Science.gov

Sample records for abstract corrosion studies

  1. Home Plumbing Simulator for the Study of Copper and Lead Corrosion and Release, Disinfectant Demand, and Biofilm Activity - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    The corrosion of household or premise plumbing materials (such as copper, brass, and solder) and the metal release that results from that corrosion can cause numerous problems, ranging from “blue” water to copper pinhole leaks. If left untreated, these problems can lead to health...

  2. Electrochemical corrosion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knockemus, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The objective was to gain familiarity with the Model 350 Corrosion Measurement Console, to determine if metal protection by grease coatings can be measured by the polarization-resistance method, and to compare corrosion rates of 4130 steel coated with various greases. Results show that grease protection of steel may be determined electrochemically. Studies were also conducted to determine the effectiveness of certain corrosion inhibitors on aluminum and steel.

  3. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  4. Corrosion characteristics of nickel alloys. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zollars, G. F.

    1979-01-01

    This bibliography cites 118 articles from the international literature concerning corrosion characteristics of nickel alloys. Articles dealing with corrosion resistance, corrosion tests, intergranular corrosion, oxidation resistance, and stress corrosion cracking of nickel alloys are included.

  5. Thermal control system corrosion study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Robert; Folsom, Rolfe A.; Mucha, Phillip E.

    1990-01-01

    During the development of an expert system for autonomous control of the Space Station Thermal Control System (TCS), the thermal performance of the Brassboard TCS began to gradually degrade. This degradation was due to filter clogging by metallic residue. A study was initiated to determine the source of the residue and the basic cause of the corrosion. The investigation focused on the TCS design, materials compatibility, Ames operating and maintenance procedures, and chemical analysis of the residue and of the anhydrous ammonia used as the principal refrigerant. It was concluded that the corrosion mechanisms involved two processes: the reaction of water alone with large, untreated aluminum parts in a high pH environment and the presence of chlorides and chloride salts. These salts will attack the aluminum oxide layer and may enable galvanic corrosion between the aluminum and the more noble stainless steel and other metallic elements present. Recommendations are made for modifications to the system design, the materials used, and the operating and maintenance procedures, which should largely prevent the recurrence of these corrosion mechanisms.

  6. Thermal control system corrosion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Robert; Folsom, Rolfe A.; Mucha, Phillip E.

    1990-02-01

    During the development of an expert system for autonomous control of the Space Station Thermal Control System (TCS), the thermal performance of the Brassboard TCS began to gradually degrade. This degradation was due to filter clogging by metallic residue. A study was initiated to determine the source of the residue and the basic cause of the corrosion. The investigation focused on the TCS design, materials compatibility, Ames operating and maintenance procedures, and chemical analysis of the residue and of the anhydrous ammonia used as the principal refrigerant. It was concluded that the corrosion mechanisms involved two processes: the reaction of water alone with large, untreated aluminum parts in a high pH environment and the presence of chlorides and chloride salts. These salts will attack the aluminum oxide layer and may enable galvanic corrosion between the aluminum and the more noble stainless steel and other metallic elements present. Recommendations are made for modifications to the system design, the materials used, and the operating and maintenance procedures, which should largely prevent the recurrence of these corrosion mechanisms.

  7. Supplementary safety system corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.H.; Wiersma, B.J.

    1991-05-21

    This memorandum presents experimental data from electrochemical and immersion tests to support the continued use of two sections of nonconforming steel in the Supplementary Safety System. The Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee met on May 16, 1991 to evaluate materials that had been installed in the SSS. The materials lacked complete Corrosion Evaluation (CE) and/or Certified Mill Test Reports and had been installed during recent modifications (Project S-4332). Items that lacked proper documentation included AISI Type 304 stainless steel (304) instrument tubing (0.375'' OD) associated with the pressure transmitters and a two-foot section of 304 pipe located on the far side of the system downstream of the pneumatic valves. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization scans were performed on sensitized and solution-annealed 304 samples in as-mixed and acidified Gd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, or ink'', solutions at room temperature to determine the susceptibility of 304 to localized corrosion in this environment. No localized attack was observed on the solution annealed or sensitized 304 in the Gd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solution. These tests revealed no significant differences in the behavior of the sensitized and solution-annealed 304 in gadolinium nitrate solution. Therefore, localized corrosion of the nonconforming components is not anticipated, and the performance of the nonconforming components should not differ from that of corrosion evaluated and certified materials. Previous studies have shown that AISI Type 304L stainless steel (304L) did not pit during a three-month exposure in gadolinium nitrate solutions of pH 2 or 5. These combined results support the continued use of the nonconforming steels until replacement can be made at the next scheduled long shut-down.

  8. Supplementary safety system corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.H.; Wiersma, B.J.

    1991-05-21

    This memorandum presents experimental data from electrochemical and immersion tests to support the continued use of two sections of nonconforming steel in the Supplementary Safety System. The Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee met on May 16, 1991 to evaluate materials that had been installed in the SSS. The materials lacked complete Corrosion Evaluation (CE) and/or Certified Mill Test Reports and had been installed during recent modifications (Project S-4332). Items that lacked proper documentation included AISI Type 304 stainless steel (304) instrument tubing (0.375`` OD) associated with the pressure transmitters and a two-foot section of 304 pipe located on the far side of the system downstream of the pneumatic valves. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization scans were performed on sensitized and solution-annealed 304 samples in as-mixed and acidified Gd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, or ``ink``, solutions at room temperature to determine the susceptibility of 304 to localized corrosion in this environment. No localized attack was observed on the solution annealed or sensitized 304 in the Gd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solution. These tests revealed no significant differences in the behavior of the sensitized and solution-annealed 304 in gadolinium nitrate solution. Therefore, localized corrosion of the nonconforming components is not anticipated, and the performance of the nonconforming components should not differ from that of corrosion evaluated and certified materials. Previous studies have shown that AISI Type 304L stainless steel (304L) did not pit during a three-month exposure in gadolinium nitrate solutions of pH 2 or 5. These combined results support the continued use of the nonconforming steels until replacement can be made at the next scheduled long shut-down.

  9. Microprobe study of diode corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Hlava, P.; Braithwaite, J.; Sorensen, R.

    1996-12-31

    A few diodes from a production lot were discovered to have unacceptable current leak rates after about 5 years of storage. Inspection revealed the presence of copper sulfide deposits that bridged the external body of the diode and presumably provided a leakage path. Figure 1 shows the physical configuration of a diode. The function of this device is performed by a silicon-based semiconductor that is bonded between two cylinders of tungsten with copper headpins (Cu wire with a flat {open_quotes}nail-head{close_quotes} formed on one end) brazed to the opposite ends of the cylinders. A tropical ring of glass protects the Si chip. All exposed metal parts are covered by an immersion plating of Ag. Then the entire assembly is coated with black epoxy and a band of green ink is applied to the cathode end. During storage, each diode was placed in a cardboard holder and secured in stacks of about ten with rubber bands. Analytical and environmental exposure studies were performed at Allied Signal and Sandia to determine the cause and potential long-term significance of this corrosion product and help identify the corrosion mechanism.

  10. Study of corrosion of 1100 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draley, J. E.; Loess, R. E.; Mori, S.

    1967-01-01

    Corrosion of 1100 aluminum in oxygen-saturated water at 70 degrees C under experimental conditions was studied, emphasizing effects of exposure interruption, the number of specimens, and the refreshment rate. A logarithmic equation was derived to express the corrosion rate.

  11. Report on accelerated corrosion studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, Curtis Dale; Glass, Sarah Jill; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2011-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted accelerated atmospheric corrosion testing for the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) to help further the understanding of the development of corrosion products on conductor materials in household electrical components exposed to environmental conditions representative of homes constructed with problem drywall. The conditions of the accelerated testing were chosen to produce corrosion product growth that would be consistent with long-term exposure to environments containing humidity and parts per billion (ppb) levels of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) that are thought to have been the source of corrosion in electrical components from affected homes. This report documents the test set-up, monitoring of electrical performance of powered electrical components during the exposure, and the materials characterization conducted on wires, screws, and contact plates from selected electrical components. No degradation in electrical performance (measured via voltage drop) was measured during the course of the 8-week exposure, which was approximately equivalent to 40 years of exposure in a light industrial environment. Analyses show that corrosion products consisting of various phases of copper sulfide, copper sulfate, and copper oxide are found on exposed surfaces of the conductor materials including wires, screws, and contact plates. The morphology and the thickness of the corrosion products showed a range of character. In some of the copper wires that were observed, corrosion product had flaked or spalled off the surface, exposing fresh metal to the reaction with the contaminant gasses; however, there was no significant change in the wire cross-sectional area.

  12. Task E container corrosion studies: Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Bunnell, L.R.; Doremus, L.A.; Topping, J.B.; Duncan, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting the Solid Waste Technology Support Program (SWTSP) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Task E is the Container Corrosion Study Portion of the SWTSP that will perform testing to provide defensible data on the corrosion of low-carbon steel, as used in drums to contain chemical and radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site. A second objective of Task E is to provide and test practical alternative materials that have higher corrosion resistance than low-carbon steel. The scope of work for fiscal year (FY) 1993 included initial testing of mild steel specimens buried in Hanford soils or exposed to atmospheric corrosion in metal storage sheds. During FY 1993, progress was made in three areas of Task E. First, exposure of test materials began at the Soil Corrosion Test Site where low-carbon steel specimens were placed in the soil in five test shafts at depths of 9 m (30 ft). Second, the corrosion measurement of low-carbon steel in the soil of two solid waste trenches continued. The total exposure time is {approx} 500 days. Third, an atmospheric corrosion test of low-carbon steel was put initiated in a metal shed (Building 2401-W) in the 200 West Area. This annual report describes the Task E efforts and provides a current status.

  13. Corrosion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  14. Youth Studies Abstracts. Vol. 4 No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youth Studies Abstracts, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts of 76 projects (most of which were conducted in Australia and New Zealand) concerned with programs for youth and with social and educational developments affecting youth. The abstracts are arranged in the following two categories: (1) Social and Educational Developments: Policy, Analysis, Research; and (2) Programs:…

  15. Study made of procedures for externally loading and corrosion testing stress corrosion specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1967-01-01

    Study was initiated to determine methods or test specimens for evaluating stress corrosion cracking characteristics of common structural materials. It was found that the methods of externally loading and corrosion testing were reliable in yielding reproducible results for stress corrosion evaluation.

  16. Youth Studies Abstracts, Vol. 3 No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youth Studies Abstracts, 1984

    1984-01-01

    These abstracts summarize 73 research projects that were conducted in Australia during 1982 and 1983 to investigate various issues related to youth employment and unemployment. Included among the topics addressed in the individual research projects are the following: economic developments, education and rural communities; employment (changing…

  17. Corrosion Studies of Wrought and Cast NASA-23 Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Corrosion studies were carried out for wrought and cast NASA-23 alloy using electrochemical methods. The scanning reference electrode technique (SRET), the polarization resistance technique (PR), and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed. These studies corroborate the findings of stress corrosion studies performed earlier, in that the material is highly resistant to corrosion.

  18. Study of crevice-galvanic corrosion of aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draley, J. E.; Loess, R. E.; Mori, S.

    1967-01-01

    Corrosion effects of aluminum-copper and aluminum-nickel couples in oxygenated distilled water, and aluminum alloys in oxygenated copper sulfate solution were studied. One of each of the couples had a water tight seal, and showed no substantial corrosion, and of the unsealed couples, only the aluminum-copper developed corrosion.

  19. A Genre Analysis Study of 80 Medical Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kenneth; Maclean, Joan

    1997-01-01

    A study investigated the usefulness of instructional materials on the writing of scientific articles by comparing the descriptions of abstracts offered in the textbook with a sample of abstracts drawn from four fields of medicine (clinical medicine, surgery, epidemiology, basic sciences). The comparison was confined to abstracts of results-focused…

  20. A study of copper corrosion control strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, N.; Sjolund, W.

    1994-10-01

    In compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule of the 1986 Safe Drinking Water Act, Brainerd Public Utilities tested the first drawn water from 60 sampling sites within the city. Ninety percent of these site samples contained elevated copper levels in excess of the 1.3 mg/L (1,300 ppb) action level established by the EPA standard. The samples, however, did not exceed the 0.015 mg/L (15 ppb) action level for lead. A water quality study evaluated the various options for copper corrosion control using a test stand for approximately five months starting in May 1993. The study evaluated the effectiveness of applying various chemicals for the control of copper corrosion. Chemicals tested included sodium hydroxide (NaOH) (for pH adjustment); sodium silicate; ortho/polyphosphate (Calgon C-4). The study also examined the possibility of reducing the level of dissolved oxygen in the water during aeration as a means of reducing the level of copper corrosion.

  1. Corrosion Study Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farooq, Muhammad Umar

    2003-01-01

    Corrosion is a common phenomenon. It is the destructive result of chemical reaction between a metal or metal alloy and its environment. Stainless steel tubing is used at Kennedy Space Center for various supply lines which service the orbiter. The launch pads are also made of stainless steel. The environment at the launch site has very high chloride content due to the proximity to the Atlantic Ocean. Also, during a launch, the exhaust products in the solid rocket boosters include concentrated hydrogen chloride. The purpose of this project was to study various alloys by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy in corrosive environments similar to the launch sites. This report includes data and analysis of the measurements for 304L, 254SMO and AL-6XN in primarily neutral 3.55% NaCl. One set of data for 304L in neutral 3.55%NaCl + 0.1N HCl is also included.

  2. CORROSION STUDY OF AMORPHOUS METAL RIBBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, T; Day, S D; Farmer, J C

    2006-07-31

    Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The potential advantages of amorphous metals have been recognized for some time [Latanison 1985]. Iron-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove important for maritime applications [Farmer et al. 2005]. Such materials could also be used to coat the entire outer surface of containers for the transportation and long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel, or to protect welds and heat affected zones, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking [Farmer et al. 1991, 2000a, 2000b]. In the future, it may be possible to substitute such high-performance iron-based materials for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling cost savings in a wide variety of industrial applications. It should be noted that thermal-spray ceramic coatings have also been investigated for such applications [Haslam et al. 2005]. This report focuses on the corrosion resistance of iron-based melt-spun amorphous metal ribbons. Melt-Spun ribbon is made by rapid solidification--a stream of molten metal is dropped onto a spinning copper wheel, a process that enables the manufacture of amorphous metals which are unable to be manufactured by conventional cold or hot rolling techniques. The study of melt-spun ribbon allows quick evaluation of amorphous metals corrosion resistance. The melt-spun ribbons included in this study are DAR40, SAM7, and SAM8, SAM1X series, and SAM2X series. The SAM1X series ribbons have

  3. Titanium-potassium heat pipe corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.

    1984-07-01

    An experimental study of the susceptibility of wickless titanium/potassium heat pipes to corrosive attack has been conducted in vacuo at 800/sup 0/K for 6511h and at 900/sup 0/K for 4797h without failure or degradation. Some movement of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen was observed in the titanium container tube, but no evidence of attack could be detected in metallographic cross sections of samples taken along the length of the heat pipes. The lack of observable attack of titanium by potassium under these conditions refutes previous reports of Ti-K incompatibility.

  4. How language enables abstraction: a study in computational cultural psychology.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Yair; Turney, Peter; Cohen, Yohai

    2012-06-01

    The idea that language mediates our thoughts and enables abstract cognition has been a key idea in socio-cultural psychology. However, it is not clear what mechanisms support this process of abstraction. Peirce argued that one mechanism by which language enables abstract thought is hypostatic abstraction, the process through which a predicate (e.g., dark) turns into an object (e.g., darkness). By using novel computational tools we tested Peirce's idea. Analysis of the data provides empirical support for Peirce's mechanism and evidence of the way the use of signs enables abstraction. These conclusions are supported by the in-depth analysis of two case studies concerning the abstraction of sweet and dark. The paper concludes by discussing the findings from a broad and integrative theoretical perspective and by pointing to computational cultural psychology as a promising perspective for addressing long-lasting questions of the field.

  5. Honors Dissertation Abstracts: A Bounded Qualitative Meta-Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Debra K.; Banning, James H.

    2012-01-01

    A potential source of useful information about undergraduate honors education can be found in doctoral dissertation abstracts that focus on honors. Debra Holman and James Banning of Colorado State University sought to explore this resource by undertaking a bounded qualitative meta-study of such abstracts using document analysis. Three…

  6. A cooling water system copper corrosion study

    SciTech Connect

    Pulkrabek, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    The plant has four units that have been operating normally for 12--33 years. Two of the units are 70 MW sister units that have copper alloy once-through condensers. The other two units are 350 MW and 500 MW units with copper alloy condensers and cooling towers. No cooling water related tube leaks had been experienced. Until 1993, the only chemicals used were sulfuric acid for pH control of the cooling tower systems and chlorine for biological control. The units were chlorinated for one hour per day per condenser. In early July 1992, their copper grab sample at the plant discharge to the river exceeded the weekly environmental limit. In fact, it was so high that there was a slim chance of coming in under their monthly average copper limit unless something was done quickly. The result of this incident was an extensive study of their plant wastewater and cooling systems. The study revealed that the elevated copper problem had existed sporadically for several years. Initially, copper control was achieved by altering the wastewater treatment processes and cooling tower blowdown flow path. Two extended trials, one with tolyltriazole (TTA) and one with a chemically modified benzotriazole (BZT) were performed. Optimal control of copper corrosion was eventually achieved by the application of a TTA treatment program in which the feed rates are adjusted based on on-line corrosion monitoring measurements. This report documents experiences and results over the past six years.

  7. The study of palm oil methyl ester and its corrosiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, W. B. Wan; Samo, K. B.; Da, T. H.; Zulkifli, M. F. R.

    2012-06-01

    The present aim of this study is to determine the corrosion effect of palm oil methyl ester (POME) on aluminium alloy 5083 (AA5083). The static immersion test was carried out at 60°C for 68 days according to ASTM G-31-72. The corrosion analysis was done by using weight loss method and electrochemical test. The POME was analyzed by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) to determine its functional group. The result from weight loss method shows the decreasing in weight loss of AA5083 which signifies the ability of POME to reduce corrosion rate. The electrochemical test shows the decreasing in polarization resistance, Rp while the corrosion current densities, icorr increase. The corrosion rate reduces from 2.250mpy to 0.1946mpy. The low concentration of fatty acid C18:2 and high anti oxidant element contributes to the reduction of corrosion rate of AA5083 in POME.

  8. Study of stress corrosion in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brummer, S. B.

    1967-01-01

    Mechanism of the stress corrosion cracking of high-strength aluminum alloys was investigated using electrochemical, mechanical, and electron microscopic techniques. The feasibility of detecting stress corrosion damage in fabricated aluminum alloy parts by nondestructive testing was investigated using ultrasonic surface waves and eddy currents.

  9. SQUID magnetometers for studying corrosion and corrosion protection in aircraft aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Wikswo, J.P. Jr.

    1997-12-01

    Studies at Vanderbilt and elsewhere have demonstrated that superconducting quantum interference (SQUID) magnetometers can be utilized for quantitative measurements of both corrosion activity and material loss in aircraft aluminum alloys. SQUIDs provide sufficient spatial resolution the distribution of hidden corrosion currents can be mapped. The sensitivity of SQUIDs operating at 4 K in liquid helium is such that corrosion can be detected for salt concentrations as low as 1 part per million, and corrosion in 4% NaCl can be detected through 1.4 cm of aluminum. While measurements of the magnetic field from galvanic currents is straightforward in the laboratory, where ferromagnetic fasteners can be eliminated and low frequency noise and the earth`s magnetic field can be shielded, this technique has yet to be demonstrated on aircraft on the flight line. Advanced, low-frequency SQUID eddy current measurements utilizing sheet inducers and phase-sensitive detection offers a depth-selective technique to image material loss deep in aluminum structures. The size of the signal makes this approach highly suitable for implementation with 77 K, liquid- nitrogen cooled SQUIDs. Thus SQUIDs may be useful both for quantitative, laboratory assessment of the rate of hidden corrosion in aircraft samples, and for imaging the extent of second- and third-layer corrosion damage in aircraft. 56 refs.

  10. Electrochemical study of aluminum corrosion in boiling high purity water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draley, J. E.; Legault, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Electrochemical study of aluminum corrosion in boiling high-purity water includes an equation relating current and electrochemical potential derived on the basis of a physical model of the corrosion process. The work involved an examination of the cathodic polarization behavior of 1100 aluminum during aqueous oxidation.

  11. Study of fluoride corrosion of nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, W. H.; Steindler, M. J.

    1969-01-01

    Report contains the results of an investigation of the corrosion resistance of nickel and nickel alloys exposed to fluorine, uranium hexafluoride, and volatile fission product fluorides at high temperatures. Survey of the unclassified literature on the subject is included.

  12. Non-Determinism: An Abstract Concept in Computer Science Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armoni, Michal; Gal-Ezer, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Non-determinism is one of the most important, yet abstract, recurring concepts of Computer Science. It plays an important role in Computer Science areas such as formal language theory, computability theory, distributed computing, and operating systems. We conducted a series of studies on the perception of non-determinism. In the current research,…

  13. Geochemistry Model Abstraction and Sensitivity Studies for the 21 PWR CSNF Waste Package

    SciTech Connect

    P. Bernot; S. LeStrange; E. Thomas; K. Zarrabi; S. Arthur

    2002-10-29

    The CSNF geochemistry model abstraction, as directed by the TWP (BSC 2002b), was developed to provide regression analysis of EQ6 cases to obtain abstracted values of pH (and in some cases HCO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration) for use in the Configuration Generator Model. The pH of the system is the controlling factor over U mineralization, CSNF degradation rate, and HCO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration in solution. The abstraction encompasses a large variety of combinations for the degradation rates of materials. The ''base case'' used EQ6 simulations looking at differing steel/alloy corrosion rates, drip rates, and percent fuel exposure. Other values such as the pH/HCO{sub 3}{sup -} dependent fuel corrosion rate and the corrosion rate of A516 were kept constant. Relationships were developed for pH as a function of these differing rates to be used in the calculation of total C and subsequently, the fuel rate. An additional refinement to the abstraction was the addition of abstracted pH values for cases where there was limited O{sub 2} for waste package corrosion and a flushing fluid other than J-13, which has been used in all EQ6 calculation up to this point. These abstractions also used EQ6 simulations with varying combinations of corrosion rates of materials to abstract the pH (and HCO{sub 3}{sup -} in the case of the limiting O{sub 2} cases) as a function of WP materials corrosion rates. The goodness of fit for most of the abstracted values was above an R{sup 2} of 0.9. Those below this value occurred during the time at the very beginning of WP corrosion when large variations in the system pH are observed. However, the significance of F-statistic for all the abstractions showed that the variable relationships are significant. For the abstraction, an analysis of the minerals that may form the ''sludge'' in the waste package was also presented. This analysis indicates that a number a different iron and aluminum minerals may form in the waste package other than those

  14. Task E container corrosion studies: Annual report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bunnell, L.R.; Doremus, L.A.; Topping, J.B.; Duncan, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting the Solid Waste Technology Support Program (SWTSP) for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Task E is the Container Corrosion Study Portion of the SWTSP that will perform testing to provide defensible data on the corrosion of low-carbon steel, as used in drums to contain chemical and radioactive wastes at the Hanford Site. A second objective of Task E is to provide and test practical alternative materials that have higher corrosion resistance than low-carbon steel. The scope of work for fiscal year (FY) 1993 included initial testing of mild steel specimens buried in Hanford soils or exposed to atmospheric corrosion in metal storage sheds. During FY 1993, progress was made in three areas of Task E. First, exposure of test materials began at the Soil Corrosion Test Site where low-carbon steel specimens were placed in the soil in five test shafts at depths of 9 m (30 ft). Second, the corrosion measurement of low-carbon steel in the soil of two solid waste trenches continued. The total exposure time is {approx} 500 days. Third, an atmospheric corrosion test of low-carbon steel was initiated in a metal shed (Building 2401-W) in the 200 West Area. This annual report describes the Task E efforts and provides a current status.

  15. A laboratory study on metal corrosion by ammonia gas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Riskowski, G.L.; Mackie, R.I.

    1999-06-01

    The effects of aerial ammonia on metal corrosion was examined in this study. Tests were conducted using three environmentally controlled chambers at three different ammonia levels (0 ppm, 100 ppm, and 200 ppm). Four types of metal products (uncoated 1010 carbon steel, galvanized steel, Galvalume, and pure zinc) were evaluated for weight losses and corrosion rates over a two-month test period. The test results showed that aerial ammonia, instead of accelerating metal corrosion, reduced the corrosion rates for steel. Weight losses for uncoated 1010 carbon steel samples in the chamber without ammonia were three and six times higher than those in chambers with ammonia levels of 100 ppm and 200 ppm, respectively. The corrosion rates were greatly reduced from 7.3 {micro}m/year to 1.2 {micro}m/year over the two-month period when ammonia level increased from 0 ppm to 200 ppm. For galvanized steel and pure zinc samples, the influence of ammonia on the corrosion processes was not apparent; however, there was a slight increase in corrosion rate for Galvalume samples with the increase of aerial ammonia concentrations.

  16. COPPER PITTING CORROSION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized or pitting corrosion of copper pipes used in household drinking-water plumbing is a problem for many water utilities and their customers. Extreme attack can lead to pinhole water leaks that may result in water damage, mold growth, and costly repairs. Water quality has b...

  17. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study on corrosion inhibition of benzyltriethylammonium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Mohd Nazri; Daud, Abdul Razak; Othman, Norinsan Kamil

    2013-11-01

    Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was employed to study the corrosion inhibition behavior of benzyltriethylammonium chloride (BTC) for carbon steel corrosion. The inhibition efficiency was investigated in 1.0 M HCl solution at room temperature (25°C) by varying the BTC concentration. EIS results indicated that the double layer capacitance of electrolyte/carbon steel interface decreases with the increasing of BTC concentration and consequently enhances the polarization resistance of equivalence Randles circuit. The results indicated that inhibition efficiency of as high as 65% could be achieved when 10mM BTC was present in 1.0 M HCl solution as compared to inhibitor-free solution. The inhibition process of BTC on the carbon steel corrosion was found to obey Langmuir adsorption isotherm. This study revealed that BTC is suitable to be used as a corrosion inhibitor in acid media.

  18. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  19. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  20. Abstract art and cortical motor activation: an EEG study

    PubMed Central

    Umilta', M. Alessandra; Berchio, Cristina; Sestito, Mariateresa; Freedberg, David; Gallese, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    The role of the motor system in the perception of visual art remains to be better understood. Earlier studies on the visual perception of abstract art (from Gestalt theory, as in Arnheim, 1954 and 1988, to balance preference studies as in Locher and Stappers, 2002, and more recent work by Locher et al., 2007; Redies, 2007, and Taylor et al., 2011), neglected the question, while the field of neuroesthetics (Ramachandran and Hirstein, 1999; Zeki, 1999) mostly concentrated on figurative works. Much recent work has demonstrated the multimodality of vision, encompassing the activation of motor, somatosensory, and viscero-motor brain regions. The present study investigated whether the observation of high-resolution digitized static images of abstract paintings by Lucio Fontana is associated with specific cortical motor activation in the beholder's brain. Mu rhythm suppression was evoked by the observation of original art works but not by control stimuli (as in the case of graphically modified versions of these works). Most interestingly, previous visual exposure to the stimuli did not affect the mu rhythm suppression induced by their observation. The present results clearly show the involvement of the cortical motor system in the viewing of static abstract art works. PMID:23162456

  1. A comparative study of atmospheric corrosion in the Caribbean area

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, L.; Castro, P.; Echeverria, M.

    1995-10-01

    Atmospheric corrosion is a phenomenon of such a magnitude that has been cause of study in several countries for decades. Nevertheless, in Mexico, it became of recent interest due to new economic factors that have involved the Peninsula of Yucatan too. The Yucatan Peninsula is limited to the North and West by the Gulf of Mexico and to the East by the Caribbean Sea. This is a non industrialized region so that in the past very little importance was given to the atmospheric corrosion damage or to the quantification of the high corrosion rates, empirically observed. However, in recent times increased tourism, industrial growth and petroleum extraction have exhibited the need for a better understanding of the atmospheric corrosion processes, as well as a realistic correlation to parameters such as time-of-wetness, levels of pollution by airborne salinity, atmospheric S0{sub 2} and corrosivity categories for the metals. To evaluate these parameters, five tests sites were selected following ISO recommendations. Three sites are marines atmospheres, one urban and one rural. Corrosion rates for commercial laminated Cu and carbon steel, as well as deposition rates of pollutants, were determined after one year exposure in the test sites. Applying the standard practice ISO 9223 a categorization of the corrosivity and of the level of pollutants was carried out. The marine environments were classified as of atmospheric corrosivity C{sub 5}, while the urban and the rural could be classified as C{sub 3}, respectively. The pollution values showed that the exposure sites were essentially contaminated with chloride with classification S{sub 1} for the rural site and S{sub 3} for the marine atmosphere.

  2. Study of Caustic Corrosion of Carbon Steel Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, C.F.

    1999-02-24

    Solution chemistry of wastes from US atomic weapons production is controlled to inhibit corrosion of carbon steel tanks used in containment and storage. The pH, nitrate ion and nitrite ion concentrations of fresh solutions are maintained within specified limits for this purpose. In the start up process for a new waste evaporator (RHL WE), non-radioactive solutions of similar chemistry will be circulated through carbon steel piping between a steel tank and the evaporator. The evaporator is fabricated from a corrosion resistant nickel base alloy. The equipment will be exposed continuously to the hot corrosive caustic solutions. Published corrosion rates for steel in pure caustic at the elevated temperatures indicate losses >1.3 mm/y. Because the total test period for start up is relatively short, penetration will not occur. However, concern exists because the rust particles will probably circulate and precipitate throughout the system.A laboratory study was performed in order to determine corrosion to be expected for the specific waste solutions being used in start up testing of the new equipment. In summary, the test results indicate that the corrosion rates for steel are acceptable for the short term simulant tests for the new evaporator. The amount of particulate is probably not a concern, through filtration is recommended as an option. the hydrogen formation is also not a concern because it is in a steam environment, and is continuously swept from the storage vessel.

  3. TREATMENT TANK CORROSION STUDIES FOR THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-08-24

    Radioactive waste is stored in high level waste tanks on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is aggressively seeking to close the non-compliant Type I and II waste tanks. The removal of sludge (i.e., metal oxide) heels from the tank is the final stage in the waste removal process. The Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed and investigated by SRR to aid in Savannah River Site (SRS) High-Level Waste (HLW) as an option for sludge heel removal. Corrosion rate data for carbon steel exposed to the ECC treatment tank environment was obtained to evaluate the degree of corrosion that occurs. These tests were also designed to determine the effect of various environmental variables such as temperature, agitation and sludge slurry type on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel. Coupon tests were performed to estimate the corrosion rate during the ECC process, as well as determine any susceptibility to localized corrosion. Electrochemical studies were performed to develop a better understanding of the corrosion mechanism. The tests were performed in 1 wt.% and 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with HM and PUREX sludge simulants. The following results and conclusions were made based on this testing: (1) In 1 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, carbon steel corroded at a rate of less than 25 mpy within the temperature and agitation levels of the test. No susceptibility to localized corrosion was observed. (2) In 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid with a sludge simulant, the carbon steel corrosion rates ranged between 15 and 88 mpy. The most severe corrosion was observed at 75 C in the HM/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. Pitting and general corrosion increased with the agitation level at this condition. No pitting and lower general corrosion rates were observed with the PUREX/2.5 wt.% oxalic acid simulant. The electrochemical and coupon tests both indicated that carbon steel is more susceptible to localized corrosion in the HM/oxalic acid environment than

  4. A study of optimal abstract jamming strategies vs. noncoherent MFSK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.; Rodemich, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the performance of uncoded MFSK modulation in the presence of arbitrary additive jamming, taking into account the objective to devise robust antijamming strategies. An abstract model is considered, giving attention to the signal strength as a nonnegative real number X, the employment of X as a random variable, its distribution function G(x), the transmitter's strategy G, the jamming noise as an M-dimensional random vector Z, and the error probability. A summary of previous work on the considered problem is provided, and the results of the current study are presented.

  5. Twelve Year Study of Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals

    SciTech Connect

    M. Kay Adler Flitton; Timothy S. Yoder

    2012-03-01

    The subsurface radioactive disposal facility located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho site contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel nuclear-reactor-core components. A long-term corrosion study is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in an arid vadose zone environment. The study uses non-radioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated material buried at the disposal location, namely, two types of stainless steels, welded stainless steel, welded nickel-chromium steel alloy, zirconium alloy, beryllium, and aluminum. Additionally, carbon steel (the material used in cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and duplex stainless steel (high-integrity containers) are also included in the study. This paper briefly describes the test program and presents the corrosion rate results through twelve years of underground exposure.

  6. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibiting effect of polyaniline coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yen; Wang, Jianguo; Jia, Xinru

    1995-12-01

    A series of electrochemical measurements, including corrosion potential (E{sub corr}), corrosion current (i{sub corr}), Tafel`s constants and polarization resistance (R{sub p}), have been made on polyaniline-coated cold rolled steel specimen under various conditions. Both the base and acid-doped forms of polyaniline were studied. The base form of polyaniline was found to offer good corrosion protection. This phenomenon may not originate merely from the barrier effect of the coatings, because the nonconjugated polymers such as polystyrene and epoxy did not show the same electrochemical behavior. The polyaniline base with zinc nitrate plus epoxy topcoat appeared to give better overall protection relative to other coating systems in this study.

  7. Corrosion study in the chemical air separation (MOLTOX trademark ) process

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Doohee; Wong, Kai P.; Archer, R.A.; Cassano, A.A.

    1988-12-01

    This report presents the results of studies aimed at solving the corrosion problems encountered during operation of the MOLTOX{trademark} pilot plant. These studies concentrated on the screening of commercial and developmental alloys under conditions simulating operation conditions in this high temperature molten salt process. Process economic studies were preformed in parallel with the laboratory testing to ensure that an economically feasible solution would be achieved. In addition to the above DOE co-funded studies, Air Products and Chemicals pursued proprietary studies aimed at developing a less corrosive salt mixture which would potentially allow the use of chemurgically available alloys such as stainless steels throughout the system. These studies will not be reported here; however, the results of corrosion tests in the new less corrosive salt mixtures are reported. Because our own studies on salt chemistry impacts heavily on the overall process and thereby has an influence on the experimental work conducted under this contract, some of the studies discussed here were impacted by our own proprietary data. Therefore, the reasons behind some of the experiments presented herein will not be explained because that information is proprietary to Air Products. 14 refs., 42 figs., 21 tabs.

  8. Teaching Psychology Students to Write Structured Abstracts: An Evaluation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, James; Rock, Judy; Fox, Claire

    2005-01-01

    Background: Considerable evidence suggests that structured abstracts in scientific journal articles are more informative than traditional ones, but no one (to our knowledge) has written about asking psychology undergraduates to write structured abstracts for their laboratory reports. Aim: Our aim was to assess whether or not the quality of such…

  9. Abstraction in Expertise: A Study of Nurses' Conceptions of Concentration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noss, Richard; Hoyles, Celia; Pozzi, Stefano

    2002-01-01

    Uses situated abstraction to understand nurses' conceptions of intensive quantity of drug concentration. Explores nurses' conceptions to undertake a pointed examination of the degree of situatedness of nurses' knowledge and reasoning. Demonstrates that nurses' conceptions were abstracted within their practice when they coordinated mathematical…

  10. Hanford Personnel Dosimeter supporting studies FY-1980. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Endres, G.W.R.; Cummings, F.M.; Aldrich, J.M.; Thorson, M.R.; Kathren, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report which describe fundamental characteristics of the Hanford multipurpose personnel dosimeter (HMPD). Abstracts were not prepared for Appendix A and Appendix B which deal with calculated standard deviations for 100 mrem mixed field exposures and detailed calculations of standard deviations, respectively. (KRM)

  11. Corrosion Studies of 2195 Al-Li Alloy and 2219 Al Alloy with Differing Surface Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion studies of 2195 Al-Li and 2219 Al alloys have been conducted using the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) and the polarization resistance (PR) technique. The SRET was used to study corrosion mechanisms, while corrosion rate measurements were studied with the PR technique. Plates of Al203 blasted, soda blasted and conversion coated 2219 Al were coated with Deft primer and the corrosion rates studied with the EIS technique. Results from all of these studies are presented.

  12. Instrumentation for potentiostatic corrosion studies with distilled water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loess, R. E.; Youngdahl, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    Corrosion is studied potentiostatically in the corroding environment of distilled water with an instrument that measures the potential of the corroding specimen immediately after interruption of the polarizing current. No current is flowing. The process permits compensation for IR drops when potentiostatic control is used in high resistance systems.

  13. A study of differential-flow-rate-cell corrosion in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, M.; Kishimoto, K.; Aoki, S.

    1995-10-01

    Mechanisms of differential-flow-rate-cell corrosion (differential-aeration-cell corrosion caused by differential flow rates) of cast iron in seawater were studied. Potential and current density distributions produced by the differential-flow-rate-cell were on actual pumps and a model test cell. Boundary element analysis was also performed on differential-flow-rate-cell corrosion occurred in the model test cell. These studies demonstrate that differential-flow-rate-cell corrosion has characteristics similar to those of galvanic corrosion, and thus can be treated in the same manner as galvanic corrosion.

  14. An electrochemical study of the corrosion behavior of primer coated 2219-T87 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Higgins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The corrosion behavior for 2219-T87 aluminum coated with various primers, including those used for the external tank and solid rocket boosters of the Space Shuttle Transportation System, were investigated using electrochemical techniques. Corrosion potential time, polarization resistance time, electrical resistance time, and corrosion rate time measurements were all investigated. It was found that electrical resistance time and corrosion rate time measurement were most useful for studying the corrosion behavior of painted aluminum. Electrical resistance time determination give useful information concerning the porosity of paint films, while corrosion rate time curves give important information concerning overall corrosion rates and corrosion mechanisms. In general, the corrosion rate time curves all exhibited at least one peak during the 30 day test period, which was attributed, according to the proposed mechanisms, to the onset of the hydrogen evolution reaction and the beginning of destruction of the protective properties of the paint film.

  15. Prompt gamma analysis of chlorine in concrete for corrosion study.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Nagadi, M M; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2006-02-01

    Measurement of chlorine in concrete is very important for studying of corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete. Corrosion of reinforcing steel is primarily ascribed to the penetration of chloride ions to the steel surface. Preventive measures for avoiding concrete structure reinforcement corrosion requires monitoring the chloride ion concentration in concrete so that its concentration does not exceed a threshold limit to initiate reinforcement concrete corrosion. An accelerator based prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup has been developed for non-destructive analysis of elemental composition of concrete samples. The setup has been used to measure chlorine concentration in concrete samples over a 1-3 wt% concentration range. Although a strong interference has been observed between the chlorine gamma-rays and calcium gamma-rays from concrete, the chlorine concentration in concrete samples has been successfully measured using the 1.164 and 7.643 MeV chlorine gamma-rays. The experimental data were compared with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations. An excellent agreement has been achieved between the experimental data and results of Monte Carlo simulations. The study has demonstrated the successful use of the accelerator-based PGNAA setup in non-destructive analysis of chlorine in concrete samples. PMID:16129605

  16. Laboratory stress corrosion cracking studies in polythionic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, V.B.; Newsome, J.F.

    1984-08-01

    Stress corrosion cracking caused by polythionic acid and/or chlorides is a problem in coal liquefaction pilot plants. This problem is also common in refineries and has been the subject of extensive research. This study examines (1) the relationship of the ASTM standard ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid test for determining sensitization to resistance to polythionic stress corrosion cracking, (2) the cracking resistance of higher-alloy Fe-Ni-Cr materials in addition to the common austenitic stainless steels, and (3) the effect of chloride concentrations up to 1% in polythionic acid solutions on cracking behavior. We found that the ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid test can be used as an acceptance test for materials resistant to polythionic acid stress corrosion cracking because of its severity. The more highly alloyed materials were more resistant to sensitization than most of the austenitic stainless steels and were virtually unattacked in polythionic acid solutions containing up to 1% chloride. Chloride increased the corrosion rate and caused localized pitting, but it did not affect significantly the number of failures or the failure mode.

  17. Corrosion studies in molten calcium chloride with chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, D.F. . Science and Technology Center); Sessions, C.E.; Marra, J.E. )

    1990-01-01

    This study is aimed at testing new materials for use in molten salt processing of plutonium. Because of the high corrosiveness of chlorine, present materials have a high rate of failure. Materials less subject to corrosion are needed to minimize costs resulting from rapid failure of sparge tubes, stirring apparatus, and crucibles; to reduce the quantity of plutonium-contaminated scrap; and to improve the purity of the plutonium product. The processing environment of molten CaCl{sub 2}--CaO salts, molten plutonium, and chlorine-oxygen gas at temperatures from 750{degree} to 900{degree} is extremely severe. Materials with resistance to both corrosion and mechanical failure are desired. Also, the incorporation of corrosion products into the final plutonium product cannot exceed the allowable impurity limits. We require materials for crucibles, sparge tubes, stirrers, and containment and pull cans. Four metallic and two ceramics materials were tested. The metallic materials were Inconel-601, Inconel-617, tantalum, and tungsten. Silicon nitride and magnesium oxide were the ceramics tested.

  18. How Dangerous Can Localized Corrosion Be? An Experiment that Studies Its Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celdran, R.; Gonzalo, P.

    1988-01-01

    Considers three common cases of localized corrosion of metals: pitting, crevice, and stress corrosion. Provides experimental methods for studying all three methods. Includes a discussion of expected results. (ML)

  19. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-08-21

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed.

  20. Laser Raman Spectroscopy in studies of corrosion and electrocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Melendres, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Laser Raman Spectroscopy (LRS) has become an important tool for the in-situ structural study of electrochemical systems and processes in recent years. Following a brief introduction of the experimental techniques involved in applying LRS to electrochemical systems, we survey the literature for examples of studies in the inhibition of electrode reactions by surface films (e.g., corrosion and passivation phenomena) as well as the acceleration of reactions by electro-sorbates (electrocatalysis). We deal mostly with both normal and resonance Raman effects on fairly thick surface films in contrast to surface-enhanced Raman investigations of monolayer adsorbates, which is covered in another lecture. Laser Raman spectroelectrochemical studies of corrosion and film formation on such metals as Pb, Ag, Fe, Ni, Co, Cr, Au, stainless steel, etc. in various solution conditions are discussed. Further extension of the technique to studies in high-temperature and high-pressure aqueous environments is demonstrated. Results of studies of the structure of corrosion inhibitors are also presented. As applications of the LRS technique in the area of electrocatalysis, we cite studies of the structure of transition metal macrocyclic compounds, i.e., phthalocyanines and porphyrins, used for catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction. 104 refs., 20 figs.

  1. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO{sub 2} Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H{sub 2}S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  2. Corrosion 99: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This conference includes the following; Corrosion in Gas Treating; Advances in Scale and Deposit Control; Uses of Computers for Improved Corrosion Control; Erosion-Corrosion in Steam Generating Systems; Electrochemical Noise Measurements for Corrosion Evaluations; Materials Performance in Fossil Fuel Combustion and Conversion Systems; Corrosion in Super Critical Processes; Cathodic Protection of External Surfaces for Underground and Aboveground Storage Tanks; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Materials for Oilfield Applications; Refining Industry Corrosion; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibition Technologies; Managing Corrosion With Plastics; Corrosion Measurement Technology; Marine Corrosion; Improved Understanding and Mitigation of CO[sub 2] Corrosion; Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection; Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion Testing in Concrete; Stress Corrosion Cracking: Field Laboratory Correlations; Materials Performance in Incineration and Waste Fuel Combustion Environments; Water Reuse in Industry; Corrosion Control and Prevention of Military and Aerospace Equipment; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; Latest Developments in Aboveground Storage Tanks Corrosion Control, Monitoring and Evaluation Technology; Internal In-line Inspection of Pipelines and Evaluation of Results; New Developments in Cathodic Protection of Reinforcing Steels in Concrete; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in the Pulp and Paper Industry; Advanced Materials for High Temperature Service in Chemical Process Industry; Advances in Cooling Water Treatment; Materials, Fabrication, and Inspection Guidelines for Wet H[sub 2]S Service; Environmental Wear of Nonmetallics in Oilfield Service; and Corrosion and Scale Control in Low Pressure Boiler and Steam Systems in Buildings. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers.

  3. Corrosion cast study of the canine hepatic veins.

    PubMed

    Uršič, M; Vrecl, M; Fazarinc, G

    2014-11-01

    This study presents a detailed description of the distribution, diameters and drainage patterns of hepatic veins on the basis of the corrosion cast analysis in 18 dogs. We classified the hepatic veins in three main groups: the right hepatic veins of the caudate process and right lateral liver lobe, the middle hepatic veins of the right medial and quadrate lobes and the left hepatic veins of both left liver lobes and the papillary process. The corrosion cast study showed that the number of the veins in the Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria and most anatomical textbooks is underestimated. The number of various-sized hepatic veins of the right liver division ranged from 3 to 5 and included 1 to 4 veins from the caudate process and 2 to 4 veins from the right lateral liver lobe. Generally, in all corrosion casts, one middle-sized vein from the right part of the right medial lobe, which emptied separately in the caudal vena cava, was established. The other vein was a large-sized vein from the remainder of the central division, which frequently joined the common left hepatic vein from the left liver lobes. The common left hepatic vein was the largest of all the aforementioned hepatic veins.

  4. Corrosion study for a radioactive waste vitrification facility

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, K.J.; Jenkins, C.F.

    1993-10-01

    A corrosion monitoring program was setup in a scale demonstration melter system to evaluate the performance of materials selected for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the DOE`s Savannah River Site. The system is a 1/10 scale prototypic version of the DWPF. In DWPF, high activity radioactive waste will be vitrified and encapsulated for long term storage. During this study twenty-six different alloys, including DWPF reference materials of construction and alternate higher alloy materials, were subjected to process conditions and environments characteristic of the DWPF except for radioactivity. The materials were exposed to low pH, elevated temperature (to 1200{degree}C) environments containing abrasive slurries, molten glass, mercury, halides and sulfides. General corrosion rates, pitting susceptibility and stress corrosion cracking of the materials were investigated. Extensive data were obtained for many of the reference materials. Performance in the Feed Preparation System was very good, whereas coupons from the Quencher Inlet region of the Melter Off-Gas System experienced localized attack.

  5. ALTERNATIVE AND ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING: CORROSION STUDIES RESULTS: FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.

    2010-09-29

    Due to the need to close High Level Waste storage tanks, chemical cleaning methods are needed for the removal of sludge heel materials remaining at the completion of mechanical tank cleaning efforts. Oxalic acid is considered the preferred cleaning reagent for heel dissolution of iron-based sludge. However, the large quantity of chemical reagents added to the tank farm from oxalic acid based cleaning has significant downstream impacts. Optimization of the oxalic acid cleaning process can potentially reduce the downstream impacts from chemical cleaning. To optimize oxalic acid usage, a detailed understanding of the chemistry of oxalic acid based sludge dissolution is required. Additionally, other acidic systems may be required for specific waste components that have low solubility in oxalic acid, and as a means to reduce oxalic acid usage in general. Electrochemical corrosion studies were conducted with 1 wt. % oxalic acid at mineral acid concentrations above and below the optimal conditions for this oxalic acid concentration. Testing environments included pure reagents, pure iron and aluminum phases, and sludge simulants. Mineral acid concentrations greater than 0.2 M and temperatures greater than 50 C result in unacceptably high corrosion rates. Results showed that manageable corrosion rates of carbon steel can be achieved at dilute mineral acid concentrations (i.e. less than 0.2 M) and low temperatures based on the contact times involved. Therefore, it is recommended that future dissolution and corrosion testing be performed with a dilute mineral acid and a less concentrated oxalic acid (e.g., 0.5 wt.%) that still promotes optimal dissolution. This recommendation requires the processing of greater water volumes than those for the baseline process during heel dissolution, but allows for minimization of oxalic acid additions. The following conclusions can be drawn from the test results: (1) In both nitric and sulfuric acid based reagents, the low temperature and

  6. The use of microelectrodes in the study of localized corrosion of aluminum 6111-like alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Aboubakr M.

    This thesis is classified into four chapters. While chapter 1 is only an introductory chapter that summarizes the two mechanisms that are trying to explain localized corrosion of metals and alloys, Chapter 4 is the conclusions and future work chapter that presents the new achievements that have been added to the field of corrosion science by this work besides the proposed work to be done in the future. In chapter 2, Crevice corrosion of an experimental Al 6111-like alloy with 0.68% Cu has been studied using potentiodynamic and potentiostatic techniques in different concentrations of sodium chloride and in 0.1M nitric acid solutions. Potentiodynamic experiments show that the alloy has an active/passive transition in a saturated sodium chloride solution at elevated temperatures (90 and 70°C). Also, a steep electrode potential gradient, E(x), within the crevice has been measured using a microprobe connected to a SCE and controlled by a 3-D manipulator, and the observed locations of corrosion on the crevice wall are similar to the locations seen previously for systems in which it was clear that the shift of E(x) into the active peak region of the polarization curve on the crevice wall stabilized the crevice corrosion process. In chapter 3, focuses on the corrosion of a peak aged aluminum 6111-like alloy of 1.47% copper using the artificial pit configuration (pencil electrode) with relatively larger specimens in the form of plates rather than wires. The sample which was flush with the surface of the epoxy resin mount was anodically polarized in neutral NaCl solutions of different concentrations and pH 6.9. The alloy dissolved uniformly at a certain rate to form a local cell with epoxy resin walls and the alloy surface as its bottom. The potential drop profile within the cavity was recorded on a daily basis. It showed that the total potential drop is in the order of 50 mV. The pH in the local cell was measured using a commercial mono pH microelectrode coupled with a

  7. Hanford double shell waste tank corrosion studies - final report FY2014

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B. J.; Fuentes, R. E.; Hicks, K.

    2014-12-19

    SRNL tasks for FY14 included studies to evaluate the susceptibility of carbon steel to vapor space corrosion (VSC), liquid-air interface (LAI) corrosion, and pitting corrosion. Additionally, SRNL evaluated the susceptibility of carbon steel to pitting corrosion under buffered waste conditions, with the objective of determining the adequate amount of inhibitor (e.g., nitrite) necessary to mitigate pitting corrosion. Other CPP experiments were performed in historical waste simulants and the results were compared to previously gathered results. The results of these activities were utilized to assess the robustness of the standardized CPP protocol

  8. International symposium on in vivo body composition studies: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This booklet contains the program and individual abstracts for papers presented at the International symposium on in vivo body composition studies. The presentations were divided into five sessions. Individual abstracts were indexed for the Energy Data Base. (DT)

  9. An Analytic Study of the Postgraduate Students' Difficulties in Writing Abstracts in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aly, Mahsoub Abdul-Sadeq

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigated the Egyptian postgraduate students' difficulties in writing abstracts in English. In order to achieve the objectives of this study, a list of criteria for writing a good and effective abstract has been developed in the light of the review of literature. Besides, a content analysis of 35 abstracts written in English…

  10. Experimental Study on Rebar Corrosion Using the Galvanic Sensor Combined with the Electronic Resistance Technique

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunze; Li, Kaiqiang; Liu, Liang; Yang, Lujia; Wang, Xiaona; Huang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new kind of carbon steel (CS) and stainless steel (SS) galvanic sensor system was developed for the study of rebar corrosion in different pore solution conditions. Through the special design of the CS and SS electronic coupons, the electronic resistance (ER) method and zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) technique were used simultaneously for the measurement of both the galvanic current and the corrosion depth. The corrosion processes in different solution conditions were also studied by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and the measurements of polarization curves. The test result shows that the galvanic current noise can provide detailed information of the corrosion processes. When localized corrosion occurs, the corrosion rate measured by the ER method is lower than the real corrosion rate. However, the value measured by the LPR method is higher than the real corrosion rate. The galvanic current and the corrosion current measured by the LPR method shows linear correlation in chloride-containing saturated Ca(OH)2 solution. The relationship between the corrosion current differences measured by the CS electronic coupons and the galvanic current between the CS and SS electronic coupons can also be used to evaluate the localized corrosion in reinforced concrete. PMID:27618054

  11. Experimental Study on Rebar Corrosion Using the Galvanic Sensor Combined with the Electronic Resistance Technique.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunze; Li, Kaiqiang; Liu, Liang; Yang, Lujia; Wang, Xiaona; Huang, Yi

    2016-09-08

    In this paper, a new kind of carbon steel (CS) and stainless steel (SS) galvanic sensor system was developed for the study of rebar corrosion in different pore solution conditions. Through the special design of the CS and SS electronic coupons, the electronic resistance (ER) method and zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) technique were used simultaneously for the measurement of both the galvanic current and the corrosion depth. The corrosion processes in different solution conditions were also studied by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and the measurements of polarization curves. The test result shows that the galvanic current noise can provide detailed information of the corrosion processes. When localized corrosion occurs, the corrosion rate measured by the ER method is lower than the real corrosion rate. However, the value measured by the LPR method is higher than the real corrosion rate. The galvanic current and the corrosion current measured by the LPR method shows linear correlation in chloride-containing saturated Ca(OH)₂ solution. The relationship between the corrosion current differences measured by the CS electronic coupons and the galvanic current between the CS and SS electronic coupons can also be used to evaluate the localized corrosion in reinforced concrete.

  12. Experimental Study on Rebar Corrosion Using the Galvanic Sensor Combined with the Electronic Resistance Technique.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunze; Li, Kaiqiang; Liu, Liang; Yang, Lujia; Wang, Xiaona; Huang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new kind of carbon steel (CS) and stainless steel (SS) galvanic sensor system was developed for the study of rebar corrosion in different pore solution conditions. Through the special design of the CS and SS electronic coupons, the electronic resistance (ER) method and zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) technique were used simultaneously for the measurement of both the galvanic current and the corrosion depth. The corrosion processes in different solution conditions were also studied by linear polarization resistance (LPR) and the measurements of polarization curves. The test result shows that the galvanic current noise can provide detailed information of the corrosion processes. When localized corrosion occurs, the corrosion rate measured by the ER method is lower than the real corrosion rate. However, the value measured by the LPR method is higher than the real corrosion rate. The galvanic current and the corrosion current measured by the LPR method shows linear correlation in chloride-containing saturated Ca(OH)₂ solution. The relationship between the corrosion current differences measured by the CS electronic coupons and the galvanic current between the CS and SS electronic coupons can also be used to evaluate the localized corrosion in reinforced concrete. PMID:27618054

  13. Study of biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiya; Tian, Yimei; Wan, Jianmei; Zhao, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water was systemically studied using the weight loss method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results demonstrated that compared to sterile water, the existence of the biofilm in reclaimed water promoted the corrosion process significantly. The characteristics of biofilm on cast iron coupons were examined by the surface profiler, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The bacterial counts in the biofilm were determined using the standard plate count method and the most probable number (MPN). The results demonstrated that the corrosion process was influenced by the settled bacteria, EPS, and corrosion products in the biofilm comprehensively. But, the corrosion mechanisms were different with respect to time and could be divided into three stages in our study. Furthermore, several corresponding corrosion mechanisms were proposed for different immersion times.

