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  1. Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious and often ... are drug resistant. Why Is the Study of Tuberculosis (TB) a Priority for NIAID? Tuberculosis is one ...

  2. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training Home Conditions Tuberculosis (TB) Treating Tuberculosis Treating Tuberculosis Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Diagnosing Tuberculosis History of TB Clinical Trials For more than ...

  3. HIV and Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) (Last updated 9/1/2016; last reviewed ... depends on a person’s individual circumstances. What is tuberculosis? Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious disease that can ...

  4. Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Testing for TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  5. Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Exposure to TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  6. Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  7. Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts You Can Prevent TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination TB Facts: You Can Prevent TB What ...

  8. Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB Can Be Treated What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Page 1 of 2 TB Facts: TB ...

  9. Tuberculosis: Learn the Signs and Symptoms of TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Tuberculosis (TB) Disease: Symptoms & Risk Factors Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria that ...

  10. Recent tuberculosis diagnosis toward the end TB strategy.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Seon Ah; Cho, Hyun Hee; Kim, Jeonghyo; Lee, Jaebeom; Kim, Hwa-Jung; Park, Tae Jung

    2016-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Despite global TB eradication efforts, it is still a global public health concern, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Most of the active TB infections are curable with early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, but drug-resistant TB is difficult and expensive to treat in immunocompetent as well as immunocompromised individuals. Thus, rapid, economic, and accurate point-of care tools for TB diagnosis are required urgently. This review describes the history of M. tuberculosis detection methods up to date and the recent advances using nanotechnology for point-of-care testing of TB diagnosis.

  11. 69 FR 26606 - Community Preparation for Tuberculosis (TB) Vaccine Trials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Community Preparation for Tuberculosis (TB..., , as amended. Purpose: The purpose of the program is for CDC to test new Tuberculosis (TB) vaccines... limited to, World Health Organization (WHO), International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung...

  12. Whole-Genome Sequences of Mycobacterium tuberculosis TB282 and TB284, a Widespread and a Unique Strain, Respectively, Identified in a Previous Study of Tuberculosis Transmission in Central Los Angeles, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenhua

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the genome sequences of two Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates previously identified in central Los Angeles, CA, in the 1990s using a PacBio platform. Isolate TB282 represents a large-cluster strain that caused 27% of the tuberculosis cases, while TB284 represents a strain that caused disease in only one patient. PMID:28082486

  13. Tuberculosis: The Connection between TB and HIV (the AIDS Virus)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tuberculosis Elimination Website at www.cdc.gov/tb File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  14. [Tuberculosis Annual Report 2009--Series 6. Condition of TB (1)].

    PubMed

    2011-10-01

    The condition of tuberculosis (TB) at the time at which an individual is diagnosed with TB influences the patient's prognosis. This paper focuses on the condition of TB at the time of the diagnosis based on bacteriological status and X-ray findings. The proportion of bacteriologically confirmed cases among newly notified pulmonary TB patients increased greatly from 25.7% in 1979 to 82.7% in 2009. During this period, the proportion of far-advanced cavitary cases among pulmonary TB patients was around 2% and remained stable. This may mean that the diagnosis had come to be performed bacteriologically rather than radiologically. The proportion of bacteriologically confirmed cases among newly notified pulmonary TB patients in 2009 was studied by sex and 5-year age group. The proportion of bacteriologically confirmed cases increased with age in both male and female TB patients. In male TB patients, the proportion of cavitary cases increased in patients aged up to the end of the 50s and then decreased with age. This tendency was not observed in females. Although the proportion of cavitary cases among elderly TB patients was lower than among youths, the proportion having extensive lesions was greater than that among youths. The proportion of sputum-smear-positive cases with cavities among pulmonary TB patients aged 30-59 years was 32.9 % in male TB patients and 17.1% in female TB patients. According to occupation, this proportion was highest in "temporary workers" (52.6%) for male TB cases and "jobless/ others" (24.9%) for female TB cases, and lowest among "medical workers" in both sexes: 8.3% of male TB cases and 7.4% of female TB cases.

  15. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR-TB): Quarantine and Isolation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-05

    1 For a discussion of XDR-TB see CDC, “Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR TB)” [http://www.cdc.gov/tb/pubs/tbfactsheets/xdrtb.htm]. 2... Tuberculosis (XDR-TB): Quarantine and Isolation Kathleen S. Swendiman and Nancy Lee Jones Legislative Attorneys American Law Division Summary The...recent international saga of a traveler with XDR-TB, a drug-resistant form of tuberculosis , has placed a spotlight on existing mechanisms to contain

  16. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prisons, or homeless shelters. If you work in hospitals or health-care settings where TB patients are likely to be seen, you should consult infection control or occupational health experts. Ask about administrative and ...

  17. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Correctional and Detention Facilities Guidelines for Preventing the Transmission of M. TB in Health care Settings Investigation ... infection control measures in place. Documented places where transmission has occurred include crowded hospitals, prisons, homeless shelters, ...

  18. [Tuberculosis annual report 2008--series 2. TB in foreigners].

    PubMed

    2009-11-01

    Statistics on tuberculosis (TB) in foreigners have been obtained since 1998 in Japan. The number of foreign TB patients increased from 739 in 1998 to 945 in 2008. In contrast, the number of Japanese TB patients decreased during this period and hence the proportion of foreign TB patients increased from 2.1% in 1998 to 3.9% in 2008, excluding those of unknown nationality. Especially, the proportion of those aged 20-29 years increased greatly from 9.1% in 1998 to 26.3% in 2008. Although the number of nationalities was 47, the majority of patients were from China (27.7%), the Philippines (24.8%) and Korea (10.2%) in 2008. The number of foreign TB patients aged 20-29 years was 468, accounting for 49.5% of all foreign TB patients in 2008. Seventy-seven percent of foreign patients aged 20-29 years had developed TB within 5 years of entering Japan. The equivalent proportion was 49% of those aged 30-39 years and 32% of those aged 40-49 years. Regarding occupation, 39.7% of foreign patients aged 20-29 years were full-time workers, 28.6% were students and 13.7% were part-time workers.

  19. Pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazole-based agents active against tuberculosis (TB), multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB.

    PubMed

    Pieroni, Marco; Tipparaju, Suresh K; Lun, Shichun; Song, Yang; Sturm, A Willem; Bishai, William R; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2011-02-07

    The struggle against tuberculosis (TB) is still far from over. TB, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the deadliest infections worldwide. Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) strains have further increased the burden for this disease. Herein, we report the discovery of 2-(4-chlorobenzyl)-3-methyl-1-oxo-1H,5H-pyrido[1,2-a]benzimidazole-4-carbonitrile as an effective antitubercular agent and the structural modifications of this molecule that have led to analogues with improved potency and lower toxicity. A number of these derivatives were also active at sub-micromolar concentrations against resistant TB strains and devoid of apparent toxicity to Vero cells, thereby underscoring their value as novel scaffolds for the development of new anti-TB drugs.

  20. Donor-derived tuberculosis (TB): isoniazid-resistant TB transmitted from a lung transplant donor with inadequately treated latent infection.

    PubMed

    Jensen, T O; Darley, D R; Goeman, E E; Shaw, K; Marriott, D J; Glanville, A R

    2016-10-01

    Donor-derived tuberculosis (TB) is an increasingly recognized complication of solid organ transplantation. We report a case of isoniazid-resistant pulmonary TB in a lung transplant recipient. The patient acquired the infection from the lung donor who was previously empirically treated with isoniazid for latent TB. The case highlights the caveat that, while adequate treatment of latent TB with isoniazid is presumed, meticulous screening of donors is required.

  1. TIME Impact - a new user-friendly tuberculosis (TB) model to inform TB policy decisions.

    PubMed

    Houben, R M G J; Lalli, M; Sumner, T; Hamilton, M; Pedrazzoli, D; Bonsu, F; Hippner, P; Pillay, Y; Kimerling, M; Ahmedov, S; Pretorius, C; White, R G

    2016-03-24

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death from infectious disease worldwide, predominantly affecting low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where resources are limited. As such, countries need to be able to choose the most efficient interventions for their respective setting. Mathematical models can be valuable tools to inform rational policy decisions and improve resource allocation, but are often unavailable or inaccessible for LMICs, particularly in TB. We developed TIME Impact, a user-friendly TB model that enables local capacity building and strengthens country-specific policy discussions to inform support funding applications at the (sub-)national level (e.g. Ministry of Finance) or to international donors (e.g. the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria).TIME Impact is an epidemiological transmission model nested in TIME, a set of TB modelling tools available for free download within the widely-used Spectrum software. The TIME Impact model reflects key aspects of the natural history of TB, with additional structure for HIV/ART, drug resistance, treatment history and age. TIME Impact enables national TB programmes (NTPs) and other TB policymakers to better understand their own TB epidemic, plan their response, apply for funding and evaluate the implementation of the response.The explicit aim of TIME Impact's user-friendly interface is to enable training of local and international TB experts towards independent use. During application of TIME Impact, close involvement of the NTPs and other local partners also builds critical understanding of the modelling methods, assumptions and limitations inherent to modelling. This is essential to generate broad country-level ownership of the modelling data inputs and results. In turn, it stimulates discussions and a review of the current evidence and assumptions, strengthening the decision-making process in general.TIME Impact has been effectively applied in a variety of settings. In South Africa, it

  2. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis A A A What's in this article? TB ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  3. TB Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  4. Tackling tuberculosis: Insights from an international TB Summit in London

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Arundhati; Danquah, Cynthia A; Scotti, Francesca; Howard, Tracey K; Kamil, Tengku K; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) poses a grave predicament to the world as it is not merely a scientific challenge but a socio-economic burden as well. A prime cause of mortality in human due to an infectious disease; the malady and its cause, Mycobacterium tuberculosis have remained an enigma with many questions that remain unanswered. The ability of the pathogen to survive and switch between varied physiological states necessitates a protracted therapeutic regimen that exerts an excessive strain on low-resource countries. To complicate things further, there has been a significant rise of antimicrobial resistance. Existing control measures, including treatment regimens have remained fairly uniform globally for at least half a century and require reinvention. Overcoming the societal and scientific challenges requires an increase in dialog to identify key regions that need attention and effective partners with whom successful collaborations can be fostered. In this report, we explore the discussions held at the International TB Summit 2015 hosted by EuroSciCon, which served as an excellent platform for researchers to share their recent findings. Ground-breaking results require outreach to affect policy design, governance and control of the disease. Hence, we feel it is important that meetings such as these reach a wider, global audience. PMID:26151309

  5. Rapid identification of tuberculosis epididymo-orchitis by INNO-LiPA Rif TB and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In Tube tests: case report.

    PubMed

    Paluch-Oleś, Jolanta; Magryś, Agnieszka; Kot, Ewa; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria

    2010-03-01

    Diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is often missed or delayed because of nonspecific clinical and laboratory findings. Novel detection methods, such as polymerase chain reaction and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In Tube, can aid in the diagnosis of active extrapulmonary TB. Here, we demonstrate a case of epididymo-orchitis as the sole presentation of TB in a 32-year-old man.

  6. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis Print A A A What's in this article? ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  7. Rapid molecular diagnosis of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rangipo strain responsible for the largest recurring TB cluster in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, Claire V; Ruthe, Ali; Cursons, Ray T; Durrant, Robert; Karalus, Noel; Coley, Kathryn; Bower, James; Permina, Elizabeth; Coleman, Megan J; Roberts, Sally A; Arcus, Vickery L; Cook, Gregory M; Aung, Htin Lin

    2017-03-23

    Despite New Zealand being a low-tuberculosis (TB) burden country, there are disproportionately high rates of TB in particular populations. Here, we report a rapid molecular diagnosis of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rangipo strain responsible for the largest recurring TB cluster in New Zealand.

  8. World TB Day 2016: an interview with leading experts in tuberculosis research.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Patrick P J; Fletcher, Helen A; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Lipman, Marc C I; McHugh, Timothy D

    2016-03-23

    In this interview, we talk to leading tuberculosis (TB) experts from University College London and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine about the current challenges in TB research. The video of this interview is available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75Die7MQBec&feature=youtu.be . The video can also be downloaded via Additional file 1.

  9. [Management of tuberculosis (TB) cases from view points of public health].

    PubMed

    Satoh, Ken; Motomiya, Masakichi

    2011-08-01

    Tuberculosis control law was enacted in 1951 and has been the basis for the management of TB cases over the long post-war period. This law has legalized the use of public founds for the treatment of TB patients for the first time and has provided the authentic basis for mandatory hospitalization, routine health examination, vaccination, notification and registration of TB cases. However, this law was abrogated in 2001 and was joined to the comprehensive infectious diseases control law, in order to facilitate a prophylactic measure against TB infection and to protect human rights of TB patients. Concurrently the medical care system and the formalities connected to hospitalization treatment of TB patients were reviewed. The purpose of the present overview is to explain how TB cases are managed under the newly-enacted law.

  10. TB or not TB? Difficulties in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in HIV-negative immigrants to Germany

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Immigrants to Germany and their children are at particular risk for tuberculosis (TB). Methods 35 Patients (10 male/25 female aged 2 - 59 years (median 33 years) originating mostly from high incidence countries in Asia (19 [54.3%]) in Africa (14 [40.0%] and East Europe (2 [5.7%]), attended at the Tropical Medicine unit were analysed. Results Primary clinical presentation was most frequently lymphadenitis (13 [37.1%]). other organs involved included bones (7 [20.0%]), central nervous system (5 [14.3%]), urogenital organs (3 [8.6%]), lung (3 [8.6%]), mediastinum, (2 [5.7%]) and abdomen (2 [5.7%]). ESR was abnormal in 21/28 (75.0%), CRP in 20/35 (57.1%), and protein electrophoresis in 22/26 (84.6%) cases. The tuberculin skin test was strongly positive in all 15 cases where the test had been performed. Tuberculosis interferon gamma release assay (TB-IGRA) was positive in all 35 cases (100%). PCR for nucleic acids of Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis complex was positive in only 7/20 (35.0%) cases. M. tuberculosis was identified in 32/35 (91.4%), M. bovis in 2 (5.7%) cases. 1 case was diagnosed clinically. All patients were negative for HIV. Typical histopathology was seen in the 29 cases, where biopsies had been taken. Chest-X-ray did not reveal specific pulmonary lesions in the majority of cases (22/35 [62.9%]). Diagnosis of TB was mostly delayed (4 to 299 weeks, [median 8]). The most frequent primary suspicion was a malignancy (17/35 [48.6%]) while TB was initially suspected in 5 cases only. Diagnosis of TB is impeded by its multifaceted presentation especially in immigrants. PMID:22024436

  11. Declining tuberculosis notification trend associated with strengthened TB and expanded HIV care in Swaziland.

    PubMed

    Haumba, S; Dlamini, T; Calnan, M; Ghazaryan, V; Smith-Arthur, A E; Preko, P; Ehrenkranz, P

    2015-06-21

    This retrospective observational review documents the efforts of the Swaziland National Tuberculosis (TB) Control Programme between 2004 and 2014. The objective is to describe the disparity between actual declines in case notification and increases in estimated incidence. The review of policies and practices shows the most influential factors associated with the decrease in TB case notification to be an increase in access to antiretroviral therapy for co-infected TB patients, the general success of TB and human immunodeficiency virus service integration in the country and improvements in implementation of all components of directly observed treatment, active case finding, and rapid diagnosis using new technologies.

  12. GSMN-TB: a web-based genome-scale network model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Beste, Dany JV; Hooper, Tracy; Stewart, Graham; Bonde, Bhushan; Avignone-Rossa, Claudio; Bushell, Michael E; Wheeler, Paul; Klamt, Steffen; Kierzek, Andrzej M; McFadden, Johnjoe

    2007-01-01

    Background An impediment to the rational development of novel drugs against tuberculosis (TB) is a general paucity of knowledge concerning the metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, particularly during infection. Constraint-based modeling provides a novel approach to investigating microbial metabolism but has not yet been applied to genome-scale modeling of M. tuberculosis. Results GSMN-TB, a genome-scale metabolic model of M. tuberculosis, was constructed, consisting of 849 unique reactions and 739 metabolites, and involving 726 genes. The model was calibrated by growing Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette Guérin in continuous culture and steady-state growth parameters were measured. Flux balance analysis was used to calculate substrate consumption rates, which were shown to correspond closely to experimentally determined values. Predictions of gene essentiality were also made by flux balance analysis simulation and were compared with global mutagenesis data for M. tuberculosis grown in vitro. A prediction accuracy of 78% was achieved. Known drug targets were predicted to be essential by the model. The model demonstrated a potential role for the enzyme isocitrate lyase during the slow growth of mycobacteria, and this hypothesis was experimentally verified. An interactive web-based version of the model is available. Conclusion The GSMN-TB model successfully simulated many of the growth properties of M. tuberculosis. The model provides a means to examine the metabolic flexibility of bacteria and predict the phenotype of mutants, and it highlights previously unexplored features of M. tuberculosis metabolism. PMID:17521419

  13. Advanced development of the digital tuberculosis tester for MDR-TB screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jason E.; Simkulet, Michelle D.; Gutin, Alexander; Gutin, Alexy; Bardarov, Savco; Jacobs, William R., Jr.; Castracane, James; Tang, Oliver; Riska, Paul

    2001-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the leading cause of death in the world from a single infectious disease, and the threat is becoming more critical with the spread of multi-drug resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB). TB detection, and susceptibility testing for drug resistant strain identification, is advancing with the development of Luciferase Reporter Mycobacteriophages (LRM). LRM will emit visible light at very low intensity when in the presence of live mycobacteria cells such as Tuberculosis strains. InterScience, Inc., together with its collaboration, is developing a highly sensitive, real-time digital detection system for the analysis of luminescent assays. Recent advances in system sensitivity, design, and implementation, as well as preliminary results of the development of individual test cartridges, will be presented. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide a versatile luminescence detection tool for widespread research and clinical applications.

  14. Progress in achieving universal access to care for multidrug- resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB).

    PubMed

    Wares, Fraser; Falzon, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    Each year there are about nine million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) in the world and over one million people die of the disease. The emergence of resistance to the drugs that are used to treat TB threaten to undo much of the progress achieved in controlling it in recent decades. In some countries, up to one third or more of TB cases have multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB; combined resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampicin), requiring a much longer and toxic treatment than that suffices for other TB patients. Countries have committed to achieve universal access to care for MDR-TB for their populations by 2015. In this article, we use national data collected by the World Health Organization (WHO) to assess global progress in detection (against WHO estimates) and treatment of MDR-TB. Over one half of all the world's MDR-TB patients are concentrated in three countries: India, China, and the Russian Federation. In 2012, about 78,753 TB cases were reported to have been started on MDR-TB treatment, about 25% of the estimated MDR-TB case load in the world. Only 48% of over 35,000 MDR-TB patients started on treatment in 2010 were reported to have completed their treatment successfully. The global MDR-TB targets for 2015 will not be achieved unless barriers to the expansion of reliable diagnosis and effective treatment of MDR-TB are not urgently overcome in many countries. New diagnostics and medicines will be required to speed up this drive within the new WHO global strategy which now looks well beyond 2015.

  15. [Tuberculosis annual report 2009. Series 1. Summary of TB notification statistics in 2009].

    PubMed

    2011-02-01

    Annual reports of tuberculosis (TB) statistics in Japan have been compiled mainly using the output of the database obtained through the nationwide computerized tuberculosis surveillance system which has been operated since 1987. This system has been revised several times, with the latest revision conducted in 2007 when much new information was added. Therefore, a plan was drawn up to provide TB epidemiological statistics in Japan on "Kekkaku" and a series of ten reports was already issued as "TB Annual Report 2008". This is the first report of a new series for "TB Annual Report 2009". The report can be summarized as follows. The TB notification (incidence) rate fell below 20 per 100,000 in 2007 and continued to decline, reaching 19.0 in 2009. However, 24,170 TB patients were newly notified in 2009. For sputum smear positive pulmonary TB, the patient count was 9,675 with an incidence rate of 7.6 per 100,000 in 2009. Since June 2007, it has been legally compulsory to notify latent TB infections (LTBI) requiring treatment; the number in 2009 was 4119 cases.

  16. Rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum by Patho-TB kit in comparison with direct microscopy and culture.

    PubMed

    Ben-Selma, Walid; Ben-Kahla, Imen; Marzouk, Manel; Ferjeni, Asma; Ghezal, Samira; Ben-Said, Moncef; Boukadida, Jalel

    2009-11-01

    The usefulness of a new rapid diagnostic test (Patho-TB) using antibodies specific to mycobacterial antigens was evaluated for the rapid discrimination between pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and non-TB pulmonary diseases on sputa. One hundred sputa collected from 79 active TB patients and from 21 patients with non-TB pulmonary diseases (asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) were enrolled into the study and tested for the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Ziehl-Neelsen smear, Patho-TB kit, and Löwenstein-Jensen culture. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the Patho-TB test were 95%, 100%, 100%, and 84%, respectively. Patho-TB test is simple, quick, and easy to perform. Its sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value are satisfactory. Therefore, it could be used as a screening test in poorly equipped laboratories of TB endemic areas.

  17. Rapid diagnosis of MDR and XDR tuberculosis with the MeltPro TB assay in China.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu; Dong, Haiyan; Tan, Yaoju; Deng, Yunfeng; Cai, Xingshan; Jing, Hui; Xia, Hui; Li, Qiang; Ou, Xichao; Su, Biyi; Li, Xuezheng; Zhang, Zhiying; Li, Junchen; Zhang, Jiankang; Huan, Shitong; Zhao, Yanlin

    2016-05-06

    New diagnostic methods have provided a promising solution for rapid and reliable detection of drug-resistant TB strains. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the MeltPro TB assay in identifying multidrug-resistant (MDR-) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) patients from sputum samples. The MeltPro TB assay was evaluated using sputum samples from 2057 smear-positive TB patients. Phenotypic Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) 960 drug susceptibility testing served as a reference standard. The sensitivity of the MeltPro TB assay was 94.2% for detecting resistance to rifampicin and 84.9% for detecting resistance to isoniazid. For second-line drugs, the assay showed a sensitivity of 83.3% for ofloxacin resistance, 75.0% for amikacin resistance, and 63.5% for kanamycin resistance. However, there was a significant difference for detecting kanamycin resistance between the two pilot sites in sensitivity, which was 53.2% in Guangdong and 81.5% in Shandong (P = 0.015). Overall, the MeltPro TB assay demonstrated good performance for the detection of MDR- and XDR-TB, with a sensitivity of 86.7% and 71.4%, respectively. The MeltPro TB assay is an excellent alternative for the detection of MDR- and XDR-TB cases in China, with high accuracy, short testing turn-around time, and low unit price compared with other tests.

  18. Management and control of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB): Addressing policy needs for India.

    PubMed

    Atre, Sachin R; Murray, Megan B

    2016-05-06

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) challenges TB control efforts because of delays in diagnosis plus its long-term treatment which has toxic effects. Of TB high-incidence countries, India carries the highest burden of MDR-TB cases. We describe policy issues in India concerning MDR-TB diagnosis and management in a careful review of the literature including a systematic review of studies on the prevalence of MDR-TB. Of 995 articles published during 2001-2016 and retrieved from the PubMed, only 20 provided data on the population prevalence of MDR-TB. We further reviewed and describe diagnostic criteria and treatment algorithms in use and endorsed by the Revised National TB Control Program of India. We discuss problems encountered in treating MDR-TB patients with standardized regimens. Finally, we provide realistic suggestions for policymakers and program planners to improve the management and control of MDR-TB in India.Journal of Public Health Policy advance online publication, 6 May 2016; doi:10.1057/jphp.2016.14.

  19. Biomarkers for risk of developing active tuberculosis in contacts of TB patients: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rakotosamimanana, Niaina; Richard, Vincent; Raharimanga, Vaomalala; Gicquel, Brigitte; Doherty, T Mark; Zumla, Alimuddin; Rasolofo Razanamparany, Voahangy

    2015-10-01

    Identifying those Mycobacterium tuberculosis latent-infected individuals most at risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB) using routine clinical and laboratory tests remains a huge challenge in TB control efforts. We conducted a prospective longitudinal study of clinical and laboratory markers associated with the risk of developing active TB in contacts with latent M. tuberculosis infection.HIV-negative household contacts (n=296) of pulmonary TB patients underwent monitoring of clinical features, full blood cell counts, tuberculin skin text (TST) and chest radiography performed regularly during 18 months of follow-up. Paired statistical tests, a Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard modelling were performed on variables between contacts progressing or not progressing to active TB.The appearance of TB disease symptoms in contacts was significantly associated with an elevated peripheral percentage of blood monocytes (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 6.25, 95% CI 1.63-23.95; p<0.01), a ≥14 mm TST response (aHR 5.72, 95% CI 1.22-26.80; p=0.03) and an increased monocyte:lymphocyte ratio (aHR 4.97, 95% CI 1.3-18.99; p=0.03). Among contacts having TST ≥14 mm, a strong association with risk of progression to TB was found with an elevated blood monocyte percentage (aHR 8.46, 95% CI 1.74-41.22; p<0.01).Elevated percentage of peripheral blood monocytes plus an elevated TST response are potential biomarkers for identifying contacts of TB patients at highest risk of developing active TB.

  20. Mortality among MDR-TB Cases: Comparison with Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis and Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Chung-Delgado, Kocfa; Guillen-Bravo, Sonia; Revilla-Montag, Alejandro; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background An increase in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases is evident worldwide. Its management implies a complex treatment, high costs, more toxic anti-tuberculosis drug use, longer treatment time and increased treatment failure and mortality. The aims of this study were to compare mortality between MDR and drug-susceptible cases of tuberculosis, and to determine risk factors associated with mortality among MDR-TB cases. Methods and Results A retrospective cohort study was performed using data from clinical records of the National Strategy for Prevention and Control of Tuberculosis in Lima, Peru. In the first objective, MDR-TB, compared to drug-susceptible cases, was the main exposure variable and time to death, censored at 180 days, the outcome of interest. For the second objective, different variables obtained from clinical records were assessed as potential risk factors for death among MDR-TB cases. Cox regression analysis was used to determine hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). A total of 1,232 patients were analyzed: mean age 30.9 ±14.0 years, 60.0% were males. 61 patients (5.0%) died during treatment, whereas the MDR-TB prevalence was 19.2%. MDR-TB increased the risk of death during treatment (HR = 7.5; IC95%: 4.1–13.4) when compared to presumed drug-susceptible cases after controlling for potential confounders. Education level (p = 0.01), previous TB episodes (p<0.001), diabetes history (p<0.001) and HIV infection (p = 0.04) were factors associated with mortality among MDR-TB cases. Conclusions MDR-TB is associated with an increased risk of death during treatment. Lower education, greater number of previous TB episodes, diabetes history, and HIV infection were independently associated with mortality among MDR-TB cases. New strategies for appropriate MDR-TB detection and management should be implemented, including drug sensitivity tests, diabetes and HIV screening, as well as guarantee for a complete adherence to

  1. Testing for TB Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  2. Comparison of tuberculin skin testing and T-SPOT.TB for diagnosis of latent and active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Hulya; Alpar, Sibel; Ucar, Nazire; Aksu, Funda; Ceyhan, Ismail; Gözalan, Aysegul; Cesur, Salih; Ertek, Mustafa

    2010-03-01

    The T-SPOT.TB test does not cross-react with Bacille Calmette-Guérin or most non-tuberculosis mycobacterium species, and is based on IFN-gamma responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigens. The objective of this study was to compare tuberculin skin test (TST) with T-SPOT.TB results used in the diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) as well as latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). A total of 136 subjects participated in three different groups (47 patients with active pulmonary TB, 47 healthy persons without M. tuberculosis exposure, and 42 hospital members with a history of close contact with active TB patients). The T-SPOT.TB sensitivity (83.0%) and the negative predictive value (NPV) (82.6%) in the diagnosis of active TB were significantly higher than those of TST. The sensitivity and NPV of the TST were 38.3 and 60.8%, respectively. The T-SPOT.TB specificity (80.9%) and positive predictive value (81.3%) were lower than those of TST (95.7 and 90.0%, respectively). The performance of T-SPOT.TB and TST for diagnosing LTBI was the same (54.8%). T-SPOT.TB was superior in terms of sensitivity (83.0%); TST detected only 18, whereas T-SPOT.TB test detected 39 out of 47 patients with active TB. T-SPOT.TB is thought to have better performance than TST due to false-negative results in diagnosing active TB. However, it is considered that large prospective longitudinal studies are needed for diagnosing LTBI.

  3. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-03-10

    Essential facts Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection caused by a bacterium, mycobacterium tuberculosis. While it can affect any part of the body, only pulmonary TB is infectious. According to the charity TB Alert, there were 5,758 cases of TB in the UK in 2015 and 39% of them were in London. This represented a fall from a peak of 8,919 cases in 2011. Left untreated, TB is life-threatening, but is usually curable with antibiotics. The sooner it is diagnosed and treated, the better, both for the person's health and in preventing them from passing the infection on to others.

  4. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-02-22

    Essential facts Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection caused by a bacterium, mycobacterium tuberculosis. While it can affect any part of the body, only pulmonary TB is infectious. According to the charity TB Alert, there were 5,758 cases of TB in the UK in 2015 and 39% of them were in London. This represented a fall from a peak of 8,919 cases in 2011. Left untreated, TB is life-threatening, but is usually curable with antibiotics. The sooner it is diagnosed and treated, the better, both for the person's health and in preventing them from passing the infection on to others.

  5. The association between alcohol use, alcohol use disorders and tuberculosis (TB). A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In 2004, tuberculosis (TB) was responsible for 2.5% of global mortality (among men 3.1%; among women 1.8%) and 2.2% of global burden of disease (men 2.7%; women 1.7%). The present work portrays accumulated evidence on the association between alcohol consumption and TB with the aim to clarify the nature of the relationship. Methods A systematic review of existing scientific data on the association between alcohol consumption and TB, and on studies relevant for clarification of causality was undertaken. Results There is a strong association between heavy alcohol use/alcohol use disorders (AUD) and TB. A meta-analysis on the risk of TB for these factors yielded a pooled relative risk of 2.94 (95% CI: 1.89-4.59). Numerous studies show pathogenic impact of alcohol on the immune system causing susceptibility to TB among heavy drinkers. In addition, there are potential social pathways linking AUD and TB. Heavy alcohol use strongly influences both the incidence and the outcome of the disease and was found to be linked to altered pharmacokinetics of medicines used in treatment of TB, social marginalization and drift, higher rate of re-infection, higher rate of treatment defaults and development of drug-resistant forms of TB. Based on the available data, about 10% of the TB cases globally were estimated to be attributable to alcohol. Conclusion The epidemiological and other evidence presented indicates that heavy alcohol use/AUD constitute a risk factor for incidence and re-infection of TB. Consequences for prevention and clinical interventions are discussed. PMID:19961618

  6. COUNTING THE MISSING CASES: ESTIMATING THE GLOBAL BURDEN OF MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS AMONG PREVALENT CASES OF TB

    PubMed Central

    Nourzad, Susan; Jenkins, Helen E.; Milstein, Meredith; Mitnick, Carole D.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) burden estimates are based on incomplete, infrequently updated data among a limited pool of cases: notified or incident, pulmonary TB patients. Methods Using WHO data reported by 217 countries/territories in 2014, we calculated MDR-TB burdens among prevalent TB cases and compared these with estimates among incident and notified TB patients. We also compared treatment coverage across estimates. Findings Among prevalent TB patients globally in 2014, we estimate that 555,545 (95% credible bounds: 499,340–617,391) MDR-TB cases occurred. This is 85% more than the 300,000 estimated among notified cases, and 16% more than the 480,000 among incident cases. Only 20% of MDR-TB cases among prevalent—compared to 37% of MDR-TB among notified—TB patients had access to MDR-TB treatment. Applying prior estimates, only 10% of MDR-TB cases will have successful outcomes. Interpretation Estimates based on likely-to-be-diagnosed cases of MDR-TB overlook a significant proportion of morbidity, mortality, and transmission: that occur in undiagnosed, untreated, prevalent TB patients. Still likely underestimating the true disease burden, MDR-TB among patients with prevalent TB represents a closer approximation of disease burden than currently reported indicators. Progress toward elimination—or control—depends on policies guided by a more complete representation of the disease burden. PMID:28157458

  7. Construction of two Listeria ivanovii attenuated strains expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens for TB vaccine purposes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qingqing; Zhou, Mengying; Xu, Zongkai; Khanniche, Asma; Shen, Hao; Wang, Chuan

    2015-02-20

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has failed in complete control of tuberculosis (TB), thus, novel tuberculosis vaccines are urgently needed. We have constructed several TB vaccine candidates, which are characterized by the use of Listeria ivanovii (LI) strain as an antigen delivery vector. Two L. ivanovii attenuated recombinant strains L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv0129c and L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv3875 were successfully screened. Results from genome PCR and sequencing showed that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen gene cassette coding for Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein respectively had been integrated into LI genome downstream of mpl gene. Western blot confirmed the secretion of Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein from the recombinant LI strains. These two recombinant strains showed similar growth curves as wide type strain in vitro. In vivo, they transiently propagated in mice spleen and liver, and induced specific CD8(+) IFN-γ secretion. Therefore, in this paper, two novel LI attenuated strains expressing specific TB antigens were successfully constructed. The promising growth characteristics in mice immune system and the capability of induction of IFN-γ secretion make them of potential interest for development of TB vaccines.

  8. [Immunotherapy for MDR-TB (multi-drug resistant tuberculosis)--its feasibility].

    PubMed

    Tsuyuguchi, I

    1999-06-01

    MDR-TB is known to be man-made-disease. Inappropriate treatment of tuberculosis is responsible for the development of MDR-TB. MDR-TB is often accompanied with the immunosuppression of the host. Given that we are unable to develop another potent anti-TB drug in near future, immunotherapy directed at combating immunosuppression and enhancing the host's own immune response is an attractive approach to supplement conventional chemotherapy for MDR-TB. Patients with AIDS and patients with abnormalities of macrophage function have frequent problems with TB. This is suggesting that the host defenses involved in protection against mycobacteria include T-cell and monocyte/macrophage functions. That is cell-mediated immunity. Diverse cytokines are known to play an important role in anti-TB cell-mediated immunity, including IL-2, IL-12, IL-18 and IFN-gamma. Various animal experiments are indicating that administration of these cytokine (s) did recover the suppressed immunity and rescued the host from death by tuberculous infection. However, we have to keep it in mind that the results obtained from animal model of mycobacterial infection on the study of pathogenesis and immune responses in TB is not always applicable to the understanding of human TB. Clinical trial of inhalation therapy with IFN-gamma showed some improvement for drug-resistant TB. Cytokine treatment, however, often gave some deleterious side effects such as high fever, malaise, general edema and even the death of the host. Clinical trials with M. vaccae have been extensively conducted by UK group. The mechanisms underlying its possible therapeutic action remain to be clarified, but when administered at an appropriate dose, it has been shown to elicit a strong Th1 immune response. From the practical view point of immunotherapy for TB, surrogate markers of disease eradication and protective immunity are urgently required. Such markers would facilitate clinical trials by providing early evidence that test

  9. Diabetes and pulmonary tuberculosis: a global overview with special focus on the situation in Asian countries with high TB-DM burden

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chunlan; Hu, Minhui; Gao, Feng

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The double burden of tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes mellitus (DM) is hitting certain Asian countries harder than other areas. In a global estimate, 15% of all TB cases could be attributable to DM, with 40% of those cases coming from India and China. Many other countries of South, East, and South-East Asia are of particular concern given their TB burdens, large projected increases in DM prevalence, and population size. Objective: In this narrative review, we aimed to: (i) give an overall insight into the evidence on TB-DM epidemiology from high double burden Asian countries, (ii) present the evidence on bi-directional screening implementation in this region, (iii) discuss possible factors related to higher TB susceptibility of Asian diabetic patients, and (iv) identify TB-DM comorbidity treatment challenges. Methods: The PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched for all studies addressing DM/TB epidemiology, bi-directional screening and management in South, East and South-East Asia. Results: We identified the DM prevalences among TB patients as ranging from approximately 5% to more than 50%, whereas TB prevalences among diabetic patients were 1.8–9.5 times higher than in the general population in developing Asian countries. Evidence from studies designed to address diagnosis and treatment of the dual disease in these critical regions is scarce as well as the evidence related to possible DM patients’ genetic and acquired predisposition for TB. Conclusion: More prospective studies specifically designed to address adequate screening techniques, identify patients at risk, and define an adequate treatment of dual disease in this region are needed without delay. PMID:28245710

  10. Tuberculosis Screening on a Health Science Campus: Use of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Test for Students and Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeser, Peggy Ingram; Smith, Phillip Karl; Handy, Barry; Martin, Sharon R.

    2007-01-01

    Detecting and managing "Mycobacterium tuberculosis" (TB) infection in a health-science center population is a clinical dilemma. Tuberculin skin tests are still the preferred method for detecting present or past infection of TB. The authors discuss the performance of whole blood interferon gamma release assay test commercially known as…

  11. Viral hepatitis and HIV-associated tuberculosis: Risk factors and TB treatment outcomes in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Sirinak, Chawin; Kittikraisak, Wanitchaya; Pinjeesekikul, Duangporn; Charusuntonsri, Pricha; Luanloed, Phinai; Srisuwanvilai, La-ong; Nateniyom, Sriprapa; Akksilp, Somsak; Likanonsakul, Sirirat; Sattayawuthipong, Wanchai; Burapat, Channawong; Varma, Jay K

    2008-01-01

    Background The occurrence of tuberculosis (TB), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and viral hepatitis infections in the same patient poses unique clinical and public health challenges, because medications to treat TB and HIV are hepatotoxic. We conducted an observational study to evaluate risk factors for HBsAg and/or anti-HCV reactivity and to assess differences in adverse events and TB treatment outcomes among HIV-infected TB patients. Methods Patients were evaluated at the beginning, during, and at the end of TB treatment. Blood samples were tested for aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin (BR), complete blood count, and CD4+ T lymphocyte cell count. TB treatment outcomes were assessed at the end of TB treatment according to international guidelines. Results Of 769 enrolled patients, 752 (98%) had serologic testing performed for viral hepatitis: 70 (9%) were reactive for HBsAg, 237 (31%) for anti-HCV, and 472 (63%) non-reactive for both markers. At the beginning of TB treatment, 18 (26%) patients with HBsAg reactivity had elevated liver function tests compared with 69 (15%) patients non-reactive to any viral marker (p = 0.02). At the end of TB treatment, 493 (64%) were successfully treated. Factors independently associated with HBsAg reactivity included being a man who had sex with men (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–4.3) and having low TB knowledge (AOR, 1.8; CI, 1.0–3.0). Factors most strongly associated with anti-HCV reactivity were having injection drug use history (AOR, 12.8; CI, 7.0–23.2) and living in Bangkok (AOR, 15.8; CI, 9.4–26.5). The rate of clinical hepatitis and death during TB treatment was similar in patients HBsAg reactive, anti-HCV reactive, both HBsAg and anti-HCV reactive, and non-reactive to any viral marker. Conclusion Among HIV-infected TB patients living in Thailand, markers of viral hepatitis infection, particularly hepatitis C virus infection, were

  12. Identifying dynamic tuberculosis case-finding policies for HIV/TB coepidemics.

    PubMed

    Yaesoubi, Reza; Cohen, Ted

    2013-06-04

    The global tuberculosis (TB) control plan has historically emphasized passive case finding (PCF) as the most practical approach for identifying TB suspects in high burden settings. The success of this approach in controlling TB depends on infectious individuals recognizing their symptoms and voluntarily seeking diagnosis rapidly enough to reduce onward transmission. It now appears, at least in some settings, that more intensified case-finding (ICF) approaches may be needed to control TB transmission; these more aggressive approaches for detecting as-yet undiagnosed cases obviously require additional resources to implement. Given that TB control programs are resource constrained and that the incremental yield of ICF is expected to wane over time as the pool of undiagnosed cases is depleted, a tool that can help policymakers to identify when to implement or suspend an ICF intervention would be valuable. In this article, we propose dynamic case-finding policies that allow policymakers to use existing observations about the epidemic and resource availability to determine when to switch between PCF and ICF to efficiently use resources to optimize population health. Using mathematical models of TB/HIV coepidemics, we show that dynamic policies strictly dominate static policies that prespecify a frequency and duration of rounds of ICF. We also find that the use of a diagnostic tool with better sensitivity for detecting smear-negative cases (e.g., Xpert MTB/RIF) further improves the incremental benefit of these dynamic case-finding policies.

  13. Outbreak of Tuberculosis in a Colony of Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) after Possible Indirect Contact with a Human TB Patient.

    PubMed

    Mätz-Rensing, K; Hartmann, T; Wendel, G M; Frick, J S; Homolka, S; Richter, E; Munk, M H; Kaup, F-J

    2015-01-01

    Simian tuberculosis is one of the most important bacterial diseases of non-human primates. Outbreaks of tuberculosis have been reported in primate colonies almost as long as these animals have been used experimentally or kept in zoological gardens. Significant progress has been made in reducing the incidence of tuberculosis in captive non-human primates, but despite reasonable precautions, outbreaks continue to occur. The most relevant reason is the high incidence of tuberculosis (TB) amongst the human population, in which tuberculosis is regarded as an important re-emerging disease. Furthermore, many non-human primate species originate from countries with a high burden of human TB. Therefore, Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a significant threat in animals imported from countries with high rates of human infection. We report an outbreak of tuberculosis among a group of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) living in a closed, long-term colony. The outbreak coincided with reactivation of a TB infection in a co-worker who never had direct access to the animal house or laboratories. Eleven of 26 rhesus monkeys developed classical chronic active tuberculosis with typical caseous granulomata of varying size within different organs. The main organ system involved was the lung, suggesting an aerosol route of infection. Such an outbreak has significant economic consequences due to animal loss, disruption of research and costs related to disease control. Precautionary measures must be improved in order to avoid TB in non-human primate colonies.

  14. M. tuberculosis T Cell Epitope Analysis Reveals Paucity of Antigenic Variation and Identifies Rare Variable TB Antigens.

    PubMed

    Coscolla, Mireia; Copin, Richard; Sutherland, Jayne; Gehre, Florian; de Jong, Bouke; Owolabi, Olumuiya; Mbayo, Georgetta; Giardina, Federica; Ernst, Joel D; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2015-11-11

    Pathogens that evade adaptive immunity typically exhibit antigenic variation. By contrast, it appears that although the chronic human tuberculosis (TB)-causing pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis needs to counter host T cell responses, its T cell epitopes are hyperconserved. Here we present an extensive analysis of the T cell epitopes of M. tuberculosis. We combined population genomics with experimental immunology to determine the number and identity of T cell epitope sequence variants in 216 phylogenetically diverse strains of M. tuberculosis. Antigen conservation is indeed a hallmark of M. tuberculosis. However, our analysis revealed a set of seven variable antigens that were immunogenic in subjects with active TB. These findings suggest that M. tuberculosis uses mechanisms other than antigenic variation to evade T cells. T cell epitopes that exhibit sequence variation may not be subject to the same evasion mechanisms, and hence vaccines that include such variable epitopes may be more efficacious.

  15. Taking forward the World TB Day 2016 theme 'Unite to End Tuberculosis' for the WHO Africa Region.

    PubMed

    Ntoumi, Francine; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Macete, Eusebio; Mfinanga, Sayoki; Chakaya, Jeremiah; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Bates, Matthew; Mwaba, Peter; Maeurer, Markus; Petersen, Eskild; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2016-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global emergency, with an estimated 9.6 million new TB cases worldwide reported in 2014. Twenty-eight percent of these cases were in the World Health Organization (WHO) Africa Region, where the annual case detection rate was 281 per 100000 population-more than double the global average of 133 per 100000. Of the 9.6 million people who developed TB, an estimated 1.2 million (12%) were HIV-positive, and the Africa Region accounted for 74% of these cases. Three million people with TB remain undiagnosed and untreated. Globally, an estimated 480000 had multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). Whilst of the African countries, only South Africa has reported a high prevalence of MDR-TB, it is likely that all of Sub-Saharan Africa has an unreported high load of drug-resistant TB. Tragically, in 2014, only 48% of individuals diagnosed with MDR-TB had successful treatment and an estimated 190000 people died of MDR-TB. Of the global TB funding gap of US$ 0.8 billion, the largest funding gap was in the Africa Region, amounting to US$ 0.4 billion in 2015. The MDR-TB pandemic in particular now threatens to devastate entire regions and may fundamentally alter the life-expectancy and demographic profile of many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. The theme designated for this year's World TB Day, March 24, 2016, is 'Unite to End TB'. From the Africa Region, there is an urgent need to seriously address the political, economic, and social factors that influence host-Mycobacterium tuberculosis interactions and result in disease. Recent political and funder initiatives that provide renewed hope for the alleviation of Africa's TB and TB/HIV problems are discussed.

  16. staffTRAK-TB: software for surveillance of tuberculosis infection in healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Burwen, D R; Seawright, M F

    1999-11-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends periodic tuberculin skin testing of healthcare workers with potential exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, many healthcare facilities have neither a system to identify workers due for their skin test nor a means of analyzing aggregate data. To illustrate some of the complexities involved in tuberculin skin test (TST) tracking and analysis, and how these might be addressed, this report describes a software package called staffTRAK-TB, developed by the CDC to facilitate surveillance of tuberculosis infection in healthcare workers. staffTRAK-TB records data for each healthcare worker, including demographic information, occupation, work location, multiple TST results, and results of evaluations to determine if clinically active tuberculosis is present. Programmed reports include lists of workers due and overdue for skin tests, and skin test conversion rates by occupation or worksite. Standardization of types of occupations and locations allows data from multiple facilities to be aggregated and compared. Data transfer to the CDC can be performed via floppy diskettes. staffTRAK-TB illustrates important issues in software structure, standardization of occupation and work-location information, relevant data items, and reports and analyses that would be useful in practice. Developing software that adequately addresses the epidemiological issues is complex, and the lessons learned may serve as a model for hospital epidemiologists, infection control personnel, occupational health personnel, and computer programmers considering software development in this area or trying to optimize their facility's TST surveillance.

  17. MDR-TB Antibody Response (Western Blot) to Fractions of Isoniazid and Rifampicin Resistant Antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hadizadeh Tasbiti, Alireza; Yari, Shamsi; Ghanei, Mostafa; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Bahrmand, Ahmadreza

    2015-12-01

    Drug-resistant TB poses a major threat to control of TB worldwide. Despite progress in the detection of Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) cases, a major diagnostic gap remains: 55% of reported TB patients estimated to have MDR-TB were not detected in 2013. MDR-TB antigens were conjugated to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. Specific polyclonal antibodies against MDR-TB Ags were prepared in rabbits using two boosted injections of the MDR-TB antigen. The antibodies were purified and treated with susceptible TB to remove any non-specific and cross-reactive antibodies. In the present study, comparative analysis of electrophoretic pattern of different antigens of INH/RIF-resistant TB were studied for identifying protein profiles. A RIF-resistant TB antigen was shown here to have different protein profiles from INH-resistant TB isolate. The results of Western blotting analysis showed that in the RIF- and INH-resistant antigenic fractions some bands of 14.4 and 45 kDa as immunogenic were common. Moreover, four bands of RIF-resistant TB antigen fractions (16, 19, 21, and 45 KDa) and one band of INH-resistant TB (about 26 KDa) were detected as diagnostic antigens. This study suggests that the Western blot is an accurate test to survey INH- and RIF-resistant TB antigens of M. tuberculosis infection. These findings indicate that MDR-TB diagnosis (based on Ag detection) could be useful in the identification of disease stages that precede symptomatic and microbiologically positive TB, such as subclinical and incipient TB.

  18. [Tuberculosis annual report 2009 --series 10. Treatment outcome and TB deaths].

    PubMed

    2012-05-01

    Evaluation of the treatment outcome by the cohort analysis method is an important part of tuberculosis (TB) control. In the Japanese TB surveillance system, the treatment outcome is automatically classified by computer according to a pre-set algorithm, so the treatment outcome is evaluated very rigidly. In the case of new sputum smear positive pulmonary TB cases (n = 8,999) newly notified in 2008, the patients' treatment outcomes based on the annual report 2009 database were as follows: "success," which combined "cured" and "completed," was 47.7%, "died" was 19.1%, "failed" was 1.1%, "defaulted" was 3.8%, "transferred out" was 2.8%, "on treatment after 12 months" was 11.8% and "not evaluated" was 13.6%. In addition to evaluation of the treatment outcome by the cohort method, the proportion of deaths was observed among all forms of TB patients (n = 24,571) who were newly registered in 2008. In total, 17.3% of all forms of TB cases died within one year after the beginning of treatment. The proportion corresponding to this was 23.7% for new sputum smear positive pulmonary TB and 23.5% for re-treatment sputum smear positive pulmonary TB. Among the new sputum smear positive pulmonary TB patients (n = 2,136) who died within one year after the beginning of treatment, 37.0% of them died within one month after the beginning of treatment, 51.6% died within two months and 61.9% died within three months.

  19. Mortality, TB/HIV co-infection, and treatment dropout: predictors of tuberculosis prognosis in Recife, Pernambuco State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Mirian Pereira; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira; Colosimo, Enrico Antônio

    2008-04-01

    This non-concurrent cohort study aims to identify predictors of tuberculosis mortality in a large population database in Brazil. Tuberculosis, death, and TB/HIV cases were validated respectively from the tuberculosis surveillance (SINAN/TB), mortality (SIM), and SINAN/AIDS databases for a five-year period. Analysis included proportional hazard models with relative risk estimates. Out of 5,451 individuals reported with tuberculosis, 320 (5.9%) died (incidence and mortality rates of 98.6 and 12.2/100 thousand inhabitants, respectively). After adjustment, relative risk of dying from tuberculosis was 9.8 for individuals>50 years of age; 9.0 for TB/HIV co-infection; 3.0 for mixed TB clinical presentation; and 2.0 for treatment dropout. In the multivariate model, using cases with HIV/AIDS, all adjusted predictors lost significance except mixed clinical presentation (RR 1.9; 1.1-3.1). TB/HIV co-infection is an important predictor of TB mortality. However, among individuals without HIV/AIDS, mortality is still highly associated with older age, mixed clinical forms, and treatment dropout.

  20. [Human resource capacity building on TB laboratory work for TB control program--through the experience of international TB laboratory training course for TB control at the Research Institute of Tuberculosis, JATA, Japan].

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Akiko; Kato, Seiya

    2008-06-01

    The international training course on TB laboratory work for national tuberculosis program (NTP) has been conducted at the Research Institute of Tuberculosis since 1975 funded by Japan International Cooperation Agency in collaboration with WHO Western Pacific Regional Office. The aim of the course is to train key personnel in TB laboratory field for NTP in resource-limited countries. The course has trained 265 national key personnel in TB laboratory service from 57 resource-limited countries in the last 33 years. The number of participants trained may sound too small in the fight against the large TB problem in resource-limited countries. However, every participant is playing an important role as a core and catalyst for the TB control program in his/her own country when they were back home. The curriculum is composed of technical aspects on TB examination, mainly sputum microscopy in addition since microscopy service is provided at many centers that are deployed in a widely spread area, the managerial aspect of maintaining quality TB laboratory work at the field laboratory is another component of the curriculum. Effective teaching methods using materials such as artificial sputum, which is useful for panel slide preparation, and technical manuals with illustrations and pictures of training procedure have been developed through the experience of the course. These manuals are highly appreciated and widely used by the front line TB workers. The course has also contributed to the expansion of EQA (External Quality Assessment) system on AFB microscopy for the improvement of the quality of TB laboratory service of NTP. The course is well-known for not only having a long history, but also for its unique learning method emphasizing "Participatory Training", particularly for practicum sessions to master the skills on AFB microscopy. The method in learning AFB microscopy, which was developed by the course, was published as a training manual by IUATLD, RIT and USAID. As it is

  1. Treatment: Latent TB Infection (LTBI) and TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis chorismate mutase: A potential target for TB.

    PubMed

    Khanapur, Manjulatha; Alvala, Mallika; Prabhakar, Maddela; Shiva Kumar, K; Edwin, R K; Sri Saranya, P S V K; Patel, Raj Kumar; Bulusu, Gopalakrishnan; Misra, P; Pal, Manojit

    2017-03-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis chorismate mutase (MtbCM) catalyzes the rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate in the shikimate biosynthetic pathway to form the essential amino acids, phenylalanine and tyrosine. Two genes encoding chorismate mutase have been identified in Mtb. The secretory form,∗MtbCM (encoded by Rv1885c) is assumed to play a key role in pathogenesis of tuberculosis. Also, the inhibition of MtbCM may hinder the supply of nutrients to the organism. Indeed, the existence of chorismate mutase (CM) in bacteria, fungi and higher plants but not in human and low sequence homology among known CM makes it an interesting target for the discovery of anti-tubercular agents. The present article mainly focuses on the recent developments in the structure, function and inhibition of MtbCM. The understanding of various aspects of MtbCM as presented in the current article may facilitate the design and subsequent chemical synthesis of new inhibitors against ∗MtbCM, that could lead to the discovery and development of novel and potent anti-tubercular agents in future.

  3. Evaluation of two line probe assays for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis (TB) drug resistance, and non-TB Mycobacteria in HIV-infected individuals with suspected TB.

    PubMed

    Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Kendall, Michelle A; Wu, Xingye; Lourenço, Maria Cristina; Jentsch, Ute; Swindells, Susan; Qasba, Sarojini S; Sanchez, Jorge; Havlir, Diane V; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Sanne, Ian M; Firnhaber, Cynthia

    2014-04-01

    Limited performance data from line probe assays (LPAs), nucleic acid tests used for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB), nontuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance are available for HIV-infected individuals, in whom paucibacillary TB is common. In this study, the strategy of testing sputum with GenoType MTBDRplus (MTBDR-Plus) and GenoType Direct LPA (Direct LPA) was compared to a gold standard of one mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) liquid culture. HIV-positive (HIV(+)) individuals with suspected TB from southern Africa and South America with <7 days of TB treatment had 1 sputum specimen tested with Direct LPA, MTBDR-Plus LPA, smear microscopy, MGIT, biochemical identification of mycobacterial species, and culture-based drug-susceptibility testing (DST). Of 639 participants, 59.3% were MGIT M. tuberculosis culture positive, of which 276 (72.8%) were acid-fast bacillus (AFB) smear positive. MTBDR-Plus had a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 100%, with sensitivities of 44.1% in AFB smear-negative versus 94.6% in AFB smear-positive specimens. For specimens that were positive for M. tuberculosis by MTBDR-Plus, the sensitivity and specificity for rifampin resistance were 91.7% and 96.6%, respectively, and for isoniazid (INH) they were 70.6% and 99.1%. The Direct LPA had a sensitivity of 88.4% and a specificity of 94.6% for M. tuberculosis detection, with a sensitivity of 72.5% in smear-negative specimens. Ten of 639 MGIT cultures grew Mycobacterium avium complex or Mycobacterium kansasii, half of which were detected by Direct LPA. Both LPA assays performed well in specimens from HIV-infected individuals, including in AFB smear-negative specimens, with 72.5% sensitivity for M. tuberculosis identification with the Direct LPA and 44.1% sensitivity with MTBDR-Plus. LPAs have a continued role for use in settings where rapid identification of INH resistance and clinically relevant NTM are priorities.

  4. Questions and Answers about TB

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  5. Tuberculosis knowledge, attitudes, and practices among northern Ethiopian prisoners: Implications for TB control efforts

    PubMed Central

    Adane, Kelemework; Spigt, Mark; Johanna, Laturnus; Noortje, Dorscheidt; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Although awareness is an important component in tuberculosis (TB) control, we do not know how much Ethiopian prisoners know about TB. This study assessed the level of knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of prisoners about TB in eight northern Ethiopian prisons. Methods Data were collected cross-sectionally from 615 prisoners using a standardized questionnaire between March and May 2016. The outcome variables were defined considering the basic elements about TB. Results Out of 615 prisoners, only 37.7% mentioned bacteria as a cause of TB while 21.7% related TB to exposure to cold wind. Eighty-eight per cent correctly mentioned the aerial route of TB transmission and 27.3% had perceived stigma towards TB. The majority (63.7%) was not aware of the possibility of getting multi-drug-resistant strains when they would not adhere to treatment. Overall, only 24% knew the basic elements about TB, 41% had favorable attitudes, and 55% had a good practice. Prisoners who were urban residents were generally more knowledgeable than rural residents (adjusted OR = 2.16; 95% CI = 1.15–4.06). Illiterates were found to be less knowledgeable (adjusted OR = 0.17; 95% CI = 0.06–0.46), less likely to have a favorable attitude (adjusted OR = 0.31; 95% CI = 0.15–0.64), and less good practice (adjusted OR = 0.35; 95% CI = 0.18–0.69). Significant differences were also observed between the different study prisons. Conclusions Knowledge of prisoners regarding the cause of TB and consequences of non-adherence to TB treatment was low. Knowledge on the transmission, symptoms, and prevention was fairly high. Health education interventions, focused on the cause and the translation of the knowledge to appropriate practices, are needed in all the study prisons. Special attention should be given to less educated prisoners, and to prisons with a high number of prisoners and those in remote areas. PMID:28358877

  6. Risk Factors for Bovine Tuberculosis (bTB) in Cattle in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Lemma, Fitsum A.; Mekonnen, Daniel A.; Alemu, Zelalem E.; Kelkay, Tessema Z.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) infection is generally correlated with individual cattle’s age, sex, body condition, and with husbandry practices such as herd composition, cattle movement, herd size, production system and proximity to wildlife—including bTB maintenance hosts. We tested the correlation between those factors and the prevalence of bTB, which is endemic in Ethiopia’s highland cattle, in the Afar Region and Awash National Park between November 2013 and April 2015. A total of 2550 cattle from 102 herds were tested for bTB presence using the comparative intradermal tuberculin test (CITT). Data on herd structure, herd movement, management and production system, livestock transfer, and contact with wildlife were collected using semi-structured interviews with cattle herders and herd owners. The individual overall prevalence of cattle bTB was 5.5%, with a herd prevalence of 46%. Generalized Linear Mixed Models with a random herd-effect were used to analyse risk factors of cattle reactors within each herd. The older the age of the cattle and the lower the body condition the higher the chance of a positive bTB test result, but sex, lactation status and reproductive status were not correlated with bTB status. At herd level, General Linear Models showed that pastoral production systems with transhumant herds had a higher bTB prevalence than sedentary herds. A model averaging analysis identified herd size, contact with wildlife, and the interaction of herd size and contact with wildlife as significant risk factors for bTB prevalence in cattle. A subsequent Structural Equation Model showed that the probability of contact with wildlife was influenced by herd size, through herd movement. Larger herds moved more and grazed in larger areas, hence the probability of grazing in an area with wildlife and contact with either infected cattle or infected wildlife hosts increased, enhancing the chances for bTB infection. Therefore, future bTB control strategies in cattle in

  7. Colostrum proinflammatory cytokines as biomarkers of bovine immune response to bovine tuberculosis (bTB).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Soto, Eduardo; Ponce-Ramos, Rosa; Hernández-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo; Gutiérrez-Ortega, Abel; Álvarez, Angel H; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Absalón, Angel E; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo; Limón-Flores, Alberto; Estrada-Chávez, Ciro; Herrera-Rodríguez, Sara E

    2017-02-01

    Bovine colostrum contains compounds, which provide passive immune protection from mother to newborn calves. Little is known about cytokine levels and their role in bovine colostrum. Moreover, the capacity of bovine colostrum cells to mount specific immune responses after natural exposure to bovine tuberculosis (bTB) antigens in dairy herds has not been studied, thus far. The purpose of this study was to identify biomarkers for bTB infection measurable in bovine colostrum. The present study reveals that isolated-immune colostrum cells can mount a specific immune response against bTB antigens, by measuring the novo IFN-γ release in cell culture. We found that IFN-γ levels in the responders (Bov(+)) to bTB antigen were higher than in non-responders (Bov(-)). On the other hand, proinflammatory cytokines contained in colostrum's whey were tested in Tuberculin Skin Test (TST) reactor (TST(+)) and non-reactor (TST(-)) animals to assess their potential role as biomarker. We observed that IFN-γ levels were lower or undetectable, as opposed to IL4 levels were measurable, the TNF-α level was higher in TST(-) than TST(+), while IL-6 levels showed the opposite reaction and with no statistical significance. Moreover, IL-1α mRNA expression levels were higher in colostrum mononuclear cells (CMC) in Bov(+) cattle. Collectively, these data suggest that the differential expression of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines could have relevant value to diagnose bTB in cattle.

  8. Sensitivity of C-Tb: a novel RD-1-specific skin test for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Soren T; Peter, Jonathan G; Theron, Grant; Pascoe, Mellissa; Tingskov, Pernille N; Aggerbeck, Henrik; Kolbus, Daniel; Ruhwald, Morten; Andersen, Peter; Dheda, Keertan

    2016-03-01

    C-Tb, a novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 6-kDa early secretory antigenic target/10-kDa culture filtrate protein (ESAT-6/CFP-10)-specific skin test, has high specificity in bacille Calmette-Guerin-vaccinated healthy controls. However, the sensitivity of C-Tb has hitherto not been determined. The objective was to determine the sensitivity of C-Tb in patients with active tuberculosis (TB) in comparison with the tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT).C-Tb and TST were randomly administered in a double-blinded fashion to one or the other forearm in 253 patients with active TB with or without HIV co-infection. QFT-GIT testing was performed prior to skin testing.Using a receiver operating characteristic curve-derived cut-point of 5 mm, C-Tb sensitivity was similar to QFT-GIT (73.9 (95% CI 67.8-79.3) versus 75.1 (95% CI 69.3-80.2)), and similar in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected patients (76.7 (95% CI 69.0-83.3) versus 69.5 (95% CI 59.2-78.5)). However, sensitivity was significantly diminished in HIV-infected patients with CD4 counts <100 cells·mm(-3). C-Tb and QFT-GIT combined had significantly higher sensitivity than C-Tb alone (p<0.0001). C-Tb was safe with no significant adverse events. The 5 mm cut-point corresponded to that found in the previously published specificity study (TESEC-04).C-Tb has similar sensitivity compared with QFT-GIT for the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection. Sensitivity was reduced only in HIV-infected patients with severe immunosuppression. Further studies in different settings are required to validate the proposed 5 mm cut-point.

  9. Tuberculosis: General Information

    MedlinePlus

    TB Elimination Tuberculosis: General Information What is TB? Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by germs that are spread from person ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination CS227840_A What Does a Positive Test ...

  10. Evaluation of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Plus for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lina; Sasaki, Yuka; Nagai, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Satoru; Takamori, Mikio; Sakashita, Kentaro; Saito, Takefumi; Fukushima, Kiyoyasu; Igarashi, Yuriko; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Takaki, Akiko; Mori, Toru; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Performance of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release assays still needs to be improved. The data on the performance of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Plus (QFT-Plus), a new-generation of QFT assay are limited. This study evaluated the diagnostic performance of QFT-Plus, and compared to that of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT). Blood samples were collected from 162 bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis (TB) patients and 212 Mycobacterium tuberculosis-uninfected volunteers; these samples were then tested with QFT-GIT and QFT-Plus. The IFN-γ concentration of QFT-Plus was lower than that of QFT-GIT in TB patients (p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curves were compared between QFT-GIT and QFT-Plus. Both assays showed area under the curve values over 0.99 without significant difference. Using the conventional cut-off (0.35 IU/mL) for QFT-GIT, QFT-Plus had a lower sensitivity of 91.1% compared to 96.2% (p = 0.008) at its optimum cut-off (0.168 IU/mL) with the same specificity. Moreover, IFN-γ values were significantly reduced with age in QFT-GIT (p = 0.035) but not in QFT-Plus. The diagnostic performance of QFT-Plus was as accurate as that of QFT-GIT despite a lack of TB7.7 antigen and despite the decrease in quantitative values. However, the cut-off value for QFT-Plus should be considered independently from that of QFT-GIT to obtain the best sensitivity without compromising specificity. PMID:27470684

  11. Evaluation of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Plus for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lina; Sasaki, Yuka; Nagai, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Satoru; Takamori, Mikio; Sakashita, Kentaro; Saito, Takefumi; Fukushima, Kiyoyasu; Igarashi, Yuriko; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Takaki, Akiko; Mori, Toru; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2016-07-29

    Performance of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release assays still needs to be improved. The data on the performance of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Plus (QFT-Plus), a new-generation of QFT assay are limited. This study evaluated the diagnostic performance of QFT-Plus, and compared to that of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT). Blood samples were collected from 162 bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis (TB) patients and 212 Mycobacterium tuberculosis-uninfected volunteers; these samples were then tested with QFT-GIT and QFT-Plus. The IFN-γ concentration of QFT-Plus was lower than that of QFT-GIT in TB patients (p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curves were compared between QFT-GIT and QFT-Plus. Both assays showed area under the curve values over 0.99 without significant difference. Using the conventional cut-off (0.35 IU/mL) for QFT-GIT, QFT-Plus had a lower sensitivity of 91.1% compared to 96.2% (p = 0.008) at its optimum cut-off (0.168 IU/mL) with the same specificity. Moreover, IFN-γ values were significantly reduced with age in QFT-GIT (p = 0.035) but not in QFT-Plus. The diagnostic performance of QFT-Plus was as accurate as that of QFT-GIT despite a lack of TB7.7 antigen and despite the decrease in quantitative values. However, the cut-off value for QFT-Plus should be considered independently from that of QFT-GIT to obtain the best sensitivity without compromising specificity.

