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Sample records for abstract vibrio cholerae

  1. NAD metabolism in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, J W; Brestel, C

    1982-01-01

    Extracts of Vibrio cholerae were assayed for various enzymatic activities associated with pyridine nucleotide cycle metabolism. The activities measured include NAD glycohydrolase, nicotinamide deamidase, nicotinamide mononucleotide deamidase, and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase. The results obtained demonstrate the existence in V. cholerae of the five-membered pyridine nucleotide cycle and the potential for a four-membered pyridine nucleotide cycle. The data presented also suggest that most of the NAD glycohydrolase in V. cholerae extracts is not directly related to cholera toxin. PMID:6119307

  2. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Anisia J; Benitez, Jorge A

    2016-02-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity. PMID:26845681

  3. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Anisia J.; Benitez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i) the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii) the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii) the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv) we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity. PMID:26845681

  4. Bacteriocin Typing of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, A. N.; Adhya, Sati; Basu, Jayantisri; Dastidar, Sujata G.

    1970-01-01

    Bacteriocins of Vibrio cholerae have been demonstrated against enterobacterial and vibrio indicator organisms by conventional techniques. Abundant bacteriocin production took place on casein hydrolysate-yeast extract, tryptic soy, digest broth, proteose-peptone, and neopeptone agars. Essential factors were a citrate-phosphate buffer concentration of 0.5 to 0.7%, at pH 7.5 to 7.6, and cold shock. Thermal treatment of indicator organisms at 45 C for 12 min increased the percentage of typable strains. The bacteriocins of V. cholerae appeared to be powerful diffusible bactericidal agents. By using 8 indicator strains, 11 bacteriocin types have been recognized among 425 strains, of which 87% are typable at present. Images PMID:16557731

  5. Mesenteric Panniculitis Associated With Vibrio cholerae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Roginsky, Grigory; Mazulis, Andrew; Ecanow, Jacob S.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of acute Vibrio cholerae infection with computed tomography (CT) changes consistent with mesenteric panniculitis (MP). A 78-year-old Indian man returned from overseas travel with progressively severe nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and watery diarrhea. His stool tested positive twice for Vibrio cholerae. CT revealed prominent lymph nodes and a hazy mesentery consistent with MP. Antibiotic treatment resulted in complete resolution of MP on follow-up CT 8 months later. In the setting of Vibrio cholerae infection, the CT finding of MP appears to be the result of a immunologically mediated reactive inflammatory disorder of the mesentery. PMID:26504876

  6. Monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, B; Rosén, A; Holme, T

    1982-01-01

    A cell line producing monoclonal antibodies directed against the core region of Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide has been established. These antibodies were inhibited by lipopolysaccharide preparations of both O-group 1 vibrios and some non-O-group 1 vibrios as detected in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-inhibition experiments. Coagglutination experiments with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies adsorbed to protein A-carrying staphylococci were performed. All V. cholerae strains tested, regardless of serotype, were agglutinated when mixed with staphylococci coated with the monoclonal antibodies, whereas staphylococci coated with group-specific (O1) polyclonal antibodies only agglutinated with O-group 1 vibrios. Images PMID:6183214

  7. Induction of melanin biosynthesis in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, V E; al-Harthi, L

    1992-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae synthesized the pigment melanin in response to specific physiological conditions that were stressful to the bacterium. Pigmentation was induced when V. cholerae was subjected to hyperosmotic stress in conjunction with elevated growth temperatures (above 30 degrees C). The salt concentration tolerated by V. cholerae was lowered by additional abiotic factors such as acidic starting pH of the growth medium and limitation of organic nutrients. Although the amount of toxin detected in the culture supernatant decreased significantly in response to stressful culture conditions, no correlation between the physiological conditions that induced melanogenesis and expression of OmpU or cholera toxin was detected. Since conditions that induce melanin production in V. cholerae occur in both the aquatic environment and the human host, it is possible that melanogenesis has a specific function with respect to the survival of the bacterium in these habitats. PMID:1444398

  8. EFFECT OF AGGREGATION ON VIBRIO CHOLERAE INACTIVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extensive research has shown that microorganisms exhibit increased resistance due to clumping, aggregation, particle association, or modification of antecedent growth conditions. During the course of investigating a major water-borne Vibrio cholerae outbreak in Peru, U.S. EPA inv...

  9. Intestinal Colonization Dynamics of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Pruss, Kali; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    To cause the diarrheal disease cholera, Vibrio cholerae must effectively colonize the small intestine. In order to do so, the bacterium needs to successfully travel through the stomach and withstand the presence of agents such as bile and antimicrobial peptides in the intestinal lumen and mucus. The bacterial cells penetrate the viscous mucus layer covering the epithelium and attach and proliferate on its surface. In this review, we discuss recent developments and known aspects of the early stages of V. cholerae intestinal colonization and highlight areas that remain to be fully understood. We propose mechanisms and postulate a model that covers some of the steps that are required in order for the bacterium to efficiently colonize the human host. A deeper understanding of the colonization dynamics of V. cholerae and other intestinal pathogens will provide us with a variety of novel targets and strategies to avoid the diseases caused by these organisms. PMID:25996593

  10. Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 in Water and Seafood, Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Nicole; Kahler, Amy M.; Jones, Jessica L.; Bopp, Cheryl A.; Marano, Nina; Tarr, Cheryl L.; Garrett, Nancy M.; Boncy, Jacques; Henry, Ariel; Gómez, Gerardo A.; Wellman, Michael; Curtis, Maurice; Freeman, Molly M.; Turnsek, Maryann; Benner, Ronald A.; Dahourou, Georges; Espey, David; DePaola, Angelo; Tappero, Jordan W.; Handzel, Tom; Tauxe, Robert V.

    2011-01-01

    During the 2010 cholera outbreak in Haiti, water and seafood samples were collected to detect Vibrio cholerae. The outbreak strain of toxigenic V. cholerae O1 serotype Ogawa was isolated from freshwater and seafood samples. The cholera toxin gene was detected in harbor water samples. PMID:22099121

  11. Phylogenetic Diversity of Vibrio cholerae Associated with Endemic Cholera in Mexico from 1991 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seon Young; Rashed, Shah M.; Hasan, Nur A.; Alam, Munirul; Islam, Tarequl; Sadique, Abdus; Johura, Fatema-Tuz; Eppinger, Mark; Huq, Anwar; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An outbreak of cholera occurred in 1991 in Mexico, where it had not been reported for more than a century and is now endemic. Vibrio cholerae O1 prototype El Tor and classical strains coexist with altered El Tor strains (1991 to 1997). Nontoxigenic (CTX−) V. cholerae El Tor dominated toxigenic (CTX+) strains (2001 to 2003), but V. cholerae CTX+ variant El Tor was isolated during 2004 to 2008, outcompeting CTX− V. cholerae. Genomes of six Mexican V. cholerae O1 strains isolated during 1991 to 2008 were sequenced and compared with both contemporary and archived strains of V. cholerae. Three were CTX+ El Tor, two were CTX− El Tor, and the remaining strain was a CTX+ classical isolate. Whole-genome sequence analysis showed the six isolates belonged to five distinct phylogenetic clades. One CTX− isolate is ancestral to the 6th and 7th pandemic CTX+ V. cholerae isolates. The other CTX− isolate joined with CTX− non-O1/O139 isolates from Haiti and seroconverted O1 isolates from Brazil and Amazonia. One CTX+ isolate was phylogenetically placed with the sixth pandemic classical clade and the V. cholerae O395 classical reference strain. Two CTX+ El Tor isolates possessing intact Vibrio seventh pandemic island II (VSP-II) are related to hybrid El Tor isolates from Mozambique and Bangladesh. The third CTX+ El Tor isolate contained West African-South American (WASA) recombination in VSP-II and showed relatedness to isolates from Peru and Brazil. Except for one isolate, all Mexican isolates lack SXT/R391 integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) and sensitivity to selected antibiotics, with one isolate resistant to streptomycin. No isolates were related to contemporary isolates from Asia, Africa, or Haiti, indicating phylogenetic diversity. PMID:26980836

  12. Surface-attachment sequence in Vibrio Cholerae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utada, Andrew; Gibiansky, Maxsim; Wong, Gerard

    2013-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative bacterium that causes the human disease cholera. It is found natively in brackish costal waters in temperate climates, where it attaches to the surfaces of a variety of different aquatic life. V. cholerae has a single polar flagellum making it highly motile, as well as a number of different pili types, enabling it to attach to both biotic and abiotic surfaces. Using in-house built tracking software we track all surface-attaching bacteria from high-speed movies to examine the early-time attachment profile of v. cholerae onto a smooth glass surface. Similar to previous work, we observe right-handed circular swimming trajectories near surfaces; however, in addition we see a host of distinct motility mechanisms that enable rapid exploration of the surface before forming a more permanent attachment. Using isogenic mutants we show that the motility mechanisms observed are due to a complex combination of hydrodynamics and pili-surface interactions. Lauga, E., DiLuzio, W. R., Whitesides, G. M., Stone, H. A. Biophys. J. 90, 400 (2006).

  13. Comparative microscopy study of Vibrio cholerae flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konnov, Nikolai P.; Baiburin, Vil B.; Zadnova, Svetlana P.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    1999-06-01

    A fine structure of bacteria flagella is an important problem of molecular cell biology. Bacteria flagella are the self-assembled structures that allow to use the flagellum protein in a number of biotechnological applications. However, at present, there is a little information about high resolution scanning probe microscopy study of flagellum structure, in particular, about investigation of Vibrio cholerae flagella. In our lab have been carried out the high resolution comparative investigation of V. cholerae flagella by means of various microscopes: tunneling (STM), scanning force (SFM) and electron transmission. As a scanning probe microscope is used designed in our lab versatile SPM with replaceable measuring heads. Bacteria were grown, fixed and treated according to the conventional techniques. For STM investigations samples were covered with Pt/Ir thin films by rotated vacuum evaporation, in SFM investigations were used uncovered samples. Electron microscopy of the negatively stained bacteria was used as a test procedure.

  14. Sequence analyses of type IV pili from Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Aagesen, Alisha M; Häse, Claudia C

    2012-08-01

    Bacterial surface structures called pili have been studied extensively for their role as possible colonization factors. Most sequenced Vibrio genomes predict a variety of pili genes in these organisms, including several types of type IV pili. In particular, the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) and the PilA pili, also known as the chitin-regulated pilus (ChiRP), are type IVa pili commonly found in Vibrio genomes and have been shown to play a role in the colonization of Vibrio species in the environment and/or host tissue. Here, we report sequence comparisons of two type IVa pilin subunit genes, mshA and pilA, and their corresponding amino acid sequences, for several strains from the three main human pathogenic Vibrio species, V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus. We identified specific groupings of these two genes in V. cholerae, whereas V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus strains had no apparent allelic clusters, and these genes were strikingly divergent. These results were compared with other genes from the MSHA and PilA operons as well as another Vibrio pili from the type IVb group, the toxin co-regulated pilus (TCP) from V. cholerae. Our data suggest that a selective pressure exists to cause these strains to vary their MSHA and PilA pilin subunits. Interestingly, V. cholerae strains possessing TCP have the same allele for both mshA and pilA. In contrast, V. cholerae isolates without TCP have polymorphisms in their mshA and pilA sequences similar to what was observed for both V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus. This data suggests a possible linkage between host interactions and maintaining a highly conserved type IV pili sequence in V. cholerae. Although the mechanism underlying this intriguing diversity has yet to be elucidated, our analyses are an important first step towards gaining insights into the various aspects of Vibrio ecology. PMID:22383120

  15. Polyphasic Taxonomy of the Genus Vibrio: Numerical Taxonomy of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Related Vibrio Species

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, R. R.

    1970-01-01

    A set of 86 bacterial cultures, including 30 strains of Vibrio cholerae, 35 strains of V. parahaemolyticus, and 21 representative strains of Pseudomonas, Spirillum, Achromobacter, Arthrobacter, and marine Vibrio species were tested for a total of 200 characteristics. Morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics were included in the analysis. Overall deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) base compositions and ultrastructure, under the electron microscope, were also examined. The taxonomic data were analyzed by computer by using numerical taxonomy programs designed to sort and cluster strains related phenetically. The V. cholerae strains formed an homogeneous cluster, sharing overall S values of ≥75%. Two strains, V. cholerae NCTC 30 and NCTC 8042, did not fall into the V. cholerae species group when tested by the hypothetical median organism calculation. No separation of “classic” V. cholerae, El Tor vibrios, and nonagglutinable vibrios was observed. These all fell into a single, relatively homogeneous, V. cholerae species cluster. V. parahaemolyticus strains, excepting 5144, 5146, and 5162, designated members of the species V. alginolyticus, clustered at S ≥80%. Characteristics uniformly present in all the Vibrio species examined are given, as are also characteristics and frequency of occurrence for V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus. The clusters formed in the numerical taxonomy analyses revealed similar overall DNA base compositions, with the range for the Vibrio species of 40 to 48% guanine plus cytosine. Generic level of relationship of V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus is considered dubious. Intra- and intergroup relationships obtained from the numerical taxonomy studies showed highly significant correlation with DNA/DNA reassociation data. Images PMID:5473901

  16. Occurrence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio cholerae, and Vibrio vulnificus in the Aquacultural Environments of Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tey, Yao Hsien; Jong, Koa-Jen; Fen, Shin-Yuan; Wong, Hin-Chung

    2015-05-01

    The occurrence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae in a total of 72 samples from six aquaculture ponds for groupers, milk fish, and tilapia in southern Taiwan was examined by the membrane filtration and colony hybridization method. The halophilic V. parahaemolyticus was only recovered in seawater ponds, with a high isolation frequency of 86.1% and a mean density of 2.6 log CFU/g. V. cholerae was found in both the seawater and freshwater ponds but preferentially in freshwater ponds, with a frequency of 72.2% and a mean density of 1.65 log CFU/g. V. vulnificus was identified mainly in seawater ponds, with an isolation frequency of 27.8%. The density of V. parahaemolyticus in seawater ponds was positively related to water temperature (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.555) and negatively related to salinity (r = 2 0.333). The density of V. cholerae in all six ponds was positively related to water temperature (r = 0.342) and negatively related to salinity (r = 2 0.432). Two putatively pathogenic tdh(+) V. parahaemolyticus isolates (1.4% of the samples) and no ctx(+) V. cholerae isolates were identified. The experimental results may facilitate assessments of the risk posed by these pathogenic Vibrio species in Taiwan, where aquaculture provides a large part of the seafood supply. PMID:25951392

  17. Genome Sequences of Clinical Vibrio cholerae Isolates from an Oyster-Borne Cholera Outbreak in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Bradd J.; Choi, Seon Young; Hasan, Nur A.; Abdullah, Abdul Shakur H.; Cebula, Thomas A.; Huq, Anwar

    2013-01-01

    Between November 2010 and April 2011, 11 cases of cholera were identified and associated with the consumption of raw oysters harvested from Apalachicola Bay, Florida. The etiological agent was the ctxAB-positive Vibrio cholerae serogroup O75. The genome sequences of the isolates provide useful information and are deposited in the public genome databases. PMID:24265497

  18. Genome Sequences of Clinical Vibrio cholerae Isolates from an Oyster-Borne Cholera Outbreak in Florida.

    PubMed

    Haley, Bradd J; Choi, Seon Young; Hasan, Nur A; Abdullah, Abdul Shakur H; Cebula, Thomas A; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R

    2013-01-01

    Between November 2010 and April 2011, 11 cases of cholera were identified and associated with the consumption of raw oysters harvested from Apalachicola Bay, Florida. The etiological agent was the ctxAB-positive Vibrio cholerae serogroup O75. The genome sequences of the isolates provide useful information and are deposited in the public genome databases. PMID:24265497

  19. Characterization of tryptophanase from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Nuidate, Taiyeebah; Tansila, Natta; Chomchuen, Piraporn; Phattaranit, Phattiphong; Eangchuan, Supachok; Vuddhakul, Varaporn

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophanase (Trpase) is a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme responsible for the production of indole, an important intra- and interspecies signaling molecule in bacteria. In this study, the tnaA gene of Vibrio cholerae coding for VcTrpase was cloned into the pET-20b(+) vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) tn5:tnaA. Using Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) chromatography, VcTrpase was purified, and it possessed a molecular mass of ∼49 kDa with specific absorption peaks at 330 and 435 nm and a specific activity of 3 U/mg protein. The VcTrpase had an 80 % homology to the Trpase of Haemophilus influenzae and E. coli, but only around 50 % identity to the Trpase of Proteus vulgaris and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The optimum conditions for the enzyme were at pH 9.0 and 45 °C. Recombinant VcTrpase exhibited analogous kinetic reactivity to the EcTrpase with K m and k cat values of 0.612 × 10(-3) M and 5.252 s(-1), respectively. The enzyme catalyzed S-methyl-L-cysteine and S-benzyl-L-cysteine degradation, but not L-phenylalanine and L-serine. Using a site-directed mutagenesis technique, eight residues (Thr52, Tyr74, Arg103, Asp137, Arg230, Lys269, Lys270, and His463) were conserved for maintaining enzyme catalysis. All amino acid substitutions at these sites either eliminated or remarkably diminished Trpase activity. These sites are thus potential targets for the design of drugs to control the V. cholerae Trpase and to further investigate its functions. PMID:25253268

  20. Recombination shapes the structure of an environmental Vibrio cholerae population.

    PubMed

    Keymer, Daniel P; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae consists of pathogenic strains that cause sporadic gastrointestinal illness or epidemic cholera disease and nonpathogenic strains that grow and persist in coastal aquatic ecosystems. Previous studies of disease-causing strains have shown V. cholerae to be a primarily clonal bacterial species, but isolates analyzed have been strongly biased toward pathogenic genotypes, while representing only a small sample of the vast diversity in environmental strains. In this study, we characterized homologous recombination and structure among 152 environmental V. cholerae isolates and 13 other putative Vibrio isolates from coastal waters and sediments in central California, as well as four clinical V. cholerae isolates, using multilocus sequence analysis of seven housekeeping genes. Recombinant regions were identified by at least three detection methods in 72% of our V. cholerae isolates. Despite frequent recombination, significant linkage disequilibrium was still detected among the V. cholerae sequence types. Incongruent but nonrandom associations were observed for maximum likelihood topologies from the individual loci. Overall, our estimated recombination rate in V. cholerae of 6.5 times the mutation rate is similar to those of other sexual bacteria and appears frequently enough to restrict selection from purging much of the neutral intraspecies diversity. These data suggest that frequent recombination among V. cholerae may hinder the identification of ecotypes in this bacterioplankton population. PMID:21075874

  1. Genome Sequence and Comparative Genomics Analysis of a Vibrio cholerae O1 Strain Isolated from a Cholera Patient in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Osama, Abdulrazak; Gan, Han Ming; Teh, Cindy Shuan Ju; Yap, Kien-Pong

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence analysis of a clinical Vibrio cholerae VC35 strain from an outbreak case in Malaysia indicates multiple genes involved in host adaptation and a novel Na+-driven multidrug efflux pump-coding gene in the genome of Vibrio cholerae with the highest similarity to VMA_001754 of Vibrio mimicus VMA223. PMID:23209200

  2. Highly diverse recombining populations of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in French Mediterranean coastal lagoons.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Kévin; Mosser, Thomas; Aujoulat, Fabien; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Monfort, Patrick; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio cholerae are ubiquitous to estuarine and marine environments. These two species found in Mediterranean coastal systems can induce infections in humans. Environmental isolates of V. cholerae (n = 109) and V. parahaemolyticus (n = 89) sampled at different dates, stations and water salinities were investigated for virulence genes and by a multilocus sequence-based analysis (MLSA). V. cholerae isolates were all ctxA negative and only one isolate of V. parahaemolyticus displayed trh2 gene. Most Sequence Types (ST) corresponded to unique ST isolated at one date or one station. Frequent recombination events were detected among different pathogenic species, V. parahaemolyticus, V. cholerae, Vibrio mimicus, and Vibrio metoecus. Recombination had a major impact on the diversification of lineages. The genetic diversity assessed by the number of ST/strain was higher in low salinity condition for V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae whereas the frequency of recombination events in V. cholerae was lower in low salinity condition. Mediterranean coastal lagoon systems housed V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus with genetic diversities equivalent to the worldwide diversity described so far. The presence of STs found in human infections as well as the frequency of recombination events in environmental vibrios populations could predict a potential epidemiological risk. PMID:26236294

  3. Highly diverse recombining populations of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in French Mediterranean coastal lagoons

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Kévin; Mosser, Thomas; Aujoulat, Fabien; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Monfort, Patrick; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio cholerae are ubiquitous to estuarine and marine environments. These two species found in Mediterranean coastal systems can induce infections in humans. Environmental isolates of V. cholerae (n = 109) and V. parahaemolyticus (n = 89) sampled at different dates, stations and water salinities were investigated for virulence genes and by a multilocus sequence-based analysis (MLSA). V. cholerae isolates were all ctxA negative and only one isolate of V. parahaemolyticus displayed trh2 gene. Most Sequence Types (ST) corresponded to unique ST isolated at one date or one station. Frequent recombination events were detected among different pathogenic species, V. parahaemolyticus, V. cholerae, Vibrio mimicus, and Vibrio metoecus. Recombination had a major impact on the diversification of lineages. The genetic diversity assessed by the number of ST/strain was higher in low salinity condition for V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae whereas the frequency of recombination events in V. cholerae was lower in low salinity condition. Mediterranean coastal lagoon systems housed V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus with genetic diversities equivalent to the worldwide diversity described so far. The presence of STs found in human infections as well as the frequency of recombination events in environmental vibrios populations could predict a potential epidemiological risk. PMID:26236294

  4. Characterization of Undermethylated Sites in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Dalia, Ankur B.; Lazinski, David W.

    2013-01-01

    The activities of DNA methyltransferases are important for a variety of cellular functions in bacteria. In this study, we developed a modified high-throughput technique called methyl homopolymer tail mediated sequencing (methyl HTM-seq) to identify the undermethylated sites in the Vibrio cholerae genome for the two DNA methyltransferases, Dam, an adenine methyltransferase, and VchM, a cytosine methyltransferase, during growth in rich medium in vitro. Many of the undermethylated sites occurred in intergenic regions, and for most of these sites, we identified the transcription factors responsible for undermethylation. This confirmed the presence of previously hypothesized DNA-protein interactions for these transcription factors and provided insight into the biological state of these cells during growth in vitro. DNA adenine methylation has previously been shown to mediate heritable epigenetic switches in gene regulation. However, none of the undermethylated Dam sites tested showed evidence of regulation by this mechanism. This study is the first to identify undermethylated adenines and cytosines genomewide in a bacterium using second-generation sequencing technology. PMID:23504020

  5. Distribution ofVibrio cholerae in two Florida estuaries.

    PubMed

    Hood, M A; Ness, G E; Rodrick, G E; Blake, N J

    1983-04-01

    The distribution ofVibrio cholerae was examined in 2 Florida estuaries, Apalachicola and Tampa Bay.Vibrio cholerae serotype non-01 was the most abundant serotype, being isolated from 45% of the oyster samples, 30% of the sediments, 50% of the waters, and 75% of the blue crabs.Vibrio cholerae serotype 01 was isolated from only one oyster sample. Strong linear correlations betweenV. cholerae and temperature, salinity, or the other physical/chemical parameters measured,Escherichia coli, or fecal coliforms were not observed, but a range of temperatures and salinities appeared relevant to the distribution of the organism. The organism was present in the highest concentrations when salinities were 10‰-25‰ and temperatures were 20‡C-35‡C.In vitro growth curves of 95V. cholerae environmental isolates further supported that 10‰-25‰ was an ideal salinity range for the organisms. The results suggest thatV. cholerae is a widely distributed organism in the nutrient-rich warm waters of the Gulf Coast estuaries. PMID:24221617

  6. Predicting the Distribution of Vibrio spp. in the Chesapeake Bay: A Vibrio cholerae Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Magny, Guillaume Constantin de; Long, Wen; Brown, Christopher W.; Hood, Raleigh R.; Huq, Anwar; Murtugudde, Raghu; Colwell, Rita R.

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, is a naturally occurring inhabitant of the Chesapeake Bay and serves as a predictor for other clinically important vibrios, including Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus. A system was constructed to predict the likelihood of the presence of V. cholerae in surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay, with the goal to provide forecasts of the occurrence of this and related pathogenic Vibrio spp. Prediction was achieved by driving an available multivariate empirical habitat model estimating the probability of V. cholerae within a range of temperatures and salinities in the Bay, with hydrodynamically generated predictions of ambient temperature and salinity. The experimental predictions provided both an improved understanding of the in situ variability of V. cholerae, including identification of potential hotspots of occurrence, and usefulness as an early warning system. With further development of the system, prediction of the probability of the occurrence of related pathogenic vibrios in the Chesapeake Bay, notably V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus, will be possible, as well as its transport to any geographical location where sufficient relevant data are available. PMID:20145974

  7. Genome assortment, not serogroup, defines Vibrio cholerae pandemic strains

    SciTech Connect

    Brettin, Thomas S; Bruce, David C; Challacombe, Jean F; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff S; Munik, A C; Chertkov, Olga; Meincke, Linda; Saunders, Elizabeth; Choi, Seon Y; Haley, Bradd J; Taviani, Elisa; Jeon, Yoon - Seong; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Jae - Hak; Walters, Ronald A; Hug, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, is a bacterium autochthonous to the aquatic environment, and a serious public health threat. V. cholerae serogroup O1 is responsible for the previous two cholera pandemics, in which classical and El Tor biotypes were dominant in the 6th and the current 7th pandemics, respectively. Cholera researchers continually face newly emerging and re-emerging pathogenic clones carrying combinations of new serogroups as well as of phenotypic and genotypic properties. These genotype and phenotype changes have hampered control of the disease. Here we compare the complete genome sequences of 23 strains of V. cholerae isolated from a variety of sources and geographical locations over the past 98 years in an effort to elucidate the evolutionary mechanisms governing genetic diversity and genesis of new pathogenic clones. The genome-based phylogeny revealed 12 distinct V. cholerae phyletic lineages, of which one, designated the V. cholerae core genome (CG), comprises both O1 classical and EI Tor biotypes. All 7th pandemic clones share nearly identical gene content, i.e., the same genome backbone. The transition from 6th to 7th pandemic strains is defined here as a 'shift' between pathogenic clones belonging to the same O1 serogroup, but from significantly different phyletic lineages within the CG clade. In contrast, transition among clones during the present 7th pandemic period can be characterized as a 'drift' between clones, differentiated mainly by varying composition of laterally transferred genomic islands, resulting in emergence of variants, exemplified by V.cholerae serogroup O139 and V.cholerae O1 El Tor hybrid clones that produce cholera toxin of classical biotype. Based on the comprehensive comparative genomics presented in this study it is concluded that V. cholerae undergoes extensive genetic recombination via lateral gene transfer, and, therefore, genome assortment, not serogroup, should be used to define pathogenic V

  8. Fish as Reservoirs and Vectors of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Senderovich, Yigal; Izhaki, Ido; Halpern, Malka

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiologic agent of cholera, is autochthonous to various aquatic environments, but despite intensive efforts its ecology remains an enigma. Recently, it was suggested that copepods and chironomids, both considered as natural reservoirs of V. cholerae, are dispersed by migratory waterbirds, thus possibly distributing the bacteria between water bodies within and between continents. Although fish have been implicated in the scientific literature with cholera cases, as far as we know, no study actually surveyed the presence of the bacteria in the fish. Here we show for the first time that fish of various species and habitats contain V. cholerae in their digestive tract. Fish (n = 110) were randomly sampled from freshwater and marine habitats in Israel. Ten different fish species sampled from freshwater habitats (lake, rivers and fish ponds), and one marine species, were found to carry V. cholerae. The fish intestine of Sarotherodon galilaeus harboured ca. 5×103 V. cholerae cfu per 1 gr intestine content—high rates compared with known V. cholerae cfu numbers in the bacteria's natural reservoirs. Our results, combined with evidence from the literature, suggest that fish are reservoirs of V. cholerae. As fish carrying the bacteria swim from one location to another (some fish species move from rivers to lakes or sea and vice versa), they serve as vectors on a small scale. Nevertheless, fish are consumed by waterbirds, which disseminate the bacteria on a global scale. Moreover, V. cholerae isolates had the ability to degrade chitin, indicating a commensal relationship between V. cholerae and fish. Better understanding of V. cholerae ecology can help reduce the times that human beings come into contact with this pathogen and thus minimize the health risk this poses. PMID:20066040

  9. Extraction from prawn shells of substances cryoprotective for Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Shimodori, S; Moriya, T; Kohashi, O; Faming, D; Amako, K

    1989-01-01

    Substances cryoprotective for Vibrio cholerae were detected from prawn shells immersed in phosphate-buffered saline. This cryoprotective activity was heat resistant and sensitive to treatment with trypsin. For the exhibition of its full activity, the presence of Mg ion was indispensable. The cryoprotective activity of this substance was more active than that of other known cryoprotectants, like glycerol or serum. PMID:2604409

  10. Isolation of Vibrio cholerae serotype Ogawa from a Florida estuary.

    PubMed

    Motes, M L; Zywno, S R; DePaola, A; Becker, R E; Presnell, M W

    1983-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae serotype Ogawa was recently isolated from the estuarine waters of Apalachicola Bay, Fla., in areas that are subject to consistent fecal contamination and in areas that are remote from any apparent source of contamination. The significance of these organisms in the environment has not been determined. PMID:6824323

  11. Sustained Local Diversity of Vibrio cholerae O1 Biotypes in a Previously Cholera-Free Country

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the current cholera pandemic can trace its origin to a specific time and place, many variants of Vibrio cholerae have caused this disease over the last 50 years. The relative clinical importance and geographical distribution of these variants have changed with time, but most remain in circulation. Some countries, such as Mexico and Haiti, had escaped the current pandemic, until large epidemics struck them in 1991 and 2010, respectively. Cholera has been endemic in these countries ever since. A recent retrospective study in mBio presents the results of more than 3 decades of V. cholerae monitoring from environmental and clinical sources in Mexico (S. Y. Choi et al., mBio 7:e02160-15, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.02160-15). It reveals that multiple V. cholerae variants, including classical strains from the previous pandemic, as well as completely novel biotypes, have been circulating in Mexico. This discovery has important implications for the epidemiology and evolution of V. cholerae. PMID:27143391

  12. Vibrio cholerae-induced inflammation in the neonatal mouse cholera model.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Anne L; Patimalla, Bharathi; Camilli, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the acute diarrheal disease of cholera. Innate immune responses to V. cholerae are not a major cause of cholera pathology, which is characterized by severe, watery diarrhea induced by the action of cholera toxin. Innate responses may, however, contribute to resolution of infection and must be required to initiate adaptive responses after natural infection and oral vaccination. Here we investigated whether a well-established infant mouse model of cholera can be used to observe an innate immune response. We also used a vaccination model in which immunized dams protect their pups from infection through breast milk antibodies to investigate innate immune responses after V. cholerae infection for pups suckled by an immune dam. At the peak of infection, we observed neutrophil recruitment accompanied by induction of KC, macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), NOS-2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-17a. Pups suckled by an immunized dam did not mount this response. Accessory toxins RtxA and HlyA played no discernible role in neutrophil recruitment in a wild-type background. The innate response to V. cholerae deleted for cholera toxin-encoding phage (CTX) and part of rtxA was significantly reduced, suggesting a role for CTX-carried genes or for RtxA in the absence of cholera toxin (CTX). Two extracellular V. cholerae DNases were not required for neutrophil recruitment, but DNase-deficient V. cholerae caused more clouds of DNA in the intestinal lumen, which appeared to be neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), suggesting that V. cholerae DNases combat NETs. Thus, the infant mouse model has hitherto unrecognized utility for interrogating innate responses to V. cholerae infection. PMID:24686062

  13. RNA Colony Blot Hybridization Method for Enumeration of Culturable Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus Bacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Grim, Christopher J.; Zo, Young-Gun; Hasan, Nur A.; Ali, Afsar; Chowdhury, Wasimul B.; Islam, Atiqul; Rashid, Mohammed H.; Alam, Munirul; Morris, J. Glenn; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R.

    2009-01-01

    A species-specific RNA colony blot hybridization protocol was developed for enumeration of culturable Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio mimicus bacteria in environmental water samples. Bacterial colonies on selective or nonselective plates were lysed by sodium dodecyl sulfate, and the lysates were immobilized on nylon membranes. A fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probe targeting a phylogenetic signature sequence of 16S rRNA of V. cholerae and V. mimicus was hybridized to rRNA molecules immobilized on the nylon colony lift blots. The protocol produced strong positive signals for all colonies of the 15 diverse V. cholerae-V. mimicus strains tested, indicating 100% sensitivity of the probe for the targeted species. For visible colonies of 10 nontarget species, the specificity of the probe was calculated to be 90% because of a weak positive signal produced by Grimontia (Vibrio) hollisae, a marine bacterium. When both the sensitivity and specificity of the assay were evaluated using lake water samples amended with a bioluminescent V. cholerae strain, no false-negative or false-positive results were found, indicating 100% sensitivity and specificity for culturable bacterial populations in freshwater samples when G. hollisae was not present. When the protocol was applied to laboratory microcosms containing V. cholerae attached to live copepods, copepods were found to carry approximately 10,000 to 50,000 CFU of V. cholerae per copepod. The protocol was also used to analyze pond water samples collected in an area of cholera endemicity in Bangladesh over a 9-month period. Water samples collected from six ponds demonstrated a peak in abundance of total culturable V. cholerae bacteria 1 to 2 months prior to observed increases in pathogenic V. cholerae and in clinical cases recorded by the area health clinic. The method provides a highly specific and sensitive tool for monitoring the dynamics of V. cholerae in the environment. The RNA blot hybridization protocol can also be

  14. Effect of water treatment on the growth potential of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in seawater.

    PubMed

    Wennberg, Aina Charlotte; Tryland, Ingun; Østensvik, Øyvin; Secic, Indira; Monshaugen, Marte; Liltved, Helge

    2013-02-01

    In laboratory experiments we added Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus to bottles with seawater previously treated by filtration, UV, chlorine or ozone. The purpose was to investigate the influence of different treatment techniques on the growth potential of these bacteria in simulated ballast water tanks. Residual oxidants were removed before inoculation, and the bottles were incubated at 21 ± 1 °C. The growth potential of the vibrios was investigated in two different experimental setups, i.e. in presence and absence of added natural microorganisms. In general, V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus rapidly lost their culturability after inoculation and storage in untreated seawater, but showed increased survival or growth in the treated water. Highest growth was observed in water previously exposed to high concentrations of ozone. Addition of natural microorganisms reduced the growth of V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:23127287

  15. Inorganic polyphosphate in Vibrio cholerae: genetic, biochemical, and physiologic features.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, N; Tzeng, C M; Fraley, C D; Kornberg, A

    2000-12-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1, biotype El Tor, accumulates inorganic polyphosphate (poly P) principally as large clusters of granules. Poly P kinase (PPK), the enzyme that synthesizes poly P from ATP, is encoded by the ppk gene, which has been cloned from V. cholerae, overexpressed, and knocked out by insertion-deletion mutagenesis. The predicted amino acid sequence of PPK is 701 residues (81.6 kDa), with 64% identity to that of Escherichia coli, which it resembles biochemically. As in E. coli, ppk is part of an operon with ppx, the gene that encodes exopolyphosphatase (PPX). However, unlike in E. coli, PPX activity was not detected in cell extracts of wild-type V. cholerae. The ppk null mutant of V. cholerae has diminished adaptation to high concentrations of calcium in the medium as well as motility and abiotic surface attachment. PMID:11073913

  16. Environmental reservoirs and mechanisms of persistence of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Carla; Erken, Martina; Noorian, Parisa; Sun, Shuyang; McDougald, Diane

    2013-01-01

    It is now well accepted that Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the water-borne disease cholera, is acquired from environmental sources where it persists between outbreaks of the disease. Recent advances in molecular technology have demonstrated that this bacterium can be detected in areas where it has not previously been isolated, indicating a much broader, global distribution of this bacterium outside of endemic regions. The environmental persistence of V. cholerae in the aquatic environment can be attributed to multiple intra- and interspecific strategies such as responsive gene regulation and biofilm formation on biotic and abiotic surfaces, as well as interactions with a multitude of other organisms. This review will discuss some of the mechanisms that enable the persistence of this bacterium in the environment. In particular, we will discuss how V. cholerae can survive stressors such as starvation, temperature, and salinity fluctuations as well as how the organism persists under constant predation by heterotrophic protists. PMID:24379807

  17. Molecular tools in understanding the evolution of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Md. Habibur; Islam, Tarequl; Colwell, Rita R.; Alam, Munirul

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, has been a scourge for centuries. Cholera remains a serious health threat for developing countries and has been responsible for millions of deaths globally over the past 200 years. Identification of V. cholerae has been accomplished using a variety of methods, ranging from phenotypic strategies to DNA based molecular typing and currently whole genomic approaches. This array of methods has been adopted in epidemiological investigations, either singly or in the aggregate, and more recently for evolutionary analyses of V. cholerae. Because the new technologies have been developed at an ever increasing pace, this review of the range of fingerprinting strategies, their relative advantages and limitations, and cholera case studies was undertaken. The task was challenging, considering the vast amount of the information available. To assist the study, key references representative of several areas of research are provided with the intent to provide readers with a comprehensive view of recent advances in the molecular epidemiology of V. cholerae. Suggestions for ways to obviate many of the current limitations of typing techniques are also provided. In summary, a comparative report has been prepared that includes the range from traditional typing to whole genomic strategies. PMID:26500613

  18. EFFECT OF AGGREGATION ON VIBRIO CHOLERA INACTIVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extensive research has shown that microorganisms exhibit increased resistance due to clumping, aggregation, particle association or modification of antecedent growth conditions. uring the course of investigating a major waterborne V. Cholerae outbreak in Peru, U.S. EPA investigat...

  19. [Intracerebral abscess after infection with non-toxigenic Vibrio cholerae].

    PubMed

    Torp-Pedersen, Trine; Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen; Olsen, Katharina E P; Barfod, Toke S

    2012-02-20

    We present the first case of intracerebral abscess after blood-borne infection with non-toxigenic Vibrio cholerae (non-01). The patient was a 66 year-old woman who was infected after swimming in Danish seawater during an unusually hot summer. She had predisposing haemochromatosis and a skin lesion on the ankle. We treated the patient with meropenem and ciprofloxacin for six weeks followed by ciprofloxacin for four weeks, and she recovered with hemiparesis and speech impairment. Marine Vibrio species may produce intracranial infection in predisposed individuals, even in temperate climate zones. PMID:22348672

  20. Survival of Vibrio cholerae O1 on fomites.

    PubMed

    Farhana, Israt; Hossain, Zenat Zebin; Tulsiani, Suhella Mohan; Jensen, Peter Kjær Mackie; Begum, Anowara

    2016-09-01

    It is well established that the contamination sources of cholera causing bacteria, Vibrio cholerae, are water and food, but little is known about the transmission role of the fomites (surfaces that can carry pathogens) commonly used in households. In the absence of appropriate nutrients or growth conditions on fomites, bacteria have been known to assume a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state after a given period of time. To investigate whether and when V. cholerae O1 assumes such a state, this study investigated the survival and viable quantification on a range of fomites such as paper, wood, glass, plastic, cloth and several types of metals under laboratory conditions. The fomites were inoculated with an outbreak strain of V. cholerae and its culturability was examined by drop plate count method at 30 min intervals for up to 6 h. For molecular detection, the viable/dead stain ethidium monoazide (EMA) which inhibits amplification of DNA from dead cells was used in combination with real-time polymerase chain reaction (EMA-qPCR) for direct quantitative analyses of viable V. cholerae at 2, 4, 6, 24 h and 7 day time intervals. Results showed that V. cholerae on glass and aluminum surfaces lost culturability within one hour after inoculation but remained culturable on cloth and wood for up to four hours. VBNC V. cholerae on dry fomite surfaces was detected and quantified by EMA-qPCR even 7 days after inoculation. In conclusion, the prolonged survival of V. cholerae on various household fomites may play vital role in cholera transmission and needs to be further investigated. PMID:27430513

  1. Management of multipartite genomes: the Vibrio cholerae model.

    PubMed

    Val, Marie-Eve; Soler-Bistué, Alfonso; Bland, Michael J; Mazel, Didier

    2014-12-01

    A minority of bacterial species has been found to carry a genome divided among several chromosomes. Among these, all Vibrio species harbor a genome split into two chromosomes of uneven size, with distinctive replication origins whose replication firing involves common and specific factors. Most of our current knowledge on replication and segregation in multi-chromosome bacteria has come from the study of Vibrio cholerae, which is now the model organism for this field. It has been firmly established that replication of the two V. cholerae chromosomes is temporally regulated and coupled to the cell cycle, but the mediators of these processes are as yet mostly unknown. The two chromosomes are also organized along different patterns within the cell and occupy different subcellular domains. The selective advantages provided by this partitioning into two replicons are still unclear and are a key motivation for these studies. PMID:25460805

  2. Biocompatible capped iron oxide nanoparticles for Vibrio cholerae detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Rawat, Kamla; Solanki, Pratima R.; Bohidar, H. B.

    2015-05-01

    We report the studies relating to fabrication of an efficient immunosensor for Vibrio cholerae detection. Magnetite (iron oxide (Fe3O4)) nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthesized by the co-precipitation method and capped by citric acid (CA). These NPs were electrophoretically deposited onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate and used for immobilization of monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) for Vibrio cholerae detection using an electrochemical technique. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and CA-Fe3O4/ITO were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, CA-Fe3O4 nanoparticles obtained were about 29 ± 1 nm and 37 ± 1 nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of the nanoparticles was found to be 77.35 nm (Fe3O4) and 189.51 nm (CA-Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/CA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits a good detection range of 12.5-500 ng mL-1 with a low detection limit of 0.32 ng mL-1, sensitivity 0.03 Ω/ng ml-1 cm-2, and reproducibility more than 11 times.

  3. Invariant recognition of polychromatic images of Vibrio cholerae 01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Borrego, Josue; Mourino-Perez, Rosa R.; Cristobal, Gabriel; Pech-Pacheco, Jose L.

    2002-04-01

    Cholera is an acute intestinal infectious disease. It has claimed many lives throughout history, and it continues to be a global health threat. Cholera is considered one of the most important emergence diseases due its relation with global climate changes. Automated methods such as optical systems represent a new trend to make more accurate measurements of the presence and quantity of this microorganism in its natural environment. Automatic systems eliminate observer bias and reduce the analysis time. We evaluate the utility of coherent optical systems with invariant correlation for the recognition of Vibrio cholerae O1. Images of scenes are recorded with a CCD camera and decomposed in three RGB channels. A numeric simulation is developed to identify the bacteria in the different samples through an invariant correlation technique. There is no variation when we repeat the correlation and the variation between images correlation is minimum. The position-, scale-, and rotation-invariant recognition is made with a scale transform through the Mellin transform. The algorithm to recognize Vibrio cholerae O1 is the presence of correlation peaks in the green channel output and their absence in red and blue channels. The discrimination criterion is the presence of correlation peaks in red, green, and blue channels.

  4. Transcript changes in Vibrio cholerae in response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiuping; Liang, Weili; Du, Pengcheng; Yan, Meiying; Kan, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, which is a serious human intestinal pathogen, often resides and thrives in estuaries but requires major self-regulation to overcome intestinal hyperosmotic stress or high salt stress in water and food. In the present study, we selected multiple O1 and O139 group V. cholerae strains that were isolated from different regions and during different years to study their salt tolerance. Based on the mechanisms that other bacteria use to respond to high salt stress, we selected salt stress-response related genes to study the mechanisms which V. cholerae responds to high salt stress. V. cholerae strains showed salt-resistance characteristics that varied in salt concentrations from 4% to 6%. However, group O1 and group O139 showed no significant difference in the degree of salt tolerance. The primary responses of bacteria to salt stress, including Na(+) exclusion, K(+) uptake and glutamate biosynthesis, were observed in V. cholerae strains. In addition, some sigma factors were up-regulated in V. cholerae strains, suggesting that V. cholerae may recruit common sigma factors to achieve an active salt stress response. However, some changes in gene transcript levels in response to salt stress in V. cholerae were strain-specific. In particular, hierarchical clustering of differentially expressed genes indicated that transcript levels of these genes were correlated with the degree of salt tolerance. Therefore, elevated transcript levels of some genes, including sigma factors and genes involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis, may be due to the salt tolerance of strains. In addition, high salt-tolerant strains may recruit common as well as additional sigma factors to activate the salt stress response. PMID:25589902

  5. Inhibition of virulence potential of Vibrio cholerae by natural compounds

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Shinji; Asakura, Masahiro; Neogi, Sucharit Basu; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Iwaoka, Emiko; Aoki, Shunji

    2011-01-01

    The rise in multi-drug resistant Vibrio cholerae strains is a big problem in treatment of patients suffering from severe cholera. Only a few studies have evaluated the potential of natural compounds against V. cholerae. Extracts from plants like ‘neem’, ‘guazuma’, ‘daio’, apple, hop, green tea and elephant garlic have been shown to inhibit bacterial growth or the secreted cholera toxin (CT). However, inhibiting bacterial growth like common antimicrobial agents may also impose selective pressure facilitating development of resistant strains. A natural compound that can inhibit virulence in V. cholerae is an alternative choice for remedy. Recently, some common spices were examined to check their inhibitory capacity against virulence expression of V. cholerae. Among them methanol extracts of red chili, sweet fennel and white pepper could substantially inhibit CT production. Fractionation of red chili methanol extracts indicated a hydrophobic nature of the inhibitory compound(s), and the n-hexane and 90 per cent methanol fractions could inhibit >90 per cent of CT production. Purification and further fractionation revealed that capsaicin is one of the major components among these red chili fractions. Indeed, capsaicin inhibited the production of CT in various V. cholerae strains regardless of serogroups and biotypes. The quantitative reverse transcription real-time PCR assay revealed that capsaicin dramatically reduced the expression of major virulence-related genes such as ctxA, tcpA and toxT but enhanced the expression of hns gene that transcribes a global prokaryotic gene regulator (H-NS). This indicates that the repression of CT production by capsaicin or red chili might be due to the repression of virulence genes transcription by H-NS. Regular intake of spices like red chili might be a good approach to fight against devastating cholera. PMID:21415500

  6. Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus detected in seafood products from Senegal.

    PubMed

    Coly, Ignace; Sow, Amy Gassama; Seydi, Malang; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime

    2013-12-01

    The detection of pathogenic Vibrio in seafood from Senegal has generated five food alerts in the European Union. To investigate the presence and abundance Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in seafood and coastal and estuarine waters, 123 seafood samples and 52 water samples were collected during 2007-2009 from two large seafood markets in Dakar, and from different oceanic and estuarine areas of the country. V. parahaemolyticus was detected in 30.1% of seafood samples, whereas presence of V. cholerae was only found in 1.6%. In water samples, V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae were detected in 28.8% and 5.7% of the samples, respectively. Abundance of V. parahaemolyticus in seafood from the fishing areas ranged from <0.3 to 7.5 most probable number (MPN) per gram. In samples from markets, densities of V. parahaemolyticus showed higher values ranging from 0.61 to >110 MPN/g. Densities of V. cholerae in the two positive seafood samples reached values of 0.36 and 0.61 MPN/g, repectively. V. parahaemolyticus strains were found to possess tlh, but not tdh and trh by polymerase chain reaction, and all the strains of V. cholerae were non-O1 or non-O139. These results suggest that the prevalence of high salinities in coastal and estuarine environments of Senegal limits the occurrence of V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae, despite warmer temperatures prevailing in seawater environments throughout the year. Furthermore, temperature abuse driven by a deficient cold chain over the distribution and retail sales may represent a major risk due to the postharvest multiplication of these Vibrio pathogens. PMID:24147655

  7. Mutations in the IMD Pathway and Mustard Counter Vibrio cholerae Suppression of Intestinal Stem Cell Division in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhipeng; Hang, Saiyu; Purdy, Alexandra E.; Watnick, Paula I.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vibrio cholerae is an estuarine bacterium and an intestinal pathogen of humans that causes severe epidemic diarrhea. In the absence of adequate mammalian models in which to study the interaction of V. cholerae with the host intestinal innate immune system, we have implemented Drosophila melanogaster as a surrogate host. We previously showed that immune deficiency pathway loss-of-function and mustard gain-of-function mutants are less susceptible to V. cholerae infection. We find that although the overall burden of intestinal bacteria is not significantly different from that of control flies, intestinal stem cell (ISC) division is increased in these mutants. This led us to examine the effect of V. cholerae on ISC division. We report that V. cholerae infection and cholera toxin decrease ISC division. Because IMD pathway and Mustard mutants, which are resistant to V. cholerae, maintain higher levels of ISC division during V. cholerae infection, we hypothesize that suppression of ISC division is a virulence strategy of V. cholerae and that accelerated epithelial regeneration protects the host against V. cholerae. Extension of these findings to mammals awaits the development of an adequate experimental model. PMID:23781070

  8. The Outer Surface Lipoprotein VolA Mediates Utilization of Exogenous Lipids by Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Pride, Aaron C.; Herrera, Carmen M.; Guan, Ziqiang; Giles, David K.; Trent, M. Stephen

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous work from our laboratory showed that the Gram-negative aquatic pathogen Vibrio cholerae can take up a much wider repertoire of fatty acids than other Gram-negative organisms. The current work elaborated on the ability of V. cholerae to exploit an even more diverse pool of lipid nutrients from its environment. We have demonstrated that the bacterium can use lysophosphatidylcholine as a metabolite for growth. Using a combination of thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry, we also showed that lysophosphatidylcholine-derived fatty acid moieties can be used for remodeling the V. cholerae membrane architecture. Furthermore, we have identified a lysophospholipase, VolA (Vibrio outer membrane lysophospholipase A), required for these activities. The enzyme is well conserved in Vibrio species, is coexpressed with the outer membrane fatty acid transporter FadL, is one of very few surface-exposed lipoprotein enzymes to be identified in Gram-negative bacteria and the first instance of a surface lipoprotein phospholipase. We propose a model whereby the bacterium efficiently couples the liberation of fatty acid from lysophosphatidylcholine to its subsequent metabolic uptake. An expanded ability to scavenge diverse environmental lipids at the bacterial surface increases overall bacterial fitness and promotes homeoviscous adaptation through membrane remodeling. PMID:23674613

  9. Nonredundant Roles of Iron Acquisition Systems in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Eric D.; Wyckoff, Elizabeth E.; Mey, Alexandra R.; Fisher, Carolyn R.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the severe diarrheal disease cholera, thrives in both marine environments and the human host. To do so, it must encode the tools necessary to acquire essential nutrients, including iron, under these vastly different conditions. A number of V. cholerae iron acquisition systems have been identified; however, the precise role of each system is not fully understood. To test the roles of individual systems, we generated a series of mutants in which only one of the four systems that support iron acquisition on unsupplemented LB agar, Feo, Fbp, Vct, and Vib, remains functional. Analysis of these mutants under different growth conditions showed that these systems are not redundant. The strain carrying only the ferrous iron transporter Feo grew well at acidic, but not alkaline, pH, whereas the ferric iron transporter Fbp promoted better growth at alkaline than at acidic pH. A strain defective in all four systems (null mutant) had a severe growth defect under aerobic conditions but accumulated iron and grew as well as the wild type in the absence of oxygen, suggesting the presence of an additional, unidentified iron transporter in V. cholerae. In support of this, the null mutant was only moderately attenuated in an infant mouse model of infection. While the null mutant used heme as an iron source in vitro, we demonstrate that heme is not available to V. cholerae in the infant mouse intestine. PMID:26644383

  10. Construction and characterization of recombinant Vibrio cholerae strains producing inactive cholera toxin analogs.

    PubMed

    Häse, C C; Thai, L S; Boesman-Finkelstein, M; Mar, V L; Burnette, W N; Kaslow, H R; Stevens, L A; Moss, J; Finkelstein, R A

    1994-08-01

    The catalytic A subunit of cholera toxin (CT-A) is capable of ADP-ribosylating the guanine nucleotide-binding protein, which regulates cell adenylyl cyclase, leading to the life-threatening diarrhea of cholera. Amino acids involved in the enzymatic activity of CT-A have previously been identified. By means of site-directed mutagenesis, an analog of the CT-A subunit gene was created with codon substitutions for both Arg-7 and Glu-112, each of which has been shown to produce subunits lacking ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. The mutated gene fragment was exchanged for the wild-type copy in the previously cloned ctxAB operon from El Tor biotype, Ogawa serotype Vibrio cholerae strain 3083, which produces CT-2. Further, the zonula occludens toxin gene, zot, was inactivated by an insertional mutation to create the new plasmid construct pCT-2*. Additionally, a DNA fragment encoding the B subunit of CT-1 (CT produced by classical biotype, Inaba serotype V. cholerae strain 569B) was exchanged for the homologous part in pCT-2*, resulting in the creation of pCT-1*. These plasmid constructs were introduced into the CT-negative V. cholerae mutant strain JBK70 (E1 Tor biotype, Inaba serotype); CT-A-B+ derivatives CVD101 and CVD103 of classical biotype Ogawa and Inaba serotype strains 395 and 569B, respectively; El Tor biotype Inaba and Ogawa serotype strains C6706 and C7258, respectively, recently isolated in Peru; and O139 (synonym Bengal) strain SG25-1 from the current epidemic in India. Recombinant toxins (CT-1* and CT-2*), partially purified from culture supernatants of transformed JBK70, were shown to be inactive on mouse Y1 adrenal tumor cells and in an in vitro ADP-ribosyltransferase assay. CT-1* and CT-2* reacted with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies against both A and B subunits of CT. The toxin analogs reacted with antibodies against CT-A and CT-B on cellulose acetate strips and in a GM1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; they reacted appropriately with B

  11. Cholera Toxin Production Induced upon Anaerobic Respiration is Suppressed by Glucose Fermentation in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Kang-Mu; Bari, Wasimul; Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, Hye Jin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2016-03-01

    The causative agent of pandemic cholera, Vibrio cholerae, infects the anaerobic environment of the human intestine. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly induced during anaerobic respiration with trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. However, the molecular mechanism of TMAO-stimulated CT production is not fully understood. Herein, we reveal that CT production during anaerobic TMAO respiration is affected by glucose fermentation. When the seventh pandemic V. cholerae O1 strain N16961 was grown with TMAO and additional glucose, CT production was markedly reduced. Furthermore, an N16961 Δcrp mutant, devoid of cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), was defective in CT production during growth by anaerobic TMAO respiration, further suggesting a role of glucose metabolism in regulating TMAO-mediated CT production. TMAO reductase activity was noticeably decreased when grown together with glucose or by mutation of the crp gene. A CRP binding region was identified in the promoter region of the torD gene, which encodes a structural subunit of the TMAO reductase. Gel shift assays further confirmed the binding of purified CRP to the torD promoter sequence. Together, our results suggest that the bacterial ability to respire using TMAO is controlled by CRP, whose activity is dependent on glucose availability. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of major virulence factor production by V. cholerae under anaerobic growth conditions. PMID:26718467

  12. New qnr Gene Cassettes Associated with Superintegron Repeats in Vibrio cholerae O1

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Freitas, Fernanda; Vieira, Verônica V.; Vicente, Ana C.P.

    2008-01-01

    A novel qnr determinant emerged in ciprofloxacin-resistant Vibrio cholerae O1 from the Amazon region of Brazil. This qnrVC1 was in a typical class 1 integron. Its attC showed 89% identity with V. parahaemolyticus superintegron repeats. Analysis showed V. cholerae O1 carrying qnrVC2 associated with a V. cholerae superintegron repeat. PMID:18598639

  13. Rapid proliferation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae during freshwater flash floods in French Mediterranean coastal lagoons.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Kevin; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Mosser, Thomas; Rodier, Claire; Tournoud, Marie-George; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle; Colwell, Rita R; Monfort, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae of the non-O1/non-O139 serotype are present in coastal lagoons of southern France. In these Mediterranean regions, the rivers have long low-flow periods followed by short-duration or flash floods during and after heavy intense rainstorms, particularly at the end of the summer and in autumn. These floods bring large volumes of freshwater into the lagoons, reducing their salinity. Water temperatures recorded during sampling (15 to 24°C) were favorable for the presence and multiplication of vibrios. In autumn 2011, before heavy rainfalls and flash floods, salinities ranged from 31.4 to 36.1‰ and concentrations of V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and V. cholerae varied from 0 to 1.5 × 10(3) most probable number (MPN)/liter, 0.7 to 2.1 × 10(3) MPN/liter, and 0 to 93 MPN/liter, respectively. Following heavy rainstorms that generated severe flash flooding and heavy discharge of freshwater, salinity decreased, reaching 2.2 to 16.4‰ within 15 days, depending on the site, with a concomitant increase in Vibrio concentration to ca. 10(4) MPN/liter. The highest concentrations were reached with salinities between 10 and 20‰ for V. parahaemolyticus, 10 and 15‰ for V. vulnificus, and 5 and 12‰ for V. cholerae. Thus, an abrupt decrease in salinity caused by heavy rainfall and major flooding favored growth of human-pathogenic Vibrio spp. and their proliferation in the Languedocian lagoons. Based on these results, it is recommended that temperature and salinity monitoring be done to predict the presence of these Vibrio spp. in shellfish-harvesting areas of the lagoons. PMID:26319881

  14. Rapid Proliferation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae during Freshwater Flash Floods in French Mediterranean Coastal Lagoons

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Kevin; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Mosser, Thomas; Rodier, Claire; Tournoud, Marie-George; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle; Colwell, Rita R.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae of the non-O1/non-O139 serotype are present in coastal lagoons of southern France. In these Mediterranean regions, the rivers have long low-flow periods followed by short-duration or flash floods during and after heavy intense rainstorms, particularly at the end of the summer and in autumn. These floods bring large volumes of freshwater into the lagoons, reducing their salinity. Water temperatures recorded during sampling (15 to 24°C) were favorable for the presence and multiplication of vibrios. In autumn 2011, before heavy rainfalls and flash floods, salinities ranged from 31.4 to 36.1‰ and concentrations of V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and V. cholerae varied from 0 to 1.5 × 103 most probable number (MPN)/liter, 0.7 to 2.1 × 103 MPN/liter, and 0 to 93 MPN/liter, respectively. Following heavy rainstorms that generated severe flash flooding and heavy discharge of freshwater, salinity decreased, reaching 2.2 to 16.4‰ within 15 days, depending on the site, with a concomitant increase in Vibrio concentration to ca. 104 MPN/liter. The highest concentrations were reached with salinities between 10 and 20‰ for V. parahaemolyticus, 10 and 15‰ for V. vulnificus, and 5 and 12‰ for V. cholerae. Thus, an abrupt decrease in salinity caused by heavy rainfall and major flooding favored growth of human-pathogenic Vibrio spp. and their proliferation in the Languedocian lagoons. Based on these results, it is recommended that temperature and salinity monitoring be done to predict the presence of these Vibrio spp. in shellfish-harvesting areas of the lagoons. PMID:26319881

  15. Swedish isolates of Vibrio cholerae enhance their survival when interacted intracellularly with Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Shanan, Salah; Bayoumi, Magdi; Saeed, Amir; Sandström, Gunnar; Abd, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that occurs naturally in aquatic environment. Only V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 produce cholera toxin and cause cholera, other serogroups can cause gastroenteritis, open wounds infection, and septicaemia. V. cholerae O1 and V. cholerae O139 grow and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii. The aim of this study is to investigate the interactions of the Swedish clinical isolates V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11, and V. cholerae O160 with A. castellanii. The interaction between A. castellanii and V. cholerae strains was studied by means of amoeba cell counts, viable counts of the bacteria in the absence or presence of amoebae, and of the intracellularly growing bacteria, visualised by electron microscopy. These results show that all V. cholerae can grow and survive outside and inside the amoebae, disclosing that V. cholerae O3, V. cholerae O4, V. cholerae O5, V. cholerae O11, and V. cholerae O160 all can be considered as facultative intracellular bacteria. PMID:27118300

  16. Spread of Cholera with Newer Clones of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor, Serotype Inaba, in India

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, B.; Ghosh, R.; Sharma, N. C.; Pazhani, G. P.; Taneja, N.; Raychowdhuri, A.; Sarkar, B. L.; Mondal, S. K.; Mukhopadhyay, A. K.; Nandy, R. K.; Bhattacharya, M. K.; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Ramamurthy, T.

    2006-01-01

    During 2004 and 2005, cholera was recorded in 15 states of India, with 7 outbreaks. The newly emerged Vibrio cholerae O1 Inaba had a different antibiogram and ribotype, different pulsotypes, and different mutations in the wbeT gene. Due to the absence of serogroup O139, the Inaba serotype may have acquired the potential to affect the population at large. PMID:16954282

  17. [The in vitro action of plants on Vibrio cholerae].

    PubMed

    Guevara, J M; Chumpitaz, J; Valencia, E

    1994-01-01

    Natural products of several plants, according to the geographic location, are used by Peruvian people in the popular treatment of diarrhea, with good success. When cholerae cases appeared in Peru, we were interested to know the "in vitro" effect against Vibrio cholerae 01, of these useful plants to treat diarrhea. The following plants were tested: Cichorium intybus, Althaea officinalis, Psorela glandulosa, Geranium maculatum, Punica granatum, Malus sativa, Cydonia oblonga, Chenopodium ambrosoides, Krameria triandria, Tea chinensis, Daucus carota, Persea gratissima, Psidium guayaba and Lippia dulcis. Decoction or infusion of the plants were used in the "in vitro" experiments. The following plants showed no "in vitro" effect against V. cholerae: Cichorium intybus, Althaea officinalis, Psorela glandulosa, Geranium maculatum, Chenopodium ambrosoides, Krameria triandria, Psidium guayaba, Lippia dulcis and Daucus carota. Decoction of Malus sativa and Cydenia oblonga showed bactericidal effect for their acidity and stone avocado (Persea gratissima) a late bactericidal effect. Tea infusión and the decoction of Punica granatum peel, showed the best bactericidal effect and we suggest to use them as to stop cholera spreading. PMID:8018898

  18. Pathogen Special: Vibrio Cholerae, Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and Xylella Fastidiosa

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    One could almost say that it is the latest fashion to sequence a bacterial genome. However, this would belittle the efforts of those working on these important organisms, whose data will greatly help those working on the prevention of disease in the fields of medicine and agriculture. In this feature we present a guided tour of the latest additions to the ‘sequenced microbes’ club. Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of cholera, which is still a threat in countries with poor sanitation and unsafe drinking water. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for a large proportion of opportunistic human infections, typically infecting those with compromised immune systems, particularly cystic fibrosis patients, those patients on respirators and burn victims. Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen that attacks citrus fruits by blocking the xylem, resulting in juiceless fruits of no commercial value. PMID:11119308

  19. Role of Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase in the function of cholera toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Galen, J E; Ketley, J M; Fasano, A; Richardson, S H; Wasserman, S S; Kaper, J B

    1992-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase (NANase) is hypothesized to act synergistically with cholera toxin (CT) and increase the severity of a secretory response by increasing the binding and penetration of CT to enterocytes. To test this hypothesis, the NANase gene (nanH) from V. cholerae Ogawa 395 was first cloned and sequenced. Isogenic wild-type and NANase- V. cholerae 395 strains were then constructed by using suicide vector-mediated mutagenesis. The influence of NANase on CT binding and penetration was examined in vitro by using culture filtrates from these isogenic strains. Fluorescence due to binding of fluorescein-conjugated CT to C57BL/6 and C3H mouse fibroblasts exposed to NANase+ filtrates increased five- and eightfold, respectively, relative to that with NANase- filtrates. In addition, NANase+ filtrates increased the short-circuit current measured in Ussing chambers 65% relative to that with NANase- filtrates, although this difference decreased as production of CT increased. The role of NANase in V. cholerae pathogenesis was examined in vivo by intragastric inoculation of the isogenic strains into CD1 suckling mice. No difference in fluid accumulation ratios was seen at doses of 10(4) to 10(8) CFU, but NANase+ strains produced 18% higher fluid accumulation ratios at 10(9) CFU than NANase- strains when inoculated into nonfasted suckling mice. It is concluded that NANase plays a subtle but significant role in the binding and uptake of CT by susceptible cells under defined conditions. Images PMID:1730470

  20. Identification and Characterization of VpsR and VpsT Binding Sites in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano-Sánchez, David; Fong, Jiunn C. N.; Kilic, Sefa; Erill, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to form biofilms is critical for environmental survival and transmission of Vibrio cholerae, a facultative human pathogen responsible for the disease cholera. Biofilm formation is controlled by several transcriptional regulators and alternative sigma factors. In this study, we report that the two main positive regulators of biofilm formation, VpsR and VpsT, bind to nonoverlapping target sequences in the regulatory region of vpsL in vitro. VpsR binds to a proximal site (the R1 box) as well as a distal site (the R2 box) with respect to the transcriptional start site identified upstream of vpsL. The VpsT binding site (the T box) is located between the R1 and R2 boxes. While mutations in the T and R boxes resulted in a decrease in vpsL expression, deletion of the T and R2 boxes resulted in an increase in vpsL expression. Analysis of the role of H-NS in vpsL expression revealed that deletion of hns resulted in enhanced vpsL expression. The level of vpsL expression was higher in an hns vpsT double mutant than in the parental strain but lower than that in an hns mutant. In silico analysis of the regulatory regions of the VpsR and VpsT targets resulted in the identification of conserved recognition motifs for VpsR and VpsT and revealed that operons involved in biofilm formation and vpsT are coregulated by VpsR and VpsT. Furthermore, a comparative genomics analysis revealed substantial variability in the promoter region of the vpsT and vpsL genes among extant V. cholerae isolates, suggesting that regulation of biofilm formation is under active selection. IMPORTANCE Vibrio cholerae causes cholera and is a natural inhabitant of aquatic environments. One critical factor that is important for environmental survival and transmission of V. cholerae is the microbe's ability to form biofilms, which are surface-associated communities encased in a matrix composed of the exopolysaccharide VPS (Vibrio polysaccharide), proteins, and nucleic acids. Two proteins, Vps

  1. Role of Vibrio polysaccharide (vps) genes in VPS production, biofilm formation and Vibrio cholerae pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fong, Jiunn C N; Syed, Khalid A; Klose, Karl E; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2010-09-01

    Biofilm formation enhances the survival and persistence of the facultative human pathogen Vibrio cholerae in natural ecosystems and its transmission during seasonal cholera outbreaks. A major component of the V. cholerae biofilm matrix is the Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS), which is essential for development of three-dimensional biofilm structures. The vps genes are clustered in two regions, the vps-I cluster (vpsU, vpsA-K, VC0916-27) and the vps-II cluster (vpsL-Q, VC0934-39), separated by an intergenic region containing the rbm gene cluster that encodes biofilm matrix proteins. In-frame deletions of the vps clusters and genes encoding matrix proteins drastically altered biofilm formation phenotypes. To determine which genes within the vps gene clusters are required for biofilm formation and VPS synthesis, we generated in-frame deletion mutants for all the vps genes. Many of these mutants exhibited reduced capacity to produce VPS and biofilms. Infant mouse colonization assays revealed that mutants lacking either vps clusters or rbmA (encoding secreted matrix protein RbmA) exhibited a defect in intestinal colonization compared to the wild-type. Understanding the roles of the various vps gene products will aid in the biochemical characterization of the VPS biosynthetic pathway and elucidate how vps gene products contribute to VPS biosynthesis, biofilm formation and virulence in V. cholerae. PMID:20466768

  2. Zebrafish as a Natural Host Model for Vibrio cholerae Colonization and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Runft, Donna L.; Mitchell, Kristie C.; Abuaita, Basel H.; Allen, Jonathan P.; Bajer, Sarah; Ginsburg, Kevin; Neely, Melody N.

    2014-01-01

    The human diarrheal disease cholera is caused by the aquatic bacterium Vibrio cholerae. V. cholerae in the environment is associated with several varieties of aquatic life, including insect egg masses, shellfish, and vertebrate fish. Here we describe a novel animal model for V. cholerae, the zebrafish. Pandemic V. cholerae strains specifically colonize the zebrafish intestinal tract after exposure in water with no manipulation of the animal required. Colonization occurs in close contact with the intestinal epithelium and mimics colonization observed in mammals. Zebrafish that are colonized by V. cholerae transmit the bacteria to naive fish, which then become colonized. Striking differences in colonization between V. cholerae classical and El Tor biotypes were apparent. The zebrafish natural habitat in Asia heavily overlaps areas where cholera is endemic, suggesting that zebrafish and V. cholerae evolved in close contact with each other. Thus, the zebrafish provides a natural host model for the study of V. cholerae colonization, transmission, and environmental survival. PMID:24375135

  3. Outer Membrane Vesicles Mediate Transport of Biologically Active Vibrio cholerae Cytolysin (VCC) from V. cholerae Strains

    PubMed Central

    Elluri, Sridhar; Enow, Constance; Vdovikova, Svitlana; Rompikuntal, Pramod K.; Dongre, Mitesh; Carlsson, Sven; Pal, Amit; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2014-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released from Gram-negative bacteria can serve as vehicles for the translocation of virulence factors. Vibrio cholerae produce OMVs but their putative role in translocation of effectors involved in pathogenesis has not been well elucidated. The V. cholerae cytolysin (VCC), is a pore-forming toxin that lyses target eukaryotic cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric β-barrel channels. It is considered a potent toxin that contributes to V. cholerae pathogenesis. The mechanisms involved in the secretion and delivery of the VCC have not been extensively studied. Methodology/Principal Findings OMVs from V. cholerae strains were isolated and purified using a differential centrifugation procedure and Optiprep centrifugation. The ultrastructure and the contents of OMVs were examined under the electron microscope and by immunoblot analyses respectively. We demonstrated that VCC from V. cholerae strain V:5/04 was secreted in association with OMVs and the release of VCC via OMVs is a common feature among V. cholerae strains. The biological activity of OMV-associated VCC was investigated using contact hemolytic assay and epithelial cell cytotoxicity test. It showed toxic activity on both red blood cells and epithelial cells. Our results indicate that the OMVs architecture might play a role in stability of VCC and thereby can enhance its biological activities in comparison with the free secreted VCC. Furthermore, we tested the role of OMV-associated VCC in host cell autophagy signalling using confocal microscopy and immunoblot analysis. We observed that OMV-associated VCC triggered an autophagy response in the target cell and our findings demonstrated for the first time that autophagy may operate as a cellular defence mechanism against an OMV-associated bacterial virulence factor. Conclusion/Significance Biological assays of OMVs from the V. cholerae strain V:5/04 demonstrated that OMV-associated VCC is indeed biologically active and

  4. Numerical taxonomy of Vibrio cholerae and related species isolated from areas that are endemic and nonendemic for cholera.