  14. CHARACTERIZING THE MICROBIAL COMMUNITY IN SABRE MICROCOSM STUDIES (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project will evaluate accelerated anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in areas of high concentration, such as DNAPL source areas. In preparation for a field scale pilot test, laboratory microcosm and column studies were conducte...

  15. METRICS OF PERFORMANCE FOR THE SABRE MICROCOSM STUDY (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) project will evaluate accelerated anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated solvents in areas of high concentration, such as DNAPL source areas. In preparation for a field scale pilot test, a laboratory microcosm study was conducted to provide...

  16. A case study of corrosion control in a Herreshoff multiple-hearth calciner

    SciTech Connect

    Schorr, M.; Mureinik, R.J.

    1985-09-01

    The calcination of magnesium hydroxide to magnesium oxide is performed in a multi-hearth Herreshoff kiln, which consists of a cylindrical shell enclosing refractory hearths. After several years of operation, corrosion on the shell was studied by mapping the residual shell thickness and temperature. Corrosion products were samples and analyzed, and a mechanism proposed to explain the extent and distribution of the corrosion intensity.

  17. Corrosion and degradation studies utilizing X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hixson, Holly Gwyndolen

    1997-08-01

    This dissertation involves studies of corrosion behavior at the surface of various metal samples, as well as the degradation of wool fibers obtained from the Star-Spangled Banner. Molybdenum metal and iron-zinc alloys were examined under corrosive conditions, and the degradation of the wool fibers was studied. The behavior of a polished molybdenum metal surface upon exposure to both aerated and deaerated water and 1.0 M NaCl solution was studied by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Exposure to deaerated water and NaCl failed to produce oxidation of the metal surfaces, but exposing the polished metal surface to aerated water produced significant oxidation. Metal surfaces cleaned by argon-ion etching were found to be inert to oxidation by aerated water. The etching process also appears to passivate the metal surface. The behavior of molybdenum metal in 0.5 M Hsb2SOsb4 treated at various potentials has been studied using core and valence band XPS. The study indicates that Mosp{IV} and Mosp{VI} (including possibly Mosp{V} in some cases) were formed as the potential of the system was increased within the active range of molybdenum. The corrosive behavior of iron-zinc alloys that have been electroplated on plain steel in both aerated and deaerated quadruply-distilled water has been studied using XPS. Several different iron-zinc alloys were electroplated for comparative purposes: an iron-rich alloy, a zinc-rich alloy, and an alloy of similar iron and zinc composition. Treatment in aerated water produces oxidation for the iron-rich and similar composition alloys, but the oxide is reduced for the zinc-rich alloy. Degradation of the fibers in the original Star-Spangled Banner has been monitored using XPS and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Comparison of white and red wool fibers and linen fibers from the flag with new, mechanically-abraded, and chemically-treated white, red, and linen fibers, respectively, was performed in an attempt to determine the fibers' levels

  18. Study of development and utilization of a multipurpose atmospheric corrosion sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diwan, Ravinder M.; Raman, A.; Bhattacharya, P. K.

    1994-01-01

    There has been a critical need for analyzing various aspects of atmospheric corrosion and for the development of atmospheric corrosion microsensors. The project work has involved the following activities: (1) making of multielectrode corrosion monitors on dielectric substrates; (2) testing them in the laboratory for functional characteristics; (3) preparing a report on the state of the art of atmospheric corrosion sensor development around the world; and (4) corrosion testing of electrochemical changes of sensor specimens and related fog testing. The study included work on the subject of development and utilization of a multipurpose atmospheric corrosion sensor and this report is the annual report on work carried out on this research project. This has included studies on the development of sensors of two designs, stage 1 and stage 2, and with glass and alumina substrate, experimentation and development and characterization of the coating uniformity, aspects of corrosion monitoring, literature search on the corrosion sensors and their development. A state of the art report on atmospheric corrosion sensor development was prepared and submitted.

  19. Corrosion and Fretting Corrosion Studies of Medical Grade CoCrMo Alloy in a Clinically Relevant Simulated Body Fluid Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocran, Emmanuel K.; Guenther, Leah E.; Brandt, Jan-M.; Wyss, Urs; Ojo, Olanrewaju A.

    2015-06-01

    In modular hip implants, fretting corrosion at the head/neck and neck/stem interfaces has been identified as a major cause of early revision in hip implants, particularly those with heads larger than 32 mm. It has been found that the type of fluid used to simulate the fretting corrosion of biomedical materials is crucial for the reliability of laboratory tests. Therefore, to properly understand and effectively design against fretting corrosion damage in modular hips, there is the need to replicate the human body environment as closely as possible during in vitro testing. In this work, corrosion and fretting corrosion behavior of CoCrMo in 0.14 M NaCl, phosphate buffered saline, and in a clinically relevant novel simulated body fluid was studied using a variety of electrochemical characterization techniques and tribological experiments. Electrochemical, spectroscopy and tribo-electrochemical techniques employed include Potentiodynamic polarization, Potentiostatic polarization, Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, augur electron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy, and pin-on-disk wear simulation. The presence of phosphate ions in PBS accounted for the higher corrosion rate when compared with 0.14 M NaCl and the clinically relevant novel simulated body fluid. The low corrosion rates and the nature of the protective passive film formed in the clinically relevant simulated body fluid make it suitable for future corrosion and fretting corrosion studies.

  20. Corrosion coupon studies at coal liquefaction pilot plants

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Baylor, V.B.; Howell, M.; Newsome, J.F.

    1983-09-01

    As part of the Fossil Energy Materials Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we have supplied corrosion coupons to coal-liquefaction pilot plants for exposure in selected vessels. These vessels were chosen on the basis of previous corrosion experience, anticipated corrosion behavior (especially important when operating conditions were changed), accessibility, and availability. Alloys exposed were selected to give a series with a corrosion resistance ranging from less than to greater than that thought to be needed for each application. Corrosion rates calculated from weight changes of the exposed coupons provide information useful in selecting materials for coal-liquefaction plants. The results presented are from coupons exposed in the Wilsonville, Alabama, and Fort Lewis, Washington, Solvent Refined Coal pilot plants; the Catlettsburg, Kentucky, H-Coal Pilot Plant; and the Baytown, Texas, Exxon Coal Liquefaction Pilot Plant.

  1. Corrosion of food and beverage cans. January 1972-November 1989 (Citations from the Food Science and Technology Abstracts data base). Report for January 1972-November 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the external and internal corrosion of food and beverage containers. The manufacture of tin and steel plate, and aluminum cans is discussed, and factors affecting pitting are considered. Food chemistry and shelf-life aspects are also evaluated. (This updated bibliography contains 290 citations, 65 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  2. Deposition measurement of particulate matter in connection with corrosion studies.

    PubMed

    Ferm, Martin; Watt, John; O'Hanlon, Samantha; De Santis, Franco; Varotsos, Costas

    2006-03-01

    A new passive particle collector (inert surrogate surface) that collects particles from all directions has been developed. It was used to measure particle deposition at 35 test sites as part of a project that examined corrosion of materials in order that variation in particulate material could be used in development of dose-response functions in a modern multi-pollutant environment. The project, MULTI-ASSESS, was funded by the EU to examine the effects of air pollution on cultural heritage. Passive samplers were mounted rain-protected, and both in wind-protected and wind-exposed positions, to match the exposure of the samples for corrosion studies. The particle mass and its chemical content (nitrate, ammonium, sulfate, calcium, sodium, chloride, magnesium and potassium) were analysed. The loss of light reflectance on the surrogate surface was also measured. Very little ammonium and potassium was found, and one or more anions are missing in the ion balance. There were many strong correlations between the analysed species. The mass of analysed water-soluble ions was fairly constant at 24% of the total mass. The particle mass deposited to the samplers in the wind-protected position was about 25% of the particles deposited to an openly exposed sampler. The Cl-/Na+ ratios indicate a reaction between HNO(3) and NaCl. The deposited nitrate flux corresponds to the missing chloride. The Ca2+ deposition equals the SO4(2-) deposition and the anion deficiency. The SO4(2-) deposition most likely originates from SO2 that has reacted with basic calcium-containing particles either before or after they were deposited. The particle depositions at the urban sites were much higher than in nearby rural sites. The deposited mass correlated surprisingly well with the PM(10) concentration, except at sites very close to traffic.

  3. STEM Education Related Dissertation Abstracts: A Bounded Qualitative Meta-Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banning, James; Folkestad, James E.

    2012-01-01

    This article utilizes a bounded qualitative meta-study framework to examine the 101 dissertation abstracts found by searching the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses[TM] digital database for dissertations abstracts from 1990 through 2010 using the search terms education, science, technology, engineer, and STEM/SMET. Professional search librarians…

  4. Theoretical study of inhibition efficiencies of some amino acids on corrosion of carbon steel in acidic media: green corrosion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dehdab, Maryam; Shahraki, Mehdi; Habibi-Khorassani, Sayyed Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition efficiencies of three amino acids [tryptophan (B), tyrosine (c), and serine (A)] have been studied as green corrosion inhibitors on corrosion of carbon steel using density functional theory (DFT) method in gas and aqueous phases. Quantum chemical parameters such as EH OMO (highest occupied molecular orbital energy), E LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy), hardness (η), polarizability ([Formula: see text]), total negative charges on atoms (TNC), molecular volume (MV) and total energy (TE) have been calculated at the B3LYP level of theory with 6-311++G** basis set. Consistent with experimental data, theoretical results showed that the order of inhibition efficiency is tryptophan (B) > tyrosine (C) > serine (A). In order to determine the possible sites of nucleophilic and electrophilic attacks, local reactivity has been evaluated through Fukui indices.

  5. SRNL SHELF LIFE STUDIES - SCC STUDIES AT ROOM TEMPERTURE [stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Duffey, J.

    2014-11-12

    Phase II, Series 2 corrosion testing performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for the Department of Energy 3013 container has been completed. The corrosion tests are part of an integrated plan conducted jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Savannah River Site. SRNL was responsible for conducting corrosion studies in small-scale vessels to address the influence of salt composition, water loading, and type of oxide/salt contact on the relative humidity inside a 3013 container and on the resulting corrosion of Type 304L and 316L stainless steel (304L and 316L). This testing was conducted in two phases: Phase I evaluated a broad spectrum of salt compositions and initial water loadings on the salt mixtures exposed to 304L and 316L and the resulting corrosion; Phase II evaluated the corrosion of 304L at specific water loadings and a single salt composition. During Phase I testing at high initial moisture levels (0.35 to 1.24 wt%)a, the roomtemperature corrosion of 304L exposed to a series of plutonium oxide/chloride salt mixtures ranged from superficial staining to pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). 304L teardrop coupons that exhibited SCC were directly exposed to a mixture composed of 98 wt % PuO2, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl2. Cracking was not observed in a 316L teardrop coupon. Pitting was also observed in this environment for both 304L and 316L with depths ranging from 20 to 100 μm. Neither pitting nor SCC was observed in mixtures with a greater chloride salt concentration (5 and 28 wt%). These results demonstrated that for a corrosive solution to form a balance existed between the water loading and the salt chloride concentration. This chloride solution results from the interaction of loaded water with the hydrating CaCl2 salt. In Phase II, Series 1 tests, the SCC results were shown to be reproducible with cracking occurring in as little as 85 days. The approximate 0.5 wt% moisture level was found to

  6. Review and study of physics driven pitting corrosion modeling in 2024-T3 aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Jata, Kumar V.

    2015-04-01

    Material degradation due to corrosion and corrosion fatigue has been recognized to significantly affect the airworthiness of civilian and military aircraft, especially for the current fleet of airplanes that have served beyond their initial design life. The ability to predict the corrosion damage development in aircraft components and structures, therefore, is of great importance in managing timely maintenance for the aging aircraft vehicles and in assisting the design of new ones. The assessment of aircraft corrosion and its influence on fatigue life relies on appropriate quantitative models that can evaluate the initiation of the corrosion as well as the accumulation during the period of operation. Beyond the aircraft regime, corrosion has also affected the maintenance, safety and reliability of other systems such as nuclear power systems, steam and gas turbines, marine structures and so on. In the work presented in this paper, we reviewed and studied several physics based pitting corrosion models that have been reported in the literature. The classic work of particle induced pitting corrosion by Wei and Harlow is reviewed in detail. Two types of modeling, a power law based simplified model and a microstructure based model, are compared for 2024-T3 alloy. Data from literatures are used as model inputs. The paper ends with conclusions and recommendations for future work.

  7. Studies of localized corrosion in welded aluminum alloys by the scanning reference electrode technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Nunes, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    Localized corrosion in welded samples of 2219-T87 Al alloy (2319 filler), 2090 Al-Li alloy (4043 and 2319 fillers), and 2195 Al-Li alloy (4043 and 2319 fillers) has been investigated using the relatively new scanning reference electrode technique. The weld beads are cathodic in all cases, leading to reduced anode/cathode ratios. A reduction in anode/cathode ratio leads to an increase in the corrosion rates of the welded metals, in agreement with results obtained in previous electrochemical and stress corrosion studies involving the overall corrosion rates of welded samples. The cathodic weld beads are bordered on both sides by strong anodic regions, with high propensity for corrosion.

  8. ClinicalTrials.gov registration can supplement information in abstracts for systematic reviews: a comparison study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The inclusion of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reported in conference abstracts in systematic reviews is controversial, partly because study design information and risk of bias is often not fully reported in the abstract. The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) requires trial registration of abstracts submitted for their annual conference as of 2007. Our goal was to assess the feasibility of obtaining study design information critical to systematic reviews, but not typically included in conference abstracts, from the trial registration record. Methods We reviewed all conference abstracts presented at the ARVO meetings from 2007 through 2009, and identified 496 RCTs; 154 had a single matching registration record in ClinicalTrials.gov. Two individuals independently extracted information from the abstract and the ClinicalTrials.gov record, including study design, sample size, inclusion criteria, masking, interventions, outcomes, funder, and investigator name and contact information. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus. We assessed the frequencies of reporting variables appearing in the abstract and the trial register and assessed agreement of information reported in both sources. Results We found a substantial amount of study design information in the ClinicalTrials.gov record that was unavailable in the corresponding conference abstract, including eligibility criteria associated with gender (83%; 128/154); masking or blinding of study participants (53%, 82/154), persons administering treatment (30%, 46/154), and persons measuring the outcomes (40%, 61/154)); and number of study centers (58%; 90/154). Only 34% (52/154) of abstracts explicitly described a primary outcome, but a primary outcome was included in the “Primary Outcome” field in the ClinicalTrials.gov record for 82% (126/154) of studies. One or more study interventions were reported in each abstract, but agreed exactly with those reported in Clinical

  9. An experimental feasibility study of pipeline corrosion pit detection using a piezoceramic time reversal mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guofeng; Kong, Qingzhao; Wu, Fanghong; Ruan, Jiabiao; Song, Gangbing

    2016-03-01

    Corrosion pits on pipelines lead to the formation of small holes, which cause further pipeline damage and even catastrophic consequences. Since many pipelines are located underground, the detection of corrosion pits on pipelines in real time is still an engineering challenge. In this paper, an experimental feasibility study on pipeline corrosion pit detection using the time reversal technique with a piezoceramic transducer as a time reversal mirror was investigated. A specimen of steel pipeline section was fabricated with an artificially drilled hole, which was to mimic a corrosion pit. By gradually increasing the depth of the hole, the evolution of the corrosion pit on the pipeline was simulated and studied. Two piezoceramic transducers were employed to generate a stress wave to propagate along the pipeline and to detect the propagated stress wave. With both the properties of sensing and actuating functions, a piezoceramic transducer was used as a time reversal mirror, which first detected the propagated stress wave signal and then sent ‘back’ the time-reversed signal as a propagating stress wave. With the inherent auto-focusing property of the time reversal technique, the detected time-reversed stress wave had a distinct focused peak. A corrosion pit on a pipeline, as a structural defect, reduces the energy of the focused signal received by the piezoceramic sensor and the attenuation ratio of the focused signal depends strongly on the degree of corrosion depth. Experimental results show that the amplitudes of the focused signal peak decrease with the increase of corrosion pit depth and we can use the peak amplitude of the focused signal to determine the state of pipeline corrosion. The time reversal based method proposed in this paper shows the potential to quantitatively monitor the damage degree of corrosion pits on pipelines in real time.

  10. Corrosion Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  11. Corrosion of copper, nickel, and gold dental casting alloys: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Johansson, B I; Lucas, L C; Lemons, J E

    1989-12-01

    The corrosion behavior of commercially available copper, nickel, and gold alloys for dental castings was investigated. The alloys investigated included: three copper alloys (76-87Cu, 6-11A1, 0-12Zn, 1-5Ni, 0-4Fe, 0.5-1.2Mn), two nickel alloys (68-78Ni, 12-16Cr, 4-14Mo, 0-1.7Be), and one gold alloy (77Au, 14Ag, 8Cu, 1Pd). Anodic and cathodic polarization curves, long-term immersion tests in saline and artificial saliva solutions, and dog crown studies were conducted to evaluate both the in vitro and in vivo corrosion characteristics of the alloys. All evaluations conducted demonstrated that the copper alloys were highly susceptible to corrosion attack. High corrosion currents were observed in the in vitro tests, and SEM of the alloys specimens showed significantly altered surfaces. The anodic polarization curves predicted that the beryllium-containing nickel alloy should be susceptible to localized corrosion and SEM revealed an etched surface with corrosion of certain microstructural features. No significant corrosion was predicted or observed for the non-beryllium nickel alloy and the gold alloy. The in vitro corrosion evaluations predicted the in vivo corrosion behavior for the alloys. Since the three copper alloys and the beryllium-containing nickel alloy demonstrated significant corrosion under the tested conditions, the use of these alloys for restorative procedures is questionable due to the release of significant levels of selected ions to the oral cavity.

  12. WASTE PACKAGE CORROSION STUDIES USING SMALL MOCKUP EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    B.E. Anderson; K.B. Helean; C.R. Bryan; P.V. Brady; R.C. Ewing

    2005-10-19

    The corrosion of spent nuclear fuel and subsequent mobilization of radionuclides is of great concern in a geologic repository, particularly if conditions are oxidizing. Corroding A516 steel may offset these transport processes within the proposed waste packages at the Yucca Mountain Repository (YMR) by retaining radionuclides, creating locally reducing conditions, and reducing porosity. Ferrous iron, Fe{sup 2+}, has been shown to reduce UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} to UO{sub 2(s)} [1], and some ferrous iron-bearing ion-exchange materials adsorb radionuclides and heavy metals [2]. Of particular interest is magnetite, a potential corrosion product that has been shown to remove TcO{sub 4}{sup -} from solution [3]. Furthermore, if Fe{sup 2+} minerals, rather than fully oxidized minerals such as goethite, are produced during corrosion, then locally reducing conditions may be present. High electron availability leads to the reduction and subsequent immobilization of problematic dissolved species such as TcO{sub 4}{sup -}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and can also inhibit corrosion of spent nuclear fuel. Finally, because the molar volume of iron material increases during corrosion due to oxygen and water incorporation, pore space may be significantly reduced over long time periods. The more water is occluded, the bulkier the corrosion products, and the less porosity is available for water and radionuclide transport. The focus of this paper is on the nature of Yucca Mountain waste package steel corrosion products and their effects on local redox state, radionuclide transport, and porosity.

  13. Corrosion of iron: A study for radioactive waste canisters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagha, S. Ben; Crusset, D.; Mabille, I.; Tran, M.; Bernard, M. C.; Sutter, E.

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the risks of atmospheric corrosion of steel waste canisters following their deep geological disposal in the temperature range from 303 to 363 K. The work was performed using iron samples deposited as thin films on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and disposed in a climatic chamber. The experiments showed that, in the temperature under study (298-363 K), the mass increase due to the formation of oxide/hydroxide rose sharply above 70% RH, as is commonly observed at room temperatures, indicating that the phenomenon remains electrochemical in nature. Ex situ Raman spectrometric analyses indicate the formation of magnetite, maghemite and oxyhydroxides species in the 298-363 K temperature range, and for oxygen contents above 1 vol.%, whereas only Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3 are detected at 363 K. In this work, the kinetics of the rust growth is discussed, on the bases of the rate of mass increase and of the composition of the rust, as a function of the climatic parameters and the oxygen content of the atmosphere.

  14. STEM Education Related Dissertation Abstracts: A Bounded Qualitative Meta-study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banning, James; Folkestad, James E.

    2012-12-01

    This article utilizes a bounded qualitative meta-study framework to examine the 101 dissertation abstracts found by searching the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses™ digital database for dissertations abstracts from 1990 through 2010 using the search terms education, science, technology, engineer, and STEM/SMET. Professional search librarians established the search criteria used to establish the database. The overarching research question for this study was: What can we learn from the examination of doctoral dissertations abstracts that focus on the STEM education found from 1990 through 2010? The study's findings provide an overview of doctoral research related to STEM education and the discussion section focuses on quality of abstracts, questions regarding the use of the pipeline metaphor, and location of instructional innovation.

  15. A facility for studying irradiation accelerated corrosion in high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiman, Stephen S.; Flick, Alexander; Toader, Ovidiu; Wang, Peng; Samad, Nassim A.; Jiao, Zhijie; Was, Gary S.

    2014-08-01

    A facility for the study of irradiation accelerated corrosion in high temperature water using in situ proton irradiation has been developed and validated. A specially designed beamline and flowing-water corrosion cell added to the 1.7 MV tandem accelerator at the Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory provide the capability to study the simultaneous effects of displacement damage and radiolysis on corrosion. A thin sample serves as both a “window” into the corrosion cell through which the proton beam passes completely, and the sample for assessing irradiation accelerated corrosion. The facility was tested by irradiating stainless steel samples at beam current densities between 0.5 and 10 μA/cm2 in 130 °C and 320 °C deaerated water, and 320 °C water with 3 wppm H2. Increases in the conductivity and dissolved oxygen content of the water varied with the proton beam current, suggesting that proton irradiation was accelerating the corrosion of the sample. Conductivity increases were greatest at 320 °C, while DO increases were highest at 130 °C. The addition of 3 wppm H2 suppressed DO below detectable levels. The facility will enable future studies into the effect of irradiation on corrosion in high temperature water with in situ proton irradiation.

  16. Experimental procedure for crevice corrosion studies of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys in natural seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, F. J.; Lucas, K. E.; Hogan, E. A.

    2002-03-01

    An experimental procedure intended for crevice corrosion studies on Ni-Cr-Mo alloys is demonstrated. In this procedure a potentiostatic control of crevice corrosion specimens is applied to an immersible crevice cell design that uses a fluoroelastomer gasket crevice former. The procedure is demonstrated for a crevice susceptibility study on Alloy 625 in elevated temperature natural seawater, where crevice corrosion initiation and propagation are shown to be influenced by the electrochemical potential. Potentiostatic current monitoring establishes the crevice initiation time and rate of propagation, while post-mortem inspections confirm the extent of crevice damage.

  17. Corrosion studies by use of the thermogravimetric analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Brinker, G.M.

    1995-11-01

    A series of tests have been performed by use of the thermogravimetric analyzer. Weight gain vs. time graphs have been generated by exposing one inch by two inch by sixty five hundredths of an inch low carbon (1020) steel specimens to a range of relative humidities (65%-90%) and temperatures (50-70{degrees}C). Data collected from these studies will give insight to both the kinetics of oxide formation and the material`s critical relative humidity. It has been observed that two separate rates and mechanisms for oxide formation exist. It is believed that dry oxidation is prevalent at low relative humidities, while aqueos electrochemical corrosion persists at high relative humidities. The relative humidity(s) and temperatures that oxidation formation transforms from one rate and mechanism to the other is of interest. The critical relative humidity is defined as the relative humidity at which oxide formation will become highly accelerated with respect to its normal growth rate. Hence, a better understanding of 1020 steel`s oxide formation kinetics and the alloy`s critical relative humidity will aid in waste package designs for use in conjunction with the proposed nuclear waste containment center at Yucca Mountain.

  18. Neural correlates of abstract rule learning: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fang; Hoshi-Shiba, Reiko; Abla, Dilshat; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2012-09-01

    Abstract rule learning is a fundamental aspect of human cognition, and is essential for language acquisition. However, despite its importance, the neural mechanisms underlying abstract rule learning are still largely unclear. In this study, we investigated the neural correlates of abstract rule learning by recording auditory event-related potentials (ERPs). Participants were first presented with artificial three-syllable sequences containing ABA or ABB abstract rules for learning. They were then tested on sequences of novel syllables following the ABA or ABB abstract rules, half of which were inconsistent with the rule previously learned. Grand-averaged ERPs revealed significant decreases in positivity at 200-260ms in response to consistent sequences during the earlier session of the test phase, and increased negativity at around 400ms in response to inconsistent sequences in the later session. The potentials exhibited a left anterior-dominant distribution. The appearance of the N400-like negativity in the later session suggests that temporal ERP changes occurred with the abstract rule learning process, and that the N400-like negativity is associated with the acquisition of abstract rules.

  19. Visual imagery while reading concrete and abstract Japanese kanji words: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Atsuko; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Yoshimura, Shinpei; Yoshino, Atsuo; Toki, Shigeru; Yamashita, Hidehisa; Matsuda, Fumio; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2014-02-01

    Neuroimaging studies have investigated differences in neural correlates between abstract and concrete concepts but this has not been done with Japanese participants. Concrete words have higher imageability than abstract words, such that they elicit more visual imagery. The present study used functional MRI to investigate brain activity of Japanese participants (N=16) during generation of visual images for written concrete or abstract Japanese kanji words. Concrete words elicited significantly more activation than abstract words in the left middle frontal gyrus (LMFG), bilateral superior frontal gyrus, and left fusiform gyrus (LFG). Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analyses were performed to assess LMFG and LFG functional connections. LMFG activity was accompanied by increased functional interaction with the left superior parietal lobule (LSPL), and LFG activity was accompanied by increased functional interaction with the LMFG. This finding suggests that the LMFG plays an important role in visual imagery, with interactions between this region and both the LSPL and LFG.

  20. Galvanic corrosion study of container materials using zero resistance ammeter

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A. K., LLNL

    1997-11-01

    Galvanic corrosion behavior of A 516 steel separately coupled to six different corrosion-resistant alloys was investigated in an acidic brine (pHa2.70) at 30{degree}C 60{degree}C and 80{degree}C using zero resistance ammeter technique. The corrosion-resistant alloys include Alloys 825, G-3, G-30, C-4 and C-22; and Ti Grade-12, which were coupled to A 516 steel at an anode-to- cathode area ratio of one. The galvanic current and galvanic potential were measured as a function of time at all three temperatures. Optical microscopic examination was also performed on all tested specimens to evaluate the extent of surface degradation due to galvanic coupling. The overall results are presented in this paper.

  1. Materials studies for preventing corrosion in condensing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.; Sugama, T. )

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the fundamental interfacial requirements for low-cost, organic and inorganic materials resistive to corrosion in condensing furnace exhausts. This research effort is being focused to provide information regarding corrosion resistance, heat transfer, material cost, fabrication method and cost, and product reliability since all are important in the final design and production of a heat exchanger. Results to date indicate that organic and inorganic-type polymer coating systems applied to low cost metals such as mild steel and aluminum provide good corrosion protection. The thermal stability of these polymers plus the identification of the interfacial requirements needed to utilize them with reactive filler materials should also make their use as bulk composites feasible.

  2. A Theoretical Study of Carbohydrates as Corrosion Inhibitors of Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Salim M.; Ali-Shattle, Elbashir E.; Ali, Nozha M.

    2013-09-01

    The inhibitive effect of fructose, glucose, lactose, maltose, and sucrose against the iron corrosion is investigated using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31 G level (d) to search the relation between the molecular structure and corrosion inhibition. The electronic properties such as the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), the energy of lowest unoccupied orbital (LUMO), the energy gap (LUMO-HOMO), quantum chemical parameters such as hardness, softness, the fraction of the electron transferred, and the electrophilicity index are reported. The inhibition efficiency of the investigated carbohydrates follows the trend: maltose

  3. Surface- and microanalysis as a tool for studying the corrosion of aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van craen, M. J. A.; Adams, F. C.; Van Beek, L. J. A.; Vanden Berghe, R. A. L.

    Corrosion phenomena of Al-1 % Si bond wires, observed after life testing of certain transistors, are studied. The following information is derived from laboratory simulation tests: the kinetics of the corrosion process, information about the corrosion mechanism and critical parameters, especially the influence of the environmental gas and Si content and finally the identification of the corrosion products and their comparison with those found for the transistor. It is demonstrated, using a combination of several surface analytical techniques, that the A1 pitting corrosion is induced and enhanced by the presence of water as a transport medium and surface electrolyte in an oxygen-rich atmosphere, with chloride ions as a stimulating and activating species. The effect of 1 % Si in the wire consists in acceleration of the corrosion rate, and is probably due to grain boundary effects. All critical corrosion parameters could be traced in the transistor system by electron microscopy, laser microprobe mass analysis and residual gas (and moisture) analysis by mass spectrometry.

  4. X-rays absorption study on medieval corrosion layers for the understanding of very long-term indoor atmospheric iron corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, J.; Réguer, S.; Vantelon, D.; Dillmann, P.; Neff, D.; Guillot, I.

    2010-05-01

    The study and prediction of very long-term atmospheric corrosion behaviour of ferrous alloys is of great importance in different fields. First the conservation of metallic artefacts in museum and the corrosion diagnosis on ferrous reinforcement used in ancient monuments since medieval times needs reliable data to understand the mechanisms. Second, in the frame of the interim storage of nuclear waste in France, it is necessary to model the long-term corrosion of low alloy steel overcontainer. The nature of phases and elements constituting the corrosion layers can greatly influence the corrosion mechanisms. On the one hand, it is crucial to precisely determine the nature of microscopic phases that can be highly reactive. On the other hand, some elements as P and S could modify this reactivity. To clarify this point and complementary to other studies using Raman micro spectroscopy technique, X-rays Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) under synchrotron radiation plays a crucial role. It allows one to precisely identify the reactive phases in the corrosion layers. Micro-XAS was required in order to refine the spatial variation, at micrometer scale, of the predominant Fe oxidation state and to characterise the corresponding corrosion products. Moreover, the role of minor elements on phase’s stability and the chemical form of these elements in the rust layer, especially phosphorus and sulphur, was investigated.

  5. COPPER PITTING CORROSION AND PINHOLE LEAKS: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized corrosion, or "pitting", of copper drinking water pipe continues is a problem for many water utilities and their customers. Extreme attack leads to pinhole leaks that can potentially lead to water damage, mold growth, and costly repairs for the homeowners, as well as th...

  6. IN-HOUSE COPPER AND LEAD SOLUBILITY/CORROSION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding and predicting metal release from pipes of all sizes and types from the treatment plant to the consumer’s tap is critical, specifically for regulatory compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule, as well as the performance, corrosion morphology, and longevity of infras...

  7. Case studies of corrosion of mixed waste and transuranic waste drums

    SciTech Connect

    Kosiewicz, S.T.

    1993-12-01

    This paper presents three case studies of corrosion of waste drums at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Corrosion was not anticipated by the waste generators, but occurred because of subtle chemical or physical mechanisms. In one case, drums of a cemented transuranic (TRU) sludge experienced general and pitting corrosion. In the second instance, a chemical from a commercial paint stripper migrated from its primary containment drums to chemically attack overpack drums made of mild carbon steel. In the third case, drums of mixed low level waste (MLLW) soil corroded drum packaging even though the waste appeared to be dry when it was placed in the drums. These case studies are jointly discussed as ``lessons learned`` to enhance awareness of subtle mechanisms that can contribute to the corrosion of radioactive waste drums during interim storage.

  8. Corrosion control study of a typical large usage water distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Hock, V.F.; Cardenas, H.E.; Zelsdorf, E.D.; Smothers, K.W.; Anderson, J.

    1995-12-01

    This corrosion control study was based on, and closely followed, the AWWA Guidance Manual and AWWARF pipe loop protocol. The primary objective of this study was to provide a corrosion control recommendation for the site to satisfy State of Maryland and EPA requirements to define and maintain optimal corrosion control treatment. A second objective was to identify technical and cost constraints that may affect the application of specific corrosion control treatments in finished water. Blended zinc potassium polyphosphate/zinc orthophosphate showed lower corrosion rates and reduced lead concentrations in finished water for the majority of days studied in plant pipe loop models and remote location (barracks) pipe loop models. Blended potassium monophosphate/potassium tripolyphosphate followed a close second in overall efficacy. The pH adjusted and control strategies exhibited little demonstrated corrosion control benefit. Recommendations based on this study included (1) addition of blended zinc potassium polyphosphate/zinc orthophosphate with a residual concentration between 2.0 and 4.5 mg/L, (2) installation of a chemical feed to buffer well water with sodium bicarbonate to stabilize alkalinity when 100% well water is used, and (3) investigation of lime addition to raw well water to control buffer capacity in the combined raw well water/surface water.

  9. In-Plant Corrosion Study of Steels in Distillery Effluent Treatment Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Chhotu; Sharma, Chhaya; Singh, A. K.

    2015-05-01

    The present study deals with corrosion and performance of steels observed in an effluent treatment plant (ETP) of a distillery. For this purpose, the metal coupons were exposed in primary (untreated effluent) and secondary tank (anaerobic treatment effluent) of the ETP. The extent of attack has been correlated with the composition of the effluent with the help of laboratory immersion and electrochemical tests. Untreated distillery effluent found to be more corrosive than the anaerobic-treated effluents and is assigned due to chloride, phosphate, calcium, nitrate, and nitrite ions, which enhances corrosivity at acidic pH. Mild steel showed highest uniform and localized corrosion followed by stainless steels 304L and 316L and lowest in case of duplex 2205.

  10. Kinetics and structural studies of the atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels in Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaén, Juan A.; de Villalaz, Mariela Sánchez; de Araque, Lilibeth; de Bósquez, Agnes

    1997-09-01

    The corrosion of a carbon steel was studied in different atmospheres at sites in the Republic of Panama. The weight loss (corrosion penetration) suffered by the carbon steel is related to time by a bilogarithmic law. Mössbauer spectroscopy indicated the rust was composed of non-stoichiometric magnetite (Fe3-xO4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), goethite (α-FeOOH) of intermediate particle size, lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and superparamagnetic particles. Magnetite formation is related to the alternating dry--wet cycles. Goethite is related to corrosion penetration by a saturation type of behavior, following a Langmuir type of relationship. Goethite in rust protects steel against further atmospheric corrosion.

  11. Application of induction coil measurements to the study of superalloy hot corrosion and oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The assessment of the degree of hot corrosion attack on nickel based alloys is a difficult task, especially when the definition specifies that it must be in terms of metal consumed and even more difficult if the measurement must be nondestructive. The inductance of a solenoid coil responds to changes in volume of fill and composition of metal cores, therefore, it may be used for nondestructive measurement of hot corrosion. The hot corrosion of U700 was studied at 900 C in a Mach 0.3 flame doped with 0.85 wppm of sodium. The change of inductance was found to define the known corrosion behavior and to suggest its use as a tool with predictive capabilities. Sufficient sensitivity exists to detect oxidation of this alloy at 900 C.

  12. Spatiotemporal dynamics during processing of abstract and concrete verbs: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Dalla Volta, Riccardo; Fabbri-Destro, Maddalena; Gentilucci, Maurizio; Avanzini, Pietro

    2014-08-01

    Different accounts have been proposed to explain the nature of concept representations. Embodied accounts claim a key involvement of sensory-motor systems during semantic processing while more traditional accounts posit that concepts are abstract mental entities independent of perceptual and motor brain systems. While the involvement of sensory-motor areas in concrete language processing is supported by a large number of studies, this involvement is far from being established when considering abstract language. The present study addressed abstract and concrete verb processing, by investigating the spatiotemporal dynamics of evoked responses by means of high density EEG while participants performed a semantic decision task. In addition, RTs to the same set of stimuli were collected. In both early and late time intervals, ERP scalp topography significantly differed according to word categories. Concrete verbs showed involvement of parieto-frontal networks for action, according to the implied body effector. In contrast, abstract verbs recruited mostly frontal regions outside the motor system, suggesting a non-motor semantic processing for this category. In addition, differently from what has been reported during action observation, the parietal recruitment related to concrete verbs presentation followed the frontal one. The present findings suggest that action word semantic is grounded in sensory-motor systems, provided a bodily effector is specified, while abstract concepts׳ representation cannot be easily explained by a motor embodiment.

  13. Spatiotemporal dynamics during processing of abstract and concrete verbs: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Dalla Volta, Riccardo; Fabbri-Destro, Maddalena; Gentilucci, Maurizio; Avanzini, Pietro

    2014-08-01

    Different accounts have been proposed to explain the nature of concept representations. Embodied accounts claim a key involvement of sensory-motor systems during semantic processing while more traditional accounts posit that concepts are abstract mental entities independent of perceptual and motor brain systems. While the involvement of sensory-motor areas in concrete language processing is supported by a large number of studies, this involvement is far from being established when considering abstract language. The present study addressed abstract and concrete verb processing, by investigating the spatiotemporal dynamics of evoked responses by means of high density EEG while participants performed a semantic decision task. In addition, RTs to the same set of stimuli were collected. In both early and late time intervals, ERP scalp topography significantly differed according to word categories. Concrete verbs showed involvement of parieto-frontal networks for action, according to the implied body effector. In contrast, abstract verbs recruited mostly frontal regions outside the motor system, suggesting a non-motor semantic processing for this category. In addition, differently from what has been reported during action observation, the parietal recruitment related to concrete verbs presentation followed the frontal one. The present findings suggest that action word semantic is grounded in sensory-motor systems, provided a bodily effector is specified, while abstract concepts׳ representation cannot be easily explained by a motor embodiment. PMID:24956569

  14. An experimental analogue study into the role of abstract thinking in trauma-related rumination.

    PubMed

    Ehring, Thomas; Szeimies, Anna-Kristina; Schaffrick, Christina

    2009-04-01

    Trauma-related rumination has been shown to predict the maintenance of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, it is still unclear how rumination can be distinguished from functional forms of thinking about traumatic events. The current study used an analogue design to experimentally test the hypothesis that the abstractness of thinking is responsible for the dysfunctional effects of trauma-related rumination. Eighty-three healthy university students first watched a distressing video and were then randomly assigned to abstract ruminative thinking, concrete thinking or distraction. Abstract thinking was found to lead to a significantly longer maintenance of negative mood and arousal than both concrete thinking and distraction. These results are in line with earlier findings in the context of excessive worry and depressive rumination and support the view that abstractness is a critical factor for the dysfunctional effects of trauma-related rumination. However, results regarding intrusive memories were not supportive of the hypotheses. Unexpectedly, the distraction group showed the highest number of intrusions, whereas the abstract and concrete conditions did not significantly differ. Implications for theoretical models of trauma-related rumination and possible clinical implications are discussed. PMID:19200947

  15. Reading and Study Skills and Instruction: Secondary: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," January through June 1980 (Vol. 40 Nos. 7 through 12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 15 titles deal with the following topics: (1) a hierarchy of purposes for reading assignments applied to secondary school social studies; (2) the effects of sentence combining practice on reading comprehension; (3) the effects of…

  16. Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Minghui; Allen, Amy J.; Nguyen, Minh T.; Ralston, Walter T.; MacLeod, Michelle J.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2013-09-15

    Transition metal nitrides (TMN) have many desirable characteristics such as high hardness and good thermal stability under reducing conditions. This work reports an initial survey of the chemical stability of mesoporous TMNs (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in water at 80 °C at neutral, acidic and alkaline pH. The mesoporous TMNs had specific surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g with average pore sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm. The high surface areas of these materials enhance the rate of corrosion per unit mass over that of a bulk material, making detection of corrosion much easier. The products were characterized by Rietveld refinement of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Several nitrides have corrosion rates that are, within error, not distinguishable from zero (±1 Å/day). Of the nitrides examined, CrN appears to be the most corrosion resistant under acidic conditions. None of the nitrides studied are corrosion resistant under alkaline conditions. - Graphical abstract: Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in acidic and alkaline solutions at 80 °C for 2 weeks. Display Omitted - highlights: • Corrosion rates of mesoporous transition metal nitrides in aqueous solution is reported. • The mesoporous TMNs had surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g. • CrN is the most corrosion resistant under the conditions studied.

  17. An Eye-Tracking Study of Learning from Science Text with Concrete and Abstract Illustrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Lucia; Pluchino, Patrik; Tornatora, Maria Caterina; Ariasi, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the online process of reading and the offline learning from an illustrated science text. The authors examined the effects of using a concrete or abstract picture to illustrate a text and adopted eye-tracking methodology to trace text and picture processing. They randomly assigned 59 eleventh-grade students to 3 reading…

  18. Television and Film in College English Instruction: A Bibliography of Research and Studies with Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svobodny, Dolly D., Comp.

    There are 62 abstracts in this compilation describing research and experimental teaching using television and film methods in college English instruction. The studies, most of them conducted since 1950, cover: (1) a comparison of televised instruction with face-to-face presentation, (2) a comparison of filmed or kinescoped courses with direct…

  19. Coal-liquefaction-plant fractionation-column corrosion-coupon studies

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Baylor, V.B.; Howell, M.; Newsome, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    Severe corrosion has been observed in fractionation columns at the Fort Lewis, Washington, and Wilsonville, Alabama, solvent refined coal pilot plants. This corrosion is most severe for materials exposed in the 220 to 260/sup 0/C (430 to 500/sup 0/F) range and results in corrosion rates of as much as 6.4 mm/y (250 mils/y) for type 18-8 stainless steels. Studies at ORNL of this corrosion problem include exposure of coupons in the columns, analysis of failed components from the pilot plants, chemical analyses of liquids from the pilot plants, and operation of laboratory experiments. This report describes the coupon exposure studies, gives the results of these studies, and discusses the selection of fractionation column materials on the basis of our experience. The studies show that several high-nickel alloys have corrosion rates of less than 0.25 mm/y (10 mils/y) and would be suitable in a fractionation column environment even if no process changes are made to reduce offending species such as chlorine.

  20. Corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel and electroplating steel in aqueous solution: AC impedance study and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrini, M.; Fontaine, G.; Gengembre, L.; Traisnel, M.; Lerasle, O.; Genet, N.

    2008-08-01

    The efficiency of a new triazole derivative, namely, 2-{(2-hydroxyethyl)[(4-methyl-1 H-1,2,3-benzotriazol-1-yl)methyl]amino}ethanol (TTA) has been studied for corrosion inhibition of galvanized steel and electroplating steel in aqueous solution. Corrosion inhibition was studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). These studies have shown that TTA was a very good inhibitor. Data obtained from EIS show a frequency distribution and therefore a modelling element with frequency dispersion behaviour, a constant phase element (CPE) has been used. The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel and electroplating steel in aqueous solution was also investigated in the presence of 4-methyl-1 H-benzotriazole (TTA unsubstituted) by EIS. These studies have shown that the ability of the molecule to adsorb on the steel surface was dependent on the group in triazole ring substituent. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy surface analysis with TTA shows that it chemisorbed on surface of galvanized steel and electroplating steel.

  1. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO{sub 2} corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  2. An ERP study of recognition memory for concrete and abstract pictures in school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Olivier; Chouinard-Leclaire, Christine; Muckle, Gina; Westerlund, Alissa; Burden, Matthew J; Jacobson, Sandra W; Jacobson, Joseph L

    2016-08-01

    Recognition memory for concrete, nameable pictures is typically faster and more accurate than for abstract pictures. A dual-coding account for these findings suggests that concrete pictures are processed into verbal and image codes, whereas abstract pictures are encoded in image codes only. Recognition memory relies on two successive and distinct processes, namely familiarity and recollection. Whether these two processes are similarly or differently affected by stimulus concreteness remains unknown. This study examined the effect of picture concreteness on visual recognition memory processes using event-related potentials (ERPs). In a sample of children involved in a longitudinal study, participants (N=96; mean age=11.3years) were assessed on a continuous visual recognition memory task in which half the pictures were easily nameable, everyday concrete objects, and the other half were three-dimensional abstract, sculpture-like objects. Behavioral performance and ERP correlates of familiarity and recollection (respectively, the FN400 and P600 repetition effects) were measured. Behavioral results indicated faster and more accurate identification of concrete pictures as "new" or "old" (i.e., previously displayed) compared to abstract pictures. ERPs were characterized by a larger repetition effect, on the P600 amplitude, for concrete than for abstract images, suggesting a graded recollection process dependent on the type of material to be recollected. Topographic differences were observed within the FN400 latency interval, especially over anterior-inferior electrodes, with the repetition effect more pronounced and localized over the left hemisphere for concrete stimuli, potentially reflecting different neural processes underlying early processing of verbal/semantic and visual material in memory. PMID:27329352

  3. An ERP study of recognition memory for concrete and abstract pictures in school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Olivier; Chouinard-Leclaire, Christine; Muckle, Gina; Westerlund, Alissa; Burden, Matthew J; Jacobson, Sandra W; Jacobson, Joseph L

    2016-08-01

    Recognition memory for concrete, nameable pictures is typically faster and more accurate than for abstract pictures. A dual-coding account for these findings suggests that concrete pictures are processed into verbal and image codes, whereas abstract pictures are encoded in image codes only. Recognition memory relies on two successive and distinct processes, namely familiarity and recollection. Whether these two processes are similarly or differently affected by stimulus concreteness remains unknown. This study examined the effect of picture concreteness on visual recognition memory processes using event-related potentials (ERPs). In a sample of children involved in a longitudinal study, participants (N=96; mean age=11.3years) were assessed on a continuous visual recognition memory task in which half the pictures were easily nameable, everyday concrete objects, and the other half were three-dimensional abstract, sculpture-like objects. Behavioral performance and ERP correlates of familiarity and recollection (respectively, the FN400 and P600 repetition effects) were measured. Behavioral results indicated faster and more accurate identification of concrete pictures as "new" or "old" (i.e., previously displayed) compared to abstract pictures. ERPs were characterized by a larger repetition effect, on the P600 amplitude, for concrete than for abstract images, suggesting a graded recollection process dependent on the type of material to be recollected. Topographic differences were observed within the FN400 latency interval, especially over anterior-inferior electrodes, with the repetition effect more pronounced and localized over the left hemisphere for concrete stimuli, potentially reflecting different neural processes underlying early processing of verbal/semantic and visual material in memory.

  4. Study of the corrosion rate behavior of ion implanted Fe-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Weiping; Tian Wei; Wu Run ); Godechot, X.; Brown, I. )

    1991-06-01

    We report on some studies we have made of the time evolution of the corrosion behavior of ion implanted samples of pure iron, medium carbon steel, and 18-8 Cr-Ni stainless steel. Ti, Cr, Ni, Cu, Mo and Yb were implanted at mean ion energies near 100 keV and at doses up to 1 {times} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}2} using a Mevva metal ion implantation facility. A novel feature of this experiment was the simultaneous implantation with several different implanted species. The implanted samples were immersed in sulfuric acid solution at 40{degrees}C and the corrosion monitored as a function of time. The loss in mass was accurately measured using atomic absorption spectroscopy. The functional dependence of the corrosion behavior was established for all samples. The cumulative mass loss Q is given as a function of time t by Q = At{sup N}, where A and N are parameters; thus the corrosion rate V is given by V = ANt{sup N-1}. A is dominated by the initial mass loss and N reflects the long-time corrosion behavior. The values of the parameters A and N were obtained by a least-squares regression for all the samples investigated. We determined that for the samples investigated here, N > 1 always and V increases with time throughout the experimental duration. In this paper we summarize the experimental results and discuss the effect of A and N on corrosion rate and the relationship between the corrosion current density and the parameters A and N. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Corrosion study of bare and coated stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    A program was conducted at Kennedy Space Center from February 1968 to February 1971 to evaluate the performance of austenitic stainless steel alloys used in fluid systems lines. For several years, there had been numerous failures of stainless steel hardware caused by pitting and stress corrosion cracking. Several alloys were evaluated for effectiveness of certain sacrificial-type protective coverings in preventing corrosion failures. Samples were tested in specially designed racks placed 91 meters (100 yards) above high-tide line at Cape Kennedy. It is concluded that: (1) unprotected tubing samples showed evidence of pitting initiation after 2 weeks; (2) although some alloys develop larger pits than others, it is probable that the actual pitting rate is independent of alloy type; (3) the deepest pitting occurred in the sheltered part of the samples; and (4) zinc-rich coatings and an aluminum-filled coating have afforded sacrificial protection against pitting for at least 28 months. It is believed that a much longer effective coating life can be expected.

  6. Cyclotron accelerated beams applied in wear and corrosion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racolta, P. M.; Popa-Simil, L.; Ivanov, E. A.; Alexandreanu, B.

    1996-05-01

    Wear and corrosion processes are characterized by a loss of material that is, for machine parts and components, usually in a micrometer's range. That is why, in the last two decades, many direct applications in machine construction, petrochemical and metallurgical industries based on the Thin Layer Activation (TLA) technique have been developed. In this paper general working patterns together with a few examples of TLA applications carried out using our laboratory's U-120 Cyclotron are presented. The relation between the counting rate of the radiation originating from the component's irradiated zone and the loss of the worn material can be determined mainly by two methods: the oil circulation method and the remnant radioactivity measuring method. The first method is illustrated with some typical examples such as the optimization of the running-in program of a diesel engine and anti-wear features certifying of lubricant oils. There is also presented an example where the second method mentioned above has been applied to corrosion rate determinations for different kinds of unoxidable steels used in inert gas generator construction.

  7. Hydrogen abstraction from n-butanol by the methyl radical: high level ab initio study of abstraction pathways and the importance of low energy rotational conformers.

    PubMed

    Katsikadakos, D; Hardalupas, Y; Taylor, A M K P; Hunt, P A

    2012-07-21

    Hydrogen abstraction reactions by the methyl radical from n-butanol have been investigated at the ROCBS-QB3 level of theory. Reaction energies and product geometries for the most stable conformer of n-butanol (ROH) have been computed, the reaction energies order α < γ < β < δ < OH. The preference for n-butane to favour H-abstraction at C(β) and C(γ) while, in contrast, n-butanol favours radical reactions at the C(α) carbon is rationalised. Transition state (TS) barriers and geometries for the most stable conformer of n-butanol are presented, and discussed with respect to the Hammond postulate. The reaction barriers order as α < OH < γ < β < δ. This relative ordering is not consistent with product radical stability, C-H bond dissociation energies or previous studies using O[combining dot above]H and HO[combining dot above](2) radicals. We provide a molecular orbital based rationalisation for this ordering and answer two related questions: Why is the γ-channel more stable than the β-channel? Why do the two C(γ)-H H-abstraction TS differ in energy? The method and basis set dependence of the TS barriers is investigated. The Boltzmann probability distribution for the n-butanol conformers suggests that low energy conformers are present in approximately equal proportions to the most stable conformer at combustion temperatures where ĊH(3) radicals are present. Thus, the relative significance of the various H-abstraction channels has been assessed for a selection of higher energy conformers (ROH'). Key results include finding that higher energy n-butanol conformers (E(ROH') > E(ROH)) can generate lower energy product radicals, E(ROH') < E(ROH). Moreover, higher energy conformers can also have a globally competitive TS energy for H-abstraction.

  8. A laboratory study of the effect of acetic acid vapor on atmospheric copper corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Delgado, A.; Cano, E.; Bastidas, J.M.; Lopez, F.A.

    1998-12-01

    A study was made of the copper corrosion rate and corrosion products originated by the action of acetic acid vapor at 100% relative humidity. Copper plates were exposed to an acetic acid contaminated atmosphere for a period of 21 days. Five acetic vapor concentration levels were used. The copper corrosion rate was in the range of 1 to 23 mg/dm{sup 2} day. The corrosion-product layers were characterized using electrochemical, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Thermal and calorimetric studies were also performed. Some of the compounds identified were cuprite (Cu{sub 2}O), copper acetate hydrate [Cu(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O], and copper hydroxide acetate [Cu{sub 4}(OH)(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 7}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O]. This last compound was also characterized. The thickness of the patina layers was 4 to 8 nm for amorphous cuprite, 11 to 48 nm for cuprite, and 225 nm for copper acetate. The patina, in which the cementation process of different corrosion-product layers plays an important role, is formed by the reaction of acetic vapor with copper through porous cuprite paths.

  9. A study on the potential of metal corrosion by sulfate-reducing bacteria in animal buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Riskowski, G.L.; Mackie, R.I.

    1999-06-01

    The potential of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to cause metal corrosion in animal buildings was examined in this study. An analysis was done on the bacterial colonization and the corrosion products on the surfaces of metals exposed to three animal buildings and one environmentally controlled building over a two-year period. Data from this study showed that the levels of SRB on metal surfaces were low after two-year's exposure (maximum count: 1.7 x 10{sup 4}/cm{sup 2}). SRB colonization levels after two years were not sufficient to corrode metal products exposed in animal environments. In addition, metal surface analysis data using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the corrosion compounds formed on the surfaces of different metals were not due to the SERB-induced corrosion mechanisms. These compounds were mainly oxides and carbonates (FeO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and Fe(CO){sub 5} on iron samples; ZnO and ZnCO{sub 3} on galvanized steel samples: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZnO, and ZnCO{sub 3} on Galvalume samples), and were normally generated due to the classic types of corrosion mechanisms. Some sulfur was present to form ZnS on the galvanized steel samples, but might not be attributed to SRB. The origin of this sulfur was not clear.

  10. An impedance study on admiralty brass dezincification originated by microbiologically influenced corrosion.

    PubMed

    Ibars, J R; Polo, J L; Moreno, D A; Ranninger, C; Bastidas, J M

    2004-09-30

    In this article we describe a field study of biofouling and microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of admiralty brass heat exchanger tubes in contact with running fresh water on the river Tagus close to Almaraz nuclear power plant in Spain. Dezincification originated by biofouling and MIC was studied using impedance, polarization resistance, gravimetric, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Close correlation was observed between the biofilms formed and the corrosion process (dezincification) using the different experimental techniques. Impedance data showed a capacitive behavior including two time constants. Kramers-Kronig (KK) transforms were used to validate impedance data. The admiralty tubes' impedance data satisfied the KK relations.

