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Sample records for abundance element

  1. Sunspots, Starspots, and Elemental Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doschek, George A.; Warren, Harry P.

    2017-08-01

    The composition of plasma in solar and stellar atmospheres is not fixed, but varies from feature to feature. These variations are organized by the First Ionization Potential (FIP) of the element. Solar measurements often indicate that low FIP elements (< 10eV, such as Fe, Si, Mg) are enriched by factors of 3-4 in the corona relative to high FIP elements (>10 eV, such as C, N, O, Ar, He) compared to abundances in the photosphere. Stellar observations have also shown similar enrichments. An inverse FIP effect, where the low FIP elements are depleted, has been observed in stellar coronae of stars believed to have large starspots in their photospheres. The abundances are important for determining radiative loss rates in models, tracing the origin of the slow solar wind, and for understanding wave propagation in the chromosphere and corona. Recently, inverse FIP effects have been discovered in the Sun (Doschek, Warren, & Feldman 2015, ApJ, 808, L7) from spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft. The inverse FIP regions seem always to be near sunspots and cover only a very small area (characteristic length = a few arcseconds). However, in pursuing the search for inverse FIP regions, we have found that in some sunspot groups the coronal abundance at a temperature of 3-4 MK can be near photospheric over much larger areas of the sun near the sunspots (e.g., 6,000 arcsec2). Also, sometimes the abundances at 3-4 MK are in between coronal and photospheric values. This can occur in small areas of an active region. It is predicted (Laming 2015, Sol. Phys., 12, 2) that the FIP effect should be highly variable in the corona. Several examples of coronal abundance variations are presented. Our work indicates that a comprehensive re-investigation of solar abundances is highly desirable. This work is supported by a NASA Hinode grant.

  2. Elemental Abundances in NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Kraemer, S. B.; Mushotzky, R. F.; George, I. M.; Gabel, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    We present Reflection Grating Spectrometer data from an XMM-Newton observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516, taken while the continuum source was in an extremely low flux state. This observation offers a rare opportunity for a detailed study of emission from a Seyfert 1 galaxy as these are usually dominated by high nuclear continuum levels and heavy absorption. The spectrum shows numerous narrow emission lines (FWHM approximately less than 1300 kilometers per second) in the 0.3 - 2 keV range, including the H-like lines of C, N, and O and the He-like lines of N, O and Ne. The emission-line ratios and the narrow width of the radiative recombination continuum of CVI indicate that the gas is photoionized and of fairly low temperature (kT approximately less than 0.01 keV). The availability of emission lines from different elements for two iso-electronic sequences allows us to constrain the element abundances. These data show that the N lines are far stronger than would be expected from gas of solar abundances. Based on our photoionization models we find that nitrogen is overabundant in the central regions of the galaxy, compared to carbon, oxygen and neon by at least a factor of 2.5. We suggest that this is the result of secondary production of nitrogen in intermediate mass stars, and indicative of the history of star formation in NGC 3516.

  3. Element abundances at high redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, David M.; Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    Abundances of Si(+), S(+), Cr(+), Mn(+), Fe(_), and Zn(+) are considered for two absorption-line systems in the spectrum of the QSO PKS 0528 - 250. Zinc and sulfur are underabundant, relative to H, by a factor of 10 compared to their solar and Galactic interstellar abundances. The silicon-, chromium-, iron-, and nickel-to-hydrogen ratios are less than the solar values and comparable to the local interstellar ratios. A straightforward interpretation is that nucleosynthesis in these high-redshift systems has led to only about one-tenth as much heavy production as in the gas clouds around the sun, and that the amount of the observed underabundances attributable to grain depletion is small. The dust-to-gas ratio in these clouds is less than 8 percent of the Galactic value.

  4. New functionalities in abundant element oxides: ubiquitous element strategy

    PubMed Central

    Hosono, Hideo; Hayashi, Katsuro; Kamiya, Toshio; Atou, Toshiyuki; Susaki, Tomofumi

    2011-01-01

    While most ceramics are composed of ubiquitous elements (the ten most abundant elements within the Earth's crust), many advanced materials are based on rare elements. A ‘rare-element crisis’ is approaching owing to the imbalance between the limited supply of rare elements and the increasing demand. Therefore, we propose a ‘ubiquitous element strategy’ for materials research, which aims to apply abundant elements in a variety of innovative applications. Creation of innovative oxide materials and devices based on conventional ceramics is one specific challenge. This review describes the concept of ubiquitous element strategy and gives some highlights of our recent research on the synthesis of electronic, thermionic and structural materials using ubiquitous elements. PMID:27877391

  5. Coronae of Stars with Supersolar Elemental Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretz, Uria; Behar, Ehud; Drake, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Coronal elemental abundances are known to deviate from the photospheric values of their parent star, with the degree of deviation depending on the first ionization potential (FIP). This study focuses on the coronal composition of stars with supersolar photospheric abundances. We present the coronal abundances of six such stars: 11 LMi, iota Hor, HR 7291, tau Boo, and alpha Cen A and B. These stars all have high-statistics X-ray spectra, three of which are presented for the first time. The abundances we measured were obtained using the line-resolved spectra of the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) in conjunction with the higher throughput EPIC-pn camera spectra onboard the XMM-Newton observatory. A collisionally ionized plasma model with two or three temperature components is found to represent the spectra well. All elements are found to be consistently depleted in the coronae compared to their respective photospheres. For 11 LMi and tau Boo no FIP effect is present, while iota Hor, HR 7291, and alpha Cen A and B show a clear FIP trend. These conclusions hold whether the comparison is made with solar abundances or the individual stellar abundances. Unlike the solar corona, where low-FIP elements are enriched, in these stars the FIP effect is consistently due to a depletion of high-FIP elements with respect to actual photospheric abundances. A comparison with solar (instead of stellar) abundances yields the same fractionation trend as on the Sun. In both cases, a similar FIP bias is inferred, but different fractionation mechanisms need to be invoked.