    PubMed Central

    McNicol, L A; De, S P; Kaper, J B; West, P A; Colwell, R R

    1983-01-01

    A total of 165 strains of vibrios isolated from clinical and environmental sources in the United States, India, and Bangladesh, 11 reference cultures, and 4 duplicated cultures were compared in a numerical taxonomic study using 83 unit characters. Similarity between strains was computed by using the simple matching coefficient and the Jaccard coefficient. Strains were clustered by unweighted average linkage and single linkage algorithms. All methods gave similar cluster compositions. The estimated probability of error in the study was obtained from a comparison of the results of duplicated strains and was within acceptable limits. A total of 174 of the 180 organisms studied were divided into eight major clusters. Two clusters were identified as Vibrio cholerae, one as Vibrio mimicus, one as Vibrio parahaemolyticus, three as Vibrio species, and one as Aeromonas hydrophila. The V. mimicus cluster could be further divided into two subclusters, and the major V. cholerae group could be split into seven minor subclusters. Phenotypic traits routinely used to identify clinical isolates of V. cholerae can be used to identify environmental V. cholerae isolates. No distinction was found between strains of V. cholerae isolated from regions endemic for cholera and strains from nonendemic regions. PMID:6874901

  5. Parallel quorum sensing signaling pathways in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sarah A; Hawver, Lisa A; Ng, Wai-Leung

    2016-05-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a microbial signaling process for monitoring population density and complexity. Communication among bacterial cells via QS relies on the production, secretion, and detection of small molecules called autoinducers. Many bacteria have evolved their QS systems with different network architectures to incorporate information from multiple signals. In the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, at least four parallel signaling pathways converge to control the activity of a single regulator to modulate its QS response. By integrating multiple signal inputs, it is believed that Vibrio species can survey intra-species, intra-genus, and inter-species populations and program their gene expression accordingly. Our recent studies suggest that this "many-to-one" circuitry is also important for maintaining the integrity of the input-output relationship of the system and minimizes premature commitment to QS due to signal perturbation. Here we discuss the implications of this specific parallel network setup for V. cholerae intercellular communication and how this system arrangement affects our approach to manipulate the QS response of this clinically important pathogen. PMID:26545759

  6. Growth of Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa Eltor in freshwater.

    PubMed

    Vital, Marius; Füchslin, Hans Peter; Hammes, Frederik; Egli, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Growth of Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa Eltor was studied with a growth assay in which autoclaved and filtered (0.22 microm) freshwater was inoculated at low cell density (5 x 10(3) cells ml(-1)) and proliferation was followed with flow cytometry. Against the common view, V. cholerae was able to grow extensively in different kinds of freshwater. The bacterium multiplied in river water, lake water and effluent of a wastewater treatment plant up to a cell density of 1.55 x 10(6) cells ml(-1). In these samples, apparent assimilable organic carbon (AOC(app)) concentrations ranged from 52 up to 800 microg l(-1) and the results demonstrate a positive trend between the AOC(app) concentration and final cell concentration, suggesting that AOC was a key parameter governing growth of V. cholerae. No growth was observed in waters (tap and bottled drinking water) containing less than approximately 60 microg AOC(app) l(-1). When pure cultures of V. cholerae were grown on identical lake water at different temperatures (20, 25 and 30 degrees C) the maximum specific growth rates (micromax) achieved were 0.22 h(-1), 0.32 h(-1) and 0.45 h(-1), respectively. In addition, growth was characterized in lake water samples amended with different concentrations of NaCl. The highest micromax of V. cholerae was recorded at moderate salinity levels (5 g NaCl l(-1), micromax=0.84 h(-1)), whereas at 30 g NaCl l(-1) (micromax=0.30 h(-1)) or 0 g NaCl l(-1) (micromax)=0.40 h(-1)) specific growth rates were significantly reduced. In the water tested here, micro(max) of V. cholerae was always around 50 % of that exhibited by a freshwater community of indigenous bacteria enriched from the water sampling site. Direct batch competition experiments between V. cholerae and the lake water bacterial community were performed at different temperatures in which V. cholerae was enumerated in the total community using fluorescent-surface antibodies. In all cases V. cholerae was able to grow and constituted around 10

  7. In silico prediction of drug targets in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Katara, Pramod; Grover, Atul; Kuntal, Himani; Sharma, Vinay

    2011-10-01

    Identification of potential drug targets is the first step in the process of modern drug discovery, subjected to their validation and drug development. Whole genome sequences of a number of organisms allow prediction of potential drug targets using sequence comparison approaches. Here, we present a subtractive approach exploiting the knowledge of global gene expression along with sequence comparisons to predict the potential drug targets more efficiently. Based on the knowledge of 155 known virulence and their coexpressed genes mined from microarray database in the public domain, 357 coexpressed probable virulence genes for Vibrio cholerae were predicted. Based on screening of Database of Essential Genes using blastn, a total of 102 genes out of these 357 were enlisted as vitally essential genes, and hence good putative drug targets. As the effective drug target is a protein which is only present in the pathogen, similarity search of these 102 essential genes against human genome sequence led to subtraction of 66 genes, thus leaving behind a subset of 36 genes whose products have been called as potential drug targets. The gene ontology analysis using Blast2GO of these 36 genes revealed their roles in important metabolic pathways of V. cholerae or on the surface of the pathogen. Thus, we propose that the products of these genes be evaluated as target sites of drugs against V. cholerae in future investigations. PMID:21174131

  8. Characterization of the lipopolysaccharide from Vibrio cholerae 395 (Ogawa).

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, S

    1982-01-01

    The chemical structure and biological properties of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Vibrio cholerae 395 (Ogawa), isolated by the phenol-water procedure, were studied. Upon acid hydrolysis, the LPS was split into its polysaccharide and lipid A moieties. The polysaccharide contained both neutral (glucose, heptose, fructose) and amino (glucosamine, quinovosamine) sugars. The LPS contained the acid-labile amino sugar, 4-amino-arabinose, which was absent in the Inaba serotype of V. cholerae. The LPS differed from the LPSs of Enterobacteriaceae by the absence of 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate and the presence of fructose. Analysis of the methylated polysaccharide by gas-liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry showed that it had a branched structure with glucose and heptose residues primarily appearing at the nonreducing-end groups. Interactions with lectins, concanavalin A. and wheat germ agglutinin suggested that terminal glucose residues were alpha linked, whereas terminal glucosamine residues were connected by alpha-1,3 linkages. The major fatty acids of the LPS were C14:0, C16:0, C12h:0, and C14h:0 compounds, of which only the C14h:0 were amide linked, the remainder being ester linked to the backbone. Biological studies showed that the LPS possessed endotoxic properties such as lethality, pyrogenicity, limulus lysate gelation, and ability to induce non-specific resistance to infection. Thus, the LPS from V. cholerae 395 (Ogawa) possessed both common and distinct features as compared with the LPSs from the Enterobacteriaceae. Images PMID:7152669

  9. Differential thiol-based switches jumpstart Vibrio cholerae pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Zhigang; Naseer, Nawar; Xiang, Fu; Kan, Biao; Goulian, Mark; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens utilize gene expression versatility to adapt to environmental changes. Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, encounters redox potential changes when it transitions from oxygen-rich aquatic reservoirs to the oxygen-limiting human gastrointestinal tract. We previously showed that the virulence regulator AphB uses thiol-based switches to sense the anoxic host environment and transcriptionally activate the key virulence activator tcpP. Here, by performing a high-throughput transposon sequencing screen in vivo, we identified OhrR as another regulator that enables V. cholerae rapid anoxic adaptation. Like AphB, reduced OhrR binds to and regulates the tcpP promoter. OhrR and AphB displayed differential dynamics in response to redox potential changes: OhrR is reduced more rapidly than AphB. Furthermore, OhrR thiol modification is required for rapid activation of virulence and successful colonization. This reveals a mechanism whereby bacterial pathogens employ posttranslational modifications of multiple transcription factors to sense and adapt to dynamic environmental changes. PMID:26748713

  10. Detection, Isolation, and Identification of Vibrio cholerae from the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Huq, Anwar; Haley, Bradd J.; Taviani, Elisa; Chen, Arlene; Hasan, Nur A.; Colwell, Rita R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent molecular advances in microbiology have greatly improved the detection of bacterial pathogens in the environment. Improvement and a downward trend in the cost of molecular detection methods have contributed to increased frequency of detection of pathogenic microorganisms where traditional culture-based detection methods have failed. Culture methods also have been greatly improved and the confluence of the two suites of methods provides a powerful tool for detection, isolation, and characterization of pathogens. While molecular detection provides data on the presence and type of pathogens, culturing methods allow a researcher to preserve the organism of interest for “–omics” studies, such as genomic, metabolomic, secretomic, and transcriptomic analysis, which are rapidly becoming more affordable. This has yielded a clearer understanding of the ecology and epidemiology of microorganisms that cause disease. Specifically, important advances have been made over the past several years on isolation, detection, and identification of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera in humans. In this unit, we present commonly accepted methods for isolation, detection, and characterization of V. cholerae, providing more extensive knowledge of the ecology and epidemiology of this organism. This unit has been fully revised and updated from the earlier unit (Huq, Grim et al. 2006) with the latest knowledge and additional information not previously included. We have also taken into account of cost of reagents and equipment that may be prohibitive for many researchers and have, therefore, included protocols for all laboratories, including those with limited resources, likely to be located in regions of cholera endemicity. PMID:22875567

  11. Vibrio cholerae Serogroup O139: Isolation from Cholera Patients and Asymptomatic Household Family Members in Bangladesh between 2013 and 2014

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Fahima; Mather, Alison E.; Begum, Yasmin Ara; Asaduzzaman, Muhammad; Baby, Nabilah; Sharmin, Salma; Biswas, Rajib; Ikhtear Uddin, Muhammad; LaRocque, Regina C.; Harris, Jason B.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Ryan, Edward T.; Clemens, John D.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Qadri, Firdausi

    2015-01-01

    Background Cholera is endemic in Bangladesh, with outbreaks reported annually. Currently, the majority of epidemic cholera reported globally is El Tor biotype Vibrio cholerae isolates of the serogroup O1. However, in Bangladesh, outbreaks attributed to V. cholerae serogroup O139 isolates, which fall within the same phylogenetic lineage as the O1 serogroup isolates, were seen between 1992 and 1993 and in 2002 to 2005. Since then, V. cholerae serogroup O139 has only been sporadically isolated in Bangladesh and is now rarely isolated elsewhere. Methods Here, we present case histories of four cholera patients infected with V. cholerae serogroup O139 in 2013 and 2014 in Bangladesh. We comprehensively typed these isolates using conventional approaches, as well as by whole genome sequencing. Phenotypic typing and PCR confirmed all four isolates belonging to the O139 serogroup. Findings Whole genome sequencing revealed that three of the isolates were phylogenetically closely related to previously sequenced El Tor biotype, pandemic 7, toxigenic V. cholerae O139 isolates originating from Bangladesh and elsewhere. The fourth isolate was a non-toxigenic V. cholerae that, by conventional approaches, typed as O139 serogroup but was genetically divergent from previously sequenced pandemic 7 V. cholerae lineages belonging to the O139 or O1 serogroups. Conclusion These results suggest that previously observed lineages of V. cholerae O139 persist in Bangladesh and can cause clinical disease and that a novel disease-causing non-toxigenic O139 isolate also occurs. PMID:26562418

  12. Effect of LexA on Chromosomal Integration of CTXϕ in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Archana; Anbumani, D; Bag, Satyabrata; Mehta, Ojasvi; Kumar, Pawan; Saxena, Shruti; Nair, G. Balakrish

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genesis of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae involves acquisition of CTXϕ, a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) filamentous phage that encodes cholera toxin (CT). The phage exploits host-encoded tyrosine recombinases (XerC and XerD) for chromosomal integration and lysogenic conversion. The replicative genome of CTXϕ produces ssDNA by rolling-circle replication, which may be used either for virion production or for integration into host chromosome. Fine-tuning of different ssDNA binding protein (Ssb) levels in the host cell is crucial for cellular functioning and important for CTXϕ integration. In this study, we mutated the master regulator gene of SOS induction, lexA, of V. cholerae because of its known role in controlling levels of Ssb proteins in other bacteria. CTXϕ integration decreased in cells with a ΔlexA mutation and increased in cells with an SOS-noninducing mutation, lexA (Ind−). We also observed that overexpression of host-encoded Ssb (VC0397) decreased integration of CTXϕ. We propose that LexA helps CTXϕ integration, possibly by fine-tuning levels of host- and phage-encoded Ssbs. IMPORTANCE Cholera toxin is the principal virulence factor responsible for the acute diarrheal disease cholera. CT is encoded in the genome of a lysogenic filamentous phage, CTXϕ. Vibrio cholerae has a bipartite genome and harbors single or multiple copies of CTXϕ prophage in one or both chromosomes. Two host-encoded tyrosine recombinases (XerC and XerD) recognize the folded ssDNA genome of CTXϕ and catalyze its integration at the dimer resolution site of either one or both chromosomes. Fine-tuning of ssDNA binding proteins in host cells is crucial for CTXϕ integration. We engineered the V. cholerae genome and created several reporter strains carrying ΔlexA or lexA (Ind−) alleles. Using the reporter strains, the importance of LexA control of Ssb expression in the integration efficiency of CTXϕ was demonstrated. PMID:26503849

  13. The Vaccine Candidate Vibrio cholerae 638 Is Protective against Cholera in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    García, Luis; Jidy, Manuel Díaz; García, Hilda; Rodríguez, Boris L.; Fernández, Roberto; Año, Gemma; Cedré, Bárbara; Valmaseda, Tania; Suzarte, Edith; Ramírez, Margarita; Pino, Yadira; Campos, Javier; Menéndez, Jorge; Valera, Rodrigo; González, Daniel; González, Irma; Pérez, Oliver; Serrano, Teresita; Lastre, Miriam; Miralles, Fernando; del Campo, Judith; Maestre, Jorge Luis; Pérez, José Luis; Talavera, Arturo; Pérez, Antonio; Marrero, Karen; Ledón, Talena; Fando, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae 638 is a living candidate cholera vaccine strain attenuated by deletion of the CTXΦ prophage from C7258 (O1, El Tor Ogawa) and by insertion of the Clostridium thermocellum endoglucanase A gene into the hemagglutinin/protease coding sequence. This vaccine candidate was previously found to be well tolerated and immunogenic in volunteers. This article reports a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted to test short-term protection conferred by 638 against subsequent V. cholerae infection and disease in volunteers in Cuba. A total of 45 subjects were enrolled and assigned to receive vaccine or placebo. The vaccine contained 109 CFU of freshly harvested 638 buffered with 1.3% NaHCO3, while the placebo was buffer alone. After vaccine but not after placebo intake, 96% of volunteers had at least a fourfold increase in vibriocidal antibody titers, and 50% showed a doubling of at least the lipopolysaccharide-specific immunoglobulin A titers in serum. At 1 month after vaccination, five volunteers from the vaccine group and five from the placebo group underwent an exploratory challenge study with 109 CFU of ΔCTXΦ attenuated mutant strain V. cholerae 81. Only two volunteers from the vaccine group shed strain 81 in their feces, but none of them experienced diarrhea; in the placebo group, all volunteers excreted the challenge strain, and three had reactogenic diarrhea. An additional 12 vaccinees and 9 placebo recipients underwent challenge with 7 × 105 CFU of virulent strain V. cholerae 3008 freshly harvested from a brain heart infusion agar plate and buffered with 1.3% NaHCO3. Three volunteers (25%) from the vaccine group and all from the placebo group shed the challenge agent in their feces. None of the 12 vaccinees but 7 volunteers from the placebo group had diarrhea, and 2 of the latter exhibited severe cholera (>5,000 g of diarrheal stool). These results indicate that at 1 month after ingestion of a single oral dose (109 CFU) of strain

  14. Rare Strain of Vibrio cholerae Septicemia in a Patient with Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Deepu; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Non-O1/non-O139 is a rare strain of Vibrio cholera that has been documented to cause significant morbidity and mortality in the immunosuppressed population. Case Presentation. A patient with multiple myeloma develops non-O1/non-O139 Vibrio cholera septicemia, leading to multiorgan failure and ultimately death. Discussion. An exceedingly rare strain of Vibrio cholera, non-O1/non-O139, may be an important factor of morbidity and mortality in certain immunosuppressed populations, such as patients with multiple myeloma and malignancies. Conclusion. Bacteremia involving generally noninvasive microbes, such as non-O1/non-O139 Vibrio cholerae, can have significant deleterious effects in the immunosuppressed patients as shown by this case report. Physicians need to be more diligent when treating these patients. PMID:26257967

  15. Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio Cholerae Paradigm (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, Rita

    2012-06-01

    Rita Colwell on "Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio cholerae paradigm" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  16. Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio Cholerae Paradigm (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema

    Colwell, Rita [University of Maryland

    2013-02-12

    Rita Colwell on "Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio cholerae paradigm" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  17. Color correlation for the recognition of Vibrio cholerae O1 in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourino-Perez, Rosa R.; Alvarez-Borrego, Josue

    1999-07-01

    Application of color correlation optical systems for the recognition of Vibrio cholerae 01 in seawater samples with matched filters and phase only filters recorded in holographic plates in three channels (RGB).

  18. Mechanisms underlying the additive and redundant Qrr phenotypes in Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Geoffrey A M; Keener, James P

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae regulate their virulence factors according to the local cell-population density in a regulatory system called quorum sensing. Their quorum sensing systems contain a small RNA (sRNA) circuit to regulate expression of a master transcriptional regulator via multiple quorum regulated RNA (Qrr) and a protein chaperon Hfq. Experiments and genetic analysis show that their respective quorum sensing networks are topologically equivalent and have homologous components, yet they respond differently to the same experimental conditions. In particular, V. harveyi Qrr are additive because all of its Qrr are required to maintain wild-type-like repression of its master transcriptional regulator. Conversely, V. cholerae Qrr are redundant because any of its Qrr is sufficient to repress its master transcriptional regulator. Given the striking similarities between their quorum sensing systems, experimentalists have been unable to identify conclusively the mechanisms behind these phenotypic differences. Nevertheless, the current hypothesis in the literature is that dosage compensation is the mechanism underlying redundancy. In this work, we identify the mechanisms underlying Qrr redundancy using a detailed mathematical model of the V. harveyi and V. cholerae sRNA circuits. We show that there are exactly two different cases underlying Qrr redundancy and that dosage compensation is unnecessary and insufficient to explain Qrr redundancy. Although V. harveyi Qrr are additive when the perturbations in Qrr are large, we predict that V. harveyi and V. cholerae Qrr are redundant when the perturbations in Qrr are small. We argue that the additive and redundant Qrr phenotypes can emerge from parametric differences in the sRNA circuit. In particular, we find that the affinity of Qrr and its expression relative to the master transcriptional regulator determine the level of redundancy in V. harveyi and V. cholerae. Furthermore, the additive and redundant Qrr

  19. Toxin producing Vibrio cholerae O75 outbreak, United States, March to April 2011.

    PubMed

    Onifade, T J M; Hutchinson, R; Van Zile, K; Bodager, D; Baker, R; Blackmore, C

    2011-01-01

    The Florida Department of Health, Florida, United States, is investigating a Vibrio cholerae O75 outbreak. Ten cases with disease onsets from 23 March to 13 April 2011, presented with gastrointestinal symptoms of diarrhoea, nausea, vomiting, cramps, chills, and/or fever, after consuming raw or lightly cooked oysters harvested from Apalachicola Bay, Florida. Symptoms were milder than those during outbreaks of epidemic (serogroup O1 and O139) Vibrio cholerae; no case required rehydration treatment or hospitalisation. PMID:21616048

  20. Vibrio metoecus sp. nov., a close relative of Vibrio cholerae isolated from coastal brackish ponds and clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Kirchberger, Paul C; Turnsek, Maryann; Hunt, Dana E; Haley, Bradd J; Colwell, Rita R; Polz, Martin F; Tarr, Cheryl L; Boucher, Yan

    2014-09-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, curved-rod-shaped bacterium with close resemblance to Vibrio cholerae, the aetiological agent of cholera, was isolated over the course of several years from coastal brackish water (17 strains) and from clinical cases (two strains) in the United States. 16S rRNA gene identity with V. cholerae exceeded 98 % yet an average nucleotide identity based on genome data of around 86 % and multi locus sequence analysis of six housekeeping genes (mdh, adk, gyrB, recA, pgi and rpoB) clearly delineated these isolates as a distinct genotypic cluster within the V. cholerae-V. mimicus clade. Most standard identification techniques do not differentiate this cluster of isolates from V. cholerae. Only amplification of the ompW gene using V. cholerae-specific primers and a negative Voges-Proskauer test showed a difference between the two clusters. Additionally, all isolated strains differed phenotypically from V. cholerae in their ability to utilize N-acetyl-d-galactosamine and d-glucuronic acid as sole carbon sources. Furthermore, they were generally unable to infect the slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum, a widespread ability in V. cholerae. Based on these clear phenotypic differences that are not necessarily apparent in standard tests as well as average nucleotide identity and phylogeny of protein-coding genes, we propose the existence of a novel species, Vibrio metoecus sp. nov. with the type strain OP3H(T) ( = LMG 27764(T) = CIP 110643(T)). Due to its close resemblance to V. cholerae and the increasing number of strains isolated over the past several years, we suggest that V. metoecus sp. nov. is a relatively common species of the genus Vibrio, isolates of which have been identified as atypical isolates of V. cholerae in the past. Its isolation from clinical samples also indicates that strains of this species, like V. cholerae, are opportunistic pathogens. PMID:24972615

  1. Evaluation of a rapid polymerase chain reaction based identification technique for Vibrio cholerae isolates.

    PubMed

    le Roux, W J; Masoabi, D; de Wet, C M E; Venter, S N

    2004-01-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of waterborne pathogens, such as Vibrio cholerae, in drinking-water sources is important to enable effective resource management and public health protection. Phenotypic systems currently being used for the identification of Vibrio cholerae isolates are time-consuming and the need exists for the development of suitable molecular techniques that can offer both fast and reliable identification. During this study, isolates identified as Vibrio cholerae by means of two different biochemical test systems (API 20E and VITEK 32) were analysed with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare the reliability of the various identification systems. The selected PCR technique amplified a sequence within the outer membrane protein of Vibrio cholerae, a gene specific for V. cholerae. It was found that out of 243 isolates biochemically identified as V. cholerae with either the API or VITEK system, 21 isolates did not give a positive result with the PCR detection method. Sequencing the 16S rDNA of more than half of these isolates and comparison of the sequences with Internet databases indicated that most of the isolates belonged to the genus Aeromonas. The results indicated that the rapid PCR procedure was more accurate than the API or VITEK systems currently being used for the phenotypic identification of Vibrio cholerae isolates. PMID:15318514

  2. Structure of Vibrio cholerae ribosome hibernation promoting factor

    PubMed Central

    De Bari, Heather; Berry, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of ribosome hibernation promoting factor (HPF) from Vibrio cholerae is presented at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal was phased by two-wavelength MAD using cocrystallized cobalt. The asymmetric unit contained two molecules of HPF linked by four Co atoms. The metal-binding sites observed in the crystal are probably not related to biological function. The structure of HPF has a typical β–α–β–β–β–α fold consistent with previous structures of YfiA and HPF from Escherichia coli. Comparison of the new structure with that of HPF from E. coli bound to the Thermus thermophilus ribosome [Polikanov et al. (2012 ▶), Science, 336, 915–918] shows that no significant structural changes are induced in HPF by binding. PMID:23519794

  3. Small RNA Control of Cell-to-Cell Communication in Vibrio Harveyi and Vibrio Cholerae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenningsen, Sine Lo

    Quorum sensing is a process of cell-to-cell communication, by which bacteria coordinate gene expression and behavior on a population-wide scale. Quorum sensing is accomplished through production, secretion, and subsequent detection of chemical signaling molecules termed autoinducers. The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae and the marine bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi incorporate information from multiple autoinducers, and also environmental signals and metabolic cues into their quorum-sensing pathways. At the core of these pathways lie several homologous small regulatory RNA molecules, the Quorum Regulatory RNAs. Small noncoding RNAs have emerged throughout the bacterial and eukaryotic kingdoms as key regulators of behavioral and developmental processes. Here, I review our present understanding of the role of the Qrr small RNAs in integrating quorum-sensing signals and in regulating the individual cells response to this information.

  4. The Dynamics of Genetic Interactions between Vibrio metoecus and Vibrio cholerae, Two Close Relatives Co-Occurring in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Orata, Fabini D.; Kirchberger, Paul C.; Méheust, Raphaël; Barlow, E. Jed; Tarr, Cheryl L.; Boucher, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio metoecus is the closest relative of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the potent diarrheal disease cholera. Although the pathogenic potential of this new species is yet to be studied in depth, it has been co-isolated with V. cholerae in coastal waters and found in clinical specimens in the United States. We used these two organisms to investigate the genetic interaction between closely related species in their natural environment. The genomes of 20 V. cholerae and 4 V. metoecus strains isolated from a brackish coastal pond on the US east coast, as well as 4 clinical V. metoecus strains were sequenced and compared with reference strains. Whole genome comparison shows 86–87% average nucleotide identity (ANI) in their core genes between the two species. On the other hand, the chromosomal integron, which occupies approximately 3% of their genomes, shows higher conservation in ANI between species than any other region of their genomes. The ANI of 93–94% observed in this region is not significantly greater within than between species, meaning that it does not follow species boundaries. Vibrio metoecus does not encode toxigenic V. cholerae major virulence factors, the cholera toxin and toxin-coregulated pilus. However, some of the pathogenicity islands found in pandemic V. cholerae were either present in the common ancestor it shares with V. metoecus, or acquired by clinical and environmental V. metoecus in partial fragments. The virulence factors of V. cholerae are therefore both more ancient and more widespread than previously believed. There is high interspecies recombination in the core genome, which has been detected in 24% of the single-copy core genes, including genes involved in pathogenicity. Vibrio metoecus was six times more often the recipient of DNA from V. cholerae as it was the donor, indicating a strong bias in the direction of gene transfer in the environment. PMID:26454015

  5. The Dynamics of Genetic Interactions between Vibrio metoecus and Vibrio cholerae, Two Close Relatives Co-Occurring in the Environment.

    PubMed

    Orata, Fabini D; Kirchberger, Paul C; Méheust, Raphaël; Barlow, E Jed; Tarr, Cheryl L; Boucher, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Vibrio metoecus is the closest relative of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the potent diarrheal disease cholera. Although the pathogenic potential of this new species is yet to be studied in depth, it has been co-isolated with V. cholerae in coastal waters and found in clinical specimens in the United States. We used these two organisms to investigate the genetic interaction between closely related species in their natural environment. The genomes of 20 V. cholerae and 4 V. metoecus strains isolated from a brackish coastal pond on the US east coast, as well as 4 clinical V. metoecus strains were sequenced and compared with reference strains. Whole genome comparison shows 86-87% average nucleotide identity (ANI) in their core genes between the two species. On the other hand, the chromosomal integron, which occupies approximately 3% of their genomes, shows higher conservation in ANI between species than any other region of their genomes. The ANI of 93-94% observed in this region is not significantly greater within than between species, meaning that it does not follow species boundaries. Vibrio metoecus does not encode toxigenic V. cholerae major virulence factors, the cholera toxin and toxin-coregulated pilus. However, some of the pathogenicity islands found in pandemic V. cholerae were either present in the common ancestor it shares with V. metoecus, or acquired by clinical and environmental V. metoecus in partial fragments. The virulence factors of V. cholerae are therefore both more ancient and more widespread than previously believed. There is high interspecies recombination in the core genome, which has been detected in 24% of the single-copy core genes, including genes involved in pathogenicity. Vibrio metoecus was six times more often the recipient of DNA from V. cholerae as it was the donor, indicating a strong bias in the direction of gene transfer in the environment. PMID:26454015

  6. Antibody-secreting cell responses after Vibrio cholerae O1 infection and oral cholera vaccination in adults in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Atiqur; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Islam, Kamrul; LaRocque, Regina C; Ryan, Edward T; Wrammert, Jens; Calderwood, Stephen B; Qadri, Firdausi; Harris, Jason B

    2013-10-01

    Infection with Vibrio cholerae and oral cholera vaccines (OCVs) induce transient circulating plasmablast responses that peak within approximately 7 days after infection or vaccination. We previously demonstrated that plasmablast responses strongly correlate with subsequent levels of V. cholerae-specific duodenal antibodies up to 6 months after V. cholerae infection. Hence, plasmablast responses provide an early window into the immunologic memory at the mucosal surface. In this study, we characterized plasmablast responses following V. cholerae infection using a flow cytometrically defined population and compared V. cholerae-specific responses in adult patients with V. cholerae O1 infection and vaccinees who received the OCV Dukoral (Crucell Vaccines Canada). Among flow cytometrically sorted populations of gut-homing plasmablasts, almost 50% of the cells recognized either cholera toxin B subunit (CtxB) or V. cholerae O1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using a traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay (ELISPOT), we found that infection with V. cholerae O1 and OCVs induce similar responses to the protein antigen CtxB, but responses to LPS were diminished after OCV compared to those after natural V. cholerae infection. A second dose of OCV on day 14 failed to boost circulating V. cholerae-specific plasmablast responses in Bangladeshi adults. Our results differ from those in studies from areas where cholera is not endemic, in which a second vaccination on day 14 significantly boosts plasmablast responses. Given these results, it is likely that the optimal boosting strategies for OCVs differ significantly between areas where V. cholerae infection is endemic and those where it is not. PMID:23945156

  7. The Mannose-Sensitive Hemagglutinin of Vibrio cholerae Promotes Adherence to Zooplankton

    PubMed Central

    Chiavelli, Deborah A.; Marsh, Jane W.; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2001-01-01

    The bacterium Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, is often found attached to plankton, a property that is thought to contribute to its environmental persistence in aquatic habitats. The V. cholerae O1 El Tor biotype and V. cholerae O139 strains produce a surface pilus termed the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA), whereas V. cholerae O1 classical biotype strains do not. Although V. cholerae O1 classical does not elaborate MSHA, the gene is present and expressed at a level comparable to that of the other strains. Since V. cholerae O1 El Tor and V. cholerae O139 have displaced V. cholerae O1 classical as the major epidemic strains over the last fifteen years, we investigated the potential role of MSHA in mediating adherence to plankton. We found that mutation of mshA in V. cholerae O1 El Tor significantly diminished, but did not eliminate, adherence to exoskeletons of the planktonic crustacean Daphnia pulex. The effect of the mutation was more pronounced for V. cholerae O139, essentially eliminating adherence. Adherence of the V. cholerae O1 classical mshA mutant was unaffected. The results suggest that MSHA is a factor contributing to the ability of V. cholerae to adhere to plankton. The results also showed that both biotypes of V. cholerae O1 utilize factors in addition to MSHA for zooplankton adherence. The expression of MSHA and these additional, yet to be defined, adherence factors differ in a serogroup- and biotype-specific manner. PMID:11425745

  8. Homology between the deoxyribonucleic acid of fertility factor P and Vibrio cholerae chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Wohhieter, J A; Datta, A; Brenner, D J; Baron, L S

    1975-01-01

    The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of the Vibrio cholerae fertility factor P was isolated by the dye-buoyant density method and hybridized to V. cholerae chromosomal DNA. The DNA of this fertility plasmid had between 35 to 40% homology with the V. cholerae chromosomal DNA. Little or no homology was detected between the P factor DNA and DNA of the Escherichia coli sex factor F. PMID:1092651

  9. Genomic Science in Understanding Cholera Outbreaks and Evolution of Vibrio cholerae as a Human Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Mekalanos, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Modern genomic and bioinformatic approaches have been applied to interrogate the V. cholerae genome, the role of genomic elements in cholera disease, and the origin, relatedness, and dissemination of epidemic strains. A universal attribute of choleragenic strains includes a repertoire of pathogenicity islands and virulence genes, namely the CTX–ϕ prophage and Toxin Co-regulated Pilus (TCP) in addition to other virulent genetic elements including those referred to as Seventh Pandemic Islands. During the last decade, the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has provided highly resolved and often complete genomic sequences of epidemic isolates in addition to both clinical and environmental strains isolated from geographically unconnected regions. Genomic comparisons of these strains, as was completed during and following the Haitian outbreak in 2010, reveals that most epidemic strains appear closely related, regardless of region of origin. Non-O1 clinical or environmental strains may also possess some virulence islands, but phylogenic analysis of the core genome suggests they are more diverse and distantly related than those isolated during epidemics. Like Haiti, genomic studies that examine both the Vibrio core- and pan-genome in addition to Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) conclude that a number of epidemics are caused by strains that closely resemble those in Asia, and often appear to originate there and then spread globally. The accumulation of SNPs in the epidemic strains over time can then be applied to better understand the evolution of the V. cholerae genome as an etiological agent. PMID:24590676

  10. Proteomic analysis of Vibrio cholerae outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Altindis, Emrah; Fu, Yang; Mekalanos, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria provide an interesting research material for defining cell-envelope proteins without experimental cell disruption. OMVs are also promising immunogenic platforms and may play important roles in bacterial survival and pathogenesis. We used in-solution trypsin digestion coupled to mass spectrometry to identify 90 proteins present in OMVs of Vibrio cholerae when grown under conditions that activate the TCP pilus virulence regulatory protein (ToxT) virulence regulon. The ToxT expression profile and potential contribution to virulence of these proteins were assessed using ToxT and in vivo RNA-seq, Tn-seq, and cholera stool proteomic and other genome-wide data sets. Thirteen OMV-associated proteins appear to be essential for cell growth, and therefore may represent antibacterial drug targets. Another 12 nonessential OMV proteins, including DegP protease, were required for intestinal colonization in rabbits. Comparative proteomics of a degP mutant revealed the importance of DegP in the incorporation of nine proteins into OMVs, including ones involved in biofilm matrix formation and various substrates of the type II secretion system. Taken together, these results suggest that DegP plays an important role in determining the content of OMVs and also affects phenotypes such as intestinal colonization, proper function of the type II secretion system, and formation of biofilm matrix. PMID:24706774

  11. Mechanistic insights into filamentous phage integration in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bhabatosh

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of acute diarrhoeal disease cholera, harbors large numbers of lysogenic filamentous phages, contribute significantly to the host pathogenesis and provide fitness factors to the pathogen that help the bacterium to survive in natural environment. Most of the vibriophage genomes are not equipped with integrase and thus exploit two host-encoded tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD, for lysogenic conversion. Integration is site-specific and it occurs at dimer resolution site (dif) of either one or both chromosomes of V. cholerae. Each dif sequence contains two recombinase-binding sequences flanking a central region. The integration follows a sequential strand exchanges between dif and attP sites within a DNA-protein complex consisting of one pair of each recombinase and two DNA fragments. During entire process of recombination, both the DNA components and recombinases of the synaptic complex keep transiently interconnected. Within the context of synaptic complex, both of the actuated enzymes mediate cleavage of phosphodiester bonds. First cleavage generates a phosphotyrosyl-linked recombinase-DNA complex at the recombinase binding sequence and free 5′-hydroxyl end at the first base of the central region. Following the cleavage, the exposed bases with 5′-hydroxyl ends of the central region of dif and attP sites melt from their complementary strands and react with the recombinase-DNA phosphotyrosyl linkage of their recombining partner. Subsequent ligation between dif and attP strands requires complementary base pair interactions at the site of phosphodiester bond formation. Integration mechanism is mostly influenced by the compatibility of dif and attP sequences. dif sites are highly conserved across bacterial phyla. Different phage genomes have different attP sequences; therefore they rely on different mechanisms for integration. Here, I review our current understanding of integration mechanisms used by the vibriophages. PMID

  12. Vibrio cholerae and Aeromonas: do they share a mutual host?

    PubMed

    Senderovich, Yigal; Gershtein, Yana; Halewa, Etti; Halpern, Malka

    2008-03-01

    Species of the genus Aeromonas are native inhabitants of aquatic environments and have recently been considered as an emergent human pathogen. It is estimated that aeromonads cause up to 13% of reported gastroenteritis cases in the United States. Although the autochthonous existence of Aeromonas in the aquatic environment has been established, its natural reservoir is as yet unknown. Chironomids are closely related to mosquitoes except they do not bite and they are the most widely distributed insects in freshwater. They infest drinking water systems in Israel and all over the world. Vibrio cholerae inhabit chironomids and are able to degrade their egg masses. The degradation of the egg masses is followed by failure of the eggs to hatch. In the current study, egg masses from a waste stabilization pond and a river in northern Israel were collected and cultured during a five-month period. Bacterial colonies were randomly chosen and checked for their egg mass degradation abilities. In addition to V. cholerae, most of the other isolates that had the ability to degrade the egg masses were identified as Aeromonas species, thus, demonstrating that Aeromonas species are natural inhabitants of chironomid egg masses. The following virulence-associated genes were detected in Aeromonas species that were isolated from chironomid egg masses: alt (78%); ahpB (76%); act/aerA/hlyA (65%); fla (59%); pla/lipH3/apl-1/lip (43%); and ast (2%). These findings indicate that the Aeromonas species inhabiting chironomid egg masses pose a potential health risk. Understanding the natural reservoir of Aeromonas will help to develop methods to monitor and control the bacteria in fresh and drinking water reservoirs and to better understand the relationships between chironomids, V. cholerae and Aeromonas populations. PMID:18317460

  13. Cholera outbreaks (2012) in three districts of Nepal reveal clonal transmission of multi-drug resistant Vibrio cholerae O1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although endemic cholera causes significant morbidity and mortality each year in Nepal, lack of information about the causal bacterium often hinders cholera intervention and prevention. In 2012, diarrheal outbreaks affected three districts of Nepal with confirmed cases of mortality. This study was designed to understand the drug response patterns, source, and transmission of Vibrio cholerae associated with 2012 cholera outbreaks in Nepal. Methods V. cholerae (n = 28) isolated from 2012 diarrhea outbreaks {n = 22; Kathmandu (n = 12), Doti (n = 9), Bajhang (n = 1)}, and surface water (n = 6; Kathmandu) were tested for antimicrobial response. Virulence properties and DNA fingerprinting of the strains were determined by multi-locus genetic screening employing polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results All V. cholerae strains isolated from patients and surface water were confirmed to be toxigenic, belonging to serogroup O1, Ogawa serotype, biotype El Tor, and possessed classical biotype cholera toxin (CTX). Double-mismatch amplification mutation assay (DMAMA)-PCR revealed the V. cholerae strains to possess the B-7 allele of ctx subunit B. DNA sequencing of tcpA revealed a point mutation at amino acid position 64 (N → S) while the ctxAB promoter revealed four copies of the tandem heptamer repeat sequence 5'-TTTTGAT-3'. V. cholerae possessed all the ORFs of the Vibrio seventh pandemic island (VSP)-I but lacked the ORFs 498–511 of VSP-II. All strains were multidrug resistant with resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT), nalidixic acid (NA), and streptomycin (S); all carried the SXT genetic element. DNA sequencing and deduced amino acid sequence of gyrA and parC of the NAR strains (n = 4) revealed point mutations at amino acid positions 83 (S → I), and 85 (S → L), respectively. Similar PFGE (NotI) pattern revealed the Nepalese V. cholerae to be clonal

  14. Genomic and phenotypic characterization of Vibrio cholerae non-O1 isolates from a US Gulf Coast cholera outbreak.

    PubMed

    Haley, Bradd J; Choi, Seon Young; Grim, Christopher J; Onifade, Tiffiani J; Cinar, Hediye N; Tall, Ben D; Taviani, Elisa; Hasan, Nur A; Abdullah, Abdulshakur H; Carter, Laurenda; Sahu, Surasri N; Kothary, Mahendra H; Chen, Arlene; Baker, Ron; Hutchinson, Richard; Blackmore, Carina; Cebula, Thomas A; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R

    2014-01-01

    Between November 2010, and May 2011, eleven cases of cholera, unrelated to a concurrent outbreak on the island of Hispaniola, were recorded, and the causative agent, Vibrio cholerae serogroup O75, was traced to oysters harvested from Apalachicola Bay, Florida. From the 11 diagnosed cases, eight isolates of V. cholerae were isolated and their genomes were sequenced. Genomic analysis demonstrated the presence of a suite of mobile elements previously shown to be involved in the disease process of cholera (ctxAB, VPI-1 and -2, and a VSP-II like variant) and a phylogenomic analysis showed the isolates to be sister taxa to toxigenic V. cholerae V51 serogroup O141, a clinical strain isolated 23 years earlier. Toxigenic V. cholerae O75 has been repeatedly isolated from clinical cases in the southeastern United States and toxigenic V. cholerae O141 isolates have been isolated globally from clinical cases over several decades. Comparative genomics, phenotypic analyses, and a Caenorhabditis elegans model of infection for the isolates were conducted. This analysis coupled with isolation data of V. cholerae O75 and O141 suggests these strains may represent an underappreciated clade of cholera-causing strains responsible for significant disease burden globally. PMID:24699521

  15. Genomic and Phenotypic Characterization of Vibrio cholerae Non-O1 Isolates from a US Gulf Coast Cholera Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Grim, Christopher J.; Onifade, Tiffiani J.; Cinar, Hediye N.; Tall, Ben D.; Taviani, Elisa; Hasan, Nur A.; Abdullah, AbdulShakur H.; Carter, Laurenda; Sahu, Surasri N.; Kothary, Mahendra H.; Chen, Arlene; Baker, Ron; Hutchinson, Richard; Blackmore, Carina; Cebula, Thomas A.; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R.

    2014-01-01

    Between November 2010, and May 2011, eleven cases of cholera, unrelated to a concurrent outbreak on the island of Hispaniola, were recorded, and the causative agent, Vibrio cholerae serogroup O75, was traced to oysters harvested from Apalachicola Bay, Florida. From the 11 diagnosed cases, eight isolates of V. cholerae were isolated and their genomes were sequenced. Genomic analysis demonstrated the presence of a suite of mobile elements previously shown to be involved in the disease process of cholera (ctxAB, VPI-1 and -2, and a VSP-II like variant) and a phylogenomic analysis showed the isolates to be sister taxa to toxigenic V. cholerae V51 serogroup O141, a clinical strain isolated 23 years earlier. Toxigenic V. cholerae O75 has been repeatedly isolated from clinical cases in the southeastern United States and toxigenic V. cholerae O141 isolates have been isolated globally from clinical cases over several decades. Comparative genomics, phenotypic analyses, and a Caenorhabditis elegans model of infection for the isolates were conducted. This analysis coupled with isolation data of V. cholerae O75 and O141 suggests these strains may represent an underappreciated clade of cholera-causing strains responsible for significant disease burden globally. PMID:24699521

  16. Whole-genome sequence comparisons reveal the evolution of Vibrio cholerae O1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jin; Lee, Chan Hee; Nair, G Balakrish; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-08-01

    The analysis of the whole-genome sequences of Vibrio cholerae strains from previous and current cholera pandemics has demonstrated that genomic changes and alterations in phage CTX (particularly in the gene encoding the B subunit of cholera toxin) were major features in the evolution of V. cholerae. Recent studies have revealed the genetic mechanisms in these bacteria by which new variants of V. cholerae are generated from type-specific strains; these mechanisms suggest that certain strains are selected by environmental or human factors over time. By understanding the mechanisms and driving forces of historical and current changes in the V. cholerae population, it would be possible to predict the direction of such changes and the evolution of new variants; this has implications for the battle against cholera. PMID:25913612

  17. An intracellular replication niche for Vibrio cholerae in the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Van der Henst, Charles; Scrignari, Tiziana; Maclachlan, Catherine; Blokesch, Melanie

    2016-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a human pathogen and the causative agent of cholera. The persistence of this bacterium in aquatic environments is a key epidemiological concern, as cholera is transmitted through contaminated water. Predatory protists, such as amoebae, are major regulators of bacterial populations in such environments. Therefore, we investigated the interaction between V. cholerae and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii at the single-cell level. We observed that V. cholerae can resist intracellular killing. The non-digested bacteria were either released or, alternatively, established a replication niche within the contractile vacuole of A. castellanii. V. cholerae was maintained within this compartment even upon encystment. The pathogen ultimately returned to its aquatic habitat through lysis of A. castellanii, a process that was dependent on the production of extracellular polysaccharide by the pathogen. This study reinforces the concept that V. cholerae is a facultative intracellular bacterium and describes a new host-pathogen interaction. PMID:26394005

  18. Active surveillance for Vibrio cholerae O1 and vibriophages in sewage water as a potential tool to predict cholera outbreaks.

    PubMed Central

    Madico, G; Checkley, W; Gilman, R H; Bravo, N; Cabrera, L; Calderon, M; Ceballos, A

    1996-01-01

    The 1991 Peruvian cholera epidemic has thus far been responsible for 600,000 cholera cases in Peru. In an attempt to design a cholera surveillance program in the capital city of Lima, weekly sewage samples were collected between August 1993 and May 1996 and examined for the presence of Vibrio cholerae O1 bacteria and V. cholerae O1 bacteriophages (i.e., vibriophages). During the 144 weeks of surveillance, 6,323 cases of clinically defined cholera were recorded in Lima. We arbitrarily defined an outbreak as five or more reported cases of cholera in a week. The odds of having an outbreak were 7.6 times greater when V. cholerae O1 was present in sewage water during the four previous weeks compared with when it was not (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the odds of having an outbreak increased as the number of V. cholerae O1 isolations during the previous 4 weeks increased (P < 0.001). The odds of having an outbreak were 2.4 times greater when vibriophages were present in sewage water during the four previous weeks compared with when they were not, but this increase was not statistically significant (P = 0.15). The odds of having an outbreak increased as the number of vibriophage isolations during the previous 4 weeks increased (P < 0.05). The signaling of a potential cholera outbreak 1 month in advance may be a valuable tool for implementation of preventive measures. In Peru, active surveillance for V. cholerae O1 and possibly vibriophages in sewage water appears to be a feasible and effective means of predicting and outbreak of cholera. PMID:8940432

  19. Dynamics of Vibrio cholerae abundance in Austrian saline lakes, assessed with quantitative solid-phase cytometry.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Sonja; Jakwerth, Stefan; Bliem, Rupert; Baudart, Julia; Lebaron, Philippe; Huhulescu, Steliana; Kundi, Michael; Herzig, Alois; Farnleitner, Andreas H; Sommer, Regina; Kirschner, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    In order to elucidate the main predictors of Vibrio cholerae dynamics and to estimate the risk of Vibrio cholera-related diseases, a recently developed direct detection approach based on fluorescence in situ hybridization and solid-phase cytometry (CARD-FISH/SPC) was applied in comparison to cultivation for water samples from the lake Neusiedler See, Austria and three shallow alkaline lakes over a period of 20 months. Vibrio cholerae attached to crustacean zooplankton was quantified via FISH and epifluorescence microscopy. Concentrations obtained by CARD-FISH/SPC were significantly higher than those obtained by culture in 2011, but were mostly of similar magnitude in 2012. Maximum cell numbers were 1.26 × 10(6) V. cholerae per L in Neusiedler See and 7.59 × 10(7) V. cholerae per L in the shallow alkaline lakes. Only on a few occasions during summer was the crustacean zooplankton the preferred habitat for V. cholerae. In winter, V. cholerae was not culturable but could be quantified at all sites with CARD-FISH/SPC. Beside temperature, suspended solids, zooplankton and ammonium were the main predictors of V. cholerae abundance in Neusiedler See, while in the shallow alkaline lakes it was organic carbon, conductivity and phosphorus. Based on the obtained concentrations a first estimation of the health risk for visitors of the lake could be performed. PMID:25847810

  20. Survival and proliferation of the lysogenic bacteriophage CTXΦ in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fenxia; Kan, Biao

    2015-02-01

    The lysogenic phage CTXΦ of Vibrio cholerae can transfer the cholera toxin gene both horizontally (inter-strain) and vertically (cell proliferation). Due to its diversity in form and species, the complexity of regulatory mechanisms, and the important role of the infection mechanism in the production of new virulent strains of V. cholerae, the study of the lysogenic phage CTXΦ has attracted much attention. Based on the progress of current research, the genomic features and their arrangement, the host-dependent regulatory mechanisms of CTXΦ phage survival, proliferation and propagation were reviewed to further understand the phage's role in the evolutionary and epidemiological mechanisms of V. cholerae. PMID:25613689

  1. Multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis of Vibrio cholerae isolates from 2012 to 2013 cholera outbreaks in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, R; Sadeghy, J; Shokri Moghadam, M; Bakhshi, B

    2016-08-01

    Cholera remains to be an international threat, with high rates of illness and death. In 2012 and 2013, two cholera outbreak happened in Iran, affecting lots of people. Vibrio cholerae O1 was confirmed as the etiological agent. Source identification and controlling the spread of the cholera disease are two critical approaches in cholera outbreaks. In this study, thirty V. cholerae O1 isolates were selected and has been evaluated for antimicrobial resistant as well as molecular typing by multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) method. Twenty-nine (97%) isolates were sero-grouped as El Tor (one isolate was classical) and 100% were related to Inaba serotype. All of the isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, ampicillin and gentamicin. On the other hand, 60% of the isolates were MDR (resistant to 3 or more classes). There were three resistance patterns. The most prevalent pattern was resistance to streptomycin, erythromycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline (ST-SXT-E-T) which was seen in 50% of isolates. Using MLVA method 14 MLVA types were identified. MLVA type 2 (5-7-7-16-15) accounted for 43% of isolates. Isolates with the same genotype often did not have the same antibiogram. Overall, the data indicate that the Iranian V. cholerae were MDR and clonaly related. Furthermore, the results of this study shows that MLVA can be used as useful method for V. cholerae genotyping in epidemiological investigations. PMID:27247094

  2. Cholera

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Jason B.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T.; Calderwood, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cholera is an acute, secretory diarrhea caused by infection with Vibrio cholerae of the O1 and O139 serogroups. Cholera is endemic in over 50 countries and also causes large epidemics. Since 1817, seven cholera pandemics have spread from Asia to much of the world. The 7th pandemic began in 1961 and affects 3–5 million people each year, killing 120,000. Although mild cholera may be indistinguishable from other diarrheal illnesses, the presentation of severe cholera is distinct, with dramatic diarrheal purging. Management of patients with cholera involves aggressive fluid replacement; effective therapy can decrease mortality from over 50% to less than 0.2%. Antibiotics decrease volume and duration of diarrhea by 50% and are recommended for patients with moderate to severe dehydration. Prevention of cholera depends on access to safe water and sanitation. Two oral cholera vaccines are available and the most effective use of these in integrated prevention programs is being actively evaluated. PMID:22748592

  3. Purification and characterization of the soluble hemagglutinin (cholera lectin)( produced by Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, R A; Hanne, L F

    1982-01-01

    The soluble hemagglutinin (HA) (cholera lectin) produced by Vibrio cholerae strain CA401 was purified to apparent homogeneity by a sequence of ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration, and preparative isoelectric focusing. Soluble HA activity was found to focus at three different pIs, 6.3, 5.3, and 4.7. Each of the factors migrated as a large-molecular-weight protein in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under normal conditions, and each, upon heating in sodium dodecyl sulfate was found to dissociate into 32,000-molecular-weight subunits. Treating the samples with a reducing agent did not affect their mobility. Each gave a reaction of immunological identity with antiserum prepared against the others. Thus, there are apparently three distinct pH isotypes of soluble HA which exist as noncovalently associated polymers of 32,000-molecular-weight subunits. Electron microscopy of purified preparations revealed long filamentous polymers. The molecule does not stain as a glycoprotein; it is hydrophobic; it is inactivated during incubation at 25, 37, or 60 degrees C; and it has significant protease activity. The protease activity likewise focused at pH values of 6.3 and 5.3 to 4.7, and it was inhibited by antiserum against the HA. However, whereas the HA is active at 4 degrees C, the protease is not. The soluble HA is, therefore, a bifunctional molecule capable of mediating hemagglutination and proteolysis. Its amino acid composition is reported. Fab fragments of antibody against the purified HA inhibited attachment of heterologous serotype-biotype V. cholerae to infant rabbit small bowel. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 PMID:7047394

  4. Phenotypic and Genetic Heterogeneity in Vibrio cholerae O139 Isolated from Cholera Cases in Delhi, India during 2001–2006

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Raikamal; Sharma, Naresh C.; Halder, Kalpataru; Bhadra, Rupak K.; Chowdhury, Goutam; Pazhani, Gururaja P.; Shinoda, Sumio; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Nair, G. Balakrish; Ramamurthy, Thadavarayan

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of epidemic Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 has declined in cholera endemic countries. However, sporadic cholera caused by V. cholerae O139 with notable genetic changes is still reported from many regions. In the present study, 42 V. cholerae O139 strains isolated from 2001 to 2006 in Delhi, India, were retrospectively analyzed to understand their phenotype and molecular characteristics. The majority of isolates were resistant to ampicillin, furazolidone and nalidixic acid. Though the integrative conjugative element was detected in all the O139 isolates, the 2004–2006 isolates remained susceptible to co-trimoxazole, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin. Cholera toxin genotype 1 was present in the majority of the O139 isolates while few had type 3 or a novel type 4. In the cholera toxin encoding gene (ctx) restriction fragment length polymorphism, the majority of the isolates harbored three copies of CTX element, of which one was truncated. In this study, the ctx was detected for the first time in the small chromosome of V. cholerae O139 and one isolate harbored 5 copies of CTX element, of which 3 were truncated. The ribotype BII pattern was found in most of the O139 isolates. Three V. cholerae O139 isolated in 2001 had a new ribotype BVIII. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed clonal variation in 2001 isolates compared to the 2004–2006 isolates. Molecular changes in V. cholerae O139 have to be closely monitored as this information may help in understanding the changing genetic features of this pathogen in relation to the epidemiology of cholera. PMID:27555841

  5. Phenotypic and Genetic Heterogeneity in Vibrio cholerae O139 Isolated from Cholera Cases in Delhi, India during 2001-2006.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Raikamal; Sharma, Naresh C; Halder, Kalpataru; Bhadra, Rupak K; Chowdhury, Goutam; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Shinoda, Sumio; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Nair, G Balakrish; Ramamurthy, Thadavarayan

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of epidemic Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 has declined in cholera endemic countries. However, sporadic cholera caused by V. cholerae O139 with notable genetic changes is still reported from many regions. In the present study, 42 V. cholerae O139 strains isolated from 2001 to 2006 in Delhi, India, were retrospectively analyzed to understand their phenotype and molecular characteristics. The majority of isolates were resistant to ampicillin, furazolidone and nalidixic acid. Though the integrative conjugative element was detected in all the O139 isolates, the 2004-2006 isolates remained susceptible to co-trimoxazole, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin. Cholera toxin genotype 1 was present in the majority of the O139 isolates while few had type 3 or a novel type 4. In the cholera toxin encoding gene (ctx) restriction fragment length polymorphism, the majority of the isolates harbored three copies of CTX element, of which one was truncated. In this study, the ctx was detected for the first time in the small chromosome of V. cholerae O139 and one isolate harbored 5 copies of CTX element, of which 3 were truncated. The ribotype BII pattern was found in most of the O139 isolates. Three V. cholerae O139 isolated in 2001 had a new ribotype BVIII. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed clonal variation in 2001 isolates compared to the 2004-2006 isolates. Molecular changes in V. cholerae O139 have to be closely monitored as this information may help in understanding the changing genetic features of this pathogen in relation to the epidemiology of cholera. PMID:27555841

  6. Secretome Analysis of Vibrio cholerae Type VI Secretion System Reveals a New Effector-Immunity Pair

    PubMed Central

    Altindis, Emrah; Dong, Tao; Catalano, Christy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a dynamic macromolecular organelle that many Gram-negative bacteria use to inhibit or kill other prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells. The toxic effectors of T6SS are delivered to the prey cells in a contact-dependent manner. In Vibrio cholerae, the etiologic agent of cholera, T6SS is active during intestinal infection. Here, we describe the use of comparative proteomics coupled with bioinformatics to identify a new T6SS effector-immunity pair. This analysis was able to identify all previously identified secreted substrates of T6SS except PAAR (proline, alanine, alanine, arginine) motif-containing proteins. Additionally, this approach led to the identification of a new secreted protein encoded by VCA0285 (TseH) that carries a predicted hydrolase domain. We confirmed that TseH is toxic when expressed in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and V. cholerae cells. The toxicity observed in V. cholerae was suppressed by coexpression of the protein encoded by VCA0286 (TsiH), indicating that this protein is the cognate immunity protein of TseH. Furthermore, exogenous addition of purified recombinant TseH to permeabilized E. coli cells caused cell lysis. Bioinformatics analysis of the TseH protein sequence suggest that it is a member of a new family of cell wall-degrading enzymes that include proteins belonging to the YD repeat and Rhs superfamilies and that orthologs of TseH are likely expressed by species belonging to phyla as diverse as Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria. PMID:25759499

  7. A global map of suitability for coastal Vibrio cholerae under current and future climate conditions.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Luis E; Ryan, Sadie J; Stewart-Ibarra, Anna M; Finkelstein, Julia L; King, Christine A; Qiao, Huijie; Polhemus, Mark E

    2015-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a globally distributed water-borne pathogen that causes severe diarrheal disease and mortality, with current outbreaks as part of the seventh pandemic. Further understanding of the role of environmental factors in potential pathogen distribution and corresponding V. cholerae disease transmission over time and space is urgently needed to target surveillance of cholera and other climate and water-sensitive diseases. We used an ecological niche model (ENM) to identify environmental variables associated with V. cholerae presence in marine environments, to project a global model of V. cholerae distribution in ocean waters under current and future climate scenarios. We generated an ENM using published reports of V. cholerae in seawater and freely available remotely sensed imagery. Models indicated that factors associated with V. cholerae presence included chlorophyll-a, pH, and sea surface temperature (SST), with chlorophyll-a demonstrating the greatest explanatory power from variables selected for model calibration. We identified specific geographic areas for potential V. cholerae distribution. Coastal Bangladesh, where cholera is endemic, was found to be environmentally similar to coastal areas in Latin America. In a conservative climate change scenario, we observed a predicted increase in areas with environmental conditions suitable for V. cholerae. Findings highlight the potential for vulnerability maps to inform cholera surveillance, early warning systems, and disease prevention and control. PMID:26048558

  8. Familial Aggregation of Vibrio cholerae-associated Infection in Matlab, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Duggal, Priya; Harris, Jason B.; Saha, Sajal Kumar; Streatfield, Peter Kim; Ryan, Edward T.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Qadri, Firdausi; Yunus, Mohammad; LaRocque, Regina C.

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a major cause of diarrhoeal illness in endemic regions, such as Bangladesh. Understanding the factors that determine an individual's susceptibility to infection due to V. cholerae may lead to improved prevention and control strategies. Increasing evidence suggests that human genetic factors affect the severity of V. cholerae-associated infection. This study, therefore, sought to characterize the heritable component of susceptibility to infection due to V. cholerae using the Matlab Health and Demographic Surveillance System database of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. In total, 144 pedigrees that included a cholera patient and 341 pedigrees without a cholera patient were evaluated during 1 January–31 December 1992. The odds of the sibling of a patient being admitted with cholera were 7.67 times the odds of the sibling of an unaffected individual being admitted with cholera [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.40–24.5, p<0.001], after adjustment for gender, age, socioeconomic status, and hygiene practices. Although exposure to environmental reservoirs is essential in the epidemiology of cholera, household-specific factors, such as familial relatedness to an index case, may also be important determinants of risk of cholera. Further analysis of human genetic factors that contribute to susceptibility to cholera may be productive. PMID:20099756

  9. Molecular epidemiology of Vibrio cholerae O1 isolated in Nepal by southern hybridization with a cholera toxin gene probe.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Shrestha, J; Iida, T; Yoh, M; Honda, T

    1995-06-01

    A cholera epidemic broke out in 1992 due to Vibrio cholerae O1 biotype El Tor in the eastern and southern belt of Nepal mainly among the Bhutanese refugees. Restriction fragment profiles (RFP) of DNA fragments of V. cholerae O1 isolates hybridized with an enzyme-labelled oligonucleotide probe for cholera toxin gene (ctx) by Southern Hybridization were compared. The probe hybridized with the 13- and 8-kb fragments of PstI-digested total DNA in all isolates observed in the epidemic. This RFP in the Nepalese strain was not observed in the strains isolated during other epidemics but was observed in the strains isolated from the exported marine products from Taiwan and Thailand. PMID:7594311

  10. The Vibrio cholerae type VI secretion system employs diverse effector modules for intraspecific competition

    PubMed Central

    Unterweger, Daniel; Miyata, Sarah T.; Bachmann, Verena; Brooks, Teresa M.; Mullins, Travis; Kostiuk, Benjamin; Provenzano, Daniele; Pukatzki, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that consists of over 200 serogroups with differing pathogenic potential. Only strains that express the virulence factors cholera toxin (CT) and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) are capable of pandemic spread of cholera diarrhoea. Regardless, all V. cholerae strains sequenced to date harbour genes for the type VI secretion system (T6SS) that translocates effectors into neighbouring eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Here we report that the effectors encoded within these conserved gene clusters differ widely among V. cholerae strains, and that immunity proteins encoded immediately downstream from the effector genes protect their host from neighbouring bacteria producing corresponding effectors. As a consequence, strains with matching effector-immunity gene sets can coexist, while strains with different sets compete against each other. Thus, the V. cholerae T6SS contributes to the competitive behaviour of this species. PMID:24686479

  11. Cholera.

    PubMed Central

    Kaper, J B; Morris, J G; Levine, M M

    1995-01-01

    Despite more than a century of study, cholera still presents challenges and surprises to us. Throughout most of the 20th century, cholera was caused by Vibrio cholerae of the O1 serogroup and the disease was largely confined to Asia and Africa. However, the last decade of the 20th century has witnessed two major developments in the history of this disease. In 1991, a massive outbreak of cholera started in South America, the one continent previously untouched by cholera in this century. In 1992, an apparently new pandemic caused by a previously unknown serogroup of V. cholerae (O139) began in India and Bangladesh. The O139 epidemic has been occurring in populations assumed to be largely immune to V. cholerae O1 and has rapidly spread to many countries including the United States. In this review, we discuss all aspects of cholera, including the clinical microbiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical features of the disease. Special attention will be paid to the extraordinary advances that have been made in recent years in unravelling the molecular pathogenesis of this infection and in the development of new generations of vaccines to prevent it. PMID:7704895

  12. Incidence of Vibrio cholerae from estuaries of the United States West Coast.

    PubMed Central

    Kaysner, C A; Abeyta, C; Wekell, M M; DePaola, A; Stott, R F; Leitch, J M

    1987-01-01

    The incidence of Vibrio cholerae in shellfish, sediment, and waters of California, Oregon, and Washington was determined during the summer of 1984. Samples from 24 distinct estuaries were analyzed qualitatively. V. cholerae non-O1 was found in 23 estuaries and in 44.6% of the 529 samples examined. V. cholerae O1 Inaba was isolated from water samples in Morro Bay, Calif. Vibrio mimicus was found in 2.3% of the samples. Cholera enterotoxin was not found in cell-free filtrates of the 100 isolates tested in the Y-1 mouse adrenal cell assay, but heat-labile cytotoxic activity was observed with 3% of the isolates. PMID:3606111

  13. Phylodynamic Analysis of Clinical and Environmental Vibrio cholerae Isolates from Haiti Reveals Diversification Driven by Positive Selection

    PubMed Central

    Azarian, Taj; Ali, Afsar; Johnson, Judith A.; Mohr, David; Prosperi, Mattia; Veras, Nazle M.; Jubair, Mohammed; Strickland, Samantha L.; Rashid, Mohammad H.; Alam, Meer T.; Weppelmann, Thomas A.; Katz, Lee S.; Tarr, Cheryl L.; Colwell, Rita R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phylodynamic analysis of genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data is a powerful tool to investigate underlying evolutionary processes of bacterial epidemics. The method was applied to investigate a collection of 65 clinical and environmental isolates of Vibrio cholerae from Haiti collected between 2010 and 2012. Characterization of isolates recovered from environmental samples identified a total of four toxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolates, four non-O1/O139 isolates, and a novel nontoxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolate with the classical tcpA gene. Phylogenies of strains were inferred from genome-wide SNPs using coalescent-based demographic models within a Bayesian framework. A close phylogenetic relationship between clinical and environmental toxigenic V. cholerae O1 strains was observed. As cholera spread throughout Haiti between October 2010 and August 2012, the population size initially increased and then fluctuated over time. Selection analysis along internal branches of the phylogeny showed a steady accumulation of synonymous substitutions and a progressive increase of nonsynonymous substitutions over time, suggesting diversification likely was driven by positive selection. Short-term accumulation of nonsynonymous substitutions driven by selection may have significant implications for virulence, transmission dynamics, and even vaccine efficacy. PMID:25538191

  14. Complete topology of the RNF complex from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Hreha, Teri N; Mezic, Katherine G; Herce, Henry D; Duffy, Ellen B; Bourges, Anais; Pryshchep, Sergey; Juarez, Oscar; Barquera, Blanca

    2015-04-21

    RNF is a redox-driven ion (Na(+) and in one case possibly H(+)) transporter present in many prokaryotes. It has been proposed that RNF performs a variety of reactions in different organisms, delivering low-potential reducing equivalents for specific cellular processes. RNF shares strong homology with the Na(+)-pumping respiratory enzyme Na(+)-NQR, although there are significant differences in subunit and redox cofactor composition. Here we report a topological analysis of the six subunits of RNF from Vibrio cholerae. Although individual subunits from other organisms have previously been studied, this is the first complete, experimentally derived, analysis of RNF from any one source. This has allowed us to identify and confirm key properties of RNF. The putative NADH binding site in RnfC is located on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. FeS centers in RnfB and RnfC are also located on the cytoplasmic side. However, covalently attached FMNs in RnfD and RnfG are both located in the periplasm. RNF also contains a number of acidic residues that correspond to functionally important groups in Na(+)-NQR. The acidic residues involved in Na(+) uptake and many of those implicated in Na(+) translocation are topologically conserved. The topology of RNF closely matches the topology represented in the newly published structure of Na(+)-NQR, consistent with the close relation between the two enzymes. The topology of RNF is discussed in the context of the current structural model of Na(+)-NQR, and the proposed functionality of the RNF complex itself. PMID:25831459

  15. Insights into Vibrio cholerae Intestinal Colonization from Monitoring Fluorescently Labeled Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Yves A.; Alvarez, David; Ringgaard, Simon; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the agent of cholera, is a motile non-invasive pathogen that colonizes the small intestine (SI). Most of our knowledge of the processes required for V. cholerae intestinal colonization is derived from enumeration of wt and mutant V. cholerae recovered from orogastrically infected infant mice. There is limited knowledge of the distribution of V. cholerae within the SI, particularly its localization along the villous axis, or of the bacterial and host factors that account for this distribution. Here, using confocal and intravital two-photon microscopy to monitor the localization of fluorescently tagged V. cholerae strains, we uncovered unexpected and previously unrecognized features of V. cholerae intestinal colonization. Direct visualization of the pathogen within the intestine revealed that the majority of V. cholerae microcolonies attached to the intestinal epithelium arise from single cells, and that there are notable regiospecific aspects to V. cholerae localization and factors required for colonization. In the proximal SI, V. cholerae reside exclusively within the developing intestinal crypts, but they are not restricted to the crypts in the more distal SI. Unexpectedly, V. cholerae motility proved to be a regiospecific colonization factor that is critical for colonization of the proximal, but not the distal, SI. Furthermore, neither motility nor chemotaxis were required for proper V. cholerae distribution along the villous axis or in crypts, suggesting that yet undefined processes enable the pathogen to find its niches outside the intestinal lumen. Finally, our observations suggest that host mucins are a key factor limiting V. cholerae intestinal colonization, particularly in the proximal SI where there appears to be a more abundant mucus layer. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the potent capacity of direct pathogen visualization during infection to deepen our understanding of host pathogen interactions. PMID:25275396

  16. Sustained Local Diversity of Vibrio cholerae O1 Biotypes in a Previously Cholera-Free Country.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Although the current cholera pandemic can trace its origin to a specific time and place, many variants of Vibrio cholerae have caused this disease over the last 50 years. The relative clinical importance and geographical distribution of these variants have changed with time, but most remain in circulation. Some countries, such as Mexico and Haiti, had escaped the current pandemic, until large epidemics struck them in 1991 and 2010, respectively. Cholera has been endemic in these countries ever since. A recent retrospective study in mBio presents the results of more than 3 decades of V. cholerae monitoring from environmental and clinical sources in Mexico (S. Y. Choi et al., mBio 7:e02160-15, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.02160-15). It reveals that multiple V. cholerae variants, including classical strains from the previous pandemic, as well as completely novel biotypes, have been circulating in Mexico. This discovery has important implications for the epidemiology and evolution of V. cholerae. PMID:27143391

  17. Relationship of aquatic environmental factors with the abundance of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio mimicus and Vibrio vulnificus in the coastal area of Guaymas, Sonora, Mexico.

    PubMed

    León Robles, A; Acedo Félix, E; Gomez-Gil, B; Quiñones Ramírez, E I; Nevárez-Martínez, M; Noriega-Orozco, L

    2013-12-01

    Members of the genus Vibrio are common in aquatic environments. Among them are V. cholerae, V. vulnificus, V. parahaemolyticus and V. mimicus. Several studies have shown that environmental factors, such as temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen, are involved in their epidemiology. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to determine if there is a correlation between the presence/amount of V. cholerae, V, vulnificus, V. parahaemolyticus and V. mimicus and the environmental conditions of the seawater off the coast of Guaymas, México. Quantification of all four pathogenic bacteria was performed using the most probable number method, and suspected colonies were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Correlations were found using principal component analysis. V. parahaemolyticus was the most abundant and widely distributed bacteria, followed by V. vulnificus, V. mimicus and V. cholerae. Positive correlations between V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. mimicus with temperature, salinity, electric conductivity, and total dissolved solids were found. The abundance of V. cholerae was mainly affected by the sampling site and not by physicochemical parameters. PMID:24334844

  18. Members of the human gut microbiota involved in recovery from Vibrio cholerae infection

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Ansel; Shamsir Ahmed, A.M.; Subramanian, Sathish; Griffin, Nicholas W.; Drewry, Lisa L.; Petri, William A.; Haque, Rashidul; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    Given the global burden of diarrheal diseases1, it is important to understand how members of the gut microbiota affect the risk for, course of, and recovery from disease in children and adults. The acute, voluminous diarrhea caused by Vibrio cholerae represents a dramatic example of enteropathogen invasion and gut microbial community disruption. We have conducted a detailed time-series metagenomic study of fecal microbiota collected during the acute diarrheal and recovery phases of cholera in a cohort of Bangladeshi adults living in an area with a high burden of disease2. We find that recovery is characterized by a pattern of accumulation of bacterial taxa that shows similarities to the pattern of assembly/maturation of the gut microbiota in healthy Bangladeshi children3. To define underlying mechanisms, we introduced into gnotobiotic mice an artificial community that was composed of human gut bacterial species that directly correlate with recovery from cholera in adults and are indicative of normal microbiota maturation in healthy Bangladeshi children3. One of the species, Ruminococcus obeum, exhibited consistent increases in its relative abundance upon V. cholerae infection of the mice. Follow-up analyses, including mono- and co-colonization studies, established that R. obeum restricts V. cholerae colonization, that R. obeum luxS [autoinducer-2 (AI-2) synthase] expression and AI-2 production increase significantly with V. cholerae invasion, and that R. obeum AI-2 causes quorum-sensing mediated repression of several V. cholerae colonization factors. Co-colonization with V. cholerae mutants disclosed that R. obeum AI-2 reduces Vibrio colonization/pathogenicity through a novel pathway that does not depend on the V. cholerae AI-2 sensor, LuxP. The approach described can be used to mine the gut microbiota of Bangladeshi or other populations for members that use autoinducers and/or other mechanisms to limit colonization with V. cholerae, or conceivably other

  19. Molecular Epidemiology and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Vibrio cholerae Associated with a Large Cholera Outbreak in Ghana in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Eibach, Daniel; Herrera-León, Silvia; Gil, Horacio; Hogan, Benedikt; Ehlkes, Lutz; Adjabeng, Michael; Kreuels, Benno; Nagel, Michael; Opare, David; Fobil, Julius N; May, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Background Ghana is affected by regular cholera epidemics and an annual average of 3,066 cases since 2000. In 2014, Ghana experienced one of its largest cholera outbreaks within a decade with more than 20,000 notified infections. In order to attribute this rise in cases to a newly emerging strain or to multiple simultaneous outbreaks involving multi-clonal strains, outbreak isolates were characterized, subtyped and compared to previous epidemics in 2011 and 2012. Methodology/Principal Findings Serotypes, biotypes, antibiotic susceptibilities were determined for 92 Vibrio cholerae isolates collected in 2011, 2012 and 2014 from Southern Ghana. For a subgroup of 45 isolates pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing and multilocus-variable tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) were performed. Eighty-nine isolates (97%) were identified as ctxB (classical type) positive V. cholerae O1 biotype El Tor and three (3%) isolates were cholera toxin negative non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae. Among the selected isolates only sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim resistance was detectable in 2011, while 95% of all 2014 isolates showed resistance towards sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, ampicillin and reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. MLVA achieved the highest subtype discrimination, revealing 22 genotypes with one major outbreak cluster in each of the three outbreak years. Apart from those clusters genetically distant genotypes circulate during each annual epidemic. Conclusions/Significance This analysis suggests different endemic reservoirs of V. cholerae in Ghana with distinct annual outbreak clusters accompanied by the occurrence of genetically distant genotypes. Preventive measures for cholera transmission should focus on aquatic reservoirs. Rapidly emerging multidrug resistance must be monitored closely. PMID:27232338

  20. Culturable and VBNC Vibrio cholerae: interactions with chironomid egg masses and their bacterial population.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Malka; Landsberg, Ori; Raats, Dina; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2007-02-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiologic agent of cholera, is autochthonous to various aquatic environments. Recently, it was found that chironomid (nonbiting midges) egg masses serve as a reservoir for the cholera bacterium and that flying chironomid adults are possible windborne carriers of V. cholerae non-O1 non-O139. Chironomids are the most widely distributed insect in freshwater. Females deposit egg masses at the water's edge, and each egg mass contains eggs embedded in a gelatinous matrix. Hemagglutinin/protease, an extracellular enzyme of V. cholerae, was found to degrade chironomid egg masses and to prevent them from hatching. In a yearly survey, chironomid populations and the V. cholerae in their egg masses followed phenological succession and interaction of host-pathogen population dynamics. In this report, it is shown via FISH technique that most of the V. cholerae inhabiting the egg mass are in the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state. The diversity of culturable bacteria from chironomid egg masses collected from two freshwater habitats was determined. In addition to V. cholerae, representatives of the following genera were isolated: Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Klebsiella, Shewanella, Pseudomonas, Paracoccus, Exiguobacterium, and unidentified bacteria. Three important human pathogens, Aeromonas veronii, A. caviae, and A. hydrophila, were isolated from chironomid egg masses, indicating that chironomid egg masses may be a natural reservoir for pathogenic Aeromonas species in addition to V. cholerae. All isolates of V. cholerae were capable of degrading chironomid egg masses. This may help explain their host-pathogen relationship with chironomids. In contrast, almost none of the other bacteria that were isolated from the egg masses possessed this ability. Studying the interaction between chironomid egg masses, the bacteria inhabiting them, and V. cholerae could contribute to our understanding of the nature of the V. cholerae-egg mass interactions. PMID:17186156

  1. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance of Vibrio cholerae, Democratic Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Miwanda, Berthe; Moore, Sandra; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Nguefack-Tsague, Georges; Kabangwa, Ickel Kakongo; Ndjakani, Daniel Yassa; Mutreja, Ankur; Thomson, Nicholas; Thefenne, Helene; Garnotel, Eric; Tshapenda, Gaston; Kakongo, Denis Kandolo; Kalambayi, Guy

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed 1,093 Vibrio cholerae isolates from the Democratic Republic of the Congo during 1997–2012 and found increasing antimicrobial drug resistance over time. Our study also demonstrated that the 2011–2012 epidemic was caused by an El Tor variant clonal complex with a single antimicrobial drug susceptibility profile. PMID:25897570

  2. A Two-Step Synthesis of Virstatin, a Virulence Inhibitor of "Vibrio cholerae"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Chriss E.

    2009-01-01

    Virstatin, an "N"-butanoic acid substituted naphthalimide, inhibits the ability of "Vibrio cholerae" to cause disease. A three-week experiment involving synthesis, purification, and spectral characterization of this compound is described. This experiment is appropriate for organic chemistry. It has been performed with three lab sections of about…

  3. Extracellular nucleases and extracellular DNA play important roles in Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Seper, Andrea; Fengler, Vera H I; Roier, Sandro; Wolinski, Heimo; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Bishop, Anne L; Camilli, Andrew; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are a preferred mode of survival for many microorganisms including Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the severe secretory diarrhoeal disease cholera. The ability of the facultative human pathogen V. cholerae to form biofilms is a key factor for persistence in aquatic ecosystems and biofilms act as a source for new outbreaks. Thus, a better understanding of biofilm formation and transmission of V. cholerae is an important target to control the disease. So far the Vibrio exopolysaccharide was the only known constituent of the biofilm matrix. In this study we identify and characterize extracellular DNA as a component of the Vibrio biofilm matrix. Furthermore, we show that extracellular DNA is modulated and controlled by the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. Our results indicate that extracellular DNA and the extracellular nucleases are involved in diverse processes including the development of a typical biofilm architecture, nutrient acquisition, detachment from biofilms and the colonization fitness of biofilm clumps after ingestion by the host. This study provides new insights into biofilm development and transmission of biofilm-derived V. cholerae. PMID:22032623

  4. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... may lead to shock, renal failure, cardiovascular collapse, and death. (b) Classification. Class II.... Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... may lead to shock, renal failure, cardiovascular collapse, and death. (b) Classification. Class II.... Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... may lead to shock, renal failure, cardiovascular collapse, and death. (b) Classification. Class II.... Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... may lead to shock, renal failure, cardiovascular collapse, and death. (b) Classification. Class II.... Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and electrolyte... may lead to shock, renal failure, cardiovascular collapse, and death. (b) Classification. Class...