  11. An impedance study on admiralty brass dezincification originated by microbiologically influenced corrosion.

    PubMed

    Ibars, J R; Polo, J L; Moreno, D A; Ranninger, C; Bastidas, J M

    2004-09-30

    In this article we describe a field study of biofouling and microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of admiralty brass heat exchanger tubes in contact with running fresh water on the river Tagus close to Almaraz nuclear power plant in Spain. Dezincification originated by biofouling and MIC was studied using impedance, polarization resistance, gravimetric, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Close correlation was observed between the biofilms formed and the corrosion process (dezincification) using the different experimental techniques. Impedance data showed a capacitive behavior including two time constants. Kramers-Kronig (KK) transforms were used to validate impedance data. The admiralty tubes' impedance data satisfied the KK relations. PMID:15334412

  12. Comparative study of the corrosion behavior of MA-956 and conventional metallic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Escudero, M L; López, M F; Ruiz, J; García-Alonso, M C; Canahua, H

    1996-07-01

    In this work the corrosion behavior of a new biomaterial, the MA-956 superalloy, immersed in Hank's solution is evaluated. A comparison with conventional metallic alloys used as articular implants is established. To determine the corrosion behavior we employed electrochemical methods: evaluation of corrosion potential Ecorr, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and anodic polarization curves. The corrosion resistance of the MA-956 superalloy preoxidized at 1100 degrees C during 100 h is at least two orders of magnitude higher than for the other alloys. This satisfactory behavior is stationary with time. Also the probability of the appearance of the pitting corrosion process is very low. When cracking is generated in the alpha-alumina layer the repassivation process is assured because of the high Cr content in the superalloy. This study is the first step in proposing this new alloy as a biomaterial. The low toxicity of these metallic alloys in the physiological environment suggests that in vivo their biocompatibility could be satisfactory. PMID:8806056

  13. Study and Modeling of the Localized Nature of Top of the Line Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Marc

    The occurrence of localized corrosion in Top of the Line Corrosion (TLC) was investigated both in sweet (CO2-dominated) and sour (H 2S-dominated) environments. The focus of the work was to understand the influence of the environmental parameters on localized corrosion at the top of the line in order to develop a narrative of the mechanism. The first part of this project presents the unique setup developed for the experimental work. Several large scale flow loops were used to perform the tests in order to recreate the field environments as closely as possible. The test section was designed using a carbon steel insert exposed to three different levels of cooling at the same time. This concept was quite successful in simulating realistic localized features. A series of long term exposure (one- to three-month) experiments was conducted to investigate the controlling parameters. The occurrence of localized corrosion could be very clearly correlated to the condensation rate, the gas temperature and the organic acid content. Important observations on the morphology of localized TLC features could be made, providing useful insight on the mechanisms involved. The second part of the study attempted to link the presence or absence of a large droplet on the steel surface to the extent of corrosion occurring underneath it. However, this was not successful as no clear relationship could be established with certainty. Instead, the water condensation rate was thought to control the corrosion and the overall aggressiveness of the environment (CO2, acetic acid). Finally, a modeling approach was proposed for the prediction of the localized attack in a top of the line corrosion scenario. The method was based on the observations made during the experimental part of the work and presented a mechanism for the prediction of the onset and propagation of localized corrosion. The FeCO3 saturation level played a key role in defining the overall corrosiveness of the condensed water, while the

  14. Abstract Painting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkes, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Abstract art provokes numerous interpretations, and as many misunderstandings. The adolescent reaction is no exception. The procedure described here can help the student to understand the abstract from at least one direction. (Author/RK)

  15. Ab initio study of the kinetics of hydrogen abstraction reactions on toluene and tetralin

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Britt, Phillip F; Buchanan III, A C; Harrison, Robert J; Hathorn, Bryan C

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen abstraction reactions play a key role in many thermal and catalytic processes involved in the production of fuels and chemicals. In this paper, the reaction barriers and rate constants for the hydrogen abstraction reactions on toluene and tetralin by the benzyl radical are calculated by ab initio methods. These reactions are representatives of similar reactions occurring in the thermolysis of lignin model compounds containing the phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE) structural moiety. Thermolysis of PPE occurs by a free radical chain mechanism in which the product selectivity arises from competitive hydrogen abstraction at the benzylic and nonbenzylic methylen sites by chain carrying benzyl and phenoxyl radicals. The title reactions serve to calibrate the theoretical methods to be used in the study of PPE through comparison of the rate constants and the reaction enthalpies with reliable experimental values. In this study, we used two different hybrid density functionals (BHandHLYP, B3LYP) and second-order perturbation theory to obtain equilibrium and transition state geometries. Multiple transition states were found for both reactions. BHandHLYP underestimates and second-order perturbation theory overestimates the reaction barriers; B3LYP energy barriers agree well with experiment. Absolute and relative rate constants were calculated using transition state theory. We found that the relative rate constant using the B3LYP functional agrees within a factor of 2.0 with experiment at the experimental temperature of 333 K, indicating that the B3LYP functional will be successful in predicting relative rate constants for hydrogen abstraction reactions participating in the pyrolysis of PPE.

  16. Corrosion Behavior of Surface-Treated Implant Ti-6Al-4V by Electrochemical Polarization and Impedance Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Subir; Yadav, Kasturi

    2011-04-01

    Implant materials for orthopedic and heart surgical services demand a better corrosion resistance material than the presently used titanium alloys, where protective oxide layer breaks down on a prolonged stay in aqueous physiological human body, giving rise to localized corrosion of pitting, crevice, and fretting corrosion. A few surface treatments on Ti alloy, in the form of anodization, passivation, and thermal oxidation, followed by soaking in Hank solution have been found to be very effective in bringing down the corrosion rate as well as producing high corrosion resistance surface film as reflected from electrochemical polarization, cyclic polarization, and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) studies. The XRD study revealed the presence of various types of oxides along with anatase and rutile on the surface, giving rise to high corrosion resistance film. While surface treatment of passivation and thermal oxidation could reduce the corrosion rate by 1/5th, anodization in 0.3 M phosphoric acid at 16 V versus stainless steel cathode drastically brought down the corrosion rate by less than ten times. The mechanism of corrosion behavior and formation of different surface films is better understood from the determination of EIS parameters derived from the best-fit equivalent circuit.

  17. Case study of a fast propagating bacteriogenically induced concrete corrosion in an Austrian sewer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grengg, Cyrill; Mittermayr, Florian; Baldermann, Andre; Böttcher, Michael; Leis, Albrecht; Koraimann, Günther; Dietzel, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Reaction mechanisms leading to microbially induced concrete corrosion (MICC) are highly complex and often not fully understood. The aim of the present case study is to contribute to a deeper understanding of reaction paths, environmental controls, and corrosion rates related to MICC in a modern Austrian sewer system by introducing an advanced multi proxy approach that comprises gaseous, hydro-geochemical, bacteriological, and mineralogical analyses. Various crucial parameters for detecting alteration features were determined in the field and laboratory, including (i) temperature, pH, alkalinity, chemical compositions of the solutions, (ii) chemical and mineralogical composition of solids, (iii) bacterial analysis, and (iv) concentrations of gaseous H2S, CH4 and CO2 within the sewer pipe atmosphere. An overview of the field site and analytical results, focusing on reaction mechanisms causing the corrosion, as well as possible remediation strategies will be presented.

  18. A study of the effects of phosphates on copper corrosion in drinking water: Copper release, electrochemical, and surface analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Young C.

    The following work is the study to evaluate the impact of corrosion inhibitors on the copper metal in drinking water and to investigate the corrosion mechanism in the presence and absence of inhibitors. Electrochemical experiments were conducted to understand the effect of specific corrosion inhibitors in synthetic drinking water which was prepared with controlled specific water quality parameters. Water chemistry was studied by Inductively Coupled Plasma--Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP--AES) to investigate the copper leaching rate with time. Surface morphology, crystallinity of corrosion products, copper oxidation status, and surface composition were characterized by various solid surface analysis methods, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy--Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM/EDS), Grazing-Incidence-angle X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The purpose of the first set of experiments was to test various electrochemical techniques for copper corrosion for short term before studying a long term loop system. Surface analysis techniques were carried out to identify and study the corrosion products that form on the fresh copper metal surface when copper coupons were exposed to test solutions for 2 days of experiments time. The second phase of experiments was conducted with a copper pipe loop system in a synthetic tap water over an extended period of time, i.e., 4 months. Copper release and electrochemically measured corrosion activity profiles were monitored carefully with and without corrosion inhibitor, polyphosphate. A correlation between the copper released into the solution and the electrochemically measured corrosion activities was also attempted. To investigate corrosion products on the copper pipe samples, various surface analysis techniques were applied in this study. Especially, static mass spectra acquisition and element distribution mapping were carried out

  19. An Experimental Investigation of Fe-Si Alloy Corrosion in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Lauretta, Dante S.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2001-01-01

    We have performed an experimental study of Fe-Si alloy corrosion under dust-rich nebular conditions. The reaction products are silica and fayalite. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Study on possibility for the improvement of corrosion resistance of metals using laser-formed oxide surface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzankina, J. S.; Vasiliev, O. S.

    2016-08-01

    The laser processes of oxidation are currently known and used extensively, in particular, to improve corrosion resistance of metals possessing certain properties and composition. In this regard, actuality is the methods of laser oxidation of metals and the determination of their modes of treatment in each specific case. Increase of corrosion resistance ST20 can carried out with the formation on the surface oxide films, as well as by reducing surface roughness. Studied various modes of processing of the steel surface. Corrosion resistance investigated for protecting a metal. Defocusing the beam to allow the surface treatment of a wide beam in the low temperature mode of processing. For further study of the irradiated surface on the corrosion resistance was conducted by chemical treatment in acid. Estimated phase composition of films formed under laser treatment simulated in the program astics. The study to increase the corrosion resistance of steel and titanium, have shown that under the chosen methods of processing of materials degradation observed.

  1. Corrosion Studies Of Raw And Treated Biomass-Derived Pyrolysis Oils

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, James R; Howell, Michael; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Connatser, Raynella M

    2012-01-01

    Rapid pyrolysis of biomass generates a liquid with properties that are particularly attractive for production of hydrocarbons that could be substituted for liquid fuels derived from petroleum. However, the high oxygen content of the biomass derived liquids presents a number of problems because of the high water content and the considerable concentration of carboxylic acids. Measurements of total acid number (TAN) of pyrolysis oil (bio-oil) samples show that values in the 90-100 range are fairly common. This level of acidity has been shown to cause corrosion problems that have to be addressed in the selection of structural materials that are used in the production, subsequent processing, storage and transport of the pyrolysis oils. Chemical analyses have been performed and laboratory corrosion studies have been conducted in order to assess the aggressiveness of the raw pyrolysis oil from several sources as well as the corrosion caused by a bio-oil that has been treated to reduce the acid and oxygen content. Components of biomass pyrolyzers have also been fabricated from various candidate alloys, and these components have been exposed for extended periods during operation of the pyrolyzers. This paper will report on results of these analyses and corrosion studies.

  2. Density Functional Theory and Electrochemical Studies: Structure-Efficiency Relationship on Corrosion Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Mendoza, Rosa L; Gutiérrez-Moreno, Evelin; Guzmán-Percástegui, Edmundo; Aquino-Torres, Eliazar; Cruz-Borbolla, Julián; Rodríguez-Ávila, José A; Alvarado-Rodríguez, José G; Olvera-Neria, Oscar; Thangarasu, Pandiyan; Medina-Franco, José L

    2015-11-23

    The relationship between structure and corrosion inhibition of a series of 30 imidazol, benzimidazol, and pyridine derivatives has been established through the investigation of quantum descriptors calculated with PBE/6-311++G**. A quantitative structure-property relationship model was obtained by examination of these descriptors using a genetic functional approximation method based on a multiple linear regression analysis. Our results indicate that the efficiency of corrosion inhibitors is strongly associated with aromaticity, electron donor ability, and molecular volume descriptors. In order to calibrate and validate the proposed model, we performed electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies on imidazole, 2-methylimidazole, benzimidazole, 2-chloromethylbenzimidazole, pyridine, and 2-aminopyridine compounds. The experimental values for efficiency of corrosion inhibition are in good agreement with the estimated values obtained by our model, thus confirming that our approach represents a promising and suitable tool to predict the inhibition of corrosion attributes of nitrogen containing heterocyclic compounds. The adsorption behavior of imidazole or benzimidazole heterocyclic molecules on the Fe(110) surface was also studied to elucidate the inhibition mechanism; the aromaticity played an important role in the adsorbate-surface complex.

  3. A laboratory study of the effect of NO 2 on the atmospheric corrosion of zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaño, J. G.; de la Fuente, D.; Morcillo, M.

    Studies on the effect of NO x on zinc corrosion are scarce and their results are variable and at times seemingly contradictory. This paper reports laboratory tests involving the dry deposition on zinc surfaces of 800 μg m -3 NO 2, alone and in combination with 800 μg m -3 SO 2, at temperatures of 35 and 25 °C and relative humidities of 90% and 70%. From the gravimetric results obtained and from the characterisation of the corrosion products by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDX), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), it has been verified that the corrosive action of NO 2 alone is negligible compared with SO 2. However, an accelerating effect has been observed when NO 2 acts in conjunction with SO 2 at 25 °C and 90% RH. At 35 °C and 90% RH, the accelerating effect is smaller, and at low relative humidities (70%), the synergistic effect is only slight, which suggests it may be favoured by the presence of moisture. In those cases where an accelerating effect has been observed, a greater proportion of sulphate ions has been found in the corrosion products, and nitrogen compounds have not been detected, indicating that NO 2 participates indirectly as a catalyst of the oxidation of SO 2 to sulphate.

  4. Experimental studies of laser-ablated zirconium carbide plasma plumes: Fuel corrosion diagnostic development

    SciTech Connect

    Wantuck, P.J.; Butt, D.P.; Sappey, A.D.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion behavior of nuclear fuel materials, such as refractory carbides, in a high temperature hydrogen environment is critical for several proposed nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) concepts. Monitoring the fuel corrosion products is important not only for understanding corrosion characteristics, but to assess the performance of an actual, operating nuclear propulsion system as well. In this paper, we describe an experimental study initiated to develop, test, and subsequently utilize non-intrusive, laser-based diagnostics to characterize the gaseous product species which are expected to evolve during the exposure of representative fuel samples to hydrogen. Laser ablation is used to produce high temperature, vapor plumes from solid solution, uranium-free, zirconium carbide (ZrC) forms for probing by other laser diagnostic methods; predominantly laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). We discuss the laser ablation technique, results of plume emission measurements, as well as the use of planar LIF to image both the ZrC plumes and actual NTP fuel corrosion constituents.

  5. Atomistic Studies of Cation Transport in Tetragonal ZrO2 During Zirconium Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Xian-Ming Bai; Yongfeng Zhang; Michael R. Tonks

    2013-10-01

    Zirconium alloys are the major fuel cladding materials in current reactors. The water-side corrosion is one of the major degradation mechanisms of these alloys. During corrosion the transport of oxidizing species in zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) determines the corrosion kinetics. Previously it has been argued that the outward diffusion of cation ions is important for forming protective oxides. In this work, the migration of Zr defects in tetragonal ZrO2 is studied with temperature accelerated dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that Zr interstitials have anisotropic diffusion and migrate preferentially along the [001] or c direction in tetragonal ZrO2. The compressive stresses can increase the Zr interstitial migration barrier significantly. The migration barriers of some defect clusters can be much lower than those of point defects. The migration of Zr interstitials at some special grain boundaries is much slower than in a bulk oxide. The implications of these atomistic simulation results in the Zr corrosion are discussed.

  6. Study on the corrosion properties of nanocrystalline nickel electrodepositied by reverse pulse current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wen; Ge, Wen; Yang, Qian; Qu, Xinxin

    2013-07-01

    Nanocrystalline nickel coatings were produced by the method of reverse pulse electrodepositing on the surface of steel sheets. The crystallite size of nanocrystalline nickel coatings was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effect of saccharin concentration on the crystallite size of the coatings was studied. The average crystallite sizes were diminished as a result of increasing saccharin concentration. CHI660C electrochemical workstation was used to determine the Tafel polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) of the coatings. The value of corrosion potential, natural corrosion current density, polarizaiton resistance and impedance was calculated, the results suggested that smaller grain size led to higher polarization resistance. EIS gave the charge transfer resistance Rct and pore resistance Rpo variation trend from beginning to 30 min. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination showed the surface morphology of the nickel coatings after the neutral salt spray (NSS) test or bathing in 10% HCl. The images indicated that the corrosion behavior of nanocrystalline nickel coatings was pitting corrosion, the mechanism was also discussed.

  7. Comparative study of the corrosion product films formed in biotic and abiotic media

    SciTech Connect

    Videla, H.A.; Mele, M.F.L. de; Swords, C.; Edyvean, R.G.J.; Beech, I.B.

    1999-11-01

    The growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) affects several important parameters at the metal/solution interface of carbon steel in liquid media such as pH and redox potential values, as well as modifications of the composition and structure of corrosion product layers. Electrochemical techniques for corrosion assessment and surface analyses by energy dispersion X-ray analysis (EDAX), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), X-ray distraction (XRD) and electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) complemented with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (MM) observations, were used to study the structure and composition of protective films on carbon steel in abiotic and biotic media containing different sulfur anions. The results revealed that in biotic and abiotic sulfide films the outer layers were formed by both FeS and FeS{sub 2}, although the relative content of these compounds varied in each case. Usually, the corrosion product films biotically formed were more adherent to the metal surface than those developed abiotically. The latter were flaky and loosely adherent, thus differing in their function during the corrosion process.

  8. Corrosion prevention capability of polyaniline (emeraldine base and salt): An XPS study

    SciTech Connect

    Jasty, S.; Epstein, A.J.

    1995-12-01

    There has been a keen interest in the use of polyaniline coatings for the corrosion protection of Fe and its alloys. To date, the primary focus has been on the doped form of the emeraldine oxidation state; also, the polyaniline has been applied, electrochemically or chemically, as an overcoat on the metal. In the present study, the surface sensitive XPS technique has been applied to investigate (1) the effectiveness of the neutral emeraldine base as well as the doped emeraldine hydrochloride forms of polyaniline in corrosion inhibition and (2) the ability of a polyaniline undercoat in providing corrosion protection by passivating the exposed metal surface. Here 350{Angstrom} and 70{Angstrom} thick Fe was sputter deposited onto the polyaniline and control polymer (non-electroactive) substrates and exposed to different environments. We conclude that an undercoat of the neutral emeraldine base form of polyaniline passivates the outer metal (Fe) surface with a thin ({approximately} 30-50{Angstrom}) oxide layer of mainly hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and that the passivation mechanism has an electronic origin. In contrast, Fe sputtered onto doped emeraldine hydrochloride forms a thicker oxide layer with a distribution of oxidation states, effectively providing much less corrosion protection.

  9. Theoretical study of the kinetics of chlorine atom abstraction from chloromethanes by atomic chlorine.

    PubMed

    Brudnik, Katarzyna; Twarda, Maria; Sarzyński, Dariusz; Jodkowski, Jerzy T

    2013-10-01

    Ab initio calculations at the G3 level were used in a theoretical description of the kinetics and mechanism of the chlorine abstraction reactions from mono-, di-, tri- and tetra-chloromethane by chlorine atoms. The calculated profiles of the potential energy surface of the reaction systems show that the mechanism of the studied reactions is complex and the Cl-abstraction proceeds via the formation of intermediate complexes. The multi-step reaction mechanism consists of two elementary steps in the case of CCl4 + Cl, and three for the other reactions. Rate constants were calculated using the theoretical method based on the RRKM theory and the simplified version of the statistical adiabatic channel model. The temperature dependencies of the calculated rate constants can be expressed, in temperature range of 200-3,000 K as [Formula: see text]. The rate constants for the reverse reactions CH3/CH2Cl/CHCl2/CCl3 + Cl2 were calculated via the equilibrium constants derived theoretically. The kinetic equations [Formula: see text] allow a very good description of the reaction kinetics. The derived expressions are a substantial supplement to the kinetic data necessary to describe and model the complex gas-phase reactions of importance in combustion and atmospheric chemistry.

  10. Study of caffeine as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel in chloride solution containing hydrogen sulfide using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solehudin, Agus; Berman, Ega Taqwali; Nurdin, Isdiriayani

    2015-09-01

    The corrosion behaviour of steel surface in the absence and presence of caffeine in 3.5% NaCl solution containing dissolved H2S gas is studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The experimental results of carbon steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution containing 500 mg/l H2S at different caffeine concentrations showed that corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with increasing of caffeine concentrations from 0 to 0,1 mmol/l. Whereas, the corrosion rate increase with increasing of caffeine concentrations from 1 to 10 mmol/l. It is clear that no inhibition efficiency increases with increasing inhibitor concentration. The optimum value of inhibition efficiency was 90% at a caffeine concentration of 0.1 mmol/l. This suggests that caffeine's performance as a corrosion inhibitor is more effective at a concentration of 0.1 mmol/l.

  11. Part I. Corrosion studies of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites. Part II. Galvanic corrosion between continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites and 4340 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun

    Part I. The corrosion performance of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites (CF-AMCs) was investigated in both the laboratory and field environments by comparing them with their respective monolithic matrix alloys, i.e., pure Al, A1-2wt%Cu T6, and Al 6061 T6. The corrosion initiation sites were identified by monitoring the changes in the surface morphology. Corrosion current densities and pH profiles at localized corrosion sites were measured using the scanning-vibrating electrode technique and the scanning ion-selective electrode technique, respectively. The corrosion damage of the materials immersed in various electrolytes, as well as those exposed in a humidity chamber and outdoor environments, was evaluated. Potentiodynamic polarization behavior was also studied. The corrosion initiation for the composites in 3.15 wt% NaCl occurred primarily around the Fe-rich intermetallic particles, which preferentially existed around the fiber/matrix interface on the composites. The corrosion initiation sites were also caused by physical damage (e.g., localized deformation) to the composite surface. At localized corrosion sites, the buildup of acidity was enhanced by the formation of micro-crevices resulting from fibers left in relief as the matrix corroded. The composites that were tested in exposure experiments exhibited higher corrosion rates than their monolithic alloys. The composites and their monolithic alloys were subjected to pitting corrosion when anodically polarized in the 3.15 wt% NaCl, while they passivated when anodically polarized in 0.5 M Na2SO4. The experimental results indicated that the composites exhibited inferior corrosion resistance compared to their monolithic matrix alloys. Part II. Galvanic corrosion studies were conducted on CF-AMCs coupled to 4340 steel since CF-AMCs have low density and excellent mechanical properties and are being considered as potential jacketing materials for reinforcing steel gun barrels. Coupled and

  12. Does Taper Angle Clearance Influence Fretting and Corrosion Damage at the Head-Stem Interface? A Matched Cohort Retrieval Study

    PubMed Central

    Kocagöz, Sevi B.; Underwood, Richard J.; Sivan, Shiril; Gilbert, Jeremy L.; MacDonald, Daniel W.; Day, Judd S.; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have speculated that modular taper design may have an effect on the corrosion and material loss at the taper surfaces. We present a novel method to measure taper angle for retrieved head taper and stem trunnions using a roundness machine (Talyrond 585, Taylor Hobson, UK). We also investigated the relationship between taper angle clearance and visual fretting-corrosion score at the taper-trunnion junction using a matched cohort study of 50 ceramic and 50 metal head-stem pairs. In this study, no correlation was observed between the taper angle clearance and the visual fretting-corrosion scores in either the ceramic or the metal cohorts. PMID:24610994

  13. Study of MHD Corrosion and Transport of Corrosion Products of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in the Flowing PbLi and its Application to Fusion Blanket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidi, Sheida

    Two important components of a liquid breeder blanket of a fusion power reactor are the liquid breeder/coolant and the steel structure that the liquid is enclosed in. One candidate combination for such components is Lead-Lithium (PbLi) eutectic alloy and advanced Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel. The research performed here is aimed at: (1) better understanding of corrosion processes in the system including RAFM steel and flowing PbLi in the presence of a strong magnetic field and (2) prediction of corrosion losses in conditions of a Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) blanket, which is at present the key liquid metal blanket concept in the US. To do this, numerical and analytical tools have been developed and then applied to the analysis of corrosion processes. First, efforts were taken to develop a computational suite called TRANSMAG (Transport phenomena in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows) as an analysis tool for corrosion processes in the PbLi/RAFM system, including transport of corrosion products in MHD laminar and turbulent flows. The computational approach in TRANSMAG is based on simultaneous solution of flow, energy and mass transfer equations with or without a magnetic field, assuming mass transfer controlled corrosion and uniform dissolution of iron in the flowing PbLi. Then, the new computational tool was used to solve an inverse mass transfer problem where the saturation concentration of iron in PbLi was reconstructed from the experimental data resulting in the following correlation: CS = e 13.604--12975/T, where T is the temperature of PbLi in K and CS is in wppm. The new correlation for saturation concentration was then used in the analysis of corrosion processes in laminar flows in a rectangular duct in the presence of a strong transverse magnetic field. As shown in this study, the mass loss increases with the magnetic field such that the corrosion rate in the presence of a magnetic field can be a few times higher compared to purely

  14. Abstract or Concrete Examples in Learning Mathematics? A Replication and Elaboration of Kaminski, Sloutsky, and Heckler's Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bock, Dirk; Deprez, Johan; Van Dooren, Wim; Roelens, Michel; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2011-01-01

    Kaminski, Sloutsky, and Heckler (2008a) published in "Science" a study on "The advantage of abstract examples in learning math," in which they claim that students may benefit more from learning mathematics through a single abstract, symbolic representation than from multiple concrete examples. This publication elicited both enthusiastic and…

  15. Corrosion studies at the Wilsonville, Alabama, coal liquefaction facility during 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, J.R.; Olsen, A.R.; Newsome, J.F.; Howell, M.

    1984-10-01

    During 1983, Oak Ridge National Laboratory continued a study of materials performance at the Wilsonville, Alabama, Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility. Materials performance was evaluated by exposure and analysis of corrosion coupons and U-bend specimens, chemical analysis of related process streams, and ultrasonic determination of the thickness of walls of various components. The results of these studies are useful to current plant operators and to designers of future large-scale plants. 18 references, 4 figures, 12 tables.

  16. Preliminary study of corrosion mechanisms of actinides alloys: calibration of FT-IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Magnien, Veronique; Cadignan, Marx; Faivret, Olivier; Rosa, Gaelle

    2008-07-01

    In situ analyzes of gaseous atmospheres could be performed by FT-IR spectroscopy in order to study the corrosion reactions of actinides. Nevertheless experimental conditions and the nature of studied species have a strong effect on IR absorption laws. Thus a prior calibration of our set-up is required to obtain an accurate estimation of gas concentration. For this purpose, the behavior of several air pure gases has been investigated according to their concentration from IR spectra. Reproducible results revealed subsequent increases of the most significant peak areas with gas pressure and small deviations from Beer Lambert's law. This preliminary work allowed to determine precise absorption laws for each studied pure gas in our in situ experimental conditions. Besides our FT-IR set-up was well suitable to quantitative analysis of gaseous atmosphere during corrosion reactions. Finally the effect of foreign gas will be investigated through more complex air mixtures to obtain a complete calibration network. (authors)

  17. Physicochemical studies of glucose, gellan gum, and hydroxypropyl cellulose--inhibition of cast iron corrosion.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, Velayutham; Kesavan, Devarayan; Gopiraman, Mayakrishnan; Viswanathamurthi, Periasamy

    2013-06-01

    Glucose, gellan gum, and hydroxypropyl cellulose were studied against the acid corrosion of cast iron by means of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, and AC impedance spectroscopy techniques. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increasing concentration of the inhibitors. The effect of immersion time and temperature were also studied. The addition of potassium iodide to the corrosion-inhibition system showed both antagonism and synergism toward inhibition efficiency. Polarization studies revealed the mixed-type inhibiting nature of the carbohydrates. The adsorption of inhibitors on the cast iron surface obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm model, both in presence and absence of KI. Physical interaction between the inhibitor molecules and the iron surface was suggested by the thermochemical parameters, rather than chemical interaction.

  18. Selected durability studies of geopolymer concrete with respect to carbonation, elevated temperature, and microbial induced corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badar, Mohammad Sufian

    This thesis reports a comprehensive study related to the experimental evaluation of carbonation in reinforced geopolymer concrete, the evaluation of geopolymer concretes at elevated temperature, and the resistance of geopolymer concrete to microbial induced corrosion (MIC). Carbonation: Reinforced concretes, made of geopolymer, prepared from two class F fly ashes and one class C fly ash, were subjected to accelerated carbonation treatment for a period of 450 days. Electrochemical, microstructure and pore structure examinations were performed to evaluate the effect of corrosion caused due to carbonation. GPC specimens prepared from class F fly ash exhibited lower corrosion rates by a factor of 21, and higher pH values (pH>12) when compared with concrete specimens prepared from class C Fly ash (GPCMN). Microstructure and pore characterization of GPC prepared using class F fly ash revealed lower porosity by a factor of 2.5 as compared with thier counterparts made using GPC-MN. The superior performace of GPC prepared with the class F fly ash could be attributed to the dense pore structure and formation of the protective layer of calcium and sodium alumino silicate hydrates (C/N-A-S-H) geopolymeric gels around the steel reinforcement. Elevated Temperature: Geopolymers are an emerging class of cementitious binders which possess a potential for high temperature resistance that could possibly be utilized in applications such as nozzles, aspirators and refractory linings. This study reports on the results of an investigation into the performance of a fly ash based geopolymer binder in high temperature environments. Geopolymer concrete (GPC) was prepared using eleven types of fly ashes obtained from four countries. High content alumina and silica sand was used in the mix for preparing GPC. GPC was subjected to thermal shock tests following ASTM C 1100-88. The GPC samples prepared with tabular alumina were kept at 1093° C and immediately quenched in water. GPC specimens

  19. English and French Journal Abstracts in the Language Sciences: Three Exploratory Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Bonn, Sarah; Swales, John M.

    2007-01-01

    This article compares French and English academic article abstracts from the language sciences in an attempt to understand how and why language choice might affect this part-genre--both in actual use and according to authors' linguistic and rhetorical perceptions. Two corpora are used: Corpus A consists of abstracts from a French linguistics…

  20. Using Monte Carlo Software to Teach Abstract Statistical Concepts: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffle, Holly; Brooks, Gordon P.

    2005-01-01

    Violations of assumptions, inflated Type I error rates, and robustness are important concepts for students to learn in an introductory statistics course. However, these abstract ideas can be difficult for students to understand. Monte Carlo simulation methods can provide a concrete way for students to learn abstract statistical concepts. This…

  1. Youth Studies Abstracts. Vol. 3 No. 4 and Index 1981-84: Subject Index, Author Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youth Studies Abstracts, 1984

    1984-01-01

    This quarterly publication contains 106 abstracts of educational materials published in Australia, covering social and educational developments, programs, and program materials. In the first two sections of the document, the abstracts are arranged in clusters according to prime subject matter. The topics covered, listed at the front of the…

  2. A study of understanding: Alchemy, abstraction, and circulating reference in tertiary science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Brett W.

    Understanding is widely touted to be of paramount importance for education. This is especially true in science education research and development where understanding is heralded as one of the cornerstones of reform. Teachers are expected to teach for understanding and students are expected to learn with understanding. This dissertation is an empirical study of the concept of understanding. After analyzing various constructions of understanding in current U.S. education literature, I suggest that understanding is defined by five distinct features---they are knowledge (or knowledge base), coherence, transfer, extrapolation, and cognition--- and that these features are heavily informed and shaped by the psychological sciences. This relationship is neither good nor bad, I argue, but it means that teaching for and learning with understanding are not heavily informed and shaped by, for example, the natural sciences. Drawing from historical, philosophical, and anthropological perspectives of science, but especially from the work of Bruno Latour, I enact a radical revision(ing) of psychological notions such as "abstraction" and "transfer." The two main purposes of this re-visioning are (1) to draw critical attention to particular characteristics of a cognitive learning theory that emphasizes abstract concepts, and (2) to align many of the principles and tools used in science education more closely with those used in empirical scientific research. Finally, by bringing some examples of teaching and learning from an undergraduate biology classroom into conversation with both psychological and empirical practices and perspectives, I suggest that problematizing the current construction of understanding creates much needed room in mainstream science education for more empirical forms of learning and styles of teaching. A shift to such forms and styles, I conclude, should prove to be more inclusive and less constraining for both students and teachers.

  3. Lithium-system corrosion/erosion studies for the FMIT project

    SciTech Connect

    Bazinet, G D

    1983-04-01

    The corrosion behavior of selected materials in a liquid lithium environment has been studied in support of system and component designs for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. The liquid lithium test resources and the capabilities of several laboratories were used to study specific concerns associated with the overall objective. Testing conditions ranged from approx. 3700 hours to approx. 6500 hours of exposure to flowing lithium at temperatures from 230/sup 0/C to 270/sup 0/C and static lithium at temperatures from 200/sup 0/C to 500/sup 0/C. Principal areas of investigation included lithium corrosion/erosion effects of FMIT lithium system materials (largely Type 304 and Type 304L austenitic stainless steels) and candidate materials for major system components.

  4. Oral Factors Affecting Titanium Elution and Corrosion: An In Vitro Study Using Simulated Body Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Suito, Hideki; Iwawaki, Yuki; Goto, Takaharu; Tomotake, Yoritoki; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Ti, which is biocompatible and resistant to corrosion, is widely used for dental implants, particularly in patients allergic to other materials. However, numerous studies have reported on Ti allergy and the in vitro corrosion of Ti. This study investigated the conditions that promote the elution of Ti ions from Ti implants. Methods Specimens of commercially pure Ti, pure nickel, a magnetic alloy, and a gold alloy were tested. Each specimen was immersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF) whose pH value was controlled (2.0, 3.0, 5.0, 7.4, and 9.0) using either hydrochloric or lactic acid. The parameters investigated were the following: duration of immersion, pH of the SBF, contact with a dissimilar metal, and mechanical stimulus. The amounts of Ti ions eluted were measured using a polarized Zeeman atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results Eluted Ti ions were detected after 24 h (pH of 2.0 and 3.0) and after 48 h (pH of 9.0). However, even after 4 weeks, eluted Ti ions were not detected in SBF solutions with pH values of 5.0 and 7.4. Ti elution was affected by immersion time, pH, acid type, mechanical stimulus, and contact with a dissimilar metal. Elution of Ti ions in a Candida albicans culture medium was observed after 72 h. Significance Elution of Ti ions in the SBF was influenced by its pH and by crevice corrosion. The results of this study elucidate the conditions that lead to the elution of Ti ions in humans, which results in implant corrosion and Ti allergy. PMID:23762461

  5. An electrochemical and surface analysis study of the influence of phosphorus on the corrosion of iron in calcium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Baer, D.R.; Jones, R.H.; Engelhard, M.H.

    1990-10-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of metallic alloys including iron is strongly influenced by the presence of grain boundary impurities such as phosphorus. In this study to determine how phosphorus affects the corrosion of iron, electrochemical polarization methods were used in conjunction with surface analyses employing ultra-high vacuum transfer. Specifically, these methods were used to examine the corrosion of iron, iron/phosphorus alloys, and iron implanted with phosphorus in deaerated 55 wt % Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} solutions at 60{degree}C. 18 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  6. A study on corrosion resistant graphene films on low alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Pavan, A. S.; Ramanan, Sutapa Roy

    2016-04-01

    Graphene nanosheets were produced after synthesizing graphene oxide via Hummer's method and a modified Hummer's method. The obtained graphene after reduction was dispersed in 1-propanol to get a coating solution. Mild steel coupons were coated with the graphene solution via dip coating method. Corrosion studies were carried out at different environments like water (pH 6.0), HCl (0.1 N), NaCl (3.5 wt%) and NaOH (1 M). Tafel analysis showed a reduction in the corrosion rate up to 99 % after three layer deposition with the graphene developed using the modified Hummer's method. X-ray diffraction and Raman Spectroscopy confirmed the presence of graphene.

  7. Method for studying stabilization of localized corrosion on carbon steel by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Campaignolle, X.; Crolet, J.L.

    1997-06-01

    Initiation of a corrosion pit in plain carbon steel (CS) was simulated by preconditioning a small area and a larger concentric area as an anode and cathode, respectively. Preconditioning was achieved by applying a galvanic current between the electrodes. During this initial step, the effect of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) on resulting polarization of this artificial galvanic cell was investigated. The previously conditioned electrodes then were left short-circuited, and the naturally flowing galvanic current was measured using a zero-resistance ammeter. In the presence of SRB biofilms, an active and naturally stable galvanic cell was achieved. In sterile conditions, the coupling current either was unstable or very low. This technique was aimed at studying risk factors linking bacterial contamination to the onset of rapid pitting corrosion.

  8. Uncertainty studies of topographical measurements on steel surface corrosion by 3D scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kang, K W; Pereda, M D; Canafoglia, M E; Bilmes, P; Llorente, C; Bonetto, R

    2012-02-01

    Pitting corrosion is a damage mechanism quite serious and dangerous in both carbon steel boiler tubes for power plants which are vital to most industries and stainless steels for orthopedic human implants whose demand, due to the increase of life expectation and rate of traffic accidents, has sharply increased. Reliable methods to characterize this kind of damage are becoming increasingly necessary, when trying to evaluate the advance of damage and to establish the best procedures for component inspection in order to determine remaining lives and failure mitigation. A study about the uncertainties on the topographies of corrosion pits from 3D SEM images, obtained at low magnifications (where errors are greater) and different stage tilt angles were carried out using an in-house software previously developed. Additionally, measurements of pit depths on biomaterial surfaces, subjected to two different surface treatments on stainless steels, were carried out. The different depth distributions observed were in agreement with electrochemical measurements.

  9. Corrosion study of a highly durable electrolyzer based on cold crucible technique for pyrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear oxide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, M.; Arai, Y.; Kase, T.; Nakajima, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The application of the cold crucible technique to a pyrochemical electrolyzer used in the oxide-electrowinning method, which is a method for the pyrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear oxide fuel, is proposed as a means for improving corrosion resistance. The electrolyzer suffers from a severe corrosion environment consisting of molten salt and corrosive gas. In this study, corrosion tests for several metals in molten 2CsCl-NaCl at 923 K with purging chlorine gas were conducted under controlled material temperature conditions. The results revealed that the corrosion rates of several materials were significantly decreased by the material cooling effect. In particular, Hastelloy C-22 showed excellent corrosion resistance with a corrosion rate of just under 0.01 mm/y in both molten salt and vapor phases by controlling the material surface at 473 K. Finally, an engineering-scale crucible composed of Hastelloy C-22 was manufactured to demonstrate the basic function of the cold crucible. The cold crucible induction melting system with the new concept Hastelloy crucible showed good compatibility with respect to its heating and cooling performances.

  10. Study of electrodeposited polypyrrole coatings for the corrosion protection of stainless steel bipolar plates for the PEM fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, M. A. Lucio; Smit, Mascha A.

    Polypyrrole coatings were prepared on stainless steel SS304 in order to study the corrosion protection provided by the conductive polymer in a simulated PEM fuel cell environment. The polypyrrole was deposited by electrochemical polymerization with 0.04, 0.07 and 0.14 g cm -2 onto SS304 electrodes. Polarization curves, taken after immersion for 1, 3 or 24 h in 0.1 M sulphuric acid at either room temperature or 60 °C were used as an accelerated test. For short immersion times, it was found that corrosion current densities (at free corrosion potentials), diminished up to 2 orders of magnitude for samples tested at room temperature and up to 4 orders of magnitude for samples tested at 60 °C. Furthermore, at potentials in the range of the PEM fuel cell anode potential, corrosion rates also decreased up to several orders of magnitude. However, these protective properties were lost at longer times of immersion. The addition of DBSA to the polypyrrole coatings did lead to improved corrosion current densities at the free corrosion potential, however due to the loss of passivity of these samples, the corrosion rates in the potential range applicable to PEM fuel cells were either similar to or larger than bare metal. SEM was used to determine the morphology of the coatings and showed that the most homogeneous coating was obtained for 0.07 g cm -2 polypyrrole, without the incorporation of DBSA.

  11. A study of scale cracking and its effects on oxidation and hot corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Shores, D.A.; Stout, J.H.; Gerberich, W.W.

    1990-05-01

    For many high temperature applications, oxidation (or hot corrosion) is an important mode of degradation of metals and alloys. Degradation mechanisms may be divided into two categories: one dealing with the chemical and transport aspects of scale growth or dissolution, and the other dealing with mechanical aspects such as stresses and scale fracture. Some applications, such as corrosion/erosion, combine both aspects in a complicated manner. Much research has been concerned with relationships between alloy composition and scale growth rates, attempting to identify alloy compositions and growth mechanisms that form compact, slow-growing scales, such as Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Nevertheless, in practice a very common mode of scale degradation is cracking and spalling, followed by re-oxidation. Efforts to understand scale stresses and ultimately scale fracture have been hampered by the simultaneous interaction of numerous variables in determining the state of stress. Thus complex issues are involved in both experimental measurements and theoretical models of stresses and fracture of oxide scales. In this study we have considered both chemical/transport issues (as applied to the oxidation and hot corrosion of SiC and Ni-Cr Alloys) and mechanical issues of oxidation, but the emphasis has been on mechanical issues. In the following sections we will briefly describe the highlights of each of several projects, and where appropriate, will attach preprints or reprints of papers that describe in more detail the results of a particular study.

  12. Research Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotnick, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Presents research abstracts from the ERIC Clearinghouse on Information and Technology. Topics include: classroom communication apprehension and distance education; outcomes of a distance-delivered science course; the NASA/Kennedy Space Center Virtual Science Mentor program; survey of traditional and distance learning higher education members;…

  13. Abstract Constructions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietropola, Anne

    1998-01-01

    Describes a lesson designed to culminate a year of eighth-grade art classes in which students explore elements of design and space by creating 3-D abstract constructions. Outlines the process of using foam board and markers to create various shapes and optical effects. (DSK)

  14. Corrosion in Haas expanders with and without use of an antimicrobial agent: an in situ study

    PubMed Central

    BAGATIN, Cristhiane Ristum; ITO, Izabel Yoko; ANDRUCIOLI, Marcela Cristina Damião; NELSON-FILHO, Paulo; FERREIRA, José Tarcísio Lima

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate in situ the occurrence of corrosion in the soldering point areas between the wire, silver brazing and band in Haas expanders. Material and Methods Thirty-four 7-12-year-old patients who needed maxillary expansion with a Haas expander were randomly assigned to two groups of 17 individuals each, according to the oral hygiene protocol adopted during the orthodontic treatment: Group I (control), toothbrushing with a fluoride dentifrice and Group II (experimental), toothbrushing with the same dentifrice plus 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate (Periogard®) mouthrinses twice a week. The appliances were removed after approximately 4 months. Fragments of the appliances containing a metallic band with a soldered wire were sectioned at random for examination by stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Data were analyzed statistically by Fisher's test at 5% significance level. Results The analysis by optical microscopy revealed areas with color change suggestive of corrosion in the soldering point areas joining the band and the wire in all specimens of both groups, with no statistically significant difference between the groups (p=1). The peaks of chemical elements (Ni, Fe, Cr, O, C and P) revealed by EDS were also similar in both groups. Conclusion: Color changes and peaks of chemical elements suggestive of corrosion were observed in the soldering point areas between the wire, silver brazing and band in both control and experimental groups, which indicate that the 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthrinses did not influence the occurrence of corrosion in situ. PMID:22231004

  15. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Study on Corrosion Protection of Acrylate Nanocomposite on Mild Steel Doped Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, M. R.; Akhir, M. M.; Shamsudin, M. S.; Afaah, A. N.; Aadila, A.; Asib, N. A. M.; Alrokayan, Salman A. H.; Khan, Haseeb A.; Harun, M. K.; Rusop, M.; Abdullah, S.

    2015-05-01

    Acrylate:carbon nanotubes (A:CNTs) nanocomposite thin film was prepared by sol- gel technique. The corrosion coating protection of acrylate:carbon nanotubes (CNTs) nanocomposite thin film has been coated on mild steel characterised by electrochemical impedance spectrometer (EIS) measurement and equivalent circuit model are employed to analyse coating impedance for corrosion protection. In this study, 3.5 w/v % sodium chloride (NaCl) solution was immersed the acrylate:carbon nanotubes nanocomposite thin film. As the results, the surface morphology were found that there formation of carbon nanotubes with good distribution on acrylate-based coating. From EIS measurement, A:CNTs nanocomposite thin film with 0.4 w/v % contain of CNTs was exhibited the highest coating impedance from Nyquist graph after immersed in sodium chloride solution and may provide the excellent corrosion protection. The Bode plots have shown the impedance is high at the beginning from the time at high frequency and slightly decreases with value of frequency become smaller.

  16. A Study of Wear and Corrosion Resistance of Arc-Sprayed Ni-Ti Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C. H.; Jeng, M. C.; Su, C. Y.; Huang, T. S.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, the corrosion and wear performance of Ni-Ti composite coatings with distinct parameters were investigated. The coatings were prepared by arc spraying with Ti and Ni wires fed synchronously. Structural, surface morphological, and compositional analyses of the Ni-Ti composite coatings were performed using microhardness, SEM/EDS, XRD, and DTA analysis. Electrochemical AC impedance and potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out to examine the anticorrosion performance of the coating. Ball-on-disc dry wear tests based on the ASTM G99 standard were performed at room temperature to evaluate the antiwear properties. The DTA and XRD analysis results indicated that some intermetallic compounds such as TiNi3 and Ni-Ti alloy were present within the Ni-Ti coating. The wear resistance of the Ni-Ti composite coating is superior to that of the Ni-sprayed coating but slightly inferior to that of the Ti-sprayed coating. The corrosion resistance of the arc-sprayed Ni-Ti coating is superior to that of Ti but inferior to that of Ni. The corrosion and wear performance of the composite coating are greatly influenced by the coating microstructure and thickness.

  17. Study of Rust Effect on the Corrosion Behavior of Reinforcement Steel Using Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensabra, Hakim; Azzouz, Noureddine

    2013-12-01

    Most studies on corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete are conducted on steel samples with polished surface (free of all oxides) in order to reproduce the same experimental conditions. However, before embedding in concrete, the steel bars are often covered with natural oxides (rust), which are formed during exposure to the atmosphere. The presence of this rust may affect the electrochemical behavior of steel rebar in concrete. In order to understand the effect of rust on the corrosion behavior of reinforcement steel, potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests were carried out in a simulated concrete pore solution using steel samples with two different surface conditions: polished and rusted samples. The obtained results have shown that the presence of rust on the steel bar has a negative effect on its corrosion behavior, with or without the presence of chlorides. This detrimental effect can be explained by the fact that the rust provokes a decrease of the electrolyte resistance at the metal-concrete interface and reduces the repassivating ability. In addition, the rust layer acts as a barrier against the hydroxyl ion diffusion, which prevents the realkalinization phenomenon.

  18. Revisiting Caroline Furness's An Introduction to the Study of Variable Stars on its Centenary (Poster abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, K.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) A century and one month ago (October 1915) Dr. Caroline Ellen Furness (1869-1936), Director of the Vassar College Observatory, published An Introduction to the Study of Variable Stars. Issued in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of Vassar College, the work was meant to fill a void in the literature, namely as both an introduction to the topic of variable stars and as a manual explaining how they should be observed and the resulting data analyzed. It was judged to be one of the hundred best books written by an American woman in the last hundred years at the 1933 World's Fair in Chicago. The book covers the relevant history of and background on types of variable stars, star charts, catalogs, and the magnitude scale, then describes observing techniques, including visual, photographic, and photoelectric photometry. The work finishes with a discussion of light curves and patterns of variability, with a special emphasis on eclipsing binaries and long period variables. Furness's work is a valuable snapshot of the state of astronomical knowledge, technology, and observing techniques from a century ago. This presentation will analyze both Furness's book and its reception in the scientific community, and draw parallels to current advice given to beginning variable star observers.

  19. Manipulating objects and telling words: a study on concrete and abstract words acquisition.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Anna M; Flumini, Andrea; Cimatti, Felice; Marocco, Davide; Scorolli, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Four experiments (E1-E2-E3-E4) investigated whether different acquisition modalities lead to the emergence of differences typically found between concrete and abstract words, as argued by the words as tools (WAT) proposal. To mimic the acquisition of concrete and abstract concepts, participants either manipulated novel objects or observed groups of objects interacting in novel ways (Training 1). In TEST 1 participants decided whether two elements belonged to the same category. Later they read the category labels (Training 2); labels could be accompanied by an explanation of their meaning. Then participants observed previously seen exemplars and other elements, and were asked which of them could be named with a given label (TEST 2). Across the experiments, it was more difficult to form abstract than concrete categories (TEST 1); even when adding labels, abstract words remained more difficult than concrete words (TEST 2). TEST 3 differed across the experiments. In E1 participants performed a feature production task. Crucially, the associations produced with the novel words reflected the pattern evoked by existing concrete and abstract words, as the first evoked more perceptual properties. In E2-E3-E4, TEST 3 consisted of a color verification task with manual/verbal (keyboard-microphone) responses. Results showed the microphone use to have an advantage over keyboard use for abstract words, especially in the explanation condition. This supports WAT: due to their acquisition modality, concrete words evoke more manual information; abstract words elicit more verbal information. This advantage was not present when linguistic information contrasted with perceptual one. Implications for theories and computational models of language grounding are discussed.

  20. Wilsonville SRC-I pilot plant: I. Fractionation area corrosion studies; II. Hot vs. normal separation mode of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.M.

    1981-04-01

    Extensive corrosion studies in solvent recovery columns have been done with different coals (mainly Kentucky number 9 Lafayette, Dotiki and Fies). Sodium carbonate (0.1 to 1.1% of coal) was added as neutralizer to control corrosion rate. Chloride balance runs were made for isolation of corrosive streams with high chlorine content. A caustic wash program of inlet streams has been developed for selective treatment of corrosive streams as an alternative means for possible replacement of sodium carbonate addition. High chlorine content coals such as Kentucky number 9 Lafayette and Dotiki (0.2 to 0.3%) were very corrosive, compared to low chlorine content coal, Kentucky number 9 Fies (< 0.1%). Sodium carbonate addition (0.6 to 0.7% of coal) reduced corrosion rate from 500 MPY to an insignificant level of less than 5 MPY. Caustic wash of solvents could reduce corrosion rate by 50%, removing most corrosive compounds present in the 440 to 480/sup 0/F boiling fraction. Extensive studies for the hot separator mode of operation have been done as a means of saving substantial energy by elimination of dissolver slurry cooling (0.3 MM Btu/hr) and reheating for solvent recovery (1 MM Btu/h). Impacts of the hot separator mode on plant operability, product quality and Kerr-McGee CSD Unit recovery have been studied. The hot separator mode of operation was carried out by controlling the V103 temperature to 740/sup 0/F. It was observed that preasphaltene contents increased in the SRC products such as V110 L/F SRC and CSD feed; CSD unit recovery was not affected significantly; solvent quality was not affected significantly.

  1. Hot corrosion studies of four nickel-base superalloys - B-1900, NASA-TRW VIA, 713C and IN738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    The susceptibility to hot corrosion of four nickel-base superalloys has been studied at 900 and 1000 C in one atmosphere of slowly flowing oxygen. Hot corrosion was induced by coating the samples with known doses of Na2SO4 and oxidizing the coated samples isothermally on a sensitive microbalance. In order of decending susceptibility to hot corrosion, these alloys were ranked: B-1900, 713C, NASA-TRW VIA, IN738. This order corresponds to the order of decreasing molybdenum content of the alloys. Chemical evidence for B-1900 indicates that hot corrosion is instigated by acid fluxing of the protective Al2O3 coating by MoO3.

  2. Abstracted model for ceramic coating

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Stockman, C

    1998-11-14

    Engineers are exploring several mechanisms to delay corrosive attack of the CAM (corrosion allowance material) by dripping water, including drip shields and ceramic coatings. Ceramic coatings deposited with high-velocity oxyfuels (HVOF's) have exhibited a porosity of only 2% at a thickness of 0.15 cm. The primary goal of this document is to provide a detailed description of an abstracted process-level model for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) that has been developed to account for the inhibition of corrosion by protective ceramic coatings. A second goal was to address as many of the issues raised during a recent peer review as possible (direct reaction of liquid water with carbon steel, stress corrosion cracking of the ceramic coating, bending stresses in coatings of finite thickness, limitations of simple correction factors, etc.). During the periods of dry oxidation (T ≥ 100°C) and humid-air corrosion (T ≤ 100°C & RH < 8O%), it is assumed that the growth rate of oxide on the surface is diminished in proportion to the surface covered by solid ceramic. The mass transfer impedance imposed by a ceramic coating with gas-filled pores is assumed to be negligible. During the period of aqueous phase corrosion (T ≤ 100°C & RH ≥ 80%), it is assumed that the overall mass transfer resistance governing the corrosion rate is due to the combined resistance of ceramic coating & interfacial corrosion products. Two porosity models (simple cylinder & cylinder-sphere chain) are considered in estimation of the mass transfer resistance of the ceramic coating. It is evident that substantial impedance to 0₂ transport is encountered if pores are filled with liquid water. It may be possible to use a sealant to eliminate porosity. Spallation (rupture) of the ceramic coating is assumed to occur if the stress introduced by the expanding corrosion products at the ceramic- CAM interface exceeds fracture stress. Since this model does not account for the possibility of

  3. Computational study on SiH4 dissociation channels and H abstraction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Toshio; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    The primary dissociation channels of SiH4 were investigated using computational chemistry. The results showed properties very similar to those of CH4. The main dissociation product was SiH2 and the second dissociation product was SiH3. SiH was produced through SiH3 to SiH + H2 dissociation by electronic excitation. H abstraction reactions by H and SiH3 were also calculated for SiH4, Si2H6, Si3H8, and Si9H14(100) cluster models. The energy barriers of H abstraction reactions were lower than those of SiH3 abstraction reactions. This result is considerably important for deposition in SiH4/H2 process plasma.

  4. Reading and Study Skills: College and Adult: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July 1978 through June 1979 (Vol. 39 Nos. 1 through 12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 29 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: the relationship between readability of written material and reading competency of upper middle class adult readers, the economic benefits of adult basic education…

  5. Reading and Study Skills and Instruction: College and Adult: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," January through June 1985 (Vol. 45 Nos. 7 through 12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 12 titles deal with the following topics: (1) conceptualization of main idea by special admission college freshmen; (2) the interactive effects of field dependence and adjunct questions on learning from prose; (3) an art based…

  6. Reading and Study Skills and Instruction: College and Adult: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," January through June 1981 (Vol. 41 Nos. 7 through 12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The ten titles deal with the following topics: (1) the composing process of adult basic writing students; (2) an integrated approach to reading and writing for college students; (3) the teaching and learning of reading in the…

  7. Reading and Study Skills: Secondary: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July 1978 through June 1979 (Vol. 39 Nos. 1 through 12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 29 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: various factors in terms of attitudes toward reading; the effect of group counseling on self-concept and reading achievement; the effect of three modes of…

  8. Reading and Study Skills and Instruction: Preschool and Elementary: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1979 (Vol. 40 Nos. 1 through 6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 47 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: a programed tutoring project in which older students tutored first grade students; oral reading miscues made by children in high, medium, and low reading groups;…

  9. Evaluation of thiosulfate as a substitute for hydrogen sulfide in sour corrosion fatigue studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappes, Mariano Alberto

    This work evaluates the possibility of replacing hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) with thiosulfate anion (S2O32- ) in sour corrosion fatigue studies. H2S increases the corrosion fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) and can be present in carbon steel risers and flowlines used in off-shore oil production. Corrosion tests with gaseous H2S require special facilities with safety features, because H2S is a toxic and flammable gas. The possibility of replacing H2S with S2O32-, a non-toxic anion, for studying stress corrosion cracking of stainless and carbon steels in H2S solutions was first proposed by Tsujikawa et al. ( Tsujikawa et al., Corrosion, 1993. 49(5): p. 409-419). In this dissertation, Tsujikawa work will be extended to sour corrosion fatigue of carbon steels. H2S testing is often conducted in deareated condition to avoid oxygen reaction with sulfide that yields sulfur and to mimic oil production conditions. Nitrogen deareation was also adopted in S2O3 2- testing, and gas exiting the cell was forced through a sodium hydroxide trap. Measurements of the sulfide content of this trap were used to estimate the partial pressure of H2S in nitrogen, and Henry's law was used to estimate the content of H2S in the solution in the cell. H2S was produced by a redox reaction of S2O 32-, which required electrons from carbon steel corrosion. This reaction is spontaneous at the open circuit potential of steel. Therefore, H2S concentration was expected to be maximum at the steel surface, and this concentration was estimated by a mass balance analysis. Carbon steel specimens exposed to S2O32- containing solutions developed a film on their surface, composed by iron sulfide and cementite. The film was not passivating and a good conductor of electrons. Hydrogen permeation experiments proved that this film controls the rate of hydrogen absorption of steels exposed to thiosulfate containing solutions. The absorption of hydrogen in S2O3 2- solutions was compared with the absorption of hydrogen in

  10. How do conceptual representations interact with processing demands: An fMRI study on action- and abstract-related words.