  6. Stellar Abundance Observations and Heavy Element Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, J. J.

    2005-05-01

    Abundance observations indicate the presence of rapid-neutron capture (i.e., r-process) elements in old Galactic halo and globular cluster stars. These observations provide insight into the nature of the earliest generations of stars in the Galaxy -- the progenitors of the halo stars -- responsible for neutron-capture synthesis of the heavy elements. Abundance comparisons among the r-process-rich halo stars show that the heaviest neutron-capture elements (i.e., Ba and above) are consistent with a scaled solar system r-process abundance distribution, while the lighter neutron-capture elements do not conform to the solar pattern. These comparisons suggest the possibility of two r-process sites in stars. The large star-to-star scatter observed in the abundances of neutron-capture element/iron ratios at low metallicities -- which disappears with increasing metallicity or [Fe/H] -- suggests the formation of these heavy elements (presumably from certain types of supernovae) was rare in the early Galaxy. The stellar abundances also indicate a change from the r-process to the slow neutron capture (i.e., s-) process at higher metallicities in the Galaxy and provide insight into Galactic chemical evolution. Finally, the detection of thorium and uranium in halo and globular cluster stars offers an independent age-dating technique that can put lower limits on the age of the Galaxy, and hence the Universe. This work has been supported in part by NSF grant AST 03-07279 (J.J.C.) and by STScI grants GO-8111, GO-8342 and GO-9359.

  7. Transition Element Abundances in MORB Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.; Humayun, M.; Salters, V. J.; Fields, D.; Jefferson, G.; Perfit, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    primarily controls the partitioning of Fe, Zn, Ga and Ge; garnet dominates the Sc abundance; spinel exerts exceptionally strong control over Ga and Zn, and cannot be neglected as a source mineral for these elements. MORB FRTE, Ga and Ge abundances are consistent with partial melting of a spinel peridotite source (<1% garnet) similar to that estimated for DMM, although the abundances of many of these elements need to be better constrained in the model sources. [1] Davis et al. GCA (submitted)

  8. Cosmological implications of light element abundances: theory.

    PubMed

    Schramm, D N

    1993-06-01

    Primordial nucleosynthesis provides (with the microwave background radiation) one of the two quantitative experimental tests of the hot Big Bang cosmological model (versus alternative explanations for the observed Hubble expansion). The standard homogeneous-isotropic calculation fits the light element abundances ranging from 1H at 76% and 4He at 24% by mass through 2H and 3He at parts in 105 down to 7Li at parts in 1010. It is also noted how the recent Large Electron Positron Collider (and Stanford Linear Collider) results on the number of neutrinos (Nnu) are a positive laboratory test of this standard Big Bang scenario. The possible alternate scenario of quark-hadron-induced inhomogeneities is also discussed. It is shown that when this alternative scenario is made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density (Omegab) remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus adding to the robustness of the standard model and the conclusion that Omegab approximately 0.06. This latter point is the driving force behind the need for nonbaryonic dark matter (assuming total density Omegatotal = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since the density of visible matter Omegavisible < Omegab. The recent Population II B and Be observations are also discussed and shown to be a consequence of cosmic ray spallation processes rather than primordial nucleosynthesis. The light elements and Nnu successfully probe the cosmological model at times as early as 1 sec and a temperature (T) of approximately 10(10) K (approximately 1 MeV). Thus, they provided the first quantitative arguments that led to the connections of cosmology to nuclear and particle physics.

  9. Cosmological implications of light element abundances: theory.

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, D N

    1993-01-01

    Primordial nucleosynthesis provides (with the microwave background radiation) one of the two quantitative experimental tests of the hot Big Bang cosmological model (versus alternative explanations for the observed Hubble expansion). The standard homogeneous-isotropic calculation fits the light element abundances ranging from 1H at 76% and 4He at 24% by mass through 2H and 3He at parts in 105 down to 7Li at parts in 1010. It is also noted how the recent Large Electron Positron Collider (and Stanford Linear Collider) results on the number of neutrinos (Nnu) are a positive laboratory test of this standard Big Bang scenario. The possible alternate scenario of quark-hadron-induced inhomogeneities is also discussed. It is shown that when this alternative scenario is made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density (Omegab) remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus adding to the robustness of the standard model and the conclusion that Omegab approximately 0.06. This latter point is the driving force behind the need for nonbaryonic dark matter (assuming total density Omegatotal = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since the density of visible matter Omegavisible < Omegab. The recent Population II B and Be observations are also discussed and shown to be a consequence of cosmic ray spallation processes rather than primordial nucleosynthesis. The light elements and Nnu successfully probe the cosmological model at times as early as 1 sec and a temperature (T) of approximately 10(10) K (approximately 1 MeV). Thus, they provided the first quantitative arguments that led to the connections of cosmology to nuclear and particle physics. Images Fig. 2 PMID:11607387