  9. Structural Characterization of the Extracellular Polysaccharide from Vibrio cholerae O1 El-Tor

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Fitnat; Fong, Jiunn; Sadovskaya, Irina; Grard, Thierry; Vinogradov, Evgeny

    2014-01-01

    The ability to form biofilms is important for environmental survival, transmission, and infectivity of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera in humans. To form biofilms, V. cholerae produces an extracellular matrix composed of proteins, nucleic acids and a glycoconjugate, termed Vibrio exopolysaccharide (VPS). Here, we present the data on isolation and characterization of the polysaccharide part of the VPS (VPS-PS), which has the following structure: where α-D-Glc is partially (∼20%) replaced with α-D-GlcNAc. α-GulNAcAGly is an amide between 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-α-guluronic acid and glycine. Apparently, the polysaccharide is bound to a yet unidentified component, which gives it high viscosity and completely suppresses any NMR signals belonging to the sugar chains of the VPS. The only reliable method to remove this component at present is a treatment of the whole glycoconjugate with concentrated hydrochloric acid. PMID:24520310

  10. Putative virulence genes of Vibrio cholerae from seafoods and the coastal environment of Southwest India.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, V; Sanath Kumar, H; Karunasagar, Indrani; Karunasagar, Iddya

    2007-11-01

    Shrimp, clam and oysters were obtained at two fish markets and at a fish landing dock, and plankton, water and sediment samples were obtained from four river estuaries, in southern India. The samples were analyzed for Vibrio cholerae by conventional isolation techniques and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedures. V. cholerae was isolated from 2 of 5 shrimp, 2 of 5 clam and 5 of 20 water samples. All biochemically confirmed isolates of V. cholerae were positive for toxR. For direct detection of V. cholerae in enrichment broths, PCR was performed using lysates from 0 and 6 h enrichments. All the V. cholerae isolates and enrichment broth lysates were subjected to PCR analysis for the detection of the genes toxR, ctxA, tcpA, ompU, hly, ace, Nag-ST (stn/sto), and ompU. Enrichment broths of all the samples which yielded V. cholerae were positive for toxR, OmpU and hlyA genes, while one of a fresh fish market sample was positive for the ace gene. Choleragenic V. cholerae were absent from all environmental samples and fresh fish from the markets, but one sample of shrimp was positive for V. cholerae O139. PMID:17900729

  11. Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae identified in estuaries of Tanzania using PCR techniques.

    PubMed

    Dalusi, Lucy; Lyimo, Thomas J; Lugomela, Charles; Hosea, Ken M M; Sjöling, Sara

    2015-03-01

    The current study assessed the occurrence of the Vibrio cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 in environmental samples along salinity gradients in three selected estuaries of Tanzania both through culture independent methods and by cultured bacteria. Occurrence of V. cholerae was determined by PCR targeting the V. cholerae outer membrane protein gene ompW. Furthermore, the presence of toxigenic strains and serogroups O1 and O139 was determined using multiplex PCR with specific primers targeting the cholera toxin gene subunit A, ctxA, and serotype specific primers, O1-rfb and O139-rfb, respectively. Results showed that V. cholerae occurred in approximately 10% (n = 185) of both the environmental samples and isolated bacteria. Eight of the bacteria isolates (n = 43) were confirmed as serogroup O1 while one belonged to serogroup O139, the first reported identification of this epidemic strain in East African coastal waters. All samples identified as serogroup O1 or O139 and a number of non-O1/O139 strains were ctxA positive. This study provides in situ evidence of the presence of pathogenic V. cholerae O1 and O139 and a number of V. cholerae non-O1/O139 that carry the cholera toxin gene in estuaries along the coast of Tanzania. PMID:25743072

  12. Survival and distribution of Vibrio cholerae in a tropical rain forest stream

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Rosas, N.; Hazen, T.C.

    1988-12-31

    For 12 months Vibrio cholerae and fecal coliforms were monitored along with 9 other water quality parameters at 12 sites in a rain forest watershed in Puerto Rico. Densities of V. cholerae and fecal coliforms were not significantly correlated even though the highest densities of both bacteria were found at a sewage outfall. High densities of V. cholerae were also found at pristine sites high in the watershed. V. cholerae and Escherichia coli were inoculated into membrane diffusion chambers, placed at two sites and monitored for 5 days on two different occasions. Two different direct count methods indicated that the density of E. coli and V. cholerae did not change significantly during the course of either study. Physiological activity, as measured by INT-reduction and relative nucleic acid composition declined for E. coli during the first 12 h then increased and remained variable during the remainder of the study. V. cholerae activity, as measured by relative nucleic acid concentrations, remained high and unchanged for the entire study. INT-reduction in V. cholerae declined initially but regained nearly all of it`s original activity within 48 h. This study suggests that V. cholerae is an indigenous organism in tropical freshwaters and that assays other than fecal coliforms or E. coli must be used for assessing public health risk in tropical waters.

  13. Phage-bacterial interactions in the evolution of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Faruque, Shah M; Mekalanos, John J

    2012-11-15

    Understanding the genetic and ecological factors which support the emergence of new clones of pathogenic bacteria is vital to develop preventive measures. Vibrio cholerae the causative agent of cholera epidemics represents a paradigm for this process in that this organism evolved from environmental non-pathogenic strains by acquisition of virulence genes. The major virulence factors of V. cholerae, cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP) are encoded by a lysogenic bacteriophage (CTXφ) and a pathogenicity island, respectively. Additional phages which cooperate with the CTXφ in horizontal transfer of genes in V. cholerae have been characterized, and the potential exists for discovering yet new phages or genetic elements which support the transfer of genes for environmental fitness and virulence leading to the emergence of new epidemic strains. Phages have also been shown to play a crucial role in modulating seasonal cholera epidemics. Thus, the complex array of natural phenomena driving the evolution of pathogenic V. cholerae includes, among other factors, phages that either participate in horizontal gene transfer or in a bactericidal selection process favoring the emergence of new clones of V. cholerae. PMID:23076327

  14. Survey on antimicrobial resistance patterns in Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 in Germany reveals carbapenemase-producing Vibrio cholerae in coastal waters

    PubMed Central

    Bier, Nadja; Schwartz, Keike; Guerra, Beatriz; Strauch, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    An increase in the occurrence of potentially pathogenic Vibrio species is expected for waters in Northern Europe as a consequence of global warming. In this context, a higher incidence of Vibrio infections is predicted for the future and forecasts suggest that people visiting and living at the Baltic Sea are at particular risk. This study aimed to investigate antimicrobial resistance patterns among Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 isolates that could pose a public health risk. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 141 V. vulnificus and 184 V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains isolated from German coastal waters (Baltic Sea and North Sea) as well as from patients and retail seafood was assessed by broth microdilution and disk diffusion. Both species were susceptible to most of the agents tested (12 subclasses) and no multidrug-resistance was observed. Among V. vulnificus isolates, non-susceptibility was exclusively found toward aminoglycosides. In case of V. cholerae, a noticeable proportion of strains was non-susceptible to aminopenicillins and aminoglycosides. In addition, resistance toward carbapenems, quinolones, and folate pathway inhibitors was sporadically observed. Biochemical testing indicated the production of carbapenemases with unusual substrate specificity in four environmental V. cholerae strains. Most antimicrobial agents recommended for treatment of V. vulnificus and V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 infections were found to be effective in vitro. However, the occurrence of putative carbapenemase producing V. cholerae in German coastal waters is of concern and highlights the need for systematic monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility in potentially pathogenic Vibrio spp. in Europe. PMID:26579088

  15. Viable but nonculturable Vibrio cholerae O1 in biofilms in the aquatic environment and their role in cholera transmission

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Munirul; Sultana, Marzia; Nair, G. Balakrish; Siddique, A. K.; Hasan, Nur A.; Sack, R. Bradley; Sack, David A.; Ahmed, K. U.; Sadique, A.; Watanabe, H.; Grim, Christopher J.; Huq, A.; Colwell, Rita R.

    2007-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae persists in aquatic environments predominantly in a nonculturable state. In this study coccoid, nonculturable V. cholerae O1 in biofilms maintained for 495 days in Mathbaria, Bangladesh, pond water became culturable upon animal passage. Culturability, biofilm formation, and the wbe, ctxA, and rstR2 genes were monitored by culture, direct fluorescent antibody (DFA), and multiplex PCR. DFA counts were not possible after formation of biofilm. Furthermore, wbe, but not ctxA, were amplifiable, even after incubation for 54 and 68 days at room temperature (≈25°C) and 4°C, respectively, when no growth was detectable. Slower biofilm formation and extended culturability were observed for cultures incubated at 4°C, compared with ≈25°C, suggesting biofilm production to be temperature dependent and linked to loss of culturability. Small colonies appearing after incubation in microcosms for 54 and 68 days at 25°C and 4°C, respectively, were wbe positive and ctxA and rstR2 negative, indicating loss of bacteriophage CTXΦ. The coccoid V. cholerae O1 observed as free cells in microcosms incubated for 495 days could not be cultured, but biofilms in the same microcosms yielded culturable cells. It is concluded that biofilms can act as a reservoir for V. cholerae O1 between epidemics because of its long-term viability in biofilms. In contrast to biofilms produced in Mathbaria pond water, V. cholerae O1 in biofilms present in cholera stools and incubated under identical conditions as the Mathbaria pond water biofilms could not be cultured after 2 months, indicating that those V. cholerae cells freshly discharged into the environment are significantly less robust than cells adapted to environmental conditions. PMID:17968017

  16. Evaluation in Mice of a Conjugate Vaccine for Cholera Made from Vibrio cholerae O1 (Ogawa) O-Specific Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Kalsy, Anuj; Yu, Y.; Freeman, Y. Wu; Sultana, Tania; Rashu, Md. Rasheduzzaman; Desai, Ishaan; Eckhoff, Grace; Leung, Daniel T.; Charles, Richelle C.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Harris, Jason B.; Clements, John D.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Qadri, Firdausi; Vann, W. F.; Kováč, Pavol; Ryan, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Protective immunity against cholera is serogroup specific. Serogroup specificity in Vibrio cholerae is determined by the O-specific polysaccharide (OSP) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Generally, polysaccharides are poorly immunogenic, especially in young children. Methodology Here we report the evaluation in mice of a conjugate vaccine for cholera (OSP:TThc) made from V. cholerae O1 Ogawa O-Specific Polysaccharide–core (OSP) and recombinant tetanus toxoid heavy chain fragment (TThc). We immunized mice intramuscularly on days 0, 21, and 42 with OSP:TThc or OSP only, with or without dmLT, a non-toxigenic immunoadjuvant derived from heat labile toxin of Escherichia coli. Principal Findings We detected significant serum IgG antibody responses targeting OSP following a single immunization in mice receiving OSP:TThc with or without adjuvant. Anti-LPS IgG responses were detected following a second immunization in these cohorts. No anti-OSP or anti-LPS IgG responses were detected at any time in animals receiving un-conjugated OSP with or without immunoadjuvant, and in animals receiving immunoadjuvant alone. Responses were highest following immunization with adjuvant. Serum anti-OSP IgM responses were detected in mice receiving OSP:TThc with or without immunoadjuvant, and in mice receiving unconjugated OSP. Serum anti-LPS IgM and vibriocidal responses were detected in all vaccine cohorts except in mice receiving immunoadjuvant alone. No significant IgA anti-OSP or anti-LPS responses developed in any group. Administration of OSP:TThc and adjuvant also induced memory B cell responses targeting OSP and resulted in 95% protective efficacy in a mouse lethality cholera challenge model. Conclusion We describe a protectively immunogenic cholera conjugate in mice. Development of a cholera conjugate vaccine could assist in inducing long-term protective immunity, especially in young children who respond poorly to polysaccharide antigens. PMID:24516685

  17. In Silico Screening of Antibacterial Compounds from Herbal Sources Against Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Perveen, Sabah; Chaudhary, Hotam Singh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prolonged use of antibiotic viz., tetracycline, quinolones, ampicillin, etc., to reduce the infection of cholera, may failed due to the emergence of new Vibrio cholerae antibiotics resistant strains. Moreover, these antibiotics even restricted for patient suffering from severe dehydration. Hence, there is a call to find an alternative therapeutics against V. cholerae. The natures serve different herbs in its lap which might contain several natural therapeutic compounds almost all diseases. Computer-aided designing is the initial steps for screening the novel inhibitors. Objective: To identify and evaluate natural compounds with low side effects with high efficacy against V. cholerae has been done. Materials and Methods: In silico screening, absorption, digestion, metabolism, and excretion (ADME), and docking of herbal compounds have been performed on to the target ToxT (transcriptional activator of V. cholerae). The compound with good ADME properties and drug-likeness property were subjected to docking. Results: From 70 herbal compounds, some compounds such as aloin, campesterol, lupeol, and ursolic acid showed a violation of the rule of five and compounds such as lupeol and beta carotene showed negative binding energy. Luteolin, catechin, brevifolin, etc., compounds were selected based on ADME, drug-likeness property, and docking studies. Conclusion: Two compounds named catechin and luteolin showed better inhibition properties against ToxT and good ADME and drug-likeness property were selected as a better lead molecule for drug development in future. The Genetic Optimization for Ligand Docking fitness score for catechin is 48.74 kcal/mol and luteolin 38.12 kcal/mol. SUMMARY Vibrio cholerae became antibiotic resistance and associated with several cholera epidemic and pandemic. Hence, there is a need to find an alternative therapeutics against V. cholerae. Many herbal compounds present in nature having high medicinal value. From in-silico study

  18. Enhanced Detection of Vibrio Cholerae in Oyster Homogenate Based on Centrifugal Removal of Inhibitory Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Donita; DePaola, Angelo; Young, Ronald B.

    1998-01-01

    The disease cholera, caused by Vibrio cholerae, has been associated with consumption of contaminated seafood, including raw oysters. Detection of V. cholerae in foods typically involves blending the oysters, diluting the homogenate in alkaline peptone water (APW), overnight enrichment, and isolation on selective agar. Unfortunately, the oyster homogenate must be diluted to large volumes because lower dilutions inhibit the growth of V. cholerae. The goals of this study were to develop an alternative to large dilutions and to evaluate the basis for the inhibition observed in lower dilutions of oyster homogenates. Centrifugation of oyster homogenates at 10,000 x g for 15 min, followed by enrichment of the resulting pellet in APW, was found to eliminate the inhibition of V. cholerae growth. Inhibition appears not to be due to competing microflora but to a component(s) released when V. cholerae grows in the presence of oyster homogenate. The inhibitory component(s) kills the V. cholerae after the cell concentration reaches > 10(exp 8) cells/mL, rather than initially preventing their growth. The pH also declines from 8.0 to 5.5 during this period; however, the pH decline by itself appears not to cause V. cholerae death. Seven strains of V. cholerae (01 and non-01) and two strains of V. vulnificus were susceptible to the inhibitory agent(s). However, other Vibrio and non-Vibrio species tested were not inhibited by the oyster homogenates. Based on digestion of oyster homogenates with pronase, trypsin and lipase, the inhibitory reaction involves a protein(s). In a preliminary trial with oyster homogenate seeded with 1 cfu/g of V. cholerae, the modified centrifugation technique detected a slightly higher percentage of samples at a 1:10 dilution than the standard FDA Bacteriological Analytical Method (BAM) detected in uncentrifuged oyster homogenate at a 1:100 dilution. V. cholerae in seeded samples could also be detected more frequently by the modified centrifugation method

  19. Efficacy of Ciprofloxacin for Treatment of Cholera Associated with Diminished Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin to Vibrio cholerae O1

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Wasif Ali; Saha, Debasish; Ahmed, Sabeena; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bennish, Michael Louis

    2015-01-01

    Objective We identified a poor clinical response to treatment of cholera with a single 1 g dose of ciprofloxacin, a standard treatment for cholera. Methods To determine reasons for the poor response and better therapeutic approaches we examined the minimal inhibitor concentration (MIC, n = 275) and disc-diffusion zone sizes (n = 205) for ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid of V. cholerae O1 strains isolated in Bangladesh from 1994 to 2012, and reexamined data from 161patients infected with Vibrio cholerae O1 recruited in four clinical trials who received single- or multiple-dose ciprofloxacin for treatment of cholera and compared their clinical response to the V. cholerae O1 susceptibility. Results Although all 275 isolates of V. cholerae O1 remained susceptible to ciprofloxacin using standard MIC and disc-diffusion thresholds, the MIC90 to ciprofloxacin increased from 0.010 in 1994 to 0.475 μgm/ml in 2012. Isolates became frankly resistant to nalidixic with the MIC90 increasing from 21 μgm/ml in 1994 to >256 μgm/ml and 166 of 205 isolates from 1994 to 2005 being frankly resistant using disc-diffusion testing. Isolates resistant to nalidixic acid by disc-diffusion testing had a median ciprofloxacin MIC of 0.190 μgm/ml (10th-90th centiles 0.022 to 0.380); nalidixic acid-susceptible isolates had a median ciprofloxacin MIC of 0.002 (0.002 to 0.012).The rate of clinical success with single-dose ciprofloxacin treatment for nalidixic acid-susceptible strains was 94% (61 of 65 patients) and bacteriologic success 97% (63/65) compared to 18% (12/67) and 8% (5/67) respectively with nalidixic acid-resistant strains (P<0.001 for both comparisons). Multiple-dose treatment with ciprofloxacin had 86% and 100% clinical and bacteriologic success rates respectively in patients infected with nalidixic acid-susceptible strains of V. cholerae O1 compared to clinical success 67% and bacteriologic success 60% with nalidixic acid-resistant strains. Conclusions Single-dose ciprofloxacin

  20. Bacteriophage CP-T1 of Vibrio cholerae. Identification of the cell surface receptor.

    PubMed

    Guidolin, A; Manning, P A

    1985-11-15

    The attachment site on the cell surface of Vibrio cholerae for the bacteriophage CP-T1 has been determined. Purified lipopolysaccharide from the Inaba and Ogawa serotypes, and of both the Classical and El Tor biotype of strains of V. cholerae show equal phage-inactivating capacities. Lipopolysaccharide extracted from a CP-T1-resistant mutant has no phage-inactivating capacity. Such mutants lack O-antigen as demonstrated by bactericidal assays utilizing a monoclonal antibody directed against O-antigen side chain of V. cholerae lipopolysaccharide. Radiolabelling of lipopolysaccharide with 33P and analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis also revealed the absence of O-antigen in phage-resistant strains. A number of V. cholerae typing phage show cross-resistance with phage CP-T1. PMID:4065151

  1. Regulation of competence-mediated horizontal gene transfer in the natural habitat of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Lisa C; Blokesch, Melanie

    2016-04-01

    The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae is an autochthonous inhabitant of aquatic environments where it often interacts with zooplankton and their chitinous molts. Chitin induces natural competence for transformation in V. cholerae, a key mode of horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Recent comparative genomic analyses were indicative of extensive HGT in this species. However, we can still expand our understanding of the complex regulatory network that drives competence in V. cholerae. Here, we present recent advances, including the elucidation of bipartite competence regulation mediated by QstR, the inclusion of the type VI secretion system in the competence regulon of pandemic O1 El Tor strains, and the identification of TfoS as a transcriptional regulator that links chitin to competence induction in V. cholerae. PMID:26615332

  2. Vibrio cholerae leuO Transcription Is Positively Regulated by ToxR and Contributes to Bile Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ante, Vanessa M.; Bina, X. Renee; Howard, Mondraya F.; Sayeed, Sameera; Taylor, Dawn L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vibrio cholerae is an aquatic organism and facultative human pathogen that colonizes the small intestine. In the small intestine, V. cholerae is exposed to a variety of antimicrobial compounds, including bile. V. cholerae resistance to bile is multifactorial and includes alterations in the membrane permeability barrier that are mediated by ToxR, a membrane-associated transcription factor. ToxR has also been shown to be required for activation of the LysR family transcription factor leuO in response to cyclic dipeptides. LeuO has been implicated in the regulation of multiple V. cholerae phenotypes, including biofilm production and virulence. In this study, we investigated the effects of bile on leuO expression. We show that leuO transcription increased in response to bile and bile salts but not in response to other detergents. The bile-dependent increase in leuO expression was dependent on ToxR, which was found to bind directly to the leuO promoter. The periplasmic domain of ToxR was required for basal leuO expression and for the bile-dependent induction of both leuO and ompU transcription. V. cholerae mutants that did not express leuO exhibited increased bile susceptibility, suggesting that LeuO contributes to bile resistance. Our collective results demonstrate that ToxR activates leuO expression in response to bile and that LeuO is a component of the ToxR-dependent responses that contribute to bile resistance. IMPORTANCE The success of Vibrio cholerae as a human pathogen is dependent upon its ability to rapidly adapt to changes in its growth environment. Growth in the human gastrointestinal tract requires the expression of genes that provide resistance to host antimicrobial compounds, including bile. In this work, we show for the first time that the LysR family regulator LeuO mediates responses in V. cholerae that contribute to bile resistance. PMID:26303831

  3. Isolation of Vibrio cholerae from nightsoil during epidemics of classical and El Tor cholera in East Pakistan*

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Kenneth J.; Khan, Moslemuddin; Mosley, Wiley H.

    1970-01-01

    A clear difference has been observed between the classical Inaba V. cholerae and the El Tor Ogawa V. cholerae in relation to the ability to isolate the organism from the environment. An early attempt to utilize nightsoil sampling as a tool to measure the extent of infection in the community during an epidemic of classical Inaba cholera in Dacca, East Pakistan, in the spring and fall of 1968 proved unsuccessful. During an epidemic caused by both the classical Inaba and the El Tor Ogawa vibrios in Chittagong between July 1968 and March 1969 the reasons for this failure became apparent. In Dacca, only 2 isolations of classical Inaba were made from 9906 individual latrine and pooled communal nightsoil samples, whereas in Chittagong, from 62 588 similar samples in which 2 classical Inaba isolations were also made, there were 52 El Tor Ogawa isolations. In areas where cases due to both biotypes were occurring simultaneously, El Tor Ogawa vibrios were isolated 10 times more frequently than the classical Inaba. It remains unclear whether the differences observed between El Tor Ogawa and classical Inaba are related to the biotype or to the serotype of the organism, or to both. An extrapolation of nightsoil sampling, therefore, to the incidence and prevalence of infection in a community must consider both the biotype and the serotype. PMID:5312997

  4. Light‐scattering sensor for real‐time identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae colonies on solid agar plate

    PubMed Central

    Huff, Karleigh; Aroonnual, Amornrat; Littlejohn, Amy E. Fleishman; Rajwa, Bartek; Bae, Euiwon; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Patsekin, Valery; Hirleman, E. Daniel; Robinson, J. Paul; Richards, Gary P.; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The three most common pathogenic species of Vibrio, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus, are of major concerns due to increased incidence of water‐ and seafood‐related outbreaks and illness worldwide. Current methods are lengthy and require biochemical and molecular confirmation. A novel label‐free forward light‐scattering sensor was developed to detect and identify colonies of these three pathogens in real time in the presence of other vibrios in food or water samples. Vibrio colonies grown on agar plates were illuminated by a 635 nm laser beam and scatter‐image signatures were acquired using a CCD (charge‐coupled device) camera in an automated BARDOT (BActerial Rapid Detection using Optical light‐scattering Technology) system. Although a limited number of Vibrio species was tested, each produced a unique light‐scattering signature that is consistent from colony to colony. Subsequently a pattern recognition system analysing the collected light‐scatter information provided classification in 1−2 min with an accuracy of 99%. The light‐scattering signatures were unaffected by subjecting the bacteria to physiological stressors: osmotic imbalance, acid, heat and recovery from a viable but non‐culturable state. Furthermore, employing a standard sample enrichment in alkaline peptone water for 6 h followed by plating on selective thiosulphate citrate bile salts sucrose agar at 30°C for ∼ 12 h, the light‐scattering sensor successfully detected V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus present in oyster or water samples in 18 h even in the presence of other vibrios or other bacteria, indicating the suitability of the sensor as a powerful screening tool for pathogens on agar plates. PMID:22613192

  5. Climate and infectious disease: use of remote sensing for detection of Vibrio cholerae by indirect measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobitz, B.; Beck, L.; Huq, A.; Wood, B.; Fuchs, G.; Faruque, A. S.; Colwell, R.

    2000-01-01

    It has long been known that cholera outbreaks can be initiated when Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes cholera, is present in drinking water in sufficient numbers to constitute an infective dose, if ingested by humans. Outbreaks associated with drinking or bathing in unpurified river or brackish water may directly or indirectly depend on such conditions as water temperature, nutrient concentration, and plankton production that may be favorable for growth and reproduction of the bacterium. Although these environmental parameters have routinely been measured by using water samples collected aboard research ships, the available data sets are sparse and infrequent. Furthermore, shipboard data acquisition is both expensive and time-consuming. Interpolation to regional scales can also be problematic. Although the bacterium, V. cholerae, cannot be sensed directly, remotely sensed data can be used to infer its presence. In the study reported here, satellite data were used to monitor the timing and spread of cholera. Public domain remote sensing data for the Bay of Bengal were compared directly with cholera case data collected in Bangladesh from 1992-1995. The remote sensing data included sea surface temperature and sea surface height. It was discovered that sea surface temperature shows an annual cycle similar to the cholera case data. Sea surface height may be an indicator of incursion of plankton-laden water inland, e.g., tidal rivers, because it was also found to be correlated with cholera outbreaks. The extensive studies accomplished during the past 25 years, confirming the hypothesis that V. cholerae is autochthonous to the aquatic environment and is a commensal of zooplankton, i.e., copepods, when combined with the findings of the satellite data analyses, provide strong evidence that cholera epidemics are climate-linked.

  6. [Cases of gastroenteritis associated to Vibrio cholerae no 01 in Oran, Salta].

    PubMed

    Rivas, M; Cacace, M L; Ayala, L T; Baschkier, A; Miliwebsky, E; Caffer, M I

    1996-01-01

    Forty-one sporadic cases of non-O group 1 Vibrio cholerae gastroenteritis were detected in Orán, Salta, between February 1992 and February 1995. The frequency of isolation was 0.9% of the diarrhea cases. Out of 41 patients, 21 (51.2%) were older than 15 years and 25 (60.9%) were male. All the patients had diarrhea, 24 (58.5%) had watery stools and 6 (14.6%) cholera-like diarrhea; 10 (24.4%) presented vomiting and 12 (29%) mild dehydration. Six malnourished children who suffered from diarrhea with moderate dehydration for more than a week, were hospitalized. V. cholerae non O1 and Shigella flexneri were isolated from one patient, during the first outbreak and V. cholerae non O1 and Salmonella IV 50:b:- were recovered simultaneously from another patient during the fourth outbreak. A 72 year old woman died during the second cholera outbreak. The symptoms were: watery diarrhea, vomiting, fever and mild dehydration. A strain of V. cholerae O5, that did not produce cholera toxin, heat-stable enterotoxin, Kanagawa-like hemolysin or verocitotoxin was detected. It was positive for El Tor hemolysin and D-mannose and L-fucose resistant cells-associated hemagglutinins. Among the 41 isolates studied, all were oxidase and indole positive, fermented glucose, saccharose and mannitol. They were all motile, produced lysine and ornithine decarboxylases but not arginine dihydrolase or hydrogen sulfide. They were sensitive to O129 vibriostatic compound. None of them belonged to O1 or O139 serogroup and they did not produce cholera troxin. Among the V. cholerae non O1 strains isolated, 9.5% were resistant to ampicillin and 4.9% to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Active surveillance had shown that V. cholerae non-O1 is not an important agent of diarrhea in Orán, Salta. PMID:9102658

  7. Engineered bacterial communication prevents Vibrio cholerae virulence in an infant mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Faping; March, John C.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of using commensal bacteria as signal mediators for inhibiting the disease cholera, we stably transformed Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (Nissle) to express the autoinducer molecule cholera autoinducer 1 (CAI-1) (shown previously to prevent virulence when present with another signaling molecule, autoinducer 2, at high concentrations) and determined the effect on Vibrio cholerae virulence gene expression and colonization in an infant mouse model. We found that pretreatment of mice for 8 h with Nissle engineered to express CAI-1 (Nissle-cqsA) greatly increased the mice’s survival (92%) from ingestion of V. cholerae. Pretreatment with Nissle-cqsA for only 4 h increased survival by 77%, whereas ingesting Nissle-cqsA at the same time as V. cholerae increased survival rates by 27%. Immunostaining revealed an 80% reduction in cholera toxin binding to the intestines of mice pretreated for 8 h with Nissle-cqsA. Further, the numbers of V. cholerae in treated mouse intestines was reduced by 69% after 40 h. This finding points to an easily administered and inexpensive approach where commensal bacteria are engineered to communicate with invasive species and potentially prevent human disease. PMID:20534565

  8. Evidence supporting predicted metabolic pathways for Vibrio cholerae: gene expression data and clinical tests

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jing; Romero, Pedro R.; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Karp, Peter D.

    2006-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of the diarrheal illness cholera, can kill an infected adult in 24 h. V.cholerae lives as an autochthonous microbe in estuaries, rivers and coastal waters. A better understanding of its metabolic pathways will assist the development of more effective treatments and will provide a deeper understanding of how this bacterium persists in natural aquatic habitats. Using the completed V.cholerae genome sequence and PathoLogic software, we created VchoCyc, a pathway-genome database that predicted 171 likely metabolic pathways in the bacterium. We report here experimental evidence supporting the computationally predicted pathways. The evidence comes from microarray gene expression studies of V.cholerae in the stools of three cholera patients [D. S. Merrell, S. M. Butler, F. Qadri, N. A. Dolganov, A. Alam, M. B. Cohen, S. B. Calderwood, G. K. Schoolnik and A. Camilli (2002) Nature, 417, 642–645.], from gene expression studies in minimal growth conditions and LB rich medium, and from clinical tests that identify V.cholerae. Expression data provide evidence supporting 92 (53%) of the 171 pathways. The clinical tests provide evidence supporting seven pathways, with six pathways supported by both methods. VchoCyc provides biologists with a useful tool for analyzing this organism's metabolic and genomic information, which could lead to potential insights into new anti-bacterial agents. VchoCyc is available in the BioCyc database collection (). PMID:16682451

  9. Isolation of Vibrio cholerae from aquatic birds in Colorado and Utah.

    PubMed Central

    Ogg, J E; Ryder, R A; Smith, H L

    1989-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae was isolated from cloacal swabs and freshly voided feces collected from 20 species of aquatic birds in Colorado and Utah during 1986 and 1987. About 17% (198 of 1,131) fecal specimens collected from July 1986 through August 1987 contained the organism. Both O1 and non-O1 V. cholerae strains were isolated from the fecal specimens. Isolates from eight birds (representing five species) agglutinated in O group 1 antiserum. Supernatants of broth cultures from three isolates which typed as V. cholerae O1 serotype Ogawa gave reactions typical of cholera toxin when tested on Y-1 mouse adrenal cell cultures. Several serovars of non-O1 V. cholerae were isolated from the fecal specimens; serovar 22 was the most prevalent type. All non-O1 isolates were cytotoxic to Y-1 mouse adrenal cells. Only non-O1 V. cholerae was detected in water samples collected from the habitat of the birds. The results of this study suggest that aquatic birds serve as carriers and disseminate V. cholerae over a wide area. PMID:2705773

  10. Quorum Sensing Contributes to Natural Transformation of Vibrio cholerae in a Species-Specific Manner▿

    PubMed Central

    Suckow, Gaia; Seitz, Patrick; Blokesch, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    Although it is a human pathogen, Vibrio cholerae is a regular member of aquatic habitats, such as coastal regions and estuaries. Within these environments, V. cholerae often takes advantage of the abundance of zooplankton and their chitinous molts as a nutritious surface on which the bacteria can form biofilms. Chitin also induces the developmental program of natural competence for transformation in several species of the genus Vibrio. In this study, we show that V. cholerae does not distinguish between species-specific and non-species-specific DNA at the level of DNA uptake. This is in contrast to what has been shown for other Gram-negative bacteria, such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae. However, species specificity with respect to natural transformation still occurs in V. cholerae. This is based on a positive correlation between quorum sensing and natural transformation. Using mutant-strain analysis, cross-feeding experiments, and synthetic cholera autoinducer-1 (CAI-1), we provide strong evidence that the species-specific signaling molecule CAI-1 plays a major role in natural competence for transformation. We suggest that CAI-1 can be considered a competence pheromone. PMID:21784943

  11. [Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Vibrio cholerae O1].

    PubMed

    Giono-Cerezo, S; Rodríguez Angeles, M G; Gutiérrez-Cogco, L; Valdespino-Gómez, J L

    1994-01-01

    We made 52180 tests for isolation and identification of toxigenic V. cholerae O1 from rectal swabs and reference strains. We isolated 17.6% V. cholerae O1 strains in 1991, 43.5% in 1992 and 38.9% in 1993. The main serovar in 1991 was Inaba, whereas in 1993 a similar percentage was serovar Ogawa. The phenotype of V. cholerae strains was determined by hemolysis test, Voges-Proskauer test, polymyxin B resistance and phages 4 and 5 resistance. All of the mexican strains were El Tor. There were 2.9-0.75% hemolytic strains from 1991 to 1993, but they were negative when the test was made in tube with human erythrocytes. The resistotypes were performed in 24526 selected strains by Kirby-Bauer method and MIC tests. All of the strains were sensitive, except more than 100 strains isolated in Veracruz that were resistant to tetracycline and doxycycline. Detection of cholera toxin was made by ELISA and on culture of Vero and CHO cells. All the V. cholerae O1 strains were toxigenic. The genotype was determined by PCR and ribotyping. The PCR amplified one 564 pb fragment on V. cholerae O1. The ribotypes of mexican strains were 5 and 6a. PMID:7701133

  12. Vibrio cholerae non-O1 non-O139 infection in an immunocompromised patient returning from Spain, July 2009.

    PubMed

    Rozemeijer, W; Korswagen, L A; Voskuyl, A E; Budding, A E

    2009-01-01

    We describe a severe gastroenteritis with non-O1, non-O139 Vibrio cholerae in an immunocompromised patient returning from a holiday in Spain in July 2009. Predisposing factors and possible cholera enterotoxin production could explain the unusually grave symptomatology. Patient recovered after doxycyclin treatment. PMID:19679033

  13. A Vibrio cholerae pathogenicity island associated with epidemic and pandemic strains.

    PubMed

    Karaolis, D K; Johnson, J A; Bailey, C C; Boedeker, E C; Kaper, J B; Reeves, P R

    1998-03-17

    The bacterial species Vibrio cholerae includes harmless aquatic strains as well as strains capable of causing epidemics and global pandemics of cholera. While investigating the relationship between pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains, we identified a chromosomal pathogenicity island (PAI) that is present in epidemic and pandemic strains but absent from nonpathogenic strains. Initially, two ToxR-regulated genes (aldA and tagA) were studied and were found to be associated with epidemic and pandemic strains but absent in nontoxigenic strains. The region containing aldA and tagA comprises 13 kb of previously unidentified DNA and is part of a PAI that contains a regulator of virulence genes (ToxT) and a gene cluster encoding an essential colonization factor and the cholera toxin phage receptor (toxin-coregulated pilus; TCP). The PAI is 39.5 kb in size, has low %G+C (35%), contains putative integrase and transposase genes, is flanked by att sites, and inserts near a 10Sa RNA gene (ssrA), suggesting it may be of bacteriophage origin. We found this PAI in two clinical non-O1/non-O139 cholera toxin-positive strains, suggesting that it can be transferred within V. cholerae. The sequence within this PAI includes an ORF with homology to a gene associated with the type IV pilus gene cluster of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, a transposase from Vibrio anguillarum, and several ORFs with no known homology. As the PAI contains the CTXPhi receptor, it may represent the initial genetic factor required for the emergence of epidemic and pandemic cholera. We propose to call this island VPI (V. cholerae pathogenicity island). PMID:9501228

  14. Hybrid microarray based on double biomolecular markers of DNA and carbohydrate for simultaneous genotypic and phenotypic detection of cholera toxin-producing Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hwa Hui; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Chang Sup; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-05-15

    Life-threatening diarrheal cholera is usually caused by water or food contaminated with cholera toxin-producing Vibrio cholerae. For the prevention and surveillance of cholera, it is crucial to rapidly and precisely detect and identify the etiological causes, such as V. cholerae and/or its toxin. In the present work, we propose the use of a hybrid double biomolecular marker (DBM) microarray containing 16S rRNA-based DNA capture probe to genotypically identify V. cholerae and GM1 pentasaccharide capture probe to phenotypically detect cholera toxin. We employed a simple sample preparation method to directly obtain genomic DNA and secreted cholera toxin as target materials from bacterial cells. By utilizing the constructed DBM microarray and prepared samples, V. cholerae and cholera toxin were detected successfully, selectively, and simultaneously; the DBM microarray was able to analyze the pathogenicity of the identified V. cholerae regardless of whether the bacteria produces toxin. Therefore, our proposed DBM microarray is a new effective platform for identifying bacteria and analyzing bacterial pathogenicity simultaneously. PMID:26735874

  15. A combined vaccine approach against Vibrio cholerae and ETEC based on outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Deborah R; Lichtenegger, Sabine; Temel, Philipp; Zingl, Franz G; Ratzberger, Desiree; Roier, Sandro; Schild-Prüfert, Kristina; Feichter, Sandra; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Enteric infections induced by pathogens like Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) remain a massive burden in developing countries with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. Previously, we showed that the immunization with genetically detoxified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from V. cholerae elicits a protective immune response based on the generation of O antigen antibodies, which effectively block the motility by binding to the sheathed flagellum. In this study, we investigated the potential of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-modified and toxin negative OMVs isolated from V. cholerae and ETEC as a combined OMV vaccine candidate. Our results indicate that the immunization with V. cholerae or ETEC OMVs induced a species-specific immune response, whereas the combination of both OMV species resulted in a high-titer, protective immune response against both pathogens. Interestingly, the immunization with V. cholerae OMVs alone resulted in a so far uncharacterized and cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) independent protection mechanism against an ETEC colonization. Furthermore, we investigated the potential use of V. cholerae OMVs as delivery vehicles for the heterologously expression of the ETEC surface antigens, CFA/I, and FliC. Although we induced a detectable immune response against both heterologously expressed antigens, none of these approaches resulted in an improved protection compared to a simple combination of V. cholerae and ETEC OMVs. Finally, we expanded the current protection model from V. cholerae to ETEC by demonstrating that the inhibition of motility via anti-FliC antibodies represents a relevant protection mechanism of an OMV-based ETEC vaccine candidate in vivo. PMID:26322032

  16. Quorum sensing-regulated chitin metabolism provides grazing resistance to Vibrio cholerae biofilms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuyang; Tay, Qi Xiang Martin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A; McDougald, Diane

    2015-08-01

    Association of Vibrio cholerae with chitinous surfaces of zooplankton is important for its persistence in marine environments, as it provides accessibility to nutrients and resistance to stresses. Predation by heterotrophic protists has a major impact on the survival of V. cholerae. V. cholerae forms biofilms as its main defensive strategy, and quorum sensing (QS) additionally regulates the production of antiprotozoal factors. The role of chitin and QS regulation in V. cholerae grazing resistance was investigated by exposing V. cholerae wild-type (WT) and QS mutant biofilms grown on chitin flakes to the bacteriotrophic, surface-feeding flagellate Rhynchomonas nasuta. V. cholerae formed more biofilm biomass on chitin flakes compared with nonchitinous surfaces. The growth of R. nasuta was inhibited by WT biofilms grown on chitin flakes, whereas the inhibition was attenuated in QS mutant biofilms. The chitin-dependent toxicity was also observed when the V. cholerae biofilms were developed under continuous flow or grown on a natural chitin source, the exoskeleton of Artemia. In addition, the antiprotozoal activity and ammonium concentration of V. cholerae biofilm supernatants were quantified. The ammonium levels (3.5 mM) detected in the supernatants of V. cholerae WT biofilms grown on chitin flakes were estimated to reduce the number of R. nasuta by >80% in add-back experiments, and the supernatant of QS mutant biofilms was less toxic owing to a decrease in ammonium production. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the majority of genes involved in chitin metabolism and chemotaxis were significantly downregulated in QS mutant biofilms when grown on chitin compared with the WT biofilms. PMID:25615438

  17. A Metalloprotease Secreted by the Type II Secretion System Links Vibrio cholerae with Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bo R.; Zielke, Ryszard A.; Wierzbicki, Igor H.; Mitchell, Kristie C.; Withey, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is autochthonous to various aquatic niches and is the etiological agent of the life-threatening diarrheal disease cholera. The persistence of V. cholerae in natural habitats is a crucial factor in the epidemiology of cholera. In contrast to the well-studied V. cholerae-chitin connection, scarce information is available about the factors employed by the bacteria for the interaction with collagens. Collagens might serve as biologically relevant substrates, because they are the most abundant protein constituents of metazoan tissues and V. cholerae has been identified in association with invertebrate and vertebrate marine animals, as well as in a benthic zone of the ocean where organic matter, including collagens, accumulates. Here, we describe the characterization of the V. cholerae putative collagenase, VchC, encoded by open reading frame VC1650 and belonging to the subfamily M9A peptidases. Our studies demonstrate that VchC is an extracellular collagenase degrading native type I collagen of fish and mammalian origin. Alteration of the predicted catalytic residues coordinating zinc ions completely abolished the protein enzymatic activity but did not affect the translocation of the protease by the type II secretion pathway into the extracellular milieu. We also show that the protease undergoes a maturation process with the aid of a secreted factor(s). Finally, we propose that V. cholerae is a collagenovorous bacterium, as it is able to utilize collagen as a sole nutrient source. This study initiates new lines of investigations aiming to uncover the structural and functional components of the V. cholerae collagen utilization program. PMID:25561716

  18. A combined vaccine approach against Vibrio cholerae and ETEC based on outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Deborah R.; Lichtenegger, Sabine; Temel, Philipp; Zingl, Franz G.; Ratzberger, Desiree; Roier, Sandro; Schild-Prüfert, Kristina; Feichter, Sandra; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Enteric infections induced by pathogens like Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) remain a massive burden in developing countries with increasing morbidity and mortality rates. Previously, we showed that the immunization with genetically detoxified outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from V. cholerae elicits a protective immune response based on the generation of O antigen antibodies, which effectively block the motility by binding to the sheathed flagellum. In this study, we investigated the potential of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-modified and toxin negative OMVs isolated from V. cholerae and ETEC as a combined OMV vaccine candidate. Our results indicate that the immunization with V. cholerae or ETEC OMVs induced a species-specific immune response, whereas the combination of both OMV species resulted in a high-titer, protective immune response against both pathogens. Interestingly, the immunization with V. cholerae OMVs alone resulted in a so far uncharacterized and cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) independent protection mechanism against an ETEC colonization. Furthermore, we investigated the potential use of V. cholerae OMVs as delivery vehicles for the heterologously expression of the ETEC surface antigens, CFA/I, and FliC. Although we induced a detectable immune response against both heterologously expressed antigens, none of these approaches resulted in an improved protection compared to a simple combination of V. cholerae and ETEC OMVs. Finally, we expanded the current protection model from V. cholerae to ETEC by demonstrating that the inhibition of motility via anti-FliC antibodies represents a relevant protection mechanism of an OMV-based ETEC vaccine candidate in vivo. PMID:26322032

  19. A metalloprotease secreted by the type II secretion system links Vibrio cholerae with collagen.

    PubMed

    Park, Bo R; Zielke, Ryszard A; Wierzbicki, Igor H; Mitchell, Kristie C; Withey, Jeffrey H; Sikora, Aleksandra E

    2015-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae is autochthonous to various aquatic niches and is the etiological agent of the life-threatening diarrheal disease cholera. The persistence of V. cholerae in natural habitats is a crucial factor in the epidemiology of cholera. In contrast to the well-studied V. cholerae-chitin connection, scarce information is available about the factors employed by the bacteria for the interaction with collagens. Collagens might serve as biologically relevant substrates, because they are the most abundant protein constituents of metazoan tissues and V. cholerae has been identified in association with invertebrate and vertebrate marine animals, as well as in a benthic zone of the ocean where organic matter, including collagens, accumulates. Here, we describe the characterization of the V. cholerae putative collagenase, VchC, encoded by open reading frame VC1650 and belonging to the subfamily M9A peptidases. Our studies demonstrate that VchC is an extracellular collagenase degrading native type I collagen of fish and mammalian origin. Alteration of the predicted catalytic residues coordinating zinc ions completely abolished the protein enzymatic activity but did not affect the translocation of the protease by the type II secretion pathway into the extracellular milieu. We also show that the protease undergoes a maturation process with the aid of a secreted factor(s). Finally, we propose that V. cholerae is a collagenovorous bacterium, as it is able to utilize collagen as a sole nutrient source. This study initiates new lines of investigations aiming to uncover the structural and functional components of the V. cholerae collagen utilization program. PMID:25561716

  20. Molecular epidemiology of Vibrio cholerae O139 in China: polymorphism of ribotypes and CTX elements.

    PubMed

    Qu, Mei; Xu, Jing; Ding, Yanpeng; Wang, Ruibai; Liu, Peng; Kan, Biao; Qi, Guoming; Liu, Yanqing; Gao, Shouyi

    2003-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae O139, the second etiological serogroup of cholera, triggered the first outbreak of O139 cholera in China in 1993. To analyze the clone polymorphism of O139 isolates in China, 117 strains of V. cholerae O139, isolated from different areas in China between 1993 and 1999, were selected to characterize the phylogenetic relationships by molecular techniques. Analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism in the conserved 16S rRNA gene revealed seven different ribotypes within the 117 strains. Among these strains, there were eight that lacked the cholera toxin gene (ctxAB), zot, and the repetitive sequence (RS); these eight strains belonged to three individual ribotypes. Our results suggested that V. cholerae O139 strains in China had clone diversity in phylogeny. The results of our hybridization patterns for CTX genetic elements (ctxAB, zot, and RS) showed that CTXPhi genomes in most V. cholerae O139 strains had two or more copies and had extensive restriction patterns even for the strains which belong to the same ribotype. For 22 (20.1%) strains, the copies of ctxAB were different from those of zot, suggesting that a ctxAB-negative CTXPhi genome may exist in O139 strains. This ctxAB-negative CTXPhi genome may coexist with the intact CTXPhi genome in a strain. In addition, the dendrogram for I-CeuI-generated pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns showed that V. cholerae serogroup O139 has a closer relationship with one strain of serogroup O22 than with the strains of serogroup O1. The results of this study showed the clonal diversity and the distribution of O139 strains in China, suggesting multiple origins of the O139 cholera epidemic or sporadic events. PMID:12791841

  1. Quorum sensing-regulated chitin metabolism provides grazing resistance to Vibrio cholerae biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shuyang; Tay, Qi Xiang Martin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rice, Scott A; McDougald, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Association of Vibrio cholerae with chitinous surfaces of zooplankton is important for its persistence in marine environments, as it provides accessibility to nutrients and resistance to stresses. Predation by heterotrophic protists has a major impact on the survival of V. cholerae. V. cholerae forms biofilms as its main defensive strategy, and quorum sensing (QS) additionally regulates the production of antiprotozoal factors. The role of chitin and QS regulation in V. cholerae grazing resistance was investigated by exposing V. cholerae wild-type (WT) and QS mutant biofilms grown on chitin flakes to the bacteriotrophic, surface-feeding flagellate Rhynchomonas nasuta. V. cholerae formed more biofilm biomass on chitin flakes compared with nonchitinous surfaces. The growth of R. nasuta was inhibited by WT biofilms grown on chitin flakes, whereas the inhibition was attenuated in QS mutant biofilms. The chitin-dependent toxicity was also observed when the V. cholerae biofilms were developed under continuous flow or grown on a natural chitin source, the exoskeleton of Artemia. In addition, the antiprotozoal activity and ammonium concentration of V. cholerae biofilm supernatants were quantified. The ammonium levels (3.5 mM) detected in the supernatants of V. cholerae WT biofilms grown on chitin flakes were estimated to reduce the number of R. nasuta by >80% in add-back experiments, and the supernatant of QS mutant biofilms was less toxic owing to a decrease in ammonium production. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the majority of genes involved in chitin metabolism and chemotaxis were significantly downregulated in QS mutant biofilms when grown on chitin compared with the WT biofilms. PMID:25615438

  2. Population Genetics of Vibrio cholerae from Nepal in 2010: Evidence on the Origin of the Haitian Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Price, Lance B.; Schupp, James M.; Gillece, John D.; Kaas, Rolf S.; Engelthaler, David M.; Bortolaia, Valeria; Pearson, Talima; Waters, Andrew E.; Prasad Upadhyay, Bishnu; Devi Shrestha, Sirjana; Adhikari, Shailaja; Shakya, Geeta; Keim, Paul S.; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cholera continues to be an important cause of human infections, and outbreaks are often observed after natural disasters, such as the one following the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. Once the cholera outbreak was confirmed, rumors spread that the disease was brought to Haiti by a battalion of Nepalese soldiers serving as United Nations peacekeepers. This possible connection has never been confirmed. We used whole-genome sequence typing (WGST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and antimicrobial susceptibility testing to characterize 24 recent Vibrio cholerae isolates from Nepal and evaluate the suggested epidemiological link with the Haitian outbreak. The isolates were obtained from 30 July to 1 November 2010 from five different districts in Nepal. We compared the 24 genomes to 10 previously sequenced V. cholerae isolates, including 3 from the Haitian outbreak (began July 2010). Antimicrobial susceptibility and PFGE patterns were consistent with an epidemiological link between the isolates from Nepal and Haiti. WGST showed that all 24 V. cholerae isolates from Nepal belonged to a single monophyletic group that also contained isolates from Bangladesh and Haiti. The Nepalese isolates were divided into four closely related clusters. One cluster contained three Nepalese isolates and three Haitian isolates that were almost identical, with only 1- or 2-bp differences. Results in this study are consistent with Nepal as the origin of the Haitian outbreak. This highlights how rapidly infectious diseases might be transmitted globally through international travel and how public health officials need advanced molecular tools along with standard epidemiological analyses to quickly determine the sources of outbreaks. PMID:21862630

  3. [The characteristics of Vibrio cholerae isolated in Dagestan in 1994].

    PubMed

    Podosinnikova, L S; Mazrukho, B L; Lomov, Iu M; Khanum'ian, T A; Voronezhskaia, L G; Kudriakova, T A; Makedonova, L D; Mironova, A V

    1995-01-01

    A high degree of resistance to cholera diagnostic phages and carriership of prophages characteristic of V. cholerae eltor strains vct+ were shown to be the specific features V. cholerae isolated in Daghestan during the period of June-October 1994. Among the strains under study, isolated respectively in 12 and 18 out of 19 regions of Daghestan, a high proportion was found to have resistance to tetracycline (65%) and chloramphenicol (28.6%). Moreover, some strains were found to be resistant to furagin and erythromycin. Out of 242 strains resistant to antibacterial preparations, 163 strains were found to have multiple resistance. Gentamicin, cipropfloxacin and doxicycline were shown to have high in vitro activity with respect to the strains under study. PMID:7771152

  4. [The first case of Vibrio cholerae 0139 in Denmark].

    PubMed

    Dalsgaard, A; Nielsen, G L; Echeverria, P; Larsen, J L; Schønheyder, H C

    1996-09-01

    We report the first case of V. cholerae O139 in Denmark. In 1994, a 61-year-old Vietnamese woman was admitted to Aalborg Hospital, Denmark due to severe diarrhoea. The diagnosis was confirmed by biochemical characterization and agglutination in O139 antiserum of a strain isolated from a stool specimen. The woman had stayed in Denmark after family reunion for nine months and had not travelled outside the country. She had not eaten any foods imported from Southeast Asia. The V. cholerae O139 isolate had similar antibiotic susceptibility pattern and contained genes encoding a virulence gene cassette previously identified in O139 isolates from Southeast Asia. Ribotyping showed a banding pattern similar to patterns exhibited by O139 isolates from Bangladesh, India and Thailand. However, the exact mode of transmission of this first Danish case of V. cholerae O139 infection was not determined. PMID:8848850

  5. Antigenic relationship between the common antigen (OEP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Hirao, Y; Homma, J Y

    1978-01-01

    Antibodies were found by the OEP-passive hemagglutination test to cross-react with the common antigen (OEP) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in sera of rabbits immunized with two serotype (Inaba and Ogawa) strains of Vibrio cholerae. The titer in the OEP-passive hemagglutination reaction rose later than did the agglutinin titer and reached a peak of 640 to 1,280. The titers of OEP antibody formation in rabbits immunized with V. cholerae were almost the same as that of P. aeruginosa. The common antigen of P. aeruginosa was confirmed to exist serologically in both strains of V. cholerae as determined by the indirect fluorescent antibody test and the agar gel precipitin test. Passive immunization with the V. cholerae immune rabbit serum significantly protected mice against P. aeruginosa infection. Purified antibodies cross-reacting with the OEP of P. aeruginosa derived from the V. cholerae immune rabbit sera by OEP-coupled affinity chromatography protected mice against P. aeruginosa infection as compared with the control group, which was injected with 100 microgram of immunoglobin G not containing OEP antibody. The purified antibodies (2.5 microgram per mouse) protected animals challenged with approximately 10,000 50% lethal doses in the control group. Consequently, the common antigen (OEP) of P. aeruginosa proved to be a common antigen of V. cholerae both serologically and in possessing infection protective properties. PMID:75846

  6. Evaluation of enteric-coated tablets as a whole cell inactivated vaccine candidate against Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Sonsire; Año, Gemma; Castaño, Jorge; Pino, Yadira; Uribarri, Evangelina; Riverón, Luis A; Cedré, Bárbara; Valmaseda, Tania; Falero, Gustavo; Pérez, José L; Infante, Juan F; García, Luis G; Solís, Rosa L; Sierra, Gustavo; Talavera, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    A vaccine candidate against cholera was developed in the form of oral tablets to avoid difficulties during application exhibited by current whole cell inactivated cholera vaccines. In this study, enteric-coated tablets were used to improve the protection of the active compound from gastric acidity. Tablets containing heat-killed whole cells of Vibrio cholerae strain C7258 as the active pharmaceutical compound was enteric-coated with the polymer Kollicoat(®) MAE-100P, which protected them efficiently from acidity when a disintegration test was carried out. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibition test and Western blot assay revealed the presence of V. cholerae antigens as LPS, mannose-sensitive haemagglutinin (MSHA) and outer membrane protein U (Omp U) in enteric-coated tablets. Immunogenicity studies (ELISA and vibriocidal test) carried out by intraduodenal administration in rabbits showed that the coating process of tablets did not affect the immunogenicity of V. cholerae-inactivated cells. In addition, no differences were observed in the immune response elicited by enteric-coated or uncoated tablets, particularly because the animal model and immunization route used did not allow discriminating between acid resistances of both tablets formulations in vivo. Clinical studies with volunteers will be required to elucidate this aspect, but the results suggest the possibility of using enteric-coated tablets as a final pharmaceutical product for a cholera vaccine. PMID:23492079

  7. Electrochemical genosensor assay using lyophilized gold nanoparticles/latex microsphere label for detection of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Liew, Pei Sheng; Lertanantawong, Benchaporn; Lee, Su Yin; Manickam, Ravichandran; Lee, Yook Heng; Surareungchai, Werasak

    2015-07-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes cholera, a diarrheal disease. Cholera is widespread in poor, under-developed or disaster-hit countries that have poor water sanitation. Hence, a rapid detection method for V. cholerae in the field under these resource-limited settings is required. In this paper, we describe the development of an electrochemical genosensor assay using lyophilized gold nanoparticles/latex microsphere (AuNPs-PSA) reporter label. The reporter label mixture was prepared by lyophilization of AuNPs-PSA-avidin conjugate with different types of stabilizers. The best stabilizer was 5% sorbitol, which was able to preserve the dried conjugate for up to 30 days. Three methods of DNA hybridization were compared and the one-step sandwich hybridization method was chosen as it was fastest and highly specific. The performance of the assay using the lyophilized reagents was comparable to the wet form for detection of 1aM to 1fM of linear target DNA. The assay was highly specific for V. cholerae, with a detection limit of 1fM of PCR products. The ability of the sensor is to detect LAMP products as low as 50ngµl(-1). The novel lyophilized AuNPs-PSA-avidin reporter label with electrochemical genosensor detection could facilitate the rapid on-site detection of V. cholerae. PMID:25882423

  8. Molecular epidemiologic analysis of Vibrio cholerae O1 isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, S; Cheong, Y M; Kan, S; Yassin, R M; Vadivelu, J; Pang, T

    1994-01-01

    Isolates of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor from two well-defined cholera outbreaks in Malaysia were analyzed by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Isolates from sporadic cases occurring during the same time period were also studied. Digestion of chromosomal DNA from these isolates of V. cholerae O1 with restriction endonucleases NotI (5'-GCGGCCGC-3') and SfiI (5'-GGCCNNNN-3'), followed by PFGE, produced restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) patterns consisting of 13 to 24 bands (ranging in size from 46 to 398 kbp). Analysis of the REA patterns generated by PFGE after digestion with NotI and SfiI suggested the clonal nature and close genetic identity of the isolates obtained during each of the two outbreaks (Dice coefficient, 0.93 to 1.0). Although they had very similar REA patterns, the two outbreak clones were not identical. Isolates of V. cholerae O1 from sporadic cases, on the other hand, appeared to be much more heterogeneous (five different REA patterns detected in the five isolates tested; Dice coefficient, 0.31 to 0.81) than those obtained during the two outbreaks. We conclude that PFGE of V. cholerae O1 chromosomal DNA digested with infrequently cutting restriction endonucleases is a useful method for molecular typing of V. cholerae isolates for epidemiological purposes. Images PMID:7883885

  9. Detection of luciferase gene sequence in nonluminescent Vibrio cholerae by colony hygridization and polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, L.M.; Colwell, R.R. )

    1991-05-01

    Bioluminescence is a trait observed among approximately 10% of Vibrio cholerae isolates. We have demonstrated that not only do some strains of V. cholerae produce low levels of light, undetectable by the human eye, but the luciferase gene sequence is present in strains of V. cholerae which emit no detectable light, evidenced by hybridization with a luciferase DNA probe. Comparisons of the amino acid sequences of luciferase regions of amino acid identity. The polymerase chain reaction method of DNA amplification with oligonucleotide primers based on these regions was used to isolate a region of the luxA gene from both luminescent and nonluminescent V. cholerae strains. The nucleotide sequence of this region was determined and reveals that nonluminescent V. cholerae have 99.7% nucleotide sequence similarity in this region with the luminescent biovar V. cholerae by albensis as well as significant similarity to other species of bioluminescent bacteria, a finding that is in accord with the hypothesis that these species have a common luminescent ancestor, most probably from the marine environment.

  10. VGJphi integration and excision mechanisms contribute to the genetic diversity of Vibrio cholerae epidemic strains.

    PubMed

    Das, Bhabatosh; Bischerour, Julien; Barre, François-Xavier

    2011-02-01

    Most strains of Vibrio cholerae are not pathogenic or cause only local outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Acquisition of the capacity to produce the cholera toxin results from a lysogenic conversion event due to a filamentous bacteriophage, CTX. Two V. cholerae tyrosine recombinases that normally serve to resolve chromosome dimers, XerC and XerD, promote CTX integration by directly recombining the ssDNA genome of the phage with the dimer resolution site of either or both V. cholerae chromosomes. This smart mechanism renders the process irreversible. Many other filamentous vibriophages seem to attach to chromosome dimer resolution sites and participate in the rapid and continuous evolution of toxigenic V. cholerae strains. We analyzed the molecular mechanism of integration of VGJ, a representative of the largest family of these phages. We found that XerC and XerD promote the integration of VGJ into a specific chromosome dimer resolution site, and that the dsDNA replicative form of the phage is recombined. We show that XerC and XerD can promote excision of the integrated prophage, and that this participates in the production of new extrachromosomal copies of the phage genome. We further show how hybrid molecules harboring the concatenated genomes of CTX and VGJ can be produced efficiently. Finally, we discuss how the integration and excision mechanisms of VGJ can explain the origin of recent epidemic V. cholerae strains. PMID:21262799

  11. Role of Indole Production on Virulence of Vibrio cholerae Using Galleria mellonella Larvae Model.

    PubMed

    Nuidate, Taiyeebah; Tansila, Natta; Saengkerdsub, Suwat; Kongreung, Jetnaphang; Bakkiyaraj, Dhamodharan; Vuddhakul, Varaporn

    2016-09-01

    Cell to cell communication facilitated by chemical signals plays crucial roles in regulating various cellular functions in bacteria. Indole, one such signaling molecule has been demonstrated to control various bacterial phenotypes such as biofilm formation and virulence in diverse bacteria including Vibrio cholerae. The present study explores some key factors involved in indole production and the subsequent pathogenesis of V. cholerae. Indole production was higher at 37 °C than at 30 °C, although the growth at 37 °C was slightly higher. A positive correlation was observed between indole production and biofilm formation in V. cholerae. Maximum indole production was detected at pH 7. There was no significant difference in indole production between clinical and environmental V. cholerae isolates, although indole production in one environmental isolate was significantly different. Both growth and indole production showed relevant changes with differences in salinity. An indole negative mutant strain was constructed using transposon mutagenesis and the direct effect of indole on the virulence of V. cholerae was evaluated using Galleria mellonella larvae model. Comparison to the wild type strain, the mutant significantly reduced the mortality of G. mellonella larvae which regained its virulence after complementation with exogenous indole. A gene involved in indole production and the virulence of V. cholerae was identified. PMID:27407302

  12. Cholera Toxin Production during Anaerobic Trimethylamine N-Oxide Respiration Is Mediated by Stringent Response in Vibrio cholerae*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young Taek; Park, Yongjin; Yoon, Mi Young; Bari, Wasimul; Go, Junhyeok; Min, Kyung Bae; Raskin, David M.; Lee, Kang-Mu; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2014-01-01

    As a facultative anaerobe, Vibrio cholerae can grow by anaerobic respiration. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly promoted during anaerobic growth using trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of TMAO-stimulated CT production and uncovered the crucial involvement of stringent response in this process. V. cholerae 7th pandemic strain N16961 produced a significantly elevated level of ppGpp, the bacterial stringent response alarmone, during anaerobic TMAO respiration. Bacterial viability was impaired, and DNA replication was also affected under the same growth condition, further suggesting that stringent response is induced. A ΔrelA ΔspoT ppGpp overproducer strain produced an enhanced level of CT, whereas anaerobic growth via TMAO respiration was severely inhibited. In contrast, a ppGpp-null strain (ΔrelA ΔspoT ΔrelV) grew substantially better, but produced no CT, suggesting that CT production and bacterial growth are inversely regulated in response to ppGpp accumulation. Bacterial capability to produce CT was completely lost when the dksA gene, which encodes a protein that works cooperatively with ppGpp, was deleted. In the ΔdksA mutant, stringent response growth inhibition was alleviated, further supporting the inverse regulation of CT production and anaerobic growth. In vivo virulence of ΔrelA ΔspoT ΔrelV or ΔdksA mutants was significantly attenuated. The ΔrelA ΔspoT mutant maintained virulence when infected with exogenous TMAO despite its defective growth. Together, our results reveal that stringent response is activated under TMAO-stimulated anaerobic growth, and it regulates CT production in a growth-dependent manner in V. cholerae. PMID:24648517

  13. Glucose-Specific Enzyme IIA Has Unique Binding Partners in The Vibrio cholerae Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Bradley S.; Smith, Daniel R.; Watnick, Paula I.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glucose-specific enzyme IIA (EIIAGlc) is a central regulator of bacterial metabolism and an intermediate in the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS), a conserved phosphotransfer cascade that controls carbohydrate transport. We previously reported that EIIAGlc activates transcription of the genes required for Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation. While EIIAGlc modulates the function of many proteins through a direct interaction, none of the known regulatory binding partners of EIIAGlc activates biofilm formation. Therefore, we used tandem affinity purification (TAP) to compare binding partners of EIIAGlc in both planktonic and biofilm cells. A surprising number of novel EIIAGlc binding partners were identified predominantly under one condition or the other. Studies of planktonic cells revealed established partners of EIIAGlc, such as adenylate cyclase and glycerol kinase. In biofilms, MshH, a homolog of Escherichia coli CsrD, was found to be a dominant binding partner of EIIAGlc. Further studies revealed that MshH inhibits biofilm formation. This function was independent of the Carbon storage regulator (Csr) pathway and dependent on EIIAGlc. To explore the existence of multiprotein complexes centered on EIIAGlc, we also affinity purified the binding partners of adenylate cyclase from biofilm cells. In addition to EIIAGlc, this analysis yielded many of the same proteins that copurified with EIIAGlc. We hypothesize that EIIAGlc serves as a hub for multiprotein complexes and furthermore that these complexes may provide a mechanism for competitive and cooperative interactions between binding partners. PMID:23131828

  14. Living in the matrix: assembly and control of Vibrio cholerae biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Teschler, Jennifer K.; Zamorano-Sánchez, David; Utada, Andrew S.; Warner, Christopher J. A.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Linington, Roger G.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Nearly all bacteria form biofilms as a strategy for survival and persistence. Biofilms are associated with biotic and abiotic surfaces and are composed of aggregates of cells that are encased by a self-produced or acquired extracellular matrix. Vibrio cholerae has been studied as a model organism for understanding biofilm formation in environmental pathogens, as it spends much of its life cycle outside of the human host in the aquatic environment. Given the important role of biofilm formation in the V. cholerae life cycle, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process and the signals that trigger biofilm assembly or dispersal have been areas of intense investigation over the past 20 years. In this Review, we discuss V. cholerae surface attachment, various matrix components and the regulatory networks controlling biofilm formation. PMID:25895940

  15. Identification of a Membrane-Bound Transcriptional Regulator That Links Chitin and Natural Competence in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Dalia, Ankur B.; Lazinski, David W.; Camilli, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vibrio cholerae is naturally competent when grown on chitin. It is known that expression of the major regulator of competence, TfoX, is controlled by chitin; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this requirement for chitin have remained unclear. In the present study, we identify and characterize a membrane-bound transcriptional regulator that positively regulates the small RNA (sRNA) TfoR, which posttranscriptionally enhances tfoX translation. We show that this regulation of the tfoR promoter is direct by performing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and by heterologous expression of this system in Escherichia coli. This transcriptional regulator was recently identified independently and was named “TfoS” (S. Yamamoto et al., Mol. Microbiol., in press, doi:10.1111/mmi.12462). Using a constitutively active form of TfoS, we demonstrate that the activity of this regulator is sufficient to promote competence in V. cholerae in the absence of chitin. Also, TfoS contains a large periplasmic domain, which we hypothesized interacts with chitin to regulate TfoS activity. In the heterologous host E. coli, we demonstrate that chitin oligosaccharides are sufficient to activate TfoS activity at the tfoR promoter. Collectively, these data characterize TfoS as a novel chitin-sensing transcriptional regulator that represents the direct link between chitin and natural competence in V. cholerae. PMID:24473132

  16. Isolation of Vibrio cholerae from the brain of a feedlot heifer with meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Bush, Jamie M; Hyatt, Doreene R; Bolte, Denise; Pandher, Karamjeet

    2006-11-01

    A 700-pound, 9-month-old Angus heifer from a feedlot presented with acute neurologic signs, characterized by circling, posterior weakness, and nonresponsiveness, followed by death. Histologically, the frontal lobe and the thalamus contained multiple foci of liquefaction that contained numerous degenerative neutrophils and foamy macrophages. Some of these foci were centered on blood vessels that contained fibrin thrombi and exhibited varying degrees of fibrinoid necrosis of the vessel wall. There was adjacent axonal degeneration and neuronal necrosis characterized by pronounced cytoplasmic eosinophilia, peripheralization of the nuclei, and loss of Nissl substance. Aerobic culture of the brain yielded moderate growth of Vibrio species, which was determined to be Vibrio cholerae by polymerase chain reaction analysis of a 438-base pair fragment of the 16 S ribosomal RNA gene. V. cholerae are motile, gram-negative, curved rod-shaped bacteria. Some strains of V. cholerae are important food- and water-borne bacterial pathogens that produce an often fatal diarrhea in humans. This is the first known case report of V. cholerae meningoencephalitis and cerebral abscessation in a bovine. PMID:17121090

  17. Bicarbonate Induces Vibrio cholerae Virulence Gene Expression by Enhancing ToxT Activity▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Abuaita, Basel H.; Withey, Jeffrey H.

