Science.gov

Sample records for abundance age structure

  1. Divergent patterns of abundance and age-class structure of headwater stream tadpoles in burned and unburned watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hossack, B.R.; Corn, P.S.; Fagre, D.B.

    2006-01-01

    Wildfire is a potential threat to many species with narrow environmental tolerances like the Rocky Mountain tailed frog (Ascaphus montanus Mittleman and Myers, 1949), which inhabits a region where the frequency and intensity of wildfires are expected to increase. We compared pre- and post-fire counts of tadpoles in eight streams in northwestern Montana to determine the effects of wildfire on A. montanus. All streams were initially sampled in 2001, 2 years before four of them burned in a large wildfire, and were resampled during the 2 years following the fire. Counts of tadpoles were similar in the two groups of streams before the fire. After the fire, tadpoles were almost twice as abundant in unburned streams than in burned streams. The fire seemed to have the greatest negative effect on abundance of age-1 tadpoles, which was reflected in the greater variation in same-stream age-class structure compared with those in unburned streams. Despite the apparent effect on tadpoles, we do not expect the wildfire to be an extirpation threat to populations in the streams that we sampled. Studies spanning a chronosequence of fires, as well as in other areas, are needed to assess the effects of fires on streams with A. montanus and to determine the severity and persistence of these effects.

  2. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of EUVE spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. Findings are that: (1) ASCA and EUVE spectra are both dominated by a region at 6 x 10(exp 6) K. (2) The high energy cut-off of the ASCA spectrum is consistent with emission from the highest ionization stages of EUVE, namely Fe XXIV. (3) EUVE requires a continuous emission measure distribution with more than two temperatures. (4) The ASCA spectra are of such high statistical significance that systematic uncertainties dominate, including atomic physics issues and calibration issues. (5) While the ASCA spectral fits achieve lower Chi(exp 2 with two-temperature fits, the EUVE-derived emission measure distribution models are also consistent with the spectra. (6) The Fe/H ratio obtained from the ASCA fit is within 20 % of the Fe/H abundance obtained from the summed spectra of Capella over 5 EUVE pointings, as well as the 1996 EUVE data. This result confirms our claims that quasi-continua composed of weak emission lines in the short wavelength spectrometer of EUVE are not major contributors to the measured Capella continuum. Other abundance ratios are also determined from the ASCA data, using models derived with EUVE. Si, Si, and Mg appear to be close to solar photospheric values, while the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined

  3. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of ASCA spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous EUVE data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated, resulting in a paper in process by Liedahl and Brickhouse. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. While solar abundance ratios are generally consistent with the ASCA data, the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined from these data. Detailed discussion has been provided to NASA in the most recent annual report (1997). Two poster presentations have been made regarding modeling requirements. A substantial paper is in the final revision form, following review by six co-authors. The results of this work have wide implications, since the newly calculated emission lines almost certainly contribute to other problems in fitting not only other stellar spectra, but also composite supernova remnants, galaxies, and cooling flow clusters of galaxies. Furthermore, Liedahl and Brickhouse have identified other species for which lines of a similar nature (high principal quantum number) will contribute significant flux. For moderate resolution X-ray spectra, lines left out of the models in relatively isolated bands, will be attributed to continuum flux by spectral fitting engines, causing errors in line-to-continuum ratios. Thus addressing the general theoretical problem is of crucial importance.

  4. Age-abundance relationships for neutral communities.

    PubMed

    Danino, Matan; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2015-10-01

    Neutral models for the dynamics of a system of competing species are often used to describe a wide variety of empirical communities. These models are used in many situations, ranging from population genetics and ecological biodiversity to macroevolution and cancer tumors. One of the main issues discussed within this framework is the relationships between the abundance of a species and its age. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of the age-abundance relationships for fixed-size and growing communities. Explicit formulas for the average and the most likely age of a species with abundance n are given, together with the full probability distribution function. We further discuss the universality of these results and their applicability to the tropical forest community. PMID:26565271

  5. Age-abundance relationships for neutral communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danino, Matan; Shnerb, Nadav M.

    2015-10-01

    Neutral models for the dynamics of a system of competing species are often used to describe a wide variety of empirical communities. These models are used in many situations, ranging from population genetics and ecological biodiversity to macroevolution and cancer tumors. One of the main issues discussed within this framework is the relationships between the abundance of a species and its age. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of the age-abundance relationships for fixed-size and growing communities. Explicit formulas for the average and the most likely age of a species with abundance n are given, together with the full probability distribution function. We further discuss the universality of these results and their applicability to the tropical forest community.

  6. Age structure and abundance levels in the entomological evaluation of an insecticide used in the control of Anopheles albimanus in southern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bown, D N; Rodríguez, M H; Arredondo-Jiménez, J I; Loyola, E G; Rodríguez, M C

    1991-06-01

    Applications of bendiocarb produced a high insecticidal residual effect lasting up to 3 months on the most common indoor house surfaces. No significant decreases in mosquito man-biting rate levels were observed between treated and untreated villages. It was shown that almost equal proportions of intra- and peridomicillary mosquitoes came into contact with the insecticide, indicating that mosquitoes commonly enter houses, rest on treated surfaces and return to bite both indoors and outdoors. Although the insecticide was found to have a significant effect on the percentage parity (interpreted as abundance of older individuals) of intra- and peridomicillary Anopheles albimanus mosquitoes, parity recovered and continued a normal cyclic pattern that appeared to be dependent on relative abundance. The proximity of a treated village to an untreated village (1.2 km) can affect the age structure of mosquito populations through shared common resting and breeding sites. PMID:1895076

  7. Rb, Sr and strontium isotopic composition, K/Ar age and large ion lithophile trace element abundances in rocks and glasses from the Wanapitei Lake impact structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winzer, S. R.; Lum, R. K. L.; Schuhmann, S.

    1976-01-01

    Shock metamorphosed rocks and shock-produced melt glasses from the Wanapitei Lake impact structure have been examined petrographically and by electron microprobe. Eleven clasts exhibiting varying degrees of shock metamorphism and eight impact-produced glasses have been analyzed for Rb, Sr and Sr isotopic composition. Five clasts and one glass have also been analyzed for large ion lithophile (LIL) trace element abundances including Li, Rb, Sr, and Ba and the REE's. The impact event forming the Wanapitei Lake structure occurred 37 m.y. ago based on K/Ar dating of glass and glassy whole-rock samples. Rb/Sr isotopic dating failed to provide a meaningful whole-rock or internal isochron. The isotopic composition of the glasses can be explained by impact-produced mixing and melting of metasediments.

  8. Correlation between lithium abundances and ages of solar twin stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos, Marília; Nissen, Poul E.; Meléndez, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We want to determine the lithium abundances of solar twin stars as a function of stellar age to provide constraints for stellar evolutions models and to investigate whether there is a connection between low Li abundance and the occurrence of planets. Methods: For a sample of 21 solar twins observed with the HARPS spectrograph at high spectral resolution (R ≃ 115.000) and very high signal-to-noise ratio (600 ≤ S/N ≤ 2400), precise lithium abundances were obtained by spectral synthesis of the Li i 6707.8 Å line and compared to stellar ages, masses, and metallicities determined from a spectroscopic analysis of the same set of HARPS spectra. Results: We show that for the large majority of the solar twins there is a strong correlation between lithium abundance and stellar age. As the age increases from 1 to 9 Gyr, the Li abundance decreases by a factor of ~50. The relation agrees fairly well with predictions from non-standard stellar evolution models of Li destruction at the bottom of the upper convection zone. Two stars deviate from the relation by having Li abundances enhanced by a factor of ~10, which may be due to planet engulfment. On the other hand, we find no indication of a link between planet hosting stars and enhanced lithium depletion. Based on data products from observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory, (observing programs 072.C-0488, 183.C-0972, 188.C-0265, and 0.88.C-0323).

  9. How selection structures species abundance distributions

    PubMed Central

    Magurran, Anne E.; Henderson, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    How do species divide resources to produce the characteristic species abundance distributions seen in nature? One way to resolve this problem is to examine how the biomass (or capacity) of the spatial guilds that combine to produce an abundance distribution is allocated among species. Here we argue that selection on body size varies across guilds occupying spatially distinct habitats. Using an exceptionally well-characterized estuarine fish community, we show that biomass is concentrated in large bodied species in guilds where habitat structure provides protection from predators, but not in those guilds associated with open habitats and where safety in numbers is a mechanism for reducing predation risk. We further demonstrate that while there is temporal turnover in the abundances and identities of species that comprise these guilds, guild rank order is conserved across our 30-year time series. These results demonstrate that ecological communities are not randomly assembled but can be decomposed into guilds where capacity is predictably allocated among species. PMID:22787020

  10. Age and mass of solar twins constrained by lithium abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Nascimento, J. D., Jr.; Castro, M.; Meléndez, J.; Bazot, M.; Théado, S.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; de Medeiros, J. R.

    2009-07-01

    Aims: We analyze the non-standard mixing history of the solar twins HIP 55 459, HIP 79 672, HIP 56 948, HIP 73 815, and HIP 100 963, to determine as precisely as possible their mass and age. Methods: We computed a grid of evolutionary models with non-standard mixing at several metallicities with the Toulouse-Geneva code for a range of stellar masses assuming an error bar of ±50 K in T_eff. We choose the evolutionary model that reproduces accurately the observed low lithium abundances observed in the solar twins. Results: Our best-fit model for each solar twin provides a mass and age solution constrained by their Li content and T_eff determination. HIP 56 948 is the most likely solar-twin candidate at the present time and our analysis infers a mass of 0.994 ± 0.004 {M⊙} and an age of 4.71 ± 1.39 Gyr. Conclusions: Non-standard mixing is required to explain the low Li abundances observed in solar twins. Li depletion due to additional mixing in solar twins is strongly mass dependent. An accurate lithium abundance measurement and non-standard models provide more precise information about the age and mass more robustly than determined by classical methods alone. The models are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/501/687 or via http://andromeda.dfte.ufrn.br

  11. Measuring the primordial deuterium abundance during the cosmic dark ages.

    PubMed

    Sigurdson, Kris; Furlanetto, Steven R

    2006-09-01

    We discuss how measurements of fluctuations in the absorption of cosmic microwave background photons by neutral gas at redshifts z approximately 7-200 could reveal the primordial deuterium abundance of the Universe. The strength of the cross-correlation of brightness-temperature fluctuations in the redshifted 21-cm line of hydrogen with those in the redshifted 92-cm line of deuterium is proportional to the value of the deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio [D/H] fixed during big bang nucleosynthesis. Although challenging, this measurement would provide the cleanest possible determination of [D/H], free from contamination by structure formation processes at lower redshifts. We additionally report our result for the thermal spin-change cross section in deuterium-hydrogen scattering. PMID:17026353

  12. Red giant masses and ages derived from carbon and nitrogen abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martig, Marie; Fouesneau, Morgan; Rix, Hans-Walter; Ness, Melissa; Mészáros, Szabolcs; García-Hernández, D. A.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Serenelli, Aldo; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Zamora, Olga

    2016-03-01

    We show that the masses of red giant stars can be well predicted from their photospheric carbon and nitrogen abundances, in conjunction with their spectroscopic stellar labels log g, Teff, and [Fe/H]. This is qualitatively expected from mass-dependent post-main-sequence evolution. We here establish an empirical relation between these quantities by drawing on 1475 red giants with asteroseismic mass estimates from Kepler that also have spectroscopic labels from Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) DR12. We assess the accuracy of our model, and find that it predicts stellar masses with fractional rms errors of about 14 per cent (typically 0.2 M⊙). From these masses, we derive ages with rms errors of 40 per cent. This empirical model allows us for the first time to make age determinations (in the range 1-13 Gyr) for vast numbers of giant stars across the Galaxy. We apply our model to ˜52 000 stars in APOGEE DR12, for which no direct mass and age information was previously available. We find that these estimates highlight the vertical age structure of the Milky Way disc, and that the relation of age with [α/M] and metallicity is broadly consistent with established expectations based on detailed studies of the solar neighbourhood.

  13. Phylogenetic structure and host abundance drive disease pressure in communities.

    PubMed

    Parker, Ingrid M; Saunders, Megan; Bontrager, Megan; Weitz, Andrew P; Hendricks, Rebecca; Magarey, Roger; Suiter, Karl; Gilbert, Gregory S

    2015-04-23

    Pathogens play an important part in shaping the structure and dynamics of natural communities, because species are not affected by them equally. A shared goal of ecology and epidemiology is to predict when a species is most vulnerable to disease. A leading hypothesis asserts that the impact of disease should increase with host abundance, producing a 'rare-species advantage'. However, the impact of a pathogen may be decoupled from host abundance, because most pathogens infect more than one species, leading to pathogen spillover onto closely related species. Here we show that the phylogenetic and ecological structure of the surrounding community can be important predictors of disease pressure. We found that the amount of tissue lost to disease increased with the relative abundance of a species across a grassland plant community, and that this rare-species advantage had an additional phylogenetic component: disease pressure was stronger on species with many close relatives. We used a global model of pathogen sharing as a function of relatedness between hosts, which provided a robust predictor of relative disease pressure at the local scale. In our grassland, the total amount of disease was most accurately explained not by the abundance of the focal host alone, but by the abundance of all species in the community weighted by their phylogenetic distance to the host. Furthermore, the model strongly predicted observed disease pressure for 44 novel host species we introduced experimentally to our study site, providing evidence for a mechanism to explain why phylogenetically rare species are more likely to become invasive when introduced. Our results demonstrate how the phylogenetic and ecological structure of communities can have a key role in disease dynamics, with implications for the maintenance of biodiversity, biotic resistance against introduced weeds, and the success of managed plants in agriculture and forestry. PMID:25903634

  14. Structural aging program status report

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.; Graves, H.L. III

    1994-12-31

    Research is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsorship to address aging management of safety-related concrete structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the USNRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Program accomplishments have included development of the Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information on the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors or aging factors, performance assessments of reinforced concrete structures in several United Kingdom nuclear power facilities, evaluation of European and North American repair practices for concrete, an evaluation of factors affecting the corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and application of the time-dependent reliability methodology to reinforced concrete flexure and shear structural elements to investigate the role of in-service inspection and repair on their probability of failure.

  15. Structural aging program status report

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.

    1995-04-01

    Research is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsorship to address aging management of safety-related concrete structures. Documentation is being prepared to provide the USNRC with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service evaluations of nuclear power plants. Program accomplishments have included development of the Structural Materials Information Center containing data and information of the time variation of 144 material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors of aging factors, performance assessments of reinforced concrete structures in several United Kingdom nuclear power facilities, evaluation of European and North American repair practices for concrete, an evaluation of factors affecting the corrosion of metals embedded in concrete, and application of the time-dependent reliability methodology to reinforced concrete flexure and shear structural elements to investigate the role of in-service inspection and repair on their probability of failure.

  16. Community structure influences species' abundance along environmental gradients.

    PubMed

    Eloranta, Antti P; Helland, Ingeborg P; Sandlund, Odd T; Hesthagen, Trygve; Ugedal, Ola; Finstad, Anders G

    2016-01-01

    Species' response to abiotic environmental variation can be influenced by local community structure and interspecific interactions, particularly in restricted habitats such as islands and lakes. In temperate lakes, future increase in water temperature and run-off of terrestrial (allochthonous) dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are predicted to alter community composition and the overall ecosystem productivity. However, little is known about how the present community structure and abiotic environmental variation interact to affect the abundance of native fish populations. We used a space-for-time approach to study how local community structure interact with lake morphometric and climatic characteristics (i.e. temperature and catchment productivity) to affect brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) yield in 283 Norwegian lakes located in different biogeographical regions. Brown trout yield (based on data from standardized survey gill net fishing; g 100 m(-2) gill net night(-1)) was generally lower in lakes where other fish species were present than in lakes with brown trout only. The yield showed an overall negative relationship with increasing temperature and a positive relationship with lake shoreline complexity. Brown trout yield was also negatively correlated with DOC load (measured using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index as a proxy) and lake size and depth (measured using terrain slope as a proxy), but only in lakes where other fish species were present. The observed negative response of brown trout yield to increasing DOC load and proportion of the pelagic open-water area is likely due to restricted (littoral) niche availability and competitive dominance of more pelagic fishes such as Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus (L.)). Our study highlights that, through competitive interactions, the local community structure can influence the response of a species' abundance to variation in abiotic conditions. Changes in biomass and niche use of top predators (such as the brown

  17. Measuring Ages and Elemental Abundances from Unresolved Stellar Populations: Fe, Mg, C, N, and Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Genevieve J.; Schiavon, Ricardo P.

    2008-08-01

    We present a method for determining mean light-weighted ages and abundances of Fe, Mg, C, N, and Ca from medium-resolution spectroscopy of unresolved stellar populations. The method is implemented in a publicly available code called EZ_Ages. The method and error estimation are described, and the results tested for accuracy and consistency, by application to integrated spectra of well-known Galactic globular and open clusters. Ages and abundances from integrated light analysis agree with studies of resolved stars to within ±0.1 dex for most clusters, and to within ±0.2 dex for nearly all cases. The results are robust to the choice of Lick indices used in the fitting to within ±0.1 dex, except for a few systematic deviations that are clearly categorized. The realism of our error estimates is checked through comparison with detailed Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, we apply EZ_Ages to the sample of galaxies presented in Thomas et al. (2005) and compare our derived values of age, [Fe/H], and [α/Fe] to their analysis. We find that [α/Fe] is very consistent between the two analyses, that ages are consistent for old (age > 10 Gyr) populations but show modest systematic differences at younger ages, and that [Fe/H] is fairly consistent, with small systematic differences related to the age systematics. Overall, EZ_Ages provides accurate estimates of fundamental parameters from medium-resolution spectra of unresolved stellar populations in the old and intermediate-age regime, for the first time allowing quantitative estimates of the abundances of C, N, and Ca in these unresolved systems.

  18. THE IMPACT OF ENHANCED He AND CNONa ABUNDANCES ON GLOBULAR CLUSTER RELATIVE AGE-DATING METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    MarIn-Franch, Antonio; Aparicio, Antonio; Cassisi, Santi; Pietrinferni, Adriano E-mail: antapaj@iac.e E-mail: pietrinferni@oa-teramo.inaf.i

    2010-05-10

    The impact that unrecognized differences in the chemical patterns of Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) have on their relative age determinations is studied. The two most widely used relative age-dating methods, horizontal and vertical, together with the more recent relative MS-fitting method, were carefully analyzed on a purely theoretical basis. The BaSTI library was adopted to perform the present analysis. We find that relative ages derived using the horizontal and vertical methods are largely dependent on the initial He content and heavy element distribution. Unrecognized cluster-to-cluster chemical abundance differences can lead to an error in the derived relative ages as large as {approx}0.5 (or {approx}6 Gyr if an age of 12.8 Gyr is adopted for normalization) and even larger for some extreme cases. It is shown that the relative MS-fitting method is by far the age-dating technique for which undetected cluster-to-cluster differences in the He abundance have less impact. Present results are used in order to pose constraints on the maximum possible spread in the He and CNONa elements abundances on the basis of the estimates-taken from the literature-of the GGCs relative age dispersion obtained with the various relative age-dating techniques. Finally, it is shown that the age-metallicity relation found for young GGCs by the GC Treasury program is a real age sequence and cannot be produced by variations in the He and/or heavy element distribution.

  19. Motor abundance and control structure in the golf swing.

    PubMed

    Morrison, A; McGrath, D; Wallace, E S

    2016-04-01

    Variability and control structure are under-represented areas of golf swing research. This study investigated the use of the abundant degrees of freedom in the golf swing of high and intermediate skilled golfers using uncontrolled manifold (UCM) analysis. The variance parallel to (VUCM) and orthogonal to (VOrth) the UCM with respect to the orientation and location of the clubhead were calculated. The higher skilled golfers had proportionally higher values of VUCM than lower skilled players for all measured outcome variables. Motor synergy was found in the control of the orientation of the clubhead and the combined outcome variables but not for clubhead location. Clubhead location variance zeroed-in on impact as has been previously shown, whereas clubhead orientation variance increased near impact. Both skill levels increased their control over the clubhead location leading up to impact, with more control exerted over the clubhead orientation in the early downswing. The results suggest that to achieve higher skill levels in golf may not lie simply in optimal technique, but may lie more in developing control over the abundant degrees of freedom in the body. PMID:26784706

  20. Structure and Abundance of Nitrous Oxide Complexes in Earth's Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Steven R; de Lange, Katrina M; Lane, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    We have investigated the lowest energy structures and binding energies of a series of atmospherically relevant nitrous oxide (N2O) complexes using explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory. Specifically, we have considered complexes with nitrogen (N2-N2O), oxygen (O2-N2O), argon (Ar-N2O), and water (H2O-N2O). We have calculated rotational constants and harmonic vibrational frequencies for the complexes and the constituent monomers. Statistical mechanics was used to determine the thermodynamic parameters for complex formation as a function of temperature and pressure. These results, in combination with relevant atmospheric data, were used to estimate the abundance of N2O complexes in Earth's atmosphere as a function of altitude. We find that the abundance of N2O complexes in Earth's atmosphere is small but non-negligible, and we suggest that N2O complexes may contribute to absorption of terrestrial radiation and be relevant for understanding the atmospheric fate of N2O. PMID:26983553

  1. Age, growth, mortality, and abundance of lake sturgeon in the Grasse River, New York, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trested, D.G.; Isely, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    An increased understanding of lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) population dynamics is a key requirement for successful management efforts. Little is known regarding the Grasse River population of lake sturgeon except that it is one of a few populations in New York State where spawning has been documented. Thus our purpose was to assess the current status of lake sturgeon in the Grasse River system, including age, growth, mortality, and abundance. Age was determined for 196 of 211 lake sturgeon by examination of sectioned pectoral fin rays. Ages ranged from 0 to 32 years and the annual mortality rate for fish between ages 7 and 14 was 16.8%. The weight (W, g) to total length (TL, mm) relationship was W = 1.281 x 10-6TL3.202. The von Bertalanffy growth equation was TL = 1913(1-e-0.0294(t+9.5691)). While the range of observed ages was similar to that of nearby St. Lawrence River populations, mean weight at age for an individual at 1000 mm TL was lower than that observed for lake sturgeon within Lake St. Francis of the St. Lawrence River. Predicted growth based on von Bertalanffy parameters was similar to that observed for the nearby Lake St. Francis. An open population estimator using the POPAN sub-module in the Program MARK produced an abundance estimate of 793 lake sturgeon (95% CI = 337-1249).

  2. On the seismic age and heavy-element abundance of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdek, G.; Gough, D. O.

    2011-12-01

    We estimate the main-sequence age and heavy-element abundance of the Sun by means of an asteroseismic calibration of theoretical solar models using only low-degree acoustic modes from the BiSON. The method can therefore be applied also to other solar-type stars, such as those observed by the NASA satellite Kepler and the planned ground-based Danish-led Stellar Observations Network Group (SONG). The age, 4.60 ± 0.04 Gyr, obtained with this new seismic method, is similar to, although somewhat greater than, today's commonly adopted values, and the surface heavy-element abundance by mass, Zs= 0.0142 ± 0.0005, lies between the values quoted recently by Asplund et al. and by Caffau et al. We stress that our best-fitting model is not a seismic model, but a theoretically evolved model of the Sun constructed with 'standard' physics and calibrated against helioseismic data.

  3. THE SPATIAL STRUCTURE OF MONO-ABUNDANCE SUB-POPULATIONS OF THE MILKY WAY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Bovy, Jo; Rix, Hans-Walter; Liu Chao; Hogg, David W.; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun

    2012-07-10

    The spatial, kinematic, and elemental-abundance structure of the Milky Way's stellar disk is complex, and has been difficult to dissect with local spectroscopic or global photometric data. Here, we develop and apply a rigorous density modeling approach for Galactic spectroscopic surveys that enables investigation of the global spatial structure of stellar sub-populations in narrow bins of [{alpha}/Fe] and [Fe/H], using 23,767 G-type dwarfs from SDSS/SEGUE, which effectively sample 5 kpc < R{sub GC} < 12 kpc and 0.3 kpc {approx}< |Z| {approx}< 3 kpc. We fit models for the number density of each such ([{alpha}/Fe] and [Fe/H]) mono-abundance component, properly accounting for the complex spectroscopic SEGUE sampling of the underlying stellar population, as well as for the metallicity and color distributions of the samples. We find that each mono-abundance sub-population has a simple spatial structure that can be described by a single exponential in both the vertical and radial directions, with continuously increasing scale heights ( Almost-Equal-To 200 pc to 1 kpc) and decreasing scale lengths (>4.5 kpc to 2 kpc) for increasingly older sub-populations, as indicated by their lower metallicities and [{alpha}/Fe] enhancements. That the abundance-selected sub-components with the largest scale heights have the shortest scale lengths is in sharp contrast with purely geometric 'thick-thin disk' decompositions. To the extent that [{alpha}/Fe] is an adequate proxy for age, our results directly show that older disk sub-populations are more centrally concentrated, which implies inside-out formation of galactic disks. The fact that the largest scale-height sub-components are most centrally concentrated in the Milky Way is an almost inevitable consequence of explaining the vertical structure of the disk through internal evolution. Whether the simple spatial structure of the mono-abundance sub-components and the striking correlations between age, scale length, and scale height can

  4. Ecological niche structure and rangewide abundance patterns of species

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Meyer, Enrique; Díaz-Porras, Daniel; Peterson, A. Townsend; Yáñez-Arenas, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Spatial abundance patterns across species' ranges have attracted intense attention in macroecology and biogeography. One key hypothesis has been that abundance declines with geographical distance from the range centre, but tests of this idea have shown that the effect may occur indeed only in a minority of cases. We explore an alternative hypothesis: that species' abundances decline with distance from the centroid of the species' habitable conditions in environmental space (the ecological niche). We demonstrate consistent negative abundance–ecological distance relationships across all 11 species analysed (turtles to wolves), and that relationships in environmental space are consistently stronger than relationships in geographical space. PMID:23134784

  5. Age and Abundance Discrimination in Old Stellar Populations Using Mid-Ultraviolet Colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, Ben; O'Connell, Robert W.; Rood, Robert T.

    2003-07-01

    The rest-frame mid-ultraviolet spectral region (2000-3200 Å) is important in analyzing the stellar populations of the ``red envelope'' systems observed at high redshifts. Here we explore the usefulness of the mid-UV for determining ages and abundances of old populations. We work with a theoretical set of low-resolution spectra and broadband colors because tests show that these are at present more realistic than high-resolution models. A mid-UV to optical/IR wavelength baseline provides good separation of population components because the main-sequence turnoff dominates the integrated light between 2500 and 4000 Å. Mid-UV spectral features are not sensitive to the dwarf/giant mixture in the population, unlike those in the optical region. We find a 6 mag difference in the mid-UV continuum level (normalized at V) over the metallicity range -1.5ages in the range 4-16 Gyr. Logarithmic derivatives of mid-UV colors with respect to age or metal abundance are 3-10 times larger than for the UBV region. Most of the spectral information on old populations therefore resides below 4000 Å. Measurement of a single mid-UV color is capable of placing a strong lower bound on the mean metallicity of an old population. We investigate the capability of UBV and mid-UV broadband colors to separately determine age and abundance, taking into account precision in the color measurements. We find that the mid-UV improves resolution in logt, logZ space by about a factor of 3 for a given observational precision. Contamination by hot, post-He flash evolutionary phases can seriously affect the mid-UV spectra of old populations. A simple estimate shows that contamination can reach over 80% in some cases. However, this is straightforward to remove as long as far-UV measurements are available. We find that extinction should have relatively small effects on parameters derived for old populations from the mid-UV. Finally, we show

  6. Constraining Stellar Population Models. I. Age, Metallicity and Abundance Pattern Compilation for Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, Joel C.; Courteau, Stéphane; Graves, Genevieve; Schiavon, Ricardo P.

    2014-01-01

    We present an extensive literature compilation of age, metallicity, and chemical abundance pattern information for the 41 Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) studied by Schiavon et al. Our compilation constitutes a notable improvement over previous similar work, particularly in terms of chemical abundances. Its primary purpose is to enable detailed evaluations of and refinements to stellar population synthesis models designed to recover the above information for unresolved stellar systems based on their integrated spectra. However, since the Schiavon sample spans a wide range of the known GGC parameter space, our compilation may also benefit investigations related to a variety of astrophysical endeavors, such as the early formation of the Milky Way, the chemical evolution of GGCs, and stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. For instance, we confirm with our compiled data that the GGC system has a bimodal metallicity distribution and is uniformly enhanced in the α elements. When paired with the ages of our clusters, we find evidence that supports a scenario whereby the Milky Way obtained its globular clusters through two channels: in situ formation and accretion of satellite galaxies. The distributions of C, N, O, and Na abundances and the dispersions thereof per cluster corroborate the known fact that all GGCs studied so far with respect to multiple stellar populations have been found to harbor them. Finally, using data on individual stars, we verify that stellar atmospheres become progressively polluted by CN(O)-processed material after they leave the main sequence. We also uncover evidence which suggests that the α elements Mg and Ca may originate from more than one nucleosynthetic production site. We estimate that our compilation incorporates all relevant analyses from the literature up to mid-2012. As an aid to investigators in the fields named above, we provide detailed electronic tables of the data upon which our work is based at http

  7. FLOW REGIME, JUVENILE ABUNDANCE, AND THE ASSEMBLAGE STRUCTURE OF STREAM FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The assemblage of fishes in a second-order stream in east-central Illinois was compared through seine sampling for two years with distinctly different flow regimes. In both years adult (age 0) fish were most abundant in late spring and early summer while juvenile (age 0) abundanc...

  8. Job Structure and Age Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, James S.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    From research findings on job design and redesign, the authors conclude that all individuals may not approve job enrichment programs which may actually decrease job satisfaction. Although job satisfaction may increase with age, individual differences and other variables make research results inconclusive. (MF)

  9. Diversity, abundance and community network structure in sporocarp-associated beetle communities of the central Appalachian Mountains.

    PubMed

    Epps, Mary Jane; Arnold, A Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Although arthropods are abundant and diverse in and on macrofungal sporocarps, their associations with fungi seldom have been described at a community level. We examined sporocarp-associated beetle communities in two primary sites in the Appalachian Mountains and foothills, assessing beetle diversity and abundance in relation to study site, sampling season (early vs. late summer), and sporocarp characteristics such as taxonomic position, dry mass and age. From 758 sporocarps representing >180 species we recovered 15404 adult beetles representing 72 species and 15 families, primarily Staphylinidae (> 98% of individuals and of 64% morphospecies). The probability of sporocarp colonization by beetles, beetle abundance and diversity differed among fungal species and were positively associated with sporocarp dry mass. Sporocarp age was positively correlated with beetle diversity and abundance (as measured in a focal species, Megacollybia platyphylla, Tricholomataceae), and its effects were independent of dry mass. Many beetle species were generalists, visiting a wide breadth of fungi in both the Agaricales and Polyporales; however, several beetle taxa showed evidence of specialization on particular fungal hosts. Host association data were used to examine the structure underlying sporocarp-beetle associations. Here we present the first evidence of nested community structure in the sporocarp-beetle interaction network. PMID:20648747

  10. Early-type galaxy archeology: Ages, abundance ratios, and effective temperatures from full-spectrum fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Graves, Genevieve J.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2014-01-01

    The stellar populations of galaxies hold vital clues to their formation histories. In this paper we present results based on modeling stacked spectra of early-type galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a function of velocity dispersion, σ, from 90 km s{sup –1} to 300 km s{sup –1}. The spectra are of extremely high quality, with typical signal-to-noise ratio of 1000 Å{sup –1}, and a wavelength coverage of 4000 Å –8800 Å. Our population synthesis model includes variation in 16 elements from C to Ba, a two-component star formation history, the shift in effective temperature, Δ T {sub eff}, of the stars with respect to a solar metallicity isochrone, and the stellar initial mass function, among other parameters. In our approach we fit the full optical spectra rather than a select number of spectral indices and are able to, for the first time, measure the abundances of the elements V, Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni from the integrated light of distant galaxies. Our main results are as follows: (1) light-weighted stellar ages range from 6-12 Gyr from low to high σ; (2) [Fe/H] varies by less than 0.1 dex across the entire sample; (3) Mg closely tracks O, and both increase from ≈0.0 at low σ to ∼0.25 at high σ; Si and Ti show a shallower rise with σ, and Ca tracks Fe rather than O; (4) the iron peak elements V, Cr, Mn, and Ni track Fe, while Co tracks O, suggesting that Co forms primarily in massive stars; (5) C and N track O over the full sample and [C/Fe] and [N/Fe] exceed 0.2 at high σ; and (6) the variation in Δ T {sub eff} with total metallicity closely follows theoretical predictions based on stellar evolution theory. This last result is significant because it implies that we are robustly solving not only for the detailed abundance patterns but also the detailed temperature distributions (i.e., isochrones) of the stars in these galaxies. A variety of tests reveal that the systematic uncertainties in our measurements are probably 0.05 dex or

  11. Early-type Galaxy Archeology: Ages, Abundance Ratios, and Effective Temperatures from Full-spectrum Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Charlie; Graves, Genevieve J.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2014-01-01

    The stellar populations of galaxies hold vital clues to their formation histories. In this paper we present results based on modeling stacked spectra of early-type galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a function of velocity dispersion, σ, from 90 km s-1 to 300 km s-1. The spectra are of extremely high quality, with typical signal-to-noise ratio of 1000 Å-1, and a wavelength coverage of 4000 Å -8800 Å. Our population synthesis model includes variation in 16 elements from C to Ba, a two-component star formation history, the shift in effective temperature, Δ T eff, of the stars with respect to a solar metallicity isochrone, and the stellar initial mass function, among other parameters. In our approach we fit the full optical spectra rather than a select number of spectral indices and are able to, for the first time, measure the abundances of the elements V, Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni from the integrated light of distant galaxies. Our main results are as follows: (1) light-weighted stellar ages range from 6-12 Gyr from low to high σ (2) [Fe/H] varies by less than 0.1 dex across the entire sample; (3) Mg closely tracks O, and both increase from ≈0.0 at low σ to ~0.25 at high σ Si and Ti show a shallower rise with σ, and Ca tracks Fe rather than O; (4) the iron peak elements V, Cr, Mn, and Ni track Fe, while Co tracks O, suggesting that Co forms primarily in massive stars; (5) C and N track O over the full sample and [C/Fe] and [N/Fe] exceed 0.2 at high σ and (6) the variation in Δ T eff with total metallicity closely follows theoretical predictions based on stellar evolution theory. This last result is significant because it implies that we are robustly solving not only for the detailed abundance patterns but also the detailed temperature distributions (i.e., isochrones) of the stars in these galaxies. A variety of tests reveal that the systematic uncertainties in our measurements are probably 0.05 dex or less. Our derived [Mg/Fe] and [O

  12. Structural aging program status report

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.

    1994-10-01

    Reinforced concrete structures play a vital role in the safe operation of all light-water reactor plants. In general, the performance of these structures has been satisfactory. However, there have been several instances where the capability of these structures to meet future functional and performance requirements has been challenged due to problems arising from either improper material selection, construction and design deficiencies, or environmental effects. Examples of some of the potentially more serious incidents include post-tensioning anchor head failures, leaching of concrete in tendon galleries, voids under vertical tendon bearing plates, containment dome delaminations, corrosion of steel tendons and rebars, water intrusion through basement cracks, and leakage of corrosion inhibitor from tendon sheaths. Such incidents indicate that there is a need for improved surveillance, inspection and testing, and maintenance to enhance the technical bases for assurance of continued safe operation of nuclear power plants both during the initial licensing period as well as throughout any continued service period.

  13. The Ages, Metallicities, and Element Abundance Ratios of Massive Quenched Galaxies at z = -1.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, M.; Carollo, C. M.; Renzini, A.; Cappellari, M.; Mancini, C.; Arimoto, N.; Daddi, E.; Gobat, R.; Strazzullo, V.; Tacchella, S.; Yamada, Y.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the stellar population properties of a sample of 24 massive quenched galaxies at 1.25< zspec< 2.09 identified in the COSMOS field with our Subaru/Multi-object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph near-IR spectroscopic observations. Tracing the stellar population properties as close to their major formation epoch as possible, we try to put constraints on the star formation history, post-quenching evolution, and possible progenitor star-forming populations for such massive quenched galaxies. By using a set of Lick absorption line indices on a rest-frame optical composite spectrum, the average age, metallicity [Z/H], and α-to-iron element abundance ratio [α/Fe] are derived as {log}({age}/{Gyr})={0.04}-0.08+0.10, [{{Z}}/{{H}}]={0.24}-0.14+0.20, and [α /{Fe}]={0.31}-0.12+0.12, respectively. If our sample of quenched galaxies at < z> =1.6 is evolved passively to z = 0, their stellar population properties will align in excellent agreement with local counterparts at similar stellar velocity dispersions, which qualifies them as progenitors of local massive early-type galaxies. Redshift evolution of stellar population ages in quenched galaxies combined with low redshift measurements from the literature suggests a formation redshift of {z}{{f}}∼ 2.3, around which the bulk of stars in these galaxies have been formed. The measured [α/Fe] value indicates a star formation timescale of ≲ 1 Gyr, which can be translated into a specific star formation rate of ≃ 1 {{Gyr}}-1 prior to quenching. Based on these findings, we discuss identifying possible progenitor star-forming galaxies at z≃ 2.3. We identify normal star-forming galaxies, i.e., those on the star-forming main sequence, followed by a rapid quenching event, as likely precursors of the quenched galaxies at < z> =1.6 presented here. Based on data collected at the Subaru telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. (Proposal IDs: S09A-043, S10A-058, and S11A-075.)

  14. Globular Cluster Abundances from High-resolution, Integrated-light Spectroscopy. III. The Large Magellanic Cloud: Fe and Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Cameron, Scott A.; McWilliam, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we refine our method for the abundance analysis of high-resolution spectroscopy of the integrated light of unresolved globular clusters (GCs). This method was previously demonstrated for the analysis of old (>10 Gyr) Milky Way (MW) GCs. Here, we extend the technique to young clusters using a training set of nine GCs in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Depending on the signal-to-noise ratio of the data, we use 20-100 Fe lines per cluster to successfully constrain the ages of old clusters to within a ~5 Gyr range, the ages of ~2 Gyr clusters to a 1-2 Gyr range, and the ages of the youngest clusters (0.05-1 Gyr) to a ~200 Myr range. We also demonstrate that we can measure [Fe/H] in clusters with any age less than 12 Gyr with similar or only slightly larger uncertainties (0.1-0.25 dex) than those obtained for old MW GCs (0.1 dex) the slightly larger uncertainties are due to the rapid evolution in stellar populations at these ages. In this paper, we present only Fe abundances and ages. In the next paper in this series, we present our complete analysis of ~20 elements for which we are able to measure abundances. For several of the clusters in this sample, there are no high-resolution abundances in the literature from individual member stars; our results are the first detailed chemical abundances available. The spectra used in this paper were obtained at Las Campanas with the echelle on the du Pont Telescope and with the MIKE spectrograph on the Magellan Clay Telescope. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  15. GLOBULAR CLUSTER ABUNDANCES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION, INTEGRATED-LIGHT SPECTROSCOPY. III. THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: Fe AND AGES

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; McWilliam, Andrew E-mail: rab@ucolick.org E-mail: andy@ociw.edu

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we refine our method for the abundance analysis of high-resolution spectroscopy of the integrated light of unresolved globular clusters (GCs). This method was previously demonstrated for the analysis of old (>10 Gyr) Milky Way (MW) GCs. Here, we extend the technique to young clusters using a training set of nine GCs in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Depending on the signal-to-noise ratio of the data, we use 20-100 Fe lines per cluster to successfully constrain the ages of old clusters to within a {approx}5 Gyr range, the ages of {approx}2 Gyr clusters to a 1-2 Gyr range, and the ages of the youngest clusters (0.05-1 Gyr) to a {approx}200 Myr range. We also demonstrate that we can measure [Fe/H] in clusters with any age less than 12 Gyr with similar or only slightly larger uncertainties (0.1-0.25 dex) than those obtained for old MW GCs (0.1 dex); the slightly larger uncertainties are due to the rapid evolution in stellar populations at these ages. In this paper, we present only Fe abundances and ages. In the next paper in this series, we present our complete analysis of {approx}20 elements for which we are able to measure abundances. For several of the clusters in this sample, there are no high-resolution abundances in the literature from individual member stars; our results are the first detailed chemical abundances available. The spectra used in this paper were obtained at Las Campanas with the echelle on the du Pont Telescope and with the MIKE spectrograph on the Magellan Clay Telescope.

  16. Evolution of the chemical element abundances with age in open clusters: The Hyades, Pleiades, Coma Berenices and M6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliçoǧlu, T.; Monier, R.; Gebran, M.; Fossati, L.

    2014-12-01

    We compare the averaged photospheric abundances of A and F stars in open clusters of different ages: M6 (˜80 Myr), Pleiades (˜100 Myr), Coma Berenices (˜450 Myr), and the Hyades (˜800 Myr). The variation in the averaged abundances among F stars generally reflects the differences between the initial compositions of the clusters in their various birthplaces. The differences of the averaged chemical composition of A stars may also reveal the effects of radiative difussion for the stars of different ages. We also discuss the methods, resolutions and wavelength coverages of spectra and discrepancies in the derived microturbulent velocities among the various studies to check if these studies are comparable. We also present the pattern of mean abundances and metallicity for the M6 cluster determined by spectral analysis of GIRAFFE spectra acquired with the VLT, Paranal Observatory.

  17. Structurally Resolved Abundances and Depletions in the Rho OPH Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seab, C.

    1995-07-01

    The mechanism that determines the pattern of depletion ofelements in the interstellar medium has been a problem for along time. It is clear that some of the most refractoryelements such as Si, Fe, and Mg, are heavily depleted onto theinterstellar grains. On the other hand, some elements such asS and Zn are normally either undepleted or very lightlydepleted. The difference between the two cases is notunderstood. We propose to address this question with adetailed study of the depletion patterns in the Rho Ophiuchicloud. This study is strongly based on a combination of thecapabilities of two modern instruments: the GHRS for high-resolution UV data, and the Ultra High Resolution Facility(UHRF) of the AAT. This instrument has been used to obtain NaI line profiles in the Rho Oph cloud with a resolution ofR=1,000,000. The combination of these two types of data willbe used to resolve the velocity structure of the elementdepletions in the cloud.

  18. Stellar abundances and ages for metal-rich Milky Way globular clusters. Stellar parameters and elemental abundances for 9 HB stars in NGC 6352

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltzing, S.; Primas, F.; Johnson, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Metal-rich globular clusters provide important tracers of the formation of our Galaxy. Moreover, and not less important, they are very important calibrators for the derivation of properties of extra-galactic metal-rich stellar populations. Nonetheless, only a few of the metal-rich globular clusters in the Milky Way have been studied using high-resolution stellar spectra to derive elemental abundances. Additionally, Rosenberg et al. identified a small group of metal-rich globular clusters that appeared to be about 2 billion years younger than the bulk of the Milky Way globular clusters. However, it is unclear if like is compared with like in this dataset as we do not know the enhancement of α-elements in the clusters and the amount of α-elements is well known to influence the derivation of ages for globular clusters. Aims: We derive elemental abundances for the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 6352 and we present our methods to be used in up-coming studies of other metal-rich globular clusters. Methods: We present a study of elemental abundances for α- and iron-peak elements for nine HB stars in the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 6352. The elemental abundances are based on high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra obtained with the UVES spectrograph on VLT. The elemental abundances have been derived using standard LTE calculations and stellar parameters have been derived from the spectra themselves by requiring ionizational as well as excitational equilibrium. Results: We find that NGC 6352 has [Fe/H] = -0.55, is enhanced in the α-elements to about +0.2 dex for Ca, Si, and Ti relative to Fe. For the iron-peak elements we find solar values. Based on the spectroscopically derived stellar parameters we find that an E(B-V) = 0.24 and (m-M) ≃ 14.05 better fits the data than the nominal values. An investigation of log gf-values for suitable Fe i lines lead us to the conclusion that the commonly used correction to the May et al. (1974) data should not be

  19. Structural Imaging Measures of Brain Aging

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Samuel N.

    2014-01-01

    During the course of normal aging, biological changes occur in the brain that are associated with changes in cognitive ability. This review presents data from neuroimaging studies of primarily “normal” or healthy brain aging. As such, we focus on research in unimpaired or nondemented older adults, but also include findings from lifespan studies that include younger and middle aged individuals as well as from populations with prodromal or clinically symptomatic disease such as cerebrovascular or Alzheimer’s disease. This review predominantly addresses structural MRI biomarkers, such as volumetric or thickness measures from anatomical images, and measures of white matter injury and integrity respectively from FLAIR or DTI, and includes complementary data from PET and cognitive or clinical testing as appropriate. The findings reveal highly consistent age-related differences in brain structure, particularly frontal lobe and medial temporal regions that are also accompanied by age-related differences in frontal and medial temporal lobe mediated cognitive abilities. Newer findings also suggest that degeneration of specific white matter tracts such as those passing through the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum may also be related to age-related differences in cognitive performance. Interpretation of these findings, however, must be tempered by the fact that comorbid diseases such as cerebrovascular and Alzheimer’s disease also increase in prevalence with advancing age. As such, this review discusses challenges related to interpretation of current theories of cognitive aging in light of the common occurrence of these later-life diseases. Understanding the differences between “Normal” and “Healthy” brain aging and identifying potential modifiable risk factors for brain aging is critical to inform potential treatments to stall or reverse the effects of brain aging and possibly extend cognitive health for our aging society. PMID:25146995

  20. Fingerprints of anomalous primordial Universe on the abundance of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect

    Baghram, Shant; Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein E-mail: abolhasani@ipm.ir E-mail: MohammadHossein.Namjoo@utdallas.edu

    2014-12-01

    We study the predictions of anomalous inflationary models on the abundance of structures in large scale structure observations. The anomalous features encoded in primordial curvature perturbation power spectrum are (a): localized feature in momentum space, (b): hemispherical asymmetry and (c): statistical anisotropies. We present a model-independent expression relating the number density of structures to the changes in the matter density variance. Models with localized feature can alleviate the tension between observations and numerical simulations of cold dark matter structures on galactic scales as a possible solution to the missing satellite problem. In models with hemispherical asymmetry we show that the abundance of structures becomes asymmetric depending on the direction of observation to sky. In addition, we study the effects of scale-dependent dipole amplitude on the abundance of structures. Using the quasars data and adopting the power-law scaling k{sup n{sub A}-1} for the amplitude of dipole we find the upper bound n{sub A} < 0.6 for the spectral index of the dipole asymmetry. In all cases there is a critical mass scale M{sub c} in which for M M{sub c}) the enhancement in variance induced from anomalous feature decreases (increases) the abundance of dark matter structures in Universe.

  1. Cooperation and age structure in spatial games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Zhen; Zhu, Xiaodan; Arenzon, Jeferson J.

    2012-01-01

    We study the evolution of cooperation in evolutionary spatial games when the payoff correlates with the increasing age of players (the level of correlation is set through a single parameter, α). The demographic heterogeneous age distribution, directly affecting the outcome of the game, is thus shown to be responsible for enhancing the cooperative behavior in the population. In particular, moderate values of α allow cooperators not only to survive but to outcompete defectors, even when the temptation to defect is large and the ageless, standard α=0 model does not sustain cooperation. The interplay between age structure and noise is also considered, and we obtain the conditions for optimal levels of cooperation.

  2. Abundance inhomogeneities and atmospheric structure in CN-bimodal globular cluster giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Plez, Bertrand; Smith, Verne V.

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested by several authors that the sodium and aluminum abundance variations correlating with CN-band strength, frequently observed in CN-bimodal globular cluster giants, could be spurious manifestations of different temperature structures in the 'CN-strong' and 'CN-weak' stars, caused by different molecular line blanketing related to the C, N, and O trio. For stellar parameters generally appropriate to giants in the intermediate metallicity CN-bimodal cluster M4, we demonstrate through new model atmosphere calculations, employing opacity sampling and spherical geometry, that the observed abundance anomalies cannot be the result of atmospheric temperature structure. Our results using spherical geometry are compared to identical calculations performed with plane-parallel geometry: the effects of atmospheric extension on derived abundances for all lines considered amount to less than 0.1 dex.

  3. Diversity and abundance of dung beetles attracted to different ages of cow dung at Tasik Chini Biosphere Reserve, Pahang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aruchunnan, Ganaswary; Foo, Ng Yong; Ling, Wee Suk; Hazmi, Izfa Riza

    2015-09-01

    The attractiveness of cow dung of different ages towards dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae) was studied in Tasik Chini Biosphere Reserve from February to April 2014. A total of 1,371 individuals belonging to 29 species and 11 genera had successfully collected in traps baited with cow dung aged at 1, 3 and 5 days. Cow dung was highly attractive at first 24 hours, and its attractiveness greatly reduced at Day 3 and Day 5. The result shows significant differences in the means of abundance (F = 4.60, d f= 2 & 24, P = 0.02) and species richness (F = 15.13, df = 2 & 24, P = 5.6 × 10-5). Bray Curtis similarity index indicated high community similarity between trap captures on Day 3 and Day 5 (59.7 %) compare to Day 1 (15.1 %) that leads to an assumption that some species preferentially colonized fresh dung while some species prefer aged dung. Species Copris agnus, Onthophagus aphodiodes, O. rorarius, O. orientalis, O. rutilans, O. vulpes, Oniticellus tessellatus and Paragymnopleurus maurus were captured on Day-1, while O. peninsularis and O. sumaveiensis captured on Day-3 and Day-5. Among the 11 genera, Onthophagus species was found to be most abundant with 762 individuals representing 55.6 % of the total captures. The most abundant species was Sisyphus thoracicus with 524 individuals (38.2 %). The dung beetle fauna's species accumulation curve in Tasik Chini did not reach to an asymptote suggesting more sampling effort is needed.

  4. Effects of understory structure on the abundance, richness and diversity of Collembola (Arthropoda) in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Troian, Vera R; Baldissera, Ronei; Hartz, Sandra M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different landscape structures on the understory Collembola community. Four different forest physiognomies were compared: Pinus spp. plantation, Eucalyptus spp. plantation, Araucaria angustifolia plantation, and a remaining native Araucaria forest. Three areas containing two sampling units (25 mx2 m each) were selected in each forest physiognomy. Understory Collembola collection was done with a 1x1 m canvas sheet held horizontally below the vegetation, which was beaten with a 1 m long stick, seasonally from September 2003 to August 2004. We evaluated the influence of forest physiognomies on the abundance, richness and diversity of Collembola communities. It was also verified if the habitat structure of each physiognomy was associated with the composition of the Collembola community. A total number of 4,111 individuals were collected belonging to the families Entomobrydae and Tomocerida (Entomobryomorpha), and Sminthuridae (Symphypleona), and divided in 12 morphospecies. Pinus plantation presented the highest richness, abundance and diversity of Collembola and it was associated to diverse understory vegetation. The abundance of Entomobrydae and Sminthuridae was associated to the presence of bushes, while Tomoceridae abundance was associated to the presence of trees. The habitat structure, measured through understory vegetation density and composition, plays an important role on the determination of the structure and composition of the Collembola community. PMID:19618049

  5. Normal and aging hair biology and structure 'aging and hair'.

    PubMed

    Goodier, Molly; Hordinsky, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Much like an individual's hairstyle, hair fibers along the scalp see a number of changes over the course of one's lifetime. As the decades pass, the shine and volume synonymous with youthful hair may give way to thin, dull, and brittle hair commonly associated with aging. These changes are a result of a compilation of genetic and environmental elements influencing the cells of the hair follicle, specifically the hair follicle stem cells and melanocytes. Telomere shortening, decrease in cell numbers, and particular transcription factors have all been implicated in this process. In turn, these molecular alterations lead to structural modifications of the hair fiber, decrease in melanin production, and lengthening of the telogen phase of the hair cycle. Despite this inevitable progression with aging, there exists an array of treatments such as light therapy, minoxidil, and finasteride which have been designed to mitigate the effects of aging, particularly balding and thinning hair. Although each works through a different mechanism, all aim to maintain or potentially restore the youthful quality of hair. PMID:26370639

  6. Structural integrity of future aging airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Jack F.; Goranson, Ulf G.

    1992-01-01

    A multitude of design considerations is involved in ensuring the structural integrity of Boeing jet transports that have common design concepts validated by extensive analyses, tests, and three decades of service. As airplanes approach their design service objectives, the incidences of fatigue and corrosion may become widespread. Continuing airworthiness of the aging jet fleet requires diligent performance from the manufacturer, the airlines, and airworthiness authorities. Aging fleet support includes timely development of supplemental structural inspection documents applicable to selected older airplanes, teardown inspections of high-time airframes retired from service, fatigue testing of older airframes, and structural surveys of more than 130 airplanes operated throughout the world. Lessons learned from these activities are incorporated in service bulletin recommendations, production line modifications, and design manual updates. An overview of traditional Boeing fleet support activities and the anticipated benefits for future generations of commercial airplanes based on the continuous design improvement process are presented.

  7. Structural integrity of future aging airplanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Jack F.; Goranson, Ulf G.

    1992-07-01

    A multitude of design considerations is involved in ensuring the structural integrity of Boeing jet transports that have common design concepts validated by extensive analyses, tests, and three decades of service. As airplanes approach their design service objectives, the incidences of fatigue and corrosion may become widespread. Continuing airworthiness of the aging jet fleet requires diligent performance from the manufacturer, the airlines, and airworthiness authorities. Aging fleet support includes timely development of supplemental structural inspection documents applicable to selected older airplanes, teardown inspections of high-time airframes retired from service, fatigue testing of older airframes, and structural surveys of more than 130 airplanes operated throughout the world. Lessons learned from these activities are incorporated in service bulletin recommendations, production line modifications, and design manual updates. An overview of traditional Boeing fleet support activities and the anticipated benefits for future generations of commercial airplanes based on the continuous design improvement process are presented.

  8. Goldeye, Hiodon alosoides, in Lake Oahe: abundance, age, growth, maturity, food, and the fishery, 1963-69

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Grant L.; Nelson, William R.

    1974-01-01

    Reproductive success was relatively consistent, and adequate to maintain species abundance at a nearly constant level, during 1963-69. Both abundance and growth in length increased from the lower to the upper portion of the reservoir. In most characteristics -- growth in length, length-weight relation, age at maturity, and food -- goldeye in Lake Oahe were similar to those from other Missouri River impoundments. Experimental gill nets samples all lengths (range 80-460 mm; median, 320 mm) of goldeye, bottom trawls sampled mostly small fish, (median, 215 mm) and trap nets large ones (median, 345 mm). Commercial gill nets were highly size selective (median, 375 mm); fish of ages IV-VII made up 90% of the catch. Survival rates were 57 to 52% for ages II-X. Estimated survival rates for ages V-IX declined from 44 to 35% after the inception of the commercial fishery in 1966. The peak commercial catch was 151,432 kg (1.2 kg/hectare) in 1969. Unless recruitment declines, the population can support a fishery of that magnitude.

  9. Functional and structural syntax networks in aging.

    PubMed

    Antonenko, Daria; Brauer, Jens; Meinzer, Marcus; Fengler, Anja; Kerti, Lucia; Friederici, Angela D; Flöel, Agnes

    2013-12-01

    Language abilities are known to deteriorate in aging, possibly related to decreased functional and structural connectivity within specialized brain networks. Here, we investigated syntactic ability in healthy young and older adults using a comprehensive assessment of behavioral performance, task-independent functional (FC) and structural brain connectivity (SC). Seed-based FC originating from left pars opercularis (part of Broca's area) known to support syntactic processes was assessed using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, and SC using fractional anisotropy from diffusion weighted imaging, in the dorsally located superior longitudinal and the ventrally located uncinate fasciculi (SLF, UF) and forceps minor. Young compared to older adults exhibited superior syntactic performance and stronger FC within the mainly left-lateralized syntax network, which was beneficial for performance. In contrast, in older adults, FC within the mainly left-lateralized syntax network was reduced and did not correlate with performance; inter-hemispheric FC to right inferior frontal and angular gyri was detrimental for performance. In both groups, performance was positively correlated with inter-hemispheric SC. For intra-hemispheric SC, performance correlated with structural integrity of SLF in young adults and with integrity of UF in older adults. Our data show that reduced syntactic ability in older adults is associated with decreased FC within dedicated syntax networks. Moreover, young adults showed an association of syntactic ability with structural integrity of the dorsal tract, while older adults rely more on ventral fibers. In sum, our study provided novel insight into the relationship between connectivity and syntactic performance in young and older adults. In addition to elucidating age-related changes in syntax networks and their behavioral relevance, our results contribute to a better understanding of age-related changes in functional and structural brain

  10. High-precision abundances of elements in solar twin stars. Trends with stellar age and elemental condensation temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, P. E.

    2015-07-01

    Context. High-precision determinations of abundances of elements in the atmospheres of the Sun and solar twin stars indicate that the Sun has an unusually low ratio between refractory and volatile elements. This has led to the suggestion that the relation between abundance ratios, [X/Fe], and elemental condensation temperature, TC, can be used as a signature of the existence of terrestrial planets around a star. Aims: HARPS spectra with S/N ≳ 600 for 21 solar twin stars in the solar neighborhood and the Sun (observed via reflected light from asteroids) are used to determine very precise (σ ~ 0.01 dex) differential abundances of elements in order to see how well [X/Fe] is correlated with TC and other parameters such as stellar age. Methods: Abundances of C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, and Y are derived from equivalent widths of weak and medium-strong spectral lines using MARCS model atmospheres with parameters determined from the excitation and ionization balance of Fe lines. Non-LTE effects are considered and taken into account for some of the elements. In addition, precise (σ ≲ 0.8 Gyr) stellar ages are obtained by interpolating between Yonsei-Yale isochrones in the log g - Teff diagram. Results: It is confirmed that the ratio between refractory and volatile elements is lower in the Sun than in most of the solar twins (only one star has the same [X/Fe]-TC distribution as the Sun), but for many stars, the relation between [X/Fe] and TC is not well defined. For several elements there is an astonishingly tight correlation between [X/Fe] and stellar age with amplitudes up to ~0.20 dex over an age interval of eight Gyr in contrast to the lack of correlation between [Fe/H] and age. While [Mg/Fe] increases with age, the s-process element yttrium shows the opposite behavior meaning that [Y/Mg] can be used as a sensitive chronometer for Galactic evolution. The Na/Fe and Ni/Fe ratios are not well correlated with stellar age, but define a tight Ni

  11. Sodium-pump gene-expression, protein abundance and enzyme activity in isolated nephron segments of the aging rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Pnina; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Popovtzer, Mordecai M

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with alteration in renal tubular functions, including sodium handling and concentrating ability. Na-K-ATPase plays a key role in driving tubular transport, and we hypothesized that decreased concentrating ability of the aging kidney is due in part to downregulation of Na-K-ATPase. In this study, we evaluated Na and K balance, aldosterone levels, and Na-K-ATPase gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in aging rat kidney. Na-K-ATPase activity (assayed microfluorometrically), mRNA (RT-PCR), and protein abundance (immunoblotting) were quantitated in the following isolated nephron segments: PCT, PST, MTAL, DCT, and CCD from 2, 8, 15, and 24 month-old-rats. In the course of aging, creatinine clearance decreased from 0.48 ± 0.02 mL/min/100 g BW to 0.28 ± 0.06 (P < 0.001) and aldosterone decreased from 23.6 ± 0.8 ng/dL to 13.2 ± 0.6 (P < 0.001). Serum Na+ and K+ increased by 4.0% and 22.5%, respectively. Na-K-ATPase activity, mRNA, and protein abundance of the α1 subunit displayed similar trends in all assayed segments; increasing in PCT and PST; decreasing in MTAL and DCT; increasing in CCD: in PCT they increased by 40%, 75%, and 250%, respectively; while in PST they increased by 80%, 50%, and 100%, respectively (P < 0.001). In MTAL they declined by 36%, 24%, and 34%, respectively, and in DCT by 38%, 59%, and 60%, respectively (P < 0.001). They were higher in CCD by 110%, 115%, and 246%, respectively (P < 0.001). Rats maintained Na/K balance; however with a steady state elevated serum K+. These results reveal quantitative changes in axial distribution of Na-K-ATPase at the level of gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in the nephrons of aging animals and may explain, in part, the pathophysiology of the senescent kidney. PMID:26056060

  12. Coronal Thermal Structure and Abundance of Super-Metal-Rich Late-Type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy; Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report covers the NASA grant NAG5-9943 for Cycle 1 XMM Guest Observer Program. The project is entitled 'Coronal Thermal Structure and Abundances of Super-Metal-Rich Late-Type Stars.' This observation is for grating spectroscopy of 30 Ari, a late-type star with very high metallicity (about twice solar). The goal is to use extreme cases to help understand how abundances change from the photosphere to the corona. The target was obtained by XMM-Newton on 2001 January 16 for 28000 sec. Data processing could not proceed until last fall because the SAS RGS software did not work. A poster was presented at the conference 'New Visions of the X-ray Universe in the XMM-Newton and Chandra Era,' held in Noordwijk 26-30 November 2001. The paper was entitled,'Coronal Abundances and Thermal Structure of the Super-Metal-Rich Star 30 Ari,'. The poster presented analysis of EPIC and RGS data to determine the individual abundances from the star and the emission measure distribution as a function of temperature. Results were compared with previous results on this star by our team using ASCA data.

  13. Global Patterns of Abundance, Diversity and Community Structure of the Aminicenantes (Candidate Phylum OP8)

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Ibrahim F.; Davis, James P.; Youssef, Noha H.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the global patterns of abundance, diversity, and community structure of members of the Aminicenantes (candidate phylum OP8). Our aim was to identify the putative ecological role(s) played by members of this poorly characterized bacterial lineages in various ecosystems. Analysis of near full-length 16S rRNA genes identified four classes and eight orders within the Aminicenantes. Within 3,134 datasets comprising ∼1.8 billion high throughput-generated partial 16S rRNA genes, 47,351 Aminicenantes-affiliated sequences were identified in 913 datasets. The Aminicenantes exhibited the highest relative abundance in hydrocarbon-impacted environments, followed by marine habitats (especially hydrothermal vents and coral-associated microbiome samples), and aquatic, non-marine habitats (especially in terrestrial springs and groundwater samples). While the overall abundance of the Aminicenantes was higher in low oxygen tension as well as non-saline and low salinity habitats, it was encountered in a wide range of oxygen tension, salinities, and temperatures. Analysis of the community structure of the Aminicenantes showed distinct patterns across various datasets that appear to be, mostly, driven by habitat variations rather than prevalent environmental parameters. We argue that the detection of the Aminicenantes across environmental extremes and the observed distinct community structure patterns reflect a high level of intraphylum metabolic diversity and adaptive capabilities that enable its survival and growth in a wide range of habitats and environmental conditions. PMID:24637619

  14. Community structure, abundance, and activity of methanotrophs in the Zoige wetland of the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Yun, Juanli; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Ma, Anzhou; Guo, Hongguang; Wang, Yanfen; Zhang, Hongxun

    2012-05-01

    The Zoige wetland of the Tibetan Plateau is a high-altitude tundra wetland and one of the biggest methane emission centers in China. In this study, methanotrophs with respect to community structure, abundance, and activity were investigated in peat soils collected in the vicinity of different marshland plants that dominate different regions of the wetland, including Polygonum amphibium, Carex muliensis, and Eleocharis valleculosa (EV). 16S rRNA gene and particulate methane monooxygenase gene (pmoA) clone library sequence data indicated the presence of methanotrophs with two genera, Methylobacter and Methylocystis. Methylococcus, like pmoA gene sequences, were also retrieved and showed low similarity to those from Methylococcus spp. and thus indicates the existence of novel methanotrophs in the Zoige wetland. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays were used to measure the abundance of methantrophs and detected 10(7) to 10(8) of total pmoA gene copies per gram dry weight of soil in the three marshes. Group-specific qPCR and reverse transcriptase qPCR results found that the Methylobacter genus dominates the wetland, and Methylocystis methanotrophs were less abundant, although this group of methanotrophs was estimated to be more active according to mRNA/DNA ratio. Furthermore, EV marsh demonstrated the highest methanotrophs abundance and activity among the three marshes investigated. Our study suggests that both type I and type II methanotrophs contribute to the methane oxidation in the Zoige wetland. PMID:22159497

  15. Influences on the structure of suburban ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) communities and the abundance of Tapinoma sessile.

    PubMed

    Toennisson, T A; Sanders, N J; Klingeman, W E; Vail, K M

    2011-12-01

    Urbanization can alter the organization of ant communities and affect populations of urban pest ants. In this study, we sampled ant communities in urban and suburban yards to understand the habitat factors that shape these communities and influence the abundance of a common pest species, Tapinoma sessile (Say). We used pitfall traps to sample ant communities and a combination of pitfall traps and baiting to collect T. sessile at 24 sites in Knoxville, TN. In total, we collected 46 ant species. Ant species richness ranged from seven to 24 species per yard. Ant species richness tended to be lowest near houses, whereas T. sessile abundance was highest near houses. The best predictors of ant species richness in yards were canopy cover and presence of leaf litter: ant species richness peaked at mid-levels of canopy cover and was negatively correlated with the presence of leaf litter. Tapinoma sessile abundance increased with presence of logs, boards, or landscaping timbers and leaf litter in yards. Our results indicate that ant communities and the abundance of particular pest species in these urban and suburban landscapes are shaped by many of the same factors that structure ant communities in less anthropogenically disturbed environments. PMID:22217754

  16. Spatial and seasonal patterns in abundance and age-composition of Calanus finmarchicus in the Gulf of Maine and on Georges Bank: 1977 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meise, C. J.; O'Reilly, J. E.

    ubiquitously very abundant (> 10 4/10 m 2), and diverged from September to December. C. finmarchicus stage distribution in the GB-GOM area was highly negatively correlated with mean water column temperature during the stratified season. This seemed more related to the hydrography of the region, which isolates warmer well mixed Georges Bank from the Gulf of Maine and the stratified areas on the Bank, than to temperature, because Calanus abundances decline on the Bank before water temperatures exceed their preferences. A large part of the spatial and seasonal variation in C. finmarchicus abundance and age structure appears to be tightly coupled to major hydrographic regimes and to major circulation patterns in the region. There was a sharp ecotone between well-mixed Georges Bank and the Gulf of Maine as defined by C. finmarchicus abundance patterns and life history distributions. The ecotone is present year-round but is most apparent during the stratified season (May-October), when thermohaline density gradients and the near-surface current jet along the northern flank are generally strongest. The Gulf of Maine had the highest abundances of C. finmarchicus, and lowest spatial and seasonal variation in the region, while tidally mixed Georges Banks displayed the opposite pattern. This indication of stable population centers in the Gulf of Maine would make it a major source of Calanus in the region, particularly during March-April. Distributional patterns also suggest a strong Calanus influence from Scotian Shelf water in northern Gulf of Maine and on the southern flank of Georges Bank.

  17. Relative abundance, age, growth, and fecundity of grubby Myoxocephalus aenaeus in Niantic River and Niantic Bay, Long Island Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roseman, Edward F.; Tomichek, Christine A.; Maynard, Tracy; Burton, Jennifer A.

    2005-04-01

    Grubby ( Myoxocephalus aenaeus, Cottidae) is a common benthic fish of inshore waters and estuaries of eastern Long Island Sound; however, little information exists on their life history or population demographics. This study utilised a long-term data series (1976-2002) to assess grubby life history and population demographics and explores trends in the Niantic River and Niantic Bay populations. In addition, we examined the age, size, and fecundity of adult grubby in 2001-02 to determine the population characteristics in the region. Mean grubby catch per unit effort (CPUE) in Niantic Bay ranged from 0.4 per trawl in 1976 to 2.9 per trawl in 1984 while river CPUE ranged from 0.4 per trawl in 1977 to 7.6 per trawl in 1989. Catch of grubby in bottom trawls varied seasonally with highest CPUE occurring in winter. Highest entrainment of grubby larvae occurred in 2001 while the lowest entrainment observed was in 1991. Four age classes, 0+ through III+, were derived from otolith analysis (N = 51) although length frequency analysis suggested the possibility of older fish in the population. The total number of eggs in ovaries ranged from 286 to 16 451 for grubby (N = 64) between 52 mm and 155 mm TL. Results of this study indicated a decline in abundance of adult grubby over the 26-year period, possibly related to concurrent declines in eelgrass ( Zostera marina) abundance and/or increased water temperature.