  10. Heavy Element Abundances in NGC 5846

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Christine

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the diffuse X-ray coronae surrounding the elliptical galaxy NGC 5846, combining measurements from two observatories, ROSAT and the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics. We map the gas temperature distribution and find a central cool region within an approximately isothermal gas halo extending to a radius of about 50 kpc and evidence for a temperature decrease at larger radii. With a radially falling temperature profile, the total mass converges to (9.6 +/- 1.0) x 10(exp 12) solar mass at 230 kpc radius. This corresponds to a total mass to blue light ratio of 53 +/- 5 solar mass/solar luminosity. As in other early type galaxies, the gas mass is only a few percent of the total mass. Using the spectroscopic measurements, we also derive radial distributions for the heavy elements silicon and iron and find that the abundances of both decrease with galaxy radius. The mass ratio of Si to Fe lies between the theoretical predictions for element production in SN Ia and SN II, suggesting an important role for SN Ia, as well as SN II, for gas enrichment in ellipticals. Using the 2 SN la yield of Si, we set an upper limit of 0.012 h(sup 2, sub 50) solar neutrino units (SNU) for the SN Ia rate at radii >50 kpc, which is independent of possible uncertainties in the iron L-shell modeling. We compare our observations with the theoretical predictions for the chemical evolution of ellipticals. We conclude that the metal content in stars, if explained by the star formation duration, requires a significant decline in the duration of star formation with galaxy radius, ranging from 1 Gyr at the center to 0.01 Gyr at 100 kpc radius. Alternatively, the decline in metallicity with galaxy radius may be caused by a similar drop with radius in the efficiency of star formation. Based on the Si and Fe measurements presented in this paper, we conclude that the latter scenario is preferred unless a dependence of the SN Ia rate on stellar metallicity is invoked.

  11. Highly Siderophile Element Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.; Neal, C. R.; Ely, J. C.

    2001-01-01

    Critical evaluation of new and literature data for highly siderophile elements (HSE) in Martian (SNC) meteorites allows several first order conclusions to be drawn. (i) Re concentrations in SNC meteorites are nearly constant (within a factor of two) and do not correlate with rock type. Exceptions to this rule are Chassigny and Dar al Gani (DaG) 476, both of which are inferred to have experienced terrestrial Re contamination. (ii) Fractionations between Rh and Pd are small. Excluding Shergotty, the Rh/Pd ratio of the SNC suite is 0.22\\pm0.05. (iii) Os and Ir contents vary by about four orders of magnitude; and positive correlations with MgO, Cr, and Ni suggest that these variations are not controlled by sulfide fractionation. A possible exception is the orthopyroxenite ALH84001, whose HSE's (including Ni, which is compatible in opx) are very low. (iv) Zagami, Shergotty, and Nakhla have nearly identical HSE signatures. Shergotty and Zagami have experienced assimilation-fractional crystallization (AFC) and have "crustal" Sr and Nd isotopic signatures. Conversely, the Nakhla parent was a small degree partial melt of a depleted mantle that interacted little with the Martian crust. These observations suggest that "evolved" HSE signatures can be produced by either fractional crystallization or small degrees of partial melting. (v) Chassigny and other mafic SNC's have HSE signatures that are very distinct from those of Nakhla-Zagami-Shergotty. The HSE elemental ratios of mafic SNC's approach chondritic, implying that the Martian mantle has nearly chondritic relative abundances of the HSE's. (vi) This chondritic HSE signature is observed in SNC's of various ages, suggesting that this is an ancient feature that has not evolved over time. (vii) No correlation is observed between HSE's and signatures of crustal contamination (e.g., Sr isotopes), indicating that the HSE signatures of the SNC suite are not derived from the crust. (vii) The Ru/Pd for the SNC suite ratio is about

  12. Trace-element abundances in several new ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, William V.; Hill, Dolores H.

    1993-01-01

    Four new ureilites are analyzed for trace-element abundances. Frontier Mountain (FRO) 90054 is an augite-rich ureilite and has high rare earth element (REE) abundances with a pattern expected of augite. FRO 90036 and Acfer 277 have REE patterns similar to the V-shape pattern of other ureilites. Nuevo Mercurio (b) has very high REE abundances, but they look like they are due to terrestrial alteration. The siderophile-element pattern of these ureilites are similar to those of known ureilites.

  13. Elemental, isotopic and molecular abundances in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delsemme, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    The chemical composition of comet nuclei and the factors affecting it are discussed, summarizing the results of recent theoretical, experimental, and observational investigations. Consideration is given to the evidence supporting the view that the nucleus is radially differentiation (except for a thin outer layer), surface differentiation by heat processing and outgassing, and mantle buildup on an undifferentiated core. The nature of the refractory and volatile components is examined, and the elemental and isotopic compositions are given in tables and characterized. The uncertain (except for H2O) molecular composition of the volatile fraction is considered, and it is suggested that some oxides or aldehydes (such as CO, CO2, and H2CO), but no large amounts of fully hydrogenated compounds (such as CH4 and NH3) are included.

  14. Space-based measurements of elemental abundances and their relation to solar abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coplan, M. A.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Bochsler, P.; Geiss, J.

