporn; Molagool, Sani; Ruangwattanapaisarn, Nichanan

    2015-01-01

    Visceral myopathy is one of the causes of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Most cases pathologically reveal degenerative changes of myocytes or muscularis propia atrophy and fibrosis. Abnormal layering of muscularis propria is extremely rare. We report a case of a 9-mo-old Thai male baby who presented with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. Histologic findings showed abnormal layering of small intestinal muscularis propria with an additional oblique layer and aberrant muscularization in serosa. The patient also had a short small bowel without malrotation, brachydactyly, and absence of the 2nd to 4th middle phalanges of both hands. The patient was treated with cisapride and combined parenteral and enteral nutritional support. He had gradual clinical improvement and gained body weight. Subsequently, the parenteral nutrition was discontinued. The previously reported cases are reviewed and discussed. PMID:26078585

  12. Health-related QOL in acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Doll, Helen; Miravitlles, Marc

    2005-01-01

    There is a lack of emphasis on health-related QOL (HR-QOL) changes associated with acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (CB) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this review is to examine the use of HR-QOL instruments to evaluate acute exacerbation of CB or COPD, so as to form recommendations for future research.A literature search of papers published between 1966 and July 2003 identified more than 300 articles that used acute exacerbation of CB or COPD as the search term. However, only 21 of these studies employed HR-QOL measures as predictors of outcome or in the assessment of the impact, evolution or treatment of acute exacerbations of COPD or CB. A variety of HR-QOL measures were used, both generic and disease specific. The disease-specific St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), devised for patients with stable CB and with a recall period of 1-12 months, was the most widely used measure, with the Chronic Respiratory disease Questionnaire (CRQ) and the Baseline and Transitional Dyspnoea Index (BDI, TDI) being the only other disease-specific measures used. Most measures, both generic and disease specific, performed adequately when used during acute exacerbation of CB or COPD and indicated poor HR-QOL during acute exacerbation, which improved on resolution of the exacerbation. Relationships were evident between HR-QOL during an acute exacerbation and various outcomes, including post-exacerbation functional status, hospital re- admission for acute exacerbation or COPD, and mortality. There is a need for studies of treatments for acute exacerbation of CB or COPD to include an appropriate HR-QOL instrument to aid in the stratification of patients so as to target the right treatment to the right patient group. While a new instrument could be developed to measure HR-QOL during acute exacerbation of CB or COPD, currently available disease-specific measures such as the CRQ and the SGRQ appear to be acceptable to patients during acute

  13. Expert consensus on acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Bai-qiang; Cai, Shao-xi; Chen, Rong-chang; Cui, Li-ying; Feng, Yu-lin; Gu, Yu-tong; Huang, Shao-guang; Liu, Rong-yu; Liu, Guang-nan; Shi, Huan-zhong; Shi, Yi; Song, Yuan-lin; Sun, Tie-ying; Wang, Chang-zheng; Wang, Jing-lan; Wen, Fu-qiang; Xiao, Wei; Xu, Yong-jian; Yan, Xi-xin; Yao, Wan-zhen; Yu, Qin; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Jin-ping; Liu, Jie; Bai, Chun-xue

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease that severely threatens human health. Acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) is a major cause of disease progression and death, and causes huge medical expenditures. This consensus statement represents a description of clinical features of AECOPD in the People’s Republic of China and a set of recommendations. It is intended to provide clinical guidelines for community physicians, pulmonologists and other health care providers for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of AECOPD. PMID:24812503

  14. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy associated with ipratropium bromide therapy in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Melão, Filipa; Nunes, José P L; Vasconcelos, Mariana; Dias, Paula; Almeida, Pedro B; Rodrigues, Rui; Pinho, Teresa; Madureira, António; Maciel, Maria J

    2014-03-01

    Stress-induced cardiomyopathy, also known as 'broken heart syndrome' or Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is characterized by transient systolic dysfunction of the apical and/or mid segments of the left ventricle, in the absence of significant coronary artery disease. We report the case of a 56-year-old male patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), with stress-induced cardiomyopathy associated with the use of ipratropium bromide, administered in the context of an acute exacerbation of COPD.