  18. Links between Ammonia Oxidizer Community Structure, Abundance, and Nitrification Potential in Acidic Soils ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huaiying; Gao, Yangmei; Nicol, Graeme W.; Campbell, Colin D.; Prosser, James I.; Zhang, Limei; Han, Wenyan; Singh, Brajesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification and is performed by both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB). However, the environmental drivers controlling the abundance, composition, and activity of AOA and AOB communities are not well characterized, and the relative importance of these two groups in soil nitrification is still debated. Chinese tea orchard soils provide an excellent system for investigating the long-term effects of low pH and nitrogen fertilization strategies. AOA and AOB abundance and community composition were therefore investigated in tea soils and adjacent pine forest soils, using quantitative PCR (qPCR), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and sequence analysis of respective ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes. There was strong evidence that soil pH was an important factor controlling AOB but not AOA abundance, and the ratio of AOA to AOB amoA gene abundance increased with decreasing soil pH in the tea orchard soils. In contrast, T-RFLP analysis suggested that soil pH was a key explanatory variable for both AOA and AOB community structure, but a significant relationship between community abundance and nitrification potential was observed only for AOA. High potential nitrification rates indicated that nitrification was mainly driven by AOA in these acidic soils. Dominant AOA amoA sequences in the highly acidic tea soils were all placed within a specific clade, and one AOA genotype appears to be well adapted to growth in highly acidic soils. Specific AOA and AOB populations dominated in soils at particular pH values and N content, suggesting adaptation to specific niches. PMID:21571885

  19. Biotic Stress Shifted Structure and Abundance of Enterobacteriaceae in the Lettuce Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Erlacher, Armin; Cardinale, Massimiliano; Grube, Martin; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Lettuce cultivars are not only amongst the most popular vegetables eaten raw, they are also involved in severe pathogen outbreaks world-wide. While outbreaks caused by Enterobacteriaceae species are well-studied, less is known about their occurrence in natural environments as well as the impact of biotic stress. Here, we studied the ecology of the human health-relevant bacterial family Enterobacteriaceae and assessed the impact of biotic disturbances by a soil-borne phytopathogenic fungus and Gastropoda on their structure and abundance in mesocosm and pot experiments. Using a polyphasic approach including network analyses of 16S rRNA gene amplicon libraries, quantitative PCR and complementary fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) microscopy we found substantial yet divergent Enterobacteriaceae communities. A similar spectrum of 14 genera was identified from rhizo- and phyllospheres but the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae was on average 3fold higher in phyllosphere samples. Both stress factors shifted the bacterial community of the leaf habitat, characterized by increases of species abundance and diversity. For the rhizosphere, we observed significant structural shifts of Enterobacteriaceae communities but also a high degree of resilience. These results could be confirmed by FISH microscopy but it was difficult to visualize phyllosphere communities. Additional inoculation experiments with Escherichia coli as model revealed their presence below the wax layer as well as in the endosphere of leaves. The observed presence influenced by stress factors and the endophytic life style of Enterobacteriaceae on lettuce can be an important aspect in relation to human health. PMID:25714833

  20. Abundance and community structure of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in reservoir sediment and adjacent soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Cui; Bao, Linlin; Xie, Shuguang

    2014-02-01

    Ammonia oxidation is an important process for global nitrogen cycling. Both ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) can be the important players in nitrification process. However, their relative contribution to nitrification remains controversial. This study investigated the abundance and community structure of AOA and AOB in sediment of Miyun Reservoir and adjacent soils. Quantitative PCR assays indicated that the highest AOA abundance occurred in unplanted riparian soil, followed by reservoir sediment, reed-planted riparian soil and agricultural soil. The AOB community size in agricultural soil was much larger than that in the other habitats. Large variations in the structures of AOA and AOB were also observed among the different habitats. The abundance of Nitrosospira-like AOB species were detected in the agricultural soil and reservoir sediment. Pearson's correlation analysis showed the AOB diversity had positive significant correlations with pH and total nitrogen, while the AOA diversity might be negatively affected by nitrate nitrogen and ammonia nitrogen. This work could add new insights towards nitrification in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:23949998

  1. Biotic stress shifted structure and abundance of Enterobacteriaceae in the lettuce microbiome.

    PubMed

    Erlacher, Armin; Cardinale, Massimiliano; Grube, Martin; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Lettuce cultivars are not only amongst the most popular vegetables eaten raw, they are also involved in severe pathogen outbreaks world-wide. While outbreaks caused by Enterobacteriaceae species are well-studied, less is known about their occurrence in natural environments as well as the impact of biotic stress. Here, we studied the ecology of the human health-relevant bacterial family Enterobacteriaceae and assessed the impact of biotic disturbances by a soil-borne phytopathogenic fungus and Gastropoda on their structure and abundance in mesocosm and pot experiments. Using a polyphasic approach including network analyses of 16S rRNA gene amplicon libraries, quantitative PCR and complementary fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) microscopy we found substantial yet divergent Enterobacteriaceae communities. A similar spectrum of 14 genera was identified from rhizo- and phyllospheres but the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae was on average 3fold higher in phyllosphere samples. Both stress factors shifted the bacterial community of the leaf habitat, characterized by increases of species abundance and diversity. For the rhizosphere, we observed significant structural shifts of Enterobacteriaceae communities but also a high degree of resilience. These results could be confirmed by FISH microscopy but it was difficult to visualize phyllosphere communities. Additional inoculation experiments with Escherichia coli as model revealed their presence below the wax layer as well as in the endosphere of leaves. The observed presence influenced by stress factors and the endophytic life style of Enterobacteriaceae on lettuce can be an important aspect in relation to human health. PMID:25714833

  2. Tillage Management and Seasonal Effects on Denitrifier Community Abundance, Gene Expression and Structure over Winter.

    PubMed

    Tatti, Enrico; Goyer, Claudia; Burton, David L; Wertz, Sophie; Zebarth, Bernie J; Chantigny, Martin; Filion, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Tillage effects on denitrifier communities and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were mainly studied during the growing season. There is limited information for the non-growing season, especially in northern countries where winter has prolonged periods with sub-zero temperatures. The abundance and structure of the denitrifier community, denitrification gene expression and N2O emissions in fields under long-term tillage regimes [no-tillage (NT) vs conventional tillage (CT)] were assessed during two consecutive winters. NT exerted a positive effect on nirK and nosZ denitrifier abundance in both winters compared to CT. Moreover, the two contrasting managements had an opposite influence on nirK and nirS RNA/DNA ratios. Tillage management resulted in different denitrifier community structures during both winters. Seasonal changes were observed in the abundance and the structure of denitrifiers. Interestingly, the RNA/DNA ratios were greater in the coldest months for nirK, nirS and nosZ. N2O emissions were not influenced by management but changed over time with two orders of magnitude increase in the coldest month of both winters. In winter of 2009-2010, emissions were mainly as N2O, whereas in 2010-2011, when soil temperatures were milder due to persistent snow cover, most emissions were as dinitrogen. Results indicated that tillage management during the growing season induced differences in denitrifier community structure that persisted during winter. However, management did not affect the active cold-adapted community structure. PMID:25851442

  3. Age-structured mark-recapture analysis: A virtual-population-analysis-based model for analyzing age-structured capture-recapture data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coggins, L.G., Jr.; Pine, William E., III; Walters, C.J.; Martell, S.J.D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new model to estimate capture probabilities, survival, abundance, and recruitment using traditional Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methods within a standard fisheries virtual population analysis framework. This approach compares the numbers of marked and unmarked fish at age captured in each year of sampling with predictions based on estimated vulnerabilities and abundance in a likelihood function. Recruitment to the earliest age at which fish can be tagged is estimated by using a virtual population analysis method to back-calculate the expected numbers of unmarked fish at risk of capture. By using information from both marked and unmarked animals in a standard fisheries age structure framework, this approach is well suited to the sparse data situations common in long-term capture-recapture programs with variable sampling effort. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  4. AGE-STRUCTURAL TRANSITION IN INDONESIA

    PubMed Central

    Kreager, Philip; Schröder-Butterfill, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    This paper responds to recent calls for empirical study of the impact of age-structural transition. It begins by reviewing evidence of cohort oscillations in twentieth-century Indonesia, which indicates that current older generations are likely to have smaller numbers of children on whom they may rely than generations before and after them. However, to assess whether the imbalances implied by this situation are actually influencing people’s lives, attention to further factors shaping the availability and reliability of younger generations, notably differences in socio-economic status and in patterns of inter-generational support flows, is required. Community-level Indonesian data confirm that elders in the lower social strata are child-poor. Social structural and family network patterns, however, have a greater influence on the availability of inter-generational support than cohort differentials. PMID:27158254

  5. Verrucomicrobial community structure and abundance as indicators for changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Soares, Tielle; Rossetto, Raffaella; van Veen, Johannes Antonie; Tsai, Siu Mui; Kuramae, Eiko Eurya

    2015-09-01

    Here we show that verrucomicrobial community structure and abundance are extremely sensitive to changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprint and real-time quantitative PCR assay were used to analyze changes in verrucomicrobial communities associated with contrasting soil nutrient conditions in tropical regions. In case study Model I ("Slash-and-burn deforestation") the verrucomicrobial community structures revealed disparate patterns in nutrient-enriched soils after slash-and-burn deforestation and natural nutrient-poor soils under an adjacent primary forest in the Amazonia (R = 0.819, P = 0.002). The relative proportion of Verrucomicrobia declined in response to increased soil fertility after slash-and-burn deforestation, accounting on average, for 4 and 2 % of the total bacterial signal, in natural nutrient-poor forest soils and nutrient-enriched deforested soils, respectively. In case study Model II ("Management practices for sugarcane") disparate patterns were revealed in sugarcane rhizosphere sampled on optimal and deficient soil fertility for sugarcane (R = 0.786, P = 0.002). Verrucomicrobial community abundance in sugarcane rhizosphere was negatively correlated with soil fertility, accounting for 2 and 5 % of the total bacterial signal, under optimal and deficient soil fertility conditions for sugarcane, respectively. In nutrient-enriched soils, verrucomicrobial community structures were related to soil factors linked to soil fertility, such as total nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and sum of bases, i.e., the sum of calcium, magnesium and potassium contents. We conclude that community structure and abundance represent important ecological aspects in soil verrucomicrobial communities for tracking the changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility under tropical environmental conditions. PMID:26184407

  6. High abundance of small zoobenthos around biogenic structures in tidal sediments of the Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reise, K.

    1981-12-01

    On the tidal flats of the island of Sylt (eastern part of the North Sea) the quantity of micro- and meiofauna associated with shoots of seagrass (Zostera noltii), with infaunal bivalves (Macoma balthica), and with tubes and burrows of polychaetes (Pygospio elegans, Pectinaria koreni, Nereis diversicolor, Nereis virens, Arenicola marina) was found to add up to 5 to 33 % of the overall abundance. These structures, taken together, account for 10 to 50 % of the faunal abundance on an average tidal flat at Sylt. The quantitative effect of biogenic structures at the sediment surface (casts and funnels) is small compared to that of tubes and burrows penetrating the anaerobic subsurface layer. In providing stable oxic microenvironments these elite structures frequently bring together more individuals than occur in the entire reducing sediment below surface. Faunal composition of irrigated dwellings of large infauna is different from that of the oxic surface sediment. The common denominator of all elite structures of the subsurface is an oxic halo. Burrows without such a halo are unattractive. There is no evidence that owners of burrows prey on their smaller inmates.

  7. Forest Structure and Roe Deer Abundance Predict Tick-Borne Encephalitis Risk in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Rizzoli, Annapaola; Hauffe, Heidi C.; Tagliapietra, Valentina; Neteler, Markus; Rosà, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Background The Western Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus often causes devastating or lethal disease. In Europe, the number of human TBE cases has increased dramatically over the last decade, risk areas are expanding and new foci are being discovered every year. The early localisation of new TBE foci and the identification of the main risk factors associated with disease emergence represent a priority for the public health community. Although a number of socio-economic parameters have been suggested to explain TBE upsurges in eastern Europe, the principal driving factors in relatively stable western European countries have not been identified. Methodology/Principal Findings In this paper, we analyse the correlation between the upsurge of TBE in 17 alpine provinces in northern Italy from 1992 to 2006 with climatic variables, forest structure (as a proxy for small mammal reservoir host abundance), and abundance of the principal large vertebrate tick host (roe deer), using datasets available for the last 40 years. No significant differences between the pattern of changes in climatic variables in provinces where TBE has emerged compared to provinces were no clinical TBE cases have been observed to date. Instead, the best model for explaining the increase in TBE incidence in humans in this area include changes in forest structure, in particular the ratio of coppice to high stand forest, and the density of roe deer. Conclusion/Significance Substantial changes in vegetation structure that improve habitat suitability for the main TBE reservoir hosts (small mammals), as well as an increase in roe deer abundance due to changes in land and wildlife management practices, are likely to be among the most crucial factors affecting the circulation potential of Western TBE virus and, consequently, the risk of TBE emergence in humans in western Europe. We believe our approach will be useful in predicting TBE risk on a wider scale. PMID:19183811

  8. Activity, abundance and structure of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in plateau soils.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yu; Wu, Zhen; Zhou, Qiheng; Zhao, Qun; Li, Ningning; Xie, Shuguang; Liu, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) can be involved in biotransformation of ammonia to nitrite in soil ecosystems. However, the distribution of AOA and AOB in plateau soils and influential factors remain largely unclear. In the present study, the activity, abundance and structure of ammonia oxidizers in different soils on the Yunnan Plateau were assessed using potential nitrification rates (PNRs), quantitative PCR assay and clone library analysis, respectively. Wide variation was found in both AOA and AOB communities in plateau soils. PNRs showed a significant positive correlation with AOB abundance. Both were determined by the ratio of organic carbon to nitrogen (C/N) and total phosphorous (TP). AOB could play a more important role in ammonia oxidation. AOB community diversity was likely affected by soil total nitrogen (TN) and total organic carbon (TOC) and was usually higher than AOA community diversity. Moreover, Nitrososphaera- and Nitrosospira-like organisms, respectively, were the dominant AOA and AOB in plateau soils. AOA community structure was likely shaped by TP and C/N, while AOB community structure was determined by pH. PMID:26257304

  9. Identification of Low Abundant Isomeric N-Glycan Structures in Biological Therapeutics by LC/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Li, Siyang; Li, Chen; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Xu, Wei; Chen, Yuetian; Shameem, Mohammed; Richardson, Douglas; Li, Huijuan

    2016-07-19

    An effective LC-MS based method for online characterization of low abundant structural isomers of N-linked glycans in biological therapeutics was developed. N-linked glycans of a recombinant monoclonal antibody were released by PNGase F and labeled with 2-aminobenzamide (2-AB) fluorescent tag. The labeled glycans were analyzed by online ultraperformance liquid chromatography-hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (UPLC-HILIC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). The glycan structure was characterized by MS(n) fragmentation in negative ion mode followed by identification of the signature D ions. The assignment included monosaccharide sequence and linkage information. The developed method successfully characterized structural isomers of A1G1F (assigned as terminal sialic acid attached in the 1,6 branch at 2,3 position), and A1G1F' (assigned as terminal sialic acid attached in the 1,3 branch at 2,3 position). Moreover, using the same approach, previously unknown low abundant species were identified unambiguously. One such structural isomer at low level, terminal GlcNAc of G1F+GlcNAc, was identified to be linked at the 1,6 branch. Additionally, another low level structural isomer, previously assigned as Man8 glycan, was found to be Man7+Glc glycan as its 1,3 branch containing three mannoses and one terminal glucose. The identification was further confirmed by a purified α-1,2-endomannosidase enzyme to generate the cleavage of α-1,3 linked terminal disaccharides (Man+glucose). Using this approach, different lots or different CHO produced mAbs was thoroughly examined and found that the newly identified "Man8" (Man7+Glc) was also present in different batches and in some commercially available therapeutic mAbs. PMID:27291648

  10. Indexing the relative abundance of age-0 white sturgeons in an impoundment of the lower Columbia River from highly skewed trawling data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Counihan, T.D.; Miller, A.I.; Parsley, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The development of recruitment monitoring programs for age-0 white sturgeons Acipenser transmontanus is complicated by the statistical properties of catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) data. We found that age-0 CPUE distributions from bottom trawl surveys violated assumptions of statistical procedures based on normal probability theory. Further, no single data transformation uniformly satisfied these assumptions because CPUE distribution properties varied with the sample mean (??(CPUE)). Given these analytic problems, we propose that an additional index of age-0 white sturgeon relative abundance, the proportion of positive tows (Ep), be used to estimate sample sizes before conducting age-0 recruitment surveys and to evaluate statistical hypothesis tests comparing the relative abundance of age-0 white sturgeons among years. Monte Carlo simulations indicated that Ep was consistently more precise than ??(CPUE), and because Ep is binomially rather than normally distributed, surveys can be planned and analyzed without violating the assumptions of procedures based on normal probability theory. However, we show that Ep may underestimate changes in relative abundance at high levels and confound our ability to quantify responses to management actions if relative abundance is consistently high. If data suggest that most samples will contain age-0 white sturgeons, estimators of relative abundance other than Ep should be considered. Because Ep may also obscure correlations to climatic and hydrologic variables if high abundance levels are present in time series data, we recommend ??(CPUE) be used to describe relations to environmental variables. The use of both Ep and ??(CPUE) will facilitate the evaluation of hypothesis tests comparing relative abundance levels and correlations to variables affecting age-0 recruitment. Estimated sample sizes for surveys should therefore be based on detecting predetermined differences in Ep, but data necessary to calculate ??(CPUE) should also be

  11. Spatial variability in the abundance, composition, and age of organic matter in surficial sediments of the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Eglinton, Timothy; Yang, Liyang; Deng, Bing; Montluçon, Daniel; Zhang, Jing

    2013-12-01

    the sources and fate of organic matter (OM) sequestered in continental margin sediments is of importance because the mode and efficiency of OM burial impact the carbon cycle and the regulation of atmospheric CO2 over long time scales. We carried out molecular (lignin-derived phenols from CuO oxidation), elemental, isotopic (δ13C, Δ14C), and sedimentological (grain size and mineral surface area) analyses in order to examine spatial variability in the abundance, source, age of surface sediments of the East China Sea. Higher terrigenous organic matter values were found in the main accumulating areas of fluvial sediments, including the Changjiang (Yangtze) Estuary and Zhejiang-Fujian coastal zone. Isotopic and biomarker data suggest that the sedimentary OM in the inner shelf region was dominated by aged (Δ14C = -423 ± 42‰) but relatively lignin-rich OM (Λ = 0.94 ± 0.57 mg/100 mg OC) associated with fine-grained sediments, suggesting important contributions from soils. In contrast, samples from the outer shelf, while of similar age (Δ14 C = -450 ± 99‰), are lignin poor (Λ = 0.25 ± 0.14 mg/100 mg OC) and associated with coarse-grained material. Regional variation of lignin phenols and OM ages indicates that OM content is fundamentally controlled by hydrodynamic sorting (especially, sediment redistribution and winnowing) and in situ primary production. Selective sorption of acid to aldehyde in clay fraction also modified the ratios of lignin phenols. The burial of lignin in East China Sea is estimated to be relatively efficient, possibly as a consequence of terrigenous OM recalcitrance and/or relatively high sedimentation rates in the Changjiang Estuary and the adjacent Zhejing-Fujian mud belt.

  12. Simultaneous mapping of chemical abundances and magnetic field structure in Ap stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueftinger, T.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic A stars represent about 5 highly ordered, very stable and often very strong magnetic fields. They frequently show variations in both brightness and spectral line profiles that are synchronised to stellar rotation. Those variations are believed to be produced by atomic diffusion operating in the stellar atmospheres which have become stabilized by multi-kG magnetic fields. In recent years, with the development and application of the Doppler and magnetic-Doppler imaging techniques and the availability of high-precision spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric data, it has became possible to map the chemical abundances and magnetic field structures of Ap stars simultaneously and in increasing detail, based on full Stokes vector observations. I review the state-of-the-art understanding pf Ap star spots and their relation to magnetic fields, the development of Doppler and magnetic-Doppler imaging into one of the most powerful remote sensing methods for astrophysics, and the physics of Ap stars atmospheres that we can deduce from simultaneous mapping of magnetic field structure and chemical abundances.

  13. Effect of altitude and season on microbial activity, abundance and community structure in Alpine forest soils.

    PubMed

    Siles, José A; Cajthaml, Tomas; Minerbi, Stefano; Margesin, Rosa

    2016-03-01

    In the current context of climate change, the study of microbial communities along altitudinal gradients is especially useful. Only few studies considered altitude and season at the same time. We characterized four forest sites located in the Italian Alps, along an altitude gradient (545-2000 m a.s.l.), to evaluate the effect of altitude in spring and autumn on soil microbial properties. Each site in each season was characterized with regard to soil temperature, physicochemical properties, microbial activities (respiration, enzymes), community level physiological profiles (CLPP), microbial abundance and community structure (PLFA). Increased levels of soil organic matter (SOM) and nutrients were found at higher altitudes and in autumn, resulting in a significant increase of (soil dry-mass related) microbial activities and abundance at higher altitudes. Significant site- and season-specific effects were found for enzyme production. The significant interaction of the factors site and incubation temperature for soil microbial activities indicated differences in microbial communities and their responses to temperature among sites. CLPP revealed site-specific effects. Microbial community structure was influenced by altitudinal, seasonal and/or site-specific effects. Correlations demonstrated that altitude, and not season, was the main factor determining the changes in abiotic and biotic characteristics at the sites investigated. PMID:26787774

  14. Structural health management for aging aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikegami, Roy; Haugse, Eric D.

    2001-06-01

    An effective structural health management (SHM) system can be a useful tool for making aircraft fleet management decisions ranging from individual aircraft maintenance scheduling and usage restrictions to fleet rotation strategies. This paper discusses the end-user requirements for the elements and architecture of an effective SHM system for application to both military and commercial aging aircraft fleets. The elements discussed include the sensor systems for monitoring and characterizing the health of the structure, data processing methods for interpreting sensor data and converting it into useable information, and automated methods for erroneous data detection, data archiving and information dissemination. Current and past SHM technology development/maturation efforts in these areas at the Boeing Company will be described. An evolutionary technology development strategy is developed in which the technologies needed will be matured, integrated into a vehicle health management system, and benefits established without requiring extensive changes to the end-user's existing operation and maintenance infrastructure. Issues regarding the end-user customer acceptance of SHM systems are discussed and summarized.

  15. Differences in ecological structure, function, and native species abundance between native and invaded Hawaiian streams.

    PubMed

    Holitzki, Tara M; MacKenzie, Richard A; Wiegner, Tracy N; McDermid, Karla J

    2013-09-01

    Poeciliids, one of the most invasive species worldwide, are found on almost every continent and have been identified as an "invasive species of concern" in the United States, New Zealand, and Australia. Despite their global prevalence, few studies have quantified their impacts on tropical stream ecosystem structure, function, and biodiversity. Utilizing Hawaiian streams as model ecosystems, we documented how ecological structure, function, and native species abundance differed between poeciliid-free and poeciliid-invaded tropical streams. Stream nutrient yields, benthic biofilm biomass, densities of macroinvertebrates and fish, and community structures of benthic algae, macroinvertebrates, and fish were compared between streams with and without established poeciliid populations on the island of Hawai'i, Hawaii, USA. Sum nitrate (sigmaNO3(-) = NO3(-) + NO2(-)), total nitrogen, and total organic carbon yields were eight times, six times, and five times higher, respectively, in poeciliid streams than in poeciliid-free streams. Benthic biofilm ash-free dry mass was 1.5x higher in poeciliid streams than in poeciliid-free streams. Percentage contributions of chironomids and hydroptilid caddisflies to macroinvertebrate densities were lower in poeciliid streams compared to poeciliid-free streams, while percentage contributions of Cheumatopsyche analis caddisflies, Dugesia sp. flatworms, and oligochaetes were higher. Additionally, mean densities of native gobies were two times lower in poeciliid streams than in poeciliid-free ones, with poeciliid densities being approximately eight times higher than native fish densities. Our results, coupled with the wide distribution of invasive poeciliids across Hawaii and elsewhere in the tropics, suggest that poeciliids may negatively impact the ecosystem structure, function, and native species abundance of tropical streams they invade. This underscores the need for increased public awareness to prevent future introductions and for

  16. Millimeter Observations of CS, HCO+, and CO toward Five Planetary Nebulae: Following Molecular Abundances with Nebular Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, J. L.; Cox, E. G.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2014-08-01

    Millimeter and sub-millimeter observations of CO, CS, and HCO+ have been conducted toward five planetary nebulae (PNe: K4-47, NGC 6537 (Red Spider), M2-48, NGC 6720 (Ring), and NGC 6853 (Dumbbell)), spanning an age range of 900-10,000 yr, using the Sub-Millimeter Telescope and the 12 m antenna of the Arizona Radio Observatory. The J = 5 → 4, J = 3 → 2, and J = 2 → 1 transitions of CS at 245, 147, and 98 GHz, as well as the J = 3 → 2 and J = 1 → 0 lines of HCO+ at 268 and 89 GHz, were detected toward each source. At least three rotational transitions of CO have also been observed, including the J = 6 → 5 and J = 4 → 3 lines at 691 and 461 GHz. CS had not been definitively identified previously in PNe, and new detections of HCO+ were made in four of the five nebulae. From a radiative transfer analysis of the CO and CS data, kinetic temperatures of T K ~ 10-80 K and gas densities of n(H2) ~ 0.1-1 × 106 cm-3 were determined for the molecular material in these sources. Column densities for CO, CS, and HCO+ were N tot ~ 0.2-5 × 1016 cm-2, N tot ~ 0.4-9 × 1012 cm-2, and N tot ~ 0.3-5 × 1012 cm-2, respectively, with fractional abundances, relative to H2, of f ~ 0.4-2 × 10-4, f ~ 1-4 × 10-8, and f ~ 1 × 10-8, with the exception of M2-48, which had f(HCO+) ~ 10-7. Overall, the molecular abundances do not significantly vary over a duration of 10,000 yr, in contrast to predictions of chemical models. The abundances reflect the remnant asymptotic giant branch shell material, coupled with photochemistry in the early PN phase. These observations also suggest that PNe eject substantial amounts of molecular material into the diffuse interstellar medium.

  17. Millimeter observations of CS, HCO{sup +}, and CO toward five planetary nebulae: following molecular abundances with nebular age

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J. L.; Ziurys, L. M.; Cox, E. G.

    2014-08-20

    Millimeter and sub-millimeter observations of CO, CS, and HCO{sup +} have been conducted toward five planetary nebulae (PNe: K4-47, NGC 6537 (Red Spider), M2-48, NGC 6720 (Ring), and NGC 6853 (Dumbbell)), spanning an age range of 900-10,000 yr, using the Sub-Millimeter Telescope and the 12 m antenna of the Arizona Radio Observatory. The J = 5 → 4, J = 3 → 2, and J = 2 → 1 transitions of CS at 245, 147, and 98 GHz, as well as the J = 3 → 2 and J = 1 → 0 lines of HCO{sup +} at 268 and 89 GHz, were detected toward each source. At least three rotational transitions of CO have also been observed, including the J = 6 → 5 and J = 4 → 3 lines at 691 and 461 GHz. CS had not been definitively identified previously in PNe, and new detections of HCO{sup +} were made in four of the five nebulae. From a radiative transfer analysis of the CO and CS data, kinetic temperatures of T {sub K} ∼ 10-80 K and gas densities of n(H{sub 2}) ∼ 0.1-1 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup –3} were determined for the molecular material in these sources. Column densities for CO, CS, and HCO{sup +} were N {sub tot} ∼ 0.2-5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup –2}, N {sub tot} ∼ 0.4-9 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup –2}, and N {sub tot} ∼ 0.3-5 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup –2}, respectively, with fractional abundances, relative to H{sub 2}, of f ∼ 0.4-2 × 10{sup –4}, f ∼ 1-4 × 10{sup –8}, and f ∼ 1 × 10{sup –8}, with the exception of M2-48, which had f(HCO{sup +}) ∼ 10{sup –7}. Overall, the molecular abundances do not significantly vary over a duration of 10,000 yr, in contrast to predictions of chemical models. The abundances reflect the remnant asymptotic giant branch shell material, coupled with photochemistry in the early PN phase. These observations also suggest that PNe eject substantial amounts of molecular material into the diffuse interstellar medium.

  18. Helium abundance and ionization structure in the Orion nebula: radio recombination lines observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppi, S.; Tsivilev, A. P.; Cortiglioni, S.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Sorochenko, R. L.

    2007-03-01

    Results of the Ori A HII region mapping based on hydrogen (H), helium (He) and carbon (C) Radio Recombination lines (RRL) are presented. Observations were made with the same angular resolution (2') using the 32 m VLBI dish of Medicina (Italy, 22.4 GHz) and the Pushchino RT-22 dish (Russia, 36.5 GHz). The behaviour of the ionized helium abundance, y^+, with distance from the center shows that the He+ zone size is smaller than that of H^+. Such a behaviour is different for the core and for the envelope, as well as for different directions from the center. The helium abundance, N(He)/N(H)=10.0(± 0.8)%, is measured. Derived line radial velocities, their widths and y+ data support the well-known "blister-type" structure of this HII region. LTE electron temperatures (7800-9600 K) are also measured. Appendices (Figs. 15, 16 and Sect. 4.1 "Carbon RRLs") are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Infer Metagenomic Abundance and Reveal Homologous Genomes Based on the Structure of Taxonomy Tree.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yu-Qing; Tian, Xue; Zhang, Shihua

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomic research uses sequencing technologies to investigate the genetic biodiversity of microbiomes presented in various ecosystems or animal tissues. The composition of a microbial community is highly associated with the environment in which the organisms exist. As large amount of sequencing short reads of microorganism genomes obtained, accurately estimating the abundance of microorganisms within a metagenomic sample is becoming an increasing challenge in bioinformatics. In this paper, we describe a hierarchical taxonomy tree-based mixture model (HTTMM) for estimating the abundance of taxon within a microbial community by incorporating the structure of the taxonomy tree. In this model, genome-specific short reads and homologous short reads among genomes can be distinguished and represented by leaf and intermediate nodes in the taxonomy tree, respectively. We adopt an expectation-maximization algorithm to solve this model. Using simulated and real-world data, we demonstrate that the proposed method is superior to both flat mixture model and lowest common ancestry-based methods. Moreover, this model can reveal previously unaddressed homologous genomes. PMID:26451823

  20. Preovulatory Aging In Vivo and In Vitro Affects Maturation Rates, Abundance of Selected Proteins, Histone Methylation Pattern and Spindle Integrity in Murine Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Demond, Hannah; Trapphoff, Tom; Dankert, Deborah; Heiligentag, Martyna; Grümmer, Ruth; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Delayed ovulation and delayed fertilization can lead to reduced developmental competence of the oocyte. In contrast to the consequences of postovulatory aging of the oocyte, hardly anything is known about the molecular processes occurring during oocyte maturation if ovulation is delayed (preovulatory aging). We investigated several aspects of oocyte maturation in two models of preovulatory aging: an in vitro follicle culture and an in vivo mouse model in which ovulation was postponed using the GnRH antagonist cetrorelix. Both models showed significantly reduced oocyte maturation rates after aging. Furthermore, in vitro preovulatory aging deregulated the protein abundance of the maternal effect genes Smarca4 and Nlrp5, decreased the levels of histone H3K9 trimethylation and caused major deterioration of chromosome alignment and spindle conformation. Protein abundance of YBX2, an important regulator of mRNA stability, storage and recruitment in the oocyte, was not affected by in vitro aging. In contrast, in vivo preovulatory aging led to reduction in Ybx2 transcript and YBX2 protein abundance. Taken together, preovulatory aging seems to affect various processes in the oocyte, which could explain the low maturation rates and the previously described failures in fertilization and embryonic development. PMID:27611906

  1. Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity and structural integrity during the aging process in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jian-Ching; Rebrin, Igor; Klichko, Vladimir; Orr, William C.; Sohal, Rajindar S.

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity during the aging process. {yields} Abundance of seven nuclear-encoded subunits of cytochrome c oxidase decreased with age in Drosophila. {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase is specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration. -- Abstract: The hypothesis, that structural deterioration of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a causal factor in the age-related decline in mitochondrial respiratory activity and an increase in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation, was tested in Drosophila melanogaster. CcO activity and the levels of seven different nuclear DNA-encoded CcO subunits were determined at three different stages of adult life, namely, young-, middle-, and old-age. CcO activity declined progressively with age by 33%. Western blot analysis, using antibodies specific to Drosophila CcO subunits IV, Va, Vb, VIb, VIc, VIIc, and VIII, indicated that the abundance these polypeptides decreased, ranging from 11% to 40%, during aging. These and previous results suggest that CcO is a specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration, which may have a broad impact on mitochondrial physiology.

  2. [Nonlinear effects on population dynamics related to age structure and fishery impact].

    PubMed

    Frisman, E Ia; Last, E V

    2005-01-01

    Population dynamics of commercial fish populations with an age structure was studied by the example of salmons. The relationship between the amount of catch on fishing efforts and total abundance of a stock fished is described by a nonlinear "trophic" function. Special attention is given to the analysis of population dynamics stability under conditions for maximum profit. Simulation results are compared to statistical data on the catch of Pacific salmon species in the Bering Sea. PMID:16240747

  3. Changing family structure and aging issues.

    PubMed

    Bae, H

    1987-12-01

    Rapid industrialization, adaptation of modern values, and rural-urban migration in Korea have led to the replacement of the extended family with the nuclear of conjugal family. In 1980, 13% of Korean households were 1-generational, 70% were 2-generational, 17% were 3-generational and less than 1% were 4-generational. This trend has had serious implications for the aged, who have become increasingly isolated from Korean society. Hindering the adaptation of the aged to modern society are their low educational level, rural concentration, low income, and high rate of female members. Adult children who are well educated and prosperous economically are most likely to refuse to take responsibility for aged parents. Since some 23% of the aged currently live alone, Korean society must assume some of the responsibility that has traditionally been accepted by family members. There is a need for systematic programming that takes into account the current sociodemographic circumstances of Korea's aged population. Incentives such as tax exemptions and aged care allowances should be considered to encourage children to take responsibility for their aged parents. To meet the needs of the growing number of aged who are disabled and without family support, the number of geriatric hospitals and institutions must be expanded. Also important are supplementary programs such as housekeeping services, meals on wheels, and day care. Although the expansion of social welfare programs and institutions for the aged is essential, they can not in themselves meet the emotional needs of the aged that have traditionally been served by family connectedness. PMID:12315151

  4. Higher plant Ca(2+)-ATPase: primary structure and regulation of mRNA abundance by salt.

    PubMed Central

    Wimmers, L E; Ewing, N N; Bennett, A B

    1992-01-01

    Calcium-dependent regulatory mechanisms participate in diverse developmentally, hormonally, and environmentally regulated processes, with the precise control of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration being critical to such mechanisms. In plant cells, P-type Ca(2+)-ATPases localized in the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum are thought to play a central role in regulating cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations. Ca(2+)-ATPase activity has been identified in isolated plant cell membranes, but the protein has not been characterized at the molecular level. We have isolated a partial-length cDNA (LCA1) and a complete genomic clone (gLCA13) encoding a putative endoplasmic reticulum-localized Ca(2+)-ATPase in tomato. The deduced amino acid sequence specifies a protein (Lycopersicon Ca(2+)-ATPase) of 1048 amino acids with a molecular mass of 116 kDa, eight probable transmembrane domains, and all of the highly conserved functional domains common to P-type cation-translocating ATPases. In addition, the protein shares approximately 50% amino acid sequence identify with animal sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases but less than 30% identity with other P-type ATPases. Genomic DNA blot hybridization analysis indicates that the Lycopersicon Ca(2+)-ATPase is encoded by a single gene. RNA blot hybridization analysis indicates the presence of three transcript sizes in root tissue and a single, much less abundant, transcript in leaves. Lycopersicon Ca(2+)-ATPase mRNA levels increase dramatically upon a 1-day exposure to 50 mM NaCl. Thus this report describes the primary structure of a higher-plant Ca(2+)-ATPase and the regulation of its mRNA abundance by salt stress. Images PMID:1384045

  5. Fish passage and abundance around grade control structures on incised streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.T.; Papanicolaou, A.N.; Pierce, C.L.; Dermisis, D.C.; Litvan, M.E.; Larson, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes research from separate studies of fish passage over weirs (Larson et al., 2004; Litvan, 2006; Litvan, et al., 2008a-c) and weir hydraulics (Papanicolaou and Dermisis, 2006; Papanicolaou and Dermisis, in press). Channel incision in the deep loess region of western Iowa has caused decreased biodiversity because streams have high sediment loads, altered flow regimes, lost habitat, and lost lateral connectivity with their former floodplains. In-stream grade control structures (GCS) are built to prevent further erosion, protect infrastructure, and reduce sediment loads. However, GCS can have a detrimental impact on fisheries abundance and migration, biodiversity, and longitudinal connectivity. Fish mark-recapture studies were performed on stretches of streams with and without GCS. GCS with vertical or 1:4 (rise/run) downstream slopes did not allow fish migration, but GCS with slopes ??? 1:15 did. GCS sites were characterized by greater proportions of pool habitat, maximum depths, fish biomass, slightly higher index of biotic integrity (IBI) scores, and greater macroinvertebrate abundance and diversity than non-GCS sites. After modification of three GCS, IBI scores increased and fish species exhibiting truncated distributions before were found throughout the study area. Another study examined the hydraulic performance of GCS to facilitate unimpeded fish passage by determining the mean and turbulent flow characteristics in the vicinity of the GCS via detailed, non-intrusive field tests. Mean flow depth (Y) and velocity (V) atop the GCS were critical for evaluating GCS performance. Turbulent flow measurements illustrated that certain GCS designs cause sudden constrictions which form eddies large enough to disorient fish. GCS with slopes ??? 1:15 best met the minimum requirements to allow catfish passage of a flow depth of ??? 0.31 m and a mean flow velocity of ??? 1.22 m/s. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  6. Structure and function of a mitochondrial late embryogenesis abundant protein are revealed by desiccation.

    PubMed

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Jaquinod, Michel; Mangavel, Cécile; Passirani, Catherine; Saulnier, Patrick; Manon, Stephen; Teyssier, Emeline; Payet, Nicole; Avelange-Macherel, Marie-Hélène; Macherel, David

    2007-05-01

    Few organisms are able to withstand desiccation stress; however, desiccation tolerance is widespread among plant seeds. Survival without water relies on an array of mechanisms, including the accumulation of stress proteins such as the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. These hydrophilic proteins are prominent in plant seeds but also found in desiccation-tolerant organisms. In spite of many theories and observations, LEA protein function remains unclear. Here, we show that LEAM, a mitochondrial LEA protein expressed in seeds, is a natively unfolded protein, which reversibly folds into alpha-helices upon desiccation. Structural modeling revealed an analogy with class A amphipathic helices of apolipoproteins that coat low-density lipoprotein particles in mammals. LEAM appears spontaneously modified by deamidation and oxidation of several residues that contribute to its structural features. LEAM interacts with membranes in the dry state and protects liposomes subjected to drying. The overall results provide strong evidence that LEAM protects the inner mitochondrial membrane during desiccation. According to sequence analyses of several homologous proteins from various desiccation-tolerant organisms, a similar protection mechanism likely acts with other types of cellular membranes. PMID:17526751

  7. Stratigraphy of small shield volcanoes on Venus: Criteria for determining stratigraphic relationships and assessment of relative age and temporal abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Head, James W.

    2004-10-01

    . Fifteen fields (~11%) appear to be synchronous with regional plains, and eleven fields (~8%) postdate the plains. Nine fields (~6%) display ambiguous relationships with regional plains and their relative age is uncertain, and eight fields (~6%) represent unclear cases when fields are covered by crater-related materials or by young lava flows or are not in contact with regional plains. The results of our study provide evidence for a distinct change of volcanic style from the mode of formation of globally abundant small shields to the mode of emplacement of vast regional plains in many areas on Venus. This systematic change of volcanic style appears to be inconsistent with the ``nondirectional'' or quasi steady state character of the geologic record of Venus. Although individual small shields were formed throughout the majority of the visible geologic history of Venus, in the syn- and postregional plains time the small-shields style of volcanism was significantly reduced in abundance. The shield fields that predate regional plains do not display a strong tendency to form a single group or a few groups and can be found virtually in all places on Venus. We interpret this observation to mean that these shield fields were globally distributed before the emplacement of regional plains. This interpretation means that the shield fields embayed by regional plains represent exposures of a specific, globally widespread unit, shield plains (psh). In contrast, shield fields that postdate regional plains occur preferentially in the Beta-Atla-Themis region on Venus, well known for its concentration of relatively young volcanic and tectonic activity. The spatial association of relatively young fields with the large centers of young volcanism suggests a genetic link of these fields with the formation and development of the large-scale volcanic centers. The abrupt decrease of the number of shields that postdate the formation of shield plains (psh) strongly suggests a major change of the

  8. Fluvial processes and local lithology controlling abundance, structure, and composition of mussel beds.

    PubMed

    Vannote, R L; Minshall, G W

    1982-07-01

    In the Salmon River Canyon, Idaho, the fresh-water pearl mussel, Margaritifera falcata, attains maximum density and age in river reaches where large block-boulders structurally stabilize cobbles and interstitial gravels. We hypothesize that block-boulders prevent significant bed scour during major floods, and these boulder-sheltered mussel beds, although rare, may be critical for population recruitment elsewhere within the river, especially after periodic flood scour of less protected mussel habitat. Mussel shells in Indian middens adjacent to these boulder-stabilized areas suggest that prehistoric tribes selectively exploited the high-density old-aged mussel beds. Locally, canyon reaches are aggrading with sand and gravel, and M. falcata is being replaced by Gonidea angulata. PMID:16593208

  9. Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity and structural integrity during the aging process in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jian-Ching; Rebrin, Igor; Klichko, Vladimir; Orr, William C.; Sohal, Rajindar S.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothesis, that structural deterioration of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a causal factor in the age-related decline in mitochondrial respiratory activity and an increase in H2O2 generation, was tested in Drosophila melanogaster. CcO activity and the levels of seven different nuclear DNA-encoded CcO subunits were determined at three different stages of adult life, namely, young-, middle- and old-age. CcO activity declined progressively with age by 33%. Western blot analysis, using antibodies specific to Drosophila CcO subunits IV, Va, Vb, VIb, VIc, VIIc and VIII, indicated that the abundance these polypeptides decreased, ranging from 11 to 40%, during aging. These and previous results suggest that CcO is a specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration, which may have a broad impact on mitochondrial physiology. PMID:20833144

  10. Refined phylogenetic structure of an abundant East Asian Y-chromosomal haplogroup O*-M134.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chao; Yan, Shi; Hu, Kang; Cui, Yin-Qiu; Jin, Li

    2016-02-01

    The human Y-chromosome haplogroup O-M134 is one of the most abundant paternal lineages in East Asian populations, comprising ~13% of Han Chinese males, and also common in Kazakh, Korean, Japanese, Thai and so on. Despite its considerable prevalence, its current substructure is poorly resolved with only one downstream marker (M117) previously investigated. Here we address this deficiency by investigating some single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously reported being potentially associated with O-M134 based on high-throughput DNA-sequencing data. Using a panel of 1301 Chinese males we first identified 154 haplogroup O-M134 subjects. We then investigated the phylogenetic structure within this haplogroup using 10 SNPs (F444, F629, F3451, F46, F48, F209, F2887, F3386, F1739 and F152). Two major branches were identified, O-M117 and O-F444 and the latter was further divided into two main subclades, O-F629 and O-F3451, accounting for 10.84 and 0.92% of the Han Chinese, respectively. This update of O-M134 diversification permits better resolution of male lineages in population studies of East Asia. PMID:26306641

  11. Structural aging program -- a summary of activities, results, and conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Research has been conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures. The purpose was to identify potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments. Primary program accomplishments have included formulation of a Structural Materials Information Center that contains data and information on the time variation of material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors and aging factors for 144 materials, an aging assessment methodology to identify critical structures and degradation factors that can potentially impact their performance, guidelines and evaluation criteria for use in condition assessments of reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current condition assessments and estimations of future performance of reinforced concrete nuclear power plant structures. In addition, the Structural Aging Program conducted in-depth evaluations of several nondestructive evaluation and repair-related technologies to develop guidance on their applicability.

  12. The abundant symmetry structure of hierarchies of nonlinear equations obtained by reciprocal links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carillo, Sandra; Fuchssteiner, Benno

    1989-07-01

    Explicit computation for a Kawamoto-type equation shows that there is a rich associated symmetry structure for four separate hierarchies of nonlinear integrodifferential equations. Contrary to the general belief that symmetry groups for nonlinear evolution equations in 1+1 dimensions have to be Abelian, it is shown that, in this case, the symmetry group is noncommutative. Its semisimple part is isomorphic to the affine Lie algebra A(1)1 associated to sl(2,C). In two of the additional hierarchies that were found, an explicit dependence of the independent variable occurs. Surprisingly, the generic invariance for the Kawamoto-type equation obtained in Rogers and Carillo [Phys. Scr. 36, 865 (1987)] via a reciprocal link to the Möbius invariance of the singularity equation of the Kaup-Kupershmidt (KK) equation only holds for one of the additional hierarchies of symmetry groups. Thus the generic invariance is not a universal property for the complete symmetry group of equations obtained by reciprocal links. In addition to these results, the bi-Hamiltonian formulation of the hierarchy is given. A direct Bäcklund transformation between the (KK) hierarchy and the hierarchy of singularity equation for the Caudrey-Dodd-Gibbon-Sawada-Kotera equation is exhibited: This shows that the abundant symmetry structure found for the Kawamoto equation must exist for all fifth-order equations, which are known to be completely integrable since these equations are connected either by Bäcklund transformations or reciprocal links. It is shown that similar results must hold for all hierarchies emerging out of singularity hierarchies via reciprocal links. Furthermore, general aspects of the results are discussed.

  13. Constraining the Thermal Structure, Abundances, and Dynamics of the Exoplanet HD 209458b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellem, Robert; Griffith, Caitlin A.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Swain, Mark R.; Knutson, Heather A.

    2014-11-01

    HD 209458b has been extensively studied from the UV to IR as it is one of the brightest of the transiting exoplanets and has a large planet-to-star contrast. However its thermal profile and abundances remain constrained to at best 3 orders of magnitude (Line et al. 2014), largely due to a lack of spectral coverage. We expand HD 209458b’s wavelength coverage with ground and space observations. Our ground H, K, and L-band secondary eclipse spectroscopy, which explores HD 209458b’s emission mechanisms, is motivated by multiple detections of bright 3.3 μm emission on HD 189733b, resembling the CH4 ν3 band and potentially non-LTE fluorescence (Swain et al. 2010; Waldmann et al. 2012). CH4 fluorescence has previously been observed on Titan (Kim et al. 2000), Saturn, and Jupiter (Drossart et al. 1999; Brown et al. 2003), thereby likening exoplanets to their Solar System counterparts. We find that the hotter HD 209458b lacks to ~3σ a bright 3.3 μm feature as seen on HD 189733b, which is consistent with thermochemical equilibrium predictions (Moses et al. 2011). We measure HD 209458b’s longitudinally-varying thermal structure with Spitzer/IRAC full-orbit phase curve observations, and revise a previous 4.5 μm emission measurement downward by ˜35%. This change is significant because the high 4.5 and 5.8 μm brightness temperatures were interpreted as a thermal inversion (e.g., Line et al. 2014). While our 4.5 μm photometric emission point does not require an inversion, the shape of the phase curve, particularly the location and brightness temperature of the hot spot, suggests that HD 209458b has a dayside inversion. However the nightside is much cooler than predicted by a GCM. This discrepancy is potentially due to the GCM lacking quenching where vertical mixing outpaces reaction rates, causing increased CO and CH4 abundances at higher altitudes. We explore evidence for CH4 quenching with IRAC 3.6 micron data, which overlap the wings of the CH4 ν3 band, allowing

  14. Constraining the Thermal Structure, Abundances, and Dynamics of the Exoplanet HD 209458b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellem, Robert; Griffith, Caitlin Ann; Lewis, Nikole; Swain, Mark R.; Knutson, Heather

    2015-01-01

    HD 209458b has been extensively studied from the UV to IR as it is one of the brightest of the transiting exoplanets and has a large planet-to-star contrast. However its thermal profile and abundances remain constrained to at best 3 orders of magnitude (Line et al. 2014), largely due to a lack of spectral coverage. We expand HD 209458b's wavelength coverage with ground and space observations. Our ground H, K, and L-band secondary eclipse spectroscopy, which explores HD 209458b's emission mechanisms, is motivated by multiple detections of bright 3.3 μm emission on HD 189733b, resembling the CH4 ν3 band and potentially non-LTE fluorescence (Swain et al. 2010; Waldmann et al. 2012). CH4 fluorescence has previously been observed on Titan (Kim et al. 2000), Saturn, and Jupiter (Drossart et al. 1999; Brown et al. 2003), thereby likening exoplanets to their Solar System counterparts. We find that the hotter HD 209458b lacks to ~3σ a bright 3.3 μm feature as seen on HD 189733b, which is consistent with thermochemical equilibrium predictions (Moses et al. 2011). We measure HD 209458b's longitudinally-varying thermal structure with Spitzer/IRAC full-orbit phase curve observations, and revise a previous 4.5 μm emission measurement downward by ˜35%. This change is significant because the high 4.5 and 5.8 μm brightness temperatures were interpreted as a thermal inversion (e.g., Line et al. 2014). While our 4.5 μm photometric emission point does not require an inversion, the shape of the phase curve, particularly the location and brightness temperature of the hot spot, suggests that HD 209458b has a dayside inversion. However the nightside is much cooler than predicted by a GCM. This discrepancy is potentially due to the GCM lacking quenching where vertical mixing outpaces reaction rates, causing increased CO and CH4 abundances at higher altitudes. We explore evidence for CH4 quenching with IRAC 3.6 micron data, which overlap the wings of the CH4 ν3 band, allowing us to

  15. Picoplankton and virioplankton abundance and community structure in Pearl River Estuary and Daya Bay, South China.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhixin; Huang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xia

    2015-06-01

    By using flow cytometry techniques, we investigated the abundance and composition of the heterotrophic prokaryotes, virioplankton and picophytoplankton community in the Pearl River Estuary and Daya Bay in the summer of 2012. We identified two subgroups of prokaryotes, high nucleic acid (HNA) and low nucleic acid (LNA), characterized by different nucleic acid contents. HNA abundance was significantly correlated with larger phytoplankton and Synechococcus (Syn) abundance, which suggested the important role of organic substrates released from primary producers on bacterial growth. Although LNA did not show any association with environmental variables, it was a vital component of the microbial community. In contrast to previous studies, the total virioplankton concentration had a poor relationship with nutrient availability. The positive relationship between large-sized phytoplankton abundance and the V-I population confirmed that V-I was a phytoplankton-infecting viral subgroup. Although the V-II group (bacteriophages) was dominant in the virioplankton community, it was not related with prokaryotic abundance, which indicated factors other than hosts controlling V-II abundance or the uncertainty of virus-host coupling. With respect to the picophytoplankton community, our results implied that river input exerted a strong limitation to Syn distribution in the estuary, while picoeukaryotes (Euk) were numerically less abundant and showed a quite different distribution pattern from that of Syn, and hence presented ecological properties distinct from Syn in our two studied areas. PMID:26040741

  16. Diversity, Abundance and Community Structure of Benthic Macro- and Megafauna on the Beaufort Shelf and Slope

    PubMed Central

    Nephin, Jessica; Juniper, S. Kim; Archambault, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Diversity and community patterns of macro- and megafauna were compared on the Canadian Beaufort shelf and slope. Faunal sampling collected 247 taxa from 48 stations with box core and trawl gear over the summers of 2009–2011 between 50 and 1,000 m in depth. Of the 80 macrofaunal and 167 megafaunal taxa, 23% were uniques, present at only one station. Rare taxa were found to increase proportional to total taxa richness and differ between the shelf ( 100 m) where they tended to be sparse and the slope where they were relatively abundant. The macrofauna principally comprised polychaetes with nephtyid polychaetes dominant on the shelf and maldanid polychaetes (up to 92% in relative abundance/station) dominant on the slope. The megafauna principally comprised echinoderms with Ophiocten sp. (up to 90% in relative abundance/station) dominant on the shelf and Ophiopleura sp. dominant on the slope. Macro- and megafauna had divergent patterns of abundance, taxa richness ( diversity) and diversity. A greater degree of macrofaunal than megafaunal variation in abundance, richness and diversity was explained by confounding factors: location (east-west), sampling year and the timing of sampling with respect to sea-ice conditions. Change in megafaunal abundance, richness and diversity was greatest across the depth gradient, with total abundance and richness elevated on the shelf compared to the slope. We conclude that megafaunal slope taxa were differentiated from shelf taxa, as faunal replacement not nestedness appears to be the main driver of megafaunal diversity across the depth gradient. PMID:25007347

  17. Nuclear Structure Data for the Present Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglin, Coral M.

    2005-05-01

    The US Nuclear Data Program maintains and provides easy and free access to several comprehensive databases that assist scientists to sift through and assess the vast quantity of published nuclear structure and decay data. These databases are an invaluable asset for nuclear-science experimentalists and theorists alike, and the recommended values provided for nuclear properties such as decay modes, level energies and lifetimes, and radiation properties can also be of great importance to specialists in other fields such as medicine, geophysics, and reactor design. The Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) contains experimental nuclear structure data for all known nuclides, evaluated by the US nuclear data program evaluators in collaboration with a number of international data groups; the Nuclear Science Reference (NSR) database provides complementary bibliographic information; the Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data Listing (XUNDL) exists to enable rapid access to experimental nuclear-structure data compiled from the most recent publications (primarily in high-spin physics). This paper presents an overview of the nuclear structure and decay data available through these databases, with emphasis on recent and forthcoming additions to and presentations of the available material.

  18. Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1992-03-01

    Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

  19. Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1992-03-01

    Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

  20. Communication Breakdown: The Impact of Ageing on Synapse Structure

    PubMed Central

    Petralia, Ronald S.; Mattson, Mark P.; Yao, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired synaptic plasticity is implicated in the functional decline of the nervous system associated with ageing. Understanding the structure of ageing synapses is essential to understanding the functions of these synapses and their role in the ageing nervous system. In this review, we summarize studies on ageing synapses in vertebrates and invertebrates, focusing on changes in morphology and ultrastructure. We cover different parts of the nervous system, including the brain, the retina, the cochlea, and the neuromuscular junction. The morphological characteristics of aged synapses could shed light on the underlying molecular changes and their functional consequences. PMID:24495392

  1. Age effect on subcortical structures in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Goodro, Matt; Sameti, Mohammad; Patenaude, Brian; Fein, George

    2012-01-01

    Cross-sectional age effects in normal control volunteers were investigated in 8 subcortical structures: lateral ventricles, thalamus, caudate, putamen, pallidum, hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens. Two hundred and twenty six control subjects, ranging in age from 19 to 85 years, were scanned on a 1.5T GE system (n = 184) or a 3.0T Siemens system (n = 42). Cranium-size adjusted subcortical structure volumes were estimated using FSL’s FIRST software, which is fully automated. Significant age effects were found for all volumes when the entire age range was analyzed, however the older subjects (60–85 years of age) showed a stronger correlation between age and structural volume for the ventricles, hippocampus, amygdala and accumbens than middle-aged (35–60 years of age) subjects. Middle-aged subjects were studied at both sites, and age effects in these groups were comparable, despite differences in magnet strength and acquisition systems. This agreement lends support to the validity of the image analysis tools and procedures used in the present study. PMID:22863654

  2. Chromatin structure and transposable elements in organismal aging

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jason G.; Helfand, Stephen L.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic regulatory mechanisms are increasingly appreciated as central to a diverse array of biological processes, including aging. An association between heterochromatic silencing and longevity has long been recognized in yeast, and in more recent years evidence has accumulated of age-related chromatin changes in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, and mouse model systems, as well as in the tissue culture-based replicative senescence model of cell aging. In addition, a number of studies have linked expression of transposable elements (TEs), as well as changes in the RNAi pathways that cells use to combat TEs, to the aging process. This review summarizes the recent evidence linking chromatin structure and function to aging, with a particular focus on the relationship of heterochromatin structure to organismal aging. PMID:24363663

  3. Localizing Age-Related Individual Differences in a Hierarchical Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2004-01-01

    Data from 33 separate studies were combined to create an aggregate data set consisting of 16 cognitive variables and 6832 different individuals who ranged between 18 and 95 years of age. Analyses were conducted to determine where in a hierarchical structure of cognitive abilities individual differences associated with age, gender, education, and…

  4. Skate assemblage on the eastern Patagonian Shelf and Slope: structure, diversity and abundance.

    PubMed

    Arkhipkin, A; Brickle, P; Laptikhovsky, V; Pompert, J; Winter, A

    2012-04-01

    The eastern Patagonian Shelf and continental slope of the south-west Atlantic Ocean support a high biodiversity and abundance of skates. In this study, meso-scale differences in the assemblages, spatial and seasonal distributions of skates are revealed among six habitat zones of the eastern Patagonian Shelf characterized by distinctive oceanographic conditions. Most skates belonged to temperate fauna, and their abundance was much greater in habitats occupied by temperate waters (north-western outer shelf) or mixed waters (northern slope) than in habitats occupied by sub-Antarctic waters (SASW) (south-eastern outer shelf and southern slope). Sub-Antarctic skates were not abundant on the shelf even in habitats occupied by SASW, occurring mainly in deep areas of the lower continental slope. The majority of temperate skates migrated seasonally, shifting northward in winter and spreading southward with warming waters in summer. Most temperate species had two peaks in female maturity (mainly spring and autumn) and spawned in the same habitats where they fed. It is hypothesized that the high biodiversity and abundance of skates on the Patagonian Shelf and Slope are due to the practical absence of their natural competitors, flatfishes, which occupy similar eco-niches elsewhere. PMID:22497404

  5. Emergence and Abundance of Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Bt Cornfields With Structured and Seed Blend Refuges.

    PubMed

    Hughson, Sarah A; Spencer, Joseph L

    2015-02-01

    To slow evolution of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) resistance to Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner) corn hybrids, non-Bt "refuges" must be planted within or adjacent to Bt cornfields, allowing susceptible insects to develop without exposure to Bt toxins. Bt-susceptible adults from refuges are expected to find and mate with resistant adults that have emerged from Bt corn, reducing the likelihood that Bt-resistant offspring are produced. The spatial and temporal distribution of adults in four refuge treatments (20, 5, and 0% structured refuges and 5% seed blend) and adjacent soybean fields was compared from 2010 to 2012. Adult emergence (adults/trap/day) from refuge corn in structured refuge treatments was greater than that from Bt corn, except during the post-pollination period of corn phenology when emergence from refuge and Bt plants was often the same. Abundance of free-moving adults was greatest in and near refuge rows in structured refuge treatments during vegetative and pollination periods. By post-pollination, adult abundance became evenly distributed. In contrast, adult abundance in 5% seed blends and 0% refuges was evenly distributed, or nearly so, across plots throughout the season. The persistent concentration of adults in refuge rows suggests that structured refuge configurations may not facilitate the expected mixing of adults from refuge and Bt corn. Seed blends produce uniform distributions of adults across the field that may facilitate mating between Bt and refuge adults and ultimately delay the evolution of Bt resistance. PMID:26470111

  6. Demographic analysis from summaries of an age-structured population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Royle, J. Andrew; Hatfield, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    Demographic analyses of age-structured populations typically rely on life history data for individuals, or when individual animals are not identified, on information about the numbers of individuals in each age class through time. While it is usually difficult to determine the age class of a randomly encountered individual, it is often the case that the individual can be readily and reliably assigned to one of a set of age classes. For example, it is often possible to distinguish first-year from older birds. In such cases, the population age structure can be regarded as a latent variable governed by a process prior, and the data as summaries of this latent structure. In this article, we consider the problem of uncovering the latent structure and estimating process parameters from summaries of age class information. We present a demographic analysis for the critically endangered migratory population of whooping cranes (Grus americana), based only on counts of first-year birds and of older birds. We estimate age and year-specific survival rates. We address the controversial issue of whether management action on the breeding grounds has influenced recruitment, relating recruitment rates to the number of seventh-year and older birds, and examining the pattern of variation through time in this rate.

  7. Aging and demographic plasticity in response to experimental age structures in honeybees (Apis mellifera L)

    PubMed Central

    Linford, Robyn; Gardner, Preston; Coleman, Jennifer; Fine, Kari

    2008-01-01

    Honeybee colonies are highly integrated functional units characterized by a pronounced division of labor. Division of labor among workers is mainly age-based, with younger individuals focusing on in-hive tasks and older workers performing the more hazardous foraging activities. Thus, experimental disruption of the age composition of the worker hive population is expected to have profound consequences for colony function. Adaptive demography theory predicts that the natural hive age composition represents a colony-level adaptation and thus results in optimal hive performance. Alternatively, the hive age composition may be an epiphenomenon, resulting from individual life history optimization. We addressed these predictions by comparing individual worker longevity and brood production in hives that were composed of a single age cohort, two distinct age cohorts, and hives that had a continuous, natural age distribution. Four experimental replicates showed that colonies with a natural age composition did not consistently have a higher life expectancy and/or brood production than the single cohort or double cohort hives. Instead, a complex interplay of age structure, environmental conditions, colony size, brood production, and individual mortality emerged. A general trade-off between worker life expectancy and colony productivity was apparent, and the transition from in-hive tasks to foraging was the most significant predictor of worker lifespan irrespective of the colony age structure. We conclude that the natural age structure of honeybee hives is not a colony-level adaptation. Furthermore, our results show that honeybees exhibit pronounced demographic plasticity in addition to behavioral plasticity to react to demographic disturbances of their societies. PMID:18663386

  8. A Long-Term Comparison of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout Abundance and Size Structure in Their Historical Range in Idaho.

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Kevin A.; Schill, Daniel J.; Elle, F. Steven

    2002-05-23

    We compared estimates of population abundance and size structure for Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri obtained by electrofishing 77 stream segments across southeastern Idaho in the 1980s and again in 1999-2000 to test whether populations of Yellowstone cutthroat trout had changed. Sites sampled in the 1980s were relocated in 1999-2000 by using maps and photographs or by finding original site-boundary stakes, so that the same reach of stream was sampled during both periods. Abundance of Yellowstone cutthroat trout longer than 10 cm did not change, averaging 41 fish/100 m of stream during both the 1980s and 1999-2000. The proportion of the total catch of trout composed of Yellowstone cutthroat trout also did not change, averaging 82% in the 1980s and 78% in 1999-2000. At the 48 sites where size structure could be estimated for both periods, the proportion of Yellowstone cutthroat trout that were 10-20 cm long declined slightly (74% versus 66%), but the change was due entirely to the shift in size structure at the Teton River sites. The number of sites that contained rainbow trout O. mykiss or cutthroat trout 3 rainbow trout hybrids rose from 23 to 37, but the average proportion of the catch composed of rainbow trout and hybrids did not increase (7% in both the 1980s and 1999-2000). Although the distribution and abundance of Yellowstone cutthroat trout have been substantially reduced in Idaho over the last century, our results indicate that Yellowstone cutthroat trout abundance and size structure in Idaho have remained relatively stable at a large number of locations for the last 10-20 years. The expanding distribution of rainbow trout and hybrids in portions of the upper Snake River basin, however, calls for additional monitoring and active management actions.

  9. Further understanding of aged composite and adhesively bonded structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslehurst, Rikard B.; Baird, John P.

    1996-11-01

    As the application of advanced composite materials and adhesively bonded components becomes increasingly numerous in aircraft structures, so is the number of aircraft containing such structures that can be classified in the aging aircraft category. The effect of environmental and in- service aging of such structures is not well known or understood, neither have NDE techniques been able to satisfactorily qualify and quantify the loss of structural integrity due to the aging process. This paper will present the latest developments in the practical use of a field portable holographic interferometric testing system. The system results, known as holographic interferograms, provide a better understanding of how a structure is behaving under realistic loads in the presence of defects, damage and material property aging. The system has been applied to a variety of defects in composite and adhesive bondlines, as well as artificial environmental aging of these materials. The holographic interferograms produced form these investigations will be briefly reviewed and their impact on structural integrity of the component discussed.

  10. Impact of herbicides on the abundance and structure of indigenous beta-subgroup ammonia-oxidizer communities in soil microcosms.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y J; Hussain, A K; Stephen, J R; Mullen, M D; White, D C; Peacock, A

    2001-11-01

    In this study, mixtures of five herbicide-formulated products (atrazine, dicamba, fluometuron, metolachlor, and sulfentrazone) were applied to soil microcosm columns in increasing concentrations. The toxic impact of herbicides on the indigenous beta-subclass Proteobacteria autotrophic ammonia-oxidizer (beta-AAO) community was assessed. The beta-AAO population abundances were estimated by competitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the gene amoA, encoding the alpha-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase. Community structure was examined by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis targeting 16S rDNA with band excision and sequence analysis, and by analysis of amoA gene fragment clone libraries. The 16S rDNA analyses showed that a single ribotype of Nitrosospira cluster 3 was the dominant beta-AAO in all treatments. At a finer scale, amoA clone library analysis suggested a shift in community structure corresponding to the 100-ppm application. Competitive PCR indicated significant differences between treatments. The control exhibited relatively stable population abundance over the time period examined. The 10-ppm treatment induced a population increase, but a significant decrease was induced by the 100-ppm application. At 1,000 ppm, the ammonia-oxidizer population dropped below the method detection limit by the first sampling point. An impact on ammonia oxidizers resulting from the application of herbicides was observed, both in abundance and community structure. PMID:11699770

  11. Dissecting simulated disc galaxies - I. The structure of mono-age populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martig, Marie; Minchev, Ivan; Flynn, Chris

    2014-08-01

    We study seven simulated disc galaxies, three with a quiescent merger history, and four with mergers in their last 9 Gyr of evolution. We compare their structure at z = 0 by decomposing them into `mono-age populations' (MAPs) of stars within 500 Myr age bins. All studied galaxies undergo a phase of merging activity at high redshift, so that stars older than 9 Gyr are found in a centrally concentrated component, while younger stars are mostly found in discs. We find that most MAPs have simple exponential radial and vertical density profiles, with a scaleheight that typically increases with age. Because a large range of merger histories can create populations with simple structures, this suggests that the simplicity of the structure of mono-abundance populations observed in the Milky Way by Bovy et al. is not necessarily a direct indicator of a quiescent history for the Milky Way. Similarly, the anticorrelation between scalelength and scaleheight does not necessarily imply a merger-free history. However, mergers produce discontinuities between thin and thick disc components, and jumps in the age-velocity relation. The absence of a structural discontinuity between thin and thick disc observed in the Milky Way would seem to be a good indicator that no merger with a mass ratio larger than 1:15-1:10 occurred in the last 9 Gyr. Mergers at higher redshift might nevertheless be necessary to produce the thickest, hottest components of the Milky Way's disc.

  12. Variation in abundance and community structure of particle-attached and free-living bacteria in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangtao; Wei, Bingbing; Wang, Jiani; Liu, Ying; Dasgupta, Shamik; Zhang, Li; Fang, Jiasong

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria play a crucial role in the biological transfer of carbon in the ocean, especially in the transformation of particulate organic carbon (POC) to dissolved organic carbon (DOC), yet little information is available for their abundance and community structures in mesopelagic and bathypelagic waters. Here we present results of our investigation on the spatial variations of abundance and community composition of the particle-attached (PA) and free-living (FL) bacterial assemblages at different depths (500 m, 800 m, and 1500 m) in the South China Sea (SCS). Our results showed that the abundance of FL bacteria was an order of magnitude higher than that of PA bacteria. The relative abundance of FL bacteria increased from 82% at 500 m to 93% at 1500 m. In all cases, the FL bacteria assemblages were more diverse than the PA fraction. The PA bacterial assemblage was dominated by members of the Rhodobacterales of the α-Proteobacteria and the Alteromonadales of the γ-Proteobacteria. In contrast, the FL bacteria assemblages displayed distinctive spatial heterogeneity and were dominant by different phylotypes at different depths. However, certain bacterial taxa of the α- and γ-Proteobacteria co-occurred in both the FL and PA fractions, with proportions being varied with depth. These results highlight the coexistence of particle-attached and free-living bacteria specialists and generalists, and provide valuable information in understanding the role of different bacterial assemblages in the deep-ocean carbon cycle.

  13. Relationships between river discharge and abundance of age 0 redhorses (Moxostoma spp.) in the Oconee River, Georgia, USA, with implications for robust redhorse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, R.; Jennings, Cecil A.; Peterson, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    Robust redhorse (Moxostoma robustum) and notchlip redhorse (M. collapsum) are two species of redhorses that reside in the lower Oconee River, Georgia. Robust redhorse is listed as a state endangered species in Georgia and North Carolina, and attempts to investigate factors affecting its reproductive success have met with limited success. Therefore, catch of robust redhorse young were combined with catch of notchlip redhorse to increase sample size. These congeners with similar spawning repertoire were assumed to respond similarly to environmental conditions. River discharge during spawning and rearing seasons may affect abundance of both redhorses in the lower Oconee River. An information-theoretic approach was used to evaluate the relative support of models relating abundance of age 0 redhorses to monthly discharge statistics that represented magnitude, timing, duration, variability and frequency of river discharge events for April through June 1995–2006. The best-approximating model indicated a negative relationship between the abundance of redhorses and mean maximum river discharge and the number of high pulses during June as well as a positive relationship with intermediate duration of low flows during April–June. This model is 9.6 times more plausible than the next best-fitting model, which revealed a negative relationship between the abundance of redhorses and mean maximum river discharge during May and the number of high pulses during June as well as a positive relationship between abundance and intermediate duration of low flows during April–June. Management implications from the results indicate low-stable flows for at least a 2-week period during spawning and rearing may increase reproductive success of robust and notchlip redhorses.