  12. Quality control in QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube for screening latent tuberculosis infection in health care workers.

    PubMed

    Igari, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Akira; Ichimura, Yasunori; Sakurai, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Toshibumi; Ishiwada, Naruhiko

    2017-04-01

    QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube has been used for screening latent tuberculosis infection in newly employed health care workers in Japan. There have been a few studies concerning quality control. We retrospectively analysed QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube results in a hospital in Japan. Interferon-γ values in three blood collection tubes for QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube were analysed in association with the positivity rate. The data set consisted of health care workers aged 20-29 years during the 7 years between 2010 and 2016. The yearly QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube positivity rate was 0.9%, 16.4%, 3.0%, 39.3%, 2.8%, 0.9% and 1.5%, and was extremely high in 2011 and 2013. The interferon-γ values in the tuberculosis antigen tube were elevated in these two years, as indicated by higher median and wider interquartile range. The interferon-γ value in the negative control tube was also higher in 2011. The higher interferon-γ values in collection tubes (tuberculosis antigen tube and/or negative control tube) resulted in higher QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube positivity rate. The distribution of interferon-γ in tuberculosis antigen tube and negative control tube, as evaluated by median and interquartile range, proved to be an effective index for the quality control of QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube.

  13. Patient Reported Delays in Seeking Treatment for Tuberculosis among Adult and Pediatric TB Patients and TB Patients Co-Infected with HIV in Lima, Peru: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Soldan, Valerie A.; Alban, Rebecca E.; Dimos Jones, Christy; Powell, Amy R.; Oberhelman, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant public health challenge worldwide, and particularly in Peru with one of the highest incidence rates in Latin America. TB patient behavior has a direct influence on whether a patient will receive timely diagnosis and successful treatment of their illness. Objectives: The objective was to understand the complex factors that can impact TB patient health seeking behavior. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with adult and parents of pediatric patients receiving TB treatment (n = 43), within that group a sub-group was also co-infected with HIV (n = 11). Results: Almost all of the study participants recognized delays in seeking either their child’s or their own diagnosis of their TB symptoms. The principal reasons for treatment-seeking delays were lack of knowledge and confusion of TB symptoms, fear and embarrassment of receiving a TB diagnosis, and a patient tendency to self-medicate prior to seeking formal medical attention. Conclusion: Health promotion activities that target patient delays have the potential to improve individual patient outcomes and mitigate the spread of TB at a community level. PMID:25566523

  14. Clinical implications of molecular drug resistance testing for Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a TBNET/RESIST-TB consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, J; Boettger, E C; Cirillo, D; Cobelens, F; Eisenach, K D; Gagneux, S; Hillemann, D; Horsburgh, R; Molina-Moya, B; Niemann, S; Tortoli, E; Whitelaw, A; Lange, C

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a challenge to global tuberculosis (TB) control. Although culture-based methods have been regarded as the gold standard for drug susceptibility testing (DST), molecular methods provide rapid information on mutations in the M. tuberculosis genome associated with resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. We ascertained consensus on the use of the results of molecular DST for clinical treatment decisions in TB patients. This document has been developed by TBNET and RESIST-TB groups to reach a consensus about reporting standards in the clinical use of molecular DST results. Review of the available literature and the search for evidence included hand-searching journals and searching electronic databases. The panel identified single nucleotide mutations in genomic regions of M. tuberculosis coding for katG, inhA, rpoB, embB, rrs, rpsL and gyrA that are likely related to drug resistance in vivo. Identification of any of these mutations in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis has implications for the management of TB patients, pending the results of in vitro DST. However, false-positive and false-negative results in detecting resistance-associated mutations in drugs for which there is poor or unproven correlation between phenotypic and clinical drug resistance complicate the interpretation. Reports of molecular DST results should therefore include specific information on the mutations identified and provide guidance for clinicians on interpretation and on the choice of the appropriate initial drug regimen.

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-secreted phosphatases: from pathogenesis to targets for TB drug development.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dennis; Chao, Joseph D; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2013-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infects human alveolar macrophages and relies on the inhibition of phagosome acidification and maturation. This is, in part, dependent on the disruption of host signaling networks within the macrophage. In recent years, Mtb-secreted protein- and lipid-phosphatases protein-tyrosine phosphatase A (PtpA), PtpB, and secreted acid phosphatase M (SapM) have been shown to contribute to Mtb pathogenicity. Here, we review the current knowledge on PtpA, PtpB, and SapM focusing on their ability to interfere with host functions. We further explore how these phosphatase-dependent host-pathogen interactions can be targeted for novel tuberculosis (TB) drug discovery and examine the ongoing development of inhibitors against these phosphatases.

  16. inTB - a data integration platform for molecular and clinical epidemiological analysis of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is currently the second highest cause of death from infectious diseases worldwide. The emergence of multi and extensive drug resistance is threatening to make tuberculosis incurable. There is growing evidence that the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may have important clinical consequences. Therefore, combining genetic, clinical and socio-demographic data is critical to understand the epidemiology of this infectious disease, and how virulence and other phenotypic traits evolve over time. This requires dedicated bioinformatics platforms, capable of integrating and enabling analyses of this heterogeneous data. Results We developed inTB, a web-based system for integrated warehousing and analysis of clinical, socio-demographic and molecular data for Mycobacterium sp. isolates. As a database it can organize and display data from any of the standard genotyping methods (SNP, MIRU-VNTR, RFLP and spoligotype), as well as an extensive array of clinical and socio-demographic variables that are used in multiple countries to characterize the disease. Through the inTB interface it is possible to insert and download data, browse the database and search specific parameters. New isolates are automatically classified into strains according to an internal reference, and data uploaded or typed in is checked for internal consistency. As an analysis framework, the system provides simple, point and click analysis tools that allow multiple types of data plotting, as well as simple ways to download data for external analysis. Individual trees for each genotyping method are available, as well as a super tree combining all of them. The integrative nature of inTB grants the user the ability to generate trees for filtered subsets of data crossing molecular and clinical/socio-demografic information. inTB is built on open source software, can be easily installed locally and easily adapted to other diseases. Its design allows for use by research

  17. Antiretroviral Treatment Scale-Up and Tuberculosis Mortality in High TB/HIV Burden Countries: An Econometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Isabel; Bendavid, Eran; Korenromp, Eline L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces mortality in patients with active tuberculosis (TB), but the population-level relationship between ART coverage and TB mortality is untested. We estimated the reduction in population-level TB mortality that can be attributed to increasing ART coverage across 41 high HIV-TB burden countries. Methods We compiled TB mortality trends between 1996 and 2011 from two sources: (1) national program-reported TB death notifications, adjusted for annual TB case detection rates, and (2) WHO TB mortality estimates. National coverage with ART, as proportion of HIV-infected people in need, was obtained from UNAIDS. We applied panel linear regressions controlling for HIV prevalence (5-year lagged), coverage of TB interventions (estimated by WHO and UNAIDS), gross domestic product per capita, health spending from domestic sources, urbanization, and country fixed effects. Results Models suggest that that increasing ART coverage was followed by reduced TB mortality, across multiple specifications. For death notifications at 2 to 5 years following a given ART scale-up, a 1% increase in ART coverage predicted 0.95% faster mortality rate decline (p = 0.002); resulting in 27% fewer TB deaths in 2011 alone than would have occurred without ART. Based on WHO death estimates, a 1% increase in ART predicted a 1.0% reduced TB death rate (p<0.001), and 31% fewer deaths in 2011. TB mortality was higher at higher HIV prevalence (p<0.001), but not related to coverage of isoniazid preventive therapy, cotrimoxazole preventive therapy, or other covariates. Conclusion This econometric analysis supports a substantial impact of ART on population-level TB mortality realized already within the first decade of ART scale-up, that is apparent despite variable-quality mortality data. PMID:27536864

  18. MDR-TB treatment as prevention: The projected population-level impact of expanded treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Azman, Andrew S.; Cobelens, Frank G.; Dowdy, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Background In 2013, approximately 480,000 people developed active multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), while only 97,000 started MDR-TB treatment. We sought to estimate the impact of improving access to MDR-TB diagnosis and treatment, under multiple diagnostic algorithm and treatment regimen scenarios, on ten-year projections of MDR-TB incidence and mortality. Methods We constructed a dynamic transmission model of an MDR-TB epidemic in an illustrative East/Southeast Asian setting. Using approximate Bayesian computation, we investigated a wide array of potential epidemic trajectories consistent with current notification data and known TB epidemiology. Results Despite an overall projected decline in TB incidence, data-consistent simulations suggested that MDR-TB incidence is likely to rise between 2015 and 2025 under continued 2013 treatment practices, although with considerable uncertainty (median 17% increase, 95% Uncertainty Range [UR] -38% to +137%). But if, by 2017, all identified active TB patients with previously-treated TB could be tested for drug susceptibility, and 85% of those with MDR-TB could initiate MDR-appropriate treatment, then MDR-TB incidence in 2025 could be reduced by 26% (95% UR 4–52%) relative to projections under continued current practice. Also expanding this drug-susceptibility testing and appropriate MDR-TB treatment to treatment-naïve as well as previously-treated TB cases, by 2020, could reduce MDR-TB incidence in 2025 by 29% (95% UR 6–55%) compared to continued current practice. If this diagnosis and treatment of all MDR-TB in known active TB cases by 2020 could be implemented via a novel second-line regimen with similar effectiveness and tolerability as current first-line therapy, a 54% (95% UR 20–74%) reduction in MDR-TB incidence compared to current-practice projections could be achieved by 2025. Conclusions Expansion of diagnosis and treatment of MDR-TB, even using current sub-optimal second-line regimens, is expected

  19. Targeted screening and treatment for latent tuberculosis infection using QuantiFERON®-TB Gold is cost-effective in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, J. L.; Kahn, J. G.; Strathdee, S. A.; Valencia-Mendoza, A.; Bautista-Arredondo, S.; Laniado-Laborin, R.; Castañeda, R.; Deiss, R.; Garfein, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY OBJECTIVE To assess the cost-effectiveness of screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) using a commercially available detection test and treating individuals at high risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in a middle-income country. DESIGN We developed a Markov model to evaluate the cost per LTBI case detected, TB case averted and quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained for a cohort of 1000 individuals at high risk for HIV infection over 20 years. Baseline model inputs for LTBI prevalence were obtained from published literature and cross-sectional data from tuberculosis (TB) screening using QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) testing among sex workers and illicit drug users at high risk for HIV recruited through street outreach in Tijuana, Mexico. Costs are reported in 2007 US dollars. Future costs and QALYs were discounted at 3% per year. Sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate model robustness. RESULTS Over 20 years, we estimate the program would prevent 78 cases of active TB and 55 TB-related deaths. The incremental cost per case of LTBI detected was US$730, cost per active TB averted was US$529 and cost per QALY gained was US$108. CONCLUSIONS In settings of endemic TB and escalating HIV incidence, targeting LTBI screening and treatment among high-risk groups may be highly cost-effective. PMID:19723375

  20. Genomic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Strains in Cantabria (Spain), a Moderate TB Incidence Setting

    PubMed Central

    Pérez del Molino Bernal, Inmaculada C.; Lillebaek, Troels; Pedersen, Mathias K.; Martinez-Martinez, Luis; Folkvardsen, Dorte B.; Agüero, Jesús; Rasmussen, E. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) control strategies are focused mainly on prevention, early diagnosis, compliance to treatment and contact tracing. The objectives of this study were to explore the frequency and risk factors of recent transmission of clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in Cantabria in Northern Spain from 2012 through 2013 and to analyze their clonal complexity for better understanding of the transmission dynamics in a moderate TB incidence setting. Methods DNA from 85 out of 87 isolates from bacteriologically confirmed cases of MTBC infection were extracted directly from frozen stocks and genotyped using the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) method. The MIRU-VNTRplus database tool was used to identify clusters and lineages and to build a neighbor joining (NJ) phylogenetic tree. In addition, data were compared to the SITVIT2 database at the Pasteur Institute of Guadeloupe. Results The rate of recent transmission was calculated to 24%. Clustering was associated with being Spanish-born. A high prevalence of isolates of the Euro-American lineage was found. In addition, MIRU-VNTR profiles of the studied isolates corresponded to previously found MIRU-VNTR types in other countries, including Spain, Belgium, Great Britain, USA, Croatia, South Africa and The Netherlands. Six of the strains analyzed represented clonal variants. Conclusion Transmission of MTBC is well controlled in Cantabria. The majority of TB patients were born in Spain. The population structure of MTBC in Cantabria has a low diversity of major clonal lineages with the Euro-American lineage predominating. PMID:27315243

  1. The High Burden of Tuberculosis (TB) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in a Large Zambian Prison: A Public Health Alert

    PubMed Central

    Henostroza, German; Topp, Stephanie M.; Hatwiinda, Sisa; Maggard, Katie R.; Phiri, Winifreda; Harris, Jennifer B.; Krüüner, Annika; Kapata, Nathan; Ayles, Helen; Chileshe, Chisela; Reid, Stewart E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) represent two of the greatest health threats in African prisons. In 2010, collaboration between the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia, the Zambia Prisons Service, and the National TB Program established a TB and HIV screening program in six Zambian prisons. We report data on the prevalence of TB and HIV in one of the largest facilities: Lusaka Central Prison. Methods Between November 2010 and April 2011, we assessed the prevalence of TB and HIV amongst inmates entering, residing, and exiting the prison, as well as in the surrounding community. The screening protocol included complete history and physical exam, digital radiography, opt-out HIV counseling and testing, sputum smear and culture. A TB case was defined as either bacteriologically confirmed or clinically diagnosed. Results A total of 2323 participants completed screening. A majority (88%) were male, median age 31 years and body mass index 21.9. TB symptoms were found in 1430 (62%). TB was diagnosed in 176 (7.6%) individuals and 52 people were already on TB treatment at time of screening. TB was bacteriologically confirmed in 88 cases (3.8%) and clinically diagnosed in 88 cases (3.8%). Confirmed TB at entry and exit interventions were 4.6% and 5.3% respectively. Smear was positive in only 25% (n = 22) of bacteriologically confirmed cases. HIV prevalence among inmates currently residing in prison was 27.4%. Conclusion Ineffective TB and HIV screening programs deter successful disease control strategies in prison facilities and their surrounding communities. We found rates of TB and HIV in Lusaka Central Prison that are substantially higher than the Zambian average, with a trend towards concentration and potential transmission of both diseases within the facility and to the general population. Investment in institutional and criminal justice reform as well as prison-specific health systems is urgently required. PMID

  2. Comparison of TST and IGRA in Diagnosis of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in a High TB-Burden Setting

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Vashishtha, Richa; Chauhan, L. S.; Sreenivas, V.; Seth, Divya

    2017-01-01

    Background There are currently two tests for diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI); TST and IGRA. However, it is still unclear that which one of these tests performs better in high TB-burden settings. Methods 1511 household contacts of pulmonary TB patients were enrolled to compare the performance of TST and IGRA for LTBI. At baseline all participant underwent testing for IGRA [QuantiFERON-TB® Gold In-tube (QFT-GIT) assay] and TST [2 tuberculin unit (TU), purified protein derivative (PPD), RT23, Staten Serum Institute (SSI), Copenhagen, Denmark]. All the household contacts were followed-up for two years for incident TB cases. Results Active TB was diagnosed in 76 household contacts at an incidence rate of 2.14 per 1000 person-years. Both, TST [Hazard Ratio (HR): 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.72–1.79, p = 0.57], as well as QFT-GIT assay (HR: 1.66, 95% CI: 0.97–2.84, p = 0.06) results at baseline were not significantly associated with subsequent development of active TB among household contacts of pulmonary TB patients. Conclusion Neither TST nor IGRA predicted subsequent development of active TB among household contacts of pulmonary TB patients during follow-up. However, keeping in view the cost, and other logistics, TST remains the most preferred method for LTBI diagnosis in resource-limited, high TB-burden settings. PMID:28060926

  3. Serological Analysis of Tuberculosis in Goats by Use of the Enferplex Caprine TB Multiplex Test.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Amanda; Whelan, Clare; Clarke, John B; Hayton, Alastair; Watt, Neil J; Harkiss, Gordon D

    2017-02-01

    Tuberculosis in goats is usually diagnosed clinically, at postmortem, or by a positive skin test. However, none of these approaches detects all infected animals. Serology offers an additional tool to identify infected animals missed by current tests. We describe the use of the Enferplex Caprine TB serology test to aid the management of a large dairy goat herd undergoing a tuberculosis breakdown. Initial skin and serology testing showed that IgG antibodies were present in both serum and milk from 100% of skin test-positive animals and in serum and milk from 77.8 and 95.4% of skin test-negative animals, respectively. A good correlation was observed between serum and milk antibody levels. The herd had been vaccinated against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, but no direct serological cross-reactions were found. Subsequent skin testing revealed 13.7% positive animals, 64.9% of which were antibody positive, while 42.1% of skin test-negative animals were seropositive. Antibody responses remained high 1 month later (57.1% positive), and the herd was slaughtered. Postmortem analysis of 20 skin test-negative goats revealed visible lesions in 6 animals, all of which had antibodies to six Mycobacterium bovis antigens. The results provide indirect evidence that serology testing with serum or milk could be a useful tool in the diagnosis and management of tuberculosis in goats.

  4. Serial T-SPOT.TB and quantiFERON-TB-Gold In-Tube assays to monitor response to antitubercular treatment in Italian children with active or latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Elena; Bonsignori, Francesca; Mangone, Giusi; Galli, Luisa; Mazzantini, Rachele; Sollai, Sara; Azzari, Chiara; de Martino, Maurizio

    2012-09-01

    We performed a prospective study to investigate T-SPOT.TB and QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-G-IT) dynamics during antitubercular treatment in active tuberculosis (TB) or latent TB. Eighteen children with latent TB and 26 with TB were enrolled. At 6 months of follow-up reversion rate was 5.88% (95% CI:0-13.79) for QFT-G-IT; 9.09% (95% CI:0.59-17.58) for T-SPOT.TB (P=0.921) in TB cases. Significant decline in quantitative response was observed exclusively in TB cases. Our results suggest that serial IGRA have limited use in children receiving antitubercular treatment.

  5. Health professionals as stigmatisers of tuberculosis: insights from community members and patients with TB in an urban district in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Dodor, Emmanuel Atsu; Kelly, Shona; Neal, Keith

    2009-05-01

    Health professionals are in a power category within any social setting so when they identify and label diseases with negative attributes, it can be recognised by society with discriminatory consequences for individuals affected in the community. This article reports how activities of health professionals, as perceived and construed by community members can be a basis of stigmatisation of patients with tuberculosis (TB) in society. One hundred individual interviews and 22 focus groups were held with community members and patients with TB, and the generated data analysed using the grounded theory techniques and procedures. Through examination of the words and statements of the participants, five inter-related ways by which activities of health professionals may expose patients with TB to stigmatisation in the community were identified: isolation and exclusionary practices; behaviours of health professionals towards patients with TB; public health discourse; food safety and hygiene practices and prohibition of full burial rites to those who died from TB. These activities are mirrored in the attitudes and behaviours of community members, and often become the basis of stigmatisation of individuals affected by TB in society. This may considerably contribute to diagnostic delay and low case finding in Ghana. Because, for fear of stigmatisation, community members who may be experiencing symptoms suggestive of TB may fail to go to the hospital. The stigma attached to TB in society may also contribute to the poor adherence to treatment seen among patients with TB in Ghana. To help to improve case finding and defaulter rate, the TB control programme should organise regular refresher courses in TB control and management for health professionals, and address the fear of infection by developing a national guidelines on how to prevent transmission of TB to health professionals within the hospital setting.

  6. [The present and future prospects in rapid molecular diagnosis of tuberculosis and MDR-TB (First Part)].

    PubMed

    Tănăsescu, Mihaela; Didilescu, Cristian; Marica, Constantin

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is still one of the diseases with a major medical and social impact, and in terms of early diagnosis (which would imply a fair treatment and established at the time), difficulties related to the delay bacilli isolation in culture, decreased susceptibility testing methods to antituberculosis drugs, lack of methods for differentiation of M. Tuberculosis complex germs of non TB Mycobacteria, may have important clinical implications. Traditional testing of anti-TB drug susceptibility on solid Löwenstein-Jensen medium (gold standard) or liquid media can only be performed using grown samples. Determining the time it takes up to 42 days on solid media and 12 days for liquid media. For MDR/XDR TB cases is absolutely essential to reduce the detection time. In these cases prove their usefulness rapid diagnostic methods. Automatic testing in liquid medium, molecular hybridization methods are currently recommended by the current WHO guidelines. Rapid diagnosis of MDR-TB is extremely useful for the early establishment of an effective treatment tailored more accurately on the spectrum of sensitivity of the resistant strain (thus reducing the risk of developing additional resistance to other drugs) and control the spread of these strains. Genetic diagnostic methods, approved and recommended by the WHO, can reduce the time of diagnosis of TB case and, importantly, the case of MDR TB. They do not replace the current standard diagnostic methods and resistance profile, but complete them in selected cases.

  7. TB in Children in the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of chest radiography for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and its role in the detection of latent TB infection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Piccazzo, Riccardo; Paparo, Francesco; Garlaschi, Giacomo

    2014-05-01

    In this systematic review we evaluate the role of chest radiography (CXR) in the diagnostic flow chart for tuberculosis (TB) infection, focusing on latent TB infection (LTBI) in patients requiring medical treatment with biological drugs. In recent findings, patients scheduled for immunomodulatory therapy with biologic drugs are a group at risk of TB reactivation and, in such patients, detection of LTBI is of great importance. CXR for diagnosis of pulmonary TB has good sensitivity, but poor specificity. Radiographic diagnosis of active disease can only be reliably made on the basis of temporal evolution of pulmonary lesions. In vivo tuberculin skin test and ex vivo interferon-γ release assays are designed to identify development of an adaptive immune response, but not necessarily LTBI. Computed tomography (CT) is able to distinguish active from inactive disease. CT is considered a complementary imaging modality to CXR in the screening procedure to detect past and LTBI infection in specific subgroups of patients who have increased risk for TB reactivation, including those scheduled for medical treatment with biological drugs.

  9. Tuberculosis Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  10. Tuberculosis Treatment and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  11. Assessment of latent tuberculosis infection in Takayasu arteritis with tuberculin skin test and Quantiferon-TB Gold test.

    PubMed

    Karadag, Omer; Aksu, Kenan; Sahin, Abdurrahman; Zihni, Figen Yargucu; Sener, Burcin; Inanc, Nevsun; Kalyoncu, Umut; Aydin, Sibel Zehra; Ascioglu, Sibel; Ocakci, Pinar Talu; Bilgen, Sule Apras; Keser, Gokhan; Inal, Vedat; Direskeneli, Haner; Calguneri, Meral; Ertenli, Ihsan; Kiraz, Sedat

    2010-09-01

    A possible relationship between Takayasu arteritis (TA) and tuberculosis (TB) has been suggested. An increased frequency of tuberculin skin test (TST) was observed in TA patients. Quantiferon-TB Gold test (QFT) is a new in vitro assay measuring interferon-gamma response to M. tuberculosis antigens and helpful in diagnosing latent TB infection. The aim of this study was to investigate latent TB infection among TA patients by the use of both TST and QFT Gold test. Ninety-four (male/female: 7/87) TA patients fulfilling ACR 1990 TA criteria from three different university hospitals in Turkey and 107 control subjects without inflammatory diseases were included in the study. Data about medical history (TA and TB) were collected for both groups. TST and QFT were performed. TST values > or =5 mm for TA patients and > or =15 mm for controls was accepted as TST positivity. Even though TA group was older (40 +/- 12 vs. 32 +/- 8, P < 0.001), there was no significant difference between TA patients and controls regarding demographic characteristics. Six TA patients and one control had a history of previous TB infection (P = 0.054). Although TST positivity was higher in TA group [55 patients (62.5%) vs. 24 controls (41.4%), P = 0.008], QFT positivity was similar between two groups [21 patients (22.3%) vs. 24 controls (22.4%), P > 0.05]. QFT was negative in two of six TA patients with previous TB history. Rate of latent TB infection in TA patients measured with QFT is no more than controls. QFT seems to be a good and favorable test compared with TST in detecting LTBI in TA.

  12. Docking-based virtual screening of known drugs against murE of Mycobacterium tuberculosis towards repurposing for TB

    PubMed Central

    Brindha, Sridharan; Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Vincent, Savariar; Gnanadoss, John Joel

    2016-01-01

    Repurposing has gained momentum globally and become an alternative avenue for drug discovery because of its better success rate, and reduced cost, time and issues related to safety than the conventional drug discovery process. Several drugs have already been successfully repurposed for other clinical conditions including drug resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB). Though TB can be cured completely with the use of currently available anti-tubercular drugs, emergence of drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the huge death toll globally, together necessitate urgently newer and effective drugs for TB. Therefore, we performed virtual screening of 1554 FDA approved drugs against murE, which is essential for peptidoglycan biosynthesis of M. tuberculosis. We used Glide and AutoDock Vina for virtual screening and applied rigid docking algorithm followed by induced fit docking algorithm in order to enhance the quality of the docking prediction and to prioritize drugs for repurposing. We found 17 drugs binding strongly with murE and three of them, namely, lymecycline, acarbose and desmopressin were consistently present within top 10 ranks by both Glide and AutoDock Vina in the induced fit docking algorithm, which strongly indicates that these three drugs are potential candidates for further studies towards repurposing for TB. PMID:28275291

  13. [Abandonment of tuberculosis treatment among patients co-infected with TB/HIV].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ivaneide Leal Ataide; Monteiro, Larissa Lima; Pacheco, Régia Hevelline Barros; da Silva, Sílvio Eder Dias

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed at analyzing the reasons that patients co-infected with tuberculosis and HIV leave the treatment of tuberculosis and to know the conduct of the health team toward that abandonment. The study, using a qualitative approach, performed semi-structured interviews on 45 professionals working at a referral health center in Pará state. Two units emerged based on the thematic analysis: patient-associated factors that make TB treatment adherence difficult; and service-associated factors that contribute to treatment abandonment. It was found that, in terms of the patients, that their low socioeconomic condition was the most common factor that led to abandonment. Other factors that led to this outcome included the adverse drug effects, the use of illegal drugs, and poor personal motivation. Regarding the service, issues related to the physical structure, working process organization and accessibility were also relevant to their non-adherence. Results show there is a need to change the practices performed at the health care services.

  14. Bayesian Models for Screening and TB Mobile for Target Inference with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ekins, Sean; Casey, Allen C.; Roberts, David; Parish, Tanya; Bunin, Barry A.

    2015-01-01

    The search for compounds active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is reliant upon high throughput screening (HTS) in whole cells. We have used Bayesian machine learning models which can predict anti-tubercular activity to filter an internal library of over 150,000 compounds prior to in vitro testing. We used this to select and test 48 compounds in vitro; 11 were active with MIC values ranging from 0.4 µM to 10.2 µM, giving a high hit rate of 22.9%. Among the hits, we identified several compounds belonging to the same series including five quinolones (including ciprofloxacin), three molecules with long aliphatic linkers and three singletons. This approach represents a rapid method to prioritize compounds for testing that can be used alongside medicinal chemistry insight and other filters to identify active molecules. Such models can significantly increase the hit rate of HTS, above the usual 1% or lower rates seen. In addition, the potential targets for the 11 molecules were predicted using TB Mobile and clustering alongside a set of over 740 molecules with known M. tuberculosis target annotations. These predictions may serve as a mechanism for prioritizing compounds for further optimization. PMID:24440548

  15. TB Summit 2014: prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of tuberculosis-a meeting report of a Euroscicon conference.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Arundhati; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2014-07-01

    World TB Day commemorates Dr Robert Koch's first announcement on March 24, 1882, that the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis. Currently, the event comprises of several conferences, meetings and activities held all over the world with the singular intention of raising public awareness about the global health emergency. In spite of having discovered the etiological agent of tuberculosis more than a century ago, a sizeable population still contract the disease every year and fall prey to it. In 2012, an estimated 8.6 million people developed the disease with 1.3 million succumbing to it. The number of TB deaths in children is unacceptably large, given that most are preventable. However, the challenge appears to be shifting toward attempts to control the rise and spread of the drug resistant variants of the microbe. To achieve this, a concerted effort from academia, clinical practice, and industry has been put forth. The TB Summit 2014 attempted to raise awareness as well as bring together experts involved in different aspects of tuberculosis research to help establish a more collective approach to battle this age-old disease.

  16. Prevalence of post-traumatic stress symptoms and associated factors in tuberculosis (TB), TB retreatment and/or TB-HIV co-infected primary public health-care patients in three districts in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, Karl; Naidoo, Pamela; Matseke, Gladys; Louw, Julia; McHunu, Gugu; Tutshana, Bomkazi

    2013-01-01

    High rates of tuberculosis (TB) and TB/HIV co-infection is often linked with mental health issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, which is further associated with poor health outcomes. In a country such as South Africa where rates of these infectious diseases are high, it is concerning that there is limited/no data on prevalence rates of mental disorders such as PTSD and its associated factors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of PTSD symptoms and associated factors in TB, TB retreatment and/or TB-HIV co-infected primary public health-care patients in three districts in South Africa. Brief screening self-report tools were used to measure: PTSD symptoms, psychological distress (anxiety and depression) and alcohol misuse. Other relevant measures, such as adherence to medication, stressful life events and sexual risk-taking behaviours, were obtained through structured questions. A total of 4900 public primary care adult patients from clinics in high TB burden districts from three provinces in South Africa participated. All the patients screened positive for TB (either new or retreatment cases). The prevalence of PTSD symptoms was 29.6%. Patients who screened positive for PTSD symptoms and psychological distress were more likely to be on antidepressant medication. Factors that predicted PTSD symptoms were poverty, residing in an urban area, psychological distress, suicide attempt, alcohol and/or drug use before sex, unprotected sex, TB-HIV co-infected and the number of other chronic conditions. Health-care systems should be strengthened to improve delivery of mental health care, by focusing on existing programmes and activities, such as those which address the prevention and treatment of TB and HIV.

  17. [Tuberculosis annual report 2008--series 10. Treatment outcome and TB deaths].

    PubMed

    2010-08-01

    Evaluation of the outcome of treatment by the cohort analysis method is an important aspect of TB control. In the Japanese tuberculosis (TB) surveillance system, the outcome of treatment is automatically classified by computer according to the order of pre-set algorithm, so the treatment outcome is evaluated very rigidly. Although treatment outcomes are classified roughly into the eight categories of "cured", "completed", "died", "failed", "defaulted", "transferred", "still on treatment" and "not evaluated", there are actually 15 categories in our surveillance system; each category of "completed", "defaulted", and "still on treatment" has two subcategories and "not evaluated" has five subcategories. In the case of new sputum smear positive pulmonary cases (n=9,421) newly notified in 2007, their treatment outcome was as follows; "success" which combined "cured" and "completed" was 45.5%, "died" was 18.4%, "failed" was 1.0%, "defaulted" was 5.0%, "transferred" was 3.2%, "still on treatment" was 12.0% and "not evaluated" was 14.9%. Among the 5.0% who were classified as "defaulted", 0.7% was due to treatment interruption for more than consecutive 60 days or 2 months, and 4.3% was due to premature treatment cessation of any causes. The category "not evaluated" includes those who died before beginning treatment, those whose initial treatment regimen is unknown, those whose treatment is other than standard treatment, those who stopped INH and/or RFP before treatment completion, and those whose information is insufficient for classifying treatment outcome. In addition to evaluation of treatment outcome by the cohort method, the proportion of deaths was observed among all forms of TB patients (n = 25,184) and new sputum smear positive pulmonary patients (n=9421) who were newly registered in 2007. 16.4% of all forms of TB cases and 22.5% of new sputum smear positive pulmonary cases died within one year after beginning of treatment. Among new sputum smear positive pulmonary

  18. Understanding the gender aspects of tuberculosis: a narrative analysis of the lived experiences of women with TB in slums of Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Khan, Koushambhi Basu

    2012-01-01

    There have been few ethnographic studies on gender aspects of tuberculosis (TB). In this article, drawing on a qualitative study on TB in Delhi slums and through an intersectional analysis of group interviews and personal narratives of women living with TB, I bring forth the "genderization" of TB and the associated sufferings for women. With my findings I demonstrate how gender, in conjunction with other social forces, influences the disease outcomes and stigmatizes women, how lives in slums are uniquely organized by multiple discourses that contribute to the gender makings of TB, and, finally, how women strategize to reduce their burden of illness.

  19. Adverse Events in Healthy Individuals and MDR-TB Contacts Treated with Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs Potentially Effective for Preventing Development of MDR-TB: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Langendam, Miranda W.; Tiemersma, Edine W.; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Sandgren, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A recent systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness to support or reject preventive therapy for treatment of contacts of patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Whether preventive therapy is favorable depends both on the effectiveness and the adverse events of the drugs used. We performed a systematic review to assess adverse events in healthy individuals and MDR-TB contacts treated with anti-tuberculosis drugs potentially effective for preventing development of MDR-TB. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and other databases (August 2011). Record selection, data extraction, and study quality assessment were done in duplicate. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Of 6,901 identified references, 20 studies were eligible. Among the 16 studies in healthy volunteers (a total of 87 persons on either levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, ofloxacin, or rifabutin, mostly for 1 week), serious adverse events and treatment discontinuation due to adverse events were rare (<1 and <5%, respectively), but mild adverse events frequently occurred. Due to small sample sizes of the levofloxacin and ofloxacin studies an increased frequency of mild adverse events compared to placebo could not be demonstrated or excluded. For moxifloxacin the comparative results were inconsistent. In four studies describing preventive therapy of MDR-TB contacts, therapy was stopped for 58–100% of the included persons because of the occurrence of adverse events ranging from mild adverse events such as nausea and dizziness to serious events requiring treatment. The quality of the evidence was very low. Although the number of publications and quality of evidence are low, the available evidence suggests that shortly after starting treatment the occurrence of serious adverse events is rare. Mild adverse events occur more frequently and may be of importance because these may provoke treatment interruption. PMID:23326464

  20. Adverse events in healthy individuals and MDR-TB contacts treated with anti-tuberculosis drugs potentially effective for preventing development of MDR-TB: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Langendam, Miranda W; Tiemersma, Edine W; van der Werf, Marieke J; Sandgren, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A recent systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness to support or reject preventive therapy for treatment of contacts of patients with multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Whether preventive therapy is favorable depends both on the effectiveness and the adverse events of the drugs used. We performed a systematic review to assess adverse events in healthy individuals and MDR-TB contacts treated with anti-tuberculosis drugs potentially effective for preventing development of MDR-TB. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and other databases (August 2011). Record selection, data extraction, and study quality assessment were done in duplicate. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Of 6,901 identified references, 20 studies were eligible. Among the 16 studies in healthy volunteers (a total of 87 persons on either levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, ofloxacin, or rifabutin, mostly for 1 week), serious adverse events and treatment discontinuation due to adverse events were rare (<1 and <5%, respectively), but mild adverse events frequently occurred. Due to small sample sizes of the levofloxacin and ofloxacin studies an increased frequency of mild adverse events compared to placebo could not be demonstrated or excluded. For moxifloxacin the comparative results were inconsistent. In four studies describing preventive therapy of MDR-TB contacts, therapy was stopped for 58-100% of the included persons because of the occurrence of adverse events ranging from mild adverse events such as nausea and dizziness to serious events requiring treatment. The quality of the evidence was very low. Although the number of publications and quality of evidence are low, the available evidence suggests that shortly after starting treatment the occurrence of serious adverse events is rare. Mild adverse events occur more frequently and may be of importance because these may provoke treatment interruption.

  1. Improved texture analysis for automatic detection of tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs with bone suppression images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduskar, Pragnya; Hogeweg, Laurens; Philipsen, Rick; Schalekamp, Steven; van Ginneken, Bram

    2013-03-01

    Computer aided detection (CAD) of tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs (CXR) is challenging due to over-lapping structures. Suppression of normal structures can reduce overprojection effects and can enhance the appearance of diffuse parenchymal abnormalities. In this work, we compare two CAD systems to detect textural abnormalities in chest radiographs of TB suspects. One CAD system was trained and tested on the original CXR and the other CAD system was trained and tested on bone suppression images (BSI). BSI were created using a commercially available software (ClearRead 2.4, Riverain Medical). The CAD system is trained with 431 normal and 434 abnormal images with manually outlined abnormal regions. Subtlety rating (1-3) is assigned to each abnormal region, where 3 refers to obvious and 1 refers to subtle abnormalities. Performance is evaluated on normal and abnormal regions from an independent dataset of 900 images. These contain in total 454 normal and 1127 abnormal regions, which are divided into 3 subtlety categories containing 280, 527 and 320 abnormal regions, respectively. For normal regions, original/BSI CAD has an average abnormality score of 0.094+/-0.027/0.085+/-0.032 (p - 5.6×10-19). For abnormal regions, subtlety 1, 2, 3 categories have average abnormality scores for original/BSI of 0.155+/-0.073/0.156+/-0.089 (p = 0.73), 0.194+/-0.086/0.207+/-0.101 (p = 5.7×10-7), 0.225+/-0.119/0.247+/-0.117 (p = 4.4×10-7), respectively. Thus for normal regions, CAD scores slightly decrease when using BSI instead of the original images, and for abnormal regions, the scores increase slightly. We therefore conclude that the use of bone suppression results in slightly but significantly improved automated detection of textural abnormalities in chest radiographs.

  2. The Prevalence of Tuberculosis in Zambia: Results from the First National TB Prevalence Survey, 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Kapata, Nathan; Chanda-Kapata, Pascalina; Ngosa, William; Metitiri, Mine; Klinkenberg, Eveline; Kalisvaart, Nico; Sunkutu, Veronica; Shibemba, Aaron; Chabala, Chishala; Chongwe, Gershom; Tembo, Mathias; Mulenga, Lutinala; Mbulo, Grace; Katemangwe, Patrick; Sakala, Sandra; Chizema-Kawesha, Elizabeth; Masiye, Felix; Sinyangwe, George; Onozaki, Ikushi; Mwaba, Peter; Chikamata, Davy; Zumla, Alimuddin; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis in Zambia is a major public health problem, however the country does not have reliable baseline data on the TB prevalence for impact measurement; therefore it was among the priority countries identified by the World Health Organization to conduct a national TB prevalence survey Objective To estimate the prevalence of tuberculosis among the adult Zambian population aged 15 years and above, in 2013–2014. Methods A cross-sectional population-based survey was conducted in 66 clusters across all the 10 provinces of Zambia. Eligible participants aged 15 years and above were screened for TB symptoms, had a chest x-ray (CXR) performed and were offered an HIV test. Participants with TB symptoms and/or CXR abnormality underwent an in-depth interview and submitted one spot- and one morning sputum sample for smear microscopy and liquid culture. Digital data collection methods were used throughout the process. Results Of the 98,458 individuals who were enumerated, 54,830 (55.7%) were eligible to participate, and 46,099 (84.1%) participated. Of those who participated, 45,633/46,099 (99%) were screened by both symptom assessment and chest x-ray, while 466/46,099 (1.01%) were screened by interview only. 6,708 (14.6%) were eligible to submit sputum and 6,154/6,708 (91.7%) of them submitted at least one specimen for examination. MTB cases identified were 265/6,123 (4.3%). The estimated national adult prevalence of smear, culture and bacteriologically confirmed TB was 319/100,000 (232-406/100,000); 568/100,000 (440-697/100,000); and 638/100,000 (502-774/100,000) population, respectively. The risk of having TB was five times higher in the HIV positive than HIV negative individuals. The TB prevalence for all forms was estimated to be 455 /100,000 population for all age groups. Conclusion The prevalence of tuberculosis in Zambia was higher than previously estimated. Innovative approaches are required to accelerate the control of TB. PMID:26771588

  3. DNA polymorphism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE_PGRS33 gene among clinical isolates of pediatric TB patients and its associations with clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Huang, Yanfeng; Zhang, Aihua; Zhu, Chaomin; Yang, Zhenhua; Xu, Hongmei

    2011-07-01

    In vitro and in animal studies have suggested an important role for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE_PGRS33 protein in the pathogenesis of TB. A significant level of PE_PGRS33 gene DNA polymorphism among clinical isolates from adult tuberculosis (TB) patients and its association with clinical and epidemiological phenotypes of the disease has been found. To better understand the role of PE_PGRS33 protein in the pathogenesis pediatric TB, we investigated DNA polymorphism of the PE_PGRS33 gene among 101 of pediatric TB patients' isolates and assessed the relationship between the PE_PGRS33 sequence variation and clinical characteristics of TB. Twelve different PE_PGRS33 sequence variations representing 12 different alleles were observed among the 101 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates investigated. Of these 101 isolates, 62(59.41%) had PE_PGRS33 alleles that would result in a change in the amino acid sequence of the PE_PGRS33 protein. The degree of DNA polymorphism within individual M. tuberculosis isolates from pediatric TB patients was remarkably lower than that previously found in M. tuberculosis isolates from adults TB patients. The frequency distribution of isolates having PE_PGRS33 gene sequence variations was similar between Beijing and non-Beijing families of the pathogen. Patients having TB meningitis and negative PPD skin test results appeared to be more likely to be infected by isolates having a mutant type of the PE_PGRS33 gene than patients who had no TB meningitis (OR 2.54, 95% CI [1.11-5.84]) and patients who had positive PPD-skin test results (OR 4.26, 95% CI [1.14-12.86]), respectively. This study provides new insight into the molecular pathogenesis of pediatric TB.

  4. Early diagnosis and effective treatment regimens are the keys to tackle antimicrobial resistance in tuberculosis (TB): A report from Euroscicon's international TB Summit 2016.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Arundhati; Kamil, Tengku Karmila; Shaik, Monisha; Danquah, Cynthia Amaning; Chrzastek, Alina; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2016-11-04

    To say that tuberculosis (TB) has regained a strong foothold in the global human health and wellbeing scenario would be an understatement. Ranking alongside HIV/AIDS as the top reason for mortality due to a single infectious disease, the impact of TB extends far into socio-economic context worldwide. As global efforts led by experts and political bodies converge to mitigate the predicted outcome of growing antimicrobial resistance, the academic community of students, practitioners and researchers have mobilised to develop integrated, inter-disciplinary programmes to bring the plans of the former to fruition. Enabling this crucial requirement for unimpeded dissemination of scientific discovery was the TB Summit 2016, held in London, United Kingdom. This report critically discusses the recent breakthroughs made in diagnostics and treatment while bringing to light the major hurdles in the control of the disease as discussed in the course of the 3-day international event. Conferences and symposia such as these are the breeding grounds for successful local and global collaborations and therefore must be supported to expand the understanding and outreach of basic science research.

  5. Knowledge and perceptions of national and provincial tuberculosis control programme managers in Pakistan about the WHO Stop TB strategy: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Wasiq Mehmood; Smith, Helen; Qadeer, Ejaz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To understand how national and provincial tuberculosis programme managers in Pakistan perceive and engage with the Stop TB strategy, its strengths, weaknesses and their experience in its implementation. National and provincial tuberculosis programme managers play an important role in effective implementation of the Stop TB strategy. Design A qualitative interview study was conducted with 10 national and provincial tuberculosis programme managers to understand how they perceive and engage with the Stop TB strategy, its strengths, weaknesses and their experience in its implementation. Managers were selected purposively; 10 managers were interviewed (six national staff and four from provincial level). Participants National and provincial tuberculosis programme managers in Pakistan. Managers were selected purposively; 10 managers were interviewed (six national staff and four from provincial level). Setting National and provincial tuberculosis programmes in Pakistan Main outcome measures 1. Knowledge and perceptions of national and provincial tuberculosis programme managers about the Stop TB strategy 2. Progress in implementing the strategy in Pakistan 3. Significant success factors 4. Significant implementation challenges 5. Lessons learnt to scale up successful implementation. Results The managers reported that most progress had been made in extending DOTS, health systems strengthening, public -private mixed interventions, MDR-TB care and TB/HIV care. The four factors that contributed significantly to progress were the availability of DOTS services, the public-private partnership approach, comprehensive guidance for TB control and government and donor commitment to TB control. Conclusion This study identified three main challenges as perceived by national and provincial tuberculosis programme managers in terms of implementing the Stop TB strategy: 1. Inadequate political commitment, 2. Issue pertaining to prioritisation of certain components in the TB

  6. Paradoxical Tuberculosis Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (TB-IRIS) in HIV Patients with Culture Confirmed Pulmonary Tuberculosis in India and the Potential Role of IL-6 in Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Brian O.; Chandrasekhar, Chockalingam; Venkatesan, Perumal; Menon, Pradeep A.; Subramanian, Sudha; Anbalagan, Selvaraj; Bhavani, Kannabiran P.; Sekar, Sathiyavelu; Padmapriyadarshini, Chandrasekaran; Kumar, Satagopan; Ravichandran, Narayanan; Raja, Krishnaraj; Bhanu, Kesavamurthy; Mahilmaran, Ayyamperumal; Sekar, Lakshmanan; Sher, Alan; Sereti, Irini; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence, manifestations, outcome and clinical predictors of paradoxical TB-IRIS in patients with HIV and culture confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in India have not been studied prospectively. Methods HIV+ patients with culture confirmed PTB started on anti-tuberculosis therapy (ATT) were followed prospectively after anti-retroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Established criteria for IRIS diagnosis were used including decline in plasma HIV RNA at IRIS event. Pre-ART plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between baseline variables and IRIS. Results Of 57 patients enrolled, 48 had complete follow up data. Median ATT-ART interval was 28 days (interquartile range, IQR 14–47). IRIS events occurred in 26 patients (54.2%) at a median of 11 days (IQR: 7–16) after ART initiation. Corticosteroids were required for treatment of most IRIS events that resolved within a median of 13 days (IQR: 9–23). Two patients died due to CNS TB-IRIS. Lower CD4+ T-cell counts, higher plasma HIV RNA levels, lower CD4/CD8 ratio, lower hemoglobin, shorter ATT to ART interval, extra-pulmonary or miliary TB and higher plasma IL-6 and CRP levels at baseline were associated with paradoxical TB-IRIS in the univariate analysis. Shorter ATT to ART interval, lower hemoglobin and higher IL-6 and CRP levels remained significant in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Paradoxical TB–IRIS frequently complicates HIV-TB therapy in India. IL-6 and CRP may assist in predicting IRIS events and serve as potential targets for immune interventions. PMID:23691062

  7. Effect of host diversity and species assemblage composition on bovine tuberculosis (bTB) risk in Ethiopian cattle.

    PubMed

    Sintayehu, Dejene W; Heitkönig, Ignas M A; Prins, Herbert H T; Tessema, Zewdu K; DE Boer, Willem F

    2017-01-30

    Current theories on diversity-disease relationships describe host species diversity and species identity as important factors influencing disease risk, either diluting or amplifying disease prevalence in a community. Whereas the simple term 'diversity' embodies a set of animal community characteristics, it is not clear how different measures of species diversity are correlated with disease risk. We therefore tested the effects of species richness, Pielou's evenness and Shannon's diversity on bovine tuberculosis (bTB) risk in cattle in the Afar Region and Awash National Park between November 2013 and April 2015. We also analysed the identity effect of a particular species and the effect of host habitat use overlap on bTB risk. We used the comparative intradermal tuberculin test to assess the number of bTB-infected cattle. Our results suggested a dilution effect through species evenness. We found that the identity effect of greater kudu - a maintenance host - confounded the dilution effect of species diversity on bTB risk. bTB infection was positively correlated with habitat use overlap between greater kudu and cattle. Different diversity indices have to be considered together for assessing diversity-disease relationships, for understanding the underlying causal mechanisms. We posit that unpacking diversity metrics is also relevant for formulating disease control strategies to manage cattle in ecosystems characterized by seasonally limited resources and intense wildlife-livestock interactions.

  8. Cost-comparison of different management policies for tuberculosis patients in Italy. AIPO TB Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Migliori, G. B.; Ambrosetti, M.; Besozzi, G.; Farris, B.; Nutini, S.; Saini, L.; Casali, L.; Nardini, S.; Bugiani, M.; Neri, M.; Raviglione, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    Although in developing countries the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) cases is among the most cost-effective health interventions, few studies have evaluated the cost-effectiveness of TB control in low-prevalence countries. The aim of the present study was to carry out an economic analysis in Italy that takes into account both the perspective of the resource-allocating authority (i.e. the Ministry of Health) and the broader social perspective, including a cost description based on current outcomes applied to a representative sample of TB patients nationwide (admission and directly observed treatment (DOT) during the initial intensive phase of treatment); a cost-comparison analysis of two alternative programmes: current policy based on available data (scenario 1) and an hypothetical policy oriented more towards outpatient care (scenario 2) (both scenarios included the option of including or not including DOT outside hospital admission, and incentives) were compared in terms of cost per case treated successfully. Indirect costs (such as loss of productivity) were included in considerations of the broader social perspective. The study was designed as a prospective monitoring activity based on the supervised collection of forms from a representative sample of Italian TB units. Individual data were collected and analysed to obtain a complete economic profile of the patients enrolled and to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. A separate analysis was done for each scenario to determine the end-point at different levels of cure rate (50-90%). The mean length of treatment was 6.6 months (i.e. patients hospitalized during the intensive phase; length of stay was significantly higher in smear-positive patients and in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive patients). Roughly six direct smear and culture examinations were performed during hospital admission and three during ambulatory treatment. The cost of a single bed day was US$186.90, whereas that of a

  9. Serial image analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis colony growth reveals a persistent subpopulation in sputum during treatment of pulmonary TB

    PubMed Central

    Barr, David A.; Kamdolozi, Mercy; Nishihara, Yo; Ndhlovu, Victor; Khonga, Margaret; Davies, Geraint R.; Sloan, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Faster elimination of drug tolerant ‘persister’ bacteria may shorten treatment of tuberculosis (TB) but no method exists to quantify persisters in clinical samples. We used automated image analysis to assess whether studying growth characteristics of individual Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonies from sputum on solid media during early TB treatment facilitates ‘persister’ phenotyping. As Time to Detection (TTD) in liquid culture inversely correlates with total bacterial load we also evaluated the relationship between individual colony growth parameters and TTD. Sputum from TB patients in Malawi was prepared for solid and liquid culture after 0, 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. Serial photography of agar plates was used to measure time to appearance (lag time) and radial growth rate for each colony. Mixed-effects modelling was used to analyse changing growth characteristics from serial samples. 20 patients had colony measurements recorded at ≥1 time-point. Overall lag time increased by 6.5 days between baseline and two weeks (p = 0.0001). Total colony count/ml showed typical biphasic elimination, but long lag time colonies (>20days) had slower, monophasic decline. TTD was associated with minimum lag time (time to appearance of first colony1). Slower elimination of long lag time colonies suggests that these may represent a persister subpopulation of bacilli. PMID:27156626

  10. Isolation unit for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients in a low endemic country, a step towards the World Health Organization End TB Strategy.

    PubMed

    Payen, M C; VAN Vooren, J P; Vandenberg, O; Clumeck, N; DE Wit, S

    2017-02-16

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a threat to public health and is the second cause of death due to a single infectious agent after HIV/AIDS. The worldwide distribution of TB is heterogeneous. The incidence is decreasing in most high-income regions, but the situation remains worrying in many parts of the world. The emergence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains resistant to key agents used in treatment (rifampin and isoniazid) contributes to TB transmission around the world. To achieve TB elimination, both high and low endemic countries must upscale their efforts to decrease disease transmission and improve cure rates. Management of drug-resistant TB is of particular importance. In this paper, we discuss the different models of care of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), the ethical considerations and the specific constraints present in high income countries. The management model chosen by the Belgian TB specialists in accordance with public health authorities as well as building of a specific MDR/XDR-TB isolation unit are also discussed.

  11. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    TUBERCULOSIS www.who.int/tb & DIABETES THE DUAL EPIDEMIC OF TB AND DIABETES DEADLY LINKAGES  People with ... higher risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis.  Diabetes triples a person’s risk of developing TB. ...

  12. Evaluation of the MeltPro TB/STR assay for rapid detection of streptomycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Hu, Siyu; Li, Guoli; Li, Hui; Liu, Xiaoli; Niu, Jianjun; Wang, Feng; Wen, Huixin; Xu, Ye; Li, Qingge

    2015-03-01

    Rapid and comprehensive detection of drug-resistance is essential for the control of tuberculosis, which has facilitated the development of molecular assays for the detection of drug-resistant mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We hereby assessed the analytical and clinical performance of an assay for streptomycin-resistant mutations. MeltPro TB/STR is a closed-tube, dual-color, melting curve analysis-based, real-time PCR test designed to detect 15 streptomycin-resistant mutations in rpsL 43, rpsL 88, rrs 513, rrs 514, rrs 517, and rrs 905-908 of M. tuberculosis. Analytical studies showed that the accuracy was 100%, the limit of detection was 50-500 bacilli per reaction, the reproducibility in the form of Tm variation was within 1.0 °C, and we could detect 20% STR resistance in mixed bacterial samples. The cross-platform study demonstrated that the assay could be performed on six models of real-time PCR instruments. A multicenter clinical study was conducted using 1056 clinical isolates, which were collected from three geographically different healthcare units, including 709 STR-susceptible and 347 STR-resistant isolates characterized on Löwenstein-Jensen solid medium by traditional drug susceptibility testing. The results showed that the clinical sensitivity and specificity of the MeltPro TB/STR was 88.8% and 95.8%, respectively. Sequencing analysis confirmed the accuracy of the mutation types. Among all the 8 mutation types detected, rpsL K43R (AAG → AGG), rpsL K88R (AAG → AGG) and rrs 514 A → C accounted for more than 90%. We concluded that MeltPro TB/STR represents a rapid and reliable assay for the detection of STR resistance in clinical isolates.

  13. Frequency of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) among re-treatment cases in NIDCH, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Noor, Rashed; Akhter, Safia; Rahman, Farjana; Munshi, Saurab Kishore; Kamal, S M Mostofa; Feroz, Farahnaaz

    2013-04-01

    Emergence of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) in Bangladesh has increased as a result of the inadequate management of TB-infected individuals. The present study attempted to detect the frequency of multidrug resistance (MDR) among the TB patients categorically from relapse, category I failure, category II failure, and return after default category I and II cases, using the conventional drug susceptibility test. Among 100 sputum specimens from all four categories, 81 and 84 positive cases were identified under light-emitting diode fluorescence microscope and the Lowenstein-Jensen (L-J) culture method, respectively. Of 84 culture-positive cases, elevated resistance was observed against isoniazid (89.3 %) and rifampicin (91.7 %) compared to that against streptomycin (53.6 %) and ethambutol (47.7 %). Resistance against ofloxacin, gatifloxacin, and kanamycin was 8.3, 5.9, and 2.4 %, consecutively. Fifty-nine cases were found to be MDR-TB. Two of these cases, which showed resistance against kanamycin and ofloxacin, were further identified as XDR. The proportion of XDR cases was more likely to be in the return after default category I and II cases.

  14. High and equitable tuberculosis awareness coverage in the community-driven Axshya TB control project in India.

    PubMed

    Thapa, B; Chadha, S S; Das, A; Mohanty, S; Tonsing, J

    2015-03-21

    Data from surveys on knowledge, attitudes and practice (KAP) on tuberculosis (TB) conducted under the Axshya project at two time points (baseline 2010-2011 and mid-line 2012-2013) were analysed for changes in coverage and equity of TB awareness after project interventions. Overall coverage increased from 84% at baseline to 88% at midline (5% increase, P < 0.05). In comparison to baseline results, coverage at the midline survey had significantly increased, from 81% to 87% among the rural population, from 81% to 86% among women, from 73% to 85% in the ⩾55 years age group, from 71% to 80% among illiterates and from 73% to 81% in the south zone (P < 0.05). The equity gap among the different study groups (settlement, sex, age, education and zones) decreased from 6-23% at baseline to 3-11% during the midline survey. The maximum decline was observed for type of settlement (rural vs. urban), from 10% to 3% (P < 0.05). This community-driven TB control project has achieved high and equitable coverage of TB awareness, offering valuable lessons for the global community.

  15. Sputum is a surrogate for bronchoalveolar lavage for monitoring Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcriptional profiles in TB patients.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Benjamin J; Loxton, Andre G; Dolganov, Gregory M; Van, Tran T; Davis, J Lucian; de Jong, Bouke C; Voskuil, Martin I; Leach, Sonia M; Schoolnik, Gary K; Walzl, Gerhard; Strong, Michael; Walter, Nicholas D

    2016-09-01

    Pathogen-targeted transcriptional profiling in human sputum may elucidate the physiologic state of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) during infection and treatment. However, whether M. tuberculosis transcription in sputum recapitulates transcription in the lung is uncertain. We therefore compared M. tuberculosis transcription in human sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from 11 HIV-negative South African patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. We additionally compared these clinical samples with in vitro log phase aerobic growth and hypoxic non-replicating persistence (NRP-2). Of 2179 M. tuberculosis transcripts assayed in sputum and BAL via multiplex RT-PCR, 194 (8.9%) had a p-value <0.05, but none were significant after correction for multiple testing. Categorical enrichment analysis indicated that expression of the hypoxia-responsive DosR regulon was higher in BAL than in sputum. M. tuberculosis transcription in BAL and sputum was distinct from both aerobic growth and NRP-2, with a range of 396-1020 transcripts significantly differentially expressed after multiple testing correction. Collectively, our results indicate that M. tuberculosis transcription in sputum approximates M. tuberculosis transcription in the lung. Minor differences between M. tuberculosis transcription in BAL and sputum suggested lower oxygen concentrations or higher nitric oxide concentrations in BAL. M. tuberculosis-targeted transcriptional profiling of sputa may be a powerful tool for understanding M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and monitoring treatment responses in vivo.

  16. The management for tuberculosis control in Greater London in comparison with that in Osaka City: lessons for improvement of TB control management in Osaka City urban setting.

    PubMed

    Ohkado, Akihiro; Williams, Gini; Ishikawa, Nobukatsu; Shimouchi, Akira; Simon, Carter

    2005-07-01

    The tuberculosis (TB) notification in Osaka City has been persistently high compared with other urban areas in Japan. Although the TB notification in Greater London has kept much lower level compared with that in Osaka City, it has been also persistently high compared with other urban areas in the UK. Nonetheless, the contexts of the two cities relating TB control programme as well as the epidemiological situation greatly vary; there must be some lessons to be learnt from each other to improve each TB control programme to tackle against TB more effectively. Comparing the epidemiological situation of TB in both cities, it is obvious that Osaka City suffers TB more than Greater London in terms of the TB notification rate. Concerning the context of the TB control programme, Osaka City has centralised approach with strong local government commitment; Greater London, on the other hand, has an approach that is greatly fragmented but coordinated through voluntary TB Networks. This paper aims to draw some constructive and practical lessons from Greater London TB control management for further improvement of Osaka City TB control management through literature review and interview to health professionals. TB epidemiology in Greater London shows distinct features in the extent of TB in new entrants and TB co-infected with HIV in comparison with those in Osaka City. TB epidemiology in Osaka City is to a great extent specifically related to homeless people whereas in Greater London, this relationship occurs to a lesser extent. Both areas have relatively high TB-notification rates compared with national figures, and they have "TB hot spots" where remarkably high TB-notification rates exist. TB control in Greater London is characterised with decentralised and devolved services to local government health authorities supplemented with co-ordinating bodies across sectors as well as across Greater London. Sector-wide TB Network as well as London TB Group (LTBG) and London TB Nurses

  17. Comparison of two interferon-gamma release assays (QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube and T-SPOT.TB) in testing for latent tuberculosis infection among HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Sultan, B; Benn, P; Mahungu, T; Young, M; Mercey, D; Morris-Jones, S; Miller, R F

    2013-10-01

    There is currently no 'gold standard' for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and both the tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) are used for diagnosis; the latter have a higher sensitivity than tuberculin skin tests for diagnosis of LTBI in HIV-infected individuals with lower CD4 counts. No evidence base exists for selection of IGRA methodology to identify LTBI among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients in the UK. We prospectively evaluated two commercially available IGRA methods (QuantiFERON-TB Gold In Tube [QFG] and T-SPOT.TB) for testing LTBI among HIV-infected patients potentially nosocomially exposed to an HIV-infected patient with 'smear-positive' pulmonary tuberculosis. Among the exposed patients median CD4 count was 550 cells/µL; 105 (90%) of 117 were receiving antiretroviral therapy, of who 104 (99%) had an undetectable plasma HIV load. IGRAs were positive in 12 patients (10.3%); QFG positive in 11 (9.4%) and T-SPOT.TB positive in six (5.1%); both IGRAs were positive in five patients (4.3%). There was one indeterminate QFG and one borderline T-SPOT.TB result. Concordance between the two IGRAs was moderate (κ = 0.56, 95% confidence interval = 0.27-0.85). IGRAs were positive in only 4 (29%) of 14 patients with previous culture-proven tuberculosis. No patient developed tuberculosis during 20 months of follow-up.