    PubMed

    Tomasino, Barbara; Fabbro, Franco; Brambilla, Paolo

    2014-12-01

    This fMRI study investigated the functional mechanisms related to mental simulation of abstract- and action-related words and measured the effect of the type of stimulus (Abstract vs. action verbs) and the type of task (imagery vs. control task) to explore how conceptual representations interact with processing demands. A significant task by stimuli interaction showed that action-related words activated the left sensorimotor cortex during explicit imagery (as compared to the control task), whereas abstract-related verbs did not automatically activate this area. Rather, as we made sure that Abstract verbs were not associated with motor states (as tested in a rating study of our stimulus list), imagery elicited by abstract verb processing (as compared to Action verbs, and controlled for letter detection) differentially activated a right hemisphere neural network including the right supramarginal (SMG) gyrus and the precuneus which might be related to mental imagery of emotion-related scenes and not to the semantics of the stimuli per se. Our results confirmed the view that the activation of the sensorimotor cortex during language processing of abstract- and action-related words is strategy-dependent.

  11. In vitro electrochemical corrosion and cell viability studies on nickel-free stainless steel orthopedic implants.

    PubMed

    Salahinejad, Erfan; Hadianfard, Mohammad Jafar; Macdonald, Digby Donald; Sharifi-Asl, Samin; Mozafari, Masoud; Walker, Kenneth J; Rad, Armin Tahmasbi; Madihally, Sundararajan V; Tayebi, Lobat

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion and cell viability behaviors of nanostructured, nickel-free stainless steel implants were studied and compared with AISI 316L. The electrochemical studies were conducted by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements in a simulated body fluid. Cytocompatibility was also evaluated by the adhesion behavior of adult human stem cells on the surface of the samples. According to the results, the electrochemical behavior is affected by a compromise among the specimen's structural characteristics, comprising composition, density, and grain size. The cell viability is interpreted by considering the results of the electrochemical impedance spectroscopic experiments.

  12. In Vitro Electrochemical Corrosion and Cell Viability Studies on Nickel-Free Stainless Steel Orthopedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Salahinejad, Erfan; Hadianfard, Mohammad Jafar; Macdonald, Digby Donald; Sharifi-Asl, Samin; Mozafari, Masoud; Walker, Kenneth J.; Rad, Armin Tahmasbi; Madihally, Sundararajan V.; Tayebi, Lobat

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion and cell viability behaviors of nanostructured, nickel-free stainless steel implants were studied and compared with AISI 316L. The electrochemical studies were conducted by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements in a simulated body fluid. Cytocompatibility was also evaluated by the adhesion behavior of adult human stem cells on the surface of the samples. According to the results, the electrochemical behavior is affected by a compromise among the specimen's structural characteristics, comprising composition, density, and grain size. The cell viability is interpreted by considering the results of the electrochemical impedance spectroscopic experiments. PMID:23630603

  13. Study made of corrosion resistance of stainless steel and nickel alloys in nuclear reactor superheaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, S.; Hart, R. K.; Lee, R. H.; Ruther, W. E.; Schlueter, R. R.

    1967-01-01

    Experiments performed under conditions found in nuclear reactor superheaters determine the corrosion rate of stainless steel and nickel alloys used in them. Electropolishing was the primary surface treatment before the corrosion test. Corrosion is determined by weight loss of specimens after defilming.

  14. Scientific Affairs Division of NATO Advanced Study Institute: abstracts for nonequilibrium superconductivity, phonons and Kapitza boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at the meeting are given. Topics covered include: Kapitza resistance; superconducting tunneling; energy gap enhancement in superconductors; instabilities in nonequilibrium superconducting states; exchange of charge between superconducting pairs and quasiparticles; motion of magnetic flux (flux flow); and other new phenomena. (GHT)

  15. On the Relation of Abstract and Concrete in Scientists' Graph Interpretations: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Hwang, SungWon

    2006-01-01

    The notions of "abstract" and "concrete" are central to the conceptualization of mathematical knowing and learning. Much of the literature takes a dualist approach, leading to the privileging of the former term at the expense of the latter. In this article, we provide a concrete analysis of a scientist interpreting an unfamiliar graph to show how…

  16. Analysis of Pipeline Steel Corrosion Data From NBS (NIST) Studies Conducted Between 1922–1940 and Relevance to Pipeline Management

    PubMed Central

    Ricker, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    Between 1911 and 1984, the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) conducted a large number of corrosion studies that included the measurement of corrosion damage to samples exposed to real-world environments. One of these studies was an investigation conducted between 1922 and 1940 into the corrosion of bare steel and wrought iron pipes buried underground at 47 different sites representing different soil types across the Unites States. At the start of this study, very little was known about the corrosion of ferrous alloys underground. The objectives of this study were to determine (i) if coatings would be required to prevent corrosion, and (ii) if soil properties could be used to predict corrosion and determine when coatings would be required. While this study determined very quickly that coatings would be required for some soils, it found that the results were so divergent that even generalities based on this data must be drawn with care. The investigators concluded that so many diverse factors influence corrosion rates underground that planning of proper tests and interpretation of the results were matters of considerable difficulty and that quantitative interpretations or extrapolations could be done “only in approximate fashion” and attempted only in the “restricted area” of the tests until more complete information is available. Following the passage of the Pipeline Safety Improvement Act in 2002 and at the urging of the pipeline industry, the Office of Pipeline Safety of the U.S. Department of Transportation approached the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NBS became NIST in 1988) and requested that the data from this study be reexamined to determine if the information handling and analysis capabilities of modern computers and software could enable the extraction of more meaningful information from these data. This report is a summary of the resulting investigations. The data from the original NBS studies were analyzed using a variety of

  17. Review of state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes. Task 1 of solar collector studies for solar heating and cooling applications. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, J E; Diegle, R B

    1980-04-11

    The state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes is reviewed, and Task 1 of a current research program on use of aqueous heat transfer fluids for solar heating and cooling is summarized. The review of available published literature has indicated that lack of quantitative information exists relative to collector corrosion at the present time, particularly for the higher temperature applications of solar heating and cooling compared to domestic water heating. Solar collector systems are reviewed from the corrosion/service life viewpoint, with emphasis on various applications, collector design, heat transfer fluids, and freeze protection methods. Available information (mostly qualitative) on collector corrosion technology is reviewed to indicate potential corrosion problem areas and corrosion prevention practices. Sources of limited quantitative data that are reviewed are current solar applications, research programs on collector corrosion, and pertinent experience in related applications of automotive cooling and non-solar heating and cooling. A data bank was developed to catalog corrosion information. Appendix A of this report is a bibliography of the data bank, with abstracts reproduced from presently available literature accessions (about 220). This report is presented as a descriptive summary of information that is contained in the data bank.

  18. Hot Corrosion Studies of HVOF-Sprayed Coating on T-91 Boiler Tube Steel at Different Operating Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Rakesh; Singh, Hazoor; Sidhu, Buta Singh

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the usefulness of high velocity oxy fuel-sprayed 75% Cr3C2-25% (Ni-20Cr) coating to control hot corrosion of T-91 boiler tube steel at different operating temperatures viz 550, 700, and 850 °C. The deposited coatings on the substrates exhibit nearly uniform, adherent and dense microstructure with porosity less than 2%. Thermogravimetry technique is used to study the high temperature hot corrosion behavior of uncoated and coated samples. The corrosion products of the coating on the substrate are analyzed by using XRD, SEM, and FE-SEM/EDAX to reveal their microstructural and compositional features for the corrosion mechanisms. It is found that the coated specimens have shown minimum weight gain at all the operating temperatures when compared with uncoated T-91 samples. Hence, coating is effective in decreasing the corrosion rate in the given molten salt environment. Oxides and spinels of nickel-chromium may be the reason for successful resistance against hot corrosion.

  19. Pitting, galvanic, and long-term corrosion studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.; Durr, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    Contest Columbus Technologies, Inc. (CC Technologies) investigated the long-term performance of container materials for high-level radioactive waste packages as part of the information needed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assess the Department of Energy`s application to construct a geologic repository for the high-level radioactive waste. The scope of work focused on the Tuff Repository and employed short-term techniques, such as electrochemical and mechanical techniques to examine a wide range of possible failure modes. Two classes of alloys were evaluated for use as container materials for the Tuff Repository; Fe-Cr-Ni alloys and copper-base alloys. The candidate Fe-Cr-Ni alloys were Type 304L Stainless Steel (Alloy 304L) and Incoloy Alloy 825 (Alloy 825). The candidate copper-base alloys were CDA 102 Copper (Alloy CDA 102) and CDA 715 Copper-3D Nickel (Alloy CDA 715). The corrosion testing was performed in a simulated J-13 well water and in solutions selected from an experimental matrix from Task 2 of the program. This report summarizes the results of Task 4 (Pitting Studies), Task 6 (Other Failure Modes) and Task 7 (Long-Term Exposures) of the program. Pit-initiation studies, performed in Task 4, focused on anomalous Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization (CPP) behavior of the copper-base alloys reported in Task 2 of the program. Pit propagation studies were performed on Alloy CDA 102 in Task A of the program. Two types of galvanic corrosion studies were performed in Task 6 of the program; thermogalvanic couples and borehole linear-container interactions. In the thermogalvanic couples tests, the effect of temperature variation on the surface of the container on acceleration of corrosion was evaluated for two alloys; Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy 304L. Long-term immersion tests were conducted in Task 7 of the program.

  20. Pitting, galvanic, and long-term corrosion studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Thompson, N.G.; Durr, C.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Contest Columbus Technologies, Inc. (CC Technologies) investigated the long-term performance of container materials for high-level radioactive waste packages as part of the information needed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to assess the Department of Energy's application to construct a geologic repository for the high-level radioactive waste. The scope of work focused on the Tuff Repository and employed short-term techniques, such as electrochemical and mechanical techniques to examine a wide range of possible failure modes. Two classes of alloys were evaluated for use as container materials for the Tuff Repository; Fe-Cr-Ni alloys and copper-base alloys. The candidate Fe-Cr-Ni alloys were Type 304L Stainless Steel (Alloy 304L) and Incoloy Alloy 825 (Alloy 825). The candidate copper-base alloys were CDA 102 Copper (Alloy CDA 102) and CDA 715 Copper-3D Nickel (Alloy CDA 715). The corrosion testing was performed in a simulated J-13 well water and in solutions selected from an experimental matrix from Task 2 of the program. This report summarizes the results of Task 4 (Pitting Studies), Task 6 (Other Failure Modes) and Task 7 (Long-Term Exposures) of the program. Pit-initiation studies, performed in Task 4, focused on anomalous Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization (CPP) behavior of the copper-base alloys reported in Task 2 of the program. Pit propagation studies were performed on Alloy CDA 102 in Task A of the program. Two types of galvanic corrosion studies were performed in Task 6 of the program; thermogalvanic couples and borehole linear-container interactions. In the thermogalvanic couples tests, the effect of temperature variation on the surface of the container on acceleration of corrosion was evaluated for two alloys; Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy 304L. Long-term immersion tests were conducted in Task 7 of the program.

  1. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  2. Overstatements in abstract conclusions claiming effectiveness of interventions in psychiatry: a study protocol for a meta-epidemiological investigation

    PubMed Central

    Suganuma, Aya M; Shinohara, Kiyomi; Imai, Hissei; Takeshima, Nozomi; Hayasaka, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Abstracts are the major and often the most important source of information for readers of the medical literature. However, there is mounting criticism that abstracts often exaggerate the positive findings and emphasise the beneficial effects of intervention beyond the actual findings mentioned in the corresponding full texts. In order to examine the magnitude of this problem, we will introduce a systematic approach to detect overstated abstracts and to quantify the extent of their prevalence in published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the field of psychiatry. Methods and analysis We will source RCTs published in 2014 from the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) that claim effectiveness of any intervention for mental disorders. The abstract conclusions will be categorised into three types: superior (only stating significant superiority of intervention to control), limited (suggesting that intervention has limited superiority to control) and equal (claiming equal effectiveness of intervention as control). The full texts will also be classified as one of the following based on the primary outcome results: significant (all primary outcomes were statistically significant in favour of the intervention), mixed (primary outcomes included both significant and non-significant results) or all non-significant results. By comparing the abstract conclusion classification and that of the corresponding full text, we will assess whether each study exhibited overstatements in its abstract conclusion. Ethics and dissemination This trial requires no ethical approval. We will publish our findings in a peer-reviewed journal. Trial registration number UMIN000018668; Pre-results. PMID:27103624

  3. Vanadium corrosion studies. Final report, 1 February 1989-30 June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bornstein, N.; Roth, H.; Pike, R.

    1993-06-30

    Vanadium present in certain crude and residual fuel oils, is converted within the burner of the gas turbine engine to the refractory dioxide, which in flight is fully oxidized to the pentoxide. Yttrium oxide, stable in the presence of the oxides of sulfur is identified and verified as a corrosion inhibitor. A chelation process to produce a hydrolytic stable fuel soluble yttrium additive is described.... Vanadium oxide corrosion, Hot corrosion, Sulfidation corrosion, Hot corrosion attenuation, Fuel additives, Water stable fuel soluble yttrium compounds, Chelation.

  4. The effect of abrasion on corrosion of dental Co-Cr alloys. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    de Melo, J F; Gjerdet, N R; Erichsen, E S

    1985-05-01

    The effect of abrasion on corrosion of two dental Co-Cr alloys was investigated in vitro. The metals were abraded with a toothbrush and with a piece of tooth enamel. Changes in corrosion potentials and metal release due to the abrasion were measured. Abrasion by tooth enamel caused a persistent drop in corrosion potentials. The release of both chromium and, in particular, cobalt was higher than during brushing. The two alloys tested did not significantly differ with regard to mode and rate of corrosion. It was demonstrated that the corrosion behavior of electrochemically passive dental alloys was affected by abrasion of a magnitude normally encountered during clinical service. PMID:3863447

  5. Understanding of action-related and abstract verbs in comparison: a behavioral and TMS study.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, Alessandro; De Stefani, Elisa; Sestito, Mariateresa; Gentilucci, Maurizio

    2014-02-01

    Does the comprehension of both action-related and abstract verbs rely on motor simulation? In a behavioral experiment, in which a semantic task was used, response times to hand-action-related verbs were briefer than those to abstract verbs and both decreased with repetition of presentation. In a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) experiment, single-pulse stimulation was randomly delivered over hand motor area of the left primary motor cortex to measure cortical-spinal excitability at 300 or 500 ms after verb presentation. Two blocks of trials were run. In each block, the same verbs were randomly presented. In the first block, stimulation induced an increase in motor evoked potentials only when TMS was applied 300 ms after action-related verb presentation. In the second block, no modulation of motor cortex was found according to type of verb and stimulation-delay. These results confirm that motor simulation can be used to understand action rather than abstract verbs. Moreover, they suggest that with repetition, the semantic processing for action verbs does not require activation of primary motor cortex anymore.

  6. Comparative study of the corrosion behavior of peripheral stents in an accelerated corrosion model: experimental in vitro study of 28 metallic vascular endoprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Paprottka, Karolin J.; Paprottka, Philipp M.; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Waggershauser, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Clinical cases of stent-fractures show that corrosion behavior might play a role in these fractures. Implanted in vivo, especially in combination with other implanted foreign materials, these metallic products are exposed to special conditions, which can cause a process of corrosion. Here, we aimed to test the corrosion potential of stents made of different materials in an in vitro setting. METHODS A total of 28 peripheral stents of different materials (nitinol, cobalt-chromium-nickel, tantalum, V4A) and surface treatments (electropolish, mechanical polish, no polish) were tested in vitro. Corrosion was accelerated by applying a constant voltage of 3.5 V and amperage of 1.16 mA in 0.9% NaCl. RESULTS Nitinol stents showed the lowest susceptibility to corrosion and the longest period without damage. The Memotherm II® (BARD Angiomed®) was the only stent that showed neither macroscopic nor microscopic damages. The worst performing material was cobalt-chromium-nickel, which showed corrosion damages about ten times earlier compared to nitinol. Considering the reasons for termination of the test, nitinol stents primarily showed length deficits, while V4A and tantalum stents showed fractures. Cobalt-chromium-nickel stents had multiple fractures or a complete lysis in equal proportions. When placed in direct contact, nitinol stents showed best corrosion resistance, regardless of what material they were combined with. In terms of polishing treatments, electropolished stents performed the best, mechanical-polished stents and those without polishing treatment followed. CONCLUSION The analysis of corrosion behavior may be useful to select the right stent fulfilling the individual needs of the patient within a large number of different stents. PMID:26268301

  7. Designing Studies of Extension Program Results: A Resource for Program Leaders and Specialists. Volume II--Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, William M., Ed.; And Others

    These abstracts of 42 studies of extension program results, which make up the second volume of a two-volume resource, are intended to advise state administrative program leaders and others with program evaluation responsibilities of how to design studies of cooperative extension programs. Designed to support volume I, which refers to these…

  8. Study of the Intergranular Corrosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Stainless Steel in Transpassive Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed Behbahani, Khashayar; Najafisayar, Pooria; Pakshir, Mahmoud

    2016-08-01

    In this study, intergranular corrosion behavior of UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel was investigated using conventional potentiodynamic polarization, double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DLEPR), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique carried out at different potentials in the transpassive region. Different types of heat treatments were used to obtain samples with different degrees of sensitization. The results of the DLEPR tests showed that the solution-annealed sample and that was sensitized for half an hour would be considered as nonsensitized ones. Moreover, the sample that was sensitized for 24 h exhibits the highest value of the degree of sensitization. Polarization test results showed a typical active-passive behavior from which the transpassive potential range was determined and used as the range of the applied DC bias in the EIS experiments. Three different AC responses (including capacitive and inductive responses) were observed depending on the value of applied DC bias in the EIS experiments. In addition, it was observed that the presence of the second inductive loop at high applied DC bias is due to the adsorption of nonsoluble corrosion products on the surface of the samples. Moreover, the fitted values to the charge transfer and polarization resistances ( R ct and R P) decreased as the sensitization time increased from 30 min to 24 h. Such observations were in good accordance with the metallographic examination of the corroded surfaces, carried out by optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques, revealing discontinuous grain boundary attack in nonsensitized samples and a continuous network of grain boundary attack in the case of sensitized ones. Moreover, as the applied DC bias increases the ferrite phase attack also occurs in the sensitized samples. In addition, approximately no pitting corrosion was observed on the surface of the corroded samples which is in accordance with their respective cyclic

  9. Ultra-High Temperature Steam Corrosion of Complex Silicates for Nuclear Applications: A Computational Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rashkeev, Sergey N.; Glazoff, Michael V.; Tokuhiro, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Stability of materials under extreme conditions is an important issue for safety of nuclear reactors. Presently, silicon carbide (SiC) is being studied as a cladding material candidate for fuel rods in boiling-water and pressurized water-cooled reactors (BWRs and PWRs) that would substitute or modify traditional zircaloy materials. The rate of corrosion of the SiC ceramics in hot vapor environment (up to 2200 degrees C) simulating emergency conditions of light water reactor (LWR) depends on many environmental factors such as pressure, temperature, viscosity, and surface quality. Using the paralinear oxidation theory developed for ceramics in the combustion reactor environment, we estimated the corrosion rate of SiC ceramics under the conditions representing a significant power excursion in a LWR. It was established that a significant time – at least 100 h – is required for a typical SiC braiding to significantly degrade even in the most aggressive vapor environment (with temperatures up to 2200 °C) which is possible in a LWR at emergency condition. This provides evidence in favor of using the SiC coatings/braidings for additional protection of nuclear reactor rods against off-normal material degradation during power excursions or LOCA incidents. Additionally, we discuss possibilities of using other silica based ceramics in order to find materials with even higher corrosion resistance than SiC. In particular, we found that zircon (ZrSiO4) is also a very promising material for nuclear applications. Thermodynamic and first-principles atomic-scale calculations provide evidence of zircon thermodynamic stability in aggressive environments at least up to 1535 degrees C.

  10. Ultra-high temperature steam corrosion of complex silicates for nuclear applications: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashkeev, Sergey N.; Glazoff, Michael V.; Tokuhiro, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Stability of materials under extreme conditions is an important issue for safety of nuclear reactors. Presently, silicon carbide (SiC) is being studied as a cladding material candidate for fuel rods in boiling-water and pressurized water-cooled reactors (BWRs and PWRs) that would substitute or modify traditional zircaloy materials. The rate of corrosion of the SiC ceramics in hot vapor environment (up to 2200 °C) simulating emergency conditions of light water reactor (LWR) depends on many environmental factors such as pressure, temperature, viscosity, and surface quality. Using the paralinear oxidation theory developed for ceramics in the combustion reactor environment, we estimated the corrosion rate of SiC ceramics under the conditions representing a significant power excursion in a LWR. It was established that a significant time - at least 100 h - is required for a typical SiC braiding to significantly degrade even in the most aggressive vapor environment (with temperatures up to 2200 °C) which is possible in a LWR at emergency condition. This provides evidence in favor of using the SiC coatings/braidings for additional protection of nuclear reactor rods against off-normal material degradation during power excursions or LOCA incidents. Additionally, we discuss possibilities of using other silica based ceramics in order to find materials with even higher corrosion resistance than SiC. In particular, we found that zircon (ZrSiO4) is also a very promising material for nuclear applications. Thermodynamic and first-principles atomic-scale calculations provide evidence of zircon thermodynamic stability in aggressive environments at least up to 1535 °C.

  11. Preattentive Extraction of Abstract Auditory Rules in Speech Sound Stream: A Mismatch Negativity Study Using Lexical Tones

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Gu, Feng; He, Kang; Chen, Ling-Hui; Chen, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Background Extraction of linguistically relevant auditory features is critical for speech comprehension in complex auditory environments, in which the relationships between acoustic stimuli are often abstract and constant while the stimuli per se are varying. These relationships are referred to as the abstract auditory rule in speech and have been investigated for their underlying neural mechanisms at an attentive stage. However, the issue of whether or not there is a sensory intelligence that enables one to automatically encode abstract auditory rules in speech at a preattentive stage has not yet been thoroughly addressed. Methodology/Principal Findings We chose Chinese lexical tones for the current study because they help to define word meaning and hence facilitate the fabrication of an abstract auditory rule in a speech sound stream. We continuously presented native Chinese speakers with Chinese vowels differing in formant, intensity, and level of pitch to construct a complex and varying auditory stream. In this stream, most of the sounds shared flat lexical tones to form an embedded abstract auditory rule. Occasionally the rule was randomly violated by those with a rising or falling lexical tone. The results showed that the violation of the abstract auditory rule of lexical tones evoked a robust preattentive auditory response, as revealed by whole-head electrical recordings of the mismatch negativity (MMN), though none of the subjects acquired explicit knowledge of the rule or became aware of the violation. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that there is an auditory sensory intelligence in the perception of Chinese lexical tones. The existence of this intelligence suggests that the humans can automatically extract abstract auditory rules in speech at a preattentive stage to ensure speech communication in complex and noisy auditory environments without drawing on conscious resources. PMID:22238691

  12. Selected durability studies of geopolymer concrete with respect to carbonation, elevated temperature, and microbial induced corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badar, Mohammad Sufian

    This thesis reports a comprehensive study related to the experimental evaluation of carbonation in reinforced geopolymer concrete, the evaluation of geopolymer concretes at elevated temperature, and the resistance of geopolymer concrete to microbial induced corrosion (MIC). Carbonation: Reinforced concretes, made of geopolymer, prepared from two class F fly ashes and one class C fly ash, were subjected to accelerated carbonation treatment for a period of 450 days. Electrochemical, microstructure and pore structure examinations were performed to evaluate the effect of corrosion caused due to carbonation. GPC specimens prepared from class F fly ash exhibited lower corrosion rates by a factor of 21, and higher pH values (pH>12) when compared with concrete specimens prepared from class C Fly ash (GPCMN). Microstructure and pore characterization of GPC prepared using class F fly ash revealed lower porosity by a factor of 2.5 as compared with thier counterparts made using GPC-MN. The superior performace of GPC prepared with the class F fly ash could be attributed to the dense pore structure and formation of the protective layer of calcium and sodium alumino silicate hydrates (C/N-A-S-H) geopolymeric gels around the steel reinforcement. Elevated Temperature: Geopolymers are an emerging class of cementitious binders which possess a potential for high temperature resistance that could possibly be utilized in applications such as nozzles, aspirators and refractory linings. This study reports on the results of an investigation into the performance of a fly ash based geopolymer binder in high temperature environments. Geopolymer concrete (GPC) was prepared using eleven types of fly ashes obtained from four countries. High content alumina and silica sand was used in the mix for preparing GPC. GPC was subjected to thermal shock tests following ASTM C 1100-88. The GPC samples prepared with tabular alumina were kept at 1093° C and immediately quenched in water. GPC specimens

  13. Aluminum Corrosion and Turbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, F.B.

    2003-03-10

    Aluminum corrosion and turbidity formation in reactors correlate with fuel sheath temperature. To further substantiate this correlation, discharged fuel elements from R-3, P-2 and K-2 cycles were examined for extent of corrosion and evidence of breaking off of the oxide film. This report discusses this study.

  14. Corrosion in methylphosphonic difluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Zabielski, C.V.; Levy, M. )

    1994-12-01

    Electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization studies were conducted for a variety of ferrous and nonferrous metals in methylphosphonic difluoride. Studies were also made of the effects of organic inhibitors on the corrosion rates of 1,020 steel, type 316L, and type 304 stainless steel, and magnesium in methylphosphonic difluoride. Chemical weapons in the US include binary munitions in which two components are kept in separate compartments until activation. These munitions must be stockpiled for long periods of time (up to 30 years) and then must operate reliably when the need arises. The principal cause of failure will be corrosion of the storage container by the highly corrosive methylphosphonic difluoride (DF). The objectives of this study were to: investigate the kinetics and mechanisms of corrosion of Al 6061-T6 and candidate metal alloys in DF; establish effective corrosion inhibitors; and ultimately incorporate or immobilize inhibitors into coatings that provide protection above the liquid line.

  15. COMPUTER-AIDED INDEXING OF A SCIENTIFIC ABSTRACTS JOURNAL BY THE UDC WITH UNIDEK--A CASE STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FREEMAN, ROBERT R.; RUSSELL, MARTIN

    THIS PAPER IS A CASE STUDY OF THE ADOPTION BY GEOSCIENCE ABSTRACTS OF UNIDEK, A COMPUTER-COMPILED SYSTEMATIC SUBJECT INDEX BASED ON THE UNIVERSAL DECIMAL CLASSIFICATION (UDC). EVENTS LEADING TO A DECISION TO ADOPT THE SYSTEM, SOME THEORY OF INDEXES, PROBLEMS INVOLVED IN CONVERSION, AND SOME OF THE RESULTS ACHIEVED ARE REVIEWED. UNIDEK MAKES…

  16. Research and Studies About the Use of Television and Film in Foreign Language Instruction: A Bibliography With Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svobodny, Dolly D., Comp.

    A compilation of 90 abstracts describes research and experimental teaching using television and film methods in foreign language instruction. The studies cover (1) a comparison of televised instruction with face-to-face presentation, (2) a comparison of filmed or kinescoped courses with direct instruction, (3) other uses of television and film…

  17. Designing for Mathematical Abstraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Dave; Noss, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Our focus is on the design of systems (pedagogical, technical, social) that encourage mathematical abstraction, a process we refer to as "designing for abstraction." In this paper, we draw on detailed design experiments from our research on children's understanding about chance and distribution to re-present this work as a case study in designing…

  18. ELECTROCHEMICAL STUDIES ON THE CORROSION OF CARBON STEEL IN OXALIC ACID CLEANING SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B; John Mickalonis, J

    2007-10-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will disperse or dissolve precipitated metal oxides as part of radioactive waste tank closure operations. Previously SRS has utilized oxalic acid to accomplish this task. Since the waste tanks are constructed of carbon steel, a significant amount of corrosion may occur. Although the total amount of corrosion may be insignificant for a short contact time, a significant amount of hydrogen may be generated due to the corrosion reaction. Linear polarization resistance and anodic/cathodic polarization tests were performed to investigate the corrosion behavior during the process. The effect of process variables such as temperature, agitation, aeration, sample orientation, light as well as surface finish on the corrosion behavior were evaluated. The results of the tests provided insight into the corrosion mechanism for the iron-oxalic acid system.

  19. Annual Report for EMSP #86803 -- Underground Corrosion After 32 Years: A Study of Fate and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    M.K. Adler Flitton

    2006-09-01

    Researchers from Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories at the Idaho and the Savannah River Sites recovered and are analyzing part of a final set of stainless steel specimens buried by the National Bureau of Standards in 1070 at Site D, near Wildwood, NJ. Findings included estimates for 32-year corrosion rates, transport of corrosion product, and elucidation of the site’s hydrogeobiochemistry. An interdisciplinary research team unraveled the complicated interrelationships among metal integrity, corrosion rates, corrosion mechanisms, soil properties, soil microbiology, plant and animal interaction with corrosion products, and fate and transport of metallic ions. This research provides long-term corrosion and transport data that can reduce the uncertainty associated with long-term waste storage and improve fate and transport modeling predictions throughout the DOE complex. The research also provides improvements in several characterization techniques.

  20. Stainless steel surface biofunctionalization with PMMA-bioglass coatings: compositional, electrochemical corrosion studies and microbiological assay.

    PubMed

    Floroian, L; Samoila, C; Badea, M; Munteanu, D; Ristoscu, C; Sima, F; Negut, I; Chifiriuc, M C; Mihailescu, I N

    2015-06-01

    A solution is proposed to surpass the inconvenience caused by the corrosion of stainless steel implants in human body fluids by protection with thin films of bioactive glasses or with composite polymer-bioactive glass nanostructures. Our option was to apply thin film deposition by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) which, to the difference to other laser or plasma techniques insures the protection of a more delicate material (a polymer in our case) against degradation or irreversible damage. The coatings composition, modification and corrosion resistance were investigated by FTIR and electrochemical techniques, under conditions which simulate their biological interaction with the human body. Mechanical testing demonstrates the adhesion, durability and resistance to fracture of the coatings. The coatings biocompatibility was assessed by in vitro studies and by flow cytometry. Our results support the unrestricted usage of coated stainless steel as a cheap alternative for human implants manufacture. They will be more accessible for lower prices in comparison with the majority present day fabrication of implants using Ti or Ti alloys. PMID:26085116

  1. Studies on the hot corrosion of a nickel-base superalloy, Udimet 700

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    The hot corrosion of a nickel-base superalloy, Udimet 700, was studied in the temperature range of 884 to 965 C and with different amounts of Na2SO4. Two different modes of degradation were identified: (1) formation of Na2MoO4 - MoO3 melt and fluxing by this melt, and (2) formation of large interconnected sulfides. The dissolution of Cr2O3, TiO2 in the Na2SO4 melt does not play a significant role in the overall corrosion process. The conditions for the formation of massive interconnected sulfides were identified and a mechanism of degradation due to sulfide formation is described. The formation of Ns2MoO4 - MoO3 melt requires an induction period and various physiochemical processes during the induction period were identified. The factors affecting the length of the induction period were also examined. The melt penetration through the oxide appears to be the prime mode of degradation whether the degradation is due to the formation of sulfides or the formation of the Na2MoO4 - MoO3 melt.

  2. Characterization and corrosion study of NiTi laser surface alloyed with Nb or Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, K. W.; Man, H. C.; Yue, T. M.

    2011-02-01

    The interest in NiTi alloys for medical applications has been steadily growing in recent years because of its biocompatibility, superelasticity and shape memory characteristics. However, the high Ni content in NiTi alloys is still a concern for its long-term applications in the human body. The release of Ni ion into the human body might cause serious problems, as Ni is capable of eliciting toxic and allergic responses. In view of this, surface modification to reduce the surface content of Ni and to improve the corrosion resistance, both of which would reduce Ni release, is an important step in the development of NiTi implants. In the present study, NiTi was surface alloyed with Nb or Co by laser processing. The fine dendritic structure characteristic of laser processing has been described in terms of rapid solidification. The amount of surface elemental Ni was reduced to 10% and 35% for the Nb-alloyed and Co-alloyed layer, respectively. The corrosion resistance in Hanks' solution (a simulated body fluid) was increased as evidenced by a reduced passive current density and a higher pitting potential for both the Nb- and Co-alloyed specimens. The composition and hardness profiles along the depth of the modified layer were correlated with the distribution of the dendrites. The microhardness of the alloyed layers was around 700-800 Hv, which was about four times that of the untreated NiTi specimens.

  3. Heat pipe and thermal energy storage and corrosion studies (1988). Final report, October 1987-September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, M.; Dalton, P.; Jacobson, D.

    1989-06-01

    Corrosion-degradation analysis was performed on a set of three Inconel 617 Thermal Energy Storage capsules filled with different eutectic fluoride mixtures of LiF, MgF{sub 2}, NaF and KF which were thermally cycled near 1000 K for 10,000 hours. These capsules were cut out and various sections were metallographically studied by Optical and Scanning Electron microscopy and by elemental X-ray mapping. Chemical analyses on the metallic container were performed using the Electron Probe Micro-analyser and that of the salts by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. It was determined that the container material did not suffer significant microstructural damage except for tiny pits near the edge in contact with the salts and some voids near the surface exposed to vacuum which could not be positively identified as due to corrosion. The region extending to about 50 microns form the inner edge is contact with salt and about 30 microns from the outer edge exposed to vacuum were found to be depleted mainly of aluminum and to a lesser extent chromium.

  4. Laser Raman and x-ray scattering studies of corrosion films on metals

    SciTech Connect

    Melendres, C.A.

    1993-02-01

    Optical spectroscopic and X-ray scattering techniques, coupled with electrochemical methods, are among the most useful in probing the structure of corrosion films on metals in-situ in aqueous environments. Laser Raman spectroscopy has been employed for a number of years to investigate composition of surface films on metals like iron, nickel, chromium, and stainless steel. We illustrate our work by presenting some results of studies of composition of passive film on nickel, using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) with an electrodeposited silver overlayer. We find that both oxide and hydroxide species are present on the surface of Ni in the passive region. We also demonstrate the utility of specular X-ray reflection in providing complementary information on the physical structure of passivated metal surfaces. Thickness of the corrosion films formed, density of surface layers, and development of surface and interface roughness on Cu electrodes have been quantitatively monitored in-situ as a function of potential for the first time.

  5. Stainless steel surface biofunctionalization with PMMA-bioglass coatings: compositional, electrochemical corrosion studies and microbiological assay.

    PubMed

    Floroian, L; Samoila, C; Badea, M; Munteanu, D; Ristoscu, C; Sima, F; Negut, I; Chifiriuc, M C; Mihailescu, I N

    2015-06-01

    A solution is proposed to surpass the inconvenience caused by the corrosion of stainless steel implants in human body fluids by protection with thin films of bioactive glasses or with composite polymer-bioactive glass nanostructures. Our option was to apply thin film deposition by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) which, to the difference to other laser or plasma techniques insures the protection of a more delicate material (a polymer in our case) against degradation or irreversible damage. The coatings composition, modification and corrosion resistance were investigated by FTIR and electrochemical techniques, under conditions which simulate their biological interaction with the human body. Mechanical testing demonstrates the adhesion, durability and resistance to fracture of the coatings. The coatings biocompatibility was assessed by in vitro studies and by flow cytometry. Our results support the unrestricted usage of coated stainless steel as a cheap alternative for human implants manufacture. They will be more accessible for lower prices in comparison with the majority present day fabrication of implants using Ti or Ti alloys.

  6. Studies on the hot corrosion of a nickel-base superalloy, Udimet 700

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    The hot corrosion of a nickel-base superalloy, Udimet 700, was studied in the temperture range of 884 to 965 C and with different amounts of Na2SO4. Two different modes of degradation were identified: (1) formation of Na2MoO4-MoO3 melt and fluxing by this melt, and (2) formation of large interconnected sulfides. The dissolution of Cr2O3, TiO2 in the Na2SO4 melt does not play a significnt role in the overall corrosion process. The conditions for the formation of massive interconnected sulfides were identified and a mechanism of degradation due to sulfide formation is described. The formation of Na2MoO4-MoO3 melt requires an induction period and various physiochemical processes during the induction period were identified. The factors affecting the length of the induction period were also examined. The melt penetration through the oxide appears to be the prime mode of degradation whether the degradation is due to the formation of sulfides or the formation of the Na2MoO4-MoO3 melt.

  7. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION STUDIES CORE 308 SEGMENTS 14R1 & 14R2 TANK 241-AY-102

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB; COOKE GA

    2003-10-30

    This document reports the results of electrochemical corrosion tests on AS1S Grade 60 carbon steel coupons exposed to tank 241-AY-102 sludge under conditions similar to those near the bottom of the tank. The tests were performed to evaluate the corrosive behavior of the waste in contact with sludge that does not meet the chemistry control limits of Administrative Control (AC) 5.15, Corrosion Mitigation Program.

  8. 1971 Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Included are 112 abstracts listed under headings such as: acoustics, continuing engineering studies, educational research and methods, engineering design, libraries, liberal studies, and materials. Other areas include agricultural, electrical, mechanical, mineral, and ocean engineering. (TS)

  9. The Tactile Dimensions of Abstract Paintings: A Cross-Modal Study.

    PubMed

    Albertazzi, Liliana; Bacci, Francesca; Canal, Luisa; Micciolo, Rocco

    2016-07-01

    In our research, we tested for the existence of cross-modal visual and tactile associations in the experience of abstract art. Specifically, we measured the association of 60 abstract paintings with four couples of antonyms related to texture, such as warm or cold, smooth or rough, lightweight or heavy, soft or hard, investigating if the different modality of presentation on a computer screen (color versions: natural colors, inverted colors, black and white) gave rise to different associations relative to the four couples of opponent qualities. Second, we tested whether there might be differences between the ratings of the paintings when they were presented as images on a computer screen versus in real life at the museum. The results confirmed that associations between visual and tactile experience with such complex stimuli exist. In the case of the couple warm or cold, a significant inversion of associated qualities occurs when the images are presented in inverted colors as opposed to natural colors; furthermore, when presented in black and white, warm evaluations are "cooled down," but cold evaluations remain the same. The degree of smoothness could be considered not associated with the color versions. When seen in black and white, both the mean softness and the mean lightweight-ness of the paintings were reduced; however, in the last case, this effect was more evident for the most lightweight pictures. There is only a slight difference between the two presentations of the paintings as images presented on a computer screen and seen in real life, relative to the warm or cold and soft or hard dimensions. Of the four opponent qualities, the three pairs warm or cold, lightweight or heavy, and soft or hard showed the most interesting results in relation to the cross-modal associations.

  10. The Tactile Dimensions of Abstract Paintings: A Cross-Modal Study.

    PubMed

    Albertazzi, Liliana; Bacci, Francesca; Canal, Luisa; Micciolo, Rocco

    2016-07-01

    In our research, we tested for the existence of cross-modal visual and tactile associations in the experience of abstract art. Specifically, we measured the association of 60 abstract paintings with four couples of antonyms related to texture, such as warm or cold, smooth or rough, lightweight or heavy, soft or hard, investigating if the different modality of presentation on a computer screen (color versions: natural colors, inverted colors, black and white) gave rise to different associations relative to the four couples of opponent qualities. Second, we tested whether there might be differences between the ratings of the paintings when they were presented as images on a computer screen versus in real life at the museum. The results confirmed that associations between visual and tactile experience with such complex stimuli exist. In the case of the couple warm or cold, a significant inversion of associated qualities occurs when the images are presented in inverted colors as opposed to natural colors; furthermore, when presented in black and white, warm evaluations are "cooled down," but cold evaluations remain the same. The degree of smoothness could be considered not associated with the color versions. When seen in black and white, both the mean softness and the mean lightweight-ness of the paintings were reduced; however, in the last case, this effect was more evident for the most lightweight pictures. There is only a slight difference between the two presentations of the paintings as images presented on a computer screen and seen in real life, relative to the warm or cold and soft or hard dimensions. Of the four opponent qualities, the three pairs warm or cold, lightweight or heavy, and soft or hard showed the most interesting results in relation to the cross-modal associations. PMID:27071636

  11. A mechanistic study of the effects of nitrogen on the corrosion properties of stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Levey, P.R.; Bennekom, A. van

    1995-12-01

    The effects of nitrogen alloying on the corrosion properties of stainless steels (SS) is a matter of debate. A number of apparently contradictory results have been presented by various researchers. The actual mechanism by which nitrogen alloying influences the corrosion properties of SS has been the topic of even more controversy. The effects of nitrogen on the corrosion and mechanical properties of SS were reviewed. Various proposals relating to the mechanistic effect of nitrogen alloying on the corrosion properties of SS were evaluated critically by comparing the various theories.

  12. Moessbauer spectroscopy study on the corrosion resistance of plasma nitrided ASTM F138 stainless steel in chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, S.D. de; Olzon-Dionysio, M.; Basso, R.L.O.; Souza, S. de

    2010-10-15

    Plasma nitriding of ASTM F138 stainless steel samples has been carried out using dc glow discharge under 80% H{sub 2}-20% N{sub 2} gas mixture, at 673 K, and 2, 4, and 7 h time intervals, in order to investigate the influence of treatment time on the microstructure and the corrosion resistance properties. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, glancing angle X-ray diffraction and conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, besides electrochemical tests in NaCl aerated solution. A modified layer of about 6 {mu}m was observed for all the nitrided samples, independent of nitriding time. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows broad {gamma}{sub N} phase peaks, signifying a great degree of nitrogen supersaturation. Besides {gamma}{sub N,} the Moessbauer spectroscopy results indicated the occurrence of {gamma}' and {epsilon} phases, as well as some other less important phases. Corrosion measurements demonstrate that the plasma nitriding time affects the corrosion resistance and the best performance is reached at 4 h treatment. It seems that the {epsilon}/{gamma}' fraction ratio plays an important role on the resistance corrosion. Additionally, the Moessbauer spectroscopy was decisive in this study, since it was able to identify and quantify the iron phases that influence the corrosion resistance of plasma nitrided ASTM F138 samples.

  13. Study for determination of industrial water corrosivity in Kashan Fajre Sepahan Galvanizing Mills during 2005-2006 Iran.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, D; Miranzadeh, M B; Motlagh, A Ahmadi

    2008-01-01

    This research was carried out in Kashan Fajre Sepahan Galvanizing mills (KFSGM) for evaluation of water corrosivity during 2005-2006. A total of 18 samples were taken from various points of the water supply system for testing the specific parameters and calculation Langelier Index (LI), Ryznar Index (RI) and Pukorious Index (PI). This research showed that in raw water (sand filter effluent) LI were positive as well as RI and PI were lower than 7 which means that mentioned water is not corrosive. Also LI in treated water by reverse osmosis process was negative and RI and PI were higher than 7, so, this water has corrosive properties. Finally, calculated indexes indicate that according to LI, conditioned water is not corrosive but based on RI and P. this water tend to corrosivity which this findings is compatible with literature review statement. So it is recommended that, for water conditioning addition of preservative chemicals to be continued but at the same time another alternatives such as pH adjustment, air stripping and deoxygenating, control of carbonate concentration and split flow treatment should be studied.

  14. Study for Corrosion and Hydrogen Evolution Behavior of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy in Simulated Acid Rain Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammam, R. H.; Fekry, A. M.

    2014-03-01

    The electrochemical behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements at the open circuit potentials and potentiodynamic polarization measurements in a simulated acid rain containing inorganic additives. The ac circuit model for Ti-6Al-4V alloy at corrosion interface in simulated acid rain containing inorganic additives was proposed, which was based on two time constants equivalent circuit. Ti-6Al-4V alloy in a simulated acid rain of pH 1.5 containing inorganic additives showed a characteristic of a capacitive behavior. The effect of different concentrations of the inorganic additives (iodate, dichromate, phosphate, and nitrate) on the corrosion of the alloy in acid rain water (ARW) was also studied. It was found that the corrosion rate decreases drastically in the solution containing iodate, dichromate, and phosphate anions; however, nitrate anions increase the corrosion rate of the alloy. The investigated inorganic additives had inhibiting effect on the corrosion of the alloy in ARW, and their efficiency decreases according to the order: iodate > dichromate > phosphate > blank > nitrate. Polarization data results are in good agreement with EIS.

  15. Study of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and enzymatic bio-Fenton process-mediated corrosion of copper-nickel alloy.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, U; Hocheng, H

    2016-10-01

    This study presents the corrosion behavior of the copper-nickel (Cu-Ni) alloy in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. ferrooxidans) and glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme. In both the cases ferric ions played an important role in weight loss and thereby to carry out the corrosion of the Cu-Ni alloy. A corrosion rate of 0.6 (±0.008), 2.11 (±0.05), 3.69 (±0.26), 0.7 (±0.006) and 0.08 (±0.002) mm/year was obtained in 72 h using 9K medium with ferrous sulfate, A. ferrooxidans culture supernatant, A. ferrooxidans cells, GOx enzyme and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution respectively. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs showed that a variable extent of corrosion was caused by 9K medium with ferrous sulfate, GOx and A. ferrooxidans cells. An arithmetic average surface roughness (Ra) of 174.78 nm was observed for the control work-piece using optical profilometer. The change in Ra was observed with the treatment of the Cu-Ni alloy using various systems. The Ra for 9K medium with ferrous sulfate, GOx and A. ferrooxidans cells was 374.54, 607.32 and 799.48 nm, respectively, after 24 h. These results suggest that A. ferrooxidans cells were responsible for more corrosion of the Cu-Ni alloy than other systems used.

  16. The coordinated use of synchrotron spectroelectrochemistry for corrosion studies on heritage metals.

    PubMed

    Adriaens, Annemie; Dowsett, Mark

    2010-06-15

    Corrosion is a major source of degradation in heritage metal objects, and any remedial measures are subject to a strong (Western) ethic that favors conservation as opposed to restoration. Accordingly, major scientific challenges exist for developing appropriate treatment methods to stabilize and protect artifacts after they are recovered from an archaeological site, both before and during their display or storage in a museum. Because inappropriate treatments can cause irreversible damage to irreplaceable objects, it is crucial that the chemical processes involved are fully understood and characterized before any preservation work is undertaken. In this regard, large infrastructural facilities such as synchrotrons, neutron sources, and particle accelerators provide a wealth of analytical possibilities, unavailable in smaller scale laboratories. In general, the intensity of the radiation available allows measurements on a short time scale or with high spatial resolution (or both), so heterogeneous changes induced by a chemical process can be recorded while they occur. The penetrative nature of the radiation (e.g., X-rays, protons, or neutrons) also allows a sample to be studied in air. If necessary, complete artifacts (such as paintings or statuettes) can be examined. In situ analysis in a controlled environment, such as a liquid or corrosive atmosphere, also becomes an exciting possibility. Finally, there are many complementary techniques (local atomic structure or crystal structure determination, macroscopic 3-D imaging (tomographies), imaging chemical analysis, and so on) so the many distinct details of a problem can be thoroughly explored. In this Account, we discuss the application of this general philosophy to studies of corrosion and its prevention in cultural heritage metals, focusing on our recent work on copper alloys. More specifically, we use synchrotron-based techniques to evaluate the use of corrosion potential measurements as a possible monitoring

  17. Study of archaeological artefacts to refine the model of iron long-term indoor atmospheric corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, J.; Legrand, L.; Bellot-Gurlet, L.; Foy, E.; Reguer, S.; Rocca, E.; Dillmann, P.; Neff, D.; Mirambet, F.; Perrin, S.; Guillot, I.

    2008-09-01

    The study of long-term indoor atmospheric corrosion is involved in the field of the interim storage of nuclear wastes. Indeed study of archaeological artefacts is one of the only mean to gather information on very long periods. Concerning ancient items, due to the complexity of the system, it is necessary to couple many analytical techniques from the macro to the microscopic scale. This enables to propose a description of the Amiens cathedral chain rust layers, made of a matrix of goethite, with lepidocrocite and akaganeite locally present and marbling of a poor crystallized phase associated to ferrihydrite. Electrochemical measurements permit to study the reduction capacity of the rust layer and to draw reduction mechanisms of the so-called active phases, by in situ experiments coupled with X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  18. Studies of corrosion and corrosion control in a CO{sub 2}-2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) environment

    SciTech Connect

    Veawab, A.; Tontiwachwuthikul, P.; Bhole, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) absorption process is essential for many industrial processing operations, i.e., natural gas purification. Corrosion and corrosion inhibition in a sterically hindered amine, 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP), were investigated by static weight loss tests. The corrosion data were compared with those of monoethanolamine (MEA), a conventional alkanolamine, which was simultaneously tested under the same conditions. The results indicated that the AMP system was generally less corrosive to carbon steel than the MEA system, but corrosion control is still necessary. Sodium metavanadate (NaVO{sub 3}) and sodium sulfite (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}) were proven to be effective corrosion inhibitors, with more than 90% protection efficiency.

  19. Container assessment: corrosion study of HLW container materials. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1981. Volume 1, No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, T M; Soo, P

    1982-01-01

    Work has been started on the corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement behavior of commercially pure titanium (ASTM Grade 2), TiCode-12 (ASTM Grade 12), and OFHC copper, which are primary candidate materials for high level waste containers. The test environment used is a simulated brine solution typical of bedded salt at 150 C or room temperature. The immersion test results for these materials are in reasonable agreement with previous screening test results of Sandia National Laboratory; electron beam welded titanium and TiCode-12 samples show higher corrosion rates than the non-welded samples. To understand the difference between titanium and TiCode-12 in uniform and crevice corrosion, electrochemical tests were performed. While the initial repassivation behavior is similar in terms of charge density transfer after scratching tests in 1 M HCl solution at 80 C, titanium shows an active peak in polarization curves in brine at room temperature while TiCode-12 does not. Also, the open circuit corrosion potential of TiCode-12 is about 300 mV more anodic than that of titanium in 0.1 M HCl plus 0.9 M KCl solution at 85 C. Slow strain rate embrittlement and impact embrittlement have been observed in cathodically hydrogen charged commercially pure titanium and TiCode-12 in tension and buckling tests. C-ring and U-bend specimens of titanium and TiCode-12 have been designed and a slow strain rate test machine is being built to study stress corrosion cracking. Alternating Current Impedance and Scanning Reference Electrode Techniques are ready for pitting studies. For the study of radiation-induced corrosion, an irradiation cell was set up in the gamma pool to estimate quantitatively the oxidants as well as hydrogen produced by the gamma radiation in the brine solutions. 35 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Hot corrosion studies of four nickel-base superalloys: B-1900, NASA-TRW VIA, 713C and IN738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    The susceptibility to hot corrosion of four nickel base superalloys has been studied at 900 deg and 1000 deg C in one atmosphere of slowly flowing oxygen. Hot corrosion was induced by coating the samples with known doses of NaSO4 and oxidizing the coated samples isothermally on a sensitive microbalance. In general, the order of susceptibility found was: B-1900 is greater than 713C is greater than NASA-TRW VIA and is greater than IN738. This order corresponds to the order of decreasing molybdenum content of the alloys. Chemical evidence for B-1900 indicates that hot corrosion is instigated by acid fluxing of the protective Al2O3 coating by MoO3.

  1. Electrochemical Study on the Inhibition Effect of Phenanthroline and Its Cobalt Complex as Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Okafor, Peter C.; Jiang, Bin; Hu, Hongxiang; Zheng, Yugui

    2015-09-01

    The corrosion inhibition effect of phenanthroline (Phen) and its cobalt complex (CoPhen) on the corrosion of carbon steel in sulphuric acid solutions was studied using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques at 20, 30, and 40 °C. Scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to characterize the mild steel surface. The results indicate that the compounds inhibit the corrosion of mild steel in H2SO4 solutions through a predominant physical adsorption following the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Polarization curves suggest that the complex and ligand are mixed-type inhibitors. The efficiency of the inhibitors is concentration- and temperature-dependent and follows the trend CoPhen > Phen.

  2. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION STUDIES FOR TANK 241-AN-107 CORE 309 SEGMENTS 21R1 & 21R2

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB

    2007-11-13

    Liquid waste in tank 241-AN-107 is below Technical Safety Requirements Administrative Control 5.16 (AC 5.16) limits. Electrochemical corrosion testing was performed on Core 309, Segments 21R1 and 21R2, to provide information on the conductivity and corrosive tendencies of the tank saltcake and interstitial liquid. This report describes data obtained under the execution of RPP-PLAN-29001, 'Electrochemical Corrosion Studies for Tank 241-AN-107 Core 309, Segments 21R1 and 21R2'. Analytical results are presented that show supernatant was within the limits while the interstitial liquid remained below the limits for the analytical cores. Applicable AC 5.16 chemistry control limits for AN-107 are presented.

  3. In vivo electrochemical corrosion study of a CoCrMo biomedical alloy in human synovial fluids.

    PubMed

    Igual Munoz, A; Schwiesau, J; Jolles, B M; Mischler, S

    2015-07-01

    The present study was initiated with the aim to assess the in vivo electrochemical corrosion behaviour of CoCrMo biomedical alloys in human synovial fluids in an attempt to identify possible patient or pathology specific effects. For this, electrochemical measurements (open circuit potential OCP, polarization resistance Rp, potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy EIS) were carried out on fluids extracted from patients with different articular pathologies and prosthesis revisions. Those electrochemical measurements could be carried out with outstanding precision and signal stability. The results show that the corrosion behaviour of CoCrMo alloy in synovial fluids not only depends on material reactivity but also on the specific reactions of synovial fluid components, most likely involving reactive oxygen species. In some patients the latter were found to determine the whole cathodic and anodic electrochemical response. Depending on patients, corrosion rates varied significantly between 50 and 750 mg dm(-2)year(-1).