  14. The lumbar extradural structure changes with increasing age.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, T; Hirabayashi, Y; Shimizu, R; Saitoh, K; Fukuda, H; Mitsuhata, H

    1997-02-01

    We have examined the extradural space using a flexible extraduroscope in 74 patients undergoing extradural anaesthesia at the L2-3 interspace. Extraduroscopy showed that the extradural space becomes widely patent and the fatty tissue in the extradural space diminishes with increasing age. We postulate that these age-related structural changes may affect the spread of local anaesthetic in the extradural space. PMID:9068330

  15. Moist convection and the vertical structure and water abundance of Jupiter's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Del Genio, Anthony D.; Mcgrattan, Kevin B.

    1990-01-01

    The cumulative effects of an ensemble of moist convective plumes on a conditionally unstable atmosphere are predicted by a model of moist convection on Jupiter in which the heating/cooling and drying/moistening of the environment occur through (1) compensating subsidence, (2) detrainment of updraft air at cloud tops, and (3) the evaporation and melting of falling condensate. Parahydrogen is transported as a passive tracer. Pure moist convective, mixed moist-dry convective, and primarily dry convective regimes are possible, depending on the assumed deep-water abundance, efficiency of condensate evaporation, and initial temperature profile.

  16. Nematode diversity, abundance and community structure 50 years after the formation of the volcanic island of Surtsey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva-Makulec, K.; Bjarnadottir, B.; Sigurdsson, B. D.

    2014-10-01

    The soil nematode fauna can give important insights into soil development and other habitat changes that occur during primary succession. We investigated the generic composition, density, distribution and community structure of nematodes 50 years after the formation of a pristine volcanic island, Surtsey, Iceland. Part of the island has received additional nutrient inputs from seagulls breeding there since 1985, while the reminder has been much less affected and is at present found at a different successional sere. In total, 25 genera of nematodes were identified, of which 14 were reported on Surtsey for the first time. Nematode communities were more diverse in the more infertile area outside the gull colony, where 24 genera were found, compared to 18 inside. The trophic structure of the nematode communities showed relatively higher abundance of fungal feeders in the infertile areas, but relatively more bacterial- and plant-feeders inside the colony. Nematode abundance in surface soil was, however, significantly higher within the gull colony, with 16.7 ind. cm-2 compared to 3.6 ind. cm-2 outside. A multivariate analysis indicated that the nematode abundance and distribution on Surtsey were most strongly related to the soil C : N ratio, soil acidity, plant cover and biomass, soil temperature and soil depth.

  17. Exploring the vertical age structure of the Galactic disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Luca

    While in external or high-redshift galaxies we can only measure integrated stellar properties at best, the Milky Way offers us the unique opportunity to study its individual baryonic components, including stars. We use oscillations measured in red giant stars by the Kepler satellite to derive stellar ages and explore the vertical age structure across few kpc of the Milky Way disc. We find that old stars dominate at increasing Galactic heights, whereas closer to the plane a rich zoology of ages exists. The age distribution of stars shows a smooth distribution over the last 10 Gyr, which together with a flat age-metallicity relation is consistent with a quiescent evolution for the Milky Way disc since a redshift of about two.

  18. Exploring the vertical age structure of the Galactic disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, Luca; Silva Aguirre, Victor; Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Stello, Dennis; Huber, Daniel; Serenelli, Aldo; Schoenrich, Ralph; Asplund, Martin; Feltzing, Sofia

    2015-08-01

    While in external or high-redshift galaxies we can only measure integrated stellar properties at best, the Milky Way offers us the unique opportunity to study its individual baryonic components, including stars. We use oscillations measured in giant stars by the Kepler satellite to derive stellar ages and explore the vertical age structure across few kpc of the Milky Way disc. We find that old stars dominate at increasing Galactic heights, whereas closer to the plane a rich zoology of ages exists. The age distribution of stars shows a smooth decline over the last 10 Gyr, which together with a flat age-metallicity relation is consistent with a quiescent evolution for the Milky Way disc since a redshift of about two.

  19. Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

  20. Abundance of phosphorylated Apis mellifera CREB in the honeybee's mushroom body inner compact cells varies with age.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Katrin B; Heufelder, Karin; Kersting, Isabella; Eisenhardt, Dorothea

    2016-04-15

    Hymenopteran eusociality has been proposed to be associated with the activity of the transcription factor CREB (cAMP-response element binding protein). The honeybee (Apis mellifera) is a eusocial insect displaying a pronounced age-dependent division of labor. In honeybee brains, CREB-dependent genes are regulated in an age-dependent manner, indicating that there might be a role for neuronal honeybee CREB (Apis mellifera CREB, or AmCREB) in the bee's division of labor. In this study, we further explore this hypothesis by asking where in the honeybee brain AmCREB-dependent processes might take place and whether they vary with age in these brain regions. CREB is activated following phosphorylation at a conserved serine residue. An increase of phosphorylated CREB is therefore regarded as an indicator of CREB-dependent transcriptional activation. Thus, we here examine the localization of phosphorylated AmCREB (pAmCREB) in the brain and its age-dependent variability. We report prominent pAmCREB staining in a subpopulation of intrinsic neurons of the mushroom bodies. In these neurons, the inner compact cells (IC), pAmCREB is located in the nuclei, axons, and dendrites. In the central bee brain, the IC somata and their dendritic region, we observed an age-dependent increase of pAmCREB. Our results demonstrate the IC to be candidate neurons involved in age-dependent division of labor. We hypothesize that the IC display a high level of CREB-dependent transcription that might be related to neuronal and behavioral plasticity underlying a bee's foraging behavior. PMID:26355639

  1. Effects of Flow on Structure and Abundances in Multispecies Solar Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Dawn D.

    2004-03-01

    We investigate the effects of large-scale bulk flows on coronal abundances using a multispecies numerical model. The model assumes that electrons, protons, and helium are in thermal equilibrium and constitute the bulk of the coronal plasma. Thermal diffusion and Coulomb friction are included. Temperature profiles for the bulk component and for each ion species are assumed, so the model reduces to a solution of mass and force balance for each component. We further assume that the bulk component has an upward bulk velocity at the base, and that ion flow speeds along field lines are negligible relative to the bulk flow. Coulomb coupling of the electrons and ions induces drag that counteracts the tendency of the ions to gravitationally settle. In regions of small ∇T, such as the outer regions of the corona, Coulomb drag is the only significant force counteracting gravitational settling in this model. We find that relatively modest bulk flows of tens of km s-1 can enhance ion abundances by 2-3 orders of magnitude over their values in low- or no-flow cases.

  2. Mind-Reading Ability and Structural Connectivity Changes in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Cabinio, Monia; Rossetto, Federica; Blasi, Valeria; Savazzi, Federica; Castelli, Ilaria; Massaro, Davide; Valle, Annalisa; Nemni, Raffaello; Clerici, Mario; Marchetti, Antonella; Baglio, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The Mind-Reading ability through the eyes is an important component of the affective Theory of Mind (ToM), which allows people to infer the other’s mental state from the eye gaze. The aim of the present study was to investigate to which extent age-associated structural brain changes impact this ability and to determine if this association is related to executive functions in elderly subjects. For this purpose, Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to determine both gray matter and white matter (WM) areas associated with aging. The resulting areas have been included in a subsequent correlation analysis to detect the brain regions whose structure was associated with the Mind-Reading ability through the eyes, assessed with the Italian version of the “Reading the Mind in the Eyes” (RME) test, in a sample of 36 healthy subjects ranging from 24 to 79 years of age. The analysis resulted in three important findings: (1) the performance to the RME test is relatively stable across the decades 20–70 (despite a slight decrease of this ability with aging) and independent from executive functions; (2) structural brain imaging demonstrated the involvement of a great number of cortical ToM areas for the execution of the RME test: the bilateral precentral gyrus, the bilateral posterior insula, the left superior temporal gyrus and the left inferior frontal gyrus, which also showed a significant volume decrease with age; (3) an age and task-related decline in WM connectivity on left fronto-temporal portion of the brain. Our results confirm the age-related structural modifications of the brain and show that these changes have an influence on the Mind-Reading ability through the eyes. PMID:26635702

  3. Mind-Reading Ability and Structural Connectivity Changes in Aging.

    PubMed

    Cabinio, Monia; Rossetto, Federica; Blasi, Valeria; Savazzi, Federica; Castelli, Ilaria; Massaro, Davide; Valle, Annalisa; Nemni, Raffaello; Clerici, Mario; Marchetti, Antonella; Baglio, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The Mind-Reading ability through the eyes is an important component of the affective Theory of Mind (ToM), which allows people to infer the other's mental state from the eye gaze. The aim of the present study was to investigate to which extent age-associated structural brain changes impact this ability and to determine if this association is related to executive functions in elderly subjects. For this purpose, Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to determine both gray matter and white matter (WM) areas associated with aging. The resulting areas have been included in a subsequent correlation analysis to detect the brain regions whose structure was associated with the Mind-Reading ability through the eyes, assessed with the Italian version of the "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" (RME) test, in a sample of 36 healthy subjects ranging from 24 to 79 years of age. The analysis resulted in three important findings: (1) the performance to the RME test is relatively stable across the decades 20-70 (despite a slight decrease of this ability with aging) and independent from executive functions; (2) structural brain imaging demonstrated the involvement of a great number of cortical ToM areas for the execution of the RME test: the bilateral precentral gyrus, the bilateral posterior insula, the left superior temporal gyrus and the left inferior frontal gyrus, which also showed a significant volume decrease with age; (3) an age and task-related decline in WM connectivity on left fronto-temporal portion of the brain. Our results confirm the age-related structural modifications of the brain and show that these changes have an influence on the Mind-Reading ability through the eyes. PMID:26635702

  4. Heterogeneity of macrozoobenthic assemblages within a Zostera noltii seagrass bed: diversity, abundance, biomass and structuring factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Hugues; de Montaudouin, Xavier; Lucas, Aurélien; Chardy, Pierre

    2004-09-01

    The macrobenthic fauna community of a 70-km 2Zostera noltii seagrass bed (Arcachon bay, France) was studied by sampling 49 stations systematically. A total of 126 taxa were identified. Cluster Analysis based on χ2 distance showed that in this apparently homogeneous habitat, four distinct macrobenthic communities could be identified. Multiple Discriminant Analysis highlighted the major contribution of the overlying water mass as a forcing variable, and, to a lesser extent, of tidal level and Z. noltii's below-ground parts. Seven stations did not constitute any conspicuous group, and were characterized by a low biomass of leaf (<28 g DW m -2), considered as the lowest value to constitute a Z. noltii community. Less than 24% of the seagrass bed was situated in more oceanic waters and at a quite low tidal level. In this relatively stable environment, the macrofauna community was characterized by a high species richness (mean = 39) and a moderate density and high biomass (12 638 individuals m -2 and 25 g AFDW m -2, respectively). Annelids dominated, particularly the oligochaetes. When physical constraints increased (emersion or brackish water conditions), diversity decreased, abundance and biomass increased. The seagrass bed (55%) was flooded with highly fluctuating waters in term of temperature and salinity, here species richness was low (mean = 27) but abundance and biomass were high (24 384 individuals m -2 and 28 g AFDW m -2, respectively), with a dominance of molluscs. The meadow (7%) was in external waters but at a higher tidal level (2.4 m vs 1.8 m above medium low tide level). This community was characterized by the particularly high density (41 826 individuals m -2) and dominance of oligochaetes (79% of total abundance). Species richness was high (mean = 37) here. A fourth community, extending over 12% of the meadow was dominated by the gastropod Hydrobia ulvae but could not be linked to a specific forcing variable. This study confirmed the almost

  5. The impact of aging on gray matter structural covariance networks.

    PubMed

    Montembeault, Maxime; Joubert, Sven; Doyon, Julien; Carrier, Julie; Gagnon, Jean-François; Monchi, Oury; Lungu, Ovidiu; Belleville, Sylvie; Brambati, Simona Maria

    2012-11-01

    Previous anatomical volumetric studies have shown that healthy aging is associated with gray matter tissue loss in specific cerebral regions. However, these studies may have potentially missed critical elements of age-related brain changes, which largely exist within interrelationships among brain regions. This magnetic resonance imaging research aims to assess the effects of aging on the organization of gray matter structural covariance networks. Here, we used voxel-based morphometry on high-definition brain scans to compare the patterns of gray matter structural covariance networks that sustain different sensorimotor and high-order cognitive functions among young (n=88, mean age=23.5±3.1 years, female/male=55/33) and older (n=88, mean age=67.3±5.9 years, female/male=55/33) participants. This approach relies on the assumption that functionally correlated brain regions show correlations in gray matter volume as a result of mutually trophic influences or common experience-related plasticity. We found reduced structural association in older adults compared with younger adults, specifically in high-order cognitive networks. Major differences were observed in the structural covariance networks that subserve the following: a) the language-related semantic network, b) the executive control network, and c) the default-mode network. Moreover, these cognitive functions are typically altered in the older population. Our results indicate that healthy aging alters the structural organization of cognitive networks, shifting from a more distributed (in young adulthood) to a more localized topological organization in older individuals. PMID:22776455

  6. Abundant mitochondrial DNA variation and world-wide population structure in humpback whales.

    PubMed

    Baker, C S; Perry, A; Bannister, J L; Weinrich, M T; Abernethy, R B; Calambokidis, J; Lien, J; Lambertsen, R H; Ramírez, J U; Vasquez, O

    1993-09-01

    Hunting during the last 200 years reduced many populations of mysticete whales to near extinction. To evaluate potential genetic bottlenecks in these exploited populations, we examined mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from 90 individual humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) representing six subpopulations in three ocean basins. Comparisons of relative nucleotide and nucleotype diversity reveal an abundance of genetic variation in all but one of the oceanic subpopulations. Phylogenetic reconstruction of nucleotypes and analysis of maternal gene flow show that current genetic variation is not due to postexploitation migration between oceans but is a relic of past population variability. Calibration of the rate of control region evolution across three families of whales suggests that existing humpback whale lineages are of ancient origin. Preservation of preexploitation variation in humpback whales may be attributed to their long life-span and overlapping generations and to an effective, though perhaps not timely, international prohibition against hunting. PMID:8367488

  7. Task-specific stability of abundant systems: Structure of variance and motor equivalence.

    PubMed

    Mattos, D; Schöner, G; Zatsiorsky, V M; Latash, M L

    2015-12-01

    Our main goal was to test a hypothesis that transient changes in performance of a steady-state task would result in motor equivalence. We also estimated effects of visual feedback on the amount of reorganization of motor elements. Healthy subjects performed two variations of a four-finger pressing task requiring accurate production of total pressing force (F TOT) and total moment of force (M TOT). In the Jumping-Target task, a sequence of target jumps required transient changes in either F TOT or M TOT. In the Step-Perturbation task, the index finger was lifted by 1cm for 0.5s leading to a change in both F TOT and M TOT. Visual feedback could have been frozen for one of these two variables in both tasks. Deviations in the space of finger modes (hypothetical commands to individual fingers) were quantified in directions of unchanged F TOT and M TOT (motor equivalent - ME) and in directions that changed F TOT and M TOT (non-motor equivalence - nME). Both the ME and nME components increased when the performance changed. After transient target jumps leading to the same combination of F TOT and M TOT, the changes in finger modes had a large residual ME component with only a very small nME component. Without visual feedback, an increase in the nME component was observed without consistent changes in the ME component. Results from the Step-Perturbation task were qualitatively similar. These findings suggest that both external perturbations and purposeful changes in performance trigger a reorganization of elements of an abundant system, leading to large ME change. These results are consistent with the principle of motor abundance corroborating the idea that a family of solutions is facilitated to stabilize values of important performance variables. PMID:26434623

  8. Structural brain changes in aging: courses, causes and cognitive consequences.

    PubMed

    Fjell, Anders M; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the brain is constantly changing from birth throughout the lifetime, meaning that normal aging, free from dementia, is associated with structural brain changes. This paper reviews recent evidence from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies about age-related changes in the brain. The main conclusions are that (1) the brain shrinks in volume and the ventricular system expands in healthy aging. However, the pattern of changes is highly heterogeneous, with the largest changes seen in the frontal and temporal cortex, and in the putamen, thalamus, and accumbens. With modern approaches to analysis of MRI data, changes in cortical thickness and subcortical volume can be tracked over periods as short as one year, with annual reductions of between 0.5% and 1.0% in most brain areas. (2) The volumetric brain reductions in healthy aging are likely only to a minor extent related to neuronal loss. Rather, shrinkage of neurons, reductions of synaptic spines, and lower numbers of synapses probably account for the reductions in grey matter. In addition, the length of myelinated axons is greatly reduced, up to almost 50%. (3) Reductions in specific cognitive abilities--for instance processing speed, executive functions, and episodic memory--are seen in healthy aging. Such reductions are to a substantial degree mediated by neuroanatomical changes, meaning that between 25% and 100% of the differences between young and old participants in selected cognitive functions can be explained by group differences in structural brain characteristics. PMID:20879692

  9. Hydrographic structure and zooplankton abundance and diversity off Paita, northern Peru (1994 to 2004) — ENSO effects, trends and changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronés, Katia; Ayón, Patricia; Hirche, Hans-Jürgen; Schwamborn, Ralf

    2009-11-01

    diel variability occurred after 1999, probably due to changes in vertical migration patterns. The considerable increase in zooplankton abundance over the study period, the ENSO effect, and the 1999-2000 transition are discussed with regard to synchronicity with other zooplankton time series. The present study contributes with the first evidence from an important area located in the Humboldt Current for synchronous trends and changes that were previously observed elsewhere in the Pacific. Our results demonstrated the importance of long-term zooplankton monitoring studies in upwelling areas, and confirms the idea of dramatic changes in pelagic ecosystem structure occurring in the East Pacific.

  10. Changes in Age Structure and Rural Community Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGranahan, David A.

    1985-01-01

    Whatever migration patterns evolve, changes in the age structure mean that rural communities in general can expect fairly stable elementary school population, reduced high school population, slower growth in new business and employment, and continued increase in the elderly population. (JHZ)

  11. Processing of temporal fine structure as a function of age

    PubMed Central

    Grose, John H.; Mamo, Sara K.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine whether the processing of temporal fine structure diminishes with age, even in the presence of relatively normal audiometric hearing. Temporal fine structure processing was assessed by measuring the discrimination of inter-aural phase differences (IPDs). The hypothesis was that IPD discrimination is more acute in middle-aged observers than in older observers but that acuity in middle-aged observers is nevertheless poorer than in young adults. Design Two experiments were undertaken. The first measured discrimination of 0-and π-radian inter-aural phases as a function of carrier frequency. The stimulus was a 5-Hz sinusoidally amplitude modulated tone where, in the signal waveform, the inter-aural phase of the carrier was inverted during alternate modulation periods. The second experiment measured IPD discrimination at fixed frequencies. The stimulus was a pair of tone pulses where, in the signal, the trailing pulse contained an IPD. A total of 39 adults with normal audiograms below 2000 Hz participated: 15 younger, 12 middle-aged, and 12 older. Results Experiment 1 showed that the highest carrier frequency at which a π-radian IPD could be discriminated from the diotic, 0-radian standard was significantly lower in middle-aged listeners than young adults, and lower still in older listeners. Experiment 2 indicated that middle-aged listeners were less sensitive to IPDs than young adults at all but the lowest frequencies tested. Older listeners, as a group, had the poorest thresholds. Conclusions These results suggest that deficits in temporal fine structure processing are evident in the pre-senescent auditory system. This adds to the accumulating evidence that deficiencies in some aspects of auditory temporal processing emerge relatively early in the aging process. It is possible that early-emerging temporal processing deficits manifest themselves in challenging speech-in-noise environments. PMID:20592614

  12. U, Th, Pb and REE abundances and Pb 207/Pb 206 ages of individual minerals in returned lunar material by ion microprobe mass analysis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, C. A.; Hinthorne, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Results of ion microprobe analyses of Apollo 11, 12 and 14 material, showing that U, Th, Pb and REE are concentrated in accessory minerals such as apatite, whitlockite, zircon, baddeleyite, zirkelite, and tranquillityite. Th/U ratios are found to vary by over a factor of 40 in these minerals. K, Ba, Rb and Sr have been localized in a K rich, U and Th poor glass phase that is commonly associated with the U and Th bearing accessory minerals. Li is observed to be fairly evenly distributed between the various accessory phases. The phosphates have been found to have REE abundance patterns (normalized to the chondrite abundances) that are fairly flat, while the Zr bearing minerals have patterns that rise steeply, by factors of ten or more, from La to Gd. All the accessory minerals have large negative Eu anomalies. Radiometric age dates (Pb 207/Pb 206) of the individual U and Th bearing minerals compare favorably with the Pb 207/Pb 206 age of the bulk rocks.

  13. Vertical changes in abundance, biomass and community structure of copepods down to 3000 m in the southern Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Tomoe; Yamaguchi, Atsushi

    2010-08-01

    Vertical changes in abundance, biomass and community structure of copepods down to 3000 m depth were studied at a single station of the Aleutian Basin of the Bering Sea (53°28'N, 177°00'W, depth 3779 m) on the 14th June 2006. Both abundance and biomass of copepods were greatest near the surface layer and decreased with increase in depth. Abundance and biomass of copepods integrated over 0-3000 m were 1,390,000 inds. m -2 and 5056 mg C m -2, respectively. Copepod carcasses occurred throughout the layer, and the carcass:living specimen ratio was the greatest in the oxygen minimum layer (750-100 m, the ratio was 2.3). A total of 72 calanoid copepod species belonging to 34 genera and 15 families occurred in the 0-3000 m water column (Cyclopoida, Harpacticoida and Poecilostomatoida were not identified to species level). Cluster analysis separated calanoid copepod communities into 5 groups (A-E). Each group was separated by depth, and the depth range of each group was at 0-75 m (A), 75-500 m (B), 500-750 m (C), 750-1500 m (D) and 1500-3000 m (E). Copepods were divided into four types based on the feeding pattern: suspension feeders, suspension feeders in diapause, detritivores and carnivores. In terms of abundance the most dominant group was suspension feeders (mainly Cyclopoida) in the epipelagic zone, and detritivores (mainly Poecilostomatoida) were dominant in the meso- and bathypelagic zones. In terms of biomass, suspension feeders in diapause (calanoid copepods Neocalanus spp. and Eucalanus bungii) were the major component (ca. 10-45%), especially in the 250-3000 m depth. These results are compared with the previous studies in the same region and that down to greater depths in the worldwide oceans.

  14. How does abundance scale with body size in coupled size-structured food webs?

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Julia L; Jennings, Simon; Law, Richard; Castle, Matthew D; McCloghrie, Paul; Rochet, Marie-Joëlle; Benoît, Eric

    2009-01-01

    1. Widely observed macro-ecological patterns in log abundance vs. log body mass of organisms can be explained by simple scaling theory based on food (energy) availability across a spectrum of body sizes. The theory predicts that when food availability falls with body size (as in most aquatic food webs where larger predators eat smaller prey), the scaling between log N vs. log m is steeper than when organisms of different sizes compete for a shared unstructured resource (e.g. autotrophs, herbivores and detritivores; hereafter dubbed 'detritivores'). 2. In real communities, the mix of feeding characteristics gives rise to complex food webs. Such complexities make empirical tests of scaling predictions prone to error if: (i) the data are not disaggregated in accordance with the assumptions of the theory being tested, or (ii) the theory does not account for all of the trophic interactions within and across the communities sampled. 3. We disaggregated whole community data collected in the North Sea into predator and detritivore components and report slopes of log abundance vs. log body mass relationships. Observed slopes for fish and epifaunal predator communities (-1.2 to -2.25) were significantly steeper than those for infaunal detritivore communities (-0.56 to -0.87). 4. We present a model describing the dynamics of coupled size spectra, to explain how coupling of predator and detritivore communities affects the scaling of log N vs. log m. The model captures the trophic interactions and recycling of material that occur in many aquatic ecosystems. 5. Our simulations demonstrate that the biological processes underlying growth and mortality in the two distinct size spectra lead to patterns consistent with data. Slopes of log N vs. log m were steeper and growth rates faster for predators compared to detritivores. Size spectra were truncated when primary production was too low for predators and when detritivores experienced predation pressure. 6. The approach also allows

  15. A spatial age-structured model for describing sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) population dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Jason M.; Wilberg, Michael J.; Adams, Jean V.; Jones, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The control of invasive sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) presents large scale management challenges in the Laurentian Great Lakes. No modeling approach has been developed that describes spatial dynamics of lamprey populations. We developed and validated a spatial and age-structured model and applied it to a sea lamprey population in a large river in the Great Lakes basin. We considered 75 discrete spatial areas, included a stock-recruitment function, spatial recruitment patterns, natural mortality, chemical treatment mortality, and larval metamorphosis. Recruitment was variable, and an upstream shift in recruitment location was observed over time. From 1993–2011 recruitment, larval abundance, and the abundance of metamorphosing individuals decreased by 80, 84, and 86%, respectively. The model successfully identified areas of high larval abundance and showed that areas of low larval density contribute significantly to the population. Estimated treatment mortality was less than expected but had a large population-level impact. The results and general approach of this work have applications for sea lamprey control throughout the Great Lakes and for the restoration and conservation of native lamprey species globally.

  16. Management of aging of nuclear power plant containment structures

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.; Norris, W.E.; Graves, H.L. III

    1998-06-01

    Research addressing aging management of nuclear power plant concrete and steel containment structures is summarized. Accomplishments related to concrete containment structures include formation of a materials` property database; an aging assessment methodology to identify critical structures and degradation factors; guidelines and evaluation criteria for use in condition assessments; and a time-dependent reliability-based methodology for condition assessments and estimations of future performance. Under the steel containments and liners activity, a degradation assessment methodology has been developed, mathematical models that describe time-dependent changes in the containment due to aggressive environmental factors have been identified, and statistical data supporting the use of these models in time-dependent reliability analysis have been summarized.

  17. X-Ray Spectroscopy of II Pegasi: Coronal Temperature Structure, Abundances, and Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Canizares, Claude R.; Schulz, Norbert S.

    2001-10-01

    We have obtained high-resolution X-ray spectra of the coronally active binary II Pegasi (HD 224085), covering the wavelength range of 1.5-25 Å. For the first half of our 44 ks observation, the source was in a quiescent state with constant X-ray flux, after which it flared, reaching twice the quiescent flux in 12 ks, then decreased. We analyze the emission-line spectrum and continuum during quiescent and flaring states. The differential emission measure derived from lines fluxes shows a hot corona with a continuous distribution in temperature. During the nonflare state, the distribution peaks near logT=7.2, and when flaring, it peaks near 7.6. High-temperature lines are enhanced slightly during the flare, but most of the change occurs in the continuum. Coronal abundance anomalies are apparent, with iron very deficient relative to oxygen and significantly weaker than expected from photospheric measurements, while neon is enhanced relative to oxygen. We find no evidence of appreciable resonant scattering optical depth in line ratios of iron and oxygen. The flare light curve is consistent with solar two-ribbon flare models but with a very long reconnection time constant of about 65 ks. We infer loop lengths of about 0.05 to about 0.25 stellar radii in the flare, if the flare emission originated from a single, low-density loop.

  18. Artemia parthenogenetica (Branchiopoda: Anostraca) from the Large Aral Sea: Abundance, distribution, population structure and cyst production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arashkevich, Elena G.; Sapozhnikov, P. V.; Soloviov, K. A.; Kudyshkin, T. V.; Zavialov, P. O.

    2009-03-01

    The brine shrimp Artemia parthenogenetica appeared in the Large Aral Sea (Central Asia) in 1998 when mineralization reached 63 ppt. Data on Artemia abundance and biomass, along with temperature and salinity measurements were collected in the western basin during 2002-2006, primarily in the autumn. During the study period, population density grew progressively, both in terms of number, from 250 to 1260 individuals per m 3, and in terms of biomass, from 0.3 to 1.3 g per m 3. In 2005, the population density and spatial distribution in the different parts of the sea (western and eastern basins and strait) was assessed. The horizontal distribution of the Artemia population was uniform in the deep central part of the western basin, although the distribution was quite patchy in the shallow coastal zone. Depth habitat of Artemia was restricted to the upper 20-25 m of depth, as the oxygen depletion and formation of anoxic layer prevented distribution of Artemia to the deeper waters. In autumn, all females reproduced oviparously, with an average clutch size of 30-35 eggs per female. The number of eggs in a clutch was positively correlated with female body length ( r2 = 0.36-0.44).

  19. Age structured dynamical model for an endangered lizard Eulamprus leuraensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supriatna, A. K.; Rachmadani, Q.; Ilahi, F.; Anggriani, N.; Nuraini, N.

    2014-02-01

    The Blue Mountains Water Skink, Eulamprus leuraensis, is listed as an endangered species under the IUCN Red List. This lizard species has a typical characteristic of growth with a low fecundity. It is known that the offspring quality may decline with maternal age of the parents despite they can grow rapidly from neonatal size to adult size within two to three years. It is also believed that low adult survival rates and specialization on rare and fragmented type of habitat are the main cause leading to the endangered status of the lizard. A mathematical model with age structure for Eulamprus leuraensis, taking into account the variation of survival rate in each structure and the declining of offspring quality with respect to maternal age is considered here. Stable coexistence of non-trivial equilibriumis shown. It is also shown that an endangered status is due to combination oflow reproductive output and low rates of adult survival. Further, understanding the age structure within populations can facilitate efective management of the endangered species.

  20. Crystal Structure of Patatin-17 in Complex with Aged and Non-Aged Organophosphorus Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Wijeyesakere, Sanjeeva J.; Richardson, Rudy J.; Stuckey, Jeanne A.

    2014-01-01

    Patatin is a non-specific plant lipase and the eponymous member of a broad class of serine hydrolases termed the patatin-like phospholipase domain containing proteins (PNPLAs). Certain PNPLA family members can be inhibited by organophosphorus (OP) compounds. Currently, no structural data are available on the modes of interaction between the PNPLAs and OP compounds or their native substrates. To this end, we present the crystal structure of patatin-17 (pat17) in its native state as well as following inhibition with methyl arachidonyl fluorophosphonate (MAFP) and inhibition/aging with diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP). The native pat17 structure revealed the existence of two portals (portal1 and portal2) that lead to its active-site chamber. The DFP-inhibited enzyme underwent the aging process with the negatively charged phosphoryl oxygen, resulting from the loss of an isopropyl group, being within hydrogen-binding distance to the oxyanion hole. The MAFP-inhibited pat17 structure showed that MAFP did not age following its interaction with the nucleophilic serine residue (Ser77) of pat17 since its O-methyl group was intact. The MAFP moiety is oriented with its phosphoryl oxygen in close proximity to the oxyanion hole of pat17 and its O-methyl group located farther away from the oxyanion hole of pat17 relative to the DFP-bound state. The orientation of the alkoxy oxygens within the two OP compounds suggests a role for the oxyanion hole in stabilizing the emerging negative charge on the oxygen during the aging reaction. The arachidonic acid side chain of MAFP could be contained within portals 1 or 2. Comparisons of pat17 in the native, inhibited, and aged states showed no significant global conformational changes with respect to their Cα backbones, consistent with observations from other α/β hydrolases such as group VIIA phospholipase A2. PMID:25248161

  1. The Significance of Myriophyllum elatinoides for Swine Wastewater Treatment: Abundance and Community Structure of Ammonia-Oxidizing Microorganisms in Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi; Zhang, Miaomiao; Liu, Feng; Li, Yong; He, Yang; Zhang, Shunan; Wu, Jinshui

    2015-01-01

    Myriophyllum elatinoides was reported to effectively treat wastewater by removing nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). However, little is known about the abundance and community structure of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms associated with M. elatinoides purification systems. The objective of this research was to characterize the abundance and community structure of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in swine wastewater and determine the main nitrogen removal pathways. In this study, five different waters were treated by M. elatinoides in microcosms for one month. The five waters included tap water (Control), swine wastewater (SW), 50% diluted swine wastewater (50% SW), and two synthetic wastewaters: 200 mg NH4+-N L−1 (200 NH4+-N) and 400 mg NH4+-N L−1 (400 NH4+-N). The most dramatic changes were in NH4+-N and total N (TN) concentrations, with average removal rates of 84% and 90%, respectively, in the treatments containing swine wastewater. On days 7, 14, and 28, the dissolved oxygen (DO) increased by 81.8%, 210.4% and 136.5%, respectively, compared with on day 0, in the swine wastewater. The results also showed that the bacterial amoA (AOB) copy numbers in the sediments of the treatments were significantly higher than those of archaeal amoA (AOA) copy numbers (p = 0.015). In addition, the high DO concentrations in swine wastewater responded well to the high abundance of AOB. The AOA and AOB community distributions were positively related with NO3-N and were negatively related with DO in swine wastewater treatments. In summary, our experimental results suggested that the M. elatinoides purification system could improve the activity of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms and consequently might contribute to the significant N removal from the swine wastewater. PMID:26444015

  2. Galactic chemical evolution and solar s-process abundances: Dependence on the {sup 13}C-pocket structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bisterzo, S.; Travaglio, C.; Gallino, R.; Wiescher, M.; Käppeler, F. E-mail: sarabisterzo@gmail.com

    2014-05-20

    We study the s-process abundances (A ≳ 90) at the epoch of the solar system formation. Asymptotic giant branch yields are computed with an updated neutron capture network and updated initial solar abundances. We confirm our previous results obtained with a Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) model: (1) as suggested by the s-process spread observed in disk stars and in presolar meteoritic SiC grains, a weighted average of s-process strengths is needed to reproduce the solar s distribution of isotopes with A > 130; and (2) an additional contribution (of about 25%) is required in order to represent the solar s-process abundances of isotopes from A = 90 to 130. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of different internal structures of the {sup 13}C pocket, which may affect the efficiency of the {sup 13}C(α, n){sup 16}O reaction, the major neutron source of the s process. First, keeping the same {sup 13}C profile adopted so far, we modify by a factor of two the mass involved in the pocket; second, we assume a flat {sup 13}C profile in the pocket, and we test again the effects of the variation of the mass of the pocket. We find that GCE s predictions at the epoch of the solar system formation marginally depend on the size and shape of the {sup 13}C pocket once a different weighted range of {sup 13}C-pocket strengths is assumed. We obtain that, independently of the internal structure of the {sup 13}C pocket, the missing solar system s-process contribution in the range from A = 90 to 130 remains essentially the same.

  3. Decreasing Abundance, Increasing Diversity and Changing Structure of the Wild Bee Community (Hymenoptera: Anthophila) along an Urbanization Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Fortel, Laura; Henry, Mickaël; Guilbaud, Laurent; Guirao, Anne Laure; Kuhlmann, Michael; Mouret, Hugues; Rollin, Orianne; Vaissière, Bernard E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Wild bees are important pollinators that have declined in diversity and abundance during the last decades. Habitat destruction and fragmentation associated with urbanization are reported as part of the main causes of this decline. Urbanization involves dramatic changes of the landscape, increasing the proportion of impervious surface while decreasing that of green areas. Few studies have investigated the effects of urbanization on bee communities. We assessed changes in the abundance, species richness, and composition of wild bee community along an urbanization gradient. Methodology/Principal Findings Over two years and on a monthly basis, bees were sampled with colored pan traps and insect nets at 24 sites located along an urbanization gradient. Landscape structure within three different radii was measured at each study site. We captured 291 wild bee species. The abundance of wild bees was negatively correlated with the proportion of impervious surface, while species richness reached a maximum at an intermediate (50%) proportion of impervious surface. The structure of the community changed along the urbanization gradient with more parasitic species in sites with an intermediate proportion of impervious surface. There were also greater numbers of cavity-nesting species and long-tongued species in sites with intermediate or higher proportion of impervious surface. However, urbanization had no effect on the occurrence of species depending on their social behavior or body size. Conclusions/Significance We found nearly a third of the wild bee fauna known from France in our study sites. Indeed, urban areas supported a diverse bee community, but sites with an intermediate level of urbanization were the most speciose ones, including greater proportion of parasitic species. The presence of a diverse array of bee species even in the most urbanized area makes these pollinators worthy of being a flagship group to raise the awareness of urban citizens about

  4. Galactic Chemical Evolution and Solar s-process Abundances: Dependence on the 13C-pocket Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisterzo, S.; Travaglio, C.; Gallino, R.; Wiescher, M.; Käppeler, F.

    2014-05-01

    We study the s-process abundances (A >~ 90) at the epoch of the solar system formation. Asymptotic giant branch yields are computed with an updated neutron capture network and updated initial solar abundances. We confirm our previous results obtained with a Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) model: (1) as suggested by the s-process spread observed in disk stars and in presolar meteoritic SiC grains, a weighted average of s-process strengths is needed to reproduce the solar s distribution of isotopes with A > 130; and (2) an additional contribution (of about 25%) is required in order to represent the solar s-process abundances of isotopes from A = 90 to 130. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of different internal structures of the 13C pocket, which may affect the efficiency of the 13C(α, n)16O reaction, the major neutron source of the s process. First, keeping the same 13C profile adopted so far, we modify by a factor of two the mass involved in the pocket; second, we assume a flat 13C profile in the pocket, and we test again the effects of the variation of the mass of the pocket. We find that GCE s predictions at the epoch of the solar system formation marginally depend on the size and shape of the 13C pocket once a different weighted range of 13C-pocket strengths is assumed. We obtain that, independently of the internal structure of the 13C pocket, the missing solar system s-process contribution in the range from A = 90 to 130 remains essentially the same.

  5. Aging of Johari-Goldstein Relaxation in Structural Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardimci, Hasan; Leheny, Robert L.

    2006-03-01

    Using frequency-dependent dielectric susceptibility measurements we characterize the aging in two supercooled liquids, sorbitol and xylitol, below their calorimetric glass transition temperatures, Tg. In addition to the alpha relaxation that tracks the structural dynamics, the susceptibilities of both liquids possess a secondary Johari-Goldstein relaxation at higher frequencies. Following a quench below Tg, the susceptibility slowly approaches equilibrium behavior. For both liquids, features of the Johari-Goldstein relaxation display a dependence on the time since the quench, or aging time, that is very similar to the age dependence of the alpha peak. However, one can not assign a single fictive temperature to both the alpha and Johari-Goldstein relaxations. For example, the peak frequency of the Johari-Goldstein relaxation remains constant during aging for sorbitol while it increases with age for xylitol, inconsistent with a decreasing fictive temperature. This behavior contrasts with that of the high frequency tail of the alpha peak whose shape and position track the aging of the main part of the peak.

  6. Variations in the abundance and structural diversity of microbes forming biofilms in a thermally stressed coral reef system.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Huda

    2015-11-30

    Little information is known about biofilm formation in the thermally stressed coral reef systems north of the Arabian Gulf. The current study investigates the abundance and diversity of marine microbes involved in biofilm formation and their succession over a period of 14 weeks (May-August 2007) at temperatures exceeding 32 °C. The results showed variations in microbial numbers and the development of more stable biofilm communities as the biofilms aged. The culture-dependent technique and microscopic examination of the developed biofilms showed the dominance of key species known for their role in precipitating CaCO3 such as Vibrio and in facilitating coral larvae settlement and metamorphosis such as Pseudoalteromonas, Bacillariophyceae and Rhodophyceae. The results revealed biofilm formations with microbial diversities that have the potential to support the larval settlement and metamorphism of marine organisms and to consolidate and stabilize biofilms via the process of calcification in the thermally stressed coral reef system considered herein. PMID:26494248

  7. Evaluating Functional Diversity: Missing Trait Data and the Importance of Species Abundance Structure and Data Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Bryndová, Michala; Kasari, Liis; Norberg, Anna; Weiss, Matthias; Bishop, Tom R.; Luke, Sarah H.; Sam, Katerina; Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Yoann; Lepš, Jan; Götzenberger, Lars; de Bello, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Functional diversity (FD) is an important component of biodiversity that quantifies the difference in functional traits between organisms. However, FD studies are often limited by the availability of trait data and FD indices are sensitive to data gaps. The distribution of species abundance and trait data, and its transformation, may further affect the accuracy of indices when data is incomplete. Using an existing approach, we simulated the effects of missing trait data by gradually removing data from a plant, an ant and a bird community dataset (12, 59, and 8 plots containing 62, 297 and 238 species respectively). We ranked plots by FD values calculated from full datasets and then from our increasingly incomplete datasets and compared the ranking between the original and virtually reduced datasets to assess the accuracy of FD indices when used on datasets with increasingly missing data. Finally, we tested the accuracy of FD indices with and without data transformation, and the effect of missing trait data per plot or per the whole pool of species. FD indices became less accurate as the amount of missing data increased, with the loss of accuracy depending on the index. But, where transformation improved the normality of the trait data, FD values from incomplete datasets were more accurate than before transformation. The distribution of data and its transformation are therefore as important as data completeness and can even mitigate the effect of missing data. Since the effect of missing trait values pool-wise or plot-wise depends on the data distribution, the method should be decided case by case. Data distribution and data transformation should be given more careful consideration when designing, analysing and interpreting FD studies, especially where trait data are missing. To this end, we provide the R package “traitor” to facilitate assessments of missing trait data. PMID:26881747

  8. Evaluating Functional Diversity: Missing Trait Data and the Importance of Species Abundance Structure and Data Transformation.

    PubMed

    Májeková, Maria; Paal, Taavi; Plowman, Nichola S; Bryndová, Michala; Kasari, Liis; Norberg, Anna; Weiss, Matthias; Bishop, Tom R; Luke, Sarah H; Sam, Katerina; Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Yoann; Lepš, Jan; Götzenberger, Lars; de Bello, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Functional diversity (FD) is an important component of biodiversity that quantifies the difference in functional traits between organisms. However, FD studies are often limited by the availability of trait data and FD indices are sensitive to data gaps. The distribution of species abundance and trait data, and its transformation, may further affect the accuracy of indices when data is incomplete. Using an existing approach, we simulated the effects of missing trait data by gradually removing data from a plant, an ant and a bird community dataset (12, 59, and 8 plots containing 62, 297 and 238 species respectively). We ranked plots by FD values calculated from full datasets and then from our increasingly incomplete datasets and compared the ranking between the original and virtually reduced datasets to assess the accuracy of FD indices when used on datasets with increasingly missing data. Finally, we tested the accuracy of FD indices with and without data transformation, and the effect of missing trait data per plot or per the whole pool of species. FD indices became less accurate as the amount of missing data increased, with the loss of accuracy depending on the index. But, where transformation improved the normality of the trait data, FD values from incomplete datasets were more accurate than before transformation. The distribution of data and its transformation are therefore as important as data completeness and can even mitigate the effect of missing data. Since the effect of missing trait values pool-wise or plot-wise depends on the data distribution, the method should be decided case by case. Data distribution and data transformation should be given more careful consideration when designing, analysing and interpreting FD studies, especially where trait data are missing. To this end, we provide the R package "traitor" to facilitate assessments of missing trait data. PMID:26881747

  9. Recurrence and Frequency of Disturbance have Cumulative Effect on Methanotrophic Activity, Abundance, and Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Adrian; van den Brink, Erik; Reim, Andreas; Krause, Sascha M. B.; Bodelier, Paul L. E.

    2016-01-01

    Alternate prolonged drought and heavy rainfall is predicted to intensify with global warming. Desiccation-rewetting events alter the soil quality and nutrient concentrations which drive microbial-mediated processes, including methane oxidation, a key biogeochemical process catalyzed by methanotrophic bacteria. Although aerobic methanotrophs showed remarkable resilience to a suite of physical disturbances induced as a single event, their resilience to recurring disturbances is less known. Here, using a rice field soil in a microcosm study, we determined whether recurrence and frequency of desiccation-rewetting impose an accumulating effect on the methanotrophic activity. The response of key aerobic methanotroph subgroups (type Ia, Ib, and II) were monitored using qPCR assays, and was supported by a t-RFLP analysis. The methanotrophic activity was resilient to recurring desiccation-rewetting, but increasing the frequency of the disturbance by twofold significantly decreased methane uptake rate. Both the qPCR and t-RFLP analyses were congruent, showing the dominance of type Ia/Ib methanotrophs prior to disturbance, and after disturbance, the recovering community was predominantly comprised of type Ia (Methylobacter) methanotrophs. Both type Ib and type II (Methylosinus/Methylocystis) methanotrophs were adversely affected by the disturbance, but type II methanotrophs showed recovery over time, indicating relatively higher resilience to the disturbance. This revealed distinct, yet unrecognized traits among the methanotroph community members. Our results show that recurring desiccation-rewetting before a recovery in community abundance had an accumulated effect, compromising methanotrophic activity. While methanotrophs may recover well following sporadic disturbances, their resilience may reach a ‘tipping point’ where activity no longer recovered if disturbance persists and increase in frequency. PMID:26779148

  10. Recurrence and Frequency of Disturbance have Cumulative Effect on Methanotrophic Activity, Abundance, and Community Structure.

    PubMed

    Ho, Adrian; van den Brink, Erik; Reim, Andreas; Krause, Sascha M B; Bodelier, Paul L E

    2015-01-01

    Alternate prolonged drought and heavy rainfall is predicted to intensify with global warming. Desiccation-rewetting events alter the soil quality and nutrient concentrations which drive microbial-mediated processes, including methane oxidation, a key biogeochemical process catalyzed by methanotrophic bacteria. Although aerobic methanotrophs showed remarkable resilience to a suite of physical disturbances induced as a single event, their resilience to recurring disturbances is less known. Here, using a rice field soil in a microcosm study, we determined whether recurrence and frequency of desiccation-rewetting impose an accumulating effect on the methanotrophic activity. The response of key aerobic methanotroph subgroups (type Ia, Ib, and II) were monitored using qPCR assays, and was supported by a t-RFLP analysis. The methanotrophic activity was resilient to recurring desiccation-rewetting, but increasing the frequency of the disturbance by twofold significantly decreased methane uptake rate. Both the qPCR and t-RFLP analyses were congruent, showing the dominance of type Ia/Ib methanotrophs prior to disturbance, and after disturbance, the recovering community was predominantly comprised of type Ia (Methylobacter) methanotrophs. Both type Ib and type II (Methylosinus/Methylocystis) methanotrophs were adversely affected by the disturbance, but type II methanotrophs showed recovery over time, indicating relatively higher resilience to the disturbance. This revealed distinct, yet unrecognized traits among the methanotroph community members. Our results show that recurring desiccation-rewetting before a recovery in community abundance had an accumulated effect, compromising methanotrophic activity. While methanotrophs may recover well following sporadic disturbances, their resilience may reach a 'tipping point' where activity no longer recovered if disturbance persists and increase in frequency. PMID:26779148

  11. Effects of oxytetracycline on the abundance and community structure of nitrogen-fixing bacteria during cattle manure composting.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiajun; Qian, Xun; Gu, Jie; Wang, Xiaojuan; Gao, Hua

    2016-09-01

    The effects of oxytetracycline (OTC) on nitrogen-fixing bacterial communities were investigated during cattle manure composting. The abundance and community structure of nitrogen-fixing bacteria were determined by qPCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), respectively. The matrix was spiked with OTC at four levels: no OTC, 10mg/kg dry weight (DW) OTC (L), 60mg/kg DW OTC (M), and 200mg/kg DW OTC (H). The high temperature period of composting was shorter with M and H, and the decline in temperature during the cooling stage was accelerated by OTC. OTC had a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on the nitrogenase activity during early composting, and the nifH gene abundance declined significantly during the later composting stage. The DGGE profile and statistical analysis showed that OTC changed the nitrogen-fixing bacterial community succession and reduced the community richness and dominance. The nitrogen-fixing bacterial community structure was affected greatly by the high level of OTC. PMID:27318157

  12. Venus cloud structure and water vapor abundance from Mariner 10 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, F. W.

    1976-01-01

    Observations of the Venus atmosphere with the infrared radiometer on Mariner 10 have been analyzed by Taylor (1975) in terms of the vertical distribution of opacity at wavelengths near 11 microns and 45 microns in the thermal infrared. In this paper, we discuss models of the Venus atmosphere which are consistent with the inferred opacity structure. Either a two-layer cloud structure, or a single cloud deck overlaid by a layer containing approximately 40 precipitable microns of water vapor, would have the required limb-darkening characteristics at the wavelengths of observation.

  13. Ageing management of french NPP civil work structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallitre, E.; Dauffer, D.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents EDF practice about concrete structure ageing management, from the mechanisms analysis to the formal procedure which allows the French company to increase 900 MWe NPP lifetime until 40 years; it will also introduce its action plan for 60 years lifetime extension. This practice is based on a methodology which identifies every ageing mechanism; both plants feedback and state of the art are screened and conclusions are drawn up into an "ageing analysis data sheet". That leads at first to a collection of 57 data sheets which give the mechanism identification, the components that are concerned and an analysis grid which is designed to assess the safety risk. This analysis screens the reference documents describing the mechanism, the design lifetime hypotheses, the associated regulation or codification, the feedback experiences, the accessibility, the maintenance actions, the repair possibility and so one. This analysis has to lead to a conclusion about the risk taking into account monitoring and maintenance. If the data sheet conclusion is not clear enough, then a more detailed report is launched. The technical document which is needed, is a formal detailed report which summarizes every theoretical knowledge and monitoring data: its objective is to propose a solution for ageing management: this solution can include more inspections or specific research development, or additional maintenance. After a first stage on the 900 MWe units, only two generic ageing management detailed reports have been needed for the civil engineering part: one about reactor building containment, and one about other structures which focuses on concrete inflating reactions. The second stage consists on deriving this generic analysis (ageing mechanism and detailed reports) to every plant where a complete ageing report is required (one report for all equipments and structures of the plant, but specific for each reactor). This ageing management is a continuous process because the

  14. [Esophageal wall structure in people of elderly and senile age].

    PubMed

    aminova, G G; Grigorenko, D E; Sapin, M R; Mkhitarov, V A

    2014-01-01

    Using histological methods, the esophageal wall structure and the cytoarchitectonics of mucous membrane were studied in the individuals of elderly (n = 5) and senile (n = 10) age. The control group included the individuals of I (n = 3) and II (n = 3) periods of mature age. It was demonstrated that with advancing age in most cases the destructive processes took place in the epithelium (delamination of the layer, separation of large fragments, formation of microerosions etc.) in most of the studied cases. Lymphocytes, neutrophils and eosinophils were found between the epithelial cells; the numbers of infiltrating cells was increased 2-3 times during aging. Mucosal lamina propria and the submucosa, in particular, were characterized by the thickening of the bundles of collagen fibers. A two-fold increase in the number of the cells of the fibroblast lineage was found. The number of leukocytes in the lamina propria was increased by the eldery age in the upper and lower parts of the esophagus (3.5 and 1.75 times respectively). The changes in lamina muscularis were manifested by its thinning, delamination and myocyte dissociation. Remodeling of the muscular tunic was less pronounced. The degree of changes increased distally and varied widely depending on the individual peculiarities. PMID:25282822

  15. THE C+N+O ABUNDANCE OF {omega} CENTAURI GIANT STARS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE CHEMICAL-ENRICHMENT SCENARIO AND THE RELATIVE AGES OF DIFFERENT STELLAR POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, A. F.; Milone, A. P.; Aparicio, A.; Piotto, G.; Cassisi, S.; D'Antona, F.; Anderson, J.; Bedin, L. R.; Renzini, A.; Villanova, S. E-mail: milone@iac.es E-mail: giampaolo.piotto@unipd.it E-mail: dantona@oa-roma.inaf.it E-mail: luigi.bedin@oapd.inaf.it E-mail: svillanova@astro-udec.cl

    2012-02-10

    We present a chemical-composition analysis of 77 red-giant stars in Omega Centauri. We have measured abundances for carbon and nitrogen, and combined our results with abundances of O, Na, La, and Fe that we determined in our previous work. Our aim is to better understand the peculiar chemical-enrichment history of this cluster by studying how the total C+N+O content varies among the different metallicity stellar groups, and among stars at different places along the Na-O anticorrelation. We find that the (anti)correlations among the light elements that would be expected on theoretical grounds for matter that has been nuclearly processed via high-temperature proton captures. The overall [(C+N+O)/Fe] increases by {approx}0.5 dex from [Fe/H] {approx}-2.0 to [Fe/H] {approx}-0.9. Our results provide insight into the chemical-enrichment history of the cluster, and the measured CNO variations provide important corrections for estimating the relative ages of the different stellar populations.

  16. Effects of different fertilizers on the abundance and community structure of ammonia oxidizers in a yellow clay soil.

    PubMed

    Yao, Huaiying; Huang, Sha; Qiu, Qiongfen; Li, Yaying; Wu, Lianghuan; Mi, Wenhai; Dai, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Yellow clay paddy soil (Oxisols) is a typical soil with low productivity in southern China. Nitrification inhibitors and slow release fertilizers have been used to improve nitrogen fertilizer utilization and reduce environmental impaction of the paddy soil. However, their effects on ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in paddy soil have rarely been investigated. In the present work, we compared the influences of several slow release fertilizers and nitrification inhibitors on the community structure and activities of the ammonia oxidizers in yellow clay soil. The abundances and community compositions of AOA and AOB were determined with qPCR, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), and clone library approaches. Our results indicated that the potential nitrification rate (PNR) of the soil was significantly related to the abundances of both AOA and AOB. Nitrogen fertilizer application stimulated the growth of AOA and AOB, and the combinations of nitrapyrin with urea (NPU) and urea-formaldehyde (UF) inhibited the growth of AOA and AOB, respectively. Compared with other treatments, the applications of NPU and UF also led to significant shifts in the community compositions of AOA and AOB, respectively. NPU showed an inhibitory effect on AOA T-RF 166 bp that belonged to Nitrosotalea. UF had a negative effect on AOB T-RF 62 bp that was assigned to Nitrosospira. These results suggested that NPU inhibited PNR and increased nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) by inhibiting the growth of AOA and altering AOA community. UF showed no effect on NUE but decreased AOB abundance and shifted AOB community. PMID:27063014

  17. The Umm Al Binni Structure and Bronze Age Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.

    Archaeological excavations of sites dating from 2200 BCE and 1200 BCE in the Middle East, Asia Minor, and southeast Europe provide evidence that a large scale disaster affected Bronze Age civilizations. There are numerous debates as to whether this was caused by warfare, a large-scale natural disaster, or some other factor. In 2001, Sharad Master used satellite images to discover a possible Holocene impact structure in the Al 'Amarah marshes of southern Iraq, known as Umm al Binni lake. With an estimated age of < 5000 years and a diameter of ~3.4 km, this structure may help explain this disaster. Using numerical models and scaling equations for a cosmic impact, I show that although destructive forces would have damaged Sumerian cities within a few hundred km of the coast, it is unlikely that this single impact would have caused the large-scale destruction seen over the larger region. The impact origin of the structure is unconfirmed and any connection to Bronze Age catastrophes remains speculative. Errata: Table 4 provides a list of impact sites, three of which are associated with nickel-iron impactors and therefore cannot be from a "fragmented comet".

  18. Spatial Genetic Structure of the Abundant and Widespread Peatmoss Sphagnum magellanicum Brid.

    PubMed

    Kyrkjeeide, Magni Olsen; Hassel, Kristian; Flatberg, Kjell Ivar; Shaw, A Jonathan; Yousefi, Narjes; Stenøien, Hans K

    2016-01-01

    Spore-producing organisms have small dispersal units enabling them to become widespread across continents. However, barriers to gene flow and cryptic speciation may exist. The common, haploid peatmoss Sphagnum magellanicum occurs in both the Northern and Southern hemisphere, and is commonly used as a model in studies of peatland ecology and peatmoss physiology. Even though it will likely act as a rich source in functional genomics studies in years to come, surprisingly little is known about levels of genetic variability and structuring in this species. Here, we assess for the first time how genetic variation in S. magellanicum is spatially structured across its full distribution range (Northern Hemisphere and South America). The morphologically similar species S. alaskense was included for comparison. In total, 195 plants were genotyped at 15 microsatellite loci. Sequences from two plastid loci (trnG and trnL) were obtained from 30 samples. Our results show that S. alaskense and almost all plants of S. magellanicum in the northern Pacific area are diploids and share the same gene pool. Haploid plants occur in South America, Europe, eastern North America, western North America, and southern Asia, and five genetically differentiated groups with different distribution ranges were found. Our results indicate that S. magellanicum consists of several distinct genetic groups, seemingly with little or no gene flow among them. Noteworthy, the geographical separation of diploids and haploids is strikingly similar to patterns found within other haploid Sphagnum species spanning the Northern Hemisphere. Our results confirm a genetic division between the Beringian and the Atlantic that seems to be a general pattern in Sphagnum taxa. The pattern of strong genetic population structuring throughout the distribution range of morphologically similar plants need to be considered in future functional genomic studies of S. magellanicum. PMID:26859563

  19. The Deep Cloud Structure and Volatile Abundances in Jupiter’s Great Red Spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjoraker, Gordon; de Pater, I.; Wong, M. H.; Adamkovics, M.; Hewagama, T.

    2013-10-01

    Images of Jupiter at 5 microns reveal a dynamic range of about 20 in thermal emission between the hottest Hot Spots and the lowest flux regions on the planet. The Great Red Spot is dark at 5 microns due to thick clouds, but imaging alone does not reveal which cloud layers are responsible for attenuating this radiation. Initial expectations were that upper level clouds were sufficiently opaque that structure at the water cloud level would be completely hidden. Fortunately, this is not the case. We used NIRSPEC on the Keck telescope and CSHELL on the Infrared Telescope Facility to spectrally resolve line profiles of CH3D and other molecules on Jupiter in order to derive the pressure of the line formation region in the 5-micron window. Deuterated methane is a good choice for studying cloud structure because methane and its isotopologues do not condense on Jupiter. Variations in CH3D line shape with position on Jupiter are therefore ONLY due to cloud structure rather than due to changes in gas mole fraction. By aligning the slit east/west on Jupiter, we sampled the Great Red Spot and a Hot Spot 7 arcsec to the west. The profile of the CH3D lines is very broad in the Hot Spot due to collisions with up to 8 bars of H2, where unit optical depth due to collision induced H2 opacity occurs. The extreme width of these CH3D features implies that Hot Spots do not have significant cloud opacity where water is expected to condense. This is consistent with the Galileo probe results. Within the Great Red Spot, the line profiles are substantially narrower than in the Hot Spot, but they are broader than would be expected if they were formed in a column above an opaque cloud at 0.7 bars (NH3) or 2 bars (NH4SH). The best fit to the line shape of CH3D requires an opaque cloud at 5 bars, which we identify as being a water cloud. Gaseous H2O is clearly evident in the Great Red Spot, which provides independent evidence that we are sounding deep in Jupiter’s atmosphere. A combination of

  20. Ionization structure and chemical abundances of the Wolf-Rayet nebula NGC 6888 with integral field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Martín, A.; Martín-Gordón, D.; Vílchez, J. M.; Pérez Montero, E.; Riera, A.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2012-05-01

    Context. The study of nebulae around Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars gives us clues about the mass-loss history of massive stars, as well as about the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium (ISM). Aims: This work aims to search for the observational footprints of the interactions between the ISM and stellar winds in the WR nebula NGC 6888 in order to understand its ionization structure, chemical composition, and kinematics. Methods: We have collected a set of integral field spectroscopy observations across NGC 6888, obtained with PPAK in the optical range performing both 2D and 1D analyses. Attending to the 2D analysis in the northeast part of NGC 6888, we have generated maps of the extinction structure and electron density. We produced statistical frequency distributions of the radial velocity and diagnostic diagrams. Furthermore, we performed a thorough study of integrated spectra in nine regions over the whole nebula. Results: The 2D study has revealed two main behaviours. We have found that the spectra of a localized region to the southwest of this pointing can be represented well by shock models assuming n = 1000 cm-3, twice solar abundances, and shock velocities from 250 to 400 km s-1. With the 1D analysis we derived electron densities ranging from <100 to 360 cm-3. The electron temperature varies from ~7700 K to ~10 200 K. A strong variation of up to a factor 10 between different regions in the nitrogen abundance has been found: N/H appears lower than the solar abundance in those positions observed at the edges and very enhanced in the observed inner parts. Oxygen appears slightly underabundant with respect to solar value, whereas the helium abundance is found to be above it. We propose a scenario for the evolution of NGC 6888 to explain the features observed. This scheme consists of a structure of multiple shells: i) an inner and broken shell with material from the interaction between the supergiant and WR shells, presenting an overabundance in N/H and a

  1. Microgeographic population structure of green swordail fish: genetic differentiation despite abundant migration.

    PubMed

    Tatarenkov, A; Healey, C I M; Avise, J C

    2010-01-01

    Swordtails (Xiphophorus; Poeciliidae) have figured prominently in research on fish mating behaviours, sexual selection, and carcinogenesis, but their population structures and dispersal patterns have been relatively neglected. Using nine microsatellite loci, we estimated genetic differentiation in Xiphophorus helleri within and between adjacent streams in Belize. The genetic data were complemented by a tagging study of movement within one stream. In the absence of physical dispersal barriers (waterfalls), population structure followed an isolation by distance (IBD) pattern. Genetic differentiation (F(ST) up to 0.07) was significant between and within creeks, despite high dispersal in the latter as judged by the tagging data. Such heterogeneity apparently was a result of genetic drift in local demes, due to small population sizes and highly skewed paternity. The IBD pattern was interrupted by waterfalls, boosting F(ST) above 0.30 between adjacent samples across these barriers. Overall, our results are helpful in understanding the interplay of evolutionary forces and population dynamics in a small fish living in a changeable habitat. PMID:20015140

  2. The effects of colony structure and resource abundance on food dispersal in Tapinoma sessile (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    VanWeelden, M T; Bennett, G; Buczkowski, G

    2015-01-01

    The odorous house ant, Tapinoma sessile (Say) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), exhibits a high degree of variation in colony spatial structure which may have direct and indirect effects on foraging. Protein marking and mark-release-recapture techniques were utilized to examine the effect of colony spatial structure on food dispersal. Sucrose water spiked with rabbit IgG protein was presented to colonies with varying spatial configurations in laboratory and field experiments. In monodomous lab colonies, the rate and extent of food dispersal was rapid due to a decrease in foraging area. In polydomous colonies, food dispersal was slower because conspecifics were forced to forage and share food over longer distances. However, over time, food was present in all extremities of the colony. Experiments conducted in the field produced similar results, with nests in close proximity to food yielding higher percentages of workers scoring positive for the marker. However, the percentage of workers possessing the marker decreased over time. Results from this study provide experimental data on mechanisms of food dispersal in monodomous and polydomous colonies of ants, and may be important for increasing the efficacy of management strategies against T. sessile and other pest ant species. PMID:25688088

  3. The Effects of Colony Structure and Resource Abundance on Food Dispersal in Tapinoma sessile (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    PubMed Central

    VanWeelden, M. T.; Bennett, G.; Buczkowski, G.

    2015-01-01

    The odorous house ant, Tapinoma sessile (Say) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), exhibits a high degree of variation in colony spatial structure which may have direct and indirect effects on foraging. Protein marking and mark–release–recapture techniques were utilized to examine the effect of colony spatial structure on food dispersal. Sucrose water spiked with rabbit IgG protein was presented to colonies with varying spatial configurations in laboratory and field experiments. In monodomous lab colonies, the rate and extent of food dispersal was rapid due to a decrease in foraging area. In polydomous colonies, food dispersal was slower because conspecifics were forced to forage and share food over longer distances. However, over time, food was present in all extremities of the colony. Experiments conducted in the field produced similar results, with nests in close proximity to food yielding higher percentages of workers scoring positive for the marker. However, the percentage of workers possessing the marker decreased over time. Results from this study provide experimental data on mechanisms of food dispersal in monodomous and polydomous colonies of ants, and may be important for increasing the efficacy of management strategies against T. sessile and other pest ant species. PMID:25688088

  4. The effects of colony structure and resource abundance on food dispersal in Tapinoma sessile (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Van Weelden, M T; Bennett, G; Buczkowski, G

    2015-01-01

    The odorous house ant, Tapinoma sessile (Say) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), exhibits a high degree of variation in colony spatial structure, which may have direct and indirect effects on foraging. Protein marking and mark-release-recapture techniques were utilized to examine the effect of colony spatial structure on food dispersal. Sucrose water spiked with rabbit IgG protein was presented to colonies with varying spatial configurations in laboratory and field experiments. In monodomous laboratory colonies, the rate and extent of food dispersal was rapid due to a decrease in foraging area. In polydomous colonies, food dispersal was slower because conspecifics were forced to forage and share food over longer distances. However, over time, food was present in all extremities of the colony. Experiments conducted in the field produced similar results, with nests in close proximity to food yielding higher percentages of workers scoring positive for the marker. However, the percentage of workers possessing the marker decreased over time. Results from this study provide experimental data on mechanisms of food dispersal in monodomous and polydomous colonies of ants and may be important for increasing the efficacy of management strategies against T. sessile and other pest ant species. PMID:25881634

  5. A Comparison of Anammox Bacterial Abundance and Community Structures in Three Different Emerged Plants-Related Sediments.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jinyu; Zhang, Jinping; Zhou, Xiaohong; Liu, Biao; Li, Yimin

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were used to document the abundance, diversity and community structure of anaerobic ammonia-oxidising (anammox) bacteria in the rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere sediments of three emergent macrophyte species (Iris pseudacorus, Thalia dealbata and Typha orientalis). The qPCR results confirmed the existence of anammox bacteria (AMX) with observed log number of gene copies per dry gram sediment ranging from 5.00 to 6.78. AMX was more abundant in T. orientalis-associated sediments than in the other two plant species. The I. pseudacorus- and T. orientalis-associated sediments had higher Shannon diversity values, indicating higher AMX diversity in these sediments. Based on the 16S rRNA gene, Candidatus 'Brocadia', Candidatus 'Kuenenia', Candidatus 'Jettenia' and new clusters were observed with the predominant Candidatus 'Kuenenia' cluster. The I. pseudacorus-associated sediments contained all the sequences of the C. 'Jettenia' cluster. Sequences obtained from T. orientalis-associated sediments contributed more than 90 % sequences in the new cluster, whereas none was found from I. pseudacorus. The new cluster was distantly related to known sequences; thus, this cluster was grouped outside the known clusters, indicating that the new cluster may be a new Planctomycetales genus. Further studies should be undertaken to confirm this finding. PMID:26077223

  6. Effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on microbial community structure and PAH ring hydroxylating dioxygenase gene abundance in soil.

    PubMed

    Sawulski, Przemyslaw; Clipson, Nicholas; Doyle, Evelyn

    2014-11-01

    Development of successful bioremediation strategies for environments contaminated with recalcitrant pollutants requires in-depth knowledge of the microorganisms and microbial processes involved in degradation. The response of soil microbial communities to three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenanthrene (3-ring), fluoranthene (4-ring) and benzo(a)pyrene (5-ring), was examined. Profiles of bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities were generated using molecular fingerprinting techniques (TRFLP, ARISA) and multivariate statistical tools were employed to interpret the effect of PAHs on community dynamics and composition. The extent and rate of PAH removal was directly related to the chemical structure, with the 5-ring PAH benzo(a)pyrene degraded more slowly than phenathrene or fluoranthene. Bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities were all significantly affected by PAH amendment, time and their interaction. Based on analysis of clone libraries, Actinobacteria appeared to dominate in fluoranthene amended soil, although they also represented a significant portion of the diversity in phenanthrene amended and unamended soils. In addition there appeared to be more γ-Proteobacteria and less Bacteroidetes in soil amended with either PAH compared to the control. The soil bacterial community clearly possessed the potential to degrade PAHs as evidenced by the abundance of PAH ring hydroxylating (PAH-RHDα) genes from both gram negative (GN) and gram positive (GP) bacteria in PAH-amended and control soils. Although the dioxygenase gene from GP bacteria was less abundant in soil than the gene associated with GN bacteria, significant (p < 0.001) increases in the abundance of the GP PAH-RHDα gene were observed during phenanthrene and fluoranthene degradation, whereas there was no significant difference in the abundance of the GN PAH-RHDα gene during the course of the experiment. Few studies to-date have examined the effect of pollutants on more than one microbial

  7. Variations in the abundance of fisheries resources and ecosystem structure in the Japan/East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chang Ik; Lee, Jae Bong; Seo, Young Il; Yoon, Sang Cheol; Kim, Suam

    2004-05-01

    Evidence supports the hypothesis that two climatic regime shifts in the North Pacific and the Japan/East Sea, have affected the dynamics of the marine ecosystem and fisheries resources from 1960 to 2000. Changes in both mixed layer depth (MLD) and primary production were detected in the Japan/East Sea after 1976. The 1976 regime shift appears to have caused the biomass replacement with changes in catch production of major exploited fisheries resources, including Pacific saury, Pacific sardine and filefish. Both fisheries yield and fish distribution are reflected in these decadal fluctuations. In the 1960s and 1990s, common squid dominated the catches whereas in the 1970s and 1980s, it was replaced by walleye pollock. In the post-1988 regime shift, the distribution of horse mackerel shifted westward and southward and its distributional overlap with common mackerel decreased. The habitat of Pacific sardine also shifted away from mackerel habitats during this period. To evaluate changes in the organization and structure of the ecosystem in the Japan/East Sea, a mass-balanced model, Ecopath, was employed. Based on two mass-balanced models, representing before (1970-75) and after (1978-84) the 1976 regime shift, the weighted mean trophic level of catch increased from 3.09 before to 3.28 after. Total biomass of species groups in the Japan/East Sea ecosystem increased by 15% and total catch production increased by 48% due to the 1976 regime shift. The largest changes occurred at mid-trophic levels, occupied by fishes and cephalopods. The dominant predatory species shifted from cephalopods to walleye pollock due to the 1976 regime shift. It is concluded that the climatic regime shifts caused changes in the structure of the ecosystem and the roles of major species, as well as, large variations in biomass and production of fisheries resources.