  18. TB in Vulnerable Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ugarte-Gil, César; Caro, Godofredo; Aylas, Rula; Castro, César; Lema, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article analyzes the factors associated with vulnerability of the Ashaninka, the most populous indigenous Peruvian Amazonian people, to tuberculosis (TB). By applying a human rights-based analytical framework that assesses public policy against human rights standards and principles, and by offering a step-by-step framework for a full assessment of compliance, it provides evidence of the relationship between the incidence of TB among the Ashaninka and Peru’s poor level of compliance with its human rights obligations. The article argues that one of the main reasons for the historical vulnerability of the Ashaninka to diseases such as TB is a lack of political will on the part of the national government to increase public health spending, ensure that resources reach the most vulnerable population, and adopt and invest in a culturally appropriate health system. PMID:27780999

  19. Characteristics and Treatment Outcomes of Patients with MDR and XDR Tuberculosis in a TB Referral Hospital in Beijing: A 13-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Hu, Yong Liang; Zhu, Baoli; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background Information on treatment outcomes among hospitalized patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) are scarce in China. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted this retrospective study to analyze the characteristics and treatment outcomes in MDR- and XDR-TB patients in the 309 Hospital in Beijing, China during 1996–2009. Socio-demographic and clinical data were retrieved from medical records and analyzed. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors associated with poor treatment outcomes and Cox proportional hazards regression model was further used to determine risk factors associated with death in TB patients. Among the 3,551 non-repetitive hospitalized TB patients who had drug susceptibility testing (DST) results, 716 (20.2%) had MDR-TB and 51 (1.4%) had XDR-TB. A total of 3,270 patients who had medical records available were used for further analyses. Treatment success rates (cured and treatment completed) were 90.9%, 53.4% and 29.2% for patients with non-MDR-TB, patients with MDR-TB excluding XDR-TB and patients with XDR-TB, respectively. Independent risk factors associated with poor treatment outcomes in MDR-TB patients included being a migrant (adjusted OR = 1.77), smear-positivity at treatment onset (adjusted OR = 1.94) and not receiving 3 or more potentially effective drugs (adjusted OR = 3.87). Independent risk factors associated with poor treatment outcomes in XDR-TB patients were smear-positivity at treatment onset (adjusted OR = 10.42) and not receiving 3 or more potentially effective drugs (adjusted OR = 14.90). The independent risk factors associated with death in TB patients were having chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (adjusted HR = 5.25) and having hypertension (adjusted HR = 4.31). Conclusions/Significance While overall satisfactory treatment success for non-MDR-TB patients was achieved, more intensive efforts

  20. Accuracy of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Test for Tuberculosis Diagnosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sali, Michela; Buonsenso, Danilo; Goletti, Delia; D’Alfonso, Pamela; Zumbo, Antonella; Fadda, Giovanni; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Delogu, Giovanni; Valentini, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the accuracy of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold assay (QFT-IT) in children with suspected active or latent TB infection (LTBI). Methods A retrospective study was conducted on 621 children (0–14 years old) evaluated for TB infection or disease. Following clinical assessment, children were tested with the QFT-IT assay. Results Among the 140 active TB suspects, we identified 19 cases of active disease. The overall sensitivity for active TB was 87.5%, ranging from 62.5% in children 25–36 months old to 100% in children older than 49 months. The overall specificity for active TB was 93.6%. Among the 481 children tested for LTBI screening, 38 scored positive and all but 2 had at least one risk factor for TB infection. Among the 26 children with indeterminate results, bacterial, viral or fungal pneumonia were later diagnosed in 11 (42.3%) cases and non-TB related extra-pulmonary infections in 12 (46.1%). Conclusions Our results indicate that the children's response to QFT-IT associates to active TB and risk factors for LTBI. Moreover, we show that mitogen response is also found in children of 1 year of age, providing support for QFT-IT use also in young children. PMID:26439935

  1. The use of Quantiferon-TB gold in-tube test in screening latent tuberculosis among Saudi Arabia dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Wakeel, Jamal Saleh; Makoshi, Ziyad; Al Ghonaim, Mohammed; Al Harbi, Ali; Al Suwaida, Abdulkareem; Algahtani, Farjah; Al Hedaithy, Mogbil; Almogairin, Sultan; Abdullah, Sami

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Screening for tuberculosis (TB) is a key strategy for controlling infection. This study aimed to detect latent TB among dialysis patients. METHODS: This is a prospective study conducted in King Saud University, Riyadh involving hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients aged ≥18 years. Patients were screened for latent TB infection (LTBI) using both TBskin test (TST) and QuantiFERONTB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT). All participants were followed-up clinically and radiologically every 3 months for 2 years. RESULTS: A total of 243 (181 HD and 62 PD) patients were included and 112(46.1%) were males. 45.3% showed positive QFT in HD patients with sensitivity of 91.7%, specificity of 71.4%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 19.5%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 91.1%. TST results in HD showed that positive TST was 17.4%, sensitivity was 63.2%, specificity was 95.5%, PPV was 51.5%, and NPV was 91.1%. Five (8.1%) showed positive QFT in PD patients with sensitivity of 7.7%, specificity of 91.8%, PPV of 6.6%, and NPV of 92.3%. TST results in PD showed that positive TST was 9.8%, sensitivity was 35.7%, specificity was 97.9%, PPV was 55.8%, and NPV was 93.3%. Previous TB infection was significantly correlated with QFT only in HD patients, but significantly associated with TST in both HD and PD patients. Also in HD, QFT was significantly associated with TST (P = 0.043). CONCLUSIONS: Due to high variability of QFT-GIT sensitivity, we recommend its use for its NPV and to use either TST or QFT in screening latent TB. PMID:26664568

  2. TB Screening Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as: Purified Protein Derivative; PPD; Mantoux; Latent Tuberculosis Infection Test; Interferon-gamma Release Assays; IGRA; T- ... else I should know? How is it used? Tuberculosis (TB) screening tests are not used as general ...

  3. Tuberculosis Treatment Non-Adherence and Lost to Follow Up among TB Patients with or without HIV in Developing Countries: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tola, Habteyes Hailu; Tol, Azar; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Garmaroudi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review intended to combine factors associated with tuberculosis treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up among TB patients with/without HIV in developing countries. Comprehensive remote electronic databases (MEDLINE, (PMC, Pub Med Central), Google scholar and Web of science) search was conducted using the following keywords: Tuberculosis, treatment, compliance, adherence, default, behavioural factors and socioeconomic factors. All types of studies intended to assess TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up in developing countries among adult TB patient from 2008 to data extraction date were included. Twenty-six original and one-reviewed articles, which meet inclusion criteria, were reviewed. TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up were continued across developing countries. The main factors associated with TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up were socioeconomic factors: lack of transportation cost, lack of social support, and patients-health care worker poor communication. Behavioural factors were Feeling better after few weeks of treatments, tobacco and alcohol use, knowledge deficit about duration of treatment and consequences of non-adherence and lost to follow up. TB treatment non-adherence and lost to follow up were continued across developing countries throughout the publication years of reviewed articles. Numerous, socioeconomic and behavioural factors were influencing TB treatment adherence and lost to follow up. Therefore, well understanding and minimizing of the effect of these associated factors is very important to enhance treatment adherence and follow up completion in developing countries.

  4. Clinical Predictors and Accuracy of Empiric Tuberculosis Treatment among Sputum Smear-Negative HIV-Infected Adult TB Suspects in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nakiyingi, Lydia; Bwanika, John Mark; Kirenga, Bruce; Nakanjako, Damalie; Katabira, Catherine; Lubega, Gloria; Sempa, Joseph; Nyesiga, Barnabas; Albert, Heidi; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The existing diagnostic algorithms for sputum smear-negative tuberculosis (TB) are complicated, time-consuming, and often difficult to implement. The decision to initiate TB treatment in resource-limited countries is often largely based on clinical predictors. We sought to determine the clinical predictors and accuracy of empiric TB treatment initiation in HIV-infected sputum smear-negative TB suspects using sputum culture as a reference standard. Setting Out-patient HIV-TB integrated urban clinic in Kampala, Uganda. Methods HIV-infected TB suspects were screened using sputum smear microscopy, and mycobacterial sputum liquid and solid cultures were performed. Smear results were made available to the clinician who made a clinical decision on empiric TB treatment initiation for sputum smear-negative patients. Clinic records were reviewed for patients whose sputum smears were negative to collect data on socio-demographics, TB symptomatology, chest X-ray findings, CD4 cell counts and TB treatment initiation. Results Of 253 smear-negative TB suspects, 56% (142/253) were females, median age 38 IQR (31–44) years, with a median CD4 cell count of 291 IQR (150–482) cells/mm3. Of the 85 (33.6%) smear-negative patients empirically initiated on TB treatment, 35.3% (n = 30) were sputum culture positive compared to only 18 (10.7%) of the 168 untreated patients (p<0.001). Abnormal chest X-ray [aOR 10.18, 95% CI (3.14–33.00), p<0.001] and advanced HIV clinical stage [aOR 3.92, 95% CI (1.20–12.85), p = 0.024] were significantly associated with empiric TB treatment initiation. The sensitivity and specificity of empiric TB treatment initiation in the diagnosis of TB in HIV-infected patients after negative smear microscopy was 62.5% and 73.7% respectively. Conclusion In resource-limited settings, clinically advanced HIV and abnormal chest X-ray significantly predict a clinical decision to empirically initiate TB treatment in smear-negative HIV

  5. An urgent need for building technical capacity for rapid diagnosis of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) among new cases: A case report from Maharashtra, India.

    PubMed

    Atre, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), the prevalence of which has increased across the globe in recent years, is a serious threat to public health. Timely diagnosis of MDR-TB, especially among new TB cases, is essential to facilitate appropriate treatment, which can prevent further emergence of drug resistance and its spread in the population. The present case report from India aims to address some operational challenges in diagnosing MDR-TB among new cases and potential measures to overcome them. It argues that even after seven years of implementing the DOTS-Plus program for controlling MDR-TB, India still lacks the technical capacity for rapid MDR-TB diagnosis. The case report underscores an urgent need to explore the use of WHO-endorsed techniques such as Xpert MTB/Rif and commercial assays such as Genotype MTBDR for rapid diagnosis of MDR-TB among new cases. Suitable applications may be found for other TB high-burden countries where MDR-TB is a major concern.

  6. Specificity of the Tuberculin Skin Test and the T-SPOT."TB" Assay among Students in a Low-Tuberculosis Incidence Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Elizabeth A.; Harland, Dawn; Wieland-Alter, Wendy; Burrer, Sherry; Adams, Lisa V.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Interferon-[gamma] release assays (IGRAs) are an important tool for detecting latent "Mycobacterium tuberculosis" infection (LTBI). Insufficient data exist about IGRA specificity in college health centers, most of which screen students for LTBI using the tuberculin skin test (TST). Participants: Students at a low-TB incidence college…

  7. Development of a Patient-Centred, Psychosocial Support Intervention for Multi-Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) Care in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Sudeepa; Elsey, Helen; King, Rebecca; Baral, Sushil C; Bhatta, Bharat Raj; Newell, James N

    2017-01-01

    Multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) poses a major threat to public health worldwide, particularly in low-income countries. The current long (20 month) and arduous treatment regime uses powerful drugs with side-effects that include mental ill-health. It has a high loss-to-follow-up (25%) and higher case fatality and lower cure-rates than those with drug sensitive tuberculosis (TB). While some national TB programmes provide small financial allowances to patients, other aspects of psychosocial ill-health, including iatrogenic ones, are not routinely assessed or addressed. We aimed to develop an intervention to improve psycho-social well-being for MDR-TB patients in Nepal. To do this we conducted qualitative work with MDR-TB patients, health professionals and the National TB programme (NTP) in Nepal. We conducted semi-structured interviews (SSIs) with 15 patients (10 men and 5 women, aged 21 to 68), four family members and three frontline health workers. In addition, three focus groups were held with MDR-TB patients and three with their family members. We conducted a series of meetings and workshops with key stakeholders to design the intervention, working closely with the NTP to enable government ownership. Our findings highlight the negative impacts of MDR-TB treatment on mental health, with greater impacts felt among those with limited social and financial support, predominantly married women. Michie et al's (2011) framework for behaviour change proved helpful in identifying corresponding practice- and policy-level changes. The findings from this study emphasise the need for tailored psycho-social support. Recent work on simple psychological support packages for the general population can usefully be adapted for use with people with MDR-TB.

  8. Development of a Patient-Centred, Psychosocial Support Intervention for Multi-Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) Care in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, Sudeepa; Elsey, Helen; Baral, Sushil C.; Bhatta, Bharat Raj; Newell, James N.

    2017-01-01

    Multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) poses a major threat to public health worldwide, particularly in low-income countries. The current long (20 month) and arduous treatment regime uses powerful drugs with side-effects that include mental ill-health. It has a high loss-to-follow-up (25%) and higher case fatality and lower cure-rates than those with drug sensitive tuberculosis (TB). While some national TB programmes provide small financial allowances to patients, other aspects of psychosocial ill-health, including iatrogenic ones, are not routinely assessed or addressed. We aimed to develop an intervention to improve psycho-social well-being for MDR-TB patients in Nepal. To do this we conducted qualitative work with MDR-TB patients, health professionals and the National TB programme (NTP) in Nepal. We conducted semi-structured interviews (SSIs) with 15 patients (10 men and 5 women, aged 21 to 68), four family members and three frontline health workers. In addition, three focus groups were held with MDR-TB patients and three with their family members. We conducted a series of meetings and workshops with key stakeholders to design the intervention, working closely with the NTP to enable government ownership. Our findings highlight the negative impacts of MDR-TB treatment on mental health, with greater impacts felt among those with limited social and financial support, predominantly married women. Michie et al’s (2011) framework for behaviour change proved helpful in identifying corresponding practice- and policy-level changes. The findings from this study emphasise the need for tailored psycho-social support. Recent work on simple psychological support packages for the general population can usefully be adapted for use with people with MDR-TB. PMID:28099475

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis at the human/wildlife interface in a high TB burden country.

    PubMed

    Michel, A L; Hlokwe, T M; Espie, I W; van Zijll Langhout, M; Koeppel, K; Lane, E

    2013-11-01

    This study reports on an investigation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cases in mostly captive wild animals using molecular typing tools [Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) typing and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism typing]. The investigation included cases from (i) the National Zoological Gardens of South Africa (NZG) recorded between 2002 and 2011; (ii) Johannesburg Zoo, where tuberculosis was first diagnosed in 2007 and has since been detected in three antelope species; (iii) a rehabilitation centre for vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) in which M. tuberculosis was diagnosed in 2008; and (iv) incidental cases in other facilities including a sable antelope (Hippotragus niger), two unrelated cases in chacma baboons (Papio ursinus) (one of which was from a free-ranging troop) and a colony of capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus). Identical genetic profiles of the latter three isolates indicate the persistence of a single M. tuberculosis strain in this population since at least 2006. Results of the outbreak investigation in the captive vervet monkey colony indicate that it was caused by two unrelated strains, while all 13 M. tuberculosis isolates from 11 animal species in the NZG showed different VNTR patterns. A substantial increase in tuberculosis cases of 60% was recorded in the NZG, compared with the previous reporting period 1991-2001, and may indicate a countrywide trend of increasing spillover of human tuberculosis to wild animals. South Africa ranks among the countries with the highest-tuberculosis burden worldwide, complicated by an increasing rate of multidrug-resistant strains. Exposure and infection of captive wildlife in this high prevalence setting is therefore a growing concern for wildlife conservation but also for human health through potential spillback.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis multi-drug-resistant strain M induces IL-17(+) IFNγ(-) CD4(+) T cell expansion through an IL-23 and TGF-β-dependent mechanism in patients with MDR-TB tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Basile, J I; Kviatcovsky, D; Romero, M M; Balboa, L; Monteserin, J; Ritacco, V; Lopez, B; Sabio y García, C; García, A; Vescovo, M; Montaner, P G; Palmero, D; Del Carmen Sasiain, M; de la Barrera, S

    2017-01-01

    We have reported previously that T cells from patients with multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) express high levels of interleukin (IL)-17 in response to the MDR strain M (Haarlem family) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Herein, we explore the pathways involved in the induction of Th17 cells in MDR-TB patients and healthy tuberculin reactors [purified protein derivative healthy donors (PPD(+) HD)] by the M strain and the laboratory strain H37Rv. Our results show that IL-1β and IL-6 are crucial for the H37Rv and M-induced expansion of IL-17(+) interferon (IFN)-γ(-) and IL-17(+) IFN-γ(+) in CD4(+) T cells from MDR-TB and PPD(+) HD. IL-23 plays an ambiguous role in T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 profiles: alone, IL-23 is responsible for M. tuberculosis-induced IL-17 and IFN-γ expression in CD4(+) T cells from PPD(+) HD whereas, together with transforming growth factor (TGF-β), it promotes IL-17(+) IFN-γ(-) expansion in MDR-TB. In fact, spontaneous and M. tuberculosis-induced TGF-β secretion is increased in cells from MDR-TB, the M strain being the highest inducer. Interestingly, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 signalling mediates the expansion of IL-17(+) IFN-γ(-) cells and the enhancement of latency-associated protein (LAP) expression in CD14(+) and CD4(+) T cells from MDR-TB, which suggests that the M strain promotes IL-17(+) IFN-γ(-) T cells through a strong TLR-2-dependent TGF-β production by antigen-presenting cells and CD4(+) T cells. Finally, CD4(+) T cells from MDR-TB patients infected with MDR Haarlem strains show higher IL-17(+) IFN-γ(-) and lower IL-17(+) IFN-γ(+) levels than LAM-infected patients. The present findings deepen our understanding of the role of IL-17 in MDR-TB and highlight the influence of the genetic background of the infecting M. tuberculosis strain on the ex-vivo Th17 response.

  11. Tuberculosis Infection and Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) has a greater burden of TB bacilli than latent TB and acts as an infection source for contacts. Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is the state in which humans are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis without any clinical symptoms, radiological abnormality, or microbiological evidence. TB is transmissible by respiratory droplet nucleus of 1–5 µm in diameter, containing 1–10 TB bacilli. TB transmission is affected by the strength of the infectious source, infectiousness of TB bacilli, immunoresistance of the host, environmental stresses, and biosocial factors. Infection controls to reduce TB transmission consist of managerial activities, administrative control, engineering control, environmental control, and personal protective equipment provision. However, diagnosis and treatment for LTBI as a national TB control program is an important strategy on the precondition that active TB is not missed. Therefore, more concrete evidences for LTBI management based on clinical and public perspectives are needed. PMID:27790271

  12. Contribution of Interferon gamma release assays testing to the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in HIV-infected patients: A comparison of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In Tube, T-SPOT.TB and tuberculin skin test

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is the most effective strategy to control tuberculosis (TB) among patients with HIV infection. The tuberculin skin test (TST) was the only available method to identify LTBI. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the usefulness of the interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs): QuantiFERON-tuberculosis (TB) Gold-In-Tube test (QFG) and T-SPOT.TB for the diagnosis of LTBI in a diverse cohort of HIV-infected patients. Methods A prospective study was carried out in consecutive patients cared for in a single institution in Spain from January 2009 to October 2010. IGRAs and TST were performed simultaneously. TST induration ≥ 5 mm was considered positive. Results QFG, T-SPOT.TB and TST were performed in 373 subjects. Median CD4 cell count was 470/μl with a median nadir of 150/μl. TST, QFG and T-SPOT.TB were positive in 13.3%, 7.5% and 18.5% cases respectively. Among 277 patients with neither past or current TB nor previous treatment for LTBI and who had TST results, a positive TST result was obtained in 20 (7.2%) cases. When adding QFG results to TST, there were a total of 26 (8.6%) diagnoses of LTBI. When the results of both IGRAs were added, the number of diagnoses increased to 54 (17.9%) (incremental difference: 10.7% [95% confidence interval [CI]:5.3-16.2%] [p < 0.001]), and when both IGRAs were added, the number of diagnoses reached 56 (18.5%) (incremental difference: 11.3% [95% CI:5.7%–16.9%] [p < 0.001]). Patients with a CD4 cell count greater than 500 cells/μl and prior stay in prison were more likely to have a diagnosis of LTBI by TST and/or QFG and/or T-SPOT.TB (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 3.8; 95% CI, 1.4 – 9.9; and aOR: 3.3; 95% CI, 1.3 – 8.3, respectively). Conclusions IGRAs were more sensitive than TST for diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection in HIV-infected patients. Dual sequential testing with TST and IGRAs may be the optimal approach for LTBI screening in this

  13. Performance evaluation of Xpert MTB/RIF in a moderate tuberculosis incidence compared with TaqMan MTB and TRCRapid M.TB.

    PubMed

    Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Nagai, Hideaki; Ogawa, Kenji; Matsumoto, Tomoshige; Morimoto, Kozo; Takaki, Akiko; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2017-02-01

    Xpert MTB/RIF is an automated nucleic acid amplification test (NAT) that can detect the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) in clinical specimens as well as rifampicin (RIF) resistance resulting from rpoB mutation. Despite its high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) with or without RIF resistance, the clinical performance of the test is variable. In this study, we evaluated the performance of Xpert MTB/RIF in a setting of moderate TB burden and high medical resources. A total of 427 sputum specimens were obtained from 237 suspected TB cases. Of these, 159 were identified as active TB, while the other 78 were non-TB diseases. The overall sensitivity and specificity of MTC detection by Xpert MTB/RIF using culture results as a reference were 86.8% [95% confidence interval (CI): 81.8%-90.6%] and 96.8% (95% CI: 93.1%-98.5%), respectively. Among MTC-positive culture specimens, Xpert MTB/RIF positivity was 95.2% (95% CI: 91.2%-97.5%) in smear-positive and 44.7% (95% CI 30.1-60.3) in smear-negative specimens. Xpert MTB/RIF was similar to other NATs (TaqMan MTB and TRCRapid M.TB) in terms of performance. Xpert MTB/RIF detected 25 RIF-resistant isolates as compared to 22 with the mycobacterial growth indicator tube antimicrobial susceptibility testing system, yielding a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI: 85.1%-100%) and specificity of 98.3% (95% CI: 95.1%-99.4%). These results indicate that although sensitivity in smear-negative/culture-positive specimens was relatively low, Xpert MTB/RIF is a useful diagnostic tool for detecting TB and RIF resistance even in settings of moderate TB burden.

  14. What is Multidrug and Extensively Drug Resistant TB?

    MedlinePlus

    ... org > Lung Health and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Tuberculosis (TB) What Is Multidrug and Extensively Drug Resistant TB? Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis ( MDR TB ) is a very dangerous form of ...

  15. TB in Correctional Facilities Is a Public Health Concern

    MedlinePlus

    ... component to TB elimination in the United States. Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria that ... is essential to these efforts. More Information Reported Tuberculosis in the United States, 2012 TB in Correctional ...

  16. Evaluation of vaccines in the EU TB Vaccine Cluster using a guinea pig aerosol infection model of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ann; Hatch, Graham J; Clark, Simon O; Gooch, Karen E; Hatch, Kim A; Hall, Graham A; Huygen, Kris; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Franken, Kees L M C; Andersen, Peter; Doherty, T Mark; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Grode, Leander; Seiler, Peter; Martin, Carlos; Gicquel, Brigitte; Cole, Stewart T; Brodin, Priscille; Pym, Alexander S; Dalemans, Wilfried; Cohen, Joe; Lobet, Yves; Goonetilleke, Nilu; McShane, Helen; Hill, Adrian; Parish, Tanya; Smith, Debbie; Stoker, Neil G; Lowrie, Douglas B; Källenius, Gunilla; Svenson, Stefan; Pawlowski, Andrzej; Blake, Karen; Marsh, Philip D

    2005-01-01

    The TB Vaccine Cluster project funded by the EU Fifth Framework programme aims to provide novel vaccines against tuberculosis that are suitable for evaluation in humans. This paper describes the studies of the protective efficacy of vaccines in a guinea pig aerosol-infection model of primary tuberculosis. The objective was to conduct comparative evaluations of vaccines that had previously demonstrated efficacy in other animal models. Groups of 6 guinea pigs were immunized with vaccines provided by the relevant EU Vaccine Cluster partners. Survival over 17 or 26 weeks was used as the principal measure of vaccine efficacy following aerosol challenge with H37Rv. Counts of mycobacteria in lungs and spleens, and histopathological changes in the lungs, were also used to provide evidence of protection. A total of 24 vaccines were evaluated in 4 experiments each of a different design. A heterologous prime-boost strategy of DNA and MVA, each expressing Ag85A and a fusion protein of ESAT-6 and Ag85B in adjuvant, protected the guinea pigs to the same extent as BCG. Genetically modified BCG vaccines and boosted BCG strategies also protected guinea pigs to the same extent as BCG but not statistically significantly better. A relatively high aerosol-challenge dose and evaluation over a protracted time post-challenge allowed superior protection over BCG to be demonstrated by BCG boosted with MVA and fowl pox vectors expressing Ag85A.

  17. Systematic review on tuberculosis transmission on aircraft and update of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control risk assessment guidelines for tuberculosis transmitted on aircraft (RAGIDA-TB).

    PubMed

    Kotila, Saara M; Payne Hallström, Lara; Jansen, Niesje; Helbling, Peter; Abubakar, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    As a setting for potential tuberculosis (TB) transmission and contact tracing, aircraft pose specific challenges. Evidence-based guidelines are needed to support the related-risk assessment and contact-tracing efforts. In this study evidence of TB transmission on aircraft was identified to update the Risk Assessment Guidelines for TB Transmitted on Aircraft (RAGIDA-TB) of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). Electronic searches were undertaken from Medline (Pubmed), Embase and Cochrane Library until 19 July 2013. Eligible records were identified by a two-stage screening process and data on flight and index case characteristics as well as contact tracing strategies extracted. The systematic literature review retrieved 21 records. Ten of these records were available only after the previous version of the RAGIDA guidelines (2009) and World Health Organization guidelines on TB and air travel (2008) were published. Seven of the 21 records presented some evidence of possible in-flight transmission, but only one record provided substantial evidence of TB transmission on an aircraft. The data indicate that overall risk of TB transmission on aircraft is very low. The updated ECDC guidelines for TB transmission on aircraft have global implications due to inevitable need for international collaboration in contract tracing and risk assessment.

  18. A VSEIR model for transmission of tuberculosis (TB) disease in North Sumatera, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangkuti, Yulita M.; Sinaga, Marlina S.; Marpaung, F.; Side, Syafruddin

    2014-12-01

    In this work, Vaccination (V), Susceptible (S) Infected (I), and Recovered (R) (VSIR) model for transmission of Tuberculosis in North Sumatera is modified. An exposed class is adopted to VSIR model so called VSEIR to determine the probability of people who infectious before infected. This model is written in ordinary differential equation (ODEs) in five classes. Determination the equilibrium point and stability analysis of the model is discussed to determine the dynamic behaviour of systems. A simulation is also discussed to see the suitable model to North Sumatera data. The simulation of VSEIR model indicates Tuberculosis has not endemic in North Sumatera.

  19. Comparison of the tuberculin skin test and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test in detecting latent tuberculosis in health care workers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The tuberculin skin test (TST) and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT) are used to identify latent tuberculosis infections (LTBIs). The aim of this study was to determine the agreement between these two tests among health care workers in Iran. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 177 tuberculosis (TB) laboratory staff and 67 non-TB staff. TST indurations of 10 mm or more were considered positive. The Student’s t-test and the chi-square test were used to compare the mean score and proportion of variables between the TB laboratory staff and the non-TB laboratory staff. Kappa statistics were used to evaluate the agreement between these tests, and logistic regression was used to assess the risk factors associated with positive results for each test. RESULTS: The prevalence of LTBIs according to both the QFT and the TST was 17% (95% confidence interval [CI], 12% to 21%) and 16% (95% CI, 11% to 21%), respectively. The agreement between the QFT and the TST was 77.46%, with a kappa of 0.19 (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.34). CONCLUSIONS: Although the prevalence of LTBI based on the QFT and the TST was not significantly different, the kappa statistic was low between these two tests for the detection of LTBIs. PMID:27457062

  20. Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Included are over 50 abstracts of papers being presented at the 1977 National Association of Biology Teachers Convention. Included in each abstract are the title, author, and summary of the paper. Topics include photographic techniques environmental studies, and biological instruction. (MA)

  1. Successful Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes among HIV/TB Coinfected Patients Down-Referred from a District Hospital to Primary Health Clinics in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Karen B.; Moll, Anthony P.; Friedland, Gerald H.; Shenoi, Sheela V.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV and tuberculosis (TB) coinfection remains a major public health threat in sub-Saharan Africa. Integration and decentralization of HIV and TB treatment services are being implemented, but data on outcomes of this strategy are lacking in rural, resource-limited settings. We evaluated TB treatment outcomes in TB/HIV coinfected patients in an integrated and decentralized system in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods We retrospectively studied a cohort of HIV/TB coinfected patients initiating treatment for drug-susceptible TB at a district hospital HIV clinic from January 2012-June 2013. Patients were eligible for down-referral to primary health clinics(PHCs) for TB treatment completion if they met specific clinical criteria. Records were reviewed for patients’ demographic, baseline clinical and laboratory information, past HIV and TB history, and TB treatment outcomes. Results Of 657(88.7%) patients, 322(49.0%) were female, 558(84.9%) were new TB cases, and 572(87.1%) had pulmonary TB. After TB treatment initiation, 280(42.6%) were down-referred from the district level HIV clinic to PHCs for treatment completion; 377(57.4%) remained at the district hospital. Retained patients possessed characteristics indicative of more severe disease. In total, 540(82.2%) patients experienced treatment success, 69(10.5%) died, and 46(7.0%) defaulted. Down-referred patients experienced higher treatment success, and lower mortality, but were more likely to default, primarily at the time of transfer to PHC. Conclusion Decentralization of TB treatment to the primary care level is feasible in rural South Africa. Treatment outcomes are favorable when patients are carefully chosen for down-referral. Higher mortality in retained patients reflects increased baseline disease severity while higher default among down-referred patients reflects failed linkage of care. Better linkage mechanisms are needed including improved identification of potential defaulters, increased

  2. Numerical study for multi-strain tuberculosis (TB) model of variable-order fractional derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sweilam, Nasser H; Al-Mekhlafi, Seham M

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we presented a novel multi-strain TB model of variable-order fractional derivatives, which incorporates three strains: drug-sensitive, emerging multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR), as an extension for multi-strain TB model of nonlinear ordinary differential equations which developed in 2014 by Arino and Soliman [1]. Numerical simulations for this variable-order fractional model are the main aim of this work, where the variable-order fractional derivative is defined in the sense of Grünwald-Letnikov definition. Two numerical methods are presented for this model, the standard finite difference method (SFDM) and nonstandard finite difference method (NSFDM). Numerical comparison between SFDM and NSFDM is presented. It is concluded that, NSFDM preserves the positivity of the solutions and numerically stable in large regions than SFDM.

  3. Numerical study for multi-strain tuberculosis (TB) model of variable-order fractional derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Sweilam, Nasser H.; AL-Mekhlafi, Seham M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we presented a novel multi-strain TB model of variable-order fractional derivatives, which incorporates three strains: drug-sensitive, emerging multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR), as an extension for multi-strain TB model of nonlinear ordinary differential equations which developed in 2014 by Arino and Soliman [1]. Numerical simulations for this variable-order fractional model are the main aim of this work, where the variable-order fractional derivative is defined in the sense of Grünwald–Letnikov definition. Two numerical methods are presented for this model, the standard finite difference method (SFDM) and nonstandard finite difference method (NSFDM). Numerical comparison between SFDM and NSFDM is presented. It is concluded that, NSFDM preserves the positivity of the solutions and numerically stable in large regions than SFDM. PMID:26966568

  4. The Risk of Depressive Disorder Among Contacts of Tuberculosis Patients in a TB-endemic Area: A Population-based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sheng-Wei; Yen, Yung-Feng; Feng, Jia-Yih; Su, Vincent Yi-Fong; Kou, Yu Ru; Su, Wei-Juin

    2015-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) disease may be transmitted to close contacts of index cases, causing physical illness. No studies have investigated the risk of developing depressive disorder among TB contacts in a TB-endemic area.Adult participants with a new diagnosis of TB contact (ICD-9-CM codes V01.1 plus chest radiographic order) since January 1, 2008, were identified from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. A control cohort matched for age (±5 y), sex, enrolled years, and income level was selected. These 2 cohorts were followed until December 31, 2012, and observed for the development of depressive disorder. The Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test were used to examine the difference in cumulative incidences of depressive disorder between groups. Cox proportional-hazard models were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) for depressive disorder.The TB contact cohort consisted of 9046 patients and matched controls of 36,184 ones. The mean age of TB contacts was 44.7 years, and 56.0% of them were women. During a mean follow-up period of 2.5 years, 127 (1.40%) TB contacts and 521 (1.44%) matched controls developed depressive disorder. TB exposure was found to be an independent risk factor of depressive disorder in women (aHR 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07-1.68), but not in men (aHR 0.71, 95% CI 0.48-1.06) after adjusting for age, comorbidities, and income levels. The risk of depression was significantly higher for female TB contacts than for matched controls in the first and second years (aHR 1.49, 95% CI 1.03-2.14; and aHR 1.53, 95% CI 1.05-2.23, respectively), but not thereafter. Of note, 67 (0.74%) TB contacts and 88 (0.24%) matched controls developed active TB, but none of them had subsequent depressive disorder during follow-up periods.Female TB contacts had an increased risk of depression within the first 2 years after exposure. Clinicians should consider conducting depression evaluations in addition to routine TB contact

  5. [Management of TB suspected cases of drug resistant tuberculosis requiring a second treatment].

    PubMed

    Caminero, José A

    2004-06-01

    The management of patients with resistance to anti tuberculous drugs is complex and therefore must be managed by physician specialists. The most difficult patients are the cases in retreatment, where some very different possibilities are possible, as abandonment, failures and relapses. Patients with multi-drug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis are the most difficult to treat; MDR appears in all the failures or non-adherences to the treatment regime. To elaborate a scheme of retreatment for these patients, two guidelines must be followed: (1) do not rely on outcomes of drug susceptibility tests and (2) a detailed history of drug treatment must be considered of paramount importance. With this information, a retreatment scheme can be formulated that involves the use of at least three drugs not previously taken by the patient. For a successful control of tuberculosis, the national tuberculosis programs in Latin American countries must assure careful management of newly diagnosed patients. Secondly, if resources are available, a bank of second-line drugs must be ready for managing retreatment situations (e.g., 3 Z-Kn-Eth-Of/15 Z-Eth-Of) if first line drug treatments fail. Using individualized retreatment with second line drugs is recommended only in industrialized countries, and for a few middle income countries as a last resort.

  6. Global Tuberculosis Report 2016

    MedlinePlus

    ... WHO Language عربي 中文 English Français Русский Español Tuberculosis (TB) Menu Tuberculosis The End TB Strategy Areas ... data News, events and features About us Global tuberculosis report 2016 WHO has published a global TB ...

  7. Performance of QuantiFERON TB Gold test in detecting latent tuberculosis infection in brain-dead organ donors in Iran: a brief report.

    PubMed

    Tabarsi, Payam; Yousefzadeh, Amir; Najafizadeh, Katayoun; Droudinia, Atousa; Bayati, Rouzbeh; Marjani, Majid; Shafaghi, Shadi; Farokhzad, Banafsheh; Javanmard, Pedram; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2014-11-01

    With regard to the significant morbidity and mortality due to tuberculosis in lung transplant recipients, the identification of brain-dead organ donors with latent tuberculosis by use of the QuantiFERON TB Gold (QFT-G) test may be of help to reduce the risk of TB reactivation and mortality in lung recipients. This study was conducted in the National Research Institute of Tuber-culosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD) in Iran, from January to March 2013. A total of 38 conse-cutive brain-dead donors, not currently infected with active tuberculosis, were recruited. The medi-cal records of all the study enrollees were reviewed. A whole-blood IFN- release assay (IGRA) in reaction to early secreted antigenic target 6 (ESAT-6), culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10), and TB7.7 antigens, was performed and the released Interferon- was measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The data was analyzed with QFT-G software which was provided by the company. The demographic, characteristics and other variables were entered into SPSS version 11.5. The QFT-G test results of three donors (7.9%) turned out to be positive, negative for 24 donors (63.1%), and indeterminate for 11 cases (28.9%). Our study revealed the potential advantages of QFT-G in lowering the incidence of donor-derived post-transplant tuberculosis among lung recipients. However, a high rate of indeterminate results restricted the performance of QFT-G in this study.

  8. Agreement between QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube and the tuberculin skin test and predictors of positive test results in Warao Amerindian pediatric tuberculosis contacts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interferon-gamma release assays have emerged as a more specific alternative to the tuberculin skin test (TST) for detection of tuberculosis (TB) infection, especially in Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccinated people. We determined the prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by TST and QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) and assessed agreement between the two test methods and factors associated with positivity in either test in Warao Amerindian children in Venezuela. Furthermore, progression to active TB disease was evaluated for up to 12 months. Methods 163 HIV-negative childhood household contacts under 16 years of age were enrolled for TST, QFT-GIT and chest X-ray (CXR). Follow-up was performed at six and 12 months. Factors associated with TST and QFT-GIT positivity were studied using generalized estimation equations logistic regression models. Results At baseline, the proportion of TST positive children was similar to the proportion of children with a positive QFT-GIT (47% vs. 42%, p = 0.12). Overall concordance between QFT-GIT and TST was substantial (kappa 0.76, 95% CI 0.46-1.06). Previous BCG vaccination was not associated with significantly increased positivity in either test (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.32-1.5 for TST and OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.14-1.9 for QFT-GIT). Eleven children were diagnosed with active TB at baseline. QFT-GIT had a higher sensitivity for active TB (88%, 95% CI 47-98%) than TST (55%, 95% CI 24-83%) while specificities were similar (respectively 58% and 55%). Five initially asymptomatic childhood contacts progressed to active TB disease during follow-up. Conclusion Replacement of TST by the QFT-GIT for detection of M. tuberculosis infection is not recommended in this resource-constrained setting as test results showed substantial concordance and TST positivity was not affected by previous BCG vaccination. The QFT-GIT had a higher sensitivity than the TST for the detection of TB disease. However, the value of the QFT

  9. Screening for tuberculosis infection among newly arrived asylum seekers: Comparison of QuantiFERON®TB Gold with tuberculin skin test

    PubMed Central

    Winje, Brita Askeland; Oftung, Fredrik; Korsvold, Gro Ellen; Mannsåker, Turid; Jeppesen, Anette Skistad; Harstad, Ingunn; Heier, Berit Tafjord; Heldal, Einar

    2008-01-01

    Background QuantiFERON®TB Gold (QFT) is a promising blood test for tuberculosis infection but with few data so far from immigrant screening. The aim of this study was to compare results of QFT and tuberculin skin test (TST) among newly arrived asylum seekers in Norway and to assess the role of QFT in routine diagnostic screening for latent tuberculosis infection. Methods The 1000 asylum seekers (age ≥ 18 years) enrolled in the study were voluntarily recruited from 2813 consecutive asylum seekers arriving at the national reception centre from September 2005 to June 2006. Participation included a QFT test and a questionnaire in addition to the mandatory TST and chest X-ray. Results Among 912 asylum seekers with valid test results, 29% (264) had a positive QFT test whereas 50% (460) tested positive with TST (indurations ≥ 6 mm), indicating a high proportion of latent infection within this group. Among the TST positive participants 50% were QFT negative, whereas 7% of the TST negative participants were QFT positive. There was a significant association between increase in size of TST result and the likelihood of being QFT positive. Agreement between the tests was 71–79% depending on the chosen TST cut-off and it was higher for non-vaccinated individuals. Conclusion By using QFT in routine screening, further follow-up could be avoided in 43% of the asylum seekers who would have been referred if based only on a positive TST (≥ 6 mm). The proportion of individuals referred will be the same whether QFT replaces TST or is used as a supplement to confirm a positive TST, but the number tested will vary greatly. All three screening approaches would identify the same proportion (88–89%) of asylum seekers with a positive QFT and/or a TST ≥ 15 mm, but different groups will be missed. PMID:18479508

  10. Analysis of latent tuberculosis infection treatment adherence among refugees and other patient groups referred to the Baltimore City Health Department TB clinic, February 2009-March 2011.

    PubMed

    Nuzzo, Jennifer B; Golub, Jonathan E; Chaulk, Patrick; Shah, Maunank

    2015-02-01

    We sought to determine the proportion of refugee patients at the Baltimore City Health Department Tuberculosis program (BCHD-TB) successfully completing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) treatment, as compared to other referral groups, and to identify factors associated with treatment completion. We completed a retrospective cohort analysis of individuals referred to BCHD-TB program for LTBI care between February 1, 2009 and March 31, 2011. Among 841 patients evaluated by BCHD-TB and diagnosed with LTBI, 81% of refugees, 50% of non-refugee foreign-born, and 35% of US-born patients completed LTBI treatment. In multivariate analysis, refugees had greater odds of LTBI treatment completion (Adjusted Odds Ratio 7.2; 95% CI 4.2-12.4, p < 0.001) compared to US-born individuals adjusting for age, gender, and treatment regimen. Overall, LTBI treatment completion remains suboptimal. At BCHD-TB, LTBI treatment completion was significantly higher among refugees than other referral groups. Additional efforts are needed to optimize LTBI care, and future efforts may need to be tailored for different risk groups.

  11. Contact investigation after a fatal case of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) in an aircraft, Germany, July 2013.

    PubMed

    An der Heiden, Maria; Hauer, Barbara; Fiebig, Lena; Glaser-Paschke, Gisela; Stemmler, Markus; Simon, Claudia; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Gilsdorf, Andreas; Haas, Walter

    2017-03-23

    In July 2013, a passenger died of infectious extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) on board of an aircraft after a 3-hour flight from Turkey to Germany. Initial information indicated the patient had moved about the aircraft coughing blood. We thus aimed to contact and inform all persons exposed within the aircraft and to test them for newly acquired TB infection. Two-stage testing within 8 weeks from exposure and at least 8 weeks after exposure was suggested, using either interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) or tuberculin skin test (TST). The TST cut-off was defined at a diameter > 10 mm; for differentiation between conversion and boosting, conversion was defined as increase of skin induration > 5 mm. Overall, 155 passengers and seven crew members were included in the investigation: the questionnaire response rate was 83%; 112 (69%) persons were tested at least once for TB infection. In one passenger, who sat next to the area where the patient died, a test conversion was registered. As of March 2017, no secondary active TB cases have been reported. We describe an unusual situation in which we applied contact tracing beyond existing European guidelines; we found one latent tuberculosis infection in a passenger, which we consider probably newly acquired.

  12. Influence of disease severity on nitrite and cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB).

    PubMed

    Dlugovitzky, D; Bay, M L; Rateni, L; Fiorenza, G; Vietti, L; Farroni, M A; Bottasso, O A

    2000-12-01

    Earlier studies in patients with pulmonary TB have revealed a higher production of Th1 cell type cytokines in moderate TB, with predominant Th2-like responses in advanced disease. Given the influence of IL-12 in T cell differentiation, as well as the roles of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in the immune response against intracellular pathogens, we decided to analyse the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), IL-4, IL-12, TGF-beta, TNF-alpha and nitrite concentrations in culture supernatants of PBMC from TB patients showing different degrees of lung involvement. The sample population comprised 18 untreated TB patients with either moderate (n = 9) or advanced (n = 9) disease and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (total population (patients and controls) 12 women, 18 men, aged 37 +/- 13 years (mean +/- s.d.)). PBMC were stimulated with whole sonicate from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the supernatants were collected on day 4 for measurement of cytokine and nitrite levels. Antigen-stimulated IFN-gamma, TGF-beta and TNF-alpha production was found to be significantly increased in TB patients, both moderate and advanced, compared with the controls. Levels of IFN-gamma were significantly higher in moderate disease than advanced cases, whereas advanced cases showed significantly higher IL-12, TGF-beta and TNF-alpha concentrations when compared with cases of moderate TB. Nitrite levels were also increased in TB patients and the increase was statistically significant when advanced cases were compared with controls. These findings may contribute to a clearer picture of the net effect of cytokine interactions in TB, essential for a better understanding of the immunopathological mechanisms underlying the distinct clinical forms of the disease.

  13. Influence of disease severity on nitrite and cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB)

    PubMed Central

    Dlugovitzky, D; Bay, M L; Rateni, L; Fiorenza, G; Vietti, L; Farroni, M A; Bottasso, O A

    2000-01-01

    Earlier studies in patients with pulmonary TB have revealed a higher production of Th1 cell type cytokines in moderate TB, with predominant Th2-like responses in advanced disease. Given the influence of IL-12 in T cell differentiation, as well as the roles of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the immune response against intracellular pathogens, we decided to analyse the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), IL-4, IL-12, TGF-β, TNF-α and nitrite concentrations in culture supernatants of PBMC from TB patients showing different degrees of lung involvement. The sample population comprised 18 untreated TB patients with either moderate (n = 9) or advanced (n = 9) disease and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (total population (patients and controls) 12 women, 18 men, aged 37 ± 13 years (mean ±s.d.)). PBMC were stimulated with whole sonicate from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the supernatants were collected on day 4 for measurement of cytokine and nitrite levels. Antigen-stimulated IFN-γ, TGF-β and TNF-α production was found to be significantly increased in TB patients, both moderate and advanced, compared with the controls. Levels of IFN-γ were significantly higher in moderate disease than advanced cases, whereas advanced cases showed significantly higher IL-12, TGF-β and TNF-α concentrations when compared with cases of moderate TB. Nitrite levels were also increased in TB patients and the increase was statistically significant when advanced cases were compared with controls. These findings may contribute to a clearer picture of the net effect of cytokine interactions in TB, essential for a better understanding of the immunopathological mechanisms underlying the distinct clinical forms of the disease. PMID:11122239

  14. Screening for latent tuberculosis infection in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis patients in a tuberculosis-endemic country: a comparison of the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test and tuberculin skin test.

    PubMed

    Duman, Nilay; Ersoy-Evans, Sibel; Karadağ, Omer; Aşçıoğlu, Sibel; Sener, Burçin; Kiraz, Sedat; Sahin, Sedef

    2014-10-01

    Since the introduction of biologic therapies for tuberculosis (TB), screening for latent TB infection has increased in importance, especially in countries in which TB is endemic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of psoriasis on tuberculin skin test (TST) results and to compare two TB screening tests, the TST and QuantiFERON(®)-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test, in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PA) patients living in a TB-endemic country (Turkey). This prospective study included 61 psoriasis and 40 PA patients, and 58 healthy controls. Demographic data, medical history, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status, level of education, smoking status, exposure to TB, personal and family histories of TB, and bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination status were recorded for all participants. The TST and QFT-GIT were performed in all participants. The mean ± standard deviation TST indurations in the patient and control groups were 12.6 ± 6.4 mm and 10.2 ± 6.5 mm, respectively (P = 0.051). The TST positivity rate was higher in patients than in controls (86.1% vs. 37.9%; P < 0.001), whereas QFT-GIT positivity did not differ significantly (patients: 20.8%; controls: 17.2%; P = 0.737). False positive results can lead to unnecessary prophylactic TB treatment; therefore, the cut-off point for TST positivity in psoriasis and PA patients should be re-evaluated, or other tests, such as the QFT-GIT, should be used.

  15. Is TB in Your Curriculum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Joanne; Elwell, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Points out the importance of effective health education to fight against tuberculosis (TB) which is the number one fatal infectious disease around the world. Describes a science curriculum on tuberculosis that includes information on the facts about tuberculosis, a forum on tuberculosis, and evaluation. (Contains 17 references.) (YDS)

  16. Putting Tuberculosis (TB) To Rest: Transformation of the Sleep Aid, Ambien, and “Anagrams” Generated Potent Antituberculosis Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Zolpidem (Ambien, 1) is an imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-acetamide and an approved drug for the treatment of insomnia. As medicinal chemists enamored by how structure imparts biological function, we found it to have strikingly similar structure to the antitubercular imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-carboxyamides. Zolpidem was found to have antituberculosis activity (MIC of 10–50 μM) when screened against replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) H37Rv. Manipulation of the Zolpidem structure, notably, to structural isomers (“anagrams”), attains remarkably improved potency (5, MIC of 0.004 μM) and impressive potency against clinically relevant drug-sensitive, multi- and extensively drug-resistant Mtb strains (MIC < 0.03 μM). Zolpidem anagrams and analogues were synthesized and evaluated for their antitubercular potency, toxicity, and spectrum of activity against nontubercular mycobacteria and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. These efforts toward the rational design of isomeric anagrams of a well-known sleep aid underscore the possibility that further optimization of the imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine core may well “put TB to rest”. PMID:25984566

  17. A Data-Driven Evaluation of the Stop TB Global Partnership Strategy of Targeting Key Populations at Greater Risk for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Schnippel, Kathryn; Sharp, Alana

    2016-01-01

    Objective Identifying those infected with tuberculosis (TB) is an important component of any strategy for reducing TB transmission and population prevalence. The Stop TB Global Partnership recently launched an initiative with a focus on key populations at greater risk for TB infection or poor clinical outcomes, due to housing and working conditions, incarceration, low household income, malnutrition, co-morbidities, exposure to tobacco and silica dust, or barriers to accessing medical care. To achieve operational targets, the global health community needs effective, low cost, and large-scale strategies for identifying key populations. Using South Africa as a test case, we assess the feasibility and effectiveness of targeting active case finding to populations with TB risk factors identified from regularly collected sources of data. Our approach is applicable to all countries with TB testing and census data. It allows countries to tailor their outreach activities to the particular risk factors of greatest significance in their national context. Methods We use a national database of TB test results to estimate municipality-level TB infection prevalence, and link it to Census data to measure population risk factors for TB including rates of urban households, informal settlements, household income, unemployment, and mobile phone ownership. To examine the relationship between TB prevalence and risk factors, we perform linear regression analysis and plot the set of population characteristics against TB prevalence and TB testing rate by municipality. We overlay lines of best fit and smoothed curves of best fit from locally weighted scatter plot smoothing. Findings Higher TB prevalence is statistically significantly associated with more urban municipalities (slope coefficient β1 = 0.129, p < 0.0001, R2 = 0.133), lower mobile phone access (β1 = -0.053, p < 0.001, R2 = 0.089), lower unemployment rates (β1 = -0.020, p = 0.003, R2 = 0.048), and a lower proportion of low

  18. Listening to Those at the Frontline: Patient and Healthcare Personnel Perspectives on Tuberculosis Treatment Barriers and Facilitators in High TB Burden Regions of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Iribarren, Sarah J; Rubinstein, Fernando; Discacciati, Vilda; Pearce, Patricia F

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. In Argentina, tuberculosis (TB) control measures have not achieved key treatment targets. The purpose of this study was to identify modes of treatment delivery and explore patient and healthcare personnel perceptions of barriers and facilitators to treatment success. Methods. We used semistructured group and individual interviews for this descriptive qualitative study. Eight high burden municipalities were purposively selected. Patients in treatment for active TB (n = 16), multidisciplinary TB team members (n = 26), and TB program directors (n = 12) at local, municipal, regional, and national levels were interviewed. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results. Modes of treatment delivery varied across municipalities and types of healthcare facility and were highly negotiated with patients. Self-administration of treatment was common in hospital-based and some community clinics. Barriers to TB treatment success were concentrated at the system level. This level relied heavily on individual personal commitment, and many system facilitators were operating in isolation or in limited settings. Conclusions. We outline experiences and perspectives of the facilitating and challenging factors at the individual, structural, social, and organizational levels. Establishing strong patient-healthcare personnel relationships, responding to patient needs, capitalizing on community resources, and maximizing established decentralized system could mitigate some of the barriers.

  19. Listening to Those at the Frontline: Patient and Healthcare Personnel Perspectives on Tuberculosis Treatment Barriers and Facilitators in High TB Burden Regions of Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Iribarren, Sarah J.; Rubinstein, Fernando; Discacciati, Vilda; Pearce, Patricia F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. In Argentina, tuberculosis (TB) control measures have not achieved key treatment targets. The purpose of this study was to identify modes of treatment delivery and explore patient and healthcare personnel perceptions of barriers and facilitators to treatment success. Methods. We used semistructured group and individual interviews for this descriptive qualitative study. Eight high burden municipalities were purposively selected. Patients in treatment for active TB (n = 16), multidisciplinary TB team members (n = 26), and TB program directors (n = 12) at local, municipal, regional, and national levels were interviewed. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results. Modes of treatment delivery varied across municipalities and types of healthcare facility and were highly negotiated with patients. Self-administration of treatment was common in hospital-based and some community clinics. Barriers to TB treatment success were concentrated at the system level. This level relied heavily on individual personal commitment, and many system facilitators were operating in isolation or in limited settings. Conclusions. We outline experiences and perspectives of the facilitating and challenging factors at the individual, structural, social, and organizational levels. Establishing strong patient-healthcare personnel relationships, responding to patient needs, capitalizing on community resources, and maximizing established decentralized system could mitigate some of the barriers. PMID:25328701

  20. Usefulness and limitations of QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Japanese rheumatoid arthritis patients: proposal to decrease the lower cutoff level for assessing latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tomoyo; Banno, Shogo; Maeda, Shinji; Naniwa, Taio; Hayami, Yoshihito; Watanabe, Maiko; Itoh, Rei; Sato, Shigeki; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2010-02-01

    We aimed to determine the sensitivity and specificity of QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) in Japanese rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with a past history of tuberculosis (TB). We assessed whether it is possible to decrease the cutoff using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. We evaluated chest computed tomography (CT) findings, prior history of treatment, and contact with active TB in 370 RA patients. Forty-nine patients before initiation of treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors were divided into two groups: 22 with a past history of TB and 27 without. We estimated the efficacy of QFT-G compared with the tuberculin skin test and antituberculosis (anti-TB) glycolipid antigen antibody. QFT-G was positive (>or=0.35 IU/ml) in 13.6% with a past history of TB, increasing to 27.3% at the intermediate range cutoff of 0.1 IU/ml. The sensitivity and specificity of QFT-G was 0.27 and 1.00, respectively, at 0.1 IU/ml. Using ROC analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) of QFT-G but not for the other two tests was significantly large. QFT-G is a useful diagnostic method due to its superior specificity, but the use of a cutoff value of 0.35 IU/ml will likely result in an underestimate. We propose that a lower interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) titer of 0.1 IU/ml be adopted when deciding to administer anti-TB drugs before initiation of TNF inhibitors.

  1. Effect of prolonged incubation time on results of the QuantiFERON TB gold in-tube assay for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Min, Joo-Won; Lee, Ha-Youn; Lee, Ji Sun; Lee, Jinwoo; Chung, Jae Ho; Han, Sung Koo; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2013-09-01

    Previous reports have shown that the sensitivity of the 6-day lymphocyte stimulation test is much higher than those of commercially available gamma interferon release assays (IGRAs). The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of prolonged incubation on the results of the QuantiFERON TB Gold in-tube (QFT-GIT) assay. Patients aged >20 years with suspected tuberculosis (TB) were recruited prospectively from 1 May 2009 to 31 December 2010. In addition, healthy volunteers with no history of TB treatment were included as controls. For each participant, three sets of the QFT-GIT assay were performed using 24-, 48-, and 72-h incubation tests, and the results were compared. Thirty-seven patients with suspected pulmonary TB and 33 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Of the 37 patients with suspected TB, the QFT-GIT assay results were positive for 28 (75.7%) after a 24-h incubation period. After prolonged incubation, the results differed in four (10.8%) of the 37 patients suspected of having TB. Among 27 patients with culture-confirmed TB, the sensitivities of the QFT-GIT assay after the 24-, 48-, and 72-h incubation tests were 85.2%, 81.5%, and 81.5%, respectively. Among the 33 healthy controls, the QFT-GIT assay results were positive in two (6.1%) after a 24-h incubation period. The results changed for two (6.1%) of the 33 healthy controls after prolonged incubation. The specificities of the QFT-GIT assay after 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation were 93.9%, 87.9%, and 90.9%, respectively. Prolonging the incubation time did not increase the sensitivity of the QFT-GIT assay. The manufacturer-recommended incubation time of 16 to 24 h should be respected because prolonged incubation can cause indeterminate or false-positive results.

  2. Analysis of Host Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens in a Multi-Site Study of Subjects with Different TB and HIV Infection States in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jayne S.; Lalor, Maeve K.; Black, Gillian F.; Ambrose, Lyn R.; Loxton, Andre G.; Chegou, Novel N.; Kassa, Desta; Mihret, Adane; Howe, Rawleigh; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Gomez, Marie P.; Donkor, Simon; Franken, Kees; Hanekom, Willem; Klein, Michel R.; Parida, Shreemanta K.; Boom, W. Henry; Thiel, Bonnie A.; Crampin, Amelia C.; Ota, Martin; Walzl, Gerhard; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat with 9 million new cases and 1.4 million deaths per year. In order to develop a protective vaccine, we need to define the antigens expressed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), which are relevant to protective immunity in high-endemic areas. Methods We analysed responses to 23 Mtb antigens in a total of 1247 subjects with different HIV and TB status across 5 geographically diverse sites in Africa (South Africa, The Gambia, Ethiopia, Malawi and Uganda). We used a 7-day whole blood assay followed by IFN-γ ELISA on the supernatants. Antigens included PPD, ESAT-6 and Ag85B (dominant antigens) together with novel resuscitation-promoting factors (rpf), reactivation proteins, latency (Mtb DosR regulon-encoded) antigens, starvation-induced antigens and secreted antigens. Results There was variation between sites in responses to the antigens, presumably due to underlying genetic and environmental differences. When results from all sites were combined, HIV- subjects with active TB showed significantly lower responses compared to both TST- and TST+ contacts to latency antigens (Rv0569, Rv1733, Rv1735, Rv1737) and the rpf Rv0867; whilst responses to ESAT-6/CFP-10 fusion protein (EC), PPD, Rv2029, TB10.3, and TB10.4 were significantly higher in TST+ contacts (LTBI) compared to TB and TST- contacts fewer differences were seen in subjects with HIV co-infection, with responses to the mitogen PHA significantly lower in subjects with active TB compared to those with LTBI and no difference with any antigen. Conclusions Our multi-site study design for testing novel Mtb antigens revealed promising antigens for future vaccine development. The IFN-γ ELISA is a cheap and useful tool for screening potential antigenicity in subjects with different ethnic backgrounds and across a spectrum of TB and HIV infection states. Analysis of cytokines other than IFN-γ is currently on-going to determine correlates of protection, which may

  3. Characteristics of adults and children diagnosed with tuberculosis in Lilongwe, Malawi: findings from an integrated HIV/TB clinic

    PubMed Central

    Feldacker, C.; Tweya, H.; Keiser, O.; Weigel, R.; Kalulu, M.; Fenner, L.; Egger, M.; Manda, E.; Mwafilaso, J. B.; Kamba, C.; Phiri, S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe initial registration characteristics of adult and pediatric TB patients at a large, public, integrated TB and HIV clinic in Lilongwe, Malawi, between January 2008 – December 2010. Methods Routine data on TB patient category and TB type, stratified by HIV and ART status, were used to explore differences in proportions among TB-only, TB/HIV co-infected patients not on ART, and TB/HIV co-infected patients on ART using Chi-square tests.. Trends over time illustrate strengths and weaknesses of integrated service provision. Results Among 10,143 adults, HIV ascertainment and ART uptake were high and increased over time. The proportion of relapse was highest among those on ART (5%). The proportion of smear-positive pulmonary TB (PTB) was highest among HIV-negative TB patients (34.9%); extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) was lowest among TB-only (16.2%). Among 338 children <15 years, EPTB and smear-positive PTB were more common among TB-only patients. Time trends showed significant increases in the proportion of adults with smear-positive PTB and the proportion of adults already on ART before starting TB treatment. However, some co-infected patients still delay ART initiation. Conclusions HIV ascertainment and ART uptake among co-infected patients is successful and improving over time. However, delays in ART initiation indicate some weakness linking TB/HIV patients into ART during TB follow-up care. Improved TB diagnostics and screening efforts, especially for pediatric patients, may help improve quality care for co-infected patients. These results may aid efforts to prioritize TB and HIV prevention, education, and treatment campaigns for specific populations. PMID:22808948

  4. Cytokine Patterns in Tuberculosis Infection; IL-1ra, IL-2 and IP-10 Differentiate Borderline QuantiFERON-TB Samples from Uninfected Controls

    PubMed Central

    Wergeland, Ida; Assmus, Jörg; Dyrhol-Riise, Anne Ma

    2016-01-01

    Background Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) do not discriminate between active tuberculosis (TB) and latent TB infection (LTBI), which limit their use in TB endemic areas. Subjects with QuantiFERON-TB (QFT) results around the diagnostic cut-off more likely show inconsistent results on serial testing which makes the interpretation of the assay difficult. We have studied potential biomarkers in patients with various stages of TB infection and with borderline QFT tests compared to those with higher values. Methods 27 soluble biomarkers were analysed in QFT supernatants from patients with active TB (n = 18), individuals with LTBI (n = 48) and from QFT negative controls (n = 16) by the Multiplex bead assay. The LTBI group was classified into two groups according to QFT IFN-γ levels; QFT borderline (0.35–0.70 IU/mL, n = 11) or QFT high (>0.70 IU/mL, n = 36). Results The levels of IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-13, IL-15, IFN-γ, IP-10 and MCP-1 in background corrected TB antigen stimulated supernatants (TBAg-Nil) significantly distinguished both active TB and LTBI QFT high groups from the QFT negative controls (p≤0.004). In addition, IL-1ra, IL-2 and IP-10 significantly differentiated the QFT borderline group from the controls (p≤0.001). Still, in the QFT borderline group the IL-1ra and IP-10 levels were not significant different from neither the QFT high nor the active TB group, whereas the IL-2 levels were lower (p≤0.003). The level of IP-10 showed the best separation between the QFT borderline group and the QFT negative controls (AUC 0.92) and offered 100% sensitivity for active TB. Conclusion IL-1ra, IL-2 and IP-10 differentiate QFT borderline samples from uninfected controls and the majority of QFT borderline subjects were classified as LTBI by these markers. Still, inconsistency was seen, and further studies are needed to examine the performance of alternative markers before concluded if they could be used as diagnostics tools. PMID:27685462

  5. Epidemiological trends and clinical comparisons of Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineages in Thai TB meningitis.

    PubMed

    Faksri, Kiatichai; Drobniewski, Francis; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Brown, Timothy; Prammananan, Therdsak; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit; Prayoonwiwat, Naraporn; Chaiprasert, Angkana

    2011-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) strains were isolated from cerebrospinal fluids collected from individual tuberculous meningitis (TBM) patients from 1996 to 2007 (n = 184) and characterised based on IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), spoligotyping, Mycobacterium interspersed repetitive unit-variable number of tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) and large sequence polymorphisms (LSPs). Beijing strains were found to possess the highest transmissibility and proportion in clustered isolates. Beijing strain predomination and stability, at 56% of the genotypic proportion, as well as association with drug resistance in TBM patients, was demonstrated. The proportion of Beijing sublineages revealed that the modern Beijing sublineage showed an increasing trend, whereas the ancestral Beijing sublineage showed a decreasing trend across the three periods. In contrast, there were neither clustered nor multidrug-resistance (MDR) isolates from the Euro-American (EuA) lineage, and the lineage genotypic proportion trend was also decreased. Based on LSPs, only the Beijing, Indo-Oceanic and Euro-American lineages were identified from TBM patients in Thailand. TBM mortality rates were not associated with either drug resistance or significantly different among MTB lineages. This study may support the Beijing genotype strain as most pathogenic causing TBM, with the EuA lineage genotype as the most benign of the strain genotypes tested. The analysis of drug susceptibility also revealed the trend of increasing drug resistance, especially MDR, in TBM patients in Thailand.

  6. Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB) in animals and humans may result from exposure to bacilli within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (i.e., M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. pinnipedii, M. microti, M. caprae, or M. canetti). Mycobacterium bovis is the species most often isolated from tuberculous catt...

  7. Determination of MIC distribution and epidemiological cutoff values for bedaquiline and delamanid in Mycobacterium tuberculosis using the MGIT 960 system equipped with TB eXiST.

    PubMed

    Keller, Peter M; Hömke, Rico; Ritter, Claudia; Valsesia, Giorgia; Bloemberg, Guido V; Böttger, Erik C

    2015-07-01

    Bedaquiline (Sirturo) and delamanid (Deltyba) have recently been approved by the regulatory authorities for treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing is not established for either substance. On the basis of the use of the MGIT 960 system equipped with EpiCenter/TB eXiST, we determined a mean bedaquiline MIC for wild-type strains of 0.65 mg/liter (median, 0.4 mg/liter) and an epidemiological cutoff (ECOFF) of 1.6 mg/liter; for delamanid, a mean wild-type drug MIC of 0.013 mg/liter (median, 0.01 mg/liter) and an ECOFF of 0.04 mg/liter were determined.

  8. Presumed latent ocular tuberculosis diagnosed with the positive quantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Test in a HLA-A29-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Carlos Mario; Atencia, Cesar; Merayo-Lloves, Jesus; Fernandez-Vega Sanz, Alvaro

    2015-06-04

    A 59-year-old Hispanic woman presented with a 3-year history of floaters associated with bilateral reduced visual acuity. Her best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/40. Both anterior segments were without inflammation, but fundoscopy showed mild vitreous inflammation and multiple inflammatory choroidal lesions. Tests for inflammatory and infectious diseases were negative except for human leucocyte antigen A29. The patient was diagnosed with birdshot choroidoretinopathy, and treatment was initiated with cyclosporine A 2.5 mg/kg/day. One year after treatment, the patient reported systemic symptoms with no improvement in visual acuity. Fundus findings remained with vitreal inflammation. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Test was positive, and a diagnosis of presumed latent ocular tuberculosis (TB) was made. We initiated anti-TB treatment for 9 months. At 6 months of anti-TB therapy, there was no active inflammation. The patient was followed for 2 years with no medications and no active inflammation. Her final BCVA was 20/25.