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative bacterium that is the causative agent of cholera, a severe diarrheal illness. The two biotypes of V. cholerae O1 capable of causing cholera, classical and El Tor, require different in vitro growth conditions for induction of virulence gene expression. Growth under the inducing conditions or infection of a host initiates a complex regulatory cascade that results in production of ToxT, a regulatory protein that directly activates transcription of the genes encoding cholera toxin (CT), toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), and other virulence genes. Previous studies have shown that sodium bicarbonate induces CT expression in the V. cholerae El Tor biotype. However, the mechanism for bicarbonate-mediated CT induction has not been defined. In this study, we demonstrate that bicarbonate stimulates virulence gene expression by enhancing ToxT activity. Both the classical and El Tor biotypes produce inactive ToxT protein when they are cultured statically in the absence of bicarbonate. Addition of bicarbonate to the culture medium does not affect ToxT production but causes a significant increase in CT and TCP expression in both biotypes. Ethoxyzolamide, a potent carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, inhibits bicarbonate-mediated virulence induction, suggesting that conversion of CO2 into bicarbonate by carbonic anhydrase plays a role in virulence induction. Thus, bicarbonate is the first positive effector for ToxT activity to be identified. Given that bicarbonate is present at high concentration in the upper small intestine where V. cholerae colonizes, bicarbonate is likely an important chemical stimulus that V. cholerae senses and that induces virulence during the natural course of infection. PMID:19564378

  18. Molecular Characterization of Vibrio cholerae Isolated From Clinical Samples in Kurdistan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ramazanzadeh, Rashid; Rouhi, Samaneh; Shakib, Pegah; Shahbazi, Babak; Bidarpour, Farzam; Karimi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vibrio cholerae causes diarrhoeal disease that afflicts thousands of people annually. V. cholerae is classified on the basis of somatic antigens into serovars or serogroups and there are at least 200 known serogroup. Two serogroups, O1 and O139 have been associated with epidemic diseases. Virulence genes of these bacteria are OmpW, ctxA and tcpA. Objectives: Due to the importance of V. cholerae infection and developing molecular diagnostics of this organism in medical and microbiology sciences, this study aimed to describe molecular characterization of V. cholerae isolated from clinical samples using a molecular method. Materials and Methods: In this study, 48 samples were provided during summer 2013 (late August and early September) by reference laboratory. Samples were assessed using biochemical tests initially. The primer of OmpW, ctxA and tcpA genes was used in Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) protocols. Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC)-PCR and Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic (REP)-PCR methods were used to subtype V. cholerae. Results: In this study, from a total of 48 clinical stool samples 39 (81.2 %) were positive for V. cholerae in biochemical tests and bacteria culture tests. The PCR results showed that of 39 positive isolates 35 (89.7%), 34 (87.1%) and 37 (94.8%) were positive for ctxA, tcpA and OmpW gene, respectively. Also, in the REP-PCR method with ERIC primer strains were divided into 10 groups. In the REP-PCR method with REP primer, strains were divided into 13 groups. Conclusions: Polymerase chain reaction has specificity and accuracy for identification of the organism and is able to differentiate biotypes. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence is one of the informative and discriminative methods for the analysis of V. cholerae diversity. The REP-PCR is a less informative and discriminative method compared to other methods for the analysis of V. cholerae diversity. PMID:26060565

  19. TLP01, an mshA mutant of Vibrio cholerae O139 as vaccine candidate against cholera.

    PubMed

    Ledón, Talena; Ferrán, Beatriz; Pérez, Celso; Suzarte, Edith; Vichi, Joivier; Marrero, Karen; Oliva, Reinaldo; Fando, Rafael

    2012-09-01

    No commercially live vaccine against cholera caused by Vibrio cholerae O139 serogroup is available and it is currently needed. Virulent O139 strain CRC266 was genetically modified by firstly deleting multiple copies of the filamentous phage CTXφ, further tagging by insertion of the endoglucanase A coding gene from Clostridium thermocellum into the hemagglutinin/protease gene and finally deleting the mshA gene, just to improve the vaccine biosafety. One of the derived strains designated as TLP01 showed full attenuation and good colonizing capacity in the infant mouse cholera model, as well as highly immunogenic properties in the adult rabbit and rat models. Since TLP01 lacks MSHA fimbriae, it is refractory to infection with another filamentous phage VGJφ and therefore protected of acquiring CTXφ from a recombinant hybrid VGJφ/CTXφ. This strategy could reduce the possibilities of stable reversion to virulence out of the human gut. Furthermore, this vaccine strain was impaired to produce biofilms under certain culture conditions, which might have implications for the strain survival in natural settings contributing to vaccine biosafety as well. The above results has encouraged us to consider TLP01 as a live attenuated vaccine strain having an adequate performance in animal models, in terms of attenuation and immunogenicity, so that it fulfills the requirements to be evaluated in human volunteers. PMID:22546527

  20. Biochemistry of Vibrio cholerae virulence: purification of cholera enterotoxin by preparative disc electrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, A C; Richardson, S H; Sheridan, B

    1976-01-01

    Procedures for cholera enterotoxin purification previously developed in this labarotory were not applicable to large-scale purification, and these methods resulted in low yields of pure toxin. An efficient scheme has been developed whereby pure cholera enterotoxin can be obtained from 6 to 8 liters of culture supernatant fluid. This method consists of concentration by membrane ultrafiltration followed by gel filtration and cation-exchange chromatography. Pure cholera enterotoxin of high biological potency was obtained after a final step of preparative acrylamide gel electrophoresis. The degree of purity of the toxin-antigen as well as its biological activity were determined at various setps of purification. This alternate technique for purification is offered because of the widespread interest in cholera enterotoxin as a specific stimulator of adenyl cyclase. Images PMID:987751

  1. Circulation of a Quorum-Sensing-Impaired Variant of Vibrio cholerae Strain C6706 Masks Important Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Stutzmann, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, is a model organism for studying virulence regulation, biofilm formation, horizontal gene transfer, and the cell-to-cell communication known as quorum sensing (QS). As in any research field, discrepancies between data from diverse laboratories are sometimes observed for V. cholerae. Such discrepancies are often caused by the use of diverse patient or environmental isolates. In this study, we investigated the inability of a few laboratories to reproduce high levels of natural transformation, a mode of horizontal gene transfer that is specifically induced on chitinous surfaces. This irreproducibility was mostly related to one specific isolate of V. cholerae: the O1 El Tor C6706 strain. C6706 was previously described as QS proficient, an important prerequisite for the induction of natural competence for transformation. To elucidate the underlying problem, we collected seven isolates of the same C6706 strain from different research laboratories in North America and Europe and compared their phenotypes. Importantly, we observed a split response with respect to QS-related gene expression, including chitin-induced natural competence and type VI secretion (T6S). While approximately half of the strains behaved as reported for several other O1 El Tor pandemic isolates that are commonly studied in the laboratory, the other half were significantly impaired in QS-related expression patterns. This impairment was caused by a mutation in a QS-related gene (luxO). We conclude that the circulation of such QS-impaired wild-type strains is responsible for masking several important phenotypes of V. cholerae, including natural competence for transformation and T6S. IMPORTANCE Phenotypic diversity between laboratory-domesticated bacterial strains is a common problem and often results in the failed reproduction of published data. However, researchers rarely compare such strains to elucidate the underlying mutation(s). In this

  2. Survivability of Vibrio cholerae O1 in Cooked Rice, Coffee, and Tea.

    PubMed

    Tang, John Yew Huat; Izenty, Bariah Ibrahim; Nur' Izzati, Ahmad Juanda; Masran, Siti Rahmah; Yeo, Chew Chieng; Roslan, Arshad; Abu Bakar, Che Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the survival of Vibrio cholerae O1 in 3 types of preparation for cooked rice, Oryza sativa L., (plain rice, rice with coconut milk, and rice with ginger); coffee, Coffea canephora, (plain coffee, coffee with sugar, and coffee with sweetened condensed milk); and tea, Camellia sinensis, (plain tea, tea with sugar, and tea with sweetened condensed milk) held at room temperature (27°C). The survival of V. cholerae O1 was determined by spread plate method on TCBS agar. Initial cultures of 8.00 log CFU/mL were inoculated into each food sample. After 6 h incubation, significant growth was only detected in rice with coconut milk (9.67 log CFU/mL; P < 0.05). However, all 3 types of rice preparation showed significant growth of V. cholerae after 24 h (P < 0.05). For coffee and tea preparations, V. cholerae survived up to 6 h in tea with condensed milk (4.72 log CFU/mL) but not in similar preparation of coffee. This study showed evidence for the survivability of V. cholerae in rice, coffee, and tea. Thus, holding these food and beverages for an extended period of time at room temperature should be avoided. PMID:26904604

  3. The Vibrio cholerae Cpx Envelope Stress Response Senses and Mediates Adaptation to Low Iron

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Nicole; Pukatzki, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The Cpx pathway, a two-component system that employs the sensor histidine kinase CpxA and the response regulator CpxR, regulates crucial envelope stress responses across bacterial species and affects antibiotic resistance. To characterize the CpxR regulon in Vibrio cholerae, the transcriptional profile of the pandemic V. cholerae El Tor C6706 strain was examined upon overexpression of cpxR. Our data show that the Cpx regulon of V. cholerae is enriched in genes encoding membrane-localized and transport proteins, including a large number of genes known or predicted to be iron regulated. Activation of the Cpx pathway further led to the expression of TolC, the major outer membrane pore, and of components of two RND efflux systems in V. cholerae. We show that iron chelation, toxic compounds, or deletion of specific RND efflux components leads to Cpx pathway activation. Furthermore, mutations that eliminate the Cpx response or members of its regulon result in growth phenotypes in the presence of these inducers that, together with Cpx pathway activation, are partially suppressed by iron. Cumulatively, our results suggest that a major function of the Cpx response in V. cholerae is to mediate adaptation to envelope perturbations caused by toxic compounds and the depletion of iron. PMID:25368298

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of Reemergent Vibrio cholerae O139 Bengal in India

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Asish Kumar; Basu, Arnab; Garg, Pallavi; Bag, Prasanta K.; Ghosh, Amit; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Takeda, Yoshifumi; Nair, G. Balakrish

    1998-01-01

    We report the prevalence of the O139 serogroup in Calcutta, India, after its reemergence in August 1996 and the spread of the reemerged clone to other parts of the country by using previously established molecular markers. Phenotypically, the reemerged Vibrio cholerae O139 displayed a difference compared to those that appeared in late 1992 and 1993 in that the current O139 strains are sensitive to co-trimoxazole. Ribotyping with the enzyme BglI produced two rRNA restriction patterns in the O139 strains isolated after August 1996, and these patterns were identical to those exhibited by strains of O139 isolated in 1992. Three clones of V. cholerae O139 are currently prevailing in the country, with strains exhibiting three bands after HindIII digestion and hybridization with a ctxA probe being dominant. The reemergence of V. cholerae O139 in Calcutta after a 32-month quiescent period reestablishes the O139 serogroup as an entity which is likely to play a crucial role in the temporal antigenic variations among the serogroups of V. cholerae causing cholera. PMID:9650989

  5. Survivability of Vibrio cholerae O1 in Cooked Rice, Coffee, and Tea

    PubMed Central

    Tang, John Yew Huat; Izenty, Bariah Ibrahim; Nur' Izzati, Ahmad Juanda; Masran, Siti Rahmah; Yeo, Chew Chieng; Roslan, Arshad; Abu Bakar, Che Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the survival of Vibrio cholerae O1 in 3 types of preparation for cooked rice, Oryza sativa L., (plain rice, rice with coconut milk, and rice with ginger); coffee, Coffea canephora, (plain coffee, coffee with sugar, and coffee with sweetened condensed milk); and tea, Camellia sinensis, (plain tea, tea with sugar, and tea with sweetened condensed milk) held at room temperature (27°C). The survival of V. cholerae O1 was determined by spread plate method on TCBS agar. Initial cultures of 8.00 log CFU/mL were inoculated into each food sample. After 6 h incubation, significant growth was only detected in rice with coconut milk (9.67 log CFU/mL; P < 0.05). However, all 3 types of rice preparation showed significant growth of V. cholerae after 24 h (P < 0.05). For coffee and tea preparations, V. cholerae survived up to 6 h in tea with condensed milk (4.72 log CFU/mL) but not in similar preparation of coffee. This study showed evidence for the survivability of V. cholerae in rice, coffee, and tea. Thus, holding these food and beverages for an extended period of time at room temperature should be avoided. PMID:26904604

  6. Extracts of edible and medicinal plants damage membranes of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Eduardo; García, Santos; Heredia, Norma

    2010-10-01

    The use of natural compounds from plants can provide an alternative approach against food-borne pathogens. The mechanisms of action of most plant extracts with antimicrobial activity have been poorly studied. In this work, changes in membrane integrity, membrane potential, internal pH (pH(in)), and ATP synthesis were measured in Vibrio cholerae cells after exposure to extracts of edible and medicinal plants. A preliminary screen of methanolic, ethanolic, and aqueous extracts of medicinal and edible plants was performed. Minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were measured for extracts showing high antimicrobial activity. Our results indicate that methanolic extracts of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), nopal cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica var. Villanueva L.), sweet acacia (Acacia farnesiana L.), and white sagebrush (Artemisia ludoviciana Nutt.) are the most active against V. cholera, with MBCs ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 mg/ml. Using four fluorogenic techniques, we studied the membrane integrity of V. cholerae cells after exposure to these four extracts. Extracts from these plants were able to disrupt the cell membranes of V. cholerae cells, causing increased membrane permeability, a clear decrease in cytoplasmic pH, cell membrane hyperpolarization, and a decrease in cellular ATP concentration in all strains tested. These four plant extracts could be studied as future alternatives to control V. cholerae contamination in foods and the diseases associated with this microorganism. PMID:20802077

  7. A globally distributed mobile genetic element inhibits natural transformation of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Dalia, Ankur B; Seed, Kimberley D; Calderwood, Stephen B; Camilli, Andrew

    2015-08-18

    Natural transformation is one mechanism of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera. Recently, it was found that V. cholerae isolates from the Haiti outbreak were poorly transformed by this mechanism. Here, we show that an integrating conjugative element (ICE)-encoded DNase, which we name IdeA, is necessary and sufficient for inhibiting natural transformation of Haiti outbreak strains. We demonstrate that IdeA inhibits this mechanism of HGT in cis via DNA endonuclease activity that is localized to the periplasm. Furthermore, we show that natural transformation between cholera strains in a relevant environmental context is inhibited by IdeA. The ICE encoding IdeA is globally distributed. Therefore, we analyzed the prevalence and role for this ICE in limiting natural transformation of isolates from Bangladesh collected between 2001 and 2011. We found that IdeA(+) ICEs were nearly ubiquitous in isolates from 2001 to 2005; however, their prevalence decreased to ∼40% from 2006 to 2011. Thus, IdeA(+) ICEs may have limited the role of natural transformation in V. cholerae. However, the rise in prevalence of strains lacking IdeA may now increase the role of this conserved mechanism of HGT in the evolution of this pathogen. PMID:26240317

  8. [Multilocus sequence-typing of vibrio cholerae strains with various epidemic importance].

    PubMed

    Mironova, L V; Afanas'ev, M V; Goldapel, E G; Balakhonov, S V

    2015-01-01

    The allele polymorphism of the housekeeping genes (dnaE, lap, recA, pgm, gyrB, cat, chi, gmd) from the Vibrio cholerae strains with different epidemic importance (n = 41) isolated in Siberia and at the Far East during the cholera pandemic VII was tested. All toxigenic strains isolated at the period of epidemic complications irrespective of time and source of isolation were characterized by the identical allele profile and belonged to the same sequence-type. Nine sequence types were detected in non-epidemic isolates. The dendrogram clustering was associated with the serogroup and in some cases with the territory and time of isolation. The structure heterogeneity of the non-toxigenic V. cholerae housekeeping genes was in most cases caused by the synonymous nucleotide replacements (Dn/Ds < 1) indicating the prevalence of the negative V. cholerae at the analyzed genome sites. The revealed distinctions in the structure of housekeeping genes of the V. cholerae with different epidemic importance can be regarded as evidence of various evolutional directions in these strain groups. PMID:26182664

  9. Competence-induced type VI secretion might foster intestinal colonization by Vibrio cholerae: Intestinal interbacterial killing by competence-induced V. cholerae.

    PubMed

    Blokesch, Melanie

    2015-11-01

    The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae exhibits two distinct lifestyles: one in the aquatic environment where it often associates with chitinous surfaces and the other as the causative agent of the disease cholera. While much of the research on V. cholerae has focused on the host-pathogen interaction, knowledge about the environmental lifestyle of the pathogen remains limited. We recently showed that the polymer chitin, which is extremely abundant in aquatic environments, induces natural competence as a mode of horizontal gene transfer and that this competence regulon also includes the type VI secretion system (T6SS), a molecular killing device. Here, I discuss the putative consequences that chitin-induced T6SS activation could have on intestinal colonization and how the transmission route might influence disease outcome. Moreover, I propose that common infant animal models for cholera might not sufficiently take into account T6SS-mediated interbacterial warfare between V. cholerae and the intestinal microbiota. PMID:26445388

  10. The Type II secretion system delivers matrix proteins for biofilm formation by Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tanya L; Fong, Jiunn C; Rule, Chelsea; Rogers, Andrew; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Sandkvist, Maria

    2014-12-01

    Gram-negative bacteria have evolved several highly dedicated pathways for extracellular protein secretion, including the type II secretion (T2S) system. Since substrates secreted via the T2S system include both virulence factors and degradative enzymes, this secretion system is considered a major survival mechanism for pathogenic and environmental species. Previous analyses revealed that the T2S system mediates the export of ≥ 20 proteins in Vibrio cholerae, a human pathogen that is indigenous to the marine environment. Here we demonstrate a new role in biofilm formation for the V. cholerae T2S system, since wild-type V. cholerae was found to secrete the biofilm matrix proteins RbmC, RbmA, and Bap1 into the culture supernatant, while an isogenic T2S mutant could not. In agreement with this finding, the level of biofilm formation in a static microtiter assay was diminished in T2S mutants. Moreover, inactivation of the T2S system in a rugose V. cholerae strain prevented the development of colony corrugation and pellicle formation at the air-liquid interface. In contrast, extracellular secretion of the exopolysaccharide VPS, an essential component of the biofilm matrix, remained unaffected in the T2S mutants. Our results indicate that the T2S system provides a mechanism for the delivery of extracellular matrix proteins known to be important for biofilm formation by V. cholerae. Because the T2S system contributes to the pathogenicity of V. cholerae by secreting proteins such as cholera toxin and biofilm matrix proteins, elucidation of the molecular mechanism of T2S has the potential to lead to the development of novel preventions and therapies. PMID:25266381

  11. The Type II Secretion System Delivers Matrix Proteins for Biofilm Formation by Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tanya L.; Fong, Jiunn C.; Rule, Chelsea; Rogers, Andrew; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria have evolved several highly dedicated pathways for extracellular protein secretion, including the type II secretion (T2S) system. Since substrates secreted via the T2S system include both virulence factors and degradative enzymes, this secretion system is considered a major survival mechanism for pathogenic and environmental species. Previous analyses revealed that the T2S system mediates the export of ≥20 proteins in Vibrio cholerae, a human pathogen that is indigenous to the marine environment. Here we demonstrate a new role in biofilm formation for the V. cholerae T2S system, since wild-type V. cholerae was found to secrete the biofilm matrix proteins RbmC, RbmA, and Bap1 into the culture supernatant, while an isogenic T2S mutant could not. In agreement with this finding, the level of biofilm formation in a static microtiter assay was diminished in T2S mutants. Moreover, inactivation of the T2S system in a rugose V. cholerae strain prevented the development of colony corrugation and pellicle formation at the air-liquid interface. In contrast, extracellular secretion of the exopolysaccharide VPS, an essential component of the biofilm matrix, remained unaffected in the T2S mutants. Our results indicate that the T2S system provides a mechanism for the delivery of extracellular matrix proteins known to be important for biofilm formation by V. cholerae. Because the T2S system contributes to the pathogenicity of V. cholerae by secreting proteins such as cholera toxin and biofilm matrix proteins, elucidation of the molecular mechanism of T2S has the potential to lead to the development of novel preventions and therapies. PMID:25266381

  12. Mechanism of activation of adenylate cyclase by Vibrio cholerae enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Bennett, V; Cuatrecasas, P

    1975-06-01

    The kinetics and properties of the activation of adenylate cyclase by cholera enterotoxin have been examined primarily in toad erythrocytes, but also in avian erythrocytes, rat fat cells and cultured melanoma cells. When cholera toxin is incubated with intact cells it stimulates adenylate cyclase activity, as measured in the subsequently isolated plasma membranes, according to a triphasic time course. This consists of a true lag period of about 30 min, followed by a stage of exponentially increasing adenylate cyclase activity which continues for 110 to 130 min, and finally a period of slow activation which may extend as long as 30 hr in cultured melanoma cells. The progressive activation of adenylate cyclase activity by cholera toxin is interrupted by cell lysis; continued incubation of the isolated membranes under nearly identical conditions does not lead to further activation of the enzyme. The delay in the action of the toxin is not grossly dependent of the number of toxin-receptor (GM1 ganglioside) complexes, and is still seen upon adding a second dose of toxin to partially stimulated cells. Direct measurements indicate negligible intracellular levels of biologically active radioiodinated toxin in either a soluble or a nuclear-bound form. The effects are not prevented by Actinomycin D (20 mug/ml), uromycin (30 mug/ml), cycloheximide (30 mug/ml), sodium fluoride (10 mM) or sodium azide (1 mM); KCN, however, almost completely prevents the action of cholera toxin. The action of the toxin is temperature dependent, occurring at very slow or negligible rates below certain critical temperatures, the values of which depend on the specific animal species. Thetransition for toad erythrocytes occurs at 15 to 17 degrees C, while rat adipocytes and turkey erythrocytes demonstrate a discontinuity at 26 to 30 degrees C. The temperature effects are evident during the lag period as well as during the exponential phase of activation. The rate of decay of the stimulated adenylate

  13. Infectious CTXΦ and the Vibrio Pathogenicity Island Prophage in Vibrio mimicus: Evidence for Recent Horizontal Transfer between V. mimicus and V. cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, E. Fidelma; Moyer, Kathryn E.; Shi, Lei; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2000-01-01

    Vibrio mimicus differs from Vibrio cholerae in a number of genotypic and phenotypic traits but like V. cholerae can give rise to diarrheal disease. We examined clinical isolates of V. mimicus for the presence of CTXΦ, the lysogenic filamentous bacteriophage that carries the cholera toxin genes in epidemic V. cholerae strains. Four V. mimicus isolates were found to contain complete copies of CTXΦ. Southern blot analyses revealed that V. mimicus strain PT5 contains two CTX prophages integrated at different sites within the V. mimicus genome whereas V. mimicus strains PT48, 523-80, and 9583 each contain tandemly arranged copies of CTXΦ. We detected the replicative form of CTXΦ, pCTX, in all four of these V. mimicus isolates. The CTX prophage in strain PT5 was found to produce infectious CTXΦ particles. The nucleotide sequences of CTXΦ genes orfU and zot from V. mimicus strain PT5 and V. cholerae strain N16961 were identical, indicating contemporary horizontal transfer of CTXΦ between these two species. The receptor for CTXΦ, the toxin-coregulated pilus, which is encoded by another lysogenic filamentous bacteriophage, VPIΦ, was also present in the CTXΦ-positive V. mimicus isolates. The nucleotide sequences of VPIΦ genes aldA and toxT from V. mimicus strain PT5 and V. cholerae N16961 were identical, suggesting recent horizontal transfer of this phage between V. mimicus and V. cholerae. In V. mimicus, the vibrio pathogenicity island prophage was integrated in the same chromosomal attachment site as in V. cholerae. These results suggest that V. mimicus may be a significant reservoir for both CTXΦ and VPIΦ and may play an important role in the emergence of new toxigenic V. cholerae isolates. PMID:10678967

  14. Functional Analysis of Bacteriophage Immunity through a Type I-E CRISPR-Cas System in Vibrio cholerae and Its Application in Bacteriophage Genome Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Box, Allison M.; McGuffie, Matthew J.; O'Hara, Brendan J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The classical and El Tor biotypes of Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1, the etiological agent of cholera, are responsible for the sixth and seventh (current) pandemics, respectively. A genomic island (GI), GI-24, previously identified in a classical biotype strain of V. cholerae, is predicted to encode clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated proteins (Cas proteins); however, experimental evidence in support of CRISPR activity in V. cholerae has not been documented. Here, we show that CRISPR-Cas is ubiquitous in strains of the classical biotype but excluded from strains of the El Tor biotype. We also provide in silico evidence to suggest that CRISPR-Cas actively contributes to phage resistance in classical strains. We demonstrate that transfer of GI-24 to V. cholerae El Tor via natural transformation enables CRISPR-Cas-mediated resistance to bacteriophage CP-T1 under laboratory conditions. To elucidate the sequence requirements of this type I-E CRISPR-Cas system, we engineered a plasmid-based system allowing the directed targeting of a region of interest. Through screening for phage mutants that escape CRISPR-Cas-mediated resistance, we show that CRISPR targets must be accompanied by a 3′ TT protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) for efficient interference. Finally, we demonstrate that efficient editing of V. cholerae lytic phage genomes can be performed by simultaneously introducing an editing template that allows homologous recombination and escape from CRISPR-Cas targeting. IMPORTANCE Cholera, caused by the facultative pathogen Vibrio cholerae, remains a serious public health threat. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and CRISPR-associated proteins (CRISPR-Cas) provide prokaryotes with sequence-specific protection from invading nucleic acids, including bacteriophages. In this work, we show that one genomic feature differentiating sixth pandemic (classical biotype) strains from seventh pandemic (El Tor

  15. Extraintestinal Infections Caused by Non-toxigenic Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Goutam; Joshi, Sangeeta; Bhattacharya, Sanjay; Sekar, Uma; Birajdar, Balaji; Bhattacharyya, Arpita; Shinoda, Sumio; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is an aerobic, sucrose fermentative Gram-negative bacterium that generally prevails in the environment. Pathogenic V. cholerae is well-known as causative agent of acute diarrhea. Apart from enteric infections, V. cholerae may also cause other diseases. However, their role in causing extraintestinal infections is not fully known as it needs proper identification and evaluation. Four cases of extraintestinal infections due to V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 have been investigated. The isolates were screened for phenotypic and genetic characteristics with reference to their major virulence genes. Serologically distinct isolates harbored rtx, msh, and hly but lacked enteric toxin encoding genes that are generally present in toxigenic V. cholerae. Timely detection of this organism can prevent fatalities in hospital settings. The underlying virulence potential of V. cholerae needs appropriate testing and intervention. PMID:26904017

  16. Unique Clones of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor with Haitian Type ctxB Allele Implicated in the Recent Cholera Epidemics from Nigeria, Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pazhani, Gururaja Perumal; Abiodun, Iwalokun Bamidele; Afolabi, Oluwadun; Kolawole, Olukoya Daniel; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Ramamurthy, Thanadarayan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and genetic characteristics of Vibrio cholerae O1, which is responsible for several cholera epidemics in Nigeria, are not reported in detail since 2007. In this study, we screened V. cholerae O1 El Tor biotype isolates from cholera cases and water samples from different states to investigate their phenotypic and genetic attributes with special reference to their clonality. Results All the V. cholerae O1 biotype El Tor isolates isolated during 2007–2013 were susceptible to fluoroquinolones and tetracycline, the drugs currently used in the treatment of cholera cases in Nigeria. Emergence of CT genotype 7 (Haitian type of ctxB allele) was predominantly seen among Ogawa serotype and the CT genotype 1 (classical ctxB allele) was mostly found in Inaba serotype. Overall, V. cholerae O1 from clinical and water samples were found to be closely related as determined by the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. V. cholerae isolates from Abia, Kano and Bauchi were found to be genetically distinct from the other states of Nigeria. Conclusion Fecal contamination of the water sources may be the possible source of the cholera infection. Combined prevalence of Haitian and classical ctxB alleles were detected in Ogawa and Inaba serotypes, respectively. This study further demonstrated that V. cholerae O1 with the ctxB has been emerged similar to the isolates reported in Haiti. Our findings suggest that the use of fluoroquinolones or tetracycline/doxycycline may help in the effective management of acute cholera in the affected Nigerian states. In addition, strengthening the existing surveillance in the hospitals of all the states and supply of clean drinking water may control cholera outbreaks in the future. PMID:27479360

  17. BIOFILM FORMATION OF Vibrio cholerae ON STAINLESS STEEL USED IN FOOD PROCESSING

    PubMed Central

    FERNÁNDEZ-DELGADO, Milagro; ROJAS, Héctor; DUQUE, Zoilabet; SUÁREZ, Paula; CONTRERAS, Monica; GARCÍA-AMADO, M. Alexandra; ALCIATURI, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae represents a significant threat to human health in developing countries. This pathogen forms biofilms which favors its attachment to surfaces and its survival and transmission by water or food. This work evaluated the in vitro biofilm formation of V. cholerae isolated from clinical and environmental sources on stainless steel of the type used in food processing by using the environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Results showed no cell adhesion at 4 h and scarce surface colonization at 24 h. Biofilms from the environmental strain were observed at 48 h with high cellular aggregations embedded in Vibrio exopolysaccharide (VPS), while less confluence and VPS production with microcolonies of elongated cells were observed in biofilms produced by the clinical strain. At 96 h the biofilms of the environmental strain were released from the surface leaving coccoid cells and residual structures, whereas biofilms of the clinical strain formed highly organized structures such as channels, mushroom-like and pillars. This is the first study that has shown the in vitro ability of V. cholerae to colonize and form biofilms on stainless steel used in food processing. PMID:27253749

  18. Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) regulates Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Tischler, Anna D.; Camilli, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Summary While studying virulence gene regulation in Vibrio cholerae during infection of the host small intestine, we identified VieA as a two-component response regulator that contributes to activating expression of cholera toxin. Here we report that VieA represses transcription of Vibrio exopolysaccharide synthesis (vps) genes involved in biofilm formation by a mechanism independent of its phosphorelay and DNA-binding activities. VieA controls the intracellular concentration of the cyclic nucleotide second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) using an EAL domain that functions as a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase. Two-dimensional thin layer chromatography of nucleotide extracts confirmed that VieA reduces the concentration of c-di-GMP, opposing the action of c-di-GMP synthetase proteins. Expression of unrelated V. cholerae c-di-GMP synthetase or phosphodiesterae proteins also modulated c-di-GMP concentration and vps gene expression. We propose that c-di-GMP synthetase and phosphodiesterase domain-containing proteins contribute to regulating biofilm formation by controlling c-di-GMP concentration. PMID:15255898

  19. R plasmids in environmental Vibrio cholerae non-O1 strains.

    PubMed Central

    Amaro, C; Aznar, R; Garay, E; Alcaide, E

    1988-01-01

    The occurrence of drug resistance and its plasmid-mediated transferability was investigated in 140 environmental strains of Vibrio cholerae non-O1 and 6 strains of Vibrio cholerae, both O1 and non-O1, of clinical origin. Of the 146 strains tested, 93% were resistant to at least one drug and 74% were resistant to two or more antibiotics. The O1 strains were susceptible to all antibiotics used. A total of 26 of 28 selected resistant wild strains carried R plasmids that were transferable by intraspecific and intergeneric matings. The most common transmissible R factor determined resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin, and sulfanilamide (30%), followed by resistance to ampicillin and amoxicillin (13%) and resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin, phosphomycin, and sulfanilamide (9%). Comparison of the three methods of plasmid analysis showed that the method of Birnboim and Doly (Nucleic Acids Res. 7:1513-1523, 1979) without EDTA and lysozyme was optimal for isolation of both large and small plasmids in environmental V. cholerae strains. Most strains harbored more than one plasmid, and the molecular sizes ranged from 1.1 to 74.8 megadaltons. The plasmids of high molecular size (around 74 megadaltons) were responsible for the resistance pattern transferred and were maintained with high stability in the hosts. Images PMID:3214157

  20. Development of highly specific monoclonal antibodies for the diagnosis of Vibrio cholerae 01.

    PubMed

    Castillo, L; Castillo, D; Silva, W; Zapata, L; Reid, M; Ulloa, M T; Seoane, M; Maldonado, A; Valenzuela, M E; Bustos, R

    1995-06-01

    We report here the development of two monoclonal antibodies, termed 5G8 and 5C12, belonging to the IgM and IgG1 class, respectively, suitable for the identification of Vibrio cholerae 01 in clinical and environmental samples. The specificities of the monoclonals were evaluated by ELISA and indirect immunofluorescent microscopy of microorganisms normally present in stool samples and with two bacterial panels. One panel included 72 potentially antigenically related bacterial strains and the second panel included 20 pathogenic bacterial strains involved in diarrhea cases. The results of these extensive analyses indicate that monoclonal antibodies 5G8 and 5C12 are highly specific and suitable for the clinical diagnosis of Vibrio cholerae 01 in human stool samples by indirect immunofluorescent microscopy. Although the antigenic sites recognized by these antibodies were not identified in this study, the observation of Western blot patterns suggested that 5G8 and 5C12 monoclonal antibodies bind to LPS epitopes, a good structural marker for the detection of V. cholerae 01 because it is present in all bacterial cell walls. PMID:7590791

  1. Cholix Toxin, a Novel ADP-ribosylating Factor from Vibrio cholerae

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Rene; Purdy, Alexandra E.; Fieldhouse, Robert J.; Kimber, Matthew S.; Bartlett, Douglas H.; Merrill, A. Rod

    2008-07-15

    The ADP-ribosyltransferases are a class of enzymes that display activity in a variety of bacterial pathogens responsible for causing diseases in plants and animals, including those affecting mankind, such as diphtheria, cholera, and whooping cough. We report the characterization of a novel toxin from Vibrio cholerae, which we call cholix toxin. The toxin is active against mammalian cells (IC50 = 4.6 {+-} 0.4 ng/ml) and crustaceans (Artemia nauplii LD50 = 10 {+-} 2 {mu}g/ml). Here we show that this toxin is the third member of the diphthamide-specific class of ADP-ribose transferases and that it possesses specific ADP-ribose transferase activity against ribosomal eukaryotic elongation factor 2. We also describe the high resolution crystal structures of the multidomain toxin and its catalytic domain at 2.1- and 1.25-{angstrom} resolution, respectively. The new structural data show that cholix toxin possesses the necessary molecular features required for infection of eukaryotes by receptor-mediated endocytosis, translocation to the host cytoplasm, and inhibition of protein synthesis by specific modification of elongation factor 2. The crystal structures also provide important insight into the structural basis for activation of toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. These results indicate that cholix toxin may be an important virulence factor of Vibrio cholerae that likely plays a significant role in the survival of the organism in an aquatic environment.

  2. BIOFILM FORMATION OF Vibrio cholerae ON STAINLESS STEEL USED IN FOOD PROCESSING.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Delgado, Milagro; Rojas, Héctor; Duque, Zoilabet; Suárez, Paula; Contreras, Monica; García-Amado, M Alexandra; Alciaturi, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae represents a significant threat to human health in developing countries. This pathogen forms biofilms which favors its attachment to surfaces and its survival and transmission by water or food. This work evaluated the in vitro biofilm formation of V. cholerae isolated from clinical and environmental sources on stainless steel of the type used in food processing by using the environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Results showed no cell adhesion at 4 h and scarce surface colonization at 24 h. Biofilms from the environmental strain were observed at 48 h with high cellular aggregations embedded in Vibrio exopolysaccharide (VPS), while less confluence and VPS production with microcolonies of elongated cells were observed in biofilms produced by the clinical strain. At 96 h the biofilms of the environmental strain were released from the surface leaving coccoid cells and residual structures, whereas biofilms of the clinical strain formed highly organized structures such as channels, mushroom-like and pillars. This is the first study that has shown the in vitro ability of V. cholerae to colonize and form biofilms on stainless steel used in food processing. PMID:27253749

  3. Genome Sequence of the K139-Like Phage VcP032 Originating from the Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor Ogawa Serotype.

    PubMed

    Jäckel, Claudia; Strauch, Eckhard; Hammerl, Jens Andre

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the cause of large cholera outbreaks, especially in endemic regions with high poverty and inadequate sanitation. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of the virulence-associated broad host range V. cholerae phage VcP032, including a brief summary of its genotypic and phenotypic features. PMID:27445393

  4. Genome Sequence of the K139-Like Phage VcP032 Originating from Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor Ogawa Serotype

    PubMed Central

    Jäckel, Claudia; Hammerl, Jens Andre

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the cause of large cholera outbreaks, especially in endemic regions with high poverty and inadequate sanitation. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of the virulence-associated broad host range V. cholerae phage VcP032, including a brief summary of its genotypic and phenotypic features. PMID:27445393

  5. Vibrio cholerae O139 conjugate vaccines: synthesis and immunogenicity of V. cholerae O139 capsular polysaccharide conjugates with recombinant diphtheria toxin mutant in mice.

    PubMed

    Kossaczka, Z; Shiloach, J; Johnson, V; Taylor, D N; Finkelstein, R A; Robbins, J B; Szu, S C

    2000-09-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental data provide evidence that a critical level of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to the surface polysaccharide of Vibrio cholerae O1 (lipopolysaccharide) and of Vibrio cholerae O139 (capsular polysaccharide [CPS]) is associated with immunity to the homologous pathogen. The immunogenicity of polysaccharides, especially in infants, may be enhanced by their covalent attachment to proteins (conjugates). Two synthetic schemes, involving 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) as activating agents, were adapted to prepare four conjugates of V. cholerae O139 CPS with the recombinant diphtheria toxin mutant, CRMH21G. Adipic acid dihydrazide was used as a linker. When injected subcutaneously into young outbred mice by a clinically relevant dose and schedule, these conjugates elicited serum CPS antibodies of the IgG and IgM classes with vibriocidal activity to strains of capsulated V. cholerae O139. Treatment of these sera with 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) reduced, but did not eliminate, their vibriocidal activity. These results indicate that the conjugates elicited IgG with vibriocidal activity. Conjugates also elicited high levels of serum diphtheria toxin IgG. Convalescent sera from 20 cholera patients infected with V. cholerae O139 had vibriocidal titers ranging from 100 to 3,200: absorption with the CPS reduced the vibriocidal titer of all sera to < or =50. Treatment with 2-ME reduced the titers of 17 of 20 patients to < or =50. These data show that, like infection with V. cholerae O1, infection with V. cholerae O139 induces vibriocidal antibodies specific to the surface polysaccharide of this bacterium (CPS) that are mostly of IgM class. Based on these data, clinical trials with the V. cholerae O139 CPS conjugates with recombinant diphtheria toxin are planned. PMID:10948122

  6. Quantitative detection of Vibrio cholera toxin by real-time and dynamic cytotoxicity monitoring.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dazhi; Luo, Yun; Zheng, Min; Li, Haijing; Zhang, Jing; Stampfl, Melinda; Xu, Xiao; Ding, Gangqiang; Zhang, Yanjun; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2013-12-01

    We report here the quantitative detection of Vibrio cholerae toxin (CT) in isolates and stool specimens by dynamic monitoring of the full course of CT-mediated cytotoxicity in a real-time cell analysis (RTCA) system. Four cell lines, including Y-1 mouse adrenal tumor cells, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, small intestine epithelial (FHs74Int) cells, and mouse adrenal gland (PC12-Adh) cells, were evaluated for their suitability for CT-induced cytotoxicity testing. Among them, the Y-1 line was demonstrated to be the most sensitive for CT-mediated cytotoxicity, with limits of detection of 7.0 pg/ml for purified CT and 0.11 ng/ml for spiked CT in pooled negative stool specimens. No CT-mediated cytotoxicity was observed for nontoxigenic V. cholerae, non-V. cholerae species, or non-V. cholerae enterotoxins. The CT-RTCA assay was further validated with 100 stool specimens consecutively collected from patients with diarrhea and 200 V. cholerae isolates recovered from patients and the environment, in comparison to a reference using three detection methods. The CT-RTCA assay had sensitivities and specificities of 97.5% and 100.0%, respectively, for V. cholerae isolates and 90.0% and 97.2% for stool specimens. For stool specimens spiked with CT concentrations ranging from 3.5 pg/ml to 1.8 ng/ml, the inoculation-to-detection time was 1.12 ± 0.38 h, and the values were inversely correlated with CT concentrations (ρ = -1; P = 0.01). The results indicate that the CT-RTCA assay with the Y-1 cell line provides a rapid and sensitive tool for the quantitative detection of CT activities in clinical specimens. PMID:24048535

  7. Assessing clonal correlation of epidemic Vibrio cholerae isolates during 2011 in 16 provinces of Iran.

    PubMed

    Hajia, Massoud; Rahbar, Mohamad; Farzami, Marjan Rahnamye; Asl, Hossein Masoumi; Dolatyar, Alireza; Imani, Mohsen; Saburian, Roghieh; Mafi, Moharam; Bakhshi, Bita

    2015-03-01

    A total of 1,187 Vibrio cholerae isolates were received during 2011 cholera outbreaks from 16 provinces in different geographical location to Iranian reference Health laboratory. A random selection was performed, and 61 isolates were subjected to further investigations. Cholera cases were come up from May with nine cases and reached to its maximum rate at August (57 cases) and continued to October after which a fall occurred in September. All of the isolates were susceptible to three antimicrobial agents including ciprofloxacin, cefixime, and ampicillin. The highest rate of resistance was seen to nalidixic acid (96.7 %) and co-trimoxazole (91.8 %). Clonality of isolates was investigated through genotyping by PFGE method. A total of seven pulsotypes were obtained from 61 isolates under study. The pulsotypes were highly related with only 1-3 bands differences. Three pulsotypes (PT5, PT6, and PT7) constituted 93.4 % of total isolates. One environmentally isolated strain showed distinct pattern from clinical specimens. This strain although had no any evidence in identified cholera infections, highlighted selecting more environmental specimens in any future outbreaks as long as human samples. In conclusion, emergence and dominance of Ogawa serotypes after about 7 years in Iran are alarming due to fear of import of new V. cholerae clones from out of the country. Approximately, one third of patients in 2011 cholera outbreak in Iran were of Afghan or Pakistani nationality which makes the hypothesis of import of Ogawa serotype strains from neighboring countries more documented and signifies the need to monitor and protect the boundaries. PMID:25424344

  8. Molecular characterization and antibiotic susceptibility of Vibrio cholerae non-O1.

    PubMed Central

    Dalsgaard, A.; Serichantalergs, O.; Pitarangsi, C.; Echeverria, P.

    1995-01-01

    A collection of 64 clinical and environmental Vibrio cholerae non-O1 strains isolated in Asia and Peru were characterized by molecular methods and antibiotic susceptibility testing. All strains were resistant to at least 1 and 80% were resistant to two or more antibiotics. Several strains showed multiple antibiotic resistance (> or = three antibiotics). Plasmids most often of low molecular weight were found in 21/64 (33%) strains. The presence of plasmids did not correlate with antibiotic resistance or influence ribotype patterns. In colony hybridization studies 63/64 (98%) V. cholerae non-O1 strains were cholera toxin negative, whereas only strains recovered from patients were heat-stable enterotoxin positive. Forty-seven Bgl I ribotypes were observed. No correlation was shown between ribotype and toxin gene status. Ribotype similarity was compared by cluster analysis and two main groups of 13 and 34 ribotypes was found. Ribotyping is apparently a useful epidemiological tool in investigations of V. cholerae non-O1 infections. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7867743

  9. Bile Salts Modulate the Mucin-Activated Type VI Secretion System of Pandemic Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Unterweger, Daniel; Diaz-Satizabal, Laura; Ogg, Stephen; Pukatzki, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae, regulates its diverse virulence factors to thrive in the human small intestine and environmental reservoirs. Among this pathogen’s arsenal of virulence factors is the tightly regulated type VI secretion system (T6SS). This system acts as an inverted bacteriophage to inject toxins into competing bacteria and eukaryotic phagocytes. V. cholerae strains responsible for the current 7th pandemic activate their T6SS within the host. We established that T6SS-mediated competition occurs upon T6SS activation in the infant mouse, and that this system is functional under anaerobic conditions. When investigating the intestinal host factors mucins (a glycoprotein component of mucus) and bile for potential regulatory roles in controlling the T6SS, we discovered that once mucins activate the T6SS, bile acids can further modulate T6SS activity. Microbiota modify bile acids to inhibit T6SS-mediated killing of commensal bacteria. This interplay is a novel interaction between commensal bacteria, host factors, and the V. cholerae T6SS, showing an active host role in infection. PMID:26317760

  10. Dual Zinc Transporter Systems in Vibrio cholerae Promote Competitive Advantages over Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Ying; Fan, Fenxia; Jensen, Owen; Zhong, Zengtao; Kan, Biao

    2015-01-01

    Zinc is an essential trace metal required for numerous cellular processes in all forms of life. In order to maintain zinc homeostasis, bacteria have developed several transport systems to regulate its uptake. In this study, we investigated zinc transport systems in the enteric pathogen Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera. Bioinformatic analysis predicts that two gene clusters, VC2081 to VC2083 (annotated as zinc utilization genes znuABC) and VC2551 to VC2555 (annotated as zinc-regulated genes zrgABCDE), are regulated by the putative zinc uptake regulator Zur. Using promoter reporter and biochemical assays, we confirmed that Zur represses znuABC and zrgABCDE promoters in a Zn2+-dependent manner. Under Zn2+-limiting conditions, we found that mutations in either the znuABC or zrgABCDE gene cluster affect bacterial growth, with znuABC mutants displaying a more severe growth defect, suggesting that both ZnuABC and ZrgABCDE are involved in Zn2+ uptake and that ZnuABC plays the predominant role. Furthermore, we reveal that ZnuABC and ZrgABCDE are important for V. cholerae colonization in both infant and adult mouse models, particularly in the presence of other intestinal microbiota. Collectively, our studies indicate that these two zinc transporter systems play vital roles in maintaining zinc homeostasis during V. cholerae growth and pathogenesis. PMID:26195552

  11. Outer Membrane Vesicle-Mediated Export of Processed PrtV Protease from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Duperthuy, Marylise; Johnson, Tanya L.; Åhlund, Monika; Lundmark, Richard; Oscarsson, Jan; Sandkvist, Maria; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2015-01-01

    Background Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are known to release from almost all Gram-negative bacteria during normal growth. OMVs carry different biologically active toxins and enzymes into the surrounding environment. We suggest that OMVs may therefore be able to transport bacterial proteases into the target host cells. We present here an analysis of the Vibrio cholerae OMV-associated protease PrtV. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we demonstrated that PrtV was secreted from the wild type V. cholerae strain C6706 via the type II secretion system in association with OMVs. By immunoblotting and electron microscopic analysis using immunogold labeling, the association of PrtV with OMVs was examined. We demonstrated that OMV-associated PrtV was biologically active by showing altered morphology and detachment of cells when the human ileocecum carcinoma (HCT8) cells were treated with OMVs from the wild type V. cholerae strain C6706 whereas cells treated with OMVs from the prtV isogenic mutant showed no morphological changes. Furthermore, OMV-associated PrtV protease showed a contribution to bacterial resistance towards the antimicrobial peptide LL-37. Conclusion/Significance Our findings suggest that OMVs released from V. cholerae can deliver a processed, biologically active form of PrtV that contributes to bacterial interactions with target host cells. PMID:26222047

  12. Vibrio cholerae hemagglutinin(HA)/protease: An extracellular metalloprotease with multiple pathogenic activities.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Jorge A; Silva, Anisia J

    2016-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae of serogroup O1 and O139, the etiological agent of the diarrheal disease cholera, expresses the extracellular Zn-dependent metalloprotease hemagglutinin (HA)/protease also reported as vibriolysin. This enzyme is also produced by non-O1/O139 (non-cholera) strains that cause mild, sporadic illness (i.e. gastroenteritis, wound or ear infections). Orthologs of HA/protease are present in other members of the Vibrionaceae family pathogenic to humans and fish. HA/protease belongs to the M4 neutral peptidase family and displays significant amino acid sequence homology to Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (LasB) and Bacillus thermoproteolyticus thermolysin. It exhibits a broad range of potentially pathogenic activities in cell culture and animal models. These activities range from the covalent modification of other toxins, the degradation of the protective mucus barrier and disruption of intestinal tight junctions. Here we review (i) the structure and regulation of HA/protease expression, (ii) its interaction with other toxins and the intestinal mucosa and (iii) discuss the possible role(s) of HA/protease in the pathogenesis of cholera. PMID:26952544

  13. Variations in SXT elements in epidemic Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruibai; Yu, Dong; Yue, Junjie; Kan, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor biotype strains are responsible for three multiyear epidemics of cholera in China during the seventh ongoing pandemic. The presence of the integrative conjugative element SXT is strongly correlated with resistance to nalidixic acid, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in these strains. Here, we sequenced the conserved genes of the SXT element, including eex, setR, and int, from 59 V. cholerae O1 El Tor strains and extracted and assembled the intact SXT sequences from the 11 genome sequenced strains. These elements had characteristics distinct from those of previously reported integrative conjugative elements (ICEs). They could be clearly divided into two types based on the clustering of conserved genes and gene structures of the elements, showing their possibly independent derivation and evolution. These two types were present before and after 2005, respectively, demonstrating the type substitution that occurred in 2005. Four to six antibiotic-resistant genes were found on the SXT elements, including genes resistant to tetracycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and multiple drugs. In summary, our findings demonstrated the roles of the SXT element in the emergence of multidrug resistance in epidemic O1 El Tor V. cholerae strains in China. PMID:26956038

  14. A D, D-carboxypeptidase is required for Vibrio cholerae halotolerance.

    PubMed

    Möll, Andrea; Dörr, Tobias; Alvarez, Laura; Davis, Brigid M; Cava, Felipe; Waldor, Matthew K

    2015-02-01

    The biological roles of low molecular weight penicillin-binding proteins (LMW PBP) have been difficult to discern in Gram-negative organisms. In Escherichia coli, mutants lacking these proteins often have no phenotype, and cells lacking all seven LMW PBPs remain viable. In contrast, we report here that Vibrio cholerae lacking DacA-1, a PBP5 homologue, displays slow growth, aberrant morphology and altered peptidoglycan (PG) homeostasis in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium, as well as a profound plating defect. DacA-1 alone among V. cholerae's LMW PBPs is critical for bacterial growth; mutants lacking the related protein DacA-2 and/or homologues of PBP4 or PBP7 displayed normal growth and morphology. Remarkably, the growth and morphology of the dacA-1 mutant were unimpaired in LB media containing reduced concentrations of NaCl (100 mM or less), and also within suckling mice, a model host for the study of cholera pathogenesis. Peptidoglycan from the dacA-1 mutant contained elevated pentapeptide levels in standard and low salt media, and comparative analyses suggest that DacA-1 is V. cholerae's principal DD-carboxypeptidase. The basis for the dacA-1 mutant's halosensitivity is unknown; nonetheless, the mutant's survival in biochemically uncharacterized environments (such as the suckling mouse intestine) can be used as a reporter of low Na(+) content. PMID:25631756

  15. Dual Zinc Transporter Systems in Vibrio cholerae Promote Competitive Advantages over Gut Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ying; Fan, Fenxia; Jensen, Owen; Zhong, Zengtao; Kan, Biao; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Zinc is an essential trace metal required for numerous cellular processes in all forms of life. In order to maintain zinc homeostasis, bacteria have developed several transport systems to regulate its uptake. In this study, we investigated zinc transport systems in the enteric pathogen Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera. Bioinformatic analysis predicts that two gene clusters, VC2081 to VC2083 (annotated as zinc utilization genes znuABC) and VC2551 to VC2555 (annotated as zinc-regulated genes zrgABCDE), are regulated by the putative zinc uptake regulator Zur. Using promoter reporter and biochemical assays, we confirmed that Zur represses znuABC and zrgABCDE promoters in a Zn(2+)-dependent manner. Under Zn(2+)-limiting conditions, we found that mutations in either the znuABC or zrgABCDE gene cluster affect bacterial growth, with znuABC mutants displaying a more severe growth defect, suggesting that both ZnuABC and ZrgABCDE are involved in Zn(2+) uptake and that ZnuABC plays the predominant role. Furthermore, we reveal that ZnuABC and ZrgABCDE are important for V. cholerae colonization in both infant and adult mouse models, particularly in the presence of other intestinal microbiota. Collectively, our studies indicate that these two zinc transporter systems play vital roles in maintaining zinc homeostasis during V. cholerae growth and pathogenesis. PMID:26195552

  16. Dissecting the Structural Elements for the Activation of β-Ketoacyl-(Acyl Carrier Protein) Reductase from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jing; Zheng, Heping; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Shumilin, Igor A.; Osinski, Tomasz; Demas, Matt; Grimshaw, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT β-Ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) reductase (FabG) catalyzes the key reductive reaction in the elongation cycle of fatty acid synthesis (FAS), which is a vital metabolic pathway in bacteria and a promising target for new antibiotic development. The activation of the enzyme is usually linked to the formation of a catalytic triad and cofactor binding, and crystal structures of FabG from different organisms have been captured in either the active or inactive conformation. However, the structural elements which enable activation of FabG require further exploration. Here we report the findings of structural, enzymatic, and binding studies of the FabG protein found in the causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae (vcFabG). vcFabG exists predominantly as a dimer in solution and is able to self-associate to form tetramers, which is the state seen in the crystal structure. The formation of the tetramer may be promoted by the presence of the cofactor NADP(H). The transition between the dimeric and tetrameric states of vcFabG is related to changes in the conformations of the α4/α5 helices on the dimer-dimer interface. Two glycine residues adjacent to the dimer interface (G92 and G141) are identified to be the hinge for the conformational changes, while the catalytic tyrosine (Y155) and a glutamine residue that forms hydrogen bonds to both loop β4-α4 and loop β5-α5 (Q152) stabilize the active conformation. The functions of the aforementioned residues were confirmed by binding and enzymatic assays for the corresponding mutants. IMPORTANCE This paper describes the results of structural, enzymatic, and binding studies of FabG from Vibrio cholerae (vcFabG). In this work, we dissected the structural elements responsible for the activation of vcFabG. The structural information provided here is essential for the development of antibiotics specifically targeting bacterial FabG, especially for the multidrug-resistant strains of V. cholerae. PMID:26553852

  17. In-vitro interaction between nitrofurantoin and Vibrio cholerae DNA.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, U; Chatterjee, S N

    1992-03-01

    In-vitro interaction of nitrofurantoin with V. cholerae DNA resulted in a quenching and red spectral shift of the drug absorption pattern. Scatchard analysis revealed that the drug binding involved more than one processes and that the strongest mode of binding was characterised by an association constant (k) of 5.04 x 10(6) M-1 and the number of binding sites per nucleotide (n) of 0.015. Based on viscosity measurements, the mode of drug binding to DNA appeared to be through intercalation, the helix unwinding angle of supercoiled plasmid pBR322 DNA being 10 degrees. Nitrofurantoin binding to DNA resulted in an elevation of the thermal melting temperature (Tm) of DNA by 6 degrees C and inhibition of the action of DNase on DNA. PMID:1547512

  18. The DNA-Uptake Process of Naturally Competent Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Matthey, Noémie; Blokesch, Melanie

    2016-02-01

    The sophisticated DNA-uptake machinery used during natural transformation is still poorly characterized, especially in Gram-negative bacteria where the transforming DNA has to cross two membranes as well as the peptidoglycan layer before entering the cytoplasm. The DNA-uptake machinery was hypothesized to take the form of a pseudopilus, which, upon repeated cycles of extension and retraction, would pull external DNA towards the cell surface or into the periplasmic space, followed by translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane. In this review, we summarize recent advances on the DNA-uptake machinery of V. cholerae, highlighting the presence of an extended competence-induced pilus and the contribution of a conserved DNA-binding protein that acts as a ratchet and reels DNA into the periplasm. PMID:26614677

  19. Molecular epidemiology of O139 Vibrio cholerae: mutation, lateral gene transfer, and founder flush.

    PubMed

    Garg, Pallavi; Aydanian, Antonia; Smith, David; J Glenn, Morris; Nair, G Balakrish; Stine, O Colin

    2003-07-01

    Vibrio cholerae in O-group 139 was first isolated in 1992 and by 1993 had been found throughout the Indian subcontinent. This epidemic expansion probably resulted from a single source after a lateral gene transfer (LGT) event that changed the serotype of an epidemic V. cholerae O1 El Tor strain to O139. However, some studies found substantial genetic diversity, perhaps caused by multiple origins. To further explore the relatedness of O139 strains, we analyzed nine sequenced loci from 96 isolates from patients at the Infectious Diseases Hospital, Calcutta, from 1992 to 2000. We found 64 novel alleles distributed among 51 sequence types. LGT events produced three times the number of nucleotide changes compared to mutation. In contrast to the traditional concept of epidemic spread of a homogeneous clone, the establishment of variant alleles generated by LGT during the rapid expansion of a clonal bacterial population may be a paradigm in infections and epidemics. PMID:12890320

  20. Isolation and characterization of a temperature-sensitive generalized transducing bacteriophage for Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Hava, D L; Camilli, A

    2001-09-01

    CP-T1 is the only described generalized transducing bacteriophage for the intestinal pathogen Vibrio cholerae, yet many of its basic biological parameters remain unknown. Due to low frequencies of transduction and pseudolysogen formation, CP-T1 has not been widely used as a genetic tool. To overcome these limitations, we have isolated a conditional mutant of CP-T1 that exhibits temperature-sensitive plaque formation. Several biological properties of CP-T1ts were determined, including its restrictive temperature, adsorbance profile to host cells, burst time, and burst size. Based on these properties, an optimized transduction protocol was designed which resulted in several fold higher transduction frequencies for a variety of genetic markers from a number of chromosomal loci. Generalized transduction was also demonstrated between classical and E1 Tor biotype strains of V. cholerae. PMID:11438186

  1. Vibrio cholerae use pili and flagella synergistically to effect motility switching and conditional surface attachment.

    PubMed

    Utada, Andrew S; Bennett, Rachel R; Fong, Jiunn C N; Gibiansky, Maxsim L; Yildiz, Fitnat H; Golestanian, Ramin; Wong, Gerard C L

    2014-01-01

    We show that Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, use their flagella and mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) type IV pili synergistically to switch between two complementary motility states that together facilitate surface selection and attachment. Flagellar rotation counter-rotates the cell body, causing MSHA pili to have periodic mechanical contact with the surface for surface-skimming cells. Using tracking algorithms at 5 ms resolution we observe two motility behaviours: 'roaming', characterized by meandering trajectories, and 'orbiting', characterized by repetitive high-curvature orbits. We develop a hydrodynamic model showing that these phenotypes result from a nonlinear relationship between trajectory shape and frictional forces between pili and the surface: strong pili-surface interactions generate orbiting motion, increasing the local bacterial loiter time. Time-lapse imaging reveals how only orbiting mode cells can attach irreversibly and form microcolonies. These observations suggest that MSHA pili are crucial for surface selection, irreversible attachment, and ultimately microcolony formation. PMID:25234699

  2. Modulating Vibrio cholerae Quorum-Sensing-Controlled Communication Using Autoinducer-Loaded Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hoang D.; Spiegel, Alina C.; Hurley, Amanda; Perez, Lark J.; Maisel, Katharina; Ensign, Laura M.; Hanes, Justin; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Semmelhack, Martin F.; Prud’homme, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    The rise of bacterial antibiotic resistance has created a demand for alternatives to traditional antibiotics. Attractive possibilities include pro- and anti-quorum sensing therapies that function by modulating bacterial chemical communication circuits. We report the use of Flash NanoPrecipitation to deliver the Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing signal CAI-1 ((S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one) in a water dispersible form as nanoparticles. The particles activate V. cholerae quorum-sensing responses five orders of magnitude higher than does the identically administered free CAI-1, and are diffusive across in vivo delivery barriers such as intestinal mucus. This work highlights the promise of combining quorum-sensing strategies with drug delivery approaches for the development of next-generation medicines. PMID:25651002

  3. Staying Alive: Vibrio cholerae's Cycle of Environmental Survival, Transmission, and Dissemination.

    PubMed

    Conner, Jenna G; Teschler, Jennifer K; Jones, Christopher J; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2016-04-01

    Infectious diseases kill nearly 9 million people annually. Bacterial pathogens are responsible for a large proportion of these diseases, and the bacterial agents of pneumonia, diarrhea, and tuberculosis are leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Increasingly, the crucial role of nonhost environments in the life cycle of bacterial pathogens is being recognized. Heightened scrutiny has been given to the biological processes impacting pathogen dissemination and survival in the natural environment, because these processes are essential for the transmission of pathogenic bacteria to new hosts. This chapter focuses on the model environmental pathogen Vibrio cholerae to describe recent advances in our understanding of how pathogens survive between hosts and to highlight the processes necessary to support the cycle of environmental survival, transmission, and dissemination. We describe the physiological and molecular responses of V. cholerae to changing environmental conditions, focusing on its survival in aquatic reservoirs between hosts and its entry into and exit from human hosts. PMID:27227302

  4. Comparative genome analysis of non-toxigenic non-O1 versus toxigenic O1 Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Munmun; Kakarla, Prathusha; Kumar, Sanath; Gonzalez, Esmeralda; Floyd, Jared T.; Inupakutika, Madhuri; Devireddy, Amith Reddy; Tirrell, Selena R.; Bruns, Merissa; He, Guixin; Lindquist, Ingrid E.; Sundararajan, Anitha; Schilkey, Faye D.; Mudge, Joann; Varela, Manuel F.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic strains of Vibrio cholerae are responsible for endemic and pandemic outbreaks of the disease cholera. The complete toxigenic mechanisms underlying virulence in Vibrio strains are poorly understood. The hypothesis of this work was that virulent versus non-virulent strains of V. cholerae harbor distinctive genomic elements that encode virulence. The purpose of this study was to elucidate genomic differences between the O1 serotypes and non-O1 V. cholerae PS15, a non-toxigenic strain, in order to identify novel genes potentially responsible for virulence. In this study, we compared the whole genome of the non-O1 PS15 strain to the whole genomes of toxigenic serotypes at the phylogenetic level, and found that the PS15 genome was distantly related to those of toxigenic V. cholerae. Thus we focused on a detailed gene comparison between PS15 and the distantly related O1 V. cholerae N16961. Based on sequence alignment we tentatively assigned chromosome numbers 1 and 2 to elements within the genome of non-O1 V. cholerae PS15. Further, we found that PS15 and O1 V. cholerae N16961 shared 98% identity and 766 genes, but of the genes present in N16961 that were missing in the non-O1 V. cholerae PS15 genome, 56 were predicted to encode not only for virulence–related genes (colonization, antimicrobial resistance, and regulation of persister cells) but also genes involved in the metabolic biosynthesis of lipids, nucleosides and sulfur compounds. Additionally, we found 113 genes unique to PS15 that were predicted to encode other properties related to virulence, disease, defense, membrane transport, and DNA metabolism. Here, we identified distinctive and novel genomic elements between O1 and non-O1 V. cholerae genomes as potential virulence factors and, thus, targets for future therapeutics. Modulation of such novel targets may eventually enhance eradication efforts of endemic and pandemic disease cholera in afflicted nations. PMID:25722857

  5. Fatal bacteremia due to immotile Vibrio cholerae serogroup O21 in Vientiane, Laos – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Nakatsu, Masami; Arakawa, Eiji; Davong, Viengmone; Vongsouvath, Manivanh; Lattana, Olay; Moore, Catrin E; Nakamura, Satoshi; Newton, Paul N

    2008-01-01

    Background Human infections with non-O1, non-O139 V. cholerae have been described from Laos. Elsewhere, non cholera-toxin producing, non-O1, non-O139 V. cholerae have been described from blood cultures and ascitic fluid, although they are exceedingly rare isolates. Case presentation We describe a farmer who died with Vibrio cholerae O21 bacteremia and peritonitis in Vientiane, Laos, after eating partially cooked apple snails (Pomacea canaliculata) and mussels (Ligumia species). The cultured V. cholerae were non-motile. PCR detected ompW and toxR gene regions but not the ctxA, ompU, omp K and TCP gene regions. Although the organisms lacked flagellae on scanning electron microscopy, they possessed the Vibrio flagellin flaA gene. Conclusion Severe bacteremic non-O1, non-O139 V. cholerae is reported from Laos. The organisms were unusual in being non-motile. They possessed the Vibrio flagellin flaA gene. Further research to determine the reasons for the non-motility and virulence is required. PMID:18439249

  6. Unusual non-serogroup O1 Vibrio cholerae bacteremia associated with liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, R; Ghafoor, M A; Nasralah, A Y

    1989-01-01

    A 50-year-old woman and a 31-year-old man with underlying liver disease presented with fever and signs of liver failure. The blood cultures in both cases yielded non-serogroup O1 Vibrio cholerae strains which were biochemically identical except that one strain was nonmotile. Despite treatment with antibiotics, the older patient died; the other patient survived. Both strains were found to be susceptible to most antibiotics tested in vitro. No apparent source of infection could be identified in either case. PMID:2592546

  7. Biochemical and full genome sequence analyses of clinical Vibrio cholerae isolates in Mexico reveals the presence of novel V. cholerae strains.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Hernández-Monroy, Irma; Montes-Colima, Norma Angélica; Moreno-Pérez, María Asunción; Galicia-Nicolás, Adriana Guadalupe; López-Martínez, Irma; Ruiz-Matus, Cuitláhuac; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Ortíz-Alcántara, Joanna María; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2016-05-01

    The first week of September 2013, the National Epidemiological Surveillance System identified two cases of cholera in Mexico City. The cultures of both samples were confirmed as Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1, serotype Ogawa, biotype El Tor. Initial analyses by PFGE and by PCR-amplification of the virulence genes, suggested that both strains were similar, but different from those previously reported in Mexico. The following week, four more cases were identified in a community in the state of Hidalgo, located 121 km northeast of Mexico City. Thereafter a cholera outbreak started in the region of La Huasteca. Genomic analyses of the four strains obtained in this study confirmed the presence of Pathogenicity Islands VPI-1 and -2, VSP-1 and -2, and of the integrative element SXT. The genomic structure of the 4 isolates was similar to that of V. cholerae strain 2010 EL-1786, identified during the epidemic in Haiti in 2010. PMID:26828665

  8. Surviving the acid barrier: responses of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae to simulated gastric fluid.

    PubMed

    Singh, Atheesha; Barnard, Tobias G

    2016-01-01

    When bacteria are subjected to low acidic pHs of the gastric environment, they may enter the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state of survival. In this state, bacteria cannot be cultured on solid media, still exhibit signs of metabolic activity (viability). In this study, the response of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 to low pH-simulated environments of the human stomach was evaluated for their survival by culturability (plate count) and viability (flow cytometry-FC) assays. Bacteria were acid challenged with simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 over a period of 180 min. Exposure to SGF up to 120 min increased acid tolerance of the Vibrios up to pH 3.5 with acid challenge occurring at pH 4.5. Bacteria were culturable from pH 2.5 to 4.5 up to 60 min SGF exposure. The stationary-phase cultures of Vibrio were able to survive SGF at all pHs in an 'injured' state with FC. This could possibly mean that the bacteria have entered the VBNC stage of survival. This is a worrying public health concern due to the fact that once favourable conditions arise (intestines), these Vibrios can change back to an infectious state and cause disease. PMID:26496916

  9. DNA Transport across the Outer and Inner Membranes of Naturally Transformable Vibrio cholerae Is Spatially but Not Temporally Coupled

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The physiological state of natural competence for transformation allows certain bacteria to take up free DNA from the environment and to recombine such newly acquired DNA into their chromosomes. However, even though conserved components that are required to undergo natural transformation have been identified in several naturally competent bacteria, our knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of the DNA uptake process remains very limited. To better understand these mechanisms, we investigated the competence-mediated DNA transport in the naturally transformable pathogen Vibrio cholerae. Previously, we used a cell biology-based approach to experimentally address an existing hypothesis, which suggested the competence protein ComEA plays a role in the DNA uptake process across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we extended this knowledge by investigating the dynamics of DNA translocation across both membranes. More precisely, we indirectly visualized the transfer of the external DNA from outside the cell into the periplasm followed by the shuttling of the DNA into the cytoplasm. Based on these data, we conclude that for V. cholerae, the DNA translocation across the outer and inner membranes is spatially but not temporally coupled. PMID:25139903

  10. Molecular epidemiology of Vibrio cholerae associated with flood in Brahamputra River valley, Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Soubhagya K; Vairale, Mohan G; Arya, Neha; Yadav, Priti; Veer, Vijay; Singh, Lokendra; Yadava, Pramod K; Kumar, Pramod

    2016-06-01

    Cholera is often caused when drinking water is contaminated through environmental sources. In recent years, the drastic cholera epidemics in Odisha (2007) and Haiti (2010) were associated with natural disasters (flood and Earthquake). Almost every year the state of Assam India witnesses flood in Brahamputra River valley during reversal of wind system (monsoon). This is often followed by outbreak of diarrheal diseases including cholera. Beside the incidence of cholera outbreaks, there is lack of experimental evidence for prevalence of the bacterium in aquatic environment and its association with cholera during/after flood in the state. A molecular surveillance during 2012-14 was carried out to study prevalence, strain differentiation, and clonality of Vibrio cholerae in inland aquatic reservoirs flooded by Brahamputra River in Assam. Water samples were collected, filtered, enriched in alkaline peptone water followed by selective culturing on thiosulfate bile salt sucrose agar. Environmental isolates were identified as V. cholerae, based on biochemical assays followed by sero-grouping and detailed molecular characterization. The incidence of the presence of the bacterium in potable water sources was higher after flood. Except one O1 isolate, all of the strains were broadly grouped under non-O1/non-O139 whereas some of them did have cholera toxin (CT). Surprisingly, we have noticed Haitian ctxB in two non-O1/non-O139 strains. MLST analyses based on pyrH, recA and rpoA genes revealed clonality in the environmental strains. The isolates showed varying degree of antimicrobial resistance including tetracycline and ciprofloxacin. The strains harbored the genetic elements SXT constins and integrons responsible for multidrug resistance. Genetic characterization is useful as phenotypic characters alone have proven to be unsatisfactory for strain discrimination. An assurance to safe drinking water, sanitation and monitoring of the aquatic reservoirs is of utmost importance for

  11. Relative contributions of Vibrio polysaccharide and quorum sensing to the resistance of Vibrio cholerae to predation by heterotrophic protists.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuyang; Kjelleberg, Staffan; McDougald, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Protozoan grazing is a major mortality factor faced by bacteria in the environment. Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the disease cholera, is a natural inhabitant of aquatic ecosystems, and its survival depends on its ability to respond to stresses, such as predation by heterotrophic protists. Previous results show that grazing pressure induces biofilm formation and enhances a smooth to rugose morphotypic shift, due to increased expression of Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS). In addition to negatively controlling vps genes, the global quorum sensing (QS) regulator, HapR, plays a role in grazing resistance as the ΔhapR strain is efficiently consumed while the wild type (WT) is not. Here, the relative and combined contributions of VPS and QS to grazing resistance were investigated by exposing VPS and HapR mutants and double mutants in VPS and HapR encoding genes at different phases of biofilm development to amoeboid and flagellate grazers. Data show that the WT biofilms were grazing resistant, the VPS mutants were less resistant than the WT strain, but more resistant than the QS mutant strain, and that QS contributes to grazing resistance mainly in mature biofilms. In addition, grazing effects on biofilms of mixed WT and QS mutant strains were investigated. The competitive fitness of each strain in mixed biofilms was determined by CFU and microscopy. Data show that protozoa selectively grazed the QS mutant in mixed biofilms, resulting in changes in the composition of the mixed community. A small proportion of QS mutant cells which comprised 4% of the mixed biofilm biovolume were embedded in grazing resistant WT microcolonies and shielded from predation, indicating the existence of associational protection in mixed biofilms. PMID:23441178

  12. Remodeling of the Vibrio cholerae membrane by incorporation of exogenous fatty acids from host and aquatic environments

    PubMed Central

    Giles, David K.; Hankins, Jessica V.; Guan, Ziqiang; Trent, M. Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Gram-negative bacteria Vibrio cholerae poses significant public health concerns by causing an acute intestinal infection afflicting millions of people each year. V. cholerae motility, as well as virulence factor expression and outer membrane protein production, have been shown to be affected by bile (Childers & Klose, 2007). The current study examines the effects of bile on V. cholerae phospholipids. Bile exposure caused significant alterations to the phospholipid profile of V. cholerae but not of other enteric pathogens. These changes consisted of a quantitative increase and migratory difference in cardiolipin, decreases in phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine, and the dramatic appearance of an unknown phospholipid determined to be lyso-phosphatidylethanolamine. Major components of bile were not responsible for the observed changes, but long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are minor components of bile, were shown to be incorporated into phospholipids of V. cholerae. Although the bile-induced phospholipid profile was independent of the V. cholerae virulence cascade, we identified another relevant environment in which V. cholerae assimilates unique fatty acids into its membrane phospholipids—marine sediment. Our results suggest that Vibrio species possess unique machinery conferring the ability to take up a wider range of exogenous fatty acids than other enteric bacteria. PMID:21255114

  13. Characterization of the Vibrio cholerae Extracellular Matrix: A Top-Down Solid-State NMR Approach

    PubMed Central

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Fong, Jiunn C.N.; Yildiz, Fitnat; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are communities of bacterial cells surrounded by a self-secreted extracellular matrix. Biofilm formation by Vibrio cholerae, the human pathogen responsible for cholera, contributes to its environmental survival and infectivity. Important genetic and molecular requirements have been identified for V. cholerae biofilm formation, yet a compositional accounting of these parts in the intact biofilm or extracellular matrix has not been described. As insoluble and non-crystalline assemblies, determinations of biofilm composition pose a challenge to conventional biochemical and biophysical analysis. The V. cholerae extracellular matrix composition is particularly complex with several proteins, complex polysaccharides, and other biomolecules having been identified as matrix parts. We developed a new top-down solid-state NMR approach to spectroscopically assign and quantify the carbon pools of the intact V. cholerae extracellular matrix using 13C CPMAS and 13C{15N}, 15N{31P}, and 13C{31P}REDOR. General sugar, lipid, and amino acid pools were first profiled and then further annotated and quantified as specific carbon types, including carbonyls, amides, glycyl carbons, and anomerics. In addition, 15N profiling revealed a large amine pool relative to amide contributions, reflecting the prevalence of molecular modifications with free amine groups. Our top-down approach could be implemented immediately to examine the extracellular matrix from mutant strains that might alter polysaccharide production or lipid release beyond the cell surface; or to monitor changes that may accompany environmental variations and stressors such as altered nutrient composition, oxidative stress or antibiotics. More generally, our analysis has demonstrated that solid-state NMR is a valuable tool to characterize complex biofilm systems. PMID:24911407

  14. Quadruple quorum-sensing inputs control Vibrio cholerae virulence and maintain system robustness.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sarah A; Chapman, Christine A; Ng, Wai-Leung

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria use quorum sensing (QS) for cell-cell communication to carry out group behaviors. This intercellular signaling process relies on cell density-dependent production and detection of chemical signals called autoinducers (AIs). Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, detects two AIs, CAI-1 and AI-2, with two histidine kinases, CqsS and LuxQ, respectively, to control biofilm formation and virulence factor production. At low cell density, these two signal receptors function in parallel to activate the key regulator LuxO, which is essential for virulence of this pathogen. At high cell density, binding of AIs to their respective receptors leads to deactivation of LuxO and repression of virulence factor production. However, mutants lacking CqsS and LuxQ maintain a normal LuxO activation level and remain virulent, suggesting that LuxO is activated by additional, unidentified signaling pathways. Here we show that two other histidine kinases, CqsR (formerly known as VC1831) and VpsS, act upstream in the central QS circuit of V. cholerae to activate LuxO. V. cholerae strains expressing any one of these four receptors are QS proficient and capable of colonizing animal hosts. In contrast, mutants lacking all four receptors are phenotypically identical to LuxO-defective mutants. Importantly, these four functionally redundant receptors act together to prevent premature induction of a QS response caused by signal perturbations. We suggest that the V. cholerae QS circuit is composed of quadruple sensory inputs and has evolved to be refractory to sporadic AI level perturbations. PMID:25874462

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Melanin-Producing (mel) Mutants of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Ivins, Bruce E.; Holmes, Randall K.

    1980-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae strain Htx-3, a hypertoxinogenic mutant of V. cholerae 569B Inaba, produces a dark brown pigment under certain growth conditions, whereas strain 569B does not. We investigated the biochemical basis for this pigment production and the possible relationships between pigmentation and other phenotypic properties in V. cholerae. After mutagenesis of V. cholerae 569B with N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, 28 independently derived pigment-forming (mel) mutants were isolated and characterized. The mel mutants frequently differed from wild type in toxinogenicity or motility and occasionally differed in other phenotypic traits. Individual mel mutants differed from wild type both in the amount of toxin produced and in the growth conditions optimal for toxin production. It has not yet been established whether multiple phenotypic changes in individual mel mutants represent pleiotropic effects of single mutations or induction of multiple mutations by N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine or both. Production of pigment by mel mutants occurred at temperatures from 22 to 40°C, was inhibited by anaerobiosis, and was stimulated by supplementation of growth media with the amino acid precursors of melanin (l-phenylalanine, l-tyrosine, or l-tyrosine plus l-cysteine). The pigment possessed several other properties reported for microbial melanins. We conclude that a biochemical pathway for melanin production is present in V. cholerae, that this pathway cannot be fully expressed in wild-type strain 569B, and that mutations in the gene(s) which we have designated mel can permit hyperproduction of melanin under appropriate conditions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7380551

  16. Characterization of environmental Vibrio cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 in the Pearl River Estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiujun; Wang, Duochun; Li, Baisheng; Zhou, Haijian; Liang, Song; Ke, Changwen; Deng, Xiaoling; Kan, Biao; Morris, J Glenn; Cao, Wuchun

    2016-02-01

    Toxigenic isolates of Vibrio cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 from aquatic reservoirs are a key source for recurrent epidemics of cholera in human populations. However, we do not have an optimal understanding of the microbiology of the strains within these reservoirs, particularly outside of the time periods when there are active cholera cases in the surrounding community. The main objective of the present study was to identify and characterize V. cholerae O1 and O139 in the Pearl River Estuary at a time when active disease was not being identified, despite prior occurrence of epidemic cholera in the region. Water samples were collected at 24 sites in the research area at monthly intervals between 2007 and 2010, and screened for the presence of V. cholerae O1 and O139. All isolates were screened for the presence of ctxAB, ompW, toxR, and tcpA genes. Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) was used to assess possible relationships among strains. The results show that Vibrio cholerae O1 or O139 was isolated, on average, from 6.7% of the sites screened at each time point. All V. cholerae O1 and O139 isolates were ctxAB negative, and 37% were positive for tcpA. Isolation was most common in the oldest, most urbanized district compared with other districts, and was associated with lower pH. Despite year-to-year variability in isolation rates, there was no evidence of seasonality. MLVA of 27 selected isolates showed evidence of high genetic diversity, with no evidence of clustering by year or geographic location. In this region where cholera has been epidemic in the past, there is evidence of environmental persistence of V. cholerae O1 and O139 strains. However, environmental strains were consistently nontoxigenic, with a high level of genetic diversity; their role as current or future agents of human disease remains uncertain. PMID:26674584

  17. Effect of nutrient deprivation on lipid, carbohydrate, DNA, RNA, and protein levels in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Hood, M A; Guckert, J B; White, D C; Deck, F

    1986-01-01

    The response of Vibrio cholerae to low nutrient levels was determined by measuring the concentrations of lipids, carbohydrates, DNA, RNA, and proteins over a 30-day starvation period. Ultrastructural integrity was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Total lipids and carbohydrates declined rapidly within the first 7 days, while DNA and protein exhibited a more constant decline over the 30 days of starvation. In contrast, RNA showed little decrease upon starvation. Although neutral lipids were lost, the percentage of neutral lipids did not decline as rapidly as the phospholipids. Detectable levels of poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate disappeared completely by 7 days. Carbohydrate profiles revealed the relative loss of the five-carbon sugar ribose and N-acetylglucosamine and a relative increase in the total six-carbon sugars, especially glucose. Morphologically, ribosomes appeared to exhibit no structural change, while inclusion bodies and mesosomelike structures disappeared completely, and cell wall and membrane integrity was lost. The data suggest that V. cholerae differs somewhat from other marine vibrios in its response to low nutrients but shares some characteristics in common with them. The data also suggest that certain lipids and carbohydrates may provide the endogenous energy sources needed for dormancy preparation and cell maintenance under nutrient starvation. Images PMID:2430523

  18. Isolation of Vibrio cholera El Tor Inaba From Lemna minor and Eichhornia crassipens Roots in Veracruz, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Cordoba Aguilar, Edgar; Herrera Rivero, Marisol; Rubi, Alberto; Arroyo-Helguera, Omar; Coutino Rodriguez, Rocio

    2014-01-01

    Background: During epidemic periods, the strain Vibrio cholera El Tor has been isolated from the aquatic macrophyte roots of Eichhornia crassipens and Lemna minor, suggesting that aquatic plants could be environmental reservoirs through either a non-specific association or a commensalism relationship. Therefore, it is important to understand V. cholera reservoirs in order to establish prevention strategies against this pathogen. Objectives: Our interest was to determine whether V. cholera could be isolated and typified from L. minor and E. crassipens roots. Materials and Methods: From 2004 to 2005, plants were collected from various ecological niches and the roots were used to isolate V. cholera. Standard bacteriological, biochemical and serological tests were used for its typification. Results: In five out of the nine ecological niches explored, we collected either L. minor or E. crassipens, as these specimens cohabited only in two niches. V. cholera was isolated from both L. minor and E. crassipens roots. The isolated V. cholera showed the same biochemical characteristics as the pure V. cholera strain which was used as a control. The isolated V. cholera corresponded to V. cholera O1 El Tor Inaba, which is the same serotype related to the last outbreak in Mexico. Conclusions: For first time V. cholera El Tor Inaba has been isolated several years after the last emergence of cholera in Mexico. A viable and cultivable V. cholera strain, sourced from freshwater niches in E. crassipens and L. minor roots, suggests the importance of these plants as a permanent aquatic reservoir for these organisms. The monitoring of E. crassipens and L. minor is the responsibility of health institutions in order to evaluate the ongoing risks. PMID:25147681

  19. Growth Inhibition of Enteric Bacteria by Vibrio cholerae in Nutrient Media Containing Lactate, Acetate, or Citrate1

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskaran, K.; Iyer, S. S.; Khan, A. W.; Vora, V. C.