  15. Resting anal pressure, not outlet obstruction or transit, predicts healthcare utilization in chronic constipation: a retrospective cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Staller, Kyle; Barshop, Kenneth; Kuo, Braden; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic constipation is common and exerts a considerable burden on health-related quality of life and healthcare resource utilization. Anorectal manometry (ARM) and colonic transit testing have allowed classification of subtypes of constipation, raising promise of targeted treatments. There has been limited study of the correlation between physiological parameters and healthcare utilization. Methods All patients undergoing ARM and colonic transit testing for chronic constipation at two tertiary care centers from 2000 to 2014 were included in this retrospective study. Our primary outcomes included number of constipation-related and gastroenterology visits per year. Multivariate linear regression adjusting for confounders defined independent effect of measures of colonic and anorectal function on healthcare utilization. Key Results Our study included 612 patients with chronic constipation. More than 50% (n=333) of patients had outlet obstruction by means of balloon expulsion testing and 43.5% (n=266) had slow colonic transit. On unadjusted analysis, outlet obstruction (1.98 vs. 1.68), slow transit (2.40 vs 2.07) and high resting anal pressure (2.16 vs. 1.76) were all associated with greater constipation-related visits/year compared to patients without each of those parameters (P<0.05 for all). Outlet obstruction and high resting anal pressure were also associated with greater number of gastroenterology visits/year. After multivariate adjustment, high resting anal pressure was the only independent predictor of increased constipation-related visits/year (P=0.02) and gastroenterology visits/year (P=0.04). Conclusions and Inferences Among patients with chronic constipation, high resting anal pressure, rather than outlet obstruction or slow transit, predicts healthcare resource utilization. PMID:26172284

  16. Molecular identification of Mycobacterium chimaera as a cause of infection in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bills, Nathan D; Hinrichs, Steven H; Aden, Tricia A; Wickert, Robert S; Iwen, Peter C

    2009-03-01

    This report describes a case of Mycobacterium chimaera infection in a patient with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease where the organism was identified by using molecular methods. M. chimaera was identified from fresh lung tissue and from an instrument-negative mycobacterial growth indicator tube broth culture. The utility of using sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region for the rapid identification of a slow-growing nontuberculous Mycobacterium spp. where conventional culture methods were not successful was shown.

  17. Body mass index, airflow obstruction and dyspnea and body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnea scores, age and pack years-predictive properties of new multidimensional prognostic indices of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Khalid; Keaney, Niall; Kay, Andrea; Price, Monica; Munby, Joan; Billett, Andrew; Haggerty, Sharon; Taylor, Ian K.; Al Otaibi, Hajed

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The assessment of the severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) should involve a multidimensional approach that is now clearly shown to be better than using spirometric impairment alone. The aim of this study is to validate and compare novel tools without an exercise test and to extend prognostic value to patients with less severe impairment of Forced expiratory volume 1 s. METHODS: A prospective, observational, primary care cohort study identified 458 eligible patients recruited from the primary care clinics in the northeast of England in 1999–2002. A new prognostic indicator – body mass index, airflow obstruction and dyspnea (BOD) together with the conventional prognostic indices age, dyspnea and airflow obstruction (ADO), global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease (GOLD) and new GOLD matrix were studied. We also sought to improve prognostication of BOD by adding age (A) and smoking history as pack years (S) to validate BODS (BOD with smoking history) and BODAS (BOD with smoking history and age) as prognostic tools and the predictive power of each was analyzed. RESULTS: The survival of the 458 patients was assessed after a median of 10 years when the mortality was found to be 33.6%. The novel indices BOD, BODS, and BODAS were significantly predictive for all-cause mortality in our cohort. Furthermore with ROC analysis the C statistics for BOD, BODS, and BODAS were 0.62, 0.66, and 0.72, respectively (P < 0.001 for each), whereas ADO and GOLD stages had a C statistic of 0.70 (P < 0.001) and 0.56 (P < 0.02), respectively. GOLD Matrix was not significant in this cohort. CONCLUSION: BOD, BODS, and BODAS scores are validated predictors of all-cause mortality in a primary care cohort with COPD. PMID:27803752

  18. Mechanisms of corticosteroid resistance in severe asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Adcock, Ian M; Marwick, John; Casolari, Paolo; Contoli, Marco; Chung, Kian Fan; Kirkham, Paul; Papi, Alberto; Caramori, Gaetano

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled glucocorticoids, also know as corticosteroids (ICS), revolutionized the treatment of asthma by suppressing airways inflammation and ICS therapy now forms the basis of treatment of asthma of all severities. More recently and usually in combination with a long-acting β-agonist (LABA), ICS use has been established in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In asthma, ICS improves asthma control, lung function and prevents exacerbations, including hospital admissions and probably decreases mortality. Similar effects are seen in COPD but to a much lesser degree, however, an improvement in symptoms such as breathlessness and reduction in exacerbations occur particularly in more advanced disease with ICS. Chronic inflammation is a feature of both asthma and COPD, although there are differences in the site and characteristics of the inflammatory response. ICS have proven to be less effective in patients with severe asthma, smoking asthmatics and in patients with COPD. ICS act by binding to and activating specific cytosolic receptors (GR), which then translocate to the nucleus where they regulate gene expression by either binding to DNA and inducing anti-inflammatory genes or by repressing the induction of pro-inflammatory mediators. GR is able to selective repress specific inflammatory genes by differing actions on specific intracellular signalling pathways and transcription factors such as nuclear factor κB and on kinases pathways. Abnormal activation of these pathways may result in glucocorticoid resistance. Although, ICS/LABA combinations will remain the main focus of treatment of airways diseases in the near future; other com