  9. TB Is Back.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1992-01-01

    The reemergence of tuberculosis, particularly of new drug-resistant strains, points up the need for well-coordinated school health programs. Immigration effects, growing populations of HIV-infected persons, and relaxed screening procedures are partly responsible for TB's reemergence. Two sidebars offer advice on coping with TB at school and…

  10. Prevalence of tuberculosis, HIV, and TB-HIV co-infection among pulmonary tuberculosis suspects in a predominantly pastoralist area, northeast Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Belay, Mulugeta; Bjune, Gunnar; Abebe, Fekadu

    2015-01-01

    Background TB-HIV co-infection is one of the biggest public health challenges in sub-Saharan Africa. Although there is a wealth of information on TB-HIV co-infection among settled populations in Africa and elsewhere, to our knowledge, there are no published reports on TB-HIV co-infection from pastoral communities. In this study, we report the prevalence of TB, HIV and TB-HIV co-infection among pulmonary TB suspects in the Afar Regional State of Ethiopia. Design In a cross-sectional study design, 325 pulmonary TB suspects were included from five health facilities. Three sputum samples (spot-morning-spot) were collected from each participant. Sputum samples were examined for the presence of acid fast bacilli using Ziehl–Neelsen staining method, and culture was done on the remaining sputum samples. Participants were interviewed and HIV tested. Results Of the 325 pulmonary TB suspects, 44 (13.5%) were smear positive, and 105 (32.3%) were culture positive. Among smear-positive patients, five were culture negative and, therefore, a total of 110 (33.8%) suspects were bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary TB patients. Out of 287 pulmonary TB suspects who were tested for HIV infection, 82 (28.6%) were HIV positive. A significantly higher proportion of bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary TB patients [40 (40.4%)] were HIV co-infected compared with patients without bacteriological evidence for pulmonary TB [42 (22.3%)]. However, among ethnic Afar pastoralists, HIV infections in smear- and/or culture-negative pulmonary TB suspects [7 (7.6%)] and bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary TB patients [4 (11.8%)] were comparable. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, Afar ethnicity was independently associated with low HIV infection [OR=0.16 (95% CI: 0.07–0.37)], whereas literacy was independently associated with higher HIV infection [OR=2.21 (95% CI: 1.05–4.64)]. Conclusions Although the overall prevalence of TB-HIV co-infection in the current study is high, ethnic

  11. Comparison of the tuberculin skin test and Quanti-FERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-G) test for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Al Jahdali, Hamdan; Ahmed, Anwar E; Balkhy, Hanan H; Baharoon, Salim; Al Hejaili, Fayez F; Hajeer, Ali; Memish, Ziad; Binsalih, Salih; Al Sayyari, Abdullah A

    2013-06-01

    Dialysis patients are more likely than the general population to develop active tuberculosis (TB). In these patients, the availability of a highly sensitive and specific test to diagnose latent TB will ensure earlier treatment and decreased progression to active disease. In the current study, the Quanti-FERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-G) test was compared with the tuberculin skin test (TST) for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) among 200 hemodialysis patients and 15 confirmed TB disease cases in a tertiary care center in Saudi Arabia. Among the LTBI cases, 26 (13%) were TST positive, and 65 (32.5%) were positive by the QTF-G test, with an overall agreement between the 2 tests of 75.5% (k=0.34) being observed. Among the confirmed tuberculosis disease cases, none were positive by TST, and 10 (66.7%) were positive by the QTF-G test, resulting in an overall agreement of 33.3% (k=0). A comparison between the TST and the QTF-G test was performed based on the sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve (AUC) obtained for the tests. The QTF-G test was more sensitive and less specific than the TST in predicting the confirmed TB disease cases. When we tested the correspondence of the AUC values between the 2 diagnostic modalities, the obtained p-value was 0.0003. In conclusion, the AUCs of the examined diagnostic modalities are significantly different in predicting LTBI and tuberculosis.

  12. Differential cellular recognition pattern to M. tuberculosis targets defined by IFN-γ and IL-17 production in blood from TB + patients from Honduras as compared to health care workers: TB and immune responses in patients from Honduras

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A better understanding of the quality of cellular immune responses directed against molecularly defined targets will guide the development of TB diagnostics and identification of molecularly defined, clinically relevant M.tb vaccine candidates. Methods Recombinant proteins (n = 8) and peptide pools (n = 14) from M. tuberculosis (M.tb) targets were used to compare cellular immune responses defined by IFN-γ and IL-17 production using a Whole Blood Assay (WBA) in a cohort of 148 individuals, i.e. patients with TB + (n = 38), TB- individuals with other pulmonary diseases (n = 81) and individuals exposed to TB without evidence of clinical TB (health care workers, n = 29). Results M.tb antigens Rv2958c (glycosyltransferase), Rv2962c (mycolyltransferase), Rv1886c (Ag85B), Rv3804c (Ag85A), and the PPE family member Rv3347c were frequently recognized, defined by IFN-γ production, in blood from healthy individuals exposed to M.tb (health care workers). A different recognition pattern was found for IL-17 production in blood from M.tb exposed individuals responding to TB10.4 (Rv0288), Ag85B (Rv1886c) and the PPE family members Rv0978c and Rv1917c. Conclusions The pattern of immune target recognition is different in regard to IFN-γ and IL-17 production to defined molecular M.tb targets in PBMCs from individuals frequently exposed to M.tb. The data represent the first mapping of cellular immune responses against M.tb targets in TB patients from Honduras. PMID:23497342

  13. 68 FR 75767 - Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2003-12-31

    ... Tuberculosis; Proposed Rule; Termination of Rulemaking Respiratory Protection for M. Tuberculosis; Final Rule... Exposure to Tuberculosis AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION... Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis (TB). Because of a broad range of Federal and community initiatives,...

  14. Use of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Test in the Diagnosis and Monitoring of Treatment Efficacy in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ping-Chin; Wang, Pin-Hui; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2017-01-01

    The value of QuantiFERON in the diagnosis of tuberculosis disease and in the monitoring of the response to anti-tuberculosis treatment is unclear. The aims of this study were to evaluate the accuracy of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test in the diagnosis of tuberculosis and in the monitoring of the response to anti-tuberculosis treatment in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Between January 2013 and December 2015, 133 cases with active PTB and 133 controls with no mycobacterial infection, matched by age (within 3 years) and by the week that they visited Tainan Chest Hospital, were enrolled in the study. Serial testing by QFT-GIT at baseline and after 2 and 6 months of treatment was performed. At these time points, a comparison of the performance of QFT-GIT with that of sputum culture status among study subjects was conducted. Compared to baseline, 116 (87.2%) cases showed a decreased response, whereas 17 (12.8%) showed persistent or stronger interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) responses at 2 months. PTB patients IFN-γ responses declined significantly from baseline to 2 months (median, 6.32 vs. 4.12; p < 0.005). The sensitivity values of the QFT-GIT test for the detection of pulmonary tuberculosis at cut-off points of 0.35 IU/mL, 0.20 IU/mL, and 0.10 IU/mL were 74.4%, 78.2%, and 80.5%, respectively. The specificity values at cut-off points of 0.35 IU/mL, 0.20 IU/mL, and 0.10 IU/mL were 66.2%, 63.9%, and 57.1%, respectively. Our results support the QFT-GIT assay as a potential tool for diagnosing tuberculosis and for monitoring the efficacy of anti-tuberculosis treatment. PMID:28264462

  15. Miliary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mert, Ali; Arslan, Ferhat; Kuyucu, Tülin; Koç, Emine Nur; Yılmaz, Mesut; Turan, Demet; Altın, Sedat; Pehlivanoglu, Filiz; Sengoz, Gonul; Yıldız, Dilek; Dokmetas, Ilyas; Komur, Suheyla; Kurtaran, Behice; Demirdal, Tuna; Erdem, Hüseyin A.; Sipahi, Oguz Resat; Batirel, Ayse; Parlak, Emine; Tekin, Recep; Tunçcan, Özlem Güzel; Balkan, Ilker Inanc; Hayran, Osman; Ceylan, Bahadır

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the clinical features, and outcome of the patients with miliary tuberculosis (TB). We retrospectively evaluated 263 patients (142 male, 121 female, mean age: 44 years, range: 16–89 years) with miliary TB. Criteria for the diagnosis of miliary TB were at least one of the followings in the presence of clinical presentation suggestive of miliary TB such as prolonged fever, night sweats, anorexia, weight loss: radiologic criterion and pathological criterion and/or microbiological criterion; pathological criterion and/or microbiological criterion. The miliary pattern was seen in 88% of the patients. Predisposing factors were found in 41% of the patients. Most frequent clinical features and laboratory findings were fever (100%), fatigue (91%), anorexia (85%), weight loss (66%), hepatomegaly (20%), splenomegaly (19%), choroid tubercules (8%), anemia (86%), pancytopenia (12%), and accelerated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (89%). Tuberculin skin test was positive in 29% of cases. Fifty percent of the patients met the criteria for fever of unknown origin. Acid-fast bacilli were demonstrated in 41% of patients (81/195), and cultures for Mycobacterium tuberculosis were positive in 51% (148/292) of tested specimens (predominantly sputum, CSF, and bronchial lavage). Blood cultures were positive in 20% (19/97). Granulomas in tissue samples of liver, lung, and bone marrow were present in 100% (21/21), 95% (18/19), and 82% (23/28), respectively. A total of 223 patients (85%) were given a quadruple anti-TB treatment. Forty-four (17%) patients died within 1 year after diagnosis established. Age, serum albumin, presence of military pattern, presence of mental changes, and hemoglobin concentration were found as independent predictors of mortality. Fever resolved within first 21 days in the majority (90%) of the cases. Miliary infiltrates on chest X-ray should raise the possibility of miliary TB especially in countries where TB is

  16. HIV-infected presumptive tuberculosis patients without tuberculosis: How many are eligible for antiretroviral therapy in Karnataka, India?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay M V; Singarajipura, Anil; Naik, Balaji; Guddemane, Deepak K; Patel, Yogesh; Shastri, Suresh; Kumar, Sunil; Deshmukh, Rajesh; Rewari, B B; Harries, Anthony David

    2017-03-01

    For certain subgroups within people living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) [active tuberculosis (TB), pregnant women, children <5years old, and serodiscordant couples], the World Health Organization recommends antiretroviral therapy (ART) irrespective of CD4 count. Another subgroup which has received increased attention is "HIV-infected presumptive TB patients without TB". In this study, we assess the proportion of HIV-infected presumptive TB patients eligible for ART in Karnataka State (population 60million), India. This was a cross-sectional analysis of data of HIV-infected presumptive TB patients diagnosed in May 2015 abstracted from national TB and HIV program records. Of 42,585 presumptive TB patients, 28,964 (68%) were tested for HIV and 2262 (8%) were HIV positive. Of the latter, 377 (17%) had active TB. Of 1885 "presumptive TB patients without active TB", 1100 (58%) were already receiving ART. Of the remaining 785 who were not receiving ART, 617 (79%) were assessed for ART eligibility and of those, 548 (89%) were eligible for ART. About 90% of "HIV-infected presumptive TB patients without TB" were eligible for ART. This evidence supports a public health approach of starting all "HIV-infected presumptive TB patients without TB" on ART irrespective of CD4 count in line with global thinking about 'test and treat'.

  17. Accuracy of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube for diagnosing tuberculosis in a young pediatric population previously vaccinated with Bacille Calmette-Guérin

    PubMed Central

    Vallada, Marcelo Genofre; Okay, Thelma Suely; Del Negro, Gilda Maria B.; Antonio, Claudio Amaral; Yamamoto, Lidia; Ramos, Sonia Regina T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of an interferongamma release assay (QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube) for diagnosing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a young pediatric population. Methods: 195 children previously vaccinated with BCG were evaluated, being 184 healthy individuals with no clinical or epidemiological evidence of mycobacterial infection, and 11 with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, according to clinical, radiological, and laboratory parameters. A blood sample was obtained from each child and processed according to the manufacturer's instructions. The assay performance was evaluated by a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve. Results: In the group of 184 non-infected children, 130 (70.6%) were under the age of four years (mean age of 35 months). In this group, 177 children (96.2%) had negative test results, six (3.2%) had indeterminate results, and one (0.5%) had a positive result. In the group of 11 infected children, the mean age was 58.5 months, and two of them (18%) had negative results. The ROC curve had an area under the curve of 0.88 (95%CI 0.82-0.92; p<0.001), disclosing a predictive positive value of 81.8% for the test (95%CI 46.3-97.4). The assay sensitivity was 81.8% (95%CI 48.2-97.2) and the specificity was 98.8% (95%CI 96-99.8). Conclusions: In the present study, the QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube performance for diagnosing M. tuberculosis infection was appropriate in a young pediatric population. PMID:24676183

  18. Economic Support to Patients in HIV and TB Grants in Rounds 7 and 10 from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Linda M.; Lönnroth, Knut; Desmond, Chris; Jackson, Robin; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Weil, Diana

    2014-01-01

    People with TB and/or HIV frequently experience severe economic barriers to health care, including out-of-pocket expenses related to diagnosis and treatment, as well as indirect costs due to loss of income. These barriers can both aggravate economic hardship and prevent or delay diagnosis, treatment and successful outcome, leading to increased transmission, morbidity and mortality. WHO, UNAIDS and the ILO argue that economic support of various kinds is essential to enable vulnerable people to protect themselves from infection, avoid delayed diagnosis and treatment, overcome barriers to adherence, and avert destitution. This paper analyses successful country proposals to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria that include economic support in Rounds 7 and 10; 36 and 20 HIV and TB grants in Round 7 and 32 and 26, respectively, in Round 10. Of these, up to 84 percent included direct or indirect economic support for beneficiaries, although the amount constituted a very small proportion of the total grant. In TB grants, the objectives of economic support were generally clearly stated, and focused on mechanisms to improve treatment uptake and adherence, and the case was most clearly made for MDR-TB patients. In HIV grants, the objectives were much broader in scope, including mitigation of adverse economic and social effects of HIV and its treatment on both patients and families. The analysis shows that economic support is on the radar for countries developing Global Fund proposals, and a wide range of economic support activities are in place. In order to move forward in this area, the wealth of country experience that exists needs to be collated, assessed and disseminated. In addition to trials, operational research and programme evaluations, more precise guidance to countries is needed to inform evidence-based decision about activities that are cost-effective, affordable and feasible. PMID:24489702

  19. TB & HIV: the deadly intersection.

    PubMed

    MacDougall, D S

    1999-05-01

    About 2 billion people worldwide are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB). TB is the leading cause of premature death in less industrialized countries, and 8 million more people become infected every year. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared TB a global emergency in 1993 and launched a series of prevention and vaccination programs. In spite of effective drug therapy and a vaccine, tuberculosis remains a major public health problem. The TB and HIV epidemics are closely intertwined, and the risk of TB disease progression is 100 times greater in HIV-positive individuals. TB is the leading cause of death among HIV-infected people worldwide, and virologic evidence suggests that the host immune response to TB may enhance HIV replication and accelerate the progression of HIV infection. The interaction between the two diseases was the subject of a conference called TB & HIV: Applying Advances to the Clinic, Public Health, and the World. Charts and tables show reported TB cases in the U.S., trends in TB cases among foreign-born persons in the U.S., and the country of origin for foreign-born persons with TB in the U.S. Several poster sessions from the conference are summarized. Strategies for dealing with the TB epidemic are outlined.

  20. Diagnostic Values of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Assay Carried out in China for Diagnosing Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fabin; Longuet, Christophe; Vernet, Guy; Goletti, Delia; Zhao, Yanlin; Lagrange, Philippe H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Interferon-release assays (IGRAs) for diagnosing active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) are not yet fully validated, particularly in high TB-endemic areas as the People's Republic of China (PRC). The aim of this report was to assess the performance of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-tube (QFT-GIT) and tuberculin skin test (TST), in addition to microbiological results, as contributors for diagnosing active PTB in the PRC. Methods/Principal Findings A total of 300 PTB patients, 41 disease controls (DC) and 59 healthy community controls (HCC) were included prospectively between May 2010 and April 2011 from two provinces of the PRC (Heilongjiang and Zhejiang). The QFT-GIT and TST yielded an overall sensitivity for active TB of 80.9% and 86.2%, and a specificity of 36.6% and 26.8%, respectively. The province of origin and smear microscopy status did not significantly impact the diagnostic values for PTB. However, using the TST with a 10 mm cut-off point, a significantly higher proportion of LTBI was observed in the DC than the HCC (p=0.01). Discordant results between the QFT-GIT and TST were found among 1/3 of the PTB, HCC and DC. Two-thirds of the individuals presented TST-positive/QFT-GIT-negative discordant results. The TST-negative/QFT-GIT-positive result was not associated with age or bacillary load. Cumulative QFT-GIT and TST positive results increased the overall sensitivity (95.9%), but it was associated with a dramatic decrease of the overall specificity (24.8%) leading to a suboptimal PPV (80.1%) and a low NPV (61.1%). Conclusions/Significance The usefulness of the QFT-GIT to diagnose active TB in high TB-endemic countries remains doubtful because like the TST, the QFT-GIT cannot distinguish between LTBI and active TB. Used as single stand-alone tests, both the QFT-GIT and TST have very limited roles in the diagnosis of active PTB. However, the combined use of SM, the TST and QFT-GIT may allow for the exclusion of ATB. PMID:25867946

  1. Abdominal involvement in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Edward G; Georgiades, Christos S; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-10-01

    Rising incidence of disseminated and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB), especially in immunocompromised hosts and patients with multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis, has resulted in an increase of unusual clinical and radiographic presentations of TB. With CT being a common part of emergency room (ER) evaluation of abdominal pain, it is imperative that radiologists be able to recognize abdominal presentations of TB. We discuss and illustrate typical and less common CT manifestations of tuberculosis in the abdomen to help ER radiologists in this task.

  2. PD-1/PD-L pathway inhibits M.tb-specific CD4+ T-cell functions and phagocytosis of macrophages in active tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Lei; Gao, Yan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Bingyan; Liu, Qianqian; Wu, Jing; Fan, Lin; Ou, Qinfang; Zhang, Wenhong; Shao, Lingyun

    2016-01-01

    The role of the PD-1/PD-L pathway in a murine model of tuberculosis remains controversial regarding viral infections and clinical tuberculosis. We conducted a case-control study to investigate the modulating role and mechanism of the PD-1/PD-L pathway in patients with active tuberculosis. Fifty-nine participants, including 43 active tuberculosis (ATB) patients and 16 healthy controls (HC), were enrolled. Cell surface staining and flow cytometry were used to detect the expressions of PD-1 and its ligands on T cells and monocytes. Intracellular cytokine staining was used to determine the PPD-specific IFN-γ-secreting T-cell proportion. CD4+ T-cell proliferation and macrophage functions were investigated in the presence or absence of PD-1/PD-L pathway blockade. Proportions of both PD-1+CD4+ and PD-L1+CD4+ T cells in ATB patients were more significantly increased than in the HC group (P = 0.0112 and P = 0.0141, respectively). The expressions of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 on CD14+ monocytes in ATB patients were much higher than those in the HC group (P = 0.0016, P = 0.0001, and P = 0.0088, respectively). Blockade of PD-1 could significantly enhance CD4+ T-cell proliferation (P = 0.0433). Phagocytosis and intracellular killing activity of macrophages increased significantly with PD-1/PD-L pathway blockade. In conclusion, the PD-1/PD-L pathway inhibits not only M.tb-specific CD4+ T-cell-mediated immunity but also innate immunity. PMID:27924827

  3. PD-1 Expression and Cytokine Secretion Profiles of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific CD4+ T-Cell Subsets; Potential Correlates of Containment in HIV-TB Co-Infection.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Katrina M; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S; Kapembwa, Moses S; Kon, Onn M; Sampson, Robert D; Taylor, Graham P; Lalvani, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    HIV co-infection is an important risk factor for tuberculosis (TB) providing a powerful model in which to dissect out defective, protective and dysfunctional Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-specific immune responses. To identify the changes induced by HIV co-infection we compared MTB-specific CD4+ responses in subjects with active TB and latent TB infection (LTBI), with and without HIV co-infection. CD4+ T-cell subsets producing interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and expressing CD279 (PD-1) were measured using polychromatic flow-cytometry. HIV-TB co-infection was consistently and independently associated with a reduced frequency of CD4+ IFN-γ and IL-2-dual secreting T-cells and the proportion correlated inversely with HIV viral load (VL). The impact of HIV co-infection on this key MTB-specific T-cell subset identifies them as a potential correlate of mycobacterial immune containment. The percentage of MTB-specific IFN-γ-secreting T-cell subsets that expressed PD-1 was increased in active TB with HIV co-infection and correlated with VL. This identifies a novel correlate of dysregulated immunity to MTB, which may in part explain the paucity of inflammatory response in the face of mycobacterial dissemination that characterizes active TB with HIV co-infection.

  4. The incidence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and tuberculosis (TB) in the Hospital "La Fe" of Valencia, Spain (1985-1989).

    PubMed

    Morales, M M; Llopis, A; Ballester, M L; Sanjuan, L

    1993-05-01

    We studied the incidence of TB and TB-AIDS in the area served by "La Fe" hospital in Valencia. We also studied the different evolution of the incidence of TB and TB-AIDS during the 1985-1989 period. We noticed the progressive increase of the incidence of TB in AIDS patients, while the incidence of TB without AIDS remained the same.

  5. Tuberculosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Tuberculosis A A A What's in this article? Signs ... When to You Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis Tuberculosis (popularly known as "TB") is a disease ...

  6. Tuberculosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Tuberculosis Print A A A What's in this article? ... When to You Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis Tuberculosis (popularly known as "TB") is a disease ...

  7. T cell reactivity against mycolyl transferase antigen 85 of M. tuberculosis in HIV-TB coinfected subjects and in AIDS patients suffering from tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Launois, Pascal; Drowart, Annie; Bourreau, Eliane; Couppie, Pierre; Farber, Claire-Michèle; Van Vooren, Jean-Paul; Huygen, Kris

    2011-01-01

    The mycolyl transferase antigen 85 complex is a major secreted protein family from mycobacterial culture filtrate, demonstrating powerful T cell stimulatory properties in most HIV-negative, tuberculin-positive volunteers with latent M.tuberculosis infection and only weak responses in HIV-negative tuberculosis patients. Here, we have analyzed T cell reactivity against PPD and Ag85 in HIV-infected individuals, without or with clinical symptoms of tuberculosis, and in AIDS patients with disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria. Whereas responses to PPD were not significantly different in HIV-negative and HIV-positive tuberculin-positive volunteers, responses to Ag85 were significantly decreased in the HIV-positive (CDC-A and CDC-B) group. Tuberculosis patients demonstrated low T cell reactivity against Ag85, irrespective of HIV infection, and finally AIDS patients suffering from NTM infections were completely nonreactive to Ag85. A one-year follow-up of twelve HIV-positive tuberculin-positive individuals indicated a decreased reactivity against Ag85 in patients developing clinical tuberculosis, highlighting the protective potential of this antigen.

  8. Comparison of AdvanSure TB/NTM PCR and COBAS TaqMan MTB PCR for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in Routine Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won-Hyung; Won, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Kee, Seung-Jung; Shin, Jong-Hee; Ryang, Dong-Wook; Suh, Soon-Pal

    2015-05-01

    The AdvanSure tuberculosis/non-tuberculous mycobacterium (TB/NTM) PCR (LG Life Science, Korea) and COBAS TaqMan Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) PCR (Roche Diagnostics, USA) are commonly used in clinical microbiology laboratories. We aimed to evaluate these two commercial real-time PCR assays for detection of MTB in a large set of clinical samples over a two-year period. AdvanSure TB/NTM PCR and COBAS TaqMan MTB PCR were performed on 9,119 (75.2%) and 3,010 (24.8%) of 12,129 (9,728 respiratory and 2,401 non-respiratory) MTB specimens, with 361 (4.0%) and 102 (3.4%) acid-fast bacilli (AFB)-positive results, respectively. In MTB culture, 788 (6.5%) MTB and 514 (4.2%) NTM were identified. The total sensitivity and specificity of the AdvanSure assay were 67.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 63.9-71.6) and 98.3% (95% CI, 98.0-98.6), while those of the COBAS TaqMan assay were 67.2% (95% CI, 60.0-73.8) and 98.4% (95% CI, 97.9-98.9), respectively. The sensitivities and specificities of the AdvanSure and COBAS TaqMan assays for AFB-positive and AFB-negative samples were comparable. Furthermore, the AdvanSure assay showed fewer invalid results compared with the COBAS TaqMan assay (5.0 vs. 20.4 invalid results/1,000 tests, P<0.001). AdvanSure assay represents a comparable yet more reliable method than COBAS TaqMan for the identification of mycobacteria in routine clinical microbiology.

  9. Comparison of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test with the tuberculin skin test for detecting latent tuberculosis infection prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Moon, S M; Lee, S-O; Choi, S-H; Kim, Y S; Woo, J H; Yoon, D H; Suh, C; Kim, D-Y; Lee, J-H; Lee, Je-H; Lee, K-H; Kim, S-H

    2013-02-01

    A total of 244 patients including 100 (41%) autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients and 144 (59%) allogeneic HCT recipients were enrolled over a 28-month period. During the study period, no prophylaxis for latent tuberculosis (TB) infection was administrated. Of these, 201 (82%) had Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) scars or prior histories of BCG vaccination. The tuberculin skin test (TST) and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test were performed simultaneously in all 244 patients. TST indurations were ≥ 5 mm in 39 of these patients (15%), and in 25 (10%) indurations were ≥ 10 mm. In addition, 40 (16%) had positive QFT-GIT outcomes, and 34 (14%) indeterminate outcomes. If the 34 patients with indeterminate QFT-GIT results were excluded from the overall agreement analysis, the agreement between the TST results (induration size ≥ 5 mm) and the QFT-GIT results in the 210 patients with clear QFT results was poor (κ = 0.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.06 to 0.24), as it was for the patients with indurations ≥ 10 mm (κ = 0.15, 95% CI -0.004 to 0.31). During follow up, 2 patients developed TB after HCT. The incidence of TB in the patients with positive QFT-GIT outcomes was 2.80 per 100 person-years (95% CI 0.07-15.81), whereas among those with positive TST (≥ 5 mm) results, it was 0 per 100 person-years (95% CI 0-8.00). However, this finding should be cautiously interpreted because of the relatively short follow up and the fact that the sample size of the study cohort did not have adequate power. In conclusion, our data show that, although the frequencies of positive outcomes in the 2 TB screening tests were similar, the overall agreement between the TST and the QFT-GIT test was poor, regardless of BCG vaccination history.

  10. Difference Between Latent TB Infection and Active TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... person with infectious TB coughs or sneezes, droplet nuclei containing M. tuberculosis are expelled into the air. If another person inhales air containing these droplet nuclei, he or she may become infected. However, not ...

  11. ROLES OF PUBLIC HEALTH CENTERS (HOKENJO) IN TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL IN JAPAN

    PubMed Central

    KATSUDA, NOBUYUKI; HIROSAWA, TOMOYA; REYER, JOSHUA A; HAMAJIMA, NOBUYUKI

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Public health centers (PHCs, hokenjo in Japanese) are local government authorities responsible for public health in Japan. PHCs have an important role in tuberculosis (TB) control. Typically, their responsibilities include 1) the recommendation to admit infectious TB patients to an isolation ward, 2) health checkups with chest X-ray of those in a close contact with infectious TB patients, and 3) public subsidy of medical expenses for TB treatments. Facing the emergence of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), the national TB control program was drastically changed; the Japanese version of the Directly Observed Treatment in Short-course (DOTS) strategy was started in 2005. New roles were added to PHCs’ responsibilities; 1) active screening of latent TB infection by interferon gamma release assays for those in a close contact with infectious TB patients, 2) community DOTS to promote treatment adherence to outpatients, 3) cohort analysis of outcomes of TB treatment, and 4) national MDR-TB surveillance. These roles are important in preventing MDR-TB and eliminating TB in Japan. PMID:25797967

  12. Evaluation of Lionex TB kits and mycobacterial antigens for IgG and IgA detection in cerebrospinal fluid from tuberculosis meningitis patients.

    PubMed

    Sardella, Isabela Gama; Singh, Mahavir; Kumpfer, Susanne; Heringer, Rafael Ribeiro; Saad, Maria Helena Féres; Sohler, Marzia Puccioni

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate commercial Lionex TB together with four antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MPT-64, MT10.3, 16 kDa and 38 kDa) for IgG and IgA cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) detection in the diagnosis of tuberculosis meningitis (TBM) with CSF negative acid-fast bacilli staining, 19 cases of TBM, 64 cases of other infectious meningoencephalitis and 73 cases of other neurological disorders were tested by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. IgA-MPT-64 and IgG Lionex showed the highest sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive value and negative predictive value (63.2%, 47.4%; 95%, 93.7%; 40%, 98% and 28.4%, 97.1%, respectively). However, while grey zone was 12.7% and 6%, respectively, lowering sensitivity but maintains high specificity (>or= 95%). High protein concentration in CSF was associated with antibody positivity CSF/HIV+ which did not influence the sensitivity of both tests. To our knowledge, this is the first description of IgA-MPT-64 and IgG Lionex antibodies in CSF-TBM and, although there is good specificity, adjustments are needed based on antigen composition to enhance sensitivity.

  13. Multicenter Evaluation of Anyplex Plus MTB/NTM MDR-TB Assay for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and Multidrug-Resistant Isolates in Pulmonary and Extrapulmonary Specimens.

    PubMed

    Sali, Michela; De Maio, Flavio; Caccuri, Francesca; Campilongo, Federica; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Fiorentini, Simona; Delogu, Giovanni; Giagulli, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and the detection of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are critical for successful public health interventions. Therefore, TB diagnosis requires the availability of diagnostic tools that allow the rapid detection of M. tuberculosis and drug resistance in clinical samples. Here, we performed a multicenter study to evaluate the performance of the Seegene Anyplex MTB/NTM MDR-TB assay, a new molecular method based on a multiplex real-time PCR system, for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), and genetic determinants of drug resistance. In total, the results for 755 samples (534 pulmonary and 221 extrapulmonary samples) were compared with the results of smears and cultures. For pulmonary specimens, the sensitivities of the Anyplex assay and acid-fast bacillus smear testing were 86.4% and 75.0%, respectively, and the specificities were 99% and 99.4%. For extrapulmonary specimens, the sensitivities of the Anyplex assay and acid-fast bacillus smear testing were 83.3% and 50.0%, respectively, and the specificities of both were 100%. The negative and positive predictive values of the Anyplex assay for pulmonary specimens were 97% and 100%, respectively, and those for extrapulmonary specimens were 84.6% and 100%. The sensitivities of the Anyplex assay for detecting isoniazid resistance in MTBC strains from pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens were 83.3% and 50%, respectively, while the specificities were 100% for both specimen types. These results demonstrate that the Anyplex MTB/NTM MDR-TB assay is an efficient and rapid method for the diagnosis of pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB and the detection of isoniazid resistance.

  14. Multicenter Evaluation of Anyplex Plus MTB/NTM MDR-TB Assay for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and Multidrug-Resistant Isolates in Pulmonary and Extrapulmonary Specimens

    PubMed Central

    De Maio, Flavio; Caccuri, Francesca; Campilongo, Federica; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Fiorentini, Simona; Giagulli, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and the detection of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are critical for successful public health interventions. Therefore, TB diagnosis requires the availability of diagnostic tools that allow the rapid detection of M. tuberculosis and drug resistance in clinical samples. Here, we performed a multicenter study to evaluate the performance of the Seegene Anyplex MTB/NTM MDR-TB assay, a new molecular method based on a multiplex real-time PCR system, for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), and genetic determinants of drug resistance. In total, the results for 755 samples (534 pulmonary and 221 extrapulmonary samples) were compared with the results of smears and cultures. For pulmonary specimens, the sensitivities of the Anyplex assay and acid-fast bacillus smear testing were 86.4% and 75.0%, respectively, and the specificities were 99% and 99.4%. For extrapulmonary specimens, the sensitivities of the Anyplex assay and acid-fast bacillus smear testing were 83.3% and 50.0%, respectively, and the specificities of both were 100%. The negative and positive predictive values of the Anyplex assay for pulmonary specimens were 97% and 100%, respectively, and those for extrapulmonary specimens were 84.6% and 100%. The sensitivities of the Anyplex assay for detecting isoniazid resistance in MTBC strains from pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens were 83.3% and 50%, respectively, while the specificities were 100% for both specimen types. These results demonstrate that the Anyplex MTB/NTM MDR-TB assay is an efficient and rapid method for the diagnosis of pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB and the detection of isoniazid resistance. PMID:26491178

  15. Implementing a successful tuberculosis programme within primary care services in a conflict area using the stop TB strategy: Afghanistan case study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Afghanistan has faced health consequences of war including those due to displacement of populations, breakdown of health and social services, and increased risks of disease transmission for over three decades. Yet it was able to restructure its National Tuberculosis Control Programme (NTP), integrate tuberculosis treatment into primary health care and achieve most of its targets by the year 2011. What were the processes that enabled the programme to achieve its targets? More importantly, what were the underpinning factors that made this success possible? We addressed these important questions through a case study. Case description We adopted a processes and outcomes framework for this study, which began with examining the change in key programme indicators, followed by backwards tracing of the processes and underlying factors, responsible for this change. Methods included review of the published and grey literature along with in-depth interviews of 15 key informants involved with the care of tuberculosis patients in Afghanistan. Discussion and evaluation TB incidence and mortality per 100,000 decreased from 325 and 92 to 189 and 39 respectively, while case notification and treatment success improved during the decade under study. Efficient programme structures were enabled through high political commitment from the Government, strong leadership from the programme, effective partnership and coordination among stakeholders, and adequate technical and financial support from the development partners. Conclusions The NTP Afghanistan is an example that public health programmes can be effectively implemented in fragile states. High political commitment and strong local leadership are essential factors for such programmes. To ensure long-term effectiveness of the NTP, the international support should be withdrawn in a phased manner, coupled with a sequential increase in resources allocated to the NTP by the Government of Afghanistan. PMID:24507446

  16. Bovine Tuberculosis Risk Factors for British Herds Before and After the 2001 Foot-and-Mouth Epidemic: What have we Learned from the TB99 and CCS2005 Studies?

    PubMed

    Vial, F; Miguel, E; Johnston, W T; Mitchell, A; Donnelly, C A

    2015-10-01

    Over the last couple of decades, the UK experienced a substantial increase in the incidence and geographical spread of bovine tuberculosis (TB), in particular since the epidemic of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in 2001. The initiation of the Randomized Badger Culling Trial (RBCT) in 1998 in south-west England provided an opportunity for an in-depth collection of questionnaire data (covering farming practices, herd management and husbandry, trading and wildlife activity) from herds having experienced a TB breakdown between 1998 and early 2006 and randomly selected control herds, both within and outside the RBCT (the so-called TB99 and CCS2005 case-control studies). The data collated were split into four separate and comparable substudies related to either the pre-FMD or post-FMD period, which are brought together and discussed here for the first time. The findings suggest that the risk factors associated with TB breakdowns may have changed. Higher Mycobacterium bovis prevalence in badgers following the FMD epidemic may have contributed to the identification of the presence of badgers on a farm as a prominent TB risk factor only post-FMD. The strong emergence of contact/trading TB risk factors post-FMD suggests that the purchasing and movement of cattle, which took place to restock FMD-affected areas after 2001, may have exacerbated the TB problem. Post-FMD analyses also highlighted the potential impact of environmental factors on TB risk. Although no unique and universal solution exists to reduce the transmission of TB to and among British cattle, there is an evidence to suggest that applying the broad principles of biosecurity on farms reduces the risk of infection. However, with trading remaining as an important route of local and long-distance TB transmission, improvements in the detection of infected animals during pre- and post-movement testing should further reduce the geographical spread of the disease.

  17. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dheda, Keertan; Barry, Clifton E; Maartens, Gary

    2016-03-19

    Although the worldwide incidence of tuberculosis has been slowly decreasing, the global disease burden remains substantial (∼9 million cases and ∼1·5 million deaths in 2013), and tuberculosis incidence and drug resistance are rising in some parts of the world such as Africa. The modest gains achieved thus far are threatened by high prevalence of HIV, persisting global poverty, and emergence of highly drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is also a major problem in health-care workers in both low-burden and high-burden settings. Although the ideal preventive agent, an effective vaccine, is still some time away, several new diagnostic technologies have emerged, and two new tuberculosis drugs have been licensed after almost 50 years of no tuberculosis drugs being registered. Efforts towards an effective vaccine have been thwarted by poor understanding of what constitutes protective immunity. Although new interventions and investment in control programmes will enable control, eradication will only be possible through substantial reductions in poverty and overcrowding, political will and stability, and containing co-drivers of tuberculosis, such as HIV, smoking, and diabetes.

  18. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sites Podcasts QR Codes RSS Feeds Social Bookmarking Social Network Sites Text Messaging Twitter Video Games Video Sharing ... possible, and that people whose initial test is negative and who are at high risk for TB ...

  19. Tuberculosis-resistant transgenic cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis is a devastating disease that affects humans and many animal species. In humans, tuberculosis (TB) is mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, while most cases in cattle are caused by Mycobacterium bovis. However, Mb can also cause, albeit rarely, human TB. In this issue, Wu et al. ...

  20. 64 FR 34625 - Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-06-28

    ... Tuberculosis AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice..., 1997, OSHA published its proposed standard to regulate occupational exposure to tuberculosis (TB) (62... preliminary risk assessment for occupational exposure to tuberculosis. DATES: Comments and data...

  1. WHO's End TB Strategy: From stopping to ending the global TB epidemic.

    PubMed

    Uplekar, Mukund; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-10-01

    The 67th World Health Assembly of 2014 adopted the "End TB Strategy" with a vision of making the world free of tuberculosis (TB) and with the goal of ending the global TB epidemic by the year 2035. World Health Organization's "End TB Strategy" captures this holistic response in its four principles and three pillars. The three high-level indicators of the "End TB Strategy" - reductions in TB deaths, reductions in the TB incidence rate and the percentage of TB patients and their households experiencing catastrophic costs - are relevant to all countries.

  2. Performance of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test and Tuberculin Skin Test for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in BCG vaccinated health care workers

    PubMed Central

    Babayigit, Cenk; Ozer, Burcin; Inandi, Tacettin; Ozer, Cahit; Duran, Nizami; Gocmen, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculin skin test (TST) has been used for years as an aid in diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) but it suffers from a number of well-documented performance and logistic problems. Quantiferon-TB Gold In Tube test (QFT-GIT) has been reported to have better sensitivity and specifity than TST. In this study, it was aimed to compare the performance of a commercial IFN-γ release assay (QFT-GIT) with TST in the diagnosis of HCWs at risk for latent TB infection in BCG vaccinated population. Material/Methods Hundred healthy volunteer health care workers were enrolled. All were subjected to TST and QFT-GIT. Results were compared among Health Care Workers (HCWs) groups in terms of profession, workplace, working duration. Results TST is affected by previous BCG vaccinations and number of cases with QFT-GIT positivity is increased in accordance with the TST induration diameter range. QFT-GIT result was negative in 17 of 32 TST positive (≥15 mm) cases and positive in 4 of 61 cases whose TST diameters are between 6–14 mm, that is attritutable to previous BCG vaccination(s). It was negative in all cases with TST diameters between 0–5 mm. HCWs with positive QFT-GIT results were significantly older than the ones with negative results. Furthermore duration of work was significantly longer in QFT-GIT positive than in negative HCWs. Conclusions There was a moderate concordance between QFT-GIT and TST, when TST result was defined as positive with a ≥15 mm diameter of induration. We suggest that QFT-GIT can be used as an alternative to TST for detection of LTBI, especially in groups with high risk of LTBI and in population with routine BCG vaccination program. PMID:24681806

  3. [Tuberculosis of the prostate].

    PubMed

    Streltsova, O S; Krupin, V N; Yunusova, K E; Mamonov, M V

    2016-12-01

    Genitourinary tract is the second most common site where extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) occurs. Genitourinary TB is notable for a latent clinical course and difficult diagnosis. The paper presents clinical observations of two patients treated in a urology department of a general public hospital. One of them was diagnosed with tuberculosis of the prostate, MTB+. In the other, TB of the prostate was suspected based on pathologic assessment of the surgical specimen after surgery for prostate cancer.

  4. Immigrant screening for TB: a missed opportunity to improve TB control in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Lalvani, Ajit; Pareek, Manish

    2012-03-01

    Tuberculosis in the United Kingdom and other high-income countries is primarily a disease of the foreign-born arising from the synergy of migration from high TB burden regions and the reactivation of remotely acquired latent TB infection. UK immigrant screening policy primarily aims to identify active, rather than latent, TB although mounting evidence indicates that implementing latent TB screening for new entrants from intermediate and high incidence countries could cost-effectively reduce TB incidence in the UK.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of the NICE guidelines for screening for latent tuberculosis infection: the QuantiFERON-TB Gold IGRA alone is more cost-effective for immigrants from high burden countries.

    PubMed

    Hardy, A B; Varma, R; Collyns, T; Moffitt, S J; Mullarkey, C; Watson, J P

    2010-02-01

    NICE (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence) guidelines for new entrant tuberculosis (TB) screening recommend chest x ray (CXR) for immigrants from countries with TB incidence >40/10(5), and tuberculin skin test (TST) for people with normal CXR from very high TB prevalence countries. A revised screening policy using first-line QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT) in high risk immigrants was piloted in 2007. Initially, TST was offered to immigrants from countries with TB incidence 200-339/10(5), and QFT to those from countries with incidence >340/10(5). When increased resources became available, all immigrants from countries with TB incidence >200/10(5) had QFT. Those with positive QFT were invited for CXR. 1336 immigrant were invited for screening, with a 32% attendance rate. 280 patients had QFT, of which 38% were positive, with <2% being indeterminate. Using the NICE approach, the cost of screening these 280 immigrants would be pound 13,346.75 ( pound 47.67 per immigrant) and would identify 83 cases of latent TB infection (LTBI). Using first-line QFT followed by CXR the cost was pound 9781.82 ( pound 34.94 per immigrant) and identified 105 cases of LTBI. The cost to identify one case of LTBI following NICE guidelines would be pound 160.81 and using the present protocol was pound 93.16. For immigrants from high risk countries QFT blood testing followed by CXR is feasible for TB screening, cheaper than screening using the NICE guideline and identifies more cases of LTBI.

  6. Tuberculosis of the genitourinary system.

    PubMed

    Langemeier, Jane

    2007-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a deadly infectious disease. Pulmonary TB cases have decreased; yet, extrapulmonary cases such as genitourinary TB have not (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2005). Health care awareness of the clinical features of genitourinary TB is necessary to effectively treat patients with this disease.

  7. Serial testing for latent tuberculosis using QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube: A Markov model

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Mark W.; Zwerling, Alice; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Denkinger, Claudia M.; Banaei, Niaz; Kik, Sandra V.; Metcalfe, John; Pai, Madhukar; Dowdy, David

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) in low-incidence settings are often serially tested for latent TB infection (LTBI) with the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT) assay, which exhibits frequent conversions and reversions. The clinical impact of such variability on serial testing remains unknown. We used a microsimulation Markov model that accounts for major sources of variability to project diagnostic outcomes in a simulated North American HCW cohort. Serial testing using a single QFT with the recommended conversion cutoff (IFN-g > 0.35 IU/mL) resulted in 24.6% (95% uncertainty range, UR: 23.8–25.5) of the entire population testing false-positive over ten years. Raising the cutoff to >1.0 IU/mL or confirming initial positive results with a (presumed independent) second test reduced this false-positive percentage to 2.3% (95%UR: 2.0–2.6%) or 4.1% (95%UR: 3.7–4.5%), but also reduced the proportion of true incident infections detected within the first year of infection from 76.5% (95%UR: 66.3–84.6%) to 54.8% (95%UR: 44.6–64.5%) or 61.5% (95%UR: 51.6–70.9%), respectively. Serial QFT testing of HCWs in North America may result in tremendous over-diagnosis and over-treatment of LTBI, with nearly thirty false-positives for every true infection diagnosed. Using higher cutoffs for conversion or confirmatory tests (for initial positives) can mitigate these effects, but will also diagnose fewer true infections. PMID:27469388

  8. Serial testing for latent tuberculosis using QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube: A Markov model.

    PubMed

    Moses, Mark W; Zwerling, Alice; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Denkinger, Claudia M; Banaei, Niaz; Kik, Sandra V; Metcalfe, John; Pai, Madhukar; Dowdy, David

    2016-07-29

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) in low-incidence settings are often serially tested for latent TB infection (LTBI) with the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT) assay, which exhibits frequent conversions and reversions. The clinical impact of such variability on serial testing remains unknown. We used a microsimulation Markov model that accounts for major sources of variability to project diagnostic outcomes in a simulated North American HCW cohort. Serial testing using a single QFT with the recommended conversion cutoff (IFN-g > 0.35 IU/mL) resulted in 24.6% (95% uncertainty range, UR: 23.8-25.5) of the entire population testing false-positive over ten years. Raising the cutoff to >1.0 IU/mL or confirming initial positive results with a (presumed independent) second test reduced this false-positive percentage to 2.3% (95%UR: 2.0-2.6%) or 4.1% (95%UR: 3.7-4.5%), but also reduced the proportion of true incident infections detected within the first year of infection from 76.5% (95%UR: 66.3-84.6%) to 54.8% (95%UR: 44.6-64.5%) or 61.5% (95%UR: 51.6-70.9%), respectively. Serial QFT testing of HCWs in North America may result in tremendous over-diagnosis and over-treatment of LTBI, with nearly thirty false-positives for every true infection diagnosed. Using higher cutoffs for conversion or confirmatory tests (for initial positives) can mitigate these effects, but will also diagnose fewer true infections.

  9. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Karen R

    2017-02-07

    This issue provides a clinical overview of tuberculosis, focusing on screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  10. Epigenetics and Proteomics Join Transcriptomics in the Quest for Tuberculosis Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Esterhuyse, Maria M.; Weiner, January; Caron, Etienne; Loxton, Andre G.; Iannaccone, Marco; Wagman, Chandre; Saikali, Philippe; Stanley, Kim; Wolski, Witold E.; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Schick, Matthias; Aebersold, Ruedi; Linhart, Heinz; Walzl, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT An estimated one-third of the world’s population is currently latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Latent M. tuberculosis infection (LTBI) progresses into active tuberculosis (TB) disease in ~5 to 10% of infected individuals. Diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers to monitor disease progression are urgently needed to ensure better care for TB patients and to decrease the spread of TB. Biomarker development is primarily based on transcriptomics. Our understanding of biology combined with evolving technical advances in high-throughput techniques led us to investigate the possibility of additional platforms (epigenetics and proteomics) in the quest to (i) understand the biology of the TB host response and (ii) search for multiplatform biosignatures in TB. We engaged in a pilot study to interrogate the DNA methylome, transcriptome, and proteome in selected monocytes and granulocytes from TB patients and healthy LTBI participants. Our study provides first insights into the levels and sources of diversity in the epigenome and proteome among TB patients and LTBI controls, despite limitations due to small sample size. Functionally the differences between the infection phenotypes (LTBI versus active TB) observed in the different platforms were congruent, thereby suggesting regulation of function not only at the transcriptional level but also by DNA methylation and microRNA. Thus, our data argue for the development of a large-scale study of the DNA methylome, with particular attention to study design in accounting for variation based on gender, age, and cell type. PMID:26374119

  11. Vitamin d and tuberculosis status in refugee children.

    PubMed

    Gray, Kara; Wood, Nicholas; Gunasekera, Hasantha; Sheikh, Mohammad; Hazelton, Briony; Barzi, Federica; Isaacs, David

    2012-05-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and tuberculosis (TB) are associated in adults, but data in children are scarce. We screened refugee children routinely for vitamin D status and TB. Vitamin D values were significantly lower in latent TB (n = 81) and TB infection (n = 11) than in children without TB (n = 236). We conclude that refugee children with TB have reduced vitamin D levels.

  12. The Calf Model of Immunity for Development of a Vaccine Against Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health threat and can be considered a reemerging disease due to many factors and is especially problematic in developing countries where co-infection with HIV significantly increases morbidity and mortality. Vaccination is a low cost and effective ...

  13. Non-pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Carrol, E D; Clark, J E; Cant, A J

    2001-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious disease of global importance, with a rising incidence in the developed world in recent years. Tuberculous lymphadenitis, tuberculous meningitis, osteoarticular tuberculosis and miliary tuberculosis are some of the more well-recognised manifestations of non-pulmonary TB in childhood. The diagnosis of non-pulmonary TB poses a particular challenge for clinicians because of the protean ways in which the disease presents. The omission of tuberculosis from the differential diagnosis of patients with obscure illnesses and the relatively insensitive bacteriological methods for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis add to the complexity of the problem. A high index of suspicion is required in order to avoid delays in diagnosis which may influence treatment outcome. The advent of DNA amplification techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction may herald a promising new era in the prompt and accurate management of extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

  14. Prisons as reservoir for community transmission of tuberculosis, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, Flávia P C; Praça, Renata M; Tatara, Mariana B; Simonsen, Vera; Ferrazoli, Lucilaine; Croda, Mariana G; Suffys, Philip N; Ko, Albert I; Andrews, Jason R; Croda, Julio

    2015-03-01

    We conducted a population-based study of tuberculosis (TB) cases in Dourados, Brazil, to assess the relationship between incarceration and TB in the general population. Incarceration was associated with TB in an urban population; 54% of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were related to strains from persons in prisons. TB control in prisons is critical for reducing disease prevalence.

  15. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Provides Insight into the Evolution and Genetic Composition of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Belarus

    PubMed Central

    Wollenberg, Kurt R.; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Zalutskaya, Aksana; Slodovnikova, Vervara; Oler, Andrew J.; Quiñones, Mariam; Abeel, Thomas; Chapman, Sinead B.; Tartakovsky, Michael; Gabrielian, Andrei; Hoffner, Sven; Skrahin, Aliaksandr; Birren, Bruce W.; Rosenthal, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emergence and spread of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (DR-TB) are critical global health issues. Eastern Europe has some of the highest incidences of DR-TB, particularly multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB. To better understand the genetic composition and evolution of MDR- and XDR-TB in the region, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 138 M. tuberculosis isolates from 97 patients sampled between 2010 and 2013 in Minsk, Belarus. MDR and XDR-TB isolates were significantly more likely to belong to the Beijing lineage than to the Euro-American lineage, and known resistance-conferring loci accounted for the majority of phenotypic resistance to first- and second-line drugs in MDR and XDR-TB. Using a phylogenomic approach, we estimated that the majority of MDR-TB was due to the recent transmission of already-resistant M. tuberculosis strains rather than repeated de novo evolution of resistance within patients, while XDR-TB was acquired through both routes. Longitudinal sampling of M. tuberculosis from 34 patients with treatment failure showed that most strains persisted genetically unchanged during treatment or acquired resistance to fluoroquinolones. HIV+ patients were significantly more likely to have multiple infections over time than HIV− patients, highlighting a specific need for careful infection control in these patients. These data provide a better understanding of the genomic composition, transmission, and evolution of MDR- and XDR-TB in Belarus and will enable improved diagnostics, treatment protocols, and prognostic decision-making. PMID:27903602

  16. HIV-1 tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lai, Rachel P J; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Patients co-infected with HIV-1 and tuberculosis (TB) are at risk of developing TB-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) following commencement of antiretroviral therapy (ART). TB-IRIS is characterized by transient but severe localized or systemic inflammatory reactions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens. Here, we review the risk factors and clinical management of TB-IRIS, as well as the roles played by different aspects of the immune response in contributing to TB-IRIS pathogenesis.

  17. Typical and unusual cases of female genital tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kulchavenya, E; Dubrovina, S

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease with myriad presentations and manifestations; it can affect any organ or tissue, excluding only hair and nails. Doctors who are not familiar with extrapulmonary tuberculosis often overlook this disease. Urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB) is the second most common form of TB in countries with severe epidemic situation and the third most common form in regions with low incidence of TB. The term "Urogenital tuberculosis" includes kidney tuberculosis; male and female tuberculosis and urinary tract tuberculosis as complication of kidney tuberculosis. We describe rarest case of tuberculosis of a placenta in young woman, suffered from genital tuberculosis, which was overlooked before delivery, as well as typical tubo-ovarian tuberculomas.

  18. TB vaccines in clinical development.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Ann M; Ruhwald, Morten; Mearns, Helen; McShane, Helen

    2016-08-01

    The 4th Global Forum on TB Vaccines, convened in Shanghai, China, from 21 - 24 April 2015, brought together a wide and diverse community involved in tuberculosis vaccine research and development to discuss the current status of, and future directions for this critical effort. This paper summarizes the sessions on TB Vaccines in Clinical Development, and Clinical Research: Data and Findings. Summaries of all sessions from the 4th Global Forum are compiled in a special supplement of Tuberculosis. [August 2016, Vol 99, Supp S1, S1-S30].

  19. Lives saved by tuberculosis control and prospects for achieving the 2015 global target for reducing tuberculosis mortality

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Katherine; Korenromp, Eline L; Sismanidis, Charalambos; Bierrenbach, Ana L; Williams, Brian G; Atun, Rifat; Raviglione, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess whether the global target of halving tuberculosis (TB) mortality between 1990 and 2015 can be achieved and to conduct the first global assessment of the lives saved by the DOTS/Stop TB Strategy of the World Health Organization (WHO). Methods Mortality from TB since 1990 was estimated for 213 countries using established methods endorsed by WHO. Mortality trends were estimated separately for people with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in accordance with the International classification of diseases. Lives saved by the DOTS/Stop TB Strategy were estimated with respect to the performance of TB control in 1995, the year that DOTS was introduced. Findings TB mortality among HIV-negative (HIV−) people fell from 30 to 20 per 100 000 population (36%) between 1990 and 2009 and could be halved by 2015. The overall decline (when including HIV-positive [HIV+] people, who comprise 12% of all TB cases) was 19%. Between 1995 and 2009, 49 million TB patients were treated under the DOTS/Stop TB Strategy. This saved 4.6–6.3 million lives, including those of 0.23–0.28 million children and 1.4–1.7 million women of childbearing age. A further 1 million lives could be saved annually by 2015. Conclusion Improvements in TB care and control since 1995 have greatly reduced TB mortality, saved millions of lives and brought within reach the global target of halving TB deaths by 2015 relative to 1990. Intensified efforts to reduce deaths among HIV+ TB cases are needed, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:21836756

  20. [Extrapulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Mazza-Stalder, J; Nicod, L; Janssens, J-P

    2012-04-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis represents an increasing proportion of all cases of tuberculosis reaching 20 to 40% according to published reports. Extrapulmonary TB is found in a higher proportion of women, black people and immunosuppressed individuals. A significant proportion of cases have a normal chest X-Ray at the time of diagnosis. The most frequent clinical presentations are lymphadenitis, pleuritis and osteoarticular TB. Peritoneal, urogenital or meningeal tuberculosis are less frequent, and their diagnosis is often difficult due to the often wide differential diagnosis and the low sensitivity of diagnostic tests including cultures and genetic amplification tests. The key clinical elements are reported and for each form the diagnostic yield of available tests. International therapeutic recommendations and practical issues are reviewed according to clinical presentation.

  1. Diabetes-related tuberculosis in the Middle East: an urgent need for regional research

    PubMed Central

    Alkabab, Yosra M.; Al-Abdely, Hail M.; Heysell, Scott K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Diabetes mellitus (DM) triples the risk of tuberculosis (TB) disease, complicates TB treatment, and increases the risk of a poor TB outcome. As DM prevalence is increasing across the Middle East, this review was performed to identify regional gaps in knowledge and research priorities for DM/TB. Methods Online databases were searched for studies published from Middle East countries on DM and TB and the studies summarized based on topic and major findings. Studies included had a principle hypothesis related to both diseases, or described TB patients with individual data on DM. Results Fifty-nine studies from 10 countries met search criteria. No published studies were found from Lebanon, Bahrain, Syria, Jordan, Cyprus, or the United Arab Emirates. DM prevalence among TB patients was high, but varied considerably across studies. The vast majority of studies were not specifically designed to compare DM/TB and non-DM/TB patients, but many suggested worse treatment outcomes for DM/TB, in accordance with reports from other regions. Conclusions Opportunity exists for the regional study of bidirectional screening, management strategies for both DM and TB diseases, and whether such efforts could take place through the integration of services. PMID:26409203

  2. Performance of Cepheid ® Xpert MTB/RIF ® and TB-Biochip ® MDR in two regions of Russia with a high prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kurbatova, E V; Kaminski, D A; Erokhin, V V; Volchenkov, G V; Andreevskaya, S N; Chernousova, L N; Demikhova, O V; Ershova, J V; Kaunetis, N V; Kuznetsova, T A; Larionova, E E; Smirnova, T G; Somova, T R; Vasilieva, I A; Vorobieva, A V; Zolkina, S S; Cegielski, J P

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the performance of Cepheid® Xpert MTB/RIF® ("Xpert") and TB-Biochip® MDR ("TB-Biochip"). Sputum specimens from adults with presumptive tuberculosis (TB) were homogenized and split for: (1) direct Xpert and microscopy, and (2) concentration for Xpert, microscopy, culture [Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) solid media and Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube® (MGIT)], indirect drug susceptibility testing (DST) using the absolute concentration method and MGIT, and TB-Biochip. In total, 109 of 238 (45.8 %) specimens were culture-positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), and, of these, 67 isolates were rifampicin resistant (RIF-R) by phenotypic DST and 64/67 (95.5 %) were isoniazid resistant (INH-R). Compared to culture of the same specimen, a single direct Xpert was more sensitive for detecting MTBC [95.3 %, 95 % confidence interval (CI), 90.0-98.3 %] than direct (59.6 %, 95 % CI, 50.2-68.5 %) or concentrated smear (85.3 %, 95 % CI, 77.7-91.1 %) or LJ culture (80.8 %, 95 % CI, 72.4-87.5 %); the specificity was 86.0 % (95 % CI, 78.9-91.3 %). Compared with MGIT DST, Xpert correctly identified 98.2 % (95 % CI, 91.5-99.9 %) of RIF-R and 95.5 % (95 % CI, 85.8-99.2 %) of RIF-susceptible (RIF-S) specimens. In a subset of 104 specimens, the sensitivity of TB-Biochip for MTBC detection compared to culture was 97.3 % (95 % CI, 91.0-99.5 %); the specificity was 78.1 % (95 % CI, 61.5-89.9 %). TB-Biochip correctly identified 100 % (95 % CI, 94.2-100 %) of RIF-R, 94.7 % (95 % CI, 76.7-99.7 %) of RIF-S, 98.2 % (95 % CI, 91.4-99.9 %) of INH-R, and 78.6 % (95 % CI, 52.1-94.2 %) of INH-S specimens compared to MGIT DST. Xpert and Biochip were similar in accuracy for detecting MTBC and RIF resistance compared to conventional culture methods.

  3. Risk factors associated with Tuberculosis (TB) among people living with HIV/AIDS: A pair-matched case-control study in Guangxi, China

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhezhe; Lin, Mei; Nie, Shaofa; Lan, Rushu

    2017-01-01

    Background As one of the poorest provinces in China, Guangxi has a high HIV and TB prevalence, with the annual number of TB/HIV cases reported by health department among the highest in the country. However, studies on the burden of TB-HIV co-infection and risk factors for active TB among HIV-infected persons in Guangxi have rarely been reported. Objective To investigate the risk factors for active TB among people living with HIV/AIDS in Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region, China. Methods A surveillance survey was conducted of 1 019 HIV-infected patients receiving care at three AIDS prevention and control departments between 2013 and 2015. We investigated the cumulative prevalence of TB during 2 years. To analyze risk factors associated with active TB, we conducted a 1:1 pair-matched case-control study of newly reported active TB/HIV co-infected patients. Controls were patients with HIV without active TB, latent TB infection or other lung disease, who were matched with the case group based on sex and age (± 3 years). Results A total of 1 019 subjects were evaluated. 160 subjects (15.70%) were diagnosed with active TB, including 85 clinically diagnosed cases and 75 confirmed cases. We performed a 1:1 matched case-control study, with 82 TB/HIV patients and 82 people living with HIV/AIDS based on surveillance site, sex and age (±3) years. According to multivariate analysis, smoking (OR = 2.996, 0.992–9.053), lower CD 4+ T-cell count (OR = 3.288, 1.161–9.311), long duration of HIV-infection (OR = 5.946, 2.221–15.915) and non-use of ART (OR = 7.775, 2.618–23.094) were independent risk factors for TB in people living with HIV/AIDS. Conclusion The prevalence of active TB among people living with HIV/AIDS in Guangxi was 173 times higher than general population in Guangxi. It is necessary for government to integrate control planning and resources for the two diseases. Medical and public health workers should strengthen health education for TB/HIV prevention and

  4. Serial QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay and tuberculin skin test to diagnose latent tuberculosis in household Mexican contacts: conversion and reversion rates and associated factors using conventional and borderline zone definitions.

    PubMed

    Monárrez-Espino, Joel; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio; Laflamme, Lucie; Serrano, Carmen J

    2014-11-01

    A cohort of 123 adult contacts was followed for 18-24 months (86 completed the follow-up) to compare conversion and reversion rates based on two serial measures of QuantiFERON (QFT) and tuberculin skin test (TST) (PPD from TUBERSOL, Aventis Pasteur, Canada) for diagnosing latent tuberculosis (TB) in household contacts of TB patients using conventional (C) and borderline zone (BZ) definitions. Questionnaires were used to obtain information regarding TB exposure, TB risk factors and socio-demographic data. QFT (IU/mL) conversion was defined as <0.35 to ≥0.35 (C) or <0.35 to >0.70 (BZ) and reversion was defined as ≥0.35 to <0.35 (C) or ≥0.35 to <0.20 (BZ); TST (mm) conversion was defined as <5 to ≥5 (C) or <5 to >10 (BZ) and reversion was defined as ≥5 to <5 (C). The QFT conversion and reversion rates were 10.5% and 7% with C and 8.1% and 4.7% with the BZ definitions, respectively. The TST rates were higher compared with QFT, especially with the C definitions (conversion 23.3%, reversion 9.3%). The QFT conversion and reversion rates were higher for TST ≥5; for TST, both rates were lower for QFT <0.35. No risk factors were associated with the probability of converting or reverting. The inconsistency and apparent randomness of serial testing is confusing and adds to the limitations of these tests and definitions to follow-up close TB contacts.

  5. A Comparison of the Sensititre MycoTB Plate, the Bactec MGIT 960, and a Microarray-Based Molecular Assay for the Detection of Drug Resistance in Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in Moscow, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Nosova, Elena Y.; Zimenkov, Danila V.; Khakhalina, Anastasia A.; Isakova, Alexandra I.; Krylova, Ludmila Y.; Makarova, Marina V.; Galkina, Ksenia Y.; Krasnova, Maria A.; Safonova, Svetlana G.; Litvinov, Vitaly I.; Gryadunov, Dmitry A.; Bogorodskaya, Elena M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to compare the consistency of three assays for the determination of the drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) strains with various resistance profiles isolated from the Moscow region. Methods A total of 144 MTB clinical isolates with a strong bias toward drug resistance were examined using Bactec MGIT 960, Sensititre MycoTB, and a microarray-based molecular assay TB-TEST to detect substitutions in the rpoB, katG, inhA, ahpC, gyrA, gyrB, rrs, eis, and embB genes that are associated with resistance to rifampin, isoniazid, fluoroquinolones, second-line injectable drugs and ethambutol. Results The average correlation for the identification of resistant and susceptible isolates using the three methods was approximately 94%. An association of mutations detected with variable resistance levels was shown. We propose a change in the breakpoint minimal inhibitory concentration for kanamycin to less than 5 μg/ml in the Sensititre MycoTB system. A pairwise comparison of the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of two different drugs revealed an increased correlation in the first-line drug group and a partial correlation in the second-line drug group, reflecting the history of the preferential simultaneous use of drugs from these groups. An increased correlation with the MICs was also observed for drugs sharing common resistance mechanisms. Conclusions The quantitative measures of phenotypic drug resistance produced by the Sensititre MycoTB and the timely detection of mutations using the TB-TEST assay provide guidance for clinicians for the choice of the appropriate drug regimen. PMID:27902737

  6. Current strategies to treat tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Podany, Anthony T.; Swindells, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has been a leading cause of death for more than a century. While effective therapies exist, treatment is long and cumbersome. TB control is complicated by the overlapping problems created by global inadequacy of public health infrastructures, the interaction of the TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics, and the emergence of drug-resistant TB. After a long period of neglect, there is now significant progress in the development of novel treatment regimens for TB. Focusing on treatment for active disease, we review pathways to TB regimen development and the new and repurposed anti-TB agents in clinical development. PMID:27853505

  7. Imaging Spectrum of Extrathoracic Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Raut, Abhijit A; Naphade, Prashant S; Ramakantan, Ravi

    2016-05-01

    The incidence of extrathoracic tuberculosis (ETB) continues to increase slowly, especially in immunocompromised and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) patients. ETB manifests with nonspecific clinical symptoms, and being less frequent, is less familiar to most physicians. Imaging modalities of choice are computed tomography (lymphadenopathy and abdominal TB) and MR imaging (central nervous system and musculoskeletal system TB). ETB commonly involves multiple organ systems with characteristic imaging findings that permit accurate diagnosis and timely management.