    1990-01-01

    The Ion Composition Instrument (ICI) aboard the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft was in the solar wind continuously from August 1978 to December 1982. The results made it possible to establish long-term average solar wind abundance values for helium, oxygen, neon, silicon, and iron. The Charge-Energy-Mass instrument aboard the CCE spacecraft of the AMPTE mission has measured the abundance of these elements in the magnetosheath and has also added carbon, nitrogen, magnesium, and sulfur to the list. There is strong evidence that these magnetosheath abundances are representative of the solar wind. Other sources of solar wind abundances are Solar Energetic Particle experiments and Apollo lunar foils. When comparing the abundances from all of these sources with photospheric abundances, it is clear that helium is depleted in the solar wind while silicon and iron are enhanced. Solar wind abundances for carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon correlate well with the photospheric values. The incorporation of minor ions into the solar wind appears to depend upon both the ionization times for the elements and the Coulomb drag exerted by the outflowing proton flux.

  15. Rare earth element abundances in presolar SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, T. R.; Ávila, J. N.; Lugaro, M.; Cristallo, S.; Holden, P.; Lanc, P.; Nittler, L.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Gyngard, F.; Amari, S.

    2018-01-01

    Individual isotope abundances of Ba, lanthanides of the rare earth element (REE) group, and Hf have been determined in bulk samples of fine-grained silicon carbide (SiC) from the Murchison CM2 chondrite. The analytical protocol involved secondary ion mass spectrometry with combined high mass resolution and energy filtering to exclude REE oxide isobars and Si-C-O clusters from the peaks of interest. Relative sensitivity factors were determined through analysis of NIST SRM reference glasses (610 and 612) as well as a trace-element enriched SiC ceramic. When normalised to chondrite abundances, the presolar SiC REE pattern shows significant deficits at Eu and Yb, which are the most volatile of the REE. The pattern is very similar to that observed for Group III refractory inclusions. The SiC abundances were also normalised to s-process model predictions for the envelope compositions of low-mass (1.5-3 M⊙) AGB stars with close-to-solar metallicities (Z = 0.014 and 0.02). The overall trace element abundances (excluding Eu and Yb) appear consistent with the predicted s-process patterns. The depletions of Eu and Yb suggest that these elements remained in the gas phase during the condensation of SiC. The lack of depletion in some other moderately refractory elements (like Ba), and the presence of volatile elements (e.g. Xe) indicates that these elements were incorporated into SiC by other mechanisms, most likely ion implantation.

  16. Isotope-abundance variations of selected elements (IUPAC technical report)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; De Bievre, P.; Ding, T.; Holden, N.E.; Hopple, J.A.; Krouse, H.R.; Lamberty, A.; Peiser, H.S.; Revesz, K.; Rieder, S.E.; Rosman, K.J.R.; Roth, E.; Taylor, P.D.P.; Vocke, R.D.; Xiao, Y.K.

    2002-01-01

    Documented variations in the isotopic compositions of some chemical elements are responsible for expanded uncertainties in the standard atomic weights published by the Commission on Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. This report summarizes reported variations in the isotopic compositions of 20 elements that are due to physical and chemical fractionation processes (not due to radioactive decay) and their effects on the standard atomic-weight uncertainties. For 11 of those elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, copper, and selenium), standard atomic-weight uncertainties have been assigned values that are substantially larger than analytical uncertainties because of common isotope-abundance variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin. For 2 elements (chromium and thallium), recently reported isotope-abundance variations potentially are large enough to result in future expansion of their atomic-weight uncertainties. For 7 elements (magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, molybdenum, palladium, and tellurium), documented isotope variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin are too small to have a significant effect on their standard atomic-weight uncertainties. This compilation indicates the extent to which the atomic weight of an element in a given material may differ from the standard atomic weight of the element. For most elements given above, data are graphically illustrated by a diagram in which the materials are specified in the ordinate and the compositional ranges are plotted along the abscissa in scales of (1) atomic weight, (2) mole fraction of a selected isotope, and (3) delta value of a selected isotope ratio.

  17. A COMPARISON OF STELLAR ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE TECHNIQUES AND MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Young, Patrick A.; Pagano, Michael D.

    2016-09-01

    Stellar elemental abundances are important for understanding the fundamental properties of a star or stellar group, such as age and evolutionary history, as well as the composition of an orbiting planet. However, as abundance measurement techniques have progressed, there has been little standardization between individual methods and their comparisons. As a result, different stellar abundance procedures determine measurements that vary beyond the quoted error for the same elements within the same stars. The purpose of this paper is to better understand the systematic variations between methods and offer recommendations for producing more accurate results in the future. We invited amore » number of participants from around the world (Australia, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States) to calculate 10 element abundances (C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Fe, Ni, Ba, and Eu) using the same stellar spectra for four stars (HD 361, HD 10700, HD 121504, and HD 202206). Each group produced measurements for each star using (1) their own autonomous techniques, (2) standardized stellar parameters, (3) a standardized line list, and (4) both standardized parameters and a line list. We present the resulting stellar parameters, absolute abundances, and a metric of data similarity that quantifies the homogeneity of the data. We conclude that standardization of some kind, particularly stellar parameters, improves the consistency between methods. However, because results did not converge as more free parameters were standardized, it is clear there are inherent issues within the techniques that need to be reconciled. Therefore, we encourage more conversation and transparency within the community such that stellar abundance determinations can be reproducible as well as accurate and precise.« less

  18. Trace Element Abundance Measurements on Cosmic Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, George

    1996-01-01

    The X-Ray Microprobe on beamline X-26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory was used to determine the abundances of elements from Cr through Sr in individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth's stratosphere and the Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (STXM) on beamline X-1A at the NSLS was used to determine the carbon abundances and spatial distributions in IDPs. In addition, modeling was performed in an attempt to associate particular types of IDPs with specific types of parent bodies, and thus to infer the chemistry, mineralogy, and structural properties of those parent bodies.