    1974-01-01

    In cross-streak tests on nutrient agar containing lactate, acetate, or citrate, the growth of certain enteric bacteria was inhibited by themselves or by Vibrio cholerae, or by both. This mimicked the activity of bacteriocins, but the phenomenon was attributable to the accumulation of carbonate and increased alkalinity of the media. Images PMID:15830491

  20. Antibacterial activity of silver and zinc nanoparticles against Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Salem, Wesam; Leitner, Deborah R; Zingl, Franz G; Schratter, Gebhart; Prassl, Ruth; Goessler, Walter; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxic Escherichia coli (ETEC) remain two dominant bacterial causes of severe secretory diarrhea and still a significant cause of death, especially in developing countries. In order to investigate new effective and inexpensive therapeutic approaches, we analyzed nanoparticles synthesized by a green approach using corresponding salt (silver or zinc nitrate) with aqueous extract of Caltropis procera fruit or leaves. We characterized the quantity and quality of nanoparticles by UV-visible wavelength scans and nanoparticle tracking analysis. Nanoparticles could be synthesized in reproducible yields of approximately 10(8) particles/ml with mode particles sizes of approx. 90-100 nm. Antibacterial activity against two pathogens was assessed by minimal inhibitory concentration assays and survival curves. Both pathogens exhibited similar resistance profiles with minimal inhibitory concentrations ranging between 5×10(5) and 10(7) particles/ml. Interestingly, zinc nanoparticles showed a slightly higher efficacy, but sublethal concentrations caused adverse effects and resulted in increased biofilm formation of V. cholerae. Using the expression levels of the outer membrane porin OmpT as an indicator for cAMP levels, our results suggest that zinc nanoparticles inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity. This consequently deceases the levels of this second messenger, which is a known inhibitor of biofilm formation. Finally, we demonstrated that a single oral administration of silver nanoparticles to infant mice colonized with V. cholerae or ETEC significantly reduces the colonization rates of the pathogens by 75- or 100-fold, respectively. PMID:25466205

  1. Vibrio cholerae biofilm growth program and architecture revealed by single-cell live imaging.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Sharo, Andrew G; Stone, Howard A; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated bacterial communities that are crucial in nature and during infection. Despite extensive work to identify biofilm components and to discover how they are regulated, little is known about biofilm structure at the level of individual cells. Here, we use state-of-the-art microscopy techniques to enable live single-cell resolution imaging of a Vibrio cholerae biofilm as it develops from one single founder cell to a mature biofilm of 10,000 cells, and to discover the forces underpinning the architectural evolution. Mutagenesis, matrix labeling, and simulations demonstrate that surface adhesion-mediated compression causes V. cholerae biofilms to transition from a 2D branched morphology to a dense, ordered 3D cluster. We discover that directional proliferation of rod-shaped bacteria plays a dominant role in shaping the biofilm architecture in V. cholerae biofilms, and this growth pattern is controlled by a single gene, rbmA Competition analyses reveal that the dense growth mode has the advantage of providing the biofilm with superior mechanical properties. Our single-cell technology can broadly link genes to biofilm fine structure and provides a route to assessing cell-to-cell heterogeneity in response to external stimuli. PMID:27555592

  2. vpsA- and luxO-independent biofilms of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jana; Miller, Michael C; Nielsen, Alex T; Schoolnik, Gary K; Spormann, Alfred M

    2007-10-01

    The natural life cycle of Vibrio cholerae involves the transitioning of cells between different environmental surfaces such as the chitinous shell of Crustaceae and the epithelial layer of the human intestine. Previous studies using static biofilm systems showed a strict dependence of biofilm formation on the vps and lux genes, which are essential for exopolysaccharide formation and cell-cell signaling, respectively. The authors' report here that in biofilms grown under hydrodynamic conditions, DeltavpsA and DeltaluxO mutants of V. cholerae do form pronounced, three-dimensional biofilms that resemble all aspects of wild-type biofilms. By genetic experiments, it was shown that in hydrodynamically grown biofilms this independence of vpsA is due to the expression of rpoS, which is a negative regulator of vpsA expression. Biofilms also underwent substantial dissolution after 96 h that could be induced by a simple stop of medium flow. The studies indicate that metabolic conditions control the reversible attachment of cells to the biofilm matrix and are key in regulating biofilm cell physiology via RpoS. Furthermore, the results redefine the roles of vps and quorum-sensing in V. cholerae biofilms. PMID:17697110

  3. Antibacterial activity of silver and zinc nanoparticles against Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Wesam; Leitner, Deborah R.; Zingl, Franz G.; Schratter, Gebhart; Prassl, Ruth; Goessler, Walter; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxic Escherichia coli (ETEC) remain two dominant bacterial causes of severe secretory diarrhea and still a significant cause of death, especially in developing countries. In order to investigate new effective and inexpensive therapeutic approaches, we analyzed nanoparticles synthesized by a green approach using corresponding salt (silver or zinc nitrate) with aqueous extract of Caltropis procera fruit or leaves. We characterized the quantity and quality of nanoparticles by UV–visible wavelength scans and nanoparticle tracking analysis. Nanoparticles could be synthesized in reproducible yields of approximately 108 particles/ml with mode particles sizes of approx. 90–100 nm. Antibacterial activity against two pathogens was assessed by minimal inhibitory concentration assays and survival curves. Both pathogens exhibited similar resistance profiles with minimal inhibitory concentrations ranging between 5 × 105 and 107 particles/ml. Interestingly, zinc nanoparticles showed a slightly higher efficacy, but sublethal concentrations caused adverse effects and resulted in increased biofilm formation of V. cholerae. Using the expression levels of the outer membrane porin OmpT as an indicator for cAMP levels, our results suggest that zinc nanoparticles inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity. This consequently deceases the levels of this second messenger, which is a known inhibitor of biofilm formation. Finally, we demonstrated that a single oral administration of silver nanoparticles to infant mice colonized with V. cholerae or ETEC significantly reduces the colonization rates of the pathogens by 75- or 100-fold, respectively. PMID:25466205

  4. Isolation and Characterization of the Fertility Factor P of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Archana; Parker, Charlotte D.; Wohlhieter, J. A.; Baron, L. S.

    1973-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae strains with the transmissible fertility factor P contained a supercoiled circular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) component amounting to between 2 and 6% of the total DNA obtained from the cells. Such a component was not observed in V. cholerae strains lacking the fertility factor. This supercoiled circular DNA was isolated from P+ cells, and the molecular weight was determined by sedimentation velocity experiments and electron microscopy to be approximately 80 million daltons. These supercoiled circular DNA molecules, which have a guanine plus cytosine (G + C) composition of 42%, were concluded to be the extrachromosomal P factor. It was calculated that there is approximately one copy of the P factor per chromosome. A small amount of supercoiled circular DNA was occasionally isolated from the P− strains of V. cholerae. The function of this component, which has a molecular weight of 40 million daltons, is not known. The molecules found in the P− strains were readily distinguished from the P+ circular molecules by their smaller molecular weight and different G + C composition. Images PMID:4690964

  5. Purification and characterization of a pilus of a Vibrio cholerae strain: a possible colonization factor.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, T; Iwanaga, M

    1996-01-01

    A new flexible type of pilus was purified from Vibrio cholerae non-O1, non-0139 strain NAGV14 and characterized. The molecular mass of the pilin was estimated to be 20 kDa, and the antigenicity differed from that of known pili such as toxin-coregulated pili, mannose-sensitive hemagglutinating pili, V10 pili, and Al-1841 pili. The NAGV14 pilus was regarded as a colonization factor because the purified pili adhered to rabbit intestine and adhesion was inhibited by treating the organisms with the Fab fraction of an antipilus antibody. An intestinal receptor blockade using purified pili failed to inhibit adhesion of the organisms. The NAGV14 pili adhered to the surface of live V. cholerae. An antigen cross-reacting with the NAGV14 pili was widely and specifically distributed among V. cholerae strains irrespective of serotype and biotype. The amino acid sequence of the pilin was homologous with that of MshA. The NAGV14 pili did not agglutinate human and rabbit erythrocytes. PMID:8945571

  6. Genetic evidence that the Vibrio cholerae monolayer is a distinct stage in biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Sudha; Watnick, Paula I.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Biofilm development is conceived as a developmental process in which free swimming cells attach to a surface, first transiently and then permanently, as a single layer. This monolayer of immobilized cells gives rise to larger cell clusters that eventually develop into the biofilm, a three-dimensional structure consisting of large pillars of bacteria interspersed with water channels. Previous studies have shown that efficient development of the Vibrio cholerae biofilm requires a combination of pili, flagella and exopolysaccharide. Little is known, however, regarding the requirements for monolayer formation by wild-type V. cholerae. In this work, we have isolated the wild-type V. cholerae monolayer and demonstrated that the environmental signals, bacterial structures, and transcription profiles that induce and stabilize the monolayer state are unique. Cells in a monolayer are specialized to maintain their attachment to a surface. The surface itself activates mannose-sensitive haemagglutinin type IV pilus (MSHA)-mediated attachment, which is accompanied by repression of flagellar gene transcription. In contrast, cells in a biofilm are specialized to maintain intercellular contacts. Progression to this stage occurs when exopolysaccharide synthesis is induced by environmental monosaccharides. We propose a model for biofilm development in natural environments in which cells form a stable monolayer on a surface. As biotic surfaces are degraded with subsequent release of carbohydrates, the monolayer develops into a biofilm. PMID:15066042

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of TssL from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jae-Hee; Chang, Jeong Ho; Kim, Yeon-Gil

    2014-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a macromolecular complex that is conserved in Gram-negative bacteria. The T6SS secretes effector proteins into recipient cells in a contact-dependent manner in order to accomplish cooperative and competitive interactions with the cells. Although the composition and mechanism of the T6SS have been intensively investigated across many Gram-negative bacteria, to date structural information on T6SS components from the important pathogen Vibrio cholerae has been rare. Here, the cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the cytoplasmic domain of TssL, an inner membrane protein of the T6SS, from V. cholerae are reported. Diffraction data were collected to 1.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belonged to the hexagonal space group P61, with unit-cell parameters a = 78.4, b = 78.4, c = 49.5 Å. The successful structural characterization of TssL from V. cholerae will contribute to understanding the role of the membrane-associated subunits of the T6SS in more detail. PMID:25195905

  8. Cell division licensing in the multi-chromosomal Vibrio cholerae bacterium.

    PubMed

    Galli, Elisa; Poidevin, Mickaël; Le Bars, Romain; Desfontaines, Jean-Michel; Muresan, Leila; Paly, Evelyne; Yamaichi, Yoshiharu; Barre, François-Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Cell division must be coordinated with chromosome replication and segregation to ensure the faithful transmission of genetic information during proliferation. In most bacteria, assembly of the division apparatus, the divisome, starts with the polymerization of a tubulin homologue, FtsZ, into a ring-like structure at mid-cell, the Z-ring(1). It typically occurs at half of the cell cycle when most of the replication and segregation cycle of the unique chromosome they generally harbour is achieved(2). The chromosome itself participates in the regulation of cell division, at least in part because it serves as a scaffold to position FtsZ polymerization antagonists(3). However, about 10% of bacteria have more than one chromosome(4), which raises questions about the way they license cell division(3). For instance, the genome of Vibrio cholerae, the agent of cholera, is divided between a 3 Mbp replicon that originates from the chromosome of its mono-chromosomal ancestor, Chr1, and a 1 Mbp plasmid-derived replicon, Chr2 (ref. 5). Here, we show that Chr2 harbours binding motifs for an inhibitor of Z-ring formation, which helps accurately position the V. cholerae divisome at mid-cell and postpones its assembly to the very end of the cell cycle. PMID:27562255

  9. Vibrio cholerae interactions with Mytilus galloprovincialis hemocytes mediated by serum components.

    PubMed

    Canesi, Laura; Pezzati, Elisabetta; Stauder, Monica; Grande, Chiara; Bavestrello, Margherita; Papetti, Adele; Vezzulli, Luigi; Pruzzo, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Edible bivalves (e.g., mussels, oysters) can accumulate large amount of bacteria in their tissues and act as passive carriers of pathogens to humans. Bacterial persistence inside bivalves depends, at least in part, on hemolymph anti-bacterial activity that is exerted by both serum soluble factors and phagocytic cells (i.e., the hemocytes). It was previously shown that Mytilus galloprovincialis hemolymph serum contains opsonins that mediate D-mannose-sensitive interactions between hemocytes and Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor bacteria that carry the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA). These opsonins enhance phagocytosis and killing of vibrios by facilitating their binding to hemocytes. Since V. cholerae strains not carrying the MSHA ligand (O1 classical, non-O1/O139) are present in coastal water and can be entrapped by mussels, we studied whether in mussel serum, in addition to opsonins directed toward MSHA, other components can mediate opsonization of these bacteria. By comparing interactions of O1 classical and non-O1/O139 strains with hemocytes in artificial sea water and serum, it was found that M. galloprovincialis serum contains components that increase by at approximately twofold their adhesion to, association with, and killing by hemocytes. Experiments conducted with high and low molecular mass fractions obtained by serum ultrafiltration indicated that these compounds have molecular mass higher than 5000 Da. Serum exposure to high temperature (80°C) abolished its opsonizing capability suggesting that the involved serum active components are of protein nature. Further studies are needed to define the chemical properties and specificity of both the involved bacterial ligands and hemolymph opsonins. This information will be central not only to better understand V. cholerae ecology, but also to improve current bivalve depuration practices and properly protect human health. PMID:24367358

  10. The antimicrobial activity of ZnO nanoparticles against Vibrio cholerae: Variation in response depends on biotype.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Shamila; Chakraborti, Soumyananda; Bera, Supriyo; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Hoque, Kazi Mirajul; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2016-08-01

    The potency of zinc oxide nanoparticles (NPs), with a core size of ~7-10nm, to inhibit cholera disease was investigated by demonstrating the effect on two biotypes (classical and El Tor) of O1 serogroup of Vibrio cholerae-El Tor was more susceptible both in planktonic and in biofilm forms. Interaction with ZnO NP results in deformed cellular architecture. Increased fluidity and depolarization of membrane, and protein leakage further confirmed the damages inflicted on Vibrio by NP. NP was shown to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induce DNA damage. These results suggest that the antibacterial mechanism of ZnO action is most likely due to generation of ROS and disruption of bacterial membrane. The antimicrobial efficacy of NP has been validated in animal model. The synergistic action of NP and antibiotic suggests an alternative for the treatment of cholera. PMID:26970029

  11. Typing and Antibiogram of Vibrio cholerae Isolates from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Pune: A 3 Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Palewar, Meghna S; Choure, Archana C; Mudshingkar, Swati; Dohe, Vaishali; Kagal, Anju; Bhardwaj, Renu; Jaiswal, Abhishek; Sarkar, Banwarilal

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was done over a period of 3 years (January 2010- December 2012) in a tertiary care hospital, Pune, to note the changes in the prevalence and distribution of biotypes, serotypes, antibiotic susceptibility pattern and phage types of Vibrio cholerae isolates from clinical samples so as to be vigilant and curtail major outbreak in future. Vibrio cholerae isolates were obtained from 4.4% of the 1126 fecal specimens processed from cases of acute watery diarrhea. Majority of the isolates were identified as V. cholerae O1 biotype El Tor serotype Ogawa (98%); Phage 27 was the predominant type (77.5%). Majority of the cases were encountered during the months June-August (68%). Antibiogram over a period of 3 years showed that isolates were consistently resistant to Ampicillin (90%) and Furazolidone (88%). Low level of resistance was seen with Norfloxacin (8%), Gentamicin (8%) and Tetracycline (6%). All isolates were susceptible to Chloramphenicol. PMID:25722619

  12. Non-O1/Non-O139 Vibrio cholerae Carrying Multiple Virulence Factors and V. cholerae O1 in the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Ceccarelli, Daniela; Chen, Arlene; Hasan, Nur A.; Rashed, Shah M.; Huq, Anwar

    2015-01-01

    Non-O1/non-O139 Vibrio cholerae inhabits estuarine and coastal waters globally, but its clinical significance has not been sufficiently investigated, despite the fact that it has been associated with septicemia and gastroenteritis. The emergence of virulent non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae is consistent with the recognition of new pathogenic variants worldwide. Oyster, sediment, and water samples were collected during a vibrio surveillance program carried out from 2009 to 2012 in the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland. V. cholerae O1 was detected by a direct fluorescent-antibody (DFA) assay but was not successfully cultured, whereas 395 isolates of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae were confirmed by multiplex PCR and serology. Only a few of the non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae isolates were resistant to ampicillin and/or penicillin. Most of the isolates were sensitive to all antibiotics tested, and 77 to 90% carried the El Tor variant hemolysin gene hlyAET, the actin cross-linking repeats in toxin gene rtxA, the hemagglutinin protease gene hap, and the type 6 secretion system. About 19 to 21% of the isolates carried the neuraminidase-encoding gene nanH and/or the heat-stable toxin (NAG-ST), and only 5% contained a type 3 secretion system. None of the non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae isolates contained Vibrio pathogenicity island-associated genes. However, ctxA, ace, or zot was present in nine isolates. Fifty-five different genotypes showed up to 12 virulence factors, independent of the source of isolation, and represent the first report of both antibiotic susceptibility and virulence associated with non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae from the Chesapeake Bay. Since these results confirm the presence of potentially pathogenic non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, monitoring for total V. cholerae, regardless of serotype, should be done within the context of public health. PMID:25556194

  13. Application of tetraplex PCR for detection of Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. mimicus in cockle.

    PubMed

    Senachai, Pachara; Chomvarin, Chariya; Namwat, Wises; Wongboot, Warawan; Wongwajana, Suwin; Tangkanakul, Waraluk

    2013-03-01

    A tetraplex PCR method was developed for simultaneous detection of Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. mimicus in cockle samples in comparison with conventional culture method. Specific primers targeting ompW of V. cholerae, tl of V. parahaemolyticus, hsp60 of V. vulnificus and sodB of V. mimicus were employed in the same PCR. Detection limit of the tetraplex PCR assay was 104 cfu/ml (400 cfu/PCR reaction) for pure cultures of all four species of Vibrio. In Vibrio spiked cockle samples, the limit of detection after 6 hours enrichment in alkaline peptone water was 1 cfu/10 g of cockle tissue for three Vibrio spp, except for V. mimicus that was 102 cfu/10 g of cockle tissue. When the tetraplex PCR and culture methods were applied to 100 cockle samples, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. cholerae and V. mimicus were detected in 100, 98, 80 and 9% of the samples by tetraplex PCR and in 76, 42, 0 and 0% by the culture method, respectively. This developed tetraplex PCR method should be suitable for simultaneous and rapid detection of Vibrio species in food samples and for food safety assessment. PMID:23691635

  14. Construction of a Vibrio cholerae prototype vaccine strain O395-N1-E1 which accumulates cell-associated cholera toxin B subunit.

    PubMed

    Rhie, Gi-eun; Jung, Hae-Mi; Kim, Bong Su; Mekalanos, John J

    2008-10-01

    Because of its production and use in Vietnam, the most widely used oral cholera vaccine consists of heat- or formalin-killed Vibrio cholerae whole cells (WC). An earlier version of this type of vaccine called whole cell-recombinant B subunit vaccine (BS-WC) produced in Sweden also contained the B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB). Both WC and BS-WC vaccines produced moderate levels of protection in field trials designed to evaluate their cholera efficacy. V. cholerae cells in these vaccines induce antibacterial immunity, and CTB contributes to the vaccine's efficacy presumably by stimulating production of anti-toxin neutralizing antibody. Although more effective than the WC vaccine, the BS-WC vaccine has not been adopted for manufacture by developing world countries primarily because the CTB component is difficult to manufacture and include in the vaccine in the doses needed to induce significant immune responses. We reasoned this was a technical problem that might be solved by engineering strains of V. cholerae that express cell-associated CTB that would co-purify with the bacterial cell fraction during the manufacture of WC vaccine. Here we report that construction of a V. cholerae O1 classical strain, O395-N1-E1, that has been engineered to accumulate CTB in the periplasmic fraction by disrupting the epsE gene of type II secretion pathway. O395-N1-E1 induces anti-CTB IgG and vibriocidal antibodies in mice immunized with two doses of formalin killed whole cells. Intraperitoneal immunization of mice with O395-N1-E1 induced a significantly higher anti-CTB antibody response compared to that of the parental strain, O395-N1. Our results suggest that this prototype cholera vaccine candidate strain may assist in preparing improved and inexpensive oral BS-WC cholera vaccine without the need to purify CTB separately. PMID:18582519

  15. Construction of a Vibrio cholerae Vaccine Candidate Strain O395-N1-E1 which Accumulates Cell-associated Cholera Toxin B Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Rhie, Gi-eun; Jung, Hae-Mi; Kim, Bong Su; Mekalanos, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Because of its production and use in Vietnam, the most widely used oral cholera vaccine consists of heat- or formalin-killed Vibrio cholerae whole cells (WC). An earlier version of this type of vaccine called whole cell-recombinant B subunit vaccine (BS-WC) produced in Sweden also contained the B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB). Both WC and BS-WC vaccines produced moderate levels of protection in field trials designed to evaluate their cholera efficacy. V. cholerae cells in these vaccines induce antibacterial immunity, and CTB contributes to the vaccine’s efficacy presumably by stimulating production of anti-toxin neutralizing antibody. Although more effective than the WC vaccine, the BS-WC vaccine has not been adopted for manufacture by developing world countries primarily because the CTB component is difficult to manufacture and include in the vaccine in the doses needed to induce significant immune responses. We reasoned this was technical problem that might be solved simply by engineering strains of V. cholerae that express cell-associated CTB that would co-purify with the bacterial cell fraction during manufacture of WC vaccine. Here we report that construction of a V. cholerae O1 classical strain, 0395-N1-E1, that has been engineered to accumulate CTB in the periplasmic fraction by disrupting the epsE gene of type II secretion pathway. 0395-N1-E1 induces anti-CTB IgG and vibriocidal antibodies in mice immunized with two doses of formalin killed whole cells. Intraperitoneal immunization of mice with O395-N1-E1 induced a significantly higher anti-CTB antibody response compared to that of the parental strain, 0395-N1. Our results suggest that this type of cholera vaccine candidate strain may assist in preparing improved, effective, and inexpensive oral or parenteral cholera vaccine without the need to purify CTB separately. PMID:18582519

  16. Incidence of severe diarrhoea due to Vibrio cholerae in the catchment area of six surveillance hospitals in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Paul, R C; Faruque, A S G; Alam, M; Iqbal, A; Zaman, K; Islam, N; Sobhan, A; DAS, S K; Malek, M A; Qadri, F; Cravioto, A; Luby, S P

    2016-04-01

    Cholera is an important public health problem in Bangladesh. Interventions to prevent cholera depend on their cost-effectiveness which in turn depends on cholera incidence. Hospital-based diarrhoeal disease surveillance has been ongoing in six Bangladeshi hospitals where a systematic proportion of patients admitted with diarrhoea were enrolled and tested for Vibrio cholerae. However, incidence calculation using only hospital data underestimates the real disease burden because many ill persons seek treatment elsewhere. We conducted a healthcare utilization survey in the catchment areas of surveillance hospitals to estimate the proportion of severe diarrhoeal cases that were admitted to surveillance hospitals and estimated the population-based incidence of severe diarrhoea due to V. cholerae by combining both hospital surveillance and catchment area survey data. The estimated incidence of severe diarrhoea due to cholera ranged from 0.3 to 4.9/1000 population in the catchment area of surveillance hospitals. In children aged <5 years, incidence ranged from 1.0 to 11.0/1000 children. Diarrhoeal deaths were most common in the Chhatak Hospital's catchment area (18.5/100 000 population). This study provides a credible estimate of the incidence of severe diarrhoea due to cholera in Bangladesh, which can be used to assess the cost-effectiveness of cholera prevention activities. PMID:26391481

  17. Protein profiles in mucosal and systemic compartments in response to Vibrio cholerae in a mouse pulmonary infection model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok-Seong; Baik, Jung Eun; Yang, Jae Seung; Cho, Kun; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    We have recently shown that a mouse lung infection model resulting in acute pneumonia could be used for evaluating the protective immunity induced by mucosal vaccines against Vibrio cholerae. In order to gain insight and better understanding of the pathogenicity of V. cholerae infection, we identified and compared proteins induced by V. cholerae in nasal washes, bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL), and sera. Intranasal administration of V. cholerae increased the concentration of total proteins in nasal washes and BAL fluids, but not in sera. LTQ-Orbitrap hybrid Fourier transform mass spectrometry showed that cytoskeletal proteins, protease inhibitors and anti-inflammatory mediators were present in nasal washes from uninfected mice. The distinctly expressed proteins in nasal washes in response to V. cholerae mainly consisted of protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory proteins, and anti-microbial proteins. A number of protease inhibitors and anti-inflammatory proteins were selectively expressed in BAL fluids from V. cholerae-infected mice, while cytoskeletal proteins and heat shock proteins were mainly observed in BAL fluids from uninfected mice. A large number of serum complements, protease inhibitors, and acute phase proteins were expressed in V. cholerae-infected mice. Collectively, these results suggest that intranasal administration of V. cholerae leading to acute pneumonia elicited alterations of protein profiles associated with immune homeostasis and host protection in both the mucosal and systemic compartments. PMID:26150210

  18. [The development of reagents set in the format of DNA-chip for genetic typing of strains of Vibrio cholerae].

    PubMed

    Pudova, E A; Markelov, M L; Dedkov, V G; Tchekanova, T A; Sadjin, A I; Kirdiyashkina, N P; Bekova, M V; Deviyatkin, A A

    2014-05-01

    The necessity of development of methods of genic diagnostic of cholera is conditioned by continuation of the Seventh pandemic of cholera, taxonomic variability of strains of Vibrio cholerae involved into pandemic and also permanent danger of delivery of disease to the territory of the Russian Federation. The methods of genic diagnostic of cholera make it possible in a comparatively short time to maximally minutely characterize strains isolated from patients or their environment. The article presents information about working out reagents set for genetic typing of agents of cholera using DNA-chip. The makeup of DNA-chip included oligonucleotide probes making possible to differentiate strains of V. cholerae on serogroups and biovars and to determine their pathogenicity. The single DNA-chip makes it possible to genetically type up to 12 samples concurrently. At that, duration of analysis without accounting stage of DNA separation makes up to 5 hours. In the progress of work, 23 cholera and non-cholera strains were analyzed. The full compliance of DNA-chip typing results to previously known characteristics of strains. Hence, there is a reason to consider availability of further development of reagents set and possibility of its further application in laboratories of regional level and reference centers. PMID:25338464

  19. Vibrio cholerae pathogen from the freshwater-cultured whiteleg shrimp Penaeus vannamei and control with Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haipeng; An, Jian; Zheng, Weidong; He, Shan

    2015-09-01

    Vibriosis has become a major global economic problem in freshwater-farmed whiteleg shrimp (Penaeus vannamei). The prevention and control of vibriosis are now priority research topics. In this study, a pathogenic strain (QH) was isolated from vibriosis-infected freshwater-farmed P. vannamei that resulted in leg yellowing and was identified as a Vibrio cholerae isolate through phylogenetic analysis and the API 32GN system. A phylogenetic tree that was constructed using the neighbor-joining method further confirmed the QH isolate as a V. cholerae strain. A virulent outer membrane protein (ompU) gene was found to be present in the QH isolate, which further confirmed its pathogenicity. In addition, Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus conferred significant protection against V. cholerae: B. bacteriovorus exhibited significant bacteriolytic effects on the V. cholerae pathogen, possessed a wide prey range that included Vibrio pathogens, and displayed a positive protective efficacy against experimental V. cholerae infection in P. vannamei. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the control of shrimp pathogen V. cholerae with B. bacteriovorus. PMID:26146226

  20. Cholera

    MedlinePlus

    ... cholerae. This same bacterium is also present in raw seafood, particularly shellfish. The best way to avoid ... contaminated with feces containing V. cholerae By eating raw shellfish contaminated with V. cholerae Who's At Risk ...

  1. Trends in the genomic epidemiology of Vibrio cholerae O1 isolated worldwide since 1961.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Sarkar, Sounak; Das, Parijat; Nandy, Suman; Koley, Hemanta; Sarkar, Banwarilal

    2015-10-01

    Here we describe the international scenario of Vibrio cholerae with a comparative analysis of different aspects of typing. Representative V. cholerae strains (n=108) associated with endemic cholera regions from 29 states of India and worldwide were subjected to microbiological, molecular and phylogenetic study. All of the strains were V. cholerae serogroup O1 biotype El Tor and were typed according to both the new phage (NP) type and Basu & Mukherjee (BM) typing schemes. The predominant phage type was T-27 (NP)/T-4 (BM) (65.7%; n=71), followed by phage type T-27 (NP)/T-2 (BM) (14.8%; n=16), T-26 (NP)/T4 (BM) (12.0%; n=13), T-13 (NP)/T-4 (BM) (2.8%; n=3), T-20 (NP)/T-4 (BM) (1.9%; n=2), T-3 (NP)/T-4 (BM) (0.9%; n=1), T-23 (NP)/T-4 (BM) (0.9%; n=1) and T-24 (NP)/T-2 (BM) (0.9%; n=1). Mismatch amplification mutation assay PCR (MAMA-PCR) findings showed the dominance of ctxB El Tor genotype (77.1%; 54/70) from 1961-1991, whilst the next two epochs showed the supremacy of ctxB classical genotype. Multidrug-resistant strains showed resistance to erythromycin, streptomycin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, norfloxacin and ampicillin. The regional resistance of epidemic clones in India draws a layout of the rapid dissemination of resistance in the past 30 years and the necessity of proper treatment to protect populations at risk. PMID:26255896

  2. Novel ctxB variants of Vibrio cholerae O1 isolates, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Haijian; Kan, Biao; Wang, Duochun

    2013-12-01

    We screened 650 isolates from historical collection of Vibrio cholerae O1 during the 7th cholera pandemic in China, by amplifying and sequencing the cholera toxin subunit gene ctxB. Ten isolates were identified as harboring three novel ctxB genotypes based on amino acid residue substitutions. Within them one isolate from a patient in 1964 was similar to the El Tor genotype, except for an 11 amino acid repeat sequence (LAGKREMAIIT) that was inserted after position 62. Six environmental isolates from different regions and years were identified as the Australia El Tor genotype, except at positions 36(T→A), 39(H→Y), and 55(K→N), while three environmental isolates were similar to genotype 5, except at position 24(Q→H). Sequencing of rstR, the marker gene for the CTXΦ allele typing, revealed that two isolates carried the rstR gene of the El Tor type, five carried the classical type rstR, while other isolates carried the rstR232 type. All 10 isolates contained the repeat in the toxin gene rtxC, an El Tor biotype-specific marker, and the El Tor toxin-coregulated pili subunit A gene tcpA, showing the El Tor traits of these isolates. Additionally, by phenotypic biotyping (susceptibility to polymyxin B, positive for chicken erythrocyte agglutination, and Voges-Proskauer test), all isolates except two were typical of the prototype El Tor isolate, while these two isolates had mixed classical phenotypes (hybrid biotype). Furthermore, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis suggested that the new ctxB altered isolates possessed potential transmissibility and thatthey propagated in the local region(s). Taken together, these novel ctxB variants of V. cholerae O1 experienced complex hybrid and genetic exchange but belong to the El Tor lineage, and the pathogenic and epidemic potential of these lineages should be monitored. PMID:23954417

  3. Resistance to antimicrobial agents of Vibrio cholerae El Tor strains isolated during the fourth cholera epidemic in the United Republic of Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Towner, K. J.; Pearson, N. J.; Mhalu, F. S.; O'Grady, F.

    1980-01-01

    Isolates of Vibrio cholerae obtained immediately after the outbreak of the fourth recorded epidemic of cholera in the United Republic of Tanzania were sensitive to tetracycline, but after five months of its extensive therapeutic and prophylactic use, 76% of the isolates were observed to be resistant to this and other antimicrobial agents. The appearance of resistance was found to be due to the rapid spread of antibiotic resistance plasmids belonging to the C incompatibility complex. Although most plasmid incompatibility groups have been shown to be unstable in V. cholerae, the strains found in the present epidemic seem to carry a plasmid belonging to one of the few relatively stable groups. These findings emphasize the importance of monitoring any emergence of bacterial resistance that may occur when mass prophylaxis programmes are in operation and also the importance of determining the genetic basis of the resistance mechanism. PMID:6975183

  4. [Historical report: first isolation of Vibrio cholera serogroup O1 biovar El Tor serovar Inaba during the cholerae epidemic in Peru ‑ 1991].

    PubMed

    Bravo Cruz, Nora; Guillén, Alfredo

    2011-03-01

    20 years ago, a new diarrheal disease was introduced in Peru and the Enteropathogens Reference Laboratory of the Instituto Nacional de Salud had an outstanding role in the isolation and rapid and timely identification of Vibrio cholerae. Cholera had not been seen before, but during the last week of January 1991 an outbreak of acute diarrhea was detected, presenting intense dehydration and some deaths. The epidemic affected, in the beginning, many locations of the peruvian coast. Some working teams of the General Office of Epidemiology and of the Instituto Nacional de Salud obtained fecal samples from patients with acute diarrhea coming from the cities of Chancay, Chimbote, Piura and some hospitals in Lima. The collected samples were transported on Cary and Blair media and processed in the National Reference Laboratory of Enteropathogens (LANARE) of the Instituto Nacional de Salud. Vibrio cholerae serogroup 01 biovar El Tor serovar Inaba was isolated from all the samples, it was sensible to tetracyclines and other antibiotics. This research confirmed the first outbreak of cholera in Peru. PMID:21537782

  5. Cholera in Vietnam: changes in genotypes and emergence of class I integrons containing aminoglycoside resistance gene cassettes in vibrio cholerae O1 strains isolated from 1979 to 1996.

    PubMed

    Dalsgaard, A; Forslund, A; Tam, N V; Vinh, D X; Cam, P D

    1999-03-01

    The number of cholera cases and the mortality rates reported from different regions of Vietnam varied considerably in the period from 1979 to 1996, with between 2,500 and 6,000 cases reported annually from 1992 to 1995. Annual mortality rates ranged from 2.0 to 9.6% from 1979 to 1983 to less than 1.8% after 1983. Major cholera outbreaks were reported from the High Plateau region for the first time in 1994 and 1995; this is an area with limited access to health services and safe drinking-water supplies. All cases were associated with Vibrio cholerae O1. Using ribotyping, cholera toxin (CT) genotyping, and characterization of antibiotic susceptibility patterns and antibiotic resistance genes by PCR, we show that strains isolated after 1990 were clearly different from strains isolated before 1991. In contrast to strains isolated before 1991, 94% of 104 strains isolated after 1990 showed an identical ribotype R1, were resistant to sulfamethoxazole and streptomycin, and showed a different CT genotype. Furthermore, PCR analysis revealed that sulfamethoxazole-resistant strains harbored class I integrons containing a gene cassette ant(3")-1a encoding resistance to streptomycin and spectinomycin. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of class I integrons in V. cholerae. The development of cholera and the changes in the phenotypic and genotypic properties of V. cholerae O1 shown in the present study highlight the importance of monitoring V. cholerae O1 in Vietnam as in other parts of the world. In particular, the emergence of the new ribotype R1 strain containing class I integrons should be further studied. PMID:9986842

  6. Molecular analysis of non-O1/non-O139 Vibrio cholerae isolated from hospitalised patients in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cholera is still a significant public health issue in developing countries. The aetiological agent is Vibrio cholerae and only two serogroups, O1 and O139, are known to cause pandemic or epidemic cholera. In contrast, non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae has only been reported to cause sporadic cholera-like illness and localised outbreaks. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae isolates from hospitalised diarrhoeal patients in Zhejiang Province, China. Results In an active surveillance of enteric pathogens in hospitalised diarrhoeal patients, nine non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae isolates were identified from 746 diarrhoeal stool samples at a rate of 1.2%. These isolates and an additional 31 isolates from sporadic cases and three outbreaks were analysed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). PFGE divided the isolates into 25 PFGE types while MLST divided them into 15 sequence types (STs). A single ST, ST80, was predominant which persisted over several years in different cities and caused two outbreaks in recent years. Antibiotic resistance varied with the majority of the isolates resistant to sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim and nearly all isolates either resistant or intermediate to erythromycin and rifampicin. None of the isolates carried the cholera toxin genes or toxin co-regulated pilus genes but the majority carried a type III secretion system as the key virulence factor. Conclusions Non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae is an important contributor to diarrhoeal infections in China. Resistance to commonly used antibiotics limits treatment options. Continuous surveillance of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae is important for control and prevention of diarrhoeal infections. PMID:23497008

  7. Anethole inhibits growth of recently emerged multidrug resistant toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor variant strains in vitro

    PubMed Central

    ZAHID, M. Shamim Hasan; AWASTHI, Sharda Prasad; HINENOYA, Atsushi; YAMASAKI, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    To search natural compounds having inhibitory effect on bacterial growth is important, particularly in view of growing multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of bacterial pathogens. Like other bacterial pathogens, MDR Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of diarrheal disease cholera, is becoming a great concern. As an approach of searching new antimicrobial agents, here, we show that anethole, a well-studied natural component of sweet fennel and star anise seeds, could potentially inhibit the growth of MDR O1 El Tor biotype, the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic variant strains of toxigenic V. cholerae. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of anethole against diverse O1 El Tor biotype strains is evaluated as 200 µg/ml. Moreover, the effect of anethole is bactericidal and exerts rapid-killing action on V. cholerae cells. This study is the first report which demonstrates that anethole, purified from natural compound, is a potent inhibitor of growth of toxigenic V. cholerae. Our data suggest that anethole could be a potential antimicrobial drug candidate, particularly against MDR V. cholerae mediated infections. PMID:25648987

  8. Evaluation of synthetic schemes to prepare immunogenic conjugates of Vibrio cholerae O139 capsular polysaccharide with chicken serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Kossaczka, Z; Szu, S C

    2000-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae serotype O139 is a new etiologic agent of epidemic cholera. There is no vaccine available against cholera caused by this serotype. V. cholerae O139 is an encapsulated bacterium, and its polysaccharide capsule is an essential virulent factor and likely protective antigen. This study evaluated several synthetic schemes for preparation of conjugates of V. cholerae O139 capsular polysaccharide (CPS) with chicken serum albumin as the carrier protein (CSA) using 1-ethyl-3(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) or 1-cyano-4-dimethylaminopyridinium tetrafluoroborate (CDAP) as activating agents. Four conjugates described here as representative of many experiments were synthesized in 2 steps: 1) preparation of adipic acid hydrazide derivative of CPS (CPS(AH)) or of CSA (CSA(AH)), and 2) binding of CPS(AH) to CSA or of CPS to CSA(AH). Although all conjugates induced CPS antibodies, the conjugate prepared by EDC-mediated binding of CPS and CSA(AH) (EDC:CPS-CSA(AH)) was statistically significantly less immunogenic than the other three conjugates. Representative sera from mice injected with these three conjugates contained antibodies that mediated the lysis of V. cholerae O139 inoculum. Evaluation of the different synthetic schemes and reaction conditions in relation to the immunogenicity of the resultant conjugates provided the basis for the preparation of a V. cholerae O139 conjugate vaccine with a medically useful carrier protein such as diphtheria toxin mutant. PMID:11294508

  9. Anethole inhibits growth of recently emerged multidrug resistant toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor variant strains in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-05-01

    To search natural compounds having inhibitory effect on bacterial growth is important, particularly in view of growing multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of bacterial pathogens. Like other bacterial pathogens, MDR Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of diarrheal disease cholera, is becoming a great concern. As an approach of searching new antimicrobial agents, here, we show that anethole, a well-studied natural component of sweet fennel and star anise seeds, could potentially inhibit the growth of MDR O1 El Tor biotype, the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic variant strains of toxigenic V. cholerae. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of anethole against diverse O1 El Tor biotype strains is evaluated as 200 µg/ml. Moreover, the effect of anethole is bactericidal and exerts rapid-killing action on V. cholerae cells. This study is the first report which demonstrates that anethole, purified from natural compound, is a potent inhibitor of growth of toxigenic V. cholerae. Our data suggest that anethole could be a potential antimicrobial drug candidate, particularly against MDR V. cholerae mediated infections. PMID:25648987

  10. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of Vibrio cholerae EpsG

    SciTech Connect

    Jens, Jason; Raghunathan, Kannan; Vago, Frank; Arvidson, Dennis

    2010-01-12

    EpsG is the major pseudopilin protein of the Vibrio cholerae type II secretion system. An expression plasmid that encodes an N-terminally truncated form of EpsG with a C-terminal noncleavable His tag was constructed. Recombinant EpsG was expressed in Escherichia coli; the truncated protein was purified and crystallized by hanging-drop vapor diffusion against a reservoir containing 6 mM zinc sulfate, 60 mM MES pH 6.5, 15% PEG MME 550. The crystals diffracted X-rays to a resolution of 2.26 {angstrom} and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.61, b = 70.02, c = 131.54 {angstrom}.

  11. Small Molecule-Induced Allosteric Activation of the Vibrio Cholerae RTX Cysteine Protease Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lupardus, P.J.; Shen, A.; Bogyo, M.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-19

    Vibrio cholerae RTX (repeats in toxin) is an actin-disrupting toxin that is autoprocessed by an internal cysteine protease domain (CPD). The RTX CPD is efficiently activated by the eukaryote-specific small molecule inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}), and we present the 2.1 angstrom structure of the RTX CPD in complex with InsP{sub 6}. InsP{sub 6} binds to a conserved basic cleft that is distant from the protease active site. Biochemical and kinetic analyses of CPD mutants indicate that InsP{sub 6} binding induces an allosteric switch that leads to the autoprocessing and intracellular release of toxin-effector domains.

  12. Genetic diversity among toxigenic and nontoxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 isolated from the Western Hemisphere.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, F.; Evins, G. M.; Cook, W. L.; Almeida, R.; Hargrett-Bean, N.; Wachsmuth, K.

    1991-01-01

    Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis was used to examine genetic relationships among and between toxigenic and non-toxigenic isolates of Vibrio cholerae O1 obtained from patients and the environment in the US Gulf Coast and surrounding areas. A total of 23 toxigenic and 23 non-toxigenic strains were examined. All the toxigenic and 7 of the non-toxigenic strains had the same alleles at 16 enzyme loci, whereas the balance of the nontoxigenic strains had 9 distinct combinations of alleles. This study suggests that all of the toxigenic strains belong to a single clone, and that while some of the non-toxigenic isolates were related, most were of diverse origin. PMID:1879486

  13. Complete genome assemblies for two single-chromosome Vibrio cholerae isolates, strains 1154-74 (serogroup O49) and 10432-62 (serogroup O27)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johnson, Shannon Lyn; Khiani, A.; Bishop-Lilly, K. A.; Chapman, C.; Patel, M.; Verratti, K.; Teshima, Hazuki; Munk, A. C.; Bruce, David Carlton; Han, C. S.; et al

    2015-05-14

    We report the completed genome sequences for two non-O1/non-O139 Vibrio cholerae isolates. Each isolate has only a single chromosome, as opposed to the normal paradigm of two chromosomes found in all other V. cholerae isolates.

  14. A Bacterial Hemerythrin Domain Regulates Activity of a Vibrio cholerae Di-Guanylate Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Ruth A.; Ali, Syed Khalid; Klose, Karl E.; Kurtz, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    The first demonstrated example of a regulatory function for a bacterial hemerythrin (Bhr) domain is reported. Bhrs have a characteristic sequence motif providing ligand residues for a type of non-heme diiron site that is known to bind O2 and undergo autoxidation. The amino acid sequence encoded by the gene, VC1216, from Vibrio cholerae O1 biovar El Tor str. N16961 contains an N-terminal Bhr domain connected to a C-terminal domain characteristic of bacterial di-guanylate cyclases (DGCs) that catalyze formation of cyclic di-(3′,5′)-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) from GTP. This protein, Vc Bhr-DGC, was found to contain two tightly bound non-heme iron atoms per protein monomer. The as-isolated protein showed the spectroscopic signatures of oxo/dicarboxylato-bridged non-heme diferric sites of previously characterized Bhr domains. The diiron site was capable of cycling between diferric and diferrous forms, the latter of which was stable only under anaerobic conditions, undergoing rapid autoxidation upon exposure to air. Vc Bhr-DGC showed approximately 10-times higher DGC activity in the diferrous relative to the diferric form. The level of intracellular c-di-GMP is known to regulate biofilm formation in Vibrio cholerae. The higher DGC activity of the diferrous Vc Bhr-DGC is consistent with induction of biofilm formation in low dioxygen environments. The non-heme diiron cofactor in the Bhr domain thus represents an alternative to heme or flavin for redox and/or diatomic gas sensing and regulation of DGC activity. PMID:23057727

  15. Genomic location of the major ribosomal protein gene locus determines Vibrio cholerae global growth and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Soler-Bistué, Alfonso; Mondotte, Juan A; Bland, Michael Jason; Val, Marie-Eve; Saleh, María-Carla; Mazel, Didier

    2015-04-01

    The effects on cell physiology of gene order within the bacterial chromosome are poorly understood. In silico approaches have shown that genes involved in transcription and translation processes, in particular ribosomal protein (RP) genes, localize near the replication origin (oriC) in fast-growing bacteria suggesting that such a positional bias is an evolutionarily conserved growth-optimization strategy. Such genomic localization could either provide a higher dosage of these genes during fast growth or facilitate the assembly of ribosomes and transcription foci by keeping physically close the many components of these macromolecular machines. To explore this, we used novel recombineering tools to create a set of Vibrio cholerae strains in which S10-spec-α (S10), a locus bearing half of the ribosomal protein genes, was systematically relocated to alternative genomic positions. We show that the relative distance of S10 to the origin of replication tightly correlated with a reduction of S10 dosage, mRNA abundance and growth rate within these otherwise isogenic strains. Furthermore, this was accompanied by a significant reduction in the host-invasion capacity in Drosophila melanogaster. Both phenotypes were rescued in strains bearing two S10 copies highly distal to oriC, demonstrating that replication-dependent gene dosage reduction is the main mechanism behind these alterations. Hence, S10 positioning connects genome structure to cell physiology in Vibrio cholerae. Our results show experimentally for the first time that genomic positioning of genes involved in the flux of genetic information conditions global growth control and hence bacterial physiology and potentially its evolution. PMID:25875621

  16. A mathematical model and quantitative comparison of the small RNA circuit in the Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Hunter, G A M; Vasquez, F Guevara; Keener, J P

    2013-08-01

    Quorum sensing is the process by which bacteria regulate their gene expression based on the local cell-population density. The quorum sensing systems of Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae are comprised of a phosphorelay cascade coupled to a small RNA (sRNA) circuit. The sRNA circuit contains multiple quorum regulated small RNA (Qrr) that regulate expression of the homologous master transcriptional regulators LuxR (in V. harveyi) and HapR (in V. cholerae). Their quorum sensing systems are topologically similar and homologous thereby making it difficult to understand why repression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr. In this work we formulate and parameterize a novel mathematical model of the V. harveyi and V. cholerae sRNA circuit. We parameterize the model by fitting it to a variety of empirical data from both species. We show that we can distinguish all of the parameters and that the parameterizations (one for each species) are robust to errors in the data. We then use our model to propose some experiments to identify and explain kinetic differences between the species. We find that V. cholerae Qrr are more abundant and more sensitive to changes in LuxO than V. harveyi Qrr and argue that this is why expression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr. PMID:23820088

  17. A mathematical model and quantitative comparison of the small RNA circuit in the Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, G. A. M.; Guevara Vasquez, F.; Keener, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    Quorum sensing is the process by which bacteria regulate their gene expression based on the local cell-population density. The quorum sensing systems of Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae are comprised of a phosphorelay cascade coupled to a small RNA (sRNA) circuit. The sRNA circuit contains multiple quorum regulated small RNA (Qrr) that regulate expression of the homologous master transcriptional regulators LuxR (in V. harveyi) and HapR (in V. cholerae). Their quorum sensing systems are topologically similar and homologous thereby making it difficult to understand why repression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr. In this work we formulate and parameterize a novel mathematical model of the V. harveyi and V. cholerae sRNA circuit. We parameterize the model by fitting it to a variety of empirical data from both species. We show that we can distinguish all of the parameters and that the parameterizations (one for each species) are robust to errors in the data. We then use our model to propose some experiments to identify and explain kinetic differences between the species. We find that V. cholerae Qrr are more abundant and more sensitive to changes in LuxO than V. harveyi Qrr and argue that this is why expression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr.

  18. A Bistable Switch and Anatomical Site Control Vibrio cholerae Virulence Gene Expression in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Alex T.; Dolganov, Nadia A.; Rasmussen, Thomas; Otto, Glen; Miller, Michael C.; Felt, Stephen A.; Torreilles, Stéphanie; Schoolnik, Gary K.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental, but unanswered question in host-pathogen interactions is the timing, localization and population distribution of virulence gene expression during infection. Here, microarray and in situ single cell expression methods were used to study Vibrio cholerae growth and virulence gene expression during infection of the rabbit ligated ileal loop model of cholera. Genes encoding the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT) were powerfully expressed early in the infectious process in bacteria adjacent to epithelial surfaces. Increased growth was found to co-localize with virulence gene expression. Significant heterogeneity in the expression of tcpA, the repeating subunit of TCP, was observed late in the infectious process. The expression of tcpA, studied in single cells in a homogeneous medium, demonstrated unimodal induction of tcpA after addition of bicarbonate, a chemical inducer of virulence gene expression. Striking bifurcation of the population occurred during entry into stationary phase: one subpopulation continued to express tcpA, whereas the expression declined in the other subpopulation. ctxA, encoding the A subunit of CT, and toxT, encoding the proximal master regulator of virulence gene expression also exhibited the bifurcation phenotype. The bifurcation phenotype was found to be reversible, epigenetic and to persist after removal of bicarbonate, features consistent with bistable switches. The bistable switch requires the positive-feedback circuit controlling ToxT expression and formation of the CRP-cAMP complex during entry into stationary phase. Key features of this bistable switch also were demonstrated in vivo, where striking heterogeneity in tcpA expression was observed in luminal fluid in later stages of the infection. When this fluid was diluted into artificial seawater, bacterial aggregates continued to express tcpA for prolonged periods of time. The bistable control of virulence gene expression points to a mechanism that could

  19. Application of Quantum-Dot Conjugates for Detection and Subspecies Differentiation of Vibrio cholerae by Optical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erohin, P. S.; Utkin, D. V.; Kouklev, V. E.; Ossina, N. A.; Miheeva, E. A.; Alenkina, T. V.

    2016-03-01

    The application of bioconjugates of specific antibodies and CdSe quantum dots to identify two serovariants of Vibrio cholerae using fluorescence microscopy and optical spectroscopy is considered. It is found that a mixture of different bioconjugates with different emission maxima can be used without affecting the specificity of the method. Different V. cholerae serovariants are colored differently in fl uorescence microscopy (bright green and bright yellow), thereby allowing subspecies differentiation. The absorption spectrum of the bacterial suspension changed with homologous antigens in the sample and did not change with heterologous antigens. It is shown that the quantum-dot bioconjugates can serve as an alternative to the traditional fluorescence and agglutination diagnostics.

  20. Plant-based Production of Two Chimeric Monoclonal IgG Antibodies Directed against Immunodominant Epitopes of Vibrio cholerae Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Kara J.; Giffen, Samantha R.; Pauly, Michael H.; Kim, Do H.; Bohorov, Ognian; Bohorova, Natasha; Whaley, Kevin J.; Zeitlin, Larry; Mantis, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    We have produced and characterized two chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that bind different immunodominant epitopes on Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide (LPS). MAb 2D6 IgG1 recognizes Ogawa O-polysaccharide antigen, while mAb ZAC-3 IgG1 recognizes core/lipid A moiety of Ogawa and Inaba LPS. Both antibodies were expressed using a Nicotiana benthamiana-based rapid antibody-manufacturing platform (RAMP) and evaluated in vitro for activities associated with immunity to V. cholerae, including vibriocidal activity, bacterial agglutination and motility arrest. PMID:25865265

  1. Experimental non-O group 1 Vibrio cholerae gastroenteritis in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J G; Takeda, T; Tall, B D; Losonsky, G A; Bhattacharya, S K; Forrest, B D; Kay, B A; Nishibuchi, M

    1990-01-01

    In this study, 27 volunteers received one of three non-O group 1 Vibrio cholerae strains in doses as high as 10(9) CFU. Only one strain (strain C) caused diarrhea: this strain was able to colonize the gastrointestinal tract, and produced a heat-stable enterotoxin (NAG-ST). Diarrhea was not seen with a strain (strain A) that colonized the intestine but did not produce NAG-ST, nor with a strain (strain B) that produced NAG-ST but did not colonize. Persons receiving strain C had diarrhea and abdominal cramps. Diarrheal stool volumes ranged from 154 to 5,397 ml; stool samples from the patient having 5,397 ml of diarrhea were tested and found to contain NAG-ST. The median incubation period for illness was 10 h. There was a suggestion that occurrence of diarrhea was dependent on inoculum size. Immune responses to homologous outer membrane proteins, lipopolysaccharide, and whole-cell lysates were demonstrable with all three strains. Our data demonstrate that V. cholerae of O groups other than 1 are able to cause severe diarrheal disease. However, not all strains are pathogenic for humans: virulence of strain C may be dependent on its ability both to colonize the intestine and to produce a toxin such as NAG-ST. Images PMID:2312721

  2. Identification of a Vibrio cholerae chemoreceptor that senses taurine and amino acids as attractants.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, So-ichiro; Takahashi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Suzuki, Daisuke; Itoh, Yasuaki; Sumita, Kazumasa; Uchida, Yumiko; Homma, Michio; Imada, Katsumi; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, was found to be attracted by taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a major constituent of human bile. Mlp37, the closest homolog of the previously identified amino acid chemoreceptor Mlp24, was found to mediate taxis to taurine as well as L-serine, L-alanine, L-arginine, and other amino acids. Methylation of Mlp37 was enhanced upon the addition of taurine and amino acids. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that a purified periplasmic fragment of Mlp37 binds directly to taurine, L-serine, L-alanine and L-arginine. Crystal structures of the periplamic domain of Mlp37 revealed that L-serine and taurine bind to the membrane-distal PAS domain in essentially in the same way. The structural information was supported by characterising the in vivo properties of alanine-substituted mutant forms of Mlp37. The fact that the ligand-binding domain of the L-serine complex had a small opening, which would accommodate a larger R group, accounts for the broad ligand specificity of Mlp37 and allowed us to visualise ligand binding to Mlp37 with fluorescently labelled L-serine. Taken together, we conclude that Mlp37 serves as the major chemoreceptor for taurine and various amino acids. PMID:26878914

  3. Nucleotide sequence of ompV, the gene for a major Vibrio cholerae outer membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Pohlner, J; Meyer, T F; Jalajakumari, M B; Manning, P A

    1986-12-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the ompV gene of Vibrio cholerae was determined. The product of the gene is a 28,000 dalton protein which, after the removal of a 19 amino acid signal sequence, produces a mature outer membrane protein of 26,000 daltons. The cleavage site was determined by amino-terminal amino acid sequencing of the purified mature protein. The DNA upstream of the gene shows the presence of a typical promoter region as judged from the Escherichia coli consensus information; however, the Shine-Dalgarno sequence is associated with a region capable of forming a secondary structure in the mRNA. The formation of this structure would inhibit binding of the mRNA to the ribosome and reduce translation. It is proposed that this structure is recognized by a positive activator in V. cholerae and because of its absence in E. coli ompV is poorly expressed. The distribution of rare codons within ompV suggests that they may serve to slow down the translation of particular domains such that the nascent polypeptide has an opportunity to take up its conformation without interference from the later formed regions. Such a mechanism could aid localization of the protein if export were by a contranslational secretion system. PMID:3031428

  4. Identification of a Vibrio cholerae chemoreceptor that senses taurine and amino acids as attractants

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, So-ichiro; Takahashi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Suzuki, Daisuke; Itoh, Yasuaki; Sumita, Kazumasa; Uchida, Yumiko; Homma, Michio; Imada, Katsumi; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, was found to be attracted by taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a major constituent of human bile. Mlp37, the closest homolog of the previously identified amino acid chemoreceptor Mlp24, was found to mediate taxis to taurine as well as L-serine, L-alanine, L-arginine, and other amino acids. Methylation of Mlp37 was enhanced upon the addition of taurine and amino acids. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that a purified periplasmic fragment of Mlp37 binds directly to taurine, L-serine, L-alanine and L-arginine. Crystal structures of the periplamic domain of Mlp37 revealed that L-serine and taurine bind to the membrane-distal PAS domain in essentially in the same way. The structural information was supported by characterising the in vivo properties of alanine-substituted mutant forms of Mlp37. The fact that the ligand-binding domain of the L-serine complex had a small opening, which would accommodate a larger R group, accounts for the broad ligand specificity of Mlp37 and allowed us to visualise ligand binding to Mlp37 with fluorescently labelled L-serine. Taken together, we conclude that Mlp37 serves as the major chemoreceptor for taurine and various amino acids. PMID:26878914

  5. Architectural transitions in Vibrio cholerae biofilms at single-cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Drescher, Knut; Dunkel, Jörn; Nadell, Carey D; van Teeffelen, Sven; Grnja, Ivan; Wingreen, Ned S; Stone, Howard A; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-04-01

    Many bacterial species colonize surfaces and form dense 3D structures, known as biofilms, which are highly tolerant to antibiotics and constitute one of the major forms of bacterial biomass on Earth. Bacterial biofilms display remarkable changes during their development from initial attachment to maturity, yet the cellular architecture that gives rise to collective biofilm morphology during growth is largely unknown. Here, we use high-resolution optical microscopy to image all individual cells in Vibrio cholerae biofilms at different stages of development, including colonies that range in size from 2 to 4,500 cells. From these data, we extracted the precise 3D cellular arrangements, cell shapes, sizes, and global morphological features during biofilm growth on submerged glass substrates under flow. We discovered several critical transitions of the internal and external biofilm architectures that separate the major phases of V. cholerae biofilm growth. Optical imaging of biofilms with single-cell resolution provides a new window into biofilm formation that will prove invaluable to understanding the mechanics underlying biofilm development. PMID:26933214

  6. [Microbiological characterization of non-O1 Vibrio cholerae isolated in Cuba].

    PubMed

    Bravo Fariñas, Laura; Fernández, Anabel; Ramírez, María M; Llop, Alina; Martínez, Gerardo; Hernández, Raquel I; Cabrera, Luis E; Morier, Luis; Fraga, Jorge; Núñez, Fidel A; Aguila, Adalberto

    2007-01-01

    The study of 422 non-01 Vibrio cholerae strains from nine provinces, 9 of them isolated from a water-borne disease outbreak, was performed. All the strains exhibited antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence factors. The nine strains from the outbreak were subjected to a DNA macrorestriction study based on the pulsed field electrophoresis technique. For the first time in Cuba and the Caribbean. The circulation of atypical non-01 V cholerae strains (resistent to vibriostatic compound 0129 and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole). The behavior of antimicrobial susceptibility evinced for the first time the circulation of two different resistence patterns in Cuba (ampicilline, trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole, sulfonamide and tetracycline, trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole, sulfonamide). The frequency of trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole-resistent strains was similar during the whole period of study. However, resistance to ampicilline decreased whereas resistance to tetracycline increased. The main found virulence factors were gelatinase, hemolysine, elastase and adherence to Hep-2 cells. On the other hand, the outbreak strains showed higher percentages than the others due to the presence of heat-liable toxin and fimbriae. The results of the molecular and epidemiological studies allowed giving a speedy and accurate response that explained the etiology of the first food-borne disease outbreak. PMID:23427461

  7. Role of Vibrio cholerae O139 surface polysaccharides in intestinal colonization.

    PubMed

    Nesper, Jutta; Schild, Stefan; Lauriano, Crystal M; Kraiss, Anita; Klose, Karl E; Reidl, Joachim

    2002-11-01

    Since the first occurrence of O139 Vibrio cholerae as a cause of cholera epidemics, this serogroup has been investigated intensively, and it has been found that its pathogenicity is comparable to that of O1 El Tor strains. O139 isolates express a thin capsule, composed of a polymer of repeating units structurally identical to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O side chain. In this study, we investigated the role of LPS O side chain and capsular polysaccharide (CPS) in intestinal colonization by with genetically engineered mutants. We constructed CPS-negative, CPS/LPS O side chain-negative, and CPS-positive/LPS O side chain-negative mutants. Furthermore, we constructed two mutants with defects in LPS core oligosaccharide (OS) assembly. Loss of LPS O side chain or CPS resulted in a approximately 30-fold reduction in colonization of the infant mouse small intestine, indicating that the presence of both LPS O side chain and CPS is important during the colonization process. The strain lacking both CPS and LPS O side chain and a CPS-positive, LPS O side chain-negative core OS mutant were both essentially unable to colonize. To characterize the role of surface polysaccharides in survival in the host intestine, resistance to several antimicrobial substances was investigated in vitro. These investigations revealed that the presence of CPS protects the cell against attack of the complement system and that an intact core OS is necessary for survival in the presence of bile. PMID:12379674

  8. Vibrio cholerae use pili and flagella synergistically to effect motility switching and conditional surface attachment

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn C. N.; Gibiansky, Maxsim L.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.; Golestanian, Ramin; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2015-01-01

    We show that Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, use their flagella and mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) type IV pili synergistically to switch between two complementary motility states that together facilitate surface selection and attachment. Flagellar rotation counter-rotates the cell body, causing MSHA pili to have periodic mechanical contact with the surface for surface-skimming cells. Using tracking algorithms at 5 ms resolution we observe two motility behaviours: ‘roaming’, characterised by meandering trajectories, and ‘orbiting’, characterised by repetitive high-curvature orbits. We develop a hydrodynamic model showing that these phenotypes result from a nonlinear relationship between trajectory shape and frictional forces between pili and the surface: strong pili-surface interactions generate orbiting motion, increasing the local bacterial loiter time. Time-lapse imaging reveals how only orbiting mode cells can attach irreversibly and form microcolonies. These observations suggest that MSHA pili are crucial for surface selection, irreversible attachment, and ultimately microcolony formation. PMID:25234699

  9. Evolutionary origin of pathogenic determinants in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae O1.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T; Gojobori, T; Yokota, T

    1987-01-01

    Three families of the evolutionarily related pathogenic determinants in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae O1, a family of cholera enterotoxin (CT) and heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) including CT, LTh, and LTp, a family of heat-stable enterotoxin I (STI) including STIa and STIb, and a family of K88 enteroadhesion fimbriae including K88ab, K88ac, and K88ad were analyzed for synonymous (silent) nucleotide substitutions by using the gene nucleotide sequences of earlier reports and the LTp gene nucleotide sequence presented in this paper. The data suggested that the divergences between LT and CT and between STIa and STIb occurred in the remote past, whereas those between LTh and LTp and between members of the K88 family occurred very recently. We concluded that the LT gene is a foreign gene that has been acquired by E. coli to form an enteropathogen. This provides evolutionary evidence of species-to-species transfer of pathogenic determinants in procaryotes. PMID:3546273

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a ribokinase from Vibrio cholerae O395

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Rakhi; Dandopath Patra, Madhumita; Banerjee, Ramanuj; Sen, Udayaditya

    2014-01-01

    Ribokinase (RK) is one of the principal enzymes in carbohydrate metabolism, catalyzing the reaction of d-ribose and adenosine triphosphate to produce ribose-5-phosphate and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). To provide further insight into the catalytic mechanism, the rbsK gene from Vibrio cholerae O395 encoding ribokinase was cloned and the protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified using Ni2+–NTA affinity chromatography. Crystals of V. cholerae RK (Vc-RK) and of its complex with ribose and ADP were grown in the presence of polyethylene glycol 6000 and diffracted to 3.4 and 1.75 Å resolution, respectively. Analysis of the diffraction data showed that both crystals possess symmetry consistent with space group P1. In the Vc-RK crystals, 16 molecules in the asymmetric unit were arranged in a spiral fashion, leaving a large empty space inside the crystal, which is consistent with its high Matthews coefficient (3.9 Å3 Da−1) and solvent content (68%). In the Vc-RK co-crystals four molecules were located in the asymmetric unit with a Matthews coefficient of 2.4 Å3 Da−1, corresponding to a solvent content of 50%. PMID:25084391

  11. Vibrio cholerae use pili and flagella synergistically to effect motility switching and conditional surface attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utada, Andrew S.; Bennett, Rachel R.; Fong, Jiunn C. N.; Gibiansky, Maxsim L.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.; Golestanian, Ramin; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-09-01

    We show that Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, use their flagella and mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) type IV pili synergistically to switch between two complementary motility states that together facilitate surface selection and attachment. Flagellar rotation counter-rotates the cell body, causing MSHA pili to have periodic mechanical contact with the surface for surface-skimming cells. Using tracking algorithms at 5 ms resolution we observe two motility behaviours: ‘roaming', characterized by meandering trajectories, and ‘orbiting’, characterized by repetitive high-curvature orbits. We develop a hydrodynamic model showing that these phenotypes result from a nonlinear relationship between trajectory shape and frictional forces between pili and the surface: strong pili-surface interactions generate orbiting motion, increasing the local bacterial loiter time. Time-lapse imaging reveals how only orbiting mode cells can attach irreversibly and form microcolonies. These observations suggest that MSHA pili are crucial for surface selection, irreversible attachment, and ultimately microcolony formation.

  12. Bile salt–induced intermolecular disulfide bond formation activates Vibrio cholerae virulence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Menghua; Liu, Zhi; Hughes, Chambers; Stern, Andrew M.; Wang, Hui; Zhong, Zengtao; Kan, Biao; Fenical, William; Zhu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    To be successful pathogens, bacteria must often restrict the expression of virulence genes to host environments. This requires a physical or chemical marker of the host environment as well as a cognate bacterial system for sensing the presence of a host to appropriately time the activation of virulence. However, there have been remarkably few such signal–sensor pairs identified, and the molecular mechanisms for host-sensing are virtually unknown. By directly applying a reporter strain of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, to a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate containing mouse intestinal extracts, we found two host signals that activate virulence gene transcription. One of these was revealed to be the bile salt taurocholate. We then show that a set of bile salts cause dimerization of the transmembrane transcription factor TcpP by inducing intermolecular disulfide bonds between cysteine (C)-207 residues in its periplasmic domain. Various genetic and biochemical analyses led us to propose a model in which the other cysteine in the periplasmic domain, C218, forms an inhibitory intramolecular disulfide bond with C207 that must be isomerized to form the active C207–C207 intermolecular bond. We then found bile salt–dependent effects of these cysteine mutations on survival in vivo, correlating to our in vitro model. Our results are a demonstration of a mechanism for direct activation of the V. cholerae virulence cascade by a host signal molecule. They further provide a paradigm for recognition of the host environment in pathogenic bacteria through periplasmic cysteine oxidation. PMID:23341592

  13. Enumeration of viable non-culturable Vibrio cholerae using propidium monoazide combined with quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Liang, Weili; Kan, Biao

    2015-08-01

    The well-known human pathogenic bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, can enter a physiologically viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state under stress conditions. The differentiation of VBNC cells and nonviable cells is essential for both disease prevention and basic research. Among all the methods for detecting viability, propidium monoazide (PMA) combined with real-time PCR is popular because of its specificity, sensitivity, and speed. However, the effect of PMA treatment is not consistent and varies among different species and conditions. In this study, with an initial cell concentration of 1×10(8) CFU/ml, time and dose-effect relationships of different PMA treatments were evaluated via quantitative real-time PCR using live cell suspensions, dead cell suspensions and VBNC cell suspensions of V. cholerae O1 El Tor strain C6706. The results suggested that a PMA treatment of 20 μM PMA for 20 min was optimal under our conditions. This treatment maximized the suppression of the PCR signal from membrane-compromised dead cells but had little effect on the signal from membrane-intact live cells. In addition to the characteristics of PMA treatment itself, the initial concentration of the targeted bacteria showed a significant negative influence on the stability of PMA-PCR assay in this study. We developed a strategy that mimicked a 1×10(8) CFU/ml cell concentration with dead bacteria of a different bacterial species, the DNA of which cannot be amplified using the real time PCR primers. With this strategy, our optimal approach successfully overcame the impact of low cell density and generated stable and reliable results for counting viable cells of V. cholerae in the VBNC state. PMID:26001818

  14. XerD-mediated FtsK-independent integration of TLCϕ into the Vibrio cholerae genome.

    PubMed

    Midonet, Caroline; Das, Bhabatosh; Paly, Evelyne; Barre, Francois-Xavier

    2014-11-25

    As in most bacteria, topological problems arising from the circularity of the two Vibrio cholerae chromosomes, chrI and chrII, are resolved by the addition of a crossover at a specific site of each chromosome, dif, by two tyrosine recombinases, XerC and XerD. The reaction is under the control of a cell division protein, FtsK, which activates the formation of a Holliday Junction (HJ) intermediate by XerD catalysis that is resolved into product by XerC catalysis. Many plasmids and phages exploit Xer recombination for dimer resolution and for integration, respectively. In all cases so far described, they rely on an alternative recombination pathway in which XerC catalyzes the formation of a HJ independently of FtsK. This is notably the case for CTXϕ, the cholera toxin phage. Here, we show that in contrast, integration of TLCϕ, a toxin-linked cryptic satellite phage that is almost always found integrated at the chrI dif site before CTXϕ, depends on the formation of a HJ by XerD catalysis, which is then resolved by XerC catalysis. The reaction nevertheless escapes the normal cellular control exerted by FtsK on XerD. In addition, we show that the same reaction promotes the excision of TLCϕ, along with any CTXϕ copy present between dif and its left attachment site, providing a plausible mechanism for how chrI CTXϕ copies can be eliminated, as occurred in the second wave of the current cholera pandemic. PMID:25385643

  15. Cloning of a Vibrio cholerae vibriobactin gene cluster: identification of genes required for early steps in siderophore biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Wyckoff, E E; Stoebner, J A; Reed, K E; Payne, S M

    1997-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae secretes the catechol siderophore vibriobactin in response to iron limitation. Vibriobactin is structurally similar to enterobactin, the siderophore produced by Escherichia coli, and both organisms produce 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) as an intermediate in siderophore biosynthesis. To isolate and characterize V. cholerae genes involved in vibriobactin biosynthesis, we constructed a genomic cosmid bank of V. cholerae DNA and isolated clones that complemented mutations in E. coli enterobactin biosynthesis genes. V. cholerae homologs of entA, entB, entC, entD, and entE were identified on overlapping cosmid clones. Our data indicate that the vibriobactin genes are clustered, like the E. coli enterobactin genes, but the organization of the genes within these clusters is different. In this paper, we present the organization and sequences of genes involved in the synthesis and activation of DHBA. In addition, a V. cholerae strain with a chromosomal mutation in vibA was constructed by marker exchange. This strain was unable to produce vibriobactin or DHBA, confirming that in V. cholerae VibA catalyzes an early step in vibriobactin biosynthesis. PMID:9371453

  16. SURVIVAL, INDUCTION AND RESUSCITATION OF Vibrio cholerae FROM THE VIABLE BUT NON-CULTURABLE STATE IN THE SOUTHERN CARIBBEAN SEA

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Delgado, Milagro; García-Amado, María Alexandra; Contreras, Monica; Incani, Renzo Nino; Chirinos, Humberto; Rojas, Héctor; Suárez, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae, can enter into a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state in response to unfavorable conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ survival of V. cholerae in an aquatic environment of the Southern Caribbean Sea, and its induction and resuscitation from the VBNC state. V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 was inoculated into diffusion chambers placed at the Cuare Wildlife Refuge, Venezuela, and monitored for plate, total and viable cells counts. At 119 days of exposure to the environment, the colony count was < 10 CFU/mL and a portion of the bacterial population entered the VBNC state. Additionally, the viability decreased two orders of magnitude and morphological changes occurred from rod to coccoid cells. Among the aquatic environmental variables, the salinity had negative correlation with the colony counts in the dry season. Resuscitation studies showed significant recovery of cell cultivability with spent media addition (p < 0.05). These results suggest that V. cholerae can persist in the VBNC state in this Caribbean environment and revert to a cultivable form under favorable conditions. The VBNC state might represent a critical step in cholera transmission in susceptible areas. PMID:25651322

  17. Detection of Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 in Environmental Water Samples by an Immunofluorescent-Aggregation Assay ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Duochun; Xu, Xuebin; Deng, Xiaoling; Chen, Changyi; Li, Baisheng; Tan, Hailing; Wang, Haibo; Tang, Song; Qiu, Haiyan; Chen, Jingdiao; Ke, Bixia; Ke, Changwen; Kan, Biao

    2010-01-01

    Environmental waters are an important reservoir for Vibrio cholerae, and effective surveillance of the pathogen can help to warn of and prevent infection with this potentially fatal pathogen. An immunofluorescent-aggregation (IFAG) assay to detect V. cholerae O1 and O139 was established and evaluated with estuarine water samples. The practical application of this assay was compared with the conventional culture method and real-time PCR. The IFAG method had a sensitivity of 103 CFU/ml for detection of V. cholerae O1 and O139 strains in a suspension containing 10 different species of enterobacterial strains (total, 105 CFU/ml). Ten fluorescent bacterial aggregate colonies were randomly picked and tested positive in serum agglutination tests for the V. cholerae O1 and O139 strains, showing a high specificity. The enrichment broths of 146 samples of estuarine water were tested, and the percentage positive by the IFAG assay was 19.9% (29/146), which was significantly higher than that of the conventional culture method (10.3%, 15/146; P < 0.01) but lower than that of real-time PCR (29.5%, 43/146; P < 0.01). The coincidence rates of real-time PCR and IFAG detection were decreased with the reduction of the V. cholerae concentration. The IFAG method, with a high specificity and a relatively high sensitivity, may be used for detection and isolation of V. cholerae in environmental water samples. PMID:20581193

  18. ToxR regulates the production of lipoproteins and the expression of serum resistance in Vibrio cholerae

    SciTech Connect

    Parsot, C.; Taxman, E.; Mekalanos, J.J. )

    1991-03-01

    The genes encoding three lipoproteins of Vibrio cholerae were identified by a combination of DNA sequence analysis and ({sup 3}H)palmitate labeling of hybrid proteins encoded by TnphoA gene fusions. The expression of these three lipoproteins, TagA, AcfD, and TcpC, was controlled by ToxR, the cholera toxin transcriptional activator. The involvement of other bacterial lipoproteins in conferring resistance ot the bactericidal effects of complement prompted us to examine this possibility in V. cholerae. Remarkably, mutations in toxR and tcp genes (including tcpC), involved in the biogenesis of the toxin coregulated pili, rendered V. cholerae about 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 6} times more sensitive to the vibriocidal activity of antibody and complement. Since V. cholerae is a noninvasive organism and toxR and tcp mutants are highly defective in intestinal colonization in animals and humans, these results raise the possibility that resistance to a gut-associated, complement-like bactericidal activity may be a major virulence determinant of V. cholerae and other enterobacterial species.