  8. Incremental Yield of Serial Sputum Cultures for Diagnosis of Tuberculosis among HIV Infected Smear Negative Pulmonary TB Suspects in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Ssengooba, Willy; Kiwanuka, Noah; Kateete, David P.; Katamba, Achilles; Joloba, Moses L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Sputum culture is the gold standard for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Although mostly used for research, culture is recommended by the World Health Organization for TB diagnosis among HIV infected smear negative PTB suspects. Even then, the number of sputum samples required remains unspecified. Here, we determined the Incremental Yield (IY) and number of samples required to diagnose an additional PTB case upon second and third serial sputum culture. Methods/Findings This was a cross sectional study done between January and March 2011. Serial sputum samples were provided by participants within two days and cultured using Lowenstein Jensen (LJ) and Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) methods. A PTB case was defined as a positive culture on either one or both methods. The IY from the second and third serial cultures was determined and the reciprocal of the product of the fractions of IY provided the number of samples required for an additional PTB case. Of the 170 smear negative PTB suspects, 62 (36.5%) met the case definition. The IY of the second sample culture was 12.7%, 23.6% and 12.6% and for the third sample culture was 6.8%, 7.5% and 7.3% with LJ, MGIT and LJ or MGIT, respectively. The number of samples required for an additional PTB case and 95% CI upon the second sample culture were 29.9 (16.6, 156.5), 11.3 (7.6, 21.9) and 20.8 (12.5, 62.7); while for the third sample culture were 55.6 (26.4, 500.4), 35.7 (19.0, 313.8) and 36.1 (19.1, 330.9) by LJ, MGIT and LJ or MGIT respectively. Conclusions/Significance Among HIV infected smear negative PTB suspects in Kampala, 93% of PTB cases are diagnosed upon the second serial sputum culture. The number of cultures needed to diagnose an additional PTB case, ranges from 11–30 and 35–56 by the second and third sputum samples, respectively. PMID:22629439

  9. Genitourinary manifestations of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wise, Gilbert J; Marella, Venkata K

    2003-02-01

    By the 1980s, the availability of antituberculosis chemotherapy reduced the incidence and prevalence of tuberculosis. Changing patterns of population emigration and the development of large pools of immune-compromised individuals reversed the downward trend of tuberculosis. The incidence of genitourinary tuberculosis has remained constant. The manifestations of GU TB can be variable and cause a variety of clinical patterns that mimic other diseases. Adrenal insufficiency, renal disease, obstructive uropathy, and chronic cystitis are not uncommon with TB. The patient with TB may have genital disease that simulates STD or scrotal tumors. Infertility can be caused by GU tuberculosis. Awareness of environmental factors and patient history should alert the urologist to the wide array of clinical findings in the genitourinary system that can be caused by tuberculosis.

  10. Unusual presentation of renal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Aunp P; Ranganath, Ravi; Pavan, Malleshappa

    2011-07-01

    Urogenital tuberculosis (TB) is a common late manifestation of an earlier symptomatic or asymptomatic pulmonary TB infection. A latency period ranging from 5 to 40 years between the time of the initial infection and the expression of urogenital TB frequently occurs. As one of the most common sites of involvement of extrapulmonary TB, urogenital TB accounts for 15% to 20% of the infections. We present a patient who had culture-negative active tubercular kidney disease due to silent tuberculous infection. Our case demonstrates the limitations of noninvasive testing in establishing the diagnosis of renal tuberculosis.

  11. MDR-TB, Isolation, and Anomie: Has Anyone Referred to Social Work? : Comment on "The Ethics of Isolation for Patients With Tuberculosis in Australia".

    PubMed

    Watts, Krista N

    2016-03-01

    MDR-TB and admission to isolation can induce a situation in which individuals are normless, unable to achieve the social goals that they have learned to pursue. Described as anomie, this situation can induce deviant behaviour. Addressing the psychosocial ethics of MDR-TB and isolation, this paper responds to the call for consideration of resource allocation and liberty.

  12. 'We are afraid of them': attitudes and behaviours of community members towards tuberculosis in Ghana and implications for TB control efforts.

    PubMed

    Dodor, Emmanuel Atsu; Kelly, Shona

    2009-03-01

    One major set back to the success of TB control globally is the stigma attached to the disease in most societies. This article explores community's understanding of, and attitudes and behaviours towards TB and examines the implications for disease control efforts. Individual in-depth interviews and focus groups were held with community members and the generated data analysed using Grounded Theory techniques and procedures. At the core of feelings towards TB in the community is the fear of infection leading to imposition of socio-physical distance and participatory restrictions on those suffering from the disease. Because of fear of infection, most of the community members were of the view that TB patients should not be part of the society and said they will not marry a TB patient or encourage any family member to enter such a relationship. They also pointed out that TB patients should not sell in the community and would not be allowed to represent them at any public function because they can infect others. Whenever it becomes unavoidable for the community members to interact with someone with TB, they indicated that they would cover their mouth with a handkerchief, turn their head or sit in the opposite direction of the wind from the TB patient to avoid inhaling the air. When a TB patient joins the community members at any function, he/she is expected to abide by certain 'codes of conduct'. The stigmatising attitudes and behaviours of the community members towards the disease and its sufferers may lead individuals with very obvious signs and symptoms of TB to attribute it to other non-stigmatising conditions or hide the diagnosis from others as well as default from treatment.

  13. TB Fluoroscopy

    Cancer.gov

    Follow-up though Dec 31, 2002 has been completed for a study of site-specific cancer mortality among tuberculosis patients treated with artificial lung collapse therapy in Massachusetts tuberculosis sanatoria (1930-1950).

  14. [Childhood tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, A

    2015-01-01

    Childhood TB is an indication of failing TB control in the community. It allows disease persistence in the population. Mortality and morbidity due to TB is high in children. Moreover, HIV co-infection and multidrug-resistant diseases are as frequent in children as in adults. Infection is more frequent in younger children. Disease risk after primary infection is greatest in infants younger than 2 years. In case of exposure, evidence of infection can be obtained using the tuberculin skin test (TST) or an interferon-gamma assay (IGRA). There is no evidence to support the use of IGRA over TST in young children. TB suspicion should be confirmed whenever possible, using new available tools, particularly in case of pulmonary and lymph node TB. Induced sputum, nasopharyngeal aspiration and fine needle aspiration biopsy provide a rapid and definitive diagnosis of mycobacterial infection in a large proportion of patients. Analysis of paediatric samples revealed higher sensitivity and specificity values of molecular techniques in comparison with the ones originated from adults. Children require higher drugs dosages than adults. Short courses of steroids are associated with TB treatment in case of respiratory distress, bronchoscopic desobstruction is proposed for severe airways involvement and antiretroviral therapy is mandatory in case of HIV infection. Post-exposure prophylaxis in children is a highly effective strategy to reduce the risk of TB disease. The optimal therapy for treatment of latent infection with a presumably multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain is currently not known.

  15. Your Child with Tuberculosis: A Guide for Parents and Guardians = Su Nino con Tuberculosis: Un Manual para Los Padres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaro, Rodolfo

    Presented in both Spanish and English versions, this booklet is a guide for parents and guardians of children who have tuberculosis (TB). The booklet is organized around specific questions covering topics such as the causes and spread of TB, demographics of TB sufferers, detecting and curing TB, TB treatment and medications, research on the…

  16. "Tuberculosis Case Management" Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knebel, Elisa; Kolodner, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    The need to isolated health providers with critical knowledge in tuberculosis (TB) case management prompted the development of "Tuberculosis Case Management" CD-ROM. Features include "Learning Center,""Examination Room," and "Library." The combination of audio, video, and graphics allows participants to…

  17. Incidence and predictors of tuberculosis among HIV-infected adults after initiation of antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria, 2004-2012

    PubMed Central

    Dokubo, E. Kainne; Shiraishi, Ray W.; Agolory, Simon G.; Auld, Andrew F.; Onotu, Dennis; Odafe, Solomon; Dalhatu, Ibrahim; Abiri, Oseni; Debem, Henry C.; Bashorun, Adebobola; Ellerbrock, Tedd

    2017-01-01

    Background Nigeria had the most AIDS-related deaths worldwide in 2014 (170,000), and 46% were associated with tuberculosis (TB). Although treatment of people living with HIV (PLHIV) with antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces TB-associated morbidity and mortality, incident TB can occur while on ART. We estimated incidence and characterized factors associated with TB after ART initiation in Nigeria. Methods We analyzed retrospective cohort data from a nationally representative sample of adult patients on ART. Data were abstracted from 3,496 patient records, and analyses were weighted and controlled for a complex survey design. We performed domain analyses on patients without documented TB disease and used a Cox proportional hazard model to assess factors associated with TB incidence after ART. Results At ART initiation, 3,350 patients (95.8%) were not receiving TB treatment. TB incidence after ART initiation was 0.57 per 100 person-years, and significantly higher for patients with CD4<50/μL (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 4.2, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4–12.7) compared with CD4≥200/μL. Patients with suspected but untreated TB at ART initiation and those with a history of prior TB were more likely to develop incident TB (AHR: 12.2, 95% CI: 4.5–33.5 and AHR: 17.6, 95% CI: 3.5–87.9, respectively). Conclusion Incidence of TB among PLHIV after ART initiation was low, and predicted by advanced HIV, prior TB, and suspected but untreated TB. Study results suggest a need for improved TB screening and diagnosis, particularly among high-risk PLHIV initiating ART, and reinforce the benefit of early ART and other TB prevention efforts. PMID:28282390

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Tun, Thanda; Permina, Elizabeth; Nyunt, Wint Wint; Aung, Si Thu; Thinn, Kyi Kyi; Crump, John A.; Cook, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and lately, extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) are increasing global health concerns. Here, we present the genome sequences of two MDR-TB isolates from Myanmar, one of 27 countries with a high MDR-TB burden, and describe a number of mutations consistent with these being XDR-TB isolates. PMID:27789629

  19. Pre-Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Strain Associated with Disseminated Tuberculosis in a Pet Dog

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, João; Canto, Ana; Albuquerque, Teresa; Leal, Nuno; Macedo, Rita; Portugal, Isabel; Cunha, Mónica V.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to isoniazid, ethambutol, and streptomycin was detected in a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, belonging to the Beijing family lineage, isolated from two nodule exudates of a Yorkshire terrier with generalized tuberculosis. This report alerts medical practitioners to the risk of dissemination of pre-multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (preMDR-TB) through exposure to M. tuberculosis-shedding pets. PMID:24153119

  20. Barriers to managing TB in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Morton, Rachel

    Improved management of tuberculosis is a key priority for Public Health England due to unacceptably high rates of the disease in the UK, particularly in London and other major cities. A survey of 20 staff in the acute medical unit at Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, explored potential barriers to early TB detection and infection control in busy emergency departments. Low awareness and little familiarity with TB among many emergency admissions staff increased the likelihood of transmission from undiagnosed patients in crowded waiting areas. The study suggested regular updates on TB so staff could refresh their knowledge and awareness, and help improve TB detection and infection control.

  1. [Tuberculosis after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Korzeniewska, Anna; Dyła, Tomasz; Kosacka, Monika; Jankowska, Renata

    2009-01-01

    Renal transplant recipients carry a relatively high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB). In most cases, active TB is the result of reactivation of a latent infection and is located in the lungs. In these patients, clinical presentation of TB can often be atypical and there is a high risk of dissemination and high mortality rates. Therefore, the use of invasive procedures for proper diagnosis is recommended, as well as anti-tuberculosis therapy instituted whenever there is a strong suspicion of TB on clinical grounds, even without microbiological evidence. The treatment of active TB in renal transplant recipients should be the same as in the general population. To avoid graft rejection, blood levels of calcineurin inhibitors should be monitored closely. Prophylaxis is recommended for high-risk patients.

  2. [Tuberculosis in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Shang, H; Desgrandchamps, D

    1995-10-03

    In Switzerland, in 1992, 957 persons suffered from tuberculosis; 52.3% were Swiss, 47.7% foreigners. Most of the swiss TB patients were more than 65 years old, whereas the foreigners generally were young patients originating from countries with high TB-infection rates. Asylum seekers had much higher TB-case rates (131 cases per 100,000) than other foreigners (27 cases per 100,000) or Swiss (9 cases per 100,000). Special refuge reception centers have been set up in Switzerland, in charge of tuberculosis screening procedures in this high-risk group on arrival to this country. Although HIV and AIDS patients bear a much higher risk of developing tuberculosis once infected, the HIV epidemic did not lead to an increase of tuberculosis in Switzerland so far, since young Swiss are rarely infected with tuberculosis. HIV-infected, drug addicts, homeless persons and alcoholics run a higher risk of contracting tuberculosis only when congregating with a person suffering from active tuberculosis not yet diagnosed or improperly treated. In order to maintain low levels of tuberculosis in Switzerland DOT (directly observed therapy) must be implemented in all patients with uncertain compliance, especially as cultural and social backgrounds become increasingly complex.

  3. Tuberculosis: will it infect wild elk?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, T.J.; Smith, B.

    1992-01-01

    Tuberculosis! Just the name conjures up images of a devastating, chronic, debilitating disease. And so it is in both humans and animals. Tuberculosis (TB) is not known to be present to any significant degree in the free-ranging elk herds of North America. But increasing reports of TB in deer species-including elk-on game ranches prompt grave concern.

  4. 'Z(S)-MDR-TB' versus 'Z(R)-MDR-TB': improving treatment of MDR-TB by identifying pyrazinamide susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Chiu Chang, Kwok; Leung, Chi-Chiu; Wai Yew, Wing; Gicquel, Brigitte; Fallows, Dorothy; Kaplan, Gilla; Chaisson, Richard E; Zhang, Wenhong

    2012-07-01

    Indispensable for shortening treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis (TB), pyrazinamide (PZA, Z) is also essential in the treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB. While resistance to PZA in MDR-TB is associated with poor treatment outcome, bacillary susceptibility to PZA along with the use of fluoroquinolone (FQ) and second-line injectable drugs (SLIDs) may predict improved treatment success in MDR-TB. Despite a high prevalence of PZA resistance among MDR-TB patients (10%-85%), PZA susceptibility testing is seldom performed because of technical challenges. To improve treatment of MDR-TB, we propose to: (i) classify MDR-TB into PZA-susceptible MDR-TB (Z(S)-MDR-TB) and PZA-resistant MDR-TB (Z(R)-MDR-TB); (ii) use molecular tests such as DNA sequencing (pncA, gyrA, rrs, etc.) to rapidly identify Z(S)-MDR-TB versus Z(R)-MDR-TB and susceptibility profile for FQ and SLID; (iii) refrain from using PZA in Z(R)-MDR-TB; and (iv) explore the feasibility of shortening the treatment duration of Z(S)-MDR-TB with a regimen comprising PZA plus at least two bactericidal agents especially new agents like TMC207 or PA-824 or delamanid which the bacilli are susceptible to, with one or two other agents. These measures may potentially shorten therapy, save costs, and reduce side effects of MDR-TB treatment.

  5. Memory-Like Antigen-Specific Human NK Cells from TB Pleural Fluids Produced IL-22 in Response to IL-15 or Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoying; Yu, Sifei; Yang, Binyan; Lao, Suihua; Li, Baiqing; Wu, Changyou

    2016-01-01

    Our previous result indicated that memory-like human natural killer (NK) cells from TB pleural fluid cells (PFCs) produced large amounts of IFN-γ in response to Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG). Furthermore, recent studies have shown that human lymphoid tissues harbored a unique NK cell subset that specialized in production of interleukin (IL)-22, a proinflammatory cytokine that mediates host defense against pathogens. Yet little information was available with regard to the properties of IL-22 production by memory-like human NK cells. In the present study, we found that cytokines IL-15 induced and IL-12 enhanced the levels of IL-22 by NK cells from TB PFCs. In addition, IL-22 but not IL-17 was produced by NK cells from PFCs in response to BCG and M.tb-related Ags. More importantly, the subset of specific IL-22-producing NK cells were distinct from IFN-γ-producing NK cells in PFCs. CD45RO+ or CD45RO- NK cells were sorted, co-cultured with autologous monocytes and stimulated with BCG for the production of IL-22. The result demonstrated that CD45RO+ but not CD45RO- NK cells produced significantly higher level of IL-22. Anti-IL-12Rβ1 mAbs (2B10) partially inhibit the expression of IL-22 by NK cells under the culture with BCG. Consistently, BCG specific IL-22-producing NK cells from PFCs expressed CD45ROhighNKG2Dhighgranzyme Bhigh. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that memory-like antigen-specific CD45RO+ NK cells might participate in the recall immune response for M. tb infection via producing IL-22, which display a critical role to fight against M. tb.

  6. Epidemiological Trends of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in China From 2007 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiao-chun; Zhang, Xian-xin; Zhao, Jiang-nan; Liu, Yao; Yu, Chun-bao; Yang, Guo-ru; Li, Huai-chen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The emergence and spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) has become the major concern in global TB control nowadays due to its limited therapy options and high mortality. A comprehensive evaluation for the epidemiological trends of DR-TB in mainland China, of which TB incidences remain high, is essential but lacking. This study aimed to describe the trends of DR-TB overtime, especially multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB); and to identify unique characteristics of MDR-TB cases compared with drug-susceptible TB cases in Mainland China. We retrospectively analyzed surveillance data collected from 36 TB prevention and control institutions in Shandong Province, China over an 8-year period. Unique characteristics of MDR-TB were identified; Chi-square test for trends and linear regression were used to assess the changes in proportions of different resistance patterns overtime. The overall MDR rate was 6.2% in our sample population. There were no statistically significant changes in the percentage of drug-susceptible, isoniazid (INH) resistance, ethambutol (EMB) resistance, streptomycin (SM) resistance, and MDR TB during our study period except that the overall rifampin (RFP) resistance and rifampin monoresistance (RMR) increased at a yearly rate of 0.2% and 0.1%, respectively. Among those with known treatment histories, a higher MDR rate of 8.7% was observed, in which 53.9% were primary MDR-TB patients, and this rate was increasing at a yearly rate of 4.1% over our study period. MDR-TB patients were more likely to be female (odds ratio [OR], 1.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.34), aged 25 to 44 years (OR, 1.67; 95%CI, 1.45–1.93), retreated (OR, 11.95; 95%CI, 9.68–14.76), having prior TB contact (OR, 1.89; 95%CI, 1.19–2.78) and having cavity (OR, 1.57; 95%CI 1.36–1.81), or bilateral disease (OR, 1.45; 95%CI 1.19–1.76) on chest radiology. Persistent high levels of MDR-TB, increasing rates of primary MDR-TB and RMR characterize DR-TB cases in

  7. SMS reminders to improve the tuberculosis cure rate in developing countries (TB-SMS Cameroon): a protocol of a randomised control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is a public health problem in Cameroon, just like in many other countries in the world. The National Tuberculosis Control Programme (PNLT) put in place by the state, aims to fight tuberculosis through the implementation of international directives (Directly Observed Treatment Short, DOTS). Despite the deployment of this strategy across the world, its implementation is difficult in the context of low-resource countries. Some expected results are not achieved. In Cameroon, the cure rate for patients with sputum positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TPM+) after 6 months is only about 65%, 20% below the target. This is mainly due to poor patient adherence to treatment. By relying on the potential of mobile Health, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of SMS reminders on the cure rate of TPM + patients, measured using 6-month bacilloscopy. Methods/design This is a blinded, randomised controlled multicentre study carried out in Cameroon. The research hypothesis is that sending daily SMS messages to remind patients to take their prescribed tuberculosis medication, together with the standard DOTS strategy, will increase the cure rate from 65% (control group: DOTS, no SMS intervention) to 85% (intervention group: DOTS, with SMS intervention) in a group of new TPM + patients. In accordance with each treatment centre, the participants will be randomly allocated into the two groups using a computer program: the intervention group and the control group. A member of the research team will send daily SMS messages. Study data will be collected by health professionals involved in the care of patients. Data analysis will be done by the intention-to-treat method. Discussion The achieving of expected outcomes by the PNLT through implementation of DOTS requires several challenges. Although it has been demonstrated that the DOTS strategy is effective in the fight against tuberculosis, its application remains difficult in developing countries

  8. Mouse model of pulmonary cavitary tuberculosis and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9

    PubMed Central

    Ordonez, Alvaro A.; Tasneen, Rokeya; Pokkali, Supriya; Xu, Ziyue; Converse, Paul J.; Klunk, Mariah H.; Mollura, Daniel J.; Nuermberger, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cavitation is a key pathological feature of human tuberculosis (TB), and is a well-recognized risk factor for transmission of infection, relapse after treatment and the emergence of drug resistance. Despite intense interest in the mechanisms underlying cavitation and its negative impact on treatment outcomes, there has been limited study of this phenomenon, owing in large part to the limitations of existing animal models. Although cavitation does not occur in conventional mouse strains after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, cavitary lung lesions have occasionally been observed in C3HeB/FeJ mice. However, to date, there has been no demonstration that cavitation can be produced consistently enough to support C3HeB/FeJ mice as a new and useful model of cavitary TB. We utilized serial computed tomography (CT) imaging to detect pulmonary cavitation in C3HeB/FeJ mice after aerosol infection with M. tuberculosis. Post-mortem analyses were performed to characterize lung lesions and to localize matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) previously implicated in cavitary TB in situ. A total of 47-61% of infected mice developed cavities during primary disease or relapse after non-curative treatments. Key pathological features of human TB, including simultaneous presence of multiple pathologies, were noted in lung tissues. Optical imaging demonstrated increased MMP activity in TB lesions and MMP-9 was significantly expressed in cavitary lesions. Tissue MMP-9 activity could be abrogated by specific inhibitors. In situ, three-dimensional analyses of cavitary lesions demonstrated that 22.06% of CD11b+ signal colocalized with MMP-9. C3HeB/FeJ mice represent a reliable, economical and tractable model of cavitary TB, with key similarities to human TB. This model should provide an excellent tool to better understand the pathogenesis of cavitation and its effects on TB treatments. PMID:27482816

  9. Evaluation of a Tuberculosis Skin Testing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    There has been a recent slowdown in the decline of rates of tuberculosis (TB) in the United States. However, there are disparities in TB diagnosis between U.S.-born and foreign-born persons and between Whites and minorities. Measures for achieving TB elimination include identification of high-risk persons, including children and adolescents, at…

  10. Epidemiology of Primary Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis, Vladimir Region, Russia.

    PubMed

    Ershova, Julia V; Volchenkov, Grigory V; Kaminski, Dorothy A; Somova, Tatiana R; Kuznetsova, Tatiana A; Kaunetis, Natalia V; Cegielski, J Peter; Kurbatova, Ekaterina V

    2015-11-01

    We studied the epidemiology of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Vladimir Region, Russia, in 2012. Most cases of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) were caused by transmission of drug-resistant strains, and >33% were in patients referred for testing after mass radiographic screening. Early diagnosis of drug resistance is essential for preventing transmission of MDR TB.

  11. Meta-analysis of factors related to health services that predict treatment default by tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano do; Braga, José Ueleres

    2008-01-01

    The identification of factors that predict tuberculosis (TB) treatment default can help control this problem. The current study used a systematic review to investigate associations between TB treatment default and previously studied factors related to health services. Abstracts were searched in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases and in the bibliography of the full texts under evaluation. Studies were included if TB treatment default was evaluated by comparing two or more groups and data could be extracted. A total of 41 studies were included for combining data. It was possible to combine five exposures: "difficult access to health services"; "need for hospitalization"; "training or support for adherence"; "delay in initiating treatment"; "long wait before medical attendance". "Difficult access to health services", "training or support for adherence", and "need for hospitalization" were associated with TB treatment default. All exposures demonstrated heterogeneity, which was only explained in one. Publication bias was only detected for one exposure.

  12. Multidrug and extensively drug-resistant TB (M/XDR-TB): problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra

    2010-10-01

    Multi Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and Extensively Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR-TB) are posing a threat to the control of tuberculosis. The first WHO-IUATLD antituberculosis drug resistance surveillance carried out in 1994 in 35 countries reported the median prevalence of primary and acquired multi drug resistance as 1.4% and 13% respectively. Subsequently, second, third and fourth WHO-IUATLD global drug resistance surveillances were carried out in 1996-99, 1999-2002 and 2002-2007 respectively. Based on drug resistance information from 114 countries, the proportion of MDR-TB among all cases was estimated for countries with no survey information. It was estimated that 4,89,139 cases of MDR-TB emerged in 2006. China and India carry approximately 50% of the global burden. 35 countries and two Special Administrative Regions (SARs) reported data on XDR-TB for the first time in 2006. Multidrug and extensively drug-resistant TB 2010 Global report on Surveillance and response estimated that 4,40,000 cases of MDR-TB emerged globally in 2008 and caused an estimated 1,50,000 deaths. 5.4% of MDR-TB cases were found to have XDR-TB. To date, a cumulative total of 58 countries have confirmed at least one case of XDR-TB. M/XDR-TB is a man-made problem and its emergence can be prevented by prompt diagnosis and effective use of first line drugs in every new patient. The DOTS Plus proposed by WHO highlights the comprehensive management strategy to control MDR-TB. Laboratory services for adequate and timely diagnosis of M/XDR-TB must be strengthened and programmatic management of M/XDR-TB must be scaled up as per target set by global plan. Proper use of second-line drugs must be ensured to cure existing MDR-TB, to reduce its transmission and to prevent XDR-TB. Sound infection control measures to avoid further transmission of M/XDR-TB and research towards development of new diagnostics, drugs and vaccines should be promoted to control M/XDR-TB.

  13. Hospital management of tuberculosis in a region with a low incidence of tuberculosis and a high prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Alexander, B D; Stout, J E; Reller, L B; Hamilton, C D

    2001-11-01

    We prospectively assessed the management of patients with suspected tuberculosis (TB) in an area with a high prevalence of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and a low incidence of TB. Clinicians' assessments were sensitive for TB but had poor predictive value. The acid-fast smear was a weak predictor of TB, owing to a high rate of isolation of NTM.

  14. Drug-resistant TB: deadly, costly and in need of a vaccine.

    PubMed

    Manjelievskaia, Janna; Erck, Dara; Piracha, Samina; Schrager, Lewis

    2016-03-01

    TB is an underappreciated public health threat in developed nations. In 2014, an estimated 9.6 million TB cases and 1.5 million deaths occurred worldwide; 3.3% of these cases resulted from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) strains. These figures underestimate the economic burden associated with MDR-TB and XDR-TB, as the cost of treating disease caused by these strains can be 9-25 times higher than treating drug-susceptible TB. Developing new drugs, improved diagnostics and new TB vaccines are critical components of a strategy to combat TB in general, and drug-resistant TB in particular. Because Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) has demonstrated a capacity to develop resistance to drugs developed to combat it, it is unlikely that drug-resistant MTB would be 'resistant' to vaccines capable of preventing disease or established infection with drug-sensitive MTB strains. Accordingly, the development of TB vaccines represents an important long-term investment in preventing the spread of drug-resistant TB and achieving WHO's goal of ending the global TB epidemic by 2035. Our current understanding of the epidemiology of drug-resistant TB and the interventions needed to limit its spread, reviewed in this article, illustrates the need for increased financial support for developing new TB drugs, diagnostics and vaccines to meet the WHO goal of TB elimination by 2035.

  15. Drug-resistant TB: deadly, costly and in need of a vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Manjelievskaia, Janna; Erck, Dara; Piracha, Samina; Schrager, Lewis

    2016-01-01

    TB is an underappreciated public health threat in developed nations. In 2014, an estimated 9.6 million TB cases and 1.5 million deaths occurred worldwide; 3.3% of these cases resulted from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) strains. These figures underestimate the economic burden associated with MDR-TB and XDR-TB, as the cost of treating disease caused by these strains can be 9–25 times higher than treating drug-susceptible TB. Developing new drugs, improved diagnostics and new TB vaccines are critical components of a strategy to combat TB in general, and drug-resistant TB in particular. Because Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) has demonstrated a capacity to develop resistance to drugs developed to combat it, it is unlikely that drug-resistant MTB would be ‘resistant’ to vaccines capable of preventing disease or established infection with drug-sensitive MTB strains. Accordingly, the development of TB vaccines represents an important long-term investment in preventing the spread of drug-resistant TB and achieving WHO's goal of ending the global TB epidemic by 2035. Our current understanding of the epidemiology of drug-resistant TB and the interventions needed to limit its spread, reviewed in this article, illustrates the need for increased financial support for developing new TB drugs, diagnostics and vaccines to meet the WHO goal of TB elimination by 2035. PMID:26884499

  16. Cost-effectiveness of bedaquiline in MDR and XDR tuberculosis in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Codecasa, Luigi R.; Toumi, Mondher; D’Ausilio, Anna; Aiello, Andrea; Damele, Francesco; Termini, Roberta; Uglietti, Alessia; Hettle, Robert; Graziano, Giorgio; De Lorenzo, Saverio

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of bedaquiline plus background drug regimens (BR) for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) in Italy. Methods: A Markov model was adapted to the Italian setting to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of bedaquiline plus BR (BBR) versus BR in the treatment of MDR-TB and XDR-TB over 10 years, from both the National Health Service (NHS) and societal perspective. Cost-effectiveness was evaluated in terms of life-years gained (LYG). Clinical data were sourced from trials; resource consumption for compared treatments was modelled according to advice from an expert clinicians panel. NHS tariffs for inpatient and outpatient resource consumption were retrieved from published Italian sources. Drug costs were provided by reference centres for disease treatment in Italy. A 3% annual discount was applied to both cost and effectiveness. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. Results: Over 10 years, BBR vs. BR alone is cost-effective, with ICERs of €16,639/LYG and €4081/LYG for the NHS and society, respectively. The sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the results from both considered perspectives. Conclusion: In Italy, BBR vs. BR alone has proven to be cost-effective in the treatment of MDR-TB and XDR-TB under a range of scenarios. PMID:28265350

  17. Disparities in HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and TB

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Search The CDC Health Disparities in HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and TB Note: Javascript is ... Hawaiians/Other Pacific Islanders MMWR Publications HIV and AIDS Viral Hepatitis STDs Tuberculosis Training and Networking Resources ...

  18. 67 FR 3465 - Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2002-01-24

    ... Tuberculosis AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Limited re-opening of the rulemaking record for Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis (TB). SUMMARY: The Agency is re... Sciences/ Institute of Medicine (NAS/IOM) report, ``Tuberculosis in the Workplace'' and the comments by...

  19. 64 FR 32447 - Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-06-17

    ... Tuberculosis AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice... standard to regulate occupational exposure to tuberculosis (TB). Public hearings on the proposal were held... Tuberculosis'' (Ex. 179-3); ``Laboratory Performance Evaluation of N95 Filtering Facepiece Respirators,...

  20. Tuberculosis 2004: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Glassroth, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues as a major public health challenge worldwide. HIV-TB coinfection is especially concerning as it accelerates progression of infection to active disease and amplifies spread of TB including drug resistant disease. Application of molecular biology and insights from classic microbiology to TB control have resulted in important innovations in diagnosis and treatment. Radiometric assay and, particularly, PCR, with nucleic acid probing, have reduced the time to diagnosis. Moreover, the sensitivity of these techniques is potentially log orders of magnitude more sensitive. Molecular techniques can be adapted to drug susceptibility testing. The differential activity and post-antibiotic effect of various drugs against TB have led to highly effective briefer regimens and to directly observed therapy. Insights into basic host defense against TB and description of the M. tuberculosis genome have created optimism for developing new treatments and effective vaccines in the years to come. PMID:16555622

  1. Immunity to TB and targets for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes

    2012-02-01

    For centuries the treatment of TB has presented an enormous challenge to global health. In the 20th century, the treatment of TB patients with long-term multidrug therapy gave hope that TB could be controlled and cured; however, contrary to these expectations and coinciding with the emergence of AIDS, the world has witnessed a rampant increase in hard-to-treat cases of TB, along with the emergence of highly virulent and multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. Unfortunately, these bacteria are now circulating around the world, and there are few effective drugs to treat them. As a result, the prospects for improved treatment and control of TB in the 21st century have worsened and we urgently need to identify new therapies that deal with this problem. The potential use of immunotherapy for TB is now of greater consideration than ever before, as immunotherapy could potentially overcome the problem of drug resistance. TB immunotherapy targets the already existing host anti-TB immune response and aims to enhance killing of the bacilli. For this purpose, several approaches have been used: the use of anti-Mycobacteria antibodies; enhancing the Th1 protective responses by using mycobacterial antigens or increasing Th1 cytokines; interfering with the inflammatory process and targeting of immunosuppressive pathways and targeting the cell activation/proliferation pathways. This article reviews our current understanding of TB immunity and targets for immunotherapy that could be used in combination with current TB chemotherapy.

  2. A rare case of primary inoculation tuberculosis seen after varicella.

    PubMed

    Polat, Meltem; Kara, Soner Sertan; Tapısız, Anıl; Tezer, Hasan; Öğüt, Betül; Uluoğlu, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    Primary inoculation tuberculosis (TB) is a rare form of cutaneous TB resulting from direct introduction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis into the skin or mucosa of a previously uninfected, nonimmune person. We herein report the first case, to our knowledge, of primary inoculation TB to be seen after varicella; this case explains the possible mechanism of varicella-zoster virus-mediated transient cellular immune suppression that predisposed the patient to cutaneous TB. In this case, we believe that varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection predisposed the patient to primary inoculation TB by leading to direct inoculation of tuberculosis bacilli through vesicles or by suppressing cellular immunity.

  3. Tuberculosis: Epidemiology and Control

    PubMed Central

    Sulis, Giorgia; Roggi, Alberto; Matteelli, Alberto; Raviglione, Mario C.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health concern worldwide: despite a regular, although slow, decline in incidence over the last decade, as many as 8.6 million new cases and 1.3 million deaths were estimated to have occurred in 2012. TB is by all means a poverty-related disease, mainly affecting the most vulnerable populations in the poorest countries. The presence of multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis in most countries, with somewhere prevalence is high, is among the major challenges for TB control, which may hinder recent achievements especially in some settings. Early TB case detection especially in resource-constrained settings and in marginalized groups remains a challenge, and about 3 million people are estimated to remain undiagnosed or not notified and untreated. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recently launched a new global TB strategy for the “post-2015 era” aimed at “ending the global TB epidemic” by 2035. This strategy is based on the three pillars that emphasize patient-centred TB care and prevention, bold policies and supportive systems, and intensified research and innovation. This paper aims to provide an overview of the global TB epidemiology as well as of the main challenges that must be faced to eliminate the disease as a public health problem everywhere. PMID:25408856

  4. [Epidemiology of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Mjid, M; Cherif, J; Ben Salah, N; Toujani, S; Ouahchi, Y; Zakhama, H; Louzir, B; Mehiri-Ben Rhouma, N; Beji, M

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a contagious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It represents, according to World Health Organization (WHO), one of the most leading causes of death worldwide. With nearly 8 million new cases each year and more than 1 million deaths per year, tuberculosis is still a public health problem. Despite of the decrease in incidence, morbidity and mortality remain important partially due to co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus and emergence of resistant bacilli. All WHO regions are not uniformly affected by TB. Africa's region has the highest rates of morbidity and mortality. The epidemiological situation is also worrying in Eastern European countries where the proportion of drug-resistant tuberculosis is increasing. These regional disparities emphasize to develop screening, diagnosis and monitoring to the most vulnerable populations. In this context, the Stop TB program, developed by the WHO and its partner's, aims to reduce the burden of disease in accordance with the global targets set for 2015.

  5. Primary tuberculosis of the palate

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Pablo; Fuente, Eduardo; Gallego, Lorena; Calvo, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a life-threatening infectious disease with a high world incidence. However, TB with oral expression is considered rare. The importance of recognising this entity lies in its early diagnosis and treatment, as it can be easily confused with neoplastic or traumatic ulcers. We present a case of a primary TB located in the hard palate and gingiva in an 88-year-old woman. PMID:24925532

  6. Primary tuberculosis of the palate.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Pablo; Fuente, Eduardo; Gallego, Lorena; Calvo, Nicolás

    2014-06-12

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a life-threatening infectious disease with a high world incidence. However, TB with oral expression is considered rare. The importance of recognising this entity lies in its early diagnosis and treatment, as it can be easily confused with neoplastic or traumatic ulcers. We present a case of a primary TB located in the hard palate and gingiva in an 88-year-old woman.

  7. Challenges in childhood tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, S; Ramachandran, G

    2015-09-01

    While tuberculosis (TB) typically causes respiratory disease in adults, the spectrum of disease is different in children, ranging from paucibacillary lymphadenitis or limited intrathoracic disease to severe disseminated disease. Diagnosing pediatric TB and monitoring treatment response is challenging, as collecting respiratory specimens is difficult in children and disease may be extrapulmonary. While basic principles of treatment are similar to adults, developmental differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics require that drug dosages in children be adjusted for body weight and age.

  8. No Significant Effect of ASAP1 Gene Variants on the Susceptibility to Tuberculosis in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xuejiao; Peng, Wu; Chen, Xuerong; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Jingya; Zhou, Juan; Cai, Bei; Chen, Jie; Zhou, Yanhong; Lu, Xiaojun; Ying, Binwu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have proposed that the ASAP1 gene participates in regulating the adaptive immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. A GWAS study has reported that ASAP1 polymorphisms (rs4733781 and rs10956514) were associated with the risk of tuberculosis (TB) in Russians. But due to population heterogeneity, different races would have different causative polymorphisms, and the aim of this study was to investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the ASAP1 gene and TB risk in Chinese population. A total of 7 SNPs in the ASAP1 gene were genotyped in 1115 Western Chinese Han and 914 Tibetan population using an improved multiplex ligation detection reaction (iMLDR) method. The associations of SNPs with TB risk and clinical phenotypes were determined based on the distributions of allelic frequencies and different genetic models. A meta-analysis was carried out to further assess the relationship between ASAP1 polymorphism and TB risk. Statistical comparisons of cases and controls after correction for multiple testing did not yield any significant associations with the risk of TB via analyses of a single locus, haplotype, and subgroup differences. Meta-analysis showed no evidence supporting association between rs10956514 and overall risk for TB. Subsequent analysis referring to the genotypes of SNPs in relationship to clinical phenotypes identified that rs4236749 was associated with different serum C-reactive protein levels, suggesting a role of this locus in influencing the inflammatory state of Western Chinese Han patients with TB. Our present data revealed that ASAP1 polymorphisms are unlikely to confer susceptibility to TB in the Western Chinese Han and Tibetan populations, which challenges the promising roles of the ASAP1 gene in the development of TB and highlights the importance of validating the association findings across ethnicities. PMID:27227929

  9. Tracking and Treating Mobile Populations. The TB Net System. Migrant Clinicians Network Monograph Series. = El Sistema de Red para la TB.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Migrant Clinicians Network, Inc., Austin, TX.

    A comprehensive tracking and referral network that helps provide continuity of care for mobile populations with active tuberculosis (TB) or TB infection is considered essential for effective treatment of TB. However, the interstate referral system that exists between state health departments has been highly inefficient for serving migrant…

  10. Microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay for the diagnosis of TB and MDR-TB in HIV-infected patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wikman-Jorgensen, Philip; Llenas-García, Jara; Hobbins, Michael; Ehmer, Jochen; Abellana, Rosa; Gonçalves, Alessandra Queiroga; Pérez-Porcuna, Tomàs Maria; Ascaso, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS) assay for tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in HIV-infected patients. MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, African Index Medicus, ResearchGate, SciELO, and the abstracts of the main conferences on infectious diseases and tropical medicine were searched, and other sources investigated. Only studies including HIV-infected patients evaluating MODS for the diagnosis of TB and using culture-based diagnostic tests as a gold standard were analysed. Summary sensitivity and specificity were calculated with a bivariate model. 3259 citations were found, 29 were selected for full-text review and 10 studies including 3075 samples were finally analysed. Overall diagnostic accuracy of MODS for the diagnosis of TB was a sensitivity of 88.3% (95% CI 86.18-90.2%) and specificity 98.2% (95% CI 97.75-98.55%). For multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB, sensitivity was 89% (95% CI 66.07-97%) and specificity was 100% (95 CI 94.81-100%). For smear-negative pulmonary TB, a sensitivity of 88.2% (95% CI 86.1-89.9%) and specificity of 98.2% (95% CI 96.8-98.9%) were found. Costs varied between USD 0.72 and 7.31 per sample. Mean time to positivity was 8.24 days. MODS was found to have a good accuracy for the diagnosis of TB and MDR-TB in HIV-infected patients with low cost and fast results.

  11. Tuberculosis genotyping information management system: enhancing tuberculosis surveillance in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Smita; Moonan, Patrick K; Cowan, Lauren; Grant, Juliana; Kammerer, Steve; Navin, Thomas R

    2012-06-01

    Molecular characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates (genotyping) can be used by public health programs to more readily identify tuberculosis (TB) transmission. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Tuberculosis Genotyping Service has offered M. tuberculosis genotyping for every culture-confirmed case in the United States since 2004. The TB Genotyping Information Management System (TB GIMS), launched in March 2010, is a secure online database containing genotype results linked with case characteristics from the national TB registry for state and local TB programs to access, manage and analyze these data. As of September 2011, TB GIMS contains genotype results for 89% of all culture-positive TB cases for 2010. Over 400 users can generate local and national reports and maps using TB GIMS. Automated alerts on geospatially concentrated cases with matching genotypes that may represent outbreaks are also generated by TB GIMS. TB genotyping results are available to enhance national TB surveillance and apply genotyping results to conduct TB control activities in the United States.

  12. Estimating the cost of TB and its social impact on TB patients and their households.

    PubMed

    Onazi, O; Gidado, M; Onazi, M; Daniel, O; Kuye, J; Obasanya, O; Odusote, T; Gande, S

    2015-06-21

    Illness often poses a significant financial burden on individuals and their households, and tuberculosis (TB) is no exception. Although TB treatment is free in Nigeria, patients are likely to incur costs due to multiple visits during treatment. The purpose of this study was 1) to examine the health-seeking behaviour of TB patients and the costs borne by TB patients in Nigeria, and 2) to assess the social impact of TB disease on TB patients and their families/households. Of 260 TB patients surveyed, the majority (74.7%) were aged between 20 and 49 years. TB patients expended an average of US$52.02 (N = 8323.58, at the rate of US$1 = N = 160) per person on all visits associated with diagnosis and receipt of diagnostic test results. Overall, households experienced a shortfall of about US$57.30 (N = 9174.72) or 24.9% of income loss due to TB illness. Further analysis revealed that 9.7% of TB patients relied on children of school age or below to finance the costs of TB illness.

  13. Estimating the cost of TB and its social impact on TB patients and their households

    PubMed Central

    Onazi, O.; Gidado, M.; Onazi, M.; Daniel, O.; Kuye, J.; Obasanya, O.; Odusote, T.; Gande, S.

    2015-01-01

    Illness often poses a significant financial burden on individuals and their households, and tuberculosis (TB) is no exception. Although TB treatment is free in Nigeria, patients are likely to incur costs due to multiple visits during treatment. The purpose of this study was 1) to examine the health-seeking behaviour of TB patients and the costs borne by TB patients in Nigeria, and 2) to assess the social impact of TB disease on TB patients and their families/households. Of 260 TB patients surveyed, the majority (74.7%) were aged between 20 and 49 years. TB patients expended an average of US$52.02 (N = 8323.58, at the rate of US$1 = N = 160) per person on all visits associated with diagnosis and receipt of diagnostic test results. Overall, households experienced a shortfall of about US$57.30 (N = 9174.72) or 24.9% of income loss due to TB illness. Further analysis revealed that 9.7% of TB patients relied on children of school age or below to finance the costs of TB illness. PMID:26400384

  14. An Imbalanced Learning based MDR-TB Early Warning System.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Tang, Bo; He, Haibo

    2016-07-01

    As a man-made disease, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is mainly caused by improper treatment programs and poor patient supervision, most of which could be prevented. According to the daily treatment and inspection records of tuberculosis (TB) cases, this study focuses on establishing a warning system which could early evaluate the risk of TB patients converting to MDR-TB using machine learning methods. Different imbalanced sampling strategies and classification methods were compared due to the disparity between the number of TB cases and MDR-TB cases in historical data. The final results show that the relative optimal predictions results can be obtained by adopting CART-USBagg classification model in the first 90 days of half of a standardized treatment process.

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific CD4+ T-cell response is increased, and Treg cells decreased, in anthelmintic-treated patients with latent TB.

    PubMed

    Toulza, Frederic; Tsang, Lillian; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Brown, Michael; Dockrell, Hazel M

    2016-03-01

    In many settings, adults with active or latent tuberculosis will also be coinfected with helminths. Our study aimed to investigate how anthelmintic treatment modulates antimycobacterial immunity, in a setting where helminth reinfection should not occur. We investigated the potential impact of helminth infection on immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in patients with latent Mtb infection with or without helminth infection (Strongyloides or Schistosoma), and tested T-cell responses before and after anthelmintic treatment. The study was performed in migrants resident in the United Kingdom, where reexposure and reinfection following anthelmintic treatment would not occur. The frequency of CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells was measured following stimulation with Mtb Purified Protein Derivative or ESAT-6/CFP-10 antigen, and concentrations of IFN-γ in culture supernatants measured by ELISA and multiplex bead array. Helminth infection was associated with a lower frequency of CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells, which increased following treatment. Patients with helminth infection showed a significant increase in CD4(+) FoxP3(+) T cells (Treg) compared to those without helminth infection. There was a decrease in the frequency of Treg cells, and an associated increase in CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells after the anthelmintic treatment. Here, we show a potential role of Treg cells in reducing the frequency and function of antimycobacterial CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells, and that these effects are reversed after anthelmintic treatment.

  16. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis: are statistical reports accurate?

    PubMed

    Kulchavenya, Ekaterina

    2014-04-01

    Before discussing the epidemiology of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) and particularly urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB), unification of the terminology is necessary. The term 'urogenital tuberculosis' is preferable to 'genitourinary tuberculosis', as renal and urinary tract tuberculosis is more common than genital tuberculosis. Some understand the term 'extrapulmonary tuberculosis' as a specific tuberculosis (TB) lesion of all organs excluding the bronchus, lungs, pleura and intrathoracic bronchopulmonary lymph nodes, but others consider pleural TB as one form of EPTB - and it is a reason for very different proportions in the spectrum of EPTB. Enigmatic tendencies have also been revealed in patients' distribution - in neighbouring regions the incidence rate may differ significantly. Although there is no clear explanation for these tendencies, careful study of the epidemiology of EPTB in different conditions will improve early diagnosis.

  17. Multidrug-Resistant TB

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Helen; Coomans, Fons

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress (REBSP) is a little-known but potentially valuable right that can contribute to rights-based approaches to addressing multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). We argue that better understanding of the REBSP may help to advance legal and civil society action for health rights. While the REBSP does not provide an individual entitlement to have a new drug developed for MDR-TB, it sets up entitlements to expect a state to establish a legislative and policy framework aimed at developing scientific capacity to address the most important health issues and at disseminating the outcomes of scientific research. By making scientific findings available and accessible, people can be enabled to claim the use of science for social benefits. Inasmuch as the market fails to address neglected diseases such as MDR-TB, the REBSP provides a potential counterbalance to frame a positive obligation on states to both marshal their own resources and to coordinate the actions of multiple other actors towards this goal, including non-state actors. While the latter do not hold the same level of accountability as states, the REBSP can still enable the recognition of obligations at a level of “soft law” responsibilities. PMID:27780997

  18. What's new in tuberculosis vaccines?

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Ann M.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, tuberculosis (TB) vaccine development has resurged as an active area of investigation. The renewed interest has been stimulated by the recognition that, although BCG is delivered to approximately 90% of all neonates globally through the Expanded Programme on Immunization, Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues to cause over 8 million new cases of TB and over 2 million deaths annually. Over one hundred TB vaccine candidates have been developed, using different approaches to inducing protective immunity. Candidate vaccines are typically screened in small animal models of primary TB disease for their ability to protect against a virulent strain of M. tuberculosis. The most promising are now beginning to enter human safety trials, marking real progress in this field for the first time in 80 years. PMID:12132007

  19. Research Advances: New Weapon in War on TB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which usually attacks the lung and is spread through the air from one person to another. Researchers from Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control and The Pitie-Salpetriere School of Medicine began their…

  20. [Tuberculosis Annual Report 2011--(1) Summary of tuberculosis notification statistics and tuberculosis in foreign nationals].

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    The Tuberculosis Surveillance Center (TSC) at the Research Institute of Tuberculosis has published a series of annual reports on tuberculosis (TB) statistics in Japan since 2008. These reports are based on information on the nationwide computerized TB surveillance system database, which has been in operation since 1987. This is the first of a new series of reports for the "TB Annual Report 2011" that includes a summary of TB statistics and an overview of TB cases with foreign nationality in 2011. A total of 22,681 cases with all types of TB were notified in 2011 with a notification rate of 17.7 per 100,000 population. The TB notification rates decreased to less than 20 per 100,000 population in 2007 and continued to decline until 2011. A total of 8,654 sputum-smear positive pulmonary TB were notified in 2011, at a rate of 6.8 per 100,000 population. The number of latent TB infection (LTBI) cases requiring prophylactic treatment drastically increased from 4,930 cases in 2010 to 10,046 cases in 2011. Surveillance data on TB cases with foreign nationality in Japan have been collected since 1998. The number of TB cases with foreign nationality increased from 739 in 1998 to 931 in 2004 but has been stagnated since then, that indicated 921 in 2011. The TB cases with foreign nationality accounted for 2.1 % of all new TB cases in 1998, and this percentage increased to 4.1% in 2011. Of note, new TB cases with foreign nationality aged 20-29 years accounted for 30.0% of all new TB cases among the same age group in 2011. Among the TB cases with foreign nationality, more than half were from China (29.6%) and the Philippines (23.7%) taken together. In most cases, foreign nationals developed TB within 5 years of entry into Japan, including 80.0% of those aged 10-19 years and 80.8% of those aged 20-29 years. Of these TB cases with foreign nationality, 27% were noted in full-time employees, followed by unemployed persons (21%) and students (20%). With an increase in the number of

  1. A Bayesian Nonparametric Model for Spatially Distributed Multivariate Binary Data with Application to a Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nanhua; Shi, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Summary There has been an increasing interest in the analysis of spatially distributed multivariate binary data motivated by a wide range of research problems. Two types of correlations are usually involved: the correlation between the multiple outcomes at one location and the spatial correlation between the locations for one particular outcome. The commonly used regression models only consider one type of correlations while ignoring or modeling inappropriately the other one. To address this limitation, we adopt a Bayesian nonparametric approach to jointly modeling multivariate spatial binary data by integrating both types of correlations. A multivariate probit model is employed to link the binary outcomes to Gaussian latent variables; and Gaussian processes are applied to specify the spatially correlated random effects. We develop an efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm for the posterior computation. We illustrate the proposed model on simulation studies and a multidrug-resistant tuberculosis case study. PMID:24975716

  2. Global Epidemiology of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Glaziou, Philippe; Sismanidis, Charalambos; Floyd, Katherine; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of effective chemotherapy, tuberculosis (TB) killed 1.3 million people in 2012. Alongside HIV, it remains a top cause of death from an infectious disease. Global targets for reductions in the epidemiological burden of TB have been set for 2015 and 2050 within the context of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and by the Stop TB Partnership. Achieving these targets is the focus of national and international efforts in TB control, and showing whether or not they are achieved is of major importance to guide future and sustainable investments. This article provides a short overview of sources of data to estimate TB disease burden; presents estimates of TB incidence, prevalence, and mortality in 2012 and an assessment of progress toward the 2015 targets for reductions in these indicators based on trends since 1990 and projections up to 2015; analyzes trends in TB notifications and in the implementation of the Stop TB Strategy; and considers prospects for elimination of TB after 2015. PMID:25359550

  3. Spinal tuberculosis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Mohammad R; Mirkoohi, Maryam; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Yarandi, Kourosh Karimi; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2012-12-01

    The spinal column is involved in less than 1% of all cases of tuberculosis (TB). Spinal TB is a very dangerous type of skeletal TB as it can be associated with neurologic deficit due to compression of adjacent neural structures and significant spinal deformity. Therefore, early diagnosis and management of spinal TB has special importance in preventing these serious complications. In order to extract current trends in diagnosis and medical or surgical treatment of spinal TB we performed a narrative review with analysis of all the articles available for us which were published between 1990 and 2011. Althoug h the development of more accurate imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and advanced surgical techniques have made the early diagnosis and management of spinal TB much easier, these are still very challenging topics. In this review we aim to discuss the diagnosis and management of spinal TB based on studies with acceptable design, clearly explained results and justifiable conclusions.

  4. Mycobacterial diversity causing multi- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in Djibouti, Horn of Africa.

    PubMed

    Millán-Lou, M I; Ollé-Goig, J E; Tortola, M T; Martin, C; Samper, S

    2016-02-01

    On detecting a high prevalence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Djibouti, 32 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates of patients hospitalised in the TB referral centre of the capital were genotyped. A high variety of M. tuberculosis lineages, including lineage 1, Indo-Oceanic, lineage 2, East-Asian, lineage 3, East-African Indian and lineage 4, Euro-American, were detected.

  5. Rationale and methods for the National Tuberculosis Genotyping and Surveillance Network.

    PubMed

    Castro, Kenneth G; Jaffe, Harold W

    2002-11-01

    Our understanding of tuberculosis (TB) transmission dynamics has been refined by genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. The National Tuberculosis Genotyping and Surveillance Network was designed and implemented to systematically evaluate the role of genotyping technology in improving TB prevention and control activities. Genotyping proved a useful adjunct to investigations of outbreaks, unusual clusters, and laboratory cross-contamination.

  6. First use of bedaquiline in a patient with XDR-TB in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chua, Angeline Poh-Gek; Hoo, Grace Si-Ru; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Wang, Yee Tang

    2015-09-23

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) continues to pose a threat to global control of TB: 3.5% of new and 20.5% of previously treated TB cases were estimated to have multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB in 2013. Approximately 9% of patients with MDR-TB had extensively drug-resistant (XDR)-TB. A 30-year-old Vietnamese woman previously treated for TB in her home country presented with 5 months of cough and shortness of breath 1 year after migrating to Singapore. Xpert MTB/Rif testing showed rpoB gene mutation. Phenotypic drug susceptibility testing revealed XDR-TB. Second and third-line TB drugs were commenced. To strengthen the efficacy of her treatment regimen, the novel anti-TB drug bedaquiline was obtained for the patient on compassionate grounds. We report the first use in Singapore of bedaquiline for the treatment of XDR-TB.

  7. The role of multiple wildlife hosts in the persistence and spread of bovine tuberculosis in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Barron, MC; Tompkins, DM; Ramsey, DSL; Bosson, MAJ

    2015-01-01

    Abstract AIM: To explore how the inclusion of multi-host dynamics affects the predicted prevalence of bovine tuberculosis (TB) in possums and other host species following the current best practice for control of TB in large difficult and remote areas, to identify which host species are responsible for changes in predicted prevalence, and whether TB can persist in possum-free host communities. METHODS: Multi-host TB models were constructed, comprising three host species with density-dependent population growth, density-dependent disease transmission and susceptible and infected classes. Models were parameterised for two case studies of current concern in New Zealand, namely chronic TB persistence in a possum-deer-pig complex in extensive forest, and in a possum-pig-ferret complex in unforested semi-arid shrub and grasslands. Persistence of TB in the face of best practice possum control was evaluated from model simulations, and the contribution of different hosts to persistence of TB was assessed by removing each host species in turn from the simulations. A sensitivity test explored how different parameter values affected modelled persistence of TB. RESULTS: The forest multi-host model-predicted amplification of TB prevalence due to the presence of pigs. The presence of pigs and/or deer did not jeopardise the success of best practice possum control in eradicating TB from the system, as pigs and deer are effectively end-hosts for TB. Sensitivity analyses indicated these interpretations were robust to uncertainty in model parameter values. The grassland system model predicted that the multi-host species complex could potentially lead to failure of eradication of TB under possum-only control, due to TB persisting in ferret and pig populations in the absence of possum hosts through reciprocal scavenging, resulting in spillback transmission to possums once their populations had started to recover from control. CONCLUSIONS: With respect to management of TB, for modelled

  8. Plan to combat extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis: recommendations of the Federal Tuberculosis Task Force.

    PubMed

    2009-02-13

    An estimated one third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and nearly 9 million persons develop disease caused by M. tuberculosis each year. Although tuberculosis (TB) occurs predominantly in resource-limited countries, it also occurs in the United States. During 1985-1992, the United States was confronted with an unprecedented TB resurgence. This resurgence was accompanied by a rise in multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB), which is defined as TB that is resistant to the two most effective first-line therapeutic drugs, isoniazid and rifampin. In addition, virtually untreatable strains of M. tuberculosis are emerging globally. Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB is defined as MDR TB that also is resistant to the most effective second-line therapeutic drugs used commonly to treat MDR TB: fluoroquinolones and at least one of three injectable second-line drugs used to treat TB (amikacin, kanamycin, or capreomycin). XDR TB has been identified in all regions of the world, including the United States. In the United States, the cost of hospitalization for one XDR TB patient is estimated to average $483,000, approximately twice the cost for MDR TB patients. Because of the limited responsiveness of XDR TB to available antibiotics, mortality rates among patients with XDR TB are similar to those of TB patients in the preantibiotic era. In January 1992, CDC convened a Federal TB Task Force to draft an action plan to improve prevention and control of drug-resistant TB in the United States (CDC. National action plan to combat multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. MMWR 1992;41([No. RR-11]). In November 2006, CDC reconvened the Task Force to draft an updated action plan to address the issue of MDR TB and XDR TB. Task Force members were divided into nine response areas and charged with articulating the most pressing problems, identifying barriers to improvement, and recommending specific action steps to improve prevention and control of XDR TB within their

  9. A Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Demethylmenaquinone Methyltransferase MenG Is Bactericidal to Both Growing and Nutritionally Deprived Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sukheja, Paridhi; Kumar, Pradeep; Mittal, Nisha; Li, Shao-Gang; Singleton, Eric; Russo, Riccardo; Perryman, Alexander L.; Shrestha, Riju; Awasthi, Divya; Husain, Seema; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Brukh, Roman; Connell, Nancy; Freundlich, Joel S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Active tuberculosis (TB) and latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection both require lengthy treatments to achieve durable cures. This problem has partly been attributable to the existence of nonreplicating M. tuberculosis “persisters” that are difficult to kill using conventional anti-TB treatments. Compounds that target the respiratory pathway have the potential to kill both replicating and persistent M. tuberculosis and shorten TB treatment, as this pathway is essential in both metabolic states. We developed a novel respiratory pathway-specific whole-cell screen to identify new respiration inhibitors. This screen identified the biphenyl amide GSK1733953A (DG70) as a likely respiration inhibitor. DG70 inhibited both clinical drug-susceptible and drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains. Whole-genome sequencing of DG70-resistant colonies identified mutations in menG (rv0558), which is responsible for the final step in menaquinone biosynthesis and required for respiration. Overexpression of menG from wild-type and DG70-resistant isolates increased the DG70 MIC by 4× and 8× to 30×, respectively. Radiolabeling and high-resolution mass spectrometry studies confirmed that DG70 inhibited the final step in menaquinone biosynthesis. DG70 also inhibited oxygen utilization and ATP biosynthesis, which was reversed by external menaquinone supplementation. DG70 was bactericidal in actively replicating cultures and in a nutritionally deprived persistence model. DG70 was synergistic with the first-line TB drugs isoniazid, rifampin, and the respiratory inhibitor bedaquiline. The combination of DG70 and isoniazid completely sterilized cultures in the persistence model by day 10. These results suggest that MenG is a good therapeutic target and that compounds targeting MenG along with standard TB therapy have the potential to shorten TB treatment duration. PMID:28196957

  10. Interferon-Gamma Improves Macrophages Function against M. tuberculosis in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Humaira; Muhammad, Niaz; Abbas, Muhammad Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) that causes tuberculosis (TB) kills millions of infected people annually especially multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). On infection, macrophages recognize the mycobacteria by toll-like receptor (TLR) followed by phagocytosis and control of mycobacteria. In addition, macrophages also secrete IL-12 to induce IFN-γ production by T, which, in turn, increases the phagocytosis and oxidative burst. Individuals with defects in innate or adaptive immunity exhibit increased susceptibility to M. tuberculosis. Understanding these immunologic mechanisms will help in TB control. We aimed to investigate the immunopathologic mechanisms in MDR-TB and role of recombinant human interferon-gamma (rhIFN-γ). Study Design and Methods. Monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of MDR-TB patients and healthy subjects and were investigated for immunologic response by ELISA and flow cytometry. Results. Different functional and molecular anomalies were observed in macrophages. In addition, a defective immune response to M. tuberculosis from the patient's MDMs was characterized, which in turn improved by pretreatment with rhIFN-γ. Conclusion. This work highlights the fact that rhIFN-γ improves macrophages function against M. tuberculosis and treatment of patients with poor responsiveness to TB therapy may be needed in future to include IFN-γ as adjuvant therapy after the full characterization of pathological and molecular mechanisms in these and in other more multidrug-resistant TB patients. PMID:27478636

  11. [Prevalence, symptoms, and diagnosis of tuberculosis in Denmark].

    PubMed

    Hilberg, Ole; Hyldgaard, Charlotte; Løkke, Anders

    2011-03-21

    In Denmark the prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) is low, but updated knowledge on the diagnostic techniques available is still important. We summarise the current procedure for diagnosing TB with emphasis on sputum culture, use of interferon gamma release assays and the clinical and radiological manifestations of tuberculosis.

  12. Bovine tuberculosis in Europe from the perspective of an officially tuberculosis free country: Trade, surveillance, and diagnostics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switzerland is officially free of bovine tuberculosis (OTF) since 1960. A mandatory eradication program had been launched in 1950. Since 1980 the control of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) has been reduced to passive abattoir surveillance. Single cases of bTB, partly due to reactivation of human Mycobacte...

  13. A worldwide investigation of tuberculosis epidemics.

    PubMed

    Currie, Christine S M; Hoad, Kathryn A

    2012-09-01

    We analyse the tuberculosis (TB) epidemics of 211 countries with a view to proposing more efficient and targeted TB control strategies. Countries are classified by how their TB case notification rates have evolved over time and the age distribution of those suffering from active TB disease in 2008. Further analysis of key statistics associated with each of the countries shows the impact of different indicators. As expected, HIV is a key driver of TB epidemics and affects their age-distribution and their scale. The level of development of a country and its wealth also vary with the shape and scale of a country's TB epidemic. Immigration has an influence on the shape of TB epidemics, which is particularly pronounced in highly developed countries with low levels of TB disease in the native population. We conclude by proposing how the TB control programme in each country analysed should prioritise its efforts.

  14. Evaluation of the Fully Automated BACTEC MGIT 960 System for Testing Susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to Pyrazinamide, Streptomycin, Isoniazid, Rifampin, and Ethambutol and Comparison with the Radiometric BACTEC 460TB Method

    PubMed Central

    Scarparo, Claudio; Ricordi, Paolo; Ruggiero, Giuliana; Piccoli, Paola

    2004-01-01

    The performance of the fully automated BACTEC MGIT 960 (M960) system for the testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis susceptibility to streptomycin (SM), isoniazid (INH), rifampin (RMP), ethambutol (EMB), and pyrazinamide (PZA) was evaluated with 100 clinical isolates and compared to that of the radiometric BACTEC 460TB (B460) system. The agar proportion method and the B460 system were used as reference methods to resolve the discordant results for SM, INH, RMP, and EMB (a combination known as SIRE) and PZA, respectively. The overall agreements were 96.3% for SIRE and 92% for PZA. For SIRE, a total of 26 discrepancies were found and were resolved in favor of the M960 system in 8 cases and in favor of the B460 system in 18 cases. The M960 system produced 8 very major errors (VME) and 10 major errors (ME), while the B460 system showed 4 VME and 4 ME. No statistically significant differences were found. Both systems exhibited excellent performance, but a higher number of VME was observed with the M960 system at the critical concentrations of EMB and SM. For PZA, a total of eight discrepancies were observed and were resolved in favor of the M960 system in one case and in favor of the B460 system in seven cases; no statistically significant differences were found. The M960 system showed four VME and three ME. The mean times to report overall PZA results and resistant results were 8.2 and 9.8 days, respectively, for the M960 system and 7.4 and 8.1 days, respectively, for the B460 system. Statistically significant differences were found. The mean times to report SIRE results were 8.3 days for the M960 system and 8.2 days for the B460 system. No statistically significant differences were found. Twelve strains tested for SIRE susceptibility and seven strains tested for PZA susceptibility had been reprocessed because of contamination. In conclusion, the M960 system can represent a valid alternative to the B460 for M. tuberculosis susceptibility testing; however, the frequent

  15. The practices of isolating tuberculosis infectious patients at hospitals of Vhembe district, Limpopo Province

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Airborne infections pose a serious threat to susceptible individuals whenever they are together in confined spaces with patients coughing up tuberculosis (TB) bacilli. In healthcare facilities, those with infectious TB should, as far as possible, be isolated from non-infectious patients in order to prevent exposure to the infectious droplet nuclei generated by infected patients. Aim This article aims to describe the use of masks and isolation of infectious TB patients at hospitals of Vhembe district, Limpopo Province in order to inform future policy and practices. Setting This study was conducted at seven of the eight hospitals in Vhembe district. Methods A cross-sectional qualitative design of a descriptive nature was used. Purposive sampling was used to select 57 focus group participants. Necessary approval, permission and clearance were obtained. The participants’ rights were respected. Results This study confirmed that TB cubicles were not reserved for patients with infectious TB and that many TB inpatients at hospitals of Vhembe district were not isolated; masks were not used consistently or appropriately by patients, staff or visitors. Furthermore, the movement of TB inpatients in isolation was not restricted. Conclusions There is an unnecessary risk of becoming infected with TB at the rural hospitals of Vhembe district as a result of incorrect isolation practices. The development and implementation of a quality control programme, as well as ongoing training at the hospital level, would improve the TB infection control measures practised by healthcare workers at hospitals in Vhembe district and reduce the risk of acquiring TB at these hospitals. PMID:26245416

  16. Innovative clinical trial designs to rationalize TB vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Ellis, R D; Hatherill, M; Tait, D; Snowden, M; Churchyard, G; Hanekom, W; Evans, T; Ginsberg, A M

    2015-05-01

    A recent trial of a leading tuberculosis (TB) vaccine candidate in 3000 South African infants failed to show protection over that from BCG alone, and highlights the difficulties in clinical development of TB vaccines. Progression of vaccine candidates to efficacy trials against TB disease rests on demonstration of safety and immunogenicity in target populations and protection against challenge in preclinical models, but immunologic correlates of protection are unknown, and animal models may not be predictive of results in humans. Even in populations most heavily affected by TB the sample sizes required for Phase 2b efficacy trials using TB disease as an endpoint are in the thousands. Novel clinical trial models have been developed to evaluate candidate TB vaccines in selected populations using biologically relevant outcomes and innovative statistical approaches. Such proof of concept studies can be used to more rationally select vaccine candidates for advancement to large scale trials against TB disease.