  8. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    SciTech Connect

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-03-08

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (NM) impedance technique are sighted and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency EIM impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acoustic-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens, (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  9. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    SciTech Connect

    GIURGIUTIU,VICTOR; REDMOND,JAMES M.; ROACH,DENNIS P.; RACKOW,KIRK A.

    2000-02-29

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance technique are cited and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high-frequency E/M impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acousto-ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  10. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Redmond, James M.; Roach, Dennis P.; Rackow, Kirk

    2000-06-01

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance technique are cited and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high frequency E/M impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acousto- ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens, (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  11. Effects of Habitat Structure and Fragmentation on Diversity and Abundance of Primates in Tropical Deciduous Forests in Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Büntge, Anna B. S.; Herzog, Sebastian K.; Kessler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Habitat structure and anthropogenic disturbance are known to affect primate diversity and abundance. However, researchers have focused on lowland rain forests, whereas endangered deciduous forests have been neglected. We aimed to investigate the relationships between primate diversity and abundance and habitat parameters in 10 deciduous forest fragments southeast of Santa Cruz, Bolivia. We obtained primate data via line-transect surveys and visual and acoustic observations. In addition, we assessed the vegetation structure (canopy height, understory density), size, isolation time, and surrounding forest area of the fragments. We interpreted our results in the context of the historical distribution data for primates in the area before fragmentation and interviews with local people. We detected 5 of the 8 historically observed primate species: Alouatta caraya, Aotus azarae boliviensis, Callithrix melanura, Callicebus donacophilus, and Cebus libidinosus juruanus. Total species number and detection rates decreased with understory density. Detection rates also negatively correlated with forest areas in the surroundings of a fragment, which may be due to variables not assessed, i.e., fragment shape, distance to nearest town. Observations for Alouatta and Aotus were too few to conduct further statistics. Cebus and Callicebus were present in 90% and 70% of the sites, respectively, and their density did not correlate with any of the habitat variables assessed, signaling high ecological plasticity and adaptability to anthropogenic impact in these species. Detections of Callithrix were higher in areas with low forest strata. Our study provides baseline data for future fragmentation studies in Neotropical dry deciduous forests and sets a base for specific conservation measures. PMID:20949116

  12. Comparison of the abundance and community structure of ammonia oxidizing prokaryotes in rice rhizosphere under three different irrigation cultivation modes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinping; Zhou, Xiaohong; Chen, Lei; Chen, Zhigang; Chu, Jinyu; Li, Yimin

    2016-05-01

    The abundance, diversity and community structure of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) in rice rhizosphere soils under three different irrigation cultivated modes, named continuous irrigation mode (C), intermittent irrigation mode (I) and semi-arid mode (M), respectively, were investigated using amoA gene as a molecular biomarker. Clone libraries and quantitative polymerase chain reaction results indicated the highest number of archaeal amoA gene copy was detected in M cultivation mode, then in I and C, whereas, their order of amoA gene copy numbers were I > M > C for AOB, and those were obvious higher than in the bulk soil. The ratios of AOA/AOB were greater than 1 for all samples, suggested the predominance of AOA throughout the period of rice growth in the three different irrigation cultivation modes. Diversity index (SChao1 and Shannon H) have an obvious variation in three different irrigation cultivation modes. For AOA, SChao1 was highest in M and lowest in I mode, whereas, Shannon H was highest in M cultivation mode and lowest in C mode. For AOB, mode M exhibited the highest diversity index (SChao1 and Shannon H), while C showed the lowest highest diversity, suggested long-term water input (continuous mode) may decrease diversity of ammonia oxidizers, whereas mode M may be more appropriate for them. In addition, AOA sequences fall within Nitrososphaera, Nitrosopumilus and Nitrosotalea cluster with proportion of 89.38, 8.85 and 1.77 %, respectively. AOB gene sequences belonged to the Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira genera with proportion of 90.97 and 9.03 %, respectively. In addition, the abundances, diversity and community structure had an obvious temporal variation in three developmental stages of rice, further suggested rice growth obviously affected the ammonia oxidizing prokaryotes in their rhizosphere soil. PMID:27038955

  13. Abundance of non-native crabs in intertidal habitats of New England with natural and artificial structure.

    PubMed

    Lovely, Christina M; O'Connor, Nancy J; Judge, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    Marine habitats containing complex physical structure (e.g., crevices) can provide shelter from predation for benthic invertebrates. To examine effects of natural and artificial structure on the abundance of intertidal juvenile crabs, 2 experiments were conducted in Kingston Bay, Massachusetts, USA, from July to September, 2012. In the first experiment, structure was manipulated in a two-factor design that was placed in the high intertidal for 3 one-week periods to test for both substrate type (sand vs. rock) and the presence or absence of artificial structure (mesh grow-out bags used in aquaculture, ∼0.5 m(2) with 62 mm(2) mesh openings). The Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, and small individuals of the green crab, Carcinus maenas, were observed only in the treatments of rocks and mesh bag plus rocks. Most green crabs were small (<6 mm in carapace width) whereas H. sanguineus occurred in a wide range of sizes. In the second experiment, 3 levels of oyster-shell treatments were established using grow-out bags placed on a muddy sand substrate in the low intertidal zone: mesh grow-out bags without shells, grow-out bags with oyster shells, and grow-out bags containing live oysters. Replicate bags were deployed weekly for 7 weeks in a randomized complete block design. All crabs collected in the bags were juvenile C. maenas (1-15 mm carapace width), and numbers of crabs differed 6-fold among treatments, with most crabs present in bags with live oysters (29.5 ± 10.6 m(-2) [mean ± S.D.]) and fewest in bags without shells (4.9 ± 3.7 m(-2)). Both C. maenas and H. sanguineus occurred in habitats with natural structure (cobble rocks). The attraction of juvenile C. maenas to artificial structure consisting of plastic mesh bags containing both oyster shells and living oysters could potentially impact oyster aquaculture operations. PMID:26401456

  14. Abundance of non-native crabs in intertidal habitats of New England with natural and artificial structure

    PubMed Central

    Lovely, Christina M.; Judge, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Marine habitats containing complex physical structure (e.g., crevices) can provide shelter from predation for benthic invertebrates. To examine effects of natural and artificial structure on the abundance of intertidal juvenile crabs, 2 experiments were conducted in Kingston Bay, Massachusetts, USA, from July to September, 2012. In the first experiment, structure was manipulated in a two-factor design that was placed in the high intertidal for 3 one-week periods to test for both substrate type (sand vs. rock) and the presence or absence of artificial structure (mesh grow-out bags used in aquaculture, ∼0.5 m2 with 62 mm2 mesh openings). The Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, and small individuals of the green crab, Carcinus maenas, were observed only in the treatments of rocks and mesh bag plus rocks. Most green crabs were small (<6 mm in carapace width) whereas H. sanguineus occurred in a wide range of sizes. In the second experiment, 3 levels of oyster-shell treatments were established using grow-out bags placed on a muddy sand substrate in the low intertidal zone: mesh grow-out bags without shells, grow-out bags with oyster shells, and grow-out bags containing live oysters. Replicate bags were deployed weekly for 7 weeks in a randomized complete block design. All crabs collected in the bags were juvenile C. maenas (1–15 mm carapace width), and numbers of crabs differed 6-fold among treatments, with most crabs present in bags with live oysters (29.5 ± 10.6 m−2 [mean ± S.D.]) and fewest in bags without shells (4.9 ± 3.7 m−2). Both C. maenas and H. sanguineus occurred in habitats with natural structure (cobble rocks). The attraction of juvenile C. maenas to artificial structure consisting of plastic mesh bags containing both oyster shells and living oysters could potentially impact oyster aquaculture operations. PMID:26401456

  15. Spatiotemporal Changes in the Structure and Composition of a Less-Abundant Bacterial Phylum (Planctomycetes) in Two Perialpine Lakes ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pollet, Thomas; Tadonléké, Rémy D.; Humbert, Jean François

    2011-01-01

    We used fingerprinting and cloning-sequencing to study the spatiotemporal dynamics and diversity of Planctomycetes in two perialpine lakes with contrasting environmental conditions. Planctomycetes, which are less-abundant bacteria in freshwater ecosystems, appeared to be structured in the same way as the entire bacterial community in these ecosystems. They were more diversified and displayed fewer temporal variations in the hypolimnia than in the epilimnia. Like the more-abundant bacterial groups in aquatic systems, Planctomycetes communities seem to be composed of a very small number of abundant and widespread operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and a large number of OTUs that are present at low abundance. This indicates that the concept of “abundant or core” and “rare” bacterial phylotypes could also be applied to less-abundant freshwater bacterial phyla. The richness and diversity of Planctomycetes were mainly driven by pH and were similar in both of the lakes studied, whereas the composition of the Planctomycetes community seemed to be determined by a combination of factors including temperature, pH, and nutrients. The relative abundances of the dominant OTUs varied over time and were differently associated with abiotic factors. Our findings demonstrate that less-abundant bacterial phyla, such as Planctomycetes, can display strong spatial and seasonal variations linked to environmental conditions and suggest that their functional role in the lakes studied might be attributable mainly to a small number of phylotypes and vary over space and time in the water column. PMID:21602381

  16. Structural disorder and the loss of RNA homeostasis in aging and neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Douglas A.; Woulfe, John

    2013-01-01

    Whereas many cases of neurodegenerative disease feature the abnormal accumulation of protein, an abundance of recent literature highlights loss of RNA homeostasis as a ubiquitous and central feature of pathological states. In some diseases expanded repeats have been identified in non-coding regions of disease-associated transcripts, calling into question the relevance of protein in the disease mechanism. We review the literature in support of a hypothesis that intrinsically disordered proteins (proteins that lack a stable three dimensional conformation) are particularly sensitive to an age-related decline in maintenance of protein homeostasis. The potential consequences for structurally disordered RNA-binding proteins are explored, including their aggregation into complexes that could be transmitted through a prion-like mechanism. We propose that the spread of ribonucleoprotein complexes through the nervous system could propagate a neuronal error catastrophe at the level of RNA metabolism. PMID:23967011

  17. Evolution of long-lived globular cluster stars. II. Sodium abundance variations on the asymptotic giant branch as a function of globular cluster age and metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnel, Corinne; Chantereau, William

    2016-02-01

    Context. Long-lived stars in globular clusters exhibit chemical peculiarities with respect to their halo counterparts. In particular, sodium-enriched stars are identified as belonging to a second stellar population born from cluster material contaminated by the hydrogen-burning ashes of a first stellar population. Their presence and numbers in different locations of the colour-magnitude diagram provide important constraints on the self-enrichment scenarios. In particular, the ratio of Na-poor to Na-rich stars on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) has recently been found to vary strongly from cluster to cluster (NGC 6752, 47 Tuc, and NGC 2808), while it is relatively constant on the red giant branch (RGB). Aims: We investigate the impact of both age and metallicity on the theoretical sodium spread along the AGB within the framework of the fast rotating massive star (FRMS) scenario for globular cluster self-enrichment. Methods: We computed evolution models of low-mass stars for four different metallicities ([Fe/H] = -2.2, -1.75, -1.15, -0.5) assuming the initial helium-sodium abundance correlation for second population stars derived from the FRMS models and using mass loss prescriptions on the RGB with two realistic values of the free parameter in the Reimers formula. Results: Based on this grid of models we derive the theoretical critical initial mass for a star born with a given helium, sodium, and metal content that determines whether that star will climb or not the AGB. This allows us to predict the maximum sodium content expected on the AGB for globular clusters as a function of both their metallicity and age. We find that (1) at a given metallicity, younger clusters are expected to host AGB stars exhibiting a larger sodium spread than older clusters and (2) at a given age, higher sodium dispersion along the AGB is predicted in the most metal-poor globular clusters than in the metal-rich ones. We also confirm the strong impact of the mass loss rate in the earlier

  18. Age structure and cooperation in coevolutionary games on dynamic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zilong; Hu, Zhenhua; Zhou, Xiaoping; Yi, Jingzhang

    2015-04-01

    Our proposed model imitates the growth of a population and describes the age structure and the level of cooperation in games on dynamic network with continuous changes of structure and topology. The removal of nodes and links caused by age-dependent attack, together with the nodes addition standing for the newborns of population, badly ruins Matthew effect in this coevolutionary process. Though the network is generated by growth and preferential attachment, it degenerates into random network and it is no longer heterogeneous. When the removal of nodes and links is equal to the addition of nodes and links, the size of dynamic network is maintained in steady-state, so is the low level of cooperation. Severe structure variation, homogeneous topology and continuous invasion of new defection jointly make dynamic network unsuitable for the survival of cooperator even when the probability with which the newborn players initially adopt the strategy cooperation is high, while things change slightly when the connections of newborn players are restricted. Fortunately, moderate interactions in a generation trigger an optimal recovering process to encourage cooperation. The model developed in this paper outlines an explanation of the cohesion changes in the development process of an organization. Some suggestions for cooperative behavior improvement are given in the end.

  19. Aging effects on the structure underlying balance abilities tests.

    PubMed

    Urushihata, Toshiya; Kinugasa, Takashi; Soma, Yuki; Miyoshi, Hirokazu

    2010-01-01

    Balance impairment is one of the biggest risk factors for falls reducing inactivity, resulting in nursing care. Therefore, balance ability is crucial to maintain the activities of independent daily living of older adults. Many tests to assess balance ability have been developed. However, few reports reveal the structure underlying results of balance performance tests comparing young and older adults. Covariance structure analysis is a tool that is used to test statistically whether factorial structure fits data. This study examined aging effects on the factorial structure underlying balance performance tests. Participants comprised 60 healthy young women aged 22 ± 3 years (young group) and 60 community-dwelling older women aged 69 ± 5 years (older group). Six balance tests: postural sway, one-leg standing, functional reach, timed up and go (TUG), gait, and the EquiTest were employed. Exploratory factor analysis revealed that three clearly interpretable factors were extracted in the young group. The first factor had high loadings on the EquiTest, and was interpreted as 'Reactive'. The second factor had high loadings on the postural sway test, and was interpreted as 'Static'. The third factor had high loadings on TUG and gait test, and was interpreted as 'Dynamic'. Similarly, three interpretable factors were extracted in the older group. The first factor had high loadings on the postural sway test and the EquiTest and therefore was interpreted as 'Static and Reactive'. The second factor, which had high loadings on the EquiTest, was interpreted as 'Reactive'. The third factor, which had high loadings on TUG and the gait test, was interpreted as 'Dynamic'. A covariance structure model was applied to the test data: the second-order factor was balance ability, and the first-order factors were static, dynamic and reactive factors which were assumed to be measured based on the six balance tests. Goodness-of-fit index (GFI) of the models were acceptable (young group, GFI

  20. Aging Effects on the Structure Underlying Balance Abilities Tests

    PubMed Central

    Kinugasa, Takashi; Soma, Yuki; Miyoshi, Hirokazu

    2010-01-01

    Balance impairment is one of the biggest risk factors for falls reducing inactivity, resulting in nursing care. Therefore, balance ability is crucial to maintain the activities of independent daily living of older adults. Many tests to assess balance ability have been developed. However, few reports reveal the structure underlying results of balance performance tests comparing young and older adults. Covariance structure analysis is a tool that is used to test statistically whether factorial structure fits data. This study examined aging effects on the factorial structure underlying balance performance tests. Participants comprised 60 healthy young women aged 22 ± 3 years (young group) and 60 community-dwelling older women aged 69 ± 5 years (older group). Six balance tests: postural sway, one-leg standing, functional reach, timed up and go (TUG), gait, and the EquiTest were employed. Exploratory factor analysis revealed that three clearly interpretable factors were extracted in the young group. The first factor had high loadings on the EquiTest, and was interpreted as ‘Reactive’. The second factor had high loadings on the postural sway test, and was interpreted as ‘Static’. The third factor had high loadings on TUG and gait test, and was interpreted as ‘Dynamic’. Similarly, three interpretable factors were extracted in the older group. The first factor had high loadings on the postural sway test and the EquiTest and therefore was interpreted as ‘Static and Reactive’. The second factor, which had high loadings on the EquiTest, was interpreted as ‘Reactive’. The third factor, which had high loadings on TUG and the gait test, was interpreted as ‘Dynamic’. A covariance structure model was applied to the test data: the second-order factor was balance ability, and the first-order factors were static, dynamic and reactive factors which were assumed to be measured based on the six balance tests. Goodness-of-fit index (GFI) of the models were

  1. The Effects of Individual PCB Congeners on the Soil Bacterial Community Structure and the Abundance of Biphenyl Dioxygenase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Paola A.; Lin, LianShin; Just, Craig L.; Hu, Dingfei; Hornbuckle, Keri C.; Schnoor, Jerald L.; Van Aken, Benoit

    2009-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are toxic environmental contaminants that represent a class of 209 congeners characterized by different degree of chlorination and substitution patterns. Most of experimental studies about microbial degradation of PCBs have been conducted on PCB mixtures, even though evidence accumulated in bacteria and other organisms shows that exposure to different congeners may have different biological effects. Microcosm experiments were conducted using aerobic agitated soil slurries individually exposed to PCB congeners with different degrees of chlorination: PCB-3, 15, 28, and 77, and the commercial mixture Aroclor 1242. After four weeks of incubation, PCBs were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) showing different transformation extents: With the exception of PCB-15 that was not significantly transformed (7%), biodegradation rates decreased with the degree of chlorination, from 75% for PCB-3 to 22% for PCB-77 and Aroclor 1242. The bacterial abundance, as measured by colony counting and 16S rDNA quantification by real-time PCR, was lower (of about 40%) in soil microcosms exposed to the higher-chlorinated congeners, PCB-28, PCB-77, and Aroclor 1242, as compared to non-exposed soils and soils exposed to the lower-chlorinated congeners, PCB-3 and PCB-15. The relative abundance of different taxonomic groups, as determined by real-time PCR, revealed an increase of β-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria in all microcosms exposed to PCBs, as compared with non-exposed soil. In addition, exposure to PCB-77 and Aroclor 1242 resulted in a higher abundance of α-Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria. Globally, these results suggest that exposure to PCBs (and especially to higher-chlorinated congeners and Aroclor 1242) selected bacterial groups involving most known PCB degraders, i.e., β-Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria. The quantification of biphenyl dioxygenase (BPH) genes - involved in the aerobic degradation of PCBs - using real

  2. [Relative abundance, population structure, habitat preferences and activity patterns of Tapirus bairdii (Perissodactyla: Tapiridae), in Chimalapas forest, Oaxaca, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Lira-Torres, Iván; Briones-Salas, Miguel; Sánchez-Rojas, Gerardo

    2014-12-01

    Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) is endangered primarily because of habitat loss and fragmentation, and overhunting throughout its distribution range. One of the priority land areas for the conservation of this species is the Northern part of its range in the Chimalapas forest, Oaxaca. The aim of this research was to determine the relative abundance, population struc- ture, habitat preferences and activity patterns of Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) in the Chimalapas forest, Oaxaca, Mexico, through the non-invasive technique of camera-trap sampling. A total of five sampling sessions were undertaken among 2009-2013, and used a total of 30 camera-traps in each period. The determinant factor of the sampling design was the hunting between two study areas. A total sampling effort of 9000 trap-days allowed to estimate an index of relative abundance (IRA) of 6.77 tapir photographs/1,000 trap-days (n = 61). IRA varied significantly between sampling stations (Mann-Whitney, p < 0.01). The frequency of Baird's tapir photos was higher in the dry season in tropical rain forest without hunting (χ2, p < 0.5). In the rainy season, the tropical rain forest and secondary vegetation habitats showed higher photo frequency than expected from random (χ2, p < 0.5). Considering population structure, a 95.08% of adult animals was obtained in photographic records (n = 58). Three types of activity pattern were observed, with more nocturnal records (88.33%; Kruskal-Wallis, p < 0.05). The Chimalapas forest appears to be the second most important terrestrial priority ecoregion, just after the Mayan Forest (Campeche, Chiapas, Quintana Roo), for the conservation of tapir populations, not only for Mexico but also for Central America. PMID:25720176

  3. Impact of structural aging on seismic risk assessment of reinforced concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingwood, B.; Song, J.

    1996-03-01

    The Structural Aging Program is addressing the potential for degradation of concrete structural components and systems in nuclear power plants over time due to aging and aggressive environmental stressors. Structures are passive under normal operating conditions but play a key role in mitigating design-basis events, particularly those arising from external challenges such as earthquakes, extreme winds, fires and floods. Structures are plant-specific and unique, often are difficult to inspect, and are virtually impossible to replace. The importance of structural failures in accident mitigation is amplified because such failures may lead to common-cause failures of other components. Structural condition assessment and service life prediction must focus on a few critical components and systems within the plant. Components and systems that are dominant contributors to risk and that require particular attention can be identified through the mathematical formalism of a probabilistic risk assessment, or PRA. To illustrate, the role of structural degradation due to aging on plant risk is examined through the framework of a Level 1 seismic PRA of a nuclear power plant. Plausible mechanisms of structural degradation are found to increase the core damage probability by approximately a factor of two.

  4. Evaluation of the ecotoxicological impact of the organochlorine chlordecone on soil microbial community structure, abundance, and function.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Chloé; Devers, Marion; Béguet, Jérémie; Boggio, Baptiste; Rouard, Nadine; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2016-03-01

    The insecticide chlordecone applied for decades in banana plantations currently contaminates 20,000 ha of arable land in the French West Indies. Although the impact of various pesticides on soil microorganisms has been studied, chlordecone toxicity to the soil microbial community has never been assessed. We investigated in two different soils (sandy loam and silty loam) exposed to different concentrations of CLD (D0, control; D1 and D10, 1 and 10 times the agronomical dose) over different periods of time (3, 7, and 32 days): (i) the fate of chlordecone by measuring (14)C-chlordecone mass balance and (ii) the impact of chlordecone on microbial community structure, abundance, and function, using standardized methods (-A-RISA, taxon-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR), and (14)C-compounds mineralizing activity). Mineralization of (14)C-chlordecone was inferior below 1 % of initial (14)C-activity. Less than 2 % of (14)C-activity was retrieved from the water-soluble fraction, while most of it remained in the organic-solvent-extractable fraction (75 % of initial (14)C-activity). Only 23 % of the remaining (14)C-activity was measured in nonextractable fraction. The fate of chlordecone significantly differed between the two soils. The soluble and nonextractable fractions were significantly higher in sandy loam soil than in silty loam soil. All the measured microbiological parameters allowed discriminating statistically the two soils and showed a variation over time. The genetic structure of the bacterial community remained insensitive to chlordecone exposure in silty loam soil. In response to chlordecone exposure, the abundance of Gram-negative bacterial groups (β-, γ-Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Bacteroidetes) was significantly modified only in sandy loam soil. The mineralization of (14)C-sodium acetate and (14)C-2,4-D was insensitive to chlordecone exposure in silty loam soil. However, mineralization of (14)C-sodium acetate was significantly reduced in soil

  5. Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant proteins from embryos of Artemia franciscana: structural properties and protective abilities during desiccation.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Leaf C; Menze, Michael A; Hand, Steven C

    2014-01-01

    Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are highly hydrophilic, and their expression is associated with desiccation tolerance in both plants and animals. Here we show that two LEA proteins from embryos of Artemia franciscana, AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m, are intrinsically disordered in solution but upon desiccation gain secondary structure, as measured by circular dichroism. Trifluoroethanol and sodium dodecyl sulfate are both shown to induce α-helical structure in AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m. Bioinformatic predictions of secondary-structure content for both proteins correspond most closely to conformations measured in the dry state. Because some LEA proteins afford protection to desiccation-sensitive proteins during drying and subsequent rehydration, we tested for this capacity in AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m. The protective capacities vary, depending on the target enzyme. For the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, neither AfrLEA2 nor AfrLEA3m, with or without trehalose present, was able to afford protection better than that provided by bovine serum albumin (BSA) under the same conditions. However, for another cytoplasmic enzyme, phosphofructokinase, both AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m in the presence of trehalose were able to afford protection far greater than that provided by BSA with trehalose. Finally, for the mitochondrial enzyme citrate synthase, 400-μg/mL AfrLEA3m without trehalose provided significantly more protection than the same concentration of either AfrLEA2 or BSA. PMID:25244376

  6. The temperature and ionization structure of the emitting gas in HII galaxies: implications for the accuracy of abundance determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hägele, Guillermo F.; Pérez-Montero, Enrique; Díaz, Ángeles I.; Terlevich, Elena; Terlevich, Roberto

    2006-10-01

    We propose a methodology to perform a self-consistent analysis of the physical properties of the emitting gas of HII galaxies adequate to the data that can be obtained with the 21st century technology. This methodology requires the production and calibration of empirical relations between the different line temperatures that should supersede currently used ones based on very simple, and poorly tested, photoionization model sequences. As a first step to reach these goals, we have obtained simultaneous blue to far red long-slit spectra with the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) of three compact HII galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 2 (DR2) spectral catalogue using the INAOE Virtual Observatory superserver. Our spectra cover the range from 3200 to 10500Å, including the Balmer jump, the [OII]λλ3727, 29Å lines, the [SIII]λλ9069, 9532Å doublet as well as various weak auroral lines such as [OIII]λ4363Å and [SIII]λ6312Å. For the three objects, we have measured at least four line temperatures, T([OIII]), T([SIII]), T([OII]) and T([SII]), and the Balmer continuum temperature T(Bac). These measurements and a careful and realistic treatment of the observational errors yield total oxygen abundances with accuracies between 5 and 9 per cent. These accuracies are expected to improve as better calibrations based on more precise measurements, both on electron temperatures and densities, are produced. We have compared our obtained spectra with those downloaded from the SDSS DR3 finding a satisfactory agreement. The analysis of these spectra yields values of line temperatures and elemental ionic and total abundances which are in general agreement with those derived from the WHT spectra, although for most quantities they can only be taken as estimates since, due to the lack of direct measurements of the required lines, theoretical models had to be used whose uncertainties are impossible to quantify. The ionization structure found for the

  7. Spatial and temporal variation in the abundance, distribution and population structure of epibenthic megafauna in Port Foster, Deception Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, T. L.; Ruhl, H. A.; Baldwin, R. J.; Kaufmann, R. S.

    2003-06-01

    Abundance and spatial distribution of epibenthic megafauna were examined at Port Foster, Deception Island, five times between March 1999 and November 2000. Camera sled surveys and bottom trawls were used to identify and collect specimens, and camera sled photographs also were used to determine abundances and spatial distributions for each species. The ophiuroid Ophionotus victoriae, the regular echinoid Sterechinus neumayeri, and one or more species of Porifera were the most abundant taxa during this sampling period. Abundances of O. victoriae varied throughout the annual cycle, peaking in June 2000, and were correlated positively with sedimentation rates. In contrast, abundances of S. neumayeri were consistent throughout the sampling period, except for a peak in June 2000, during austral winter. Peak abundances for both species coincided with a large number of small individuals, indicating apparent recruitment events for O. victoriae and S. neumayeri during this time period. Poriferans, as a group, had statistically similar abundances during each sampling period. Low-abundance species tended to be aggregated on both small and large spatial scales, their distributions probably influenced by reproductive method, gregarious settlement, and food availability. The spatial distribution of S. neumayeri in June 2000 and O. victoriae was random across multiple spatial scales, perhaps in response to food availability and broad environmental tolerances, respectively.

  8. Tectonic structures on Mercury: kinematics and age dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, Lorenza; Massironi, Matteo; Rothery, David; Di Achille, Gaetano; Marchi, Simone; Galluzzi, Valentina; Ferrari, Sabrina; Fassett, Caleb; Cremonese, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    At a global scale, Mercury is dominated by contractional features manifested as lobate scarps, wrinkle ridges and high-relief ridges. Here, we show that some of these features are associated with strike-slip kinematic indicators, which we identified using flyby and orbital Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) data and digital terrain models. We recognize oblique-shear kinematics along lobate scarps and high-relief ridges by means of (1) map geometries of fault patterns (frontal thrusts bordered by lateral ramps, strike-slip duplexes, restraining bends); (2) structural morphologies indicating lateral shearing (en echelon folding, pop-ups, pull-aparts); and (3) estimates of offsets based on displaced crater rims and differences in elevation between pop-up structures and pull-apart basins and their surroundings. Transpressional faults, documented across a wide range of latitudes, are found associated with reactivated rims of ancient buried basins and, in most cases, linked to frontal thrusts as lateral ramps hundreds of kilometres long. This latter observation suggests stable directions of tectonic transport over wide regions of Mercury's surface. In contrast, global cooling would imply an overall isotropic contraction with limited processes of lateral shearing induced by pre-existent lithospheric heterogeneities. Mantle convection therefore may have played an important role during the early tectonic evolution of Mercury. Estimating absolute model ages for compressional features and comparing it from what it is envisaged with thermal modeling based on cooling alone can be useful in determining if other processes could have been responsible for lobate scarps nucleation. In particular, ages more ancient that the one predicted by the models would imply other kind of tectonic processes ongoing during the early evolution of Mercury . For this reason, we date an extended thrust system, which we term the Blossom Thrust System, located between 80°E and 100°E, and 30°N and 15

  9. Inferring Selection Intensity and Allele Age from Multilocus Haplotype Structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    It is a challenging task to infer selection intensity and allele age from population genetic data. Here we present a method that can efficiently estimate selection intensity and allele age from the multilocus haplotype structure in the vicinity of a segregating mutant under positive selection. We use a structured-coalescent approach to model the effect of directional selection on the gene genealogies of neutral markers linked to the selected mutant. The frequency trajectory of the selected allele follows the Wright-Fisher model. Given the position of the selected mutant, we propose a simplified multilocus haplotype model that can efficiently model the dynamics of the ancestral haplotypes under the joint influence of selection and recombination. This model approximates the ancestral genealogies of the sample, which reduces the number of states from an exponential function of the number of single-nucleotide polymorphism loci to a quadratic function. That allows parameter inference from data covering DNA regions as large as several hundred kilo-bases. Importance sampling algorithms are adopted to evaluate the probability of a sample by exploring the space of both allele frequency trajectories of the selected mutation and gene genealogies of the linked sites. We demonstrate by simulation that the method can accurately estimate selection intensity for moderate and strong positive selection. We apply the method to a data set of the G6PD gene in an African population and obtain an estimate of 0.0456 (95% confidence interval 0.0144−0.0769) for the selection intensity. The proposed method is novel in jointly modeling the multilocus haplotype pattern caused by recombination and mutation, allowing the analysis of haplotype data in recombining regions. Moreover, the method is applicable to data from populations under exponential growth and a variety of other demographic histories. PMID:23797107

  10. Douglas-fir forests in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon and Washington: is the abundance of small mammals related to stand age and moisture?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coen, P.S.; Bury, R.B.; Spies, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    Red tree voles (Arborimus longicaudus) were the only small mammal strongly associated with old-growth forests, whereas vagrant shrews (Sorex vagrans) were most abundant in young forests. Pacific marsh shrews (S. bendirii) were most abundant in wet old-growth forests, but abundance of this species in young (wet) forests needs further study. Clearcuts had a mammalian fauna distinct from young forest stands. Abundance of several species was correlated to habitat features unique to naturally regenerated forests, indicated an urgent need to study the long-term effects of forest management to nongame wildlife.

  11. Accounting for subgroup structure in line-transect abundance estimates of false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) in Hawaiian waters.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Amanda L; Forney, Karin A; Oleson, Erin M; Barlow, Jay

    2014-01-01

    For biological populations that form aggregations (or clusters) of individuals, cluster size is an important parameter in line-transect abundance estimation and should be accurately measured. Cluster size in cetaceans has traditionally been represented as the total number of individuals in a group, but group size may be underestimated if group members are spatially diffuse. Groups of false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens) can comprise numerous subgroups that are dispersed over tens of kilometers, leading to a spatial mismatch between a detected group and the theoretical framework of line-transect analysis. Three stocks of false killer whales are found within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone of the Hawaiian Islands (Hawaiian EEZ): an insular main Hawaiian Islands stock, a pelagic stock, and a Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) stock. A ship-based line-transect survey of the Hawaiian EEZ was conducted in the summer and fall of 2010, resulting in six systematic-effort visual sightings of pelagic (n = 5) and NWHI (n = 1) false killer whale groups. The maximum number and spatial extent of subgroups per sighting was 18 subgroups and 35 km, respectively. These sightings were combined with data from similar previous surveys and analyzed within the conventional line-transect estimation framework. The detection function, mean cluster size, and encounter rate were estimated separately to appropriately incorporate data collected using different methods. Unlike previous line-transect analyses of cetaceans, subgroups were treated as the analytical cluster instead of groups because subgroups better conform to the specifications of line-transect theory. Bootstrap values (n = 5,000) of the line-transect parameters were randomly combined to estimate the variance of stock-specific abundance estimates. Hawai'i pelagic and NWHI false killer whales were estimated to number 1,552 (CV = 0.66; 95% CI = 479-5,030) and 552 (CV = 1.09; 95% CI = 97

  12. Separating the effects of intra- and interspecific age-structured interactions in an experimental fish assemblage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, R.C.; Trexler, J.C.; Loftus, W.F.

    2001-01-01

    We documented patterns of age-structured biotic interactions in four mesocosm experiments with an assemblage of three species of co-occurring fishes from the Florida Everglades, the eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki), sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna), and bluefin killifish (Lucania goodei). These species were chosen based on their high abundance and overlapping diets. Juvenile mosquitofish and sailfin mollies, at a range of densities matching field estimates, were maintained in the presence of adult mosquitofish, sailfin mollies, and bluefin killifish to test for effects of competition and predation on juvenile survival and growth. The mesocosms held 1,200 1 of water and all conditions were set to simulate those in Shark River Slough, Everglades National Park (ENP), USA. We placed floating mats of periphyton and bladderwort in each tank in standard volumes that matched field values to provide cover and to introduce invertebrate prey. Of 15 possible intra- and interspecific age-structured interactions, we found 7 to be present at the densities of these fish found in Shark River Slough marshes. Predation by adult mosquitofish on juvenile fish, including conspecifics, was the strongest effect observed. We also observed growth limitation in mosquitofish and sailfin molly juveniles from intra- and interspecific competition. When maintained at high densities, juvenile mosquitofish changed their diets to include more cladocerans and fewer chironomid larvae relative to low densities. We estimated size-specific gape limitation by adult mosquitofish when consuming juvenile mosquitofish and sailfin mollies. At high field densities, intraspecific competition might prolong the time period when juveniles are vulnerable to predation by adult mosquitofish. These results suggest that path analysis, or other techniques used to document food-web interactions, must include age-specific roles of these fishes.

  13. Urban groundwater age modeling under unconfined condition - Impact of underground structures on groundwater age: Evidence of a piston effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, Guillaume; Rossier, Yvan; Eisenlohr, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, underground structures are shown to have a major influence on the groundwater mean age distribution described as a dispersive piston effect. Urban underground development does not occur without impacts on subsoil resources. In particular, groundwater resources can be vulnerable and generate disturbances when this space is exploited. Groundwater age spatial distribution data are fundamental for resource management as it can provide operational sustainability indicators. However, the application of groundwater age modeling is neglected regarding the potential effect of underground structures in urban areas. A three dimensional modeling approach was conducted to quantify the impact of two underground structures: (1) an impervious structure and (2) a draining structure. Both structures are shown to cause significant mixing processes occurring between shallow and deeper aquifers. The design technique used for draining structures is shown to have the greatest impact, generating a decrease in mean age of more than 80% under the structure. Groundwater age modeling is shown to be relevant for highlighting the role played by underground structures in advective-dispersive flows in urban areas.

  14. Long-term signal of population disturbance after pulse exposure to an insecticide: rapid recovery of abundance, persistent alteration of structure.

    PubMed

    Liess, Matthias; Pieters, Barry Johan; Duquesne, Sabine

    2006-05-01

    Little is known about the effect of pulse exposure to toxicants on populations when density regulation is present. Yet, for a more realistic risk assessment, it is necessary to include effect and recovery at the population level. Here, we investigate the long-term and delayed effects as well as the subsequent recovery of populations of Daphnia magna. A 24-h pulse of the pyrethroid fenvalerate reduced the abundance at a concentration of 1.0 microg/L and higher. However, abundance recovered and reached control levels after one to two generation times (GTs) following reproduction of surviving individuals (GT = 8 d, from birth until first reproduction). At high concentrations above the acute median lethal concentration (3.2 micorg/L), abundance initially decreased even more strongly but was then elevated compared to control values for an extended period of time. Population structure (size distribution) was affected at lower concentrations than abundance (> 0.8 microg/L). In addition, the alteration of population structure lasted for a long time, so that control levels were approached only after approximately six or seven GTs. Our results show that pulse exposure to toxicants may lead to a long-term alteration of population structure even at sublethal concentrations. Possible mechanisms that sustain the effects of toxicants may be delayed life-history effects on the individual level and elevated competition because of altered population structure on the population level. PMID:16704065

  15. Biochemical and structural characterization of an endoplasmic reticulum-localized late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Rie; Furuki, Takao; Shimizu, Tempei; Takezawa, Daisuke; Kikawada, Takahiro; Sakurai, Minoru; Sugawara, Yasutake

    2014-11-28

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate to high levels in seeds during late maturation, are associated with desiccation tolerance. A member of the LEA protein family was found in cultured cells of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha; preculture treatment of these cells with 0.5M sucrose medium led to their acquisition of desiccation tolerance. We characterized this preculture-induced LEA protein, designated as MpLEA1. MpLEA1 is predominantly hydrophilic with a few hydrophobic residues that may represent its putative signal peptide. The protein also contains a putative endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention sequence, HEEL, at the C-terminus. Microscopic observations indicated that GFP-fused MpLEA1 was mainly localized in the ER. The recombinant protein MpLEA1 is intrinsically disordered in solution. On drying, MpLEA1 shifted predominantly toward α-helices from random coils. Such changes in conformation are a typical feature of the group 3 LEA proteins. Recombinant MpLEA1 prevented the aggregation of α-casein during desiccation-rehydration events, suggesting that MpLEA1 exerts anti-aggregation activity against desiccation-sensitive proteins by functioning as a "molecular shield". Moreover, the anti-aggregation activity of MpLEA1 was ten times greater than that of BSA or insect LEA proteins, which are known to prevent aggregation on drying. Here, we show that an ER-localized LEA protein, MpLEA1, possesses biochemical and structural features specific to group 3 LEA proteins. PMID:25450698

  16. A Respectable Old Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swensen, Clifford H.

    1983-01-01

    Contrasts the relatively abundant information on the young with the paucity of research knowledge on the aged, and asserts that psychologists have too few solutions to coping with the problems of aging. Suggests the integration of older adults into all aspects of society through structural change. (Author/AOS)

  17. The structure of horizontal-branch models. I - The zero-age horizontal branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorman, Ben

    1992-01-01

    A detailed study of the structure of zero-age horizontal-branch (ZAHB) models is studied in order to show how the hydrostatic structure of these models changes with the input parameters and determines the H-R diagram location of a given model. The properties of composite polytropes on the homology-invariant (U,V)-plane are demonstrated. A variety of test models and sequences were constructed to elucidate the underlying factors that give rise to the wide variation in HB model properties with composition. The roles of the CNO elements as nuclear catalysts and of the envelope sources, as well as the envelope helium abundance are reexamined. It is found that, for stars of a fixed range of mass arriving on the HB, the stellar distribution is determined mainly by CNO for low metallicities (Fe/H of less than about -1), but mainly by opacity sources for high metallicities. The value of Fe/H where CNO ceases to dominate depends significantly on the adopted opacity and will decrease if and when opacity estimates are revised upward.

  18. Inconsistent Changes in Microbial Community Structure and Abundance with Biochar Amendment in Rice Paddy Soils from South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Qu, J.; Liu, X.; Zheng, J.; Li, L.; Pan, G.

    2012-04-01

    Effects of biochar amendment on soil microbiota had not yet been well understood. We conducted a cross site field study on biochar amendment to rice paddies from south China in 2010. The experiment was performed with four treatments including N fertilization only (C0N), N fertilization plus biochar at 20t/ha (C1N) and at 40t/ha (C2N) as well as a control without N fertilization and biochar (C0N0) consistently with three sites. Biochar was spread at soil surface and incorporated into soil and thoroughly mixed to depth of about 12cm before padding for rice seedling transplantation. Rice production was conducted with conventional water and nutrient management practices adapting to local climate and cultivar conditions. Topsoil samples were collected from each treatment plot across sites for chemical properties and molecular analysis after rice harvest in autumn of 2010. Contents of organic carbon, total N as well as soil microbial biomass carbon were determined with recommended methods. Quantitative real-time PCR coupled with 16S rRNA gene and 18S rRNA gene denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were respectively employed to trace changes in abundance and structure of bacteria and fungi community with biochar amendment. Increase in microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) was not observed in one site but by 10-20% in other two sites while SOC contents were increased by 25-45% in all sites under biochar treatments. Copy numbers of bacterial genes were different between the sites but no changes with biochar treatment in a single site. However, cluster analysis revealed a more or less decreased similarity of bacterial community to the control (ranging from 75% to 85%) by biochar treatment in a single site. Nevertheless, a number of special bands appeared both in bacterial and fungal DGGE patterns under biochar treatments, though varying with site also. While the fungi copy numbers markedly varied both with sites and with biochar treatments, lower similarity and greater

  19. Sensitivity analysis of the age-structured malaria transmission model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addawe, Joel M.; Lope, Jose Ernie C.

    2012-09-01

    We propose an age-structured malaria transmission model and perform sensitivity analyses to determine the relative importance of model parameters to disease transmission. We subdivide the human population into two: preschool humans (below 5 years) and the rest of the human population (above 5 years). We then consider two sets of baseline parameters, one for areas of high transmission and the other for areas of low transmission. We compute the sensitivity indices of the reproductive number and the endemic equilibrium point with respect to the two sets of baseline parameters. Our simulations reveal that in areas of either high or low transmission, the reproductive number is most sensitive to the number of bites by a female mosquito on the rest of the human population. For areas of low transmission, we find that the equilibrium proportion of infectious pre-school humans is most sensitive to the number of bites by a female mosquito. For the rest of the human population it is most sensitive to the rate of acquiring temporary immunity. In areas of high transmission, the equilibrium proportion of infectious pre-school humans and the rest of the human population are both most sensitive to the birth rate of humans. This suggests that strategies that target the mosquito biting rate on pre-school humans and those that shortens the time in acquiring immunity can be successful in preventing the spread of malaria.

  20. Family Structure and the Timing of Transitions from 70 to 103 Years of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Colleen L.; Troll, Lillian

    1996-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional analysis of 250 white individuals, 70-103 years of age, this article questions whether a vertical family structure is found with increasing age. Findings indicate, among other things, that at least until age 90 the proportion of individuals with a vertical family structure with four generations never exceeds the numbers of…

  1. The local expression and abundance of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding proteins in skeletal muscle are regulated by age and gender but not local IGF-I in vivo.

    PubMed

    Oliver, William T; Rosenberger, Judy; Lopez, Rusmely; Gomez, Adam; Cummings, Kathleen K; Fiorotto, Marta L

    2005-12-01

    We wished to determine whether sustained IGF-I production in skeletal muscle increases local IGF binding protein (IGFBP) abundance, thereby mitigating the long-term stimulation of muscle growth by IGF-I. Muscle growth of transgenic mice that overexpress IGF-I in muscle (SIS2) and of wild-type (Wt) mice was compared. At 3, 5, 10, and 20 wk of age, hind-limb muscle weights and IGFBP-3, -4, -5, and -6 mRNA and protein abundances were quantified. Additional mice were injected with IGF-I or LR3-IGF-I, and phosphorylation of the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) was compared. Muscle mass was 20% greater in SIS2 compared with Wt mice by 10 wk of age (P < 0.01), and this difference was maintained to 20 wk. IGFBP mRNA and protein abundances were unaffected by genotype. IGFBP-4 and -5 protein abundances increased with age, whereas for IGFBP-3 and -6, there was a sexual dimorphic response (P < 0.01); after 5 wk of age, IGFBP-3 decreased in males but increased in females, whereas IGFBP-6 decreased in females and remained unchanged in males. These protein expression patterns resulted from differences at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. LR3-IGF-I stimulated IGF-1R phosphorylation to a greater extent than IGF-I at both 5 and 10 wk of age (P < 0.01), regardless of gender or genotype (P > 0.21). Thus, variations in local IGF-I levels do not appear to regulate muscle IGFBP expression. The age- and gender-specific differences in muscle IGFBP expression are not sufficient to alter the response of the muscle to the IGFs but may impact the IGF-independent effects of these IGFBPs. PMID:16166219

  2. Decorin expression is important for age-related changes in tendon structure and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Dunkman, Andrew A; Buckley, Mark R; Mienaltowski, Michael J; Adams, Sheila M; Thomas, Stephen J; Satchell, Lauren; Kumar, Akash; Pathmanathan, Lydia; Beason, David P; Iozzo, Renato V; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2013-01-01

    The aging population is at an increased risk of tendon injury and tendinopathy. Elucidating the molecular basis of tendon aging is crucial to understanding the age-related changes in structure and function in this vulnerable tissue. In this study, the structural and functional features of tendon aging are investigated. In addition, the roles of decorin and biglycan in the aging process were analyzed using transgenic mice at both mature and aged time points. Our hypothesis is that the increase in tendon injuries in the aging population is the result of altered structural properties that reduce the biomechanical function of the tendon and consequently increase susceptibility to injury. Decorin and biglycan are important regulators of tendon structure and therefore, we further hypothesized that decreased function in aged tendons is partly the result of altered decorin and biglycan expression. Biomechanical analyses of mature (day 150) and aged (day 570) patellar tendons revealed deteriorating viscoelastic properties with age. Histology and polarized light microscopy demonstrated decreased cellularity, alterations in tenocyte shape, and reduced collagen fiber alignment in the aged tendons. Ultrastructural analysis of fibril diameter distributions indicated an altered distribution in aged tendons with an increase of large diameter fibrils. Aged wild type tendons maintained expression of decorin which was associated with the structural and functional changes seen in aged tendons. Aged patellar tendons exhibited altered and generally inferior properties across multiple assays. However, decorin-null tendons exhibited significantly decreased effects of aging compared to the other genotypes. The amelioration of the functional deficits seen in the absence of decorin in aged tendons was associated with altered tendon fibril structure. Fibril diameter distributions in the decorin-null aged tendons were comparable to those observed in the mature wild type tendon with the absence

  3. Decorin expression is important for age-related changes in tendon structure and mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Dunkman, Andrew A.; Buckley, Mark R.; Mienaltowski, Michael J.; Adams, Sheila M.; Thomas, Stephen J.; Satchell, Lauren; Kumar, Akash; Pathmanathan, Lydia; Beason, David P.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Birk, David E.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    The aging population is at an increased risk of tendon injury and tendinopathy. Elucidating the molecular basis of tendon aging is crucial to understanding the age-related changes in structure and function in this vulnerable tissue. In this study, the structural and functional features of tendon aging are investigated. In addition, the roles of decorin and biglycan in the aging process were analyzed using transgenic mice at both mature and aged time points. Our hypothesis is that the increase in tendon injuries in the aging population is the result of altered structural properties that reduce the biomechanical function of the tendon and consequently increase susceptibility to injury. Decorin and biglycan are important regulators of tendon structure and therefore, we further hypothesized that decreased function in aged tendons is partly the result of altered decorin and biglycan expression. Biomechanical analyses of mature (day 150) and aged (day 570) patellar tendons revealed deteriorating viscoelastic properties with age. Histology and polarized light microscopy demonstrated decreased cellularity, alterations in tenocyte shape, and reduced collagen fiber alignment in the aged tendons. Ultrastructural analysis of fibril diameter distributions indicated an altered distribution in aged tendons with an increase of large diameter fibrils. Aged wild type tendons maintained expression of decorin which was associated with the structural and functional changes seen in aged tendons. Aged patellar tendons exhibited altered and generally inferior properties across multiple assays. However, decorin-null tendons exhibited significantly decreased effects of aging compared to the other genotypes. The amelioration of the functional deficits seen in the absence of decorin in aged tendons was associated with altered tendon fibril structure. Fibril diameter distributions in the decorin-null aged tendons were comparable to those observed in the mature wild type tendon with the absence

  4. Increased seawater temperature increases the abundance and alters the structure of natural Vibrio populations associated with the coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Tout, Jessica; Siboni, Nachshon; Messer, Lauren F; Garren, Melissa; Stocker, Roman; Webster, Nicole S; Ralph, Peter J; Seymour, Justin R

    2015-01-01

    Rising seawater temperature associated with global climate change is a significant threat to coral health and is linked to increasing coral disease and pathogen-related bleaching events. We performed heat stress experiments with the coral Pocillopora damicornis, where temperature was increased to 31°C, consistent with the 2-3°C predicted increase in summer sea surface maxima. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed a large shift in the composition of the bacterial community at 31°C, with a notable increase in Vibrio, including known coral pathogens. To investigate the dynamics of the naturally occurring Vibrio community, we performed quantitative PCR targeting (i) the whole Vibrio community and (ii) the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus. At 31°C, Vibrio abundance increased by 2-3 orders of magnitude and V. coralliilyticus abundance increased by four orders of magnitude. Using a Vibrio-specific amplicon sequencing assay, we further demonstrated that the community composition shifted dramatically as a consequence of heat stress, with significant increases in the relative abundance of known coral pathogens. Our findings provide quantitative evidence that the abundance of potential coral pathogens increases within natural communities of coral-associated microbes as a consequence of rising seawater temperature and highlight the potential negative impacts of anthropogenic climate change on coral reef ecosystems. PMID:26042096

  5. Genetic structure of the benthic amphipod Diporeia (Amphipoda: Pontoporeiidae) and its relationship to abundance in Lake Superior

    EPA Science Inventory

    The freshwater amphipod Diporeia is a crucial part of the food web in the Laurentian Great Lakes, but has faced serious declines correlated with the invasion of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha), except in Lake Superior, which has seen an increase in Diporeia abundance. Specul...

  6. Increased seawater temperature increases the abundance and alters the structure of natural Vibrio populations associated with the coral Pocillopora damicornis

    PubMed Central

    Tout, Jessica; Siboni, Nachshon; Messer, Lauren F.; Garren, Melissa; Stocker, Roman; Webster, Nicole S.; Ralph, Peter J.; Seymour, Justin R.

    2015-01-01

    Rising seawater temperature associated with global climate change is a significant threat to coral health and is linked to increasing coral disease and pathogen-related bleaching events. We performed heat stress experiments with the coral Pocillopora damicornis, where temperature was increased to 31°C, consistent with the 2–3°C predicted increase in summer sea surface maxima. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing revealed a large shift in the composition of the bacterial community at 31°C, with a notable increase in Vibrio, including known coral pathogens. To investigate the dynamics of the naturally occurring Vibrio community, we performed quantitative PCR targeting (i) the whole Vibrio community and (ii) the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus. At 31°C, Vibrio abundance increased by 2–3 orders of magnitude and V. coralliilyticus abundance increased by four orders of magnitude. Using a Vibrio-specific amplicon sequencing assay, we further demonstrated that the community composition shifted dramatically as a consequence of heat stress, with significant increases in the relative abundance of known coral pathogens. Our findings provide quantitative evidence that the abundance of potential coral pathogens increases within natural communities of coral-associated microbes as a consequence of rising seawater temperature and highlight the potential negative impacts of anthropogenic climate change on coral reef ecosystems. PMID:26042096

  7. Age Differences in Personality Structure: A Cluster Analytic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Paul T., Jr.; McCrae, Robert R.

    1976-01-01

    Presented at the 81st APA Convention, Montreal, 1973, this study showed how a cluster analytic approach was used to determine age differences in personality measured by the Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF). Subjects were 969 adult male volunteers, 25 to 34, 35 to 54, and 55 to 82. Openness to experience showed age-related…

  8. Effects of Aging Structures and Humidity on Fatigue Properties of Maraging Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kousuke; Nagano, Takanori; Moriyama, Michihiko; Wang, Xishu; Kawagoishi, Norio

    Effects of aging structures and humidity on fatigue properties of 350 grade 18% Ni maraging steel were investigated under rotating bending in relative humidity of 25% and 85%. Aging conditions tested were a conventional single aging and a double one which was aged at low temperature after the conventional aging. In each aging, under and peak aged steels were prepared. Tensile strength was increased by the double aging without reduction of the ductility. Proportional relation between fatigue limit and Vickers hardness held until 750HV in low humidity. However fatigue strength was largely decreased by high humidity, especially in the peak aged steel at the single aging. The decrease in fatigue strength by high humidity was mainly caused by the acceleration of a crack initiation due to the anodic dissolution. The acceleration of a crack initiation was larger in the steel peak aged at the single aging with larger precipitated particles.

  9. Abundance, distribution and size structure of zooplankton along a 20° west meridional transect of the northeast Atlantic Ocean in July

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallienne, C. P.; Robins, D. B.; Woodd-Walker, R. S.

    Zooplankton distribution, abundance and size structure were characterised on leg 2 of the PRIME cruise in the northeast Atlantic during July 1996. Latitudinal sampling was carried out from 60°N to 37°N along a meridian at approximately 20°W. Zooplankton were characterised using an Optical Plankton Counter (OPC), and from traditional depth-integrated net hauls for taxonomy and carbon. The former method allows zooplankton to be described in terms of biovolume and size. There was good agreement between the two methods for abundance and a good correlation between OPC biovolume and carbon analysis. These data also showed compatibility with concurrent acoustic measurements of zooplankton. Results for the cruise compared to recent studies in the region, show that, overall abundance was generally low, although most of the previous studies were closer to spring bloom conditions. The size structure over latitude shows that mean size fluctuated, but there was a general trend of decreasing mean size from the north of the transect to about 47°N. Further statistical treatment of the OPC data, using principal component analysis, showed that zooplankton size structure changed at five positions along the transect. Three of these coincided with changes in physical structure, one each side of the front at 48°N and the third on the outer edge of an eddy. The other two occurred in regions of high-surface chlorophyll concentration.

  10. The Hamburg/ESO R-process enhanced star survey (HERES). IV. Detailed abundance analysis and age dating of the strongly r-process enhanced stars CS 29491-069 and HE 1219-0312

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, W.; Wiesendahl, U.; Christlieb, N.; Eriksson, K.; Korn, A. J.; Barklem, P. S.; Hill, V.; Beers, T. C.; Farouqi, K.; Pfeiffer, B.; Kratz, K.-L.

    2009-09-01

    We report on a detailed abundance analysis of two strongly r-process enhanced, very metal-poor stars newly discovered in the HERES project, CS 29491-069 ([Fe/H]=-2.51, [r/Fe]=+1.1) and HE 1219-0312 ([Fe/H]=-2.96, [r/Fe]=+1.5). The analysis is based on high-quality VLT/UVES spectra and MARCS model atmospheres. We detect lines of 15 heavy elements in the spectrum of CS 29491-069, and 18 in HE 1219-0312; in both cases including the Th II 4019 Å line. The heavy-element abundance patterns of these two stars are mostly well-matched to scaled solar residual abundances not formed by the s-process. We also compare the observed pattern with recent high-entropy wind (HEW) calculations, which assume core-collapse supernovae of massive stars as the astrophysical environment for the r-process, and find good agreement for most lanthanides. The abundance ratios of the lighter elements strontium, yttrium, and zirconium, which are presumably not formed by the main r-process, are reproduced well by the model. Radioactive dating for CS 29491-069 with the observed thorium and rare-earth element abundance pairs results in an average age of 9.5 Gyr, when based on solar r-process residuals, and 17.6 Gyr, when using HEW model predictions. Chronometry seems to fail in the case of HE 1219-0312, resulting in a negative age due to its high thorium abundance. HE 1219-0312 could therefore exhibit an overabundance of the heaviest elements, which is sometimes called an “actinide boost”. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (Proposal Number 170.D-0010). Table 8 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Structure and Correlates of Cognitive Aging in a Narrow Age Cohort

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aging-related changes occur for multiple domains of cognitive functioning. An accumulating body of research indicates that, rather than representing statistically independent phenomena, aging-related cognitive changes are moderately to strongly correlated across domains. However, previous studies have typically been conducted in age-heterogeneous samples over longitudinal time lags of 6 or more years, and have failed to consider whether results are robust to a comprehensive set of controls. Capitalizing on 3-year longitudinal data from the Lothian Birth Cohort of 1936, we took a longitudinal narrow age cohort approach to examine cross-domain cognitive change interrelations from ages 70 to 73 years. We fit multivariate latent difference score models to factors representing visuospatial ability, processing speed, memory, and crystallized ability. Changes were moderately interrelated, with a general factor of change accounting for 47% of the variance in changes across domains. Change interrelations persisted at close to full strength after controlling for a comprehensive set of demographic, physical, and medical factors including educational attainment, childhood intelligence, physical function, APOE genotype, smoking status, diagnosis of hypertension, diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, and diagnosis of diabetes. Thus, the positive manifold of aging-related cognitive changes is highly robust in that it can be detected in a narrow age cohort followed over a relatively brief longitudinal period, and persists even after controlling for many potential confounders. PMID:24955992

  12. Age of Onset of Schizophrenia: Perspectives From Structural Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gogtay, Nitin; Vyas, Nora S.; Testa, Renee; Wood, Stephen J.; Pantelis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    Many of the major neuropsychiatric illnesses, including schizophrenia, have a typical age of onset in late adolescence. Late adolescence may reflect a critical period in brain development making it particularly vulnerable for the onset of psychopathology. Neuroimaging studies that focus on this age range may provide unique insights into the onset and course of psychosis. In this review, we examine the evidence from 2 unique longitudinal cohorts that span the ages from early childhood through young adulthood; a study of childhood-onset schizophrenia where patients and siblings are followed from ages 6 through to their early twenties, and an ultra-high risk study where subjects (mean age of 19 years) are studied before and after the onset of psychosis. From the available evidence, we make an argument that subtle, regionally specific, and genetically influenced alterations during developmental age windows influence the course of psychosis and the resultant brain phenotype. The importance of examining trajectories of development and the need for future combined approaches, using multimodal imaging together with molecular studies is discussed. PMID:21505117

  13. Age of onset of schizophrenia: perspectives from structural neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Gogtay, Nitin; Vyas, Nora S; Testa, Renee; Wood, Stephen J; Pantelis, Christos

    2011-05-01

    Many of the major neuropsychiatric illnesses, including schizophrenia, have a typical age of onset in late adolescence. Late adolescence may reflect a critical period in brain development making it particularly vulnerable for the onset of psychopathology. Neuroimaging studies that focus on this age range may provide unique insights into the onset and course of psychosis. In this review, we examine the evidence from 2 unique longitudinal cohorts that span the ages from early childhood through young adulthood; a study of childhood-onset schizophrenia where patients and siblings are followed from ages 6 through to their early twenties, and an ultra-high risk study where subjects (mean age of 19 years) are studied before and after the onset of psychosis. From the available evidence, we make an argument that subtle, regionally specific, and genetically influenced alterations during developmental age windows influence the course of psychosis and the resultant brain phenotype. The importance of examining trajectories of development and the need for future combined approaches, using multimodal imaging together with molecular studies is discussed. PMID:21505117

  14. Changes in abundance and community structure of nematodes from the abyssal polymetallic nodule field, Tropical Northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miljutin, Dmitry; Miljutina, Maria; Messié, Monique

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea fields of polymetallic nodules in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCFZ, tropical NE Pacific) are currently being investigated to assess their potential for commercial mining. During such mining, benthic communities will be inevitably disturbed or destroyed. Therefore, assessments of their standing stock and composition may be helpful for the future evaluation of possible impacts of commercial nodule exploitation. Analysis of nematode communities (at genus level) inhabiting the French license area of the CCFZ were studied based on data from the cruises NODINAUT (2004) and BIONOD (2012). The total nematode density was ca. 1.5-fold higher in 2012 as compared with 2004. This reflected a 2-2.5 times higher density of non-selective deposit-feeders (i.e. possessing a small buccal cavity without armature) in 2012 compared with 2004, whereas no significant differences between sampling periods were observed in the density of the other feeding groups. Consequently, whilst the list of the most abundant genera was identical, their relative abundances changed significantly. The relative abundance of the genus Thalassomonhystera was two times greater in 2012 than in 2004, whereas the relative abundances of the genera Acantholaimus and Theristus were significantly lower in 2012 (10% and 4%, respectively) than in 2004 (28% and 9%). Nematode diversity (including values of diversity indices and total number of recorded genera) was significantly lower in 2012 in comparison with 2004. Although our data do not take into account seasonal and shorter temporal scales of variability in nematode assemblages, we report here that a certain fraction of variations observed between the two sampling periods could be associated with differences in primary production. Future studies should aim to better characterise temporal variability in nematode communities of the CCFZ at seasonal and interannual scales.

  15. Effects of deep-water coral banks on the abundance and size structure of the megafauna in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onghia, G.; Maiorano, P.; Sion, L.; Giove, A.; Capezzuto, F.; Carlucci, R.; Tursi, A.

    2010-03-01

    The Santa Maria di Leuca (SML) coral banks represent a rare example of living Lophelia-Madrepora-bearing coral mounds in the Mediterranean Sea. They are located between 350 and 1100 m in depth, in the northern Ionian Sea (eastern-central Mediterranean). Using a multi-beam echo sounder, side-scan sonar, high-resolution seismics and underwater video, the zones were identified for the sampling demersal fauna without damaging the coral colonies. During September-October 2005 experimental samplings were carried out with longlines and trawl nets inside the coral habitat and outside, where fishery exploitation occurs. No significant differences were shown between the abundance of fish recorded using longlines in the coral and non-coral habitat even though some selachians and teleosts were more abundant in the former than in the latter. Large specimens of rockfish ( Helicolenus dactylopterus) and blackspot seabream ( Pagellus bogaraveo) were commonly caught using longlines in the coral habitat. Data from trawling revealed refuge effects in the coral habitat and fishing effects outside. Significant differences were detected between the recorded abundances in the two study areas. Greater densities and biomasses were obtained inside the coral area, and fish size spectra and size distributions indicate a greater abundance of large fish inside the coral habitat. The SML coral habitat is a spawning area for H. dactylopterus. The remarkable density of the young-of-the-year of the deep-water shark Etmopterus spinax as well as of Merluccius merluccius, Micromesistius poutassou, Phycis blennoides and H. dactylopterus, indicates that the coral habitat also acts as nursery area for these demersal species, which are exploited outside. Considering the evidence of the negative impact of bottom trawling and, to a lesser extent, of longlining, the coral banks can provide a refuge for the conservation of unique species and habitats as well as in providing benefit to adjacent fisheries

  16. Natural decay process affects the abundance and community structure of Bacteria and Archaea in Picea abies logs.

    PubMed

    Rinta-Kanto, J M; Sinkko, H; Rajala, T; Al-Soud, W A; Sørensen, S J; Tamminen, M V; Timonen, S

    2016-07-01

    Prokaryotes colonize decaying wood and contribute to the degradation process, but the dynamics of prokaryotic communities during wood decay is still poorly understood. We studied the abundance and community composition of Bacteria and Archaea inhabiting naturally decaying Picea abies logs and tested the hypothesis that the variations in archaeal and bacterial abundances and community composition are coupled with environmental parameters related to the decay process. The data set comprises >500 logs at different decay stages from five geographical locations in south and central Finland. The results show that Bacteria and Archaea are an integral and dynamic component of decaying wood biota. The abundances of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes increase as wood decay progresses. Changes in bacterial community composition are clearly linked to the loss of density of wood, while specific fungal-bacterial interactions may also affect the distribution of bacterial taxa in decaying wood. Thaumarchaeota were prominent members of the archaeal populations colonizing decaying wood, providing further evidence of the versatility and cosmopolitan nature of this phylum in the environment. The composition and dynamics of the prokaryotic community suggest that they are an active component of biota that are involved in processing substrates in decaying wood material. PMID:27127195

  17. The abundances of components of the lunar soils by a least-squares mixing model and the formation age of KREEP.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonfeld, E.; Meyer, C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A least-square mixing model incorporating mare basalts, KREEP basalts, anorthosites, anorthositic gabbros, ultramafics, granites, and meteorites was used to estimate the abundances of rock components in lunar soil from the Apollo 11, 12, 15, Luna 16, and Surveyor 5 and 6 landing sites. The predominance of iron-rich mare basalt at the sites is indicated.

  18. Camera Traps on Wildlife Crossing Structures as a Tool in Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) Management - Five-Years Monitoring of Wolf Abundance Trends in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Šver, Lidija; Bielen, Ana; Križan, Josip; Gužvica, Goran

    2016-01-01

    The conservation of gray wolf (Canis lupus) and its coexistence with humans presents a challenge and requires continuous monitoring and management efforts. One of the non-invasive methods that produces high-quality wolf monitoring datasets is camera trapping. We present a novel monitoring approach where camera traps are positioned on wildlife crossing structures that channel the animals, thereby increasing trapping success and increasing the cost-efficiency of the method. In this way we have followed abundance trends of five wolf packs whose home ranges are intersected by a motorway which spans throughout the wolf distribution range in Croatia. During the five-year monitoring of six green bridges we have recorded 28 250 camera-events, 132 with wolves. Four viaducts were monitored for two years, recording 4914 camera-events, 185 with wolves. We have detected a negative abundance trend of the monitored Croatian wolf packs since 2011, especially severe in the northern part of the study area. Further, we have pinpointed the legal cull as probable major negative influence on the wolf pack abundance trends (linear regression, r2 > 0.75, P < 0.05). Using the same approach we did not find evidence for a negative impact of wolves on the prey populations, both wild ungulates and livestock. We encourage strict protection of wolf in Croatia until there is more data proving population stability. In conclusion, quantitative methods, such as the one presented here, should be used as much as possible when assessing wolf abundance trends. PMID:27327498

  19. Camera Traps on Wildlife Crossing Structures as a Tool in Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) Management - Five-Years Monitoring of Wolf Abundance Trends in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Križan, Josip; Gužvica, Goran

    2016-01-01

    The conservation of gray wolf (Canis lupus) and its coexistence with humans presents a challenge and requires continuous monitoring and management efforts. One of the non-invasive methods that produces high-quality wolf monitoring datasets is camera trapping. We present a novel monitoring approach where camera traps are positioned on wildlife crossing structures that channel the animals, thereby increasing trapping success and increasing the cost-efficiency of the method. In this way we have followed abundance trends of five wolf packs whose home ranges are intersected by a motorway which spans throughout the wolf distribution range in Croatia. During the five-year monitoring of six green bridges we have recorded 28 250 camera-events, 132 with wolves. Four viaducts were monitored for two years, recording 4914 camera-events, 185 with wolves. We have detected a negative abundance trend of the monitored Croatian wolf packs since 2011, especially severe in the northern part of the study area. Further, we have pinpointed the legal cull as probable major negative influence on the wolf pack abundance trends (linear regression, r2 > 0.75, P < 0.05). Using the same approach we did not find evidence for a negative impact of wolves on the prey populations, both wild ungulates and livestock. We encourage strict protection of wolf in Croatia until there is more data proving population stability. In conclusion, quantitative methods, such as the one presented here, should be used as much as possible when assessing wolf abundance trends. PMID:27327498

  20. Shifts in the abundance and community structure of soil ammonia oxidizers in a wet sclerophyll forest under long-term prescribed burning.