  19. Survival, induction and resuscitation of Vibrio cholerae from the viable but non-culturable state in the Southern Caribbean Sea.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Delgado, Milagro; García-Amado, María Alexandra; Contreras, Monica; Incani, Renzo Nino; Chirinos, Humberto; Rojas, Héctor; Suárez, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae, can enter into a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state in response to unfavorable conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ survival of V. cholerae in an aquatic environment of the Southern Caribbean Sea, and its induction and resuscitation from the VBNC state. V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 was inoculated into diffusion chambers placed at the Cuare Wildlife Refuge, Venezuela, and monitored for plate, total and viable cells counts. At 119 days of exposure to the environment, the colony count was < 10 CFU/mL and a portion of the bacterial population entered the VBNC state. Additionally, the viability decreased two orders of magnitude and morphological changes occurred from rod to coccoid cells. Among the aquatic environmental variables, the salinity had negative correlation with the colony counts in the dry season. Resuscitation studies showed significant recovery of cell cultivability with spent media addition (p < 0.05). These results suggest that V. cholerae can persist in the VBNC state in this Caribbean environment and revert to a cultivable form under favorable conditions. The VBNC state might represent a critical step in cholera transmission in susceptible areas. PMID:25651322

  20. One-step immunochromatographic dipstick tests for rapid detection of Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Nato, F; Boutonnier, A; Rajerison, M; Grosjean, P; Dartevelle, S; Guénolé, A; Bhuiyan, N A; Sack, D A; Nair, G B; Fournier, J M; Chanteau, S

    2003-05-01

    We describe the development and evaluation of a rapid diagnostic test for Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 based on lipopolysaccharide detection using gold particles. The specificity ranged between 84 and 100%. The sensitivity of the dipsticks ranged from 94.2 to 100% when evaluated with stool samples obtained in Madagascar and Bangladesh. The dipstick can provide a simple tool for epidemiological surveys. PMID:12738652

  1. Nonimmunoglobulin fraction of human milk inhibits bacterial adhesion (hemagglutination) and enterotoxin binding of Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Holmgren, J; Svennerholm, A M; Ahrén, C

    1981-01-01

    Human milk and colostrum samples were divided into an immunoglobulin and a nonimmunoglobulin fraction by immunosorbent chromatography. The ability of these fractions to inhibit bacterial cell adhesion and enterotoxin receptor binding of Vibrio cholerae and various Escherichia coli isolates was then tested by in vitro assays. The strongest effect was generally seen with the nonimmunoglobulin fractions, which were shown to significantly inhibit E. coli cell adhesion (hemagglutination) mediated by CFA/I, CFA/II, or K88 fimbriae (but not type 1 pili) and V. cholerae hemagglutination, as well as the binding of cholera toxin and E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin to GM1 ganglioside. Also, the immunoglobulin fractions had significant inhibitory activity in some of these systems. The results are interpreted to suggest that human milk and colostrum may contain secreted structure analogs of the cell receptors for some bacterial adhesions and enterotoxins; this might contribute to the protective effect of milk against enteric infections. PMID:7021421

  2. Development of a dry reagent-based triplex PCR for the detection of toxigenic and non-toxigenic Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Chua, Ang Lim; Elina, Husni Tan; Lim, Boon Huat; Yean, Chan Yean; Ravichandran, Manickam; Lalitha, Pattabhiraman

    2011-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae has caused severe outbreaks of cholera worldwide with thousands of recorded deaths annually. Molecular diagnosis for cholera has become increasingly important for rapid detection of cholera as the conventional methods are time-consuming and labour intensive. However, traditional PCR tests still require cold-chain transportation and storage as well as trained personnel to perform, which makes them user-unfriendly. The aim of this study was to develop a thermostabilized triplex PCR test for cholera which is in a ready-to-use form and requires no cold chain. The PCR test specifically detects both toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains of V. cholerae based on the cholera toxin A (ctxA) and outer-membrane lipoprotein (lolB) genes. The thermostabilized triplex PCR also incorporates an internal amplification control that helps to check for PCR inhibitors in samples. PCR reagents and the specific primers were lyophilized into a pellet form in the presence of trehalose, which acts as an enzyme stabilizer. The triplex PCR was validated with 174 bacteria-spiked stool specimens and was found to be 100 % sensitive and specific. The stability of the thermostabilized PCR was evaluated using the Q10 method and it was found to be stable for approximately 7 months at 24 °C. The limit of detection of the thermostabilized triplex PCR assay was 2×10(4) c.f.u. at the bacterial cell level and 100 pg DNA at the genomic DNA level, comparable to conventional PCR methods. In conclusion, a rapid thermostabilized triplex PCR assay was developed for detecting toxigenic and non-toxigenic V. cholerae which requires minimal pipetting steps and is cold chain-free. PMID:21183596

  3. Construction and preclinical evaluation of mmCT, a novel mutant cholera toxin adjuvant that can be efficiently produced in genetically manipulated Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Lebens, Michael; Terrinoni, Manuela; Karlsson, Stefan L; Larena, Maximilian; Gustafsson-Hedberg, Tobias; Källgård, Susanne; Nygren, Erik; Holmgren, Jan

    2016-04-19

    There is an urgent need for new adjuvants that are effective with mucosally administered vaccines. Cholera toxin (CT) is the most powerful known mucosal adjuvant but is much too toxic for human use. In an effort to develop a useful mucosal adjuvant we have generated a novel non-toxic mutant CT molecule that retains much of the adjuvant activity of native CT. This was achieved by making the enzymatically active A subunit (CTA) recalcitrant to the site-specific proteolytic cleavage ("nicking") required for toxicity, which was found to require mutations not only in the two residues rendering the molecule resistant to trypsin but also in neighboring sites protecting against cleavage by Vibrio cholerae proteases. This multiple-mutated CT (mmCT) adjuvant protein could be efficiently produced in and purified from the extracellular medium of CT-deleted V. cholerae. The mmCT completely lacked detectable enterotoxicity in an infant mouse model and had >1000-fold reduced cAMP inducing activity compared to native CT in a sensitive mammalian target cell system. It nonetheless proved to have potent adjuvant activity on mucosal and systemic antibody as well as cellular immune responses to mucosally co-administered antigens including oral cholera and intranasal influenza vaccines. We conclude that mmCT is an attractive novel non-toxic mucosal adjuvant for enhancing immune responses to co-administered mucosal vaccines. PMID:26973069

  4. Detection of Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 in environmental waters of rural Bangladesh: a flow-cytometry-based field trial.

    PubMed

    Righetto, L; Zaman, R U; Mahmud, Z H; Bertuzzo, E; Mari, L; Casagrandi, R; Gatto, M; Islam, S; Rinaldo, A

    2015-08-01

    Presence of Vibrio cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 in the waters of the rural area of Matlab, Bangladesh, was investigated with quantitative measurements performed with a portable flow cytometer. The relevance of this work relates to the testing of a field-adapted measurement protocol that might prove useful for cholera epidemic surveillance and for validation of mathematical models. Water samples were collected from different water bodies that constitute the hydrological system of the region, a well-known endemic area for cholera. Water was retrieved from ponds, river waters, and irrigation canals during an inter-epidemic time period. Each sample was filtered and analysed with a flow cytometer for a fast determination of V. cholerae cells contained in those environments. More specifically, samples were treated with O1- and O139-specific antibodies, which allowed precise flow-cytometry-based concentration measurements. Both serogroups were present in the environmental waters with a consistent dominance of V. cholerae O1. These results extend earlier studies where V. cholerae O1 and O139 were mostly detected during times of cholera epidemics using standard culturing techniques. Furthermore, our results confirm that an important fraction of the ponds' host populations of V. cholerae are able to self-sustain even when cholera cases are scarce. Those contaminated ponds may constitute a natural reservoir for cholera endemicity in the Matlab region. Correlations of V. cholerae concentrations with environmental factors and the spatial distribution of V. cholerae populations are also discussed. PMID:25496520

  5. A new Vibrio cholerae sRNA modulates colonization and affects release of outer membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tianyan; Mika, Franziska; Lindmark, Barbro; Liu, Zhi; Schild, Stefan; Bishop, Anne; Zhu, Jun; Camilli, Andrew; Johansson, Jörgen; Vogel, Jörg; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2008-01-01

    We discovered a new small non-coding RNA (sRNA) gene, vrrA of Vibrio cholerae O1 strain A1552. A vrrA mutant overproduces OmpA porin, and we demonstrate that the 140 nt VrrA RNA represses ompA translation by base-pairing with the 5′ region of the mRNA. The RNA chaperone Hfq is not stringently required for VrrA action, but expression of the vrrA gene requires the membrane stress sigma factor, σE, suggesting that VrrA acts on ompA in response to periplasmic protein folding stress. We also observed that OmpA levels inversely correlated with the number of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), and that VrrA increased OMV production comparable to loss of OmpA. VrrA is the first sRNA known to control OMV formation. Moreover, a vrrA mutant showed a fivefold increased ability to colonize the intestines of infant mice as compared with the wild type. There was increased expression of the main colonization factor of V. cholerae, the toxin co-regulated pili, in the vrrA mutant as monitored by immunoblot detection of the TcpA protein. VrrA overproduction caused a distinct reduction in the TcpA protein level. Our findings suggest that VrrA contributes to bacterial fitness in certain stressful environments, and modulates infection of the host intestinal tract. PMID:18681937

  6. Participation of Chromosome Segregation Protein ParAI of Vibrio cholerae in Chromosome Replication▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kadoya, Ryosuke; Baek, Jong Hwan; Sarker, Arnab; Chattoraj, Dhruba K.

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae carries homologs of plasmid-borne parA and parB genes on both of its chromosomes. The par genes help to segregate many plasmids and chromosomes. Here we have studied the par genes of V. cholerae chromosome I. Earlier studies suggested that ParBI binds to the centromeric site parSI near the origin of replication (oriI), and parSI-ParBI complexes are placed at the cell poles by ParAI. Deletion of parAI and parSI caused the origin-proximal DNA to be less polar. Here we found that deletion of parBI also resulted in a less polar localization of oriI. However, unlike the deletion of parAI, the deletion of parBI increased the oriI number. Replication was normal when both parAI and parBI were deleted, suggesting that ParBI mediates its action through ParAI. Overexpression of ParAI in a parABI-deleted strain also increased the DNA content. The results are similar to those found for Bacillus subtilis, where ParA (Soj) stimulates replication and this activity is repressed by ParB (SpoOJ). As in B. subtilis, the stimulation of replication most likely involves the replication initiator DnaA. Our results indicate that control of chromosomal DNA replication is an additional function of chromosomal par genes conserved across the Gram-positive/Gram-negative divide. PMID:21257772

  7. Lipidation of an FlrC-dependent protein is required for enhanced intestinal colonization by Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Morris, David C; Peng, Fen; Barker, Jeffrey R; Klose, Karl E

    2008-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, has a sheathed, polar flagellum, and motility has been linked to virulence. An operon with two genes, flgO and flgP (VC2207 and VC2206), is positively regulated by FlrC, the activator of class III flagellar genes. Deletion of flgP results in a nonmotile phenotype, demonstrating the requirement of this gene for V. cholerae motility. V. cholerae delta flgP cells synthesize fragile and defective flagella but transcribe flagellar genes similar to the wild-type strain. PhoA fusion analysis indicated that the putative lipoprotein FlgP is localized external to the cytoplasm, and fractionation demonstrated that it was localized to the outer membrane. Mutagenesis of the site of lipidation of FlgP (C18G) prevented [3H]palmitate incorporation and outer membrane localization. Interestingly, FlgP with the mutation C18G [FlgP(C18G)] could complement the delta flgP mutant for motility, and the cells synthesized wild-type flagella. The delta flgP mutant strain was defective for intestinal colonization (approximately 20-fold), but FlgP(C18G) was unable to complement this defect, demonstrating that lipidation of FlgP is essential for its role in intestinal colonization but not flagellar synthesis. FlgP thus represents a novel V. cholerae intestinal colonization factor that is regulated by the flagellar transcription hierarchy. PMID:17981980

  8. Isolation of non-O1 Vibrio cholerae associated with enteric disease of herbivores in western Colorado.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, J B; Schweitzer, D; Ogg, J E

    1985-10-01

    Non-O1 Vibrio cholerae was isolated from a horse (Equus caballus), a lamb (genus Ovis), and two American buffalo (Bison bison) suffering from enteric disease in the western part of Colorado. In 1981, a foal died of apparent respiratory failure. Necropsy findings included heart failure and gastroenteritis. V. cholerae serovar 347 (Smith) was isolated from the colon of this animal. V. cholerae serovar 27 (Smith) was isolated in 1983 from the intestine of a feedlot lamb suffering from pneumonia and severe watery diarrhea. In 1984, an enteric disease occurred in a herd of American bison. The sick animals were depressed and separated from the herd, dying in about 3 days. Of approximately 100 adult bison, 7 died. Necropsy of one animal revealed that gross lesions were limited to the gastrointestinal tract. V. cholerae serovar 27 (Smith) was isolated from the abomasum, duodenum, and colon of this animal. A swab specimen from the intestine of another dead bison also yielded V. cholerae serovar 27 (Smith). PMID:4077968

  9. A Genome-Wide Screen Reveals that the Vibrio cholerae Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Modulates Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Yves A.; Chao, Michael C.; Sasabe, Jumpei; Davis, Brigid M.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse environmental stimuli and a complex network of regulatory factors are known to modulate expression of Vibrio cholerae's principal virulence factors. However, there is relatively little known about how metabolic factors impinge upon the pathogen's well-characterized cascade of transcription factors that induce expression of cholera toxin and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP). Here, we used a transposon insertion site (TIS) sequencing-based strategy to identify new factors required for expression of tcpA, which encodes the major subunit of TCP, the organism's chief intestinal colonization factor. Besides identifying most of the genes known to modulate tcpA expression, the screen yielded ptsI and ptsH, which encode the enzyme I (EI) and Hpr components of the V. cholerae phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS). In addition to reduced expression of TcpA, strains lacking EI, Hpr, or the associated EIIAGlc protein produced less cholera toxin (CT) and had a diminished capacity to colonize the infant mouse intestine. The PTS modulates virulence gene expression by regulating expression of tcpPH and aphAB, which themselves control expression of toxT, the central activator of virulence gene expression. One mechanism by which PTS promotes virulence gene expression appears to be by modulating the amounts of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP). Our findings reveal that the V. cholerae PTS is an additional modulator of the ToxT regulon and demonstrate the potency of loss-of-function TIS sequencing screens for defining regulatory networks. PMID:26056384

  10. Functional and Structural Characterization of Vibrio cholerae Extracellular Serine Protease B, VesB*

    PubMed Central

    Gadwal, Shilpa; Korotkov, Konstantin V.; Delarosa, Jaclyn R.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Sandkvist, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The chymotrypsin subfamily A of serine proteases consists primarily of eukaryotic proteases, including only a few proteases of bacterial origin. VesB, a newly identified serine protease that is secreted by the type II secretion system in Vibrio cholerae, belongs to this subfamily. VesB is likely produced as a zymogen because sequence alignment with trypsinogen identified a putative cleavage site for activation and a catalytic triad, His-Asp-Ser. Using synthetic peptides, VesB efficiently cleaved a trypsin substrate, but not chymotrypsin and elastase substrates. The reversible serine protease inhibitor, benzamidine, inhibited VesB and served as an immobilized ligand for VesB affinity purification, further indicating its relationship with trypsin-like enzymes. Consistent with this family of serine proteases, N-terminal sequencing implied that the propeptide is removed in the secreted form of VesB. Separate mutagenesis of the activation site and catalytic serine rendered VesB inactive, confirming the importance of these features for activity, but not for secretion. Similar to trypsin but, in contrast to thrombin and other coagulation factors, Na+ did not stimulate the activity of VesB, despite containing the Tyr250 signature. The crystal structure of catalytically inactive pro-VesB revealed that the protease domain is structurally similar to trypsinogen. The C-terminal domain of VesB was found to adopt an immunoglobulin (Ig)-fold that is structurally homologous to Ig-folds of other extracellular Vibrio proteins. Possible roles of the Ig-fold domain in stability, substrate specificity, cell surface association, and type II secretion of VesB, the first bacterial multidomain trypsin-like protease with known structure, are discussed. PMID:24459146

  11. Proteolysis of Virulence Regulator ToxR Is Associated with Entry of Vibrio cholerae into a Dormant State

    PubMed Central

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Kim, Tae K.; Skorupski, Karen; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 is a natural inhabitant of aquatic environments and causes the diarrheal disease, cholera. Two of its primary virulence regulators, TcpP and ToxR, are localized in the inner membrane. TcpP is encoded on the Vibrio Pathogenicity Island (VPI), a horizontally acquired mobile genetic element, and functions primarily in virulence gene regulation. TcpP has been shown to undergo regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) in response to environmental conditions that are unfavorable for virulence gene expression. ToxR is encoded in the ancestral genome and is present in non-pathogenic strains of V. cholerae, indicating it has roles outside of the human host. In this study, we show that ToxR undergoes RIP in V. cholerae in response to nutrient limitation at alkaline pH, a condition that occurs during the stationary phase of growth. This process involves the site-2 protease RseP (YaeL), and is dependent upon the RpoE-mediated periplasmic stress response, as deletion mutants for the genes encoding these two proteins cannot proteolyze ToxR under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. We determined that the loss of ToxR, genetically or by proteolysis, is associated with entry of V. cholerae into a dormant state in which the bacterium is normally found in the aquatic environment called viable but nonculturable (VBNC). Strains that can proteolyze ToxR, or do not encode it, lose culturability, experience a change in morphology associated with cells in VBNC, yet remain viable under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. On the other hand, mutant strains that cannot proteolyze ToxR remain culturable and maintain the morphology of cells in an active state of growth. Overall, our findings provide a link between the proteolysis of a virulence regulator and the entry of a pathogen into an environmentally persistent state. PMID:25849031

  12. Proteolysis of virulence regulator ToxR is associated with entry of Vibrio cholerae into a dormant state.

    PubMed

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Kim, Tae K; Skorupski, Karen; Taylor, Ronald K

    2015-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 is a natural inhabitant of aquatic environments and causes the diarrheal disease, cholera. Two of its primary virulence regulators, TcpP and ToxR, are localized in the inner membrane. TcpP is encoded on the Vibrio Pathogenicity Island (VPI), a horizontally acquired mobile genetic element, and functions primarily in virulence gene regulation. TcpP has been shown to undergo regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) in response to environmental conditions that are unfavorable for virulence gene expression. ToxR is encoded in the ancestral genome and is present in non-pathogenic strains of V. cholerae, indicating it has roles outside of the human host. In this study, we show that ToxR undergoes RIP in V. cholerae in response to nutrient limitation at alkaline pH, a condition that occurs during the stationary phase of growth. This process involves the site-2 protease RseP (YaeL), and is dependent upon the RpoE-mediated periplasmic stress response, as deletion mutants for the genes encoding these two proteins cannot proteolyze ToxR under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. We determined that the loss of ToxR, genetically or by proteolysis, is associated with entry of V. cholerae into a dormant state in which the bacterium is normally found in the aquatic environment called viable but nonculturable (VBNC). Strains that can proteolyze ToxR, or do not encode it, lose culturability, experience a change in morphology associated with cells in VBNC, yet remain viable under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. On the other hand, mutant strains that cannot proteolyze ToxR remain culturable and maintain the morphology of cells in an active state of growth. Overall, our findings provide a link between the proteolysis of a virulence regulator and the entry of a pathogen into an environmentally persistent state. PMID:25849031

  13. The RNA Domain Vc1 Regulates Downstream Gene Expression in Response to Cyclic Diguanylate in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Kariisa, Ankunda T.; Weeks, Kevin; Tamayo, Rita

    2016-01-01

    In many bacterial species, including the aquatic bacterium and human pathogen Vibrio cholerae, the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) modulates processes such as biofilm formation, motility, and virulence factor production. By interacting with various effectors, c-di-GMP regulates gene expression or protein function. One type of c-di-GMP receptor is the class I riboswitch, representatives of which have been shown to bind c-di-GMP in vitro. Herein, we examined the in vitro and in vivo function of the putative class I riboswitch in Vibrio cholerae, Vc1, which lies upstream of the gene encoding GbpA, a colonization factor that contributes to attachment of V. cholerae to environmental and host surfaces containing N-acetylglucosamine moieties. We provide evidence that Vc1 RNA interacts directly with c-di-GMP in vitro, and that nucleotides conserved among this class of riboswitch are important for binding. Yet the mutation of these conserved residues individually in the V. cholerae chromosome inconsistently affects the expression of gbpA and production of the GbpA protein. By isolating the regulatory function of Vc1, we show that the Vc1 element positively regulates downstream gene expression in response to c-di-GMP. Together these data suggest that the Vc1 element responds to c-di-GMP in vivo. Positive regulation of gbpA expression by c-di-GMP via Vc1 may influence the ability of V. cholerae to associate with chitin in the aquatic environment and the host intestinal environment. PMID:26849223

  14. A checkpoint control orchestrates the replication of the two chromosomes of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Val, Marie-Eve; Marbouty, Martial; de Lemos Martins, Francisco; Kennedy, Sean P.; Kemble, Harry; Bland, Michael J.; Possoz, Christophe; Koszul, Romain; Skovgaard, Ole; Mazel, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria with multiple chromosomes represent up to 10% of all bacterial species. Unlike eukaryotes, these bacteria use chromosome-specific initiators for their replication. In all cases investigated, the machineries for secondary chromosome replication initiation are of plasmid origin. One of the important differences between plasmids and chromosomes is that the latter replicate during a defined period of the cell cycle, ensuring a single round of replication per cell. Vibrio cholerae carries two circular chromosomes, Chr1 and Chr2, which are replicated in a well-orchestrated manner with the cell cycle and coordinated in such a way that replication termination occurs at the same time. However, the mechanism coordinating this synchrony remains speculative. We investigated this mechanism and revealed that initiation of Chr2 replication is triggered by the replication of a 150-bp locus positioned on Chr1, called crtS. This crtS replication–mediated Chr2 replication initiation mechanism explains how the two chromosomes communicate to coordinate their replication. Our study reveals a new checkpoint control mechanism in bacteria, and highlights possible functional interactions mediated by contacts between two chromosomes, an unprecedented observation in bacteria. PMID:27152358

  15. Anion inhibition studies of the β-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Vullo, Daniela; Del Prete, Sonia; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Ferraroni, Marta; Dedeoglu, Nurcan; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-03-01

    The genome of the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae encodes for three carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) belonging to the α-, β- and γ-classes. Here we report and anion inhibition study of the β-CA, VchCAβ with anions and other small molecules which inhibit metalloenzymes. The best VchCAβ anion inhibitors were sulfamide, sulfamate, phenylboronic acid and phenylarsonic acid, which showed KIs in the range of 54-86μM. Diethyldithiocarbonate was also an effective VchCAβ inhibitor, with an inhibition constant of 0.73mM. The halides, cyanate, thiocyanate, cyanide, bicarbonate, carbonate, nitrate, nitrite, stannate, selenate, tellurate, divanadate, tetraborate, perrhenate, perruthenate, peroxydisulfate, selenocyanide, trithiocarbonate, and fluorosulfonate showed affinity in the low millimolar range, with KIs of 2.3-9.5mM. Identification of selective inhibitors of VchCAβ (over the human CA isoforms) may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the physiological role(s) of this under-investigated enzyme. PMID:26853167

  16. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the β-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Sonia; Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Ferraroni, Marta; Osman, Sameh M; AlOthman, Zeid; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2016-03-01

    The genome of the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae encodes for three carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) belonging to the α-, β- and γ-classes. VchCA, the α-CA from this species was investigated earlier, whereas the β-class enzyme, VchCAβ was recently cloned, characterized kinetically and its X-ray crystal structure reported by this group. Here we report an inhibition study with sulfonamides and one sulfamate of this enzyme. The best VchCAβ inhibitors were deacetylated acetazolamide and methazolamide and hydrochlorothiazide, which showed inhibition constants of 68.2-87.0nM. Other compounds, with medium potency against VchCAβ, (KIs in the range of 275-463nM), were sulfanilamide, metanilamide, sulthiame and saccharin whereas the clinically used agents such as acetazolamide, methazolamide, ethoxzolamide, dorzolamide, zonisamide and celecoxib were micromolar inhibitors (KIs in the range of 4.51-8.57μM). Identification of potent and possibly selective inhibitors of VchCA and VchCAβ over the human CA isoforms, may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the physiological role(s) of this under-investigated enzymes. PMID:26850377

  17. Crystallization of the HigBA2 toxin–antitoxin complex from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Hadži, San; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Verschueren, Koen; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Gerdes, Kenn; Lah, Jurij; Loris, Remy

    2013-01-01

    The genome of Vibrio cholerae encodes two higBA toxin–antitoxin (TA) modules that are activated by amino-acid starvation. Here, the TA complex of the second module, higBA2, as well as the C-terminal domain of the corresponding HigA2 antitoxin, have been purified and crystallized. The HigBA2 complex crystallized in two crystal forms. Crystals of form I belonged to space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 129.0, b = 119.8, c = 33.4 Å, and diffracted to 3.0 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit is likely to contain a single complex consisting of two toxin monomers and one antitoxin dimer. The second crystal form crystallized in space group P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = 134.5, c = 55.4 Å. These crystals diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution and probably contain a complex with a different stoichiometry. Crystals of the C-­terminal domain of HigA2 belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 115.4, b = 61.2, c = 73.8 Å, β = 106.7°, and diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. PMID:23989162

  18. A comparative structure-function analysis of active-site inhibitors of Vibrio cholerae cholix toxin.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Miguel R; Merrill, A Rod

    2015-09-01

    Cholix toxin from Vibrio cholerae is a novel mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase (mART) toxin that shares structural and functional properties with Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A and Corynebacterium diphtheriae diphtheria toxin. Herein, we have used the high-resolution X-ray structure of full-length cholix toxin in the apo form, NAD(+) bound, and 10 structures of the cholix catalytic domain (C-domain) complexed with several strong inhibitors of toxin enzyme activity (NAP, PJ34, and the P-series) to study the binding mode of the ligands. A pharmacophore model based on the active pose of NAD(+) was compared with the active conformation of the inhibitors, which revealed a cationic feature in the side chain of the inhibitors that may determine the active pose. Moreover, a conformational search was conducted for the missing coordinates of one of the main active-site loops (R-loop). The resulting structural models were used to evaluate the interaction energies and for 3D-QSAR modeling. Implications for a rational drug design approach for mART toxins were derived. PMID:25756608

  19. The Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of the Vibrio cholerae Sodium-dependent NADH Dehydrogenase*♦

    PubMed Central

    Tuz, Karina; Mezic, Katherine G.; Xu, Tianhao; Barquera, Blanca; Juárez, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    The sodium-dependent NADH dehydrogenase (Na+-NQR) is the main ion transporter in Vibrio cholerae. Its activity is linked to the operation of the respiratory chain and is essential for the development of the pathogenic phenotype. Previous studies have described different aspects of the enzyme, including the electron transfer pathways, sodium pumping structures, cofactor and subunit composition, among others. However, the mechanism of the enzyme remains to be completely elucidated. In this work, we have studied the kinetic mechanism of Na+-NQR with the use of steady state kinetics and stopped flow analysis. Na+-NQR follows a hexa-uni ping-pong mechanism, in which NADH acts as the first substrate, reacts with the enzyme, and the oxidized NAD leaves the catalytic site. In this conformation, the enzyme is able to capture two sodium ions and transport them to the external side of the membrane. In the last step, ubiquinone is bound and reduced, and ubiquinol is released. Our data also demonstrate that the catalytic cycle involves two redox states, the three- and five-electron reduced forms. A model that gathers all available information is proposed to explain the kinetic mechanism of Na+-NQR. This model provides a background to understand the current structural and functional information. PMID:26004776

  20. The Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of the Vibrio cholerae Sodium-dependent NADH Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Tuz, Karina; Mezic, Katherine G; Xu, Tianhao; Barquera, Blanca; Juárez, Oscar

    2015-08-14

    The sodium-dependent NADH dehydrogenase (Na(+)-NQR) is the main ion transporter in Vibrio cholerae. Its activity is linked to the operation of the respiratory chain and is essential for the development of the pathogenic phenotype. Previous studies have described different aspects of the enzyme, including the electron transfer pathways, sodium pumping structures, cofactor and subunit composition, among others. However, the mechanism of the enzyme remains to be completely elucidated. In this work, we have studied the kinetic mechanism of Na(+)-NQR with the use of steady state kinetics and stopped flow analysis. Na(+)-NQR follows a hexa-uni ping-pong mechanism, in which NADH acts as the first substrate, reacts with the enzyme, and the oxidized NAD leaves the catalytic site. In this conformation, the enzyme is able to capture two sodium ions and transport them to the external side of the membrane. In the last step, ubiquinone is bound and reduced, and ubiquinol is released. Our data also demonstrate that the catalytic cycle involves two redox states, the three- and five-electron reduced forms. A model that gathers all available information is proposed to explain the kinetic mechanism of Na(+)-NQR. This model provides a background to understand the current structural and functional information. PMID:26004776

  1. Structural and Molecular Mechanism for Autoprocessing of MARTX Toxin of Vibrio cholerae at Multiple Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Prochazkova, Katerina; Shuvalova, Ludmilla A.; Minasov, George; Voburka, Zdeněk; Anderson, Wayne F.; Satchell, Karla J.F.

    2009-10-05

    The multifunctional autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin (MARTX) toxin of Vibrio cholerae causes destruction of the actin cytoskeleton by covalent cross-linking of actin and inactivation of Rho GTPases. The effector domains responsible for these activities are here shown to be independent proteins released from the large toxin by autoproteolysis catalyzed by an embedded cysteine protease domain (CPD). The CPD is activated upon binding inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}). In this study, we demonstrated that InsP{sub 6} is not simply an allosteric cofactor, but rather binding of InsP{sub 6} stabilized the CPD structure, facilitating formation of the enzyme-substrate complex. The 1.95-{angstrom} crystal structure of this InsP{sub 6}-bound unprocessed form of CPD was determined and revealed the scissile bond Leu{sup 3428}-Ala{sup 3429} captured in the catalytic site. Upon processing at this site, CPD was converted to a form with 500-fold reduced affinity for InsP{sub 6}, but was reactivated for high affinity binding of InsP{sub 6} by cooperative binding of both a new substrate and InsP{sub 6}. Reactivation of CPD allowed cleavage of the MARTX toxin at other sites, specifically at leucine residues between the effector domains. Processed CPD also cleaved other proteins in trans, including the leucine-rich protein YopM, demonstrating that it is a promiscuous leucine-specific protease.

  2. A Transposon Screen Identifies Genetic Determinants of Vibrio cholerae Resistance to High-Molecular-Weight Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Tobias; Delgado, Fernanda; Umans, Benjamin D; Gerding, Matthew A; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2016-08-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are notoriously resistant to a variety of high-molecular-weight antibiotics due to the limited permeability of their outer membrane (OM). The basis of OM barrier function and the genetic factors required for its maintenance remain incompletely understood. Here, we employed transposon insertion sequencing to identify genes required for Vibrio cholerae resistance to vancomycin and bacitracin, antibiotics that are thought to be too large to efficiently penetrate the OM. The screen yielded several genes whose protein products are predicted to participate in processes important for OM barrier functions and for biofilm formation. In addition, we identified a novel factor, designated vigA (for vancomycin inhibits growth), that has not previously been characterized or linked to outer membrane function. The vigA open reading frame (ORF) codes for an inner membrane protein, and in its absence, cells became highly sensitive to glycopeptide antibiotics (vancomycin and ramoplanin) and bacitracin but not to other large antibiotics or detergents. In contrast to wild-type (WT) cells, the vigA mutant was stained with fluorescent vancomycin. These observations suggest that VigA specifically prevents the periplasmic accumulation of certain large antibiotics without exerting a general role in the maintenance of OM integrity. We also observed marked interspecies variability in the susceptibilities of Gram-negative pathogens to glycopeptides and bacitracin. Collectively, our findings suggest that the OM barrier is not absolute but rather depends on specific OM-antibiotic interactions. PMID:27216069

  3. Vibrio cholerae GbpA elicits necrotic cell death in intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sudipto; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar

    2016-08-01

    Vibrio choleraeN-acetylglucosamine-binding protein GbpA is a secretory protein that facilitates the initial adherence of bacteria in the human intestine. Until now, considerable progress in the characterization of GbpA has been done, yet little is known about its role in host response. Our present studies demonstrated that GbpA at the amount secreted in the intestine resulted in decreased cell viability, altered cell morphology, disruption of cell membrane integrity and damage of cellular DNA indicating necrotic cell death. We observed that GbpA exposure leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, characterized by accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and depletion of ATP pool in host cells. Additionally, the intra-cellular ROS, accumulated in response to GbpA, were found to induce the migration of NF-κB from cytoplasm into nucleus in host cells. Taken together, these results prompted us to conclude that GbpA orchestrates a necrotic response in host cells which may have implications in immune response. PMID:27324251

  4. Multidrug Efflux Pumps from Enterobacteriaceae, Vibrio cholerae and Staphylococcus aureus Bacterial Food Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jody L.; He, Gui-Xin; Kakarla, Prathusha; KC, Ranjana; Kumar, Sanath; Lakra, Wazir Singh; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Tran, Thuy; Varela, Manuel F.

    2015-01-01

    Foodborne illnesses caused by bacterial microorganisms are common worldwide and constitute a serious public health concern. In particular, microorganisms belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae families of Gram-negative bacteria, and to the Staphylococcus genus of Gram-positive bacteria are important causative agents of food poisoning and infection in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Recently, variants of these bacteria have developed resistance to medically important chemotherapeutic agents. Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter spp., and Staphylococcus aureus are becoming increasingly recalcitrant to clinical treatment in human patients. Of the various bacterial resistance mechanisms against antimicrobial agents, multidrug efflux pumps comprise a major cause of multiple drug resistance. These multidrug efflux pump systems reside in the biological membrane of the bacteria and actively extrude antimicrobial agents from bacterial cells. This review article summarizes the evolution of these bacterial drug efflux pump systems from a molecular biological standpoint and provides a framework for future work aimed at reducing the conditions that foster dissemination of these multidrug resistant causative agents through human populations. PMID:25635914

  5. Vibrio and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... illness, is caused by two specific groups of Vibrio cholerae. These groups of Vibrio cholerae are not usually found in the United States, ... human milk that inhibit classical and El Tor Vibrio cholerae cell adherence (hemagglutination). Infect Immun 39:147-154. ...

  6. Antimicrobial Effects of Blueberry, Raspberry, and Strawberry Aqueous Extracts and their Effects on Virulence Gene Expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Hazim O; Kamimoto, Maki; Shimamoto, Toshi; Shimamoto, Tadashi

    2015-11-01

    The antimicrobial effects of aqueous extracts of blueberry, raspberry, and strawberry on 13 pathogenic bacteria were evaluated. The minimum inhibitory concentrations and minimum bactericidal concentrations of the extracts were determined before and after neutralization to pH 7.03 ± 0.15. Both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria were selectively inhibited by the non-neutralized berries. Blueberry was the best inhibitor, and Vibrio and Listeria were the most sensitive bacteria. After neutralization, blueberry affected only Vibrio and Listeria, whereas the antimicrobial activities of raspberry and strawberry were abolished. The total contents of phenolics, flavonoids, and proanthocyanidins in the extracts were measured with colorimetric methods and were highest in strawberry, followed by raspberry, and then blueberry. We also studied the effects of sub-bactericidal concentrations of the three berry extracts on virulence gene expression in Vibrio cholerae. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the three berry extracts effectively repressed the transcription of the tcpA gene. Raspberry also repressed the transcription of the ctxA gene, whereas blueberry and strawberry did not. However, the three berry extracts did not affect the transcription of toxT. These results suggest that the three berry extracts exert potent antimicrobial effects and inhibit the expression of the virulence factors of V. cholerae. PMID:26292998

  7. A Vibrio cholerae ghost-based subunit vaccine induces cross-protective chlamydial immunity that is enhanced by CTA2B, the nontoxic derivative of cholera toxin

    PubMed Central

    Ekong, Eno E.; Okenu, Daniel N.; Mania-Pramanik, Jayanti; He, Qing; Igietseme, Joseph U.; Ananaba, Godwin A.; Lyn, Deborah; Black, Carolyn; Eko, Francis O.

    2011-01-01

    The Vibrio cholerae ghost (rVCG) platform is an effective carrier and delivery system for designing efficacious Chlamydia vaccines. We investigated whether CTA2B, the nontoxic derivative of cholera toxin, can augment protective immunity conferred by an rVCG-based chlamydial vaccine and enhance cross-protection against heterologous chlamydial strains. An rVCG vaccine coexpressing chlamydial major outer membrane protein and CTA2B was genetically constructed and antigens were targeted to the inner membrane of V. cholerae before ghost production by gene E-mediated lysis. Effective immunomodulation by CTA2B was demonstrated by the ability of the vaccine construct to enhance the activation and maturation of dendritic cells in vitro. Also, C57BL/6 mice immunized via mucosal and systemic routes showed increased specific mucosal and systemic antibody and T-helper type-1 (Th1) responses, irrespective of the route. The enhanced production of IFN-γ, but not IL-4 by genital mucosal and splenic T cells, indicated a predominantly Th1 response. Clearance of the Chlamydia muridarum vaginal infection was significantly enhanced by codelivery of the vaccine with CTA2B, with the intravaginal route showing a moderate advantage. These results indicate that the rVCG-based vaccine is capable of inducing cross-protection against heterologous chlamydial serovars and that incorporation of mucosal adjuvants, such as CTA2B in the rVCG delivery platform, may enhance protective immunity. PMID:19040663

  8. Glucose- but Not Rice-Based Oral Rehydration Therapy Enhances the Production of Virulence Determinants in the Human Pathogen Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Juliane; Finger, Flavio; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Borgeaud, Sandrine; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea; Blokesch, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Despite major attempts to prevent cholera transmission, millions of people worldwide still must address this devastating disease. Cholera research has so far mainly focused on the causative agent, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, or on disease treatment, but rarely were results from both fields interconnected. Indeed, the treatment of this severe diarrheal disease is mostly accomplished by oral rehydration therapy (ORT), whereby water and electrolytes are replenished. Commonly distributed oral rehydration salts also contain glucose. Here, we analyzed the effects of glucose and alternative carbon sources on the production of virulence determinants in the causative agent of cholera, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae during in vitro experimentation. We demonstrate that virulence gene expression and the production of cholera toxin are enhanced in the presence of glucose or similarly transported sugars in a ToxR-, TcpP- and ToxT-dependent manner. The virulence genes were significantly less expressed if alternative non-PTS carbon sources, including rice-based starch, were utilized. Notably, even though glucose-based ORT is commonly used, field studies indicated that rice-based ORT performs better. We therefore used a spatially explicit epidemiological model to demonstrate that the better performing rice-based ORT could have a significant impact on epidemic progression based on the recent outbreak of cholera in Haiti. Our results strongly support a change of carbon source for the treatment of cholera, especially in epidemic settings. PMID:25474211

  9. Cytotoxic and Inflammatory Responses Induced by Outer Membrane Vesicle-Associated Biologically Active Proteases from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Ayan; Tapader, Rima; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar; Ghosh, Amit; Sinha, Ritam; Koley, Hemanta; Saha, Dhira Rani; Chakrabarti, Manoj K; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Pal, Amit

    2016-05-01

    Proteases in Vibrio cholerae have been shown to play a role in its pathogenesis. V. cholerae secretes Zn-dependent hemagglutinin protease (HAP) and calcium-dependent trypsin-like serine protease (VesC) by using the type II secretion system (TIISS). Our present studies demonstrated that these proteases are also secreted in association with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) and transported to human intestinal epithelial cells in an active form. OMV-associated HAP induces dose-dependent apoptosis in Int407 cells and an enterotoxic response in the mouse ileal loop (MIL) assay, whereas OMV-associated VesC showed a hemorrhagic fluid response in the MIL assay, necrosis in Int407 cells, and an increased interleukin-8 (IL-8) response in T84 cells, which were significantly reduced in OMVs from VesC mutant strain. Our results also showed that serine protease VesC plays a role in intestinal colonization of V. cholerae strains in adult mice. In conclusion, our study shows that V. cholerae OMVs secrete biologically active proteases which may play a role in cytotoxic and inflammatory responses. PMID:26930702

  10. The Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing autoinducer CAI-1: analysis of the biosynthetic enzyme CqsA

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.; Bolitho, M; Higgins, D; Lu, W; Ng, W; Jeffrey, P; Rabinowitz, J; Semmelhack, M; Hughson, F; Bassler, B

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes the disease cholera, controls virulence factor production and biofilm development in response to two extracellular quorum-sensing molecules, called autoinducers. The strongest autoinducer, called CAI-1 (for cholera autoinducer-1), was previously identified as (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one. Biosynthesis of CAI-1 requires the enzyme CqsA. Here, we determine the CqsA reaction mechanism, identify the CqsA substrates as (S)-2-aminobutyrate and decanoyl coenzyme A, and demonstrate that the product of the reaction is 3-aminotridecan-4-one, dubbed amino-CAI-1. CqsA produces amino-CAI-1 by a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent acyl-CoA transferase reaction. Amino-CAI-1 is converted to CAI-1 in a subsequent step via a CqsA-independent mechanism. Consistent with this, we find cells release {ge}100 times more CAI-1 than amino-CAI-1. Nonetheless, V. cholerae responds to amino-CAI-1 as well as CAI-1, whereas other CAI-1 variants do not elicit a quorum-sensing response. Thus, both CAI-1 and amino-CAI-1 have potential as lead molecules in the development of an anticholera treatment.

  11. Intestinal GPS: bile and bicarbonate control cyclic di-GMP to provide Vibrio cholerae spatial cues within the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Koestler, Benjamin J; Waters, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates numerous phenotypes in response to environmental stimuli to enable bacteria to transition between different lifestyles. Here we discuss our recent findings that the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae recognizes 2 host-specific signals, bile and bicarbonate, to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP. We have demonstrated that bile acids increase intracellular c-di-GMP to promote biofilm formation. We have also shown that this bile-mediated increase of intracellular c-di-GMP is negated by bicarbonate, and that this interaction is dependent on pH, suggesting that V. cholerae uses these 2 environmental cues to sense and adapt to its relative location in the small intestine. Increased intracellular c-di-GMP by bile is attributed to increased c-di-GMP synthesis by 3 diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and decreased expression of one phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the presence of bile. The molecular mechanisms by which bile controls the activity of the 3 DGCs and the regulators of bile-mediated transcriptional repression of the PDE are not yet known. Moreover, the impact of varying concentrations of bile and bicarbonate at different locations within the small intestine and the response of V. cholerae to these cues remains unclear. The native microbiome and pharmaceuticals, such as omeprazole, can impact bile and pH within the small intestine, suggesting these are potential unappreciated factors that may alter V. cholerae pathogenesis. PMID:25621620

  12. Evaluation of Enrichment Method for Detection of Vibrio cholerae O1 using a Rapid Dipstick Test in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    George, Christine Marie; Rashid, Mahamud-ur; Sack, David A.; Sack, R. Bradley; Saif-Ur-Rahman, K. M.; Azman, Andrew S; Monira, Shirajum; Bhuyian, Sazzadul Islam; Zillur Rahman, K. M.; Mahmud, M. Toslim; Mustafiz, Munshi; Alam, Munirul

    2014-01-01

    Background Culturing is generally considered to be the gold standard for detecting Vibrio cholerae in stool, though it is not always feasible in resource-limited settings. The Crystal VC dipstick test allows for rapid stool testing for the diagnosis of cholera in the field. However, previous studies have found low specificities (49%–79%) associated with direct testing of stool for cholera using this kit when compared to culturing. Methods In the present study conducted in Dhaka, Bangladesh in 2013, we compare direct testing using the Crystal VC dipstick test and testing after enrichment for 6-hours in Alkaline Peptone Water (APW) to bacterial culture as the gold standard. Samples positive by dipstick but negative by culture were also tested using PCR. Results Stool was collected from 125 patients. The overall specificities of the direct testing and testing after 6-hour enrichment in APW compared to bacterial culture were 91.8% and 98.4% (p=0.125) respectively, and the sensitivities were 65.6% and 75.0% (p=0.07), respectively. Conclusion The increase in the sensitivity of the Crystal VC kit with the use of the 6 hour enrichment step in APW compared to direct testing was marginally significant. The Crystal VC dipstick was found to have a much higher specificity than previously reported (91–98%). Therefore this method provides a promising screening tool for cholera outbreak surveillance in resource limited settings where elimination of false positive results is critical. PMID:24401137

  13. Intestinal GPS: bile and bicarbonate control cyclic di-GMP to provide Vibrio cholerae spatial cues within the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Koestler, Benjamin J; Waters, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates numerous phenotypes in response to environmental stimuli to enable bacteria to transition between different lifestyles. Here we discuss our recent findings that the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae recognizes 2 host-specific signals, bile and bicarbonate, to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP. We have demonstrated that bile acids increase intracellular c-di-GMP to promote biofilm formation. We have also shown that this bile-mediated increase of intracellular c-di-GMP is negated by bicarbonate, and that this interaction is dependent on pH, suggesting that V. cholerae uses these 2 environmental cues to sense and adapt to its relative location in the small intestine. Increased intracellular c-di-GMP by bile is attributed to increased c-di-GMP synthesis by 3 diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and decreased expression of one phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the presence of bile. The molecular mechanisms by which bile controls the activity of the 3 DGCs and the regulators of bile-mediated transcriptional repression of the PDE are not yet known. Moreover, the impact of varying concentrations of bile and bicarbonate at different locations within the small intestine and the response of V. cholerae to these cues remains unclear. The native microbiome and pharmaceuticals, such as omeprazole, can impact bile and pH within the small intestine, suggesting these are potential unappreciated factors that may alter V. cholerae pathogenesis. PMID:25621620

  14. Hemagglutination and intestinal adherence properties of clinical and environmental isolates of non-O1 Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Datta-Roy, K; Dasgupta, C; Ghose, A C

    1989-01-01

    Hemagglutination and intestinal adherence properties of non-O1 Vibrio cholerae were studied in vitro. No definite correlation between the cell-associated hemagglutinin titers and the intestinal adhesion indices was noted. Sugar- and glycoprotein-mediated inhibition data also indicated differences between the hemagglutination and adherence processes in respect to the receptor structures. Intestinal adherence of most V. cholerae strains could be inhibited to various extents by N-acetyl D-glucosamine. This observation provides a likely explanation for the ecological behavior of these organisms, which are known to associate themselves with chitinous (chitin:homopolymer of N-acetyl D-glucosamine) surfaces of zooplankton. The absence of any significant difference between the intestinal adherence indices of clinical and environmental isolates suggests that intestinal adhesion may be an essential but not sufficient prerequisite for colonization by and subsequent expression of pathogenicity of these microorganisms. PMID:2802613

  15. Effects of Small Molecule Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Inhibitors on Structure and Function of Accessory Cholera Enterotoxin (Ace) of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Chakravarty, Devlina; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Sarkar, Paramita; Saha, Tultul; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.; Hoque, Kazi Mirajul

    2015-01-01

    Cholera pathogenesis occurs due to synergistic pro-secretory effects of several toxins, such as cholera toxin (CTX) and Accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace) secreted by Vibrio cholerae strains. Ace activates chloride channels stimulating chloride/bicarbonate transport that augments fluid secretion resulting in diarrhea. These channels have been targeted for drug development. However, lesser attention has been paid to the interaction of chloride channel modulators with bacterial toxins. Here we report the modulation of the structure/function of recombinant Ace by small molecule calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) inhibitors, namely CaCCinh-A01, digallic acid (DGA) and tannic acid. Biophysical studies indicate that the unfolding (induced by urea) free energy increases upon binding CaCCinh-A01 and DGA, compared to native Ace, whereas binding of tannic acid destabilizes the protein. Far-UV CD experiments revealed that the α-helical content of Ace-CaCCinh-A01 and Ace-DGA complexes increased relative to Ace. In contrast, binding to tannic acid had the opposite effect, indicating the loss of protein secondary structure. The modulation of Ace structure induced by CaCC inhibitors was also analyzed using docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Functional studies, performed using mouse ileal loops and Ussing chamber experiments, corroborate biophysical data, all pointing to the fact that tannic acid destabilizes Ace, inhibiting its function, whereas DGA stabilizes the toxin with enhanced fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop. The efficacy of tannic acid in mouse model suggests that the targeted modulation of Ace structure may be of therapeutic benefit for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26540279

  16. Genome-Wide Study of the Defective Sucrose Fermenter Strain of Vibrio cholerae from the Latin American Cholera Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Garza, Daniel Rios; Thompson, Cristiane C.; Loureiro, Edvaldo Carlos Brito; Dutilh, Bas E.; Inada, Davi Toshio; Junior, Edivaldo Costa Sousa; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; Nunes, Márcio Roberto T.; de Lima, Clayton Pereira Silva; Silvestre, Rodrigo Vellasco Duarte; Nunes, Keley Nascimento Barbosa; Santos, Elisabeth C. O.; Edwards, Robert A.; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.; de Sá Morais, Lena Lillian Canto

    2012-01-01

    The 7th cholera pandemic reached Latin America in 1991, spreading from Peru to virtually all Latin American countries. During the late epidemic period, a strain that failed to ferment sucrose dominated cholera outbreaks in the Northern Brazilian Amazon region. In order to understand the genomic characteristics and the determinants of this altered sucrose fermenting phenotype, the genome of the strain IEC224 was sequenced. This paper reports a broad genomic study of this strain, showing its correlation with the major epidemic lineage. The potentially mobile genomic regions are shown to possess GC content deviation, and harbor the main V. cholera virulence genes. A novel bioinformatic approach was applied in order to identify the putative functions of hypothetical proteins, and was compared with the automatic annotation by RAST. The genome of a large bacteriophage was found to be integrated to the IEC224's alanine aminopeptidase gene. The presence of this phage is shown to be a common characteristic of the El Tor strains from the Latin American epidemic, as well as its putative ancestor from Angola. The defective sucrose fermenting phenotype is shown to be due to a single nucleotide insertion in the V. cholerae sucrose-specific transportation gene. This frame-shift mutation truncated a membrane protein, altering its structural pore-like conformation. Further, the identification of a common bacteriophage reinforces both the monophyletic and African-Origin hypotheses for the main causative agent of the 1991 Latin America cholera epidemics. PMID:22662140

  17. Comparison of DOT-ELISA and Standard-ELISA for Detection of the Vibrio cholerae Toxin in Culture Supernatants of Bacteria Isolated from Human and Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Meza-Lucas, Antonio; Pérez-Villagómez, María-Fernanda; Martínez-López, José-Patricio; García-Rodea, Ricardo; Martínez-Castelán, María-Guadalupe; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; de-la-Rosa-Arana, Jorge-Luis; Villanueva-Zamudio, Altagracia

    2016-09-01

    A comparison of DOT-ELISA and Standard-ELISA was made for detection of Vibrio cholerae toxin in culture supernatants of bacteria isolated from human and environmental samples. A total of 293 supernatants were tested in a double blind assay. A correlation of 100 % was obtained between both techniques. The cholera toxin was found in 20 Inaba and 3 Ogawa strains. Positive samples were from seafood (17 samples), potable water (1 sample) and sewage (5 samples). The DOT-ELISA was useful as the standard-ELISA to confirm the presence of cholera toxin in the environmental samples. PMID:27407304

  18. Revisiting the oligomerization mechanism of Vibrio cholerae cytolysin, a beta-barrel pore-forming toxin.

    PubMed

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2016-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a membrane-damaging beta-barrel pore-forming toxin (beta-PFT). VCC causes permeabilization of the target membranes by forming transmembrane oligomeric beta-barrel pores. Oligomerization is a key step in the mode of action of any beta-PFT, including that of VCC. Earlier studies have identified some of the key residues in VCC that are directly involved in the generation of the inter-protomer contacts, thus playing critical roles in the oligomerization of the membrane-bound toxin. Analysis of the VCC oligomeric pore structure reveals a potential hydrogen-bond network that appears to connect the sidechain of an asparagine residue (Asn582; located within an inter-domain linker sequence) from one protomer to the backbone CO- and NH-groups of the neighbouring protomer, indirectly through water molecules at most of the inter-protomer interfaces. In the present study, we show that the mutation of Asn582Ala affects the oligomerization and the pore-forming activity of VCC in the membrane lipid bilayer of the synthetic lipid vesicles, while the replacement of Asn582Gln results into the restoration of the oligomeric pore-forming ability of the toxin. Using a number of truncated variants of VCC, having deletion in the C-terminal region of the toxin starting from the Asn582 residue or beyond, we also show that the presence of Asn582 is critically required for the oligomerization of the truncated form of the protein. PMID:27150630

  19. In situ proteolysis of the Vibrio cholerae matrix protein RbmA promotes biofilm recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Daniel R.; Maestre-Reyna, Manuel; Lee, Gloria; Gerard, Harry; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Watnick, Paula I.

    2015-01-01

    The estuarine gram-negative rod and human diarrheal pathogen Vibrio cholerae synthesizes a VPS exopolysaccharide-dependent biofilm matrix that allows it to form a 3D structure on surfaces. Proteins associated with the matrix include, RbmA, RbmC, and Bap1. RbmA, a protein whose crystallographic structure suggests two binding surfaces, associates with cells by means of a VPS-dependent mechanism and promotes biofilm cohesiveness and recruitment of cells to the biofilm. Here, we show that RbmA undergoes limited proteolysis within the biofilm. This proteolysis, which is carried out by the hemagglutinin/protease and accessory proteases, yields the 22-kDa C-terminal polypeptide RbmA*. RbmA* remains biofilm-associated. Unlike full-length RbmA, the association of RbmA* with cells is no longer VPS-dependent, likely due to an electropositive surface revealed by proteolysis. We provide evidence that this proteolysis event plays a role in recruitment of VPS− cells to the biofilm surface. Based on our findings, we propose that association of RbmA with the matrix reinforces the biofilm structure and leads to limited proteolysis of RbmA to RbmA*. RbmA*, in turn, promotes recruitment of cells that have not yet initiated VPS synthesis to the biofilm surface. The assignment of two functions to RbmA, separated by a proteolytic event that depends on matrix association, dictates an iterative cycle in which reinforcement of recently added biofilm layers precedes the recruitment of new VPS− cells to the biofilm. PMID:26240338

  20. Vibrio cholerae porin OmpU induces LPS tolerance by attenuating TLR-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Sakharwade, Sanica C; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika

    2015-12-01

    Porins can act as pathogen-associated molecular patterns, can be recognized by the host immune system and modulate immune responses. Vibrio choleraeporin OmpU aids in bacterial survival in the human gut by increasing resistance against bile acids and anti-microbial peptides. V. choleraeOmpU is pro-inflammatory in nature. However, interestingly, it can also down-regulate LPS-mediated pro-inflammatory responses. In this study, we have explored how OmpU-pretreatment affects LPS-mediated responses. Our study indicates that OmpU-pretreatment followed by LPS-activation does not induce M2-polarization of macrophages/monocytes. Further, OmpU attenuates LPS-mediated TLR2/TLR6 signaling by decreasing the association of TLRs along with recruitment of MyD88 and IRAKs to the receptor complex. This results in decreased translocation of NFκB in the nucleus. Additionally, OmpU-pretreatment up-regulates expression of IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling, in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage cells upon LPS-stimulation. Suppressor cytokine IL-10 is partially involved in OmpU-induced down-regulation of LPS-mediated TNFα production in human PBMCs. Furthermore, OmpU-pretreatment also affects macrophage function, by enhancing phagocytosis in LPS-treated RAW 264.7 cells, and down-regulates LPS-induced cell surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules. Altogether, OmpU causes suppression of LPS-mediated responses by attenuating the LPS-mediated TLR signaling pathway. PMID:26454478

  1. Crystal structure of a concentrative nucleoside transporter from Vibrio cholerae at 2.4;#8201;Å

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Zachary Lee; Cheong, Cheom-Gil; Lee, Seok-Yong

    2012-07-11

    Nucleosides are required for DNA and RNA synthesis, and the nucleoside adenosine has a function in a variety of signalling processes. Transport of nucleosides across cell membranes provides the major source of nucleosides in many cell types and is also responsible for the termination of adenosine signalling. As a result of their hydrophilic nature, nucleosides require a specialized class of integral membrane proteins, known as nucleoside transporters (NTs), for specific transport across cell membranes. In addition to nucleosides, NTs are important determinants for the transport of nucleoside-derived drugs across cell membranes. A wide range of nucleoside-derived drugs, including anticancer drugs (such as Ara-C and gemcitabine) and antiviral drugs (such as zidovudine and ribavirin), have been shown to depend, at least in part, on NTs for transport across cell membranes. Concentrative nucleoside transporters, members of the solute carrier transporter superfamily SLC28, use an ion gradient in the active transport of both nucleosides and nucleoside-derived drugs against their chemical gradients. The structural basis for selective ion-coupled nucleoside transport by concentrative nucleoside transporters is unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of a concentrative nucleoside transporter from Vibrio cholerae in complex with uridine at 2.4 {angstrom}. Our functional data show that, like its human orthologues, the transporter uses a sodium-ion gradient for nucleoside transport. The structure reveals the overall architecture of this class of transporter, unravels the molecular determinants for nucleoside and sodium binding, and provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of nucleoside and nucleoside drug transport across cell membranes.

  2. Designing an efficient multi-epitope peptide vaccine against Vibrio cholerae via combined immunoinformatics and protein interaction based approaches.

    PubMed

    Nezafat, Navid; Karimi, Zeinab; Eslami, Mahboobeh; Mohkam, Milad; Zandian, Sanam; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-06-01

    Cholera continues to be a major global health concern. Among different Vibrio cholerae strains, only O1 and O139 cause acute diarrheal diseases that are related to epidemic and pandemic outbreaks. The currently available cholera vaccines are mainly lived and attenuated vaccines consisting of V. cholerae virulence factors such as toxin-coregulated pili (TCP), outer membrane proteins (Omps), and nontoxic cholera toxin B subunit (CTB). Nowadays, there is a great interest in designing an efficient epitope vaccine against cholera. Epitope vaccines consisting of immunodominant epitopes and adjuvant molecules enhance the possibility of inciting potent protective immunity. In this study, V. cholerae protective antigens (OmpW, OmpU, TcpA and TcpF) and the CTB, which is broadly used as an immunostimulatory adjuvant, were analyzed using different bioinformatics and immunoinformatics tools. The common regions between promiscuous epitopes, binding to various HLA-II supertype alleles, and B-cell epitopes were defined based upon the aforementioned protective antigens. The ultimately selected epitopes and CTB adjuvant were fused together using proper GPGPG linkers to enhance vaccine immunogenicity. A three-dimensional model of the thus constructed vaccine was generated using I-TASSER. The model was structurally validated using the ProSA-web error-detection software and the Ramachandran plot. The validation results indicated that the initial 3D model needed refinement. Subsequently, a high-quality model obtained after various refinement cycles was used for defining conformational B-cell epitopes. Several linear and conformational B-cell epitopes were determined within the epitope vaccine, suggesting likely antibody triggering features of our designed vaccine. Next, molecular docking was performed between the 3D vaccine model and the tertiary structure of the toll like receptor 2 (TLR2). To gain further insight into the interaction between vaccine and TLR2, molecular dynamics

  3. The Lake Chad Basin, an Isolated and Persistent Reservoir of Vibrio cholerae O1: A Genomic Insight into the Outbreak in Cameroon, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Kaas, Rolf S.; Ngandjio, Antoinette; Nzouankeu, Ariane; Siriphap, Achiraya; Fonkoua, Marie-Christine; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Hendriksen, Rene S.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of reported cholera was relatively low around the Lake Chad basin until 1991. Since then, cholera outbreaks have been reported every couple of years. The objective of this study was to investigate the 2010/2011 Vibrio cholerae outbreak in Cameroon to gain insight into the genomic make-up of the V. cholerae strains responsible for the outbreak. Twenty-four strains were isolated and whole genome sequenced. Known virulence genes, resistance genes and integrating conjugative element (ICE) elements were identified and annotated. A global phylogeny (378 genomes) was inferred using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. The Cameroon outbreak was found to be clonal and clustered distant from the other African strains. In addition, a subset of the strains contained a deletion that was found in the ICE element causing less resistance. These results suggest that V. cholerae is endemic in the Lake Chad basin and different from other African strains. PMID:27191718

  4. The Lake Chad Basin, an Isolated and Persistent Reservoir of Vibrio cholerae O1: A Genomic Insight into the Outbreak in Cameroon, 2010.

    PubMed

    Kaas, Rolf S; Ngandjio, Antoinette; Nzouankeu, Ariane; Siriphap, Achiraya; Fonkoua, Marie-Christine; Aarestrup, Frank M; Hendriksen, Rene S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of reported cholera was relatively low around the Lake Chad basin until 1991. Since then, cholera outbreaks have been reported every couple of years. The objective of this study was to investigate the 2010/2011 Vibrio cholerae outbreak in Cameroon to gain insight into the genomic make-up of the V. cholerae strains responsible for the outbreak. Twenty-four strains were isolated and whole genome sequenced. Known virulence genes, resistance genes and integrating conjugative element (ICE) elements were identified and annotated. A global phylogeny (378 genomes) was inferred using a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. The Cameroon outbreak was found to be clonal and clustered distant from the other African strains. In addition, a subset of the strains contained a deletion that was found in the ICE element causing less resistance. These results suggest that V. cholerae is endemic in the Lake Chad basin and different from other African strains. PMID:27191718

  5. Cholera

    MedlinePlus

    ... developed packets of salts that are mixed with clean water to help restore fluids. These are cheaper and ... cholera occur, efforts should be made to establish clean water, food, and sanitation. Vaccination is not very effective ...

  6. Cholera

    MedlinePlus

    ... universal access to safe drinking water and adequate sanitation, which is key in preventing both epidemic and endemic cholera. Actions targeting environmental conditions include: the development of piped water systems ...

  7. A Novel Triplex Quantitative PCR Strategy for Quantification of Toxigenic and Nontoxigenic Vibrio cholerae in Aquatic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Bliem, Rupert; Schauer, Sonja; Plicka, Helga; Obwaller, Adelheid; Sommer, Regina; Steinrigl, Adolf; Alam, Munirul; Reischer, Georg H.; Farnleitner, Andreas H.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a severe human pathogen and a frequent member of aquatic ecosystems. Quantification of V. cholerae in environmental water samples is therefore fundamental for ecological studies and health risk assessment. Beside time-consuming cultivation techniques, quantitative PCR (qPCR) has the potential to provide reliable quantitative data and offers the opportunity to quantify multiple targets simultaneously. A novel triplex qPCR strategy was developed in order to simultaneously quantify toxigenic and nontoxigenic V. cholerae in environmental water samples. To obtain quality-controlled PCR results, an internal amplification control was included. The qPCR assay was specific, highly sensitive, and quantitative across the tested 5-log dynamic range down to a method detection limit of 5 copies per reaction. Repeatability and reproducibility were high for all three tested target genes. For environmental application, global DNA recovery (GR) rates were assessed for drinking water, river water, and water from different lakes. GR rates ranged from 1.6% to 76.4% and were dependent on the environmental background. Uncorrected and GR-corrected V. cholerae abundances were determined in two lakes with extremely high turbidity. Uncorrected abundances ranged from 4.6 × 102 to 2.3 × 104 cell equivalents liter−1, whereas GR-corrected abundances ranged from 4.7 × 103 to 1.6 × 106 cell equivalents liter−1. GR-corrected qPCR results were in good agreement with an independent cell-based direct detection method but were up to 1.6 log higher than cultivation-based abundances. We recommend the newly developed triplex qPCR strategy as a powerful tool to simultaneously quantify toxigenic and nontoxigenic V. cholerae in various aquatic environments for ecological studies as well as for risk assessment programs. PMID:25724966

  8. A novel triplex quantitative PCR strategy for quantification of toxigenic and nontoxigenic Vibrio cholerae in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Bliem, Rupert; Schauer, Sonja; Plicka, Helga; Obwaller, Adelheid; Sommer, Regina; Steinrigl, Adolf; Alam, Munirul; Reischer, Georg H; Farnleitner, Andreas H; Kirschner, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a severe human pathogen and a frequent member of aquatic ecosystems. Quantification of V. cholerae in environmental water samples is therefore fundamental for ecological studies and health risk assessment. Beside time-consuming cultivation techniques, quantitative PCR (qPCR) has the potential to provide reliable quantitative data and offers the opportunity to quantify multiple targets simultaneously. A novel triplex qPCR strategy was developed in order to simultaneously quantify toxigenic and nontoxigenic V. cholerae in environmental water samples. To obtain quality-controlled PCR results, an internal amplification control was included. The qPCR assay was specific, highly sensitive, and quantitative across the tested 5-log dynamic range down to a method detection limit of 5 copies per reaction. Repeatability and reproducibility were high for all three tested target genes. For environmental application, global DNA recovery (GR) rates were assessed for drinking water, river water, and water from different lakes. GR rates ranged from 1.6% to 76.4% and were dependent on the environmental background. Uncorrected and GR-corrected V. cholerae abundances were determined in two lakes with extremely high turbidity. Uncorrected abundances ranged from 4.6×10(2) to 2.3×10(4) cell equivalents liter(-1), whereas GR-corrected abundances ranged from 4.7×10(3) to 1.6×10(6) cell equivalents liter(-1). GR-corrected qPCR results were in good agreement with an independent cell-based direct detection method but were up to 1.6 log higher than cultivation-based abundances. We recommend the newly developed triplex qPCR strategy as a powerful tool to simultaneously quantify toxigenic and nontoxigenic V. cholerae in various aquatic environments for ecological studies as well as for risk assessment programs. PMID:25724966

  9. Reciprocal Regulation of Resistance-Nodulation-Division Efflux Systems and the Cpx Two-Component System in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Dawn L.; Bina, X. Renee; Slamti, Leyla; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2014-01-01

    The Cpx two-component regulatory system has been shown in Escherichia coli to alleviate stress caused by misfolded cell envelope proteins. The Vibrio cholerae Cpx system was previously found to respond to cues distinct from those in the E. coli system, suggesting that this system fulfills a different physiological role in the cholera pathogen. Here, we used microarrays to identify genes that were regulated by the V. cholerae Cpx system. Our observations suggest that the activation of the V. cholerae Cpx system does not induce expression of genes involved in the mitigation of stress generated by misfolded cell envelope proteins but promotes expression of genes involved in antimicrobial resistance. In particular, activation of the Cpx system induced expression of the genes encoding the VexAB and VexGH resistance-nodulation-division (RND) efflux systems and their cognate outer membrane pore protein TolC. The promoters for these loci contained putative CpxR consensus binding sites, and ectopic cpxR expression activated transcription from the promoters for the RND efflux systems. CpxR was not required for intrinsic antimicrobial resistance, but CpxR activation enhanced resistance to antimicrobial substrates of VexAB and VexGH. Mutations that inactivated VexAB or VexGH efflux activity resulted in the activation of the Cpx response, suggesting that vexAB and vexGH and the cpxP-cpxRA system are reciprocally regulated. We speculate that the reciprocal regulation of the V. cholerae RND efflux systems and the Cpx two-component system is mediated by the intracellular accumulation of an endogenously produced metabolic by-product that is normally extruded from the cell by the RND efflux systems. PMID:24799626

  10. Endochitinase Is Transported to the Extracellular Milieu by the eps-Encoded General Secretory Pathway of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Terry D.; Metzger, Daniel J.; Lynch, Jennifer; Folster, Jason P.

    1998-01-01

    The chiA gene of Vibrio cholerae encodes a polypeptide which degrades chitin, a homopolymer of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) found in cell walls of fungi and in the integuments of insects and crustaceans. chiA has a coding capacity corresponding to a polypeptide of 846 amino acids having a predicted molecular mass of 88.7 kDa. A 52-bp region with promoter activity was found immediately upstream of the chiA open reading frame. Insertional inactivation of the chromosomal copy of the gene confirmed that expression of chitinase activity by V. cholerae required chiA. Fluorescent analogues were used to demonstrate that the enzymatic activity of ChiA was specific for β,1-4 glycosidic bonds located between GlcNAc monomers in chitin. Antibodies against ChiA were obtained by immunization of a rabbit with a MalE-ChiA hybrid protein. Polypeptides with antigenic similarity to ChiA were expressed by classical and El Tor biotypes of V. cholerae and by the closely related bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila. Immunoblotting experiments using the wild-type strain 569B and the secretion mutant M14 confirmed that ChiA is an extracellular protein which is secreted by the eps system. The eps system is also responsible for secreting cholera toxin, an oligomeric protein with no amino acid homology to ChiA. These results indicate that ChiA and cholera toxin have functionally similar extracellular transport signals that are essential for eps-dependent secretion. PMID:9791107

  11. The Hybrid Pre-CTXΦ-RS1 Prophage Genome and Its Regulatory Function in Environmental Vibrio cholerae O1 Strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxia; Pang, Bo; Xiong, Lifeng; Wang, Duochun; Wang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Lijuan; Kan, Biao

    2015-10-01

    The cholera toxin genes of Vibrio cholerae are encoded by CTXΦ, a lysogenic bacteriophage. Infection with this phage plays a determinant role in toxigenicity conversion and the emergence of new clones of pathogenic V. cholerae. Multiple phage alleles, defined by sequence types of the repressor gene rstR, have been found, showing the divergence of phage genomes. Pre-CTXΦ, which is characterized by the absence of toxin genes, is predicted to be the precursor of CTXΦ. We have found a new pre-CTXΦ prophage genome (named pre-CTXZJΦ for its novel rstR allele) in nontoxigenic V. cholerae O1 isolates that were obtained during surveillance of the estuary water of the Zhujiang River. A novel hybrid genome of the helper phage RS1 was identified in an environmental strain carrying pre-CTXZJΦ in this study. The chromosomal integration and genomic arrangement of pre-CTXZJΦ and RS1 were determined. The RS2 of pre-CTXZJΦ was shown to have a function in replication, but it seemed to have lost its ability to integrate. The RstR of pre-CTXZJΦ exerted the highest repression of its own rstA promoter compared to other RstRs, suggesting rstR-specific phage superinfection immunity and potential coinfection with other pre-CTXΦ/CTXΦ alleles. The environmental strain carrying pre-CTXZJΦ could still be infected by CTXETΦ, the most common phage allele in the strains of the seventh cholera pandemic, suggesting that this nontoxigenic clone could potentially undergo toxigenicity conversion by CTXΦ infection and become a new toxigenic clone despite already containing the pre-CTXΦ prophage. PMID:26253680

  12. Population genetics of Vibrio cholerae from Nepal in 2010: evidence on the origin of the Haitian outbreak.

    PubMed

    Hendriksen, Rene S; Price, Lance B; Schupp, James M; Gillece, John D; Kaas, Rolf S; Engelthaler, David M; Bortolaia, Valeria; Pearson, Talima; Waters, Andrew E; Upadhyay, Bishnu Prasad; Shrestha, Sirjana Devi; Adhikari, Shailaja; Shakya, Geeta; Keim, Paul S; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2011-01-01

    Cholera continues to be an important cause of human infections, and outbreaks are often observed after natural disasters, such as the one following the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. Once the cholera outbreak was confirmed, rumors spread that the disease was brought to Haiti by a battalion of Nepalese soldiers serving as United Nations peacekeepers. This possible connection has never been confirmed. We used whole-genome sequence typing (WGST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and antimicrobial susceptibility testing to characterize 24 recent Vibrio cholerae isolates from Nepal and evaluate the suggested epidemiological link with the Haitian outbreak. The isolates were obtained from 30 July to 1 November 2010 from five different districts in Nepal. We compared the 24 genomes to 10 previously sequenced V. cholerae isolates, including 3 from the Haitian outbreak (began July 2010). Antimicrobial susceptibility and PFGE patterns were consistent with an epidemiological link between the isolates from Nepal and Haiti. WGST showed that all 24 V. cholerae isolates from Nepal belonged to a single monophyletic group that also contained isolates from Bangladesh and Haiti. The Nepalese isolates were divided into four closely related clusters. One cluster contained three Nepalese isolates and three Haitian isolates that were almost identical, with only 1- or 2-bp differences. Results in this study are consistent with Nepal as the origin of the Haitian outbreak. This highlights how rapidly infectious diseases might be transmitted globally through international travel and how public health officials need advanced molecular tools along with standard epidemiological analyses to quickly determine the sources of outbreaks. PMID:21862630

  13. Identification of a membrane-bound transcriptional regulator that links chitin and natural competence in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Dalia, Ankur B; Lazinski, David W; Camilli, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is naturally competent when grown on chitin. It is known that expression of the major regulator of competence, TfoX, is controlled by chitin; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this requirement for chitin have remained unclear. In the present study, we identify and characterize a membrane-bound transcriptional regulator that positively regulates the small RNA (sRNA) TfoR, which posttranscriptionally enhances tfoX translation. We show that this regulation of the tfoR promoter is direct by performing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and by heterologous expression of this system in Escherichia coli. This transcriptional regulator was recently identified independently and was named "TfoS" (S. Yamamoto et al., Mol. Microbiol., in press, doi:10.1111/mmi.12462). Using a constitutively active form of TfoS, we demonstrate that the activity of this regulator is sufficient to promote competence in V. cholerae in the absence of chitin. Also, TfoS contains a large periplasmic domain, which we hypothesized interacts with chitin to regulate TfoS activity. In the heterologous host E. coli, we demonstrate that chitin oligosaccharides are sufficient to activate TfoS activity at the tfoR promoter. Collectively, these data characterize TfoS as a novel chitin-sensing transcriptional regulator that represents the direct link between chitin and natural competence in V. cholerae. IMPORTANCE Naturally competent bacteria can take up exogenous DNA from the environment and integrate it into their genome by homologous recombination. This ability to take up exogenous DNA is shared by diverse bacterial species and serves as a mechanism to acquire new genes to enhance the fitness of the organism. Several members of the family Vibrionaceae become naturally competent when grown on chitin; however, a molecular understanding of how chitin activates competence is lacking. Here, we identify a novel membrane-bound transcriptional regulator that is required for natural

  14. Shared antigenicity and immunogenicity of type 4 pilins expressed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Moraxella bovis, Neisseria gonorrhoaea, Dichelobacter nodosus, and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Patel, P; Marrs, C F; Mattick, J S; Ruehl, W W; Taylor, R K; Koomey, M

    1991-12-01

    Immunoblotting with polyclonal rabbit antibodies raised against pilins expressed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Moraxella bovis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Dichelobacter nodosus, and Vibrio cholerae was used to demonstrate that these polypeptides display conserved antigenic and, in most cases, immunogenic determinants. These determinants appear to be localized to the highly homologous amino-terminal domains (residues 1 to 25). PMID:1682267

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of an ortho-Nitrophenyl-β-d-Galactoside (ONPG)-Negative Strain of Vibrio cholerae, Isolated from Drakes Bay, California

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cindy H.; Chen, Chih-Ying; Kiang, David

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft whole-genome sequence of a Vibrio cholerae strain (Vc25-3) isolated from Drakes Bay, California. This environmental isolate has an atypical morphology and is ortho-nitrophenyl-β-d-galactoside (ONPG)-negative. PMID:26988050

  16. Light scattering sensor for real-time identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. cholera colonies on solid agar plates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The three most common pathogenic species of Vibrio, V. cholerae, V. parahemolyticus and V. vulnificus, are of major concern as water- and food-borne pathogens because of an increasing incidence of water and seafood related outbreaks and illnesses worldwide. Current methods are time-consuming and req...