  19. NEUTRON-CAPTURE ELEMENT ABUNDANCES IN MAGELLANIC CLOUD PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Mashburn, A. L.; Sterling, N. C.; Madonna, S.

    We present near-infrared spectra of 10 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC), acquired with the FIRE and GNIRS spectrometers on the 6.5 m Baade and 8.1 m Gemini South Telescopes, respectively. We detect Se and/or Kr emission lines in eight of these objects, the first detections of n -capture elements in Magellanic Cloud PNe. Our abundance analysis shows large s -process enrichments of Kr (0.6–1.3 dex) in the six PNe in which it was detected, and Se is enriched by 0.5–0.9 dex in five objects. We also estimate upper limits to Rb andmore » Cd abundances in these objects. Our abundance results for the LMC are consistent with the hypothesis that PNe with 2–3 M {sub ⊙} progenitors dominate the bright end of the PN luminosity function in young gas-rich galaxies. We find no significant correlations between s -process enrichments and other elemental abundances, central star temperature, or progenitor mass, though this is likely due to our small sample size. We determine S abundances from our spectra and find that [S/H] agrees with [Ar/H] to within 0.2 dex for most objects, but is lower than [O/H] by 0.2–0.4 dex in some PNe, possibly due to O enrichment via third dredge-up. Our results demonstrate that n -capture elements can be detected in PNe belonging to nearby galaxies with ground-based telescopes, allowing s -process enrichments to be studied in PN populations with well-determined distances.« less

  20. Heavy-Element Abundances in Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2004-01-01

    We survey the relative abundances of elements with 1 less than or = Z less than or = 82 in solar energetic particle (SEP) events observed at 2 - 10 MeV amu" during nearly 9 years aboard the Wind spacecraft, with special emphasis on enhanced abundances of elements with 2Z greater than or = 34. Abundances of Fe/O again show a bimodal distribution with distinct contributions from impulsive and gradual SEP events as seen in earlier solar cycles. Periods with greatly enhanced abundances of (50 less than or = Z less than or = 56)/O, like those with enhanced He-3/He-4, fall prominently in the Fe-rich population of the impulsive SEP events. In a sample of the 39 largest impulsive events, 25 have measurable enhancements in (50 less than or = Z less than or = 56)/O and (76 less than or = Z less than or = 82)/O, relative to coronal values, ranging from approx. 100 to 10,000. By contrast, in a sample of 45 large gradual events the corresponding enhancements vary from approx. 0.2 to 20. However, the magnitude of the heavy-element enhancements in impulsive events is less striking than their strong correlation with the Fe spectral index and flare size, with the largest enhancements occurring in flares with the steepest Fe spectra, the smallest Fe fluence, and the lowest X-ray intensity, as reported here for the first time Thus it seem that small events with low energy input can produce only steep spectra of the dominant species but accelerate rare heavy elements with great efficiency, probably by selective absorption of resonant waves in the flare plasma. With increased energy input, enhancements diminish, as heavy ions are depleted, and spectra of the dominant species harden.

  1. Heavy-Element Abundances in Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Ng, C. K.

    2004-01-01

    We survey the relative abundances of elements with 1 < or equal to Z < or equal to 82 in solar energetic particle (SEP) events observed at 2-10 MeV/amu during nearly 9 years aboard the Wind spacecraft, with special emphasis on enhanced abundances of elements with Z > or equal to 34. Abundances of Fe/O again show a bimodal distribution with distinct contributions from impulsive and gradual SEP events as seen in earlier solar cycles. Periods with greatly enhanced abundances of (50 < or equal to Z < or equal to 56)/O, like those with enhanced (3)He/(4)He, fall prominently in the Fe-rich population of the impulsive SEP events. In a sample of the 39 largest impulsive events, 25 have measurable enhancements in (50 < or equal to z < or equal to 56)/O and (76 < or equal to Z < or equal to 82)/O, relative to coronal values, ranging from approx. 100 to 10,000. By contrast, in a sample of 45 large gradual events the corresponding enhancements vary from approx. 0.2 to 20. However, the magnitude of the heavy-element enhancements in impulsive events is less striking than their strong correlation with the Fe spectral index and flare size, with the largest enhancements occurring in flares with the steepest Fe spectra, the smallest Fe fluence, and the lowest X-ray intensity, as reported here for the first time. Thus it seems that small events with low energy input can produce only steep spectra of the dominant species but accelerate rare heavy elements with great efficiency, probably by selective absorption of resonant waves in the flare plasma. With increased energy input, enhancements diminish, as heavy ions are depleted, and spectra of the dominant species harden.

  2. Fossil Signatures Using Elemental Abundance Distributions and Bayesian Probabilistic Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    Elemental abundances (C6, N7, O8, Na11, Mg12, Al3, P15, S16, Cl17, K19, Ca20, Ti22, Mn25, Fe26, and Ni28) were obtained for a set of terrestrial fossils and the rock matrix surrounding them. Principal Component Analysis extracted five factors accounting for the 92.5% of the data variance, i.e. information content, of the elemental abundance data. Hierarchical Cluster Analysis provided unsupervised sample classification distinguishing fossil from matrix samples on the basis of either raw abundances or PCA input that agreed strongly with visual classification. A stochastic, non-linear Artificial Neural Network produced a Bayesian probability of correct sample classification. The results provide a quantitative probabilistic methodology for discriminating terrestrial fossils from the surrounding rock matrix using chemical information. To demonstrate the applicability of these techniques to the assessment of meteoritic samples or in situ extraterrestrial exploration, we present preliminary data on samples of the Orgueil meteorite. In both systems an elemental signature produces target classification decisions remarkably consistent with morphological classification by a human expert using only structural (visual) information. We discuss the possibility of implementing a complexity analysis metric capable of automating certain image analysis and pattern recognition abilities of the human eye using low magnification optical microscopy images and discuss the extension of this technique across multiple scales.