    PubMed

    Long, Xi-En; Chen, Chengrong; Xu, Zhihong; He, Ji-Zheng

    2014-02-01

    Fire shapes global biome distribution and promotes the terrestrial biogeochemical cycles. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) play a vital role in the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen (N). However, behaviors of AOB and AOA under long-term prescribed burning remain unclear. This study was to examine how fire affected the abundances and communities of soil AOB and AOA. A long-term repeated forest fire experiment with three burning treatments (never burnt, B0; biennially burnt, B2; and quadrennially burnt, B4) was used in this study. The abundances and community structure of soil AOB and AOA were determined using quantitative PCR, restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone library. More frequent fires (B2) increased the abundance of bacterium amoA gene, but tended to decrease archaeal amoA genes. Fire also modified the composition of AOA and AOB communities. Canonical correspondence analysis showed soil pH and dissolved organic C (DOC) strongly affected AOB genotypes, while nitrate-N and DOC shaped the AOA distribution. The increased abundance of bacterium amoA gene by fires may imply an important role of AOB in nitrification in fire-affected soils. The fire-induced shift in the community composition of AOB and AOA demonstrates that fire can disturb nutrient cycles. PMID:24176706

  1. Effects of Fragment and Vegetation Structure on the Population Abundance of Ateles hybridus, Alouatta seniculus and Cebus albifrons in Magdalena Valley, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Christopher; Link, Andres; King-Bailey, Gillian; Donati, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Many primate species currently subsist in fragmented and anthropogenically disturbed habitats. Different threats arise depending on the species' life history strategy, dietary requirements and habitat preference. Additionally, anthropogenic disturbance is far from uniform and may affect individual forest fragments in a single landscape in differing ways. We studied the effects of fragmentation on three species of diurnal primate, Cebus albifrons, Alouatta seniculus and Ateles hybridus, in Magdalena Valley, Colombia. We tested the assumption that generalist species are more resilient than specialist species to habitat degradation by examining the fragments' vegetation and spatial structure and how these affected primate presence and abundance patterns. We found C. albifrons, a generalist, to be the most abundant species in 9 of 10 forest fragments, regardless of the level of habitat disturbance. A. hybridus, a large-bodied primate with a specialist diet, was either absent or low in abundance in fragments that had experienced recent disturbances and was found only in higher-quality fragments, regardless of the fragment size. A. seniculus, a species considered to have a highly flexible diet and the ability to survive in degraded habitat, was found in intermediate abundances between those of Cebus spp. and Ateles spp., and was more frequently found in high-quality fragments. PMID:27093602

  2. Lake Erie Yellow perch age estimation based on three structures: Precision, processing times, and management implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergoot, C.S.; Bur, M.T.; Powell, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    Yellow perch Perca flavescens support economically important recreational and commercial fisheries in Lake Erie and are intensively managed. Age estimation represents an integral component in the management of Lake Erie yellow perch stocks, as age-structured population models are used to set safe harvest levels on an annual basis. We compared the precision associated with yellow perch (N = 251) age estimates from scales, sagittal otoliths, and anal spine sections and evaluated the time required to process and estimate age from each structure. Three readers of varying experience estimated ages. The precision (mean coefficient of variation) of estimates among readers was 1% for sagittal otoliths, 5-6% for anal spines, and 11-13% for scales. Agreement rates among readers were 94-95% for otoliths, 71-76% for anal spines, and 45-50% for scales. Systematic age estimation differences were evident among scale and anal spine readers; less-experienced readers tended to underestimate ages of yellow perch older than age 4 relative to estimates made by an experienced reader. Mean scale age tended to underestimate ages of age-6 and older fish relative to otolith ages estimated by an experienced reader. Total annual mortality estimates based on scale ages were 20% higher than those based on otolith ages; mortality estimates based on anal spine ages were 4% higher than those based on otolith ages. Otoliths required more removal and preparation time than scales and anal spines, but age estimation time was substantially lower for otoliths than for the other two structures. We suggest the use of otoliths or anal spines for age estimation in yellow perch (regardless of length) from Lake Erie and other systems where precise age estimates are necessary, because age estimation errors resulting from the use of scales could generate incorrect management decisions. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  3. Motor Control and Aging: Links to Age-Related Brain Structural, Functional, and Biochemical Effects

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, Rachael D.; Bernard, Jessica A.; Burutolu, Taritonye B.; Fling, Brett W.; Gordon, Mark T.; Gwin, Joseph T.; Kwak, Youngbin; Lipps, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Although connections between cognitive deficits and age-associated brain differences have been elucidated, relationships with motor performance are less well understood. Here, we broadly review age-related brain differences and motor deficits in older adults in addition to cognition-action theories. Age-related atrophy of the motor cortical regions and corpus callosum may precipitate or coincide with motor declines such as balance and gait deficits, coordination deficits, and movement slowing. Correspondingly, degeneration of neurotransmitter systems—primarily the dopaminergic system—may contribute to age-related gross and fine motor declines, as well as to higher cognitive deficits. In general, older adults exhibit involvement of more widespread brain regions for motor control than young adults, particularly the prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia networks. Unfortunately these same regions are the most vulnerable to age-related effects, resulting in an imbalance of “supply and demand”. Existing exercise, pharmaceutical, and motor training interventions may ameliorate motor deficits in older adults. PMID:19850077

  4. Stellar Oxygen Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeremy

    1994-04-01

    This dissertation addresses several issues concerning stellar oxygen abundances. The 7774 {\\AA} O I triplet equivalent widths of Abia & Rebolo [1989, AJ, 347, 186] for metal-poor dwarfs are found to be systematically too high. I also argue that current effective temperatures used in halo star abundance studies may be ~150 K too low. New color-Teff relations are derived for metal-poor stars. Using the revised Teff values and improved equivalent widths for the 7774A O I triplet, the mean [O/Fe] ratio for a handful of halo stars is found to be +0.52 with no dependence on Teff or [Fe/H]. Possible cosmological implications of the hotter Teff scale are discussed along with additional evidence supporting the need for a higher temperature scale for metal-poor stars. Our Teff scale leads to a Spite Li plateau value of N(Li)=2.28 +/- 0.09. A conservative minimal primordial value of N(Li)=2.35 is inferred. If errors in the observations and models are considered, consistency with standard models of Big Bang nucleosynthesis is still achieved with this larger Li abundance. The revised Teff scale raises the observed B/Be ratio of HD 140283 from 10 to 12, making its value more comfortably consistent with the production of the observed B and Be by ordinary spallation. Our Teff values are found to be in good agreement with values predicted from both the Victoria and Yale isochrone color-Teff relations. Thus, it appears likely that no changes in globular cluster ages would result. Next, we examine the location of the break in the [O/Fe] versus [Fe/H] plane in a quantitative fashion. Analysis of a relatively homogeneous data set does not favor any unique break point in the range -1.7 /= -3), in agreement with the new results for halo dwarfs. We find that the gap in the observed [O/H] distribution, noted by Wheeler et al

  5. Aortic Aging in ESRD: Structural, Hemodynamic, and Mortality Implications.

    PubMed

    London, Gérard M; Safar, Michel E; Pannier, Bruno

    2016-06-01

    Aging incurs aortic stiffening and dilation, but these changes are less pronounced in peripheral arteries, resulting in stiffness and geometry gradients influencing progression of the forward and reflected pressure waves. Because premature arterial aging is observed in ESRD, we determined the respective roles of stiffness and aortic geometry gradients in 73 controls and 156 patients on hemodialysis. We measured aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) and brachial PWV to evaluate the stiffness gradient [(brachial PWV/aortic PWV)(0.5)] and ascending aortic and aortic bifurcation diameters to assess aortic taper (ascending aortic diameter/aortic bifurcation diameter). The global reflection coefficient was estimated from characteristic impedance and vascular resistance. Cox proportional hazard models were used to determine mortality risk. The age-associated increase in aortic PWV was higher in patients (P<0.001). In controls, aortic ascending and bifurcation diameters increased with age, with an unchanged aortic taper. In patients on hemodialysis, age did not associate with increased ascending aortic diameter but did associate with increased aortic bifurcation diameter and decreased aortic taper, both of which also associated with abdominal aortic calcifications and smaller global reflection coefficient (P<0.001). In patients, multivariate models revealed all-cause and cardiovascular mortality associated with age, aortic PWV, and aortic bifurcation diameter with high specificity and sensitivity. Using stiffness gradient, aortic taper, or global reflection coefficient in the model produced similar results. Thus, whereas aortic stiffness is a known independent predictor of mortality, these results indicate the importance of also evaluating the aortic geometry in patients on hemodialysis. PMID:26475595

  6. On the dynamics of the age structure, dependency, and consumption

    PubMed Central

    Hock, Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    We examine the effects of population aging due to declining fertility and rising elderly life expectancy on consumption possibilities in the presence of intergenerational transfers. Our analysis is based on a highly tractable continuous-time overlapping generations model in which the population is divided into three groups (youth dependents, workers, and elderly dependents) and lifecourse transitions take place in a probabilistic fashion. We show that the consumption-maximizing response to greater longevity in highly developed countries is an increase in fertility. However, with larger transfer payments, the actual fertility response will likely be the opposite, leading to further population aging. PMID:24353374

  7. The Role of Temporal Abundance Structure and Habitat Preferences in the Survival of Conodonts during the Mid-Early Silurian Ireviken Mass Extinction Event

    PubMed Central

    Spiridonov, Andrej; Brazauskas, Antanas; Radzevičius, Sigitas

    2015-01-01

    The Ireviken event was one of the most intense extinction episodes that occurred during the mid-Paleozoic era. It had a strong global effect on a range of clades, with conodonts, graptolites and chitinozoans affected most. Using geophysical proxies and conodont species parameters of their temporal abundance structure we investigate how they affected the selectivity of conodont species survival during this calamity. After performing bivariate logistic analyses on 34 species of conodonts, we find three variables that were statistically significantly associated with their odds of survival. These namely include spectral exponents that describe degrees of autocorrelation in a time series, the skewness of species abundance distribution, and average environmental preferences, which are mostly determined by ancient water depths at sampling sites. Model selection of multivariate logistic models found the best model includes species local abundance skewness and substrate preference. A similar pattern is revealed through the regression tree analysis. The apparent extinction selectivity points to a possible causes of environmental deterioration during the Ireviken event. The significant positive relationship between extinction risk and preferential existence in deeper environments suggests the open ocean causal mechanisms of biotic stress that occurred during the Ireviken event. Marine regressions, which were previously suggested as a causal factor in this extinction episode, on theoretical grounds should have had higher impact on species living in near-shore environments, through the processes of habitat loss which are associated with decreases of shelfal areas. In addition, the significant positive correlations found between skewness of abundance distributions and spectral exponent values and the probability of species survival suggest that community and ecosystem processes (which controlled species abundance fluctuation patterns) were significantly related to selectivity

  8. The role of temporal abundance structure and habitat preferences in the survival of conodonts during the mid-early Silurian Ireviken mass extinction event.

    PubMed

    Spiridonov, Andrej; Brazauskas, Antanas; Radzevičius, Sigitas

    2015-01-01

    The Ireviken event was one of the most intense extinction episodes that occurred during the mid-Paleozoic era. It had a strong global effect on a range of clades, with conodonts, graptolites and chitinozoans affected most. Using geophysical proxies and conodont species parameters of their temporal abundance structure we investigate how they affected the selectivity of conodont species survival during this calamity. After performing bivariate logistic analyses on 34 species of conodonts, we find three variables that were statistically significantly associated with their odds of survival. These namely include spectral exponents that describe degrees of autocorrelation in a time series, the skewness of species abundance distribution, and average environmental preferences, which are mostly determined by ancient water depths at sampling sites. Model selection of multivariate logistic models found the best model includes species local abundance skewness and substrate preference. A similar pattern is revealed through the regression tree analysis. The apparent extinction selectivity points to a possible causes of environmental deterioration during the Ireviken event. The significant positive relationship between extinction risk and preferential existence in deeper environments suggests the open ocean causal mechanisms of biotic stress that occurred during the Ireviken event. Marine regressions, which were previously suggested as a causal factor in this extinction episode, on theoretical grounds should have had higher impact on species living in near-shore environments, through the processes of habitat loss which are associated with decreases of shelfal areas. In addition, the significant positive correlations found between skewness of abundance distributions and spectral exponent values and the probability of species survival suggest that community and ecosystem processes (which controlled species abundance fluctuation patterns) were significantly related to selectivity

  9. The Frontal Hypothesis of Cognitive Aging: Factor Structure and Age Effects on Four "Frontal Tests" among Healthy Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Aranda, Claudia; Sundet, Kjetil

    2006-01-01

    With 101 healthy aging adult participants, the authors investigated whether executive functions are a unitary concept. The authors established the factor structure of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST; E. A. Berg, 1948), the Stroop color and word test (C. J. Golden, 1978), verbal fluency using the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT;…

  10. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi community structure, abundance and species richness changes in soil by different levels of heavy metal and metalloid concentration.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Ramasamy; Kim, Chang-Gi; Subramanian, Parthiban; Kim, Ki-Yoon; Selvakumar, Gopal; Sa, Tong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) play major roles in ecosystem functioning such as carbon sequestration, nutrient cycling, and plant growth promotion. It is important to know how this ecologically important soil microbial player is affected by soil abiotic factors particularly heavy metal and metalloid (HMM). The objective of this study was to understand the impact of soil HMM concentration on AMF abundance and community structure in the contaminated sites of South Korea. Soil samples were collected from the vicinity of an abandoned smelter and the samples were subjected to three complementary methods such as spore morphology, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) for diversity analysis. Spore density was found to be significantly higher in highly contaminated soil compared to less contaminated soil. Spore morphological study revealed that Glomeraceae family was more abundant followed by Acaulosporaceae and Gigasporaceae in the vicinity of the smelter. T-RFLP and DGGE analysis confirmed the dominance of Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices in all the study sites. Claroideoglomus claroideum, Funneliformis caledonium, Rhizophagus clarus and Funneliformis constrictum were found to be sensitive to high concentration of soil HMM. Richness and diversity of Glomeraceae family increased with significant increase in soil arsenic, cadmium and zinc concentrations. Our results revealed that the soil HMM has a vital impact on AMF community structure, especially with Glomeraceae family abundance, richness and diversity. PMID:26035444

  11. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Community Structure, Abundance and Species Richness Changes in Soil by Different Levels of Heavy Metal and Metalloid Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Ramasamy; Kim, Chang-Gi; Subramanian, Parthiban; Kim, Ki-Yoon; Selvakumar, Gopal; Sa, Tong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) play major roles in ecosystem functioning such as carbon sequestration, nutrient cycling, and plant growth promotion. It is important to know how this ecologically important soil microbial player is affected by soil abiotic factors particularly heavy metal and metalloid (HMM). The objective of this study was to understand the impact of soil HMM concentration on AMF abundance and community structure in the contaminated sites of South Korea. Soil samples were collected from the vicinity of an abandoned smelter and the samples were subjected to three complementary methods such as spore morphology, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) for diversity analysis. Spore density was found to be significantly higher in highly contaminated soil compared to less contaminated soil. Spore morphological study revealed that Glomeraceae family was more abundant followed by Acaulosporaceae and Gigasporaceae in the vicinity of the smelter. T-RFLP and DGGE analysis confirmed the dominance of Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus intraradices in all the study sites. Claroideoglomus claroideum, Funneliformis caledonium, Rhizophagus clarus and Funneliformis constrictum were found to be sensitive to high concentration of soil HMM. Richness and diversity of Glomeraceae family increased with significant increase in soil arsenic, cadmium and zinc concentrations. Our results revealed that the soil HMM has a vital impact on AMF community structure, especially with Glomeraceae family abundance, richness and diversity. PMID:26035444

  12. 76 FR 69292 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    .... ML100920158), for which a notice of availability was published in the Federal Register on June 22, 2010 (75 FR... COMMISSION Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water AGENCY... Staff Guidance (LR-ISG), LR- ISG-2011-01, ``Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures...

  13. 15 CFR 50.5 - Fee structure for age search and citizenship information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fee structure for age search and... THE CENSUS § 50.5 Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. Type of service Fee Searches of one census for one person and one transcript $65.00 Each additional copy of census transcript...

  14. 15 CFR 50.5 - Fee structure for age search and citizenship information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fee structure for age search and... THE CENSUS § 50.5 Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. Type of service Fee Searches of one census for one person and one transcript $65.00 Each additional copy of census transcript...

  15. 15 CFR 50.5 - Fee structure for age search and citizenship information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fee structure for age search and... THE CENSUS § 50.5 Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. Type of service Fee Searches of one census for one person and one transcript $65.00 Each additional copy of census transcript...

  16. 15 CFR 50.5 - Fee structure for age search and citizenship information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fee structure for age search and... THE CENSUS § 50.5 Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. Type of service Fee Searches of one census for one person and one transcript $65.00 Each additional copy of census transcript...

  17. 15 CFR 50.5 - Fee structure for age search and citizenship information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... THE CENSUS § 50.5 Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. Type of service Fee... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fee structure for age search and citizenship information. 50.5 Section 50.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce...

  18. School Finance Systems: Aging Structures in Need of Renovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan; Clune, William H.

    1998-01-01

    Traditional school-finance systems need dramatic change to make them more supportive of the goals and strategies of standards. The shortcomings of current structures are reviewed, and suggestions are provided for changing finance structures, including a shift from fiscal equity toward educational adequacy. Elements to enhance a new system are…

  19. The effect of human settlement on the abundance and community structure of ammonia oxidizers in tropical stream sediments

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Mariana P.; Ávila, Marcelo P.; Keijzer, Rosalinde M.; Barbosa, Francisco A. R.; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M. A.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are a diverse and functionally important group in the nitrogen cycle. Nevertheless, AOA and AOB communities driving this process remain uncharacterized in tropical freshwater sediment. Here, the effect of human settlement on the AOA and AOB diversity and abundance have been assessed by phylogenetic and quantitative PCR analyses, using archaeal and bacterial amoA and 16S rRNA genes. Overall, each environment contained specific clades of amoA and 16S rRNA genes sequences, suggesting that selective pressures lead to AOA and AOB inhabiting distinct ecological niches. Human settlement activities, as derived from increased metal and mineral nitrogen contents, appear to cause a response among the AOB community, with Nitrosomonas taking advantage over Nitrosospira in impacted environments. We also observed a dominance of AOB over AOA in mining-impacted sediments, suggesting that AOB might be the primary drivers of ammonia oxidation in these sediments. In addition, ammonia concentrations demonstrated to be the driver for the abundance of AOA, with an inversely proportional correlation between them. Our findings also revealed the presence of novel ecotypes of Thaumarchaeota, such as those related to the obligate acidophilic Nitrosotalea devanaterra at ammonia-rich places of circumneutral pH. These data add significant new information regarding AOA and AOB from tropical freshwater sediments, albeit future studies would be required to provide additional insights into the niche differentiation among these microorganisms. PMID:26379659

  20. The effect of human settlement on the abundance and community structure of ammonia oxidizers in tropical stream sediments.

    PubMed

    Reis, Mariana P; Ávila, Marcelo P; Keijzer, Rosalinde M; Barbosa, Francisco A R; Chartone-Souza, Edmar; Nascimento, Andréa M A; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are a diverse and functionally important group in the nitrogen cycle. Nevertheless, AOA and AOB communities driving this process remain uncharacterized in tropical freshwater sediment. Here, the effect of human settlement on the AOA and AOB diversity and abundance have been assessed by phylogenetic and quantitative PCR analyses, using archaeal and bacterial amoA and 16S rRNA genes. Overall, each environment contained specific clades of amoA and 16S rRNA genes sequences, suggesting that selective pressures lead to AOA and AOB inhabiting distinct ecological niches. Human settlement activities, as derived from increased metal and mineral nitrogen contents, appear to cause a response among the AOB community, with Nitrosomonas taking advantage over Nitrosospira in impacted environments. We also observed a dominance of AOB over AOA in mining-impacted sediments, suggesting that AOB might be the primary drivers of ammonia oxidation in these sediments. In addition, ammonia concentrations demonstrated to be the driver for the abundance of AOA, with an inversely proportional correlation between them. Our findings also revealed the presence of novel ecotypes of Thaumarchaeota, such as those related to the obligate acidophilic Nitrosotalea devanaterra at ammonia-rich places of circumneutral pH. These data add significant new information regarding AOA and AOB from tropical freshwater sediments, albeit future studies would be required to provide additional insights into the niche differentiation among these microorganisms. PMID:26379659

  1. Nanoscale Structure, Dynamics, and Aging Behavior of Metallic Glass Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, J. A. J.; Holt, C. M. B.; Luber, E. J.; Fortin, D. C.; Popowich, G.; Zahiri, B.; Concepcion, P.; Mitlin, D.; Freeman, M. R.

    2016-08-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy observations resolve the structure and dynamics of metallic glass Cu100‑xHfx films and demonstrate scanning tunnelling microscopy control of aging at a metallic glass surface. Surface clusters exhibit heterogeneous hopping dynamics. Low Hf concentration films feature an aged surface of larger, slower clusters. Argon ion-sputtering destroys the aged configuration, yielding a surface in constant fluctuation. Scanning tunnelling microscopy can locally restore the relaxed state, allowing for nanoscale lithographic definition of aged sections.

  2. Nanoscale Structure, Dynamics, and Aging Behavior of Metallic Glass Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, J. A. J.; Holt, C. M. B.; Luber, E. J.; Fortin, D. C.; Popowich, G.; Zahiri, B.; Concepcion, P.; Mitlin, D.; Freeman, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning tunnelling microscopy observations resolve the structure and dynamics of metallic glass Cu100−xHfx films and demonstrate scanning tunnelling microscopy control of aging at a metallic glass surface. Surface clusters exhibit heterogeneous hopping dynamics. Low Hf concentration films feature an aged surface of larger, slower clusters. Argon ion-sputtering destroys the aged configuration, yielding a surface in constant fluctuation. Scanning tunnelling microscopy can locally restore the relaxed state, allowing for nanoscale lithographic definition of aged sections. PMID:27498698

  3. Age-class structure and variability of two populations of the bluemask darter etheostoma (Doration) sp.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, J.W.; Layzer, J.B.; Smith, D.D.

    2008-01-01

    The bluemask darter Etheostoma (Doration) sp. is an endangered fish endemic to the upper Caney Fork system in the Cumberland River drainage in central Tennessee. Darters (Etheostoma spp.) are typically short-lived and exhibit rapid growth that quickly decreases with age. Consequently, estimating age of darters from length-frequency distributions can be difficult and subjective. We used a nonparametric kernel density estimator to reduce subjectivity in estimating ages of bluemask darters. Data were collected from a total of 2926 bluemask darters from the Collins River throughout three growing seasons. Additionally, data were collected from 842 bluemask darters from the Rocky River during one growing season. Analysis of length-frequencies indicated the presence of four age classes in both rivers. In each river, the majority of the population was comprised of fish 0.05). In both rivers, females were more abundant than males.

  4. The MARK-AGE phenotypic database: Structure and strategy.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Villanueva, María; Kötter, Tobias; Sindlinger, Thilo; Baur, Jennifer; Oehlke, Sebastian; Bürkle, Alexander; Berthold, Michael R

    2015-11-01

    In the context of the MARK-AGE study, anthropometric, clinical and social data as well as samples of venous blood, buccal mucosal cells and urine were systematically collected from 3337 volunteers. Information from about 500 standardised questions and about 500 analysed biomarkers needed to be documented per individual. On the one hand handling with such a vast amount of data necessitates the use of appropriate informatics tools and the establishment of a database. On the other hand personal information on subjects obtained as a result of such studies has, of course, to be kept confidential, and therefore the investigators must ensure that the subjects' anonymity will be maintained. Such secrecy obligation implies a well-designed and secure system for data storage. In order to fulfil the demands of the MARK-AGE study we established a phenotypic database for storing information on the study subjects by using a doubly coded system. PMID:25817205

  5. Mixing in age-structured population models of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Glasser, John; Feng, Zhilan; Moylan, Andrew; Del Valle, Sara; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Infectious diseases are controlled by reducing pathogen replication within or transmission between hosts. Models can reliably evaluate alternative strategies for curtailing transmission, but only if interpersonal mixing is represented realistically. Compartmental modelers commonly use convex combinations of contacts within and among groups of similarly aged individuals, respectively termed preferential and proportionate mixing. Recently published face-to-face conversation and time-use studies suggest that parents and children and co-workers also mix preferentially. As indirect effects arise from the off-diagonal elements of mixing matrices, these observations are exceedingly important. Accordingly, we refined the formula published by Jacquez et al. [19] to account for these newly-observed patterns and estimated age-specific fractions of contacts with each preferred group. As the ages of contemporaries need not be identical nor those of parents and children to differ by exactly the generation time, we also estimated the variances of the Gaussian distributions with which we replaced the Kronecker delta commonly used in theoretical studies. Our formulae reproduce observed patterns and can be used, given contacts, to estimate probabilities of infection on contact, infection rates, and reproduction numbers. As examples, we illustrate these calculations for influenza based on "attack rates" from a prospective household study during the 1957 pandemic and for varicella based on cumulative incidence estimated from a cross-sectional serological survey conducted from 1988-94, together with contact rates from the several face-to-face conversation and time-use studies. Susceptibility to infection on contact generally declines with age, but may be elevated among adolescents and adults with young children. PMID:22037144

  6. Age structure of refractory interstellar dust and isotopic consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Donald D.; Scowen, Paul; Liffman, Kurt

    1989-01-01

    A sputtering and recycling Monte Carlo model, developed by Liffman and Clayton (1988) is used to calculate the distribution of existence times of the matter in interstellar dust composed of refractory metals. The mean age of each dust particle is defined not as the time it has existed but rather as the mass-weighted existence times of its parts at t = 6 Gyr of the modeled solar system formation. It is shown that Galactic evolution generates a mean correlation, applying to large numbers of particles binned according to size rather than according to individual particles, whose mean ages fluctuate statistically. The cosmochemical consequence is that if interstellar particles can be dynamically sorted into separate size populations during the aggregation history of solar system bodies, the collections of larger grains will constitute matter that is chemically older than collections of smaller grains. The macroscopic age difference generates isotopic anomalies by virtue of the time dependence of the secondary/primary nucleosynthesis yields. Results are compared with three different prescriptions for the sputtering of interstellar dust.

  7. A geostatistical analysis of small-scale spatial variability in bacterial abundance and community structure in salt marsh creek bank sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Rima B.; Blum, Linda K.; McComb, Alison C.; Mills, Aaron L.

    2002-01-01

    Small-scale variations in bacterial abundance and community structure were examined in salt marsh sediments from Virginia's eastern shore. Samples were collected at 5 cm intervals (horizontally) along a 50 cm elevation gradient, over a 215 cm horizontal transect. For each sample, bacterial abundance was determined using acridine orange direct counts and community structure was analyzed using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting of whole-community DNA extracts. A geostatistical analysis was used to determine the degree of spatial autocorrelation among the samples, for each variable and each direction (horizontal and vertical). The proportion of variance in bacterial abundance that could be accounted for by the spatial model was quite high (vertical: 60%, horizontal: 73%); significant autocorrelation was found among samples separated by 25 cm in the vertical direction and up to 115 cm horizontally. In contrast, most of the variability in community structure was not accounted for by simply considering the spatial separation of samples (vertical: 11%, horizontal: 22%), and must reflect variability from other parameters (e.g., variation at other spatial scales, experimental error, or environmental heterogeneity). Microbial community patch size based upon overall similarity in community structure varied between 17 cm (vertical) and 35 cm (horizontal). Overall, variability due to horizontal position (distance from the creek bank) was much smaller than that due to vertical position (elevation) for both community properties assayed. This suggests that processes more correlated with elevation (e.g., drainage and redox potential) vary at a smaller scale (therefore producing smaller patch sizes) than processes controlled by distance from the creek bank. c2002 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of soil tillage and management of crop residues on soil properties: abundance, biomass and diversity of earthworms, soil structure and nutrient evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    lemtiri, Aboulkacem

    2013-04-01

    The living soil is represented by soil biota that interacts with aboveground biota and with the abiotic environment, soil structure, soil reaction, organic matter, nutrient contents, aso. Maintenance of soil organic matter through integrated soil fertility management is an important issue to conciliate soil quality and agricultural productivity. Earthworms are key actors in soil structure formation through the production of casts and the incorporation of soil organic matter in the soil. Research is still needed about the interactive effects of various tillage and crop residue management practices on earthworm populations and physical and chemical properties of soil. To investigate the impacts of two tillage management systems and two cropping systems on earthworm populations, soil structure evolution and nutrient dynamics, we carried out a three years study in an experimental field. The aims of this experimentation, were to assess the effects of the tillage systems (ploughing versus reduced tillage) and the availability of crop residues (export versus no export) on (i) the abundance, biomass and diversity of earthworms, on the soil structure and on the temporal variation of water extractable nutrients and organic carbon. The first results show that tillage management did significantly affect earthworm abundance and biomass. However, crop residue management did not affect abundance, biomass and diversity of earthworms. Regarding soil physical properties, the tillage affected the compaction profiles within the top 30cm. The analysis of nutrient and organic carbon dynamics show divergent trends (decrease of calcium and magnesium, increase of hot water extractable carbon and phosphorus…) but no clear effect of the studied factors could be identified. The question of the initial soil variability raised as a crucial point in the discussion.

  9. Aging.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Choon; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2013-09-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  10. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  11. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-05-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions.

  12. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions. PMID:27220911

  13. Radiostratigraphy and age structure of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacGregor, Joseph A.; Fahnestock, Mark A.; Catania, Ginny A.; Paden, John D.; Prasad Gogineni, S.; Young, S. Keith; Rybarski, Susan C.; Mabrey, Alexandria N.; Wagman, Benjamin M.; Morlighem, Mathieu

    2015-02-01

    Several decades of ice-penetrating radar surveys of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have observed numerous widespread internal reflections. Analysis of this radiostratigraphy has produced valuable insights into ice sheet dynamics and motivates additional mapping of these reflections. Here we present a comprehensive deep radiostratigraphy of the Greenland Ice Sheet from airborne deep ice-penetrating radar data collected over Greenland by The University of Kansas between 1993 and 2013. To map this radiostratigraphy efficiently, we developed new techniques for predicting reflection slope from the phase recorded by coherent radars. When integrated along track, these slope fields predict the radiostratigraphy and simplify semiautomatic reflection tracing. Core-intersecting reflections were dated using synchronized depth-age relationships for six deep ice cores. Additional reflections were dated by matching reflections between transects and by extending reflection-inferred depth-age relationships using the local effective vertical strain rate. The oldest reflections, dating to the Eemian period, are found mostly in the northern part of the ice sheet. Within the onset regions of several fast-flowing outlet glaciers and ice streams, reflections typically do not conform to the bed topography. Disrupted radiostratigraphy is also observed in a region north of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream that is not presently flowing rapidly. Dated reflections are used to generate a gridded age volume for most of the ice sheet and also to determine the depths of key climate transitions that were not observed directly. This radiostratigraphy provides a new constraint on the dynamics and history of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  14. Radiostratigraphy and age structure of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Joseph A; Fahnestock, Mark A; Catania, Ginny A; Paden, John D; Prasad Gogineni, S; Young, S Keith; Rybarski, Susan C; Mabrey, Alexandria N; Wagman, Benjamin M; Morlighem, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Several decades of ice-penetrating radar surveys of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have observed numerous widespread internal reflections. Analysis of this radiostratigraphy has produced valuable insights into ice sheet dynamics and motivates additional mapping of these reflections. Here we present a comprehensive deep radiostratigraphy of the Greenland Ice Sheet from airborne deep ice-penetrating radar data collected over Greenland by The University of Kansas between 1993 and 2013. To map this radiostratigraphy efficiently, we developed new techniques for predicting reflection slope from the phase recorded by coherent radars. When integrated along track, these slope fields predict the radiostratigraphy and simplify semiautomatic reflection tracing. Core-intersecting reflections were dated using synchronized depth-age relationships for six deep ice cores. Additional reflections were dated by matching reflections between transects and by extending reflection-inferred depth-age relationships using the local effective vertical strain rate. The oldest reflections, dating to the Eemian period, are found mostly in the northern part of the ice sheet. Within the onset regions of several fast-flowing outlet glaciers and ice streams, reflections typically do not conform to the bed topography. Disrupted radiostratigraphy is also observed in a region north of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream that is not presently flowing rapidly. Dated reflections are used to generate a gridded age volume for most of the ice sheet and also to determine the depths of key climate transitions that were not observed directly. This radiostratigraphy provides a new constraint on the dynamics and history of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Key Points Phase information predicts reflection slope and simplifies reflection tracing Reflections can be dated away from ice cores using a simple ice flow model Radiostratigraphy is often disrupted near the onset of fast ice flow PMID:26213664

  15. Effects of habitat structure on the epifaunal community in Mussismilia corals: does coral morphology influence the richness and abundance of associated crustacean fauna?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, Marcos M.; Neves, Elizabeth; Johnsson, Rodrigo

    2015-06-01

    Coral habitat structures increase abundance and richness of organisms by providing niches, easy access to resources and refuge from predators. Corals harbor a great variety of animals; the variation in coral species morphology contributes to the heterogeneity and complexity of habitat types. In this report, we studied the richness and abundance of crustaceans (Decapoda, Copepoda, Peracarida and Ostracoda) associated with three species of Mussismilia exhibiting different growth morphologies, in two different coral reefs of the Bahia state (Caramuanas and Boipeba-Moreré, Brazil). Mussismilia hispida is a massive coral; M. braziliensis also has a massive growth pattern, but forms a crevice in the basal area of the corallum; M. harttii has a meandroid pattern. PERMANOVA analysis suggests significant differences in associated fauna richness among Mussismilia species, with higher values for M. harttii, followed by M. braziliensis and later by M. hispida. The same trend was observed for density, except that the comparison of M. braziliensis and M. hispida did not show differences. Redundancy and canonical correspondence analysis indicated that almost all of the crustacean species were more associated with the M. harttii colonies that formed a group clearly separated from colonies of M. braziliensis and M. hispida. We also found that the internal volume of interpolyp space, only present in M. harttii, was the most important factor influencing richness and abundance of all analyzed orders of crustaceans.

  16. AGE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT STRUCTURES AND COMPONENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    BRAVERMAN,J.

    1999-03-29

    This paper summarizes and highlights the results of the initial phase of a research project on the assessment of aged and degraded structures and components important to the safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). A review of age-related degradation of structures and passive components at NPPs was performed. Instances of age-related degradation have been collected and reviewed. Data were collected from plant generated documents such as Licensing Event Reports, NRC generic communications, NUREGs and industry reports. Applicable cases of degradation occurrences were reviewed and then entered into a computerized database. The results obtained from the review of degradation occurrences are summarized and discussed. Various trending analyses were performed to identify which structures and components are most affected, whether degradation occurrences are worsening, and what are the most common aging mechanisms. The paper also discusses potential aging issues and degradation-susceptible structures and passive components which would have the greatest impact on plant risk.

  17. Age-Related Degradation of Nuclear Power Plant Structures and Components

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, J.; Chang, T.-Y.; Chokshi, N.; Hofmayer, C.; Morante, R.; Shteyngart, S.

    1999-03-29

    This paper summarizes and highlights the results of the initial phase of a research project on the assessment of aged and degraded structures and components important to the safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). A review of age-related degradation of structures and passive components at NPPs was performed. Instances of age-related degradation have been collected and reviewed. Data were collected from plant generated documents such as Licensing Event Reports, NRC generic communications, NUREGs and industry reports. Applicable cases of degradation occurrences were reviewed and then entered into a computerized database. The results obtained from the review of degradation occurrences are summarized and discussed. Various trending analyses were performed to identify which structures and components are most affected, whether degradation occurrences are worsening, and what was the most common aging mechanisms. The paper also discusses potential aging issues and degradation-susceptible structures and passive components which would have the greatest impact on plant risk.

  18. Aged Muscle Demonstrates Fiber-Type Adaptations in Response to Mechanical Overload, in the Absence of Myofiber Hypertrophy, Independent of Satellite Cell Abundance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonah D; Fry, Christopher S; Mula, Jyothi; Kirby, Tyler J; Jackson, Janna R; Liu, Fujun; Yang, Lin; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; McCarthy, John J; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2016-04-01

    Although sarcopenia, age-associated loss of muscle mass and strength, is neither accelerated nor exacerbated by depletion of muscle stem cells, satellite cells, we hypothesized that adaptation in sarcopenic muscle would be compromised. To test this hypothesis, we depleted satellite cells with tamoxifen treatment of Pax7(CreER)-DTA mice at 4 months of age, and 20 months later subjected the plantaris muscle to 2 weeks of mechanical overload. We found myofiber hypertrophy was impaired in aged mice regardless of satellite cell content. Even in the absence of growth, vehicle-treated mice mounted a regenerative response, not apparent in tamoxifen-treated mice. Further, myonuclear accretion occurred in the absence of growth, which was prevented by satellite cell depletion, demonstrating that myonuclear addition is insufficient to drive myofiber hypertrophy. Satellite cell depletion increased extracellular matrix content of aged muscle that was exacerbated by overload, potentially limiting myofiber growth. These results support the idea that satellite cells regulate the muscle environment, and that their loss during aging may contribute to fibrosis, particularly during periods of remodeling. Overload induced a fiber-type composition improvement, independent of satellite cells, suggesting that aged muscle is very responsive to exercise-induced enhancement in oxidative capacity, even with an impaired hypertrophic response. PMID:25878030

  19. The 1991 International Conference on Aging Aircraft and Structural Airworthiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Technical sessions of the conference included structural performance, nondestructive evaluation, maintenance and repair, international activities, and commuter airlines. Each session was organized to provide a well-rounded view of the subject from the industry, regulatory, and research perspective. Thirty-four presentations were given by the international technical community.

  20. Interplay between Shear Loading and Structural Aging in a Physical Gelatin Gel

    SciTech Connect

    Ronsin, O.; Caroli, C.; Baumberger, T.

    2009-09-25

    We show that the aging of the mechanical relaxation of a gelatin gel exhibits the same scaling phenomenology as polymer and colloidal glasses. In addition, gelatin is known to exhibit logarithmic structural aging (stiffening). We find that stress accelerates this process. However, this effect is definitely irreducible to a mere age shift with respect to natural aging. We suggest that it is interpretable in terms of elastically aided elementary (coil->helix) local events whose dynamics gradually slows down as aging increases geometric frustration.

  1. Continuous Age-Structured Model for Bovine Tuberculosis in African buffalo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguelov, R.; Kojouharov, H.

    2009-10-01

    The paper deals with a model of the spread of bovine tuberculosis in the buffalo population in the Kruger National Park in South Africa. The model uses continuous age structure and it is formulated in terms of partial differential equations using eight epidemiological classes (compartments). More precisely, the age density for each class at time t satisfies a one way wave equation, where the age is the space variable. The continuous age model discussed here is derived from a 2006 age groups model by P. C. Cross and W. M. Getz.

  2. Structural damages of maxillofacial biopolymers under solar aging.

    PubMed

    Eleni, P N; Krokida, M K; Frangou, M J; Polyzois, G L; Maroulis, Z B; Marinos-Kouris, D

    2007-09-01

    Additional types of silicone biopolymers are widely used in maxillofacial prosthetics. Therefore, the knowledge of the solar radiation's effect on their structural stability is highly important. Four different industrially synthesized biomaterials were examined, called Episil Europe 1, Europe 2, Europe 3 and Africa 3, which were exposed to solar radiation (UVA, UVB) for eight different time periods (from 8 to 168 h). Structural damages due to irradiation exposure were investigated by mechanical tests (compression) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) methods. Simple mathematical models were developed, containing parameters with physical meaning such as maximum stress (sigma(max)), maximum strain (epsilon), elasticity parameter (E), and viscoelastic parameter (p), for the compression test, and melting temperature (T (m)) and Enthalpy in melting point (Heat) for DSC. With increasing irradiation time their maximum stress and strain decreased significantly, and the materials lost their elasticity and molecular stability. A decrement in their melting points and heats was observed as irradiation time was increasing. Finally, experimental results demonstrated that solar radiation has a severe effect on the structural stability of the examined biomaterials. PMID:17483904

  3. Geroprotectors.org: a new, structured and curated database of current therapeutic interventions in aging and age-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Moskalev, Alexey; Chernyagina, Elizaveta; de Magalhães, João Pedro; Barardo, Diogo; Thoppil, Harikrishnan; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Budovsky, Arie; Fraifeld, Vadim E.; Garazha, Andrew; Tsvetkov, Vasily; Bronovitsky, Evgeny; Bogomolov, Vladislav; Scerbacov, Alexei; Kuryan, Oleg; Gurinovich, Roman; Jellen, Leslie C.; Kennedy, Brian; Mamoshina, Polina; Dobrovolskaya, Evgeniya; Aliper, Alex; Kaminsky, Dmitry; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    As the level of interest in aging research increases, there is a growing number of geroprotectors, or therapeutic interventions that aim to extend the healthy lifespan and repair or reduce aging-related damage in model organisms and, eventually, in humans. There is a clear need for a manually-curated database of geroprotectors to compile and index their effects on aging and age-related diseases and link these effects to relevant studies and multiple biochemical and drug databases. Here, we introduce the first such resource, Geroprotectors (http://geroprotectors.org). Geroprotectors is a public, rapidly explorable database that catalogs over 250 experiments involving over 200 known or candidate geroprotectors that extend lifespan in model organisms. Each compound has a comprehensive profile complete with biochemistry, mechanisms, and lifespan effects in various model organisms, along with information ranging from chemical structure, side effects, and toxicity to FDA drug status. These are presented in a visually intuitive, efficient framework fit for casual browsing or in-depth research alike. Data are linked to the source studies or databases, providing quick and convenient access to original data. The Geroprotectors database facilitates cross-study, cross-organism, and cross-discipline analysis and saves countless hours of inefficient literature and web searching. Geroprotectors is a one-stop, knowledge-sharing, time-saving resource for researchers seeking healthy aging solutions. PMID:26342919

  4. Antifouling Coatings Influence both Abundance and Community Structure of Colonizing Biofilms: a Case Study in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Camps, Mercedes; Barani, Aude; Gregori, Gérald; Bouchez, Agnès; Le Berre, Brigitte; Bressy, Christine; Blache, Yves

    2014-01-01

    When immersed in seawater, substrates are rapidly colonized by both micro- and macroorganisms. This process is responsible for important economic and ecological prejudices, particularly when related to ship hulls or aquaculture nets. Commercial antifouling coatings are supposed to reduce biofouling, i.e., micro- and macrofoulers. In this study, biofilms that primarily settled on seven different coatings (polyvinyl chloride [PVC], a fouling release coating [FRC], and five self-polishing copolymer coatings [SPC], including four commercial ones) were quantitatively studied, after 1 month of immersion in summer in the Toulon Bay (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, France), by using flow cytometry (FCM), microscopy, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. FCM was used after a pretreatment to separate cells from the biofilm matrix, in order to determine densities of heterotrophic bacteria, picocyanobacteria, and pico- and nanoeukaryotes on these coatings. Among diatoms, the only microphytobenthic class identified by microscopy, Licmophora, Navicula, and Nitzschia were determined to be the dominant taxa. Overall, biocide-free coatings showed higher densities than all other coatings, except for one biocidal coating, whatever the group of microorganisms. Heterotrophic bacteria always showed the highest densities, and diatoms showed the lowest, but the relative abundances of these groups varied depending on the coating. In particular, the copper-free SPC failed to prevent diatom settlement, whereas the pyrithione-free SPC exhibited high picocyanobacterial density. These results highlight the interest in FCM for antifouling coating assessment as well as specific selection among microbial communities by antifouling coatings. PMID:24907329

  5. Antifouling coatings influence both abundance and community structure of colonizing biofilms: a case study in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Camps, Mercedes; Barani, Aude; Gregori, Gérald; Bouchez, Agnès; Le Berre, Brigitte; Bressy, Christine; Blache, Yves; Briand, Jean-François

    2014-08-01

    When immersed in seawater, substrates are rapidly colonized by both micro- and macroorganisms. This process is responsible for important economic and ecological prejudices, particularly when related to ship hulls or aquaculture nets. Commercial antifouling coatings are supposed to reduce biofouling, i.e., micro- and macrofoulers. In this study, biofilms that primarily settled on seven different coatings (polyvinyl chloride [PVC], a fouling release coating [FRC], and five self-polishing copolymer coatings [SPC], including four commercial ones) were quantitatively studied, after 1 month of immersion in summer in the Toulon Bay (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea, France), by using flow cytometry (FCM), microscopy, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. FCM was used after a pretreatment to separate cells from the biofilm matrix, in order to determine densities of heterotrophic bacteria, picocyanobacteria, and pico- and nanoeukaryotes on these coatings. Among diatoms, the only microphytobenthic class identified by microscopy, Licmophora, Navicula, and Nitzschia were determined to be the dominant taxa. Overall, biocide-free coatings showed higher densities than all other coatings, except for one biocidal coating, whatever the group of microorganisms. Heterotrophic bacteria always showed the highest densities, and diatoms showed the lowest, but the relative abundances of these groups varied depending on the coating. In particular, the copper-free SPC failed to prevent diatom settlement, whereas the pyrithione-free SPC exhibited high picocyanobacterial density. These results highlight the interest in FCM for antifouling coating assessment as well as specific selection among microbial communities by antifouling coatings. PMID:24907329

  6. Characterizing structural association alterations within brain networks in normal aging using Gaussian Bayesian networks

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yan; Chen, Kewei; Wu, Xia; Zhang, Jiacai; Li, Ke; Jin, Zhen; Yao, Li

    2014-01-01

    Recent multivariate neuroimaging studies have revealed aging-related alterations in brain structural networks. However, the sensory/motor networks such as the auditory, visual and motor networks, have obtained much less attention in normal aging research. In this study, we used Gaussian Bayesian networks (BN), an approach investigating possible inter-regional directed relationship, to characterize aging effects on structural associations between core brain regions within each of these structural sensory/motor networks using volumetric MRI data. We then further examined the discriminability of BN models for the young (N = 109; mean age =22.73 years, range 20–28) and old (N = 82; mean age =74.37 years, range 60–90) groups. The results of the BN modeling demonstrated that structural associations exist between two homotopic brain regions from the left and right hemispheres in each of the three networks. In particular, compared with the young group, the old group had significant connection reductions in each of the three networks and lesser connection numbers in the visual network. Moreover, it was found that the aging-related BN models could distinguish the young and old individuals with 90.05, 73.82, and 88.48% accuracy for the auditory, visual, and motor networks, respectively. Our findings suggest that BN models can be used to investigate the normal aging process with reliable statistical power. Moreover, these differences in structural inter-regional interactions may help elucidate the neuronal mechanism of anatomical changes in normal aging. PMID:25324771

  7. Age-structured modeling reveals long-term declines in the natality of western Steller sea lions.

    PubMed

    Holmes, E E; Fritz, L W; York, A E; Sweeney, K

    2007-12-01

    Since the mid-1970s, the western Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus), inhabiting Alaskan waters from Prince William Sound west through the Aleutian Islands, has declined by over 80%. Changing oceanographic conditions, competition from fishing operations, direct human-related mortality, and predators have been suggested as factors driving the decline, but the indirect and interactive nature of their effects on sea lions have made it difficult to attribute changes in abundance to specific factors. In part, this is because only changes in abundance, not changes in vital rates, are known. To determine how vital rates of the western Steller sea lion have changed during its 28-year decline, we first estimated the changes in Steller sea lion age structure using measurements of animals in aerial photographs taken during population surveys since 1985 in the central Gulf of Alaska (CGOA). We then fit an age-structured model with temporally varying vital rates to the age-structure data and to total population and pup counts. The model fits indicate that birth rate in the CGOA steadily declined from 1976 to 2004. Over the same period, survivorship first dropped severely in the early 1980s, when the population collapsed, and then survivorship steadily recovered. The best-fitting model indicates that in 2004, the birth rate in the central Gulf of Alaska was 36% lower than in the 1970s, while adult and juvenile survivorship were close to or slightly above 1970s levels. These predictions and other model predictions concerning population structure match independent field data from mark-recapture studies and photometric analyses. The dominant eigenvalue for the estimated 2004 Leslie matrix is 1.0014, indicating a stable population. The stability, however, depends on very high adult survival, and the shift in vital rates results in a population that is more sensitive to changes in adult survivorship. Although our modeling analysis focused exclusively on the central Gulf of Alaska

  8. Asexual Endophytes and Associated Alkaloids Alter Arthropod Community Structure and Increase Herbivore Abundances on a Native Grass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dispite their minute biomass, microbial symbionts of plants potentially alter herbivory, diversity and community structure. Infection of grasses by asexual endophytic fungi often decreases herbivore loads and alters arthropod diverisy. However, most studies to date have involved agronomic grasses ...

  9. Direct measurement of riverine particulate organic carbon age structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenheim, Brad E.; Galy, Valier

    2012-10-01

    Carbon cycling studies focusing on transport and transformation of terrigenous carbon sources toward marine sedimentary sinks necessitate separation of particulate organic carbon (OC) derived from many different sources and integrated by river systems. Much progress has been made on isolating and characterizing young biologically-formed OC that is still chemically intact, however quantification and characterization of old, refractory rock-bound OC has remained troublesome. Quantification of both endmembers of riverine OC is important to constrain exchanges linking biologic and geologic carbon cycles and regulating atmospheric CO2 and O2. Here, we constrain petrogenic OC proportions in suspended sediment from the headwaters of the Ganges River in Nepal through direct measurement using ramped pyrolysis radiocarbon analysis. The unique results apportion the biospheric and petrogenic fractions of bulk particulate OC and characterize biospheric OC residence time. Compared to the same treatment of POC from the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River system, contrast in age spectra of the Ganges tributary samples illustrates the difference between small mountainous river systems and large integrative ones in terms of the global carbon cycle.

  10. Structure formation and the end of the cosmic dark ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Marcelo Alonso

    We present results on the evolution of dark matter halos and reionization. Dark matter halos enshroud galaxies, quasars and stars. As such, they are fundamentally important to structure formation. In studying reionization, we focus on photoionization by the first stars, the 21-cm and cosmic microwave backgrounds, and its large-scale structure. Several new and important results are presented. First, we analyze the evolution of dark matter haloes that result from collapse within cosmological pancakes. Their mass accretion history and concentration are very similar to those reported simulations of CDM. Thus, fundamental properties of virialized halo formation and evolution are generic and not limited to hierarchical clustering or Gaussian-random-noise initial conditions. We also find that a simple one dimensional fluid model can explain this universal behaviour, implying that the evolving structure of CDM halos can be well understood as the effect of a universal, time-varying rate of smooth and continuous mass infall on an isotropic, collisionless fluid. We discuss cosmological reionization, from small scales and early times, to large scales and late times. We have simulated ionization fronts (I-fronts) created by the first stars forming in "minihalos". We find that nearby minihalos trap the I-front, so their centers remain neutral, contrary to the suggestion that these stars would trigger a second generation by ionizing neighboring minihalos cores. We then turn to the cross-correlation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) and 21-cm maps. We find that its measurement can be used to reconstruct the reionization history of the universe. Afterwards, we discuss the three versus first-year data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). Surprisingly, the delay of reionization from three-year data is matched by a similar delay in structure formation. These effects cancel to leave the source halo efficiency constraints unchanged. We conclude by analyzing the

  11. The aging of elite male athletes: age-related changes in performance and skeletal muscle structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, John A.; Davis, Carol S.; Mendias, Christopher L.; Brooks, Susan V.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The paper addresses the degree to which the attainment of the status as an elite athlete in different sports ameliorates the known age-related losses in skeletal muscle structure and function. Design The retrospective design, based on comparisons of published data on former elite and masters athletes and data on control subjects, assessed the degree to which the attainment of ‘elite and masters athlete status’ ameliorated the known age-related changes in skeletal muscle structure and function. Setting Institutional. Participants Elite male athletes. Interventions Participation in selected individual and team sports. Main Outcome Measurements Strength, power, VO2 max and performance. Results For elite athletes in all sports, as for the general population, age-related muscle atrophy begins at about 50 years of age. Despite the loss of muscle mass, elite athletes who maintain an active life style age gracefully with few health problems. Conversely, those who lapse into inactivity regress toward general population norms for fitness, weight control, and health problems. Elite athletes in the dual and team sports have careers that rarely extend into the thirties. Conclusions Life long physical activity does not appear to have any impact on the loss in fiber number. The loss of fibers can be buffered to some degree by hypertrophy of fibers that remain. Surprisingly, the performance of elite athletes in all sports appears to be impaired before the onset of the fiber loss. Even with major losses in physical capacity and muscle mass, the performance of elite and masters athletes is remarkable. PMID:19001883

  12. Some Effects of Sex, Age, and Household Structure on Family Drawings of Barbadian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Monica A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports on an analysis of the family drawings of a nonclinical sample of 502 Barbadian children ages 7-11. Reveals a correlation among sex, age, and household structure and the inclusion or omission of figures, as well as the size and positioning of the figures of parent and self. (MJP)

  13. Estimating survival rates with time series of standing age-structure data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udevitz, Mark S.; Gogan, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been recognized that age-structure data contain useful information for assessing the status and dynamics of wildlife populations. For example, age-specific survival rates can be estimated with just a single sample from the age distribution of a stable, stationary population. For a population that is not stable, age-specific survival rates can be estimated using techniques such as inverse methods that combine time series of age-structure data with other demographic data. However, estimation of survival rates using these methods typically requires numerical optimization, a relatively long time series of data, and smoothing or other constraints to provide useful estimates. We developed general models for possibly unstable populations that combine time series of age-structure data with other demographic data to provide explicit maximum likelihood estimators of age-specific survival rates with as few as two years of data. As an example, we applied these methods to estimate survival rates for female bison (Bison bison) in Yellowstone National Park, USA. This approach provides a simple tool for monitoring survival rates based on age-structure data.

  14. Aging Optimization of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy C458 for Application to Cryotank Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, B. J.; Sankaran, K. K.; Babel, H. W.; Farahmand, B.; Rioja, R.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an examination of the fracture toughness of aluminum-lithium alloy C458 for use in cryotank structures. Topics cover include: cryogenics, alloy composition, strengthing precipitates in C458, cryogenic fracture toughness improvements, design of experiments for measuring aging optimization of C458 plate and effects of aging of properties of C458 plate.

  15. Factor Structure of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms for Children Age 3 to 5 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGoey, Kara E.; Schreiber, James; Venesky, Lindsey; Westwood, Wendy; McGuirk, Lindsay; Schaffner, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) distinguishes two dimensions of symptoms, inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity for ages 3 to adulthood. Currently, no separate classification for preschool-age children exists, whereas preliminary research suggests that the two-factor structure of ADHD may not match the…

  16. Does white matter structure or hippocampal volume mediate associations between cortisol and cognitive ageing?

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Simon R.; MacPherson, Sarah E.; Ferguson, Karen J.; Royle, Natalie A.; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Hernández, Maria del C. Valdés; Bastin, Mark E.; MacLullich, Alasdair M.J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated glucocorticoid (GC) levels putatively damage specific brain regions, which in turn may accelerate cognitive ageing. However, many studies are cross-sectional or have relatively short follow-up periods, making it difficult to relate GCs directly to changes in cognitive ability with increasing age. Moreover, studies combining endocrine, MRI and cognitive variables are scarce, measurement methods vary considerably, and formal tests of the underlying causal hypothesis (cortisol → brain → cognition) are absent. In this study, 90 men, aged 73 years, provided measures of fluid intelligence, processing speed and memory, diurnal and reactive salivary cortisol and two measures of white matter (WM) structure (WM hyperintensity volume from structural MRI and mean diffusivity averaged across 12 major tracts from diffusion tensor MRI), hippocampal volume, and also cognitive ability at age 11. We tested whether negative relationships between cognitive ageing differences (over more than 60 years) and salivary cortisol were significantly mediated by WM and hippocampal volume. Significant associations between reactive cortisol at 73 and cognitive ageing differences between 11 and 73 (r = −.28 to −.36, p < .05) were partially mediated by both WM structural measures, but not hippocampal volume. Cortisol-WM relationships were modest, as was the degree to which WM structure attenuated cortisol–cognition associations (<15%). These data support the hypothesis that GCs contribute to cognitive ageing differences from childhood to the early 70s, partly via brain WM structure. PMID:26298692

  17. Microbial community structure and abundance in the rhizosphere and bulk soil of a tomato cropping system that includes cover crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this report we use Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms (TRFLP) in a tomato production system to “finger printing” the soil microbial community structure with Phylum specific primer sets. Factors influencing the soil microbes are a cover crop of Hairy Vetch (Vicia villosa) or Rye (...

  18. Aging management of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. ); Arndt, E.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The Structural Aging Program has the overall objective of providing the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with an improved basis for evaluating nuclear power plants for continued service. In meeting this objective, a materials property data base is being developed as well as an aging assessment methodology for concrete structures in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, studies are well under way to review and assess inservice inspection techniques for concrete structures and to develop a methodology which can be used for performing current as well as reliability-based future conditions assessments of these structures. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Structural Aging Program to evaluate continued performance of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses the Structural Aging (SAG) Program which is being conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the United States Nuclear Regulatory commission (USNRC). The SAG Program is addressing the aging management of safety-related concrete structures in nuclear power plants for the purpose of providing improved technical bases for their continued service. The program is organized into three technical tasks: Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technologies, and Quantitative Methodology for continued Service Determinations. Objectives and a summary of recent accomplishments under each of these tasks are presented.

  20. Abundance coefficients, a new method for measuring microorganism relative abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A new method of measuring the relative abundance of microorganisms by using a set of interrelated coefficients, termed 'abundance coefficients' or 'AC', is proposed. These coefficients provide a means of recording abundance for geometric density categories, and each density measurement represents an approximation of the Poisson parameter ??t. The AC is the natural logarithm of a 'characteristic value,' which is a particular number for each geometric density category. The 'characteristic values' are based upon a probabilistic error statement derived from the Poisson formula, and they present evidence for separation of the geometric category boundaries by e = 2.71828. The proposed AC provide a means for recording species abundance in a manner suitable for arithmetic manipulation, for population structure studies, and for the determination of practical limits for defining the presence or absence of a species. Further, these coefficients provide for both intrasample and intersample abundance comparisons. ?? 1977 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  1. Microbial communities on glacier surfaces in Svalbard: impact of physical and chemical properties on abundance and structure of cyanobacteria and algae.

    PubMed

    Stibal, Marek; Sabacká, Marie; Kastovská, Klára

    2006-11-01

    Microbial communities occurring in three types of supraglacial habitats--cryoconite holes, medial moraines, and supraglacial kames--at several glaciers in the Arctic archipelago of Svalbard were investigated. Abundance, biovolume, and community structure were evaluated by using epifluorescence microscopy and culturing methods. Particular emphasis was laid on distinctions in the chemical and physical properties of the supraglacial habitats and their relation to the microbial communities, and quantitative multivariate analyses were used to assess potential relationships. Varying pH (4.8 in cryoconite; 8.5 in a moraine) and texture (the proportion of coarse fraction 2% of dry weight in cryoconite; 99% dw in a kame) were found, and rather low concentrations of organic matter (0.3% of dry weight in a kame; 22% dw in cryoconite) and nutrients (nitrogen up to 0.4% dw, phosphorus up to 0.8% dw) were determined in the samples. In cryoconite sediment, the highest numbers of bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae were found, whereas relatively low microbial abundances were recorded in moraines and kames. Cyanobacterial cells were significantly more abundant than microalgal ones in cryoconite and supraglacial kames. Different species of the cyanobacterial genus Leptolyngbya were by far the most represented in all samples, and cyanobacteria of the genera Phormidium and Nostoc prevailed in cultures isolated from cryoconite samples. These species are considered opportunistic organisms with wide ecological valency and strong colonizing potential rather than glacial specialists. Statistical analyses suggest that fine sediment with higher water content is the most suitable condition for bacteria, cyanobacteria, and algae. Also, a positive impact of lower pH on microbial growth was found. The fate of a microbial cell deposited on the glacier surface seems therefore predetermined by the physical and chemical factors such as texture of sediment and water content rather than spatial factors

  2. An agent-based computational model for tuberculosis spreading on age-structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graciani Rodrigues, C. C.; Espíndola, Aquino L.; Penna, T. J. P.

    2015-06-01

    In this work we present an agent-based computational model to study the spreading of the tuberculosis (TB) disease on age-structured populations. The model proposed is a merge of two previous models: an agent-based computational model for the spreading of tuberculosis and a bit-string model for biological aging. The combination of TB with the population aging, reproduces the coexistence of health states, as seen in real populations. In addition, the universal exponential behavior of mortalities curves is still preserved. Finally, the population distribution as function of age shows the prevalence of TB mostly in elders, for high efficacy treatments.

  3. Mathematical Model of Three Age-Structured Transmission Dynamics of Chikungunya Virus

    PubMed Central

    Agusto, Folashade B.; Easley, Shamise; Freeman, Kenneth; Thomas, Madison

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new age-structured deterministic model for the transmission dynamics of chikungunya virus. The model is analyzed to gain insights into the qualitative features of its associated equilibria. Some of the theoretical and epidemiological findings indicate that the stable disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable when the associated reproduction number is less than unity. Furthermore, the model undergoes, in the presence of disease induced mortality, the phenomenon of backward bifurcation, where the stable disease-free equilibrium of the model coexists with a stable endemic equilibrium when the associated reproduction number is less than unity. Further analysis of the model indicates that the qualitative dynamics of the model are not altered by the inclusion of age structure. This is further emphasized by the sensitivity analysis results, which shows that the dominant parameters of the model are not altered by the inclusion of age structure. However, the numerical simulations show the flaw of the exclusion of age in the transmission dynamics of chikungunya with regard to control implementations. The exclusion of age structure fails to show the age distribution needed for an effective age based control strategy, leading to a one size fits all blanket control for the entire population. PMID:27190548

  4. Neuroanatomical correlates of cognitive aging: evidence from structural magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Raz, N; Gunning-Dixon, F M; Head, D; Dupuis, J H; Acker, J D

    1998-01-01

    To examine putative brain substrates of cognitive functions differentially affected by age the authors measured the volume of cortical regions and performance on tests of executive functions, working memory, explicit memory, and priming in healthy adults (18-77 years old). The results indicate that shrinkage of the prefrontal cortex mediates age-related increases in perseveration. The volume of visual processing areas predicted performance on nonverbal working memory tasks. Contrary to the hypotheses, in the examined age range, the volume of limbic structures was unrelated to any of the cognitive functions; verbal working memory, verbal explicit memory, and verbal priming were independent of cortical volumes. Nevertheless, among the participants aged above 60, reduction in the volume of limbic structures predicted declines in explicit memory. Chronological age adversely influenced all cognitive indices, although its effects on priming were only indirect, mediated by declines in verbal working memory. PMID:9460738

  5. Prophylactic and abundant intake of α-lipoic acid causes hepatic steatosis and should be reconsidered in usage as an anti-aging drug.

    PubMed

    Kuhla, Angela; Derbenev, Margarita; Shih, Hao Yu; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    The majority of research has suggested that α-lipoic acid (ALA) is a potential therapeutic agent for chronic diseases associated with oxidative stress, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. Therefore, a nutritional supplementation with ALA is recommended although the effects of a short- and long-term intake of ALA on central organs in healthy individuals are not studied in detail yet. Therefore, liver tissue of 4 and 74 weeks ALA-treated healthy C57BL6/J mice with respect to lipid metabolism was analyzed. In doing so, it was shown that short-term and long-term ALA treatment caused a marked increase of β-oxidation, as indicated by a significant rise of mRNA expression of fgf21, pparα, and its target genes, for example, acox1, cpt1α, and cpt2, as well as of Fgf21 plasma concentration. Glycolytic activity, as assessed by pklr1 mRNA expression and pyruvate kinase activity, was also found increased. In addition, it was shown that both short- and long-term ALA treatment increased cholesterol content, induced systemic triglyceridemia, and enhanced rxrα and lxrα mRNA expression. Despite the fact that short-term ALA intake reduced lipogenesis, as given by significant declines of fas and srebp1c mRNA expression, and that a long-term ALA intake induced a significant rise of these lipogenic genes, both treatment regimen caused fat accumulation. This, however, was more pronounced upon long-term ALA intake, leading to hepatic steatosis and liver injury, as indicated by increased inflammation and disruption of the general hepatic architecture. In summary, the prophylactic and abundant use of ALA under healthy conditions should be considered with caution. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(2):179-189, 2016. PMID:26876280

  6. Catalytic activities enhanced by abundant structural defects and balanced N distribution of N-doped graphene in oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaogong; Shi, Yantao; Guo, Jiahao; Gao, Liguo; Wang, Kai; Du, Yi; Ma, Tingli

    2016-02-01

    N-doped graphene (NG) is a promising candidate for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the cathode of fuel cells. However, the catalytic activity of NG is lower than that of commercial Pt/C in alkaline and acidic media. In this study, NG samples were obtained using urea as N source. The structural defects and N distribution in the samples were adjusted by regulating the pyrolysis temperature. The new NG type exhibited remarkable catalytic activities for ORR in both alkaline and acidic media.

  7. Effects of age and sex on the structural, chemical and technological characteristics of mule duck meat.

    PubMed

    Baeza, E; Salichon, M R; Marche, G; Wacrenier, N; Dominguez, B; Culioli, J

    2000-07-01

    1. The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of age and sex on the chemical, structural and technological characteristics of mule duck meat. 2. Ten males and 10 females were weighed and slaughtered at 8, 10, 11, 12 and 13 weeks of age. Weight, pH value, colour, tenderness and juice loss of breast muscle were determined. 3. The activities of 3 enzymes (citrate synthase, beta-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase) which indicate muscular metabolic activity were assayed. 4. Chemical composition (moisture, lipids, proteins, minerals, lipid and phospholipid classes, fatty acid composition) of breast muscle was analysed. 5. Fibre type, fibre type percentage and cross-sectional areas were determined using histochemistry and an image analysis system. 6. For growth performance and muscular structure, the ideal slaughter age of mule ducks is 10 weeks of age. Chemical and technological analysis indicated that muscular maturity in Pectoralis major was reached at 11 weeks of age, but, at this age, breast lipid content is high. Moreover, after 10 weeks of age, food costs rapidly increased. 7. Lastly, sexual dimorphism for body weight is minor. In this study, at any given age, no significant differences between males and females were shown. Thus, it is possible to rear both sexes together and to slaughter them at the same age. PMID:11081424

  8. Quota implementation of the maximum sustainable yield for age-structured fisheries.

    PubMed

    Kanik, Zafer; Kucuksenel, Serkan

    2016-06-01

    One of the main goals stated in the proposals for the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) reform was achieving maximum sustainable yield (MSY) for all European fisheries. In this paper, we propose a fishing rights allocation mechanism or management system, which specifies catch limits for individual fishing fleets to implement MSY harvesting conditions in an age-structured bioeconomic model. An age-structured model in a single species fishery with two fleets having perfect or imperfect fishing selectivity is studied. If fishing technology or gear selectivity depends on the relative age composition of the mature fish stock, fixed harvest proportions, derived from catchability and bycatch coefficients, is not valid anymore. As a result, not only the age-structure and fishing technology but also the estimated level of MSY is steering the allocation of quota shares. The results also show that allocation of quota shares based on historical catches or auctioning may not provide viable solutions to achieve MSY. PMID:27018447

  9. Temporal and spatial variation in relative abundance and length structure of salmonids in reservoirs: Implications for monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhea, D.T.; Hubert, W.A.; Gangl, R.S.; Whaley, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in salmonid catch per unit effort (C/f) may affect monitoring efforts in lakes and reservoirs. This study evaluated the spatial and temporal variation in gill-net C/f and length structure of captured salmonids in nearshore (???7.6-m bottom depth) and offshore (>7.6-m bottom depth) areas of two Wyoming reservoirs. Floating experimental gill nets were set as nearshore and offshore pairs at 24 locations in both reservoirs during each of four sampling periods (spring, early summer, late summer, and fall). Salmonid C/f was significantly higher in nearshore areas than in offshore areas during all periods in one reservoir and during all periods except spring in the other reservoir. Mean C/f of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss was not significantly different between nearshore and offshore areas when water temperatures were 10-13??C in both reservoirs. Length structure of salmonids differed significantly between nearshore and offshore locations and among periods in both reservoirs. These patterns should be considered in both the design and analysis phases of monitoring efforts that use floating experimental gill nets and other sampling gears. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  10. Genome-wide identification, structural analysis and new insights into late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) gene family formation pattern in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu; Xiong, Ziyi; Zheng, Jianxiao; Xu, Dongyang; Zhu, Zeyang; Xiang, Jun; Gan, Jianping; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Yin, Yongtai; Li, Maoteng

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a diverse and large group of polypeptides that play important roles in desiccation and freezing tolerance in plants. The LEA family has been systematically characterized in some plants but not Brassica napus. In this study, 108 BnLEA genes were identified in the B. napus genome and classified into eight families based on their conserved domains. Protein sequence alignments revealed an abundance of alanine, lysine and glutamic acid residues in BnLEA proteins. The BnLEA gene structure has few introns (<3), and they are distributed unevenly across all 19 chromosomes in B. napus, occurring as gene clusters in chromosomes A9, C2, C4 and C5. More than two-thirds of the BnLEA genes are associated with segmental duplication. Synteny analysis revealed that most LEA genes are conserved, although gene losses or gains were also identified. These results suggest that segmental duplication and whole-genome duplication played a major role in the expansion of the BnLEA gene family. Expression profiles analysis indicated that expression of most BnLEAs was increased in leaves and late stage seeds. This study presents a comprehensive overview of the LEA gene family in B. napus and provides new insights into the formation of this family. PMID:27072743

  11. Improved V II Log(gf) Values, Hyperfine Structure Constants, and Abundance Determinations in the Photospheres of the Sun and Metal-poor Star HD 84937

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M. P.; Lawler, J. E.; Den Hartog, E. A.; Sneden, C.; Cowan, J. J.