  4. Experimental investigation of solid by-product as sensible heat storage material: Characterization and corrosion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Fernández, Iñigo; Faik, Abdessamad; Mani, Karthik; Rodriguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier; D'Aguanno, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of water cooled electrical arc furnace (EAF) slag used as filler material in the storage tank for sensible heat storage application was demonstrated in this study. The physicochemical and thermal properties of the tested slags were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and laser flash analysis, respectively. In addition, the chemical compatibility between slags and molten nitrate salt (60 wt. % NaNO3 and 40 wt. % KNO3) was investigated at 565 °C for 500 hrs. The obtained results were clearly demonstrated that the slags showed a good corrosion resistance in direct contact with molten salt at elevated temperature. The present study was clearly indicated that a low-cost filler material used in the storage tank can significantly reduce the overall required quantities of the relatively higher cost molten salt and consequently reduce the overall cost of the electricity production.

  5. M"ossbauer study of corrosion and abrasion products in oil transporting pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Raul W.; Perez Mazariego, Jose Luis; Marquina, Vivianne; Marquina, Ma. Luisa; Ridaura, Rosalia; Martinez, Lorenzo

    2012-02-01

    It is known that one of the main technological problems in carbon steel oleoducts is the corrosion produced by different substances, such as water, carbon dioxide, sulfur, and microorganisms. In addition, if in such mixture there is sand, aggressive sludge can be form that abrasions material from the oleoduct. A room temperature M"ossbauer study of corroded material taken from different sites of oleoducts is presented. Most of the M"ossbauer spectra reveal the presence of nanoparticles, indicating that in these pipes the abrasion problem is severe. A preliminary identification of the oxidized samples suggests the presence of magnetite, and some Iron hydroxides. Further studies are in course in order to identify unambiguously the products present in the corroded materials.

  6. Abstract coherent categories.

    PubMed

    Rehder, B; Ross, B H

    2001-09-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the importance of the knowledge that interrelates features in people's mental representation of categories and that makes our conception of categories coherent. This article focuses on abstract coherent categories, coherent categories that are also abstract because they are defined by relations independently of any features. Four experiments demonstrate that abstract coherent categories are learned more easily than control categories with identical features and statistical structure, and also that participants induced an abstract representation of the category by granting category membership to exemplars with completely novel features. The authors argue that the human conceptual system is heavily populated with abstract coherent concepts, including conceptions of social groups, societal institutions, legal, political, and military scenarios, and many superordinate categories, such as classes of natural kinds. PMID:11550753

  7. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility: Fundamental studies of particle formation and interactions. Volume 2: Abstracts, candidate experiments and feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogleman, Guy (Editor); Huntington, Judith L. (Editor); Schwartz, Deborah E. (Editor); Fonda, Mark L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) project and its current status is provided. The proceedings of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility Experiments Workshop are recorded. The goal of the workshop was to define experiments for the GGSF--a small particle microgravity research facility. The workshop addressed the opportunity for performing, in Earth orbit, a wide variety of experiments that involve single small particles (grains) or clouds of particles. Twenty experiments from the fields of exobiology, planetary science, astrophysics, atmospheric science, biology, physics, and chemistry were described at the workshop and are outlined in Volume 2. Each experiment description included specific scientific objectives, an outline of the experimental procedure, and the anticipated GGSF performance requirements. Since these experiments represent the types of studies that will ultimately be proposed for the facility, they will be used to define the general science requirements of the GGSF. Also included in the second volume is a physics feasibility study and abstracts of example Gas-Grain Simulation Facility experiments and related experiments in progress.

  8. Corrosion control and disinfection studies in spacecraft water systems. [considering Saturn 5 orbital workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, T. G.

    1974-01-01

    Disinfection and corrosion control in the water systems of the Saturn 5 Orbital Workshop Program are considered. Within this framework, the problem areas of concern are classified into four general areas: disinfection; corrosion; membrane-associated problems of disinfectant uptake and diffusion; and taste and odor problems arising from membrane-disinfectant interaction.

  9. Study on corrosion behaviors of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets in different environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. J.; Li, A. H.; Zhu, M. G.; Pan, W.; Li, W.

    2011-04-01

    Nd-Fe-B magnets have outstanding magnetic properties, but their corrosion resistance is poor because the rare-earth-rich phases in them are easily oxidized. In this article, we report an investigation of the corrosion behaviors of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets with varied compositions in different corrosion conditions. The weight losses of the magnets after corrosion testing were measured after brushing off the corrosion products. The magnetic flux losses of the magnets were measured using a fluxmeter. A scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray analysis system was employed to observe the corrosion morphology. It was found that the humid-heat resistance of the magnets was obviously improved by partially substituting Dy for Nd and adding minor Co. The corrosion products and morphologies of Nd-Fe-B magnets for the autoclave test were different from those for the constant humid-heat test. The corrosion rates of the magnets for the former were much slower than for the latter; this is probably because the high-pressure steam led to an oxygen-deficient atmosphere, and the liquid film on the surface of the magnet specimens hindered the diffusion of oxygen into the bulk for the autoclave test.

  10. Writing a successful research abstract.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Donna Z

    2012-01-01

    Writing and submitting a research abstract provides timely dissemination of the findings of a study and offers peer input for the subsequent development of a quality manuscript. Acceptance of abstracts is competitive. Understanding the expected content of an abstract, the abstract review process and tips for skillful writing will improve the chance of acceptance.

  11. Electrochemical, Polarization, and Crevice Corrosion Testing of Nitinol 60, A Supplement to the ECLSS Sustaining Materials Compatibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier trials, electrochemical test results were presented for six noble metals evaluated in test solutions representative of waste liquids processed in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Subsequently, a seventh metal, Nitinol 60, was added for evaluation and subjected to the same test routines, data analysis, and theoretical methodologies. The previous six test metals included three titanium grades, (commercially pure, 6Al-4V alloy and 6Al-4V low interstitial alloy), two nickel-chromium alloys (Inconel(RegisteredTrademark) 625 and Hastelloy(RegisteredTrademark) C276), and one high-tier stainless steel (Cronidur(RegisteredTrademark) 30). The three titanium alloys gave the best results of all the metals, indicating superior corrosive nobility and galvanic protection properties. For this current effort, the results have clearly shown that Nitinol 60 is almost as noble as titanium, being very corrosion-resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals electrochemically and during long-term exposure. is also quite noble as it is very corrosion resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals from both an electrochemical perspective and long-term crevice corrosion scenario. This was clearly demonstrated utilizing the same techniques for linear, Tafel and cyclic polarization, and galvanic coupling of the metal candidate as was done for the previous study. The high nobility and low corrosion susceptibility for Nitinol 60 appear to be intermediate to the nickel/chromium alloys and the titanium metals with indications that are more reflective of the titanium metals in terms of general corrosion and pitting behavior.

  12. Stress Corrosion Cracking and Fatigue Crack Growth Studies Pertinent to Spacecraft and Booster Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. R.; Finger, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This experimental program was divided into two parts. The first part evaluated stress corrosion cracking in 2219-T87 aluminum and 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI) titanium alloy plate and weld metal. Both uniform height double cantilever beam and surface flawed specimens were tested in environments normally encountered during the fabrication and operation of pressure vessels in spacecraft and booster systems. The second part studied compatibility of material-environment combinations suitable for high energy upper stage propulsion systems. Surface flawed specimens having thicknesses representative of minimum gage fuel and oxidizer tanks were tested. Titanium alloys 5Al-2.5Sn (ELI), 6Al-4V annealed, and 6Al-4V STA were tested in both liquid and gaseous methane. Aluminum alloy 2219 in the T87 and T6E46 condition was tested in fluorine, a fluorine-oxygen mixture, and methane. Results were evaluated using modified linear elastic fracture mechanics parameters.

  13. Electrode polarization studies in hot corrosion systems. Progress report, 1 June 1979-31 April 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Devereux, O.F.

    1980-02-01

    Work on the following discrete tasks is reported: Electrode Polarization Studies in Molten Sodium Carbonate: A comprehensive set of tests has been performed on iron, nickel, and types 304 and 316 stainless steel in gas mixtures of controlled CO, CO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/S pressures at a total pressure of one atmosphere and in a temperature range of 900 to 1000/sup 0/C. The polarization curves thus derived have been reduced to a set of empirical kinetic constants via computer modelling. Gas/Metal Reactions in Mixed Oxidants: Oxidation of iron in gas mixtures of controlled P/sub CO/, P/sub CO//sub 2/, P/sub H//sub 2/ and P/sub H//sub 2//sub S/ at a total pressure of one atmosphere and a temperature of 900/sup 0/C has been studied. In the P/sub S//sub 2/ and P/sub O//sub 2/ ranges employed sulfide scales were formed; P/sub O//sub 2/ influenced the short term sulfidation kinetics. Specimen geometry was seen as a significant factor influencing long term kinetics. Liquid Line Corrosion: A reproducible corrosive attack is seen at the metal/molten carbonate/gas phase junction. This attack can be quantitatively evaluated and explained in terms of a diffusion model. Evaluation of Reaction Kinetics from Polarization Data (addendum): previous modelling procedures have been expanded to include one or more anodic reactions displaying passive behavior.

  14. Copper corrosion in coastal Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S. Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is studying the atmospheric corrosion performance of copper and other metals along the Oregon coast. Only the copper results will be presented in this paper. Atmospheric corrosion measurements of copper samples were made at seven bridges, eight coastal communities, and three inland reference sites to quantify and understand the effect of high chloride environments on the corrosion performance of copper. The materials were atmospherically exposed for 1, 2, and 3 years to examine the effects of sheltering, orientation, distance from the ocean, and coastal microclimates on the rate of corrosion and the composition of the corrosion film.

  15. ABSTRACTS OF STUDIES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION, CENTRAL REGION, FOR THE YEARS 1963-64.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., St. Paul.

    SIXTY-FOUR DOCTORAL DISSERTATIONS, STAFF STUDIES, AND MASTERS' THESES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION ARE REPORTED IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS -- (1) COMMUNITY COLLEGES AND TECHNICAL SCHOOLS, (2) CURRICULUM STUDIES, (3) EDUCATIONAL ASPIRATIONS, EXPECTATIONS, AND GUIDANCE, (4) EDUCATIONAL MEDIA AND MATERIALS, (5) EVALUATION STUDIES, (6) EXTENSION STUDIES, (7)…

  16. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers

  17. Corrosion protection

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  18. Surface Studies of Ultra Strength Drilling Steel after Corrosion Fatigue in Simulated Sour Environment

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ziomek-Moroz; J.A. Hawk; R. Thodla; F. Gui

    2012-05-06

    The Unites States predicted 60% growth in energy demand by 2030 makes oil and natural gas primary target fuels for energy generation. The fact that the peak of oil production from shallow wells (< 5000 m) is about to be reached, thereby pushing the oil and natural gas industry into deeper wells. However, drilling to depths greater than 5000 m requires increasing the strength-to weight ratio of the drill pipe materials. Grade UD-165 is one of the ultra- high yield strength carbon steels developed for ultra deep drilling (UDD) activities. Drilling UDD wells exposes the drill pipes to Cl{sup -}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}/CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and H{sub 2}S-containig corrosive environments (i.e., sour environments) at higher pressures and temperatures compared to those found in conventional wells. Because of the lack of synergism within the service environment, operational stresses can result in catastrophic brittle failures characteristic for environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). Approximately 75% of all drill string failures are caused by fatigue or corrosion fatigue. Since there is no literature data on the corrosion fatigue performance of UD-165 in sour environments, research was initiated to better clarify the fatigue crack growth (FCGR) behavior of this alloy in UDD environments. The FCGR behavior of ultra-strength carbon steel, grade UD-165, was investigated by monitoring crack growth rate in deaerated 5%NaCl solution buffered with NaHCO{sub 3}/Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and in contact with H{sub 2}S. The partial pressure of H{sub 2}S (p{sub H2S}) was 0.83 kPa and pH of the solution was adjusted by NaOH to 12. The fatigue experiments were performed at 20 and 85 C in an autoclave with surface investigations augmented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. In this study, research focused on surface analyses supported by the fatigue crack growth rate measurements. Fig. 1 shows an SEM micrograph of the crack that propagated from the

  19. Mechanistic studies of the radical SAM enzyme 4-demethylwyosine synthase reveals the site of hydrogen atom abstraction

    PubMed Central

    Young, Anthony P.; Bandarian, Vahe

    2015-01-01

    TYW1 catalyzes the formation of 4-demethylwyosine via the condensation of N-methylguanosine (m1G) with carbons 2 and 3 of pyruvate. In this study labeled transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) and pyruvate were utilized to determine the site of hydrogen atom abstraction and regiochemistry of the pyruvate addition. tRNA containing a 2H labeled m1G methyl group was used to identify the methyl group of m1G as the site of hydrogen atom abstraction by S-adenosyl-L-methionine. [2-13C1,3,3,3-2H3]-Pyruvate was used to demonstrate retention of all the pyruvate protons indicating that C2 of pyruvate forms the bridging carbon of the imidazoline ring and C3 the methyl. PMID:26052987

  20. Corrosion `98: 53. annual conference and exposition, proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    Vehicle Corrosion Resistance; Seawater Injection Systems; Automating Improved Materials Performance; Boiler Water Corrosion; and New Advances in Pipeline Rehabilitation Coatings and Associated Technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for some of the papers.

  1. Definition of tolerance to continuous hyperoxia in man - An abstract report of Predictive Studies V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambertsen, C. J.; Clark, J. M.; Gelfand, R.; Pisarello, J. B.; Cobbs, W. H.

    1987-01-01

    The overall goals, design, and procedures of Predictive Studies V are discussed as well as the specific elements of neural effects produced by prolonged hyperoxia. It is noted that Predictive Studies V study of oxygen poisoning in normal men during uninterrupted exposures to oxygen over the range of hyperbaric oxygen exposure most useful in diving, the treatment of gas lesion diseases, and general hyperbaric medicine. It is found that, throughout the study, the most striking observations were related to effects on visual function, on the lung, and the probable interactions of preconvulsive neural activity with effects on cardiovascular and respiratory-pulmonary functions.

  2. Study of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel in chloride solution containing hydrogen sulfide using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solehudin, Agus; Nurdin, Isdiriayani

    2014-03-01

    Corrosion and inhibition studies on API 5LX65 carbon steel in chloride solution containing various concentrations of benzotriazole has been conducted at temperature of 70°C using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Corroded carbon steel surface with and without inhibitor have been observed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The objectives of this research are to study the performance of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors. The experimental results of carbon steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution containing 500 mg/l H2S at different BTAH concentrations showed that corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with increasing of BTAH concentrations from 0 to 10 mmol/l. The inhibition efficiency of BTAH was found to be affected by its concentration. The optimum efficiency obtained of BTAH is 93% at concentration of 5 mmol/l. The result of XRD and EDS analysis reveal the iron sulfide (FeS) formation on corroded carbon steel surface without inhibitor. The EDS spectrum show the Nitrogen (N) bond on carbon steel surface inhibited by BTAH.

  3. Study of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel in chloride solution containing hydrogen sulfide using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Solehudin, Agus; Nurdin, Isdiriayani

    2014-03-24

    Corrosion and inhibition studies on API 5LX65 carbon steel in chloride solution containing various concentrations of benzotriazole has been conducted at temperature of 70°C using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Corroded carbon steel surface with and without inhibitor have been observed using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The objectives of this research are to study the performance of benzotriazole as corrosion inhibitors. The experimental results of carbon steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution containing 500 mg/l H{sub 2}S at different BTAH concentrations showed that corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with increasing of BTAH concentrations from 0 to 10 mmol/l. The inhibition efficiency of BTAH was found to be affected by its concentration. The optimum efficiency obtained of BTAH is 93% at concentration of 5 mmol/l. The result of XRD and EDS analysis reveal the iron sulfide (FeS) formation on corroded carbon steel surface without inhibitor. The EDS spectrum show the Nitrogen (N) bond on carbon steel surface inhibited by BTAH.

  4. Identification and Descriptions of the Momentum Effect in Studies of Learning: An Abstract Science Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Jae-Sool; Mayer, Victor J.

    1985-01-01

    Several studies of the validity of the intensive time-series design have revealed a post-intervention increase in the level of achievement data (the "momentum effect"). Reports on the development and use of a technique to study the effect as it is observed in several data sets on the learning of plate tectonics. (Author/JN)

  5. Northern Illinois University of Abstracts of Graduate Studies on the Community (Junior) College 1972-73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogilvie, William K., Ed.

    Research summaries of 29 studies in the area of the community (junior) college, completed by Northern Illinois University graduate students during the years 1972-73, are provided. The papers discuss teaching loads, career education planning, Asian studies, student characteristics, reading improvement program effectiveness, instructor attitudes,…

  6. New titanium alloys for biomaterials: a study of mechanical and corrosion properties and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, T I; Han, J H; Lee, I S; Lee, K H; Shin, M C; Choi, B B

    1997-01-01

    Three new titanium alloys with Zr, Nb, Ta, Pd and In as alloying elements were developed and compared with currently used implant metals, namely, pure Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy, in terms of mechanical and corrosion properties, and cytotoxicity. New alloys showed comparable mechanical properties with that of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, but increased corrosion potential, somewhat decreased breakdown potential and increased corrosion rate. There were no significant differences in cell growth on the surface of the various metal specimens, indicating that the cells cannot differentiate between the passivated surfaces of the various Ti metals.

  7. ABSTRACTS OF STUDIES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION, SOUTHERN REGION, FOR THE YEAR 1964-65.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station.

    FORTY-FIVE DOCTORAL DISSERTATIONS, STAFF STUDIES, AND MASTERS' THESES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION ARE REPORTED IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS -- ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT, ADMINISTRATOR ATTITUDES, ADULT FARMER EDUCATION, AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION AGENTS, AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY, AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, CONTESTS, CURRICULUM, EDUCATIONAL NEEDS, EMPLOYMENT…

  8. ABSTRACTS OF RESEARCH STUDIES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION, SOUTHERN REGION, 1965-66.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAKER, RICHARD A.

    THIRTY-ONE DOCTORAL DISSERTATIONS, STAFF STUDIES, AND MASTERS' THESES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION ARE REPORTED IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS -- ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT, ADMINISTRATOR ATTITUDES, ADULT VOCATIONAL EDUCATION, ADVISORY COMMITTEES, AGRICULTURAL COLLEGES, AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION AGENTS, ASPIRATION, CURRICULUM, EDUCATIONAL NEEDS, EMPLOYMENT…

  9. Baseline Study of Women in South Africa with Postgraduate Physics Degrees (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, Diane J.

    2009-04-01

    A baseline study was conducted of women in South Africa who obtained BSc (Honours), MSc, or PhD degrees in physics and astronomy between 1995 and 2005. The first step involved identifying and contacting the women, using snowball sampling. These women were then asked to complete a questionnaire by e-mail. Responses to the questionnaire yielded information about the types of schools they attended, attitudes of their teachers, family history of studying science, influences on choosing to study physics, role models and mentors, employment history and aspects of a job that are important to them, experiences of gender bias, and suggestions for improving the situation for women in physics. This information is very valuable in designing programs, projects, and advocacy to encourage and retain women in physics, from school level to senior management. The methodology and questions developed can be useful to participants interested in obtaining similar information for their own countries.

  10. Fireside Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon

    2011-07-14

    Oxy-fuel fireside research goals are: (1) determine the effect of oxyfuel combustion on fireside corrosion - flue gas recycle choice, staged combustion ramifications; and (2) develop methods to use chromia solubility in ash as an ash corrosivity measurement - synthetic ashes at first, then boiler and burner rig ashes.

  11. Corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Metro, S.J.

    1989-10-31

    A corrosion inhibitor for use in synthetic ester lubricating oils is disclosed. It comprises an effective amount of: at least one aromatic amide; and at least one hydroxy substituted aromatic compound. The corrosion inhibitor thus formed is particularly useful in synthetic ester turbo lubricating oils.

  12. The effect of frictional torque and bending moment on corrosion at the taper interface : an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidou, A; Meswania, J; Osman, K; Bolland, B; Latham, J; Skinner, J; Haddad, F S; Hart, A; Blunn, G

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of frictional torque and bending moment on fretting corrosion at the taper interface of a modular femoral component and to investigate whether different combinations of material also had an effect. The combinations we examined were 1) cobalt-chromium (CoCr) heads on CoCr stems 2) CoCr heads on titanium alloy (Ti) stems and 3) ceramic heads on CoCr stems. In test 1 increasing torque was imposed by offsetting the stem in the anteroposterior plane in increments of 0 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm and 8 mm when the torque generated was equivalent to 0 Nm, 9 Nm, 14 Nm and 18 Nm. In test 2 we investigated the effect of increasing the bending moment by offsetting the application of axial load from the midline in the mediolateral plane. Increments of offset equivalent to head + 0 mm, head + 7 mm and head + 14 mm were used. Significantly higher currents and amplitudes were seen with increasing torque for all combinations of material. However, Ti stems showed the highest corrosion currents. Increased bending moments associated with using larger offset heads produced more corrosion: Ti stems generally performed worse than CoCr stems. Using ceramic heads did not prevent corrosion, but reduced it significantly in all loading configurations. PMID:25820883

  13. The effect of frictional torque and bending moment on corrosion at the taper interface : an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidou, A; Meswania, J; Osman, K; Bolland, B; Latham, J; Skinner, J; Haddad, F S; Hart, A; Blunn, G

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of frictional torque and bending moment on fretting corrosion at the taper interface of a modular femoral component and to investigate whether different combinations of material also had an effect. The combinations we examined were 1) cobalt-chromium (CoCr) heads on CoCr stems 2) CoCr heads on titanium alloy (Ti) stems and 3) ceramic heads on CoCr stems. In test 1 increasing torque was imposed by offsetting the stem in the anteroposterior plane in increments of 0 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm and 8 mm when the torque generated was equivalent to 0 Nm, 9 Nm, 14 Nm and 18 Nm. In test 2 we investigated the effect of increasing the bending moment by offsetting the application of axial load from the midline in the mediolateral plane. Increments of offset equivalent to head + 0 mm, head + 7 mm and head + 14 mm were used. Significantly higher currents and amplitudes were seen with increasing torque for all combinations of material. However, Ti stems showed the highest corrosion currents. Increased bending moments associated with using larger offset heads produced more corrosion: Ti stems generally performed worse than CoCr stems. Using ceramic heads did not prevent corrosion, but reduced it significantly in all loading configurations.

  14. SORPTION OF LEAD ON A HIGH AFFINITY OXIDE: MACROSCOPIC AND MICROSCOPIC STUDIES (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of lead (Pb) was investigated on an innovative metal oxide compound using macroscopic and microscopic techniques. The objective of this study was to elucidate the sorption mechanism of Pb on the high-affinity engineered oxide with time at pH 6 employing batch methods an...

  15. FIELD-SCALE STUDIES: HOW DOES SOIL SAMPLE PRETREATMENT AFFECT REPRESENTATIVENESS ? (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples from field-scale studies are very heterogeneous and can contain large soil and rock particles. Oversize materials are often removed before chemical analysis of the soil samples because it is not practical to include these materials. Is the extracted sample representativ...

  16. Student Project Work and Abstracts. Beaufort, North Carolina Environmental Studies Project, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carteret County Board of Education, Beaufort, NC.

    This collection contains reports of 22 environmental study projects conducted by junior and senior students in a North Carolina high school. The scope of the projects covered total community service and sought to emphasize the students' roles as useful participants in the community. Fire, postal, health, and school services were surveyed, in…

  17. Analogical Scaffolding and the Learning of Abstract Ideas in Physics: Empirical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podolefsky, Noah S.; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we proposed a model of student reasoning which combines the roles of representation, analogy, and layering of meaning--analogical scaffolding [Podolefsky and Finkelstein, Phys. Rev. ST Phys. Educ. Res. 3, 010109 (2007)]. The present empirical studies build on this model to examine its utility and demonstrate the vital intertwining of…

  18. Student Project Work and Abstracts. Beaufort, North Carolina Environmental Studies Project, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carteret County Board of Education, Beaufort, NC.

    This document contains reports of 11 environmental study projects conducted by junior and senior students in a North Carolina high school. Topics range from the construction of an artificial reef and a survey of seashore changes to surveys of past and present development of various facets of the county ecology. The emphasis is on student…

  19. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  20. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  1. Use of Microwaves for the Detection of Corrosion Under Insulation: a Sensitivity Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. E.; Simonetti, F.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Bradley, I. P.

    2011-06-01

    Corrosion under insulation is a significant cause of pipeline failure in the oil and gas industry. This paper describes the initial developmental stages of a technique which uses the structure of an insulated pipeline as a coaxial waveguide to support the propagation of microwaves. These microwaves are used to inspect the insulation layer for the presence of water, which will indicate the regions of the pipe at risk from corrosion.

  2. Optical and Calorimetric Studies of Cholesterol-Rich Filamentous, Helical Ribbon and Crystal Microstructures (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnikova, Y. A.; Elsenbeck, M.; Kashuri, K.; Iannacchione, G. S.; Zastavker, Y. V.

    2009-04-01

    Formation of biological self-assemblies at all scales is a focus of studies in fields ranging from biology to physics to biomimetics. Understanding the physico-chemical properties of these self-assemblies may lead to the design of bio-inspired structures and technological applications. Here we examine self-assembled filamentous, helical ribbon, and crystal microstructures formed in chemically defined lipid concentrate (CDLC), a model system for cholesterol crystallization in gallbladder bile. CDLC consists of cholesterol, bilayer-forming amphiphiles, micelle-forming amphiphiles, and water. Phase contrast and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy indicate the presence of three microstructure types in all samples studied, and allow for an investigation of the structures' unique geometries. Additionally, confocal microscopy is used for qualitative assessment of surface and internal composition. To complement optical observations, calorimetric (differential-scanning and modulation) experiments, provide the basis for an in-depth understanding of collective and individual thermal behavior. Observed ``transition'' features indicate clustering and ``straightening'' of helical ribbons into short, increasingly thickening, filaments that dissolve with increasing temperature. These results suggest that all microstructures formed in CDLC may coexist in a metastable chemical equilibrium. Further investigation of the CDLC thermal profile should uncover the process of cholesterol crystallization as well as the unique design and function of microstructures formed in this system.

  3. A versatile instrument for structural studies of interfaces in ultrahigh vacuum (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausnitzer, M.; Pauly, T.; Materlik, G.

    1989-07-01

    Structural studies of interfaces with synchrotron x-radiation (SXR) are presently carried out with several different methods which were developed in connection with SXR over the past decade: dynamical x-ray diffraction using standing wavefields (XSW), kinematical surface diffraction (KSD), Fresnel reflection (FR), and absorption spectroscopy (SEXAFS, SXANES). These methods can determine different, and often complementary parameters of a system such as short-/long-range order, relaxation relative to bulk, structure normal/parallel to surface, valence state of surface atoms, roughness of a buried interface, etc. Accordingly, these different principles have also been combined to form new methods such as diffraction of evanescent x rays during total external reflection (DEXTER) and reflection EXAFS (REFLEXAFS). It is, therefore, highly desirable to have the opportunity to study the same interface system with different methods. On the other hand, preparation of a system in ultrahigh vacuum requires in most cases expensive bulky equipment and time consuming techniques. These considerations call for a setup which provides different experimental options. We have, therefore, installed at the beamline ROEMO I at HASYLAB a versatile UHV system for interface studies. A sample can either be prepared inside a chamber with three Knudsen cells for MBE growth and standard equipment for cleaning, heating and surface characterization by RHEED, or inside a chamber for aggressive gases. The first one is installed outside the interlock area providing access also when the ROEMO beam is on and the second one inside the interlock area. From either chamber the sample can be transferred into an analysis chamber at the ROEMO I station or into a transportable baby chamber. The analysis chamber can be used for measurements with standing waves, absorption spectroscopy and reflectivity measurements. Electrons are detected with a spherical analyzer and photons outside the vacuum through Be windows

  4. Automated extraction of precise protein expression patterns in lymphoma by text mining abstracts of immunohistochemical studies

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jia-Fu; Popescu, Mihail; Arthur, Gerald L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In general, surgical pathology reviews report protein expression by tumors in a semi-quantitative manner, that is, -, -/+, +/-, +. At the same time, the experimental pathology literature provides multiple examples of precise expression levels determined by immunohistochemical (IHC) tissue examination of populations of tumors. Natural language processing (NLP) techniques enable the automated extraction of such information through text mining. We propose establishing a database linking quantitative protein expression levels with specific tumor classifications through NLP. Materials and Methods: Our method takes advantage of typical forms of representing experimental findings in terms of percentages of protein expression manifest by the tumor population under study. Characteristically, percentages are represented straightforwardly with the % symbol or as the number of positive findings of the total population. Such text is readily recognized using regular expressions and templates permitting extraction of sentences containing these forms for further analysis using grammatical structures and rule-based algorithms. Results: Our pilot study is limited to the extraction of such information related to lymphomas. We achieved a satisfactory level of retrieval as reflected in scores of 69.91% precision and 57.25% recall with an F-score of 62.95%. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of a web-based curation tool for confirming and correcting our findings. Conclusions: The experimental pathology literature represents a rich source of pathobiological information, which has been relatively underutilized. There has been a combinatorial explosion of knowledge within the pathology domain as represented by increasing numbers of immunophenotypes and disease subclassifications. NLP techniques support practical text mining techniques for extracting this knowledge and organizing it in forms appropriate for pathology decision support systems. PMID:23967385

  5. An ion microprobe study of CAIs from CO3 meteorites. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Greenwood, R. C.; Fahey, A. J.; Huss, G. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    When attempting to interpret the history of Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) it is often difficult to distinguish between primary features inherited from the nebula and those produced during secondary processing on the parent body. We have undertaken a systematic study of CAIs from 10 CO chondrites, believed to represent a metamorphic sequence with the goal of distinguishing primary and secondary features. ALHA 77307 (3.0), Colony (3.0), Kainsaz (3.1), Felix (3.2), ALH 82101 (3.3), Ornans (3.3), Lance (3.4), ALHA 77003 (3.5), Warrenton (3.6), and Isna (3.7) were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. We have identified 141 CAIs within these samples, and studied in detail the petrology of 34 inclusions. The primary phases in the lower petrologic types are spinel, melilite, and hibonite. Perovskite, FeS, ilmenite, anorthite, kirschsteinite, and metallic Fe are present as minor phases. Melilite becomes less abundant in higher petrologic types and was not detected in chondrites of type 3.5 and above, confirming previous reports that this mineral easily breaks down during heating. Iron, an element that would not be expected to condense at high temperatures, has a lower abundance in spinel from low-petrologic-type meteorites than those of higher grade, and CaTiO3 is replaced by FeTiO3 in meteorites of higher petrologic type. The abundance of CAIs is similar in each meteorite. Eight inclusions have been analyzed by ion probe. The results are summarized. The results obtained to date show that CAIs in CO meteorites, like those from other meteorite classes, contain Mg* and that Mg in some inclusions has been redistributed.

  6. BWR steel containment corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  7. A study of sound transmission in an abstract middle ear using physical and finite element models.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Herrera, Antonio; Olson, Elizabeth S

    2015-11-01

    The classical picture of middle ear (ME) transmission has the tympanic membrane (TM) as a piston and the ME cavity as a vacuum. In reality, the TM moves in a complex multiphasic pattern and substantial pressure is radiated into the ME cavity by the motion of the TM. This study explores ME transmission with a simple model, using a tube terminated with a plastic membrane. Membrane motion was measured with a laser interferometer and pressure on both sides of the membrane with micro-sensors that could be positioned close to the membrane without disturbance. A finite element model of the system explored the experimental results. Both experimental and theoretical results show resonances that are in some cases primarily acoustical or mechanical and sometimes produced by coupled acousto-mechanics. The largest membrane motions were a result of the membrane's mechanical resonances. At these resonant frequencies, sound transmission through the system was larger with the membrane in place than it was when the membrane was absent.

  8. Studies into the use of waterborne coating formulations for the preparation of magnetic tape (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrom, Stacy; Bray, Ashley; Cheng, Song; Elike, John; Fan, Hong; Lane, Alan M.; Nikles, David E.

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this research project is to replace the organic solvents used in modern tape manufacture with water, thereby eliminating the potential for solvent emissions. This has led to a search to identify tape components compatible with a waterborne coating process. The pigments were either cobalt-modified γ-Fe2O3 or barium ferrite, with the majority of the research focused on cobalt-modified γ-Fe2O3 formulations. A combination of sodium polyphosphate and Surfynol CT-136, a pigment grinding aid, were used as dispersing agents. The binders included commercial water-dispersed polyurethanes and a commercial ethylene-vinylchloride copolymer emulsion. A commercial waterborne melamine-formaldehyde was used as a cross-linking agent. Addition of the ethylene-vinylchloride copolymer to the polyurethane increased the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the unpigmented binder films. The melamine-formaldehyde cross-linker further enhanced the mechanical properties and increased the adhesion between the pigmented binder films and the polyester base film. In a 180° peel test, the adhesion easily exceeded the ITO specification for 8 mm helical scan magnetic tape.1 Rheological studies of the waterborne dispersions revealed that the viscosity was too low. Hydroxyethylcellulose, a water soluble polymer, was added as a thickener and this gave rise to a desirable thixotropic behavior in the dispersion. Waterborne dispersions were cast onto polyester base film, oriented in a 2000 G longitudinal magnetic field, and cured in a convection oven at 60 °C. Magnetic hysteresis loops showed a squareness of 0.875 and a switching field distribution of 0.324 for films containing cobalt-modified γ-Fe2O3.

  9. Advances in Studies of Electrode Kinetics and Mass Transport in AMTEC Cells (abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; Kisor, A.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    Previous work reported from JPL has included characterization of electrode kinetics and alkali atom transport from electrodes including Mo, W, WRh(sub x), WPt(sub x)(Mn), in sodium AMTEC cells and vapor exposure cells, and Mo in potassium vapor exposure cells. These studies were generally performed in cells with small area electrodes (about 1 to 5 cm(sup 2)), and device geometry had little effect on transport. Alkali diffusion coefficients through these electrodes have been characterized, and approximate surface diffusion coefficients derived in cases of activated transport. A basic model of electrode kinetic at the alkali metal vapor/porous metal electrode/alkali beta'-alumina solid electrolyte three phase boundary has been proposed which accounts for electrochemical reaction rates with a collision frequency near the three phase boundary and tunneling from the porous electrode partially covered with adsorbed alkali metal atoms. The small electrode effect in AMTEC cells has been discussed in several papers, but quantitative investigations have described only the overall effect and the important contribution of electrolyte resistance. The quantitative characterization of transport losses in cells with large area electrodes has been limited to simulations of large area electrode effects, or characterization of transport losses from large area electrodes with significant longitudinal temperature gradients. This paper describes new investigations of electrochemical kinetics and transport, particularily with WPt(sub 3.5) electrodes, including the influence of electrode size on the mass transport loss in the AMTEC cell. These electrodes possess excellent sodium transport properties making verification of device limitations on transport much more readily attained.

  10. Theoretical and kinetic study of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of unsaturated C6 methyl esters with hydroxyl radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quan-De; Ni, Zhong-Hai

    2016-04-01

    This work reports a systematic ab initio and chemical kinetic study of the rate constants for hydrogen atom abstraction reactions by hydroxyl radical (OH) on typical isomers of unsaturated C6 methyl esters at the CBS/QB3 level of theory. The high-pressure limit rate constants at different reaction sites for all the methyl esters in the temperature range from 500 to 2000 K are calculated via transition-state theory with the Wigner method for quantum tunneling effect and fitted to the modified three parameters Arrhenius expression using least-squares regression. Further, a branching ratio analysis for each reaction site has been performed.

  11. Motorcycle safety, environmental effects, and performance studies. 1964-June, 1980 (a bibliography with abstracts). Report for 1964-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Kenton, E.

    1980-07-01

    The reports cited in this bibliography primarily are concerned with motorcycle safety and pollution. These studies cover safety equipment and education, visual and visibility factors, noise, fuel consumption, engine performance, air pollution, vehicle design, tire and brake characteristics, and illuminating systems. Testing programs are described for both machines and operators, underlining impact and anthropomorphic crash data. Training programs are noted for drivers. Particular attention is given to accident prevention, safety helmets, and protective clothing. (This updated bibliography contains 172 abstracts, 37 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  12. Underground Corrosion after 32 Years: A Study of Fate and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Flitton, M. K. Adler

    2006-06-01

    Improved estimates for corrosion rates in variably saturated porous media are required by the U.S. Department of Energy to maintain long-term storage of radioactive contaminants in stainless steel containers. To better define these parameters, research was undertaken to complete the National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) long-term study of buried stainless steel began 35 years ago. The 1970 study was initiated by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now known as NIST, when over 1000 specimens--including stainless steel Types 201, 202, 301, 304, 316, 409, 410, 430, and 434-configured as plates, U-bend, and tubes in both annealed and cold worked conditions with various treatments--were buried at six distinctive soil-type sites throughout the United States. During the first eight years of the study, four of five planned removals were completed with specimens retrieved after one, two, four, and eight years at each of the six sites. The fifth and final set of specimens remained undisturbed for over 34 years.

  13. Underground Corrosion after 32 years: A Study of Fate and Transport, #80803 Annual Report, June 2005

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Adler Flitton; Carolyn Bishop

    2005-06-01

    Improved estimates for corrosion rates in variably saturated porous media are required by the U.S. Department of Energy to maintain long-term storage of radioactive contaminants in stainless steel containers. To better define these parameters, research was undertaken to complete the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s (NIST) long-term study of buried stainless steel began 35 years ago. The 1970 study was initiated by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now known as NIST, when over 1000 specimens—including stainless steel Types 201, 202, 301, 304, 316, 409, 410, 430, and 434—configured as plates, U-bend, and tubes in both annealed and cold worked conditions with various treatments— were buried at six distinctive soil-type sites throughout the United States. During the first eight years of the study, four of five planned removals were completed with specimens retrieved after one, two, four, and eight years at each of the six sites. The fifth and final set of specimens remained undisturbed for over 34 years.

  14. Underground Corrosion after 32 Years: A Study of Fate and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Flitton, M.K. Adler

    2006-06-01

    Improved estimates for corrosion rates in variably saturated porous media are required by the U.S. Department of Energy to maintain long-term storage of radioactive contaminants in stainless steel containers. To better define these parameters, research was undertaken to complete the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s (NIST) long-term study of buried stainless steel began 35 years ago. The 1970 study was initiated by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), now known as NIST, when over 1000 specimens—including stainless steel Types 201, 202, 301, 304, 316, 409, 410, 430, and 434—configured as plates, U-bend, and tubes in both annealed and cold worked conditions with various treatments—were buried at six distinctive soil-type sites throughout the United States. During the first eight years of the study, four of five planned removals were completed with specimens retrieved after one, two, four, and eight years at each of the six sites. The fifth and final set of specimens remained undisturbed for over 34 years.

  15. Studies on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Super 304H Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabha, B.; Sundaramoorthy, P.; Suresh, S.; Manimozhi, S.; Ravishankar, B.

    2009-12-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a common mode of failure encountered in boiler components especially in austenitic stainless steel tubes at high temperature and in chloride-rich water environment. Recently, a new type of austenitic stainless steels called Super304H stainless steel, containing 3% copper is being adopted for super critical boiler applications. The SCC behavior of this Super 304H stainless steel has not been widely reported in the literature. Many researchers have studied the SCC behavior of steels as per various standards. Among them, the ASTM standard G36 has been widely used for evaluation of SCC behavior of stainless steels. In this present work, the SCC behavior of austenitic Fe-Cr-Mn-Cu-N stainless steel, subjected to chloride environments at varying strain conditions as per ASTM standard G36 has been studied. The environments employed boiling solution of 45 wt.% of MgCl2 at 155 °C, for various strain conditions. The study reveals that the crack width increases with increase in strain level in Super 304H stainless steels.

  16. A Comparison Study on the Rhetorical Moves of Abstracts in Published Research Articles and Master's Foreign-Language Theses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ren, Hongwei; Li, Yuying

    2011-01-01

    The abstract of research papers is one of the first things that a reader will read to determine the value of the research. A well-written abstract will surely promote the text attached to it more effectively. By examining the rhetorical moves in the abstracts of Chinese Master's English theses and published research articles in applied…

  17. A Comparative Study of Effect of New and Old Science Curriculum on Chinese Junior High School Students' Abstract Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Weiping; Chen, Ming

    2008-01-01

    "Teenagers' abstract thinking ability test" was designed in accordance with the structure and performance of teenagers' ability to think abstractly. 138 Chinese junior high school students who learned New curriculum and old curriculum separately were measured. A comparison between the two kinds of students shows that abstract thinking ability of…

  18. Adsorption and Corrosion Inhibition Studies of Some Selected Dyes as Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel in Acidic Medium: Gravimetric, Electrochemical, Quantum Chemical Studies and Synergistic Effect with Iodide Ions.

    PubMed

    Peme, Thabo; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O; Bahadur, Indra; Adekunle, Abolanle S; Kabanda, Mwadham M; Ebenso, Eno E

    2015-09-02

    The corrosion inhibition properties of some organic dyes, namely Sunset Yellow (SS), Amaranth (AM), Allura Red (AR), Tartrazine (TZ) and Fast Green (FG), for mild steel corrosion in 0.5 M HCl solution, were investigated using gravimetric, potentiodynamic polarization techniques and quantum chemical calculations. The results showed that the studied dyes are good corrosion inhibitors with enhanced inhibition efficiencies. The inhibition efficiency of all the studied dyes increases with increase in concentration, and decreases with increase in temperature. The results showed that the inhibition efficiency of the dyes increases in the presence of KI due to synergistic interactions of the dye molecules with iodide (I(-)) ions. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that the studied dyes are mixed-type inhibitors both in the absence and presence of KI. The adsorption of the studied dyes on mild steel surface, with and without KI, obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and involves physical adsorption mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations revealed that the most likely sites in the dye molecules for interactions with mild steel are the S, O, and N heteroatoms.

  19. Metacognition and abstract reasoning.

    PubMed

    Markovits, Henry; Thompson, Valerie A; Brisson, Janie

    2015-05-01

    The nature of people's meta-representations of deductive reasoning is critical to understanding how people control their own reasoning processes. We conducted two studies to examine whether people have a metacognitive representation of abstract validity and whether familiarity alone acts as a separate metacognitive cue. In Study 1, participants were asked to make a series of (1) abstract conditional inferences, (2) concrete conditional inferences with premises having many potential alternative antecedents and thus specifically conducive to the production of responses consistent with conditional logic, or (3) concrete problems with premises having relatively few potential alternative antecedents. Participants gave confidence ratings after each inference. Results show that confidence ratings were positively correlated with logical performance on abstract problems and concrete problems with many potential alternatives, but not with concrete problems with content less conducive to normative responses. Confidence ratings were higher with few alternatives than for abstract content. Study 2 used a generation of contrary-to-fact alternatives task to improve levels of abstract logical performance. The resulting increase in logical performance was mirrored by increases in mean confidence ratings. Results provide evidence for a metacognitive representation based on logical validity, and show that familiarity acts as a separate metacognitive cue.

  20. Study of ferrous corrosion products on iron archaeological objects by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, Ilanith; Conforto, Egle; Refait, Philippe; Rémazeilles, Céline

    2013-02-01

    The corrosion of iron-based archaeomaterials in anoxic environments leads mainly to Fe(II) compounds, like the hydroxychloride β-Fe2(OH)3Cl, chukanovite Fe2(OH)2CO3 or siderite FeCO3. The understanding of the mechanisms then necessarily implies a thorough investigation of the chemical, mechanical and morphological characteristics of the Fe(II)-based layer that develops between the metal surface and the environment. In the peculiar case of Fe(II) compounds, generally very reactive towards O2, the main concern is to prevent any transformation by air during the analysis. The EBSD technique is adapted on a scanning electron microscope (SEM) where the samples are analysed under vacuum and consequently sheltered from air. Different options offered by EBSD for phase characterisation and microstructural study were tested for the first time on the rust layers of two archaeological iron nails. Results were confronted to those obtained by micro-Raman spectroscopy, which was used as reference method. Magnetite, Fe(II) hydroxychloride β-Fe2(OH)3Cl and siderite were analysed successfully but improvements have to be brought for the study of other compounds such as iron oxyhydroxides and chukanovite. The choice of experimental parameters in our approach as well as the potentialities and limits of the technique for this kind of application are discussed.

  1. The Application of Electrochemical and Surface Analysis Approaches to Studying Copper Corrosion in Water: Fundamentals, Limitations, and Examples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corrosion control is a concern for many drinking water utilities. The Lead and Copper Rule established a regulatory need to maintain a corrosion control program. Other corrosion-related issues such as “red” water resulting from excessive iron corrosion and copper pinhole leaks ...

  2. Corrosion testing in natural waters: Second volume

    SciTech Connect

    Kain, R.M.; Young, W.T.

    1997-12-31

    This is the second STP of the same title. The first volume, STP 1086, was published in 1990 and contained papers on seawater corrosivity, crevice corrosion resistance of stainless steels, corrosion fatigue testing, and corrosion in potable water. Since then, final results have become available from the worldwide study on corrosion behavior of metals in seawater, and additional studies have been performed that should be brought to the attention of the corrosion engineering community. The second volume contains these studies. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  3. Corrosion in a temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; White, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    High temperature corrosion limits the operation of equipment used in the Power Generation Industry. Some of the more destructive corrosive attack occurs on the surfaces of heat exchangers, boilers, and turbines where the alloys are subjected to large temperature gradients that cause a high heat flux through the accumulated ash, the corrosion product, and the alloy. Most current and past corrosion research has, however, been conducted under isothermal conditions. Research on the thermal-gradient-affected corrosion of various metals and alloys is currently being studied at the Albany Research Center’s SECERF (Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility) laboratory. The purpose of this research is to verify theoretical models of heat flux effects on corrosion and to quantify the differences between isothermal and thermal gradient corrosion effects. The effect of a temperature gradient and the resulting heat flux on corrosion of alloys with protective oxide scales is being examined by studying point defect diffusion and corrosion rates. Fick’s first law of diffusion was expanded, using irreversible thermodynamics, to include a heat flux term – a Soret effect. Oxide growth rates are being measured for the high temperature corrosion of cobalt at a metal surface temperature of 900ºC. Corrosion rates are also being determined for the high temperature corrosion of carbon steel boiler tubes in a simulated waste combustion environment consisting of O2, CO2, N2, and water vapor. Tests are being conducted both isothermally and in the presence of a temperature gradient to verify the effects of a heat flux and to compare to isothermal oxidation.

  4. Corrosion study on high power feeding of telecomunication copper cable in 5 wt.% CaSO4.2H2O solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsudin, Shaiful Rizam; Hashim, Nabihah; Ibrahim, Mohd Saiful Bahri; Rahman, Muhammad Sayuzi Abdul; Idrus, Muhammad Amin; Hassan, Mohd Rezadzudin; Abdullah, Wan Razli Wan

    2016-07-01

    The studies were carried out to find out the best powering scheme over the copper telephone line. It was expected that the application of the higher power feeding could increase the data transfer and capable of providing the customer's satisfaction. To realize the application of higher remote power feeding, the potential of corrosion problem on Cu cables was studied. The natural corrosion behaviour of copper cable in the 0.5% CaSO4.2H2O solution was studied in term of open circuit potential for 30 days. The corrosion behaviour of higher power feeding was studied by the immersion and the planned interval test to determine the corrosion rate as well as the effect of voltage magnitudes and the current scheme i.e. positive direct (DC+) and alternating current (AC) at about 0.40 ± 0.01 mA/ cm2 current density. In the immersion test, both DC+ and AC scheme showed the increasing of feeding voltage magnitude has increased the corrosion rate of Cu samples starting from 60 to 100 volts. It was then reduced at about 100 - 120 volts which may due to the passive and transpassive mechanism. The corrosion rate was slowly reduced further from 120 to 200 volts. Visually, the positively charged of Cu cable was seems susceptible to severe corrosion, while AC scheme exhibited a slight corrosion reaction on the surface. However, the planned interval test and XRD results showed the corrosion activity of the copper cable in the studied solution was a relatively slow process and considered not to be corroded as a partially protective scale of copper oxide formed on the surface.

  5. Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, James R; Bestor, Michael A; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Storey, John Morse

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

  6. Electrochemical study of resistance to localized corrosion of stainless steels for biomaterial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, J.; Karlen, C.; Ulfvin, C.

    2000-03-01

    Sandvik Bioline High-N and 316 LVM are two austenitic stainless steels especially developed for biomaterial applications. Their resistance to localized corrosion was investigated by electrochemical methods including cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and potentiostatic polarization measurements in a phosphate-buffered saline solution and in a simulated crevice solution, i.e., designed for crevice corrosion testing. Sandvik SAF 2507 (a high-performance super duplex stainless steel) was included in the tests as a reference material High-N, higher alloyed than 316 LVM, demonstrated excellent resistance to pitting initiation and a strong tendency to repassivation. High-N proved to have an equivalent or even higher resistance to localized corrosion than SAF 2507. The latter is known for its impressive corrosion properties, particularly in chloride containing environments. While 316 LVM may run the risk of crevice corrosion in implant applications, the risk seems negligible for High-N. In view of the fact that also the mechanical properties are superior to those of 316 LVM, High-N is a very attractive implant material.

  7. An in situ corrosion study of Middle Ages wrought iron bar chains in the Amiens Cathedral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassini, S.; Angelini, E.; Parvis, M.; Bouchar, M.; Dillmann, P.; Neff, D.

    2013-12-01

    The corrosion behaviour of Middle Ages wrought iron bar chains exposed to indoor atmospheric corrosion for hundred of years in the Notre Dame Cathedral of Amiens (France) has been evaluated by means of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS), a well-established electrochemical technique extensively used for testing anticorrosive properties of metal coatings. The measurements have been performed in situ with a portable EIS instrument designed to work as a standalone device, in six different areas of the wrought iron bar chains characterized by different aesthetical appearance. Moreover, a properly designed electrochemical cell has been employed to carry out the impedance measurements without affecting the artefacts surfaces. The wrought iron bar chains, as evidenced by μ-Raman and microscopic analyses, are covered by corrosion products constituted by iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, such as goethite, lepidocrocite, maghemite, akaganeite, organized in complex layered structures. In situ EIS allows one to investigate the phenomena involved at the electrochemical interfaces among the various corrosion products and to assess and predict their corrosion behaviour. From the analysis of the experimental findings of this monitoring campaign, EIS measurements can be proposed to restorers/conservators as a reliable indicator of dangerous situations on which they must act for the preservation of the iron artefacts.

  8. Corrosion Studies in Support of Medium Power Lead Alloy Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Loewen; Ronald Ballinger; Jeongyoun Lim

    2004-09-01

    The performance of structural materials in lead or lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) systems is evaluated. The materials evaluated included refractory metals (W, Mo, and Ta), several U.S. steels [austenitic steel (316L), carbon steels (F-22, Fe-Si), ferritic/martensitic steels (HT-9 and 410)], and several experimental Fe-Si-Cr alloys that were expected to demonstrate corrosion resistance. The materials were exposed in either an LBE rotating electrode or a dynamic corrosion cell for periods from 100 to 1000 h at temperatures of 400, 500, 600, and 700°C, depending on material and exposure location. Weight change and optical scanning electron microscopy or X-ray analysis of the specimen were used to characterize oxide film thickness, corrosion depth, microstructure, and composition changes. The results of corrosion tests validate the excellent resistance of refractory metals (W, Ta, and Mo) to LBE corrosion. The tests conducted with stainless steels (410, 316L, and HT-9) produced mass transfer of elements (e.g., Ni and Cr) into the LBE, resulting in degradation of the material. With Fe-Si alloys a Si-rich layer (as SiO2) is formed on the surface during exposure to LBE from the selective dissolution of Fe.

  9. Corrosion Studies in Support of Medium-Power Lead-Alloy-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Loewen, Eric P.; Ballinger, Ronald G.; Lim, Jeongyoun

    2004-09-15

    The performance of structural materials in lead or lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) systems is evaluated. The materials evaluated included refractory metals (W, Mo, and Ta), several U.S. steels [austenitic steel (316L), carbon steels (F-22, Fe-Si), ferritic/martensitic steels (HT-9 and 410)], and several experimental Fe-Si-Cr alloys that were expected to demonstrate corrosion resistance. The materials were exposed in either an LBE rotating electrode or a dynamic corrosion cell for periods from 100 to 1000 h at temperatures of 400, 500, 600, and 700 deg. C, depending on material and exposure location. Weight change and optical scanning electron microscopy or X-ray analysis of the specimen were used to characterize oxide film thickness, corrosion depth, microstructure, and composition changes. The results of corrosion tests validate the excellent resistance of refractory metals (W, Ta, and Mo) to LBE corrosion. The tests conducted with stainless steels (410, 316L, and HT-9) produced mass transfer of elements (e.g., Ni and Cr) into the LBE, resulting in degradation of the material. With Fe-Si alloys a Si-rich layer (as SiO{sub 2}) is formed on the surface during exposure to LBE from the selective dissolution of Fe.

  10. Studies on biologically induced corrosion in heat exchanger systems at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, SC

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, D.H.; Soracco, R.J.; Wilde, E.W.

    1982-07-01

    Biological fouling and corrosion of stainless steel tubes in the heat exchangers in nuclear reactors at the Savannah River Plant have caused decreased heat transfer efficiency and reduced operational life. This report addresses the microbiology and chemistry of the films present on these tubes, and the relation of this data to the corrosion of the tube material (304L stainless steel). Very few microorganisms other than bacteria were found in the biofilm. Bacteria capable of producing H/sub 2/S, organic acids, anaerobic conditions, and slime have all been isolated from these films. All of these have been implicated in corrosion processes. The most remarkable chemical finding was the inability to detect chloride in the film around areas of presumed chloride induced stress corrosion cracking. Three model systems were used to test the fouling and corrosion potential of metal specimens under a variety of environmental conditions including various biocide regimes. Using these systems, potential improvements in the use of chlorine as a biocidal agent have been observed. It was also shown that larger bacterial populations (including viable and killed cells) were associated with corroded areas as compared to noncorroded areas on the same specimen.

  11. Friction surfacing for enhanced surface protection of marine engineering components: erosion-corrosion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajakumar, S.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balakrishnan, M.

    2016-08-01

    Good mechanical properties combined with outstanding corrosion-resistance properties of cast nickel-aluminum bronze (NAB) alloy lead to be a specific material for many marine applications, including ship propellers. However, the erosion-corrosion resistance of cast-NAB alloy is not as good as wrought NAB alloy. Hence, in this investigation, an attempt has been made to improve the erosion-corrosion resistance of cast NAB alloy by depositing wrought (extruded) NAB alloy applying the friction surfacing (FS) technique. Erosion-corrosion tests were carried out in slurries composed of sand particles of 3.5% NaCl solution. Silica sand having a nominal size range of 250-355 μm is used as an erodent. Specimens were tested at 30° and 90° impingement angles. It is observed that the erosion and erosion-corrosion resistance of friction surfaced NAB alloy exhibited an improvement as compared to cast NAB alloy. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis showed that the erosion tracks developed on the cast NAB alloy were wider and deeper than those formed on the friction surfaced extruded NAB alloy.

  12. Study of metal corrosion using ac impedance techniques in the STS launch environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.