  3. Abundances in 54 Chemical Elements in Przybylski's Star: HD 101065

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, Charles R.; et al.

    We report abundances from carbon through uranium, based on ESO observations: SN >= 200, resolution 80,000. Light elements, through the iron group scatter with respect to the standard abundance distribution (SAD). Carbon and oxygen are mildly depleted, as are iron and nickel, while titanium and cobalt are enhanced. Calcium is depleted, but silicon, sulfur, and scandium are solar. The heavier elements including some 4d and REE's are generally enhanced by 3 to 4 dex. This is not extreme for an Ap star. The truly bizarre appearance of the spectrum is an an ionization phenomena. Some hotter Ap stars have comparable lanthanide abundances, but their second spectra are weaker due to double ionization. Our adopted model has a Te of 6600K, and log(g) = 4.2. Because of the high line opacity, the photospheric pressure is low, and convection is ineffective. Chemical separation has distorted the third r-process peak only slightly. The overall coherence of the heavier elements is remarkable. Additional information is available from http://www.astro.lsa.umich.edu/users/cowley/przyb.html. This abstract is based on a paper submitted to MNRAS, by CRC, and coauthors: T. A. Ryabchikova (Moscow & Vienna), F. Kupka (Vienna), D. Bord (Michigan), G. Mathys (ESO), and W. P. Bidelman (Case-Western Reserve).

  4. Element Abundance Ratios in the Quiet Sun Transition Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P. R.

    2018-03-01

    Element abundance ratios of magnesium to neon (Mg/Ne) and neon to oxygen (Ne/O) in the transition region of the quiet Sun have been derived by re-assessing previously published data from the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory in the light of new atomic data. The quiet Sun Mg/Ne ratio is important for assessing the effect of magnetic activity on the mechanism of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, while the Ne/O ratio can be used to infer the solar photospheric abundance of neon, which cannot be measured directly. The average Mg/Ne ratio is found to be 0.52 ± 0.11, which applies over the temperature region 0.2–0.7 MK, and is consistent with the earlier study. The Ne/O ratio is, however, about 40% larger, taking the value 0.24 ± 0.05 that applies to the temperature range 0.08–0.40 MK. The increase is mostly due to changes in ionization and recombination rates that affect the equilibrium ionization balance. If the Ne/O ratio is interpreted as reflecting the photospheric ratio, then the photospheric neon abundance is 8.08 ± 0.09 or 8.15 ± 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale for which hydrogen is 12), according to whether the oxygen abundances of M. Asplund et al. or E. Caffau et al. are used. The updated photospheric neon abundance implies a Mg/Ne FIP bias for the quiet Sun of 1.6 ± 0.6.

  5. Source abundances of ultra heavy elements derived from UHCRE measurements.

    PubMed

    Domingo, C; Font, J; Baixeras, C; Fernandez, F

    1996-11-01

    A total of 205 tracks have been located, measured, and positively identified as originating from Ultra Heavy (Z > or = 65) cosmic ray ions with energies over 2 GeV/amu in the 10 UHCRE plastic track detector (mainly Lexan polycarbonate) stacks studied by our Group. About 40 values of reduced etch rate S have been obtained along each of these tracks. A method based on determining the gradient of S, together with calibration in accelerators, is used to determine the charge of each ion resulting in one of such tracks to obtain the charge spectrum of the recorded Ultra Heavy ions. The abundance ratio of ions with 87 < or = Z < or = 100 to those with 74 < or = Z < or = 86 as well as that of ions with 81 < or = Z < or = 86 to those with 74 < or = Z < or = 80 are calculated at 0.016 and 0.32, respectively, which agree with the values obtained from measurements in the HEAO-3 and Ariel-6 experiments. The abundance ratio of ions with 70 < or = Z < or = 73 to those with 74 < or = Z < or = 86 is also calculated, but its value (0.074) did not seem to be significant because of our detectors' low registration efficiency in the charge range 70 < or = Z < or = 73. A computer program developed by our Group, based on the Leaky Box cosmic ray propagation model, has been used to determine the source abundances of cosmic ray nuclei with Z > or = 65 inferred from the abundances measured in the UHCRE. It appeared that r-process synthesized elements were overabundant compared to the Solar System abundances, as predicted by other authors.

  6. The interstellar abundances of tin and four other heavy elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, L. M.; Welty, D. E.; Morton, D. C.; Spitzer, L.; York, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    Spectra recorded at 1150-1600 A with an instrumental resolution near 16 km/s were obtained with the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph on board the HST. The gaseous interstellar abundances of five heavy elements along the light paths to 23 Ori, 15 Mon, 1 Sco, Pi Sco, and Pi Aqr were determined from the observations. The 1400.450 A line of Sn II was detected and identified toward three stars; at Z = 50, tin is the first element from the fifth row of the periodic table to be identified in the interstellar medium. One spectral line of each of Cu II (Z = 29) and Ga II (Z = 31), three lines of Ge II (Z = 32), and two lines of Kr I (Z = 36) were also detected toward some or all of the five stars. The depletions of these five heavy elements generally decrease monotonically with increasing atomic number toward each of the six stars, and tin is generally undepleted within the observational errors. The depletions of 26 elements from the interstellar gas in an average dense interstellar cloud appear to correlate with the elemental 'nebular' condensation temperatures more closely than with the first ionization potentials.