    2014-10-01

    New experimental absolute atomic transition probabilities are reported for 203 lines of V II. Branching fractions are measured from spectra recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer and an echelle spectrometer. The branching fractions are normalized with radiative lifetime measurements to determine the new transition probabilities. Generally good agreement is found between this work and previously reported V II transition probabilities. Two spectrometers, independent radiometric calibration methods, and independent data analysis routines enable a reduction in systematic uncertainties, in particular those due to optical depth errors. In addition, new hyperfine structure constants are measured for selected levels by least squares fitting line profiles in the FTS spectra. The new V II data are applied to high resolution visible and UV spectra of the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937 to determine new, more accurate V abundances. Lines covering a range of wavelength and excitation potential are used to search for non-LTE effects. Very good agreement is found between our new solar photospheric V abundance, log ɛ(V) = 3.95 from 15 V II lines, and the solar-system meteoritic value. In HD 84937, we derive [V/H] = -2.08 from 68 lines, leading to a value of [V/Fe] = 0.24.

  12. IMPROVED V II log(gf) VALUES, HYPERFINE STRUCTURE CONSTANTS, AND ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS IN THE PHOTOSPHERES OF THE SUN AND METAL-POOR STAR HD 84937

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, M. P.; Lawler, J. E.; Den Hartog, E. A.; Sneden, C.; Cowan, J. J. E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu

    2014-10-01

    New experimental absolute atomic transition probabilities are reported for 203 lines of V II. Branching fractions are measured from spectra recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer and an echelle spectrometer. The branching fractions are normalized with radiative lifetime measurements to determine the new transition probabilities. Generally good agreement is found between this work and previously reported V II transition probabilities. Two spectrometers, independent radiometric calibration methods, and independent data analysis routines enable a reduction in systematic uncertainties, in particular those due to optical depth errors. In addition, new hyperfine structure constants are measured for selected levels by least squares fitting line profiles in the FTS spectra. The new V II data are applied to high resolution visible and UV spectra of the Sun and metal-poor star HD 84937 to determine new, more accurate V abundances. Lines covering a range of wavelength and excitation potential are used to search for non-LTE effects. Very good agreement is found between our new solar photospheric V abundance, log ε(V) = 3.95 from 15 V II lines, and the solar-system meteoritic value. In HD 84937, we derive [V/H] = –2.08 from 68 lines, leading to a value of [V/Fe] = 0.24.

  13. Genome-wide identification, structural analysis and new insights into late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) gene family formation pattern in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu; Xiong, Ziyi; Zheng, Jianxiao; Xu, Dongyang; Zhu, Zeyang; Xiang, Jun; Gan, Jianping; Raboanatahiry, Nadia; Yin, Yongtai; Li, Maoteng

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a diverse and large group of polypeptides that play important roles in desiccation and freezing tolerance in plants. The LEA family has been systematically characterized in some plants but not Brassica napus. In this study, 108 BnLEA genes were identified in the B. napus genome and classified into eight families based on their conserved domains. Protein sequence alignments revealed an abundance of alanine, lysine and glutamic acid residues in BnLEA proteins. The BnLEA gene structure has few introns (<3), and they are distributed unevenly across all 19 chromosomes in B. napus, occurring as gene clusters in chromosomes A9, C2, C4 and C5. More than two-thirds of the BnLEA genes are associated with segmental duplication. Synteny analysis revealed that most LEA genes are conserved, although gene losses or gains were also identified. These results suggest that segmental duplication and whole-genome duplication played a major role in the expansion of the BnLEA gene family. Expression profiles analysis indicated that expression of most BnLEAs was increased in leaves and late stage seeds. This study presents a comprehensive overview of the LEA gene family in B. napus and provides new insights into the formation of this family. PMID:27072743

  14. Spatial and temporal variations in the age structure of Arctic sea ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belchansky, G.I.; Douglas, D.C.; Platonov, N.G.

    2005-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in the age structure of Arctic sea ice are investigated using a new reverse chronology algorithm that tracks ice-covered pixels to their location and date of origin based on ice motion and concentration data. The Beaufort Gyre tends to harbor the oldest (>10 years old) sea ice in the western Arctic while direct ice advection pathways toward the Transpolar Drift Stream maintain relatively young (10 years old (10+ year age class) were observed during 1989-2003. Since the mid-1990s, losses to the 10+ year age class lacked compensation by recruitment due to a prior depletion of all mature (6-10 year) age classes. Survival of the 1994 and 1996-1998 sea ice generations reestablished most mature age classes, and thereby the potential to increase extent of the 10+ year age class during the mid-2000s.

  15. Protection of rubbers against aging with the use of structural, diffusion and kinetic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kablov, V. F.; Zaikov, G. E.

    2014-05-15

    Processes of rubber aging in the different kinetic modes and mathematical models of the processes including aging and destruction processes under extreme conditions have been studied. The aging process for rubbers as thermodynamically open nonlinear systems has also been considered in the paper. It has been revealed that the aging process can be controlled by the internal physical-chemical processes organization and by creation of external influences (by organization of thermodynamic forces and flows). According to the Onsager principle, in certain conditions of aging the conjugation of thermodynamic forces and flows is possible. The diffusion and structural aspects of aging in elastomeric rubbers and articles thereof have been considered. The composite antiaging systems of prolonged action based on the use of microparticles with a saturated solution of the antiagers migrating into an elastomeric matrix at the exploitation have been proposed.

  16. Protection of rubbers against aging with the use of structural, diffusion and kinetic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablov, V. F.; Zaikov, G. E.

    2014-05-01

    Processes of rubber aging in the different kinetic modes and mathematical models of the processes including aging and destruction processes under extreme conditions have been studied. The aging process for rubbers as thermodynamically open nonlinear systems has also been considered in the paper. It has been revealed that the aging process can be controlled by the internal physical-chemical processes organization and by creation of external influences (by organization of thermodynamic forces and flows). According to the Onsager principle, in certain conditions of aging the conjugation of thermodynamic forces and flows is possible. The diffusion and structural aspects of aging in elastomeric rubbers and articles thereof have been considered. The composite antiaging systems of prolonged action based on the use of microparticles with a saturated solution of the antiagers migrating into an elastomeric matrix at the exploitation have been proposed.

  17. Structural Validity of the Professional Development Profile of the LoTi Digital-Age Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Vandhana; Hull, Darrell M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was used to examine the structural construct validity of the Professional Development Profile of the LoTi Digital-Age Survey, a measure of teacher instructional practices with technology in the classroom. Teacher responses ("N" = 2,840) from across the United States were used to assess factor structure of the instrument using…

  18. Natural abundance 17O, 6Li NMR and molecular modeling studies of the solvation structures of lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide/1,2-dimethoxyethane liquid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chuan; Hu, Mary Y.; Borodin, Oleg; Qian, Jiangfeng; Qin, Zhaohai; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Natural abundance 17O and 6Li NMR experiments, quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics studies were employed to investigate the solvation structures of Li+ at various concentrations of LiFSI in DME electrolytes. It was found that the chemical shifts of both 17O and 6Li changed with the concentration of LiFSI, indicating the changes of solvation structures with concentration. For the quantum chemistry calculations, the coordinated cluster LiFSI(DME)2 forms at first, and its relative ratio increases with increasing LiFSI concentration to 1 M. Then the solvation structure LiFSI(DME) become the dominant component. As a result, the coordination of forming contact ion pairs between Li+ and FSI- ion increases, but the association between Li+ and DME molecule decreases. Furthermore, at LiFSI concentration of 4 M the solvation structures associated with Li+(FSI-)2(DME), Li+2(FSI-)(DME)4 and (LiFSI)2(DME)3 become the dominant components. For the molecular dynamics simulation, with increasing concentration, the association between DME and Li+ decreases, and the coordinated number of FSI- increases, which is in perfect accord with the DFT results.

  19. Structural Validity of the Movement ABC-2 Test: Factor Structure Comparisons across Three Age Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Joerg; Henderson, Sheila E.; Sugden, David A.; Barnett, Anna L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Movement ABC test is one of the most widely used assessments in the field of Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). Improvements to the 2nd edition of the test (M-ABC-2) include an extension of the age range and reduction in the number of age bands as well as revision of tasks. The total test score provides a measure of motor…

  20. Lithium Abundance in Planet Search Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, Justin; Yale Exoplanets

    2016-01-01

    Since most lithium in the universe is primordial and is destroyed in stars, lithium abundance can be used as a stellar age indicator. Some research seems to show that planet formation may also affect lithium abundance in exoplanet host stars (EHS). However, small and heterogenous samples have made both of these phenomena unclear. Further study of lithium abundance in EHS is needed to better understand possible physical roles of lithium in planet formation theory. We use a large homogenous sample with accurate stellar parameters on which we will use equivalent width analysis to determine precise lithium abundances. From these abundance values we determine an age vs. abundance relation. Additionally, we aim to explore correlation between lithium abundance and planet formation.

  1. The effect of aging temperature on structure characteristics of ordered mesoporous silicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deryło-Marczewska, A.; Marczewski, A. W.; Skrzypek, I.; Pikus, S.; Kozak, M.

    2005-10-01

    A series of mesoporous silica materials were synthesized by applying Pluronic type polymers as pore creating agents. In order to differentiate the characteristics of porous structure of the obtained sorbents the temperature of aging process was changed in the synthesis. The parameters characterizing the pore structure were estimated from nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms. The changes of pore arrangement of the obtained materials being a result of different synthesis conditions were investigated by using a small angle X-ray scattering method. Correlations between the values of structure parameters and aging temperature were found.

  2. Extended Aging Theories for Predictions of Safe Operational Life of Critical Airborne Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Chen, Tony

    2006-01-01

    The previously developed Ko closed-form aging theory has been reformulated into a more compact mathematical form for easier application. A new equivalent loading theory and empirical loading theories have also been developed and incorporated into the revised Ko aging theory for the prediction of a safe operational life of airborne failure-critical structural components. The new set of aging and loading theories were applied to predict the safe number of flights for the B-52B aircraft to carry a launch vehicle, the structural life of critical components consumed by load excursion to proof load value, and the ground-sitting life of B-52B pylon failure-critical structural components. A special life prediction method was developed for the preflight predictions of operational life of failure-critical structural components of the B-52H pylon system, for which no flight data are available.

  3. Sleep Duration and Age-Related Changes in Brain Structure and Cognitive Performance

    PubMed Central

    Lo, June C.; Loh, Kep Kee; Zheng, Hui; Sim, Sam K.Y.; Chee, Michael W.L.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the contribution of sleep duration and quality to age-related changes in brain structure and cognitive performance in relatively healthy older adults. Design: Community-based longitudinal brain and cognitive aging study using a convenience sample. Setting: Participants were studied in a research laboratory. Participants: Relatively healthy adults aged 55 y and older at study commencement. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging and neuropsychological assessment every 2 y. Subjective assessments of sleep duration and quality and blood samples were obtained. Each hour of reduced sleep duration at baseline augmented the annual expansion rate of the ventricles by 0.59% (P = 0.007) and the annual decline rate in global cognitive performance by 0.67% (P = 0.050) in the subsequent 2 y after controlling for the effects of age, sex, education, and body mass index. In contrast, global sleep quality at baseline did not modulate either brain or cognitive aging. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein, a marker of systemic inflammation, showed no correlation with baseline sleep duration, brain structure, or cognitive performance. Conclusions: In healthy older adults, short sleep duration is associated with greater age-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline. These associations are not associated with elevated inflammatory responses among short sleepers. Citation: Lo JC, Loh KK, Zheng H, Sim SK, Chee MW. Sleep duration and age-related changes in brain structure and cognitive performance. SLEEP 2014;37(7):1171-1178. PMID:25061245

  4. Contaminant effects on growth, age-structure, and reproduction, of Mytilus edulis from Puget Sound, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Casillas, E.; Kardong, K.; Kagley, A.; Snider, R.G.; Stein, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    Age-length relationships, age structure, and reproductive status (fecundity, egg size) of Mytilus edulis from six sites in central Puget Sound and one site in the relatively pristine area of northern Puget Sound were measured. Mussels from urban-associated sites (areas with elevated sediment concentrations of PAHs, PCBs, and toxic and essential metals) exhibited high tissue burdens of these contaminants. Age length relationships, fitted to the von Bertalanffy equation, showed that the growth of mussels from urban-associated areas was similar, but was lower than in mussels from minimally-contaminated environments. Comparison of mussel population age-structure showed that at urban sites, mussels of comparable size were consistently older than mussels from minimally contaminated areas and the mean age of urban populations was higher than that of rural populations. In mussels from urban sites, gonad mass was lower while number of oocytes/g gonad was similar compared to mussels from minimally-contaminated areas of Puget Sound. Thus, in mussels from urban sites fecundity was reduced compared to mussels of comparable age from reference sites. The findings support the hypothesis that mussels from the urban areas exhibit impaired growth, altered population age-structure, and reproductive impairment as a result of accumulation of chemical contaminants.

  5. Planting increases the abundance and structure complexity of soil core functional genes relevant to carbon and nitrogen cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Liang, Yuting; Jiang, Yuji; Yang, Yunfeng; Xue, Kai; Xiong, Jinbo; Zhou, Jizhong; Sun, Bo

    2015-09-01

    Plants have an important impact on soil microbial communities and their functions. However, how plants determine the microbial composition and network interactions is still poorly understood. During a four-year field experiment, we investigated the functional gene composition of three types of soils (Phaeozem, Cambisols and Acrisol) under maize planting and bare fallow regimes located in cold temperate, warm temperate and subtropical regions, respectively. The core genes were identified using high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip 3.0), and functional molecular ecological networks (fMENs) were subsequently developed with the random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework. Our results demonstrated that planting significantly (P < 0.05) increased the gene alpha-diversity in terms of richness and Shannon - Simpson’s indexes for all three types of soils and 83.5% of microbial alpha-diversity can be explained by the plant factor. Moreover, planting had significant impacts on the microbial community structure and the network interactions of the microbial communities. The calculated network complexity was higher under maize planting than under bare fallow regimes. The increase of the functional genes led to an increase in both soil respiration and nitrification potential with maize planting, indicating that changes in the soil microbial communities and network interactions influenced ecological functioning.

  6. Planting increases the abundance and structure complexity of soil core functional genes relevant to carbon and nitrogen cycling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Liang, Yuting; Jiang, Yuji; Yang, Yunfeng; Xue, Kai; Xiong, Jinbo; Zhou, Jizhong; Sun, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Plants have an important impact on soil microbial communities and their functions. However, how plants determine the microbial composition and network interactions is still poorly understood. During a four-year field experiment, we investigated the functional gene composition of three types of soils (Phaeozem, Cambisols and Acrisol) under maize planting and bare fallow regimes located in cold temperate, warm temperate and subtropical regions, respectively. The core genes were identified using high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip 3.0), and functional molecular ecological networks (fMENs) were subsequently developed with the random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework. Our results demonstrated that planting significantly (P < 0.05) increased the gene alpha-diversity in terms of richness and Shannon – Simpson’s indexes for all three types of soils and 83.5% of microbial alpha-diversity can be explained by the plant factor. Moreover, planting had significant impacts on the microbial community structure and the network interactions of the microbial communities. The calculated network complexity was higher under maize planting than under bare fallow regimes. The increase of the functional genes led to an increase in both soil respiration and nitrification potential with maize planting, indicating that changes in the soil microbial communities and network interactions influenced ecological functioning. PMID:26396042

  7. A longitudinal study of structural brain network changes with normal aging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kai; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sato, Kazunori; Qi, Haochen; Kawashima, Ryuta; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate age-related changes in the topological organization of structural brain networks by applying a longitudinal design over 6 years. Structural brain networks were derived from measurements of regional gray matter volume and were constructed in age-specific groups from baseline and follow-up scans. The structural brain networks showed economical small-world properties, providing high global and local efficiency for parallel information processing at low connection costs. In the analysis of the global network properties, the local and global efficiency of the baseline scan were significantly lower compared to the follow-up scan. Moreover, the annual rate of change in local and global efficiency showed a positive and negative quadratic correlation with the baseline age, respectively; both curvilinear correlations peaked at approximately the age of 50. In the analysis of the regional nodal properties, significant negative correlations between the annual rate of change in nodal strength and the baseline age were found in the brain regions primarily involved in the visual and motor/control systems, whereas significant positive quadratic correlations were found in the brain regions predominately associated with the default-mode, attention, and memory systems. The results of the longitudinal study are consistent with the findings of our previous cross-sectional study: the structural brain networks develop into a fast distribution from young to middle age (approximately 50 years old) and eventually became a fast localization in the old age. Our findings elucidate the network topology of structural brain networks and its longitudinal changes, thus enhancing the understanding of the underlying physiology of normal aging in the human brain. PMID:23565087

  8. Brain white matter structure and information processing speed in healthy older age.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Ksenia A; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Ritchie, Stuart J; Cox, Simon R; Storkey, Amos J; Starr, John M; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Deary, Ian J; Bastin, Mark E

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive decline, especially the slowing of information processing speed, is associated with normal ageing. This decline may be due to brain cortico-cortical disconnection caused by age-related white matter deterioration. We present results from a large, narrow age range cohort of generally healthy, community-dwelling subjects in their seventies who also had their cognitive ability tested in youth (age 11 years). We investigate associations between older age brain white matter structure, several measures of information processing speed and childhood cognitive ability in 581 subjects. Analysis of diffusion tensor MRI data using Tract-based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) showed that all measures of information processing speed, as well as a general speed factor composed from these tests (g speed), were significantly associated with fractional anisotropy (FA) across the white matter skeleton rather than in specific tracts. Cognitive ability measured at age 11 years was not associated with older age white matter FA, except for the g speed-independent components of several individual processing speed tests. These results indicate that quicker and more efficient information processing requires global connectivity in older age, and that associations between white matter FA and information processing speed (both individual test scores and g speed), unlike some other aspects of later life brain structure, are generally not accounted for by cognitive ability measured in youth. PMID:26254904

  9. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Reyes, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to water deficit in vegetative plant tissues. The typical LEA proteins are highly hydrophilic and intrinsically unstructured. They have been classified in different families, each one showing distinctive conserved motifs. In this manuscript we present and discuss some of the recent findings regarding their role in plant adaptation to water deficit, as well as those concerning to their possible function, and how it can be related to their intrinsic structural flexibility. PMID:21447997

  10. The age-sex structure of the slave population in Harris County, Texas: 1850 and 1860.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, J

    1987-10-01

    The effect of the slave system on demography can be revealed by examining the age-sex structure of slave populations. The age-sex structure of slaves in Harris County, Texas is investigated using the 1850 and 1860 slave schedules. Median ages for black and mulatto slaves suggest that the population was young. Population pyramids exhibit a narrow base and top with a broad middle. The high proportion of slaves between 10 and 30 years of age and the increase in population size between 1850 and 1860 were mainly related to the importation of slaves and only partly due to natural increase. The data also show that black slaves were older on small plantations while mulattoes were older on larger farms. It is suggested that differential treatment in terms of purchase practices, assignment of tasks, food allocation, and/or differential susceptibility to infectious diseases may account for this pattern. PMID:3322029

  11. The effect of collagen ageing on its structure and cellular behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Samantha L.; Guilbert, Marie; Sulé-Suso, Josep; Torbet, James; Jeannesson, Pierre; Sockalingum, Ganesh D.; Yang, Ying

    2012-03-01

    Collagen is the most important component in extracellular matrix (ECM) and plays a pivotal role in individual tissue function in mammals. During ageing, collagen structure changes, which can detrimentally affect its biophysical and biomechanical properties due to an accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). AGEs have been linked to non-enzymatic cross-linking of proteins resulting in the alteration of mechanical properties of the tissue. In this study we investigate the influence of different aged collagens on the mechanical and contractile properties of reconstituted hydrogel constructs seeded with corneal stromal fibroblasts. A non-destructive indentation technique and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are used to determine the elastic modulus and dimensional changes respectively. It is revealed that the youngest collagen constructs have a higher elastic modulus and increased contraction compared to the older collagen. These results provide new insights into the relationship between collagen molecular structures and their biomechanical properties.

  12. Aging Theories for Establishing Safe Life Spans of Airborne Critical Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2003-01-01

    New aging theories have been developed to establish the safe life span of airborne critical structural components such as B-52B aircraft pylon hooks for carrying air-launch drop-test vehicles. The new aging theories use the equivalent-constant-amplitude loading spectrum to represent the actual random loading spectrum with the same damaging effect. The crack growth due to random loading cycling of the first flight is calculated using the half-cycle theory, and then extrapolated to all the crack growths of the subsequent flights. The predictions of the new aging theories (finite difference aging theory and closed-form aging theory) are compared with the classical flight-test life theory and the previously developed Ko first- and Ko second-order aging theories. The new aging theories predict the number of safe flights as considerably lower than that predicted by the classical aging theory, and slightly lower than those predicted by the Ko first- and Ko second-order aging theories due to the inclusion of all the higher order terms.

  13. Arterial structure and function in vascular ageing: are you as old as your arteries?

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Carter, Sophie E; Green, Daniel J

    2016-04-15

    Advancing age may be the most potent independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, a relationship that is not fully explained by time-related changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Since some arteries exhibit differential susceptibility to atherosclerosis, generalisations regarding the impact of ageing in humans may be overly simplistic, whereas in vivo assessment of arterial function and health provide direct insight. Coronary and peripheral (conduit, resistance and skin) arteries demonstrate a gradual, age-related impairment in vascular function that is likely to be related to a reduction in endothelium-derived nitric oxide bioavailability and/or increased production of vasoconstrictors (e.g. endothelin-1). Increased exposure and impaired ability for defence mechanisms to resist oxidative stress and inflammation, but also cellular senescence processes, may contribute to age-related changes in vascular function and health. Arteries also undergo structural changes as they age. Gradual thickening of the arterial wall, changes in wall content (i.e. less elastin, advanced glycation end-products) and increase in conduit artery diameter are observed with older age and occur similarly in central and peripheral arteries. These changes in structure have important interactive effects on artery function, with increases in small and large arterial stiffness representing a characteristic change with older age. Importantly, direct measures of arterial function and structure predict future cardiovascular events, independent of age or other cardiovascular risk factors. Taken together, and given the differential susceptibility of arteries to atherosclerosis in humans, direct measurement of arterial function and health may help to distinguish between biological and chronological age-related change in arterial health in humans. PMID:26140618

  14. A kinetic theory for age-structured stochastic birth-death processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; Greenman, Chris

    Classical age-structured mass-action models such as the McKendrick-von Foerster equation have been extensively studied but they are structurally unable to describe stochastic fluctuations or population-size-dependent birth and death rates. Conversely, current theories that include size-dependent population dynamics (e.g., carrying capacity) cannot be easily extended to take into account age-dependent birth and death rates. In this paper, we present a systematic derivation of a new fully stochastic kinetic theory for interacting age-structured populations. By defining multiparticle probability density functions, we derive a hierarchy of kinetic equations for the stochastic evolution of an aging population undergoing birth and death. We show that the fully stochastic age-dependent birth-death process precludes factorization of the corresponding probability densities, which then must be solved by using a BBGKY-like hierarchy. Our results generalize both deterministic models and existing master equation approaches by providing an intuitive and efficient way to simultaneously model age- and population-dependent stochastic dynamics applicable to the study of demography, stem cell dynamics, and disease evolution. NSF.

  15. Structural architecture supports functional organization in the human aging brain at a regionwise and network level.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Joelle; Ritter, Petra; Shen, Kelly; Rothmeier, Simon; Schirner, Michael; McIntosh, Anthony R

    2016-07-01

    Functional interactions in the brain are constrained by the underlying anatomical architecture, and structural and functional networks share network features such as modularity. Accordingly, age-related changes of structural connectivity (SC) may be paralleled by changes in functional connectivity (FC). We provide a detailed qualitative and quantitative characterization of the SC-FC coupling in human aging as inferred from resting-state blood oxygen-level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging in a sample of 47 adults with an age range of 18-82. We revealed that SC and FC decrease with age across most parts of the brain and there is a distinct age-dependency of regionwise SC-FC coupling and network-level SC-FC relations. A specific pattern of SC-FC coupling predicts age more reliably than does regionwise SC or FC alone (r = 0.73, 95% CI = [0.7093, 0.8522]). Hence, our data propose that regionwise SC-FC coupling can be used to characterize brain changes in aging. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2645-2661, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27041212

  16. Structural transition in sputter-deposited amorphous germanium films by aging at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okugawa, M.; Nakamura, R.; Ishimaru, M.; Watanabe, K.; Yasuda, H.; Numakura, H.

    2016-06-01

    The structure of amorphous Ge (a-Ge) films prepared by sputter-deposition and the effects of aging at ambient temperature and pressure were studied by pair-distribution-function (PDF) analysis from electron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. The PDFs of the as-deposited and aged samples for 3-13 months showed that the major peaks for Ge-Ge bonds decrease in intensity and broaden with aging for up to 7 months. In the PDFs of a-Ge of molecular dynamics simulation obtained by quenching liquid at different rates, the major peak intensities of a slowly cooled model are higher than those of a rapidly cooled model. Analyses on short- and medium-range configurations show that the slowly cooled model includes a certain amount of medium-range ordered (MRO) clusters, while the rapidly cooled model includes liquid-like configurations rather than MRO clusters. The similarity between experimental and computational PDFs implies that as-deposited films are similar in structure to the slowly cooled model, whereas the fully aged films are similar to the rapidly cooled model. It is assumed that as they undergo room-temperature aging, the MRO clusters disintegrate and transform into liquid-like regions in the same matrix. This transition in local configurations is discussed in terms of instability and the non-equilibrium of nanoclusters produced by a vapor-deposition process.

  17. Functional and structural aging of the speech sensorimotor neural system: fMRI evidence

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Pascale; Dick, Anthony Steven; Small, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to perceive and produce speech undergoes important changes in late adulthood. The goal of the present study was to characterize functional and structural age-related differences in the cortical network supporting speech perception and production using magnetic resonance imaging, as well as the relationship between functional and structural age-related changes occurring in this network. We asked young and older adults to (1) observe videos of a speaker producing single words (perception), and (B) observe and repeat the words produced (production). Results show a widespread bilateral network of brain activation for Perception and Production that was uncorrelated with age. In addition, several regions did show age-related change (auditory cortex, planum temporale, superior temporal sulcus, premotor cortices, SMA-proper). Examination of the relationship between brain signal and regional and global gray matter volume and cortical thickness revealed a complex set of relationships between structure and function, with some regions showing a relationship between structure and function and not. The present results provide novel findings about the neurobiology of aging and verbal communication. PMID:23523270

  18. Effects of Stand age Structure on Regional Carbon Budgets of Forest Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, C.; Woodcock, C. E.

    2002-12-01

    This study has developed a two-stage modeling scheme to investigate the importance of age structure on regional carbon fluxes for the forests in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. In the first stage, an individual-based forest ecosystem carbon flux model (IntCarb) at stand scale is developed. IntCarb combines components from the ZELIG and CENTURY models to simulate forest growth and development, and heterotrophic respiration, respectively. Stand scale carbon fluxes simulated by IntCarb strongly depend on stand age. Due to its high variablity over large areas, forest age structure has to be taken into account for realistic estimation of carbon budgets. The RegCarb model is developed to estimate regional scale carbon fluxes based on forest age structure and adjusting for the nonrespiratory carbon losses, such as harvesting. Our initial estimate with RegCarb for the Pacific Northwest of the United States found that this region was a tremendous carbon source to the atmosphere from 1890 to 1990 due to intensive logging of old-growth forest, and is becoming a carbon sink since the last decade. Projections for the role of forests in this region in the global carbon cycle in the future strongly depend on the amount of timber to be harvested, i.e. how the age structure of forests in this region is to be altered.

  19. Developing a Computerized Aging Management System for Concrete Structures in Finnish Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Neshawy, F.; Piironen, J.; Sistonen, E.; Vesikari, E.; Tuomisto, M.; Hradil, P.; Ferreira, M.

    2013-07-01

    Finland has four nuclear reactors units in two power plants. The first unit started operation in 1977 and in the early 1980's all four units were in use. During the last few years the aging management of the Nuclear Power Plant's (NPP) concrete structures has grown an important issue because the existing structures are reaching the end of their licensed operating lifetime (about 40 years). Therefore the nuclear power companies are developing aging management systems to avoid premature degradation of NPP facilities and to be able to extend their operating lifetime. This paper is about the development of a computerized ageing management system for the nuclear power plants concrete structures. The computerized ageing management system is built upon central database and implementation applications. It will assist the personnel of power companies to implement the aging management activities at different phases of the lifetime of a power plant. It will provide systematic methods for planning, surveillance, inspection, monitoring, condition assessment, maintenance and repair of structures.

  20. Chemical Abundances of Solar-Type Dwarfs in Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, S. C.

    2005-12-01

    Open clusters present homogeneous samples of stars that are of the same age, distance, and initial chemical composition, making open clusters valuable observational targets for studies of stellar evolution, stellar structure, exoplanetary systems, and Galactic chemical evolution. I present an overview of my graduate dissertation research on LTE abundances of solar-type dwarfs (4200 ≲ T eff ≲ 6400 ; {K}) in the open clusters Pleiades, M34, and Hyades, as well as in the Ursa Major moving group. For the dwarfs of intermediate T eff (5500 ≲ T eff ≲ 6100 ; {K}), intracluster metal abundances are in good agreement. Conversely, we have identified excitation/ionization-related abundance anomalies among the cool dwarfs (T eff ≤ 5500 ; {K}) of all three clusters and UMa; for example, O abundances derived from the high-excitation, near-IR \\ion{O}{1} triplet show a dramatic increase with decreasing T eff, a behavior that is not predicted by current non-LTE calculations. Intercluster comparisons are suggestive of an age-related diminution of the \\ion{O}{1} triplet abundance trend, and possible causes of these observed abundance anomalies, i.e., chromospheric activity, surface inhomogeneities, etc., are explored. Using multi-component ``toy model'' stellar atmospheres, we demonstrate that the \\ion{O}{1} triplet abundance trend may be due to inhomogeneous temperature structure, possibly resulting from spots or plages, in the photospheres of cool open cluster dwarfs. I gratefully acknowledge the following agencies that have provided support during this research: NSF (through grants AST 00-86576 and AST 02-39518 to Prof. J.R. King), South Carolina Space Grant Consortium (through the Graduate Student Research Fellowship program), and the Charles Curry Foundation (through a generous grant to Clemson University).

  1. Effects of winter burning and structural marsh management on vegetation and winter bird abundance in the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gabrey, S.W.; Afton, A.D.; Wilson, B.C.

    1999-01-01

    Marshes in the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain provide important winter habitats for many species of birds. Many of these marshes are managed intensively through a combination of fall/winter burning and construction of impoundments to improve wintering waterfowl habitat, reduce wetland loss, and create emergent wetlands. Little information is available on effects of this management on wintering birds, particularly passerines. We conducted experimental burns in impounded and unimpounded marshes on Rockefeller State Wildlife Refuge in southwest Louisiana and recorded species composition and abundance of birds during the 1996 and 1997 winters. We found that burning and impoundment influenced vegetation structure, which in turn influenced bird abundance and species composition. Blackbirds (Icteridae) preferred recently burned plots. Sparrows (Emberizidae) and wrens (Troglodytidae) avoided recently burned plots but recolonized these plots after one year of vegetation recovery. Sparrows and wrens present in burned plots during the first winter following burning generally were observed in scattered patches of unburned vegetation. Suitability of Chenier Plain marshes as winter habitat for several bird species was reduced during the winter in which burning was conducted, particularly if a high proportion of the plot was burned. We recommend that patchy burns be used, at both the landscape level and within specific burned areas, to achieve management objectives and still provide suitable winter habitat for non-target species. Although many groups of birds depend on Chenier Plain marshes for winter habitat, these groups differ in their specific habitat requirements. We recommend that a diverse wetland complex (e.g., impoundments managed for waterfowl foraging habitat interpersed with those managed for passerine winter cover) be maintained.

  2. The abundance of functional genes, cbbL, nifH, amoA and apsA, and bacterial community structure of intertidal soil from Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Keshri, Jitendra; Yousuf, Basit; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2015-06-01

    The Gulf of Cambay is a trumpet-shaped inlet of the Arabian Sea, located along the west coast of India and confronts a high tidal range with strong water currents. The region belongs to a semi-arid zone and saline alkaline intertidal soils are considered biologically extreme. The selected four soil types (S1-S4) were affected by salinity, alkalinity and sodicity. Soil salinity ranged from 20 to 126 dS/m, soil pH 8.6-10.0 with high sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP). Abundance of the key functional genes like cbbL, nifH, amoA and apsA involved in biogeochemical cycling were targeted using qPCR, which varied from (2.36 ± 0.03) × 10(4) to (2.87 ± 0.26) × 10(8), (1.18 ± 0.28) × 10(6) to (1.01 ± 0.26) × 10(9), (1.41 ± 0.21) × 10(6) to (1.29 ± 0.05) × 10(8) and (8.47 ± 0.23) × 10(4) to (1.73 ± 0.01) × 10(6) per gram dry weight, respectively. The microbial community structure revealed that soils S1 and S3 were dominated by phylum Firmicutes whereas S4 and S2 showed an abundance of Proteobacterial clones. These soils also represented Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, Planctomycetes and Acidobacteria clones. Molecular phylogeny showed a significant variation in the bacterial community distribution among the intertidal soil types. A high number of novel taxonomic units were observed which makes the intertidal zone a unique reservoir of unidentified bacterial taxa that may be explored further. PMID:25862282

  3. Heavy-Machinery Traffic Impacts Methane Emissions as Well as Methanogen Abundance and Community Structure in Oxic Forest Soils▿†

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Beat; Niklaus, Pascal A.; Kremer, Johann; Lüscher, Peter; Zimmermann, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Temperate forest soils are usually efficient sinks for the greenhouse gas methane, at least in the absence of significant amounts of methanogens. We demonstrate here that trafficking with heavy harvesting machines caused a large reduction in CH4 consumption and even turned well-aerated forest soils into net methane sources. In addition to studying methane fluxes, we investigated the responses of methanogens after trafficking in two different forest sites. Trafficking generated wheel tracks with different impact (low, moderate, severe, and unaffected). We found that machine passes decreased the soils' macropore space and lowered hydraulic conductivities in wheel tracks. Severely compacted soils yielded high methanogenic abundance, as demonstrated by quantitative PCR analyses of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes, whereas these sequences were undetectable in unaffected soils. Even after a year after traffic compression, methanogen abundance in compacted soils did not decline, indicating a stability of methanogens here over time. Compacted wheel tracks exhibited a relatively constant community structure, since we found several persisting mcrA sequence types continuously present at all sampling times. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a rather large methanogen diversity in the compacted soil, and most mcrA gene sequences were mostly similar to known sequences from wetlands. The majority of mcrA gene sequences belonged either to the order Methanosarcinales or Methanomicrobiales, whereas both sites were dominated by members of the families Methanomicrobiaceae Fencluster, with similar sequences obtained from peatland environments. The results show that compacting wet forest soils by heavy machinery causes increases in methane production and release. PMID:21742929

  4. Influence of manure age and sunlight on the community structure of cattle fecal bacteria as revealed by Illumina sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, K.; Shaw, T. I.; Oladeinde, A.; Molina, M.

    2013-12-01

    Fecal pollution of environmental waters is a major concern for the general public because exposure to fecal-associated pathogens can have severe impacts on human health. Stream and river impairment due to fecal pollution is largely the result of agricultural activities in the United States. In the last few years, numerous metagenomic studies utilized next generation sequencing to develop microbial community profiles by massively sequencing the 16sRNA hypervariable region. This technology supports the application of water quality assessment such as pathogen detection and fecal source tracking. The bacteria communities of samples in these studies were determined when they were freshly collected; therefore, little is known about how feces age or how environmental stress influences the microbial ecology of fecal materials. In this study we monitored bacteria community changes in cattle feces for 57 days after excretion (day 0, 2, 4 8, 15, 22, 29, 43, 57) by sequencing the 16s variable region 4, using Illumnia MiSeq. Twelve cattle feces were studied; half of the samples were directly exposed to sunlight (unshaded) and half were shaded. Results indicate that the relative abundance (RA) profile in both shaded and unshaded samples rapidly changed from day 0 to 15, but stabilized from day 22 to 57. Firmcutes were the most abundant phylum (~40%) at day 0, but were reduced to <10% by day 57. The RA of Proteobacteria was only 1% at day 0, but increased to ~50% by day 57in both shaded and unshaded samples. By the end of the study, shaded and unshaded samples had a similar RA of Firmcutes and Proteobacteria but the RA of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria was, respectively, about 7% lower and 10% higher for unshaded samples. UV intensity, moisture, and temperature were significantly different between shaded and unshaded plots, indicating that these environmental stresses could influence the structure of fecal bacteria community in the natural environment. According to the

  5. [Size and age structure of the striped marlin Tetrapturus audax (Pisces: Xiphidae), at Cabo San Lucas, Baja California sur, México].

    PubMed

    Barrera, Felipe Neri Melo; Uraga, Roberto Felix

    2004-12-01

    The striped marlin (Tetrapturus audax) is found in temperate and tropical waters of the Pacific and Indian Ocean. It is particularly abundant in the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula. Specimens brought to Cabo San Lucas port (22 degrees 53' N y 109 degrees 54' W) by the sport fishery fleet that operates withing a radius of 54 km from 1988 to 1993 were sexes, measured and weighed. A total 1030 individuals were sampled. Dorsal fin spines (389) were collected for age estimation. The spines were sectioned and hyaline-opaque bands counted. The relation of length to spine radius was similar for males and females. The fourth dorsal spine reflected the growth of the fish. The rhythm of growth mark formation is yearly and related to the sea surface temperature. Ten age groups were found and the seventh group was the most abundant, followed by groups "6" and "8". The age structure of the striped marlin was stable in the study period. The observed sizes were 160-280 cm jaw length with 90% of the organisms measuring between 190 and 225 cm. The small individuals recruit to the fishery from June to December. PMID:17354410

  6. An age-structured population model for horseshoe crabs in the Delaware Bay area to assess harvest and egg availability for shorebirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweka, J.A.; Smith, D.R.; Millard, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this simulation study was to create an age-structured population model for horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphenols) in the Delaware Bay region using best available estimates of age-specific mortality and recent harvest levels. Density dependence was incorporated using a spatial model relating egg mortality with abundance of spawning females. Combinations of annual female harvest (0, 50, 100, and 200 thousand), timing of female harvest (before or after spawning), and three levels of density-dependent egg mortality were simulated. The probability of the population increasing was high (> 80%) with low and medium egg mortality and harvest less than 200 thousand females per year. Under the high egg mortality case, the probability of the population increasing was < 50% regardless of harvest. Harvest occurring after spawning increased the probability of population growth. The number of eggs available to shorebirds was highest when egg mortality was lowest and female abundance was at its highest levels. Although harvest and egg mortality influenced population growth and food availability to shorebirds, sensitivity and elasticity analyses showed that early-life stage mortality, age 0 mortality in particular, was the most important parameter for population growth. Our modeling results indicate areas where further research is needed and suggest effective management will involve a combination of harvest management and actions to increase early juvenile survival. ?? 2007 Estuarine Research Federation.

  7. Aging Optimization of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy L277 for Application to Cryotank Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, B. J.; Sankaran, K. K.; Babel, H.; Farahmand, B.; Cho, A.

    2003-01-01

    Compared with aluminum alloys such as 2219, which is widely used in space vehicle for cryogenic tanks and unpressurized structures, aluminum-lithium alloys possess attractive combinations of lower density and higher modulus along with comparable mechanical properties and improved damage tolerance. These characteristics have resulted in the successful use of the aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 for the Space Shuttle External Tank, and the consideration of newer U.S. aluminum-lithium alloys such as L277 and C458 for future space vehicles. A design of experiments aging study was conducted for plate and a limited study on extrusions. To achieve the T8 temper, Alloy L277 is typically aged at 290 F for 40 hours. In the study for plate, a two-step aging treatment was developed through a design of experiments study and the one step aging used as a control. Based on the earlier NASA studies on 2195, the first step aging temperature was varied between 220 F and 260 F. The second step aging temperatures was varied between 290 F and 310 F, which is in the range of the single-step aging temperature. For extrusions, two, single-step, and one two-step aging condition were evaluated. The results of the design of experiments used for the T8 temper as well as a smaller set of experiments for the T6 temper for plate and the results for extrusions will be presented.

  8. A group 6 late embryogenesis abundant protein from common bean is a disordered protein with extended helical structure and oligomer-forming properties.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M; Reyes, José L; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2014-11-14

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. PMID:25271167

  9. A Group 6 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Common Bean Is a Disordered Protein with Extended Helical Structure and Oligomer-forming Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y.; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O.; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M.; Reyes, José L.; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2014-01-01

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. PMID:25271167

  10. Structure and composition of arytenoid cartilage of the bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) during maturation and aging.

    PubMed

    Laureano, Priscila Eliane dos Santos; Oliveira, Kris Daiana Silva; de Aro, Andrea Aparecida; Gomes, Laurecir; Pimentel, Edson Rosa; Esquisatto, Marcelo Augusto Marretto

    2015-10-01

    The aging process induces progressive and irreversible changes in the structural and functional organization of animals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of aging on the structure and composition of the extracellular matrix of the arytenoid cartilage found in the larynx of male bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) kept in captivity for commercial purposes. Animals at 7, 180 and 1080 days post-metamorphosis (n=10/age) were euthanized and the cartilage was removed and processed for structural and biochemical analysis. For the structural analyses, cartilage sections were stained with picrosirius, toluidine blue, Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin and Von Kossa stain. The sections were also submitted to immunohistochemistry for detection of collagen types I and II. Other samples were processed for the ultrastructural and cytochemical analysis of proteoglycans. Histological sections were used to chondrocyte count. The number of positive stainings for proteoglycans was quantified by ultrastructural analysis. For quantification and analysis of glycosaminoglycans were used the dimethyl methylene blue and agarose gel electrophoresis methods. The chloramine T method was used for hydroxyproline quantification. At 7 days, basophilia was observed in the pericellular and territorial matrix, which decreased in the latter over the period studied. Collagen fibers were arranged perpendicular to the major axis of the cartilaginous plate and were thicker in older animals. Few calcification areas were observed at the periphery of the cartilage specimens in 1080-day-old animals. Type II collagen was present throughout the stroma at the different ages. Elastic fibers were found in the stroma and perichondrium and increased with age in the two regions. Proteoglycan staining significantly increased from 7 to 180 days and reduced at 1080 days. The amount of total glycosaminoglycans was higher in 180-day-old animals compared to the other ages, with marked presence of

  11. Kinetic theory of age-structured stochastic birth-death processes.

    PubMed

    Greenman, Chris D; Chou, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Classical age-structured mass-action models such as the McKendrick-von Foerster equation have been extensively studied but are unable to describe stochastic fluctuations or population-size-dependent birth and death rates. Stochastic theories that treat semi-Markov age-dependent processes using, e.g., the Bellman-Harris equation do not resolve a population's age structure and are unable to quantify population-size dependencies. Conversely, current theories that include size-dependent population dynamics (e.g., mathematical models that include carrying capacity such as the logistic equation) cannot be easily extended to take into account age-dependent birth and death rates. In this paper, we present a systematic derivation of a new, fully stochastic kinetic theory for interacting age-structured populations. By defining multiparticle probability density functions, we derive a hierarchy of kinetic equations for the stochastic evolution of an aging population undergoing birth and death. We show that the fully stochastic age-dependent birth-death process precludes factorization of the corresponding probability densities, which then must be solved by using a Bogoliubov--Born--Green--Kirkwood--Yvon-like hierarchy. Explicit solutions are derived in three limits: no birth, no death, and steady state. These are then compared with their corresponding mean-field results. Our results generalize both deterministic models and existing master equation approaches by providing an intuitive and efficient way to simultaneously model age- and population-dependent stochastic dynamics applicable to the study of demography, stem cell dynamics, and disease evolution. PMID:26871029

  12. Kinetic theory of age-structured stochastic birth-death processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenman, Chris D.; Chou, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Classical age-structured mass-action models such as the McKendrick-von Foerster equation have been extensively studied but are unable to describe stochastic fluctuations or population-size-dependent birth and death rates. Stochastic theories that treat semi-Markov age-dependent processes using, e.g., the Bellman-Harris equation do not resolve a population's age structure and are unable to quantify population-size dependencies. Conversely, current theories that include size-dependent population dynamics (e.g., mathematical models that include carrying capacity such as the logistic equation) cannot be easily extended to take into account age-dependent birth and death rates. In this paper, we present a systematic derivation of a new, fully stochastic kinetic theory for interacting age-structured populations. By defining multiparticle probability density functions, we derive a hierarchy of kinetic equations for the stochastic evolution of an aging population undergoing birth and death. We show that the fully stochastic age-dependent birth-death process precludes factorization of the corresponding probability densities, which then must be solved by using a Bogoliubov--Born--Green--Kirkwood--Yvon-like hierarchy. Explicit solutions are derived in three limits: no birth, no death, and steady state. These are then compared with their corresponding mean-field results. Our results generalize both deterministic models and existing master equation approaches by providing an intuitive and efficient way to simultaneously model age- and population-dependent stochastic dynamics applicable to the study of demography, stem cell dynamics, and disease evolution.

  13. Increased iron abundances in slope avalanches of certain lunar craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ya.; Shevchenko, V. V.

    2012-07-01

    On the basis of the first images of certain areas of Lunar surface obtained by the Chang'e-2 spacecraft and materials of large-scale image acquisition from the LRO (Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter) spacecraft, supplemented with remote spectral measurements performed from the Clementine spacecraft, the slope movements of material have been studied in lunar craters Daniell, Burg and Mauri A. It is established that despite a significantly different age of formation of these craters, the slope formations are of similar structure and differ by increased iron abundance in the soil surface layer. All objects are characterized with by increase in FeO abundance to 20 wt % at depths of several hundred meters from the surface. The material of the slope structures is distinguished by a low maturity rate. According to preliminary assessments using the optical maturity index and spectropolarimetric maturity index, the fresher slope formations can have an exposure age from several tens of years to several years.

  14. Aging Management of Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures - Overview and Suggested Research Topics

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J

    2008-10-01

    Nuclear power plant concrete structures are described and their operating experience noted. Primary considerations related to management of their aging are noted and an indication of their status provided: degradation mechanisms, damage models, and material performance; assessment and remediation (i.e., component selection, in-service inspection, nondestructive examinations, and remedial actions); and estimation of performance at present or some future point in time (i.e., application of structural reliability theory to the design and optimization of in-service inspection/maintenance strategies, and determination of the effects of degradation on plant risk). Several activities are identified that provide background information and data on areas of concern with respect to nondestructive examination of nuclear power plant concrete structures: inspection of thick-walled, heavily-reinforced sections, basemats, and inaccessible areas of the containment metallic pressure boundary. Topics are noted where additional research would be of benefit to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures.

  15. Survivability of integrated PVDF film sensors to accelerated ageing conditions in aeronautical/aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, E.; Cugnoni, J.; Gmür, T.; Bonhôte, P.; Schorderet, A.

    2013-06-01

    This work validates the use of integrated polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film sensors for dynamic testing, even after being subjected to UV-thermo-hygro-mechanical accelerated ageing conditions. The verification of PVDF sensors’ survivability in these environmental conditions, typically confronted by civil and military aircraft, is the main concern of the study. The evaluation of survivability is made by a comparison of dynamic testing results provided by the PVDF patch sensors subjected to an accelerated ageing protocol, and those provided by neutral non-aged sensors (accelerometers). The available measurements are the time-domain response signals issued from a modal analysis procedure, and the corresponding frequency response functions (FRF). These are in turn used to identify the constitutive properties of the samples by extraction of the modal parameters, in particular the natural frequencies. The composite specimens in this study undergo different accelerated ageing processes. After several weeks of experimentation, the samples exhibit a loss of stiffness, represented by a decrease in the elastic moduli down to 10%. Despite the ageing, the integrated PVDF sensors, subjected to the same ageing conditions, are still capable of providing reliable data to carry out a close followup of these changes. This survivability is a determinant asset in order to use integrated PVDF sensors to perform structural health monitoring (SHM) in the future of full-scale composite aeronautical structures.

  16. Age at First Episode Modulates Diagnosis-Related Structural Brain Abnormalities in Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Pina-Camacho, Laura; Del Rey-Mejías, Ángel; Janssen, Joost; Bioque, Miquel; González-Pinto, Ana; Arango, Celso; Lobo, Antonio; Sarró, Salvador; Desco, Manuel; Sanjuan, Julio; Lacalle-Aurioles, Maria; Cuesta, Manuel J; Saiz-Ruiz, Jerónimo; Bernardo, Miguel; Parellada, Mara

    2016-03-01

    Brain volume and thickness abnormalities have been reported in first-episode psychosis (FEP). However, it is unclear if and how they are modulated by brain developmental stage (and, therefore, by age at FEP as a proxy). This is a multicenter cross-sectional case-control brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. Patients with FEP (n = 196), 65.3% males, with a wide age at FEP span (12-35 y), and healthy controls (HC) (n = 157), matched for age, sex, and handedness, were scanned at 6 sites. Gray matter volume and thickness measurements were generated for several brain regions using FreeSurfer software. The nonlinear relationship between age at scan (a proxy for age at FEP in patients) and volume and thickness measurements was explored in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD), affective psychoses (AFP), and HC. Earlier SSD cases (ie, FEP before 15-20 y) showed significant volume and thickness deficits in frontal lobe, volume deficits in temporal lobe, and volume enlargements in ventricular system and basal ganglia. First-episode AFP patients had smaller cingulate cortex volume and thicker temporal cortex only at early age at FEP (before 18-20 y). The AFP group also had age-constant (12-35-y age span) volume enlargements in the frontal and parietal lobe. Our study suggests that age at first episode modulates the structural brain abnormalities found in FEP patients in a nonlinear and diagnosis-dependent manner. Future MRI studies should take these results into account when interpreting samples with different ages at onset and diagnosis. PMID:26371339

  17. A Hierarchical Kinetic Theory of Birth, Death and Fission in Age-Structured Interacting Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; Greenman, Chris D.

    2016-07-01

    We develop mathematical models describing the evolution of stochastic age-structured populations. After reviewing existing approaches, we formulate a complete kinetic framework for age-structured interacting populations undergoing birth, death and fission processes in spatially dependent environments. We define the full probability density for the population-size age chart and find results under specific conditions. Connections with more classical models are also explicitly derived. In particular, we show that factorial moments for non-interacting processes are described by a natural generalization of the McKendrick-von Foerster equation, which describes mean-field deterministic behavior. Our approach utilizes mixed-type, multidimensional probability distributions similar to those employed in the study of gas kinetics and with terms that satisfy BBGKY-like equation hierarchies.

  18. A Hierarchical Kinetic Theory of Birth, Death and Fission in Age-Structured Interacting Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; Greenman, Chris D.

    2016-05-01

    We develop mathematical models describing the evolution of stochastic age-structured populations. After reviewing existing approaches, we formulate a complete kinetic framework for age-structured interacting populations undergoing birth, death and fission processes in spatially dependent environments. We define the full probability density for the population-size age chart and find results under specific conditions. Connections with more classical models are also explicitly derived. In particular, we show that factorial moments for non-interacting processes are described by a natural generalization of the McKendrick-von Foerster equation, which describes mean-field deterministic behavior. Our approach utilizes mixed-type, multidimensional probability distributions similar to those employed in the study of gas kinetics and with terms that satisfy BBGKY-like equation hierarchies.

  19. Unveiling the structural arrangements responsible for the atomic dynamics in metallic glasses during physical aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, V. M.; Ruta, B.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and controlling physical aging, that is, the spontaneous temporal evolution of out-of-equilibrium systems, represents one of the greatest tasks in material science. Recent studies have revealed the existence of a complex atomic motion in metallic glasses, with different aging regimes in contrast with the typical continuous aging observed in macroscopic quantities. By combining dynamical and structural synchrotron techniques, here for the first time we directly connect previously identified microscopic structural mechanisms with the peculiar atomic motion, providing a broader unique view of their complexity. We show that the atomic scale is dominated by the interplay between two processes: rearrangements releasing residual stresses related to a cascade mechanism of relaxation, and medium range ordering processes, which do not affect the local density, likely due to localized relaxations of liquid-like regions. As temperature increases, a surprising additional secondary relaxation process sets in, together with a faster medium range ordering, likely precursors of crystallization.

  20. Unveiling the structural arrangements responsible for the atomic dynamics in metallic glasses during physical aging

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, V. M.; Ruta, B

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and controlling physical aging, that is, the spontaneous temporal evolution of out-of-equilibrium systems, represents one of the greatest tasks in material science. Recent studies have revealed the existence of a complex atomic motion in metallic glasses, with different aging regimes in contrast with the typical continuous aging observed in macroscopic quantities. By combining dynamical and structural synchrotron techniques, here for the first time we directly connect previously identified microscopic structural mechanisms with the peculiar atomic motion, providing a broader unique view of their complexity. We show that the atomic scale is dominated by the interplay between two processes: rearrangements releasing residual stresses related to a cascade mechanism of relaxation, and medium range ordering processes, which do not affect the local density, likely due to localized relaxations of liquid-like regions. As temperature increases, a surprising additional secondary relaxation process sets in, together with a faster medium range ordering, likely precursors of crystallization. PMID:26787443

  1. Structural and vibrational relaxations during aging of an ultralow-expansion glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ohtake, Yurie; Hirata, Shu; Morinaga, Atsuo

    2016-05-01

    We accurately measured the aging of an ultralow-expansion (ULE) glass for 1250 days using a diode laser resonated in the glass cavity at -3.3 °C, where the glass has zero thermal expansion coefficient. We observed that the glass shows exponential and linear decreases in length In addition, it is theoretically shown that glass aging is a nonlinear irreversible process with the spontaneous relaxations of a linear contraction and a dissipated heat. The origin for the linear contraction is an osmotic pressure which is spontaneously generated during glass aging, and the origin for the dissipated heat is the irreversibility on thermal vibrations of molecules. The result obtained is a verification of the Glansdorff-Prigogine evolutional criterion, which is first applied to a structural relaxation phenomenon in this paper. We conclude that a glass reaches a steady nonequilibrium state, which has the dissipative structure both in a steady configurational state and in steady irreversible processes.

  2. [Age structure and dynamics of Quercus wutaishanica population in Lingkong Mountain of Shanxi Province, China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Shangguan, Tie-Liang; Duan, Yi-Hao; Guo, Wei; Liu, Wei-Hua; Guo, Dong-Gang

    2014-11-01

    Using the plant survivorship theory, the age structure, and the relationship between tree height and diameter (DBH) of Quercus wutaishanica population in Lingkong Mountain were analyzed, and the static life table was compiled and the survival curve plotted. The shuttle shape in age structure of Q. wutaishanica population suggested its temporal stability. The linear regression significantly fitted the positive correlation between tree height and DBH. The maximal life expectancy was observed among the trees beyond the age of the highest mortality and coincided with the lowest point of mortality density, suggesting the strong vitality of the seedlings and young trees that survived in the natural selection and intraspecific competition. The population stability of the Q. wutaishanica population was characterized by the Deevey-II of the survival curve. The dynamic pattern was characterized by the recession in the early phase, growth in the intermediate phase, and stability in the latter phase. PMID:25898607

  3. The Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire: Factor Structure and Correlates in a Lifespan Sample.

    PubMed

    Calamia, Matthew; Reese-Melancon, Celinda; Cherry, Katie E; Hawley, Karri S; Jazwinski, S Michal

    2016-03-01

    The authors examined the factor structure of the Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire (KMAQ) [1] using confirmatory factor analysis in a lifespan sample of 933 individuals who ranged in age from 18 to 101. Participants were college students at Louisiana State University and adults from the community enrolled in the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS). A two-factor solution was expected, consistent with the normal and pathological memory aging dimensions that comprise the KMAQ. A bi-factor solution with items loading on a general response bias factor and either a normal or pathological knowledge-specific factor showed good model fit. Knowledge scores were correlated with demographic and cognitive performance variables. Implications of these data for clinical settings and research are considered. PMID:27505021

  4. The Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire: Factor Structure and Correlates in a Lifespan Sample

    PubMed Central

    Calamia, Matthew; Reese-Melancon, Celinda; Cherry, Katie E.; Hawley, Karri S.; Jazwinski, S. Michal

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the factor structure of the Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire (KMAQ) [1] using confirmatory factor analysis in a lifespan sample of 933 individuals who ranged in age from 18 to 101. Participants were college students at Louisiana State University and adults from the community enrolled in the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (LHAS). A two-factor solution was expected, consistent with the normal and pathological memory aging dimensions that comprise the KMAQ. A bi-factor solution with items loading on a general response bias factor and either a normal or pathological knowledge-specific factor showed good model fit. Knowledge scores were correlated with demographic and cognitive performance variables. Implications of these data for clinical settings and research are considered. PMID:27505021

  5. Socio-Demographic Determinants of Economic Growth: Age-Structure, Preindustrial Heritage and Sociolinguistic Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crenshaw, Edward; Robison, Kristopher

    2010-01-01

    This study establishes a socio-demographic theory of international development derived from selected classical and contemporary sociological theories. Four hypotheses are tested: (1. population growth's effect on development depends on age-structure; (2. historic population density (used here as an indicator of preindustrial social complexity)…

  6. 77 FR 27815 - Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Register on June 22, 2010 (75 FR 35510). The NRC staff has determined that existing guidance in the SRP-LR... Register notice (76 FR 69292) to request public comments on draft LR-ISG-2011-01 (ADAMS Accession No... COMMISSION Aging Management of Stainless Steel Structures and Components in Treated Borated Water...

  7. Sparse representation of brain aging: extracting covariance patterns from structural MRI.

    PubMed

    Su, Longfei; Wang, Lubin; Chen, Fanglin; Shen, Hui; Li, Baojuan; Hu, Dewen

    2012-01-01

    An enhanced understanding of how normal aging alters brain structure is urgently needed for the early diagnosis and treatment of age-related mental diseases. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a reliable technique used to detect age-related changes in the human brain. Currently, multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) enables the exploration of subtle and distributed changes of data obtained from structural MRI images. In this study, a new MVPA approach based on sparse representation has been employed to investigate the anatomical covariance patterns of normal aging. Two groups of participants (group 1:290 participants; group 2:56 participants) were evaluated in this study. These two groups were scanned with two 1.5 T MRI machines. In the first group, we obtained the discriminative patterns using a t-test filter and sparse representation step. We were able to distinguish the young from old cohort with a very high accuracy using only a few voxels of the discriminative patterns (group 1:98.4%; group 2:96.4%). The experimental results showed that the selected voxels may be categorized into two components according to the two steps in the proposed method. The first component focuses on the precentral and postcentral gyri, and the caudate nucleus, which play an important role in sensorimotor tasks. The strongest volume reduction with age was observed in these clusters. The second component is mainly distributed over the cerebellum, thalamus, and right inferior frontal gyrus. These regions are not only critical nodes of the sensorimotor circuitry but also the cognitive circuitry although their volume shows a relative resilience against aging. Considering the voxels selection procedure, we suggest that the aging of the sensorimotor and cognitive brain regions identified in this study has a covarying relationship with each other. PMID:22590522

  8. Advances in Structural Integrity Analysis Methods for Aging Metallic Airframe Structures with Local Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Harris, Charles E.; Piascik, Robert S.; Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2003-01-01

    Analysis methodologies for predicting fatigue-crack growth from rivet holes in panels subjected to cyclic loads and for predicting the residual strength of aluminum fuselage structures with cracks and subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads are described. The fatigue-crack growth analysis methodology is based on small-crack theory and a plasticity induced crack-closure model, and the effect of a corrosive environment on crack-growth rate is included. The residual strength analysis methodology is based on the critical crack-tip-opening-angle fracture criterion that characterizes the fracture behavior of a material of interest, and a geometric and material nonlinear finite element shell analysis code that performs the structural analysis of the fuselage structure of interest. The methodologies have been verified experimentally for structures ranging from laboratory coupons to full-scale structural components. Analytical and experimental results based on these methodologies are described and compared for laboratory coupons and flat panels, small-scale pressurized shells, and full-scale curved stiffened panels. The residual strength analysis methodology is sufficiently general to include the effects of multiple-site damage on structural behavior.

  9. Evaluation of aged concrete structures for continued service in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Marchbanks, M.F.; Arndt, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    Results are summarized of a study on concrete component aging and its significance relative to continued service of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond the initial period for which they were granted operating licenses. Progress is presented of a second study being conducted to identify and provide acceptance criteria for structural safety issues which the USNRC staff will need to address when applications are submitted for continued service of NPPs. Major activities under this program include: development of a materials property data base, establishment of structural component assessment and repair procedures, and development of a methodology for determination of structural reliability. 19 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Evaluation of aged concrete structures for continued service in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Marchbanks, M.F.; Arndt, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    Results are summarized of a study on concrete component aging and its significance relative to continued service of nuclear power plants (NPPs) beyond the initial period for which they were granted operating licenses. Progress is presented of a second study being conducted to identify and provide acceptance criteria for structural safety issues which the USNRC staff will need to address when applications are submitted for continued service of NPPs. Major activities under this program include: development of a materials property data base, establishment of structural component assessment and repair procedures, and development of a methodology for determination of structural reliability.

  11. An artificial intelligence-based structural health monitoring system for aging aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Tang, Stanley S.; Chen, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    To reduce operating expenses, airlines are now using the existing fleets of commercial aircraft well beyond their originally anticipated service lives. The repair and maintenance of these 'aging aircraft' has therefore become a critical safety issue, both to the airlines and the Federal Aviation Administration. This paper presents the results of an innovative research program to develop a structural monitoring system that will be used to evaluate the integrity of in-service aerospace structural components. Currently in the final phase of its development, this monitoring system will indicate when repair or maintenance of a damaged structural component is necessary.

  12. Phytoplankton abundance and structure as indicator of water quality in the drainage system of the Burullus Lagoon, southern Mediterranean coast, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Kassas, Hala Yassin; Gharib, Samiha Mahmoud

    2016-09-01

    This study represents the first detailed account of phytoplankton community structure and seasonal succession in eight drain sites and the Brimbal Canal influx into the Burullus Lagoon. The phytoplankton characteristics were studied based on the data collected seasonally over 4 years, from summer 2012 to spring 2016. Various indices such as Palmer's and Shannon's biotic indices were used for the assessment of the water quality of the different drains. There were a total of 194 species belonging to 65 genera and 6 groups: Bacillariophyceae (76 species), Chlorophyceae (59 species), Cyanophyceae (30 species), Euglenophyceae (25 species), Dinophyceae (3 species), and Xanthophyceae (1 species). The phytoplankton community was dominated with diatoms, green algae, and euglenoids such as Cyclotella, Scenedesmus, Navicula, Nitzschia, Ankistrodesmus, Chlorella, and Euglena. Maximum and minimum phytoplankton abundance was recorded at the Brimbal Canal and Hooks Drain. Maximum and minimum species diversities (H') were found at the Hooks Drain (2.564) and Burullus Drain (2.055). Species evenness fluctuated between 0.595 (Burullus Drain) and 0.750 (West Burullus Drain). The total score of algal genus pollution index and the algal species pollution index at the different drains showed that Drain 7 and the West Burullus Drain had moderate pollution, and the total score of the other drains were greater than 20 indicating the confirmed high organic pollution. Thus, the present investigation can be considered an attempt to use the phytoplankton community as a bioindicator of organic pollution. PMID:27553944

  13. Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are abundant in Solanaceae and have a family-specific impact on gene structure and genome organization.

    PubMed

    Seibt, Kathrin M; Wenke, Torsten; Muders, Katja; Truberg, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are highly abundant non-autonomous retrotransposons that are widespread in plants. They are short in size, non-coding, show high sequence diversity, and are therefore mostly not or not correctly annotated in plant genome sequences. Hence, comparative studies on genomic SINE populations are rare. To explore the structural organization and impact of SINEs, we comparatively investigated the genome sequences of the Solanaceae species potato (Solanum tuberosum), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), wild tomato (Solanum pennellii), and two pepper cultivars (Capsicum annuum). Based on 8.5 Gbp sequence data, we annotated 82 983 SINE copies belonging to 10 families and subfamilies on a base pair level. Solanaceae SINEs are dispersed over all chromosomes with enrichments in distal regions. Depending on the genome assemblies and gene predictions, 30% of all SINE copies are associated with genes, particularly frequent in introns and untranslated regions (UTRs). The close association with genes is family specific. More than 10% of all genes annotated in the Solanaceae species investigated contain at least one SINE insertion, and we found genes harbouring up to 16 SINE copies. We demonstrate the involvement of SINEs in gene and genome evolution including the donation of splice sites, start and stop codons and exons to genes, enlargement of introns and UTRs, generation of tandem-like duplications and transduction of adjacent sequence regions. PMID:26996788

  14. Aging Optimization of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy C458 for Application to Cryotank Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, B. J.; Sankaran, K. K.; Babel, H.; Farahmand, B.; Rioja, R.

    2003-01-01

    Compared with aluminum alloys such as 2219, which is widely used in space vehicle for cryogenic tanks and unpressurized structures, aluminum-lithium alloys possess attractive combinations of lower density and higher modulus along with comparable mechanical properties. These characteristics have resulted in the successful use of the aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 (Al-1.0 Li-4.0 Cu-0.4 Mg-0.4 Ag-0.12 Zr) for the Space Shuttle External Tank, and the consideration of newer U.S. aluminum-lithium alloys such as L277 and C458 for future space vehicles. These newer alloys generally have lithium content less than 2 wt. % and their composition and processing have been carefully tailored to increase the toughness and reduce the mechanical property anisotropy of the earlier generation alloys such 2090 and 8090. Alloy processing, particularly the aging treatment, has a significant influence on the strength-toughness combinations and their dependence on service environments for aluminum-lithium alloys. Work at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on alloy 2195 has shown that the cryogenic toughness can be improved by employing a two-step aging process. This is accomplished by aging at a lower temperature in the first step to suppress nucleation of the strengthening precipitate at sub-grain boundaries while promoting nucleation in the interior of the grains. Second step aging at the normal aging temperature results in precipitate growth to the optimum size. A design of experiments aging study was conducted for plate. To achieve the T8 temper, Alloy C458 (Al-1.8 Li-2.7 Cu-0.3 Mg- 0.08 Zr-0.3 Mn-0.6 Zn) is typically aged at 300 F for 24 hours. In this study, a two-step aging treatment was developed through a comprehensive 24 full factorial design of experiments study and the typical one-step aging used as a reference. Based on the higher lithium content of C458 compared with 2195, the first step aging temperature was varied between 175 F and 250 F. The second step aging temperatures was

  15. Age structure of owned dogs under compulsory culling in a visceral leishmaniasis endemic area.

    PubMed

    Bortoletto, Danielly Vieira; Utsunomiya, Yuri Tani; Perri, Silvia Helena Venturoli; Ferreira, Fernando; Nunes, Cáris Maroni

    2016-01-01

    The age structure of the dog population is essential for planning and evaluating control programs for zoonotic diseases. We analyzed data of an owned-dog census in order to characterize, for the first time, the structure of a dog population under compulsory culling in a visceral leishmaniasis endemic area (Panorama, São Paulo State, Brazil) that recorded a dog-culling rate of 28% in the year of the study. Data on 1,329 households and 1,671 owned dogs revealed an owned dog:human ratio of 1:7. The mean age of dogs was estimated at 1.73 years; the age pyramid indicated high birth and mortality rates at the first year of age with an estimated cumulative mortality of 78% at the third year of age and expected life span of 2.75 years. In spite of the high mortality, a growth projection simulation suggested that the population has potential to grow in a logarithmic scale over the years. The estimated parameters can be further applied in models to maximize the impact and minimize financial inputs of visceral leishmaniasis control measures. PMID:27598014

  16. Benefits of gregarious feeding by aposematic caterpillars depend on group age structure.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Stuart A; Stastny, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Gregarious feeding is a common feature of herbivorous insects and can range from beneficial (e.g. dilution of predation risk) to costly (e.g. competition). Group age structure should influence these costs and benefits, particularly when old and young larvae differ in their feeding mode or apparency to predators. We investigated the relative value of gregarious feeding by aposematic larvae of Uresiphita reversalis that we observed feeding in groups of mixed ages and variable densities on wild Lupinus diffusus. In a manipulative field experiment, the survivorship and growth of young larvae were enhanced in the presence of older conspecifics, but not in large groups of similarly aged larvae. Estimates of insect damage and induced plant responses suggest that mixed-age groups enhance plant quality for young larvae while avoiding competition. We conclude that benefits of gregariousness in this species are contingent on group age structure, a finding of significance for the ecology and evolution of gregariousness and other social behaviours. PMID:25399243

  17. The effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation in Poland

    SciTech Connect

    Talalaj, Izabela Anna Walery, Maria

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • An effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation was presented. • The waste accumulation index is influenced by a number of unemployed women. • Greater share of women in society contributes to greater waste production. • A model describing the analyzed dependences was determined. - Abstract: In this study the effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation was investigated. The data from 10-year period, from 2001 to 2010 year, were taken into consideration. The following parameters of gender and age structure were analyzed: men and woman quantity, female to male ratio, number of working, pre-working and post-working age men/women, number of unemployed men/women. The results have showed a strong correlation of annual per capita waste generation rate with number of unemployed women (r = 0.70) and female to male ratio (r = 0.81). This indicates that waste generation rate is more depended on ratio of men and women that on quantitative size of each group. Using the regression analysis a model describing the dependence between female to male ratio, number of unemployed woman and waste quantity was determined. The model explains 70% of waste quantity variation. Obtained results can be used both to improve waste management and to a fuller understanding of gender behavior.