  17. Characteristics of Multidrug Resistant Shigella and Vibrio cholerae O1 Infections in Patients Treated at an Urban and a Rural Hospital in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sumon Kumar; Klontz, Erik H.; Azmi, Ishrat J.; Ud-Din, Abu I. M. S.; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Afrad, Mokibul Hassan; Malek, Mohammad Abdul; Ahmed, Shahnawaz; Das, Jui; Talukder, Kaisar Ali; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu Syed Golam; Klontz, Karl C.

    2013-01-01

    We determined the frequency of multidrug resistant (MDR) infections with Shigella spp. and Vibrio cholerae O1 at an urban (Dhaka) and rural (Matlab) hospital in Bangladesh. We also compared sociodemographic and clinical features of patients with MDR infections to those with antibiotic-susceptible infections at both sites. Analyses were conducted using surveillance data from the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), for the years 2000–2012. Compared to patients with antibiotic-susceptible for Shigella infections, those in Dhaka with MDR shigellosis were more likely to experience diarrhea for >24 hours, while, in Matlab, they were more likely to stay inhospital >24 hours. For MDR shigellosis, Dhaka patients were more likely than those in Matlab to have dehydration, stool frequency >10/day, and diarrheal duration >24 hours. Patients with MDR Vibrio cholerae O1 infections in Dhaka were more likely than those in Matlab to experience dehydration and stool frequency >10/day. Thus, patients with MDR shigellosis and Vibrio cholerae O1 infection exhibited features suggesting more severe illness than those with antibiotic-susceptible infections. Moreover, Dhaka patients with MDR shigellosis and Vibrio cholerae O1 infections exhibited features indicating more severe illness than patients in Matlab. PMID:24455398

  18. The Vibrio cholerae Extracellular Chitinase ChiA2 Is Important for Survival and Pathogenesis in the Host Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Moumita; Nag, Dhrubajyoti; Koley, Hemanta; Saha, Dhira Rani; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    In aquatic environments, Vibrio cholerae colonizes mainly on the chitinous surface of copepods and utilizes chitin as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. Of the two extracellular chitinases essential for chitin utilization, the expression of chiA2 is maximally up-regulated in host intestine. Recent studies indicate that several bacterial chitinases may be involved in host pathogenesis. However, the role of V. cholerae chitinases in host infection is not yet known. In this study, we provide evidence to show that ChiA2 is important for V. cholerae survival in intestine as well as in pathogenesis. We demonstrate that ChiA2 de-glycosylates mucin and releases reducing sugars like GlcNAc and its oligomers. Deglycosylation of mucin corroborated with reduced uptake of alcian blue stain by ChiA2 treated mucin. Next, we show that V. cholerae could utilize mucin as a nutrient source. In comparison to the wild type strain, ΔchiA2 mutant was 60-fold less efficient in growth in mucin supplemented minimal media and was also ∼6-fold less competent to survive when grown in the presence of mucin-secreting human intestinal HT29 epithelial cells. Similar results were also obtained when the strains were infected in mice intestine. Infection with the ΔchiA2 mutant caused ∼50-fold less fluid accumulation in infant mice as well as in rabbit ileal loop compared to the wild type strain. To see if the difference in survival of the ΔchiA2 mutant and wild type V. cholerae was due to reduced adhesion of the mutant, we monitored binding of the strains on HT29 cells. The initial binding of the wild type and mutant strain was similar. Collectively these data suggest that ChiA2 secreted by V. cholerae in the intestine hydrolyzed intestinal mucin to release GlcNAc, and the released sugar is successfully utilized by V. cholerae for growth and survival in the host intestine. PMID:25244128

  19. Circulation of a Quorum-Sensing-Impaired Variant of Vibrio cholerae Strain C6706 Masks Important Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Stutzmann, Sandrine; Blokesch, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, is a model organism for studying virulence regulation, biofilm formation, horizontal gene transfer, and the cell-to-cell communication known as quorum sensing (QS). As in any research field, discrepancies between data from diverse laboratories are sometimes observed for V. cholerae. Such discrepancies are often caused by the use of diverse patient or environmental isolates. In this study, we investigated the inability of a few laboratories to reproduce high levels of natural transformation, a mode of horizontal gene transfer that is specifically induced on chitinous surfaces. This irreproducibility was mostly related to one specific isolate of V. cholerae: the O1 El Tor C6706 strain. C6706 was previously described as QS proficient, an important prerequisite for the induction of natural competence for transformation. To elucidate the underlying problem, we collected seven isolates of the same C6706 strain from different research laboratories in North America and Europe and compared their phenotypes. Importantly, we observed a split response with respect to QS-related gene expression, including chitin-induced natural competence and type VI secretion (T6S). While approximately half of the strains behaved as reported for several other O1 El Tor pandemic isolates that are commonly studied in the laboratory, the other half were significantly impaired in QS-related expression patterns. This impairment was caused by a mutation in a QS-related gene (luxO). We conclude that the circulation of such QS-impaired wild-type strains is responsible for masking several important phenotypes of V. cholerae, including natural competence for transformation and T6S. IMPORTANCE Phenotypic diversity between laboratory-domesticated bacterial strains is a common problem and often results in the failed reproduction of published data. However, researchers rarely compare such strains to elucidate the underlying mutation(s). In this study, we

  20. Receptor-like glycocompounds in human milk that inhibit classical and El Tor Vibrio cholerae cell adherence (hemagglutination).

    PubMed Central

    Holmgren, J; Svennerholm, A M; Lindblad, M

    1983-01-01

    The two biotypes of Vibrio cholerae were found to have cell-associated hemagglutinins which differ with regard to binding to different species of erythrocytes and inhibition by monosaccharides. A total of 12 classical V. cholerae strains (Inaba or Ogawa) strongly agglutinated human erythrocytes in a reaction specifically inhibited by L-fucose, whereas 12 El Tor strains preferably agglutinated chicken erythrocytes, a reaction reversed by D-mannose or by higher concentrations of D-fructose, D-glucose, alpha-methyl-D-mannoside, or sucrose. Milk from Swedish women inhibited both of these adherence reactions, and the predominating inhibitory activity for each reaction resisted boiling, was destroyed by periodate treatment, and bound a concanavalin A-Sepharose column, suggesting a carbohydrate structure. Further characterization indicated that the inhibitory activity for classical V. cholerae hemagglutination was distributed about equally on glycoprotein and free oligosaccharide, but was not present on glycolipid. The El Tor inhibiting activity, on the other hand, was almost exclusively of a high-molecular-weight glycoprotein nature. These results support our previous suggestion (Holmgren et al., Infect. Immun. 33:136-141, 1981) that human milk may contain receptor-like glycocompounds which can prevent bacterial adherence by competition with receptors on target cells. PMID:6295953

  1. Role of the Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase in voltage generation and Na(+) extrusion in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Vorburger, Thomas; Nedielkov, Ruslan; Brosig, Alexander; Bok, Eva; Schunke, Emina; Steffen, Wojtek; Mayer, Sonja; Götz, Friedrich; Möller, Heiko M; Steuber, Julia

    2016-04-01

    For Vibrio cholerae, the coordinated import and export of Na(+) is crucial for adaptation to habitats with different osmolarities. We investigated the Na(+)-extruding branch of the sodium cycle in this human pathogen by in vivo (23)Na-NMR spectroscopy. The Na(+) extrusion activity of cells was monitored after adding glucose which stimulated respiration via the Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR). In a V. cholerae deletion mutant devoid of the Na(+)-NQR encoding genes (nqrA-F), rates of respiratory Na(+) extrusion were decreased by a factor of four, but the cytoplasmic Na(+) concentration was essentially unchanged. Furthermore, the mutant was impaired in formation of transmembrane voltage (ΔΨ, inside negative) and did not grow under hypoosmotic conditions at pH8.2 or above. This growth defect could be complemented by transformation with the plasmid encoded nqr operon. In an alkaline environment, Na(+)/H(+) antiporters acidify the cytoplasm at the expense of the transmembrane voltage. It is proposed that, at alkaline pH and limiting Na(+) concentrations, the Na(+)-NQR is crucial for generation of a transmembrane voltage to drive the import of H(+) by electrogenic Na(+)/H(+) antiporters. Our study provides the basis to understand the role of the Na(+)-NQR in pathogenicity of V. cholerae and other pathogens relying on this primary Na(+) pump for respiration. PMID:26721205

  2. Independent Regulation of Type VI Secretion in Vibrio cholerae by TfoX and TfoY.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Lisa C; Stutzmann, Sandrine; Scrignari, Tiziana; Van der Henst, Charles; Matthey, Noémie; Blokesch, Melanie

    2016-05-01

    Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) are nanomachines used for interbacterial killing and intoxication of eukaryotes. Although Vibrio cholerae is a model organism for structural studies on T6SSs, the underlying regulatory network is less understood. A recent study showed that the T6SS is part of the natural competence regulon in V. cholerae and is activated by the regulator TfoX. Here, we identify the TfoX homolog TfoY as a second activator of the T6SS. Importantly, despite inducing the same T6SS core machinery, the overall regulons differ significantly for TfoX and TfoY. We show that TfoY does not contribute to competence induction. Instead, TfoY drives the production of T6SS-dependent and T6SS-independent toxins, together with an increased motility phenotype. Hence, we conclude that V. cholerae uses its sole T6SS in response to diverse cues and for distinctive outcomes: either to kill for the prey's DNA, leading to horizontal gene transfer, or as part of a defensive escape reaction. PMID:27117415

  3. CytR Is a Global Positive Regulator of Competence, Type VI Secretion, and Chitinases in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    The facultative pathogen Vibrio cholerae transitions between its human host and aquatic reservoirs where it colonizes chitinous surfaces. Growth on chitin induces expression of chitin utilization genes, genes involved in DNA uptake by natural transformation, and a type VI secretion system that allows contact-dependent killing of neighboring bacteria. We have previously shown that the transcription factor CytR, thought to primarily regulate the pyrimidine nucleoside scavenging response, is required for natural competence in V. cholerae. Through high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we show that CytR positively regulates the majority of competence genes, the three type VI secretion operons, and the four known or predicted chitinases. We used transcriptional reporters and phenotypic analysis to determine the individual contributions of quorum sensing, which is controlled by the transcription factors HapR and QstR; chitin utilization that is mediated by TfoX; and pyrimidine starvation that is orchestrated by CytR, toward each of these processes. We find that in V. cholerae, CytR is a global regulator of multiple behaviors affecting fitness and adaptability in the environment. PMID:26401962

  4. Independent Regulation of Type VI Secretion in Vibrio cholerae by TfoX and TfoY

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Lisa C.; Stutzmann, Sandrine; Scrignari, Tiziana; Van der Henst, Charles; Matthey, Noémie; Blokesch, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Summary Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) are nanomachines used for interbacterial killing and intoxication of eukaryotes. Although Vibrio cholerae is a model organism for structural studies on T6SSs, the underlying regulatory network is less understood. A recent study showed that the T6SS is part of the natural competence regulon in V. cholerae and is activated by the regulator TfoX. Here, we identify the TfoX homolog TfoY as a second activator of the T6SS. Importantly, despite inducing the same T6SS core machinery, the overall regulons differ significantly for TfoX and TfoY. We show that TfoY does not contribute to competence induction. Instead, TfoY drives the production of T6SS-dependent and T6SS-independent toxins, together with an increased motility phenotype. Hence, we conclude that V. cholerae uses its sole T6SS in response to diverse cues and for distinctive outcomes: either to kill for the prey’s DNA, leading to horizontal gene transfer, or as part of a defensive escape reaction. PMID:27117415

  5. A Molecular Surveillance Reveals the Prevalence of Vibrio cholerae O139 Isolates in China from 1993 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Haijian; Diao, Baowei; Li, Fengjuan; Du, Pengcheng; Li, Jie; Morris, J. Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 was first identified in 1992 in India and Bangladesh, in association with major epidemics of cholera in both countries; cases were noted shortly thereafter in China. We characterized 211 V. cholerae O139 isolates that were isolated at multiple sites in China between 1993 and 2012 from patients (n = 92) and the environment (n = 119). Among clinical isolates, 88 (95.7%) of 92 were toxigenic, compared with 47 (39.5%) of 119 environmental isolates. Toxigenic isolates carried the El Tor CTX prophage and toxin-coregulated pilus A gene (tcpA), as well as the Vibrio seventh pandemic island I (VSP-I) and VSP-II. Among a subset of 42 toxigenic isolates screened by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), all were in the same sequence type as a clinical isolate (MO45) from the original Indian outbreak. Nontoxigenic isolates, in contrast, generally lacked VSP-I and -II, and fell within13 additional sequence types in two clonal complexes distinct from the toxigenic isolates. In further pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) (with NotI digestion) studies, toxigenic isolates formed 60 pulsotypes clustered in one group, while the nontoxigenic isolates formed 43 pulsotypes which clustered into 3 different groups. Our data suggest that toxigenic O139 isolates from widely divergent geographic locations, while showing some diversity, have maintained a relatively tight clonal structure across a 20-year time span. Nontoxigenic isolates, in contrast, exhibited greater diversity, with multiple clonal lineages, than did their toxigenic counterparts. PMID:24452176

  6. Structure of the Minor Pseudopilin EpsH From the Type 2 Secretion System of Vibrio Cholerae

    SciTech Connect

    Yanez, M.E.; Korotkov, K.V.; Abendroth, J.; Hol, W.G.J.

    2009-05-28

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use the multi-protein type II secretion system (T2SS) to selectively translocate virulence factors from the periplasmic space into the extracellular environment. In Vibrio cholerae the T2SS is called the extracellular protein secretion (Eps) system, which translocates cholera toxin and several enzymes in their folded state across the outer membrane. Five proteins of the T2SS, the pseudopilins, are thought to assemble into a pseudopilus, which may control the outer membrane pore EpsD, and participate in the active export of proteins in a 'piston-like' manner. We report here the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of an N-terminally truncated variant of EpsH, a minor pseudopilin from Vibrio cholerae. While EpsH maintains an N-terminal {alpha}-helix and C-terminal {beta}-sheet consistent with the type 4a pilin fold, structural comparisons reveal major differences between the minor pseudopilin EpsH and the major pseudopilin GspG from Klebsiella oxytoca: EpsH contains a large {beta}-sheet in the variable domain, where GspG contains an {alpha}-helix. Most importantly, EpsH contains at its surface a hydrophobic crevice between its variable and conserved {beta}-sheets, wherein a majority of the conserved residues within the EpsH family are clustered. In a tentative model of a T2SS pseudopilus with EpsH at its tip, the conserved crevice faces away from the helix axis. This conserved surface region may be critical for interacting with other proteins from the T2SS machinery.

  7. Comprehensive Functional Analysis of the 18 Vibrio cholerae N16961 Toxin-Antitoxin Systems Substantiates Their Role in Stabilizing the Superintegron

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Naeem; Guérout, Anne-Marie; Krin, Evelyne; Le Roux, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The role of chromosomal toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems, which are ubiquitous within the genomes of free-living bacteria, is still debated. We have scanned the Vibrio cholerae N16961 genome for class 2 TA genes and identified 18 gene pair candidates. Interestingly, all but one are located in the chromosome 2 superintegron (SI). The single TA found outside the SI is located on chromosome 1 and is related to the well-characterized HipAB family, which is known to play a role in antibiotic persistence. We investigated this clustering within the SI and its possible biological consequences by performing a comprehensive functional analysis on all of the putative TA systems. We demonstrate that the 18 TAs identified encode functional toxins and that their cognate antitoxins are able to neutralize their deleterious effects when expressed in Escherichia coli. In addition, we reveal that the 17 predicted TA systems of the SI are transcribed and expressed in their native context from their own promoters, a situation rarely found in integron cassettes. We tested the possibility of interactions between noncognate pairs of all toxins and antitoxins and found no cross-interaction between any of the different TAs. Although these observations do not exclude other roles, they clearly strengthen the role of TA systems in stabilizing the massive SI cassette array of V. cholerae. IMPORTANCE The chromosomal toxin-antitoxin systems have been shown to play various, sometimes contradictory roles, ranging from genomic stabilization to bacterial survival via persistence. Determining the interactions between TA systems hosted within the same bacteria is essential to understand the hierarchy between these different roles. We identify here the full set of class 2 TAs carried in the Vibrio cholerae N16961 genome and found they are all, with a single exception, located in the chromosome 2 superintegron. Their characterization, in terms of functionality, expression, and possible cross

  8. Scanning the landscape of genome architecture of non-O1 and non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by whole genome mapping reveals extensive population genetic diversity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chapman, Carol; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Awosika, Joy; Briska, Adam; Ptashkin, Ryan N.; Wagner, Trevor; Rajanna, Chythanya; Tsang, Hsinyi; Johnson, Shannon L.; et al

    2015-03-20

    Historically, cholera outbreaks have been linked to V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains or its derivatives of the O37 and O139 serogroups. A genomic study on the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak strains highlighted the putative role of non O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in causing cholera and the lack of genomic sequences of such strains from around the world. Here we address these gaps by scanning a global collection of V. cholerae strains as a first step towards understanding the population genetic diversity and epidemic potential of non O1/non-O139 strains. Whole Genome Mapping (Optical Mapping) based bar coding produces a high resolution, orderedmore » restriction map, depicting a complete view of the unique chromosomal architecture of an organism. To assess the genomic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, we applied a Whole Genome Mapping strategy on a well-defined and geographically and temporally diverse strain collection, the Sakazaki serogroup type strains. Whole Genome Map data on 91 of the 206 serogroup type strains support the hypothesis that V. cholerae has an unprecedented genetic and genomic structural diversity. Interestingly, we discovered chromosomal fusions in two unusual strains that possess a single chromosome instead of the two chromosomes usually found in V. cholerae. We also found pervasive chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and indels in many strains. The majority of Vibrio genome sequences currently in public databases are unfinished draft sequences. The Whole Genome Mapping approach presented here enables rapid screening of large strain collections to capture genomic complexities that would not have been otherwise revealed by unfinished draft genome sequencing and thus aids in assembling and finishing draft sequences of complex genomes. Furthermore, Whole Genome Mapping allows for prediction of novel V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains that may have the potential to cause future cholera outbreaks.« less

  9. Scanning the Landscape of Genome Architecture of Non-O1 and Non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by Whole Genome Mapping Reveals Extensive Population Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Awosika, Joy; Briska, Adam; Ptashkin, Ryan N.; Wagner, Trevor; Rajanna, Chythanya; Tsang, Hsinyi; Johnson, Shannon L.; Mokashi, Vishwesh P.; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2015-01-01

    Historically, cholera outbreaks have been linked to V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains or its derivatives of the O37 and O139 serogroups. A genomic study on the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak strains highlighted the putative role of non O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in causing cholera and the lack of genomic sequences of such strains from around the world. Here we address these gaps by scanning a global collection of V. cholerae strains as a first step towards understanding the population genetic diversity and epidemic potential of non O1/non-O139 strains. Whole Genome Mapping (Optical Mapping) based bar coding produces a high resolution, ordered restriction map, depicting a complete view of the unique chromosomal architecture of an organism. To assess the genomic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, we applied a Whole Genome Mapping strategy on a well-defined and geographically and temporally diverse strain collection, the Sakazaki serogroup type strains. Whole Genome Map data on 91 of the 206 serogroup type strains support the hypothesis that V. cholerae has an unprecedented genetic and genomic structural diversity. Interestingly, we discovered chromosomal fusions in two unusual strains that possess a single chromosome instead of the two chromosomes usually found in V. cholerae. We also found pervasive chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and indels in many strains. The majority of Vibrio genome sequences currently in public databases are unfinished draft sequences. The Whole Genome Mapping approach presented here enables rapid screening of large strain collections to capture genomic complexities that would not have been otherwise revealed by unfinished draft genome sequencing and thus aids in assembling and finishing draft sequences of complex genomes. Furthermore, Whole Genome Mapping allows for prediction of novel V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains that may have the potential to cause future cholera outbreaks. PMID:25794000

  10. Development of an in vitro model for study of non-O1 Vibrio cholerae virulence using Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, P; Tall, B D; Russell, R G; Detolla, L J; Morris, J G

    1990-01-01

    Non-O1 Vibrio cholerae strains have been reported as a causative agent of diarrhea throughout the world. We recently reported that non-O1 V. cholerae strains cause diarrhea in human volunteers. In this study we evaluated the virulence of three strains of non-O1 V. cholerae in a Caco-2 cell adherence assay by light and electron microscopy. A-5 is an environmental isolate which failed to colonized volunteers and did not cause diarrhea. It exhibited low numbers of organisms adherent to Caco-2 cells, leaving the microvilli intact. Strain 2076-79, isolated from a patient with diarrhea, colonized human volunteers without producing disease. It adhered to Caco-2 cells in moderate numbers without producing any damage to the microvilli. Strain NRT36S, a clinical isolate, colonized human volunteers and produced significant diarrhea disease. This strain adhered in very large numbers to Caco-2 cells and caused damage to the brush borders. Membrane-bound bacteria were also seen within the cytoplasm of these cells. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the generalized adherence of NRT36S to the microvilli of Caco-2 cells. The three strains did not appear to compete with each other for binding sites on Caco-2 cells and were not adherent when assays were conducted at 4 degrees C. Our results with strains A-5, 2076-79, and NRT36S correlate well with observations in human volunteer studies, suggesting that Caco-2 cells provide an appropriate in vitro system for further investigation of the pathogenesis of non-O1 V. cholerae gastroenteritis. Images PMID:2205582

  11. Calcium binding by the PKD1 domain regulates interdomain flexibility in Vibrio cholerae metalloprotease PrtV☆

    PubMed Central

    Edwin, Aaron; Rompikuntal, Pramod; Björn, Erik; Stier, Gunter; Wai, Sun N.; Sauer-Eriksson, A. Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, releases several virulence factors including secreted proteases when it infects its host. These factors attack host cell proteins and break down tissue barriers and cellular matrix components such as collagen, laminin, fibronectin, keratin, elastin, and they induce necrotic tissue damage. The secreted protease PrtV constitutes one virulence factors of V. cholerae. It is a metalloprotease belonging to the M6 peptidase family. The protein is expressed as an inactive, multidomain, 102 kDa pre-pro-protein that undergoes several N- and C-terminal modifications after which it is secreted as an intermediate variant of 81 kDa. After secretion from the bacteria, additional proteolytic steps occur to produce the 55 kDa active M6 metalloprotease. The domain arrangement of PrtV is likely to play an important role in these maturation steps, which are known to be regulated by calcium. However, the molecular mechanism by which calcium controls proteolysis is unknown. In this study, we report the atomic resolution crystal structure of the PKD1 domain from V. cholera PrtV (residues 755–838) determined at 1.1 Å. The structure reveals a previously uncharacterized Ca2+-binding site located near linker regions between domains. Conformational changes in the Ca2+-free and Ca2+-bound forms suggest that Ca2+-binding at the PKD1 domain controls domain linker flexibility, and plays an important structural role, providing stability to the PrtV protein. PMID:23905008

  12. Production and sequence validation of a complete full length ORF collection for the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Rolfs, Andreas; Montor, Wagner R.; Yoon, Sang Sun; Hu, Yanhui; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Kelley, Fontina; McCarron, Seamus; Jepson, Daniel A.; Shen, Binghua; Taycher, Elena; Mohr, Stephanie E.; Zuo, Dongmei; Williamson, Janice; Mekalanos, John; LaBaer, Joshua

    2008-01-01

    Cholera, an infectious disease with global impact, is caused by pathogenic strains of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. High-throughput functional proteomics technologies now offer the opportunity to investigate all aspects of the proteome, which has led to an increased demand for comprehensive protein expression clone resources. Genome-scale reagents for cholera would encourage comprehensive analyses of immune responses and systems-wide functional studies that could lead to improved vaccine and therapeutic strategies. Here, we report the production of the FLEXGene clone set for V. cholerae O1 biovar eltor str. N16961: a complete-genome collection of ORF clones. This collection includes 3,761 sequence-verified clones from 3,887 targeted ORFs (97%). The ORFs were captured in a recombinational cloning vector to facilitate high-throughput transfer of ORF inserts into suitable expression vectors. To demonstrate its application, ≈15% of the collection was transferred into the relevant expression vector and used to produce a protein microarray by transcribing, translating, and capturing the proteins in situ on the array surface with 92% success. In a second application, a method to screen for protein triggers of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) was developed. We tested in vitro-synthesized proteins for their ability to stimulate TLR5 in A549 cells. This approach appropriately identified FlaC, and previously uncharacterized TLR5 agonist activities. These data suggest that the genome-scale, fully sequenced ORF collection reported here will be useful for high-throughput functional proteomic assays, immune response studies, structure biology, and other applications. PMID:18337508

  13. A Study on the Geophylogeny of Clinical and Environmental Vibrio cholerae in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Ahmed Abade; Kimani, Racheal W.; Mwituria, Joyce; Sanaya, Robert Onsare; Muyodi, Jane; Revathi, Gunturu; Parkhill, Julian; Thomson, Nicholas; Dougan, Gordon; Kariuki, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Cholera remains a significant public health challenge in many sub-Saharan countries including Kenya. We have performed a combination of phylogenetic and phenotypic analysis based on whole genome DNA sequences derived from 40 environmental and 57 clinical V. cholerae from different regions of Kenya isolated between 2005 and 2010. Some environmental and all clinical isolates mapped back onto wave three of the monophyletic seventh pandemic V. cholerae El Tor phylogeny but other environmental isolates were phylogenetically very distinct. Thus, the genomes of the Kenyan V. cholerae O1 El Tor isolates are clonally related to other El Tor V. cholerae isolated elsewhere in the world and similarly harbour antibiotic resistance-associated STX elements. Further, the Kenyan O1 El Tor isolates fall into two distinct clades that may have entered Kenya independently. PMID:24066154

  14. Cholera

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually found in water or food contaminated by feces (poop). Cholera is rare in the US. You may get it if you travel to parts of the world with inadequate water treatment and poor sanitation, and lack of sewage treatment. Outbreaks can also happen after disasters. The ...

  15. Molecular Insights Into the Evolutionary Pathway of Vibrio cholerae O1 Atypical El Tor Variants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jin; Lee, Dokyung; Moon, Se Hoon; Lee, Chan Hee; Kim, Sang Jun; Lee, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jae Ouk; Song, Manki; Das, Bhabatosh; Clemens, John D.; Pape, Jean William; Nair, G. Balakrish; Kim, Dong Wook

    2014-01-01

    Pandemic V. cholerae strains in the O1 serogroup have 2 biotypes: classical and El Tor. The classical biotype strains of the sixth pandemic, which encode the classical type cholera toxin (CT), have been replaced by El Tor biotype strains of the seventh pandemic. The prototype El Tor strains that produce biotype-specific cholera toxin are being replaced by atypical El Tor variants that harbor classical cholera toxin. Atypical El Tor strains are categorized into 2 groups, Wave 2 and Wave 3 strains, based on genomic variations and the CTX phage that they harbor. Whole-genome analysis of V. cholerae strains in the seventh cholera pandemic has demonstrated gradual changes in the genome of prototype and atypical El Tor strains, indicating that atypical strains arose from the prototype strains by replacing the CTX phages. We examined the molecular mechanisms that effected the emergence of El Tor strains with classical cholera toxin-carrying phage. We isolated an intermediary V. cholerae strain that carried two different CTX phages that encode El Tor and classical cholera toxin, respectively. We show here that the intermediary strain can be converted into various Wave 2 strains and can act as the source of the novel mosaic CTX phages. These results imply that the Wave 2 and Wave 3 strains may have been generated from such intermediary strains in nature. Prototype El Tor strains can become Wave 3 strains by excision of CTX-1 and re-equipping with the new CTX phages. Our data suggest that inter-chromosomal recombination between 2 types of CTX phages is possible when a host bacterial cell is infected by multiple CTX phages. Our study also provides molecular insights into population changes in V. cholerae in the absence of significant changes to the genome but by replacement of the CTX prophage that they harbor. PMID:25233006

  16. Non-O1 Vibrio cholerae intestinal pathology and invasion in the removable intestinal tie adult rabbit diarrhea model.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, R G; Tall, B D; Morris, J G

    1992-01-01

    A modified removable intestinal tie adult rabbit diarrhea (RITARD) model was used to investigate the intestinal pathology, intestinal bacterial colonization, intestinal fluid volume, and onset of diarrhea caused by non-O1 Vibrio cholerae. Three strains of non-O1 V. cholerae were studied. RITARD rabbits challenged with 10(3) CFU of strain NRT36S (a strain previously shown to cause diarrhea in volunteers) developed grade 3 diarrhea at 48 to 72 h. The mean counts of non-O1 V. cholerae isolated were 9.3 +/- 0.07 and 8.7 +/- 0.7 CFU/g from the small and large intestines, respectively. Histologic examination showed necrosis of the luminal epithelium in the colon and mild inflammatory cell infiltration in the adjacent lamina propria. The severity and extent of intestinal damage by strain NRT36S was dose dependent. Higher doses of strain NRT36S caused severe necrotizing colitis and enteritis, with bacteremia and mortality at less than 24 h in RITARD rabbits challenged with 10(9) CFU and at less than 48 h in RITARD rabbits challenged with 10(4) CFU. Electron and light microscopy demonstrated invasion of NRT36S into the luminal epithelial cells of the intestine. Challenge of RITARD rabbits with non-O1 V. cholerae A-5 and 2076-79 (strains which did not cause diarrhea in volunteers) did not cause diarrhea or intestinal pathology. Intestinal colonization was transient: at 72 h postchallenge, animals inoculated with strain A-5 were culture negative, while only low numbers of strain 2076-79 were detectable (approximately 0.4 to 0.8 CFU/g). Our data highlight the utility of the RITARD model, when combined with appropriate pathologic and bacteriologic studies, for obtaining insights into pathophysiologic mechanisms of enteric disease by non-O1 V. cholerae. In agreement with volunteer studies, non-O1 V. cholerae NRT36S is clearly pathogenic in this model; direct cell invasion may play a role in its ability to cause illness. Images PMID:1730473

  17. Roles of the Sodium-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) on Vibrio cholerae Metabolism, Motility and Osmotic Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Yusuke; Halang, Petra; Quinn, Matthew J.; Faulkner, Wyatt J.; Aagesen, Alisha M.; Steuber, Julia; Stevens, Jan F.; Häse, Claudia C.

    2014-01-01

    The Na+ translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is a unique respiratory enzyme catalyzing the electron transfer from NADH to quinone coupled with the translocation of sodium ions across the membrane. Typically, Vibrio spp., including Vibrio cholerae, have this enzyme but lack the proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I). Thus, Na+-NQR should significantly contribute to multiple aspects of V. cholerae physiology; however, no detailed characterization of this aspect has been reported so far. In this study, we broadly investigated the effects of loss of Na+-NQR on V. cholerae physiology by using Phenotype Microarray (Biolog), transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. We found that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant showed multiple defects in metabolism detected by Phenotype Microarray. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant up-regulates 31 genes and down-regulates 55 genes in both early and mid-growth phases. The most up-regulated genes included the cadA and cadB genes, encoding a lysine decarboxylase and a lysine/cadaverine antiporter, respectively. Increased CadAB activity was further suggested by the metabolomics analysis. The down-regulated genes include sialic acid catabolism genes. Metabolomic analysis also suggested increased reductive pathway of TCA cycle and decreased purine metabolism in the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant. Lack of Na+-NQR did not affect any of the Na+ pumping-related phenotypes of V. cholerae suggesting that other secondary Na+ pump(s) can compensate for Na+ pumping activity of Na+-NQR. Overall, our study provides important insights into the contribution of Na+-NQR to V. cholerae physiology. PMID:24811312

  18. Vibrio cholerae Persisted in Microcosm for 700 Days Inhibits Motility but Promotes Biofilm Formation in Nutrient-Poor Lake Water Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Jubair, Mohammad; Atanasova, Kalina R.; Rahman, Mustafizur; Klose, Karl E.; Yasmin, Mahmuda; Yilmaz, Özlem; Morris, J. Glenn; Ali, Afsar

    2014-01-01

    Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, ubiquitous in aquatic environments, is responsible for cholera; humans can become infected after consuming food and/or water contaminated with the bacterium. The underlying basis of persistence of V. cholerae in the aquatic environment remains poorly understood despite decades of research. We recently described a “persister” phenotype of V. cholerae that survived in nutrient-poor “filter sterilized” lake water (FSLW) in excess of 700-days. Previous reports suggest that microorganisms can assume a growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) phenotype in response to long-term survival during stationary phase of growth. Here we report a V. cholerae GASP phenotype (GASP-700D) that appeared to result from 700 day-old persister cells stored in glycerol broth at −80°C. The GASP-700D, compared to its wild-type N16961, was defective in motility, produced increased biofilm that was independent of vps (p<0.005) and resistant to oxidative stress when grown specifically in FSLW (p<0.005). We propose that V. cholerae GASP-700D represents cell populations that may better fit and adapt to stressful survival conditions while serving as a critical link in the cycle of cholera transmission. PMID:24667909

  19. Vibrio cholerae persisted in microcosm for 700 days inhibits motility but promotes biofilm formation in nutrient-poor lake water microcosms.

    PubMed

    Jubair, Mohammad; Atanasova, Kalina R; Rahman, Mustafizur; Klose, Karl E; Yasmin, Mahmuda; Yilmaz, Ozlem; Morris, J Glenn; Ali, Afsar

    2014-01-01

    Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, ubiquitous in aquatic environments, is responsible for cholera; humans can become infected after consuming food and/or water contaminated with the bacterium. The underlying basis of persistence of V. cholerae in the aquatic environment remains poorly understood despite decades of research. We recently described a "persister" phenotype of V. cholerae that survived in nutrient-poor "filter sterilized" lake water (FSLW) in excess of 700-days. Previous reports suggest that microorganisms can assume a growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) phenotype in response to long-term survival during stationary phase of growth. Here we report a V. cholerae GASP phenotype (GASP-700D) that appeared to result from 700 day-old persister cells stored in glycerol broth at -80°C. The GASP-700D, compared to its wild-type N16961, was defective in motility, produced increased biofilm that was independent of vps (p<0.005) and resistant to oxidative stress when grown specifically in FSLW (p<0.005). We propose that V. cholerae GASP-700D represents cell populations that may better fit and adapt to stressful survival conditions while serving as a critical link in the cycle of cholera transmission. PMID:24667909

  20. lolB gene, a valid alternative for qPCR detection of Vibrio cholerae in food and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Maestu, Alejandro; Chapela, María-José; Vieites, Juan M; Cabado, Ana G

    2015-04-01

    In recent years a new genetic target for Vibrio cholerae detection has been reported, but its application was limited to clinical samples. This target, lolB, has never been applied to either food or environmental samples. In the present study the development, as well as the evaluation and pre-validation, of a real-time PCR method based on lolB, is described. The method included a newly designed hydrolysis probe to enhance its specificity. After comparison against other molecular and traditional methods, similar results were obtained regarding relative sensitivity, relative specificity, relative accuracy, positive and negative predictive values and index kappa of concordance (all higher than 91%), as well as a very low limit of detection (2 cfu/25 g). Additionally, after the analysis of more than 160 different food and environmental samples, its applicability in the food industry was completely demonstrated. PMID:25475326

  1. [Antibiotic sensitivity to epidemic strains of Vibrio cholerae and Shigella dysenteriae 1 isolated in Rwandan refugee camps in Zaire].

    PubMed

    Cavallo, J D; Niel, L; Talarmin, A; Dubrous, P

    1995-01-01

    Multiresistance or epidemic enteric bacteria to antibiotics greatly complicates treatment, and in some cases prophylaxis, of severe invasive gastroenteritis. During the summer of 1994, two epidemics of diarrhea, one due to Vibrio cholerae and the other to Shigella dysenteriae 1 isolated from the Goma and Bukavu camps was determined by measurement of the Agar Minimal Inhibitory Concentration. Multiresistance to tetracyclins, aminopenicillins, trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole, and nifuroxazide was observed. After intensive treatment mutant forms of both bacteria resistant to nalidixic acid rapidly appeared. Only fluoroquinolones remained active on these mutant strains, but the availability of this agent in Africa is restricted due to cost. The most effective way of preventing resistance is to limit the spread of enteric infections by health education and improvement of hygiene. This can be difficult during wartime. PMID:8830219

  2. DNA cloning, characterization, and inhibition studies of an α-carbonic anhydrase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Del Prete, Sonia; Isik, Semra; Vullo, Daniela; De Luca, Viviana; Carginale, Vincenzo; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T; Capasso, Clemente

    2012-12-13

    We have cloned, purified, and characterized an α-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) from the human pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae, VchCA. The new enzyme has significant catalytic activity, and an inhibition study with sulfonamides and sulfamates led to the detection of a large number of low nanomolar inhibitors, among which are methazolamide, acetazolamide, ethoxzolamide, dorzolamide, brinzolamide, benzolamide, and indisulam (KI values in the range 0.69-8.1 nM). As bicarbonate is a virulence factor of this bacterium and since ethoxzolamide was shown to inhibit the in vivo virulence, we propose that VchCA may be a target for antibiotic development, exploiting a mechanism of action rarely considered until now. PMID:23181552

  3. Multidrug Transport Protein NorM from Vibrio cholerae Simultaneously Couples to Sodium- and Proton-Motive Force*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yoonhee; Nair, Asha; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transporters belonging to the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion family mediate the efflux of unrelated pharmaceuticals from the interior of the cell in organisms ranging from bacteria to human. These proteins are thought to fall into two classes that couple substrate efflux to the influx of either Na+ or H+. We studied the energetics of drug extrusion by NorM from Vibrio cholerae in proteoliposomes in which purified NorM protein was functionally reconstituted in an inside-out orientation. We establish that NorM simultaneously couples to the sodium-motive force and proton-motive force, and biochemically identify protein regions and residues that play important roles in Na+ or H+ binding. As the positions of protons are not available in current medium and high-resolution crystal structures of multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporters, our findings add a previously unrecognized parameter to mechanistic models based of these structures. PMID:24711447

  4. Vibrio cholerae VpsT Regulates Matrix Production and Motility by Directly Sensing Cyclic di-GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Krasteva, P.; Fong, J; Shikuma, N; Beyhan, S; Navarro, M; Yildiz, F; Sondermann, H

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms can switch from a planktonic, free-swimming life-style to a sessile, colonial state, called a biofilm, which confers resistance to environmental stress. Conversion between the motile and biofilm life-styles has been attributed to increased levels of the prokaryotic second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), yet the signaling mechanisms mediating such a global switch are poorly understood. Here we show that the transcriptional regulator VpsT from Vibrio cholerae directly senses c-di-GMP to inversely control extracellular matrix production and motility, which identifies VpsT as a master regulator for biofilm formation. Rather than being regulated by phosphorylation, VpsT undergoes a change in oligomerization on c-di-GMP binding.

  5. Comparison of inferred relatedness based on multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis and whole genome sequencing of Vibrio cholerae O1.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mahamud-Ur; Almeida, Mathieu; Azman, Andrew S; Lindsay, Brianna R; Sack, David A; Colwell, Rita R; Huq, Anwar; Morris, J Glenn; Alam, Munirul; Stine, O Colin

    2016-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae causes cholera, a severe diarrheal disease. Understanding the local genetic diversity and transmission of V. cholerae will improve our ability to control cholera. Vibrio cholerae isolates clustered in genetically related groups (clonal complexes, CC) by multilocus variable tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) were compared by whole genome sequencing (WGS). Isolates in CC1 had been isolated from two geographical locations. Isolates in a second genetically distinct group, CC2, were isolated only at one location. Using WGS, CC1 isolates from both locations revealed, on average, 43.8 nucleotide differences, while those strains comprising CC2 averaged 19.7 differences. Strains from both MLVA-CCs had an average difference of 106.6. Thus, isolates comprising CC1 were more closely related (P < 10(-6)) to each other than to isolates in CC2. Within a MLVA-CC, after removing all paralogs, alternative alleles were found in all possible combinations on separate chromosomes indicative of recombination within the core genome. Including recombination did not affect the distinctiveness of the MLVA-CCs when measured by WGS. We found that WGS generally reflected the same genetic relatedness of isolates as MLVA, indicating that isolates from the same MLVA-CC shared a more recent common ancestor than isolates from the same location that clustered in a distinct MLVA-CC. PMID:27190166

  6. Comparison of inferred relatedness based on multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis and whole genome sequencing of Vibrio cholerae O1

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Mahamud-ur; Almeida, Mathieu; Azman, Andrew S.; Lindsay, Brianna R.; Sack, David A.; Colwell, Rita R.; Huq, Anwar; Morris, J. Glenn; Alam, Munirul; Stine, O. Colin

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae causes cholera, a severe diarrheal disease. Understanding the local genetic diversity and transmission of V. cholerae will improve our ability to control cholera. Vibrio cholerae isolates clustered in genetically related groups (clonal complexes, CC) by multilocus variable tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) were compared by whole genome sequencing (WGS). Isolates in CC1 had been isolated from two geographical locations. Isolates in a second genetically distinct group, CC2, were isolated only at one location. Using WGS, CC1 isolates from both locations revealed, on average, 43.8 nucleotide differences, while those strains comprising CC2 averaged 19.7 differences. Strains from both MLVA-CCs had an average difference of 106.6. Thus, isolates comprising CC1 were more closely related (P < 10−6) to each other than to isolates in CC2. Within a MLVA-CC, after removing all paralogs, alternative alleles were found in all possible combinations on separate chromosomes indicative of recombination within the core genome. Including recombination did not affect the distinctiveness of the MLVA-CCs when measured by WGS. We found that WGS generally reflected the same genetic relatedness of isolates as MLVA, indicating that isolates from the same MLVA-CC shared a more recent common ancestor than isolates from the same location that clustered in a distinct MLVA-CC. PMID:27190166

  7. Clinical Isolates of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor Ogawa of 2009 from Kolkata, India: Preponderance of SXT Element and Presence of Haitian ctxB Variant

    PubMed Central

    Kutar, Braj M. R. N. S.; Rajpara, Neha; Upadhyay, Hardik; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Bhardwaj, Ashima K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Increase in the number of multidrug resistant pathogens and the accompanied rise in case fatality rates has hampered the treatment of many infectious diseases including cholera. Unraveling the mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in the clinical isolates of Vibrio cholerae would help in understanding evolution of these pathogenic bacteria and their epidemic potential. This study was carried out to identify genetic factors responsible for multiple drug resistance in clinical isolates of Vibrio cholerae O1, serotype Ogawa, biotype El Tor isolated from the patients admitted to the Infectious Diseases Hospital, Kolkata, India, in 2009. Methodology/Principal Findings One hundred and nineteen clinical isolates of V. cholerae were analysed for their antibiotic resistance phenotypes. Antibiogram analysis revealed that majority of the isolates showed resistance to co-trimoxazole, nalidixic acid, polymixin B and streptomycin. In PCR, SXT integrase was detected in 117 isolates and its sequence showed 99% identity notably to ICEVchInd5 from Sevagram, India, ICEVchBan5 from Bangladesh and VC1786ICE sequence from Haiti outbreak among others. Antibiotic resistance traits corresponding to SXT element were transferred from the parent Vibrio isolate to the recipient E. coli XL-1 Blue cells during conjugation. Double-mismatch-amplification mutation assay (DMAMA) revealed the presence of Haitian type ctxB allele of genotype 7 in 55 isolates and the classical ctxB allele of genotype 1 in 59 isolates. Analysis of topoisomerase sequences revealed the presence of mutation Ser83 → Ile in gyrA and Ser85→ Leu in parC. This clearly showed the circulation of SXT-containing V. cholerae as causative agent for cholera in Kolkata. Conclusions There was predominance of SXT element in these clinical isolates from Kolkata region which also accounted for their antibiotic resistance phenotype typical of this element. DMAMA PCR showed them to be a mixture of isolates with

  8. Complete genome assemblies for two single-chromosome Vibrio cholerae isolates, strains 1154-74 (serogroup O49) and 10432-62 (serogroup O27)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Shannon Lyn; Khiani, A.; Bishop-Lilly, K. A.; Chapman, C.; Patel, M.; Verratti, K.; Teshima, Hazuki; Munk, A. C.; Bruce, David Carlton; Han, C. S.; Xie, G.; Davenport, Karen Walston; Chain, Patrick Sam Guy; Sozhamannan, S.

    2015-05-14

    We report the completed genome sequences for two non-O1/non-O139 Vibrio cholerae isolates. Each isolate has only a single chromosome, as opposed to the normal paradigm of two chromosomes found in all other V. cholerae isolates.

  9. Effects of conjugated and unconjugated bile acids on the activity of the Vibrio cholerae porin OmpT.

    PubMed

    Pagel, Melissa; Delcour, Anne H

    2011-01-01

    During infection, the enteric pathogen Vibrio cholerae encounters a bile-containing environment. Previous studies have shown that bile and/or bile acids exert several effects on the virulence and physiology of the bacterial cells. These observations have led to the suggestion that bile acids may play a signaling role in infection. We have previously reported that the bile component deoxycholic acid blocks the general diffusion porin OmpT in a dose-dependent manner, presumably as it transits through the pore. V. cholerae colonizes the distal jejunum and ileum, where a mixture of various conjugated and unconjugated bile acids are found. In this work, we have used patch clamp electrophysiology to investigate the effects of six bile acids on OmpT. Two bile acids (deoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic acids) were found to block OmpT at physiological concentrations below 1 mM, while glycodeoxycholic acid was mildly effective and cholic, lithocholic and taurodeoxycholic acids were ineffective in this range. The block was also voltage-dependent. These observations suggest the presence of a specific binding site inside the OmpT pore. Since deconjugation is due to the activity of the endogenous flora, the preferential uptake of some unconjugated bile acids by OmpT may signal the presence of a hospitable environment. The results are also discussed in terms of the possible molecular interactions between the penetrating bile acid molecule and the channel wall. PMID:21067451

  10. Autophagy and endosomal trafficking inhibition by Vibrio cholerae MARTX toxin phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-specific phospholipase A1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shivani; Kim, Hyunjin; Chan, Robin B.; Agarwal, Shivangi; Williamson, Rebecca; Cho, Wonhwa; Paolo, Gilbert D.; Satchell, Karla J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, responsible for acute gastroenteritis secretes a large multifunctional-autoprocessing repeat-in-toxin (MARTX) toxin linked to evasion of host immune system, facilitating colonization of small intestine. Unlike other effector domains of the multifunctional toxin that target cytoskeleton, the function of alpha-beta hydrolase (ABH) remained elusive. This study demonstrates that ABH is an esterase/lipase with catalytic Ser–His–Asp triad. ABH binds with high affinity to phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) and cleaves the fatty acid in PtdIns3P at the sn1 position in vitro making it the first PtdIns3P-specific phospholipase A1 (PLA1). Expression of ABH in vivo reduces intracellular PtdIns3P levels and its PtdIns3P-specific PLA1 activity blocks endosomal and autophagic pathways. In accordance with recent studies acknowledging the potential of extracellular pathogens to evade or exploit autophagy to prevent their clearance and facilitate survival, this is the first report highlighting the role of ABH in inhibiting autophagy and endosomal trafficking induced by extracellular V. cholerae. PMID:26498860

  11. Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance of Vibrio cholerae Results from an LPS Modification Pathway Related to Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The current pandemic El Tor biotype of O1 Vibrio cholerae is resistant to polymyxins, whereas the previous pandemic strain of the classical biotype is polymyxin sensitive. The almEFG operon found in El Tor V. cholerae confers >100-fold resistance to polymyxins through the glycylation of lipopolysaccharide. Here, we present the mechanistic determination of initial steps in the AlmEFG pathway. We verify that AlmF is an aminoacyl carrier protein and identify AlmE as the enzyme required to activate AlmF as a functional carrier protein. A combination of structural information and activity assays was used to identify a pair of active site residues that are important for mediating AlmE glycine specificity. Overall, the structure of AlmE in complex with its glycyl-adenylate intermediate reveals that AlmE is related to Gram-positive d-alanine/d-alanyl carrier protein ligase, while the trio of proteins in the AlmEFG system forms a chemical pathway that resembles the division of labor in nonribosomal peptide synthetases. PMID:25068415

  12. Microcystin-producing and non-producing cyanobacterial blooms collected from the Central India harbor potentially pathogenic Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Prashant; Kumar Agrawal, Manish; Nath Bagchi, Suvendra

    2015-05-01

    On the basis of relative abundance, frequency and biovolume, the important value index ranks were assigned to individual cyanobacteria in phytoplankton samples collected from fourteen water resources of Central India. The mcyABDE genes were detected in all the blooms with Microcystis (-aeruginosa, -viridis, -panniformis, -botrys) as being the major constituent morphospecies. On the other hand, blooms composed of primarily Oscillatoria (-limosa,-agardhii, -laetevirens) along with Anabaena, Nostoc, Phormidium and Spirulina as sub-dominant forms exhibited quite a patchy distribution of one or the other mcy genes. Fifty percent of Microcystis- but none of the Oscillatoria dominant blooms produced microcystins-RR and desmethyl-RR at 0.03-0.41mgg(-1) bloom dry mass. Traces of dissolved microcystin was detected in lake water, which is well below the WHO guideline. Irrespective of cyanobacterial composition and microcystin production ability, during the study period 43-64% of the cyanobacterial bloom samples exhibited association of viable but nonculturable forms of Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139, as evident from amplification of the antigen genes. We believe that spread of endemic cholera is the major threat associated with harmful algal blooms. PMID:25682583

  13. Molecular Analysis of Antibiotic Resistance Gene Clusters in Vibrio cholerae O139 and O1 SXT Constins

    PubMed Central

    Hochhut, Bianca; Lotfi, Yasmin; Mazel, Didier; Faruque, Shah M.; Woodgate, Roger; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2001-01-01

    Many recent Asian clinical Vibrio cholerae E1 Tor O1 and O139 isolates are resistant to the antibiotics sulfamethoxazole (Su), trimethoprim (Tm), chloramphenicol (Cm), and streptomycin (Sm). The corresponding resistance genes are located on large conjugative elements (SXT constins) that are integrated into prfC on the V. cholerae chromosome. We determined the DNA sequences of the antibiotic resistance genes in the SXT constin in MO10, an O139 isolate. In SXTMO10, these genes are clustered within a composite transposon-like structure found near the element's 5′ end. The genes conferring resistance to Cm (floR), Su (sulII), and Sm (strA and strB) correspond to previously described genes, whereas the gene conferring resistance to Tm, designated dfr18, is novel. In some other O139 isolates the antibiotic resistance gene cluster was found to be deleted from the SXT-related constin. The El Tor O1 SXT constin, SXTET, does not contain the same resistance genes as SXTMO10. In this constin, the Tm resistance determinant was located nearly 70 kbp away from the other resistance genes and found in a novel type of integron that constitutes a fourth class of resistance integrons. These studies indicate that there is considerable flux in the antibiotic resistance genes found in the SXT family of constins and point to a model for the evolution of these related mobile elements. PMID:11600347

  14. Serine 26 in the PomB Subunit of the Flagellar Motor Is Essential for Hypermotility of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Halang, Petra; Vorburger, Thomas; Steuber, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is motile by means of its single polar flagellum which is driven by the sodium-motive force. In the motor driving rotation of the flagellar filament, a stator complex consisting of subunits PomA and PomB converts the electrochemical sodium ion gradient into torque. Charged or polar residues within the membrane part of PomB could act as ligands for Na+, or stabilize a hydrogen bond network by interacting with water within the putative channel between PomA and PomB. By analyzing a large data set of individual tracks of swimming cells, we show that S26 located within the transmembrane helix of PomB is required to promote very fast swimming of V. cholerae. Loss of hypermotility was observed with the S26T variant of PomB at pH 7.0, but fast swimming was restored by decreasing the H+ concentration of the external medium. Our study identifies S26 as a second important residue besides D23 in the PomB channel. It is proposed that S26, together with D23 located in close proximity, is important to perturb the hydration shell of Na+ before its passage through a constriction within the stator channel. PMID:25874792

  15. Expression and morphology of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli surface antigen CS31A in E. coli K12 and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Kuehni-Boghenbor, Kathrin; Jordi, Helene A; Frey, Joachim; Vilei, Edy M; Favre, Didier; Stoffel, Michael H

    2012-06-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is known as a worldwide cause of diarrheal disease. The pathogenesis involves the attachment of the microorganisms to the mucosa and the production of enterotoxins. Surface expression of CS31A fimbriae was assessed by Western blots, dot blots, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy using negative staining and immunogold labeling. These investigations revealed significant differences in both the morphology of the wild-type and recombinant strains and the antigen exposure of CS31A in the wild-type and recombinant strains. In the wild-type ETEC strain, expression of CS31A was subject to phase variation. The recombinant E. coli strain produced CS31A but was prone to epitope shedding. In Vibrio cholerae vaccine strain CVD 103-HgR, the recombinant CS31A antigen was expressed but was only found intracellularly. Thus, E. coli strains seem to lend themselves better to the development of recombinant vaccines expressing ETEC-specific antigens at the cell's surface than strains from other orders or genera such as V. cholerae. PMID:22607531

  16. Whole genome sequencing of environmental Vibrio cholerae O1 from 10 nanograms of DNA using short reads.

    PubMed

    Pérez Chaparro, Paula Juliana; McCulloch, John Anthony; Cerdeira, Louise Teixeira; Al-Dilaimi, Arwa; Canto de Sá, Lena Lillian; de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Tauch, Andreas; de Carvalho Azevedo, Vasco Ariston; Cruz Schneider, Maria Paula; da Silva, Artur Luiz da Costa

    2011-11-01

    Multiple Displacement Amplification (MDA) of DNA using φ29 (phi29) DNA polymerase amplifies DNA several billion-fold, which has proved to be potentially very useful for evaluating genome information in a culture-independent manner. Whole genome sequencing using DNA from a single prokaryotic genome copy amplified by MDA has not yet been achieved due to the formation of chimeras and skewed amplification of genomic regions during the MDA step, which then precludes genome assembly. We have hereby addressed the issue by using 10 ng of genomic Vibrio cholerae DNA extracted within an agarose plug to ensure circularity as a starting point for MDA and then sequencing the amplified yield using the SOLiD platform. We successfully managed to assemble the entire genome of V. cholerae strain LMA3984-4 (environmental O1 strain isolated in urban Amazonia) using a hybrid de novo assembly strategy. Using our method, only 178 out of 16,713 (1%) of contigs were not able to be inserted into either chromosome scaffold, and out of these 178, only 3 appeared to be chimeras. The other contigs seem to be the result of template-independent non-specific amplification during MDA, yielding spurious reads. Extraction of genomic DNA within an agarose plug in order to ensure circularity of the extracted genome might be key to minimizing amplification bias by MDA for WGS. PMID:21871929

  17. Role of polyphosphate kinase gene (ppk) for survival of Vibrio cholerae O1 in surface water of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Jahid, Iqbal Kabir; Hasan, Md Mahmud; Abdul Matin, Mohammad; Mahmud, Zahid Hayat; Neogi, Sucharit Basu; Uddin, Md Hafiz; Islam, Md Sirajul

    2013-11-15

    Polyphosphate provides a substitute for ATP and energy source when phosphorus is a limiting resource in nature. The present study focuses on the role ofpolyphosphate for the survival of Vibrio cholerae in the aquatic habitats as an autochthonous bacterium. The survival advantages of polyphosphate of V. cholerae O1 having (wild type) and lacking (mutant) polyphosphate kinase (ppk) gene in surface water and with Anabaena variabilis were compared by cultural, Direct Fluorescent Antibody (DFA) and polymerase chain reaction methods in natural water microcosms. The microcosm's water was prepared by filtering and physicochemical parameters were also investigated by standard methods. The results revealed that both fresh and saline water, the wild type strain enhanced survival in cultural conditioned than ppk mutant strain. However, Fluorescent Antibody Direct Viable Counts (FADVC) and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) results noted both strains have the equal survival strategy in viable but nonculturable state (VNC). In conclusion, it could be hypothesized that the polyphosphate inclusion body might keep cultivable and survivable at low phosphate natural environment of the aquatic bacterium. PMID:24511696

  18. Discovery and Biological Characterization of the Auromomycin Chromophore as an Inhibitor of Biofilm Formation in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Peach, Kelly C.; Cheng, Andrew T.; Oliver, Allen G.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms pose a significant challenge in clinical environments due to their inherent lack of susceptibility to antibiotic treatment. It is widely recognized that most pathogenic bacterial strains in the clinical setting persist in the biofilm state, and are the root cause of many recrudescent infections. Discovery and development of compounds capable of either inhibiting biofilm formation or initiating biofilm dispersal may provide new therapeutic avenues for reducing the number of hospital acquired, biofilm-mediated infections. We now report the application of our recently reported image-based, high-throughput screen to the discovery of microbially-derived natural products with biofilm inhibitory activity against Vibrio cholerae. Examination of a prefractionated library of microbially-derived marine natural products has lead to the identification of a new biofilm inhibitor that is structurally unrelated to previously reported inhibitors and is one of the most potent inhibitors reported to date against V. cholerae. Combination of this compound with sub-MIC concentrations of a number of clinically relevant antibiotics was shown to improve the biofilm inhibitory efficacy of this new compound compared to monotherapy treatments, and provides evidence for the potential therapeutic benefit of biofilm inhibitors in treating persistent biofilm-mediated infections. PMID:24106077

  19. An Electrochemical Genosensing Assay Based on Magnetic Beads and Gold Nanoparticle-Loaded Latex Microspheres for Vibrio cholerae Detection.

    PubMed

    Low, Kim-Fatt; Rijiravanich, Patsamon; Singh, Kirnpal Kaur Banga; Surareungchai, Werasak; Yean, Chan Yean

    2015-04-01

    An ultrasensitive electrochemical genosensing assay was developed for the sequence-specific detection of Vibrio cholerae DNA using magnetic beads as the biorecognition surface and gold nanoparticle-loaded latex microspheres (latex-AuNPs) as a signal-amplified hybridization tag. This biorecognition surface was prepared by immobilizing specific biotinylated capturing probes onto the streptavidin-coupled magnetic beads. Fabricating a hybridization tag capable of amplifying the electrochemical signal involved loading multiple AuNPs onto polyelectrolyte multilayer film-coated poly(styrene-co-acrylic acid) latex microspheres as carrier particles. The detection targets, single-stranded 224-bp asymmetric PCR amplicons of the V. cholerae lolB gene, were sandwich-hybridized to magnetic bead-functionalized capturing probes and fluorescein-labeled detection probes and tagged with latex-AuNPs. The subsequent electrochemical stripping analysis of chemically dissolved AuNPs loaded onto the latex microspheres allowed for the quantification of the target amplicons. The high-loading capacity of the AuNPs on the latex microspheres for sandwich-type dual-hybridization genosensing provided eminent signal amplification. The genosensing variables were optimized, and the assay specificity was demonstrated. The clinical applicability of the assay was evaluated using spiked stool specimens. The current signal responded linearly to the different V. cholerae concentrations spiked into stool specimens with a detection limit of 2 colony-forming units (CFU)/ml. The proposed latex-AuNP-based magnetogenosensing platform is promising, exhibits an effective amplification performance, and offers new opportunities for the ultrasensitive detection of other microbial pathogens. PMID:26310076

  20. A cis-regulatory antisense RNA represses translation in Vibrio cholerae through extensive complementarity and proximity to the target locus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Howard; Replogle, John Michael; Vather, Naomi; Tsao-Wu, Maya; Mistry, Ronak; Liu, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    As with all facultative pathogens, Vibrio cholerae must optimize its cellular processes to adapt to different environments with varying carbon sources and to environmental stresses. More specifically, in order to metabolize mannitol, V. cholerae must regulate the synthesis of MtlA, a mannitol transporter protein produced exclusively in the presence of mannitol. We previously showed that a cis-acting small RNA (sRNA) expressed by V. cholerae, MtlS, appears to post-transcriptionally downregulate the expression of mtlA and is produced in the absence of mannitol. We hypothesized that since it is complementary to the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of mtlA mRNA, MtlS may affect synthesis of MtlA by forming an mtlA-MtlS complex that blocks translation of the mRNA through occlusion of its ribosome binding site. To test this hypothesis, we used in vitro translation assays in order to examine the role MtlS plays in mtlA regulation and found that MtlS is sufficient to suppress translation of transcripts harboring the 5′ UTR of mtlA. However, in a cellular context, the 5′ UTR of mtlA is not sufficient for targeted repression by endogenous MtlS; additional segments from the coding region of mtlA play a role in the ability of the sRNA to regulate translation of mtlA mRNA. Additionally, proximity of transcription sites between the sRNA and mRNA significantly affects the efficacy of MtlS. PMID:25826566

  1. RS1 satellite phage promotes diversity of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by driving CTX prophage loss and elimination of lysogenic immunity.

    PubMed

    Kamruzzaman, M; Robins, William Paul; Bari, S M Nayeemul; Nahar, Shamsun; Mekalanos, John J; Faruque, Shah M

    2014-09-01

    In El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the CTXϕ prophage often resides adjacent to a chromosomally integrated satellite phage genome, RS1, which produces RS1ϕ particles by using CTX prophage-encoded morphogenesis proteins. RS1 encodes RstC, an antirepressor against the CTXϕ repressor RstR, which cooperates with the host-encoded LexA protein to maintain CTXϕ lysogeny. We found that superinfection of toxigenic El Tor strains with RS1ϕ, followed by inoculation of the transductants into the adult rabbit intestine, caused elimination of the resident CTX prophage-producing nontoxigenic derivatives at a high frequency. Further studies using recA deletion mutants and a cloned rstC gene showed that the excision event was recA dependent and that introduction of additional copies of the cloned rstC gene instead of infection with RS1ϕ was sufficient to enhance CTXϕ elimination. Our data suggest that once it is excised from the chromosome, the elimination of CTX prophage from host cells is driven by the inability to reestablish CTXϕ lysogeny while RstC is overexpressed. However, with eventual loss of the additional copies of rstC, the nontoxigenic derivatives can act as precursors of new toxigenic strains by acquiring the CTX prophage either through reinfection with CTXϕ or by chitin-induced transformation. These results provide new insights into the role of RS1ϕ in V. cholerae evolution and the emergence of highly pathogenic clones, such as the variant strains associated with recent devastating epidemics of cholera in Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and Haiti. PMID:24935981

  2. [Experimental study of mixed infection by Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella typhi].

    PubMed

    Lobanov, V V; Kolpikova, L D; Sharikov, A M; Gavrilov, B V

    1998-01-01

    Mixed infection caused by V.cholerae and S.typhi was studied on guinea pig gall-bladder, used as an experimental model. These microorganisms coexisted in association in animals and exhibited no pronounced antagonistic properties in vitro. The cultures isolated from the organs of infected guinea pigs did not differ from initial ones. The study revealed that in nutrient broth containing 50% of dried bile salmonellae were preserved, but not V.cholerae. The latter could co-exist with S.typhi in 1% biliary medium prepared on meat-peptone broth (MPB). The use of bile and MPB as the basis for media intended for the study of material obtained from cholera and typhoid fever patients is recommended. PMID:9825490

  3. Ecology of Vibrio cholerae non-O1 and Salmonella spp. and role of zooplankton in their seasonal distribution in Fukuyama coastal waters, Japan.

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswaran, K; Takai, T; Navarro, I M; Nakano, H; Hashimoto, H; Siebeling, R J

    1989-01-01

    Seasonal variation of human pathogens such as Vibrio Cholerae non-01 and Salmonella spp. in Fukuyama coastal waters and the role of zooplankton in their distribution were studies for a period of 1 year. Comparison of two established methods, viz., the elevated temperature method and the two-step enrichment method of enumerating V. cholerae, showed that the former is superior in the recoveries of V. cholerae non-01. Isolation of this pathogen on a wider range of salinities (0.4 to 32.5%) revealed that these organisms are apparently an autochthonous component of the aquatic environment. Temperature appears to be the most crucial element in governing the distribution of V. cholerae non-01. Among the 69 isolates serotyped, 22 different serovars were identified, while one isolate failed to react with any of the known Louisiana State University antisera tested. Zooplankton samples did not harbor more V. Cholerae non-01 than the water column did. Better isolation of an allochthonous pathogen, viz., Salmonella spp., was noticed from the water samples when swabs were employed. Of the 251 isolates serotyped, 18 serotypes with three variants of Salmonella spp. were identified. A high amount of nutrients in the water column increased the survival rate of these pathogens in saline waters as evidenced by a higher incidence of various serotypes in polluted Fukuyama port than in clean marine waters. Salmonella spp. association between V. cholerae non-01 of Salmonella spp. with zooplankton could be noticed as influencing their seasonal distribution. PMID:2764569

  4. A genomic island integrated into recA of Vibrio cholerae contains a divergent recA and provides multi-pathway protection from DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Rapa, Rita A; Islam, Atiqul; Monahan, Leigh G; Mutreja, Ankur; Thomson, Nicholas; Charles, Ian G; Stokes, Harold W; Labbate, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) has been crucial in the evolution of the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. The two major virulence factors are present on two different mobile genetic elements, a bacteriophage containing the cholera toxin genes and a genomic island (GI) containing the intestinal adhesin genes. Non-toxigenic V. cholerae in the aquatic environment are a major source of novel DNA that allows the pathogen to morph via LGT. In this study, we report a novel GI from a non-toxigenic V. cholerae strain containing multiple genes involved in DNA repair including the recombination repair gene recA that is 23% divergent from the indigenous recA and genes involved in the translesion synthesis pathway. This is the first report of a GI containing the critical gene recA and the first report of a GI that targets insertion into a specific site within recA. We show that possession of the island in Escherichia coli is protective against DNA damage induced by UV-irradiation and DNA targeting antibiotics. This study highlights the importance of genetic elements such as GIs in the evolution of V. cholerae and emphasizes the importance of environmental strains as a source of novel DNA that can influence the pathogenicity of toxigenic strains. PMID:24889424

  5. Vibrio cholerae InV117, a Class 1 Integron Harboring aac(6′)-Ib and blaCTX-M-2, Is Linked to Transposition Genes

    PubMed Central

    Soler Bistué, Alfonso J. C.; Martín, Fernando A.; Petroni, Alejandro; Faccone, Diego; Galas, Marcelo; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.; Zorreguieta, Angeles

    2006-01-01

    A ca. 150-kbp Vibrio cholerae O1 biotype El Tor plasmid includes blaCTX-M-2 and a variant of aac(6′)-Ib within InV117, an orf513-bearing class 1 integron. InV117 is linked to a tnp1696 module in which IRl carries an insertion of IS4321R. The complete structure could be a potential mobile element. PMID:16641475

  6. 1.65 Å resolution structure of the AraC-family transcriptional activator ToxT from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiaqin; Wehmeyer, Graham; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Egan, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    ToxT is an AraC-family transcriptional activator protein that controls the expression of key virulence factors in Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera. ToxT directly activates the expression of the genes that encode the toxin-coregulated pilus and cholera toxin, and also positively auto-regulates its own expression from the tcp promoter. The crystal structure of ToxT has previously been solved at 1.9 Å resolution (PDB entry 3gbg). In this study, a crystal structure of ToxT at 1.65 Å resolution with a similar overall structure to the previously determined structure is reported. However, there are distinct differences between the two structures, particularly in the region that extends from Asp101 to Glu110. This region, which can influence ToxT activity but was disordered in the previous structure, can be traced entirely in the current structure. PMID:27599865

  7. 1.65 Å resolution structure of the AraC-family transcriptional activator ToxT from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiaqin; Wehmeyer, Graham; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P; Egan, Susan M

    2016-09-01

    ToxT is an AraC-family transcriptional activator protein that controls the expression of key virulence factors in Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera. ToxT directly activates the expression of the genes that encode the toxin-coregulated pilus and cholera toxin, and also positively auto-regulates its own expression from the tcp promoter. The crystal structure of ToxT has previously been solved at 1.9 Å resolution (PDB entry 3gbg). In this study, a crystal structure of ToxT at 1.65 Å resolution with a similar overall structure to the previously determined structure is reported. However, there are distinct differences between the two structures, particularly in the region that extends from Asp101 to Glu110. This region, which can influence ToxT activity but was disordered in the previous structure, can be traced entirely in the current structure. PMID:27599865

  8. Abundance of Vibrio cholerae, V. vulnificus, and V. parahaemolyticus in oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) from Long Island sound.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jessica L; Lüdeke, Catharina H M; Bowers, John C; DeRosia-Banick, Kristin; Carey, David H; Hastback, William

    2014-12-01

    Vibriosis is a leading cause of seafood-associated morbidity and mortality in the United States. Typically associated with consumption of raw or undercooked oysters, vibriosis associated with clam consumption is increasingly being reported. However, little is known about the prevalence of Vibrio spp. in clams. The objective of this study was to compare the levels of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in oysters and clams harvested concurrently from Long Island Sound (LIS). Most probable number (MPN)-real-time PCR methods were used for enumeration of total V. cholerae, V. vulnificus, V. parahaemolyticus, and pathogenic (tdh(+) and/or trh(+)) V. parahaemolyticus. V. cholerae was detected in 8.8% and 3.3% of oyster (n = 68) and clam (n = 30) samples, with levels up to 1.48 and 0.48 log MPN/g in oysters and clams, respectively. V. vulnificus was detected in 97% and 90% of oyster and clam samples, with median levels of 0.97 and -0.08 log MPN/g, respectively. V. parahaemolyticus was detected in all samples, with median levels of 1.88 and 1.07 log MPN/g for oysters and clams, respectively. The differences between V. vulnificus and total and pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus levels in the two shellfish species were statistically significant (P < 0.001). These data indicate that V. vulnificus and total and pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus are more prevalent and are present at higher levels in oysters than in hard clams. Additionally, the data suggest differences in vibrio populations between shellfish harvested from different growing area waters within LIS. These results can be used to evaluate and refine illness mitigation strategies employed by risk managers and shellfish control authorities. PMID:25281373

  9. Phenotypic and genetic characteristics of Vibrio cholerae O1 carrying Haitian ctxB and attributes of classical and El Tor biotypes isolated from Silvassa, India.