  7. Measuring Elemental Abundances in Impulsive Heating Events with EIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry; Doschek, George A.; Young, Peter

    2015-04-01

    It is well established that elemental abundances vary in the solar atmosphere and that this variation is organized by first ionization potential (FIP). Previous studies have indicated that in the solar corona low FIP elements, such as Fe, Si, and Mg, are enriched relative to high FIP elements, such as H, He, C, N, and O. In this paper we report on measurements of plasma composition made during transient heating events observed at transition region temperatures with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. During these events the intensities of O IV, V, and VI emission lines are enhanced relative to emission lines from Mg V, VI, and VII and indicate a composition close to that of the photosphere. Differential emission measure calculations show a broad distribution of temperatures in these events. Long-lived coronal structures, in contrast, show an enrichment of low FIP elements and relatively narrow temperature distributions. We conjecture that plasma composition is an important signature of the coronal heating process, with impulsive heating leading to the evaporation of unfractionated material from the lower layers of the solar atmosphere and higher frequency heating leading to the accumulation of low-FIP elements in the corona.

  8. Heavy-Element Abundances in Blue Compact Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izotov, Yuri I.; Thuan, Trinh X.

    1999-02-01

    We present high-quality ground-based spectroscopic observations of 54 supergiant H II regions in 50 low-metallicity blue compact galaxies with oxygen abundances 12+logO/H between 7.1 and 8.3. We use the data to determine abundances for the elements N, O, Ne, S, Ar, and Fe. We also analyze Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Faint Object Spectrograph archival spectra of 10 supergiant H II regions to derive C and Si abundances in a subsample of seven BCGs. The main result of the present study is that none of the heavy element-to-oxygen abundance ratios studied here (C/O, N/O, Ne/O, Si/O, S/O, Ar/O, Fe/O) depend on oxygen abundance for BCGs with 12+logO/H<=7.6 (Z<=Zsolar/20). This constancy implies that all of these heavy elements have a primary origin and are produced by the same massive (M>=10 Msolar) stars responsible for O production. The dispersion of the ratios C/O and N/O in these galaxies is found to be remarkably small, being only +/-0.03 and +/-0.02 dex, respectively. This very small dispersion is strong evidence against any time-delayed production of C and primary N in the lowest metallicity BCGs (secondary N production is negligible at these low metallicities). The absence of a time-delayed production of C and N is consistent with the scenario that galaxies with 12+logO/H<=7.6 are now undergoing their first burst of star formation, and that they are therefore young, with ages not exceeding 40 Myr. If very low metallicity BCGs are indeed young, this would argue against the commonly held belief that C and N are produced by intermediate-mass (3 Msolar<=M<=9 Msolar) stars at very low metallicities, as these stars would not have yet completed their evolution in these lowest metallicity galaxies. In higher metallicity BCGs (7.6<12+logO/H<8.2), the abundance ratios Ne/O, Si/O, S/O, Ar/O, and Fe/O retain the same constant value they had at lower metallicities. By contrast, there is an increase of C/O and N/O along with their dispersions at a given O. We interpret this

  9. CAMSS: A spectroscopic survey of meteoroid elemental abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Gural, P.; Berdeu, A.

    2014-07-01

    The main element abundances (Mg, Fe, Na, ...) of some Near Earth Objects can be measured by meteor spectroscopy. The Cameras for All-sky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS) Spectrograph project aims to scale up meteor spectroscopy in the same way as CAMS scaled up the measurement of precise meteoroid trajectories from multi-station video observations. Spectra are recorded with sixteen low-light video cameras, each equipped with a high 1379 lines/mm objective transmission grating. The cameras are operated in survey mode and have recorded spectra in the San Francisco Bay Area every clear night since March 12, 2013. An interactive software tool is being developed to calibrate the wavelength alignments projected on the focal plane and extract the meteor spectra. Because the meteoroid trajectory and pre-atmospheric orbit are also independently measured, the absolute abundances of elements in the meteoroid plasma can be calculated as a function of altitude, while the orbital information can tie the meteoroid back to its parent object. % 2007AdSpR..39..538A Berezhnoy, A. A., Borovička, J. 2012, ACM 2012, Abstract 6142 1993A&A...279..627B 1994A&AS..103...83B 2005Icar..174...15B 2011pimo.conf...28G Gural, P. S. 2012, M&PS, 47, 1405 1997ApJ...479..441J 2007AdSpR..39..491J 2011Icar..216...40J Gomez, N., Madiedo, J. M., & Trigo-Rodriguez, J. M. 2013, 44th LPSC, Abstract 1239 2007AdSpR..39..513K 2004AJ....128.2564M 2007AdSpR..39..583R 2007AdSpR..39..517T 2011A&A...526A.126W

  10. Apollo 16 returned lunar samples - Lithophile trace-element abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpotts, J. A.; Schuhmann, S.; Kouns, C. W.; Lum, R. K. L.; Bickel, A. L.; Schnetzler, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Lithium, K, Rb, Sr, Ba, rare-earth, Zr, and Hf abundances have been determined by mass-spectrometric isotope-dilution for Apollo 16 soils, anorthosite 61016, and 'basalt' 68415 whole-rock and separated pyroxene and plagioclase. Our sample of 61016 is similar to some other lunar anorthosites in lithophile trace-element concentrations but at a slightly lower level. It was probably accumulated from a little differentiated basalt. Basalt 68415 might be a homogeneous mixture of KREEP and anorthosite material; it appears to have crystallized under conditions as reducing as those holding for mare-basalts. The soil fines cover only a limited compositional range. No obvious chemical differences were noted between the Descartes and Cayley formations. Most of the compositional variation of the soils can be accounted for in terms of the addition of plagioclase. The existence of very high alumina basalt as an independent magma-type appears debatable in view of its KREEP-like lithophile trace-element relative concentrations and the observed lunar radioactivity distribution.