  17. TB and MDR/XDR-TB in European Union and European Economic Area countries: managed or mismanaged?

    PubMed

    Migliori, G B; Sotgiu, G; D'Ambrosio, L; Centis, R; Lange, C; Bothamley, G; Cirillo, D M; De Lorenzo, S; Guenther, G; Kliiman, K; Muetterlein, R; Spinu, V; Villar, M; Zellweger, J P; Sandgren, A; Huitric, E; Manissero, D

    2012-03-01

    In spite of the growing awareness of emerging drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the extent of inappropriate tuberculosis (TB) case management may be underestimated, even in Europe. We evaluated TB case management in the European Union/European Economic Area countries, with special focus on multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR)-TB, using a purposely developed, standardised survey tool. National reference centres in five countries representing different geographical, socioeconomic and epidemiological patterns of TB in Europe were surveyed. 40 consecutive, original clinical TB case records (30 MDR/XDR-TB cases) were reviewed in each of the five countries. The findings were recorded and, through the survey tool, compared with previously agreed and identified international standards. Deviations from international standards of TB care were observed in the following areas: surveillance (no information available on patient outcomes); infection control (lack of respiratory isolation rooms/procedures and negative-pressure ventilation rooms); clinical management of TB, MDR-TB and HIV co-infection (inadequate bacteriological diagnosis, regimen selection and treatment duration); laboratory support; and diagnostic/treatment algorithms. Gaps between present international standards of care and the management of MDR/XDR-TB patients were identified. Training, increased awareness, promotion of standards and allocation of appropriate resources are necessary to ensure appropriate care and management as well as to prevent further emergence of drug resistance.

  18. Achievements in and Challenges of Tuberculosis Control in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Han; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2015-11-01

    After the Korean War (1950-1953), nearly 6.5% of South Korea's population had active tuberculosis (TB). In response, South Korea implemented the National Tuberculosis Program in 1962. From 1965 to 1995, the prevalence of bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary TB in South Korea decreased from 940 to 219 cases per 100,000 population. Astounding economic growth might have contributed to this result; however, TB incidence in South Korea remains the highest among high-income countries. The rate of decrease in TB incidence seems to have slowed over the past 15 years. A demographic shift toward an older population, many of whom have latent TB and various concurrent conditions, is challenging TB control efforts in South Korea. The increasing number of immigrants also plays a part in the prolonged battle against TB. A historical review of TB in South Korea provides an opportunity to understand national TB control efforts that are applicable to other parts of the world.

  19. XDR-TB: an outcome of programmatic management of TB in India.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Gyanshankar; Ghorpade, S V; Mulani, Jasmin

    2014-01-01

    A significantly strengthened Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) is currently operational in India. In this case-based commentary, we describe the plight of a patient who developed extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) despite having received treatment under the RNTCP for a long period. Our aim is to analyse the programmatic management of tuberculosis in India by highlighting and discussing various issues related to the treatment received by the patient. Further, the article explores whether there is a need to incorporate an ethical element into the RNTCP as it stands today.

  20. Comparison of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) and tuberculin skin test (TST) for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis in haemodialysis (HD) patients: a meta-analysis of κ estimates.

    PubMed

    Ayubi, E; Doosti-Irani, A; Sanjari Moghaddam, A; Khazaei, S; Mansori, K; Safiri, S; Sani, M; Mostafavi, E

    2017-03-02

    Diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is a concern in haemodialysis (HD) patients. Many studies have compared QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) and tuberculin skin test (TST) for detecting LTBI and reported the κ statistic of agreement between QFT-GIT and TST in HD patients. The present study aimed to systematically review this literature and conduct meta-analysis of individual studies that estimated the κ between QFT-GIT with TST among HD patients. All relevant published studies that were available as full-text were obtained by searching Medline (1950), Web of Sciences (1945), Scopus (1973) through May 2016. The κ was re-estimated from the individual studies and pooled using random effect meta-analysis. Subgroup analysis and meta-regression were applied to evaluate the effect of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination, TST cut-off points, quality of studies, sample size and age on variation of κ estimate. Eight studies involving 901 HD patients were included in meta-analysis. The pooled κ estimate was 0·28 (I 2 = 18·4%, P = 0·239, 95% confidence intervals 0·22-0·34). The discordance of TST-/QFT-GIT+ was more than TST+/QFT-GIT-. History of BCG vaccination, TST cut-off points and age are related to variation of κ estimates. TST and QFT-GIT are not comparable in detecting LTBI in HD patients. The higher TST-/QFT-GIT+ ratio compared with TST+/QFT-GIT- ratio, may indicate the superiority of QFT-GIT over TST for detection LTBI in HD patients.

  1. The effect of household poverty on tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Siroka, A; Law, I; Macinko, J; Floyd, K; Banda, R P; Hoa, N B; Tsolmon, B; Chanda-Kapata, P; Gasana, M; Lwinn, T; Senkoro, M; Tupasi, T; Ponce, N A

    2016-12-01

    pSETTING: Households in Malawi, Mongolia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Rwanda, Tanzania, Viet Nam and Zambia.OBJECTIVE To assess the relationship between household socio-economic level, both relative and absolute, and individual tuberculosis (TB) disease.

  2. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: A Sign of the Times and an Impetus for Antimicrobial Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Haydel, Shelley E.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an extraordinarily successful human pathogen, infecting one-third of the world’s population and causing nearly two million deaths each year. In this article, current trends in worldwide tuberculosis (TB) incidence, prevalence, and mortality are discussed along with standard TB treatment regimens, characteristics of first-line and second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs, and mechanisms of antibiotic resistance. The global TB emergency has been further exacerbated by extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB strains that are resistant to our best antibiotics and very difficult to treat. This review also focuses on the emergence of XDR-TB strains, the global health impact, and existing treatment options and outcomes for XDR-TB disease. Finally, this review briefly describes new anti-tuberculosis drugs currently in Phase II clinical evaluations and the impetus for discovering new antibacterial compounds to target drug-resistant M. tuberculosis and improve tuberculosis therapy. PMID:21170297

  3. TB and HIV Therapeutics: Pharmacology Research Priorities.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kelly E; Kim, Peter S; Williams, Sharon D; Hafner, Richard

    2012-01-01

    An unprecedented number of investigational drugs are in the development pipeline for the treatment of tuberculosis. Among patients with tuberculosis, co-infection with HIV is common, and concurrent treatment of tuberculosis and HIV is now the standard of care. To ensure that combinations of anti-tuberculosis drugs and antiretrovirals are safe and are tested at doses most likely to be effective, selected pharmacokinetic studies based on knowledge of their metabolic pathways and their capacity to induce or inhibit metabolizing enzymes of companion drugs must be conducted. Drug interaction studies should be followed up by evaluations in larger populations to evaluate safety and pharmacodynamics more fully. Involving patients with HIV in trials of TB drugs early in development enhances the knowledge gained from the trials and will ensure that promising new tuberculosis treatments are available to patients with HIV as early as possible. In this review, we summarize current and planned pharmacokinetic and drug interaction studies involving investigational and licensed tuberculosis drugs and antiretrovirals and suggest priorities for tuberculosis-HIV pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and drug-drug interaction studies for the future. Priority studies for children and pregnant women with HIV and tuberculosis co-infection are briefly discussed.

  4. Tuberculous meningitis in child born in the US to immigrants from a tuberculosis-endemic country.

    PubMed

    Chow, Eric J; Toll, Elizabeth; Montague, Brian T; Alexander-Scott, Nicole; Van Scoyoc, Erin

    2014-01-05

    This is a case of a child born in the US to immigrant parents from a tuberculosis (TB)-endemic area of Liberia who was diagnosed with TB meningitis after a greater than 1-month history of unremitting fever. This report aims to highlight the importance of early identification of TB in the pediatric population with risk factors for TB and considering TB as a diagnosis among US born children to immigrants from TB-endemic countries.

  5. The TB Structural Genomics Consortium: A decade of progress

    PubMed Central

    Chim, Nicholas; Habel, Jeff E.; Johnston, Jodie M.; Krieger, Inna; Miallau, Linda; Sankaranarayanan, Ramasamy; Morse, Robert P.; Bruning, John; Swanson, Stephanie; Kim, Haelee; Kim, Chang-Yub; Li, Hongye; Bulloch, Esther M.; Payne, Richard J.; Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; Hung, Li-Wei; Baker, Edward N.; Lott, J. Shaun; James, Michael N.G.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Eisenberg, David S.; Sacchettini, James C.; Goulding, Celia W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The TB Structural Genomics Consortium is a worldwide organization of collaborators whose mission is the comprehensive structural determination and analyses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins to ultimately aid in tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment. Congruent to the overall vision, Consortium members have additionally established an integrated facilities core to streamline M. tuberculosis structural biology and developed bioinformatics resources for data mining. This review aims to share the latest Consortium developments with the TB community, including recent structures of proteins that play significant roles within M. tuberculosis. Atomic resolution details may unravel mechanistic insights and reveal unique and novel protein features, as well as important protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, which ultimately leads to a better understanding of M. tuberculosis biology and may be exploited for rational, structure-based therapeutics design. PMID:21247804

  6. Co-morbid anxiety and depression among pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Aamir, Siddiqua; Aisha

    2010-10-01

    The need to recognize and manage psychiatric co-morbidity in tuberculosis (TB) patients in primary care settings in order to improve adherence to the treatment is now well documented. Pulmonary TB patients at the District TB Control Office and TB Centre in Haripur from December 2007 to March 2008 were evalute in order to assess the frequency of anxiety and depression and continuation of treatment. Forty seven out of 65 (72%) TB patients had severe/moderate level of anxiety and depression according to Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Fourteen (22%) TB patients with co-morbid anxiety and depression showed multi drug-resistance (MDR-TB).

  7. Best practice in the diagnosis and management of urogenital tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kulchavenya, Ekaterina

    2013-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a current public health problem, remaining the most common worldwide cause of mortality from infectious diseases. Urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB) is the second most common form of extrapulmonary TB in countries with severe epidemic situations and the third most common form in regions with a low incidence of TB. In this article we present the terminology, epidemiology and classification of UGTB, as well as describing the laboratory findings and clinical features and approaches to chemotherapy as well as surgery.

  8. [Drug-resistant tuberculosis. Epidemiology, diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Grobusch, M P; Schaumburg, F; Altpeter, E; Bélard, S

    2016-02-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is one of the serious problems in the fight against tuberculosis on a global scale. This review article describes in brief the global epidemiology, diagnostics and treatment of DR-TB. The situation in Germany, Switzerland and Austria is addressed in detail. The article concludes with a presentation of current research topics in the field of resistant TB.

  9. Systematic review of mathematical models exploring the epidemiological impact of future TB vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Rebecca C.; Sumner, Tom; Knight, Gwenan M.; White, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mathematical models are useful for assessing the potential epidemiological impact of future tuberculosis (TB) vaccines. We conducted a systematic review of mathematical models estimating the epidemiological impact of future human TB vaccines. PubMed, Embase and WHO Global Health Library were searched, 3-stage manual sifted, and citation- and reference-tracked, identifying 23 papers. An adapted quality assessment tool was developed, with a resulting median study quality score of 20/28. The literature remains divided as to whether vaccines effective pre- or post-infection would provide greatest epidemiological impact. However, all-age or adolescent/adult targeted prevention of disease vaccines achieve greater and more rapid impact than neonatal vaccines. Mass campaigns alongside routine neonatal vaccination can have profound additional impact. Economic evaluations found TB vaccines overwhelmingly cost-effective, particularly when targeted to adolescents/adults. The variability of impact by setting, age group and vaccine characteristics must be accounted for in the development and delivery of future TB vaccines. PMID:27448625

  10. Tuberculosis in Africa: learning from pathogenesis for biomarker identification.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Parida, Shreemanta K

    2008-09-11

    In Africa, more than 4 million people suffer from active tuberculosis (TB) resulting in an estimated 650,000 deaths every year. The etiologic agent of TB, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, survives in resting macrophages, which control the pathogen after activation by specific T lymphocytes. Here, we describe the basic mechanisms underlying the host response to TB with an emphasis on immunity and discuss diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines for TB. Moreover, we outline our attempts to develop biomarkers, which could help the monitoring of TB clinical trials, provide the basis for new diagnostics, and allow prognosis of outcome of infection and of drug treatment.

  11. Global Burden of Childhood Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Helen E.

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared tuberculosis (TB) to be responsible for more deaths than any other single infectious disease. The burden of TB among children has frequently been dismissed as relatively low with resulting deaths contributing very little to global under-five all-cause mortality, although without rigorous estimates of these statistics, the burden of childhood TB was, in reality, unknown. Recent work in the area has resulted in a WHO estimate of 1 million new cases of childhood TB in 2014 resulting in 136,000 deaths. Around 3% of these cases likely have multidrug-resistant TB and at least 40,000 are in HIV-infected children. TB is now thought to be a major or contributory cause of many deaths in children under five years old, despite not being recorded as such, and is likely in the top ten causes of global mortality in this age group. In particular, recent work has shown that TB is an under-lying cause of a substantial proportion of pneumonia deaths in TB-endemic countries. Childhood TB should be given higher priority: we need to identify children at greatest risk of TB disease and death and make more use of tools such as active case-finding and preventive therapy. TB is a preventable and treatable disease from which no child should die. PMID:28003956

  12. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, Somalia, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Sindani, Ireneaus; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Falzon, Dennis; Suleiman, Bashir; Arube, Peter; Adam, Ismail; Baghdadi, Samiha; Bassili, Amal; Zignol, Matteo

    2013-03-01

    In a nationwide survey in 2011, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) was found in 5.2% and 40.8% of patients with new and previously treated TB, respectively. These levels of drug resistance are among the highest ever documented in Africa and the Middle East. This finding presents a serious challenge for TB control in Somalia.

  13. T7 Phage Display Library a Promising Strategy to Detect Tuberculosis Specific Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Harvinder; Talreja, Jaya; Samavati, Lobelia

    2016-01-01

    One-third of the world's population is infected with tuberculosis, only 10% will develop active disease and the remaining 90% is considered to have latent TB (LTB). While active TB is contagious and can be lethal, the LTB can evolve to active TB. The diagnosis of TB can be challenging, especially in the early stages, due to the variability in presentation and nonspecific signs and symptoms. Currently, we have limited tools available to diagnose active TB, predict treatment efficacy and cure of active tuberculosis, the reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection, and the induction of protective immune responses through vaccination. Therefore, the identification of robust and accurate tuberculosis-specific biomarkers is crucial for the successful eradication of TB. In this commentary, we summarized the available methods for diagnosis and differentiation of active TB from LTB and their limitations. Additionally, we present a novel peptide microarray platform as promising strategy to identify TB biomarkers. PMID:27867751

  14. Field application of serodiagnostics to identify elephants with Tuberculosis prior to case confirmation by culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three serologic methods for antibody detection in elephant tuberculosis (TB), multiantigen print immunoassay (MAPIA), ElephantTB STAT-PAK kit, and DPP VetTB test, were validated prospectively using serial serum samples from 14 captive elephants in 5 countries which were diagnosed with TB by positive...

  15. Global Efforts in the Development of Vaccines for Tuberculosis: Requirements for Improved Vaccines Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, P

    2016-10-01

    Currently, more than 9.0 million people develop acute pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) each year and about 1.5 million people worldwide die from this infection. Thus, developing vaccines to prevent active TB disease remains a priority. This article discusses recent progress in the development of new vaccines against TB and focusses on the main requirements for development of improved vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). Over the last two decades, significant progress has been made in TB vaccine development, and some TB vaccine candidates have currently completed a phase III clinical trial. The potential public health benefits of these vaccines are possible, but it will need much more effort, including new global governance investment on this research. This investment would certainly be less than the annual global financial toll of TB treatment.

  16. Tuberculosis. Digging deep in the soul of humanity.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the oldest infectious diseases that affected humankind. A quintessential social disease, TB remains one of the world's deadliest communicable diseases, with still a high mortality and burden of disease. Social representations of TB focus on aspects associated to feelings and manifestations awakened by the disease, sometimes reinforcing stigmas and prejudices about the way of perceiving TB. TB is a historic disease now reborn with a deeper social stigma. Despite the modest reduction in TB incidence worldwide, its incidence is still rising in certain crisis-affected populations like refugees, and in those bearing high prevalence of HIV, persisting poverty, especially in the developing world. Fear and stigma may appear justified with the increasing rates of multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB, and now extremely drug resistant (XDR) TB. However, stigmatization of TB poses serious obstacles to current TB control efforts, as socio-cultural aspects can influence adherence to TB treatment.

  17. Optimal intervention strategies for tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowong, Samuel; Aziz Alaoui, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of optimal control of a deterministic model of tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus). We first present and analyze an uncontrolled tuberculosis model which incorporates the essential biological and epidemiological features of the disease. The model is shown to exhibit the phenomenon of backward bifurcation, where a stable disease-free equilibrium co-exists with one or more stable endemic equilibria when the associated basic reproduction number is less than the unity. Based on this continuous model, the tuberculosis control is formulated and solved as an optimal control problem, indicating how control terms on the chemoprophylaxis and detection should be introduced in the population to reduce the number of individuals with active TB. Results provide a framework for designing the cost-effective strategies for TB with two intervention methods.

  18. Understanding social context on TB cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyanto, Y.; Wati, D. M.

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) nowadays still becomes one of the world’s deadliest communicable disease. More than half were in South-East Asia and Western Pacific Regions, including Indonesia. As developing country, Indonesia remains classic problems in overcoming TB, that is discontinuation on treatment. Most of discontinuation on treatment among TB patients are affected by diagnostic delay that caused by patient delay. These phenomena occur in many areas, rural to suburb, coastal to plantation, and so on, and they are related with social context among community that could be social capital for each community to deal with TB. Jember as one of county in East Java is known as plantation area. It also has a high prevalence of TB. This study focused on understanding about social context among community, especially on plantation area. This cross-sectional study involved in three districts of Jember, those are Tanggul, Pakusari, and Kalisat. The data were obtained directly from the TB patients, local community, and Primary Health Care (PHC) where the patients recorded. Spatial analysis and social network analysis (SNA) were applied to obtain health seeking behavior pattern among the TB patients coincide the community. Most of TB patients had already chosen health professionals to lead the treatment, although some of them remained to choose self-medication. Meanwhile, SNA showed that religious leader was considered as main part of countermeasures of TB. But they didn’t ever become central figures. So it can be concluded that there are other parts among community who can contribute due to combatting on TB.

  19. Toward eradication: the effect of Mycobacterium bovis infection in wildlife on the evolution and future direction of bovine tuberculosis management in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, PG; Hancox, N; Nugent, G; de Lisle, GW

    2015-01-01

    Abstract New Zealand's bovine tuberculosis (TB) control programme has greatly reduced the burden of tuberculosis on the farming industry, from 11% of mature cattle found with TB at slaughter in 1905 to <0.003% in 2012/13. New Zealand implemented TB control measures in cattle from the mid-twentieth century, and later in farmed deer. Control was based on established methods of tuberculin testing of herds, slaughter of suspect cases, and livestock movement control. Unexplained regional control failures and serious disease outbreaks were eventually linked to wildlife-vectored infection from the introduced Australian brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), which also triggered a wildlife disease complex involving a range of introduced species. This paper reviews the progressive elucidation of the epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis in New Zealand's wildlife and farmed livestock, and the parallel development of research-led, multi-faceted TB control strategies required to protect New Zealand's livestock industries from damaging infection levels. The adoption of coordinated national pest management strategies, with increasingly ambitious objectives agreed between government and industry funders, has driven a costly but very successful management regime targeted at controlling TB in the possum maintenance host. This success has led to initiation of a strategy designed to eradicate TB from New Zealand's livestock and wildlife, which is considered a realistic long-term prospect. PMID:25273888

  20. Pathology of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Domingo, M; Vidal, E; Marco, A

    2014-10-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a chronic granulomatous caseous-necrotising inflammatory process that mainly affects the lungs and their draining lymph nodes (Ln.). The pathological changes associated with bTB infection reflect the interplay between the host defence mechanisms and the mycobacterial virulence factors and the balance between the immunologic protective responses and the damaging inflammatory processes. Inhalation is the most common infection route and causes lesions of the nasopharynx and lower respiratory tract, including its associated lymph nodes. The initial infection (primary complex) may be followed by chronic (post-primary) tuberculosis or may be generalised. Goat tuberculosis often produces liquefactive necrosis and caverns, similarly to human TB. The assessment of the severity of TB lesions is crucial for vaccine trials. Semi-quantitative gross lesion scoring systems have been developed for cattle, but imaging technology has allowed the development of more standardised, objective, and quantitative methods, such as multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), which provides quantitative measures of lesion volume.

  1. 76 FR 26239 - Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis... framework being developed for the bovine tuberculosis and brucellosis programs in the United States. The... tuberculosis (TB) and bovine brucellosis in the United States. In keeping with its commitment to...

  2. 76 FR 38602 - Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Program Framework

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Program Framework AGENCY... extending the comment period on a new framework being developed for the bovine tuberculosis and brucellosis... (USDA) is currently developing proposed revisions to its programs regarding bovine tuberculosis (TB)...

  3. 69 FR 52506 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-08-26

    ... Tuberculosis In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the... Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET). Times and Dates: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., October 6, 2004. 8... Director, CDC, regarding the elimination of tuberculosis (TB). Specifically, the Council...

  4. 68 FR 52401 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2003-09-03

    ... Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... following council meeting. Name: Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET). Times and... tuberculosis (TB). Specifically, the Council makes recommendations regarding policies, strategies,...

  5. 71 FR 37583 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2006-06-30

    ... Tuberculosis In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the... Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET). Times and Dates: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., July 26, 2006. 8:30... Director, CDC, regarding the elimination of tuberculosis (TB). Specifically, the Council...

  6. 69 FR 30300 - Tuberculosis Elimination and Laboratory Cooperative Agreements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-05-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Tuberculosis Elimination and Laboratory... Tuberculosis (TB) Elimination Cooperative Agreement Program is to assist the current efforts of State and local... in tuberculosis to State and local health agencies and other partners. Working with State and...

  7. 71 FR 62112 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2006-10-23

    ... Tuberculosis In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the... Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET). Times and Dates: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., December 5, 2006; 8... the elimination of tuberculosis (TB). Specifically, the Council makes recommendations...

  8. 79 FR 43923 - Approved Tests for Bovine Tuberculosis in Cervids

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2014-07-29

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Approved Tests for Bovine Tuberculosis in... comments. SUMMARY: We are amending the regulations regarding official tuberculosis tests for captive cervids to remove the CervidTB Stat- Pak as an official bovine tuberculosis test for the following...

  9. 70 FR 24048 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2005-05-06

    ... Tuberculosis In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the... Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET). Times and Dates: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., June 8, 2005., 8:30... Director, CDC, regarding the elimination of tuberculosis (TB). Specifically, the Council...

  10. 69 FR 29958 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-05-26

    ... Tuberculosis In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the... Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET). Times and Dates: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., June 23, 2004. 8:30... the Director, CDC, regarding the elimination of tuberculosis (TB). Specifically, the Council...

  11. 79 FR 53430 - Georgia Tuberculosis Outbreak Among Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2014-09-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Georgia Tuberculosis Outbreak Among Homeless... Department of Public Health, Tuberculosis (TB) Program. This award will be in the amount of $419,095.00. The purpose of this award is to halt the further spread of a drug- resistant strain of tuberculosis...

  12. 71 FR 3519 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2006-01-23

    ... Tuberculosis In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the... Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET). Times and Dates: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., February 15, 2006... elimination of tuberculosis (TB). Specifically, the council makes recommendations regarding...

  13. 78 FR 1718 - Approved Tests for Bovine Tuberculosis in Cervids

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Approved Tests for Bovine Tuberculosis in... comments. SUMMARY: We are adding the CervidTB Stat-Pak and DPP tests as official tuberculosis tests for the... of antibodies to bovine tuberculosis in certain species of captive cervids. This action is...

  14. Real Time Measurement of Host Bioenergetics During Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0149 TITLE: Real Time Measurement of Host Bioenergetics During Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection ... Tuberculosis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Infection 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0149 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...resistant state, sometimes reactivating to cause tuberculosis (TB) decades after the primary infection , has puzzled scientists for years. This

  15. Imaging of gastrointestinal and abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Vanhoenacker, F M; De Backer, A I; Op de, Beeck B; Maes, M; Van Altena, R; Van Beckevoort, D; Kersemans, P; De Schepper, A M

    2004-03-01

    This article discusses the range of manifestations of tuberculosis (TB) of the abdomen, including involvement of the gastrointestinal tract, the peritoneum, mesentery, omentum, abdominal lymph nodes, solid abdominal organs, the genital system and the abdominal aorta. Abdominal TB is a diagnostic challenge, particularly when pulmonary TB is absent. It may mimic many other abdominal diseases, both clinically and radiologically. An early correct diagnosis, however, is important in order to ensure proper treatment and a favorable outcome. Modern imaging is a cornerstone in the early diagnosis of abdominal TB and may prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. Generally, CT appears to be the imaging modality of choice in the detection and assessment of abdominal tuberculosis, other than gastrointestinal TB. Barium studies remain superior for demonstrating mucosal intestinal lesions. Ultrasound may be used for follow-up to monitor therapy response. The diagnosis of abdominal TB should be considered if suggestive imaging findings are found in patients with a high index of suspicion.

  16. Public Transportation and Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Pérez, Héctor J.; Sánchez, Inma; Bedoya, Alfredo; Martín, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    The association between public transportation for commuting and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) was analyzed in workers in Lima, Peru. Traveling in minibuses was a risk factor for pulmonary TB. Preventive measures need to be taken by health services to prevent spread of this disease. PMID:18257992

  17. Tuberculosis in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Jéssica Fernandes; Batista, Marjorie Vieira; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    Literature on tuberculosis (TB) occurring in recipients of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) is scanty even in countries where TB is common. Most reports of TB in HSCT patients were from ASIA, in fact the TB incidence ranging from 0.0014 (USA) to 16% (Pakistan). There are few reports of TB diagnosis during the first two weeks after HSCT; most of cases described in the literature occurred after 90 days of HSCT, and the lung was the organ most involved. The mortality ranged from 0 to 50% and is higher in allogeneic HSCT than in autologous. There is no consensus regarding the screening with tuberculin skin test or QuantiFERON-TB gold, primary prophylaxis for latent TB, and whether the epidemiologic query should be emphasized in developing countries with high prevalence of TB. PMID:24363876

  18. Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Yee Man Tracy; Pillinger, Toby; Luqmani, Asad; Cooper, Nichola

    2015-01-01

    Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare, potentially fatal condition that can be primary or secondary. Secondary HLH can occur in association with infections, most commonly viral infections, but has also been reported in association with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). Prompt identification of the underlying cause of HLH is important as it guides treatment decisions. Early initiation of appropriate treatment (eg, anti-TB treatment) reduces morbidity and mortality. We present a case of HLH associated with TB infection. Initial TB investigations were negative and standard combination chemoimmunotherapy for HLH resulted in a limited clinical response. On apparent relapse of HLH, further investigation revealed TB with changes on CT chest, granuloma on bone marrow and eventual positive TB culture on bronchoalveolar lavage. Subsequent treatment with quadruple anti-TB treatment resulted in rapid clinical response and disease remission. We advocate continued monitoring for TB infection in patients with HLH, and prophylaxis or full treatment for those at high risk. PMID:25870214

  19. Perspectives on tuberculosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew; Ahmed, Yusuf; Kapata, Nathan; Maeurer, Markus; Mwaba, Peter; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has been recognized as an important cause of morbidity and mortality in pregnancy for nearly a century, but research and efforts to roll out comprehensive TB screening and treatment in high-risk populations such as those with a high prevalence of HIV or other diseases of poverty, have lagged behind similar efforts to address HIV infection in pregnancy and the prevention of mother-to-child-transmission. Immunological changes during pregnancy make the activation of latent TB infection or de novo infection more likely than among non-pregnant women. TB treatment in pregnancy poses several problems that have been under-researched, such as contraindications to anti-TB and anti-HIV drugs and potential risks to the neonate, which are particularly important with respect to second-line TB treatment. Whilst congenital TB is thought to be rare, data from high HIV burden settings suggest this is not the case. There is a need for more studies screening for TB in neonates and observing outcomes, and testing preventative or curative actions. National tuberculosis control programmes (NTPs) should work with antenatal and national HIV programmes in high-burden populations to provide screening at antenatal clinics, or to establish functioning systems whereby pregnant women at high risk can drop in to routine NTP screening stations.

  20. Barriers and Delays in Tuberculosis Diagnosis and Treatment Services: Does Gender Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei-Teng; Gounder, Celine R.; Akande, Tokunbo; De Neve, Jan-Walter; McIntire, Katherine N.; Chandrasekhar, Aditya; de Lima Pereira, Alan; Gummadi, Naveen; Samanta, Santanu; Gupta, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global public health problem with known gender-related disparities. We reviewed the quantitative evidence for gender-related differences in accessing TB services from symptom onset to treatment initiation. Methods. Following a systematic review process, we: searched 12 electronic databases; included quantitative studies assessing gender differences in accessing TB diagnostic and treatment services; abstracted data; and assessed study validity. We defined barriers and delays at the individual and provider/system levels using a conceptual framework of the TB care continuum and examined gender-related differences. Results. Among 13,448 articles, 137 were included: many assessed individual-level barriers (52%) and delays (42%), 76% surveyed persons presenting for care with diagnosed or suspected TB, 24% surveyed community members, and two-thirds were from African and Asian regions. Many studies reported no gender differences. Among studies reporting disparities, women faced greater barriers (financial: 64% versus 36%; physical: 100% versus 0%; stigma: 85% versus 15%; health literacy: 67% versus 33%; and provider-/system-level: 100% versus 0%) and longer delays (presentation to diagnosis: 45% versus 0%) than men. Conclusions. Many studies found no quantitative gender-related differences in barriers and delays limiting access to TB services. When differences were identified, women experienced greater barriers and longer delays than men. PMID:24876956

  1. Barriers and delays in tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment services: does gender matter?

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Teng; Gounder, Celine R; Akande, Tokunbo; De Neve, Jan-Walter; McIntire, Katherine N; Chandrasekhar, Aditya; de Lima Pereira, Alan; Gummadi, Naveen; Samanta, Santanu; Gupta, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global public health problem with known gender-related disparities. We reviewed the quantitative evidence for gender-related differences in accessing TB services from symptom onset to treatment initiation. Methods. Following a systematic review process, we: searched 12 electronic databases; included quantitative studies assessing gender differences in accessing TB diagnostic and treatment services; abstracted data; and assessed study validity. We defined barriers and delays at the individual and provider/system levels using a conceptual framework of the TB care continuum and examined gender-related differences. Results. Among 13,448 articles, 137 were included: many assessed individual-level barriers (52%) and delays (42%), 76% surveyed persons presenting for care with diagnosed or suspected TB, 24% surveyed community members, and two-thirds were from African and Asian regions. Many studies reported no gender differences. Among studies reporting disparities, women faced greater barriers (financial: 64% versus 36%; physical: 100% versus 0%; stigma: 85% versus 15%; health literacy: 67% versus 33%; and provider-/system-level: 100% versus 0%) and longer delays (presentation to diagnosis: 45% versus 0%) than men. Conclusions. Many studies found no quantitative gender-related differences in barriers and delays limiting access to TB services. When differences were identified, women experienced greater barriers and longer delays than men.

  2. Mucosal BCG Vaccination Induces Protective Lung-Resident Memory T Cell Populations against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Carolina; Zedler, Ulrike; Kühl, Anja A.; Lozza, Laura; Saikali, Philippe; Sander, Leif E.; Vogelzang, Alexis; Kupz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), yet its moderate efficacy against pulmonary TB calls for improved vaccination strategies. Mucosal BCG vaccination generates superior protection against TB in animal models; however, the mechanisms of protection remain elusive. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been implicated in protective immune responses against viral infections, but the role of TRM cells following mycobacterial infection is unknown. Using a mouse model of TB, we compared protection and lung cellular infiltrates of parenteral and mucosal BCG vaccination. Adoptive transfer and gene expression analyses of lung airway cells were performed to determine the protective capacities and phenotypes of different memory T cell subsets. In comparison to subcutaneous vaccination, intratracheal and intranasal BCG vaccination generated T effector memory and TRM cells in the lung, as defined by surface marker phenotype. Adoptive mucosal transfer of these airway-resident memory T cells into naive mice mediated protection against TB. Whereas airway-resident memory CD4+ T cells displayed a mixture of effector and regulatory phenotype, airway-resident memory CD8+ T cells displayed prototypical TRM features. Our data demonstrate a key role for mucosal vaccination-induced airway-resident T cells in the host defense against pulmonary TB. These results have direct implications for the design of refined vaccination strategies. PMID:27879332

  3. [The diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Sekiya; Sakaguchi, Nobuki; Hotta, Jyunnichi

    2012-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infects all organs in the body; however, lung infection is the primary lesion. The total number of infections is decreasing, but the percentage of infections in older people is rising. Because this disease is due to infection with M. tuberculosis, the diagnosis requires the presence of M. tuberculosis. Chest X-ray and CT are very powerful tools to suggest the presence of M. tuberculosis infection. Pathological examination of the tissues also shows the typical findings of M. tuberculosis infection; however, the presence of the bacterium was not proven in certain cases of M. tuberculosis infection, and especially in cases of latent infection. Recently, the whole-blood interferon--gamma test (QuantiFERON-TB, QFT) became more popular than the tuberculin skin test. It is reported that the specificity and sensitivity of QFT are similar to or better than the tuberculin skin test. However, it should be noted that QFT positive does not automatically lead to a diagnosis of active M. tuberculosis infection and that QFT is one of the supplementary tests in the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection. Currently, massive infection with M. tuberculosis is increasing. The precise responsible linkage in massive infection with M. tuberculosis needs DNA polymorphism analysis using variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTR) or restricted fragment length polymorphism (RFLP).

  4. 29 CFR 1904.11 - Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a positive... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases... Forms and Recording Criteria § 1904.11 Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases. (a)...

  5. 29 CFR 1904.11 - Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a positive... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases... Forms and Recording Criteria § 1904.11 Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases. (a)...

  6. 29 CFR 1904.11 - Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a positive... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases... Forms and Recording Criteria § 1904.11 Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases. (a)...

  7. 29 CFR 1904.11 - Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a positive... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases... Forms and Recording Criteria § 1904.11 Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases. (a)...

  8. 29 CFR 1904.11 - Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a positive... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases... Forms and Recording Criteria § 1904.11 Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases. (a)...

  9. Timing of antiretroviral therapy and TB treatment outcomes in patients with TB-HIV in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Shewade, H. D.; Kyaw, N. T. T.; Oo, M. M.; Aung, T. K.; Aung, S. T.; Oo, H. N.; Win, T.; Harries, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Integrated HIV Care programme, Mandalay, Myanmar. Objectives: To determine time to starting antiretroviral treatment (ART) in relation to anti-tuberculosis treatment (ATT) and its association with TB treatment outcomes in patients co-infected with tuberculosis (TB) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enrolled from 2011 to 2014. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Results: Of 1708 TB-HIV patients, 1565 (92%) started ATT first and 143 (8%) started ART first. Treatment outcomes were missing for 226 patients and were thus not included. In those starting ATT first, the median time to starting ART was 8.6 weeks. ART was initiated after 8 weeks in 830 (53%) patients. Unsuccessful outcome was found in 7%, with anaemia being an independent predictor. In patients starting ART first, the median time to starting ATT was 21.6 weeks. ATT was initiated within 3 months in 56 (39%) patients. Unsuccessful outcome was found in 12%, and in 20% of those starting ATT within 3 months. Patients with CD4 count <100/mm3 had a four times higher risk of an unsuccessful outcome. Conclusions: Timing of ART in relation to ATT was not an independent risk factor for unsuccessful outcome. Extensive screening for TB with rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests in HIV-infected persons and close monitoring of anaemia and immunosuppression are recommended to further improve TB treatment outcomes among patients with TB-HIV. PMID:27358804

  10. Comparison of bacteriological conversion and treatment outcomes among MDR-TB patients with and without diabetes in Mexico: Preliminary data.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Torrico, M; Caminero Luna, J; Migliori, G B; D'Ambrosio, L; Carrillo-Alduenda, J L; Villareal-Velarde, H; Torres-Cruz, A; Flores-Ergara, H; Martínez-Mendoza, D; García-Sancho, C; Centis, R; Salazar-Lezama, M Á; Pérez-Padilla, R

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a well-known risk factor for tuberculosis (TB). However, it is not known to what extent DM affects the outcome in patients with multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) treated with second-line anti-TB drugs. The objective of this study was to compare the microbiological evolution (sputum smear and culture conversion) and final outcomes of MDR/XDR-TB patients with and without DM, managed at the national TB reference centre in Mexico City.

  11. The START Study to evaluate the effectiveness of a combination intervention package to enhance antiretroviral therapy uptake and retention during TB treatment among TB/HIV patients in Lesotho: rationale and design of a mixed-methods, cluster-randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Andrea A.; Hirsch-Moverman, Yael; Frederix, Koen; Daftary, Amrita; Saito, Suzue; Gross, Tal; Wu, Yingfeng; Maama, Llang Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Background Initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) early during tuberculosis (TB) treatment increases survival; however, implementation is suboptimal. Implementation science studies are needed to identify interventions to address this evidence-to-program gap. Objective The Start TB Patients on ART and Retain on Treatment (START) Study is a mixed-methods, cluster-randomized trial aimed at evaluating the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and acceptability of a combination intervention package (CIP) to improve early ART initiation, retention, and TB treatment success among TB/HIV patients in Berea District, Lesotho. Design Twelve health facilities were randomized to receive the CIP or standard of care after stratification by facility type (hospital or health center). The CIP includes nurse training and mentorship, using a clinical algorithm; transport reimbursement and health education by village health workers (VHW) for patients and treatment supporters; and adherence support using text messaging and VHW. Routine data were abstracted for all newly registered TB/HIV patients; anticipated sample size was 1,200 individuals. A measurement cohort of TB/HIV patients initiating ART was recruited; the target enrollment was 384 individuals, each to be followed for the duration of TB treatment (6–9 months). Inclusion criteria were HIV-infected; on TB treatment; initiated ART within 2 months of TB treatment initiation; age ≥18; English- or Sesotho-speaking; and capable of informed consent. The exclusion criterion was multidrug-resistant TB. Three groups of key informants were recruited from intervention clinics: early ART initiators; non/late ART initiators; and health care workers. Primary outcomes include ART initiation, retention, and TB treatment success. Secondary outcomes include time to ART initiation, adherence, change in CD4+ count, sputum smear conversion, cost-effectiveness, and acceptability. Follow-up and data abstraction are complete. Discussion The START

  12. Optimal Control for TB disease with vaccination assuming endogeneous reactivation and exogeneous reinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggriani, N.; Wicaksono, B. C.; Supriatna, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the deadliest infectious disease in the world which caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The disease is spread through the air via the droplets from the infectious persons when they are coughing. The World Health Organization (WHO) has paid a special attention to the TB by providing some solution, for example by providing BCG vaccine that prevent an infected person from becoming an active infectious TB. In this paper we develop a mathematical model of the spread of the TB which assumes endogeneous reactivation and exogeneous reinfection factors. We also assume that some of the susceptible population are vaccinated. Furthermore we investigate the optimal vaccination level for the disease.

  13. Tuberculosis immunity: Opportunities from studies with cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. bovis are closely related (>99% genetic identity), inducing similar host responses and disease expression upon infection. There is a rich history of co-discovery in the development of control measures applicable to both human and bovine tuberculosis (TB) including s...

  14. [Tuberculosis in the Czech Republic in 1999].

    PubMed

    Trnka, L; Danková, D; Krejbich, F; Svandová, E

    2000-11-08

    Report is given on the tuberculosis (TB) prevalence and the new diseases monitoring in Czech Republic (CR) in 1999 using the register of notifiable TB diseases. 1631 new TB cases and relapse were notified (15.9/100,000 citizens). Majority TB cases, 1369 (13.3/100,000 citizens) were of the respiratory system and 262 TB cases were in other locations. 63% of the respiratory system diseases were bacteriologically verified. In comparison with the year 1998, the number of newly notified TB patients was 9.6% lower, number of TB cases of the respiratory system which were bacteriologically verified was 12.3% lower, cases of microscopically positive TB were 17.4% less frequent. Among the notified TB patients there were 91 foreigners. TB relapse was identified in 61 patients. Among the notified TB cases, 987 (60.5%) were males and 644 (39.5%) were females. In both sexes patients over 65 predominated. Prevalence of TB cases higher than the average for the whole state was found in Prague, northern and western Bohemia. Groups with TB prevalence higher than 50/100,000 citizens were identified (the risk groups). They include homeless people, drug addicts, asylum applicants, and prisoners. Due to subjective troubles of patients TB was diagnosed in 70.2% cases, by active investigation in 13.9% patients. Late TB diagnosis at autopsy came in 6.8% cases. Decease due to TB was notified in 79 patients. In 77 of them TB had not been diagnosed premortally. 106 new cases and relapses of non-TB mycobacterial disease were notified in 1999. The case of tuberculosis in CR was in 1999 restrainable. In comparison with 1998 significant decrease of TB prevalence in individual subgroups of TB disease was described (10 to 17%). Also the decrease of the long-term trend (10 years) of newly notified TB patients and TB of the respiratory system was depicted. It is necessary to maintain the quality and extend of the TB control program in order to prevent the new outbreak of TB disease.

  15. TAIMA (Stop) TB: The Impact of a Multifaceted TB Awareness and Door-to-Door Campaign in Residential Areas of High Risk for TB in Iqaluit, Nunavut

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Gonzalo G.; VanDyk, Deborah D.; Aaron, Shawn D.; Cameron, D. William; Davies, Naomi; Stephen, Natasha; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Momoli, Franco; Moreau, Katherine; Obed, Natan; Baikie, Maureen; Osborne, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Background The incidence rate of active tuberculosis (TB) disease in the Canadian Territory of Nunavut has shown a rising trend over the past 10 years. In 2010 it was 60 times greater than the national incidence rate. The objective of the Taima (translates to “stop” in Inuktitut) TB study was to implement and evaluate a public health campaign to enhance existing TB prevention efforts in Nunavut. Methods A TB awareness campaign followed by a door-to-door screening campaign was carried out in Iqaluit, Nunavut. The aim of the campaign was to raise awareness about TB, and to provide in-home screening and treatment for people living in residential areas at high risk for TB. Screening was based on geographic location rather than on individual risk factors. Results During the general awareness campaign an increase in the number of people who requested TB testing at the local public health clinic was observed. However, this increase was not sustained following cessation of the awareness campaign. Targeted TB screening in high risk residential areas in Iqaluit resulted in 224 individuals having TSTs read, and detection of 42 previously unidentified cases of latent TB, (overall yield of 18.8% or number needed to screen = 5.3). These cases of latent TB infection (LTBI) were extra cases that had not been picked up by traditional screening practices (34% relative increase within the community). This resulted in a 33% relative increase in the completion of LTBI treatment within the community. The program directly and indirectly identified 5/17 new cases of active TB disease in Iqaluit during the study period (29.5% of all incident cases). Conclusions While contact tracing investigations remain a cornerstone of TB prevention, additional awareness, screening, and treatment programs like Taima TB may contribute to the successful control of TB in Aboriginal communities. PMID:25033320

  16. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: an insurmountable epidemic?

    PubMed

    Chakroborty, Amitabha

    2011-06-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis has brought back the spectre of pre-antibiotic days. WHO surveillance data from 2007 showed multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB)-tubercle bacillus resistant to both isoniazid and rifampicin accounting for 4.8% of all new and subsequent cases of tuberculosis. India and China-the two most populated countries of the world, house the maximum number of drug-resistant tuberculosis cases. In eastern European and central Asian countries, more than 6% of new TB cases are MDR-TB, whereas the number is <3% in the countries of the western world. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has emerged with the prospect of tuberculosis becoming an incurable disease. A surveillance spreading over the six continents showed 10% of MDR-TB cases were also XDR-TB. The fact that tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic infection among HIV-infected patients in developing countries makes the challenge almost insurmountable. The mortality of HIV and MDR-TB co-infected patients is exceedingly high. The absence of guidelines for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis and of infrastructure for delivery of DOT program and rapid laboratory diagnostic facilities, including drug susceptibility testing for both first and second-line drugs, and lack of trained human resource in most of the developing world account for the emergence and perpetuation of this menacing problem. WHO along with partnership with Green Light Committee and individual national governments has started DOT plus program to control this global epidemic.

  17. Tuberculosis notifications in Australia, 2011.

    PubMed

    Bareja, Christina; Waring, Justin; Stapledon, Richard; Toms, Cindy; Douglas, Paul

    2014-12-31

    The National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System received 1,385 tuberculosis (TB) notifications in 2011, representing a rate of 6.2 cases per 100,000 population. While Australia has maintained a rate of 5 to 6 cases per 100,000 for TB since the mid-1980s, there has been a steady increase in incidence over the past decade. In 2011, Australia's overseas-born population continued to represent the majority of TB notifications (88%) with a notification rate of 20.2 per 100,000. The incidence of TB in the Australian-born Indigenous population has fluctuated over the last decade and showed no clear trend; however, in 2011 the notification rate was 4.9 per 100,000, which is a notable decrease from the 7.5 per 100,000 recorded in 2010. The incidence of TB in the Australian-born non-Indigenous population has continued to remain low at 0.9 per 100,000. Australia continued to record only a small number of multi-drug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) cases nationally (n=25), all of which were identified in the overseas-born population. To ensure that Australia can retain its low TB rate and work toward reducing rates further, it is essential that Australia maintains good centralised national TB reporting to monitor trends and identify at-risk populations, and continues to contribute to global TB control initiatives.

  18. Human Tuberculosis II. M. tuberculosis Mechanisms of Genetic and Phenotypic Resistance to Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs.

    PubMed

    Sgaragli, Giampietro; Frosini, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The great progress of knowledge of both M. tuberculosis physiology and how human host and bacilli interact has provided fertile ground for improving diagnosis and cure of TB infection. Once M. tuberculosis has infected humans, it elaborates strategies for evading the risk to killing by the cells of the host immune system and by the anti-tuberculosis (anti-TB) agents employed to cure infection. These strategies give rise to a bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) status. This stems firstly from genetic mutations targeting a constellation of drug-processing mechanisms that still need full identification, as drug efflux pumps and drug activating/ inactivating enzymes (genetic resistance). Secondly, from the bacterial adaptation to stressful environmental conditions by adopting a temporary dormancy state lasting for decades and characterized by indifference to anti-TB drugs (phenotypic resistance or tolerance). The clarification of the strategies elaborated for surviving by M. tuberculosis has brought to the identification in the last few years of a number of mycobacterial molecular targets worth to exploitation for the development of novel and powerful anti-TB drugs. These targets include drug-efflux pump systems, considered partly responsible for genetic multi-drug resistance, and several enzymes and pump systems, as well, that sustain the metabolic adaptations of M. tuberculosis in the host and give rise to its phenotypic drug resistance.

  19. The National Tuberculosis Programme and its implementation.

    PubMed

    Banerji, D

    1995-01-01

    India has formulated a nationally applicable, socially acceptable, and epidemiologically effective National Tuberculosis Program (NTP), which served as an example for many other countries. In the 1940s, the New Delhi Tuberculosis Center pioneered organized domiciliary treatment of TB cases; the Union Mission Tuberculosis Sanatorium, Madanapalle, had started conducting epidemiological surveys in the late 1930s; the 1954-56 national sample survey of TB is still considered a classic; and this was followed by outstanding longitudinal surveys and epidemiological studies demonstrating that BCG does not provide protection to adults against TB. Halfdan Mahler joined P.V. Benjamin in launching the National BCG Campaign in the 1950s. India demonstrated in the 1950s that home treatment of patients is as efficacious as sanatorium treatment. The National Tuberculosis Institute was set up in 1959 with the specific mandate of making TB services available to larger masses of people. Social science data were also collected to show that TB patients were seeking help from health institutions; they helped diagnose patients in remote rural areas, they proved that the TB program had to be part of the general health services, and they demonstrated the epidemiological potential of a felt-need oriented TB program. The NTP diagnosed TB cases in rural institutions by sputum examination and treated them with chemotherapy. The Tuberculosis Center at district headquarters (DTC) was responsible for providing training to health workers, keeping track of all TB cases and referring them. By 1983-84, the NTP program had been implemented in 353 districts and during that year 1,308,880 cases were treated. Nevertheless, hundreds of thousands of infectious patients are not treated because health authorities put priority on child immunization and are preoccupied with malaria and family planning. The indifference of the bureaucracy and public health leadership is to be blamed for thousands of TB deaths

  20. Litigation as TB Rights Advocacy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract One thousand people die every day in India as a result of TB, a preventable and treatable disease, even though the Constitution of India, government schemes, and international law guarantee available, accessible, acceptable, quality health care. Failure to address the spread of TB and to provide quality treatment to all affected populations constitutes a public health and human rights emergency that demands action and accountability. As part of a broader strategy, health activists in India employ Public Interest Litigation (PIL) to hold the state accountable for rights violations and to demand new legislation, standards for patient care, accountability for under-spending, improvements in services at individual facilities, and access to government entitlements in marginalized communities. Taking inspiration from right to health PIL cases (PILs), lawyers in a New Delhi-based rights organization used desk research, fact-findings, and the Right To Information Act to build a TB PIL for the Delhi High Court, Sanjai Sharma v. NCT of Delhi and Others (2015). The case argues that inadequate implementation of government TB schemes violates the Constitutional rights to life, health, food, and equality. Although PILs face substantial challenges, this paper concludes that litigation can be a crucial advocacy and accountability tool for people living with TB and their allies. PMID:27781000

  1. [Tuberculosis control of urban areas in Japan].

    PubMed

    2000-10-01

    The rates of tuberculosis remain high in urban areas. The declining speed of tuberculosis incidence rate in urban areas has been slower than other areas. Efforts and resources to tuberculosis control must be concentrated on urban locations to eradicate tuberculosis in Japan. 1. Tuberculosis control in a public health center of urban area: Teru OGURA and Chiyo INOGUCHI (Toshima City, Ikebukuro Public Health Center, Tokyo Metropolitan) A wide range of TB control measures is implemented by public health centers, such as a patient registration, home-visit guidance, contact examination in urban areas. Directors of every health center have the direct responsibility for tuberculosis control measures in their jurisdiction. Ikebukuro is urban areas where there are many offices, shopping and amusement facilities. Urban people is often on the move looking for job, so public health centers are often not easy to carry out contact examinations as planned. In recent years, homelessness has been recognized as a growing urban social problem. Their incidence of tuberculosis is high. Special TB control program must be carried out in urban areas. 2. Tuberculosis Control in Tokyo Metropolitan: Kazumasa MATSUKI (Department of Infectious Diseases and Tuberculosis, Bureau of Public Health, Tokyo Metropolitan) There has been a steady decline in the TB wards. The beds for TB patients are running short and even smear positive TB cases cannot be put in a hospital without waiting several days. Staffs of an urban emergency department must protect tuberculosis infection by environmental controls of emergency room. Tokyo Metropolitan government supports the engineering improvements of emergency room to hospitals. Directly observed therapy for tuberculosis patients at a district has been implemented to complete their therapy. On DOT, a trained health worker observes the patient take anti-TB medication. 3. Usefulness of Molecular Epidemiologic approach on Tuberculosis Control: Atsushi HASE (Osaka

  2. [Particular features of detection of patients with urogenital tuberculosis and their management].

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, V N; Golubev, D N; Novikov, B I; Skorniakov, S N; Medvinskiĭ, I D; Arkanov, L V; Cherniaev, I A; Borodin, É P; Verbetskiĭ, A F; Bobykin, E N

    2012-01-01

    The rate and trend in extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) incidence including urogenital tuberculosis (UTB) were estimated in population of the Sverdlovsk region for the last 25 years. Long-term results of treatment of 591 patients with different forms of UTB (renal parenchyma TB, tuberculosis papillitis, monocavernous and polycavernous renal TB, male genital TB) were studied. Ureter was involved in tuberculosis process in 24.7% of UTB cases, urinary bladder--in 20.1%, renal TB combined with male genital TB. Early (non-destructive) forms incidence increased 2.8-fold while advanced forms incidence decreased 1.7-fold. This shows an increased level of detection. Total number of patients operated in state hospitals with undetected, mostly complicated urogenital male tuberculosis remains high--from 7.3 to 16% from all newly detected patients.

  3. Tuberculosis of Glans Penis- A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Gangalakshmi, C.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) of penis is a very rare entity, even in developing countries. It may present as primary or secondary to Pulmonary TB (PTB). Penile TB mimics carcinoma penis, granulomatous penile ulcer, genital herpes simplex, granuloma inguinale and HIV infection. We, hereby, present the case of a 57-year-old male patient who presented to us with ulcerative growth over glans penis and was clinically diagnosed as carcinoma penis, however biopsy of the lesion showed evidence of tuberculosis which was supported by chest X-ray. PMID:28208927

  4. Clinical evaluation of QuantiFERON TB-2G test for immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Kobashi, Y; Mouri, K; Obase, Y; Fukuda, M; Miyashita, N; Oka, M

    2007-11-01

    The usefulness of the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the QuantiFERON TB-2G (QFT-TB) test were compared in immunocompromised patients. The subjects consisted of 252 immunocompromised patients who were clinically suspected of tuberculosis (TB) infection between April 2005 and December 2006. Regarding the underlying diseases, 74 subjects had malignant diseases, 72 were undergoing immunosuppressive treatment, 52 had diabetes mellitus, 50 had chronic renal failure and four had HIV infection. While the positive rate of the QFT-TB test for the diagnosis of TB infection (TB disease or latent TB infection) was 78.1%, that of TST for TB infection was 50.0%. The QFT-TB test was significantly better than TST. However, 32 (13%) patients had an indeterminate QFT-TB result. Indeterminate findings were significantly more frequent in patients receiving immunosuppressive treatment (28%), especially with lymphocytopaenia in the peripheral blood, than in those who had other underlying diseases. While TST-positive and QFT-TB test-negative results were recognised in immunocompromised patients with bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination or nontuberculous mycobacterial disease, TST-negative and QFT-TB test-positive results were recognised in immunocompromised patients with a past history of TB infection. It was concluded that the QuantiFERON TB-2G test is a more useful diagnostic method for tuberculosis infection than tuberculin skin test for immunocompromised patients suspected of tuberculosis disease. However, because the results of the QuantiFERON TB-2G test show an indeterminate response for patients receiving immunosuppressive treatment, especially for those with lymphocytopaenia due to severe underlying diseases, care must be taken in the interpretation of the QuantiFERON TB-2G test for these patients.

  5. Rv2744c Is a PspA Ortholog That Regulates Lipid Droplet Homeostasis and Nonreplicating Persistence in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Richard M.; Adams, Katherine L.; Zilisch, Joseph E.; Bretl, Daniel J.; Sato, Hiromi; Anderson, David M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite the availability of a live attenuated vaccine and anti-TB antibiotics. The vast majority of individuals infected with M. tuberculosis develop an asymptomatic latent infection in which the bacterium survives within host-generated granulomatous lesions in a physiologically altered metabolic state of nonreplicating persistence. The granuloma represents an adverse environment, as M. tuberculosis is exposed to various stressors capable of disrupting the essential constituents of the bacterium. In Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, resistance to cell envelope stressors that perturb the plasma membrane is mediated in part by proteins comprising the phage shock protein (Psp) system. PspA is an important component of the Psp system; in the presence of envelope stress, PspA localizes to the inner face of the plasma membrane, homo-oligomerizes to form a large scaffold-like complex, and helps maintain plasma membrane integrity to prevent a loss of proton motive force. M. tuberculosis and other members of the Mycobacterium genus are thought to encode a minimal functional unit of the Psp system, including an ortholog of PspA. Here, we show that Rv2744c possesses structural and physical characteristics that are consistent with its designation as a PspA family member. However, although Rv2744c is upregulated under conditions of cell envelope stress, loss of Rv2744c does not alter resistance to cell envelope stressors. Furthermore, Rv2744c localizes to the surface of lipid droplets in Mycobacterium spp. and regulates lipid droplet number, size, and M. tuberculosis persistence during anaerobically induced dormancy. Collectively, our results indicate that Rv2744c is a bona fide ortholog of PspA that may function in a novel role to regulate lipid droplet homeostasis and nonreplicating persistence (NRP) in M. tuberculosis

  6. Mass incarceration can explain population increases in TB and multidrug-resistant TB in European and central Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Stuckler, David; Basu, Sanjay; McKee, Martin; King, Lawrence

    2008-09-09

    Several microlevel studies have pinpointed prisons as an important site for tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug-resistant TB in European and central Asian countries. To date, no comparative analyses have examined whether rises in incarceration rates can account for puzzling differences in TB trends among overall populations. Using longitudinal TB and cross-sectional multidrug-resistant TB data for 26 eastern European and central Asian countries, we examined whether and to what degree increases in incarceration account for differences in population TB and multidrug-resistant TB burdens. We find that each percentage point increase in incarceration rates relates to an increased TB incidence of 0.34% (population attributable risk, 95% C.I.: 0.10-0.58%, P < 0.01), after controlling for TB infrastructure; HIV prevalence; and several surveillance, economic, demographic, and political indicators. Net increases in incarceration account for a 20.5% increase in TB incidence or nearly three-fifths of the average total increase in TB incidence in the countries studied from 1991 to 2002. Although the number of prisoners is a significant determinant of differences in TB incidence and multidrug-resistant TB prevalence among countries, the rate of prison growth is a larger determinant of these outcomes, and its effect is exacerbated but not confounded by HIV. Differences in incarceration rates are a major determinant of differences in population TB outcomes among eastern European and central Asian countries, and treatment expansion alone does not appear to resolve the effect of mass incarceration on TB incidence.

  7. Investigation of presumptive tuberculosis cases by private health providers: lessons learnt from a survey in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Fatima, R; Qadeer, E; Enarson, D A; Hinderaker, S G; Harris, R; Yaqoob, A; Bassili, A

    2014-06-21

    Pakistan's National Tuberculosis Control Programme (NTP) is missing data on many tuberculosis (TB) cases who visit private providers. A survey on the incidence and under-reporting of TB in Pakistan provided a database for exploring the investigation and referral of presumptive TB cases by private health providers. The survey showed that private health providers requested both sputum smear and X-ray for diagnostic investigations. Of 2161 presumptive TB cases referred, 1189 (55%) were sent for investigations to a district NTP TB centre, of whom only 314 (26.4%) were registered. This indicates an urgent need to strengthen the link between private health providers and NTP to enhance TB notification.

  8. Pregnancy outcomes in women with tuberculosis: a 10-year experience from an Indian tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Seema; Siwatch, Sujata; Aggarwal, Neelam; Sikka, Pooja; Suri, Vanita

    2016-08-30

    Our study sought to determine the characteristics of antenatal patients with tuberculosis (TB) and their pregnancy outcomes. Case records of 50 antenatal women with extra-pulmonary and pulmonary TB at a tertiary centre in India were compared to 150 antenatal women not suffering from TB, for adverse medical, obstetric and neonatal outcomes. The prevalence of TB was 1.16 per 1000 deliveries. Of these, 62% had extra-pulmonary TB. There were two maternal deaths. TB in pregnancy was associated with a five times higher risk of prematurity and three times higher risk of intrauterine growth restriction than the norm. Maternal prognosis depends on the complications of tuberculosis and treatment compliance.

  9. Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Recent Advances and Diagnostic Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) persists as a great public health problem in Korea. Increases in the overall age of the population and the rise of drug-resistant TB have reinforced the need for rapid diagnostic improvements and new modalities to detect TB and drug-resistant TB, as well as to improve TB control. Standard guidelines and recent advances for diagnosing pulmonary TB are summarized in this article. An early and accurate diagnosis of pulmonary TB should be established using chest X-ray, sputum microscopy, culture in both liquid and solid media, and nucleic acid amplification. Chest computed tomography, histopathological examination of biopsy samples, and new molecular diagnostic tests can be used for earlier and improved diagnoses, especially in patients with smear-negative pulmonary TB or clinically-diagnosed TB and drug-resistant TB. PMID:25861338

  10. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the United States-Affiliated Pacific Islands.

    PubMed

    Bamrah, Sapna; Desmond, Edward; Ghosh, Smita; France, Anne Marie; Kammerer, J Steve; Cowan, Lauren S; Heetderks, Andrew; Forbes, Alstead; Moonan, Patrick K

    2014-01-01

    The United States-Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) are part of the US National Tuberculosis (TB) Surveillance System and use laboratory services contracted through a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In 2004, the CDC established the National Tuberculosis Genotyping Service, a system to genotype 1 isolate from each culture-confirmed case of TB. To describe the molecular epidemiology of TB in the region, we examined all Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates submitted for genotyping from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2008. Over this time period, the USAPI jurisdictions reported 1339 verified TB cases to the National Tuberculosis Surveillance System. Among 419 (31%) reported culture-confirmed TB cases, 352 (84%) had complete genotype results. Routine TB genotyping allowed, for the first time, an exploration of the molecular epidemiology of TB in the USAPI.

  11. Epidemiology and control of Mycobacterium bovis infection in brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula), the primary wildlife host of bovine tuberculosis in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, G; Buddle, BM; Knowles, G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The introduced Australian brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) is a maintenance host for bovine tuberculosis (TB) in New Zealand and plays a central role in the TB problem in this country. The TB-possum problem emerged in the late 1960s, and intensive lethal control of possums is now used to reduce densities to low levels over 8 million ha of the country. This review summarises what is currently known about the pathogenesis and epidemiology of TB in possums, and how the disease responds to possum control. TB in possums is a highly lethal disease, with most possums likely to die within 6 months of becoming infected. The mechanisms of transmission between possums remain unclear, but appear to require some form of close contact or proximity. At large geographic scales, TB prevalence in possum populations is usually low (1–5%), but local prevalence can sometimes reach 60%. Intensive, systematic and uniform population control has been highly effective in breaking the TB cycle in possum populations, and where that control has been sustained for many years the prevalence of TB is now zero or near zero. Although some uncertainties remain, local eradication of TB from possums appears to be straightforward, given that TB managers now have the ability to reduce possum numbers to near zero levels and to maintain them at those levels for extended periods where required. We conclude that, although far from complete, the current understanding of TB-possum epidemiology, and the current management strategies and tactics, are sufficient to achieve local, regional, and even national disease eradication from possums in New Zealand. PMID:25290902

  12. Pathogen-derived biomarkers for active tuberculosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Paula; González-Sapienza, Gualberto; Marin, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by members of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Despite the availability of effective treatments, TB remains a major public health concern in most low and middle-income countries, representing worldwide the second leading cause of death from an infectious disease. Inadequate case detection and failures to classify the disease status hamper proper TB control. The limitations of the conventional diagnostic methods have encouraged much research activities in this field, but there is still an urgent need for an accurate point of care test for active TB diagnosis. A rapid, precise, and inexpensive TB diagnostic test would allow an earlier implementation of an appropriate treatment and the reduction of disease transmission. Pathogen-derived molecules present in clinical specimens of affected patients are being validated for that purpose. This short review aims to summarize the available data regarding biomarkers derived from M. tuberculosis, and their current usage in active TB diagnosis.