    PubMed

    Das, Moon Moon; Bhotra, Tilothama; Zala, Dolatsinh; Singh, Durg Vijai

    2016-08-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 biotype El Tor, the causative agent of the seventh pandemic, has recently been replaced by strains carrying classical and Haitian ctxB in India, Haiti and other parts of the world. We conducted phenotypic and genetic tests to characterize V. cholerae O1 isolated between 2012 and 2014 from Silvassa, India, to examine the presence of virulence and regulatory genes, seventh pandemic marker, ctxB type and biofilm formation and to study genomic diversity. Of the 59 V. cholerae O1, eight isolates belong to El Tor prototype, one to classical prototype and the remaining isolates have attributes of both classical and El Tor biotypes. PCR and ctxB gene sequencing revealed the presence of classical ctxB in four strains and Haitian ctxB in 55 isolates; indicating that isolates were either an El Tor or hybrid variant. All isolates carried virulence, regulatory, adherence, Vibrio seventh pandemic pathogenicity island I and seventh pandemic group-specific marker VC2346, in addition to tcpAET and rstRET, the features of seventh pandemic strains, and produced cholera toxin and biofilm. PFGE analysis showed that the majority of isolates are clonal and belong to fingerprint pattern A; however, pattern B is unrelated and patterns C and D are distinct, suggesting considerable diversity in the genomic content among them. These data thus show that isolates from Silvassa are genetically diverse and that Haitian ctxB and hybrid phenotypes are undergoing global dissemination. PMID:27255911

  10. Computer based screening for novel inhibitors against Vibrio cholerae using NCI diversity set-II: an alternative approach by targeting transcriptional activator ToxT.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Shakhinur Islam; Khadka, Bijendra; Akter, Arzuba; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Sultana, Razia

    2014-06-01

    Cholera is a severe diarrheal disease caused by Vibrio cholerae and remains as a major health risk in developing countries. The emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant V. cholerae strains during the past two decades is now a major problem in the treatment of cholera and have created the urgent need for the development of novel therapeutic agents. Targeting transcriptional factor is now a novel approach to tackle the development of multi-drug resistant strain. In the recent year virtual high throughput screening has emerged as a widely accepted powerful technology in the identification of novel and diverse lead. This study provides new insight to the search for new potent and selective inhibitors that still remains necessary to avoid the risk of possible resistance and reduce toxicity and side effects of currently available cholera drugs. The publications of high resolution X-ray structure of V. cholerae ToxT has open the way to the structure based virtual screening to identify new small molecular inhibitors which still remain necessary to avoid the risk of possible resistance and reduce toxicity and side effects of currently available cholera drugs. In this study we have performed structure based virtual screening approach using NCI diversity set-II to look for novel inhibitor of ToxT and proposed eight candidate compounds with high scoring function. Thus from complex scoring and binding ability it is elucidated that these compounds could be the promising inhibitors or could be developed as novel lead compounds for drug design against cholera. PMID:25172449

  11. O-Specific Polysaccharide-Specific Memory B Cell Responses in Young Children, Older Children, and Adults Infected with Vibrio cholerae O1 Ogawa in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Aktar, Amena; Rahman, M Arifur; Afrin, Sadia; Faruk, M Omar; Uddin, Taher; Akter, Aklima; Sami, M Israk Nur; Yasmin, Tahirah; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful I; Leung, Daniel T; LaRocque, Regina C; Charles, Richelle C; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Mandlik, Anjali; Kelly, Meagan; Kováč, Pavol; Xu, Peng; Calderwood, Stephen B; Harris, Jason B; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T

    2016-05-01

    Cholera caused by Vibrio cholerae O1 confers at least 3 to 10 years of protection against subsequent disease regardless of age, despite a relatively rapid fall in antibody levels in peripheral blood, suggesting that memory B cell responses may play an important role in protection. The V. cholerae O1-specific polysaccharide (OSP) component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is responsible for serogroup specificity, and it is unclear if young children are capable of developing memory B cell responses against OSP, a T cell-independent antigen, following cholera. To address this, we assessed OSP-specific memory B cell responses in young children (2 to 5 years, n = 11), older children (6 to 17 years, n = 21), and adults (18 to 55 years, n = 28) with cholera caused by V. cholerae O1 in Dhaka, Bangladesh. We also assessed memory B cell responses against LPS and vibriocidal responses, and plasma antibody responses against OSP, LPS, and cholera toxin B subunit (CtxB; a T cell-dependent antigen) on days 2 and 7, as well as days 30, 90, and 180 after convalescence. In all age cohorts, vibriocidal responses and plasma OSP, LPS, and CtxB-specific responses peaked on day 7 and fell toward baseline over the follow-up period. In comparison, we were able to detect OSP memory B cell responses in all age cohorts of patients with detectable responses over baseline for 90 to 180 days. Our results suggest that OSP-specific memory B cell responses can occur following cholera, even in the youngest children, and may explain in part the age-independent induction of long-term immunity following naturally acquired disease. PMID:27009211

  12. Rapid Effects of a Protective O-Polysaccharide-Specific Monoclonal IgA on Vibrio cholerae Agglutination, Motility, and Surface Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Kara J.; De Jesus, Magdia

    2015-01-01

    2D6 is a dimeric monoclonal immunoglobulin A (IgA) specific for the nonreducing terminal residue of Ogawa O-polysaccharide (OPS) of Vibrio cholerae. It was previously demonstrated that 2D6 IgA is sufficient to passively protect suckling mice from oral challenge with virulent V. cholerae O395. In this study, we sought to define the mechanism by which 2D6 IgA antibody protects the intestinal epithelium from V. cholerae infection. In a mouse ligated-ileal-loop assay, 2D6 IgA promoted V. cholerae agglutination in the intestinal lumen and limited the ability of the bacteria to associate with the epithelium, particularly within the crypt regions. In vitro fluorescence digital video microscopy analysis of antibody-treated V. cholerae in liquid medium revealed that 2D6 IgA not only induced the rapid (5- to 10-min) onset of agglutination but was an equally potent inhibitor of bacterial motility. Scanning electron microscopy showed that 2D6 IgA promoted flagellum-flagellum cross-linking, as well as flagellar entanglement with bacterial bodies, suggesting that motility arrest may be a consequence of flagellar tethering. However, monovalent 2D6 Fab fragments also inhibited V. cholerae motility, demonstrating that antibody-mediated agglutination and motility arrest are separate phenomena. While 2D6 IgA is neither bactericidal nor bacteriostatic, exposure of V. cholerae to 2D6 IgA (or Fab fragments) resulted in a 5-fold increase in surface-associated blebs, as well an onset of a wrinkled surface morphotype. We propose that the protective immunity conferred by 2D6 IgA is the result of multifactorial effects on V. cholerae, including agglutination, motility arrest, and possibly outer membrane stress. PMID:25667263

  13. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, M. Shamim Hasan; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chatterjee, Shruti; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Faruque, Shah M.; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP), the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:26361388

  14. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System.

    PubMed

    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chatterjee, Shruti; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Faruque, Shah M; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP), the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:26361388

  15. Crystal structure of HlyU, the hemolysin gene transcription activator, from Vibrio cholerae N16961 and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debadrita; Datta, Ajit Bikram; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2014-10-18

    HlyU in Vibrio cholerae is known to be the transcriptional activator of the hemolysin gene, HlyA and possibly a regulator of other virulence factors influencing growth, colonization and pathogenicity of this infective agent. Here we report the crystal structure of HlyU from V. cholerae N16961 (HlyU_Vc) at 1.8Å. The protein, with five α-helices and three β-strands in the topology of α1-α2-β1-α3-α4-β2-β3-α5, forms a homodimer. Helices α3-α4 and a β sheet form the winged helix-turn-helix (wHTH) DNA-binding motif common to the transcription regulators of the SmtB/ArsR family. In spite of an overall fold similar to SmtB/ArsR family, it lacks any metal binding site seen in SmtB. A comparison of the dimeric interfaces showed that the one in SmtB is much larger and have salt bridges that can be disrupted to accommodate metal ions. A model of HlyU-DNA complex suggests bending of the DNA. Cys38 in the structure was found to be modified as sulfenic acid; the oxidized form was not seen in another structure solved under reducing condition. Although devoid of any metal binding site, the presence of a Cys residue exhibiting oxidation-reduction suggests the possibility of the existence of a redox switch in transcription regulation. A structure-based phylogenetic analysis of wHTH proteins revealed the segregation of metal and non-metal binding proteins as well as those in the latter group that are under redox control. PMID:25450504

  16. The Relationship between Glycan Binding and Direct Membrane Interactions in Vibrio cholerae Cytolysin, a Channel-forming Toxin.

    PubMed

    De, Swastik; Bubnys, Adele; Alonzo, Francis; Hyun, Jinsol; Lary, Jeffrey W; Cole, James L; Torres, Victor J; Olson, Rich

    2015-11-20

    Bacterial pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are structurally diverse pathogen-secreted proteins that form cell-damaging channels in the membranes of host cells. Most PFTs are released as water-soluble monomers that first oligomerize on the membrane before inserting a transmembrane channel. To modulate specificity and increase potency, many PFTs recognize specific cell surface receptors that increase the local toxin concentration on cell membranes, thereby facilitating channel formation. Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a toxin secreted by the human pathogen responsible for pandemic cholera disease and acts as a defensive agent against the host immune system. Although it has been shown that VCC utilizes specific glycan receptors on the cell surface, additional direct contacts with the membrane must also play a role in toxin binding. To better understand the nature of these interactions, we conducted a systematic investigation of the membrane-binding surface of VCC to identify additional membrane interactions important in cell targeting. Through cell-based assays on several human-derived cell lines, we show that VCC is unlikely to utilize high affinity protein receptors as do structurally similar toxins from Staphylococcus aureus. Next, we identified a number of specific amino acid residues that greatly diminish the VCC potency against cells and investigated the interplay between glycan binding and these direct lipid contacts. Finally, we used model membranes to parse the importance of these key residues in lipid and cholesterol binding. Our study provides a complete functional map of the VCC membrane-binding surface and insights into the integration of sugar, lipid, and cholesterol binding interactions. PMID:26416894

  17. The PhoB regulatory system modulates biofilm formation and stress response in El Tor biotype Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Syed Zafar; Silva, Anisia J; Benitez, Jorge A

    2010-01-01

    The PhoBR regulatory system is required for the induction of multiple genes under conditions of phosphate limitation. Here, we examine the role of PhoB in biofilm formation and environmental stress response in Vibrio cholerae of the El Tor biotype. Deletion of phoB or hapR enhanced biofilm formation in a phosphate-limited medium. Planktonic and redispersed biofilm cells of the DeltaphoB mutant did not differ from wild type for the expression of HapR, suggesting that PhoB negatively affects biofilm formation through an HapR-independent pathway. The DeltaphoB mutant exhibited elevated expression of exopolysaccharide genes vpsA and vpsL compared with the wild type. Deletion of hapR enhanced the expression of the positive regulator vpsT, but had no effect on the expression of vpsR. In contrast, deletion of phoB enhanced the expression of the positive regulator vpsR, but had no effect on the expression of hapR and vpsT. The DeltaphoB mutant was more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide compared with the wild type and with an isogenic DeltarpoS mutant. Conversely, the DeltaphoB mutant was more resistant to acidic conditions and high osmolarity compared with the wild type and with an isogenic DeltarpoS mutant. Taken together, our data suggest that phosphate limitation induces V. cholerae to adopt a free-swimming life style in which PhoB modulates environmental stress response in a manner that differs from the general stress response regulator RpoS. PMID:19909344

  18. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    O’Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni. PMID:25715048

  19. Genetic Variation of Vibrio cholerae during Outbreaks, Bangladesh, 2010–2011

    PubMed Central

    Rashed, Shah M.; Azman, Andrew S.; Alam, Munirul; Li, Shan; Sack, David A.; Morris, J. Glenn; Longini, Ira; Siddique, Abul Kasem; Iqbal, Anwarul; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R.; Sack, R. Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Cholera remains a major public health problem. To compare the relative contribution of strains from the environment with strains isolated from patients during outbreaks, we performed multilocus variable tandem repeat analyses on samples collected during the 2010 and 2011 outbreak seasons in 2 geographically distinct areas of Bangladesh. A total of 222 environmental and clinical isolates of V. cholerae O1 were systematically collected from Chhatak and Mathbaria. In Chhatak, 75 of 79 isolates were from the same clonal complex, in which extensive differentiation was found in a temporally consistent pattern of successive mutations at single loci. A total of 59 isolates were collected from 6 persons; most isolates from 1 person differed by sequential single-locus mutations. In Mathbaria, 60 of 84 isolates represented 2 separate clonal complexes. The small number of genetic lineages in isolates from patients, compared with those from the environment, is consistent with accelerated transmission of some strains among humans during an outbreak. PMID:24377372

  20. Isolation frequency and susceptibility pattern of non-O1 and non-O139 Vibrio cholerae in a tertiary health care laboratory, 1999-2012.

    PubMed

    Irfan, S; Fasih, N; Ghanchi, N K; Khan, E

    2016-02-01

    In the past decade the importance of non-O1 and non-O139 strains of Vibrio cholerae has been highlighted globally. This study aimed to evaluate the frequency and antimicrobial susceptibility profile of non-O1 and non-O139 V. cholerae in Pakistan. Data of stool specimens yielding growth of non-O1 and non-O139 V. cholerae isolated at a national referral laboratory from 1999 to 2012 were retrospectively analysed and evaluated for resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, co-trimoxazole and ofloxacin. A total of 95 800 stool samples submitted over 1999-2012 yielded 3668 strains of V. cholerae, of which 6% were non-O1 and non-O139 V. cholerae. A high isolation rate was found in the summer season, with a peak in the year 2003. Antimicrobial susceptibility data revealed increasing resistance to co-trimoxazole and ampicillin, but strains remained highly susceptible to ofloxacin. Active surveillance of serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility is essential to predict future epidemics and define measures to curtail the disease. PMID:27180742

  1. Immunochemical characterization of synthetic hexa-, octa- and decasaccharide conjugate vaccines for Vibrio cholerae O:1 Serotype Ogawa with emphasis on antigenic density and chain length

    PubMed Central

    Ftacek, Peter; Nelson, Victor; Szu, Shousun C.

    2013-01-01

    Cholera remains to be a global health problem without suitable vaccines for endemic control or outbreak relief. Here we describe a new parenteral vaccine based on neoglyco-conjugate of synthetic fragments of O-specific polysaccharide (O-SP) of Vibrio cholerae O1, serotype Ogawa. Hexa-, octa- and decasaccharides of the O-SP with carboxylic acid at the reducing end were chemically synthesized and conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT). The conjugates prepared by a novel linking scheme consisted of 17-atom linker of hydrazide and alkyl bonds elicited robust serum IgG anti-LPS responses with vibriocidal activities in mice. There is a length dependence in immune response with decasaccharide conjugates elicited the highest anti-LPS IgG. There seems to be an indication that regardless of the carbohydrate chain length, a molar ratio of 230±10 monosaccharide units per TT induced high antibody response. The conjugates also elicited cross-reactive antibodies to serotype Inaba. The formulation of the proposed cholera conjugate vaccine, similar to other licensed polysaccharide vaccine, is suitable for children immunization. A parenteral cholera vaccine could overcome the diminishing immunogenicity in most of oral vaccines due to the gastrointestinal complexity and environmental enteropathy in children living in impoverished environment and could be considered for global cholera immunization. PMID:23955520

  2. Dry-reagent gold nanoparticle-based lateral flow biosensor for the simultaneous detection of Vibrio cholerae serogroups O1 and O139.

    PubMed

    Yu, Choo Yee; Ang, Geik Yong; Chua, Ang Lim; Tan, Elina Husni; Lee, Su Yin; Falero-Diaz, Gustavo; Otero, Oscar; Rodríguez, Irelio; Reyes, Fátima; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, María E; Ghosh, Santanu; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Yean Yean, Chan; Lalitha, Pathabhiraman; Ravichandran, Manickam

    2011-09-01

    Cholera is a communicable disease caused by consumption of contaminated food and water. This potentially fatal intestinal infection is characterised by profuse secretion of rice watery stool that can rapidly lead to severe dehydration and shock, thus requiring treatment to be given immediately. Epidemic and pandemic cholera are exclusively associated with Vibrio cholerae serogroups O1 and O139. In light of the need for rapid diagnosis of cholera and to prevent spread of outbreaks, we have developed and evaluated a direct one-step lateral flow biosensor for the simultaneous detection of both V. cholerae O1 and O139 serogroups using alkaline peptone water culture. Serogroup specific monoclonal antibodies raised against lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were used to functionalize the colloidal gold nanoparticles for dual detection in the biosensor. The assay is based on immunochromatographic principle where antigen-antibody reaction would result in the accumulation of gold nanoparticles and thus, the appearance of a red line on the strip. The dry-reagent dipstick format of the biosensor ensure user-friendly application, rapid result that can be read with the naked eyes and cold-chain free storage that is well-suited to be performed at resource-limited settings. PMID:21571011

  3. Genetic relatedness of selected clinical Vibrio cholerae O139 isolates from the southern coastal area of China over a 20-year period.

    PubMed

    Li, B S; Xiao, Y; Wang, D C; Tan, H L; Ke, B X; He, D M; Ke, C W; Zhang, Y H

    2016-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae O139 emerged as a causative agent of epidemic cholera in 1992 in India and Bangladesh, and was subsequently reported in China in 1993. The genetic relatedness and molecular characteristics of V. cholerae O139 in Guangdong Province, located in the southern coastal area of China, remains undetermined. In this study, we investigated 136 clinical V. cholerae O139 isolates from 1993 to 2013 in Guangdong. By conventional PCR, 123 (90·4%) isolates were positive for ctxB, ace and zot. Sequencing of the positive amplicons indicated 113 (91·7%) isolates possessed the El Tor allele of ctxB (genotype 3); seven carried the classical ctxB type (genotype 1) and three harboured a novel ctxB type (genotype 5). With respect to tcpA, 123 (90·4%) isolates were positive for the El Tor allele. In addition, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (with NotI digestion) differentiated the isolates into clusters A and B. Cluster A contained seven of the non-toxigenic isolates from 1998 to 2000; another six non-toxigenic isolates (from 1998 and 2007) and all of the toxigenic isolates formed cluster B. Our results suggest that over a 20-year period, the predominant O139 clinical isolates have maintained a relatively tight clonal structure, although some genetic variance and shift has occurred. Our data highlight the persistence of toxigenic V. cholerae O139 in clinical settings in the southern coastal area of China. PMID:27305977

  4. Immunochemical characterization of synthetic hexa-, octa- and decasaccharide conjugate vaccines for Vibrio cholerae O:1 serotype Ogawa with emphasis on antigenic density and chain length.

    PubMed

    Ftacek, Peter; Nelson, Victor; Szu, Shousun C

    2013-12-01

    Cholera remains to be a global health problem without suitable vaccines for endemic control or outbreak relief. Here we describe a new parenteral vaccine based on neoglyco-conjugate of synthetic fragments of O-specific polysaccharide (O-SP) of Vibrio cholerae O1, serotype Ogawa. Hexa-, octa- and decasaccharides of the O-SP with carboxylic acid at the reducing end were chemically synthesized and conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT). The conjugates prepared by a novel linking scheme consisted of 17-atom linker of hydrazide and alkyl bonds elicited robust serum IgG anti-LPS responses with vibriocidal activities in mice. There is a length dependence in immune response with decasaccharide conjugates elicited the highest anti-LPS IgG. There seems to be an indication that regardless of the carbohydrate chain length, a molar ratio of 230 ± 10 monosaccharide units per TT induced high antibody response. The conjugates also elicited cross-reactive antibodies to serotype Inaba. The formulation of the proposed cholera conjugate vaccine, similar to other licensed polysaccharide vaccine, is suitable for children immunization. A parenteral cholera vaccine could overcome the diminishing immunogenicity in most of oral vaccines due to the gastrointestinal complexity and environmental enteropathy in children living in impoverished environment and could be considered for global cholera immunization. PMID:23955520

  5. Genetic and phenotypic analysis of Vibrio cholerae non-O1, non-O139 isolated from German and Austrian patients.

    PubMed

    Schirmeister, F; Dieckmann, R; Bechlars, S; Bier, N; Faruque, S M; Strauch, E

    2014-05-01

    Vibrio cholerae belonging to the non-O1, non-O139 serogroups are present in the coastal waters of Germany and in some German and Austrian lakes. These bacteria can cause gastroenteritis and extraintestinal infections, and are transmitted through contaminated food and water. However, non-O1, non-O139 V. cholerae infections are rare in Germany. We studied 18 strains from German and Austrian patients with diarrhea or local infections for their virulence-associated genotype and phenotype to assess their potential for infectivity in anticipation of possible climatic changes that could enhance the transmission of these pathogens. The strains were examined for the presence of genes encoding cholera toxin and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), as well as other virulence-associated factors or markers, including hemolysins, repeats-in-toxin (RTX) toxins, Vibrio seventh pandemic islands VSP-1 and VSP-2, and the type III secretion system (TTSS). Phenotypic assays for hemolysin activity, serum resistance, and biofilm formation were also performed. A dendrogram generated by incorporating the results of these analyses revealed genetic differences of the strains correlating with their clinical origin. Non-O1, non-O139 strains from diarrheal patients possessed the TTSS and/or the multifunctional autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin (MARTX) toxin, which were not found in the strains from ear or wound infections. Routine matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of all strains provided reliable identification of the species but failed to differentiate between strains or clusters. The results of this study indicate the need for continued surveillance of V. cholerae non-O1, non-O139 in Germany, in view of the predicted increase in the prevalence of Vibrio spp. due to the rise in surface water temperatures. PMID:24213848

  6. Growth Phase, Oxygen, Temperature, and Starvation Affect the Development of Viable but Non-culturable State of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Liang, Weili; Kan, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae can enter into a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state in order to survive in unfavorable environments. In this study, we studied the roles of five physicochemical and microbiological factors or states, namely, different strains, growth phases, oxygen, temperature, and starvation, on the development of VBNC of V. cholerae in artificial sea water (ASW). Different strains of the organism, the growth phase, and oxygen levels affected the progress of VBNC development. It was found that the VBNC state was induced faster in V. cholerae serogroup O1 classical biotype strain O395 than in O1 El Tor biotype strains C6706 and N16961. When cells in different growth phases were used for VBNC induction, stationary-phase cells lost their culturability more quickly than exponential-phase cells, while induction of a totally non-culturable state took longer to achieve for stationary-phase cells in all three strains, suggesting that heterogeneity of cells should be considered. Aeration strongly accelerated the loss of culturability. During the development of the VBNC state, the culturable cell count under aeration conditions was almost 10(6)-fold lower than under oxygen-limited conditions for all three strains. The other two factors, temperature and nutrients-rich environment, may prevent the induction of VBNC cells. At 22 or 37°C in ASW, most of the cells rapidly died and the culturable cell count reduced from about 10(8) to 10(6)-10(5) CFU/mL. The total cell counts showed that cells that lost viability were decomposed, and the viable cell counts were the same as culturable cell counts, indicating that the cells did not reach the VBNC state. VBNC state development was blocked when ASW was supplied with Luria-Bertani broth (LB), but it was not affected in ASW with M9, suggesting that specific nutrients in LB may prevent the development of VBNC state. These results revealed that the five factors evaluated in this study had different roles during the progress of VBNC

  7. Growth Phase, Oxygen, Temperature, and Starvation Affect the Development of Viable but Non-culturable State of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bin; Liang, Weili; Kan, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae can enter into a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state in order to survive in unfavorable environments. In this study, we studied the roles of five physicochemical and microbiological factors or states, namely, different strains, growth phases, oxygen, temperature, and starvation, on the development of VBNC of V. cholerae in artificial sea water (ASW). Different strains of the organism, the growth phase, and oxygen levels affected the progress of VBNC development. It was found that the VBNC state was induced faster in V. cholerae serogroup O1 classical biotype strain O395 than in O1 El Tor biotype strains C6706 and N16961. When cells in different growth phases were used for VBNC induction, stationary-phase cells lost their culturability more quickly than exponential-phase cells, while induction of a totally non-culturable state took longer to achieve for stationary-phase cells in all three strains, suggesting that heterogeneity of cells should be considered. Aeration strongly accelerated the loss of culturability. During the development of the VBNC state, the culturable cell count under aeration conditions was almost 106-fold lower than under oxygen-limited conditions for all three strains. The other two factors, temperature and nutrients-rich environment, may prevent the induction of VBNC cells. At 22 or 37°C in ASW, most of the cells rapidly died and the culturable cell count reduced from about 108 to 106–105 CFU/mL. The total cell counts showed that cells that lost viability were decomposed, and the viable cell counts were the same as culturable cell counts, indicating that the cells did not reach the VBNC state. VBNC state development was blocked when ASW was supplied with Luria-Bertani broth (LB), but it was not affected in ASW with M9, suggesting that specific nutrients in LB may prevent the development of VBNC state. These results revealed that the five factors evaluated in this study had different roles during the progress of VBNC

  8. Crystal structures of a CTXphi pIII domain unbound and in complex with a Vibrio cholerae TolA domain reveal novel interaction interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ford, Christopher G; Kolappan, Subramaniapillai; Phan, Hanh T H; Waldor, Matthew K; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C; Craig, Lisa

    2012-10-19

    Vibrio cholerae colonize the small intestine where they secrete cholera toxin, an ADP-ribosylating enzyme that is responsible for the voluminous diarrhea characteristic of cholera disease. The genes encoding cholera toxin are located on the genome of the filamentous bacteriophage, CTXϕ, that integrates as a prophage into the V. cholerae chromosome. CTXϕ infection of V. cholerae requires the toxin-coregulated pilus and the periplasmic protein TolA. This infection process parallels that of Escherichia coli infection by the Ff family of filamentous coliphage. Here we demonstrate a direct interaction between the N-terminal domain of the CTXϕ minor coat protein pIII (pIII-N1) and the C-terminal domain of TolA (TolA-C) and present x-ray crystal structures of pIII-N1 alone and in complex with TolA-C. The structures of CTXϕ pIII-N1 and V. cholerae TolA-C are similar to coliphage pIII-N1 and E. coli TolA-C, respectively, yet these proteins bind via a distinct interface that in E. coli TolA corresponds to a colicin binding site. Our data suggest that the TolA binding site on pIII-N1 of CTXϕ is accessible in the native pIII protein. This contrasts with the Ff family phage, where the TolA binding site on pIII is blocked and requires a pilus-induced unfolding event to become exposed. We propose that CTXϕ pIII accesses the periplasmic TolA through retraction of toxin-coregulated pilus, which brings the phage through the outer membrane pilus secretin channel. These data help to explain the process by which CTXϕ converts a harmless marine microbe into a deadly human pathogen. PMID:22942280

  9. A Vibrio cholerae Classical TcpA Amino Acid Sequence Induces Protective Antibody That Binds an Area Hypothesized To Be Important for Toxin-Coregulated Pilus Structure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ronald K.; Kirn, Thomas J.; Meeks, Michael D.; Wade, Terri K.; Wade, William F.

    2004-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative bacterium that has been associated with cholera pandemics since the early 1800s. Whole-cell, killed, and live-attenuated oral cholera vaccines are in use. We and others have focused on the development of a subunit cholera vaccine that features standardized epitopes from various V. cholerae macromolecules that are known to induce protective antibody responses. TcpA protein is assembled into toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), a type IVb pilus required for V. cholerae colonization, and thus is a strong candidate for a cholera subunit vaccine. Polypeptides (24 to 26 amino acids) in TcpA that can induce protective antibody responses have been reported, but further characterization of their amino acid targets relative to tertiary or quaternary TCP structures has not been done. We report a refinement of the TcpA sequences that can induce protective antibody. One sequence, TcpA 15 (residues 170 to 183), induces antibodies that bind linear TcpA in a Western blot as well as weakly bind soluble TcpA in solution. These antibodies bind assembled pili at high density and provide 80 to 100% protection in the infant mouse protection assay. This is in sharp contrast to other anti-TcpA peptide sera (TcpA 11, TcpA 13, and TcpA 17) that bind very strongly in Western blot and solution assays yet do not provide protection or effectively bind TCP, as evidenced by immunoelectron microscopy. The sequences of TcpA 15 that induce protective antibody were localized on a model of assembled TCP. These sequences are centered on a site that is predicted to be important for TCP structure. PMID:15385509

  10. IncA/C Conjugative Plasmids Mobilize a New Family of Multidrug Resistance Islands in Clinical Vibrio cholerae Non-O1/Non-O139 Isolates from Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Nicolas; Ceccarelli, Daniela; Colwell, Rita R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mobile genetic elements play a pivotal role in the adaptation of bacterial populations, allowing them to rapidly cope with hostile conditions, including the presence of antimicrobial compounds. IncA/C conjugative plasmids (ACPs) are efficient vehicles for dissemination of multidrug resistance genes in a broad range of pathogenic species of Enterobacteriaceae. ACPs have sporadically been reported in Vibrio cholerae, the infectious agent of the diarrheal disease cholera. The regulatory network that controls ACP mobility ultimately depends on the transcriptional activation of multiple ACP-borne operons by the master activator AcaCD. Beyond ACP conjugation, AcaCD has also recently been shown to activate the expression of genes located in the Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). Here, we describe MGIVchHai6, a novel and unrelated mobilizable genomic island (MGI) integrated into the 3′ end of trmE in chromosome I of V. cholerae HC-36A1, a non-O1/non-O139 multidrug-resistant clinical isolate recovered from Haiti in 2010. MGIVchHai6 contains a mercury resistance transposon and an integron In104-like multidrug resistance element similar to the one of SGI1. We show that MGIVchHai6 excises from the chromosome in an AcaCD-dependent manner and is mobilized by ACPs. Acquisition of MGIVchHai6 confers resistance to β-lactams, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, and streptomycin/spectinomycin. In silico analyses revealed that MGIVchHai6-like elements are carried by several environmental and clinical V. cholerae strains recovered from the Indian subcontinent, as well as from North and South America, including all non-O1/non-O139 clinical isolates from Haiti. PMID:27435459

  11. Characterization of VCC-1, a Novel Ambler Class A Carbapenemase from Vibrio cholerae Isolated from Imported Retail Shrimp Sold in Canada.

    PubMed

    Mangat, Chand S; Boyd, David; Janecko, Nicol; Martz, Sarah-Lynn; Desruisseau, Andrea; Carpenter, Michael; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Mulvey, Michael R

    2016-03-01

    One of the core goals of the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (CIPARS) is to monitor major meat commodities for antimicrobial resistance. Targeted studies with methodologies based on core surveillance protocols are used to examine other foods, e.g., seafood, for antimicrobial resistance to detect resistances of concern to public health. Here we report the discovery of a novel Ambler class A carbapenemase that was identified in a nontoxigenic strain of Vibrio cholerae (N14-02106) isolated from shrimp that was sold for human consumption in Canada. V. cholerae N14-02106 was resistant to penicillins, carbapenems, and monobactam antibiotics; however, PCR did not detect common β-lactamases. Bioinformatic analysis of the whole-genome sequence of V. cholerae N14-02106 revealed on the large chromosome a novel carbapenemase (referred to here as VCC-1, for Vibrio cholerae carbapenemase 1) with sequence similarity to class A enzymes. Two copies of blaVCC-1 separated and flanked by ISVch9 (i.e., 3 copies of ISVch9) were found in an acquired 8.5-kb region inserted into a VrgG family protein gene. Cloned blaVCC-1 conferred a β-lactam resistance profile similar to that in V. cholerae N14-02106 when it was transformed into a susceptible laboratory strain of Escherichia coli. Purified VCC-1 was found to hydrolyze penicillins, 1st-generation cephalosporins, aztreonam, and carbapenems, whereas 2nd- and 3rd-generation cephalosporins were poor substrates. Using nitrocefin as a reporter substrate, VCC-1 was moderately inhibited by clavulanic acid and tazobactam but not EDTA. In this report, we present the discovery of a novel class A carbapenemase from the food supply. PMID:26824956

  12. Synthesis of oligosaccharides corresponding to Vibrio cholerae O139 polysaccharide structures containing dideoxy sugars and a cyclic phosphate.

    PubMed

    Turek, Dominika; Sundgren, Andreas; Lahmann, Martina; Oscarson, Stefan

    2006-04-01

    A spacer-equipped tetrasaccharide, p-aminocyclohexylethyl alpha-l-Colp-(1-->2)-beta-d-Galp-(1-->3)-[alpha-l-Colp-(1-->4)]-beta-D-GlcpNAc, containing a 4,6-cyclic phosphate in the galactose residue, has been synthesised. The structure corresponds to a part of the repeating unit of the capsular (and lipo-) polysaccharide of the endemic bacteria Vibrio cholerae type O139 synonym Bengal. The synthetic strategy allows continuous syntheses of the complete O139 hexasaccharide repeating unit as well as of the structurally related repeating unit of serotype O22. Starting from ethyl 2-azido-4,6-O-benzylidene-2-deoxy-1-thio-beta-D-glucopyranoside, a thioglycoside tetrasaccharide donor block was constructed through two orthogonal glycosylations with glycosyl bromide donors. First, a properly protected galactose moiety was introduced using silver triflate as promoter and subsequently the two colitose residues, carrying electron-withdrawing protecting groups for stability reasons, under halide-assisted conditions. The tetrasaccharide block was then linked to the spacer in a NIS-TMSOTf-promoted coupling. Transformation of the azido group into an acetamido group using H2S followed by removal of temporary protecting acetyl groups gave a 4',6'-diol, which was next phosphorylated with methyl dichlorophosphate and deprotected to yield the 4,6-cyclic phosphate tetrasaccharide target structure. PMID:16557311

  13. The low-resolution solution structure of Vibrio cholerae Hfq in complex with Qrr1 sRNA.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Helen A; Henderson, Charlotte A; Stone, Carlanne M; Cary, Peter D; Gowers, Darren M; Sobott, Frank; Taylor, James E; Callaghan, Anastasia J

    2012-09-01

    In Vibrio cholerae, the RNA binding protein and chaperone Hfq (VcHfq) facilitates the pairing of the quorum regulatory RNA (Qrr) small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) to the 5' untranslated regions of the mRNAs for a number of global regulators that modulate the expression of virulence genes. This Qrr-mediated sRNA circuit is an attractive antimicrobial target, but characterization at the molecular level is required for this to be realized. Here, we investigate the interactions between VcHfq and the Qrr sRNAs using a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques. We show that the ring-shaped VcHfq hexamer binds the Qrrs with 1:1 stoichiometry through its proximal face, and the molecular envelope of the VcHfq-Qrr complex is experimentally determined from small angle scattering data to present the first structural glimpse of a Hfq-sRNA complex. This structure reveals that the VcHfq protein does not change shape on complex formation but the RNA does, suggesting that a chaperone role for VcHfq is a critical part of the VcHfq-Qrr interaction. Overall, these studies enhance our understanding of VcHfq-Qrr interactions. PMID:22730296

  14. The Vibrio cholerae Mrp System: Cation/Proton Antiport Properties and Enhancement of Bile Salt Resistance in a Heterologous Host

    PubMed Central

    Dzioba-Winogrodzki, Judith; Winogrodzki, Olga; Krulwich, Terry A.; Boin, Markus A.; Häse, Claudia C.; Dibrov, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    The mrp operon from Vibrio cholerae encoding a putative multisubunit Na+/H+ antiporter was cloned and functionally expressed in the antiporter-deficient strain of Escherichia coli EP432. Cells of EP432 expressing Vc-Mrp exhibited resistance to Na+ and Li+ as well as to natural bile salts such as sodium cholate and taurocholate. When assayed in everted membrane vesicles of the E. coli EP432 host, Vc-Mrp had sufficiently high antiport activity to facilitate the first extensive analysis of Mrp system from a Gram-negative bacterium encoded by a group 2 mrp operon. Vc-Mrp was found to exchange protons for Li+, Na+, and K+ ions in pH-dependent manner with maximal activity at pH 9.0–9.5. Exchange was electrogenic (more than one H+ translocated per cation moved in opposite direction). The apparent Km at pH 9.0 was 1.08, 1.30, and 68.5 mM for Li+, Na+, and K+, respectively. Kinetic analyses suggested that Vc-Mrp operates in a binding exchange mode with all cations and protons competing for binding to the antiporter. The robust ion antiport activity of Vc-Mrp in sub-bacterial vesicles and its effect on bile resistance of the heterologous host make Vc-Mrp an attractive experimental model for the further studies of biochemistry and physiology of Mrp systems. PMID:18311075

  15. Vibrio cholerae non-O1 bacteraemia: description of three cases in the Netherlands and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Engel, Madelon F; Muijsken, Mariette A; Mooi-Kokenberg, Esther; Kuijper, Ed J; van Westerloo, David J

    2016-04-14

    Vibrio cholerae non-O1 serogroup (VCNO) bacteraemia is a severe condition with a high case-fatality rate. We report three cases diagnosed in the Netherlands, identified during a national microbiological congress, and provide a literature review on VCNO bacteraemia. A search strategy including synonyms for 'VCNO' and 'bacteraemia' was applied to PubMed, Medline, Web of Science and Embase databases. The three cases were reported in elderly male patients after fish consumption and/or surface water contact. The literature search yielded 82 case reports on 90 cases and six case series. Thirty case reports were from Asia (30/90; 33%), concerned males (67/90; 74%), and around one third (38/90; 42%) involved a history of alcohol abuse and/or liver cirrhosis The presenting symptom often was gastroenteritis (47/90; 52%) which occurred after seafood consumption in 32% of the cases (15/47).Aside from the most frequent symptom being fever, results of case series concurred with these findings. Published cases also included rare presentations e.g. endophthalmitis and neonatal meningitis. Based on the limited data available, cephalosporins seemed the most effective treatment. Although mainly reported in Asia, VCNO bacteraemia occurs worldwide. While some risk factors for VCNO were identified in this study, the source of infection remains often unclear. Clinical presentation may vary greatly and therefore a quick microbiological diagnosis is indispensable. PMID:27104237

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray study of Vibrio cholerae uridine phosphorylase in complex with 6-methyluracil

    PubMed Central

    Prokofev, Igor I.; Lashkov, Alexander A.; Gabdulkhakov, Azat G.; Dontsova, Mariya V.; Seregina, Tatyana A.; Mironov, Alexander S.; Betzel, Christian; Mikhailov, Al’bert M.

    2014-01-01

    Uridine phosphorylase catalyzes the phosphorolysis of ribonucleosides, with the nitrogenous base and ribose 1-phosphate as products. Additionally, it catalyzes the reverse reaction of the synthesis of ribonucleosides from ribose 1-phosphate and a nitrogenous base. However, the enzyme does not catalyze the synthesis of nucleosides when the substrate is a nitrogenous base substituted at the 6-­position, such as 6-methyluracil (6-MU). In order to explain this fact, it is essential to investigate the three-dimensional structure of the complex of 6-MU with uridine phosphorylase. 6-MU is a pharmaceutical agent that improves tissue nutrition and enhances cell regeneration by normalization of nucleotide exchange in humans. 6-MU is used for the treatment of diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, including infectious diseases. Here, procedures to obtain the uridine phosphorylase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae (VchUPh), purification of this enzyme, crystallization of the complex of VchUPh with 6-MU, and X-ray data collection and preliminary X-ray analysis of the VchUPh–6-MU complex at atomic resolution are reported. PMID:24419619

  17. Solar-photocatalytic disinfection of Vibrio cholerae by using Ag@ZnO core-shell structure nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Das, Sourav; Sinha, Sayantan; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Yun, Soon-Il; Mishra, Amrita; Tripathy, Suraj K

    2015-01-01

    Disinfection of Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae 569B in aqueous matrix by solar-photocatalysis mediated by Ag@ZnO core-shell structure nanocomposite particles was investigated. Silver nanoparticles are synthesized by the reduction of silver perchlorate followed by precipitation of zinc oxide shell and are employed in the photocatalytic disinfection of the model pathogen. Effect of photocatalyst loading and reaction temperature on the disinfection kinetics was studied. Disinfection efficiency in laboratory as well as real water samples was compared with that of pure-ZnO and TiO2 (Degussa P25). Nanocomposite system has shown optimum disinfection (≈98%) at 40-60min of sun-light exposure with a catalyst loading of 0.5mg/L of the reaction solution. The reduction of aquatic bacterial densities by photocatalytically active Ag@ZnO core-shell nanocomposite in presence of natural sun-light may have potential ex situ application in water decontamination at ambient conditions. PMID:25523714

  18. Hexamers of the Type II Secretion ATPase GspE from Vibrio cholerae with Increased ATPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Connie; Turley, Stewart; Marionni, Samuel T.; Park, Young-Jun; Lee, Kelly K.; Patrick, Marcella; Shah, Ripal; Sandkvist, Maria; Bush, Matthew F.; Hol, Wim G. J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The Type II Secretion System (T2SS), a multi-protein machinery spanning two membranes in Gram-negative bacteria, is responsible for the secretion of folded proteins from the periplasm across the outer membrane. The critical multi-domain T2SS assembly ATPase GspEEpsE had so far not been structurally characterized as a hexamer. Here, four hexamers of Vibrio cholerae GspEEpsE are obtained when fused to Hcp1 as an assistant hexamer, as shown by native mass spectrometry. The enzymatic activity of the GspEEpsE-Hcp1 fusions is ~20 times higher than that of a GspEEpsE monomer indicating that increasing the local concentration of GspEEpsE by the fusion strategy was successful. Crystal structures of GspEEpsE-Hcp1 fusions with different linker lengths reveal regular and elongated hexamers of GspEEpsE with major differences in domain orientation within subunits, and in subunit assembly. SAXS studies on GspEEpsE-Hcp1 fusions suggest that even further variability in GspEEpsE hexamer architecture is likely. PMID:23954505

  19. LCP crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of VcmN, a MATE transporter from Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Kusakizako, Tsukasa; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Hipolito, Christopher J.; Kuroda, Teruo; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Suga, Hiroaki; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters, one of the multidrug exporter families, efflux xenobiotics towards the extracellular side of the membrane. Since MATE transporters expressed in bacterial pathogens contribute to multidrug resistance, they are important therapeutic targets. Here, a MATE-transporter homologue from Vibrio cholerae, VcmN, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in lipidic cubic phase (LCP). X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution from a single crystal obtained in a sandwich plate. The crystal belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.3, b = 93.7, c = 100.2 Å. As a result of further LCP crystallization trials, crystals of larger size were obtained using sitting-drop plates. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.2 Å resolution from a single crystal obtained in a sitting-drop plate. The crystal belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.9, b = 91.8, c = 100.9 Å. The present work provides valuable insights into the atomic resolution structure determination of membrane transporters. PMID:27380372

  20. Detection of vibrio cholerae O1 by using cerium oxide nanowires - based immunosensor with different antibody immobilization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Phuong Dinh; Hoang, Nguyen Luong; Lan, Hoang; Vuong, Pham Hung; Anh, Ta Thi Nhat; Huy, Tran Quang; Thuy, Nguyen Thanh

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we evaluated the effects of different antibody immobilization strategies on the response of a CeO2-nanowires (NWs)-based immunosensor for Vibrio cholerae O1 detection. Accordingly, the changes in the electron-transfer resistance ( R et ) from before to after cells bind to an antibody-modified electrode prepared by using three different methods of antibody immobilization were determined. The values were 16.2%, 8.3%, and 6.65% for the method that utilized protein A, antibodies activated by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS), and absorption, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry confirmed that the change in the current was highest for the immunosensors prepared using protein A (11%), followed by those prepared with EDC/NHS-activated antibodies (9%), and finally, those prepared through absorption (7.5%). The order of the antibody immobilization strategies in terms of resulting immunosensor detection limit and sensitivity was as follows order: absorption (3.2 × 103 CFU/mL; 45.1 Ω/CFU·mL-1) < EDC/NHS-activated antibody (1.0 × 103 CFU/mL; 50.6 Ω/CFU·mL-1) < protein A (1.0 × 102 CFU/mL; 65.8 Ω/CFU·mL-1). Thus, we confirmed that the protein A - mediated method showed significantly high cell binding efficiencies compared to the random immobilization method.

  1. LCP crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of VcmN, a MATE transporter from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Kusakizako, Tsukasa; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Hipolito, Christopher J; Kuroda, Teruo; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Suga, Hiroaki; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters, one of the multidrug exporter families, efflux xenobiotics towards the extracellular side of the membrane. Since MATE transporters expressed in bacterial pathogens contribute to multidrug resistance, they are important therapeutic targets. Here, a MATE-transporter homologue from Vibrio cholerae, VcmN, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized in lipidic cubic phase (LCP). X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution from a single crystal obtained in a sandwich plate. The crystal belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.3, b = 93.7, c = 100.2 Å. As a result of further LCP crystallization trials, crystals of larger size were obtained using sitting-drop plates. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.2 Å resolution from a single crystal obtained in a sitting-drop plate. The crystal belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.9, b = 91.8, c = 100.9 Å. The present work provides valuable insights into the atomic resolution structure determination of membrane transporters. PMID:27380372

  2. The Resistance of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor Strains to the Typing Phage 919TP, a Member of K139 Phage Family

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaona; Zhang, Jingyun; Xu, Jialiang; Du, Pengcheng; Pang, Bo; Li, Jie; Kan, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage 919TP is a temperate phage of Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 El Tor and is used as a subtyping phage in the phage-biotyping scheme in cholera surveillance in China. In this study, sequencing of the 919TP genome showed that it belonged to the Vibrio phage K139 family. The mechanisms conferring resistance to 919TP infection of El Tor strains were explored to help understand the subtyping basis of phage 919TP and mutations related to 919TP resistance. Among the test strains resistant to phage 919TP, most contained the temperate 919TP phage genome, which facilitated superinfection exclusion to 919TP. Our data suggested that this immunity to Vibrio phage 919TP occurred after absorption of the phage onto the bacteria. Other strains contained LPS receptor synthesis gene mutations that disable adsorption of phage 919TP. Several strains resistant to 919TP infection possessed unknown resistance mechanisms, since they did not contain LPS receptor mutations or temperate K139 phage genome. Further research is required to elucidate the phage infection steps involved in the resistance of these strains to phage infection. PMID:27242744

  3. The Resistance of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor Strains to the Typing Phage 919TP, a Member of K139 Phage Family.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaona; Zhang, Jingyun; Xu, Jialiang; Du, Pengcheng; Pang, Bo; Li, Jie; Kan, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophage 919TP is a temperate phage of Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 El Tor and is used as a subtyping phage in the phage-biotyping scheme in cholera surveillance in China. In this study, sequencing of the 919TP genome showed that it belonged to the Vibrio phage K139 family. The mechanisms conferring resistance to 919TP infection of El Tor strains were explored to help understand the subtyping basis of phage 919TP and mutations related to 919TP resistance. Among the test strains resistant to phage 919TP, most contained the temperate 919TP phage genome, which facilitated superinfection exclusion to 919TP. Our data suggested that this immunity to Vibrio phage 919TP occurred after absorption of the phage onto the bacteria. Other strains contained LPS receptor synthesis gene mutations that disable adsorption of phage 919TP. Several strains resistant to 919TP infection possessed unknown resistance mechanisms, since they did not contain LPS receptor mutations or temperate K139 phage genome. Further research is required to elucidate the phage infection steps involved in the resistance of these strains to phage infection. PMID:27242744

  4. Development of pVCR94ΔX from Vibrio cholerae, a prototype for studying multidrug resistant IncA/C conjugative plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Carraro, Nicolas; Sauvé, Maxime; Matteau, Dominick; Lauzon, Guillaume; Rodrigue, Sébastien; Burrus, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has grown steadily in Vibrio cholerae over the last few decades to become a major threat in countries affected by cholera. Multi-drug resistance (MDR) spreads among clinical and environmental V. cholerae strains by lateral gene transfer often mediated by integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) of the SXT/R391 family. However, in a few reported but seemingly isolated cases, MDR in V. cholerae was shown to be associated with other self-transmissible genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids. IncA/C conjugative plasmids are often found associated with MDR in isolates of Enterobacteriaceae. To date, IncA/C plasmids have not been commonly found in V. cholerae or other species of Vibrio. Here we present a detailed analysis of pVCR94ΔX derived from pVCR94, a novel IncA/C conjugative plasmid identified in a V. cholerae clinical strain isolated during the 1994 Rwandan cholera outbreak. pVCR94 was found to confer resistance to sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol and to transfer at very high frequency. Sequence analysis revealed its mosaic nature as well as high similarity of the core genes responsible for transfer and maintenance with other IncA/C plasmids and ICEs of the SXT/R391 family. Although IncA/C plasmids are considered a major threat in antibiotics resistance, their basic biology has received little attention, mostly because of the difficulty to genetically manipulate these MDR conferring elements. Therefore, we developed a convenient derivative from pVCR94, pVCR94Δ X, a 120.5-kb conjugative plasmid which only codes for sulfamethoxazole resistance. Using pVCR94Δ X, we identified the origin of transfer (oriT) and discovered an essential gene for transfer, both located within the shared backbone, allowing for an annotation update of all IncA/C plasmids. pVCR94Δ X may be a useful model that will provide new insights on the basic biology of IncA/C conjugative plasmids. PMID

  5. Development and evaluation of a highly sensitive immunochromatographic strip test using gold nanoparticle for direct detection of Vibrio cholerae O139 in seafood samples.

    PubMed

    Pengsuk, Chalinan; Chaivisuthangkura, Parin; Longyant, Siwaporn; Sithigorngul, Paisarn

    2013-04-15

    A strip test for the detection of Vibrio cholerae O139 was developed using two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), namely VC-273 and VC-812, which specifically bind to the lipopolysaccharide and capsular polysaccharide of V. cholerae O139. The MAb VC-273 gold nanoparticle conjugate was sprayed onto a glass fiber pad that was placed adjacent to a sample chamber. MAb VC-812 and the goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin G (GAM) antibody were sprayed onto a nitrocellulose membrane in strips at positions designated as T and C, respectively. The test strips were assessed for their ability to directly detect V. cholerae O139 using samples dispersed in application buffer, and a 100 μL aliquot of sample was applied to the sample chamber. The results were observable within 20 min after application of the sample. In samples containing V. cholerae O139, the antigen was bound to the colloidal gold-conjugated MAb to form an antibody-antigen complex. This complex was captured by the MAbs at the T test line, resulting in the appearance of a reddish-purple band at the T position. The sensitivity of the test was determined to be 10⁴ cfu mL⁻¹. Direct detection of V. cholerae O139 in various fresh seafood samples could be accomplished with similar sensitivities. The detection limit was substantially improved to 1 cfu mL⁻¹ of the original bacterial content after pre-incubation of the sample in alkaline peptone water for 12 h. The V. cholerae strip test provides several advantages over other methods, including the speed and simplicity of use because there is no requirement for sophisticated equipment. PMID:23208091

  6. The Highly Conserved Bacterial RNase YbeY Is Essential in Vibrio cholerae, Playing a Critical Role in Virulence, Stress Regulation, and RNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Vercruysse, Maarten; Köhrer, Caroline; Davies, Bryan W.; Arnold, Markus F. F.; Mekalanos, John J.; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; Walker, Graham C.

    2014-01-01

    YbeY, a highly conserved protein, is an RNase in E. coli and plays key roles in both processing of the critical 3′ end of 16 S rRNA and in 70 S ribosome quality control under stress. These central roles account for YbeY's inclusion in the postulated minimal bacterial genome. However, YbeY is not essential in E. coli although loss of ybeY severely sensitizes it to multiple physiological stresses. Here, we show that YbeY is an essential endoribonuclease in Vibrio cholerae and is crucial for virulence, stress regulation, RNA processing and ribosome quality control, and is part of a core set of RNases essential in most representative pathogens. To understand its function, we analyzed the rRNA and ribosome profiles of a V. cholerae strain partially depleted for YbeY and other RNase mutants associated with 16 S rRNA processing; our results demonstrate that YbeY is also crucial for 16 S rRNA 3′ end maturation in V. cholerae and that its depletion impedes subunit assembly into 70 S ribosomes. YbeY's importance to V. cholerae pathogenesis was demonstrated by the complete loss of mice colonization and biofilm formation, reduced cholera toxin production, and altered expression levels of virulence-associated small RNAs of a V. cholerae strain partially depleted for YbeY. Notably, the ybeY genes of several distantly related pathogens can fully complement an E. coli ΔybeY strain under various stress conditions, demonstrating the high conservation of YbeY's activity in stress regulation. Taken together, this work provides the first comprehensive exploration of YbeY's physiological role in a human pathogen, showing its conserved function across species in essential cellular processes. PMID:24901994

  7. Expression of ToxR, the transcriptional activator of the virulence factors in Vibrio cholerae, is modulated by the heat shock response.

    PubMed Central

    Parsot, C; Mekalanos, J J

    1990-01-01

    The toxR gene of Vibrio cholerae encodes a transmembrane, DNA-binding protein that positively controls transcription of the genes for cholera toxin, TCP pili, and other proteins important in cholera pathogenesis. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the toxR upstream region has revealed that the heat shock gene htpG, encoding the bacterial homologue of the eukaryotic Hsp90 protein, was located immediately upstream and was divergently transcribed from toxR. Using lacZ transcriptional fusions, we have shown that neither toxR nor htpG expression was regulated by ToxR. However, the growth temperature had a coordinate but reciprocal effect on the expression from both the toxR and htpG promoters in V. cholerae; the decrease of toxR expression between 22 degrees C and 37 degrees C was proportional to the increase of htpG expression observed within that temperature range. A similar pattern of expression of the htpG and toxR promoters was observed in the heterologous host Escherichia coli, where this regulation was controlled by the level of the E. coli rpoH (htpR) gene product, sigma-32. Consistent with the temperature-regulated expression of the V. cholerae htpG promoter in E. coli, a sequence similar to the consensus sequence of the E. coli heat shock promoters was detected upstream from the V. cholerae htpG gene. We propose a model in which the regulation of toxR expression by temperature is controlled by the level of sigma-32 (RpoH) RNA polymerase. Images PMID:2124707

  8. The Vibrio cholerae Fatty Acid Regulatory Protein, FadR, Represses Transcription of plsB, the Gene Encoding the First Enzyme of Membrane Phospholipid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Cronan, John E.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Glycerol-3-phosphate (sn-glycerol-3-P, G3P) acyltransferase catalyzes the first committed step in the biosynthesis of membrane phospholipids, the acylation of G3P to form 1-acyl G3P (lysophosphatidic acid). The paradigm G3P acyltransferase is the Escherichia coli plsB gene product which acylates position-1 of G3P using fatty acids in thioester linkage to either acyl carrier protein (ACP) or CoA as acyl-donors. Although the Escherichia coli plsB gene was discovered about 30 years ago, no evidence for transcriptional control of its expression has been reported. However Kazakov and coworkers (Kazakov, A. E. et al. (2009) J Bacteriol, 191, 52–64) reported the presence of a putative FadR-binding site upstream of the candidate plsB genes of V. cholerae and three other Vibrio species suggesting that plsB might be regulated by FadR, a GntR-family transcription factor thus far known only to regulate fatty acid synthesis and degradation. We report that the V. cholerae plsB homologue restored growth of E. coli strain BB26-36 which is a G3P auxotroph due to an altered G3P acyltransferase activity. The plsB promoter was also mapped and the predicted FadR-binding palindrome was found to span positions -19 to -35, upstream of the transcription start site. Gel shift assays confirmed that both V. cholerae FadR and E. coli FadR bound the V. cholerae plsB promoter region and binding was reversed upon addition of long chain fatty acyl-CoA thioesters. The expression level of the V. cholerae plsB gene was elevated 2–3 fold in an E. coli fadR null mutant strain indicating that FadR acts as a repressor of V. cholerae plsB expression. In both E. coli and V. cholerae the β-galactosidase activity of transcriptional fusions of the V. cholerae plsB promoter to lacZ increased 2–3 fold upon supplementation of growth media with oleic acid. Therefore, V. cholerae coordinates fatty acid metabolism with 1-acyl G3P synthesis. PMID:21771112

  9. The Transmission and Antibiotic Resistance Variation in a Multiple Drug Resistance Clade of Vibrio cholerae Circulating in Multiple Countries in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhemin; Diao, Baowei; Cui, Zhigang; Zhou, Haijian; Kan, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae has caused massive outbreaks and even trans-continental epidemics. In 2008 and 2010, at least 3 remarkable cholera outbreaks occurred in Hainan, Anhui and Jiangsu provinces of China. To address the possible transmissions and the relationships to the 7th pandemic strains of those 3 outbreaks, we sequenced the whole genomes of the outbreak isolates and compared with the global isolates from the 7th pandemic. The three outbreaks in this study were caused by a cluster of V. cholerae in clade 3.B which is parallel to the clade 3.C that was transmitted from Nepal to Haiti and caused an outbreak in 2010. Pan-genome analysis provided additional evolution information on the mobile element and acquired multiple antibiotic resistance genes. We suggested that clade 3.B should be monitored because the multiple antibiotic resistant characteristics of this clade and the ‘amplifier’ function of China in the global transmission of current Cholera pandemic. We also show that dedicated whole genome sequencing analysis provided more information than the previous techniques and should be applied in the disease surveillance networks. PMID:26930352

  10. The Transmission and Antibiotic Resistance Variation in a Multiple Drug Resistance Clade of Vibrio cholerae Circulating in Multiple Countries in Asia.

    PubMed

    Pang, Bo; Du, Pengcheng; Zhou, Zhemin; Diao, Baowei; Cui, Zhigang; Zhou, Haijian; Kan, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae has caused massive outbreaks and even trans-continental epidemics. In 2008 and 2010, at least 3 remarkable cholera outbreaks occurred in Hainan, Anhui and Jiangsu provinces of China. To address the possible transmissions and the relationships to the 7th pandemic strains of those 3 outbreaks, we sequenced the whole genomes of the outbreak isolates and compared with the global isolates from the 7th pandemic. The three outbreaks in this study were caused by a cluster of V. cholerae in clade 3.B which is parallel to the clade 3.C that was transmitted from Nepal to Haiti and caused an outbreak in 2010. Pan-genome analysis provided additional evolution information on the mobile element and acquired multiple antibiotic resistance genes. We suggested that clade 3.B should be monitored because the multiple antibiotic resistant characteristics of this clade and the 'amplifier' function of China in the global transmission of current Cholera pandemic. We also show that dedicated whole genome sequencing analysis provided more information than the previous techniques and should be applied in the disease surveillance networks. PMID:26930352

  11. Clinical and Environmental Surveillance for Vibrio cholerae in Resource Constrained Areas: Application During a 1-Year Surveillance in the Far North Region of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Debes, Amanda K; Ateudjieu, Jerome; Guenou, Etienne; Ebile, Walter; Sonkoua, Isaac Tadzong; Njimbia, Anthony Chebe; Steinwald, Peter; Ram, Malathi; Sack, David A

    2016-03-01

    Biological confirmation of the presence of Vibrio cholerae in clinical and environmental samples is often constrained due to resource- and labor-intensive gold standard methods. To develop low-cost, simple, and sustainable surveillance techniques, we modified previously published specimen sampling and culture techniques and applied the use of enriched dipstick testing in conjunction with the use of filter paper for DNA specimen preservation during clinical and environmental surveillance in the Far North of Cameroon from August 2013 to October 2014. The enriched dipstick methodology during routine use in a remote setting demonstrated a specificity of 99.8% compared with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The novel application of filter paper as a preservation method for cholera DNA specimens reduced the need for cold chain storage and allowed for PCR characterization and confirmation of V. cholerae. The application of basic technologies such as the enriched dipstick, the use of simplified gauze filtration for environmental sample collection, and the use of filter paper for sample preservation enabled early case identification with reduced logistics and supply cost while reporting minimal false-positive results. Simplified laboratory and epidemiological methodologies can improve the feasibility of cholera surveillance in rural and resource-constrained areas, facilitating early case detection and rapid response implementation. PMID:26755564

  12. In vitro and in vivo antimicrobial efficacy of natural plant-derived compounds against Vibrio cholerae of O1 El Tor Inaba serotype.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Ip; Kim, Ji-Ae; Choi, Eun-Jin; Harris, Jason B; Jeong, Seong-Yeop; Son, Seok-Jun; Kim, Younghoon; Shin, Ok Sarah

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated antibacterial activities of 20 plant-derived natural compounds against Gram-negative enteric pathogens. We found that both flavonoids and non-flavonoids, including honokiol and magnolol, possess specific antibacterial activities against V. cholerae, but not against other species of Gram-negative bacterium which we tested. Using various antibacterial assays, we determined that there was a dose-dependent bactericidal and biofilm inhibitory activity of honokiol and magnolol against Vibrio cholerae. In addition to antibacterial activities, these molecules also induced an attenuating effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and pro-inflammatory responses generated by macrophages in response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Additionally, Caenorhabditis elegans lethality assay revealed that honokiol and magnolol have an ability to extend a lifespan of V. cholerae-infected worms, contributing to prolonged survival of worms after lethal infection. Altogether, our data show for the first time that honokiol and magnolol may be considered as attractive protective or preventive food adjuncts for cholera. PMID:25516242

  13. High-resolution definition of the Vibrio cholerae essential gene set with hidden Markov model–based analyses of transposon-insertion sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Michael C.; Pritchard, Justin R.; Zhang, Yanjia J.; Rubin, Eric J.; Livny, Jonathan; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2013-01-01

    The coupling of high-density transposon mutagenesis to high-throughput DNA sequencing (transposon-insertion sequencing) enables simultaneous and genome-wide assessment of the contributions of individual loci to bacterial growth and survival. We have refined analysis of transposon-insertion sequencing data by normalizing for the effect of DNA replication on sequencing output and using a hidden Markov model (HMM)-based filter to exploit heretofore unappreciated information inherent in all transposon-insertion sequencing data sets. The HMM can smooth variations in read abundance and thereby reduce the effects of read noise, as well as permit fine scale mapping that is independent of genomic annotation and enable classification of loci into several functional categories (e.g. essential, domain essential or ‘sick’). We generated a high-resolution map of genomic loci (encompassing both intra- and intergenic sequences) that are required or beneficial for in vitro growth of the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. This work uncovered new metabolic and physiologic requirements for V. cholerae survival, and by combining transposon-insertion sequencing and transcriptomic data sets, we also identified several novel noncoding RNA species that contribute to V. cholerae growth. Our findings suggest that HMM-based approaches will enhance extraction of biological meaning from transposon-insertion sequencing genomic data. PMID:23901011

  14. Clinical and Environmental Surveillance for Vibrio cholerae in Resource Constrained Areas: Application during a 1-Year Surveillance in the Far North Region of Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Debes, Amanda K.; Ateudjieu, Jerome; Guenou, Etienne; Ebile, Walter; Sonkoua, Isaac Tadzong; Njimbia, Anthony Chebe; Steinwald, Peter; Ram, Malathi; Sack, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Biological confirmation of the presence of Vibrio cholerae in clinical and environmental samples is often constrained due to resource- and labor-intensive gold standard methods. To develop low-cost, simple, and sustainable surveillance techniques, we modified previously published specimen sampling and culture techniques and applied the use of enriched dipstick testing in conjunction with the use of filter paper for DNA specimen preservation during clinical and environmental surveillance in the Far North of Cameroon from August 2013 to October 2014. The enriched dipstick methodology during routine use in a remote setting demonstrated a specificity of 99.8% compared with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The novel application of filter paper as a preservation method for cholera DNA specimens reduced the need for cold chain storage and allowed for PCR characterization and confirmation of V. cholerae. The application of basic technologies such as the enriched dipstick, the use of simplified gauze filtration for environmental sample collection, and the use of filter paper for sample preservation enabled early case identification with reduced logistics and supply cost while reporting minimal false-positive results. Simplified laboratory and epidemiological methodologies can improve the feasibility of cholera surveillance in rural and resource-constrained areas, facilitating early case detection and rapid response implementation. PMID:26755564

  15. Mechanisms Underlying the Immune Response Generated by an Oral Vibrio cholerae Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Sirskyj, Danylo; Kumar, Ashok; Azizi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic details underlying the resulting protective immune response generated by mucosal vaccines remain largely unknown. We investigated the involvement of Toll-like receptor signaling in the induction of humoral immune responses following oral immunization with Dukoral, comparing wild type mice with TLR-2-, TLR-4-, MyD88- and Trif-deficient mice. Although all groups generated similar levels of IgG antibodies, the proliferation of CD4+ T-cells in response to V. cholerae was shown to be mediated via MyD88/TLR signaling, and independently of Trif signaling. The results demonstrate differential requirements for generation of immune responses. These results also suggest that TLR pathways may be modulators of the quality of immune response elicited by the Dukoral vaccine. Determining the critical signaling pathways involved in the induction of immune response to this vaccine would be beneficial, and could contribute to more precisely-designed versions of other oral vaccines in the future. PMID:27384558

  16. Mechanisms Underlying the Immune Response Generated by an Oral Vibrio cholerae Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sirskyj, Danylo; Kumar, Ashok; Azizi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic details underlying the resulting protective immune response generated by mucosal vaccines remain largely unknown. We investigated the involvement of Toll-like receptor signaling in the induction of humoral immune responses following oral immunization with Dukoral, comparing wild type mice with TLR-2-, TLR-4-, MyD88- and Trif-deficient mice. Although all groups generated similar levels of IgG antibodies, the proliferation of CD4+ T-cells in response to V. cholerae was shown to be mediated via MyD88/TLR signaling, and independently of Trif signaling. The results demonstrate differential requirements for generation of immune responses. These results also suggest that TLR pathways may be modulators of the quality of immune response elicited by the Dukoral vaccine. Determining the critical signaling pathways involved in the induction of immune response to this vaccine would be beneficial, and could contribute to more precisely-designed versions of other oral vaccines in the future. PMID:27384558

  17. Assessment by electron-microscopy of recombinant Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella vaccine strains expressing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-specific surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Ziethlow, V; Favre, D; Viret, J-F; Frey, J; Stoffel, M H

    2008-03-01

    Diarrhoea caused by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) requires adhesion of microorganisms to enterocytes. Hence, a promising approach to immunoprophylaxis is to elicit antibodies against colonisation factor antigens (CFAs). Genes encoding the most prevalent ETEC-specific surface antigens were cloned into Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella vaccine strains. Expression of surface antigens was assessed by electron-microscopy. Whereas negative staining was effective in revealing CFA/I and CS3, but not CS6, immunolabelling allowed identification of all surface antigens examined. The V. cholerae vaccine strain CVD103 did not express ETEC-specific colonisation factors, whereas CVD103-HgR expressed CS3 only. However, expression of both CFA/I and CS3 was demonstrated in Salmonella Ty21a. PMID:18093230

  18. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the Vibrio cholerae hemagglutinin/protease (HA/protease) gene and construction of an HA/protease-negative strain.

    PubMed Central

    Häse, C C; Finkelstein, R A

    1991-01-01

    The structural gene hap for the extracellular hemagglutinin/protease (HA/protease) of Vibrio cholerae was cloned and sequenced. The cloned DNA fragment contained a 1,827-bp open reading frame potentially encoding a 609-amino-acid polypeptide. The deduced protein contains a putative signal sequence followed by a large propeptide. The extracellular HA/protease consists of 414 amino acids with a computed molecular weight of 46,700. In the absence of protease inhibitors, this is processed to the 32-kDa form which is usually isolated. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature HA/protease showed 61.5% identity with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase. The cloned hap gene was inactivated and introduced into the chromosome of V. cholerae by recombination to construct the HA/protease-negative strain HAP-1. The cloned fragment containing the hap gene was then shown to complement the mutant strain. Images PMID:2045361

  19. Detection and characterization of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs)-positive Vibrio cholerae isolates from aquacultured shrimp and the environment in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    He, Yu; Tang, Yuyi; Sun, Fengjiao; Chen, Lanming

    2015-12-30

    Increasing industrialization and use of antimicrobial agents in aquaculture production, have led to heavy metals and multidrug resistant (MDR) pathogens becoming serious problems. These resistances are conferred in two ways: intrinsic and transfer via conjugation, or transformation by the major transmission mediators. Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) are one of the major mediators; however, few studies on ICEs of environmental origin have been reported in Asia. Herein, we determined the prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility, heavy metal resistance and genotypes of 126 strains of Vibrio cholerae isolated from aquatic products and the environment in Shanghai, China. 92.3% of isolates were ICEs-positive from aquaculture water and 89.3% of isolates from shrimp showed MDR. Tracing the V. cholerae genotypes, showed no significant relevance of genotype among the antimicrobial resistance strains bearing the ICEs or not. Thus, in aquaculture, ICEs are not the major transmission mediators of resistance to antibiotics or heavy metals. PMID:26522159

  20. Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor from southern Vietnam in 2010 was molecularly distinct from that present from 1999 to 2004.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V H; Pham, H T; Diep, T T; Phan, C D H; Nguyen, T Q; Nguyen, N T N; Ngo, T C; Nguyen, T V; DO, Q K; Phan, H C; Nguyen, B M; Ehara, M; Ohnishi, M; Yamashiro, T; Nguyen, L T P; Izumiya, H

    2016-04-01

    The Vibrio cholerae O1 (VCO1) El Tor biotype appeared during the seventh cholera pandemic starting in 1961, and new variants of this biotype have been identified since the early 1990s. This pandemic has affected Vietnam, and a large outbreak was reported in southern Vietnam in 2010. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analyses (MLVA) were used to screen 34 VCO1 isolates from the southern Vietnam 2010 outbreak (23 patients, five contact persons, and six environmental isolates) to determine if it was genetically distinct from 18 isolates from outbreaks in southern Vietnam from 1999 to 2004, and two isolates from northern Vietnam (2008). Twenty-seven MLVA types and seven PFGE patterns were identified. Both analyses showed that the 2008 and 2010 isolates were distinctly clustered and separated from the 1999-2004 isolates. PMID:26554547

  1. Distribution of virulence-associated genes and genetic relationships in non-O1/O139 Vibrio cholerae aquatic isolates from China.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengjuan; Du, Pengcheng; Li, Baisheng; Ke, Changwen; Chen, Aiping; Chen, Jie; Zhou, Haijian; Li, Jie; Morris, J Glenn; Kan, Biao; Wang, Duochun

    2014-08-01

    Non-O1/O139 Vibrio cholerae is naturally present in aquatic ecosystems and has been linked with cholera-like diarrhea and local outbreaks. The distribution of virulence-associated genes and genetic relationships among aquatic isolates from China are largely unknown. In this study, 295 aquatic isolates of V. cholerae non-O1/O139 serogroups from different regions in China were investigated. Only one isolate was positive for ctxB and harbored a rare genotype; 10 (3.4%) isolates carried several types of rstR sequences, eight of which carried rare types of toxin-coregulated pili (tcpA). Furthermore, 16 (5.4%) isolates carried incomplete (with partial open reading frames [ORFs]) vibrio seventh pandemic island I (VSP-I) or VSP-II clusters, which were further classified as 11 novel types. PCR-based analyses revealed remarkable variations in the distribution of putative virulence genes, including mshA (95.6%), hlyA (95.3%), rtxC (89.8%), rtxA (82.7%), IS1004 (52.9%), chxA (30.2%), SXT (15.3%), type III secretion system (18.0%), and NAG-ST (3.7%) genes. There was no correlation between the prevalence of putative virulence genes and that of CTX prophage or TCP genes, whereas there were correlations among the putative virulence genes. Further multilocus sequence typing (MLST) placed selected isolates (n = 70) into 69 unique sequence types (STs), which were different from those of the toxigenic O1 and O139 counterparts, and each isolate occupied a different position in the MLST tree. The V. cholerae non-O1/O139 aquatic isolates predominant in China have high genotypic diversity; these strains constitute a reservoir of potential virulence genes, which may contribute to evolution of pathogenic isolates. PMID:24907334

  2. Heme-independent Redox Sensing by the Heme-Nitric Oxide/Oxygen-binding Protein (H-NOX) from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadyay, Roma; Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Schaub, Tanner; Yukl, Erik T

    2016-08-19

    Heme nitric oxide/oxygen (H-NOX)-binding proteins act as nitric oxide (NO) sensors among various bacterial species. In several cases, they act to mediate communal behavior such as biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and motility by influencing the activity of downstream signaling proteins such as histidine kinases (HisKa) in a NO-dependent manner. An H-NOX/HisKa regulatory circuit was recently identified in Vibrio cholerae, and the H-NOX protein has been spectroscopically characterized. However, the influence of the H-NOX protein on HisKa autophosphorylation has not been evaluated. This process may be important for persistence and pathogenicity in this organism. Here, we have expressed and purified the V. cholerae HisKa (HnoK) and H-NOX in its heme-bound (holo) and heme-free (apo) forms. Autophosphorylation assays of HnoK in the presence of H-NOX show that the holoprotein in the Fe(II)-NO and Fe(III) forms is a potent inhibitor of HnoK. Activity of the Fe(III) form and aerobic instability of the Fe(II) form suggested that Vibrio cholerae H-NOX may act as a sensor of the redox state as well as NO. Remarkably, the apoprotein also showed robust HnoK inhibition that was dependent on the oxidation of cysteine residues to form disulfide bonds at a highly conserved zinc site. The importance of cysteine in this process was confirmed by mutagenesis, which also showed that holo Fe(III), but not Fe(II)-NO, H-NOX relied heavily upon cysteine for activation. These results highlight a heme-independent mechanism for activation of V. cholerae H-NOX that implicates this protein as a dual redox/NO sensor. PMID:27358409

  3. Structural basis for competitive inhibition of 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Islam, Zeyaul; Kumar, Adarsh; Singh, Suruchi; Salmon, Laurent; Karthikeyan, Subramanian

    2015-05-01

    The riboflavin biosynthesis pathway has been shown to be essential in many pathogens and is absent in humans. Therefore, enzymes involved in riboflavin synthesis are considered as potential antibacterial drug targets. The enzyme 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (DHBPS) catalyzes one of the two committed steps in the riboflavin pathway and converts d-ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P) to l-3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 4-phosphate and formate. Moreover, DHBPS is shown to be indispensable for Mycobacterium, Salmonella, and Helicobacter species. Despite the essentiality of this enzyme in bacteria, no inhibitor has been identified hitherto. Here, we describe kinetic and crystal structure characterization of DHBPS from Vibrio cholerae (vDHBPS) with a competitive inhibitor 4-phospho-d-erythronohydroxamic acid (4PEH) at 1.86-Å resolution. In addition, we also report the structural characterization of vDHBPS in its apo form and in complex with its substrate and substrate plus metal ions at 1.96-, 1.59-, and 2.04-Å resolution, respectively. Comparison of these crystal structures suggests that 4PEH inhibits the catalytic activity of DHBPS as it is unable to form a proposed intermediate that is crucial for DHBPS activity. Furthermore, vDHBPS structures complexed with substrate and metal ions reveal that, unlike Candida albicans, binding of substrate to vDHBPS induces a conformational change from an open to closed conformation. Interestingly, the position of second metal ion, which is different from that of Methanococcus jannaschii, strongly supports an active role in the catalytic mechanism. Thus, the kinetic and structural characterization of vDHBPS reveals the molecular mechanism of inhibition shown by 4PEH and that it can be explored further for designing novel antibiotics. PMID:25792735

  4. Crystal Structure of an Integron Gene Cassette-Associated Protein from Vibrio cholerae Identifies a Cationic Drug-Binding Module

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Boucher, Yan; Hassan, Karl A.; Leo, Rosa Di; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Chang, Changsoo; Labbate, Maurizio; Paulsen, Ian T.; Stokes, H. W.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Mabbutt, Bridget C.

    2011-01-01

    Background The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes. Methodology/Principal Findings We report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators. Conclusions/Significance Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds. PMID:21390267

  5. Transmembrane oligomeric form of Vibrio cholerae cytolysin triggers TLR2/TLR6-dependent proinflammatory responses in monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Khilwani, Barkha; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2015-02-15

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) kills target eukaryotic cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric β-barrel pores. Once irreversibly converted into the transmembrane oligomeric form, VCC acquires an unusual structural stability and loses its cytotoxic property. It is therefore possible that, on exertion of its cytotoxic activity, the oligomeric form of VCC retained in the disintegrated membrane fractions of the lysed cells would survive within the host cellular milieu for a long period, without causing any further cytotoxicity. Under such circumstances, VCC oligomers may potentially be recognized by the host immune cells. Based on such a hypothesis, in the present study we explored the interaction of the transmembrane oligomeric form of VCC with the monocytes and macrophages of the innate immune system. Our study shows that the VCC oligomers assembled in the liposome membranes elicit potent proinflammatory responses in monocytes and macrophages, via stimulation of the toll-like receptor (TLR)2/TLR6-dependent signalling cascades that involve myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/interleukin-1-receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)1/tumour-necrosis-factor-receptor-associated factor (TRAF)6. VCC oligomer-mediated proinflammatory responses critically depend on the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB. Proinflammatory responses induced by the VCC oligomers also require activation of the mitogen-