  18. A comparison of the structure of solute clusters formed during thermal ageing and irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hyde, J M; Sha, G; Marquis, E A; Morley, A; Wilford, K B; Williams, T J

    2011-05-01

    Nanometre scale clusters form in Cu-containing reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels during neutron irradiation. These clusters have a deleterious effect on mechanical properties, which can result in embrittlement and limit the reactor operating life. Thermal ageing of RPV steels can also induce the formation of solute clusters but it is not clear how similar these are to those formed during irradiation. In this work atom probe tomography, combined with detailed structural assessments of the structure of solute clusters, is used to address this issue. A series of thermal ageing heat treatments has been performed on several high- and low-Ni RPV welds to produce 1-4 nm diameter solute clusters. The same materials have also been neutron irradiated. The results show that CuMnNiSi enriched clusters formed during thermal ageing have, on average, higher Cu contents and lower Mn, Ni and Si contents than those found in irradiation-induced clusters. The effect of increasing bulk Ni is to encourage the formation of clusters with significantly higher Ni content, slightly higher Mn and Si contents and significantly lower Cu contents. At very high doses and dose rates MnNiSi enriched clusters can form even in high-Cu welds. Despite differences in the compositions of individual clusters formed during irradiation and during thermal ageing, clusters in both exhibit similar structure. In particular, well developed clusters in both materials have Cu-enriched cores whose peripheries are enriched in Ni, Mn and, in most cases, Si. PMID:21227587

  19. Population Genetic Structure, Abundance, and Health Status of Two Dominant Benthic Species in the Saba Bank National Park, Caribbean Netherlands: Montastraea cavernosa and Xestospongia muta

    PubMed Central

    de Bakker, Didier M.; Meesters, Erik H. W. G.; van Bleijswijk, Judith D. L.; Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C.; Breeuwer, Hans J. A. J.; Becking, Leontine E.

    2016-01-01

    Saba Bank, a submerged atoll in the Caribbean Sea with an area of 2,200 km2, has attained international conservation status due to the rich diversity of species that reside on the bank. In order to assess the role of Saba Bank as a potential reservoir of diversity for the surrounding reefs, we examined the population genetic structure, abundance and health status of two prominent benthic species, the coral Montastraea cavernosa and the sponge Xestospongia muta. Sequence data were collected from 34 colonies of M. cavernosa (nDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2; 892 bp) and 68 X. muta sponges (mtDNA I3-M11 partition of COI; 544 bp) on Saba Bank and around Saba Island, and compared with published data across the wider Caribbean. Our data indicate that there is genetic connectivity between populations on Saba Bank and the nearby Saba Island as well as multiple locations in the wider Caribbean, ranging in distance from 100s–1000s km. The genetic diversity of Saba Bank populations of M. cavernosa (π = 0.055) and X. muta (π = 0.0010) was comparable to those in other regions in the western Atlantic. Densities and health status were determined along 11 transects of 50 m2 along the south-eastern rim of Saba Bank. The densities of M. cavernosa (0.27 ind. m-2, 95% CI: 0.12–0.52) were average, while the densities of X. muta (0.09 ind. m-2, 95% CI: 0.02–0.32) were generally higher with respect to other Caribbean locations. No disease or bleaching was present in any of the specimens of the coral M. cavernosa, however, we did observe partial tissue loss (77.9% of samples) as well as overgrowth (48.1%), predominantly by cyanobacteria. In contrast, the majority of observed X. muta (83.5%) showed signs of presumed bleaching. The combined results of apparent gene flow among populations on Saba Bank and surrounding reefs, the high abundance and unique genetic diversity, indicate that Saba Bank could function as an important buffer for the region. Either as a natural source of larvae to

  20. Population Genetic Structure, Abundance, and Health Status of Two Dominant Benthic Species in the Saba Bank National Park, Caribbean Netherlands: Montastraea cavernosa and Xestospongia muta.

    PubMed

    de Bakker, Didier M; Meesters, Erik H W G; van Bleijswijk, Judith D L; Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C; Breeuwer, Hans J A J; Becking, Leontine E

    2016-01-01

    Saba Bank, a submerged atoll in the Caribbean Sea with an area of 2,200 km2, has attained international conservation status due to the rich diversity of species that reside on the bank. In order to assess the role of Saba Bank as a potential reservoir of diversity for the surrounding reefs, we examined the population genetic structure, abundance and health status of two prominent benthic species, the coral Montastraea cavernosa and the sponge Xestospongia muta. Sequence data were collected from 34 colonies of M. cavernosa (nDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2; 892 bp) and 68 X. muta sponges (mtDNA I3-M11 partition of COI; 544 bp) on Saba Bank and around Saba Island, and compared with published data across the wider Caribbean. Our data indicate that there is genetic connectivity between populations on Saba Bank and the nearby Saba Island as well as multiple locations in the wider Caribbean, ranging in distance from 100s-1000s km. The genetic diversity of Saba Bank populations of M. cavernosa (π = 0.055) and X. muta (π = 0.0010) was comparable to those in other regions in the western Atlantic. Densities and health status were determined along 11 transects of 50 m2 along the south-eastern rim of Saba Bank. The densities of M. cavernosa (0.27 ind. m-2, 95% CI: 0.12-0.52) were average, while the densities of X. muta (0.09 ind. m-2, 95% CI: 0.02-0.32) were generally higher with respect to other Caribbean locations. No disease or bleaching was present in any of the specimens of the coral M. cavernosa, however, we did observe partial tissue loss (77.9% of samples) as well as overgrowth (48.1%), predominantly by cyanobacteria. In contrast, the majority of observed X. muta (83.5%) showed signs of presumed bleaching. The combined results of apparent gene flow among populations on Saba Bank and surrounding reefs, the high abundance and unique genetic diversity, indicate that Saba Bank could function as an important buffer for the region. Either as a natural source of larvae to replenish

  1. Definitions of fitness in age-structured populations: Comparison in the haploid case.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Sabin; Soares, Cintia

    2016-02-21

    Fisher's (1930) Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection (FTNS), and in particular the development of an explicit age-structured version of the theorem, is of everlasting interest. In a recent paper, Grafen (2015a) argues that Fisher regarded his theorem as justifying individual rather than population fitness maximization. The argument relies on a new definition of fitness in age-structured populations in terms of individual birth and death rates and age-specific reproductive values in agreement with a principle of neutrality. The latter are frequency-dependent and defined without reference to genetic variation. In the same paper, it is shown that the rate of increase in the mean of the breeding values of fitness weighted by the reproductive values, but keeping the breeding values constant as in Price (1972) is equal to the additive genetic variance in fitness. Therefore, this partial change is obtained by keeping constant not only the genotypic birth and death rates but also the mean age-specific birth and death rates from which the age-specific reproductive values are defined. In this paper we reaffirm that the Malthusian parameter which measures the relative rate of increase or decrease in reproductive value of each genotype in a continuous-time age-structured population is the definition of fitness used in Fisher's (1930) FTNS. This is shown by considering an age-structured asexual haploid population with constant age-specific birth and death (or survival) parameters for each type. Although the original statement of the FTNS is for a diploid population, this simplified haploid model allows us to address the definition of fitness meant in this theorem without the complexities and effects of a changing genic environment. In this simplified framework, the rate of change in mean fitness in continuous time is expected to be exactly equal to the genetic variance in fitness (or to the genetic variance in fitness divided by the mean fitness in discrete time), which can

  2. Methanotrophic community structure of aged refuse and its capability for methane bio-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mei, Juan; Wang, Li; Han, Dan; Zhao, Youcai

    2011-01-01

    Aged refuse from waste landfills closed for eight years was examined and found to contain rich methanotrophs capable of biooxidation for methane. Specially, community structure and methane oxidation capability of methanotrophs in the aged refuse were studied. The amount of methanotrophs ranged 61.97 x 10(3)-632.91 x 10(3) cells/g (in dry basis) in aged refuse from Shanghai Laogang Landfill. Type I and II methanotrophs were found in the aged refuse in the presence of sterilized sewage sludge and only Type I methanotrophs were detected in the presence of nitrate minimal salt medium (NMS). The clone sequences of the pmoA gene obtained from the aged refuse were similar to the pmoA gene of Methylobacter Methylocaldum, and Methylocystis, and two clones were distinct with known genera of Type I methanotrophs according to phylogenetic analysis. Aged refuse enriched with NMS was used for methane biological oxidation and over 93% conversions were obtained. PMID:21790062

  3. ALPS: The Age-Layered Population Structure for Reducing the Problem of Premature Convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.

    2006-01-01

    To reduce the problem of premature convergence we define a new attribute of an individual, its age, and propose the Age-Layered Population Structure (ALPS), in which age is used to restrict competition and breeding between members of the population. ALPS differs from a typical EA by segregating individuals into different age-layers by their age - a measure of how long the genetic material has been in the population - and by regularly replacing all individuals in the bottom layer with randomly generated ones. The introduction of new, randomly generated individuals at regular intervals results in an EA that is never completely converged and is always looking at new parts of the fitness landscape. By using age to restrict competition and breeding search is able to develop promising young individuals without them being dominated by older ones. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the ALPS algorithm on an antenna design problem in which evolution with ALPS produces antennas more than twice as good as does evolution with two other types of EAs. Further analysis shows that the ALPS model does allow the offspring of newly generated individuals to move the population out of mediocre local-optima to better parts of the fitness landscape.

  4. Spatial and temporal variations in the age structure of Arctic sea ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belchansky, G.I.; Douglas, D.C.; Platonov, N.G.

    2005-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in the age structure of Arctic sea ice are investigated using a new reversechronology algorithm that tracks ice-covered pixels to their location and date of origin based on ice motion and concentration data. The Beaufort Gyre tends to harbor the oldest (>10 years old) sea ice in the western Arctic while direct ice advection pathways toward the Transpolar Drift Stream maintain relatively young (???5 years) ice in the eastern Arctic. Persistent net losses (-4.2% yr-1) in extent of ice >10 years old (10+ year age class) were observed during 1989-2003. Since the mid-1990s, losses to the 10+ year age class lacked compensation by recruitment due to a prior depletion of all mature (6-10 year) age classes. Survival of the 1994 and 1996-1998 sea ice generations reestablished most mature age classes, and thereby the potential to increase extent of the 10+ year age class during the mid-2000s. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Effects of Age and Hearing Loss on the Processing of Auditory Temporal Fine Structure.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J

    2016-01-01

    Within the cochlea, broadband sounds like speech and music are filtered into a series of narrowband signals, each of which can be considered as a relatively slowly varying envelope (ENV) imposed on a rapidly oscillating carrier (the temporal fine structure, TFS). Information about ENV and TFS is conveyed in the timing and short-term rate of nerve spikes in the auditory nerve. There is evidence that both hearing loss and increasing age adversely affect the ability to use TFS information, but in many studies the effects of hearing loss and age have been confounded. This paper summarises evidence from studies that allow some separation of the effects of hearing loss and age. The results suggest that the monaural processing of TFS information, which is important for the perception of pitch and for segregating speech from background sounds, is adversely affected by both hearing loss and increasing age, the former being more important. The monaural processing of ENV information is hardly affected by hearing loss or by increasing age. The binaural processing of TFS information, which is important for sound localisation and the binaural masking level difference, is also adversely affected by both hearing loss and increasing age, but here the latter seems more important. The deterioration of binaural TFS processing with increasing age appears to start relatively early in life. The binaural processing of ENV information also deteriorates somewhat with increasing age. The reduced binaural processing abilities found for older/hearing-impaired listeners may partially account for the difficulties that such listeners experience in situations where the target speech and interfering sounds come from different directions in space, as is common in everyday life. PMID:27080640

  6. Structured additive regression modeling of age of menarche and menopause in a breast cancer screening program.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Elisa; de Sousa, Bruno; Cadarso-Suarez, Carmen; Rodrigues, Vitor; Kneib, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancer risk is believed to be associated with several reproductive factors, such as early menarche and late menopause. This study is based on the registries of the first time a woman enters the screening program, and presents a spatio-temporal analysis of the variables age of menarche and age of menopause along with other reproductive and socioeconomic factors. The database was provided by the Portuguese Cancer League (LPCC), a private nonprofit organization dealing with multiple issues related to oncology of which the Breast Cancer Screening Program is one of its main activities. The registry consists of 259,652 records of women who entered the screening program for the first time between 1990 and 2007 (45-69-year age group). Structured Additive Regression (STAR) models were used to explore spatial and temporal correlations with a wide range of covariates. These models are flexible enough to deal with a variety of complex datasets, allowing us to reveal possible relationships among the variables considered in this study. The analysis shows that early menarche occurs in younger women and in municipalities located in the interior of central Portugal. Women living in inland municipalities register later ages for menopause, and those born in central Portugal after 1933 show a decreasing trend in the age of menopause. Younger ages of menarche and late menopause are observed in municipalities with a higher purchasing power index. The analysis performed in this study portrays the time evolution of the age of menarche and age of menopause and their spatial characterization, adding to the identification of factors that could be of the utmost importance in future breast cancer incidence research. PMID:24615881

  7. Genus age, provincial area and the taxonomic structure of marine faunas

    PubMed Central

    Harnik, Paul G.; Jablonski, David; Krug, Andrew Z.; Valentine, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Species are unevenly distributed among genera within clades and regions, with most genera species-poor and few species-rich. At regional scales, this structure to taxonomic diversity is generated via speciation, extinction and geographical range dynamics. Here, we use a global database of extant marine bivalves to characterize the taxonomic structure of climate zones and provinces. Our analyses reveal a general, Zipf–Mandelbrot form to the distribution of species among genera, with faunas from similar climate zones exhibiting similar taxonomic structure. Provinces that contain older taxa and/or encompass larger areas are expected to be more species-rich. Although both median genus age and provincial area correlate with measures of taxonomic structure, these relationships are interdependent, nonlinear and driven primarily by contrasts between tropical and extra-tropical faunas. Provincial area and taxonomic structure are largely decoupled within climate zones. Counter to the expectation that genus age and species richness should positively covary, diverse and highly structured provincial faunas are dominated by young genera. The marked differences between tropical and temperate faunas suggest strong spatial variation in evolutionary rates and invasion frequencies. Such variation contradicts biogeographic models that scale taxonomic diversity to geographical area. PMID:20534619

  8. Genus age, provincial area and the taxonomic structure of marine faunas.

    PubMed

    Harnik, Paul G; Jablonski, David; Krug, Andrew Z; Valentine, James W

    2010-11-22

    Species are unevenly distributed among genera within clades and regions, with most genera species-poor and few species-rich. At regional scales, this structure to taxonomic diversity is generated via speciation, extinction and geographical range dynamics. Here, we use a global database of extant marine bivalves to characterize the taxonomic structure of climate zones and provinces. Our analyses reveal a general, Zipf-Mandelbrot form to the distribution of species among genera, with faunas from similar climate zones exhibiting similar taxonomic structure. Provinces that contain older taxa and/or encompass larger areas are expected to be more species-rich. Although both median genus age and provincial area correlate with measures of taxonomic structure, these relationships are interdependent, nonlinear and driven primarily by contrasts between tropical and extra-tropical faunas. Provincial area and taxonomic structure are largely decoupled within climate zones. Counter to the expectation that genus age and species richness should positively covary, diverse and highly structured provincial faunas are dominated by young genera. The marked differences between tropical and temperate faunas suggest strong spatial variation in evolutionary rates and invasion frequencies. Such variation contradicts biogeographic models that scale taxonomic diversity to geographical area. PMID:20534619

  9. Fine structural changes in the lateral vestibular nucleus of aging rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E., Jr.; Miquel, J.

    1974-01-01

    The fine structure of the lateral vestibular nucleus was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats, that were sacrified at 4 weeks, 6-8 weeks, 6-8 months, and 18-20 months of age. In the neuronal perikaria, the following age-associated changes were seen with increasing frequency with advancing age: rodlike nuclear inclusions and nuclear membrane invaginations; cytoplasmic dense bodies with the characteristics of lipofuscin; and moderate disorganization of the granular endoplasmic reticulum. Dense bodies were also seen in glial cells. Rats 18 to 20 months old showed dendritic swellings, axonal degeneration, and an apparent increase in the number of axosomatic synaptic terminals containing flattened vesicles (presumed to be inhibitory in function).

  10. Significance of locally intensified strain aging to the fracture toughness of welded steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, M.G.

    1995-12-31

    A review of past studies shows that tests on specimens notched after welding can give overestimates of the fracture toughness that occurs at the tips of flaws present during welding. This situation results from locally intensified straining and aging embrittlement (LISAE), which has been shown to trigger low stress brittle fractures in both notched and welded wide plate tension tests, and welded structures in service. Although the relative susceptibilities of steels to strain aging embrittlement are sometimes assessed by testing bulk strained and aged samples, the results of such tests may be optimistic. A summary is given of work to develop a fracture toughness test method for LISAE. The new test will give increased confidence and accuracy in fracture assessments, be of use in selecting tough materials, and aid the development of materials that are resistant to LISAE.

  11. Structural and functional rejuvenation of the aged brain by an approved anti-asthmatic drug

    PubMed Central

    Marschallinger, Julia; Schäffner, Iris; Klein, Barbara; Gelfert, Renate; Rivera, Francisco J.; Illes, Sebastian; Grassner, Lukas; Janssen, Maximilian; Rotheneichner, Peter; Schmuckermair, Claudia; Coras, Roland; Boccazzi, Marta; Chishty, Mansoor; Lagler, Florian B.; Renic, Marija; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Singewald, Nicolas; Blümcke, Ingmar; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Lie, D. Chichung; Abbracchio, Maria P.; Aigner, Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    As human life expectancy has improved rapidly in industrialized societies, age-related cognitive impairment presents an increasing challenge. Targeting histopathological processes that correlate with age-related cognitive declines, such as neuroinflammation, low levels of neurogenesis, disrupted blood–brain barrier and altered neuronal activity, might lead to structural and functional rejuvenation of the aged brain. Here we show that a 6-week treatment of young (4 months) and old (20 months) rats with montelukast, a marketed anti-asthmatic drug antagonizing leukotriene receptors, reduces neuroinflammation, elevates hippocampal neurogenesis and improves learning and memory in old animals. By using gene knockdown and knockout approaches, we demonstrate that the effect is mediated through inhibition of the GPR17 receptor. This work illustrates that inhibition of leukotriene receptor signalling might represent a safe and druggable target to restore cognitive functions in old individuals and paves the way for future clinical translation of leukotriene receptor inhibition for the treatment of dementias. PMID:26506265

  12. Structural and functional rejuvenation of the aged brain by an approved anti-asthmatic drug.

    PubMed

    Marschallinger, Julia; Schäffner, Iris; Klein, Barbara; Gelfert, Renate; Rivera, Francisco J; Illes, Sebastian; Grassner, Lukas; Janssen, Maximilian; Rotheneichner, Peter; Schmuckermair, Claudia; Coras, Roland; Boccazzi, Marta; Chishty, Mansoor; Lagler, Florian B; Renic, Marija; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Singewald, Nicolas; Blümcke, Ingmar; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Lie, D Chichung; Abbracchio, Maria P; Aigner, Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    As human life expectancy has improved rapidly in industrialized societies, age-related cognitive impairment presents an increasing challenge. Targeting histopathological processes that correlate with age-related cognitive declines, such as neuroinflammation, low levels of neurogenesis, disrupted blood-brain barrier and altered neuronal activity, might lead to structural and functional rejuvenation of the aged brain. Here we show that a 6-week treatment of young (4 months) and old (20 months) rats with montelukast, a marketed anti-asthmatic drug antagonizing leukotriene receptors, reduces neuroinflammation, elevates hippocampal neurogenesis and improves learning and memory in old animals. By using gene knockdown and knockout approaches, we demonstrate that the effect is mediated through inhibition of the GPR17 receptor. This work illustrates that inhibition of leukotriene receptor signalling might represent a safe and druggable target to restore cognitive functions in old individuals and paves the way for future clinical translation of leukotriene receptor inhibition for the treatment of dementias. PMID:26506265

  13. Optimal control for an age-structured model for the transmission of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Djidjou Demasse, Ramses; Tewa, Jean-Jules; Bowong, Samuel; Emvudu, Yves

    2016-08-01

    One of the characteristics of HBV transmission is the age structure of the host population and the vertical transmission of the disease. That is the infection is transmitted directly from infected mother to an embryo, fetus, or baby during pregnancy or childbirth (the perinatal infection). We formulated an age-structured model for the transmission dynamics of HBV with differential infectivity: symptomatic and asymptomatic infections. The model without intervention strategies is completely analyzed. We compute the basic reproduction number which determines the outcome of the disease. We also compute equilibria and study their stability. The sensitivity analysis of the initial model parameters is performed (to determine the impact of control-related parameters on outbreak severity). Using optimal control theory, we determine the cost-effective balance of three interventions methods which minimizes HBV-related deaths as well as the costs associated with intervention. PMID:26676356

  14. The contribution of age structure to cell population responses to targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Pierre; Garbett, Shawn P.; Quaranta, Vito; Tyson, Darren R.; Webb, Glenn F.

    2013-01-01

    Cells grown in culture act as a model system for analyzing the effects of anticancer compounds, which may affect cell behavior in a cell cycle position-dependent manner. Cell synchronization techniques have been generally employed to minimize the variation in cell cycle position. However, synchronization techniques are cumbersome and imprecise and the agents used to synchronize the cells potentially have other unknown effects on the cells. An alternative approach is to determine the age structure in the population and account for the cell cycle positional effects post hoc. Here we provide a formalism to use quantifiable lifespans from live cell microscopy experiments to parameterize an age-structured model of cell population response. PMID:22796330

  15. Surface structural changes of naturally aged silicone and EPDM composite insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Vlastos, A.E. ); Gubanski, S.M. )

    1991-04-01

    In a long-term outdoor test with high direct and alternating voltages, silicone and EPDM rubber composite insulators have, at the beginning, shown a superior performance to that of glass and porcelain insulators. In the long-term test, however, the silicone rubber composite insulator has, in spite of the ageing of both insulator types, kept its good performance, while the performance of the EPDM rubber composite insulator was drastically deteriorated. In order to get a better insight into results obtained, the wettability and the surface structural changes of the insulators were studied by the drop deposition method (using a goniometer) and by advanced techniques such as SEM, ESCA, FTIR and SIMS respectively. The results show that the differences in performance have to be found in the differences in the surface structural changes and in the dynamic ability of the surface to compensate the ageing.

  16. DETERMINING THE EFFECTS OF RADIATION ON AGING CONCRETE STRUCTURES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Serrato, M.

    2010-01-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) is responsible for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities throughout the DOE Complex. Some of these facilities will be completely dismantled, while others will be partially dismantled and the remaining structure will be stabilized with cementitious fill materials. The latter is a process known as In-Situ Decommissioning (ISD). The ISD decision process requires a detailed understanding of the existing facility conditions, and operational history. System information and material properties are need for aged nuclear facilities. This literature review investigated the properties of aged concrete structures affected by radiation. In particular, this review addresses the Savannah River Site (SRS) isotope production nuclear reactors. The concrete in the reactors at SRS was not seriously damaged by the levels of radiation exposure. Loss of composite compressive strength was the most common effect of radiation induced damage documented at nuclear power plants.

  17. Experimental febrile seizures induce age-dependent structural plasticity and improve memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, K; Ichikawa, J; Matsuki, N; Ikegaya, Y; Koyama, R

    2016-03-24

    Population-based studies have demonstrated that children with a history of febrile seizure (FS) perform better than age-matched controls at hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. Here, we report that FSs induce two distinct structural reorganizations in the hippocampus and bidirectionally modify future learning abilities in an age-dependent manner. Compared with age-matched controls, adult mice that had experienced experimental FSs induced by hyperthermia (HT) on postnatal day 14 (P14-HT) performed better in a cognitive task that requires dentate granule cells (DGCs). The enhanced memory performance correlated with an FS-induced persistent increase in the density of large mossy fiber terminals (LMTs) of the DGCs. The memory enhancement was not observed in mice that had experienced HT-induced seizures at P11 which exhibited abnormally located DGCs in addition to the increased LMT density. The ectopic DGCs of the P11-HT mice were abolished by the diuretic bumetanide, and this pharmacological treatment unveiled the masked memory enhancement. Thus, this work provides a novel basis for age-dependent structural plasticity in which FSs influence future brain function. PMID:26794590

  18. Optimal Harvesting in an Age-Structured Predator-Prey Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fister, K. Renee Lenhart, Suzanne

    2006-06-15

    We investigate optimal harvesting control in a predator-prey model in which the prey population is represented by a first-order partial differential equation with age-structure and the predator population is represented by an ordinary differential equation in time. The controls are the proportions of the populations to be harvested, and the objective functional represents the profit from harvesting. The existence and uniqueness of the optimal control pair are established.

  19. Damage from periorbital ageing to the multilayered structures and resilience of the skin in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chuh-Kai; Tsai, Feng-Chou; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Hu, Chien-Ming; Wei, Po-Li; Su, Ching-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Ageing dynamically disrupts the multilayered supporting components of the skin that are held together by cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Skin specimens from 33 female Chinese patients undergoing lower blepharoplasty were divided into three age groups and examined by haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Elastica-van Gieson (EVG) stains, western blotting, surface electron microscopy (SEM) and biomechanical tension analysis. The SEM density (skin surface topology) showed a negative linear relationship with age. The triangular pattern of the skin surface in the younger group gradually broke down into quadrangular and irregular patterns in the older group. Collagens and elastic fibres in the dermis showed anisotropy and decreased density in the older groups compared with the younger group, especially in the papillary dermis. Anisotropy means that physical properties differ according to the direction of measurement. E-cadherin and integrin αv (whose functions are to bind epidermal and dermal elements respectively) increased and decreased, respectively, in the oldest group. Skin resilience decreased significantly in this group under repetitive stress. In conclusion, a loss of skin surface textures, integrin αv expressions, epidermal-dermal connections and dermal compactness led to the multilayered structure of the skin becoming separated. This in turn decreased resilience during ageing. These findings may therefore explain why aged skins cannot tolerate repetitive facial expressions, and why this action produces further dynamic wrinkles. PMID:23441675

  20. Nuclei of aged myofibres undergo structural and functional changes suggesting impairment in RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Malatesta, M.; Perdoni, F.; Muller, S.; Zancanaro, C.; Pellicciari, C.

    2009-01-01

    Advancing adult age is associated with a progressive decrease in skeletal muscle mass, strength and quality known as sarcopenia. The mechanisms underlying age-related skeletal muscle wasting and weakness are manifold and still remain to be fully elucidated. Despite the increasing evidence that the progress of muscle diseases leading to muscle atrophy/dystrophy may be related to defective RNA processing, no data on the morpho-functional features of skeletal muscle nuclei in sarcopenia are available at present. In this view, we have investigated, by combining morphometry and immunocytochemistry at light and electron microscopy, the fine structure of myonuclei as well as the distribution and amount of RNA processing factors in skeletal myofibres of biceps brachii and quadriceps femoris from adult and old rats. Results demonstrate that the myonuclei of aged type II fibres show an increased amount of condensed chromatin and lower amounts of phosphorylated polymerase II and DNA/RNA hybrid molecules, clearly indicating a decrease in pre-mRNA transcription rate compared to adult animals. In addition, myonuclei of aged fibres show decreased amounts of nucleoplasmic splicing factors and an accumulation of cleavage factors, polyadenilated RNA and perichromatin granules, suggesting a reduction in the processing and transport rate of pre-mRNA. During ageing, it seems therefore that in rat myonuclei the entire production chain of mRNA, from synthesis to cytoplasmic export, is less efficient. This failure likely contributes to the reduced responsiveness of muscle cells to anabolic stimuli in the elderly.

  1. Spatial variation in age structure among colonies of a marine snake: the influence of ectothermy.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Xavier; Brischoux, François; Pinaud, David; Michel, Catherine Louise; Clobert, Jean; Shine, Richard; Fauvel, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Several tetrapod lineages that have evolved to exploit marine environments (e.g. seals, seabirds, sea kraits) continue to rely upon land for reproduction and, thus, form dense colonies on suitable islands. In birds and mammals (endotherms), the offspring cannot survive without their parents. Terrestrial colonies contain all age classes. In reptiles (ectotherms), this constraint is relaxed, because offspring are independent from birth. Hence, each age class has the potential to select sites with characteristics that favour them. Our studies of sea snakes (sea kraits) in the lagoon of New Caledonia reveal marked spatial heterogeneity in age structure among colonies. Sea krait colonies exhibit the endothermic 'seal-seabird' pattern (mixed-age classes within populations) only where the lagoon is narrow. Where the lagoon is wide, most snake colonies are comprised primarily of a single age cohort. Nurseries are located near the coast, adult colonies offshore and mixed colonies in-between. We suggest that ectothermy allows individuals to utilize habitats that are best suited to their own ecological requirements, a flexibility not available to endothermic marine taxa with obligate parental care. PMID:25785869

  2. The age and structure of the Galactic bulge from Mira variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchpole, Robin M.; Whitelock, Patricia A.; Feast, Michael W.; Hughes, Shaun M. G.; Irwin, Mike; Alard, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    We report periods and JHKL observations for 643 oxygen-rich Mira variables found in two outer bulge fields at b = -7° and l = ±8° and combine these with data on 8057 inner bulge Miras from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment, MACHO and Two Micron All Sky Survey surveys, which are concentrated closer to the Galactic Centre. Distance moduli are estimated for all these stars. Evidence is given showing that the bulge structure is a function of age. The longer period Miras (log P > 2.6, age ˜5 Gyr and younger) show clear evidence of a bar structure inclined to the line of sight in both the inner and outer regions. The distribution of the shorter period (metal-rich globular cluster age) Miras appears spheroidal in the outer bulge. In the inner region these old stars are also distributed differently from the younger ones and possibly suggest a more complex structure. These data suggest a distance to the Galactic Centre, R0, of 8.9 kpc with an estimated uncertainty of ˜0.4 kpc. The possible effect of helium enrichment on our conclusions is discussed.

  3. Influence of aging temperature on the structure and mechanical properties of titanium alloy VT22 subjected to helical rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, I. P.; Naydenkin, E. V.; Ratochka, I. V.; Lykova, O. N.; Balushkina, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of titanium alloy VT22 after helical rolling and subsequent aging was investigated. It is shown that the treatment leads to the formation of ultra-fine grain/subgrain structure in the alloy. The subsequent aging increases the ultimate strength and yield strength to 1640 and 1590 MPa respectively, while saving satisfactory plasticity (δ > 5%).

  4. Assessing Defense Structure in School-Age Children Using the Response Evaluation Measure-71-Youth Version (REM-Y-71)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo, Katy B.; Medic, Sanja; Yasnovsky, Jessica; Steiner, Hans

    2006-01-01

    This study used the Response Evaluation Measure-Youth (REM-Y-71), a self-report measure of 21 defense reactions, among school-age children. Participants were elementary and middle school students (n=290; grades 3-8; age range: 8-15; mean=11.73). Factor analysis revealed a 2-factor defense structure consistent with structure among high school and…

  5. Solar abundance of osmium

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    The abundance parameter, log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance (by numbers of atoms with respect to hydrogen), has been derived for three lines of osmium by a method of spectrum synthesis. An apparent discordance of the derived abundance with that found from the carbonaceous chondrites is probably to be attributed primarily to errors in the f-values, and blending with unknown contributors. PMID:16592314

  6. Structural covariance of the default network in healthy and pathological aging.

    PubMed

    Spreng, R Nathan; Turner, Gary R

    2013-09-18

    Significant progress has been made uncovering functional brain networks, yet little is known about the corresponding structural covariance networks. The default network's functional architecture has been shown to change over the course of healthy and pathological aging. We examined cross-sectional and longitudinal datasets to reveal the structural covariance of the human default network across the adult lifespan and through the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We used a novel approach to identify the structural covariance of the default network and derive individual participant scores that reflect the covariance pattern in each brain image. A seed-based multivariate analysis was conducted on structural images in the cross-sectional OASIS (N = 414) and longitudinal Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (N = 434) datasets. We reproduced the distributed topology of the default network, based on a posterior cingulate cortex seed, consistent with prior reports of this intrinsic connectivity network. Structural covariance of the default network scores declined in healthy and pathological aging. Decline was greatest in the AD cohort and in those who progressed from mild cognitive impairment to AD. Structural covariance of the default network scores were positively associated with general cognitive status, reduced in APOEε4 carriers versus noncarriers, and associated with CSF biomarkers of AD. These findings identify the structural covariance of the default network and characterize changes to the network's gray matter integrity across the lifespan and through the progression of AD. The findings provide evidence for the large-scale network model of neurodegenerative disease, in which neurodegeneration spreads through intrinsically connected brain networks in a disease specific manner. PMID:24048852

  7. The Formation, Structure, and Ageing of As-Rich Hydrous Ferric Oxide at the Abandoned Sb Deposit Pezinok (Slovakia)

    SciTech Connect

    Majzlan,J.; Lalinska, B.; Chovan, M.; Jurkovic, L.; Milovska, S.; Gottlicher, J.

    2007-01-01

    The abandoned Sb deposit Pezinok in Slovakia is a significant source of As and Sb pollution that can be traced in the upper horizons of soils kilometers downstream. The source of the metalloids are two tailing impoundments which hold {approx}380,000 m{sup 3} of mining waste. The tailings and the discharged water have circumneutral pH values (7.0 {+-} 0.6) because the acidity generated by the decomposition of the primary sulfides (pyrite, FeS{sub 2}; arsenopyrite, FeAsS; berthierite, FeSb{sub 2}S{sub 4}) is rapidly neutralized by the abundant carbonates. The weathering rims on the primary sulfides are iron oxides which act as very efficient scavengers of As and Sb (with up to 19.2 wt% As and 23.7 wt% Sb). In-situ {mu}-XANES experiments indicate that As in the weathering rims is fully oxidized (As{sup 5+}). The pore solutions in the impoundment body contain up to 81 ppm As and 2.5 ppm Sb. Once these solutions are discharged from the impoundments, they precipitate or deposit masses of As-rich hydrous ferric oxide (As-HFO) with up to 28.3 wt% As{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 2.7 wt% Sb. All As-HFO samples are amorphous to X-rays. They contain Fe and As in their highest oxidation state and in octahedral and tetrahedral coordination, respectively, as suggested by XANES and EXAFS studies on Fe K and As K edges. The iron octahedra in the As-HFO share edges to form short single chains and the chains polymerize by sharing edges or corners with the adjacent units. The arsenate ions attach to the chains in a bidentate-binuclear and monodentate fashion. In addition, hydrogen-bonded complexes may exist to satisfy the bonding requirements of all oxygen atoms in the first coordination sphere of As{sup 5+}. Structural changes in the As-HFO samples were traced by chemical analyses and Fe EXAFS spectroscopy during an ageing experiment. As the samples age, As becomes more easily leachable. EXAFS spectra show a discernible trend of increasing number of Fe-Fe pairs at a distance of 3

  8. The formation, structure, and ageing of As-rich hydrous ferric oxide at the abandoned Sb deposit Pezinok (Slovakia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majzlan, Juraj; Lalinská, Bronislava; Chovan, Martin; Jurkovič, L.'ubomír; Milovská, Stanislava; Göttlicher, Jörg

    2007-09-01

    The abandoned Sb deposit Pezinok in Slovakia is a significant source of As and Sb pollution that can be traced in the upper horizons of soils kilometers downstream. The source of the metalloids are two tailing impoundments which hold ˜380,000 m 3 of mining waste. The tailings and the discharged water have circumneutral pH values (7.0 ± 0.6) because the acidity generated by the decomposition of the primary sulfides (pyrite, FeS 2; arsenopyrite, FeAsS; berthierite, FeSb 2S 4) is rapidly neutralized by the abundant carbonates. The weathering rims on the primary sulfides are iron oxides which act as very efficient scavengers of As and Sb (with up to 19.2 wt% As and 23.7 wt% Sb). In-situ μ-XANES experiments indicate that As in the weathering rims is fully oxidized (As 5+). The pore solutions in the impoundment body contain up to 81 ppm As and 2.5 ppm Sb. Once these solutions are discharged from the impoundments, they precipitate or deposit masses of As-rich hydrous ferric oxide (As-HFO) with up to 28.3 wt% As 2O 5 and 2.7 wt% Sb. All As-HFO samples are amorphous to X-rays. They contain Fe and As in their highest oxidation state and in octahedral and tetrahedral coordination, respectively, as suggested by XANES and EXAFS studies on Fe K and As K edges. The iron octahedra in the As-HFO share edges to form short single chains and the chains polymerize by sharing edges or corners with the adjacent units. The arsenate ions attach to the chains in a bidentate-binuclear and monodentate fashion. In addition, hydrogen-bonded complexes may exist to satisfy the bonding requirements of all oxygen atoms in the first coordination sphere of As 5+. Structural changes in the As-HFO samples were traced by chemical analyses and Fe EXAFS spectroscopy during an ageing experiment. As the samples age, As becomes more easily leachable. EXAFS spectra show a discernible trend of increasing number of Fe-Fe pairs at a distance of 3.3-3.5 Å, that is, increasing polymerization of the iron

  9. Social Structural Influences on Healthy Aging: Community-Level Socioeconomic Conditions and Survival Probability of Becoming a Centenarian for Those Aged 65 to 69 in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong In; Kim, Gukbin

    2015-10-01

    This study estimated the associations between community-level socioeconomic conditions and survival probability of becoming a centenarian (SPBC) for those aged 65 to 69 in South Korea to determine the social structural influences on healthy aging. The indicators of socioeconomic and data of centenarians were obtained from Statistics Korea database 2014: population census and social survey. Significant positive correlations were found between SPBC and community-level socioeconomic conditions (minimum cost of living and economically active population, water supply and sewerage, pave a road with asphalt, and urbanization). SPBC male and female predictors had higher economic level and base facilities (R2)=0.578, p<.001). The study provides evidence that community-level socioeconomic conditions are important correlates of SPBC for those aged 65 to 69 in South Korea. These strategies should include social structural influences on successful aging in the overall socioeconomic conditions. PMID:26769915

  10. Mössbauer study of two different aged rock types in the Vredefort structure, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waanders, F. B.; Brink, M. C.; Bisschoff, A. A.

    2005-11-01

    The Vredefort Structure in South Africa was recently inscribed into the list of World Heritage sites as the oldest and largest recognised impact structure on earth. Due to upliftment of more than 30 km of the Archaean basement core and subsequent exposure of the deeply eroded central portion of the crater a unique opportunity exists to study rocks of the crust, especially those that have undergone recrystallization due to various thermal metamorphic events over time. Two rock types occurring in the central uplifted part of the impact structure were studied. One was a typical Archaean iron formation of sedimentary origin. The other rock studied, adjacent to this much older rock, is a homogeneous, medium grained recrystallized norite of immediately pre- or post-impact age, indicating a possible mafic igneous activity related to impact. Microscopy, XRD and Mössbauer analyses were performed on both samples.

  11. Age of language learning shapes brain structure: a cortical thickness study of bilingual and monolingual individuals.

    PubMed

    Klein, Denise; Mok, Kelvin; Chen, Jen-Kai; Watkins, Kate E

    2014-04-01

    We examined the effects of learning a second language (L2) on brain structure. Cortical thickness was measured in the MRI datasets of 22 monolinguals and 66 bilinguals. Some bilingual subjects had learned both languages simultaneously (0-3 years) while some had learned their L2 after achieving proficiency in their first language during either early (4-7 years) or late childhood (8-13 years). Later acquisition of L2 was associated with significantly thicker cortex in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and thinner cortex in the right IFG. These effects were seen in the group comparisons of monolinguals, simultaneous bilinguals and early and late bilinguals. Within the bilingual group, significant correlations between age of acquisition of L2 and cortical thickness were seen in the same regions: cortical thickness correlated with age of acquisition positively in the left IFG and negatively in the right IFG. Interestingly, the monolinguals and simultaneous bilinguals did not differ in cortical thickness in any region. Our results show that learning a second language after gaining proficiency in the first language modifies brain structure in an age-dependent manner whereas simultaneous acquisition of two languages has no additional effect on brain development. PMID:23819901

  12. Fine resolution mapping of population age-structures for health and development applications

    PubMed Central

    Alegana, V. A.; Atkinson, P. M.; Pezzulo, C.; Sorichetta, A.; Weiss, D.; Bird, T.; Erbach-Schoenberg, E.; Tatem, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The age-group composition of populations varies considerably across the world, and obtaining accurate, spatially detailed estimates of numbers of children under 5 years is important in designing vaccination strategies, educational planning or maternal healthcare delivery. Traditionally, such estimates are derived from population censuses, but these can often be unreliable, outdated and of coarse resolution for resource-poor settings. Focusing on Nigeria, we use nationally representative household surveys and their cluster locations to predict the proportion of the under-five population in 1 × 1 km using a Bayesian hierarchical spatio-temporal model. Results showed that land cover, travel time to major settlements, night-time lights and vegetation index were good predictors and that accounting for fine-scale variation, rather than assuming a uniform proportion of under 5 year olds can result in significant differences in health metrics. The largest gaps in estimated bednet and vaccination coverage were in Kano, Katsina and Jigawa. Geolocated household surveys are a valuable resource for providing detailed, contemporary and regularly updated population age-structure data in the absence of recent census data. By combining these with covariate layers, age-structure maps of unprecedented detail can be produced to guide the targeting of interventions in resource-poor settings. PMID:25788540

  13. The effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation in Poland.

    PubMed

    Talalaj, Izabela Anna; Walery, Maria

    2015-06-01

    In this study the effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation was investigated. The data from 10-year period, from 2001 to 2010 year, were taken into consideration. The following parameters of gender and age structure were analyzed: men and woman quantity, female to male ratio, number of working, pre-working and post-working age men/women, number of unemployed men/women. The results have showed a strong correlation of annual per capita waste generation rate with number of unemployed women (r=0.70) and female to male ratio (r=0.81). This indicates that waste generation rate is more depended on ratio of men and women that on quantitative size of each group. Using the regression analysis a model describing the dependence between female to male ratio, number of unemployed woman and waste quantity was determined. The model explains 70% of waste quantity variation. Obtained results can be used both to improve waste management and to a fuller understanding of gender behavior. PMID:25843355

  14. Fine resolution mapping of population age-structures for health and development applications.

    PubMed

    Alegana, V A; Atkinson, P M; Pezzulo, C; Sorichetta, A; Weiss, D; Bird, T; Erbach-Schoenberg, E; Tatem, A J

    2015-04-01

    The age-group composition of populations varies considerably across the world, and obtaining accurate, spatially detailed estimates of numbers of children under 5 years is important in designing vaccination strategies, educational planning or maternal healthcare delivery. Traditionally, such estimates are derived from population censuses, but these can often be unreliable, outdated and of coarse resolution for resource-poor settings. Focusing on Nigeria, we use nationally representative household surveys and their cluster locations to predict the proportion of the under-five population in 1 × 1 km using a Bayesian hierarchical spatio-temporal model. Results showed that land cover, travel time to major settlements, night-time lights and vegetation index were good predictors and that accounting for fine-scale variation, rather than assuming a uniform proportion of under 5 year olds can result in significant differences in health metrics. The largest gaps in estimated bednet and vaccination coverage were in Kano, Katsina and Jigawa. Geolocated household surveys are a valuable resource for providing detailed, contemporary and regularly updated population age-structure data in the absence of recent census data. By combining these with covariate layers, age-structure maps of unprecedented detail can be produced to guide the targeting of interventions in resource-poor settings. PMID:25788540

  15. STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS OF SEVEN SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD INTERMEDIATE-AGE AND OLD STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Glatt, Katharina; Grebel, Eva K.; Kayser, Andrea; Gallagher, John S.; Harbeck, Daniel; Nota, Antonella; Sabbi, Elena; Sirianni, Marco; Clementini, Gisella; Tosi, Monica; Da Costa, Gary; Koch, Andreas

    2009-11-15

    We present structural parameters for the seven intermediate-age and old star clusters NGC 121, Lindsay 1, Kron 3, NGC 339, NGC 416, Lindsay 38, and NGC 419 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We fit King profiles and Elson, Fall, and Freeman profiles to both surface-brightness and star-count data taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Clusters older than {approx}1 Gyr show a spread in cluster core radii that increases with age, while the youngest clusters have relatively compact cores. No evidence for post-core-collapse clusters was found. We find no correlation between core radius and distance from the SMC center, although consistent with other studies of dwarf galaxies, some relatively old and massive clusters have low densities. The oldest SMC star cluster, the only globular NGC121, is the most elliptical object of the studied clusters. No correlation is seen between ellipticity and distance from the SMC center. The structures of these massive intermediate-age (1-8 Gyr) SMC star clusters thus appear to primarily result from internal evolutionary processes.

  16. Atomic structure of Cu-10. 9 at % Be alloys in the early stages of aging

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, Y.M.

    1987-01-01

    Diffuse x-ray scattering was employed to investigate the local atomic structure and static strains in a single crystal of a Cu-10.9 at. % Be alloy in the early stages of aging. In addition to these experiments, neutron elastic and inelastic scattering were obtained to investigate the phonon properties in the as-quenched state of this alloy. In the as-quenched state, there is a nearly regular array of small ellipsoidal Be clusters aligned along <100> directions (This produces the tweed contrast seen in TEM). The density of these clusters is 7.5 x 10/sup 26//m/sup 3/. The diffuse streaks seen in electron diffraction patterns are due largely to thermal diffuse scattering. Phonon-dispersion curves show no large differences from those of pure copper, except at (xi xi xi)/sub T/ zone boundary, where there is softening. This difference may be due to a Kohn anomaly. The elastic anisotropy of this alloy increases considerably with alloying, which probably leads to the plate-like GP zone morphology in subsequent aging treatments. The structure of the GP zones is a mixture of Be-rich single- and multi-layered zones. As aging proceeds, the zones grow in thickness.

  17. Aging Optimization of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy C458 for Application to Cryotank Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, B. J.; Sankaran, K. K.; Babel, H.; Farahmand, B.; Rioja, R.

    2003-01-01

    Compared with aluminum alloys such as 2219, which is widely used in space vehicle for cryogenic tanks and unpressurized structures, aluminum-lithium alloys possess attractive combinations of lower density and higher modulus along with comparable mechanical properties. These characteristics have resulted in the successful use of the aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 (Al-1.0 Li-4.0 Cu-0.4 Mg-0.4 Ag-0.12 Zr) for the Space Shuttle External Tank, and the consideration of newer U.S. aluminum-lithium alloys such as L277 and C458 for future space vehicles. These newer alloys generally have lithium content less than 2 wt. % and their composition and processing have been carefully tailored to increase the toughness and reduce the mechanical property anisotropy of the earlier generation alloys such 2090 and 8090. Alloy processing, particularly the aging treatment, has a significant influence on the strength-toughness combinations and their dependence on service environments for aluminum-lithium alloys. Work at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on alloy 2195 has shown that the cryogenic toughness can be improved by employing a two-step aging process. This is accomplished by aging at a lower temperature in the first step to suppress nucleation of the strengthening precipitate at sub-grain boundaries while promoting nucleation in the interior of the grains. Second step aging at the normal aging temperature results in precipitate growth to the optimum size. A design of experiments aging study was conducted for plate. To achieve the T8 temper, Alloy C458 (Al-1.8 Li-2.7 Cu-0.3 Mg-0.08 Zr-0.3 Mn-0.6 Zn) is typically aged at 300F for 24hours. In this study, a two-step aging treatment was developed through a comprehensive 2(exp 4) full factorial design of experiments study and the typical one-step aging used as a reference. Based on the higher lithium content of C458 compared with 2195, the first step aging temperature was varied between 175F and 250F. The second step aging temperatures was

  18. The relationship of brain structure to age and executive functioning in adolescent disruptive behavior disorder.

    PubMed

    Hummer, Tom A; Wang, Yang; Kronenberger, William G; Dunn, David W; Mathews, Vincent P

    2015-03-30

    Characterizing brain maturation in adolescents with disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs) may provide insight into the progression of their behavioral deficits. Therefore, this study examined how age and executive functioning were related to structural neural characteristics in DBD. Thirty-three individuals (aged 13-17) with a DBD, along with a matched control sample, completed neuropsychological testing and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure gray matter volume and microstructural white matter properties. Voxel-based morphometry quantified gray matter volume, and diffusion tensor imaging measured fractional anisotropy (FA) in white matter tracts. In the anterior cingulate, gray matter volume decreased with age in healthy controls but showed no such change in the DBD sample. In the corpus callosum and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), FA increased with age in the control sample significantly more than in the DBD sample. Executive functioning, particularly working memory, was associated with SLF FA bilaterally. However, the relationship of SLF FA to working memory performance was weaker in the DBD sample. These data suggest that youth with DBD have altered brain development compared with typically developing youth. The abnormal maturation of the anterior cingulate and frontoparietal tracts during adolescence may contribute to the persistence of behavioral deficits in teens with a DBD. PMID:25533028

  19. Structural modeling of age specific fertility curves in Peninsular Malaysia: An approach of Lee Carter method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanafiah, Hazlenah; Jemain, Abdul Aziz

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, the study of fertility has been getting a lot of attention among research abroad following fear of deterioration of fertility led by the rapid economy development. Hence, this study examines the feasibility of developing fertility forecasts based on age structure. Lee Carter model (1992) is applied in this study as it is an established and widely used model in analysing demographic aspects. A singular value decomposition approach is incorporated with an ARIMA model to estimate age specific fertility rates in Peninsular Malaysia over the period 1958-2007. Residual plots is used to measure the goodness of fit of the model. Fertility index forecast using random walk drift is then utilised to predict the future age specific fertility. Results indicate that the proposed model provides a relatively good and reasonable data fitting. In addition, there is an apparent and continuous decline in age specific fertility curves in the next 10 years, particularly among mothers' in their early 20's and 40's. The study on the fertility is vital in order to maintain a balance between the population growth and the provision of facilities related resources.

  20. Age-Based Comparison of Human Dendritic Spine Structure Using Complete Three-Dimensional Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Robles, Victor; Yuste, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons are targets of most excitatory synapses in the cerebral cortex. Recent evidence suggests that the morphology of the dendritic spine could determine its synaptic strength and learning rules. However, unfortunately, there are scant data available regarding the detailed morphology of these structures for the human cerebral cortex. In the present study, we analyzed over 8900 individual dendritic spines that were completely 3D reconstructed along the length of apical and basal dendrites of layer III pyramidal neurons in the cingulate cortex of 2 male humans (aged 40 and 85 years old), using intracellular injections of Lucifer Yellow in fixed tissue. We assembled a large, quantitative database, which revealed a major reduction in spine densities in the aged case. Specifically, small and short spines of basal dendrites and long spines of apical dendrites were lost, regardless of the distance from the soma. Given the age difference between the cases, our results suggest selective alterations in spines with aging in humans and indicate that the spine volume and length are regulated by different biological mechanisms. PMID:22710613

  1. Macro- and micro-structural white matter differences correlate with cognitive performance in healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Marques, Paulo César Gonçalves; Soares, José Miguel Montenegro; Magalhães, Ricardo José da Silva; Santos, Nadine Correia; Sousa, Nuno Jorge Carvalho

    2016-03-01

    Studies have shown that white matter (WM) volumetric reductions and overall degradation occur with aging. Nonetheless little is known about the WM alterations that may underlie different cognitive status in older individuals. The main goal of the present work was to identify and characterize possible macro and microstructural WM alterations that could distinguish between older healthy individuals with contrasting cognitive profiles (i.e., "poor" vs "good" cognitive performers). Structural and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging was performed in order to quantify local WM volumes, white matter signal abnormalities (WMSA) volume (a measure of lesion burden) and diffusion tensor imaging scalar maps known to probe WM microstructure. A battery of neurocognitive/psychological tests was administered to assess the cognitive performance. Poor performers showed a higher slope for the positive association between WMSA volume and age compared to good performers. Even when controlling for WMSA volume, poor performers also evidenced lower fractional anisotropy, as well as positive associations with age with higher slopes of regression parameters in radial and axial diffusivity. Altogether results suggest that cognitive performance is related to differences in WM, with poor cognitive performers displaying signs of faster aging in WM. PMID:25824621

  2. Relationships between brain metabolism decrease in normal aging and changes in structural and functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Chételat, Gaël; Landeau, Brigitte; Salmon, Eric; Yakushev, Igor; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Mézenge, Florence; Perrotin, Audrey; Bastin, Christine; Manrique, Alain; Scheurich, Armin; Scheckenberger, Mathias; Desgranges, Béatrice; Eustache, Francis; Fellgiebel, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    Normal aging is characterized by brain glucose metabolism decline predominantly in the prefrontal cortex. The goal of the present study was to assess whether this change was associated with age-related alteration of white matter (WM) structural integrity and/or functional connectivity. FDG-PET data from 40 young and 57 elderly healthy participants from two research centers (n=49/48 in Center 1/2) were analyzed. WM volume from T1-weighted MRI (Center 1), fractional anisotropy from diffusion-tensor imaging (Center 2), and resting-state fMRI data (Center 1) were also obtained. Group comparisons were performed within each imaging modality. Then, positive correlations were assessed, within the elderly, between metabolism in the most affected region and the other neuroimaging modalities. Metabolism decline in the elderly predominated in the left inferior frontal junction (LIFJ). LIFJ hypometabolism was significantly associated with macrostructural and microstructural WM disturbances in long association fronto-temporo-occipital fibers, while no relationship was found with functional connectivity. The findings offer new perspectives to understand normal aging processes and open avenues for future studies to explore causality between age-related metabolism and connectivity changes. PMID:23518010

  3. Aging of Iron Nanoparticles in Aqueous Solution: Effects on Structure and Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, Vaishnavi; Tratnyek, Paul G.; Nurmi, James; Baer, Donald R.; Amonette, James E.; Chun, Chan Lan; Penn, Ryland L.; Reardon, Eric J.

    2008-02-21

    Aging (or longevity) is one of the most important and potentially limiting factors in the use of nano-Fe0 to reduce groundwater contaminants. We investigated the aging of FeH2 (Toda RNIP-10DS) in water with a focus on changes in (i) the composition and structure of the particles (by XPS, XRD, TEM, and bulk Fe0 content), and (ii) the reactivity of the particles (by carbon tetrachloride reaction kinetics and electrochemical corrosion potentials). Our results show that the FeH2 becomes more reactive between 0 and ~2 days aging, and then gradually loses reactivity over the next few hundred days. These changes in reactivity correlate with evidence for rapid destruction of the original Fe(III) oxide film on FeH2 during immersion and the subsequent formation of a new passivating mixed-valence Fe(II)-Fe(III) oxide shell. The behavior of “unaged” nano-Fe0 in the laboratory may be similar to that in field-scale applications for source-zone treatment due to the short reaction times involved. Long-term aged FeH2 acquires properties that are relatively stable over weeks or even months.

  4. Abundance and Distribution of Dimethylsulfoniopropionate Degradation Genes and the Corresponding Bacterial Community Structure at Dimethyl Sulfide Hot Spots in the Tropical and Subtropical Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shotaro; Omori, Yuko; Wong, Shu-Kuan; Ijichi, Minoru; Kaneko, Ryo; Kameyama, Sohiko; Tanimoto, Hiroshi; Hamasaki, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is mainly produced by marine phytoplankton but is released into the microbial food web and degraded by marine bacteria to dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and other products. To reveal the abundance and distribution of bacterial DMSP degradation genes and the corresponding bacterial communities in relation to DMS and DMSP concentrations in seawater, we collected surface seawater samples from DMS hot spot sites during a cruise across the Pacific Ocean. We analyzed the genes encoding DMSP lyase (dddP) and DMSP demethylase (dmdA), which are responsible for the transformation of DMSP to DMS and DMSP assimilation, respectively. The averaged abundance (±standard deviation) of these DMSP degradation genes relative to that of the 16S rRNA genes was 33% ± 12%. The abundances of these genes showed large spatial variations. dddP genes showed more variation in abundances than dmdA genes. Multidimensional analysis based on the abundances of DMSP degradation genes and environmental factors revealed that the distribution pattern of these genes was influenced by chlorophyll a concentrations and temperatures. dddP genes, dmdA subclade C/2 genes, and dmdA subclade D genes exhibited significant correlations with the marine Roseobacter clade, SAR11 subgroup Ib, and SAR11 subgroup Ia, respectively. SAR11 subgroups Ia and Ib, which possessed dmdA genes, were suggested to be the main potential DMSP consumers. The Roseobacter clade members possessing dddP genes in oligotrophic subtropical regions were possible DMS producers. These results suggest that DMSP degradation genes are abundant and widely distributed in the surface seawater and that the marine bacteria possessing these genes influence the degradation of DMSP and regulate the emissions of DMS in subtropical gyres of the Pacific Ocean. PMID:25862229

  5. Can artificial reefs mimic natural reef communities? The roles of structural features and age.

    PubMed

    Perkol-Finkel, S; Shashar, N; Benayahu, Y

    2006-03-01

    In light of the deteriorating state of coral reefs worldwide, the need to rehabilitate marine environments has greatly increased. Artificial reefs (ARs) have been suggested as a tool for reef conservation and rehabilitation. Although successions of AR communities have been thoroughly studied, current understanding of the interactions between artificial and natural reefs (NRs) is poor and a fundamental question still to be answered is that of whether AR communities can mimic adjacent NR communities. We suggest three alternative hypotheses: Neighboring ARs and NRs will (1) achieve a similar community structure given sufficient time; (2) be similar only if they possess similar structural features; (3) always differ, regardless of age or structural features. We examined these hypotheses by comparing the community structure on a 119-year old shipwreck to a neighboring NR. Fouling organisms, including stony and soft corals, sponges, tunicates, sea anemones and hydrozoans were recorded and measured along belt transects. The ahermatypic stony coral Tubastrea micrantha dominated vertical AR regions while the soft corals Nephthea sp. and Xenia sp. dominated both artificial and natural horizontal surfaces. Our results support the second hypothesis, indicating that even after a century an AR will mimic its adjacent NR communities only if it possesses structural features similar to those of the natural surroundings. However, if the two differ structurally, their communities will remain distinct. PMID:16198411

  6. Age and thermochronology of K-feldspars from the Manson Impact Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitler, P. K.; Kunk, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    As a contribution to the effort to obtain a precise age for the Manson Impact Structure, we are approaching the problem from a thermo chronological perspective, with the goal of extracting an age from Ar-40/Ar-39 age-spectrum analysis of partially overprinted K-feldspars taken from granitoid clasts. We find that shocked feldspars from Manson generally show a strong overprint in their age spectra, with more than 50 percent of each spectrum being reset. The reset portions of the age spectra correspond to gas lost from very small diffusion domains, and a characteristic of the Manson samples is the very large range in apparent diffusion dimensions that they display, with the smallest domains being some 400 times smaller than the largest domains. It is also noteworthy that the small domains comprise a substantial portion of the volume of the feldspars (50 percent or more). These observations are consistent with the extreme shock experienced by these samples. In detail, the spectra we have measured to date are saddle-shaped and show minimum ages of between 67 and 72 Ma, which we interpret to be maximum estimates for the age of the impact. In the case of one sample (M1-678.3; K-feldspar from a large syenite block located well below the apparent melt-matrix breccia in the M1 borehole), isotope correlation analysis suggests the presence of a non-atmospheric trapped Ar component (Ar-40/Ar-36 of 660 plus or minus 40), and an age of about 65.3 plus or minus 0.5 Ma (2 sigma). Our interpretation of our results is that the shock of impact greatly reduced the diffusion-domain sizes of our samples, making them susceptible to significant Ar loss during heating associated with impact. It appears that while our feldspars were partially open to Ar loss, they equilibrated with a non-atmospheric Ar component, probably related to impact-related degassing of old basement around the impact site.

  7. Age and thermochronology of K-feldspars from the Manson Impact Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitler, P. K.; Kunk, M. J.

    1993-03-01

    As a contribution to the effort to obtain a precise age for the Manson Impact Structure, we are approaching the problem from a thermo chronological perspective, with the goal of extracting an age from Ar-40/Ar-39 age-spectrum analysis of partially overprinted K-feldspars taken from granitoid clasts. We find that shocked feldspars from Manson generally show a strong overprint in their age spectra, with more than 50 percent of each spectrum being reset. The reset portions of the age spectra correspond to gas lost from very small diffusion domains, and a characteristic of the Manson samples is the very large range in apparent diffusion dimensions that they display, with the smallest domains being some 400 times smaller than the largest domains. It is also noteworthy that the small domains comprise a substantial portion of the volume of the feldspars (50 percent or more). These observations are consistent with the extreme shock experienced by these samples. In detail, the spectra we have measured to date are saddle-shaped and show minimum ages of between 67 and 72 Ma, which we interpret to be maximum estimates for the age of the impact. In the case of one sample (M1-678.3; K-feldspar from a large syenite block located well below the apparent melt-matrix breccia in the M1 borehole), isotope correlation analysis suggests the presence of a non-atmospheric trapped Ar component (Ar-40/Ar-36 of 660 plus or minus 40), and an age of about 65.3 plus or minus 0.5 Ma (2 sigma). Our interpretation of our results is that the shock of impact greatly reduced the diffusion-domain sizes of our samples, making them susceptible to significant Ar loss during heating associated with impact. It appears that while our feldspars were partially open to Ar loss, they equilibrated with a non-atmospheric Ar component, probably related to impact-related degassing of old basement around the impact site.

  8. All together now? Sensitivity, dynamics, and predictability of planktonic foraminiferal species abundance versus community structure across Plio-Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, P. M.; Norris, R. D.; Sexton, P.

    2012-12-01

    Most studies to date of biospheric sensitivity to global change have focused on understanding the sensitivity of modern species and communities to recent or experimental environmental change. However, it is unclear how to scale these results towards predicting the response of the biosphere to ongoing global change given that i) similar species often respond individualistically the same perturbation, ii) biotic response often scales nonlinearly with the size and/or duration of environmental change, and iii) many terrestrial and marine community types known from the recent past lack modern analogs. In this context, marine microfossils from deep sea sediments hold enormous promise for furthering our understanding of biotic sensitivity as they capture temporally expanded records of paleoceanographic and biotic response across a range climatic regimes (e.g., icehouse versus greenhouse climates), disturbance types (e.g., from background climate oscillations to mass extinctions), and habitats (e.g., low vs. high latitudes, upwelling vs. gyre ecosystems, etc). Here we use the repeated glacial-interglacial cycles and longer term trend of intensifying Northern Hemisphere glaciation from the Pliocene-Pleistocene to examine issues related to the sensitivity of planktonic foraminiferal species and communities to global change in an icehouse world. More specifically, we quantify the sensitivity and predictability of changes in planktonic foraminiferal species abundance (species specific mass accumulation rates) and community structure (dissimilarity indices and community classification) to glacial-interglacial cycles in the Plio-Pleistocene in two Atlantic sites (ODP Sites 999 and 662). We first examine whether the sensitivity of species and communities to glacial-interglacial cycles in the early Pliocene (~5-3 million years ago) is predictive of i) their sensitivity to the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (~3-2 million years ago), or ii) their sensitivity to

  9. Late-summer zooplankton community structure, abundance, and distribution in the Hudson Bay system (Canada) and their relationships with environmental conditions, 2003-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Rafael; Harvey, Michel; Gosselin, Michel; Starr, Michel; Galbraith, Peter S.; Straneo, Fiammetta

    2012-08-01

    Zooplankton communities were examined for the first time in three different hydrographic regions of the Hudson Bay system (HBS) in early August to early September from 2003 to 2006. Sampling was conducted at 50 stations distributed along different transects located in Hudson Bay (HB), Hudson Strait (HS), and Foxe Basin (FB). Variations in zooplankton biomass, abundance, taxonomic composition, and diversity in relation to environmental variables were studied using multivariate techniques. During all sampling years, the total zooplankton biomass was on average four times lower in HB than in HS and FB. Clustering samples by their relative species compositions revealed no interannual variation in zooplankton community but showed a marked interregional variability between the three regions. Water column stratification explained the greatest proportion (25%) of this spatial variability. According to redundancy analysis (RDA), the zooplankton taxa that contribute most to the separation of the three regions are Microcalanus spp., Oithona similis, Oncaea borealis, Aeginopsis laurentii, Sagitta elegans, Fritillaria sp., and larvae of cnidaria, chaetognatha, and pteropoda in HB; hyperiid amphipods in FB; and Pseudocalanus spp. CI-CV, Calanus glacialis CI-CVI, Calanus finmarchicus CI-CVI, Calanus hyperboreus CV-CVI, Acartia longiremis CI-CV, Metridia longa N3-N6 CI-CIII CVIf, Eukrohnia hamata, larvae of echinodermata, mollusca, cirripedia, appendicularia, and polychaeta in the northwestern and southeastern HS transects. For the HB transect, the RDA analyzed allowed us to distinguish three regions (HB west, central, and east) with different environmental gradients and zooplankton assemblages, in particular higher concentration of Pseudocalanus spp. nauplii and CI-CVI, as well as benthic macrozooplankton and meroplankton larvae in western HB. In HS, Calanoid species (mainly C. finmarchicus and C. glacialis) were mostly observed at the north shore stations associated with the

  10. The secondary history of Sutter's Mill CM carbonaceous chondrite based on water abundance and the structure of its organic matter from two clasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, P.; Quirico, E.; Garenne, A.; Yin, Q.-Z.; Bonal, L.; Schmitt, B.; Montes-Hernandez, G.; Montagnac, G.; Chiriac, R.; Toche, F.

    2014-11-01

    Sutter's Mill is a regolith breccia composed of both heavily altered clasts and more reduced xenoliths. Here, we present a detailed investigation of fragments of SM18 and SM51. We have characterized the water content and the mineralogy by infrared (IR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the structure of the organic compounds by Raman spectroscopy, to characterize the secondary history of the clasts, including aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism. The three methods used in this study suggest that SM18 was significantly heated. The amount of water contained in phyllosilicates derived by TGA is estimated to be approximately 3.2 wt%. This value is quite low compared with other CM chondrites that typically range from 6 to 12 wt%. The infrared transmission spectra of SM18 show that the mineralogy of the sample is dominated by a mixture of phyllosilicate and olivine. SM18 shows an intense peak at 11.2 μm indicative of olivine (Fig. 1). If we compare SM18 with other CM and metamorphosed CM chondrites, it shows one of the most intense olivine signatures, and therefore a lower proportion of phyllosilicate minerals. The Raman results tend to support a short-duration heating hypothesis. In the ID/IG versus FWHM-D diagram, SM18 appears to be unusual compared to most CM samples, and close to the metamorphosed CM chondrites Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91008 and PCA 02012. In the case of SM51, infrared spectroscopy reveals that olivine is less abundant than in SM18 and the 10 μm silicate feature is more similar to that of moderately altered CM chondrites (like Murchison or Queen Alexandra Range [QUE] 97990). Raman spectroscopy does not clearly point to a heating event for SM51 in the ID/IG versus FWHM-D diagram. However, TGA analysis suggests that SM51 was slightly dehydrated as the amount of water contained in phyllosilicates is approximately 3.7 wt%, which is higher than SM18, but still lower than phyllosilicate water contents in weakly altered CM chondrites

  11. Threshold behaviour of a SIR epidemic model with age structure and immigration.

    PubMed

    Franceschetti, Andrea; Pugliese, Andrea

    2008-07-01

    We consider a SIR age-structured model with immigration of infectives in all epidemiological compartments; the population is assumed to be in demographic equilibrium between below-replacement fertility and immigration; the spread of the infection occurs through a general age-dependent kernel. We analyse the equations for steady states; because of immigration of infectives a steady state with a positive density of infectives always exists; however, a quasi-threshold theorem is proved, in the sense that, below the threshold, the density of infectives is close to 0, while it is away from 0, above the threshold; furthermore, conditions that guarantee uniqueness of steady states are obtained. Finally, we present some numerical examples, inspired by the Italian demographic situation, that illustrate the threshold-like behaviour, and other features of the stationary solutions and of the transient. PMID:17985131

  12. Impact of Ice Ages on the genetic structure of trees and shrubs.

    PubMed Central

    Lascoux, Martin; Palmé, Anna E; Cheddadi, Rachid; Latta, Robert G

    2004-01-01

    Data on the genetic structure of tree and shrub populations on the continental scale have accumulated dramatically over the past decade. However, our ability to make inferences on the impact of the last ice age still depends crucially on the availability of informative palaeoecological data. This is well illustrated by the results from a recent project, during which new pollen fossil maps were established and the variation in chloroplast DNA was studied in 22 European species of trees and shrubs. Species exhibit very different levels of genetic variation between and within populations, and obviously went through very different histories after Ice Ages. However, when palaeoecological data are non-informative, inferences on past history are difficult to draw from entirely genetic data. On the other hand, as illustrated by a study in ponderosa pine, when we can infer the species' history with some certainty, coalescent simulations can be used and new hypotheses can be tested. PMID:15101576

  13. Stability of ultrafine lamellar structures during aging in two-phase {gamma}-TiAl alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Liu, C.T.; Wright, J.L.