    1989-01-01

    AC impedance measurements were performed to investigate the corrosion resistance of 19 alloys under conditions similar to the STS launch environment. The alloys were: Zirconium 702, Hastelloy C-22, Inconel 625, Hastelloy C-276, Hastelloy C-4, Inconel 600, 7Mo + N, Ferralium 255, Inco Alloy G-3, 20Cb-3, SS 904L, Inconel 825, SS 304LN, SS 316L, SS 317L, ES 2205, SS 304L, Hastelloy B-2, and Monel 400. AC impedance data were gathered for each alloy after one hour immersion time in each of the following three electrolyte solutions: 3.55 percent NaCl, 3.55 percent NaCl-0.1N HCl, and 3.55 percent NaCl-1.0N HCl. The data were analyzed qualitatively using the Nyquist plot and quantitatively using the Bode plot. Polarization resistance, Rp, values were obtained using the Bode plot. Zirconium 702 was the most corrosion resistant alloy in the three electrolytes. The ordering of the other alloys according the their resistance to corrosion varied as the concentration of hydrochloric acid in the electrolyte increased. The corrosion resistance of Zirconium 702 and Ferralium 255 increased as the concentration of hydrochloric acid in the electrolyte increased. The corrosion resistance of the other 17 alloys decreased as the concentration of the hyrdochloric acid in the electrolyte increased.

  13. Utilizing various test methods to study the stress corrosion behavior of Al-Li-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Galvin, R. P.; Nelson, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to aluminum-lithium alloys because of rather substantial specific-strength and specific-stiffness advantages offered over commercial 2000and 7000-series aluminum alloys. An obstacle to Al-Li alloy development has been inherent limited ductility. In order to obtain a more refined microstructure, powder metallurgy (P/M) has been employed in alloy development programs. As stress corrosion (SC) of high-strength aluminum alloys has been a major problem in the aircraft industry, the possibility of an employment of Al-Li alloys has been considered, taking into account a use of Al-Li-Cu alloys. Attention is given to a research program concerned with the evaluation of the relative SC resistance of two P/M processed Al-Li-Cu alloys. The behavior of the alloys, with and without an addition of magnesium, was studied with the aid of three test methods. The susceptibility to SC was found to depend on the microstructure of the alloys.

  14. SERS and DFT study of copper surfaces coated with corrosion inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Muniz-Miranda, Francesco; Caporali, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Summary Azole derivatives are common inhibitors of copper corrosion due to the chemical adsorption occurring on the metal surface that gives rise to a protective film. In particular, 1,2,4-triazole performs comparable to benzotriazole, which is much more widely used, but is by no means an environmentally friendly agent. In this study, we have analyzed the adsorption of 1,2,4-triazole on copper by taking advantage of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect, which highlights the vibrational features of organic ligand monolayers adhering to rough surfaces of some metals such as gold, silver and copper. To ensure the necessary SERS activation, a roughening procedure was implemented on the copper substrates, resulting in nanoscale surface structures, as evidenced by microscopic investigation. To obtain sufficient information on the molecule–metal interaction and the formation of an anticorrosive thin film, the SERS spectra were interpreted with the aid of theoretical calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) approach. PMID:25671144

  15. Electrochemical and conversion electron mössbauer study of corrosion induced by acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vértes, Cs.; Lakatos-Varsányi, M.; Meisel, W.; Vértes, A.; Gütlich, P.

    1993-04-01

    The passivation of low carbon steel was studied in aqueous solution of 0.5M Na 2SO 4 +0.001M NaHSO 3 (pH 3.5, 6.5 and 8.5) which can be considered as a model of acid rain. The used conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) with the complementary electrochemical investigations proved that the sulfite ions induce pitting corrosion at pH 3.5 and 6 5 while the measurements showed much weaker pitting at pH 8.5. The compositions and thicknesses of the passive films formed during the electrochemical treatments are determined from the CEM spectra. Only γ-FeOOH was found on the surface of the samples at pH 6.5 and 8.5. Nevertheless, at pH 3.5 the sextet belonging to Fe 3C appears in the spectra, and also FeS0 4H 2O could be detected in low concentration.

  16. Pipe loop demonstration study of corrosion control alternatives at a pH of 10

    SciTech Connect

    Yannoni, C.C.; Clark, S.D.; Rafanovic, R.O.; Covellone, M.A.; Crosby, F.J.; Neff, C.H.

    1995-12-01

    The Federal Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) under the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) requires many water supply utilities to reevaluate their current method of corrosion control and has resulted in the implementation of numerous capital improvements and/or changes in water treatment plant operations. The Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB) serves more than 600,000 people and maintains a pH of 10 through the treatment plant and water distribution system. Maintaining a pH of 10 results in a calcium carbonate precipitation potential (CCPP) of 5 to 12 mg/l expressed as calcium carbonate. Theoretically, a positive CCPP will result in the precipitation of calcium carbonate which maintains a thin protective film along the interior walls of water distribution pipe and helps minimize lead and copper solubility. Monitoring results indicated that lead levels were close to maximum allowable limits. The application of a pipe loop demonstration study provided information on alternative treatment methodologies to minimize lead solubility while maintaining a pH close to 10.0. Sodium silicate inhibition and dissolved inorganic carbonate (DIC) adjustment were two treatment methodologies which resulted in reducing lead levels by 50 percent.

  17. Stress-corrosion-cracking studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Durr, C.L.

    1992-05-01

    Cortest Columbus Technologies, Inc. (CC Technologies) investigated the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level waste package as part of the information needed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the Department of Energy`s application to construct to geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. At the direction of the NRC, the program focused on the Tuff Repository. This report summarizes the results of Stress-Corrosion-Cracking (SCC) studies performed in Tasks 3, 5, and 7 of the program. Two test techniques were used; U-bend exposures and Slow-Strain-Rate (SSR) tests. The testing was performed on two copper-base alloys (Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy CDA 175) and two Fe-Cr-Ni alloys (Alloy 304L and Alloy 825) in simulated J-13 groundwater and other simulated solutions for the Tuff Repository. These solutions were designed to simulate the effects of concentration and irradiation on the groundwater composition. All SCC testing on the Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys was performed on solution-annealed specimens and thus issues such as the effect of sensitization on SCC were not addressed.

  18. Electrode-polarization studies in hot-corrosion systems. Progress report, 1 June 1980-31 May 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Devereux, O.F.

    1981-02-01

    The following tasks are reported on: electrode polarization studies in molten sodium carbonate, liquid line corrosion, and gas/metal reactions in mixed oxidants. Two previously unpublished papers are included as appendices: Reactions at the CO, CO/sub 2//Ni electrode in Molten Sodium Carbonate; and Reactions at the Corroding Nickel Electrode in Molten Sodium Carbonate under CO, CO/sub 2/ Atmospheres. (DLC)

  19. CORROSION STUDY FOR THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY CHROME (VI) REDUCTANT SOLUTION USING 304 AND 316L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB; WYRAS RB

    2007-10-08

    This report documents the laboratory testing and analyses as directed under the test plan, RPP PLAN-34065, and documented in laboratory notebooks HNF 2742 and HNF-N-473-1. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the electrochemical corrosion and pitting susceptibility of the 304 and 316L stainless steel in the acidified reducing solution that will be contained in either the secondary waste receiving tank or concentrate tank.

  20. Study of localized corrosion in aluminum alloys by the scanning reference electrode technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1995-01-01

    Localized corrosion in 2219-T87 aluminum (Al) alloy, 2195 aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy, and welded 2195 Al-Li alloy (4043 filler) have been investigated using the relatively new scanning reference electrode technique (SRET). Anodic sites are more frequent and of greater strength in the 2195 Al-Li alloy than in the 2219-T87 Al alloy, indicating a greater tendency toward pitting for the latter. However, the overall corrosion rates are about the same for these two alloys, as determined using the polarization resistance technique. In the welded 2195 Al-Li alloy, the weld bean is entirely cathodic, with rather strongly anodic heat affected zones (HAZ) bordering both sides, indicating a high probability of corrosion in the HAZ parallel to the weld bead.

  1. Materials studies for preventing corrosion in condensing environments. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.; Sugama, T.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the fundamental interfacial requirements for low-cost, organic and inorganic materials resistive to corrosion in condensing furnace exhausts. This research effort is being focused to provide information regarding corrosion resistance, heat transfer, material cost, fabrication method and cost, and product reliability since all are important in the final design and production of a heat exchanger. Results to date indicate that organic and inorganic-type polymer coating systems applied to low cost metals such as mild steel and aluminum provide good corrosion protection. The thermal stability of these polymers plus the identification of the interfacial requirements needed to utilize them with reactive filler materials should also make their use as bulk composites feasible.

  2. [Study on the corrosion of Yuan Dynasty bronze mirror by Raman spectrum].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-lin; Yang, Qun; Zhang, Peng-xiang; Li, Chao-zhen

    2002-02-01

    Over the past 17 years, Raman microscopy has proven to be a valuable tool for the non-destructive evaluation of pigments in artwork and artifacts. Here Raman microscopy and electro probe technique were used to identify the corrosion products and their locations on and within of ancient Yuan Dynasty bronze mirror from Lufeng of Yunnan province. The most corrosive compounds are CuCO3.Cu(OH)2 and Cu2O. There is a thin layer of Fe-Al alloy on bronze mirror, which can protect the mirror from corrosion. The Raman microscopy is shown to be a useful tool to complement more traditional characterizations such as scanning electron microscopy and x-ray energy-dispersive spectrometry in the analysis of metal artifacts.

  3. The role of prefrontal and parietal cortices in esthetic appreciation of representational and abstract art: a TMS study.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Lega, Carlotta; Gardelli, Chiara; Merabet, Lotfi B; Cela-Conde, Camilo J; Nadal, Marcos

    2014-10-01

    To explain the biological foundations of art appreciation is to explain one of our species' distinctive traits. Previous neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies have pointed to the prefrontal and the parietal cortex as two critical regions mediating esthetic appreciation of visual art. In this study, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the left prefrontal cortex and the right posterior parietal cortex while participants were evaluating whether they liked, and by how much, a particular painting. By depolarizing cell membranes in the targeted regions, TMS transiently interferes with the activity of specific cortical areas, which allows clarifying their role in a given task. Our results show that both regions play a fundamental role in mediating esthetic appreciation. Critically though, the effects of TMS varied depending on the type of art considered (i.e. representational vs. abstract) and on participants' a-priori inclination toward one or the other.

  4. Fighting Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures such as bridges, parking decks, and balconies are designed to have a service life of over 50 years. All too often, however, many structures fall short of this goal, requiring expensive repairs and protection work earlier than anticipated. The corrosion of reinforced steel within the concrete infrastructure is a major cause for this premature deterioration. Such corrosion is a particularly dangerous problem for the facilities at NASA s Kennedy Space Center. Located near the Atlantic Ocean in Florida, Kennedy is based in one of the most corrosive-prone areas in the world. In order to protect its launch support structures, highways, pipelines, and other steel-reinforced concrete structures, Kennedy engineers developed the Galvanic Liquid Applied Coating System. The system utilizes an inorganic coating material that slows or stops the corrosion of reinforced steel members inside concrete structures. Early tests determined that the coating meets the criteria of the National Association of Corrosion Engineers for complete protection of steel rebar embedded in concrete. Testing is being continued at the Kennedy's Materials Science Beach Corrosion Test Site.

  5. Corrosion Inhibition of Mild Steel in 1.0 M HCl by Amino Compound: Electrochemical and DFT Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Ahmed Y.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd Sobri

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the inhibitory effect of 4-amino-5-methyl-4H-1, 2, 4-triazole-3-thiol (AMTT) on the corrosion of mild steel in 1.0 M HCl solution using weight loss, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization. The results indicate that AMTT performed as a good mixed-type inhibitor for mild steel corrosion in a 1.0 M HCl solution, and the inhibition efficiencies increased and tend to saturate with inhibitor concentration. Potentiodynamic polarization results showed that AMTT is a mixed-type inhibitor. Adsorption of AMTT molecules is a spontaneous process, and its adsorption behavior obeys Langmuir's adsorption isotherm model. The reactivity of AMTT was analyzed through theoretical calculations based on density functional theory. Results showed that the reactive sites were located on the nitrogen and sulfur (N1, N2, and S) atoms.

  6. Corrosion Inhibition of Mild Steel in 1.0 M HCl by Amino Compound: Electrochemical and DFT Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Ahmed Y.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd Sobri

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the inhibitory effect of 4-amino-5-methyl-4H-1, 2, 4-triazole-3-thiol (AMTT) on the corrosion of mild steel in 1.0 M HCl solution using weight loss, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization. The results indicate that AMTT performed as a good mixed-type inhibitor for mild steel corrosion in a 1.0 M HCl solution, and the inhibition efficiencies increased and tend to saturate with inhibitor concentration. Potentiodynamic polarization results showed that AMTT is a mixed-type inhibitor. Adsorption of AMTT molecules is a spontaneous process, and its adsorption behavior obeys Langmuir's adsorption isotherm model. The reactivity of AMTT was analyzed through theoretical calculations based on density functional theory. Results showed that the reactive sites were located on the nitrogen and sulfur (N1, N2, and S) atoms.

  7. Case studies in management of THA failure secondary to taper corrosion, modular junctions and metal-on-metal bearings.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Adolph V

    2014-04-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of patients with painful total hip arthroplasties secondary to taper corrosion and wear of modular junctions and metal-on-metal bearings represents a major challenge for the orthopaedic clinician. Guidelines are evolving as we analyze the growing body of evidence regarding metal-related failures of orthopaedic implants and adverse reactions to metal debris. In this article 6 case examples are presented to enhance understanding and application of current evidence into practice. Clinical expertise is integrated with the best available evidence from research and national joint registries data into the decision making process relevant for patient care in everyday practice. Issues addressed include understanding taper corrosion and metal failure mechanisms, clinical presentation of adverse soft tissue reactions, utility of specialized tests such as metal ion analysis and cross-sectional imaging studies, the utility of modular components for primary THA, dealing with recalled component, and current recommendations.

  8. STUDY ON CHARACTERISTICS OF RESIDUAL STRENGTH OF RC BEAMS WITH DEFECTIVE ANCHORAGES DUE TO CORROSION OF REINFORCEMENTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Yuki; Dong, Wei; Oshita, Hideki; Suzuki, Shuichi; Tsutsumi, Tomoaki

    In this study, to evaluate flexural strength and shear strength with def ective anchorages due to corrosion of reinforcemen t, the bending test of the RC beams r eceived damage in the anchorage region due to corrosion was carried out. As a result, it is se ems that the residual shear strength of RC beams with defective anchorages depends on shear span ratio in addition to the anchorage performance. Furthermore, the authors propose an evaluation model for an shear strength of RC beams with defective anchorages on the basis of these experimental results and analy tical result. The value of residual shear strength calculated using this model corresponds to the test results in the past.

  9. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  10. Abstraction of Drift Seepage

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer

    2004-11-01

    This model report documents the abstraction of drift seepage, conducted to provide seepage-relevant parameters and their probability distributions for use in Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). Drift seepage refers to the flow of liquid water into waste emplacement drifts. Water that seeps into drifts may contact waste packages and potentially mobilize radionuclides, and may result in advective transport of radionuclides through breached waste packages [''Risk Information to Support Prioritization of Performance Assessment Models'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 168796], Section 3.3.2)]. The unsaturated rock layers overlying and hosting the repository form a natural barrier that reduces the amount of water entering emplacement drifts by natural subsurface processes. For example, drift seepage is limited by the capillary barrier forming at the drift crown, which decreases or even eliminates water flow from the unsaturated fractured rock into the drift. During the first few hundred years after waste emplacement, when above-boiling rock temperatures will develop as a result of heat generated by the decay of the radioactive waste, vaporization of percolation water is an additional factor limiting seepage. Estimating the effectiveness of these natural barrier capabilities and predicting the amount of seepage into drifts is an important aspect of assessing the performance of the repository. The TSPA-LA therefore includes a seepage component that calculates the amount of seepage into drifts [''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504], Section 6.3.3.1)]. The TSPA-LA calculation is performed with a probabilistic approach that accounts for the spatial and temporal variability and inherent uncertainty of seepage-relevant properties and processes. Results are used for subsequent TSPA-LA components that may handle, for example, waste package corrosion or radionuclide transport.

  11. Stress corrosion study of PH13-8Mo stainless steel using the Slow Strain Rate Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Pablo D.

    1989-01-01

    The need for a fast and reliable method to study stress corrosion in metals has caused increased interest in the Slow Strain Rate Technique (SSRT) during the last few decades. PH13-8MoH950 and H1000 round tensile specimens were studied by this method. Percent reduction-in-area, time-to-failure, elongation at fracture, and fracture energy were used to express the loss in ductility, which has been used to indicate susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Results from a 3.5 percent salt solution (corrosive medium) were compared to those in air (inert medium). A tendency to early failure was found when testing in the vicinity of 1.0 x 10(-6) mm/mm/sec in the 3.5 percent salt solution. PH13-8Mo H1000 was found to be less likely to suffer SCC than PH13-8Mo H950. This program showed that the SSRT is promising for the SCC characterization of metals and results can be obtained in much shorter times (18 hr for PH steels) than those required using conventional techniques.

  12. A study of early corrosion behaviors of FeCrAl alloys in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jun; Nam, Hyo On; Hwang, Il Soon; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2010-12-01

    Lead and lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) alloy have been increasingly receiving attention as heavy liquid metal coolants (HLMC) for future nuclear energy systems. The compatibility of structural materials and components with lead-bismuth eutectic liquid at high temperature is one of key issues for the commercialization of lead fast reactors. In the present study, the corrosion behaviors of iron-based alumina-forming alloys (Kanthal-AF®, PM2000, MA956) were investigated by exposing to stagnant LBE environments at 500 °C and 550 °C for up to 500 h. After exposures, the thickness and chemistry of the oxide layer on the specimens were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. As a result, the oxide characteristics and the corrosion resistance were compared. In this study, it was shown that the corrosion resistance of FeCrAl ODS steels (PM2000, MA956) are superior to that of FeCrAl ferritic steel (Kanthal-AF®) in higher temperature LBE.

  13. Towards lightweight nanocomposite coatings for corrosion inhibition: Graphene, carbon nanotubes, and nanostructured magnesium as case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Robert Vincent, III

    The field of nanocomposites is a burgeoning area of research due to the interest in the remarkable properties which can be achieved through their use in a variety of applications, including corrosion resistant coatings. Lightweighting is of increasing importance in the world today due to the ever growing push towards energy efficiency and the green movement and in recent years there has been a vast amount of research performed in the area of developing lightweight nanocomposites for corrosion inhibition. Many new composite materials have been developed through the use of newly developed nanomaterials (including carbonaceous and metallic constituents) and their specialized incorporation in the coating matrix materials. We start with a general review on the development of hybrid nanostructured composites for corrosion protection of base metals from a sustainability perspective in Chapter 1. This review demonstrates the ever swelling requirements for a paradigm shift in the way that we protect metals against corrosion due to the costs and environmental concerns that exist with currently used technology. In Chapter 2, we delve into the much required understanding of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide through near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy measurements to elucidate information about the electronic structure upon incorporation of nitrogen within the structure. For successful integration of the carbonaceous nanomaterials into a composite coating, a full swath of knowledge is necessary. Within this work we have shown that upon chemical defunctionalization of graphene oxide to reduced graphene oxide by means of hydrazine treatment, nitrogen is incorporated into the structure in the form of a pyrazole ring. In Chapter 3, we demonstrate that by way of in situ polymerization, graphene and multiwalled carbon nanotubes can be incorporated within a polymer (polyetherimide, PEI) matrix. Two systems have been developed including graphene and

  14. Micro-Raman study of copper hydroxychlorides and other corrosion products of bronze samples mimicking archaeological coins.

    PubMed

    Bertolotti, Giulia; Bersani, Danilo; Lottici, Pier Paolo; Alesiani, Marcella; Malcherek, Thomas; Schlüter, Jochen

    2012-02-01

    Three bronze samples created by CNR-ISMN (National Research Council-Institute of Nanostructured Materials) to be similar to Punic and Roman coins found in Tharros (OR, Sardinia, Italy) were studied to identify the corrosion products on their surfaces and to evaluate the reliability of the reproduction process. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was chosen to investigate the corroded surfaces because it is a non-destructive technique, it has high spatial resolution, and it gives the opportunity to discriminate between polymorphs and to correlate colour and chemical composition. A significant amount of green copper hydroxychlorides (Cu(2)(OH)(3)Cl) was detected on all the coins. Their discrimination by Raman spectroscopy was challenging because the literature on the topic is currently confusing. Thus, it was necessary to determine the characteristic peaks of atacamite, clinoatacamite, and the recently discovered anatacamite by acquiring Raman spectra of comparable natural mineral samples. Clinoatacamite, with different degrees of order in its structure, was the major component identified on the three coins. The most widespread corrosion product, besides hydroxychlorides, was the red copper oxide cuprite (Cu(2)O). Other corrosion products of the elements of the alloy (laurionite, plumbonacrite, zinc carbonate) and those resulting from burial in the soil (anatase, calcite, hematite) were also found. This study shows that identification of corrosion products, including discrimination of copper hydroxychlorides, could be accomplished by micro-Raman on valuable objects, for example archaeological findings or works of art, avoiding any damage because of extraction of samples or the use of a destructive analytical technique.

  15. The role of the lateral occipital cortex in aesthetic appreciation of representational and abstract paintings: a TMS study.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Lega, Carlotta; Ferrari, Chiara; Vecchi, Tomaso; Cela-Conde, Camilo José; Silvanto, Juha; Nadal, Marcos

    2015-04-01

    Neuroimaging studies of aesthetic appreciation have shown that activity in the lateral occipital area (LO)-a key node in the object recognition pathway-is modulated by the extent to which visual artworks are liked or found beautiful. However, the available evidence is only correlational. Here we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate the putative causal role of LO in the aesthetic appreciation of paintings. In our first experiment, we found that interfering with LO activity during aesthetic appreciation selectively reduced evaluation of representational paintings, leaving appreciation of abstract paintings unaffected. A second experiment demonstrated that, although the perceived clearness of the images overall positively correlated with liking, the detrimental effect of LO TMS on aesthetic appreciation does not owe to TMS reducing perceived clearness. Taken together, our findings suggest that object-recognition mechanisms mediated by LO play a causal role in aesthetic appreciation of representational art.

  16. A multi-analytical approach to gold in Ancient Egypt: Studies on provenance and corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, I.; Troalen, L. G.; Manso, M.; Ponting, M.; Radtke, M.; Reinholz, U.; Barreiros, M. A.; Shaw, I.; Carvalho, M. L.; Guerra, M. F.

    2015-06-01

    Recent results from a three-year multi-disciplinary project on Ancient Egyptian gold jewellery revealed that items of jewellery from the Middle Kingdom to the New Kingdom were manufactured using a variety of alluvial gold alloys. These alloys cover a wide range of colours and the majority contain Platinum Group Elements inclusions. However, in all the gold foils analysed, these inclusions were found to be absent. In this work a selection of gilded wood and leather items and gold foil fragments, all from the excavations by John Garstang at Abydos (primarily from Middle Kingdom graves), were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Disperse Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-Ray Fluorescence (μXRF), Particle Induced X-Ray Emission (μPIXE) and Double Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (D2XRF). The work allowed us to characterise the composition of the base-alloys and also to reveal the presence of Pt at trace levels, confirming the use of alluvial gold deposits. Corrosion products were also investigated in the foils where surface tarnish was visually observed. Results showed that the differences in the colour of corrosion observed for the foils are related not only to the thickness of the corrosion layer but also to a multi-layer structure containing the various corrosion products.

  17. Copper Corrosion in Nuclear Waste Disposal: A Swedish Case Study on Stakeholder Insight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    The article describes the founding principles, work program, and accomplishments of a Reference Group with both expert and layperson stakeholders for the corrosion of copper canisters in a proposed deep repository in Sweden for spent nuclear fuel. The article sets the Reference Group as a participatory effort within a broader context of…

  18. Application of x-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of corrosion and inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, A.J.; Isaacs, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique for determination of valency and coordination. Measurements can be made in air or in situ under electrochemical control. The technique will be described and its application to the analysis of passive oxide films, corrosion products, and inhibitors will be reviewed.

  19. Comparative study on lithium borates as corrosion inhibitors of aluminum current collector in lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kisung; Yu, Sunghun; Lee, Chulhaeng; Lee, Hochun

    2015-11-01

    Lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) is a promising salt that can possibly overcome the limitations of lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) in current Li-ion batteries (LIBs). Aluminum (Al) corrosion issue, however, is a major bottleneck for the wide use of LiFSI. This study investigates lithium borate salts as Al corrosion inhibitors in LiFSI electrolytes. Through a systematic comparison among lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF4), lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB), and lithium difluoro(oxalato)borate (LiDFOB), and LiPF6, the inhibition ability of the additives is revealed to be in the following order: LiDFOB > LiBF4 ≈ LiPF6 > LiBOB. In particular, the inhibition effect of LiDFOB is outstanding; the anodic behavior of Al in 0.8 M LiFSI + 0.2 M LiDFOB ethylene carbonate (EC)-based electrolyte is comparable to that of corrosion-free 1 M LiPF6 solution. The superior inhibition ability of LiDFOB is attributed to the formation of a passive layer composed of Al-F, Al2O3, and B-O species, as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. A LiCoO2/graphite cell with 0.8 M LiFSI + 0.2 M LiDFOB electrolyte exhibits a rate capability comparable to a cell with 1 M LiPF6 solution, whereas a cell with 0.8 M LiFSI solution without LiDFOB suffers from poor power performance resulting from severe Al corrosion.

  20. Study of mechanical joint strength of aluminum alloy 7075-T6 and dual phase steel 980 welded by friction bit joining and weld-bonding under corrosion medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Squires, Lile; Pan, Tsung-Yu; Miles, Michael; Song, Guang-Ling; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-30

    We have employed a unique solid-sate joining process, called friction bit joining (FBJ), to spot weld aluminum alloy (AA) 7075-T6 and dual phase (DP) 980 steel. Static joint strength was studied in the lap shear tension configuration. In addition, weld-bonding (adhesive + FBJ) joints were studied in order to evaluate the ability of adhesive to mitigate the impact of corrosion on joint properties. Accelerated laboratory cyclic corrosion tests were carried out for both FBJ only and weld-bonding joints. Furthermore, the FBJ only joints that emerged from corrosion testing had lap shear failure loads that were significantly lower than freshly prepared joints. However, weld-bonding specimens retained more than 80% of the lap shear failure load of the freshly prepared weld-bonding specimens. Moreover, examination of joint cross sections confirmed that the presence of adhesive in the weld-bonding joints mitigated the effect of the corrosion environment, compared to FBJ only joints.

  1. Experimental and theoretical studies on inhibition of mild steel corrosion by some synthesized polyurethane tri-block co-polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudershan; Vashisht, Hemlata; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O.; Bahadur, Indra; Verma, Hemant; Singh, Gurmeet; Obot, Ime B.; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2016-08-01

    Polyurethane based tri-block copolymers namely poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-b-polyurethane-b-poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PNVP-PU) and poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate)-b-polyurethane-b-poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate) (PDMAEMA-PU) were synthesized through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) mechanism. The synthesized polymers were characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) methods. The corrosion inhibition performances of the compounds were investigated on mild steel (MS) in 0.5 M H2SO4 medium using electrochemical measurements, surface analysis, quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS). Potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) measurements revealed that the polymers are mixed-type corrosion inhibitors. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements showed that the polymers inhibit MS corrosion by adsorbing on MS surface to form pseudo-capacitive interface. The inhibitive effects of the polymers increase with increasing concentration and decrease with increasing temperature. The adsorption of both the polymers on MS surface obey the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and involves both physisorption and chemisorption mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses showed that the polymers formed protective film on MS surface and shield it from direct acid attack. Quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamic simulations studies corroborate experimental results.

  2. Experimental and theoretical studies on inhibition of mild steel corrosion by some synthesized polyurethane tri-block co-polymers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sudershan; Vashisht, Hemlata; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O.; Bahadur, Indra; Verma, Hemant; Singh, Gurmeet; Obot, Ime B.; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2016-01-01

    Polyurethane based tri-block copolymers namely poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-b-polyurethane-b-poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PNVP-PU) and poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate)-b-polyurethane-b-poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate) (PDMAEMA-PU) were synthesized through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) mechanism. The synthesized polymers were characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) methods. The corrosion inhibition performances of the compounds were investigated on mild steel (MS) in 0.5 M H2SO4 medium using electrochemical measurements, surface analysis, quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS). Potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) measurements revealed that the polymers are mixed-type corrosion inhibitors. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements showed that the polymers inhibit MS corrosion by adsorbing on MS surface to form pseudo-capacitive interface. The inhibitive effects of the polymers increase with increasing concentration and decrease with increasing temperature. The adsorption of both the polymers on MS surface obey the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and involves both physisorption and chemisorption mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses showed that the polymers formed protective film on MS surface and shield it from direct acid attack. Quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamic simulations studies corroborate experimental results. PMID:27515383

  3. Experimental and theoretical studies on inhibition of mild steel corrosion by some synthesized polyurethane tri-block co-polymers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudershan; Vashisht, Hemlata; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O; Bahadur, Indra; Verma, Hemant; Singh, Gurmeet; Obot, Ime B; Ebenso, Eno E

    2016-01-01

    Polyurethane based tri-block copolymers namely poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-b-polyurethane-b-poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PNVP-PU) and poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate)-b-polyurethane-b-poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate) (PDMAEMA-PU) were synthesized through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) mechanism. The synthesized polymers were characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) methods. The corrosion inhibition performances of the compounds were investigated on mild steel (MS) in 0.5 M H2SO4 medium using electrochemical measurements, surface analysis, quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS). Potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) measurements revealed that the polymers are mixed-type corrosion inhibitors. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements showed that the polymers inhibit MS corrosion by adsorbing on MS surface to form pseudo-capacitive interface. The inhibitive effects of the polymers increase with increasing concentration and decrease with increasing temperature. The adsorption of both the polymers on MS surface obey the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and involves both physisorption and chemisorption mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses showed that the polymers formed protective film on MS surface and shield it from direct acid attack. Quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamic simulations studies corroborate experimental results. PMID:27515383

  4. Alternating and direct current electrochemical studies of a wool wax-based corrosion preventive coating on aluminum alloy 2024

    SciTech Connect

    Su, P.C.; Devereux, O.F.

    1998-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of Al 2024-T3 treated with a wool wax (lanolin)-based corrosion preventive coating in aqueous 0.5 M sodium chloride was studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and direct current electrode polarization. DC measurements were modeled by three reactions: oxidation of aluminum, reduction of oxygen, and reduction of hydrogen. Alternating current behavior of untreated specimens was modeled using the Randles circuit, and that of inhibited specimens was modeled using parallel resistance-capacitance circuits representing the coating and the charge-transfer process. AC and DC estimates of the polarization resistance of coated specimens were 50 M{Omega}-cm{sup 2} and 32 M{Omega}-cm{sup 2}, respectively. AC and DC values for bare control specimens were of the order of 3 k{Omega}-cm{sup 2} and 15 k{Omega}-cm{sup 2}, respectively. The wool wax coating was found to be a very effective corrosion preventative for this alloy in the aqueous saline environment whether applied to freshly prepared surfaces or to corroded specimens removed from simulated service.

  5. Experimental and theoretical studies on inhibition of mild steel corrosion by some synthesized polyurethane tri-block co-polymers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudershan; Vashisht, Hemlata; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O; Bahadur, Indra; Verma, Hemant; Singh, Gurmeet; Obot, Ime B; Ebenso, Eno E

    2016-08-12

    Polyurethane based tri-block copolymers namely poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-b-polyurethane-b-poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PNVP-PU) and poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate)-b-polyurethane-b-poly(dimethylaminoethylmethacrylate) (PDMAEMA-PU) were synthesized through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) mechanism. The synthesized polymers were characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) methods. The corrosion inhibition performances of the compounds were investigated on mild steel (MS) in 0.5 M H2SO4 medium using electrochemical measurements, surface analysis, quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS). Potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) measurements revealed that the polymers are mixed-type corrosion inhibitors. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements showed that the polymers inhibit MS corrosion by adsorbing on MS surface to form pseudo-capacitive interface. The inhibitive effects of the polymers increase with increasing concentration and decrease with increasing temperature. The adsorption of both the polymers on MS surface obey the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and involves both physisorption and chemisorption mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses showed that the polymers formed protective film on MS surface and shield it from direct acid attack. Quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamic simulations studies corroborate experimental results.

  6. Contemporary Theories of Oral Communication: A Collection of Abstracts, Critical Literature Reviews, and Experiments in the Study of Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert M., Ed.

    This booklet is a collection of abstracts, literature reviews, and reports on experiments in the communication field. Ninety abstracts from speech communication literature (1970-1977) are presented under the following categories: communication theory, research methodology, interpersonal communication, rhetorical theory and criticism, persuasion,…

  7. Abstracts of State Authorizing and Oversight Laws and Regulations. A Study of State Oversight in Postsecondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helliwell, Carolyn B.; And Others

    Herein are contained abstracts of state laws and regulations governing postsecondary education in three sectors: public, private degree-granting, and private nondegree-granting. With some exceptions, all obtainable statutes having the force of law are included. The statutes are arranged by state. Each abstract includes basic identifying data,…

  8. Preliminary review of mass transfer and flow visualization studies and techniques relevant to the study of erosion-corrosion of reactor piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.M.; Halle, H.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides some background information on the failed piping at the Surry-2 reactor; a summary of pertinent literature on mass transfer in related geometries; and a description of methodologies for visualization and erosion rate measurements in laboratory model studies that can provide greater insight into the role of flow geometry in erosion-corrosion. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Theoretical study of dynamics for the abstraction reaction H' + HBr(v=0, j=0) --> H'H + Br.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqin; Cong, Shulin; Zhang, Cuihua; Xu, Xuesong; Chen, Maodu

    2009-04-23

    Theoretical studies of the dynamics of the abstraction reaction, H' + HBr (v=0,j=0) --> H'H + Br, have been performed with quasiclassical trajectory method (QCT) on a new ab initio potential energy surface (Y. Kurosaki and T. Takayanagi, private communication). The calculated QCT cross sections are in good agreement with earlier quantum wave packet results over most of the collision energy range from 0.1 to 2.6 eV, and the state-resolved rotational distributions of the product H'H molecule are quantitatively consistent with the experimental results. Comparisons of the QCT-calculated rotational-state-resolved cross sections on different potential energy surfaces show that the characteristics of the potential energy surface in the region far away from the minimum energy path have a large influence on the title abstraction reaction dynamics, and the indirect reactions that do not follow the minimum energy path have little influence on the differential cross sections (DCS). The DCSs are mainly governed by the direct reactions that do follow the minimum energy path, at both low and high collision energies. The degree of the rotational alignment of the product H'H molecule is strong at high collision energies, which means that the influence of the indirect reactions on the product rotational alignment is negligible, whereas the distribution of P(varphi(r)) is sensitive to the indirect reactions at high collision energies. With increasing collision energy, the polarization of the product rotational angular momentum decreases and the molecular rotation of the product prefers an in-plane reaction mechanism rather than the out-of-plane mechanism.

  10. Thermochemical and kinetics studies of the CH3SH+S (3P) hydrogen abstraction and insertion reactions.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Daniely V V; Cunha, Leonardo A; Spada, Rene F K; Ferrão, Luiz F A; Roberto-Neto, Orlando; Machado, Francisco B C

    2014-09-01

    Sulfur-containing molecules have a significant impact on atmosphere and biosphere. In this work we studied, from the point of view of electronic structure and chemical kinetics methods, the elementary reactions between a methanethiol molecule and a sulfur atom leading to hydrogen abstraction C-S bond cleavage (CH(3)SH+S; R1:→ CH(3)S+SH; R2: → CH(2)SH+SH; R3:→ CH(3)+HS(2)). The geometrical structures of the reactants, products, and saddle points for the three reaction paths were optimized using the BB1K method with the aug-cc-pV(T+d)Z basis set. The thermochemical properties were improved using single point coupled-cluster (CCSD(T)) calculations on the BB1K geometries followed by extrapolation to the complete basis set (CBS) limit. This methodology was previously applied and has given accurate values of thermochemical and kinetics properties when compared to benchmark calculations and experimental data. For each reaction, the thermal rate constants were calculated using the improved canonical variational theory (ICVT) including the zero-curvature (ICVT/ZCT) and small-curvature (ICVT/SCT) tunneling corrections. For comparison, the overall ICVT/SCT reaction rate constant at 300 K obtained with single-point CCSD(T)/CBS calculations for the CH(3)SH+S reaction is approximately 1400 times lower than the isovalent CH(3)SH+O reaction, obtained with CVT/SCT. The reaction path involving the hydrogen abstraction from the thiol group is the most important reactive path in all temperatures.

  11. Naphthenic acid corrosion in the refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, H.L. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    Field tests and laboratory studies of refinery process streams are presented. The effects of temperature, velocity and physical state were studied with respect to alloy selection for corrosion resistant service. The amount of molybdenum in the austenitic stainless steel alloys is the dominant factor in conferring corrosion resistance. The Naphthenic Acid Corrosion Index (NACI) is useful in assessing the severity of corrosion under a variety of circumstances.

  12. Seismic Consequence Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    M. Gross

    2004-10-25

    The primary purpose of this model report is to develop abstractions for the response of engineered barrier system (EBS) components to seismic hazards at a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and to define the methodology for using these abstractions in a seismic scenario class for the Total System Performance Assessment - License Application (TSPA-LA). A secondary purpose of this model report is to provide information for criticality studies related to seismic hazards. The seismic hazards addressed herein are vibratory ground motion, fault displacement, and rockfall due to ground motion. The EBS components are the drip shield, the waste package, and the fuel cladding. The requirements for development of the abstractions and the associated algorithms for the seismic scenario class are defined in ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The development of these abstractions will provide a more complete representation of flow into and transport from the EBS under disruptive events. The results from this development will also address portions of integrated subissue ENG2, Mechanical Disruption of Engineered Barriers, including the acceptance criteria for this subissue defined in Section 2.2.1.3.2.3 of the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]).

  13. Study of the corrosion products formed on a multiphase CuAlBe alloy in a sodium chloride solution by micro-Raman and in situ AFM measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montecinos, S.; Simison, S. N.

    2011-06-01

    The corrosion products formed on a multiphase Cu-11.40Al-0.55Be (wt.%) alloy in 3.5% NaCl at open circuit potential, and their evolution with immersion time were studied mainly by micro-Raman and in situ AFM measurements. The aluminium content of each phase affects the formation of the corrosion products on them. After 1 day of immersion, γ 2 precipitates were more susceptible to dealuminization, while α' phase exhibited a high corrosion stability. The corrosion products evolved with immersion time, and CuCl 2 and a Cu 2O/CuO double layer film were the stable products formed on all the phases after long times.

  14. Study of the Susceptibility of Oxygen-Free Phosphorous Doped Copper to Corrosion in Simulated Groundwater in the Presence of Chloride and Sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, Ivan; Lamas, Claudia; Werme, Lars |; Oversby, Virginia

    2007-07-01

    Oxygen free high conductivity copper, doped with phosphorus (Cu OFP) has been chosen as the material for the fabrication of high level nuclear waste containers in Sweden. This material will be the corrosion barrier for spent fuel in the environment of a deep geological repository in granitic rock. The service life of this container is expected to exceed 1,000,000 years. During this time, which includes several glaciations, water of different compositions, including high concentration of chloride ions, will contact the copper surface. This work reports a study of the susceptibility of Cu OFP to corrosion when chloride ions are present, in deionized water (DW) and in synthetic groundwater (SGW). The techniques used were electrochemical methods such as corrosion potential evolution and Tafel curves. The system was studied with Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). We also used as characterization techniques Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The main conclusions are that copper is more susceptible to corrosion at high chloride ion concentration. When the chloride concentration is low, it is possible to form copper chloride crystals, but at the highest concentration, copper chloride complexes are formed, leaving the copper surface without deposits. When the chloride concentration is low (<0.1 M) the corrosion process is mainly controlled by diffusion, while at higher concentrations (0.1 M to 1 M) corrosion is controlled by charge transfer processes. At low concentration of sulfide (<3 . 10{sup -5} M), copper corrosion in the presence of chloride is controlled by diffusional processes, while at higher concentrations corrosion is controlled by charge transfer processes. (authors)

  15. Piaget on Abstraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moessinger, Pierre; Poulin-Dubois, Diane

    1981-01-01

    Reviews and discusses Piaget's recent work on abstract reasoning. Piaget's distinction between empirical and reflective abstraction is presented; his hypotheses are considered to be metaphorical. (Author/DB)

  16. A select bibliography with abstracts of reports related to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant geotechnical studies (1972--1990)

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, D.W.; Martin, M.L.

    1993-08-01

    This select bibliography contains 941 entries. Each bibliographic entry contains the citation of a report, conference paper, or journal article containing geotechnical information about the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The entries cover the period from 1972, when investigation began for a WIPP Site in southeastern New Mexico, through December 1990. Each entry is followed by an abstract. If an abstract or suitable summary existed, it has been included; 316 abstracts were written for other documents. For some entries, an annotation has been provided to clarify the abstract, comment on the setting and significance of the document, or guide the reader to related reports. An index of key words/phrases is included for all entries.

  17. Draft report: Results of stainless steel canister corrosion studies and environmental sample investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Charles R.; Enos, David

    2014-09-01

    This progress report describes work being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of used nuclear fuel. The work involves both characterization of the potential physical and chemical environment on the surface of the storage canisters and how it might evolve through time, and testing to evaluate performance of the canister materials under anticipated storage conditions.

  18. The chemical durability of tektites - A laboratory study and correlation with long-term corrosion behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkatt, A.; Boulos, M. S.; Barkatt, A.; Sousanpour, W.; Boroomand, M. A.; Macedo, P. B.; Okeefe, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Leach tests carried out on tektite specimens (indochinites and australites) under high-dilution conditions show a common behavior characterized by low leach rates (0.00018 g/sq m per d, or 7.2 x 10 to the -12th m/d at 23 C) and an activation energy of (79,600 + or - 700 J/mol). The extent of selective leaching is very small, of the order of 10 to the -8th m. Extrapolation of test results over the lifetime of the tektites gives an excellent agreement with field observations on the extent of corrosion, and this is an important step in establishing the validity of laboratory tests as a basis for the development of models and predictions concerning long-term durabilities at least in the limiting case of high dilution or rapid flow. The results are also shown to be in agreement with various previous observations on the corrosion resistance of tektites. The chemical durability of tektites is observed to be consistent with their composition, highlighting requirements of high corrosion resistance in glasses; these requirements include a silica content in excess of 67 mol percent, an extremely low water content, and an alkali content which is low both absolutely and relative to the di- and poly-valent metal oxide levels. It is shown that artificial glasses which fulfil these criteria are no less corrosion-resistant than the corresponding natural glasses. These conclusions have bearing on the development, as well as on the evaluation, of glasses intended for very long service, such as radioactive waste vitrification media.

  19. CORROSION INHIBITION

    DOEpatents

    Cartledge, G.H.

    1958-06-01

    The protection of ferrous metsls from the corrosive action of aqueous solutions is accomplished by the incorporation of small amounts of certain additive agents into the aqueous solutions. The method comprises providing a small concentration of technetium, in the form of pertechnetate ion, dissolved in the solution.

  20. Environmental and alloying effects on corrosion of metals and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dong

    2009-12-01

    In the first part of this project, corrosion studies were carried out on 304L stainless steel samples welded with Cr-free consumables, which were developed to minimize the concentration of chromate species in the weld fume. The corrosion properties of Ni-Cu and Ni-Cu-Pd Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welds and Shielded Metal Arc (SMA) welds are comparable to those of welds fabricated with SS308L consumable, which is the standard consumable for welding 304L. Although the breakdown potentials of the new welds from both welding processes are lower than that of the SS308L weld, the repassivation potential of these new welds is much higher. Generally, the repassivation potential is a more conservative measure of susceptibility to localized corrosion. Our studies showed that the Ni-Cu and Ni-Cu-Pd welds are more resistant to crevice corrosion than SS308L welds, which is related to the high repassivation potential. Also, addition of Pd improved the corrosion resistance of the new welds, which is consistent with previous studies from button samples and bead-on-plate samples. Other corrosion studies such as creviced and uncreviced long time immersion, atmospheric exposure, and slow strain rate testing suggest that Ni-Cu-Pd welds can be a qualified substitute for SS308 weld. In the second part of this project, efforts are put on the connection between lab and field exposure tests because sometimes the correspondence between lab atmospheric corrosion tests (ASTM B117) and field exposures is poor as a result of differences in the critical conditions controlling chemical and electrochemical reactions on surfaces. Recent studies in atmospheric chemistry revealed the formation of extremely reactive species from interactions between UV light, chloride aerosols above oceans and oxidizing agents such as ozone or peroxide. Atmospheric corrosion of metals can be affected by these species which might be transported long distances in the atmosphere to locations far from oceans. However, these

  1. Quinoxaline derivatives as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in hydrochloric acid medium: Electrochemical and quantum chemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olasunkanmi, Lukman O.; Kabanda, Mwadham M.; Ebenso, Eno E.

    2016-02-01

    The corrosion inhibition potential of four quinoxaline derivatives namely, 1-[3-(4-methylphenyl)-5-(quinoxalin-6-yl)-4,5-dihydropyrazol-1-yl]butan-1-one (Me-4-PQPB), 1-(3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-(quinoxalin-6-yl)-4,5-dihydropyrazol-1-yl)butan-1-one (Mt-4-PQPB), 1-[3-(3-methoxyphenyl)-5-(quinoxalin-6-yl)-4,5-dihydropyrazol-1-yl]butan-1-one (Mt-3-PQPB) and 1-[3-(2H-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-5-(quinoxalin-6-yl)-4,5-dihydropyrazol-1-yl]butan-1-one (Oxo-1,3-PQPB) was studied for mild steel corrosion in 1 M HCl solution using electrochemical, spectroscopic techniques and quantum chemical calculations. The results of both potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic studies revealed that the compounds are mixed-type inhibitors and the order of corrosion inhibition efficiency at 100 ppm is Me-4-PQPB>Mt-3-PQPB>Oxo-1,3-PQPB>Mt-4-PQPB. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopic analyses confirmed the presence of chemical interactions between the inhibitors and mild steel surface. The adsorption of the inhibitor molecules on mild steel surface was found to be both physisorption and chemisorption but predominantly chemisorption. The experimental data obey Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Scanning electron microscopy studies revealed the formation of protective films of the inhibitors on mild steel surface. Quantum chemical parameters obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations support experimental results.

  2. Study of corrosion of super martensitic stainless steel under alternating current in artificial seawater with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, T.; Bhola, S.; Olson, D. L.; Mishra, B.

    2011-06-23

    The assessment of corrosion requires the use of tools able to quantify the corrosion but often times also qualify it. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is a laboratory tool that can provide both qualification and quantification of corrosion. EIS was successfully used to compare the thickness of the corrosion products formed during the application of different alternating current (AC) densities as well as to characterize pitting. When EIS is applied at the open circuit potential, the technique is nondestructive and predicts the corrosion behavior of the electrode. It can also be used at cathodic potentials while still being nondestructive, providing information about the electrode reaction kinetics, diffusion and electrical double layer.

  3. Corrosion under argon irradiation of titanium in the low MeV range: A study coupling AFM and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Ngoc-Long; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Bérerd, Nicolas; Moncoffre, Nathalie; Gorse-Pomonti, Dominique

    2014-05-01

    This paper reports on a recent study of the corrosion under argon ion irradiation of titanium in the low MeV range (1-9 MeV), associating AFM and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry. Irradiation with MeV Arn+ (n = 1, 3) ions produces damages on the titanium surface. Large craters form on the oxidized titanium surface whose characteristics vary as a function of the argon energy between 2 and 9 MeV. The superficial oxide grows thicker under irradiation over the same energy range, especially near 3 MeV. It is suggested that collisions cascades play a significant role in the overall damage process.

  4. The effects of microstructure on the corrosion of glycine/nitrate processed cermet inert anodes: A preliminary study

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, Jr, C F; Chick, L A; Maupin, G D; Stice, N D

    1991-07-01

    The Inert Electrodes Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supported by the Office of Industrial Processes of the US Department of Energy and is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of Hall-Heroult cells through the development of inert anodes. The inert anodes currently under the study are composed of a cermet material of the general composition NiO-NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-Cu. The program has three primary objectives: (a) to evaluate the anode material in a scaled-up, pilot cell facility, (b) to investigate the mechanisms of the electrochemical reactions at the anodes surface, and (c) to develop sensors for monitoring various anode and/or electrolyte conditions. This report covers the results of a portion of the studies on anode reaction mechanisms. The anode mechanism studies were focused in four areas in FY 1990 and FY 1991: (a) the determination of whether a film formed on cermet inert anodes and (if it existed) the characterization of this film, (b) the determination of the sources of the anode impedance, (c) the evaluation of the effects of silica and a precorroded state on anode corrosion, and (d) a preliminary study on the effect of microstructure on the corrosion properties of the anodes. This report discusses the results of the microstructure studies. 6 refs., 32 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Theoretical and kinetic study of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions of esters with H(O.)2 radicals.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Jorge; Zhou, Chong-Wen; Curran, Henry J

    2013-12-27

    This work details an ab initio and chemical kinetic study of the hydrogen atom abstraction reactions by the hydroperoxyl radical (HȮ2) on the following esters: methyl ethanoate, methyl propanoate, methyl butanoate, methyl pentanoate, methyl isobutyrate, ethyl ethanoate, propyl ethanoate, and isopropyl ethanoate. Geometry optimizations and frequency calculations of all of the species involved, as well as the hindrance potential descriptions for reactants and transition states, have been performed with the Møller-Plesset (MP2) method using the 6-311G(d,p) basis set. A validation of all of the connections between transition states and local minima was performed by intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations. Electronic energies for all of the species are reported at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level of theory in kcal mol(-1) with the zero-point energy corrections. The CCSD(T)/CBS (extrapolated from CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ, in which X = D, T, Q) was used for the reactions of methyl ethanoate + HȮ2 radicals as a benchmark in the electronic energy calculations. High-pressure limit rate constants, in the temperature range 500-2000 K, have been calculated for all of the reaction channels using conventional transition state theory with asymmetric Eckart tunneling corrections. The 1-D hindered rotor approximation has been used for the low frequency torsional modes in both reactants and transition states. The calculated individual and total rate constants are reported for all of the reaction channels in each reaction system. A branching ratio analysis for each reaction site has also been investigated for all of the esters studied in this work. PMID:24175616

  6. Corrosion and corrosion prevention in gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mom, A. J. A.; Kolkman, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    The conditions governing the corrosion behavior in gas turbines are surveyed. Factors such as temperature, relative humidity, the presence of sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and fuel quality are discussed. Electromechanical corrosion at relatively low temperature in compressors; oxidation; and hot corrosion (sulfidation) at high temperature in turbines are considered. Corrosion prevention by washing and rinsing, fueld additives, and corrosion resistant materials and coatings are reviewed.

  7. Results of stainless steel canister corrosion studies and environmental sample investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Charles R.; Enos, David

    2014-12-01

    This progress report describes work being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess the localized corrosion performance of container/cask materials used in the interim storage of used nuclear fuel. The work involves both characterization of the potential physical and chemical environment on the surface of the storage canisters and how it might evolve through time, and testing to evaluate performance of the canister materials under anticipated storage conditions. To evaluate the potential environment on the surface of the canisters, SNL is working with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to collect and analyze dust samples from the surface of in-service SNF storage canisters. In FY 13, SNL analyzed samples from the Calvert Cliffs Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI); here, results are presented for samples collected from two additional near-marine ISFSI sites, Hope Creek NJ, and Diablo Canyon CA. The Hope Creek site is located on the shores of the Delaware River within the tidal zone; the water is brackish and wave action is normally minor. The Diablo Canyon site is located on a rocky Pacific Ocean shoreline with breaking waves. Two types of samples were collected: SaltSmart™ samples, which leach the soluble salts from a known surface area of the canister, and dry pad samples, which collected a surface salt and dust using a swipe method with a mildly abrasive ScotchBrite™ pad. The dry samples were used to characterize the mineralogy and texture of the soluble and insoluble components in the dust via microanalytical techniques, including mapping X-ray Fluorescence spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy. For both Hope Creek and Diablo Canyon canisters, dust loadings were much higher on the flat upper surfaces of the canisters than on the vertical sides. Maximum dust sizes collected at both sites were slightly larger than 20 μm, but Phragmites grass seeds ~1 mm in size, were observed on the tops of the Hope Creek canisters

  8. Study of the HVOF Ni-Based Coatings' Corrosion Resistance Applied on Municipal Solid-Waste Incinerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilemany, J. M.; Torrell, M.; Miguel, J. R.

    2008-06-01

    Oxidation of exchanger steel tubes causes important problems in Municipal Solid-Waste Incinerator (MSWI) plants. The present paper shows a possible solution for this problem through High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings. A comparative study was carried out between powder and wire Ni-based thermal spray coatings (with the same composition). These optimized coatings were compared based on their microstructure, wear properties (ASTM G99-90, ASTM G65-91), and erosion-corrosion (E-C) resistance. An E-C test designed in the Thermal Spray Centre was performed to reproduce the mechanisms that take place in a boiler. Studying the results of this test, the wire HVT Inconel coating sprayed by propylene appears to be the best alternative. A commercial bulk material with a composition similar to Ni-based coatings was tested to find the products of the oxidation reactions. The protective mechanisms of these materials were assessed after studying the results obtained for HVOF coatings and the bulk material where the presence of nickel and chromium oxides as a corrosion product can be seen. Kinetic evolution of the Ni-based coatings can be studied by thermogravimetric analysis. The protection that Inconel coatings give to the tube through the difference of the gain mass can be seen. Ni-based HVOF coatings by both spray conditions are a promising alternative to MSWI protection against chlorine environments, and their structures have a very important role.

  9. Meeting Abstracts - Nexus 2015.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    The AMCP Abstracts program provides a forum through which authors can share their insights and outcomes of advanced managed care practice through publication in AMCP's Journal of Managed Care Specialty Pharmacy (JMCP). Of the abstracts accepted for publication, most are presented as posters, so interested AMCP meeting attendees can review findings and query authors. The main poster presentation is Tuesday, October 27, 2015; posters are also displayed on Wednesday, October 28, 2015. The AMCP Nexus 2015 in Orlando, Florida, is expected to attract more than 3,500 managed care pharmacists and other health care professionals who manage and evaluate drug therapies, develop and manage networks, and work with medical managers and information specialists to improve the care of all individuals enrolled in managed care programs.  Abstracts were submitted in the following categories:  Research Report: describe completed original research on managed care pharmacy services or health care interventions. Examples include (but are not limited to) observational studies using administrative claims, reports of the impact of unique benefit design strategies, and analyses of the effects of innovative administrative or clinical programs.Economic Model: describe models that predict the effect of various benefit design or clinical decisions on a population. For example, an economic model could be used to predict the budget impact of a new pharmaceutical product on a health care system. Solving Problems in Managed Care: describe the specific steps taken to introduce a needed change, develop and implement a new system or program, plan and organize an administrative function, or solve other types of problems in managed care settings. These abstracts describe a course of events; they do not test a hypothesis, but they may include data.