  13. Spinal tuberculosis in an infant associated with maternal urinary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Rachel Ranitha; Agarwal, Indira; Gibikote, Sridhar

    2012-07-01

    A ten-month-old infant who presented with regression of milestones and seizures was noted to have a gibbus deformity in the upper thoracic region. She was diagnosed to have spine and central nervous system tuberculosis by culture of pus from the paravertebral abcess which showed a growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The mother, who had been having recurrent episodes of Urinary tract infection, was diagnosed to have Urinary TB proven by culture. Spinal tuberculosis, though rare, can be encountered in infancy and should be kept in mind while treating infants presenting with related symptoms.

  14. Tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus: merging epidemics.

    PubMed

    Sen, Tiyas; Joshi, Shashank R; Udwadia, Zarir F

    2009-05-01

    The link between tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes mellitus (DM) has occupied the center stage of discussion. Experts have raised concern about the merging epidemics of tuberculosis and diabetes particularly in the low to medium income countries like India and China that have the highest burden of TB in the world, and are experiencing the fastest increase in the prevalence of DM. There is good evidence that DM makes a substantial contribution to TB incidence. The huge prevalence of DM in India, may be contributing to the increasing prevalence of TB. This review looks at the link between these two merging epidemics. We discuss the epidemiology, clinical features, microbiology and radiology, and management and treatment outcomes of patients with tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus.

  15. Tuberculosis surveillance in a therapeutic community.

    PubMed

    Foley, M E; Ehr, A P; Raza, B; Devlin, C J

    1995-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a chronic communicable bacterial infection of epidemic proportions in the United States, is more common among debilitated and immunocompromised persons, for example, alcoholics, drug abusers, and HIV/AIDS patients, than among the general population. Daytop Village Inc., a drug free therapeutic community for chemical dependency treatment, initiated a program of tuberculosis (TB) surveillance and prevention education with grant support. Continuous educational sessions for staff and residents have raised awareness of the threat of TB. From March 1991 until September 1992, 2,932 clients screened for TB found 272 (9.2%) PPD positive. Of these 272, 125 also tested for HIV found 28 (22.4%) HIV positive. The TB screening program had no negative impact on the retention rate of Daytop residents. With sufficient fiscal and personnel support, tuberculosis education, screening, and treatment has been naturally integrated into the primary care agenda within the therapeutic community model of drug abuse rehabilitation.

  16. Advocacy, partnership and political commitment for TB vaccine research.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Ole F; Chan, Sharon; Chappell, Janice; Guo, Yan; Leite, Luciana C C

    2016-08-01

    The 4th Global Forum on TB Vaccines, convened in Shanghai, China, from 21 - 24 April 2015, brought together a wide and diverse community involved in tuberculosis vaccine research and development to discuss the current status of, and future directions for this critical effort. This paper summarizes the sessions on Advancing the Pipeline: A Vision for the Next Decade, Engaging the BRICS: Basic Research to Manufacturing, and Regulatory and Access Issues for New TB Vaccines. Summaries of all sessions from the 4th Global Forum are compiled in a special supplement of Tuberculosis. [August 2016, Vol 99, Supp S1, S1-S30].

  17. Tuberculosis of spine

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vinod; Patgaonkar, P. R.; Nagariya, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the spine is one of the most common spine pathology in India. Over last 4 decades a lot has changed in the diagnosis, medical treatment and surgical procedures to treat this disorder. Further developments in diagnosis using molecular genetic techniques, more effective antibiotics and more aggressive surgical protocols have become essential with emergence of multidrug resistant TB. Surgical procedures such as single stage anterior and posterior stabilization, extrapleral dorsal spine anterior stabilization and endoscopic thoracoscopic surgeries have reduced the mortality and morbidity of the surgical procedures. is rapidly progressing. It is a challenge to treat MDR-TB Spine with late onset paraplegia and progressive deformity. Physicians must treat tuberculosis of spine on the basis of Culture and sensitivity. PMID:21572628

  18. Translating childhood tuberculosis case management research into operational policies.

    PubMed

    Safdar, N; Hinderaker, S G; Baloch, N A; Enarson, D A; Khan, M A; Morkve, O

    2011-08-01

    The control of childhood tuberculosis (TB) has been of low priority in TB programmes in high-burden settings. The objective of this paper was to describe the development and testing of tools for the management of childhood TB. The Pakistan National TB Control Programme embarked on a number of activities, including the establishment of policy guidelines for the management of childhood TB and later a guidance document, 'Case Management Desk Guide and Structured Monitoring', to demonstrate the implementation of childhood TB interventions in a programme context. Initial results showed improved case finding and treatment outcome in implementation sites compared with control districts. However, further programme attention is required to improve quality.

  19. Snapshot of Quantiferon TB gold testing in Northern Mexico.

    PubMed

    González-Salazar, F; Vargas-Villarreal, J; Garcialuna-Martínez, F J; Rivera, G; Moreno-Treviño, M G; Montfort-Gardeazabal, J M; Garcialuna-Martínez, E

    2011-12-01

    Most people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis have an asymptomatic condition named latent tuberculosis. These people do not have bacilli in the corporal secretions and are hard to diagnose by conventional laboratory tests. Diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in México is based on the tuberculin skin test (TST). This test has disadvantages, principally because the vaccine containing the Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is applied to 99% of this population and causes false positive TST outcomes. Recently, interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA) have been demonstrated to be a good test to detect latent tuberculosis with equal or better sensitivity to TST and without interference from BCG. However, in México the IGRA are an uncommon test due to the higher cost compared to TST. The main objective of this work was demonstrate the potential utility of the Quantiferon TB(®) gold in tube (QTB(®)-GIT) test to detect latent TB in a population from northern México. Samples from 106 subjects with close contact, or without contact, with actively infected TB patients were tested to detect LTBI. Our results show a significant difference between individuals in close contact with active TB patients (39.7%) compared to those without contact (3.2%), p < 0.01. The concordance between TST and QTB(®)-GIT was poor (κ = 0.31). Our preliminary results show that the QTB(®)-GIT has better capacity than TST to detect latent tuberculosis infection.

  20. The Characteristics of TB Epidemic and TB/HIV Co-Infection Epidemic: A 2007–2013 Retrospective Study in Urumqi, Xinjiang Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wang; Wei-Sheng, Zhang; Ahan, Alayi; Ci, Yan; Wei-Wen, Zhang; Ming-Qin, Cao

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was aimed to find out epidemiologic characteristic of tuberculosis (TB) cases, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positive cases among TB patients (TB/HIV co-infection) through demographic, temporal, and spatial study in Urumqi. Methods Descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression were applied to identify the epidemiologic characteristics and risk factors of TB epidemic and TB/HIV co-infection epidemic. All addresses of each TB case, TB/HIV co-infection case, and administrative street were transformed into geographical coordinate. Subsequently, the geocoded address for 82 streets was transformed into a dot map used as the basis of spatial datasets. In addition, the paper also used quantile map and the spatial scan statistic in order to identify the spatial distribution and spatial clusters of TB epidemic and TB/HIV co-infection epidemic. Result There was a declining trend of the notification rates of TB epidemic from 2007 to 2009, as well as a rising trend from 2010 to 2013. However, the notification rates of TB/HIV co-infection epidemic showed a rising trend from 2007 to 2010, and a declining trend from 2011 to 2013. Moreover, a significant share of TB epidemic and TB/HIV co-infection epidemic happened between the age of 15 to 45 years old, indicating an increase in risk of TB and TB/HIV infection. It is worth noting that the risk of HIV infection for male TB patients was 2.947 times (95% CI [2.178, 3.988]) than that of female patients. Han ethnicity and Uygur ethnicity in urban region accounted for a large proportion of total TB and TB/HIV co-infection cases. Most of the TB cases of minorities in Urumqi showed a statistically significant increase in risk of HIV infection than Han ethnicity in Urumqi. In addition, the spatial distribution of TB epidemic and TB/HIV co-infection epidemic was highly skewed. Most of the local clusters were located in urban area and rural-urban continuum where showed an increase in risk of TB and

  1. Turning the tide against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Padayatchi, Nesri; Naidu, Naressa; Friedland, Gerald; Naidoo, Kasavan; Conradie, Francesca; Naidoo, Kogieleum; O'Donnell, Max Roe

    2017-03-01

    Despite affecting men, women, and children for millennia, tuberculosis (TB) is the most neglected disease. In contrast, the global response to HIV has reached a defining moment. By uniting efforts, promptly integrating major scientific findings for both treatment and prevention, and scaling up services, the once inconceivable end to the HIV epidemic may no longer be an illusion. "The world has made defeating AIDS a top priority. This is a blessing. But TB remains ignored" - Nelson Mandela. While there is no doubt that revolutionary diagnostics and new and repurposed drugs have provided some hope in the fight against TB, it is evident that scientific advances on their own are inadequate to achieve the World Health Organization's ambitious goal to end TB by 2035. In this article, the consequences of a myopic and conventional biomedical approach to TB, which has ultimately permeated to the level of individual patient care, are highlighted.

  2. Characterization of hepatitis C infection in tuberculosis patients in an urban city in the USA.

    PubMed

    Campo, M; Shrestha, A; Oren, E; Thiede, H; Duchin, J; Narita, M; Crothers, K

    2014-07-01

    The impact of hepatitis C virus infection (HCI), the most common bloodborne virus infection in the USA, on outcome of active tuberculosis (TB) treatment is largely unknown. We aimed to describe characteristics of TB patients with hepatitis C virus infection (TB-HCI) in King County, Washington, including TB treatment duration and outcome. We reviewed 1510 records of patients treated for active TB at the Public Health - Seattle & King County Tuberculosis Control Program between 2000 and 2010, and identified 53 with HCI. Advanced age, being born in the USA, HIV infection, homelessness and injection drug use were independently associated with HCI in TB cases. Independent factors associated with increased treatment duration included HIV infection, excess alcohol use, extrapulmonary TB, and any drug-resistant TB disease. Our findings suggest that TB-HCI patients can be successfully treated for active TB without extending treatment duration.

  3. Systemic lupus erythematosus accompanying with renal tuberculosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Gao, Liang; Chen, Peng; Bu, Si-Yuan; Cao, De-Hong; Yang, Lu; Wei, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman, with a six-year history of well-controlled systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), complained of urinary frequency and urgency. After failure of commonly-used antibiotic therapy, mycobacterium tuberculosis was cultured from her urine and renal tuberculosis (TB) was diagnosed. However, she underwent right nephrectomy after the combination therapies of prednisone for SLE and anti-tuberculosis treatment for renal TB failed. To our knowledge, SLE accompanying renal TB is rare, and such a rapid deterioration in renal function has never been reported. PMID:26221395

  4. Cell Death and Autophagy in TB

    PubMed Central

    Moraco, Andrew H.; Kornfeld, Hardy

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has succeeded in infecting one third of the human race though inhibition or evasion of innate and adaptive immunity. The pathogen is a facultative intracellular parasite that uses the niche provided by mononuclear phagocytes for its advantage. Complex interactions determine whether the bacillus will or will not be delivered to acidified lysosomes, whether the host phagocyte will survive infection or die, and whether the timing and mode of cell death works to the advantage of the host or the pathogen. Here we discuss cell death and autophagy in TB. These fundamental processes of cell biology feature in all aspects of TB pathogenesis and may be exploited to the treatment or prevention of TB disease. PMID:25453227

  5. Updating and curating metabolic pathways of TB.

    PubMed

    Slayden, Richard A; Jackson, Mary; Zucker, Jeremy; Ramirez, Melissa V; Dawson, Clinton C; Crew, Rebecca; Sampson, Nicole S; Thomas, Suzanne T; Jamshidi, Neema; Sisk, Peter; Caspi, Ron; Crick, Dean C; McNeil, Michael R; Pavelka, Martin S; Niederweis, Michael; Siroy, Axel; Dona, Valentina; McFadden, Johnjoe; Boshoff, Helena; Lew, Jocelyne M

    2013-01-01

    The sequencing of complete genomes has accelerated biomedical research by providing information about the overall coding capacity of bacterial chromosomes. The original TB annotation resulted in putative functional assignment of ∼60% of the genes to specific metabolic functions, however, the other 40% of the encoded ORFs where annotated as conserved hypothetical proteins, hypothetical proteins or encoding proteins of unknown function. The TB research community is now at the beginning of the next phases of post-genomics; namely reannotation and functional characterization by targeted experimentation. Arguably, this is the most significant time for basic microbiology in recent history. To foster basic TB research, the Tuberculosis Community Annotation Project (TBCAP) jamboree exercise began the reannotation effort by providing additional information for previous annotations, and refining and substantiating the functional assignment of ORFs and genes within metabolic pathways. The overall goal of the TBCAP 2012 exercise was to gather and compile various data types and use this information with oversight from the scientific community to provide additional information to support the functional annotations of encoding genes. Another objective of this effort was to standardize the publicly accessible Mycobacterium tuberculosis reference sequence and its annotation. The greatest benefit of functional annotation information of genome sequence is that it fuels TB research for drug discovery, diagnostics, vaccine development and epidemiology.

  6. Vaccine approaches for bovine tuberculosis: Correlates of protection and relevance to human tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB), primarily due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans and Mycobacterium bovis in cattle, is a classic model of the One Health Concept. M. bovis Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) was first proven effective in cattle prior to use in humans. Recent experimental trials with cattle have d...

  7. The immune response to bovine tuberculosis: Correlates of protection and relevance to human tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB), primarily due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans and Mycobacterium bovis in cattle, is a classic model for demonstration of the One Health Concept. Early studies with cattle were instrumental in the development of the use of Koch’s tuberculin as an in vivo measure of cell-med...

  8. Understanding cutaneous tuberculosis: two clinical cases

    PubMed Central

    De Maio, Flavio; Trecarichi, Enrico Maria; Visconti, Elena; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Sali, Michela

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an ancient human disease and remains today one of the most important public health problems and the second most frequent cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide. While pulmonary TB is the most common form, extra-pulmonary TB is on the rise due to the increase in immunosuppressed subjects. Cutaneous TB manifestations are rare forms of extra-pulmonary TB due to systemic dissemination of bacilli or direct inoculation, involving skin or skin-associated tissue, more common in immunocompromised subjects. Some risk factors and the features of the lesion may prompt the suspicion of cutaneous TB, but only microbiological assays can confirm the diagnosis. Our work summarizes cutaneous TB manifestations and differences from other skin mycobacterial infections, also describes two characteristic clinical cases. PMID:28348793

  9. The Pregnane X Receptor in Tuberculosis Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Shehu, Amina I.; Li, Guangming; Xie, Wen; Ma, Xiaochao

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Among the infectious diseases, tuberculosis (TB) remains the second cause of death after HIV. TB treatment requires the combination of multiple drugs including the rifamycin class. However, rifamycins are activators of human pregnane X receptor (PXR), a transcription factor that regulates drug metabolism, drug resistance, energy metabolism, and immune response. Rifamycin-mediated PXR activation may affect the outcome of TB therapy. Areas covered This review describes the role of PXR in modulating metabolism, efficacy, toxicity, and resistance to anti-TB drugs; as well as polymorphisms of PXR that potentially affect TB susceptibility. Expert opinion The wide range of PXR functions aside mediating drug metabolism and toxicity in TB therapy is underappreciated and thus understudied. Further studies are needed to determine the overall impact of PXR activation on the outcome of TB therapy. PMID:26592418

  10. [Present and future perspectives for the rapid molecular diagnosis of TB and MDR-TB].

    PubMed

    Tanasescu, Mihaela; Didilescu, Cristian; Marica, Constantin

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is still one of the diseases with a major medical and social impact, and in terms of early diagnosis (which would imply a fair treatment and established at the time), difficulties related to the delay bacilli isolation in culture, decreased susceptibility testing methods to antituberculosis drugs, lack of methods for differentiation of M. Tuberculosis complex germs of non-TB Mycobacteria, may have important clinical implications. Traditional testing of anti-TB drug susceptibility on solid Löwenstein-Jensen medium (gold standard) or liquid media can only be performed using grown samples. Determining the time it takes up to 42 days on solid media and 12 days for liquid media. For MDR/XDR TB cases itis absolutely essential to reduce the detection time. In these cases rapid diagnostic methods prove their usefulness. Automatic testing in liquid medium, molecular hybridization methods are currently recommended by the current WHO guidelines. Rapid diagnosis of MDR-TBis extremely useful for the early establishment of an effective treatment tailored more accurately on the spectrum of sensitivity of the resistant strain (thus reducing the risk of developing additional resistance to other drugs) and control the spread of these strains. Genetic diagnostic methods, approved and recommended by the WHO, can reduce the time of diagnosis of TB case and, importantly, the case of MDR-TB. They do not replace the current standard diagnostic methods and resistance profile, but complete them in selected cases.

  11. Prevalence of Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Prison Inmates in Ethiopia, a Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Solomon; Haileamlak, Abraham; Wieser, Andreas; Pritsch, Michael; Heinrich, Norbert; Loscher, Thomas; Hoelscher, Michael; Rachow, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Setting Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major health problems in prisons. Objective This study was done to assess the prevalence and determinants of active tuberculosis in Ethiopian prisons. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2013 to December 2013 in 13 zonal prisons. All incarcerated inmates underwent TB symptom screening according to WHO criteria. From identified TB-suspects two sputum samples were analyzed using smear microscopy and solid culture. A standardized questionnaire assessing TB risk factors was completed for each TB suspect. Results 765 (4.9%) TB suspects were identified among 15,495 inmates. 51 suspects were already on anti-TB treatment (6.67%) and 20 (2.8%) new culture-confirmed TB cases were identified in the study, resulting in an overall TB prevalence of 458.1/100,000 (95%CI: 350-560/100,000). Risk factors for active TB were alcohol consumption, contact with a TB case before incarceration and no window in prison cell. HIV prevalence was not different between TB suspects and active TB cases. Further, the TB burden in prisons increased with advancing distance from the capital Addis Ababa. Conclusions The overall TB prevalence in Ethiopian prisons was high and extremely variable among different prisons. TB risk factors related to conditions of prison facilities and the impact of implemented TB control measures need to be further studied in order to improve TB control among inmates. PMID:26641654

  12. Addressing diabetes mellitus as part of the strategy for ending TB.

    PubMed

    Harries, Anthony D; Kumar, Ajay M V; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Lin, Yan; Zachariah, Rony; Lönnroth, Knut; Kapur, Anil

    2016-03-01

    As we enter the new era of Sustainable Development Goals, the international community has committed to ending the TB epidemic by 2030 through implementation of an ambitious strategy to reduce TB-incidence and TB-related mortality and avoiding catastrophic costs for TB-affected families. Diabetes mellitus (DM) triples the risk of TB and increases the probability of adverse TB treatment outcomes such as failure, death and recurrent TB. The rapidly escalating global epidemic of DM means that DM needs to be addressed if TB-related milestones and targets are to be achieved. WHO and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease's Collaborative Framework for Care and Control of Tuberculosis and Diabetes, launched in 2011, provides a template to guide policy makers and implementers to combat the epidemics of both diseases. However, more evidence is required to answer important questions about bi-directional screening, optimal ways of delivering treatment, integration of DM and TB services, and infection control. This should in turn contribute to better and earlier TB case detection, and improved TB treatment outcomes and prevention. DM and TB collaborative care can also help guide the development of a more effective and integrated public health approach for managing non-communicable diseases.

  13. Addressing diabetes mellitus as part of the strategy for ending TB

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Anthony D.; Kumar, Ajay M.V.; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Lin, Yan; Zachariah, Rony; Lönnroth, Knut; Kapur, Anil

    2016-01-01

    As we enter the new era of Sustainable Development Goals, the international community has committed to ending the TB epidemic by 2030 through implementation of an ambitious strategy to reduce TB-incidence and TB-related mortality and avoiding catastrophic costs for TB-affected families. Diabetes mellitus (DM) triples the risk of TB and increases the probability of adverse TB treatment outcomes such as failure, death and recurrent TB. The rapidly escalating global epidemic of DM means that DM needs to be addressed if TB-related milestones and targets are to be achieved. WHO and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease's Collaborative Framework for Care and Control of Tuberculosis and Diabetes, launched in 2011, provides a template to guide policy makers and implementers to combat the epidemics of both diseases. However, more evidence is required to answer important questions about bi-directional screening, optimal ways of delivering treatment, integration of DM and TB services, and infection control. This should in turn contribute to better and earlier TB case detection, and improved TB treatment outcomes and prevention. DM and TB collaborative care can also help guide the development of a more effective and integrated public health approach for managing non-communicable diseases. PMID:26884497

  14. [Evaluation of children with tuberculosis contact].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez C, Daniela; Moreno M, Claudia; Araya D, Andrea; González L, Marcela

    2010-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a worldwide infectious disease, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Koch bacilli), that has re-emerged since the decade of the 80's in relation to the pandemic of HIV infection. Chile has one of the lowest TB prevalence rates in Latin America. In children, TB exhibits some differences from adult disease in terms of pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and probability of progression from the infected state to disease, making it more difficult to diagnose and increasing the likelihood of developing the disease once the infection is acquired. There is a National Program for the Prevention and Control of TB that allows us to develop prevention and chemoprophylaxis strategies. This article summarizes these strategies to guide the study and management of children in contact with TB patients.

  15. Bedaquiline: a novel antitubercular drug for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nagabushan, H; Roopadevi, H S

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) are emerging global health threats. Bedaquiline is a new antituberculous drug belonging to the diarylquinoline class that efficiently inhibits the adenosine triphosphate synthase enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is a bactericidal and long-acting drug. It inhibits both dormant as well as replicating bacterial sub-populations and thus shortens the duration of TB treatment. This drug has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration in December 2012 for the management of multidrug resistant-TB. The drug marks the introduction of a new addition to the TB armamentarium after four decades.

  16. Review: New Vaccine Against Tuberculosis: Current Developments and Future Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun

    2009-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a global health threat. BCG was developed as an attenuated live vaccine for tuberculosis control nearly a century ago. Despite being the most widely used vaccine in human history, BCG is not an ideal vaccine and has two major limitations: its poor efficacy against adult pulmonary TB and its disconcerting safety in immunocompromised individuals. A safer and more effective TB vaccine is urgently needed. This review article discusses current strategies to develop the next generation of TB vaccines to replace BCG. While some progresses have been made in the past decade, significant challenges lie ahead.

  17. Intensified tuberculosis case finding amongst vulnerable communities in southern India.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K K; Ananthakrishnan, R; Jacob, A G; Das, M; Isaakidis, P; Kumar, A M V

    2015-12-21

    India mainly uses passive case finding to detect tuberculosis (TB) patients through the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP). An intensified case finding (ICF) intervention was conducted among vulnerable communities in two districts of Karnataka during July-December 2013; 658 sputum smear-positive TB cases were detected. The number of smear-positive cases detected increased by 8.8% relative to the pre-intervention period (July-December 2012) in intervention communities as compared to an 8.6% decrease in communities without the ICF intervention. ICF activities brought TB services closer to vulnerable communities, moderately increasing TB case detection rates.

  18. Tuberculosis Prevention in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Stephen J.; Bernardo, John; Daly, Jennifer S.; Husson, Robert

    2004-01-01

    To help college health services in all parts of the country improve their approach to latent tuberculosis, two Listservs were provided for them to post their questions on dealing with TB infection. In this article, the authors present some of the questions posted in the Listservs and their corresponding answers. In their answers, the authors have…

  19. Gender-Related Barriers and Delays in Accessing Tuberculosis Diagnostic and Treatment Services: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies

    PubMed Central

    Akande, Tokunbo; Shankar, Anita V.; McIntire, Katherine N.; Gounder, Celine R.; Gupta, Amita; Yang, Wei-Teng

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant global public health problem with known gender-related (male versus female) disparities. We reviewed the qualitative evidence (written/spoken narrative) for gender-related differences limiting TB service access from symptom onset to treatment initiation. Methods. Following a systematic process, we searched 12 electronic databases, included qualitative studies that assessed gender differences in accessing TB diagnostic and treatment services, abstracted data, and assessed study validity. Using a modified “inductive coding” system, we synthesized emergent themes within defined barriers and delays limiting access at the individual and provider/system levels and examined gender-related differences. Results. Among 13,448 studies, 28 studies were included. All were conducted in developing countries and assessed individual-level barriers; 11 (39%) assessed provider/system-level barriers, 18 (64%) surveyed persons with suspected or diagnosed TB, and 7 (25%) exclusively surveyed randomly sampled community members or health care workers. Each barrier affected both genders but had gender-variable nature and impact reflecting sociodemographic themes. Women experienced financial and physical dependence, lower general literacy, and household stigma, whereas men faced work-related financial and physical barriers and community-based stigma. Conclusions. In developing countries, barriers limiting access to TB care have context-specific gender-related differences that can inform integrated interventions to optimize TB services. PMID:24900921

  20. Leveling of Tuberculosis Incidence - United States, 2013-2015.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Jorge L; Mindra, Godwin; Haddad, Maryam B; Pratt, Robert; Price, Sandy F; Langer, Adam J

    2016-03-25

    After 2 decades of progress toward tuberculosis (TB) elimination with annual decreases of ≥0.2 cases per 100,000 persons (1), TB incidence in the United States remained approximately 3.0 cases per 100,000 persons during 2013-2015. Preliminary data reported to the National Tuberculosis Surveillance System indicate that TB incidence among foreign-born persons in the United States (15.1 cases per 100,000) has remained approximately 13 times the incidence among U.S.-born persons (1.2 cases per 100,000). Resuming progress toward TB elimination in the United States will require intensification of efforts both in the United States and globally, including increasing U.S. efforts to detect and treat latent TB infection, strengthening systems to interrupt TB transmission in the United States and globally, accelerating reductions in TB globally, particularly in the countries of origin for most U.S.

  1. Proteomics Based Biomarker Discovery to Aid in the Unambiguous Detection of Bovine Tuberculosis Infection in Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine Tuberculosis (TB) is a zoonotic infection caused by Mycobacterium bovis (MBO), a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. The disease is generally asymptomatic with a long incubation period and good early diagnostics are lacking. Current surveillance for bovine TB is a laborious mul...

  2. Vaccination of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) for protection against bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis and other related species in the M. tuberculosis complex, pose a serious continual threat to the health and economic wellbeing of wildlife, livestock, and humans worldwide. Wildlife reservoirs of bTB play a very important role in the epidemio...

  3. Lupus pleuritis: a relevant risk factor for pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pasoto, S G; Borba, E F; Bonfa, E; Shinjo, S K

    2010-12-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Clinical/laboratorial features of 1283 SLE patients (ACR criteria) followed at the Lupus Clinic were obtained from the electronic register database from 2001 to 2009. Pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed in 20 patients (1.6%) (TB+ group). As control group (TB-), 40 patients without tuberculosis matched for age, gender, ethnicity, age at SLE diagnosis, and disease duration were arbitrarily selected. All 20 patients of the TB+ group presented confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis from 1 to 23 years after SLE diagnosis (7.6 ± 8.1 years). Frequencies of previous SLE involvements (cutaneous, articular, hematological, renal, pericarditis, pneumonitis, and central nervous system) were alike in TB+ and TB- groups (p > 0.05). In contrast, prior pleuritis was more frequent in the TB+ group (40% vs. 5%, p = 0.001). In fact, pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed in 8/10 patients with previous pleuritis. Immunosuppressive and corticosteroid therapies at the moment of tuberculosis diagnosis were also similar in both groups (p > 0.05). We have identified pleuritis as a relevant risk factor for pulmonary tuberculosis, suggesting that previous pleural injury is a critical part of the complex interplay between altered immune system, socio-economic conditions, and increased susceptibility to this mycobacterial infection.

  4. Factors that influence current tuberculosis epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Millet, Juan-Pablo; Moreno, Antonio; Fina, Laia; del Baño, Lucía; Orcau, Angels; de Olalla, Patricia García; Caylà, Joan A

    2013-06-01

    According to WHO estimates, in 2010 there were 8.8 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) and 1.5 million deaths. TB has been classically associated with poverty, overcrowding and malnutrition. Low income countries and deprived areas, within big cities in developed countries, present the highest TB incidences and TB mortality rates. These are the settings where immigration, important social inequalities, HIV infection and drug or alcohol abuse may coexist, all factors strongly associated with TB. In spite of the political, economical, research and community efforts, TB remains a major global health problem worldwide. Moreover, in this new century, new challenges such as multidrug-resistance extension, migration to big cities and the new treatments with anti-tumour necrosis alpha factor for inflammatory diseases have emerged and threaten the decreasing trend in the global number of TB cases in the last years. We must also be aware about the impact that smoking and diabetes pandemics may be having on the incidence of TB. The existence of a good TB Prevention and Control Program is essential to fight against TB. The coordination among clinicians, microbiologists, epidemiologists and others, and the link between surveillance, control and research should always be a priority for a TB Program. Each city and country should define their needs according to the epidemiological situation. Local TB control programs will have to adapt to any new challenge that arises in order to respond to the needs of their population.

  5. CT of abdominal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, B.M.; Mann, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    Intraabdominal tuberculosis (TB) presents with a wide variety of clinical and radiologic features. Besides the reported computed tomographic (CT) finding of high-density ascites in tuberculous peritonitis, this report describes additional CT features highly suggestive of abdominal tuberculosis in eight cases: (1) irregular soft-tissue densities in the omental area; (2) low-density masses surrounded by thick solid rims; (3) a disorganized appearance of soft-tissue densities, fluid, and bowel loops forming a poorly defined mass; (4) low-density lymph nodes with a multilocular appearance after intravenous contrast administration; and (5) possibly high-density ascites. The differential diagnosis of these features include lymphoma, various forms of peritonitis, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and peritoneal mesothelioma. It is important that the CT features of intraabdominal tuberculosis be recognized in order that laparotomy be avoided and less invasive procedures (e.g., laparoscopy, biopsy, or a trial of antituberculous therapy) be instituted.

  6. Map the gap: missing children with drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, C. M.; Rodriguez, C. A.; Keshavjee, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The lack of published information about children with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is an obstacle to efforts to advocate for better diagnostics and treatment. Objective: To describe the lack of recognition in the published literature of MDR-TB and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) in children. Design: We conducted a systematic search of the literature published in countries that reported any MDR- or XDR-TB case by 2012 to identify MDR- or XDR-TB cases in adults and in children. Results: Of 184 countries and territories that reported any case of MDR-TB during 2005–2012, we identified adult MDR-TB cases in the published literature in 143 (78%) countries and pediatric MDR-TB cases in 78 (42%) countries. Of the 92 countries that reported any case of XDR-TB, we identified adult XDR-TB cases in the published literature in 55 (60%) countries and pediatric XDR-TB cases for 9 (10%) countries. Conclusion: The absence of publications documenting child MDR- and XDR-TB cases in settings where MDR- and XDR-TB in adults have been reported indicates both exclusion of childhood disease from the public discourse on drug-resistant TB and likely underdetection of sick children. Our results highlight a large-scale lack of awareness about children with MDR- and XDR-TB. PMID:26400601

  7. Exploring anti-TB leads from natural products library originated from marine microbes and medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueting; Chen, Caixia; He, Wenni; Huang, Pei; Liu, Miaomiao; Wang, Qian; Guo, Hui; Bolla, Krishna; Lu, Yan; Song, Fuhang; Dai, Huanqin; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Lixin

    2012-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and TB-HIV co-infection have become a great threat to global health. However, the last truly novel drug that was approved for the treatment of TB was discovered 40 years ago. The search for new effective drugs against TB has never been more intensive. Natural products derived from microbes and medicinal plants have been an important source of TB therapeutics. Recent advances have been made to accelerate the discovery rate of novel TB drugs including diversifying strategies for environmental strains, high-throughput screening (HTS) assays, and chemical diversity. This review will discuss the challenges of finding novel natural products with anti-TB activity from marine microbes and plant medicines, including biodiversity- and taxonomy-guided microbial natural products library construction, target- and cell-based HTS, and bioassay-directed isolation of anti-TB substances from traditional medicines.

  8. Beyond pills and tests: addressing the social determinants of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Tom; Tovar, Marco A; Huff, Doug; Boccia, Delia; Saunders, Matthew J; Datta, Sumona; Montoya, Rosario; Ramos, Eric; Lewis, James J; Gilman, Robert H; Evans, Carlton

    2016-12-01

    Poverty drives tuberculosis (TB) rates but the approach to TB control has been disproportionately biomedical. In 2015, the World Health Organization's End TB Strategy explicitly identified the need to address the social determinants of TB through socio-economic interventions. However, evidence concerning poverty reduction and cost mitigation strategies is limited. The research described in this article, based on the 2016 Royal College of Physicians Linacre Lecture, aimed to address this knowledge gap. The research was divided into two phases: the first phase was an analysis of a cohort study identifying TB-related costs of TB-affected households and creating a clinically relevant threshold above which those costs became catastrophic; the second was the design, implementation and evaluation of a household randomised controlled evaluation of socio-economic support to improve access to preventive therapy, increase TB cure, and mitigate the effects of catastrophic costs. The first phase showed TB remains a disease of people living in poverty - 'free' TB care was unaffordable for impoverished TB-affected households and incurring catastrophic costs was associated with as many adverse TB treatment outcomes (including death, failure of treatment, lost to follow-up and TB recurrence) as multidrug resistant (MDR) TB. The second phase showed that, in TB-affected households receiving socio-economic support, household contacts were more likely to start and adhere to TB preventive therapy, TB patients were more likely to be cured and households were less likely to incur catastrophic costs. In impoverished Peruvian shantytowns, poverty remains inextricably linked with TB and incurring catastrophic costs predicted adverse TB treatment outcome. A novel socio-economic support intervention increased TB preventive therapy uptake, improved TB treatment success and reduced catastrophic costs. The impact of the intervention on TB control is currently being evaluated by the Community

  9. Associations between national tuberculosis program budgets and tuberculosis outcomes: an ecological study

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Will; Katz, Alan Roy; Li, Dongmei

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study is to explore the associations between national tuberculosis program (NTP) budget allocation and tuberculosis related outcomes in the World Health Organization's 22 high burden countries from 2007–2009. Methods This ecological study used mixed effects and generalized estimating equation models to identify independent associations between NTP budget allocations and various tuberculosis related outcomes. Models were adjusted for a number of independent variables previously noted to be associated with tuberculosis incidence. Results Increasing the percent of the NTP budget for advocacy, communication and social mobilization was associated with an increase in the case detection rate. Increasing TB-HIV funding was associated with an increase in HIV testing among TB patients. Increasing the percent of the population covered by the Directly Observed Therapy (DOT) program was associated with an increase in drug susceptibility testing. Laboratory funding was positively associated with tuberculosis notification. Increasing the budgets for first line drugs, management and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) was associated with a decrease in smear positive deaths. Conclusion Effective TB control is a complex and multifaceted challenge. This study revealed a number of budget allocation related factors associated with improved TB outcome parameters. If confirmed with future longitudinal studies, these findings could help guide NTP managers with allocation decisions. PMID:23024825

  10. The Transcriptional Signature of Active Tuberculosis Reflects Symptom Status in Extra-Pulmonary and Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Blankley, Simon; Graham, Christine M.; Turner, Jacob; Berry, Matthew P. R.; Bloom, Chloe I.; Xu, Zhaohui; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Breen, Ronan; Santis, George; Blankenship, Derek M.; Lipman, Marc; O’Garra, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is a leading cause of infectious death worldwide. Gene-expression microarray studies profiling the blood transcriptional response of tuberculosis (TB) patients have been undertaken in order to better understand the host immune response as well as to identify potential biomarkers of disease. To date most of these studies have focused on pulmonary TB patients with gene-expression profiles of extra-pulmonary TB patients yet to be compared to those of patients with pulmonary TB or sarcoidosis. Methods A novel cohort of patients with extra-pulmonary TB and sarcoidosis was recruited and the transcriptional response of these patients compared to those with pulmonary TB using a variety of transcriptomic approaches including testing a previously defined 380 gene meta-signature of active TB. Results The 380 meta-signature broadly differentiated active TB from healthy controls in this new dataset consisting of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB. The top 15 genes from this meta-signature had a lower sensitivity for differentiating extra-pulmonary TB from healthy controls as compared to pulmonary TB. We found the blood transcriptional responses in pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB to be heterogeneous and to reflect the extent of symptoms of disease. Conclusions The transcriptional signature in extra-pulmonary TB demonstrated heterogeneity of gene expression reflective of symptom status, while the signature of pulmonary TB was distinct, based on a higher proportion of symptomatic individuals. These findings are of importance for the rational design and implementation of mRNA based TB diagnostics. PMID:27706152

  11. Pediatric Tuberculosis in Italian Children: Epidemiological and Clinical Data from the Italian Register of Pediatric Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Galli, Luisa; Lancella, Laura; Tersigni, Chiara; Venturini, Elisabetta; Chiappini, Elena; Bergamini, Barbara Maria; Codifava, Margherita; Venturelli, Cristina; Tosetti, Giulia; Marabotto, Caterina; Cursi, Laura; Boccuzzi, Elena; Garazzino, Silvia; Tovo, Pier Angelo; Pinon, Michele; Le Serre, Daniele; Castiglioni, Laura; Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Guarino, Alfredo; Bruzzese, Eugenia; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Castagnola, Elio; Bossi, Grazia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi; Esposito, Susanna; Bosis, Samantha; Grandolfo, Rita; Fiorito, Valentina; Valentini, Piero; Buonsenso, Danilo; Domenici, Raffaele; Montesanti, Marco; Salvini, Filippo Maria; Riva, Enrica; Dodi, Icilio; Maschio, Francesca; Abbagnato, Luisa; Fiumana, Elisa; Fornabaio, Chiara; Ballista, Patrizia; Portelli, Vincenzo; Bottone, Gabriella; Palladino, Nicola; Valenzise, Mariella; Vecchi, Barbara; Di Gangi, Maria; Lupi, Carla; Villani, Alberto; de Martino, Maurizio

    2016-06-17

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Over the last decades, TB has also emerged in the pediatric population. Epidemiologic data of childhood TB are still limited and there is an urgent need of more data on very large cohorts. A multicenter study was conducted in 27 pediatric hospitals, pediatric wards, and public health centers in Italy using a standardized form, covering the period of time between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2012. Children with active TB, latent TB, and those recently exposed to TB or recently adopted/immigrated from a high TB incidence country were enrolled. Overall, 4234 children were included; 554 (13.1%) children had active TB, 594 (14.0%) latent TB and 3086 (72.9%) were uninfected. Among children with active TB, 481 (86.8%) patients had pulmonary TB. The treatment of active TB cases was known for 96.4% (n = 534) of the cases. Overall, 210 (39.3%) out of these 534 children were treated with three and 216 (40.4%) with four first-line drugs. Second-line drugs where used in 87 (16.3%) children with active TB. Drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were reported in 39 (7%) children. Improving the surveillance of childhood TB is important for public health care workers and pediatricians. A non-negligible proportion of children had drug-resistant TB and was treated with second-line drugs, most of which are off-label in the pediatric age. Future efforts should concentrate on improving active surveillance, diagnostic tools, and the availability of antitubercular pediatric formulations, also in low-endemic countries.

  12. Pediatric Tuberculosis in Italian Children: Epidemiological and Clinical Data from the Italian Register of Pediatric Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Luisa; Lancella, Laura; Tersigni, Chiara; Venturini, Elisabetta; Chiappini, Elena; Bergamini, Barbara Maria; Codifava, Margherita; Venturelli, Cristina; Tosetti, Giulia; Marabotto, Caterina; Cursi, Laura; Boccuzzi, Elena; Garazzino, Silvia; Tovo, Pier Angelo; Pinon, Michele; Le Serre, Daniele; Castiglioni, Laura; Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Guarino, Alfredo; Bruzzese, Eugenia; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Castagnola, Elio; Bossi, Grazia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi; Esposito, Susanna; Bosis, Samantha; Grandolfo, Rita; Fiorito, Valentina; Valentini, Piero; Buonsenso, Danilo; Domenici, Raffaele; Montesanti, Marco; Salvini, Filippo Maria; Riva, Enrica; Dodi, Icilio; Maschio, Francesca; Abbagnato, Luisa; Fiumana, Elisa; Fornabaio, Chiara; Ballista, Patrizia; Portelli, Vincenzo; Bottone, Gabriella; Palladino, Nicola; Valenzise, Mariella; Vecchi, Barbara; Di Gangi, Maria; Lupi, Carla; Villani, Alberto; de Martino, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Over the last decades, TB has also emerged in the pediatric population. Epidemiologic data of childhood TB are still limited and there is an urgent need of more data on very large cohorts. A multicenter study was conducted in 27 pediatric hospitals, pediatric wards, and public health centers in Italy using a standardized form, covering the period of time between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2012. Children with active TB, latent TB, and those recently exposed to TB or recently adopted/immigrated from a high TB incidence country were enrolled. Overall, 4234 children were included; 554 (13.1%) children had active TB, 594 (14.0%) latent TB and 3086 (72.9%) were uninfected. Among children with active TB, 481 (86.8%) patients had pulmonary TB. The treatment of active TB cases was known for 96.4% (n = 534) of the cases. Overall, 210 (39.3%) out of these 534 children were treated with three and 216 (40.4%) with four first-line drugs. Second-line drugs where used in 87 (16.3%) children with active TB. Drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were reported in 39 (7%) children. Improving the surveillance of childhood TB is important for public health care workers and pediatricians. A non-negligible proportion of children had drug-resistant TB and was treated with second-line drugs, most of which are off-label in the pediatric age. Future efforts should concentrate on improving active surveillance, diagnostic tools, and the availability of antitubercular pediatric formulations, also in low-endemic countries. PMID:27322255

  13. Modulation of the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis during malaria/M. tuberculosis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Chukwuanukwu, R C; Onyenekwe, C C; Martinez-Pomares, L; Flynn, R; Singh, S; Amilo, G I; Agbakoba, N R; Okoye, J O

    2017-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) causes significant morbidity and mortality on a global scale. The African region has 24% of the world's TB cases. TB overlaps with other infectious diseases such as malaria and HIV, which are also highly prevalent in the African region. TB is a leading cause of death among HIV-positive patients and co-infection with HIV and TB has been described as a syndemic. In view of the overlapping epidemiology of these diseases, it is important to understand the dynamics of the immune response to TB in the context of co-infection. We investigated the cytokine response to purified protein derivative (PPD) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from TB patients co-infected with HIV or malaria and compared it to that of malaria- and HIV-free TB patients. A total of 231 subjects were recruited for this study and classified into six groups; untreated TB-positive, TB positive subjects on TB drugs, TB- and HIV-positive, TB- and malaria-positive, latent TB and apparently healthy control subjects. Our results demonstrate maintenance of interferon (IFN)-γ production in HIV and malaria co-infected TB patients in spite of lower CD4 counts in the HIV-infected cohort. Malaria co-infection caused an increase in the production of the T helper type 2 (Th2)-associated cytokine interleukin (IL)-4 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in PPD-stimulated cultures. These results suggest that malaria co-infection diverts immune response against M. tuberculosis towards a Th-2/anti-inflammatory response which might have important consequences for disease progression.

  14. Progression to active tuberculosis, but not transmission, varies by M. tuberculosis lineage in The Gambia

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Bouke C.; Hill, Philip C.; Aiken, Alex; Awine, Timothy; Antonio, Martin; Adetifa, Ifedayo M.; Jackson-Sillah, Dolly J.; Fox, Annette; DeRiemer, Kathryn; Gagneux, Sebastien; Borgdorff, Martien W.; McAdam, Keith P.W.J.; Corrah, Tumani; Small, Peter M.; Adegbola, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Considerable variability exists in the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. We hypothesized that M. africanum was less likely than M. tuberculosis to transmit and progress to tuberculosis disease. In a cohort study of tuberculosis patients and their household contacts in the Gambia, we categorized 1,808 HIV negative tuberculosis contacts according to exposure to M. tuberculosis or to M. africanum. A positive skin test indicated transmission and development of tuberculosis during 2 years of follow-up indicated progression to disease. Transmission was similar, but progression to disease was significantly lower in contacts exposed to M. africanum than to M. tuberculosis (1.0% vs 2.9%; Hazard Ratio (HR) 3.1, 95% CI 1.1–8.7). Within M. tuberculosis sensu stricto, contacts exposed to a Beijing family strain were most likely to progress to disease (5.6%; HR 6.7 (2.0–22) relative to M. africanum). M. africanum and M. tuberculosis transmit equally well to household contacts, but contacts exposed to M. africanum are less likely to progress to tuberculosis disease than those exposed to M. tuberculosis. The variable rate of progression by lineage suggests that TB variability matters in clinical settings and should be taken into account in studies evaluating tuberculosis vaccines and treatment regimens for latent tuberculosis infection. PMID:18702608

  15. [TUBERCULOSIS ANNUAL REPORT 2014--(1) Summary of Statistics on Tuberculosis Notification and Foreign-born Tuberculosis Patients].

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    This brief is the first of a series of documents based on the Tuberculosis Annual Report 2014. It includes a summary of tuberculosis (TB) statistics, including data on foreign-born TB patients notified and registered in Japan in 2014. For the first time, the number of newly notified cases (all forms of TB) fell below 20,000. In 2014, a total of 19,615 patients were notified, a rate of 15.4 per 100,000 population The number of sputum-smear positive pulmonary. TB patients notified was 7,651, a rate of 6.0 per 100,000 population. The number of patients with latent TB infections increased slightly from 7,147 in 2013 to 7,562 in 2014. The proportion of miliary TB cases has constantly increased over the past 10 years, especially among women aged 80 years and older. The number of foreign-born TB patients continued to increase from 1,064 in 2013 to 1,101 in 2014. In 2014, new foreign-born TB patients aged 20-29 years accounted for 44.1% of all new TB patients in that age group. Among foreign-born TB patients, half were from the Philippines (26.5%) and China (23.5%). However, the number of patients from Vietnam and Nepal is increasing. Among foreign-born TB patients, 28% were regular employees, 26% were students, and 20% were unemployed. The changing trend in the nationality of foreign students entering Japan may at least partially explain the differences in TB burden among foreign-born patients, by country of birth. As we expect to see the proportion of foreign-born TB patients continue to rise, more tailored case identification and treatment support activities are needed.

  16. [Management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Tritar, F; Daghfous, H; Ben Saad, S; Slim-Saidi, L

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant TB in many countries has become a major public health problem and an obstacle to effective tuberculosis control. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), which is most often the result of poor adherence, is a particularly dangerous form of tuberculosis because it is caused by bacilli resistant to at least isoniazid and rifampicin, the two most effective anti-tuberculosis drugs. Techniques for rapid diagnosis of resistance have greatly improved the care of patients by allowing early treatment which remains complex and costly establishment, and requires skills and resources. The treatment is not standardized but it includes in all cases attack phase with five drugs (there must be an injectable agent and a fluoroquinolone that form the basis of the regimen) for eight months and a maintenance phase (without injectable agent) with a total duration of 20 months on average. Surgery may be beneficial as long as the lesions are localized and the patient has a good cardiorespiratory function. Evolution of MDR-TB treated is less favorable than tuberculosis with germ sensitive. The cure rate varies from 60 to 75% for MDR-TB, and drops to 30 to 40% for XDR-TB. Mortality remains high, ranging from 20 to 40% even up to 70-90% in people co-infected with HIV.

  17. Medical management of genitourinary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kadhiravan, Tamilarasu; Sharma, Surendra K

    2008-07-01

    Antimycobacterial chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for the majority of patients with genitourinary tuberculosis (GUTB). A large body of evidence from clinical trials suggests that short-course chemotherapy regimens, employing four drugs including rifampicin and pyrazinamide, achieve cure in most of the patients with tuberculosis (TB) and are associated with the lowest rates of relapse. Standard six-month regimens are adequate for the treatment of GUTB. Directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS) is the internationally recommended comprehensive strategy to control TB, and directly observed treatment is just one of its five elements. DOTS cures not only the individual with TB but also reduces the incidence of TB as well as the prevalence of primary drug-resistance in the community. Corticosteroids have no proven role in the management of patients with GUTB. Errors in prescribing anti-TB drugs are common in clinical practice. Standardized treatment regimens at correct doses and assured completion of treatment have made DOTS the present-day standard of care for the management of all forms of TB including GUTB.

  18. HIV-associated pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nunn, P

    1991-11-01

    The problems of diagnosis, treatment and management of tuberculosis associated with HIV infection in Africa are placed in perspective by the former director of the Kenya Medical Research Institute. Tuberculosis (TB) has increased as much as 3-fold in many African countries due to heightened susceptibility of HIV patients. HIV infection may both re-activate latent TB, which virtually all Africans harbor, or increase the likelihood of exogenous infection or re-infection by TB. In most of Africa diagnosis by stained sputum smear is standard: in late AIDS, this method may yield false negatives due to non-pulmonary TB, or pulmonary TB with a negative smear. Chest x-rays are also atypical, since cavitation of the upper zones is not as common, but lobar consolidation and lower zone involvement, and various unusual findings are likely. There is no evidence that mycobacterium avium intracellular has occurred in Africa. Treatment in Africa often centers on long-term thiazina (thiacetazone and isoniazid combined). HIV+ patients are more prone to skin rashes or even lethal epidermal neurolysis as a complication of treatment. Treated patients should be monitored for other symptoms such as diarrhea, recurrent fevers, other chest infections, cerebral space occupying lesions, urinary infections. Many can be treated with broad spectrum antibiotics such as chloramphenicol. Nursing HIV-infected young adults is an expensive and burdensome prospect for overworked and underpaid staff, but curing TB in AIDS patients is possible and worthwhile because of the public health advantages.

  19. Renal tuberculosis in the modern era.

    PubMed

    Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco; da Silva, Geraldo Bezerra; Barros, Elvino José Guardão

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The disease remains as an important public health problem in developing countries. Extrapulmonary TB became more common with the advent of infection with human immunodeficiency virus and by the increase in the number of organ transplantation, which also leads to immunosuppression of thousand of persons. Urogenital TB represents 27% of extrapulmonary cases. Renal involvement in TB can be part of a disseminated infection or a localized genitourinary disease. Renal involvement by TB infection is underdiagnosed in most health care centers. Most patients with renal TB have sterile pyuria, which can be accompanied by microscopic hematuria. The diagnosis of urinary tract TB is based on the finding of pyuria in the absence of common bacterial infection. The first choice drugs include isoniazide, rifampicin, pirazinamide, ethambutol, and streptomycin. Awareness of renal TB is urgently needed by physicians for suspecting this disease in patients with unexplained urinary tract abnormalities, mainly in those with any immunosuppression and those coming from TB-endemic areas.

  20. Supporting clinical management of the difficult-to-treat TB cases: the ERS-WHO TB Consilium.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Lia; Tadolini, Marina; Centis, Rosella; Duarte, Raquel; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Aliberti, Stefano; Dara, Masoud; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2015-03-01

    Multi-drug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) are considered a serious threat for TB control and elimination. The outcome of these patients is still largely unsatisfactory as of today, with treatment success rates being consistently below 50% at global level. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that management of MDR-TB cases is supported by a specialized team, including complementary medical professionals able to cover several perspectives (clinical, both for adults and children; surgical; radiological; public health; psychological; nursing, among others). Implementation of such a body (known as Consilium in most of the former Soviet Union countries) is often a pre-requisite to apply for international TB control funding and concessionally priced medicines to treat M/XDR-TB cases. The primary objective of the ERS/WHO TB Consilium is to provide clinical consultation for drug-resistant TB and other difficult-to-treat TB cases, including co-infection with HIV and paediatric cases. Through technical guidance to clinicians managing complex TB cases, the main contribution and outcome of the initiative will be a public health response aimed at achieving correct treatment of affected patients and preventing further development of drug resistance. The Consilum's secondary objective is to ensure monitoring and evaluation of clinical practices on the ground (diagnosis, treatment and prevention).

  1. First Outcome of MDR-TB among Co-Infected HIV/TB Patients from South-West Iran

    PubMed Central

    Motamedifar, Mohammad; Abadi, Ali Reza Hassan; Moghadam, Mahboube Nakhzari

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients and the majority of them occur in developing countries. The aims of the present study were to determine the frequency of HIV/TB co-infection and other probable associated factors. Methods This 10 year retrospective study was conducted on 824 HIV patients in the south-west of Iran. HIV infection was diagnosed by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and confirmed by Western blot. TB diagnosis was based on consistency of the clinical manifestations, chest X-ray, and microscopic examination. Drug susceptibility testing was done by the proportional method on Löwenstein-Jensen media. Results Of 824 HIV patients, 59 (7.2%) were identified as TB co-infected and the majority (86.4%) of them were male. Of the overall TB infected patients, 6 cases (10.2%) showed multidrug-resistant with the mean CD4+ lymphocyte count of 163±166 cells/mm3. The main clinical forms of TB were pulmonary (73%). There was a significant (p<0.05) correlation between TB infection and CD4+ lymphocyte counts ≤200 cells/mm3, gender, prison history, addiction history, and highly active anti-retroviral therapy. Conclusion We reported novel information on frequency of HIV/TB co-infection and multidrug resistant-TB outcome among co-infected patients that could facilitate better management of such infections on a global scale. PMID:26175780

  2. Restarting the tuberculosis programme post-Haiyan

    PubMed Central

    Vianzon, Rosalind; Garfin, Anna Marie Celina; Hall, Julie Lyn

    2015-01-01

    Problem Typhoon Haiyan damaged or destroyed health infrastructure, equipment and services essential to the Philippine National Tuberculosis Programme (NTP), and it had to be re-established in the affected areas in Regions 6, 7 and 8. Continuing treatment and restoring diagnostic capacity were also challenging. Context The Philippines has one of the highest tuberculosis (TB) burdens in the world. At the time of Typhoon Haiyan, there were an estimated 26 600 TB cases on treatment at directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS) centres and 356 multidrug-resistant TB cases registered at programmatic management of drug-resistant TB (PMDT) sites. As TB was not included in the Philippines early-warning post-disaster surveillance system, tracking TB patients was difficult after Haiyan. Actions and outcomes Immediately following Haiyan, each aspect of the NTP was assessed to determine the extent of damage. TB patients were traced and services restored. We created maps showing the location of temporary TB diagnostic and treatment services, which hastened referrals. We provided new laboratory equipment, training and rapid testing capabilities in the affected regions. All TB services in the affected areas (473 DOTS, 490 TB microscopy and six PMDT facilities) were restored just two months after Haiyan. Lessons learnt Key lessons learnt from the NTP experience following Tyhoon Haiyan were: (1) the importance of having an electronic TB registry (database); (2) the need to include TB in the post-disaster surveillance system; (3) clear guidelines for TB control in disasters; and (4) the importance of coordination with all partners. PMID:26767144

  3. The Ethics of Isolation for Patients With Tuberculosis in Australia.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Jane

    2016-03-01

    This case study examines the ethical dimensions of isolation for patients diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB) in Australia. It seeks to explore the issues of resource allocation, liberty, and public safety for wider consideration and discussion.

  4. Anti-TB activity of Evodia elleryana bark extract

    PubMed Central

    Barrows, Louis R.; Powan, Emma; Pond, Christopher D.; Matainaho, Teatulohi

    2009-01-01

    An ethyl acetate extract of bark from Evodia elleryana produced significant growth inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis at concentrations only minimally inhibitory to human T cells. The crude extract yielded 95% inhibition of TB at 50 μg/ml. The crude extract yielded 29 % growth inhibition of human T-cells in culture at that concentration. PMID:17350179

  5. Prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection among tuberculosis laboratory workers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The risk of transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from patients to health care workers (HCWs) is a neglected problem in many countries, including Iran. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI) among TB laboratory staff in Iran, and to elucidate the risk factors associated with LTBI. METHODS All TB laboratory staff (689 individuals) employed in the TB laboratories of 50 Iranian universities of medical sciences and a random sample consisting of 317 low-risk HCWs were included in this cross-sectional study. Participants with tuberculin skin test indurations of 10 mm or more were considered to have an LTBI. RESULTS The prevalence of LTBI among TB laboratory staff and low-risk HCWs was 24.83% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.31 to 27.74%) and 14.82% (95% CI, 11.31 to 19.20%), respectively. No active TB cases were found in either group. After adjusting for potential confounders, TB laboratory staff were more likely to have an LTBI than low-risk HCWs (prevalence odds ratio, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.35 to 3.17). CONCLUSIONS This study showed that LTBI are an occupational health problem among TB laboratory staff in Iran. This study reinforces the need to design and implement simple, effective, and affordable TB infection control programs in TB laboratories in Iran. PMID:28092930

  6. The epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis in wild deer and feral pigs and their roles in the establishment and spread of bovine tuberculosis in New Zealand wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, G; Gortazar, C; Knowles, G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In New Zealand, wild deer and feral pigs are assumed to be spillover hosts for Mycobacterium bovis, and so are not targeted in efforts aimed at locally eradicating bovine tuberculosis (TB) from possums (Trichosurus vulpecula), the main wildlife host. Here we review the epidemiology of TB in deer and pigs, and assess whether New Zealand's TB management programme could be undermined if these species sometimes achieve maintenance host status. In New Zealand, TB prevalences of up to 47% have been recorded in wild deer sympatric with tuberculous possums. Patterns of lesion distribution, age-specific prevalences and behavioural observations suggest that deer become infected mainly through exposure to dead or moribund possums. TB can progress rapidly in some deer (<10%), but generalised disease is uncommon in wild deer; conversely some infected animals can survive for many years. Deer-to-deer transmission of M. bovis is rare, but transmission from tuberculous deer carcasses to scavengers, including possums, is likely. That creates a small spillback risk that could persist for a decade after transmission of new infection to wild deer has been halted. Tuberculosis prevalence in New Zealand feral pigs can reach 100%. Infections in lymph nodes of the head and alimentary tract predominate, indicating that TB is mostly acquired through scavenging tuberculous carrion, particularly possums. Infection is usually well contained, and transmission between pigs is rare. Large reductions in local possum density result in gradual declines (over 10 years) in TB prevalence among sympatric wild deer, and faster declines in feral pigs. Elimination of TB from possums (and livestock) therefore results in eventual disappearance of TB from feral pigs and wild deer. However, the risk of spillback infection from deer to possums substantially extends the time needed to locally eradicate TB from all wildlife (compared to that which would be required to eradicate disease from possums alone

  7. Prevalence of latent TB infection and TB disease among adolescents in high TB burden countries in Africa: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bunyasi, Erick Wekesa; Schmidt, Bey-Marrie; Abdullahi, Leila Hussein; Mulenga, Humphrey; Tameris, Michele; Luabeya, Angelique; Shenje, Justin; Scriba, Thomas; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Wood, Robin; Hatherill, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Almost a third of the world population has latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI), ∼10 million of whom develop TB disease annually, despite existence of effective, but lengthy, preventive and curative drug regimens. Although adolescents appear to have a very high force of LTBI, their reported incidence of TB disease is less than that of their corresponding general population. The few available studies on adolescent TB infection and disease prevalence are not sufficient to address the apparent discordance between rates of infection and disease in high TB burden countries in Africa. Therefore, we aim to perform a systematic review to examine the relationship between adolescent LTBI and TB disease, benchmarked against national TB disease burden data. Methods and analysis A comprehensive literature search will be performed for cross-sectional studies and screening data in cohort studies to determine the prevalence of LTBI and TB disease among adolescents in high TB burden countries in Africa in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane library, Web of Science, Africa Wide, CINAHL and the Africa Index Medicus. This will be supplemented by a search of reference lists of selected articles for potentially relevant articles. We will restrict our search to articles published in the English language between 1990 and 2016 among adolescents in order to obtain estimates reflective of the mature HIV epidemic in most high TB burden countries in Africa that occurred over this critical period. Primary end points are: prevalence of LTBI and TB disease. We will use the random-effects or fixed-effects modelling for our meta-analysis based on heterogeneity estimates. Ethics and dissemination No ethics approval is required given that this is a systematic review. Findings will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal in line with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). Trial registration number CRD42015023495. PMID

  8. Comparison of the Sensitivity of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube and T-SPOT.TB According to Patient Age

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Won; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Eun Young; Kim, Se Joong; Lee, Yeon Joo; Park, Jong Sun; Cho, Young-Jae; Yoon, Ho Il; Yim, Jae-Joon; Lee, Choon-Taek; Lee, Jae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are two types of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) in use for the detection of tuberculosis (TB) infection, the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test (GFT-GIT) and T-SPOT.TB. Owing to contradictory reports regarding whether the results of these IGRAs are affected by the age of the patient, we aimed to determine if these two tests have age-related differences in sensitivity. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of diagnosed TB patients who were tested using either QFT-GIT or T-SPOT.TB from February 2008 to December 2013. The positivity of the two tests was analyzed and compared with true TB infection, which was defined as active TB based on either a positive Mycobacterium culture or a positive TB polymerase chain reaction. The QFT-GIT group included 192 TB patients, and the T-SPOT.TB group included 212 TB patients. Of the patients with pulmonary TB, 76 (39.6%) were in the QFT-GIT group and 143 (67.5%) in the T-SPOT.TB group. The overall sensitivity was 80.2% for QFT-GIT and 91.0% for T.SPOT.TB. The sensitivities of QFT-GIT and T-SPOT.TB according to age group were as follows: <29 years, 93.3% and 96.7%; 30–49 years, 86.5% and 94.7%; 50–69 years, 76.8% and 87.5%; and >70 years, 68.3% and 85.7%, respectively. The trend of age-related changes in sensitivity was significant for both QFT-GIT (p = 0.004) and T.SPOT.TB (p = 0.039). However, only QFT-GIT was significantly related to age in the multivariate analysis. QFT-GIT, but not T-SPOT.TB, was significantly affected by patient age. PMID:27258377

  9. Characteristics and treatment response in patients with tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus in New Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Khanna, A; Lohya, S; Sharath, B N; Harries, A D

    2013-11-04

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is known to increase the risk of tuberculosis (TB) and adversely affect TB treatment outcomes. A descriptive study was carried out in registered TB patients screened for DM at Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi, India. Of 458 TB patients, 66 (14%) had DM. In those with dual disease, age ≥40 years, smear-positive pulmonary TB and recurrent TB were significantly more common. There was no effect of DM on TB treatment outcomes, although there was a trend towards smear non-conversion at 2 months. Screening for DM works well, and certain patient characteristics are more common in those with dual disease.

  10. Tuberculosis infection control in health facilities in Lithuania: lessons learnt from a capacity support project.

    PubMed

    Turusbekova, N; Ljungqvist, I; Davidavičiene, E; Mikaityte, J; van der Werf, M J

    2016-03-21

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection control (IC) is key in controlling TB transmission in health facilities in Lithuania. This article presents a project that aimed at supporting health care facilities in Lithuania in implementing TB-IC. The project consisted of 1) facility TB-IC assessments, 2) development of facility TB-IC plans, 3) TB-IC training and 4) site visits. We assessed the impact of these activities through a self-assessment questionnaire. The project resulted in limited improvements. Most progress was seen in administrative and managerial activities. Possible reasons for the limited improvements are challenges with funding and the lack of supportive legislation and a national TB-IC plan.

  11. Tuberculosis incidence in developing countries with high prevalence of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, A; Veeken, H; Berra, A

    1992-10-01

    95% of tuberculosis (TB) cases in the world live in developing countries. HIV infection greatly increases the risk of developing active TB among those with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Thus researchers have used data from existing research to develop a mathematical model to gauge the increase in TB incidence in developing countries while considering rising HIV prevalence among adults. They look at 2 groups with sizable differences in risk of acquiring TB: adults with both HIV and M. tuberculosis infections and all other adults. The researchers plot the expected increase in TB incidence and percentage of TB cases that also have HIV infection against HIV prevalence. According to the model, when the prevalence of HIV infection hits 13% of adults in developing countries, the number of new TB cases doubles. Most of this increase will occur in areas that already lack diagnostic services, drugs, hospital beds, and other needed supplies. TB chemoprophylaxis treatment of HIV-positive people could result in a lower increase in TB incidence, however. WHO has set a goal of 50% reduction in TB incidence by 2002. Public health officials could use this model to plan TB control programs to bring about a reduction in the increase. Even though TB control programs can help stem the projected increase, it will be very difficult for developing countries with high HIV prevalence to hold back the projected rise in TB incidence. Developing countries must take considerable appropriate action soon to prevent doubling of TB incidence as HIV prevalence nears 13% of adults.