    1997-08-01

    Two-phase {gamma}-tail alloys such as PM Ti-47Al-2Cr-2Nb or Ti-47Al- 2Cr-1Nb-Ta hot extruded above the {alpha}-transus temperature have unique refined-colony/ultrafine lamellar structures. These lamellar microstructures consist of very fine laths of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases, with average interlamellar spacings of 100 nm and {alpha}{sub 2}-{alpha}{sub 2} spacings of 200 nm, and are dominated by {gamma}/{alpha}{sub 2} interfaces. This ultrafine lamellar structure remains stable during 900 C heat treatment for 2 h, but becomes unstable after 4 h at 982 C. This structure remains stable in both alloys after aging for >5000 h at 800 C but disappears completely at 1000 C. Continuous coarsening begins with dissolution of fine {alpha}{sub 2} lamellea. The aged Ta-modified alloy shows similar lamellar coarsening behavior within the colonies but has more discontinuous coarsening of the intercolony {gamma} with new precipitation of coarse {alpha}{sub 2} and {beta} phase particles. Analytical electron microscopy show that changes in {alpha}{sub 2} phase composition correlate with microstructural instability.

  14. Feasibility of multi-site clinical structural neuroimaging studies of aging using legacy data.

    PubMed

    Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Gamst, Anthony C; Quinn, Brian T; Pacheco, Jenni; Jernigan, Terry L; Thal, Leon; Buckner, Randy; Killiany, Ron; Blacker, Deborah; Dale, Anders M; Fischl, Bruce; Dickerson, Brad; Gollub, Randy L

    2007-01-01

    The application of advances in biomedical computing to medical imaging research is enabling scientists to conduct quantitative clinical imaging studies using data collected across multiple sites to test new hypotheses on larger cohorts, increasing the power to detect subtle effects. Given that many research groups have valuable existing (legacy) data, one goal of the Morphometry Biomedical Informatics Research Network (BIRN) Testbed is to assess the feasibility of pooled analyses of legacy structural neuroimaging data in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. The present study examined whether such data could be meaningfully reanalyzed as a larger combined data set by using rigorous data curation, image analysis, and statistical modeling methods; in this case, to test the hypothesis that hippocampal volume decreases with age and to investigate findings of hippocampal asymmetry. This report describes our work with legacy T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) and demographic data related to normal aging that have been shared through the BIRN by three research sites. Results suggest that, in the present application, legacy MR data from multiple sites can be pooled to investigate questions of scientific interest. In particular, statistical analyses suggested that a mixed-effects model employing site as a random effect best fits the data, accounting for site-specific effects while taking advantage of expected comparability of age-related effects. In the combined sample from three sites, significant age-related decline of hippocampal volume and right-dominant hippocampal asymmetry were detected in healthy elderly controls. These expected findings support the feasibility of combining legacy data to investigate novel scientific questions. PMID:17999200

  15. Neural mechanisms of verb argument structure processing in agrammatic aphasic and healthy age-matched listeners

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, C.K.; Bonakdarpour, B.; Fix, S.F.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lexical verbs involves automatic access to argument structure entries entailed within the verb's representation. Recent neuroimaging studies with young normal listeners suggest that this involves bilateral posterior perisylvian tissue, with graded activation in these regions based on argument structure complexity. The aim of the present study was to examine the neural mechanisms of verb processing using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in older normal volunteers and patients with stroke-induced agrammatic aphasia, a syndrome in which verb, as compared to noun, production often is selectively impaired, but verb comprehension in both on-line and off-line tasks is spared. Fourteen healthy listeners and five age-matched aphasic patients performed a lexical decision task, which examined verb processing by argument structure complexity, i.e., one-argument (i.e., intransitive (v1)); two-argument (i.e., transitive (v2)), and three-argument (v3) verbs. Results for the age-matched listeners largely replicated those for younger participants studied by Thompson et al. (2007): v3-v1 comparisons showed activation of the angular gyrus in both hemispheres and this same heteromodal region was activated in the left hemisphere in the (v2+v3)-v1 contrast. Similar results were derived for the agrammatic aphasic patients, however, activation was unilateral (in the right hemisphere for 3 participants) rather than bilateral likely because these patients' lesions extended to the left temporoparietal region. All performed the task with high accuracy and, despite differences in lesion site and extent, they recruited spared tissue in the same regions as healthy normals. Consistent with psycholinguistic models of sentence processing, these findings indicate that the posterior language network is engaged for processing verb argument structure and is crucial for semantic integration of argument structure information. PMID:19702460

  16. Age, sex and APOE ε4 effects on memory, brain structure and β-amyloid across the adult lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Clifford R.; Wiste, Heather J.; Weigand, Stephen D.; Knopman, David S.; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Mielke, Michelle M.; Lowe, Val; Senjem, Matthew L.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Machulda, Mary M.; Gregg, Brian E.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Rocca, Walter A.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Typical cognitive aging may be defined as age associated changes in cognitive performance in individuals who remain free of dementia. Ideally the full adult age spectrum should be included to assess brain imaging findings associated with typical aging. Objective To compare age, sex and Apolipoprotein E (APOE ε4) effects on memory, brain structure (adjusted hippocampal volume, HVa) and amyloid PET in cognitively normal individuals aged 30 to 95 years old. Design, Setting, and Participants Cross sectional observational study (Marc 2006 to October 2014) at an academic medical center. We studied 1246 cognitively normal subjects; 1209 participants aged 50–95 years old enrolled in a population-based study of cognitive aging and 37 self-selected volunteers aged 30–49. Main Outcomes and Measures Memory, HVa, and amyloid PET Results Overall, memory worsened from age 30 years through the 90s. HVa worsened gradually from 30 years to the mid-60s and more steeply beyond that age. The median amyloid PET was low until age 70 years and increased thereafter. Memory was worse in men than women overall (p<0.001) and more specifically beyond age 40 years. HVa was lower in men than women overall (p<0.001) and more specifically beyond age 60 years. There was no sex difference in amyloid PET at any age. Within each sex, memory performance and HVa were not different by APOE ε4 at any age. From age 70 years onward APOE ε4 carriers had significantly greater median amyloid PET load than noncarriers. However the ages at which 10% of the population were amyloid PET positive were 57 years for APOE ε4 carriers and 64 years for non-carriers. Conclusions and Relevance Male sex is associated with worse memory and HVa among cognitively normal individuals while APOE ε4 is not. In contrast, APOE ε4 is associated with greater amyloid PET values (from age 70 years onward) while sex is not. Worsening memory and HVa occur at earlier ages than abnormal amyloid PET. Therefore

  17. Land use Effects on Storage, Stability and Structure of Organic Carbon in Soil Density Fractions Revealed by 13C Natural Abundance and CPMAS 13C NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flessa, H.; Helfrich, M.; John, B.; Yamashita, T.; Ludwig, B.

    2004-12-01

    with a relative accumulation of aromatic and carbonyl C structures in the mineral-bound SOM. In all soils, the free particulate organic matter had a smaller proportion of alkyl C and a larger proportion of O-alkyl C than the particulate organic matter occluded in aggregates. The mean age of the SOM in the density fractions of the maize soil increased with increasing aromaticity in the order free POM (22 yr) < occluded POM1.6-2.0 (49 yr) < mineral-associated SOM (63 yr). The results showed that the type of land use influenced the distribution pattern of litter carbon to functionally different SOM pools which represented different stages of SOM decomposition and humification. Additionally, the type of land use influenced the chemical structure of SOM in soil density fractions. Thus, the effect of land use on SOM storage should not only be assessed in terms of total C stocks but also with respect to changes of SOC structure, stability and function.

  18. Stage-structured models of intra- and inter-specific competition within age classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jian; Gourley, Stephen A.; Lou, Yijun

    2016-01-01

    In some species, larvae and adults experience competition in completely different ways. Simple stage-structured models without larval competition usually yield a single delay equation for the adults. Using an age structured system incorporating competition among both larvae and adults, we derive a system of distributed delay equations for the numbers of larvae and adults. The system is neither cooperative nor reducible to a single equation for either variable. Positivity, boundedness and uniform strong persistence are established. Linear stability analysis of equilibria is difficult due to the strong coupling, but results are proved for small delays using monotone systems theory and exponential ordering. For small delay we prove a theorem on generic convergence to equilibria, which does not directly follow from standard theory but can be proved indirectly using comparison arguments. Finally, we consider an extension to two-strain competition and prove theorems on the linear stability of the boundary equilibria.

  19. [Structure and function of the heart according to body weight in men of working age].

    PubMed

    Dudar, L V; Honcharenko, L I; Ovdiĭ, M O

    2014-01-01

    The scientific structure and function heart in 65 working age men according to weight and body composition. The shown that the excess body weight observed a significant increase in the size and volume left ventricle of the heart and myocardial mass. The percentage of muscle mass in the body of the patients positively correlated with systolic function of the heart, while the percentage of body fat had a negative correlation with this index. The shown that the individualization of health exercise should take into account the percentage of the active body weight and fat mass in the body, since the high content of fat intense exercise can lead to heart and remodeling worsening left ventricular systolic function heart, while increasing BMI due to muscle does not contribute to the structural and functional reorganization of the heart. PMID:24908966

  20. Normal forms for semilinear equations with non-dense domain with applications to age structured models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhihua; Magal, Pierre; Ruan, Shigui

    2014-08-01

    Normal form theory is very important and useful in simplifying the forms of equations restricted on the center manifolds in studying nonlinear dynamical problems. In this paper, using the center manifold theorem associated with the integrated semigroup theory, we develop a normal form theory for semilinear Cauchy problems in which the linear operator is not densely defined and is not a Hille-Yosida operator and present procedures to compute the Taylor expansion and normal form of the reduced system restricted on the center manifold. We then apply the main results and computation procedures to determine the direction of the Hopf bifurcation and stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions in a structured evolutionary epidemiological model of influenza A drift and an age structured population model.

  1. Mechanical and structural characterization of tibial prosthetic interfaces before and after aging under simulated service conditions.

    PubMed

    Cavaco, A; Ramalho, A; Pais, S; Durães, L

    2015-03-01

    Prosthesis interface is one of the most important components to promote individual׳s health and comfort, as it establishes direct contact with the skin and transfers loads generated during gait. The aim of this study was to mechanically characterize, three commercial interfaces (block copolymer, silicone gel and silicone elestomer), under static and dynamic conditions, before and after undergoing a process of chemical aging in synthetic sweat for periods up to 90 days. Static mechanical compression tests were performed on the materials, as well as fatigue tests to assess their static and dynamic mechanical behaviors, respectively. For the second, a sinusoidal load was applied with an appropriate range of deformation for each material. Several analytical techniques were also used to characterize the materials, namely Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and morphology characterization by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). All the tested materials have strong viscoelastic behavior, showing a linear response for small deformations, followed by a nonlinear behavior for higher deformation. The block copolymer and the silicone gel are affected by aging in synthetic sweat in a similar way, with a significant increase of their rigidity after 30 days, followed by a progressive reduction. The silicone elastomer displays a continuous increase of rigidity along the 90 days of storage, being the most sensitive to aging affects. It also exhibits the lowest stiffness value, being suitable for uses that require maximum comfort. All materials demonstrate chemical and structural stability under service simulated conditions. PMID:25554916

  2. Age- and sex-specific mortality and population structure in sea otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodkin, J.L.; Burdin, A.M.; Ryazanov, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    We used 742 beach-cast carcasses to characterize age- and sex-specific sea otter mortality during the winter of 1990-1991 at Bering Island, Russia. We also examined 363 carcasses recovered after the 1989 grounding of the T/V Exxon Valdez, to characterize age and sex composition in the living western Prince William Sound (WPWS) sea otter population. At Bering Island, mortality was male-biased (81%), and 75% were adults. The WPWS population was female-biased (59%) and most animals were subadult (79% of the males and 45% of the females). In the decade prior to 1990-1991 we found increasing sea otter densities (particularly among males), declining prey resources, and declining weights in adult male sea otters at Bering Island. Our findings suggest the increased mortality at Bering Island in 1990-1991 was a density-dependent population response. We propose male-maintained breeding territories and exclusion of juvenile females by adult females, providing a mechanism for potentially moderating the effects of prey reductions on the female population. Increased adult male mortality at Bearing Island in 1990-1991 likely modified the sex and age class structure there toward that observed in Prince William Sound.

  3. The effect of age on the structural integrity of HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.S.; Beason, D.G.; Smith, P.R.; Gregory, W.S.

    1988-08-17

    All of the controls on high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are based on rigid manufacturing standards with regard to filtration efficiency, temperature performance, pressure integrity, and strength. Third-party inspection and testing by the US Department of Energy increases the reliability of new HEPA filters, but only routine in-place testing is used to assure that an aging filter performs adequately. In 1980 the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory initiated a small evaluation to determine if age has a significant effect on the structural integrity of HEPA filters. A series of used uncontaminated filters dating back to 1965 was obtained for these tests. Tensile strength tests on the old media indicated a decrease in strength. To provide additional measurement of the filters' overall strength, several of these aged filters were subjected to pressure pulses equivalent to the NRC Region I tornado pulses and shock wave overpressures. Data from these tests indicate a decrease in breaking pressure of from 25/endash/50%. A large increase in complete filter pack blow-out during the simulated NRC Region I tornado tests was also observed. The preliminary results indicate the need for an administrative lifetime for HEPA filters used in critical nuclear facilities. Due to the unique conditions in each facility, different administrative lifetimes may be necessary.

  4. Changes in infestation rate and age structure of Dermanyssus hirundinis and Ornithonyssus sylviarum (Acarina) during nidification and breeding period of penduline tit.

    PubMed

    Masán, P

    1997-11-01

    Populations of 2 parasitic mites, Dermanyssus hirundinis (Hermann) (63,169 collected individuals) and Ornithonyssus sylviarum (Canestrini et Fanzago) (3,425 collected individuals), in 305 penduline tit, Remiz pendulinus L., nests were studied in 1993 and 1994. The nests were divided into 4 groups: nests without eggs, nests with eggs, nests with nestlings, and nests just after fledging. The average percentage of infested nests increased from the nests without eggs to the nests after fledging (at 20% in both years of investigation), and the increase of mite abundance was exponential. Presence of nestlings in the nests stimulated intensive reproduction of parasitic mites. An increasing infestation intensity in nests was observed during the host breeding period. The 2 mite species exhibited similar age structure patterns in the nests of all the groups and during the entire penduline tit breeding period as well. A decrease in the proportion of adult mites (mainly females) and an increase of nymphs (above all of protonymphs) occurred at the time of fledging and at the end of host breeding period. The percentage of the ovigerous females increased in the individual nests, but decreased during the breeding period of penduline tit. The quantitative parameters of D. hirundinis populations in the highly infested nests depended on the individual nidification and nidobiology of the host, whereas the qualitative parameters (age structure) of these populations depended more on abiotic factors and life strategy of the ectoparasite. PMID:9439114

  5. Age- and bite-structured models for vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Rock, K S; Wood, D A; Keeling, M J

    2015-09-01

    The biology and behaviour of biting insects is a vitally important aspect in the spread of vector-borne diseases. This paper aims to determine, through the use of mathematical models, what effect incorporating vector senescence and realistic feeding patterns has on disease. A novel model is developed to enable the effects of age- and bite-structure to be examined in detail. This original PDE framework extends previous age-structured models into a further dimension to give a new insight into the role of vector biting and its interaction with vector mortality and spread of disease. Through the PDE model, the roles of the vector death and bite rates are examined in a way which is impossible under the traditional ODE formulation. It is demonstrated that incorporating more realistic functions for vector biting and mortality in a model may give rise to different dynamics than those seen under a more simple ODE formulation. The numerical results indicate that the efficacy of control methods that increase vector mortality may not be as great as predicted under a standard host-vector model, whereas other controls including treatment of humans may be more effective than previously thought. PMID:26342239

  6. Structural brain aging and speech production: a surface-based brain morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Pascale; Deschamps, Isabelle

    2016-07-01

    While there has been a growing number of studies examining the neurofunctional correlates of speech production over the past decade, the neurostructural correlates of this immensely important human behaviour remain less well understood, despite the fact that previous studies have established links between brain structure and behaviour, including speech and language. In the present study, we thus examined, for the first time, the relationship between surface-based cortical thickness (CT) and three different behavioural indexes of sublexical speech production: response duration, reaction times and articulatory accuracy, in healthy young and older adults during the production of simple and complex meaningless sequences of syllables (e.g., /pa-pa-pa/ vs. /pa-ta-ka/). The results show that each behavioural speech measure was sensitive to the complexity of the sequences, as indicated by slower reaction times, longer response durations and decreased articulatory accuracy in both groups for the complex sequences. Older adults produced longer speech responses, particularly during the production of complex sequence. Unique age-independent and age-dependent relationships between brain structure and each of these behavioural measures were found in several cortical and subcortical regions known for their involvement in speech production, including the bilateral anterior insula, the left primary motor area, the rostral supramarginal gyrus, the right inferior frontal sulcus, the bilateral putamen and caudate, and in some region less typically associated with speech production, such as the posterior cingulate cortex. PMID:26336952

  7. Testis structure and function in a nongenetic hyperadipose rat model at prepubertal and adult ages.

    PubMed

    França, L R; Suescun, M O; Miranda, J R; Giovambattista, A; Perello, M; Spinedi, E; Calandra, R S

    2006-03-01

    There are few data for hormonal levels and testis structure and function during postnatal development in rats neonatally treated with monosodium L-glutamate (MSG). In our study, newborn male pups were ip injected with MSG (4 mg/g body weight) every 2 d up to 10 d of age and investigated at prepubertal and adult ages. Plasma levels of leptin, LH, FSH, prolactin, testosterone (T), corticosterone, and free T4 (FT4) were measured. MSG rats displayed elevated circulating levels of corticosterone and hyperadiposity/hyperleptinemia, regardless of the age examined; conversely, circulating prolactin levels were not affected. Moreover, prepubertal MSG rats revealed a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in testis weight and the number of Sertoli (SC) and Leydig cells per testis. Leptin plasma levels were severalfold higher (2.41 vs. 8.07; P < 0.05) in prepubertal MSG rats, and these animals displayed plasma LH, FSH, T, and FT4 levels significantly decreased (P < 0.05). Taken together, these data indicate that testis development, as well as SC and Leydig cell proliferation, were disturbed in prepubertal MSG rats. Adult MSG rats also displayed significantly higher leptin plasma levels (7.26 vs. 27.04; P < 0.05) and lower (P < 0.05) LH and FSH plasma levels. However, T and FT4 plasma levels were normal, and no apparent alterations were observed in testis structure of MSG rats. Only the number of SCs per testis was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in the adult MSG rats. In conclusion, although early installed hyperadipose/hyperleptinemia phenotype was probably responsible for the reproductive axis damages in MSG animals, it remains to be investigated whether this condition is the main factor for hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis dysfunction in MSG rats. PMID:16339210

  8. Structural and functional connectivity in healthy aging: Associations for cognition and motor behavior.

    PubMed

    Hirsiger, Sarah; Koppelmans, Vincent; Mérillat, Susan; Liem, Franziskus; Erdeniz, Burak; Seidler, Rachael D; Jäncke, Lutz

    2016-03-01

    Age-related behavioral declines may be the result of deterioration of white matter tracts, affecting brain structural (SC) and functional connectivity (FC) during resting state. To date, it is not clear if the combination of SC and FC data could better predict cognitive/motor performance than each measure separately. We probed these relationships in the cingulum bundle, a major white matter pathway of the default mode network. We aimed to attain deeper knowledge about: (a) the relationship between age and the cingulum's SC and FC strength, (b) the association between SC and FC, and particularly (c) how the cingulum's SC and FC are related to cognitive/motor performance separately and combined. We examined these associations in a healthy and well-educated sample of 165 older participants (aged 64-85). SC and FC were acquired using probabilistic tractography to derive measures to capture white matter integrity within the cingulum bundle (fractional anisotropy, mean, axial and radial diffusivity) and a seed-based resting-state functional MRI correlation approach, respectively. Participants performed cognitive tests measuring processing speed, memory and executive functions, and motor tests measuring motor speed and grip force. Our data revealed that only SC but not resting state FC was significantly associated with age. Further, the cingulum's SC and FC showed no relation. Different relationships between cognitive/motor performance and SC/FC separately were found, but no additive effect of the combined analysis of cingulum's SC and FC for predicting cognitive/motor performance was apparent. Hum Brain Mapp 37:855-867, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26663386

  9. Joint Effects of Structural Racism and Income Inequality on Small-for-Gestational-Age Birth

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Maeve E.; Liu, Danping; Grantz, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined potential synergistic effects of racial and socioeconomic inequality associated with small-for-gestational-age (SGA) birth. Methods. Electronic medical records from singleton births to White and Black women in 10 US states and the District of Columbia (n = 121 758) were linked to state-level indicators of structural racism, including the ratios of Blacks to Whites who were employed, were incarcerated, and had a bachelor’s or higher degree. We used state-level Gini coefficients to assess income inequality. Generalized estimating equations models were used to quantify the adjusted odds of SGA birth associated with each indicator and the joint effects of structural racism and income inequality. Results. Structural racism indicators were associated with higher odds of SGA birth, and similar effects were observed for both races. The joint effects of racial and income inequality were significantly associated with SGA birth only when levels of both were high; in areas with high inequality levels, adjusted odds ratios ranged from 1.81 to 2.11 for the 3 structural racism indicators. Conclusions. High levels of racial inequality and socioeconomic inequality appear to increase the risk of SGA birth, particularly when they co-occur. PMID:26066964

  10. Forest stand structure, productivity, and age mediate climatic effects on aspen decline.

    PubMed

    Bell, David M; Bradford, John B; Lauenroth, William K

    2014-08-01

    Because forest stand structure, age, and productivity can mediate the impacts of climate on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality, ignoring stand-scale factors limits inference on the drivers of recent sudden aspen decline. Using the proportion of aspen trees that were dead as an index of recent mortality at 841 forest inventory plots, we examined the relationship of this mortality index to forest structure and climate in the Rocky Mountains and Intermountain Western United States. We found that forest structure explained most of the patterns in mortality indices, but that variation in growing-season vapor pressure deficit and winter precipitation over the last 20 years was important. Mortality index sensitivity to precipitation was highest in forests where aspen exhibited high densities, relative basal areas, quadratic mean diameters, and productivities, whereas sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit was highest in young forest stands. These results indicate that the effects of drought on mortality may be mediated by forest stand development, competition with encroaching conifers, and physiological vulnerabilities of large trees to drought. By examining mortality index responses to both forest structure and climate, we show that forest succession cannot be ignored in studies attempting to understand the causes and consequences of sudden aspen decline. PMID:25230455

  11. Forest stand structure, productivity, and age mediate climatic effects on aspen decline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, David M.; Bradford, John B.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Because forest stand structure, age, and productivity can mediate the impacts of climate on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality, ignoring stand-scale factors limits inference on the drivers of recent sudden aspen decline. Using the proportion of aspen trees that were dead as an index of recent mortality at 841 forest inventory plots, we examined the relationship of this mortality index to forest structure and climate in the Rocky Mountains and Intermountain Western United States. We found that forest structure explained most of the patterns in mortality indices, but that variation in growing-season vapor pressure deficit and winter precipitation over the last 20 years was important. Mortality index sensitivity to precipitation was highest in forests where aspen exhibited high densities, relative basal areas, quadratic mean diameters, and productivities, whereas sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit was highest in young forest stands. These results indicate that the effects of drought on mortality may be mediated by forest stand development, competition with encroaching conifers, and physiological vulnerabilities of large trees to drought. By examining mortality index responses to both forest structure and climate, we show that forest succession cannot be ignored in studies attempting to understand the causes and consequences of sudden aspen decline.

  12. Structural Aging Program technical progress for period, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1993-07-01

    The Structural Aging (SAG) Program is conducted for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The program has the overall objective of preparing an expandable handbook or report which will provide potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use by the NRC in nuclear power plant evaluations of continued service. Initial focus of the program is on concrete and concrete-related materials which comprise safety-related (Category I) structures in light-water reactor facilities. The SAG Program is organized into four tasks: Task S.1 -- Program Management, Task S.2 -- Materials Property Data Base, Task S.3 -- Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Task S.4 -- Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. In meeting the individual objectives of these tasks resources are drawn from ORNL with subcontract support from universities and other research laboratories. This report provides an overview of principal developments in each of the four program tasks from January 1, 1992 to December 31, 1992. Planned activities under each of these tasks are also presented.

  13. Structural effects of protein aging: Terminal marking by deamidation in human triosephosphate isomerase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Méndez, Sara -Teresa; Castillo-Villanueva, Adriana; Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Velázquez, Gabriel López-; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Torres-Arroyo, Angélica; García-Torres, Itzhel; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; et al

    2015-04-17

    Deamidation, the loss of the ammonium group of asparagine and glutamine to form aspartic and glutamic acid, is one of the most commonly occurring post-translational modifications in proteins. Since deamidation rates are encoded in the protein structure, it has been proposed that they can serve as molecular clocks for the timing of biological processes such as protein turnover, development and aging. Despite the importance of this process, there is a lack of detailed structural information explaining the effects of deamidation on the structure of proteins. Here, we studied the effects of deamidation on human triosephosphate isomerase (HsTIM), an enzyme formore » which deamidation of N15 and N71 has been long recognized as the signal for terminal marking of the protein. Deamidation was mimicked by site directed mutagenesis; thus, three mutants of HsTIM (N15D, N71D and N15D/N71D) were characterized. The results show that the N71D mutant resembles, structurally and functionally, the wild type enzyme. In contrast, the N15D mutant displays all the detrimental effects related to deamidation. The N15D/N71D mutant shows only minor additional effects when compared with the N15D mutation, supporting that deamidation of N71 induces negligible effects. The crystal structures show that, in contrast to the N71D mutant, where minimal alterations are observed, the N15D mutation forms new interactions that perturb the structure of loop 1 and loop 3, both critical components of the catalytic site and the interface of HsTIM. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of TIM sequences, we propose the conservation of this mechanism for mammalian TIMs.« less

  14. Structural effects of protein aging: Terminal marking by deamidation in human triosephosphate isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Méndez, Sara -Teresa; Castillo-Villanueva, Adriana; Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Velázquez, Gabriel López-; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Torres-Arroyo, Angélica; García-Torres, Itzhel; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Oria-Hernández, Jesús; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio

    2015-04-17

    Deamidation, the loss of the ammonium group of asparagine and glutamine to form aspartic and glutamic acid, is one of the most commonly occurring post-translational modifications in proteins. Since deamidation rates are encoded in the protein structure, it has been proposed that they can serve as molecular clocks for the timing of biological processes such as protein turnover, development and aging. Despite the importance of this process, there is a lack of detailed structural information explaining the effects of deamidation on the structure of proteins. Here, we studied the effects of deamidation on human triosephosphate isomerase (HsTIM), an enzyme for which deamidation of N15 and N71 has been long recognized as the signal for terminal marking of the protein. Deamidation was mimicked by site directed mutagenesis; thus, three mutants of HsTIM (N15D, N71D and N15D/N71D) were characterized. The results show that the N71D mutant resembles, structurally and functionally, the wild type enzyme. In contrast, the N15D mutant displays all the detrimental effects related to deamidation. The N15D/N71D mutant shows only minor additional effects when compared with the N15D mutation, supporting that deamidation of N71 induces negligible effects. The crystal structures show that, in contrast to the N71D mutant, where minimal alterations are observed, the N15D mutation forms new interactions that perturb the structure of loop 1 and loop 3, both critical components of the catalytic site and the interface of HsTIM. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of TIM sequences, we propose the conservation of this mechanism for mammalian TIMs.

  15. Structural Effects of Protein Aging: Terminal Marking by Deamidation in Human Triosephosphate Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Méndez, Sara-Teresa; Castillo-Villanueva, Adriana; Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Torres-Arroyo, Angélica; García-Torres, Itzhel; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Oria-Hernández, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Deamidation, the loss of the ammonium group of asparagine and glutamine to form aspartic and glutamic acid, is one of the most commonly occurring post-translational modifications in proteins. Since deamidation rates are encoded in the protein structure, it has been proposed that they can serve as molecular clocks for the timing of biological processes such as protein turnover, development and aging. Despite the importance of this process, there is a lack of detailed structural information explaining the effects of deamidation on the structure of proteins. Here, we studied the effects of deamidation on human triosephosphate isomerase (HsTIM), an enzyme for which deamidation of N15 and N71 has been long recognized as the signal for terminal marking of the protein. Deamidation was mimicked by site directed mutagenesis; thus, three mutants of HsTIM (N15D, N71D and N15D/N71D) were characterized. The results show that the N71D mutant resembles, structurally and functionally, the wild type enzyme. In contrast, the N15D mutant displays all the detrimental effects related to deamidation. The N15D/N71D mutant shows only minor additional effects when compared with the N15D mutation, supporting that deamidation of N71 induces negligible effects. The crystal structures show that, in contrast to the N71D mutant, where minimal alterations are observed, the N15D mutation forms new interactions that perturb the structure of loop 1 and loop 3, both critical components of the catalytic site and the interface of HsTIM. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of TIM sequences, we propose the conservation of this mechanism for mammalian TIMs. PMID:25884638

  16. Physical aging and structural recovery in a colloidal glass subjected to volume-fraction jump conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiaoguang; McKenna, Gregory B.

    2016-04-01

    Three important kinetic phenomena have been cataloged by Kovacs in the investigation of molecular glasses during structural recovery or physical aging. These are responses to temperature-jump histories referred to as intrinsic isotherms, asymmetry of approach, and memory effect. Here we use a thermosensitive polystyrene-poly (N -isopropylacrylamide)-poly (acrylic acid) core-shell particle-based dispersion as a colloidal model and by working at a constant number concentration of particles we use temperature changes to create volume-fraction changes. This imposes conditions similar to those defined by Kovacs on the colloidal system. We use creep experiments to probe the physical aging and structural recovery behavior of colloidal glasses in the Kovacs-type histories and compare the results with those seen in molecular glasses. We find that there are similarities in aging dynamics between molecular glasses and colloidal glasses, but differences also persist. For the intrinsic isotherms, the times teq needed for relaxing or evolving into the equilibrium (or stationary) state are relatively insensitive to the volume fraction and the values of teq are longer than the α -relaxation time τα at the same volume fraction. On the other hand, both of these times grow at least exponentially with decreasing temperature in molecular glasses. For the asymmetry of approach, similar nonlinear behavior is observed for both colloidal and molecular glasses. However, the equilibration time teq is the same for both volume-fraction up-jump and down-jump experiments, different from the finding in molecular glasses that it takes longer for the structure to evolve into equilibrium for the temperature up-jump condition than for the temperature down-jump condition. For the two-step volume-fraction jumps, a memory response is observed that is different from observations of structural recovery in two-step temperature histories in molecular glasses. The concentration dependence of the dynamics

  17. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  18. Investigating the Structure of the WJ-III Cognitive in Early School Age through Two Exploratory Bifactor Analysis Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombrowski, Stefan C.

    2014-01-01

    Two exploratory bifactor methods (e.g., Schmid-Leiman [SL] and exploratory bifactor analysis [EBFA]) were used to investigate the structure of the Woodcock-Johnson III (WJ-III) Cognitive in early school age (age 6-8). The SL procedure is recognized by factor analysts as a preferred method for EBFA. Jennrich and Bentler recently developed an…

  19. The evolution of labile traits in sex- and age-structured populations.

    PubMed

    Childs, Dylan Z; Sheldon, Ben C; Rees, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Many quantitative traits are labile (e.g. somatic growth rate, reproductive timing and investment), varying over the life cycle as a result of behavioural adaptation, developmental processes and plastic responses to the environment. At the population level, selection can alter the distribution of such traits across age classes and among generations. Despite a growing body of theoretical research exploring the evolutionary dynamics of labile traits, a data-driven framework for incorporating such traits into demographic models has not yet been developed. Integral projection models (IPMs) are increasingly being used to understand the interplay between changes in labile characters, life histories and population dynamics. One limitation of the IPM approach is that it relies on phenotypic associations between parents and offspring traits to capture inheritance. However, it is well-established that many different processes may drive these associations, and currently, no clear consensus has emerged on how to model micro-evolutionary dynamics in an IPM framework. We show how to embed quantitative genetic models of inheritance of labile traits into age-structured, two-sex models that resemble standard IPMs. Commonly used statistical tools such as GLMs and their mixed model counterparts can then be used for model parameterization. We illustrate the methodology through development of a simple model of egg-laying date evolution, parameterized using data from a population of Great tits (Parus major). We demonstrate how our framework can be used to project the joint dynamics of species' traits and population density. We then develop a simple extension of the age-structured Price equation (ASPE) for two-sex populations, and apply this to examine the age-specific contributions of different processes to change in the mean phenotype and breeding value. The data-driven framework we outline here has the potential to facilitate greater insight into the nature of selection and its

  20. Variation Principles and Applications in the Study of Cell Structure and Aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Economos, Angelos C.; Miquel, Jaime; Ballard, Ralph C.; Johnson, John E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    In this report we have attempted to show that "some reality lies concealed in biological variation". This "reality" has its principles, laws, mechanisms, and rules, only a few of which we have sketched. A related idea we pursued was that important information may be lost in the process of ignoring frequency distributions of physiological variables (as is customary in experimental physiology and gerontology). We suggested that it may be advantageous to expand one's "statistical field of vision" beyond simple averages +/- standard deviations. Indeed, frequency distribution analysis may make visible some hidden information not evident from a simple qualitative analysis, particularly when the effect of some external factor or condition (e.g., aging, dietary chemicals) is being investigated. This was clearly illustrated by the application of distribution analysis in the study of variation in mouse liver cellular and fine structure, and may be true of fine structural studies in general. In living systems, structure and function interact in a dynamic way; they are "inseparable," unlike in technological systems or machines. Changes in fine structure therefore reflect changes in function. If such changes do not exceed a certain physiologic range, a quantitative analysis of structure will provide valuable information on quantitative changes in function that may not be possible or easy to measure directly. Because there is a large inherent variation in fine structure of cells in a given organ of an individual and among individuals, changes in fine structure can be analyzed only by studying frequency distribution curves of various structural characteristics (dimensions). Simple averages +/- S.D. do not in general reveal all information on the effect of a certain factor, because often this effect is not uniform; on the contrary, this will be apparent from distribution analysis because the form of the curves will be affected. We have also attempted to show in this chapter that

  1. NDE of hidden flaws in aging aircraft structures using obliquely backscattered ultrasonic signals (OBUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mal, Ajit K.; Lasser, Marvin E.

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion is a relatively slow material degradation process to which metallic structures of aircraft are subjected during service and it can appear in many forms. Generally, corrosion protection for preventing or inhibiting the formation and growth of corrosion damage on aircraft structures is well-established technology. Unfortunately, despite preventive measures, corrosion does occur and its probability of formation significantly increases as structures age. Corrosion detection and characterization at the initiation stages, while hidden under paint or in concealed areas, still poses a challenge to inspection science and technology. Corrosion damage is costly and it carries the risk of loss of life as well as hardware in case of catastrophic failure. The authors are investigating the application of obliquely backscattered ultrasonic signals (OBUS) as a means of detecting and characterizing corrosion under paint in metallic panels. OBUS were measured using oblique insonification and were used to produce C-scan images of corrosion damage located on both top and bottom faces of test panels through the paint. A combination of OBUS data and a sensor-array real-time imaging (SARTI) system is being developed for field applications. SARTI uses CCD to display ultrasonic data nd the integrated system has the potential to reduce the need for paint stripping prior to inspection. The main features of the combined OBUS and SARTI are described in this paper.

  2. Management of the aging of critical safety-related concrete structures in light-water reactor plants

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. ); Arndt, E.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The Structural Aging Program has the overall objective of providing the USNRC with an improved basis for evaluating nuclear power plant safety-related structures for continued service. The program consists of a management task and three technical tasks: materials property data base, structural component assessment/repair technology, and quantitative methodology for continued-service determinations. Objectives, accomplishments, and planned activities under each of these tasks are presented. Major program accomplishments include development of a materials property data base for structural materials as well as an aging assessment methodology for concrete structures in nuclear power plants. Furthermore, a review and assessment of inservice inspection techniques for concrete materials and structures has been complete, and work on development of a methodology which can be used for performing current as well as reliability-based future condition assessment of concrete structures is well under way. 43 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. The conceptual structure of hwa-byung in middle-aged Korean women.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Joo; Kim, Hesook Suzie; Schwartz-Barcott, Donna; Kim, Jong-Woo

    2002-06-01

    The term hwa-byung (HB) as a culture-bound syndrome of Koreans has been used to refer to certain types of symptom complexes. However, there is an ambiguity in relation to what sorts of experiences and personal attributes can be identified for describing HB. Our study was designed to reexamine the conceptual structure of HB through a qualitative analysis of interview data with six middle-aged women experiencing HB. The emerging common themes of HB were identified in three dimensions: (a) those related to personal attributes or life situations such as quick-temperedness, strong commitment to traditional values, a hard or unhappy life, and conflicted marital relationship; (b) those related to experiential accounts such as deep sorrow (hahn in Korean), a feeling of victimization, anger, and enduring; and (c) HB symptoms. "Enduring" as one of the core concepts of HB viewed as the only way of life for these women needs further examination. PMID:12148916

  4. Individual fitness and phenotypic selection in age-structured populations with constant growth rates

    PubMed Central

    Moorad, Jacob A.

    2013-01-01

    Powerful multiple regression-based approaches are commonly used to measure the strength of phenotypic selection, which is the statistical association between individual fitness and trait values. Age structure and overlapping generations complicate determinations of individual fitness, contributing to the popularity of alternative methods for measuring natural selection that do not depend upon such measures. The application of regression-based techniques for measuring selection in these situations requires a demographically appropriate, conceptually sound, and observable measure of individual fitness. It has been suggested that Fisher’s reproductive value applied to an individual at its birth is such a definition. Here I offer support for this assertion by showing that multiple regression applied to this measure and vital rates (age-specific survival and fertility rates) yields the same selection gradients for vital rates as those inferred from Hamilton’s classical results. I discuss how multiple regressions, applied to individual reproductive value at birth, can be used efficiently to estimate measures of phenotypic selection that are problematic for sensitivity analyses. These include nonlinear selection, components of the opportunity for selection, and multi-level selection. PMID:24933826

  5. The first description of oarfish Regalecus glesne (Regalecus russellii Cuvier 1816) ageing structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Midway, S.R.; Wagner, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a large, conspicuous teleost with a worldwide tropical and temperate distribution, the giant oarfish Regalecus spp. remain very rare fish species in terms of scientific sampling. Subsequently, very little biological information is known about Regalecus spp. and almost nothing has been concluded in the field of age and growth (Roberts, 2012). No studies of otoliths or temporal (annual) markings on any hard structures have been reported, and to our knowledge otoliths have never been recovered from any specimens (Tyson Roberts, personal communication),although a few texts do provide illustrations of Regalecus sp. otoliths (Lin and Chang, 2012; Nolf, 2013). Further inferential difficulty comes from the fact that age and growth studies of any Lampridiforme species are rare. Lampris guttatus is perhaps the only Lampridiforme species for which any biological information has been reported(Francis et al., 2004), which stems from the species commercial value. In order to begin understanding any species (for later purposes of management, conservation, etc.), basic biological information is needed. In the present study, we examine not only the first Regalecus russellii otolith, but provide suggestions toward future work that should direct data collection that can be used to generate basic biological information for this species.

  6. The impact of obesity on skeletal muscle strength and structure through adolescence to old age.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, D J; Erskine, R M; Morse, C I; Winwood, K; Onambélé-Pearson, Gladys

    2016-06-01

    Obesity is associated with functional limitations in muscle performance and increased likelihood of developing a functional disability such as mobility, strength, postural and dynamic balance limitations. The consensus is that obese individuals, regardless of age, have a greater absolute maximum muscle strength compared to non-obese persons, suggesting that increased adiposity acts as a chronic overload stimulus on the antigravity muscles (e.g., quadriceps and calf), thus increasing muscle size and strength. However, when maximum muscular strength is normalised to body mass, obese individuals appear weaker. This relative weakness may be caused by reduced mobility, neural adaptations and changes in muscle morphology. Discrepancies in the literature remain for maximal strength normalised to muscle mass (muscle quality) and can potentially be explained through accounting for the measurement protocol contributing to muscle strength capacity that need to be explored in more depth such as antagonist muscle co-activation, muscle architecture, a criterion valid measurement of muscle size and an accurate measurement of physical activity levels. Current evidence demonstrating the effect of obesity on muscle quality is limited. These factors not being recorded in some of the existing literature suggest a potential underestimation of muscle force either in terms of absolute force production or relative to muscle mass; thus the true effect of obesity upon skeletal muscle size, structure and function, including any interactions with ageing effects, remains to be elucidated. PMID:26667010

  7. What will 1984 be like? Socioeconomic implications of recent twists in age structure.

    PubMed

    Easterlin, R A

    1978-11-01

    Since 1940, under conditions of restricted immigration and high and sustained growth in aggregate demand, shifts in the relative number of younger versus older adults have had a pervasive impact on American life. Before 1960, younger males were in increasingly short supply and their relative economic position substantially improved; after 1960, the opposite was true. Since the early sixties, as the relative condition of young adults has deteriorated, marriage has been increasingly deferred and fertility reduced. The labor force participation of young women has risen at above average rates, and that of older women has risen at below average rates. Changes in the age structure of the working age population have also contributed to a combination of rising unemployment and accelerating inflation. Cohort divorce rates, suicide among young males, crime rates, and political alienation have worsened. The rise in college enrollment rates has been interrupted, and SAT scores have declined. In contrast, in the period 1940-1960, changes in these various magnitudes were typically of a more favorable sort. The United States is now at the start of a new period of growing scarcity of young adults as a result of the birth rate decline that set in after 1960. This implies that the 1980s will see a turnaround or amelioration in a wide variety of these social, political, and economic conditions, some of which have been taken as symptomatic of a hardening social malaise. PMID:738471

  8. Impact of clay mineral, wood sawdust or root organic matter on the bacterial and fungal community structures in two aged PAH-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Cébron, Aurélie; Beguiristain, Thierry; Bongoua-Devisme, Jeanne; Denonfoux, Jérémie; Faure, Pierre; Lorgeoux, Catherine; Ouvrard, Stéphanie; Parisot, Nicolas; Peyret, Pierre; Leyval, Corinne

    2015-09-01

    The high organic pollutant concentration of aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated wasteland soils is highly recalcitrant to biodegradation due to its very low bioavailability. In such soils, the microbial community is well adapted to the pollution, but the microbial activity is limited by nutrient availability. Management strategies could be applied to modify the soil microbial functioning as well as the PAH contamination through various amendment types. The impact of amendment with clay minerals (montmorillonite), wood sawdust and organic matter plant roots on microbial community structure was investigated on two aged PAH-contaminated soils both in laboratory and 1-year on-site pot experiments. Total PAH content (sum of 16 PAHs of the US-EPA list) and polar polycyclic aromatic compounds (pPAC) were monitored as well as the available PAH fraction using the Tenax method. The bacterial and fungal community structures were monitored using fingerprinting thermal gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) method. The abundance of bacteria (16S rRNA genes), fungi (18S rRNA genes) and PAH degraders (PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase and catechol dioxygenase genes) was followed through qPCR assays. Although the treatments did not modify the total and available PAH content, the microbial community density, structure and the PAH degradation potential changed when fresh organic matter was provided as sawdust and under rhizosphere influence, while the clay mineral only increased the percentage of catechol-1,2-dioxygenase genes. The abundance of bacteria and fungi and the percentage of fungi relative to bacteria were enhanced in soil samples supplemented with wood sawdust and in the plant rhizospheric soils. Two distinct fungal populations developed in the two soils supplemented with sawdust, i.e. fungi related to Chaetomium and Neurospora genera and Brachyconidiellopsis and Pseudallescheria genera, in H and NM soils respectively. Wood sawdust amendment favoured the

  9. GHOSTS: the age and structure of stellar halos around nearby disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Roelof S.; Bailin, Jeremy; Bell, Eric; Holwerda, Benne Willem; Monachesi, Antonela; Streich, David

    2015-08-01

    The stars in the halos around galaxies are thought to be for a significant fraction the result of tidally disrupted infalling smaller galaxies, an important process in the mass build up of galaxies. However, in recent year the realization has grown that a fraction of halo stars may have formed in situ or in the disk of the host galaxy.To understand the nature of stellar halos, the GHOSTS project has used the Hubble Space Telescope to observe the resolved stellar populations in the outskirts of 18 nearby massive galaxies, with a range of masses and seen from face-on to edge-on. From two filter observations (F814W and F606W) with both WFC3 and ACS, we map the different giant populations in these haloes: typically Asymptotic, Red, and He-burning Giants (AGB, RGB and HeB). By studying the distribution of these stellar populations, the GHOSTS project aims to characterize on a statistical basis the size, shape, age, amount of sub-structure, and chemical composition of stellar halos, thereby allowing us to constrain models of the hierarchical galaxy formation process.In this presentation we will in particular show the structural parameters of the observed stellar halos out to 70 kpc and present the rather small range in color gradients present in the RGB population indicative in small metallicity gradients in these halos. We also present the discovery of a surprisingly large population of AGB stars with ages <2 Gyr seen to ~20 kpc above the disks of many edge-on galaxies and speculations on the origin of these young populations at a location where no current star formation is seen.

  10. Solar abundance of platinum

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Harry; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1975-01-01

    Three lines of neutral platinum, located at λ 2997.98 Å, λ 3064.71 Å, and λ 3301.86 Å have been used to determine the solar platinum abundance by the method of spectral synthesis. On the scale, log A(H) = 12.00, the thus-derived solar platinum abundance is 1.75 ± 0.10, in fair accord with Cameron's value of log A(Pt) = 1.69 derived by Mason from carbonaceous chondrites and calculated on the assumption that log A(Si) = 7.55 in the sun. PMID:16592278

  11. Factor Structure of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale for Norwegian School-Age Children Explored with Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drugli, May Britt; Hjemdal, Odin

    2013-01-01

    The validity of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale (STRS) was examined in a national sample of 863 Norwegian schoolchildren in grades 1-7 (aged 6-13). The original factor structure of the STRS was tested by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The CFA results did not support the original three-factor structure of the STRS. Subsequent CFA of the…

  12. Fathers' Involvement with Their Preschool-Age Children: How Fathers Spend Time with Their Children in Different Family Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halme, Nina; Astedt-Kurki, Paivi; Tarkka, Marja-Terttu

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how fathers (n = 263) spent time with their preschool-age children and to compare it in different family structures. Data were gathered by structured questionnaires. The instrument included five categories of variables for the time spent: the quantity of time, physical activities, fathers' attitude towards…

  13. The Factor Structure and Age-Related Factorial Invariance of the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latzman, Robert D.; Markon, Kristian E.

    2010-01-01

    There has been an increased interest in the structure of and relations among executive functions.The present study examined the factor structure as well as age-related factorial invariance of the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS), a widely used inventory aimed at assessing executive functions. Analyses were first conducted using data…

  14. Structural neuroplasticity in expert pianists depends on the age of musical training onset.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Lucía; Hartmann, Karl; Ripollés, Pablo; Rojo, Nuria; Sierpowska, Joanna; François, Clément; Càmara, Estela; van Vugt, Floris Tijmen; Mohammadi, Bahram; Samii, Amir; Münte, Thomas F; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2016-02-01

    In the last decade, several studies have investigated the neuroplastic changes induced by long-term musical training. Here we investigated structural brain differences in expert pianists compared to non-musician controls, as well as the effect of the age of onset (AoO) of piano playing. Differences with non-musicians and the effect of sensitive periods in musicians have been studied previously, but importantly, this is the first time in which the age of onset of music-training was assessed in a group of musicians playing the same instrument, while controlling for the amount of practice. We recruited a homogeneous group of expert pianists who differed in their AoO but not in their lifetime or present amount of training, and compared them to an age-matched group of non-musicians. A subset of the pianists also completed a scale-playing task in order to control for performance skill level differences. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was used to examine gray-matter differences at the whole-brain level. Pianists showed greater gray matter (GM) volume in bilateral putamen (extending also to hippocampus and amygdala), right thalamus, bilateral lingual gyri and left superior temporal gyrus, but a GM volume shrinkage in the right supramarginal, right superior temporal and right postcentral gyri, when compared to non-musician controls. These results reveal a complex pattern of plastic effects due to sustained musical training: a network involved in reinforcement learning showed increased GM volume, while areas related to sensorimotor control, auditory processing and score-reading presented a reduction in the volume of GM. Behaviorally, early-onset pianists showed higher temporal precision in their piano performance than late-onset pianists, especially in the left hand. Furthermore, early onset of piano playing was associated with smaller GM volume in the right putamen and better piano performance (mainly in the left hand). Our results, therefore, reveal for the first time in

  15. Particle trajectories on hillslopes: Implications for particle age and 10Be structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Robert S.

    2015-09-01

    Many geomorphic systems act as conveyor belts onto which material is loaded at a particular rate and is transported in one direction toward another system that serves as a sink. As the material travels, it ages, it changes in grain size, it accumulates cosmogenic radionuclides, it adsorbs or releases nutrients, and it weathers. Here I address the hillslope conveyor. As many geochemical processes are depth-dependent, the depth history of a particle becomes important to know. I calculate soil particle trajectories in the horizontal-depth plane and address three cases, one in which horizontal speeds decline exponentially with depth, a second in which they are uniform with depth, and a third in which horizontal speeds are also uniform but all profile values are vertically well-mixed. Vertical speeds are governed by continuity in an incompressible medium and by the boundary condition of zero vertical particle speed at the soil surface. Particle trajectories must therefore become surface parallel at the surface. Knowledge of soil particle trajectories allows calculation of residence times and concentration profiles of 10Be in the soil. The results inform strategies for interpretation of nuclide concentrations in soils and stream sediments and for inference of transport rate profiles. In all steady cases, the particle age and 10Be structure are uniform with distance from the divide. When significant vertical gradients in horizontal speed occur, the patterns of particle age and of 10Be concentration are dominated by the depth scale of the transport process. In unmixed cases, the particle age and 10Be concentration in near-surface samples can greatly exceed the vertically averaged values, reflecting the fact that the vertical speeds of particles slow dramatically as they near the surface. In cases in which horizontal speed varies significantly with depth, the vertically averaged concentration of 10Be within the soil can significantly underpredict the mean 10Be concentration

  16. Abundance trends and status of the Little Colorado River population of humpback chub

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coggins, L.G., Jr.; Pine, William E., III; Walters, C.J.; Van Haverbeke, D. R.; Ward, D.; Johnstone, H.C.

    2006-01-01

    The abundance of the Little Colorado River population of federally listed humpback chub Gila cypha in Grand Canyon has been monitored since the late 1980s by means of catch rate indices and capture-recapture-based abundance estimators. Analyses of data from all sources using various methods are consistent and indicate that the adult population has declined since monitoring began. Intensive tagging led to a high proportion (>80%) of the adult population being marked by the mid-1990s. Analysis of these data using both closed and open abundance estimation models yields results that agree with catch rate indices about the extent of the decline. Survival rates for age-2 and older fish are age dependent but apparently not time dependent. Back-calculation of recruitment using the apparent 1990s population age structure implies periods of higher recruitment in the late 1970s to early 1980s than is now the case. Our analyses indicate that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recovery criterion of stable abundance is not being met for this population. Also, there is a critical need to develop new abundance indexing and tagging methods so that early, reliable, and rapid estimates of humpback chub recruitment can be obtained to evaluate population responses to management actions designed to facilitate the restoration of Colorado River native fish communities. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  17. Age, phylogeography and population structure of the microendemic banded spring snail, Mexipyrgus churinceanus.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven G

    2005-07-01

    Recent theoretical and empirical studies of phylogeography and population structure indicate that many processes influence intraspecific evolutionary history. The present study represents the first examination of various forces influencing the spatial and temporal patterns of sequence variation in the freshwater Mexican banded spring snail, Mexipyrgus churinceanus. This snail occurs in one of the most critically endangered centres of freshwater endemism, the desert ecosystem of Cuatro Ciénegas. From cytochrome b mtDNA sequence variation, there is strong evidence of long-term isolation of three regions, suggesting that these regions represent evolutionarily distinct lineages. Molecular clock estimates of clade age indicate a time to most recent common ancestor of approximately 2.5 million years ago (Ma). The three regions differ considerably in the historical and demographic forces affecting population structure. The western populations have extremely low mtDNA diversity consistent with a severe bottleneck dating to 50,000 years before present (bp). The nearby Rio Mesquites drainage is characterized by fragmentation events, restricted gene flow with isolation by distance, and higher levels of mtDNA polymorphism. These patterns are consistent with the long-term stability of this drainage along with habitat heterogeneity and brooding contributing to population isolation and restricted gene flow. Southeastern populations show evidence of range expansion and a strong influence of genetic drift. Migration rates between drainages indicate very little gene flow between drainages except for asymmetric migration from the Rio Mesquites into both western and southeastern drainages. PMID:15969715

  18. PROTOSTARS AND STARS IN THE CORONET CLUSTER: AGE, EVOLUTION, AND CLUSTER STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Henning, Thomas; Kainulainen, Jouni; Roccatagliata, Veronica

    2011-08-01

    We present new optical spectroscopy with the FLAMES spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope (VLT), near-IR imaging with VLT/HAWK-I, and 870 {mu}m mapping with APEX/LABOCA of the Coronet cluster. The optical data allow us to estimate spectral types, extinction, and the presence of accretion in 6 more M-type members, in addition to the 12 that we had previously studied. The submillimeter maps and near-IR data reveal the presence of nebular structures and high extinction regions, which are in some cases associated to known IR, optical, and X-ray sources. Most star formation is associated to two elongated structures crossing in the central part of the cluster. Placing all the 18 objects with known spectral types and extinction in an H-R diagram suggests that the cluster is younger than previously thought (<2 Myr, and probably {approx}0.5-1 Myr). The new age estimate is in agreement with the evolutionary status of the various protostars in the region and with its compactness (<1.3 pc across), but results in a conflict with the low disk and accretion fraction (only 50%-65% of low-mass stars appear to have protoplanetary disks, and most transitional and homologously depleted disks are consistent with no accretion) and with the evolutionary features observed in the mid-IR spectra and spectral energy distributions of the disks.

  19. Hyperhomocysteinemia disrupts retinal pigment epithelial structure and function with features of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ahmed S.; Mander, Suchreet; Hussein, Khaled A.; Elsherbiny, Nehal M.; Smith, Sylvia B.; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Tawfik, Amany

    2016-01-01

    The disruption of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) function and the degeneration of photoreceptors are cardinal features of age related macular degeneration (AMD); however there are still gaps in our understanding of underlying biological processes. Excess homocysteine (Hcy) has been reported to be elevated in plasma of patients with AMD. This study aimed to evaluate the direct effect of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) on structure and function of RPE. Initial studies in a mouse model of HHcy, in which cystathionine-β-synthase (cbs) was deficient, revealed abnormal RPE cell morphology with features similar to that of AMD upon optical coherence tomography (OCT), fluorescein angiography (FA), histological, and electron microscopic examinations. These features include atrophy, vacuolization, hypopigmentation, thickened basal laminar membrane, hyporeflective lucency, choroidal neovascularization (CNV), and disturbed RPE–photoreceptor relationship. Furthermore, intravitreal injection of Hcy per se in normal wild type (WT) mice resulted in diffuse hyper-fluorescence, albumin leakage, and CNV in the area of RPE. In vitro experiments on ARPE-19 showed that Hcy dose-dependently reduced tight junction protein expression, increased FITC dextran leakage, decreased transcellular electrical resistance, and impaired phagocytic activity. Collectively, our results demonstrated unreported effects of excess Hcy levels on RPE structure and function that lead to the development of AMD-like features. PMID:26885895

  20. Abundances of light elements.

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, B E

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of abundances of light elements and their relevance to cosmological nucleosynthesis are briefly reviewed. The simplest model, based on standard cosmology and particle physics and assuming homogeneous baryon density at the relevant times, continues to stand up well. PMID:11607388

  1. Interaction between glycated serum albumin and AGE-receptors depends on structural changes and the glycation reagent.

    PubMed

    Indurthi, Venkata S K; Leclerc, Estelle; Vetter, Stefan W

    2012-12-15

    Physiologically relevant reactive carbonyl compounds vary greatly in their glycation reactivity and the resulting advanced glycation endproducts (AGE) are likely to have distinct structural and biological properties. We characterized a panel of twenty AGE-BSA preparations in terms of (i) their biophysical properties, (ii) their binding to the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) and galectin-3, and (iii) their effects on cellular proliferation. We could establish correlations between lysine glycation and changes in secondary structure. Circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry experiments showed that glycation causes albumin to adopt folding properties of a molten globule. Binding studies between AGE-albumin and RAGE or galectin-3 indicate that binding to the isolated receptor domains was weak. Only AGE compounds derived by glycation with ribose were able to bind tightly (K(d) < 10 μM) to both AGE receptors. Cell based assays using an engineered melanoma cell line demonstrated correlations between the extent of (i) lysine side chain modification, (ii) β-sheet content and (iii) albumin multimerization with stimulation of cell proliferation. However, in addition to structural properties of the protein, the chemical structures of the AGE-modifications were important for receptor binding and biological activity as well. PMID:23079546

  2. THE LOCAL EXPRESSION AND ABUNDANCE OF INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR (IGF) BINDING PROTEINS IN SKELETAL MUSCLE ARE REGULATED BY AGE AND GENDER BUT NOT LOCAL IGF-I "IN VIVO"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We wished to determine whether sustained IGF-I production in skeletal muscle increases local IGF binding protein (IGFBP) abundance, thereby mitigating the long-term stimulation of muscle growth by IGF-I. Muscle growth of transgenic mice that overexpress IGF-I in muscle (SIS2) and of wild-type (Wt) m...

  3. Relationships between default-mode network connectivity, medial temporal lobe structure, and age-related memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Ward, Andrew M; Mormino, Elizabeth C; Huijbers, Willem; Schultz, Aaron P; Hedden, Trey; Sperling, Reisa A

    2015-01-01

    Advanced aging negatively impacts memory performance. Brain aging has been associated with shrinkage in medial temporal lobe structures essential for memory--including hippocampus and entorhinal cortex--and with deficits in default-mode network connectivity. Yet, whether and how these imaging markers are relevant to age-related memory deficits remains a topic of debate. Using a sample of 182 older (age 74.6 ± 6.2 years) and 66 young (age 22.2 ± 3.6 years) participants, this study examined relationships among memory performance, hippocampus volume, entorhinal cortex thickness, and default-mode network connectivity across aging. All imaging markers and memory were significantly different between young and older groups. Each imaging marker significantly mediated the relationship between age and memory performance and collectively accounted for most of the variance in age-related memory performance. Within older participants, default-mode connectivity and hippocampus volume were independently associated with memory. Structural equation modeling of cross-sectional data within older participants suggest that entorhinal thinning may occur before reduced default-mode connectivity and hippocampal volume loss, which in turn lead to deficits in memory performance. PMID:25113793

  4. Solar abundances and 3D model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Caffau, Elisabetta; Steffen, Matthias; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Freytag, Bernd; Cayrel, Roger

    2010-03-01

    We present solar photospheric abundances for 12 elements from optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. The abundance analysis was conducted employing 3D hydrodynamical (CO5BOLD) as well as standard 1D hydrostatic model atmospheres. We compare our results to others with emphasis on discrepancies and still lingering problems, in particular exemplified by the pivotal abundance of oxygen. We argue that the thermal structure of the lower solar photosphere is very well represented by our 3D model. We obtain an excellent match of the observed center-to-limb variation of the line-blanketed continuum intensity, also at wavelengths shortward of the Balmer jump.

  5. Effects of earthworms and plants on the soil structure, the physical stabilization of soil organic matter and the microbial abundance and diversity in soil aggregates in a long term study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangerlé, Anne; Hissler, Christophe; Lavelle, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Earthworms and plant roots, as ecosystem engineers, have large effects on biotic and abiotic properties of the soil system. They create biogenic soil macroaggregates (i.e. earthworm casts and root macroaggregates) with specific physical, chemical and microbiological properties. Research to date has mainly considered their impacts in isolation thereby ignoring potential interactions between these organisms. On the other hand, most of the existing studies focused on short to midterm time scale. We propose in this study to consider effect of earthworms and plants on aggregate dynamics at long time scale. A 24 months macrocosm experiment, under semi-controlled conditions, was conducted to assess the impacts of corn and endogeic plus anecic earthworms (Apporectodea caliginosa and Lumbricus terrestris) on soil structure, C stabilization and microbial abundance and biodiversity. Aggregate stability was assessed by wet-sieving. Macroaggregates (>2 mm) were also visually separated according to their biological origin (e.g., earthworms, roots). Total C and N contents were measured in aggregates of all size classes and origins. Natural abundances of 13C of corn, a C4 plant, were used as a supplemental marker of OM incorporation in aggregates. The genetic structure and the abundance of the bacterial and fungal communities were characterized by using respectively the B- and F-ARISA fingerprinting approach and quantitative PCR bacteria (341F/515R) and fungi (FF330/FR1). They significantly impacted the soil physical properties in comparison to the other treatments: lower bulk density in the first 10cm of the soil with 0.95 g/cm3 in absence of corn plants and 0.88 g/cm3 in presence of corn plants compared to control soil (1.21g/cm3). The presence of earthworms increased aggregate stability (mean weight diameter) by 7.6 %, while plants alone had no simple impacts on aggregation. A significant interaction revealed that earthworms increased aggregate stability in the presence of

  6. Aging Brain, Aging Mind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selkoe, Dennis J.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the aging process related to physical changes of the human neural structure involved in learning, memory, and reasoning. Presents evidence that indicates such alterations do not necessarily signal the decline in cognitive function. Vignettes provide images of brain structures involved in learning, memory, and reasoning; hippocampal…

  7. The aged epidermal permeability barrier. Structural, functional, and lipid biochemical abnormalities in humans and a senescent murine model.

    PubMed Central

    Ghadially, R; Brown, B E; Sequeira-Martin, S M; Feingold, K R; Elias, P M

    1995-01-01

    Aged epidermis displays altered drug permeability, increased susceptibility to irritant contact dermatitis, and often severe xerosis, suggesting compromise of the aged epidermal barrier. To delineate the functional, structural, and lipid biochemical basis of epidermal aging, we compared barrier function in young (20-30 yr) vs aged (> 80 yr) human subjects, and in a murine model. Baseline transepidermal water loss in both aged humans and senescent mice was subnormal. However, the aged barrier was perturbed more readily with either acetone or tape stripping (18 +/- 2 strippings vs 31 +/- 5 strippings in aged vs young human subjects, respectively). Moreover, after either acetone treatment or tape stripping, the barrier recovered more slowly in aged than in young human subjects (50 and 80% recovery at 24 and 72 h, respectively, in young subjects vs 15% recovery at 24 h in aged subjects), followed by a further delay over the next 6 d. Similar differences in barrier recovery were seen in senescent vs young mice. Although the total lipid content was decreased in the stratum corneum of aged mice (approximately 30%), the distribution of ceramides (including ceramide 1), cholesterol, and free fatty acids was unchanged. Moreover, a normal complement of esterified, very long-chain fatty acids was present. Finally, stratum corneum lamellar bilayers displayed normal substructure and dimensions, but were focally decreased in number, with decreased secretion of lamellar body contents. Thus, assessment of barrier function in aged epidermis under basal conditions is misleading, since both barrier integrity and barrier repair are markedly abnormal. These functional changes can be attributed to a global deficiency in all key stratum corneum lipids, resulting in decreased lamellar bilayers in the stratum corneum interstices. This constellation of findings may explain the increased susceptibility of intrinsically aged skin to exogenous and environmental insults. Images PMID:7738193

  8. Assessment of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale factor structure among middle-aged workers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Norio; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Sasaki, Giro; Umeda, Takashi; Takahashi, Ippei; Danjo, Kazuma; Matsuzaka, Masashi; Kaneko, Sunao; Nakaji, Shigeyuki

    2011-02-01

    Our aim was to assess the internal consistency and structural/construct validity of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale among middle-aged employees in Japan. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 7284 workers, aged 49.0 ± 6.3 (mean ± SD) years old. Structural/construct validity was assessed by confirmatory factor analysis. The 4-factor structure reported in the general population was replicated, and a second-order model with an overarching depression factor fitted well. These findings indicate that the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale is a valid and reliable measure of depressive symptoms for middle-aged workers in Japan. PMID:21265946

  9. Structure and properties during aging of an ultra-high strength Al-Cu-Li-Ag-Mg alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayle, Frank W.; Heubaum, Frank H.; Pickens, Joseph R.

    1990-01-01

    The structure and properties of the strengthening phases formed during aging in an Al-Cu-Li-Ag-Mg alloy (Weldalite 049) were elulcidated, by following the development of the microstructure by means of TEM. The results of observations showed that the Weldalite 049 alloy has a series of unusual and technologically useful combinations of mechanical properties in different aging conditions, such as natural aging without prior cold work to produce high strengths, a reversion temper of lower yield strength and unusually high ductility, a room temperature reaging of the reversion temper eventually leading to the original T4 hardness, and ultrahigh-strength T6 properties.

  10. Rainfall influences on ungulate population abundance in the Mara-Serengeti ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Ogutu, J O; Piepho, H-P; Dublin, H T; Bhola, N; Reid, R S

    2008-07-01

    1. Rainfall is the prime climatic factor underpinning the dynamics of African savanna ungulates, but no study has analysed its influence on the abundance of these ungulates at monthly to multiannual time scales. 2. We report relationships between rainfall and changes in age- and sex-structured abundances of seven ungulate species monitored monthly for 15 years using vehicle ground counts in the Maasai Mara National Reserve, Kenya. 3. Abundance showed strong and curvilinear relationships with current and cumulative rainfall, with older topi, Damaliscus korrigum (Ogilby); warthog, Phacochoerus aethiopicus (Pallas); waterbuck, Kobus ellipsyprimnus (Ogilby); and impala, Aepyceros melampus (Lichtenstein) responding to longer lags than younger animals, portraying carryover effects of prior habitat conditions. 4. The abundances of newborn calves were best correlated with monthly rainfall averaged over the preceding 5-6 months for topi, waterbuck, warthog, and 2 months for the migratory zebra Equus burchelli (Gray), but with seasonal rainfall averaged over 2-5 years for giraffe, Giraffa camelopardalis (L.); impala; and kongoni, Alcelaphus busephalus (Pallas). The cumulative late wet-season rainfall was the best predictor of abundance for quarter- to full-grown animals for most species. Monthly rainfall exerted both negative and positive effects on the abundances of zebra, impala and waterbuck. Ignoring age, both sexes responded similarly to rainfall. 5. Births were strongly seasonal only for warthog and topi, but peaked between August and December for most species. Hence abundance was strongly seasonal for young topi and warthog and the migratory zebra. Pronounced seasonality in births for warthog and topi obliterated otherwise strong relationships between abundance and rainfall when both month and rainfall were included in the same model. Aggregated density produced relationships with rainfall similar to those for fully grown animals, emphasizing the necessity of

  11. Solar abundance of iridium

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Stephen; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    By a method of spectrum synthesis, which yields log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance, an attempt is made to deduce the solar iridium abundance from one relatively unblended, but fairly weak IrI line, λ 3220.78 Å. If the Corliss-Bozman f-value for this line is adopted, we find log A(Ir) = 0.82 on the scale log A(H) = 12.00. The discordance with the value found from carbonaceous chondrites may arise from faulty f-values or from difficulties arising from line blending in this far ultraviolet domain of the solar spectrum. PMID:16578735