  10. The Fate Of Silicon During Glass Corrosion Under Alkaline Conditions: A Mechanistic And Kinetic Study With The International Simple Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Gin, Stephane; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournie, Maxime; Berthon, Claude; Wang, Zhaoying; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Zhu, Zihua; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2015-02-01

    International Simple Glass - a six oxide borosilicate glass selected by the international nuclear glass community to improve the understanding of glass corrosion mechanisms and kinetics - was altered at 90°C in a solution initially saturated with respect to amorphous 29-SiO2. The pH90°C, was fixed at 9 at the start of the experiment and raised to 11.5 after 209 d by the addition of KOH. Isotope sensitive analytical techniques were used to analyze the solution and altered glass samples, helping to understand the driving forces and rate limiting processes controlling long-term glass alteration. At pH 9, the corrosion rate continuously drops and the glass slowly transforms into a uniform, homogeneous and isovolumic amorphous alteration layer. The mechanisms responsible for this transformation are water diffusion through the growing alteration layer and ion exchange. We demonstrate that this amorphous alteration layer is not a precipitate resulting from the hydrolysis of the silicate network; it inherits from the glass structure from which the most weakly bonded cations (Na, Ca and B) have been released. At pH 11.5, the alteration process is very different: the high solubility of glass network formers (Si, Al, Zr) triggers the rapid and complete dissolution of the glass (dissolution becomes congruent) and precipitation of amorphous and crystalline phases. Unlike at pH 9 where glass corrosion rate decreased by 3 orders of magnitude likely due to transport-limiting phenomenon within the amorphous alteration layer, the rate at pH 11.5 is maintained at a value close to the forward rate due to both the hydrolysis of the silicate network and the precipitation of CSH and zeolites. This study provides key information for a unified model for glass dissolution.

  11. A comparative study of the cytotoxicity and corrosion resistance of nickel-titanium and titanium-niobium shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Rebecca E; Ma, Ji; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V; Munoz-Pinto, Dany; Karaman, Ibrahim; Rubitschek, Felix; Maier, Hans J; Hahn, Mariah S

    2012-07-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloys (SMAs) are commonly used in a range of biomedical applications. However, concerns exist regarding their use in certain biomedical scenarios due to the known toxicity of Ni and conflicting reports of NiTi corrosion resistance, particularly under dynamic loading. Titanium-niobium (TiNb) SMAs have recently been proposed as an alternative to NiTi SMAs due to the biocompatibility of both constituents, the ability of both Ti and Nb to form protective surface oxides, and their superior workability. However, several properties critical to the use of TiNb SMAs in biomedical applications have not been systematically explored in comparison with NiTi SMAs. These properties include cytocompatibility, corrosion resistance, and alterations in alloy surface composition in response to prolonged exposure to physiological solutions. Therefore, the goal of the present work was to comparatively investigate these aspects of NiTi (49.2 at.% Ti) and TiNb (26 at.% Nb) SMAs. The results from the current studies indicate that TiNb SMAs are less cytotoxic than NiTi SMAs, at least under static culture conditions. This increased TiNb cytocompatibility was correlated with reduced ion release as well as with increased corrosion resistance according to potentio-dynamic tests. Measurements of the surface composition of samples exposed to cell culture medium further supported the reduced ion release observed from TiNb relative to NiTi SMAs. Alloy composition depth profiles also suggested the formation of calcium phosphate deposits within the surface oxide layers of medium-exposed NiTi but not of TiNb. Collectively, the present results indicate that TiNb SMAs may be promising alternatives to NiTi for certain biomedical applications.

  12. The fate of silicon during glass corrosion under alkaline conditions: A mechanistic and kinetic study with the International Simple Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gin, Stéphane; Jollivet, Patrick; Fournier, Maxime; Berthon, Claude; Wang, Zhaoying; Mitroshkov, Alexandre; Zhu, Zihua; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2015-02-01

    International Simple Glass - a six oxide borosilicate glass selected by the international nuclear glass community to improve the understanding of glass corrosion mechanisms and kinetics - was altered at 90 °C in a solution initially saturated with respect to amorphous 29SiO2. The pH90°C, was fixed at 9 at the start of the experiment and raised to 11.5 after 209 d by the addition of KOH. Isotope sensitive analytical techniques were used to analyze the solution and altered glass samples, helping to understand the driving forces and rate limiting processes controlling long-term glass alteration. At pH 9, the corrosion rate continuously drops and the glass slowly transforms into a uniform, homogeneous amorphous alteration layer. The mechanisms responsible for this transformation are water penetration through the growing alteration layer and ion exchange. We demonstrate that this amorphous alteration layer is not a precipitate resulting from the hydrolysis of the silicate network; it is mostly inherited from the glass structure from which the most weakly bonded cations (Na, Ca and B) have been released. At pH 11.5, the alteration process is very different: the high solubility of glass network formers (Si, Al, Zr) triggers the rapid and complete dissolution of the glass (dissolution becomes congruent) and precipitation of amorphous and crystalline phases. Unlike at pH 9 where glass corrosion rate decreased by 3 orders of magnitude likely due to the retroaction of the alteration layer on water dynamics/reactivity at the reaction front, the rate at pH 11.5 is maintained at a value close to the forward rate due to both the hydrolysis of the silicate network promoted by OH- and the precipitation of CSH and zeolites. This study provides key information for a unified model for glass dissolution.

  13. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  14. Mentha pulegium extract as a natural product for the inhibition of corrosion. Part I: electrochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Khadraoui, Abdelkader; Khelifa, Abdellah; Boutoumi, Hocine; Hammouti, Belkheir

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of Mentha pulegium extract (MPE) on steel corrosion in 1 M HCl solution was investigated using potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The inhibition efficiency of MPE was found to increase with the concentration and reached 88% at 33% (v/v). Polarisation measurements show that the natural extract acted as a mixed inhibitor. The remarkable inhibition efficiency of MPE was discussed in terms of blocking of electrode surface by adsorption of inhibitor molecules through active centres. The adsorption of MPE was found to accord with the Temkin isotherm.

  15. Corrosion of 15th and early 16th century stained glass from the monastery of Batalha studied with external ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Vilarigues, M.; Redol, P.; Machado, A.; Rodrigues, P.A.; Alves, L.C.; Silva, R.C. da

    2011-02-15

    This paper reports the study of corrosion in two stained glass panels from the south aisle of Sta. Maria da Vitoria monastery, at Batalha (Portugal), one depicting the Last Supper (dated from 1508), and the other one showing a saint (c. 1450). These panels exhibit extensive corrosion with darkening phenomena that are an impediment to their correct visualization, a source of major concern both to conservators and curators. By using external micro-beam Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Particle Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE) spectrometry, the elemental compositions of large fragments were obtained, enabling the selection of representative corroded areas, from which elemental distribution maps were produced by scanning. Calcium and potassium rich structures were found - at the surface and inside cavities in the glass - that were identified as oxalates and carbonates, by Raman microscopy and micro-FTIR. The dark spots present in the glass surfaces were found to be Zn and Pb rich. These findings indicate that the corrosion observed was due not only to reactions with atmospheric water and CO{sub 2} but also with the oxalic acid secreted by micro-organisms. Furthermore, it did not result from reactions with atmospheric SO{sub 2} or acid rain. The information obtained is relevant for a better understanding of the corrosion processes and products formed on the surface of these panels and therefore for the proper planning of much needed adequate conservation-restoration actions and appropriate display conditions. - Research Highlights: {yields} Corrosion and darkening of stained glasses is of concern to conservators and curators. {yields} A multi-technique approach is of relevance to study stained glass corrosion. {yields} External beam PIXE-PIGE provide valuable insight on stained glass corrosion.

  16. An Abstract from The School in Question: A Comparative Study of the School and Its Future in Western Societies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husen, Torsten

    1979-01-01

    Presents an abstract from "The School in Question" by Torsten Husen, which is a result of a series of seminars organized by the Aspen Institute. The book identifies symptoms of institutional malaise in Western societies, diagnoses causes of the malaise, and suggests institutional changes to remedy the situation. (Author/KC)

  17. Agents of Change in Promoting Reflective Abstraction: A Quasi-Experimental, Study on Limits in College Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappetta, Robert W.; Zollman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    We measured student performance on the concept of limit by promoting reflection through four agents of change: instructor, peer, curriculum and individual. It is based on Piaget's four constructs of reflective abstraction: interiorization, coordination, encapsulation, and generalization, and includes the notion of reversal, as refined into a…

  18. Oxidation and corrosion studies of Al-implanted stainless steel AISI 321 using nuclear reaction and electrochemical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noli, F.; Misaelides, P.; Spathis, P.; Pilakouta, M.; Baumann, H.

    1992-05-01

    The oxidation of Al-implanted (implantation energy 40 keV, dose 1016-1017 Al ions/cm2) AISI 321 stainless steel samples in air has been studied at temperatures between 450 and 650°C using the 16O(d,p)17O nuclear reaction. The determination of the distribution of the implanted Al atoms has been performed using the resonance at 992 keV of the 27Al(p,γ)28Si nuclear reaction. The determined oxygen profiles indicate that the implantation of 5×1016 and 1017 Al ions/cm2 leads to an improvement of the oxidation resistance of the studied steel samples. The passivation/corrosion behaviour of the Al-implanted steel samples in 0.5M aqueous sulphuric acid solution has also been investigated electrochemically using potentiodynamic and cyclovoltammetric techniques. The passivation potential values and the repassivation moving to more positive values indicate an improvement of the corrosion resistance of the Al-implanted steel samples.

  19. In vitro corrosion and biocompatibility study of phytic acid modified WE43 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, C. H.; Zheng, Y. F.; Wang, S. Q.; Xi, T. F.; Li, Y. D.

    2012-02-01

    Phytic acid (PA) conversion coating on WE43 magnesium alloy was prepared by the method of immersion. The influences of phytic acid solution with different pH on the microstructure, properties of the conversion coating and the corrosion resistance were investigated by SEM, FTIR and potentiodynamic polarization method. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of different pH phytic acid solution modified WE43 magnesium alloys was evaluated by MTT and hemolysis test. The results show that PA can enhance the corrosion resistance of WE43 magnesium especially when the pH value of modified solution is 5 and the cytotoxicity of the PA coated WE43 magnesium alloy is much better than that of the bare WE43 magnesium alloy. Moreover, all the hemolysis rates of the PA coated WE43 Mg alloy were lower than 5%, indicating that the modified Mg alloy met the hemolysis standard of biomaterials. Therefore, PA coating is a good candidate to improve the biocompatibility of WE43 magnesium alloy.

  20. A case study of application of guided waves for detecting corrosion in pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, Javad; Safizadeh, Mir Saeed

    2012-05-01

    Every year noticeable amount of money is spent on fixing and replacing the damaged pipes which carry gas and fuel. Since there is a possibility for a catastrophic failure, knowing the proper time of this repair is of great importance. Because significant proportion of failures is due to wall thinning of pipes because of the corrosion, detecting the wall thinning has been a main part of nondestructive testing of pipes. There are wide variety of NDT techniques to detect this kind of defect such as conventional ultrasonic, eddy current, radiography etc. but some of these techniques, for example conventional ultrasonic needs the insulation of pipes removed and in some other cases such as radiography the test is not done at a reasonable speed. A new method of nondestructive testing of pipes which has the potential to test a long distance in a short period of time and does not need the whole insulation removed, has drawn a lot of attention. In this paper, the ability of ultrasonic guided waves for detecting corrosion in gas pipelines is experimentally investigated.

  1. Kinetic studies of the stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noronha, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of load interactions on the crack growth velocity of D6AC steel under stress corrosion cracking conditions was determined. The environment was a 3.5 percent salt solution. The modified-wedge opening load specimens were fatigue precracked and subjected to a deadweight loading in creep machines. The effects of load shedding on incubation times and crack growth rates were measured using high-sensitivity compliance measurement techniques. Load shedding results in an incubation time, the length of which depends on the amount of load shed and the baseline stress intensity. The sequence of unloading the specimen also controls the subsequent incubation period. The incubation period is shorter when load shedding passes through zero load than when it does not if the specimen initially had the same baseline stress intensity. The crack growth rates following the incubation period are also different from the steady-state crack growth rate at the operating stress intensity. These data show that the susceptibility of this alloy system to stress corrosion cracking depends on the plane-strain fracture toughness and on the yield strength of the material.

  2. Study of mechanical, physical, and corrosion behavior of 0.5% cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Bulan; Jaffar, Ahmed; Alias, Siti Khadijah; Ramli, Abdullah; Izham, Mohd Faizul

    2009-12-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of 0.5% Co-DI before and after heat treatment and compare with commercial ductile iron. Methods: Molten metal of newly developed ductile iron which alloyed with 0.5% Cobalt produced through CO2 sand casting method. The specimens then performed preheat to 500°C in an hour then oil quenched. Specimens then performed annealing to 900°C in half an hour before oil quenched again. 500°C, 600°C and 700°C austempering temperature had been selected subjected to the specimens in half an hour before cooled to room temperature. The tests involved are microstructure analysis which included nodule count and phase analysis, polarization test, spectrometer test, density test, tensile test (ASTM E 8M), hardness test and impact test (ASTM A327) on as cast and austempered specimen. Results: 0.5% Cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron with 500°C austempered temperature is the optimum temperature for 0.5% Co-ADI. It's not only increase the nodule count in the content, but also improve the mechanical properties such as impact toughness and tensile strength. Corrosion rate of 0.5% Co-DI also improved compare to unalloyed DI.

  3. Study of mechanical, physical, and corrosion behavior of 0.5% cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Bulan; Jaffar, Ahmed; Alias, Siti Khadijah; Ramli, Abdullah; Izham, Mohd Faizul

    2010-03-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of 0.5% Co-DI before and after heat treatment and compare with commercial ductile iron. Methods: Molten metal of newly developed ductile iron which alloyed with 0.5% Cobalt produced through CO2 sand casting method. The specimens then performed preheat to 500°C in an hour then oil quenched. Specimens then performed annealing to 900°C in half an hour before oil quenched again. 500°C, 600°C and 700°C austempering temperature had been selected subjected to the specimens in half an hour before cooled to room temperature. The tests involved are microstructure analysis which included nodule count and phase analysis, polarization test, spectrometer test, density test, tensile test (ASTM E 8M), hardness test and impact test (ASTM A327) on as cast and austempered specimen. Results: 0.5% Cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron with 500°C austempered temperature is the optimum temperature for 0.5% Co-ADI. It's not only increase the nodule count in the content, but also improve the mechanical properties such as impact toughness and tensile strength. Corrosion rate of 0.5% Co-DI also improved compare to unalloyed DI.

  4. Analyses of containment structures with corrosion damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Corrosion damage to a nuclear power plant containment structure can degrade the pressure capacity of the vessel. For the low-carbon, low- strength steels used in containments, the effect of corrosion on material properties is discussed. Strain-to-failure tests, in uniaxial tension, have been performed on corroded material samples. Results were used to select strain-based failure criteria for corroded steel. Using the ABAQUS finite element analysis code, the capacity of a typical PWR Ice Condenser containment with corrosion damage has been studied. Multiple analyses were performed with the locations of the corrosion the containment, and the amount of corrosion varied in each analysis.

  5. Grounding Abstractness: Abstract Concepts and the Activation of the Mouth

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Anna M.; Zarcone, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    One key issue for theories of cognition is how abstract concepts, such as freedom, are represented. According to the WAT (Words As social Tools) proposal, abstract concepts activate both sensorimotor and linguistic/social information, and their acquisition modality involves the linguistic experience more than the acquisition of concrete concepts. We report an experiment in which participants were presented with abstract and concrete definitions followed by concrete and abstract target-words. When the definition and the word matched, participants were required to press a key, either with the hand or with the mouth. Response times and accuracy were recorded. As predicted, we found that abstract definitions and abstract words yielded slower responses and more errors compared to concrete definitions and concrete words. More crucially, there was an interaction between the target-words and the effector used to respond (hand, mouth). While responses with the mouth were overall slower, the advantage of the hand over the mouth responses was more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts. The results are in keeping with grounded and embodied theories of cognition and support the WAT proposal, according to which abstract concepts evoke linguistic-social information, hence activate the mouth. The mechanisms underlying the mouth activation with abstract concepts (re-enactment of acquisition experience, or re-explanation of the word meaning, possibly through inner talk) are discussed. To our knowledge this is the first behavioral study demonstrating with real words that the advantage of the hand over the mouth is more marked with concrete than with abstract concepts, likely because of the activation of linguistic information with abstract concepts. PMID:27777563

  6. Corrosion study of iron-cobalt alloys for MRI-based propulsion embedded in untethered microdevices operating in the vascular network.

    PubMed

    Pouponneau, Pierre; Savadogo, Oumarou; Napporn, Teko; Yahia, L'hocine; Martel, Sylvain

    2010-04-01

    Our group have shown in an experiment performed in the carotid artery of a living swine that magnetic gradients generated by a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system could propel and navigate untethered medical microdevices and micro-nanorobots in the human vasculature. The main problem with these devices is that the metal necessary for magnetic propulsion may corrode and induce cytotoxic effects. The challenge, then, is to find an alloy with low corrosion yet providing an adequate magnetization level for propulsion in often stringent physiological conditions. Because of their high magnetization, we studied the corrosion behavior of two iron-cobalt alloys, Permendur (49% Fe, 49% Co, 2% V) and Vacoflux 17 (81% Fe, 17% Co, 2% Cr), in physiological solution by potentiodynamic polarization assay, surface analysis, and corrosion electrolyte analysis. Both alloys exhibited low corrosion parameters such as a corrosion potential (E(corr)) of -0.57 V/SCE and E(corr) of -0.42 V/SCE for Vacoflux 17. The surface of Permendur samples was homogenously degraded. Vacoflux 17 surface was impaired by cracks and crevices. Both alloys had a stoichiometric dissolution in the electrolyte, and they released enough cobalt to induce cytotoxic effects. This study concluded that Fe-Co alloys could be used preferably in medical microdevices if they were coated so as not to come in contact with physiological solutions.

  7. Psychological Abstracts/BRS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Donna R.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses particular problems and possible solutions in searching the Psychological Abstracts database, with special reference to its loading on BRS. Included are examples of typical searches, citations (with or without abstract/annotation), a tabulated searchguide to Psychological Abstracts on BRS and specifications for the database. (Author/JD)

  8. Abstraction and Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, John; Ozmantar, Mehmet Fatih

    2006-01-01

    The framework for this paper is a recently developed theory of abstraction in context. The paper reports on data collected from one student working on tasks concerned with absolute value functions. It examines the relationship between mathematical constructions and abstractions. It argues that an abstraction is a consolidated construction that can…

  9. A study of electrochemically-induced corrosion of low carbon steel in a medium modelling acid rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vértes, Cs.; Lakatos-Varsányi, M.; Vértes, A.; Meisel, W.; Gütlich, P.

    1994-12-01

    Complementary electrochemical, spectrophotometric and electron microsopic investigations were made in addition to the conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopic (CEMS) measurements to learn more about the mechanism of corrosion of low carbon steel samples in aqueous sulfate and sulfite containing sulfate solutions (pH 3.5, 6.5 and 8.5). Passivation of iron in pure sulfate solution was studied in detail in earlier papers. In the present work, we used a solution containing both sulfate and sulfite anions to obtain more information about the effect of acid rain on low carbon steel samples. The compositions and thicknesses of the passive films formed due to the electrochemical treatments were determined from the CEM spectra. γ-FeOOH was found in each case on the surface of the samples; nevertheless, at pH 3.5 the sextet belonging to Fe3C appears in the CEM spectra, and also FeSO4 · H2O was detected in low concentration after the shortest polarization time (90 min). The results of the applied methods proved that the sulfite ions induce pitting corrosion at pH 3.5 and 6.5, while the measurements referred to suppressed pitting at pH 8.5.

  10. Composition of CuAu alloy and changes upon corrosion studied by Hard X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajput, Parasmani; Detlefs, Blanka; Gupta, Ajay; Kolb, Dieter; Zegenhagen, Jorg

    2011-03-01

    Metals and their alloys are highly susceptible to corrosion in wet environment. Dealloying is a particular type of corrosion, attacking practically all metals in industrial use: When an alloy is coming into contact with an electrolyte, the less noble metal may go into solution, typically causing crack formation and subsequent material failure upon stress. We used bulk sensitive Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) with an excitation energy of 6 keV as a new powerful tool to investigate the chemical composition of alloys and changes upon dealloying, studying Cu x Au (with x = 4.1) alloy films of 9 to 50 nm thickness. Morphology, structure and composition were further characterized by atomic force microscopy, X-ray reflectivity and quantitative X-ray fluorescence. The HAXPES analysis revealed that chemical shifts of metal core-levels, i.e. Au 4 f and Cu 3 s , can be used as a benchmark for the alloy composition. HAXPES as a function of electron emission angle allowed depth sensitive determination of the chemical composition before and after dealloying in sulphuric acid.

  11. Experimental and Quantum Studies on Adsorption and Corrosion Inhibition Effect of Imidazole Derivatives on N80 Steel in Hydrochloric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, M.; Kumar, Sumit; Sharma, Dipti; Yadav, P. N.

    2013-12-01

    The inhibition effect of synthesized N‧-(phenylmethylidene)-2-(2-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)acetohydrazides, N‧-(4-methylphenylmethylidene)-2-(2-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)acetohydrazides, and N‧-(4-methoxyphenylmethylidene)-2-(2-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)acetohydrazides on the corrosion behaviour of N80 steel in 15% hydrochloric acid solution was investigated using weight loss, potentiostatic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods. The inhibition efficiency increased as the concentration of the inhibitors was increased. The effect of temperature on corrosion inhibition was investigated by weight loss method and thermodynamic parameters were calculated. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements show that all the three studied inhibitors act as mixed inhibitor. The adsorption of inhibitors on N80 steel surface obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The structure of inhibitors was optimized using semiemperical AM1 method. Theoretical parameters such as the highest occupied molecular orbital (EHOMO), lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (ELUMO) energy levels, energy gap (ΔE = ELUMO - EHOMO), dipole moment (μ), global hardness (γ), softness (σ), binding energy, molecular surface area and the fraction of electrons transferred (ΔN) were calculated and the adsorption mechanism was discussed. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the surface marphology of the N80 steel.

  12. A study of the use of abstract types for the representation of engineering units in integration and test applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles S.

    1986-01-01

    Physical quantities using various units of measurement can be well represented in Ada by the use of abstract types. Computation involving these quantities (electric potential, mass, volume) can also automatically invoke the computation and checking of some of the implicitly associable attributes of measurements. Quantities can be held internally in SI units, transparently to the user, with automatic conversion. Through dimensional analysis, the type of the derived quantity resulting from a computation is known, thereby allowing dynamic checks of the equations used. The impact of the possible implementation of these techniques in integration and test applications is discussed. The overhead of computing and transporting measurement attributes is weighed against the advantages gained by their use. The construction of a run time interpreter using physical quantities in equations can be aided by the dynamic equation checks provided by dimensional analysis. The effects of high levels of abstraction on the generation and maintenance of software used in integration and test applications are also discussed.

  13. A Study on Cavitation Erosion and Corrosion Behavior of Al-, Zn-, Cu-, and Fe-Based Coatings Prepared by Arc Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Hong; Lee, Myeong-Hoon

    2010-12-01

    Investigation to find a suitable coating material for a rudder application has been carried out in this study. Ten different coatings were prepared by arc spraying with Al-, Zn-, Cu-, and Fe-based wire feedstock. Both the cavitation erosion and marine corrosion behavior of the arc-sprayed coatings were evaluated, and compared with the conventional anti-corrosion paint. In terms of marine corrosion resistance, aluminum coating was the best among the tested coating systems while stainless steel coating showed the highest resistance against cavitation erosion. In addition, the effects of both the Si composition in Al-based coatings and the Ni composition in Cu- and Fe- based coatings were discussed in this study.

  14. Experimental and theoretical study of the phenomena of corrosion by carbon dioxide under dewing conditions at the top of a horizontal pipeline in the presence of a noncondensable gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitse, Frederic

    2002-01-01

    Under a stratified flow regime and under dewing conditions, internal corrosion can occur at the top of horizontal pipelines. Corrosive gases such as carbon dioxide dissolve in the freshly condensed water on the inner pipewall where continuous injection of inhibitors of corrosion is not possible. In absence of such inhibitors, a thorough understanding of the phenomena of corrosion under dewing conditions is needed to predict the corrosion risk. The corrosion and condensation rates were studied experimentally in a full-scale flow-loop. The experimental data were compared with theoretical results obtained from a mechanistic model for the prediction of the corrosion rate during Top-of-the-Line Corrosion (TLC). This model solves the hydrodynamics of the condensed liquid and the heat and mass transfer in the gas phase to predict the condensation rate in a horizontal pipeline in the presence of a non-condensable gas. Further, the mass transfer in the condensed liquid is coupled to the thermodynamics of the vapor-liquid equilibrium and to an electrochemical model for the corrosion reaction at the wall. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code was implemented to study the influence of mass transfer in the condensed water on the corrosion rate. Based on the chemistry of the condensed liquid the corrosion rate in the absence and in the presence of an iron carbonate scale is computed. The mechanistic model is tuned to a large set of experimental corrosion rates through the use of the superficial porosity accounting for the partial blockage of the corroding surface by the deposition of an iron carbonate scale. Increasing the gas temperature led to larger condensation and corrosion rates. However, at a higher temperature the corrosion rate was found to decrease due to the formation of a corrosion products scale. The gas velocity was found to influence the condensation rate, which, in turn, influenced the corrosion rate. The total pressure and partial pressure of CO2 played a

  15. Corrosion of 310 stainless steel in H2-H2O-H2S gas mixtures: Studies at constant temperature and fixed oxygen potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. B.; Jacob, K. T.; Nelson, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    Corrosion of SAE 310 stainless steel in H2-H2O-H2S gas mixtures was studied at a constant temperature of 1150 K. Reactive gas mixtures were chosen to yield a constant oxygen potential of approximately 6 x 10 to the minus 13th power/cu Nm and sulfur potentials ranging from 0.19 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm to 33 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm. The kinetics of corrosion were determined using a thermobalance, and the scales were analyzed using metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Two corrosion regimes, which were dependent on sulfur potential, were identified. At high sulfur potentials (p sub S sub 2 less than or equal to 2.7 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm) the corrosion rates were high, the kinetics obeyed a linear rate equation, and the scales consisted mainly of sulfide phases similar to those observed from pure sulfication. At low sulfur potentials (P sub S sub 2 less than or equal to 0.19 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm) the corrosion rates were low, the kinetics obeyed a parabolic rate equation, and scales consisted mainly of oxide phases.

  16. A study on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in hot alkaline-sulfide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasse, Kevin Robert

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) generally have superior strength and corrosion resistance as compared to most standard austenitic and ferritic stainless grades owing to a balanced microstructure of austenite and ferrite. As a result of having favorable properties, DSS have been selected for the construction of equipment in pulp and paper, chemical processing, nuclear, oil and gas as well as other industries. The use of DSS has been restricted in some cases because of stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which can initiate and grow in either the ferrite or austenite phase depending on the environment. Thorough understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in chloride- and hydrogen sulfide-containing solutions has been useful for material selection in many environments. However, understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in sulfide-containing caustic solutions is limited, which has restricted the capacity to optimize process and equipment design in pulp and paper environments. Process environments may contain different concentrations of hydroxide, sulfide, and chloride, altering corrosion and SCC susceptibility of each phase. Crack initiation and growth behavior will also change depending on the relative phase distribution and properties of austenite and ferrite. The role of microstructure and environment on the SCC of standard grade UNS S32205 and lean grade UNS S32101 in hot alkaline-sulfide solution were evaluated in this work using electrochemical, film characterization, mechanical testing, X-ray diffraction, and microscopy techniques. Microstructural aspects, which included residual stress state, phase distribution, phase ratio, and microhardness, were related to the propensity for SCC crack initiation in different simulated alkaline pulping liquors at 170 °C. Other grades of DSS and reference austenitic and superferritic grades of stainless steel were studied using exposure coupons for comparison to understand compositional effects and individual phase susceptibility

  17. Abstraction and Problem Reformulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giunchiglia, Fausto

    1992-01-01

    In work done jointly with Toby Walsh, the author has provided a sound theoretical foundation to the process of reasoning with abstraction (GW90c, GWS9, GW9Ob, GW90a). The notion of abstraction formalized in this work can be informally described as: (property 1), the process of mapping a representation of a problem, called (following historical convention (Sac74)) the 'ground' representation, onto a new representation, called the 'abstract' representation, which, (property 2) helps deal with the problem in the original search space by preserving certain desirable properties and (property 3) is simpler to handle as it is constructed from the ground representation by "throwing away details". One desirable property preserved by an abstraction is provability; often there is a relationship between provability in the ground representation and provability in the abstract representation. Another can be deduction or, possibly inconsistency. By 'throwing away details' we usually mean that the problem is described in a language with a smaller search space (for instance a propositional language or a language without variables) in which formulae of the abstract representation are obtained from the formulae of the ground representation by the use of some terminating rewriting technique. Often we require that the use of abstraction results in more efficient .reasoning. However, it might simply increase the number of facts asserted (eg. by allowing, in practice, the exploration of deeper search spaces or by implementing some form of learning). Among all abstractions, three very important classes have been identified. They relate the set of facts provable in the ground space to those provable in the abstract space. We call: TI abstractions all those abstractions where the abstractions of all the provable facts of the ground space are provable in the abstract space; TD abstractions all those abstractions wllere the 'unabstractions' of all the provable facts of the abstract space are

  18. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  19. A Case Study of One Instructor's Lecture-Based Teaching of Proof in Abstract Algebra: Making Sense of Her Pedagogical Moves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukawa-Connelly, Timothy Patrick

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a case study of the teaching of an undergraduate abstract algebra course, in particular the way the instructor presented proofs. It describes a framework for proof writing based on Selden and Selden (2009) and the work of Alcock (2010) on modes of thought that support proof writing. The paper offers a case study of the teaching of a…

  20. Influence of NOM on copper corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Korshin, G.V.; Ferguson, J.F.; Perry, S.A.L.

    1996-07-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) profoundly affected the corrosion of copper in a moderately alkaline synthetic water. It decreased the rate of corrosion, increased the rate of copper leaching, and dispersed crystalline inorganic corrosion products. The interaction of NOM with corrosion products was modeled using separate phase of malachite and cuprous oxide. The authors concluded that NOM promotes the formation of pits in a certain narrow range of concentrations (0.1--0.2 mg/L in laboratory tests) and suppresses this type of corrosion at higher dosages. At low DOC concentrations, the main interaction between NOM and the surfaces of corroding metal and corrosion products is adsorption. The influence of NOM on corrosion of metals in real distribution systems must be studied in relation to long periods of surface aging, flow rate, concentration and type of oxidants, pH, and alkalinity.

  1. Waste of cleaning emulsion sewage as inhibitors of steel corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazullin, D. D.; Mavrin, G. V.; Shaikhiev, I. G.

    2016-06-01

    The article describes the corrosion test of steel of the brand 20 in the stratal water. To increase corrosion resistance as a corrosion inhibitor the concentrate waste emulsion of the mark "Incam- 1" was provided. The article presents studies of the corrosion rate with different dosages of corrosion inhibitor in the stratal water. Based on these research results are revealed that the degree of protection of steel is 27% at a dosage of 3.8 g / dm3.

  2. Study of the effects of gaseous environments on the hot corrosion of superalloy materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeggil, J. G.; Bornstein, N. S.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the gaseous corrodent NaCl on the high temperature oxidation and sodium sulfate induced hot corrosion behavior of alumina formers, chromia formers, and the superalloy B-1900 was examined. Isothermal experiments were conducted at 900 C and 1050 C in air in the presence and absence of NaCl vapors. Microstructural changes in oxide morphology and increased rates of oxidation were observed when NaCl(g) was present. It is hypothesized that the accelerated rates of oxidation are the result of removal of aluminum from the scale substrate interface and the weakening of the scale substrate bonds. The aluminum removed was redeposited on the surfaces in the form of alumina whiskers. For the superalloy B-1900, alumina whiskers are also formed, and the alloy oxidizes at catastrophic rates. In the case of Ni-25Cr alloy, NaCl vapors interact with the scale depleting it of chromium.

  3. A positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopic study of the corrosion protective properties of epoxy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    MacQueen, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) was used to measure the free volume cavity sizes and free volume fractions of crosslinked epoxy coatings on steel before and after saturation with liquid water at 23[degrees]C. A direct linear relationship between the equilibrium volume fraction of water absorbed and the dry relative free volume fraction of bisphenol A epoxy coatings was found. The free volume cavity sizes and the number of free volume cavities per unit volume of these epoxies were found to decrease after water saturation. These decreases are ascribed to the occupation of 13-17% of the free volume cavities by 2-4 water molecules per cavity. The free volume cavity size of polyglycol diepoxides was found to increase after water saturation. This increase is ascribed to the expansion of the free volume cavities by water, which is substantiated by the macroscopic swelling observed in these coatings. An inverse, linear relationship between the equilibrium water uptake and the relative free volume fraction of these coatings were observed. This result coupled with the fact that less than one molecule of nitrobenzene was determined to fit into an epoxy free volume cavity, and that nitrobenzene is quite soluble in most of the epoxides, indicates that other factors besides the magnitude of the free volume fraction affect the amount of solvent absorbed by epoxy coatings. The small percentage of free volume occupied by water and the small number of water molecules capable of filling each void of the bisphenol A epoxies after water saturation correlate to the high impedance values and the good corrosion protection of these coatings, suggesting that water passes through these coatings by slow diffusion through the connected free volume cavities in the coating. Increases in the free volume cavity sizes of the polyglycol diepoxides after water saturation correlate to the low impedance and the poor corrosion protection of these coatings.

  4. Surface Studies of HSLA [high strength low alloy] Steel after Electrochemical Corrosion in Supercritical CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M. Holcomb, G. Tylczak, J Beck, J Fedkin, M. Lvov, S.

    2011-10-11

    Corrosion resistance of pipeline materials for transporting coal combustion produced supercritical CO{sub 2} from power plants to sequestration sites has not been fully determined. Although pipeline materials are resistant to corrosion in pure supercritical CO{sub 2}, cleaning costs of combustion produced CO{sub 2} streams from impurities such as H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} are too high, making sequestration of pure CO{sub 2} streams unfeasible. Impacts of the H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} impurities on pipeline corrosion must be determined. Filling Up This Technological Gap requires studying effects of H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} concentrations on pipeline.

  5. The relationship between the surface composition and electrical properties of corrosion films formed on carbon steel in alkaline sour medium: an XPS and EIS study.

    PubMed

    Galicia, Policarpo; Batina, Nikola; González, Ignacio

    2006-07-27

    This work studies the evolution of 1018 carbon steel surfaces during 3-15 day immersion in alkaline sour medium 0.1 M (NH4)2S and 10 ppm CN(-) as (NaCN). During this period of time, surfaces were jointly characterized by electrochemical techniques in situ (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, EIS) and spectroscopic techniques ex situ (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS). The results obtained by these techniques allowed for a description of electrical and chemical properties of the films of corrosion products formed at the 1018 steel surface. There is an interconversion cycle of chemical species that form films of corrosion products whose conversion reactions favor two different types of diffusions inside the films: a chemical diffusion of iron cations and a typical diffusion of atomic hydrogen. These phenomena jointly control the passivity of the interface attacked by the corrosive medium.

  6. CORROSION STUDY FOR THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY (ETF) CHROME (VI) REDUCTANT SOLUTION USING 304 & 316L STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN, J.B.

    2007-06-27

    The Effluent Treatment Facility has developed a method to regenerate spent resin from the groundwater pump and treat intercepting chrome(VI) plumes (RPP-RPT-32207, Laboratory Study on Regeneration of Spent DOWEX 21K 16-20 Mesh Ion Exchange Resin). Subsequent laboratory studies have shown that the chrome(VI) may be reduced to chrome(III) by titrating with sodium metabisulfite to an oxidation reduction potential (ORP) of +280 mV at a pH of 2. This test plan describes the use of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization techniques to ascertain the electrochemical corrosion and pitting propensity of the 304 and 316L stainless steel in the acidified reducing the solution that will be contained in either the secondary waste receiver tank or concentrate tank.

  7. Experimental and theoretical studies of xanthan gum and its graft co-polymer as corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in 15% HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Amrita; Pal, Sagar; Udayabhanu, G.

    2015-10-01

    Xanthan gum (XG) and its graft co-polymer have been investigated as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in 15% HCl. Gravimetric analysis, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods were employed for investigating the effectiveness of these inhibitors. Results indicate that both the inhibitors are of mixed type and follow Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study also confirmed the protection of the metal surface by XG and xanthan gum-graft-poly(acrylamide) (XG-g-PAM). Theoretical calculations using Density Functional Theory (DFT) were used to establish the correlation between the structure and corrosion protection efficiencies.

  8. General Corrosion and Localized Corrosion of Waste Package Outer Barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.C.; McCright, R.D.

    2000-01-28

    Alloy 22 is an extremely Corrosion Resistant Material, with a very stable passive film. Based upon exposures in the LTCTF, the GC rates of Alloy 22 are typically below the level of detection, with four outliers having reported rates up to 0.75 #mu#m per year. In any event, over the 10,000 year life of the repository, GC of the Alloy 22 (assumed to be 2 cm thick) should not be life limiting. Because measured corrosion potentials are far below threshold potentials, localized breakdown of the passive film is unlikely under plausible conditions, even in SSW at 120 deg C. The pH in ambient-temperature crevices formed from Alloy 22 have been determined experimentally, with only modest lowering of the crevice pH observed under plausible conditions. Extreme lowering of the crevice pH was only observed under situations where the applied potential at the crevice mouth was sufficient to result in catastrophic breakdown of the passive film above the threshold potential in non-buffered conditions not characteristic of the Yucca Mountain environment. In cases where naturally ocurring buffers are present in the crevice solution, little or no lowering of the pH was observed, even with significant applied potential. With exposures of twelve months, no evidence of crevice corrosion has been observed in SDW, SCW and SAW at temperatures up to 90 deg C. An abstracted model has been presented, with parameters determined experimentally, that should enable performance assessment to account for the general and localized corrosion of this material. A feature of this model is the use of the materials specification to limit the range of corrosion and threshold potentials, thereby making sure that substandard materials prone to localized attack are avoided. Model validation will be covered in part by a companion SMR on abstraction of this model.

  9. Corrosion-Activated Micro-Containers for Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, J. W.; Zhang, X.; Johnsey, M. N.; Pearman, B. P.; Jolley, S. T.; Calle, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    indicators, inhibitors and self-healing agents. This allows the incorporation of autonomous corrosion control functionalities, such as corrosion detection and inhibition as well as the self-healing of mechanical damage, into coatings. This paper presents technical details on the characterization of inhibitor-containing particles and their corrosion inhibitive effects using electrochemical and mass loss methods.Three organic environmentally friendly corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated in organic microparticles that are compatible with desired coatings. The release of the inhibitors from the microparticles in basic solution was studied. Fast release, for immediate corrosion protection, as well as long-term release for continued protection, was observed.The inhibition efficacy of the inhibitors, incorporated directly and in microparticles, on carbon steel was evaluated. Polarization curves and mass loss measurements showed that, in the case of 2MBT, its corrosion inhibition effectiveness was greater when it was delivered from microparticles.

  10. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  11. Loving Those Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lori

    2004-01-01

    The author describes a lesson she did on abstract art with her high school art classes. She passed out a required step-by-step outline of the project process. She asked each of them to look at abstract art. They were to list five or six abstract artists they thought were interesting, narrow their list down to the one most personally intriguing,…

  12. Studies of Corrosion Resistant Materials Being Considered for High-Level Nuclear Waste Containment in Yucca Mountain Relevant Environments

    SciTech Connect

    McCright, R.D.; Ilevbare, G.; Estill, J.; Rebak, R.

    2001-12-09

    Containment of spent nuclear fuel and vitrified forms of high level nuclear waste require use of materials that are highly corrosion resistant to all of the anticipated environmental scenarios that can occur in a geological repository. Ni-Cr-Mo Alloy 22 (UNS N60622) is proposed for the corrosion resistant outer barrier of a two-layer waste package container at the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain. A range of water compositions that may contact the outer barrier is under consideration, and a testing program is underway to characterize the forms of corrosion and to quantify the corrosion rates. Results from the testing support models for long term prediction of the performance of the container. Results obtained to date indicate a very low general corrosion rate for Alloy 22 and very high resistance to all forms of localized and environmentally assisted cracking in environments tested to date.

  13. The Effectiveness of Education and Schooling Activities with Respect to Learning Styles on the Learning of Abstract and Tangible Concepts of Social Studies by Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seker, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    This research reviews the effects of education and schooling activities that are conducted with respect to different learning styles on the success of teaching abstract and tangible concepts of 6th Grade Social Studies, and researches whether the demographic variables (age, gender) of the students had any effect on this success levels. To do so, 2…

  14. XPS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies on effects of the porcelain firing process on surface and corrosion properties of two nickel-chromium dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jing; Tang, Chun-bo; Zhu, Zhi-jun; Zhou, Guo-xing; Wang, Jie; Yang, Yi; Wang, Guo-ping

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a simulated porcelain firing process on the surface, corrosion behavior and cell culture response of two nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) dental alloys. A Be-free alloy and a Be-containing alloy were tested. Before porcelain firing, as-cast specimens were examined for surface composition using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and metallurgical phases using X-ray diffraction. Corrosion behaviors were evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. 3T3 fibroblasts were cultured and exposed indirectly to specimens. MTT assays were counted after 3 and 6 days. The cell culture mediums exposed to specimens were analyzed for metal ion release. After porcelain firing, similar specimens were examined for the same properties. In both as-cast and fired conditions, the Be-free Ni-Cr alloy showed significantly more resistance to corrosion than the Be-containing Ni-Cr alloy, which exhibited BeNi phase. After porcelain firing, the corrosion resistance of the Be-free Ni-Cr alloy decreased statistically, corresponding with evident decreases of Cr and Ni oxides on the alloy surface. Also, the alloy's MTT assay decreased significantly corresponding with an obvious increase of Ni-ion release after the firing. For the Be-containing Ni-Cr alloy, the firing process led to increases of surface oxides and metallic Be, while its corrosion resistance and cell culture response were not significantly changed after porcelain firing. The results suggested that the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the Be-free Ni-Cr alloy decreased after porcelain firing, whereas the firing process had little effect on the same properties of the Be-containing Ni-Cr alloy. PMID:23881280

  15. XPS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies on effects of the porcelain firing process on surface and corrosion properties of two nickel-chromium dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jing; Tang, Chun-bo; Zhu, Zhi-jun; Zhou, Guo-xing; Wang, Jie; Yang, Yi; Wang, Guo-ping

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a simulated porcelain firing process on the surface, corrosion behavior and cell culture response of two nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) dental alloys. A Be-free alloy and a Be-containing alloy were tested. Before porcelain firing, as-cast specimens were examined for surface composition using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and metallurgical phases using X-ray diffraction. Corrosion behaviors were evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. 3T3 fibroblasts were cultured and exposed indirectly to specimens. MTT assays were counted after 3 and 6 days. The cell culture mediums exposed to specimens were analyzed for metal ion release. After porcelain firing, similar specimens were examined for the same properties. In both as-cast and fired conditions, the Be-free Ni-Cr alloy showed significantly more resistance to corrosion than the Be-containing Ni-Cr alloy, which exhibited BeNi phase. After porcelain firing, the corrosion resistance of the Be-free Ni-Cr alloy decreased statistically, corresponding with evident decreases of Cr and Ni oxides on the alloy surface. Also, the alloy's MTT assay decreased significantly corresponding with an obvious increase of Ni-ion release after the firing. For the Be-containing Ni-Cr alloy, the firing process led to increases of surface oxides and metallic Be, while its corrosion resistance and cell culture response were not significantly changed after porcelain firing. The results suggested that the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of the Be-free Ni-Cr alloy decreased after porcelain firing, whereas the firing process had little effect on the same properties of the Be-containing Ni-Cr alloy.

  16. Corrosion protection of copper by polypyrrole film studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and the electrochemical quartz microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yanhua; Ohtsuka, Toshiaki; Sheng, Nan

    2015-12-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) films were synthesized on copper in solution of sodium di-hydrogen phosphate and phytate for corrosion protection. The protection properties of PPy films were comparatively investigated in NaCl solution. During two months immersion, the PPy film doped with phytate anions, working as a cationic perm-selective membrane, inhibited the dissolution of copper to 1% of bare copper. Differently, the PPy film doped with di-hydrogen phosphate anions, possessing anionic perm-selectivity, was gradually reduced, and inhibited the dissolution to 7.8% of bare copper. Degradation of the PPy films was studied by comparing the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy change at different immersion time and Raman spectra change after immersion.

  17. Experimental and computational studies of naphthyridine derivatives as corrosion inhibitor for N80 steel in 15% hydrochloric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, K. R.; Quraishi, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    The inhibition effect of three naphthyridine derivatives namely 2-amino-4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carbonitrile (ANC-1), 2-amino-4-(4-methylphenyl)-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carbonitrile (ANC-2) and 2-amino-4-(3-nitrophenyl)-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carbonitrile (ANC-3) as corrosion inhibitors for N80 steel in 15% HCl by using gravimetric, electrochemical techniques (EIS and potentiodynamic polarization), SEM, EDX and quantum chemical calculation. The order of inhibition efficiency is ANC-1>ANC-2>ANC-3. Potentiodynamic polarization reveals that these inhibitors are mixed type with predominant cathodic control. Studied inhibitors obey the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The quantum calculation is in good agreement with experimental results.

  18. Corrosion and stability study of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki starch industry wastewater-derived biopesticide formulation.

    PubMed

    Gnepe, Jean R; Tyagi, Rajeshwar D; Brar, Satinder K; Valéro, José R; Surampalli, Rao Y

    2014-01-01

    Biopesticides are usually sprayed on forests by using planes made up of aluminum alloy. Bioval derived from starch industry wastewater (SIW) in suspension form was developed as stable anticorrosive biopesticide formulation. In this context, various anticorrosion agents such as activated charcoal, glycerin, ethylene glycol, phytic acid, castor oil and potassium silicate were tested as anticorrosive agents. There was no corrosion found in Bioval formulation where potassium silicate (0.5% w/v) was added and compared with Foray 76 B, as an industrial standard, when stored over 6 months. In relation to other parameters, the anticorrosion formulation of Bioval+buffer+KSi reported excellent zeta potential (-33.19 ± 4 mV) and the viscosity (319.13 ± 32 mPa.s) proving it's stability over 6 months, compared to the standard biopesticide Foray 76 B (-36.62 ± 4 mV potential zeta, pH 4.14 ± 0.1 and 206 ± 21 mPa.s viscosity). Metal analysis of the different biopesticides showed that Bioval+buffer+KSi has no corrosion (5.11 ± 0.5 mg kg(-1) of Al and 13.53 ± 1.5 mg kg(-1) of Fe) on the aluminum alloy due to the contribution of sodium acetate buffer at pH 5. The bioassays reported excellent results for Bioval+Buffer+KSi (2.95 ± 0.3 × 10(9) CFU mL(-1) spores and 26.6 ± 2.7 × 10(9) IU L(-1) Tx) compared with initial Bioval (2.46 ± 0.3 × 10(9) CFU mL(-1) spores and 23.09 ± 3 × 10(9) IU L(-1) Tx) and Foray 76 B (2.3 ± 0.2 × 10(9) CFU mL(-1) spores and 19.950 ± 2.1 UI L(-1) Tx) which was due to the break-up of the external chitinous membrane due to abrasive action of potassium silicate after ingestion by insects. The contribution of sodium acetate buffer and potassium silicate (0.5% and at pH = 5) as anticorrosion agent in the Bioval allowed production of an efficient biopesticide with a reduced viscosity and favorable pH as compared to Foray 76 B which enhanced the entomotoxic potential against spruce budworm (SB) larvae (Lepidoptera: Choristoneura fumiferana).

  19. Studies on corrosion behaviour of electro-slag strip cladded weld overlays for chemical process industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahar, Sunilkumar D.

    The rapidly expanding oil sands of western Canada, the third largest reserves in the world, are creating serious challenges, such as ecological harm, labour shortages, and extensive natural gas consumption. This thesis develops three practical real options models to evaluate the feasibility of oil sands projects and to estimate the optimal rate of oil sands expansion, while accounting for the stated concerns. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  20. Yucca Mountain project canister material corrosion studies as applied to the electrometallurgical treatment metallic waste form

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, D.D.

    1996-11-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is currently being evaluated as a potential site for a geologic repository. As part of the repository assessment activities, candidate materials are being tested for possible use as construction materials for waste package containers. A large portion of this testing effort is focused on determining the long range corrosion properties, in a Yucca Mountain environment, for those materials being considered. Along similar lines, Argonne National Laboratory is testing a metallic alloy waste form that also is scheduled for disposal in a geologic repository, like Yucca Mountain. Due to the fact that Argonne`s waste form will require performance testing for an environment similar to what Yucca Mountain canister materials will require, this report was constructed to focus on the types of tests that have been conducted on candidate Yucca Mountain canister materials along with some of the results from these tests. Additionally, this report will discuss testing of Argonne`s metal waste form in light of the Yucca Mountain activities.

  1. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour. PMID:27403638

  2. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour.

    PubMed

    Martin, T L; Coe, C; Bagot, P A J; Morrall, P; Smith, G D W; Scott, T; Moody, M P

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour. PMID:27403638

  3. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W.; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour.

  4. Applications of advanced electrochemical techniques in the study of microbial fuel cells and corrosion protection by polymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohar, Aswin Karthik

    determined by the sum of the polarization resistance of the anode (Rap) and the cathode (Rcp), and therefore Rint depends on V. The ohmic contribution to the Rint was very small. It has been found that Rint decreased with decreasing cell voltage as the increasing current flow decreased R ap and Rcp. In the presence of MR-1, Rint was lower by a factor of about 100 than Rint of the MFC with buffer and lactate as anolyte. Additions of SS balls to the anode compartment produced a very large decrease of Rint. For the MFC containing SS balls in the anode compartment no significant further decrease of Rint could be observed when MR-1 was added to the anolyte. In Chapter 2, EIS has been used to determine the properties and stability of polymer coatings based on different chromate or chromate-free pretreatments and primers. Five sets of coated aluminum 2024 samples were exposed to 0.5N NaCl for a period of 31 days. Impedance spectra of the samples were measured during this period and the changes of the properties of the different coatings were studied as a function of time. From the analysis of the fit parameters of the impedance spectra, it was found that the corrosion protection of the coated samples depended on the type of primer used. The coating with the chromate based primer provided better corrosion protection than the coating with the chromate free primer. After 31 days of exposure, one sample from each set was scribed and exposed to 0.5N NaCl. The corrosion behavior of the scribed coatings was found to be dependent upon the type of pretreatment employed. The samples with the chromate conversion coating pretreatment showed better corrosion resistance in the scribed area than the samples that were treated by the trivalent chromium based method.

  5. Mathematical Abstraction through Scaffolding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmantar, Mehmet Fatih; Roper, Tom

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the role of scaffolding in the process of abstraction. An activity-theoretic approach to abstraction in context is taken. This examination is carried out with reference to verbal protocols of two 17 year-old students working together on a task connected to sketching the graph of |f|x|)|. Examination of the data suggests that…

  6. Is It Really Abstract?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kernan, Christine

    2011-01-01

    For this author, one of the most enjoyable aspects of teaching elementary art is the willingness of students to embrace the different styles of art introduced to them. In this article, she describes a project that allows upper-elementary students to learn about abstract art and the lives of some of the master abstract artists, implement the idea…

  7. Paper Abstract Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutley, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Abstraction is, in effect, a simplification and reduction of shapes with an absence of detail designed to comprise the essence of the more naturalistic images being depicted. Without even intending to, young children consistently create interesting, and sometimes beautiful, abstract compositions. A child's creations, moreover, will always seem to…

  8. Leadership Abstracts, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Larry, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    The abstracts in this series provide two-page discussions of issues related to leadership, administration, and teaching in community colleges. The 12 abstracts for Volume 8, 1995, are: (1) "Redesigning the System To Meet the Workforce Training Needs of the Nation," by Larry Warford; (2) "The College President, the Board, and the Board Chair: A…

  9. Concept Formation and Abstraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunzer, Eric A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper examines the nature of concepts and conceptual processes and the manner of their formation. It argues that a process of successive abstraction and systematization is central to the evolution of conceptual structures. Classificatory processes are discussed and three levels of abstraction outlined. (Author/SJL)

  10. Data Abstraction in GLISP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Gordon S., Jr.

    GLISP is a high-level computer language (based on Lisp and including Lisp as a sublanguage) which is compiled into Lisp. GLISP programs are compiled relative to a knowledge base of object descriptions, a form of abstract datatypes. A primary goal of the use of abstract datatypes in GLISP is to allow program code to be written in terms of objects,…

  11. Leadership Abstracts, Volume 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milliron, Mark D., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The abstracts in this series provide brief discussions of issues related to leadership, administration, professional development, technology, and education in community colleges. Volume 10 for 1997 contains the following 12 abstracts: (1) "On Community College Renewal" (Nathan L. Hodges and Mark D. Milliron); (2) "The Community College Niche in a…

  12. Application of iron electrode corrosion enhanced electrokinetic-Fenton oxidation to remediate diesel contaminated soils: A laboratory feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tzai-Tang; Sah, Jygau; Kao, Chih-Ming

    2010-01-01

    SummaryDiesel soil contamination on gas stations or refinery plants is a worldwide environmental problem. The main objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the efficiency of electrokinetic (EK) by using different electrode materials (graphite and iron rods) and electrolytes (tap water, 0.01 M NaCl, and 0.1 M NaCl) on the remediation of diesel contaminated soils, and (2) evaluate the feasibility of total petroleum hydrocarbon-diesel (TPH-D) reducing in soils via EK-Fenton oxidation enhanced by corroded iron electrode. The EK and EK-Fenton experiments were conducted in batch and sand box experiments, respectively. Batch experiments reveal that the most appropriate electrolyte was 0.1 M NaCl when iron electrode was used in the EK system. Sand box experiments indicate that the TPH-D concentration dropped from 10,000 to 300 mg kg -1 when amorphous iron/total iron (Fe o/Fe t) ratio increased from 0.1 to 0.33, with the addition of 8% of H 2O 2 and 0.1 M NaCl after 60 days of EK-Fenton operation. Electrokinetically enhanced oxidation with the presence of both H 2O 2 and Fe 3O 4 (iron electrode corrosion) resulted in higher TPH-D removal efficiency (97%) compared to the efficiencies observed from EK (55%) or Fenton oxidation (27%) alone. This demonstrates that EK-Fenton oxidation catalyzed by iron electrode corrosion is a valuable direction to efficiently and effectively remediate diesel contaminated soils.