  12. Validation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1681 Protein as a Diagnostic Marker of Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Macovei, Lilia; Kanunfre, Kelly; Dhiman, Rakesh; Restrepo, Blanca I.; Zarate, Izelda; Pino, Paula A.; Mora-Guzman, Francisco; Fujiwara, Ricardo T.; Michel, Gerd; Kashino, Suely S.

    2013-01-01

    The development of an accurate antigen detection assay for the diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) would represent a major clinical advance. Here, we demonstrate that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1681 protein is a biomarker for active TB with potential diagnostic utility. We initially identified, by mass spectroscopy, peptides from the Rv1681 protein in urine specimens from 4 patients with untreated active TB. Rabbit IgG anti-recombinant Rv1681 detected Rv1681 protein in lysates and culture filtrates of M. tuberculosis and immunoprecipitated it from pooled urine specimens from two TB patients. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay formatted with these antibodies detected Rv1681 protein in unconcentrated urine specimens from 11/25 (44%) TB patients and 1/21 (4.8%) subjects in whom TB was initially clinically suspected but then ruled out by conventional methods. Rv1681 protein was not detected in urine specimens from 10 subjects with Escherichia coli-positive urine cultures, 26 subjects with confirmed non-TB tropical diseases (11 with schistosomiasis, 5 with Chagas' disease, and 10 with cutaneous leishmaniasis), and 14 healthy subjects. These results provide strong validation of Rv1681 protein as a promising biomarker for TB diagnosis. PMID:23390284

  13. Risk factors associated with kanamycin-resistant tuberculosis in a Beijing tuberculosis referral hospital.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao Tian; Wang, Qi; Yang, Nan; Li, Hong Min; Liang, Jian Qin; Liu, Cui Hua

    2012-07-01

    The rapidly increasing number of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases worldwide underlines the necessity for the rational use of key second-line drugs such as kanamycin. In this study, we determined the prevalence of, and risk factors associated with, kanamycin-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in 309 Hospital, Beijing, China, with the aim of providing information for better case management in order to minimize further development of extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB). Drug susceptibility testing results and clinical data were retrospectively analysed for hospitalized TB patients for whom such data were available in 309 Hospital for the period 1997-2009. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the risk factors associated with kanamycin-resistant TB. During 1997-2009, 553 (14.4 %) of 3843 tested Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from hospitalized TB patients were kanamycin-resistant. The increasing trend of resistance to kanamycin was reversed since 2000. The independent risk factors associated with kanamycin-resistant TB included living in urban areas [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.89], being retreated for repeat cases (adjusted OR = 1.60), being smear-positive for acid-fast bacilli at admission to the hospital (adjusted OR = 1.39), having ofloxacin-resistant (adjusted OR = 1.61) or para-aminosalicylic acid-resistant TB (adjusted OR = 1.47), having MDR-TB (adjusted OR = 5.10), having MDR-TB plus ofloxacin resistance (adjusted OR = 4.27) and having poly-resistant TB (adjusted OR = 3.94). The remaining rate of kanamycin resistance is still high despite the reversal of the increasing trend during the past decade. Surveillance of kanamycin resistance, especially among high-risk populations, should be continued to closely monitor trends so that appropriate action can be taken.

  14. Be alert to tuberculosis-mediated glomerulonephritis: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Yuan, Q; Feng, J; Yao, L; Fan, Q; Ma, J; Wang, L

    2012-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection causing glomerulonephritis is a rare disorder. This retrospective study analyzed the clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis-mediated glomerulonephritis (TB-GN) between 2002 and 2009, as well as the diagnostic tools used. These findings were then compared with those of patients with primary glomerulonephritis (P-GN). The records of all patients were reviewed. The diagnosis of TB-GN was based on renal hematuria and/or proteinuria and cure after antituberculosis therapy alone plus urine culture positive for M. tuberculosis, demonstration of typical tubercle granulomas on renal biopsy specimens, or the detection of M. tuberculosis DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on renal specimens. Forty-six patients with TB-GN and 49 patients with P-GN were included. Compared with patients in the P-GN group, most (76%) patients with TB-GN had a history of TB. Systemic symptoms were much more frequent in patients with TB-GN than local genitourinary symptoms. Serological testing showed a statistical difference between the two groups. Immunoglobulin A nephropathy was found in the majority (72%) of patients with TB-GN. M. tuberculosis DNA detection was positive in 39 (84.8%) patients, a much higher positive rate of diagnosis than that with urine culture for M. tuberculosis. The manifestation of TB-GN is atypical and nonspecific. It warrants a high index of suspicion when patients with renal hematuria and proteinuria fail to respond to standard treatments for P-GN. Clinicians should pay close attention to the medical history and results of special laboratory tests. M. tuberculosis DNA detection on renal biopsy specimens should be considered in order to confirm the diagnosis of TB-GN.

  15. Bedaquiline: A Novel Antitubercular Agent for the Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Gautam; Baxi, Mudit

    2016-01-01

    The developing countries are having an abruptly growing number of drug resistant tuberculosis cases. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a type of TB in which the strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is resistant to at least Isoniazid and Rifampicin, the two most effective of the four first-line TB drugs (the other two drugs being Ethambutol and Pyrazinamide). The management of such cases is complex and requires a treatment for 24-27 months. The current guidelines available for the management of this type of TB are largely based on the second line TB drugs which are relatively costly, less efficacious and are associated with greater side-effects. The introduction of newer drugs to cater to the high mortality and early sputum culture conversion in the MDR-TB cases is an absolute essential. In the present article, the authors discuss about the introduction of a newer drug named Bedaquiline for the control of MDR-TB. PMID:27656462

  16. Increased Risk for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Migratory Workers, Armenia

    PubMed Central

    Crape, Byron; Grigoryan, Ruzanna; Martirosyan, Hripsime; Petrosyan, Varduhi

    2015-01-01

    To understand use of tuberculosis (TB) services for migrant workers, we conducted a cross-sectional census of 95 migrant workers with TB from Armenia by using medical record reviews and face-to-face interviews. Prolonged time between diagnosis and treatment, treatment interruption, and treatment defaults caused by migrant work might increase the risk for multidrug-resistant TB. PMID:25695488

  17. Crack cocaine use among persons with tuberculosis--Contra Costa County, California, 1987-1990.

    PubMed

    1991-07-26

    From January 1, 1987, through June 30, 1990, 44 cases of tuberculosis (TB) occurred among residents of Contra Costa County, California, who were known to use crack cocaine. To investigate a possible association between crack cocaine use and TB, local health officials conducted a retrospective study of TB cases among residents of Contra Costa County.

  18. Global Tuberculosis Research Initiative welcomes expansion of TDR portfolio.

    PubMed

    1999-08-01

    This article reports the topics discussed at the second annual meeting of the Global Tuberculosis Research Initiative (GTRI) held June 29 to July 1, 1999, in Casablanca, Morocco. The meeting hailed the inclusion of tuberculosis (TB) in the Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) portfolio of diseases. GTRI brings together diverse partners, from bench researchers to TB control program personnel, with the dual goals of developing a sustainable agenda for TB research addressing the needs of TB-endemic communities and increasing the resource allocated for TB research. The infusion of TDR expertise in training, research, and product development was expected to give substantial momentum to the drive to develop and carry out a significant and practicable global TB research agenda. The lack of research capability in TB-endemic countries, especially among TB control personnel, was a major stumbling block to the execution of a TB research agenda, and among the topic discussed at the meeting, integration of TB into existing Research Capacity Strengthening efforts of TDR received special focus. In its formal recommendations from the meeting, GTRI welcomed the inclusion of TB into the TDR portfolio of diseases and recommended rapid expansion of TB research activities within TDR. The recommendations to the TDR are listed.

  19. Decreasing cost effectiveness of testing for latent TB in HIV in a low TB incidence area.

    PubMed

    Capocci, Santino; Smith, Colette; Morris, Stephen; Bhagani, Sanjay; Cropley, Ian; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Johnson, Margaret; Lipman, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Testing for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in HIV-infected persons in low tuberculosis (TB) incidence areas is often recommended. Using contemporary, clinical data, we report the yield and cost-effectiveness of testing all HIV attendees, two current UK strategies and no LTBI testing. Economic modelling was performed utilising 10-year follow up data from a large HIV clinical cohort. Outcomes were numbers of cases of active TB and incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Between 2000 and 2010, 256 people were treated for TB/HIV co-infection. 72 (28%) occurred ≥3 months after HIV diagnosis and may have been prevented by LTBI testing. Between 2000 and 2005, the incremental cost per QALY gained for the British HIV Association (BHIVA) and UK National Institute of Care Excellence (NICE) strategies, and testing all clinic attendees was €6270, €6998 and €33,473, respectively. These rose to €9332, €32,564 and €74,067, respectively, between 2005 and 2010. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis suggested that at a threshold of €24,000 per additional QALY, the most cost-effective strategies would be NICE or testing all in 2000-2005 and BHIVA during 2005-2010. Both UK testing regimens missed cases but are cost-effective compared with no testing. Using recent data, they all became more expensive, suggesting that alternative or more targeted TB testing strategies must be considered.

  20. Mean Platelet Volume in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Young; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Hee Joo; Park, Tae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Mean platelet volume (MPV) has been thought as a useful index of platelet activation. It is supposed that MPV is also associated with several inflammatory and infectious diseases. Korea still has a high incidence of tuberculosis (TB). The aim of this study was to investigate MPV as an inflammatory marker in TB patients. Materials and Methods. MPV were determined in 221 patients with TB and 143 individuals for control group. MPV was estimated by an Advia 2120 (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, Tarrytown, NY, USA). Results. In the TB patient group, a positive correlation was found between CRP and MPV. Age and MPV had a positive correlation in TB patient group. Conclusions. We conclude that there is a significant relation between MPV and inflammatory conditions. MPV can be an inflammatory marker to determine the disease activity in TB patients. PMID:27419136

  1. Orofacial tuberculosis: Clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya; Mittal, Sunandan

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial tuberculosis (TB) is an uncommon form of extrapulmonary TB and is nonspecific in its clinical presentation. It can be misdiagnosed especially when oral lesions are present before systemic symptoms become apparent. Doctors especially attending dentist who generally is the first among clinicians to come across such pathological entity should be aware of the orofacial lesions of TB and consider them in the differential diagnosis of suspicious oral lesions to ensure early diagnosis of TB and its treatment. In this review, we have discussed in detail the clinical presentation of various forms of orofacial TB, diagnosis, and management of patients. Also, an update is provided about recent anti-TB drug development. PMID:26288770

  2. Medical Management of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Doosoo

    2015-07-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is still a major threat worldwide. However, recent scientific advances in diagnostic and therapeutic tools have improved the management of drug-resistant TB. The development of rapid molecular testing methods allows for the early detection of drug resistance and prompt initiation of an appropriate treatment. In addition, there has been growing supportive evidence for shorter treatment regimens in multidrug-resistant TB; and for the first time in over 50 years, new anti-TB drugs have been developed. The World Health Organization has recently revised their guidelines, primarily based on evidence from a meta-analysis of individual patient data (n=9,153) derived from 32 observational studies, and outlined the recommended combination and correct use of available anti-TB drugs. This review summarizes the updated guidelines with a focus on the medical management of drug-resistant TB.

  3. Childhood tuberculosis: epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and vaccination.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kuo-Sheng; Chang, Hsiao-Ling; Chien, Shun-Tien; Chen, Kwo-Liang; Chen, Kou-Huang; Mai, Ming-Hsin; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2013-10-01

    Despite the existence of a government-run tuberculosis (TB) control program, the current nationwide burden of TB continues to be a public health problem in Taiwan. Intense current and previous efforts into diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive interventions have focused on TB in adults, but childhood TB has been relatively neglected. Children are particularly vulnerable to severe disease and death following infection, and children with latent infections become reservoirs for future transmission following disease reactivation in adulthood, thus fueling future epidemics. Additional research, understanding, and prevention of childhood TB are urgently needed. This review assesses the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and relevant principles of TB vaccine development and presents efficacy data for the currently licensed vaccines.

  4. Screening and preventive therapy for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Marais, Ben J; Ayles, Helen; Graham, Stephen M; Godfrey-Faussett, Peter

    2009-12-01

    The tuberculosis (TB) epidemic is well controlled in most developed countries and the focus in these areas has shifted to TB eradication. Transmission within nonendemic areas is limited and most cases of TB result from reactivation of distant (latent) infection. With adequate resources, wide-scale use of preventive therapy can assist to eliminate the pool of latent infection that is required for TB eradication. In contrast, TB control remains poor in many developing countries, especially those worst affected by poverty and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. In this review the authors critically assess the approach to TB preventive therapy in children and adults, focus on the underlying treatment rationale, discuss available data and identify issues of concern.

  5. [Report of the VIth Tuberculosis Day Conference].

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Tadeusz M

    2012-01-01

    On 23 - 24 Mars in Warsaw a scientific conference was held sixth time organised to celebrate the World TB Day by Warsaw-Otwock Branch of the Polish Respiratory Society in collaboration with WHO, Poland. Welcoming lecture "TB Research in Poland, Past and Present" discussed TB diagnosis scientific research results, achieved during the last two centuries, and which contributed, after practical application, to improvement of TB epidemiological situation in our country. Sessions devoted to, as follows: 1) Discussion of multidrug-resistant TB with special focus on epidemiology, diagnostics and WHU guidelines relative to treatment; 2) Tuberculosis brought into Poland by refugees and methods of diagnosis and treatment; 3) TB among persons detained in penitentiary institutions with an outlook on molecular research (tests?) used in epidemiological investigations.

  6. Detection of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis patients with the 38-kilodalton antigen from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a rapid membrane-based assay.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, A T; Ma, W L; Zhang, P Y; Cole, R A

    1996-01-01

    A rapid membrane-based serologic assay using the 38-kDa antigen from Mycobacterium tuberculosis for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) was evaluated with 201 patients with pulmonary TB, 67 patients with extrapulmonary TB, 79 Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated healthy controls, and 77 non-TB respiratory patients. The overall sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative predictive values were, respectively, 92, 92, 84, and 96% for sputum-positive TB patients; 70, 92, 87, and 79% for sputum-negative TB patients; and 76, 92, 80, and 90% for extrapulmonary-TB patients. Only 2% (1 of 44) of the healthy control BCG-vaccinated subjects gave weak positive signals in the assay, indicating that this rapid serological assay is a valuable aid in clinical diagnosis for both pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB. PMID:8705680

  7. Tuberculosis eradication versus control.

    PubMed

    Schito, Marco; Hanna, Debra; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2017-03-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 10.4 million people died of tuberculosis (TB) in 2015, and the disease is now the number one cause of death from a preventable infectious disease worldwide. A bold vision is needed from global leaders to end the TB epidemic and plans to this end have been proposed. However enthusiasm must be matched by tangible and achievable goals based on the science and available funding. In order to reach the target and goals set by the WHO End TB Strategy, the challenges for TB eradication need to be addressed. In order to achieve the targets, several areas need to be bolstered, including the requirement to better identify and treat existing drug-susceptible cases and diagnose all the drug-resistant forms of the disease. Although treatment is available for most TB patients, stock-outs and other delays are problematic in some settings, resulting in ongoing transmission, especially for the drug-resistant forms of the disease. Despite the fact that a majority of multidrug-resistant cases are linked to treatment, the cure rate is only 50%, which highlights the need for safer, shorter, and more efficacious drug regimens that are more tolerable to patients. Prospects for a more efficacious vaccine are limited, with no correlates of protection identified; thus the availability of a vaccine by 2025 is highly improbable. Support for instituting infection control methods should be prioritized to subvert transmission while patients seek treatment and care. Finally, more adequate financial mechanisms should be instituted to reduce patient expenditures and support national TB programs. Moreover, funding to support basic science, drug development, clinical trials, vaccine development, diagnostics, and implementation research needs to be secured in order to reduce global TB incidence in the future.

  8. Assessing spatial heterogeneity of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in a high-burden country.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Helen E; Plesca, Valeriu; Ciobanu, Anisoara; Crudu, Valeriu; Galusca, Irina; Soltan, Viorel; Serbulenco, Aliona; Zignol, Matteo; Dadu, Andrei; Dara, Masoud; Cohen, Ted

    2013-11-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a major concern in countries of the former Soviet Union. The reported risk of resistance among tuberculosis (TB) cases in the Republic of Moldova is among the highest in the world. We aimed to produce high-resolution spatial maps of MDR-TB risk and burden in this setting. We analysed national TB surveillance data collected between 2007 and 2010 in Moldova. High drug susceptibility testing coverage and detailed location data permitted identification of subregional areas of higher MDR-TB risk. We investigated whether the distribution of cases with MDR-TB risk factors could explain this observed spatial variation in MDR-TB. 3447 MDR-TB cases were notified during this period; 24% of new and 62% of previously treated patients had MDR-TB. Nationally, the estimated annual MDR-TB incidence was 54 cases per 100 000 persons and >1000 cases per 100 000 persons within penitentiaries. We identified substantial geographical variation in MDR-TB burden and hotspots of MDR-TB. Locations with a higher percentage of previously incarcerated TB cases were at greater risk of being MDR-TB hotspots. Spatial analyses revealed striking geographical heterogeneity of MDR-TB. Methods to identify locations of high MDR-TB risk and burden should allow for better resource allocation and more appropriate targeting of studies to understand local mechanisms driving resistance.

  9. Reactivation tuberculosis: role of surveillance.

    PubMed

    DiNardo, Andrew R; Guy, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and death rates from tuberculosis (TB) have declined through concerted efforts in the diagnosis and treatment of active disease. Despite this, 9.6 million new cases and 1.1 million deaths in 2014 are unacceptably high. To decrease the rates of TB further, the huge number of persons with latent TB infection (LTBI) from whom new cases will arise has to be addressed with a sense of priority. Identifying the highest risk groups and providing effective treatment has been shown to decrease active TB. Further research to refine the predictors of reactivation and shorter effective treatments are urgently needed. Implementing intensified case finding, testing and treatment for LTBI will require continued investment in health care capacity at multiple levels.

  10. Decline in national tuberculosis notifications with national scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Kanyerere, H; Mganga, A; Harries, A D; Tayler-Smith, K; Jahn, A; Chimbwandira, F M; Mpunga, J

    2014-06-21

    From 2000 to 2012, Malawi scaled up antiretroviral therapy (ART) from <3000 to 404 905 persons living with HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome), representing an ART coverage of 40.6% among those living with HIV. During this time, annual tuberculosis (TB) notifications declined by 28%, from 28 234 to 20 463. Percentage declines in annual TB case notifications were as follows: new TB (26%), recurrent TB (40%), new smear-positive pulmonary TB (19%), new smear-negative pulmonary TB (42%), extra-pulmonary TB (19%), HIV-positive TB (30%) and HIV-negative TB (10%). The decline in TB notifications is associated with ART scale-up, supporting its value in controlling TB in high HIV prevalence areas in sub-Saharan Africa.

  11. Efficacy and Safety of ‘Fixed Dose’ versus ‘Loose’ Drug Regimens for Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Two High TB-Burden African Countries: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background There are limited data on the performance of the use of fixed-dose combination (FDC) TB drugs when used under programmatic settings in high TB-endemic countries. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of FDC versus loose formulation (LF) TB treatment regimens for treatment of pulmonary TB (PTB) in the context of actual medical practice in prevailing conditions within programmatic settings in five sites in two high TB-burden African countries. Methods A two-arm, single-blind, randomized clinical trial comparing FDCs with separate LFs involving 1000 adults newly diagnosed with culture positive PTB was conducted at five sites in two African countries between 2007 and 2011. Participants were randomized to receive daily treatment with anti-TB drugs given as either FDC or separate LFs for 24 weeks (intensive phase– 8 weeks of isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and pyrazinamide; continuation phase– 16 weeks of rifampicin and isoniazid). Primary outcome measures were microbiological cure and safety at the end of six months’ treatment; pre-specified non-inferiority margin for difference in cure rate was 4%. The primary efficacy analysis was based on the modified intent to treat (mITT) cohort comprising all randomized patients with a positive baseline culture result for TB and who received at least one dose of study treatment. Patients missing end of treatment culture results were considered failures. Further analyses were done in which mITT patients without an end of treatment (EOT) culture were excluded in a complete case analysis (mITTcc) and a per protocol cohort analysis defined as mITTcc patients who received at least 95% of their intended doses and had an EOT culture result. Results In the mITT analysis, the cure rate in the FDC group was 86.7% (398/459) and in the LF group 85.2% (396/465) (difference 1.5-% (90% confidence interval (CI) (-2.2%– 5.3%)). Per Protocol analysis showed similar results: FDC 98.9% (359/363) versus LF 96.9% (345

  12. Tuberculous Fasciitis in Polymyositis: A Rare Case of Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nagayama, Ikue; Nagatoya, Katsuyuki; Kurahara, Yu; Mega, Akira; Morita, Masashi; Haga, Ryota; Yamanouchi, Yu; Yamaguchi, Yoshito; Oka, Tatsufumi; Yamauchi, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    A 71-year-old woman with polymyositis presenting with left thigh pain and an intermittent fever was admitted to Osaka Rosai Hospital. We initially diagnosed that her pain and fever were caused by a soft tissue infection because her polymyositis was controlled. She did not respond to various antibiotic therapies. Chest computed tomography demonstrated miliary tuberculosis (TB). Ziehl-Neelsen staining of liver biopsy specimens revealed epithelioid cell granuloma and acid-fast bacilli. Therefore, we finally diagnosed the lesion as TB fasciitis that improved with anti-TB drug therapy. The atypical presentation of TB fasciitis demonstrates the clinical importance of eliminating TB infections in immunocompromised hosts. PMID:27803421

  13. Highly Multiplexed Proteomic Analysis of Quantiferon Supernatants To Identify Biomarkers of Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    De Groote, Mary Ann; Higgins, Michael; Hraha, Thomas; Wall, Kirsten; Wilson, Michael L.; Sterling, David G.; Janjic, Nebojsa; Reves, Randall

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The tests for diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are limited by a poor predictive value for identifying people at the highest risk for progressing to active tuberculosis (TB) and have various sensitivities and specificities in different populations. Identifying a more robust signature for LTBI is important for TB prevention and elimination. A pilot study was conducted with samples from immigrants to the United States that were screened for LTBI by the three commercially approved tests, namely, the tuberculin skin test (TST), the Quantiferon-TB Gold in-tube (QFT-GIT), and the T-SPOT.TB (T-SPOT). QFT-GIT supernatants from 13 people with concordant positive results and 26 people with concordant negative results were analyzed via the highly multiplexed SOMAscan proteomic assay. The proteins in the stimulated supernatants that distinguished LTBI from controls included interleukin-2 (IL-2), monocyte chemotactic protein 2 (MCP-2), interferon gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14, also known as LIGHT), monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG), and granzyme B (P <0.00001). In addition, antigen stimulation increased the expression of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) and activin AB in LTBI samples. In nil tubes, LIGHT was the most significant marker (P <0.0001) and was elevated in LTBI subjects. Other prominent markers in nonstimulated QFT-GIT supernatants were the complement-3 components C3b, iC3b, and C3d, which were upregulated in LTBI and markedly decreased upon stimulation. We found known and novel proteins that warrant further studies for developing improved tests for LTBI, for predicting progression to active disease, and for discriminating LTBI from active TB. PMID:27852671

  14. [Urogenital tuberculosis today].

    PubMed

    Zhukova, I I; Kul'chavenia, E V; Kholtobin, D P; Brizhatiuk, E V; Khomiakov, V T; Osadchiĭ, A V

    2013-01-01

    In order to analyze the structure of urogenital tuberculosis, retrospective analysis of medical records of 131 patients with newly diagnosed urogenital tuberculosis observed in the Novosibirsk Regional TB Dispensary from 2009 to 2011 was performed. The renal tuberculosis is main form in the structure is urotuberculosis, detected in 75% of patients, and widespread destructive forms of the disease were diagnosed in more than half of cases. Isolated nephrotuberculosis was more often diagnosed in women--56.8%. 15.9% of patients had asymptomatic nephrotuberculosis; one-third of patients complained of pain in the lumbar region and frequent painful urination (35.2 and 39.8%, respectively); symptoms of intoxication were present in 17% of patients, renal colic--in 9.1%, and gross hematuria--in 7.9% of patients. Mycobacteriuria in isolated nephrotuberculosis was detected in 31.8% of cases. Acute tuberculous orchiepididymitis developed in 35.7% of patients, hemospermia was observed in 7.1% of patients, dysuria was in 35.7% of patients. The pain in the perineum, frequent painful urination (both by 31.6%), hemospermia (26.3%) were main complaints in prostate tuberculosis. Mycobacteria was detected in 10.5% of cases. It was found that urogenital tuberculosis has no pathognomonic symptoms; the most alarming manifestations include long-term dysuria, hematuria, hemospermia.

  15. Efficacy, safety, and tolerability of a 24-month treatment regimen including delamanid in a child with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Susanna; Bosis, Samantha; Tadolini, Marina; Bianchini, Sonia; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rational: Multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) are emerging problems in several countries. These infections require long and expensive treatment regimens. Recently, 2 new drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, have been approved in several countries for use in adults with severe, difficult-to-treat MDR-TB, and it has been suggested that they could also be administered to children with MDR-TB and limited treatment options. However, no study has been completed on their efficacy. Patient concerns: This report describes a 12-year-old child with XDR-TB who was cured after a 24-month therapy regimen, which included delamanid. Diagnoses: The patient showed progressive clinical deterioration after 5 months of treatment with the majority of anti-TB drugs available on the market. Interventions: After unsuccessfull treatment with several anti-TB drugs for 5 months, he was treated with a regimen including for 24 months. Outcomes: Direct smear microscopy of the gastric aspirates and gastric aspirate cultures for Mycobacterium tuberculosis became negative after only 1 week and remained persistently negative. During the 24-month treatment, all blood test results remained within the normal range, no adverse events were reported, and corrected QT interval was always normal. A clinical and laboratory control was performed 3 months after discontinuation of delamanid, and the other drugs did not reveal any modification of both general conditions as well as laboratory and radiological findings. The patient was considered cured. Lessons: The positive outcome associated with the favorable safety and tolerability profile showed that long-term therapy with delamanid can significantly contribute to treating apparently hopeless XDR-TB cases in children. PMID:27861363

  16. Gene expression profiles of bronchoalveolar cells in Pulmonary TB

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Bindu; Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Belitskaya-Lévy, Ilana; Dawson, Rod; Ress, Stanley; Gold, Jeffrey A.; Condos, Rany; Pine, Richard; Brown, Stuart; Nolan, Anna; Rom, William N.; Weiden, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    The host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis includes macrophage activation, inflammation with increased immune effector cells, tissue necrosis and cavity formation, and fibrosis, distortion, and bronchiectasis. To evaluate the molecular basis of the immune response in the lungs of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), we used bronchoalveolar lavage to obtain cells at the site of infection. Affymetrix Genechip micro-arrays and cDNA nylon filter microarrays interrogated gene expression in BAL cells from 11 healthy controls and 17 patients with active pulmonary TB. We found altered gene expression for 69 genes in TB versus normal controls that included cell surface markers, cytokines, chemokines, receptors, transcription factors, and complement components. In addition, TB BAL cell gene expression patternssegregated into 2 groups: one suggestive of a T helper type 1 (Th1) cellular immune response with increased STAT-4, IFN-γ receptor, and MIG expression with increased IFN-γ protein levels in BAL fluid; the other group displayed characteristics of Th2 immunity with increased STAT-6, CD81, and IL-10 receptor expression. We were able to demonstrate that a Th2 presentation could change to a Th1 pattern after anti-tuberculous treatment in one TB patient studied serially. These gene expression data support the conclusion that pulmonary TB produces a global change in the BAL cell transcriptome with manifestations of either Th1 or Th2 immunity. PMID:17921069

  17. Diagnostic Value of T-cell Interferon-γ Release Assays on Synovial Fluid for Articular Tuberculosis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xin-He; Bian, Sai-Nan; Zhang, Yue-Qiu; Zhang, Li-Fan; Shi, Xiao-Chun; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Feng-Chun; Liu, Xiao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global public health challenge. Articular TB is an important form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and its diagnosis is difficult because of the low sensitivity of traditional methods. The aim of this study was to analyze the diagnostic value of T-SPOT.TB on synovial fluid for the diagnosis of articular TB. Methods: Patients with suspected articular TB were enrolled consecutively between August 2011 and December 2015. T-SPOT.TB was performed on both synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The final diagnosis of articular TB was independent of the T-SPOT.TB result. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, predictive value, and likelihood ratio of T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs and PBMCs were analyzed. Results: Twenty patients with suspected articular TB were enrolled. Six were diagnosed with articular TB, and 14 patients were diagnosed with other diseases. Sensitivity and specificity were 83% and 86% for T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs, and 67% and 69% for T-SPOT.TB on PBMCs, respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs were 71% and 92%, respectively. The PPV and NPV were 50% and 82% for T-SPOT.TB on PBMCs. Conclusion: Sensitivity, specificity, and NPV of T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs appeared higher than that on PBMCs, indicating that T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs might be a rapid and accurate diagnostic test for articular TB. PMID:27174325

  18. Polymorphisms in Autophagy Genes and Susceptibility to Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Alisjahbana, Bachti; Sahiratmadja, Edhyana; Parwati, Ida; Oosting, Marije; Plantinga, Theo S.; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Netea, Mihai G.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; van de Vosse, Esther; van Crevel, Reinout

    2012-01-01

    Recent data suggest that autophagy is important for intracellular killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and polymorphisms in the autophagy gene IRGM have been linked with susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB) among African-Americans, and with TB caused by particular M. tuberculosis genotypes in Ghana. We compared 22 polymorphisms of 14 autophagy genes between 1022 Indonesian TB patients and 952 matched controls, and between patients infected with different M. tuberculosis genotypes, as determined by spoligotyping. The same autophagy polymorphisms were studied in correlation with ex-vivo production of TNF, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ and IL-17 in healthy volunteers. No association was found between TB and polymorphisms in the genes ATG10, ATG16L2, ATG2B, ATG5, ATG9B, IRGM, LAMP1, LAMP3, P2RX7, WIPI1, MTOR and ATG4C. Associations were found between polymorphisms in LAMP1 (p = 0.02) and MTOR (p = 0.02) and infection with the successful M. tuberculosis Beijing genotype. The polymorphisms examined were not associated with M. tuberculosis induced cytokines, except for a polymorphism in ATG10, which was linked with IL-8 production (p = 0.04). All associations found lost statistical significance after correction for multiple testing. This first examination of a broad set of polymorphisms in autophagy genes fails to show a clear association with TB, with M. tuberculosis Beijing genotype infection or with ex-vivo pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:22879892

  19. Bovine Tuberculosis Vaccine Efficacy Studies: Neonatal Calves and White-tailed Deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) in humans and animals may result from exposure to bacilli within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (i.e., M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. pinnipedi, M. microti, M. caprae, or M. canetti)(#1). Mycobacterium bovis is the species most often isolated from ...

  20. 68 FR 18987 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis: Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2003-04-17

    ... Tuberculosis: Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463...: Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET). Times and Dates: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., June 4... Director, CDC, regarding the elimination of tuberculosis (TB). Specifically, the Council...

  1. Co-evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Brites, Daniela; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    The causative agent of human tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an obligate pathogen that evolved to exclusively persist in human populations. For M. tuberculosis to transmit from person to person, it has to cause pulmonary disease. Therefore, M. tuberculosis virulence has likely been a significant determinant of the association between M. tuberculosis and humans. Indeed, the evolutionary success of some M. tuberculosis genotypes seems at least partially attributable to their increased virulence. The latter possibly evolved as a consequence of human demographic expansions. If co-evolution occurred, humans would have counteracted to minimize the deleterious effects of M. tuberculosis virulence. The fact that human resistance to infection has a strong genetic basis is a likely consequence of such a counter-response. The genetic architecture underlying human resistance to M. tuberculosis remains largely elusive. However, interactions between human genetic polymorphisms and M. tuberculosis genotypes have been reported. Such interactions are consistent with local adaptation and allow for a better understanding of protective immunity in TB. Future ‘genome-to-genome’ studies, in which locally associated human and M. tuberculosis genotypes are interrogated in conjunction, will help identify new protective antigens for the development of better TB vaccines. PMID:25703549

  2. Functional and phenotypic changes in monocytes from patients with tuberculosis are reversed with treatment.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, María D; García, Yoenis; Montes, Carlos; París, Sara C; Rojas, Mauricio; Barrera, Luis F; Arias, Mauricio A; García, Luis F

    2006-08-01

    Alterations of monocyte/macrophages have been reported in patients with tuberculosis (TB), but their significance is poorly understood. Blood mononuclear cells from patients with different clinical forms of TB, at various times of anti-TB treatment, and healthy tuberculin positive individuals, were double-stained for CD14 plus CD206, TLR-2, IFN-gammaR1, CD40, HLA-DR, CD36 and CD163, and analyzed by flow cytometry. Monocytes were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and 24h later the phenotype, induction of necrosis and apoptosis and production of tumor necrosis factor TNFalpha, interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-12p40 were determined. TB patients presented higher percentage of CD14+ cells but lower percentage of CD14+DR+ and CD14+CD36+ cells. Expression of CD14, HLA-DR and CD36 was decreased in TB patients. Normal percentages and expression were restored during anti-TB treatment. Monocytes from TB patients underwent necrosis and apoptosis after M. tuberculosis infection, whereas monocytes from healthy controls exhibited only apoptosis. Anti-TB treatment reverted necrosis. There were no differences between the various clinical forms of TB. In vitro M. tuberculosis infection decreased expression of the membrane molecules studied. HLA-DR and CD36 inhibition correlated with induction of apoptosis. Restoration of monocyte alterations during anti-TB treatment suggests that such alterations may be caused by the high M. tuberculosis load present during active disease.

  3. Chemotherapy and diagnosis of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Saltini, Cesare

    2006-12-01

    Since after the first streptomycin 1944 trials, anti-tuberculous chemotherapy research has been focused upon establishing drug combination regimens capable of overcoming drug resistance and amenable to ambulatory treatment in resource strapped countries. The first milestone being the 1959 Madras trial comparing home and sanatorium treatment in South India. Subsequently, the MRC trials led Fox and Mitchison to indicate rifampicin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide as the first line drugs for short course, 6 month, regimens and the 1982 Hong Kong Chest Service trials established intermittent therapy as the ambulatory treatment standard for directly observed therapy (DOT). The rising of the HIV epidemic at the beginning of the 1980s has refuelled tuberculosis spread in Africa and Asia and contributed to the expansion of drug-resistant tuberculosis worldwide making the development of new drugs and drug regimens for ambulatory treatment a top priority. Led by biotechnological advances, molecular biology has been brought into TB laboratory diagnosis for the highly sensitive and specific rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in biological samples. The field of immunological diagnosis of TB infection, dominated since the early 1900s by the intradermal tuberculin reaction has been put back in motion by the discovery of M. tuberculosis-specific proteins and peptides, now employed in blood tests of high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of latent TB which may help with the identification of contacts at higher risk of active disease and the eradication of epidemic cases.

  4. Web tools for molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shabbeer, Amina; Ozcaglar, Cagri; Yener, Bülent; Bennett, Kristin P

    2012-06-01

    In this study we explore publicly available web tools designed to use molecular epidemiological data to extract information that can be employed for the effective tracking and control of tuberculosis (TB). The application of molecular methods for the epidemiology of TB complement traditional approaches used in public health. DNA fingerprinting methods are now routinely employed in TB surveillance programs and are primarily used to detect recent transmissions and in outbreak investigations. Here we present web tools that facilitate systematic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) genotype information and provide a view of the genetic diversity in the MTBC population. These tools help answer questions about the characteristics of MTBC strains, such as their pathogenicity, virulence, immunogenicity, transmissibility, drug-resistance profiles and host-pathogen associativity. They provide an integrated platform for researchers to use molecular epidemiological data to address current challenges in the understanding of TB dynamics and the characteristics of MTBC.

  5. Mucosal Vaccination against Tuberculosis Using Inert Bioparticles

    PubMed Central

    Reljic, Rajko; Sibley, Laura; Huang, Jen-Min; Pepponi, Ilaria; Hoppe, Andreas; Hong, Huynh A.

    2013-01-01

    Needle-free, mucosal immunization is a highly desirable strategy for vaccination against many pathogens, especially those entering through the respiratory mucosa, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Unfortunately, mucosal vaccination against tuberculosis (TB) is impeded by a lack of suitable adjuvants and/or delivery platforms that could induce a protective immune response in humans. Here, we report on a novel biotechnological approach for mucosal vaccination against TB that overcomes some of the current limitations. This is achieved by coating protective TB antigens onto the surface of inert bacterial spores, which are then delivered to the respiratory tract. Our data showed that mice immunized nasally with coated spores developed humoral and cellular immune responses and multifunctional T cells and, most importantly, presented significantly reduced bacterial loads in their lungs and spleens following pathogenic challenge. We conclude that this new vaccine delivery platform merits further development as a mucosal vaccine for TB and possibly also other respiratory pathogens. PMID:23959722

  6. Increase in Tuberculosis Cases among Prisoners, Brazil, 2009–20141

    PubMed Central

    Bourdillon, Paul M.; Gonçalves, Crhistinne C.M.; Pelissari, Daniele Maria; Arakaki-Sanchez, Denise; Ko, Albert I.; Croda, Julio; Andrews, Jason R.

    2017-01-01

    During 2009–2014, incarceration rates in Brazil rose 34%, and tuberculosis (TB) cases among prisoners rose 28.8%. The proportion of national TB cases that occurred among prisoners increased from 6.2% to 8.4% overall and from 19.3% to 25.6% among men 20–29 years of age. PMID:28221118

  7. Detection of lipomannan in cattle infected with bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early and rapid detection of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is critical to controlling the spread of this disease in cattle and other animals. In this study, we demonstrate the development of an immunoassay for the direct detection of the bovine bTB biomarker, lipomannan (LM) in serum using a waveguide-...

  8. Prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis in Karachi juvenile jail, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shah, S A; Mujeeb, S A; Mirza, A; Nabi, K G; Siddiqui, Q

    2003-07-01

    Jail inmates may be at increased risk of contracting tuberculosis (TB). We studied 386 detainees (mean age 17.7 years) in Karachi juvenile jail to determine the prevalence of TB and possible risk factors for contracting TB. We found a 3.9% prevalence of TB among the inmates, significantly higher than the estimated 1.1% prevalence in the general population of Pakistan. Positive family history of TB was a significant risk factor for TB. Poor adherence of previously diagnosed patients to anti-TB treatment was found. Our study highlights the vulnerability of inmates to TB owing to the presence of highly infectious cases, along with environmental conditions such as overcrowding and poor ventilation. This study strongly indicates the need for an effective treatment programme in the jails as well in the general community.

  9. Imaging features of extraaxial musculoskeletal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Vanhoenacker, Filip M; Sanghvi, Darshana A; De Backer, Adelard I

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a public health problem in both developing and industrialized countries. TB can involve pulmonary as well as extrapulmonary sites. The musculoskeletal system is involved in 1–3% of patients with tuberculosis. Although musculoskeletal TB has become uncommon in the Western world, it remains a huge problem in Asia, Africa, and many developing countries. Tuberculous spondylitis is the most common form of musculoskeletal TB and accounts for approximately 50% of cases. Extraspinal musculoskeletal TB shows a predilection for large joints (hip and knee) and para-articular areas; isolated soft tissue TB is extremely rare. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are mandatory to prevent serious destruction of joints and skeletal deformity. However, due to the nonspecific and often indolent clinical presentation, the diagnosis may be delayed. Radiological assessment is often the first step in the diagnostic workup of patients with musculoskeletal TB and further investigations are decided by the findings on radiography. Both the radiologist and the clinician should be aware of the possibility of this diagnosis. In this manuscript we review the imaging features of extraspinal bone, joint, and soft tissue TB. PMID:19881081

  10. Getting to Zero: Tuberculosis Elimination in California.

    PubMed

    Barry, Pennan M; Kay, Alexander W; Flood, Jennifer M; Watt, James

    This review of tuberculosis epidemiology is intended to provide a historical perspective on the public health approach to tuberculosis (TB) control in California. This historical context offers a lens through which to view current epidemiologic trends and insight into how new therapeutic tools can be applied. Since 1993, the year detailed case reporting was instituted, California has had a decrease in recent TB transmission as evidenced by a reduction in pediatric cases and an increased percentage of cases attributable to progression of latent infection to TB disease in the foreign-born population. Overall, there has been a dramatic decline in the annual TB case count, but the speed of the decline has slowed over the last several years. At the current pace and case count of 2137 in 2015, California will not achieve TB elimination (<1 TB case per one million population) for at least 100 years. There are an estimated 2.1 million persons in California with latent TB infection. Modeling suggests that LTBI detection and treatment are important in reaching TB elimination. For this reason, a coalition of stakeholders in California is exploring novel approaches to accelerate the case decline in order to prevent unnecessary disease and death.

  11. Tuberculosis elimination and the challenge of latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Matteelli, Alberto; Sulis, Giorgia; Capone, Susanna; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Getahun, Haileyesus

    2017-03-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) affects one third to one fourth of the human population and is the reservoir for a significant proportion of emerging active tuberculosis (TB) cases, especially in low incidence countries. The World Health Organization launched in 2015 the END-TB strategy that aims at TB elimination and promotes, for the first time ever, the management of LTBI. The preventive package, basically consisting of testing and treatment for LTBI in groups at high risk of reactivation, is a mainstay of the first pillar of the strategy, alongside prompt diagnosis and early treatment of both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant TB disease. Testing and treatment for LTBI should be pursued with a programmatic perspective. This implies strong political commitment, adequate funding and an effective monitoring and evaluation system. People living with HIV and children under five years of age who are household contact of a contagious TB cases are primarily targeted in all epidemiological setting. In high resource and low incidence setting, additional at risk populations should also be the target for systematic LTBI testing and treatment. Research is urgently needed to develop diagnostic tests with higher predictive value to identify individuals that progress from infection to disease. Similarly, shorter and safer treatment regimens are needed to make the trade-off between potential benefits and harms more favourable for an increasing proportion of infected individuals.

  12. Evaluation of Tuberculosis Underreporting in Greece through Comparison with Anti-Tuberculosis Drug Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Lytras, Theodore; Spala, Georgia; Bonovas, Stefanos; Panagiotopoulos, Takis

    2012-01-01

    Surveillance is an integral part of tuberculosis (TB) control. Greece has a low TB notification rate, but there are doubts about underreporting. Examining anti-TB drug consumption is a way to validate the results of surveillance and estimate TB burden in the country. We used surveillance data from 2004 to 2008 to calculate the average prescribed treatment duration with the first-line anti-TB drugs isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and pyrazinamide. We then obtained the best available data on consumption of these drugs, and calculated the number of treated cases to which these quantities correspond. We thus estimated underreporting at around 80% (77–81%), and annual TB incidence at about 30 cases per 100,000 population, five times over the notification rate. Underreporting was found to be constant over the study period, while incidence followed a decreasing trend. In addition we estimated that one person receives chemoprophylaxis for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) for every three TB cases. These results indicate the need for a comprehensive plan to improve TB surveillance and TB contact tracing in Greece, especially in light of the economic crisis affecting the country since 2009. PMID:23185524

  13. Changes in cell-mediated immune response after lung resection surgery for MDR-TB patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Kyu; Hong, Sunghee; Eum, Seok-Yong; Lee, In Hee; Shin, Donk Ok; Cho, Jang Eun; Cho, Sungae; Cho, Sang-Nae

    2011-07-01

    The immune responses of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) patients undergoing lung resection surgery were investigated in order to understand the mechanism of strong immune suppression in MDR-TB. We examined changes in cell-mediated immune response (CMI) of a total of sixteen MDR-TB patients, three of them extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) patients, after the removal of the heavily diseased lung section. The IFN-γ response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate proteins (Mtb-CFP), one of the most important CMI to defend TB, showed a statistically significant elevation in 2-4 months after operation when compared to the preoperative CMI in patients who were converted into AFB negative and cured in two years' follow-up, suggesting that the recovery of CMI may be one of the key factors in the successful treatment of MDR-TB. Interestingly, IL-10 response to Mtb-CFP was also elevated in 2-4 months after surgery in cured patients although both proliferative response and PBMC composition were not significantly changed. Infection with first- or second-line drugs resistant Mtb reduces the efficiency of chemotherapeutic treatment of MDR-TB to about 50%. Thus, this study suggests that chemotherapeutic treatment of MDR-TB may be more effective when combined with accompanying therapy that increases CMI, includes lung resection surgery.

  14. Labial swelling: a rare presentation of pubic bone tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shende, Prajakta; Gandhewar, Manisha; Gaikwad, Pradip; Nanaware, Sandip; Risbud Joshi, Prachi

    2016-09-14

    Tuberculosis (TB), being a global health problem, represents variedly. Its presentation as a labial swelling secondary to pubic bone TB has been reported rarely in literature. We report a case of pubic bone TB presenting as a labial swelling in a woman of reproductive age. Early diagnosis with fine needle aspiration cytology, acid-fast bacillus (AFB) staining, AFB culture and magnetic resonance imaging with early initiation of treatment resulted in a favourable outcome.

  15. Tuberculosis: infection control in hospital and at home.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Miles

    This article examines infection control issues relating to tuberculosis (TB) in acute and community settings. Background information on TB is discussed briefly along with key challenges to global and national control. A programme to prevent infection composed of specific hierarchical levels is outlined, using national and international guidance, and suggestions are made for infection control in the community. The article will be useful for nurses involved in the care of patients with confirmed or suspected TB.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strain MtURU-001, Isolated from a Rapidly Progressing Outbreak in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Greif, Gonzalo; Iraola, Gregorio; Berná, Luisa; Coitinho, Cecilia; Rivas, Carlos M.; Naya, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Despite efficient control programs, large clonal outbreaks of tuberculosis (TB) may arise in low-risk populations. Recently, an unusual TB outbreak was reported in Uruguay, reaching an elevated disease attack rate (53 to 69%). Here, we report the genome sequence of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain associated with this rapidly progressing outbreak, named MtURU-001. PMID:24459279

  17. The prevalence and evolution of anemia associated with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei Won; Kang, Young Ae; Yoon, Young Soon; Um, Sang-Won; Lee, Sang Min; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Shim, Young-Soo; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2006-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) may produce abnormalities in the peripheral blood, including anemia. However, the evolution of TB-associated anemia with short-term combination anti-TB chemotherapy has not been well elucidated. The aim of this study was to characterize TB-associated anemia by clarifying its prevalence, characteristics, and evolution, through involving large numbers of patients with TB. The medical records of adult patients with TB diagnosed between June 2000 and May 2001 were reviewed. Among 880 patients with TB, 281 (31.9%) had anemia on diagnosis of TB, however, the hemoglobin concentration was less than 10 g/dL in only 45 patients (5.0%). Anemia was more frequently associated with the female and old age. Good treatment response, young age (< or =65 yr-old) and initial high hemoglobin were the predictive factor for resolution of anemia. In 202 patients with anemia (71.9%), anemia was normocytic and normochromic. During or after anti-TB treatment, anemia was resolved in 175 (64.6%) out of 271 patients without iron intake. The mean duration of resolution from the initiation of anti-TB treatment was 118.8+/-113.2 days. In conclusion, anemia is a common hematological abnormality in patients with TB and close observation is sufficient for patients with TB-associated anemia, because TB-associated anemia is usually mild and resolves with anti-TB treatment.

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis effectors interfering host apoptosis signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minqiang; Li, Wu; Xiang, Xiaohong; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis remains a serious human public health concern. The coevolution between its pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human host complicated the way to prevent and cure TB. Apoptosis plays subtle role in this interaction. The pathogen endeavors to manipulate the apoptosis via diverse effectors targeting key signaling nodes. In this paper, we summarized the effectors pathogen used to subvert the apoptosis, such as LpqH, ESAT-6/CFP-10, LAMs. The interplay between different forms of cell deaths, such as apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis, is also discussed with a focus on the modes of action of effectors, and implications for better TB control.

  19. Advancing host-directed therapy for tuberculosis:

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chul-Su

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) drug-development strategies, a wide range of candidate host-directed therapies (HDT)s-including new and repurposed drugs, biologics, and cellular therapies-have been proposed to accelerate eradication of infection and overcome the problems associated with current treatment regimens. By investigating the interaction between macrophages and the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii), we uncovered that infection-induced signaling pathways suggest possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic modalities for TB that target the intracellular signaling pathways permitting the replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). PMID:28357397

  20. Tuberculosis Comorbidity with Communicable and Noncommunicable Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew; Marais, Ben J; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-02-06

    The 18th WHO Global Tuberculosis Annual Report indicates that there were an estimated 8.6 million incident cases of tuberculosis (TB) in 2012, which included 2.9 million women and 530,000 children. TB caused 1.3 million deaths including 320,000 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected people; three-quarters of deaths occurred in Africa and Southeast Asia. With one-third of the world's population latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), active TB disease is primarily associated with a break down in immune surveillance. This explains the strong link between active TB disease and other communicable diseases (CDs) or noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) that exert a toll on the immune system. Comorbid NCD risk factors include diabetes, smoking, malnutrition, and chronic lung disease, all of which have increased relentlessly over the past decade in developing countries. The huge overlap between killer infections such as TB, HIV, malaria, and severe viral infections with NCDs, results in a "double burden of disease" in developing countries. The current focus on vertical disease programs fails to recognize comorbidities or to encourage joint management approaches. This review highlights major disease overlaps and discusses the rationale for better integration of tuberculosis care with services for NCDs and other infectious diseases to enhance the overall efficiency of the public health responses.

  1. Effects of gender and age on development of concurrent extrapulmonary tuberculosis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis: a population based study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Lu, Po-Liang; Lai, Chung-Chih; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Wei-Ru; Huang, Pei-Ming; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2013-01-01

    Most cases of adult-onset tuberculosis (TB) result from reactivation of a pre-existing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Mycobacterium tuberculosis usually invades the respiratory tract and most patients develop intrapulmonary TB; however, some patients develop concurrent pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB. The purpose of the present study was to identify the demographic and clinical factors associated with an increased risk of concurrent extra-pulmonary diseases in patients with pulmonary TB. We compared patients who had isolated pulmonary TB with patients who had concurrent pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB. We initially analyzed one-million randomly selected subjects from the population-based Taiwan National Health Insurance database. Based on analysis of 5414 pulmonary TB patients in this database, women were more likely than men to have concurrent extra-pulmonary TB (OR: 1.30, p = 0.013). A separate analysis of the Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital database, which relied on sputum culture-proven pulmonary TB, indicated that women were more likely than men to have concurrent extra-pulmonary TB (OR: 1.62, p = 0.039). There was no significant gender difference in extra-pulmonary TB for patients younger than 45 years in either database. However, for patients 45 years and older, women were more likely than men to have concurrent extra-pulmonary TB (insurance database: 9.0% vs. 6.8%, p = 0.016, OR: 1.36; hospital database: 27.3% vs. 16.0%, p = 0.008, OR = 1.98). Our results indicate that among patients who have pulmonary TB, older females have an increased risk for concurrent extra-pulmonary TB.

  2. Tuberculosis: distribution, risk factors, mortality.

    PubMed

    Kochi, A

    1994-10-01

    About a century after Koch's discovery of the TB bacilli the tuberculosis epidemic which had appeared to be under control was again recognized as a major global health threat. The decline in the epidemic in this century had been largely through the improved living standards and, eventually, the availability and use of effective antibiotics. While tuberculosis gradually disappeared from the health agenda in the western world it remained a big killer throughout the century and in 1992 an estimated 2.7 million TB deaths occurred; 30 million will die from TB during the 1990s if current trends are not reversed. The annual number of new cases will increase from 7.5 million estimated in 1990 to more than 10 million in the year 2000. The main factors for this increase are demographic forces, population movements, the HIV epidemic and increasing drug resistance. The impact of the HIV epidemic is already felt in many sub-Saharan African countries and now threatens Asia where almost two-thirds of the world's TB infected population live and where HIV is spreading. Tuberculosis has also reemerged as a major public health problem in industrialized countries due to international migration, the breakdown of health services, including TB services etc. The control of the epidemic can only be through a concerted action to reinstate TB as priority among health concerns, reflected in national and international resources. A coalition of public and private supporters must be mobilized to support the effort to fight the disease. Governments, non-governmental organizations, the business community, refugee organizations, medical institutions, and other UN agencies are invited to join with WHO in this effort.

  3. Autophagy in the fight against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bento, Carla F; Empadinhas, Nuno; Mendes, Vítor

    2015-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), a chronic infectious disease mainly caused by the tubercle bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the world's deadliest diseases that has afflicted humanity since ancient times. Although the number of people falling ill with TB each year is declining, its incidence in many developing countries is still a major cause of concern. Upon invading host cells by phagocytosis, M. tuberculosis can replicate within infected cells by arresting the maturation of the phagosome whose function is to target the pathogen for elimination. Host cells have mechanisms of controlling this evasion by inducing autophagy, an elaborate cellular process that targets bacteria for progressive elimination, decreasing bacterial loads within infected cells. In addition, autophagy activation also aids in the control of inflammation, contributing to a more efficient innate immune response against M. tuberculosis. Several innovative TB therapies have been envisaged based on autophagy manipulation, with some of them revealing high potential for future clinical trials and eventual implementation in healthcare systems. Thus, this review highlights the recent advances on the innate immune response regulation by autophagy upon M. tuberculosis infection and the promising new autophagy-based therapies for TB.

  4. Autophagy in the Fight Against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Carla F.; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), a chronic infectious disease mainly caused by the tubercle bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the world's deadliest diseases that has afflicted humanity since ancient times. Although the number of people falling ill with TB each year is declining, its incidence in many developing countries is still a major cause of concern. Upon invading host cells by phagocytosis, M. tuberculosis can replicate within infected cells by arresting the maturation of the phagosome whose function is to target the pathogen for elimination. Host cells have mechanisms of controlling this evasion by inducing autophagy, an elaborate cellular process that targets bacteria for progressive elimination, decreasing bacterial loads within infected cells. In addition, autophagy activation also aids in the control of inflammation, contributing to a more efficient innate immune response against M. tuberculosis. Several innovative TB therapies have been envisaged based on autophagy manipulation, with some of them revealing high potential for future clinical trials and eventual implementation in healthcare systems. Thus, this review highlights the recent advances on the innate immune response regulation by autophagy upon M. tuberculosis infection and the promising new autophagy-based therapies for TB. PMID:25607549

  5. Spatial Analysis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Antananarivo Madagascar: Tuberculosis-Related Knowledge, Attitude and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Rakotosamimanana, Sitraka; Mandrosovololona, Vatsiharizandry; Rakotonirina, Julio; Ramamonjisoa, Joselyne; Ranjalahy, Justin Rasolofomanana; Randremanana, Rindra Vatosoa; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis infection may remain latent, but the disease is nevertheless a serious public health issue. Various epidemiological studies on pulmonary tuberculosis have considered the spatial component and taken it into account, revealing the tendency of this disease to cluster in particular locations. The aim was to assess the contribution of Knowledge Attitude and Practice (KAP) to the distribution of tuberculosis and to provide information for the improvement of the National Tuberculosis Program. Methods We investigated the role of KAP to distribution patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis in Antananarivo. First, we performed spatial scanning of tuberculosis aggregation among permanent cases resident in Antananarivo Urban Township using the Kulldorff method, and then we carried out a quantitative study on KAP, involving TB patients. The KAP study in the population was based on qualitative methods with focus groups. Results The disease still clusters in the same districts identified in the previous study. The principal cluster covered 22 neighborhoods. Most of them are part of the first district. A secondary cluster was found, involving 18 neighborhoods in the sixth district and two neighborhoods in the fifth. The relative risk was respectively 1.7 (p<10−6) in the principal cluster and 1.6 (p<10−3) in the secondary cluster. Our study showed that more was known about TB symptoms than about the duration of the disease or free treatment. Knowledge about TB was limited to that acquired at school or from relatives with TB. The attitude and practices of patients and the population in general indicated that there is still a stigma attached to tuberculosis. Conclusion This type of survey can be conducted in remote zones where the tuberculosis-related KAP of the TB patients and the general population is less known or not documented; the findings could be used to adapt control measures to the local particularities. PMID:25386655

  6. Factors related to previous tuberculosis treatment of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Rifat, Mahfuza; Hall, John; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Husain, Ashaque; Hinderaker, Sven Gudmund; Milton, Abul Hasnat

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous tuberculosis (TB) treatment status is an established risk factor for multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). This study explores which factors related to previous TB treatment may lead to the development of multidrug resistant in Bangladesh. Design We previously conducted a large case–control study to identify risk factors for developing MDR-TB in Bangladesh. Patients who had a history of previous TB treatment, either MDR-TB or non-MDR-TB, were interviewed about their previous treatment episode. This study restricts analysis to the strata of patients who have been previously treated for TB. Information was collected through face-to-face interviews and record reviews. Unadjusted and multivariable logistic regression was used for data analysis. Setting Central-level, district-level and subdistrict-level hospitals in rural and urban Bangladesh. Results The strata of previously treated patients include a total of 293 patients (245 current MDR-TB; 48 non-MDR-TB). Overall, 54% of patients received previous TB treatment more than once, and all of these patients were multidrug resistant. Patients with MDR-TB were more likely to have experienced the following factors: incomplete treatment (OR 4.3; 95% CI 1.7 to 10.6), adverse reactions due to TB treatment (OR 8.2; 95% CI 3.2 to 20.7), hospitalisation for symptoms associated with TB (OR 16.9; CI 1.8 to 156.2), DOTS (directly observed treatment, short-course) centre as treatment unit (OR 6.4; CI 1.8 to 22.8), supervised treatment (OR 3.8; CI 1.6 to 9.5); time-to-treatment centre (OR 0.984; CI 0.974 to 0.993). Conclusions Incomplete treatment, hospitalisation for TB treatment and adverse reaction are the factors related to previous TB treatment of patients with MDR-TB. Although the presence of supervised treatment (DOT), less time-to-treatment centres and being treated in DOTS centres were relatively higher among the patients with MDR-TB compared with patients without MDR-TB, these findings include information of

  7. HIV treatment cascade in tuberculosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Lessells, Richard J.; Swaminathan, Soumya; Godfrey-Faussett, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Globally, the number of deaths associated with tuberculosis (TB) and HIV coinfection remains unacceptably high. We review the evidence around the impact of strengthening the HIV treatment cascade in TB patients and explore recent findings about how best to deliver integrated TB/HIV services. Recent findings There is clear evidence that the timely provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces mortality in TB/HIV coinfected adults. Despite this, globally in 2013, only around a third of known HIV-positive TB cases were treated with ART. Although there is some recent evidence exploring the barriers to achieve high coverage of HIV testing and ART initiation in TB patients, our understanding of which factors are most important and how best to address these within different health systems remains incomplete. There are some examples of good practice in the delivery of integrated TB/HIV services to improve the HIV treatment cascade. However, evidence of the impact of such strategies is of relatively low quality for informing integrated TB/HIV programming more broadly. In most settings, there remain barriers to higher-level organizational and functional integration. Summary There remains a need for commitment to patient-centred integrated TB/HIV care in countries affected by the dual epidemic. There is a need for better quality evidence around how best to deliver integrated services to strengthen the HIV treatment cascade in TB patients, both at primary healthcare level and within community settings. PMID:26352390

  8. Paragonimiasis in tuberculosis patients in Nagaland, India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Mrinalini; Doleckova, Katerina; Shenoy, Rahul; Mahanta, Jagadish; Narain, Kanwar; Devi, K. Rekha; Konyak, Tongmeth; Mansoor, Homa; Isaakidis, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the infections that mimic tuberculosis (TB) is paragonimiasis (PRG), a foodborne parasitic disease caused by lung flukes of the genus Paragonimus. In the northeastern states of India, TB and PRG are endemic; however, PRG is rarely included in the differential diagnosis of TB. Objective To address limited evidence on the dual burden of TB and PRG in northeastern India, we aimed to document the prevalence of PRG among TB patients using sputum smear, stool examination for children <15 years and ELISA. Design A cross-sectional study of patients receiving TB treatment in the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)-supported TB programme in Mon district, in collaboration with the Regional Medical Research Centre (RMRC), Dibrugarh, Assam, between November 2012 and December 2013. Results Of 96 patients screened between November 2012 and December 2013, three (3%) had pulmonary PRG and were successfully treated with praziquantel. Conclusions PRG should be considered in the TB diagnostic algorithms in PRG–TB dual burden areas. In case of TB–PRG co-infection, it is preferable to treat PRG first followed by anti-TB treatment a few days later. PMID:27667815

  9. Totally drug-resistant tuberculosis and adjunct therapies.

    PubMed

    Parida, S K; Axelsson-Robertson, R; Rao, M V; Singh, N; Master, I; Lutckii, A; Keshavjee, S; Andersson, J; Zumla, A; Maeurer, M

    2015-04-01

    The first cases of totally drug-resistant (TDR) tuberculosis (TB) were reported in Italy 10 years ago; more recently, cases have also been reported in Iran, India and South Africa. Although there is no consensus on terminology, it is most commonly described as 'resistance to all first- and second-line drugs used to treat TB'. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) acquires drug resistance mutations in a sequential fashion under suboptimal drug pressure due to monotherapy, inadequate dosing, treatment interruptions and drug interactions. The treatment of TDR-TB includes antibiotics with disputed or minimal effectiveness against M.tb, and the fatality rate is high. Comorbidities such as diabetes and infection with human immunodeficiency virus further impact on TB treatment options and survival rates. Several new drug candidates with novel modes of action are under late-stage clinical evaluation (e.g., delamanid, bedaquiline, SQ109 and sutezolid). 'Repurposed' antibiotics have also recently been included in the treatment of extensively drug resistant TB. However, because of mutations in M.tb, drugs will not provide a cure for TB in the long term. Adjunct TB therapies, including therapeutic vaccines, vitamin supplementation and/or repurposing of drugs targeting biologically and clinically relevant molecular pathways, may achieve better clinical outcomes in combination with standard chemotherapy. Here, we review broader perspectives of drug resistance in TB and potential adjunct treatment options.

  10. Tuberculosis of the genitourinary system-Urinary tract tuberculosis: Renal tuberculosis-Part II

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Suleman; Bharati, Alpa; Merchant, Neesha

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of renal tuberculosis (TB), including TB in transplant recipients and immunocompromised patients. Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) forms the mainstay of cross-sectional imaging in renal TB. It can easily identify calcification, renal scars, mass lesions, and urothelial thickening. The combination of uneven caliectasis, with urothelial thickening and lack of pelvic dilatation, can also be demonstrated on MDCT. MRI is a sensitive modality for demonstration of features of renal TB, including tissue edema, asymmetric perinephric fat stranding, and thickening of Gerota's fascia, all of which may be clues to focal pyelonephritis of tuberculous origin. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values may help in differentiating hydronephrosis from pyonephrosis. ADC values also have the potential to serve as a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of renal fibrosis. Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk of renal TB. In transplant patients, renal TB, including tuberculous interstitial nephritis, is an important cause of graft dysfunction. Renal TB in patients with HIV more often shows greater parenchymal affection, with poorly formed granulomas and relatively less frequent findings of caseation and stenosis. Atypical mycobacterial infections are also more common in immunocompromised patients. PMID:23986619

  11. Caecal perforation from TB and the Law of Laplace

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Amad N.; Khalid, Salema; Chaudhry, Mohammad Naushad; Ho, Cherrie

    2015-01-01

    A 43-year-old man presented to the hospital with haemoptysis. When worked up, his history and examination were highly suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). He subsequently developed a massive upper gastrointestinal bleed and underwent an emergency laparotomy, which revealed a massively dilated caecum measuring ∼20 cm in diameter. The caecum had perforated due to acute decompensation of intestinal TB. Though common in developing countries, TB is rare in the UK, especially the intestinal kind. The most striking feature of this case is, however, the size of the caecal distension caused by the tubercular inflammation and subsequent perforation—something unheard of in the literature. This massive caecal distention would be explained by the Law of L