  13. Abstract Datatypes in PVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owre, Sam; Shankar, Natarajan

    1997-01-01

    PVS (Prototype Verification System) is a general-purpose environment for developing specifications and proofs. This document deals primarily with the abstract datatype mechanism in PVS which generates theories containing axioms and definitions for a class of recursive datatypes. The concepts underlying the abstract datatype mechanism are illustrated using ordered binary trees as an example. Binary trees are described by a PVS abstract datatype that is parametric in its value type. The type of ordered binary trees is then presented as a subtype of binary trees where the ordering relation is also taken as a parameter. We define the operations of inserting an element into, and searching for an element in an ordered binary tree; the bulk of the report is devoted to PVS proofs of some useful properties of these operations. These proofs illustrate various approaches to proving properties of abstract datatype operations. They also describe the built-in capabilities of the PVS proof checker for simplifying abstract datatype expressions.

  14. Designing validation studies more efficiently according to the modular approach: retrospective analysis of the EPISKIN test for skin corrosion.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Hartung, Thomas

    2006-05-01

    It is claimed that the modular approach to validation, which involves seven independent modules, will make the assessment of test validity more flexible and more efficient. In particular, the aspects of between-laboratory variability and predictive capacity are formally separated. Here, the main advantage of the approach is to offer the opportunity for reduced labour, and thus to allow study designs to be more time efficient and cost effective. The impact of this separation was analysed by taking the ECVAM validation study on in vitro methods for skin corrosivity as an example of a successful validation study - two of its methods triggered new OECD test guidelines. Lean study designs, which reduced the number of tests required by up to 60%, were simulated with the original validation data for the EPISKIN model. By using resampling techniques, we were able to demonstrate the effects of the lean designs on three between-laboratory variability measures and on the predictive capacity in terms of sensitivity and specificity, in comparison with the original study. Overall, the study results, especially the levels of confidence, were only slightly affected by the lean designs that were modelled. It is concluded that the separation of the two modules is a promising way to speed-up prospective validation studies and to substantially reduce costs, without compromising study quality.

  15. Stress Corrosion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Advanced testing of structural materials was developed by Lewis Research Center and Langley Research Center working with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Under contract, Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) conducted a study for evaluating stress corrosion cracking, and recommended the "breaking load" method which determines fracture strengths as well as measuring environmental degradation. Alcoa and Langley plan to submit the procedure to ASTM as a new testing method.

  16. Study of mechanical joint strength of aluminum alloy 7075-T6 and dual phase steel 980 welded by friction bit joining and weld-bonding under corrosion medium

    DOE PAGES

    Lim, Yong Chae; Squires, Lile; Pan, Tsung-Yu; Miles, Michael; Song, Guang-Ling; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-30

    We have employed a unique solid-sate joining process, called friction bit joining (FBJ), to spot weld aluminum alloy (AA) 7075-T6 and dual phase (DP) 980 steel. Static joint strength was studied in the lap shear tension configuration. In addition, weld-bonding (adhesive + FBJ) joints were studied in order to evaluate the ability of adhesive to mitigate the impact of corrosion on joint properties. Accelerated laboratory cyclic corrosion tests were carried out for both FBJ only and weld-bonding joints. Furthermore, the FBJ only joints that emerged from corrosion testing had lap shear failure loads that were significantly lower than freshly preparedmore » joints. However, weld-bonding specimens retained more than 80% of the lap shear failure load of the freshly prepared weld-bonding specimens. Moreover, examination of joint cross sections confirmed that the presence of adhesive in the weld-bonding joints mitigated the effect of the corrosion environment, compared to FBJ only joints.« less

  17. Mechanically Assisted Taper Corrosion in Modular TKA

    PubMed Central

    Arnholt, Christina; MacDonald, Daniel W.; Tohfafarosh, Mariya; Gilbert, Jeremy L.; Rimnac, Clare M.; Kurtz, Steven M.; Klein, Gregg; Mont, Michael A.; Parvizi, Javad; Cates, Harold E.; Lee, Gwo-Chin; Malkani, Arthur; Kraay, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the prevalence of taper damage in modular TKA components. 198 modular components were revised after 3.9±4.2y (range: 0.0–17.5y). Modular components were evaluated for fretting corrosion using a semi-quantitative 4-point scoring system. Flexural rigidity, stem diameter, alloy coupling, patient weight, age and implantation time were assessed as predictors of fretting corrosion damage. Mild-to-severe fretting corrosion (score≥2) was observed in 94/101 of the tapers on the modular femoral components and 90/97 of the modular tibial components. Mixed alloy pairs (p=0.03), taper design (p<0.001), and component type (p=0.02) were associated with taper corrosion. The results from this study supported the hypothesis that there is taper corrosion in TKA. However the clinical implications of fretting and corrosion in TKA remain unclear. PMID:24996586

  18. Corrosion in supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Propp, W.A.; Carleson, T.E.; Wai, Chen M.; Taylor, P.R.; Daehling, K.W.; Huang, Shaoping; Abdel-Latif, M.

    1996-05-01

    Integrated studies were carried out in the areas of corrosion, thermodynamic modeling, and electrochemistry under pressure and temperature conditions appropriate for potential applications of supercritical fluid (SCF) extractive metallurgy. Carbon dioxide and water were the primary fluids studied. Modifiers were used in some tests; these consisted of 1 wt% water and 10 wt% methanol for carbon dioxide and of sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium nitrate at concentrations ranging from 0.00517 to 0.010 M for the aqueous fluids. The materials studied were Types 304 and 316 (UNS S30400 and S31600) stainless steel, iron, and AISI-SAE 1080 (UNS G10800) carbon steel. The thermodynamic modeling consisted of development of a personal computer-based program for generating Pourbaix diagrams at supercritical conditions in aqueous systems. As part of the model, a general method for extrapolating entropies and related thermodynamic properties from ambient to SCF conditions was developed. The experimental work was used as a tool to evaluate the predictions of the model for these systems. The model predicted a general loss of passivation in iron-based alloys at SCF conditions that was consistent with experimentally measured corrosion rates and open circuit potentials. For carbon-dioxide-based SCFs, measured corrosion rates were low, indicating that carbon steel would be suitable for use with unmodified carbon dioxide, while Type 304 stainless steel would be suitable for use with water or methanol as modifiers.

  19. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Reactions of OH Radicals with Hexenols: An Evaluation of the Relative Importance of the H-Abstraction Reaction Channel.

    PubMed

    Gai, Yanbo; Lin, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Qiao; Hu, Changjin; Gu, Xuejun; Zhao, Weixiong; Fang, Bo; Zhang, Weijun; Long, Bo; Long, Zhengwen

    2015-09-01

    C6 hexenols are one of the most significant groups of volatile organic compounds with biogenic emissions. The lack of corresponding kinetic parameters and product information on their oxidation reactions will result in incomplete atmospheric chemical mechanisms and models. In this paper, experimental and theoretical studies are reported for the reactions of OH radicals with a series of C6 hexenols, (Z)-2-hexen-1-ol, (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol, (Z)-4-hexen-1-ol, (E)-2-hexen-1-ol, (E)-3-hexen-1-ol, and (E)-4-hexen-1-ol, at 298 K and 1.01 × 10(5) Pa. The corresponding rate constants were 8.53 ± 1.36, 10.1 ± 1.6, 7.86 ± 1.30, 8.08 ± 1.33, 9.10 ± 1.50, and 7.14 ± 1.20 (in units of 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)), respectively, measured by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID), using a relative technique. Theoretical calculations concerning the OH-addition and H-abstraction reaction channels were also performed for these reactions to further understand the reaction mechanism and the relative importance of the H-abstraction reaction. By contrast to previously reported results, the H-abstraction channel is a non-negligible reaction channel for reactions of OH radicals with these hexenols. The rate constants of the H-abstraction channel are comparable with those for the OH-addition channel and contribute >20% for most of the studied alcohols, even >50% for (E)-3-hexen-1-ol. Thus, H-abstraction channels may have an important role in the reactions of these alcohols with OH radicals and must be considered in certain atmospheric chemical mechanisms and models. PMID:26274814

  20. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    SciTech Connect

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  1. Eutectic alloys. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, P.

    1980-01-01

    These 250 abstracts from the international literature provide summaries of the preparation, treatments, composition and structure, and properties of eutectic alloys. Techniques for directional solidification and treatments including glazing, coating, and fiber reinforcement are discussed. In addition to the mechanical and thermal properties, the superconducting, corrosion, resistance, and thermionic emission and adsorption properties are described.

  2. Corrosivity of paper mill effluent and corrosion performance of stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Ram, Chhotu; Sharma, Chhaya; Singh, A K

    2015-01-01

    Present study relates to the corrosivity of paper mill effluent and corrosion performance of stainless steel (SS) as a construction material for the effluent treatment plant (ETP). Accordingly, immersion test and electrochemical polarization tests were performed on SS 304 L, 316 L and duplex 2205 in paper mill effluent and synthetic effluent. This paper presents electrochemical polarization measurements, performed for the first time to the best of the authors' information, to see the influence of chlorophenols on the corrosivity of effluents. The corrosivity of the effluent was observed to increase with the decrease in pH and increase in Cl- content while the addition of SO4- tends to inhibit corrosion. Mill effluent was found to be more corrosive as compared to synthetic effluent and has been attributed to the presence of various chlorophenols. Corrosion performance of SS was observed to govern by the presence of Cr, Mo and N contents. PMID:25188842

  3. Corrosivity of paper mill effluent and corrosion performance of stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Ram, Chhotu; Sharma, Chhaya; Singh, A K

    2015-01-01

    Present study relates to the corrosivity of paper mill effluent and corrosion performance of stainless steel (SS) as a construction material for the effluent treatment plant (ETP). Accordingly, immersion test and electrochemical polarization tests were performed on SS 304 L, 316 L and duplex 2205 in paper mill effluent and synthetic effluent. This paper presents electrochemical polarization measurements, performed for the first time to the best of the authors' information, to see the influence of chlorophenols on the corrosivity of effluents. The corrosivity of the effluent was observed to increase with the decrease in pH and increase in Cl- content while the addition of SO4- tends to inhibit corrosion. Mill effluent was found to be more corrosive as compared to synthetic effluent and has been attributed to the presence of various chlorophenols. Corrosion performance of SS was observed to govern by the presence of Cr, Mo and N contents.

  4. 2016 ACPA MEETING ABSTRACTS.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The peer-reviewed abstracts presented at the 73rd Annual Meeting of the ACPA are published as submitted by the authors. For financial conflict of interest disclosure, please visit http://meeting.acpa-cpf.org/disclosures.html. PMID:27447885

  5. Abstracts--Citations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Mental Health, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Provides abstracts and citations of journal articles and reports dealing with aspects of mental health. Topics include alcoholism, drug abuse, disadvantaged, mental health programs, rehabilitation, student mental health, and others. (SB)

  6. Automatic Abstraction in Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, J.

    1991-01-01

    Traditionally, abstraction in planning has been accomplished by either state abstraction or operator abstraction, neither of which has been fully automatic. We present a new method, predicate relaxation, for automatically performing state abstraction. PABLO, a nonlinear hierarchical planner, implements predicate relaxation. Theoretical, as well as empirical results are presented which demonstrate the potential advantages of using predicate relaxation in planning. We also present a new definition of hierarchical operators that allows us to guarantee a limited form of completeness. This new definition is shown to be, in some ways, more flexible than previous definitions of hierarchical operators. Finally, a Classical Truth Criterion is presented that is proven to be sound and complete for a planning formalism that is general enough to include most classical planning formalisms that are based on the STRIPS assumption.

  7. Introducing Abstract Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciscell, Bob

    1973-01-01

    A functional approach involving collage, two-dimensional design, three-dimensional construction, and elements of Cubism, is used to teach abstract design in elementary and junior high school art classes. (DS)

  8. Abstracts of SIG Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents abstracts of 36 special interest group (SIG) sessions. Highlights include the Chemistry Online Retrieval Experiment; organizing and retrieving images; intelligent information retrieval using natural language processing; interdisciplinarity; libraries as publishers; indexing hypermedia; cognitive aspects of classification; computer-aided…

  9. Paradigms for Abstracting Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Maria; Galvez, Carmen

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of abstracting systems focuses on the paradigm concept and identifies and explains four paradigms: communicational, or information theory; physical, including information retrieval; cognitive, including information processing and artificial intelligence; and systemic, including quality management. Emphasizes multidimensionality and…

  10. Studies on the impact, detection, and control of microbiology influenced corrosion related to pitting failures in the Russian oil and gas industry. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.

    2006-09-30

    The objectives of the Project are: (1) to design effective anti-corrosion preparations (biocides, inhibitors, penetrants and their combinations) for gas- and oil-exploration industries; (2) to study a possibility of development of environmentally beneficial ('green') biocides and inhibitors of the new generation; (3) to develop chemical and microbiological methods of monitoring of sites at risk of corrosion; and (4) to evaluate potentialities in terms of technology, raw materials and material and technical basis to set up a production of effective anti-corrosion preparations of new generation in Russia. During the four years of the project 228 compounds and formulations were synthesized and studied in respect to their corrosion inhibiting activity. A series of compounds which were according to the Bubble tests more efficient (by a factor of 10-100) than the reference inhibitor SXT-1102, some possessing the similar activity or slightly better activity than new inhibitor ??-1154? (company ONDEO/Nalco). Two synthetic routes for the synthesis of mercaptopyrimidines as perspective corrosion inhibitors were developed. Mercaptopyrimidine derivatives can be obtained in one or two steps from cheap and easily available precursors. The cost for their synthesis is not high and can be further reduced after the optimization of the production processes. A new approach for lignin utilization was proposed. Water-soluble derivative of lignin can by transformed to corrosion protective layer by its electropolymerization on a steel surface. Varying lignosulfonates from different sources, as well as conditions of electrooxidation we proved, that drop in current at high anodic potentials is due to electropolymerization of lignin derivative at steel electrode surface. The electropolymerization potential can be sufficiently decreased by an increase in ionic strength of the growing solution. The lignosulfonate electropolymerization led to the considerable corrosion protection effect of

  11. SECM Study of Effect of Chromium Content on the Localized Corrosion Behavior of Low-Alloy Steels in Chloride Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indira, K.; Nishimura, T.

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the effect of chromium (Cr) content (0, 1, 3 and 5% Cr) in epoxy-coated alloy steel against corrosion using in situ electrochemical techniques such as EIS and SECM in a 3% NaCl solution. The EIS results revealed that the epoxy-coated Cr steel exhibited higher impedance values than carbon steel, which is attributed to the greater resistance of Cr steel toward corrosion. Based on the cyclic voltammogram results, the tip potentials were set at -0.7, 0.04 and 0.60 V for determining the concentration of dissolved oxygen at cathodic region, and oxidation of Cr2+ and Fe2+ at anodic region, respectively. The SECM measurements showed that, the tip current in the anodic region has decreased with increase in Cr content of the sample, which indicates that the oxidation of Fe2+ and Cr2+ decreases (corrosion is reduced) with the increase in Cr content of the steel. Besides, 5% Cr steel can maintain the highest corrosion resistance, and 1 and 3% Cr steels have higher corrosion resistance than the 0% Cr steel. This higher corrosion resistance of Cr steel samples could be due to the formation of Cr-rich hydro-oxide layers [Cr(OH)3 as a corrosion product] on the surface of the samples. Thus, the epoxy-coated Cr alloy steel has greater corrosion resistance in a chloride-containing environment than the carbon steel. Hence, epoxy-coated Cr alloy steel can be successfully used as a construction material in structures.

  12. SECM Study of Effect of Chromium Content on the Localized Corrosion Behavior of Low-Alloy Steels in Chloride Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indira, K.; Nishimura, T.

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the effect of chromium (Cr) content (0, 1, 3 and 5% Cr) in epoxy-coated alloy steel against corrosion using in situ electrochemical techniques such as EIS and SECM in a 3% NaCl solution. The EIS results revealed that the epoxy-coated Cr steel exhibited higher impedance values than carbon steel, which is attributed to the greater resistance of Cr steel toward corrosion. Based on the cyclic voltammogram results, the tip potentials were set at -0.7, 0.04 and 0.60 V for determining the concentration of dissolved oxygen at cathodic region, and oxidation of Cr2+ and Fe2+ at anodic region, respectively. The SECM measurements showed that, the tip current in the anodic region has decreased with increase in Cr content of the sample, which indicates that the oxidation of Fe2+ and Cr2+ decreases (corrosion is reduced) with the increase in Cr content of the steel. Besides, 5% Cr steel can maintain the highest corrosion resistance, and 1 and 3% Cr steels have higher corrosion resistance than the 0% Cr steel. This higher corrosion resistance of Cr steel samples could be due to the formation of Cr-rich hydro-oxide layers [Cr(OH)3 as a corrosion product] on the surface of the samples. Thus, the epoxy-coated Cr alloy steel has greater corrosion resistance in a chloride-containing environment than the carbon steel. Hence, epoxy-coated Cr alloy steel can be successfully used as a construction material in structures.

  13. Abstracts of contributed papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains 571 abstracts of contributed papers to be presented during the Twelfth US National Congress of Applied Mechanics. Abstracts are arranged in the order in which they fall in the program -- the main sessions are listed chronologically in the Table of Contents. The Author Index is in alphabetical order and lists each paper number (matching the schedule in the Final Program) with its corresponding page number in the book.

  14. Studies on Hot Corrosion of the 2.25 Cr-1Mo Boiler Tube Steel and Its Weldments in the Molten Salt Na2SO4-60 pct V2O5 Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ravindra; Tewari, V. K.; Prakash, S.

    2007-01-01

    Hot corrosion is mainly due to the dissolution of protective oxides in the molten salt at the metal surface and their reprecipitation at some other sites as nonprotective porous mass. The hot corrosion attack along the grain boundaries leading to subsurface precipitation of oxides and sulfides also contributes to weakening of material. Ferritic steel with 2.25Cr 1Mo is used widely as a candidate material in the steam generating system of power plants. Hot corrosion studies were conducted on 2.25Cr-1Mo unwelded as well as welded steel specimens with molten salt coated after exposure at 900 °C under cyclic conditions. The thermogravimetric technique was used to establish the kinetics of corrosion X-ray diffraction (XRD); scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive analysis (SEM/EDAX) was used to analyze the corrosion products.

  15. Study on Corrosion Performance of Cu-Te-Se Alloys in a 3.5% Sodium Chloride Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Lin; Li, Meng; Zeng, Tao; Zhu, Dachuan

    2015-11-01

    Samples of Cu-Te-Se alloys, previously aged or treated as a solid solution, were immersed in 3.5% (mass fraction) sodium chloride solution to investigate their corrosion resistance at room temperature by determining their corrosive weight loss. The morphologies of the precipitated phase and surface products following immersion were observed by scanning electron microscope. In addition, energy-dispersive spectroscopic analysis was used to determine the elemental constituents of precipitated phase and corroded surface of the alloy samples. The phase composition was measured by x-ray diffraction, and the electrochemical polarization behavior of the samples was determined using an electrochemical workstation. The experimental results revealed that the alloy samples appeared to corrode uniformly, which was accompanied by a small amount of localized corrosion. There was the possibility that localized corrosion could increase following aging treatment. The addition of a small amount of tellurium and selenium to the alloy appeared to retard oxygen adsorption on the copper in the alloy, which has ameliorated the alloy corrosion due to the similar physical and chemical properties of oxygen. In comparison to the solid solution state, the corrosion resistance of the alloy appeared to decline slightly following aging treatment.

  16. Evidence of angiogenesis and microvascular regression in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease kidneys: a corrosion cast study.

    PubMed

    Wei, W; Popov, V; Walocha, J A; Wen, J; Bello-Reuss, E

    2006-10-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) accounts for about 10% of all cases of chronic renal failure requiring dialysis. The disease is characterized by proliferation of renal epithelial cells and formation of cysts that expand over years and replace the normal parenchyma of the kidney. As the cysts grow, the volume of the kidney can increase by more than 10-fold, implying that remodeling and expansion of the vasculature must occur to provide oxygenation and nutrition to the cyst cells. Our previous studies support the notion that there is angiogenesis in ADPKD. We report here results from resin casting of ADPKD kidneys vasculature. In this study, the corrosion-casting method was used in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy to study the vascular architecture and the evidence for angiogenesis in ADPKD kidneys. We found a well-defined vascular network around the cysts forming a 'vascular capsule' somewhat similar to that described in avascular leiomyomata. We also found that the normal vascular architecture is lost and replaced by an assortment of capillaries of larger size than those in the normal kidney, mixed with flattened and spiral arterioles, damaged glomeruli, and atresic venules, indicative of regression of the microvasculature. In the same areas, there was capillary sprouting, considered the hallmark of angiogenesis. The present study documents regression changes of the vasculature and confirms the existence of angiogenesis in ADPKD kidneys, and suggests the use of inhibitors of angiogenesis as a possible avenue for the treatment of the disease. PMID:16883324

  17. Corrosive wear principles

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    The dual effects of corrosion and wear operate together in such industries as paper and pulp, coal handling, mining, and sugar beet extraction. There is a synergistic effect that causes far greater wastage to carbon steels, alloy steels, and even much more abrasion resistant cast irons. Several laboratory and in situ studies have been conducted to better understand the contributions of corrosion and wear to the wastage process. The environmental conditions are usually set by the process. However, there are a few instances where inhibitors as sodium nitrite, sodium chromate, and sodium metasilicate have been successfully used to reduce metal wastage of carbon steels. Hardness has been found to be an unreliable guide to performance under wet sliding conditions. Heat treated alloy steels and cast irons are inferior to stainless steels. Even distilled water is too severe a corrodent for steels. While the austenitic stainlesses perform the best, cold rolling to increase hardness does not further improve their performance. The surface roughness of stainless steels gets smoother during corrosive wear testing while it gets rougher for the alloy steels. This observation substantiated the reputation of improved slideability for stainless alloys over alloy steels.

  18. Quantum chemical studies of some rhodanine azosulpha drugs as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in acidic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebenso, Eno E.; Arslan, Taner; Kandemirli, Fatma; Caner, Necmettin; Love, Ian

    The density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) and B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) basis set levels and ab initio calculations using the HF/6-31G (d,p) and HF/6-311G(d,p) methods were performed on four rhodanine azosulpha drugs (namely 5-sulfadiazineazo-3-phenyl-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone, 5- sulfamethazineazo-3-phenyl-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone, 5-sulfadimethoxineazo-3-phenyl-2-thioxo- 4-thiazolidinone, and 5-sulfamethoxazoleazo-3-phenyl-2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone) used as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in acidic medium to determine the relationship between the molecular structure of the rhodanine azosulpha drugs and inhibition efficiency(%IE). The quantum chemical parameters/descriptors, namely, EHOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital energy), ELUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy), the energy difference (ΔE) between EHOMO and ELUMO, dipole moment (μ), electron affinity (A), ionization potential (I), the absolute electronegativity (X), absolute hardness (η), softness (σ), polarizability (α), the Mulliken charges, and the fraction of electrons (ΔN) transfer from inhibitors to iron, were calculated and correlated with the experimental %IE. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) approach has been used, and a composite index of some quantum chemical parameters/descriptors was performed to characterize the inhibition performance of the studied molecules. The results showed that the inhibition efficiency (%IE) of the rhodanine azo sulfa drugs studied was closely related to some of the quantum chemical parameters/descriptors but with varying degrees of correlation coefficient (R2). The %IE also increased with the increase in EHOMO and decrease in EHOMO-ELUMO; and the areas containing N atoms are the most possible sites for bonding to the metal iron surface by donating electrons to the metal. The HOMO orbitals consist of 61.73-63.04% double bonded S atom (7(S)), and most of the rest are concentrated on the rhodanine group; so, the

  19. Internal Corrosion and Deposition Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reviews the current knowledge of the science of corrosion control and control of scaling in drinking water systems. Topics covered include: types of corrosion; physical, microbial and chemical factors influencing corrosion; corrosion of specific materials; direct ...

  20. Studies on Adsorption and Corrosion Inhibitive Properties of Indoline Compounds on N80 Steel in Hydrochloric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, M.; Sarkar, T. K.; Purkait, Taniya

    2015-12-01

    Corrosion inhibition performance of synthesized indoline compounds, namely, 3'-(4-(1-acetyl-5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)phenyl)spiro[indoline-3,2'-thiazolidine]-2,4'-dione (MPIT ) and 1-(4-(1-acetyl-5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-3-yl)phenyl)spiro[imidazolidine-2,3'-indoline]-2',5-dione (MPII) on N80 steel in 15% HCl solution was studied using weight loss measurement, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Polarization studies showed that both studied inhibitors were of mixed type in nature. The adsorption of inhibitors on the N80 steel surface obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The potential of zero charge ( E PZC) for the N80 steel was determined by EIS method. Scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy were used to characterize the surface morphology of uninhibited and inhibited N80 steel specimens. The density functional theory was employed for theoretical calculations.

  1. Study of corrosion in multimetallic systems. Task 2 of solar collector studies for solar heating and cooling applications. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Diegle, R B

    1980-04-11

    Corrosion measurements were made on candidate alloys of construction for non-concentrating solar collectors under simulated conditions of collector operation. Materials evaluated were aluminum alloys 1100, 3003, and 6061, copper alloy 122, Type 444 stainless steel, and 1018 plain carbon steel. The solutions used were equivolume mixtures of ethylene glycol and water, and propylene glycol and water. They were used without corrosion inhibitors but with addition of chloride, sulfate, and bicarbonate ions. The influences of dissolved oxygen, solution flow velocity, and heat transfer were evaluated. Corrosion morphologies investigated were general attack, pitting, crevice corrosion, and galvanic corrosion. Experimental results indicated that aluminum alloys can experience severe pitting and crevice corrosion at chloride concentrations approaching 50 ppM. The corrosion rate of copper exceeded about 100 ..mu..m/yr in ethylene glycol solutions and about 80 ..mu..m/yr in propylene glycol solutions. Crevice corrosion was not observed for copper, but severe galvanic corrosion occurred when it was coupled to T444 stainless steel. T444 steel corroded at rates of less than 1 ..mu..m/yr under all exposure conditions. During circulation at 100 C in the presence of air, ethylene glycol solutions acidified because of degradation of the glycol. The initial pH of propylene glycol solutions was already low, about 4.5. The inherent corrosivity of propylene glycol was somewhat less than that of ethylene glycol, although this difference was usually less than a factor of two in measured corrosion rates. It was concluded that he corrosion rates of aluminum alloys and copper were prohibitively high in uninhibited glycol solutions, and that corrosion inhibitors are definitely necessary in operating systems.

  2. Does "Social Work Abstracts" Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Gary; Barker, Kathleen; Covert-Vail, Lucinda; Rosenberg, Gary; Cohen, Stephanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The current study seeks to provide estimates of the adequacy of journal coverage in the Social Work Abstracts (SWA) database. Method: A total of 23 journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports social work category during the 1997 to 2005 period were selected for study. Issue-level coverage estimates were obtained for SWA and…

  3. The three-dimensional microvascular architecture of the human Kaposi sarcoma implanted in nude mice: a SEM corrosion casting study.

    PubMed

    Sangiorgi, S; Congiu, T; Manelli, A; Dell'Eva, R; Noonan, D M

    2006-11-01

    The human Kaposi sarcoma represents one of the most common skin lesions associated with AIDS. Its clinical presentation and anatomopathological structure seem to demonstrate a particularly rich vascularity. The latest therapies aim to limit its intrinsic angiogenic activity in an attempt to reduce vascular density and the formation of new vessels. For these reasons, we decided to study the microvascular architecture of Kaposi sarcoma in three dimensions. We used a corrosion casting technique applied to nude mice previously transplanted subcutaneously with human modified neoplastic Kaposi sarcoma cells. The cooption of host vessels made by the tumor was demonstrated by three-dimensional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. At high magnification several angiogenic patterns were observed in the form of potato-shaped vessels, sprouts, intussusceptions and mouse tailed end tipped capillaries along with some ultrastructural features such as intercellular extravasations and endothelial cell modifications. Our investigation allowed us to build a detailed map of tumor vasculature in human Kaposi sarcoma. Furthermore, this study want to shed light on the sharp morphological three-dimensional conformation of angiogenic sprouts so to be able to better understand their modifications occurred during time and after antiangiogenic experimental therapies, by now observed only by immunohistochemical or immunofluorescent assays. PMID:16920158

  4. Abstracting and indexing guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Department of the Interior; Office of Water Resources Research

    1974-01-01

    These instructions have been prepared for those who abstract and index scientific and technical documents for the Water Resources Scientific Information Center (WRSIC). With the recent publication growth in all fields, information centers have undertaken the task of keeping the various scientific communities aware of current and past developments. An abstract with carefully selected index terms offers the user of WRSIC services a more rapid means for deciding whether a document is pertinent to his needs and professional interests, thus saving him the time necessary to scan the complete work. These means also provide WRSIC with a document representation or surrogate which is more easily stored and manipulated to produce various services. Authors are asked to accept the responsibility for preparing abstracts of their own papers to facilitate quick evaluation, announcement, and dissemination to the scientific community.

  5. Thyra Abstract Interface Package

    2005-09-01

    Thrya primarily defines a set of abstract C++ class interfaces needed for the development of abstract numerical atgorithms (ANAs) such as iterative linear solvers, transient solvers all the way up to optimization. At the foundation of these interfaces are abstract C++ classes for vectors, vector spaces, linear operators and multi-vectors. Also included in the Thyra package is C++ code for creating concrete vector, vector space, linear operator, and multi-vector subclasses as well as other utilitiesmore » to aid in the development of ANAs. Currently, very general and efficient concrete subclass implementations exist for serial and SPMD in-core vectors and multi-vectors. Code also currently exists for testing objects and providing composite objects such as product vectors.« less

  6. NOVEL CORROSION SENSOR FOR VISION 21 SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Heng Ban

    2004-12-01

    Advanced sensor technology is identified as a key component for advanced power systems for future energy plants that would have virtually no environmental impact. This project intends to develop a novel high temperature corrosion sensor and subsequent measurement system for advanced power systems. Fireside corrosion is the metal loss caused by chemical reactions on surfaces exposed to the combustion environment. Such corrosion is the leading mechanism for boiler tube failures and has emerged to be a significant concern for current and future energy plants due to the introduction of technologies targeting emissions reduction, efficiency improvement, or fuel/oxidant flexibility. Corrosion damage can lead to catastrophic equipment failure, explosions, and forced outages. Proper management of corrosion requires real-time indication of corrosion rate. However, short-term, on-line corrosion monitoring systems for fireside corrosion remain a technical challenge to date due to the extremely harsh combustion environment. The overall objective of this proposed project is to develop a technology for on-line corrosion monitoring based on a new concept. This report describes the initial results from the first-year effort of the three-year study that include laboratory development and experiment, and pilot combustor testing.

  7. Classification of corrosion risk zones using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Nikolas; Anastasiou, Constantina; Tantele, Elia A.; Votsis, Renos A.; Danezis, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the major deterioration factor of the RC infrastructures. Several factors are contributing towards increasing the corrosion risk like the exposure and environmental conditions which are a function of the geographical location of the infrastructure. Information for these conditions and their affected areas can be proved valuable at design stage and/or during maintenance planning. This study aims to relate corrosion risk of RC infrastructures with their geographical location. The corrosion risk is quantified through data from NDT methods and subsequently correlated with its location. Therefore high risk areas with structures prone to corrosion deterioration are identified. The latter is implemented via GIS tools in order to create maps that describe how corrosion risk is related to the location of each structure. Two GIS methods are suggested, the grid system and the use of classified areas. Corrosion data has been collected from labs about various constructions in Cyprus and used in conjunction with GIS tools to provide useful information on corrosion identification. The outcome is a digitized map of the Limassol area which indicates the risks levels associated with corrosion of the steel reinforcement.

  8. Boric Acid Corrosion of Concrete Rebar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabalan, R. T.; Yang, L.; Chiang, K.–T.

    2013-07-01

    Borated water leakage through spent fuel pools (SFPs) at pressurized water reactors is a concern because it could cause corrosion of reinforcement steel in the concrete structure and compromise the integrity of the structure. Because corrosion rate of carbon steel in concrete in the presence of boric acid is lacking in published literature and available data are equivocal on the effect of boric acid on rebar corrosion, corrosion rate measurements were conducted in this study using several test methods. Rebar corrosion rates were measured in (i) borated water flowing in a simulated concrete crack, (ii) borated water flowing over a concrete surface, (iii) borated water that has reacted with concrete, and (iv) 2,400 ppm boric acid solutions with pH adjusted to a range of 6.0 to 7.7. The corrosion rates were measured using coupled multielectrode array sensor (CMAS) and linear polarization resistance (LPR) probes, both made using carbon steel. The results indicate that rebar corrosion rates are low (~1 μm/yr or less)when the solution pH is ~7.1 or higher. Below pH ~7.1, the corrosion rate increases with decreasing pH and can reach ~100 μm/yr in solutions with pH less than ~6.7. The threshold pH for carbon steel corrosion in borated solution is between 6.8 and 7.3.

  9. ABSTRACTS OF RESEARCH STUDIES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION COMPILED IN 1965-66 IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC REGION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LOVE, GENE M.

    FORTY-TWO DOCTORAL DISSERTATIONS, STAFF STUDIES, AND MASTERS' THESES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION ARE REPORTED IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS -- ADMINISTRATION, AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, CAREER CHOICE, CURRICULUM, COMMUNITY COLLEGES, EDUCATIONAL NEEDS, EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES, EXTENSION EDUCATION, FARMERS, GRADUATE STUDENTS, INNOVATIONS, INTERNATIONAL…

  10. On abstract degenerate neutral differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Eduardo; O'Regan, Donal

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a new abstract model of functional differential equations, which we call abstract degenerate neutral differential equations, and we study the existence of strict solutions. The class of problems and the technical approach introduced in this paper allow us to generalize and extend recent results on abstract neutral differential equations. Some examples on nonlinear partial neutral differential equations are presented.

  11. Corrosion inhibiting organic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sasson, E.

    1984-10-16

    A corrosion inhibiting coating comprises a mixture of waxes, petroleum jelly, a hardener and a solvent. In particular, a corrosion inhibiting coating comprises candelilla wax, carnauba wax, microcrystalline waxes, white petrolatum, an oleoresin, lanolin and a solvent.

  12. Duralumin and Its Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, WM

    1927-01-01

    The types of corrosion and factors of corrosion of duralumin are investigated. Salt water is the most common of the corroding media with which designers have to contend in using duralumin in aircraft and ships.

  13. AC corrosion -- a new threat to pipeline integrity?

    SciTech Connect

    Gummow, R.A.; Wakelin, R.G.; Segall, S.M.

    1996-12-31

    Corrosion of steel by alternating current was investigated as far back as the early 1900`s. These early studies and others in the 1950--60`s indicated that AC corrosion of steel was only a fraction of an equivalent amount of direct current (i.e., less than 1% of a like amount of DC) and in addition was controlled to negligible levels with cathodic protection applied to industry standards. In 1986 however, an investigation into a corrosion failure on a high pressure gas pipeline in Germany indicated that the sole cause of the failure was AC corrosion. This corrosion failure on an otherwise well protected pipeline resulted in several laboratory and field studies which indicated, that above a certain minimum AC current density, standard levels of cathodic protection will not control AC corrosion and AC mitigation is required to prevent further corrosion. Several other corrosion anomalies were discovered at coating holidays during the follow-up investigations in Germany. The authors have investigated several corrosion occurrences on pipelines in Ontario during the last 2--3 years which appear to be caused by AC corrosion. This presentation traces the literature record on AC electrolysis from the past to the present and discusses the key parameters which determine the likelihood of corrosion attack. Several case histories of suspected AC corrosion will be discussed and guidelines on how to assess whether or not a pipeline is susceptible to AC corrosion will be offered.

  14. Abstracts and reviews.

    PubMed

    Liebmann, G H; Wollman, L; Woltmann, A G

    1966-09-01

    Abstract Eric Berne, M.D.: Games People Play. Grove Press, New York, 1964. 192 pages. Price $5.00. Reviewed by Hugo G. Beigel Finkle, Alex M., Ph.D., M.D. and Prian, Dimitry F. Sexual Potency in Elderly Men before and after Prostatectomy. J.A.M.A., 196: 2, April, 1966. Reviewed by H. George Liebman Calvin C. Hernton: Sex and Racism In America. Grove Press, Inc. Black Cat Edition No. 113 (Paperback), 1966, 180 pp. Price $.95. Reviewed by Gus Woltmann Hans Lehfeldt, M.D., Ernest W. Kulka, M.D., H. George Liebman, M.D.: Comparative Study of Uterine Contraceptive Devices. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 26: 5, 1965, pp. 679-688. Lawrence Lipton. The Erotic Revolution. Sherbourne Press, Los Angeles, 1965. 322 pp., Price $7.50. Masters, William H., M.D. and Johnson, Virginia E. Human Sexual Response. Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1966. 366 pages. Price $.10.00. Reviewed by Hans Lehfeldt Douglas P. Murphy, M.D. and Editha F. Torrano, M.D. Male Fertility in 3620 Childless Couples. Fertility and Sterility, 16: 3, May-June, 1965. Reviewed by Leo Wollman, M.D. Edwin M. Schur, Editor: The Family and the Sexual Revolution, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Indiana, 1964. 427 pgs. Weldon, Virginia F., M.D., Blizzard, Robert M., M.D., and Migeon, Claude, M.D. Newborn Girls Misdiagnosed as Bilaterally Chryptorchid Males. The New England Journal of Medicine, April 14, 1966. Reviewed by H. George Liebman.

  15. An electrochemical study of corrosion protection by primer-topcoat systems on 4130 steel with ac impedance and dc methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendrek, M. J.; Higgins, R. H.; Danford, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate metal surface corrosion and the breakdown of metal protective coatings, the ac impedance method is applied to six systems of primer coated and primer topcoated 4130 steel. Two primers were used: a zinc-rich epoxy primer and a red lead oxide epoxy primer. The epoxy-polyamine topcoat was used in four of the systems. The EG and G-PARC Model 368 ac impedance measurement system, along with dc measurements with the same system using the polarization resistance method, were used to monitor changing properties of coated 4230 steel disks immersed in 3.5 percent NaCl solutions buffered at pH 5.4 over periods of 40 to 60 days. The corrosion system can be represented by an electronic analog called an equivalent circuit consisting of resistors and capacitors in specific arrangements. This equivalent circuit parallels the impedance behavior of the corrosion system during a frequency scan. Values for the resistors and capacitors, that can be assigned in the equivalent circuit following a least-squares analysis of the data, describe changes that occur on the corroding metal surface and in the protective coatings. Two equivalent circuits have been determined that predict the correct Bode phase and magnitude of the experimental sample at different immersion times. The dc corrosion current density data are related to equivalent circuit element parameters. Methods for determining corrosion rate with ac impedance parameters are verified by the dc method.

  16. High Temperature Corrosion studies on Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welded Alloy C-276 in Molten Salt Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, M.; Arivarasu, M.; Arivazhagan, N.; Puneeth, T.; Sivakumar, N.; Murugan, B. Arul; Sathishkumar, M.; Sivalingam, S.

    2016-09-01

    Alloy C-276 is widely used in the power plant environment due to high strength and corrosion in highly aggressive environment. The investigation on high- temperature corrosion resistance of the alloy C-276 PCGTA weldment is necessary for prolonged service lifetime of the components used in corrosive environments. Investigation has been carried out on Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding by autogenous and different filler wires (ERNiCrMo-3 and ERNiCrMo-4) under molten state of K2SO4-60% NaCl environment at 675oC under cyclic condition. Thermogravimetric technique was used to establish the kinetics of corrosion. Weight gained in the molten salt reveals a steady-state parabolic rate law while the kinetics with salt deposits displays multi-stage growth rates. PCGTA ERNiCrMo-3 shows the higher parabolic constant compared to others. The scale formed on the weldment samples upon hot corrosion was characterized by using X-ray diffraction, SEM and EDAX analysis to understand the degradation mechanisms. From the results of the experiment the major phases are identified as Cr2O3, Fe2O3, and NiCr2O4. The result showed that weld fabricated by ERNiCrMo-3 found to be more prone to degradation than base metal and ERNiCrMo-4 filler wire due to higher segregation of alloying element of Mo and W in the weldment

  17. Aerial photography: Applications in the study of coastal erosion and pollution. (Latest citations from Oceanic abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the applications of aerial photography in the study of coastal shoreline problems such as erosion and pollution. Topics include ocean wave direction and measurement, oil pollution detection and direction forecasting, shoreline change measurements, coastal mapping, and coastal topographic features. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Is increased modularity associated with increased fretting and corrosion damage in metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty devices?: a retrieval study.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Genymphas B; Hanzlik, Josa A; MacDonald, Daniel W; Gilbert, Jeremy L; Rimnac, Clare M; Kurtz, Steven M

    2013-09-01

    This retrieval study documents taper damage at modular interfaces in retrieved MOM THA systems and investigates if increased modularity is associated with increased fretting and corrosion. One hundred thirty-four (134) heads and 60 stems (41 modular necks) of 8 different bearing designs (5 manufacturers) were analyzed. Damage at the shell-liner interface of 18 modular CoCr acetabular liners and the corresponding 11 acetabular shells was also evaluated. The results of this study support the hypothesis that fretting and corrosion damage occurs at a variety of modular component interfaces in contemporary MOM THAs. We also found that modularity of the femoral stem was associated with increased damage at the head. An analysis of component and patient variables revealed that dissimilar alloy pairing, larger head sizes, increased medio-lateral offsets and longer neck moment arms were all associated with increased taper damage at the modular interfaces.

  19. Metal levels in corrosion of spinal implants

    PubMed Central

    Beguiristain, Jose; Duart, Julio

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion affects spinal instrumentations and may cause local and systemic complications. Diagnosis of corrosion is difficult, and nowadays it is performed almost exclusively by the examination of retrieved instrumentations. We conducted this study to determine whether it is possible to detect corrosion by measuring metal levels on patients with posterior instrumented spinal fusion. Eleven asymptomatic patients, with radiological signs of corrosion of their stainless steel spinal instrumentations, were studied by performing determinations of nickel and chromium in serum and urine. Those levels were compared with the levels of 22 patients with the same kind of instrumentation but without evidence of corrosion and to a control group of 22 volunteers without any metallic implants. Statistical analysis of our results revealed that the patients with spinal implants without radiological signs of corrosion have increased levels of chromium in serum and urine (P < 0.001) compared to volunteers without implants. Corrosion significantly raised metal levels, including nickel and chromium in serum and urine when compared to patients with no radiological signs of corrosion and to volunteers without metallic implants (P < 0.001). Metal levels measured in serum have high sensibility and specificity (area under the ROC curve of 0.981). By combining the levels of nickel and chromium in serum we were able to identify all the cases of corrosion in our series of patients. The results of our study confirm that metal levels in serum and urine are useful in the diagnosis of corrosion of spinal implants and may be helpful in defining the role of corrosion in recently described clinical entities such as late operative site pain or late infection of spinal implants. PMID:17256156

  20. Corrosion of metals by hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, E. A.; Moran, C. M.; Distefano, S.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism of corrosion of metals by hydrazine has been studied by means of coupons in sealed ampoules and by electrochemical techniques. The variables considered were temperature, CO2 impurity level, alloy composition and microcrystalline structure. The coupon studies, to date, verify that increasng temperature and the presence of CO2 does increase the corrosion rate as expected. The presence of molybdenum in stainless steels to the 3 percent level is not necessarily deleterious, contrary to published reports. The influence of microcrystalline structure and surface characteristics are more dominant effects. However, with Ti-6Al-4V, two different microcrystalline structures showed no significant differences. Corrosion rates of CRES 304 L in hydrazine have also been measured by several electrochemical techniques such as Tafel plots, polarization resistance and A. C. Impedance. This is the first documented work to show that A. C. Impedance can be used with non-aqueous solvents. Preliminary data correlated satisfactorily with the results of the coupon studies.

  1. A physical corrosion model for bioabsorbable metal stents.

    PubMed

    Grogan, J A; Leen, S B; McHugh, P E

    2014-05-01

    Absorbable metal stents (AMSs) are an emerging technology in the treatment of heart disease. Computational modelling of AMS performance will facilitate the development of this technology. In this study a physical corrosion model is developed for AMSs based on the finite element method and adaptive meshing. The model addresses a gap between currently available phenomenological corrosion models for AMSs and physical corrosion models that have been developed for more simple geometries than those of a stent. The model developed in this study captures the changing surface of a corroding three-dimensional AMS structure for the case of diffusion-controlled corrosion. Comparisons are made between model predictions and those of previously developed phenomenological corrosion models for AMSs in terms of predicted device geometry and mechanical performance during corrosion. Relationships between alloy solubility and diffusivity in the corrosion environment and device performance during corrosion are also investigated.

  2. Radioactive dating: Studies on ground water and sediments. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning radioactive dating of ground water and sediments. Articles discuss ground water movement and recharge; and lake, marine, and glacial sediments. Citations address dating techniques using isotopes of carbon, lead, uranium, radium, and tritium. Studies on sedimentation rate, water quality, aquifer characteristics, geological survey, and glacial history are presented. (Contains a minimum of 103 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineering Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presents the abstracts of 158 papers presented at the American Society for Engineering Education's annual conference at Knoxville, Tennessee, June 14-17, 1976. Included are engineering topics covering education, aerospace, agriculture, biomedicine, chemistry, computers, electricity, acoustics, environment, mechanics, and women. (SL)

  4. Abstraction through Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avraamidou, Antri; Monaghan, John; Walker, Aisha

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the computer game play of an 11-year-old boy. In the course of building a virtual house he developed and used, without assistance, an artefact and an accompanying strategy to ensure that his house was symmetric. We argue that the creation and use of this artefact-strategy is a mathematical abstraction. The discussion…

  5. Making the Abstract Concrete

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2005-01-01

    President Ronald Reagan nominated a woman to serve on the United States Supreme Court. He did so through a single-page form letter, completed in part by hand and in part by typewriter, announcing Sandra Day O'Connor as his nominee. While the document serves as evidence of a historic event, it is also a tangible illustration of abstract concepts…

  6. Computers in Abstract Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwabueze, Kenneth K.

    2004-01-01

    The current emphasis on flexible modes of mathematics delivery involving new information and communication technology (ICT) at the university level is perhaps a reaction to the recent change in the objectives of education. Abstract algebra seems to be one area of mathematics virtually crying out for computer instructional support because of the…

  7. 2002 NASPSA Conference Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Contains abstracts from the 2002 conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. The publication is divided into three sections: the preconference workshop, "Effective Teaching Methods in the Classroom;" symposia (motor development, motor learning and control, and sport psychology); and free…

  8. Abstracts of SIG Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Presents abstracts of 15 special interest group (SIG) sessions. Topics include navigation and information utilization in the Internet, natural language processing, automatic indexing, image indexing, classification, users' models of database searching, online public access catalogs, education for information professions, information services,…

  9. Abstraction and art.

    PubMed Central

    Gortais, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    In a given social context, artistic creation comprises a set of processes, which relate to the activity of the artist and the activity of the spectator. Through these processes we see and understand that the world is vaster than it is said to be. Artistic processes are mediated experiences that open up the world. A successful work of art expresses a reality beyond actual reality: it suggests an unknown world using the means and the signs of the known world. Artistic practices incorporate the means of creation developed by science and technology and change forms as they change. Artists and the public follow different processes of abstraction at different levels, in the definition of the means of creation, of representation and of perception of a work of art. This paper examines how the processes of abstraction are used within the framework of the visual arts and abstract painting, which appeared during a period of growing importance for the processes of abstraction in science and technology, at the beginning of the twentieth century. The development of digital platforms and new man-machine interfaces allow multimedia creations. This is performed under the constraint of phases of multidisciplinary conceptualization using generic representation languages, which tend to abolish traditional frontiers between the arts: visual arts, drama, dance and music. PMID:12903659

  10. Leadership Abstracts, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Cynthia, Ed.; Milliron, Mark David, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This 2002 volume of Leadership Abstracts contains issue numbers 1-12. Articles include: (1) "Skills Certification and Workforce Development: Partnering with Industry and Ourselves," by Jeffrey A. Cantor; (2) "Starting Again: The Brookhaven Success College," by Alice W. Villadsen; (3) "From Digital Divide to Digital Democracy," by Gerardo E. de los…

  11. Water reuse. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Middlebrooks, E.J.

    1982-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 31 chapters of this book which deals with all aspects of wastewater reuse. Design data, case histories, performance data, monitoring information, health information, social implications, legal and organizational structures, and background information needed to analyze the desirability of water reuse are presented. (KRM)

  12. Abstract Film and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grice, Malcolm

    A theoretical and historical account of the main preoccupations of makers of abstract films is presented in this book. The book's scope includes discussion of nonrepresentational forms as well as examination of experiments in the manipulation of time in films. The ten chapters discuss the following topics: art and cinematography, the first…

  13. Rolloff Roof Observatory Construction (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulowetz, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) Lessons learned about building an observatory by someone with limited construction experience, and the advantages of having one for imaging and variable star studies. Sample results shown of composite light curves for cataclysmic variables UX UMa and V1101 Aql with data from my observatory combined with data from others around the world.

  14. A CFD-Based Study of the Feasibility of Adapting an Erosion Burner Rig for Examining the Effect of CMAS Deposition Corrosion on Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic and computational fluid dynamics modeling has been conducted to examine the feasibility of adapting the NASA-Glenn erosion burner rigs for use in studies of corrosion of environmental barrier coatings by the deposition of molten CMAS. The effect of burner temperature, Mach number, particle preheat, duct heating, particle size, and particle phase (crystalline vs. glass) were analyzed. Detailed strategies for achieving complete melting of CMAS particles were developed, thereby greatly improving the probability of future successful experimental outcomes.

  15. NON-UNIFORM COPPER CORROSION: RESEARCH UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pinhole leaks due to copper pitting corrosion are a major cause of home plumbing failure. This study documents cases of copper pitting corrosion found in homes supplied by Butler County Environmental Services in Ohio. SEM. XRD, and optical microscopy were used to document pit s...

  16. Study of corrosion protection of alumimium by siliconoxid-polymer coatings deposited by a dielectric barrier discharge under atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, J. F.; Sonnenfeld, A.; Ivanova, O.; Hippler, R.; To, T. X. H.; Pham, G. V.; Vu, K. O.; Nguyen, T. D.

    2003-10-01

    Aluminum surfaces were treated with the plasma of a dielectric barrier discharge under atmospheric pressure in air and in nitrogen. Tetraethoxysilan (TEOS) was used as the precursor for the deposition of a thin SiOx polymer film with an anticorrosive and an adhesive characteristics. The substrate temperature was varied from 25 C to 50 C. The coated aluminum surface was provided with a painting of primer. The corrosion performance of the layers was evaluated by adhesion measurements, by salt spraying test and by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The corrosion resistance of the layers depends on the substrate temperature. The results of the impedance measurements show that a surface treatment with a substrate temperature of 50 C supplies the best corrosion protection. The same results were found by using the salt spaying test.

  17. The software IDA for investigation of asteroid dynamics and its use for study of some asteroid motion (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galushina, T.; Bykova, L.; Letner, O.; Baturin, A.

    2015-08-01

    This work is devoted to description of the application suite IDA that is designed for investigation of dynamics and probability orbital evolution of asteroids. IDA allows to predict asteroid motion, to reveal close encounters, possible collisions and orbital resonance with planets, to estimate impact probability, to demonstrate asteroid and planets motion on a computer screen and to solve some additional problems. The features of the suite are multifunctionality, high efficiency and a convenient interface. The application suite IDA consists of following subsystems: subsystem "Assol" which allows to study orbital evolution of the nominal orbit and to demonstrate the asteroid and planets motion on a computer screen; subsystem "Observations" which intended to asteroid orbit fitting to positional observations and construction of initial probability domain with non-linear methods; subsystem "Distribution" which developed for the visualization of distribution of observations along an asteroid orbit; subsystem "Clones ensemble" which allows to construct an initial probability domain with the linear method; subsystem "Evolution" which designed for the study of the orbital evolution of an ensemble of asteroid clones; subsystem "Megno" which intended to estimate of predictability time of asteroid motion by means of average MEGNO parameter. The results of the motion investigation of the asteroid 2012 MF7 are given to demonstrate use of the application suite. This object has nonzero collision probability with the Earth in 2046.

  18. TANK 241-AN-107 CORROSION COUPON LABORATORY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB; ANANTATMULA RP

    2001-09-27

    To support the corrosion study for Tank 241-AN-107, corrosion coupons consisting of C-rings and pins were removed from four detectors of the corrosion probe retrieved from the tank. The detectors were located as follows: one in the sludge layer, one in the liquid layer, one in the lower head space and the last in the upper head space. ASTM Method G-190 was used to determine the amount of corrosion product present.

  19. Study of materials to resist corrosion in condensing gas-fired furnaces. Final report Oct 79-Dec 81

    SciTech Connect

    Lahtvee, T.; Schaus, O.O.

    1982-02-01

    Based on a thorough review of background information on the performance of materials in condensing gas-fired heat exchangers and similar corrosive environments, candidate materials were examined on test equipment built to provide the varying corrosive conditions encountered in actual gas-fired condensing system heat exchangers. The 32 different materials tested in a one month screening test included: mild, low alloy, galvanized, solder coated steel, porcelain, epoxy, teflon and nylon coated and alonized mild steel; austenitic, ferritic, low interstitial Ti stabilized ferritic, and high alloy stainless steels; aluminum alloys, anodized and porcelain coated aluminum; copper and cupronickel alloys, solder coated copper; and titanium.

  20. Dynamics study of the OH + NH3 hydrogen abstraction reaction using QCT calculations based on an analytical potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monge-Palacios, M.; Corchado, J. C.; Espinosa-Garcia, J.

    2013-06-01

    To understand the reactivity and mechanism of the OH + NH3 → H2O + NH2 gas-phase reaction, which evolves through wells in the entrance and exit channels, a detailed dynamics study was carried out using quasi-classical trajectory calculations. The calculations were performed on an analytical potential energy surface (PES) recently developed by our group, PES-2012 [Monge-Palacios et al. J. Chem. Phys. 138, 084305 (2013)], 10.1063/1.4792719. Most of the available energy appeared as H2O product vibrational energy (54%), reproducing the only experimental evidence, while only the 21% of this energy appeared as NH2 co-product vibrational energy. Both products appeared with cold and broad rotational distributions. The excitation function (constant collision energy in the range 1.0-14.0 kcal mol-1) increases smoothly with energy, contrasting with the only theoretical information (reduced-dimensional quantum scattering calculations based on a simplified PES), which presented a peak at low collision energies, related to quantized states. Analysis of the individual reactive trajectories showed that different mechanisms operate depending on the collision energy. Thus, while at high energies (Ecoll ≥ 6 kcal mol-1) all trajectories are direct, at low energies about 20%-30% of trajectories are indirect, i.e., with the mediation of a trapping complex, mainly in the product well. Finally, the effect of the zero-point energy constraint on the dynamics properties was analyzed.