  11. Coronal Elemental Abundances in Solar Emerging Flux Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Deborah; Brooks, David H.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; James, Alexander W.; Démoulin, Pascal; Long, David M.; Warren, Harry P.; Williams, David R.

    2018-03-01

    The chemical composition of solar and stellar atmospheres differs from the composition of their photospheres. Abundances of elements with low first ionization potential (FIP) are enhanced in the corona relative to high-FIP elements with respect to the photosphere. This is known as the FIP effect and it is important for understanding the flow of mass and energy through solar and stellar atmospheres. We used spectroscopic observations from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board the Hinode observatory to investigate the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of coronal plasma composition within solar emerging flux regions inside a coronal hole. Plasma evolved to values exceeding those of the quiet-Sun corona during the emergence/early-decay phase at a similar rate for two orders of magnitude in magnetic flux, a rate comparable to that observed in large active regions (ARs) containing an order of magnitude more flux. During the late-decay phase, the rate of change was significantly faster than what is observed in large, decaying ARs. Our results suggest that the rate of increase during the emergence/early-decay phase is linked to the fractionation mechanism that leads to the FIP effect, whereas the rate of decrease during the later decay phase depends on the rate of reconnection with the surrounding magnetic field and its plasma composition.

  12. Trace Element Abundances in Refractory Inclusions from Antarctic Micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greshake, A.; Hoppe, P.; Bischoff, A.

    1995-09-01

    Refractory inclusions are charcteristic components in carbonaceous chondrites. Therefore, refractory inclusions found in micrometeorites can give important hints about the relationship between micrometeorites and carbonaceous chondrites. So far, only a few inclusions were found in micrometeorites [1-4]. In this study we report the first trace element analysis of perovskite and fassaite found in micrometeorites. We studied two Antarctic micrometeorites by ASEM, EMP, and SIMS. The first particle is 120 micrometers in size mainly consisting of a fine-grained matrix of dehydrated former phyllosilikates that enclose a 5 micrometers sized perovskite [5]. The perovskite is surrounded by a 1 micrometers thick rim of ilmenite and contains up to 1.3 wt% FeO as determined by EMP. The trace element abundances were determined by SIMS following the procedure described by [6]. The REE pattern of the perovskite is shown in Fig. 1. The pattern is closely related to the Group II pattern with its typical depletion of the more refractory REEs [7]. It is also very similar to the REE abundances of perovskite from Murchison (CM) [8] and CH-chondrites [9]. This may indicate a relationship between this micrometeorite and components in carbonaceous chondrites. The second micrometeorite is 100 micrometers in size consisting of a fine-grained (20 micrometers across) and a coarse-grained (80 micrometers across) area. Both areas contain fassaite with different chemical compositions. The particle was previously analyzed by Lindstrom and Kloeck [1] without knowing the mineralogy. We carried out SIMS analysis of each area of the micrometeorite separately. The TEE patterns of these two areas are similar and show in general a Group III pattern (20-30x CI) in which the more refractory REEs are not fractionated. The negative Eu anomaly is much more apparent in the coarse-grained area and no Yb anomaly is apparent in one of the areas. This is the first CAI of a micrometeorite showing a Group III REE

  13. Elemental and isotopic abundances in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiss, J.

    1972-01-01

    The use of collecting foils and lunar material to assay the isotopic composition of the solar wind is reviewed. Arguments are given to show that lunar surface correlated gases are likely to be most useful in studying the history of the solar wind, though the isotopic abundances are thought to give a good approximation to the solar wind composition. The results of the analysis of Surveyor material are also given. The conditions leading to a significant component of the interstellar gas entering the inner solar system are reviewed and suggestions made for experimental searches for this fraction. A critical discussion is given of the different ways in which the basic solar composition could be modified by fractionation taking place between the sun's surface and points of observation such as on the Moon or in interplanetary space. An extended review is made of the relation of isotopic and elemental composition of the interplanetary gas to the dynamic behavior of the solar corona, especially processes leading to fractionation. Lastly, connection is made between the subject of composition, nucleosynthesis and the convective zone of the sun, and processes leading to modification of initial accretion of certain gases on the Earth and Moon.

  14. Temperature and Gravity Dependence of Trace Element Abundances in Hot DA White Dwarfs (94-EUVE-094)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, David S.

    1998-01-01

    EUV spectroscopy has shown that DA white dwarfs hotter than about 45,000 K may contain trace heavy elements, while those hotter than about 50,000 K almost always have significant abundances of trace heavy elements. One of our continuing challenges is to identify and determine the abundances of these trace constituents, and then to relate the observed abundance patterns to the present conditions and previous evolutionary histories of the hot DA white dwarfs.

  15. Trace Element Abundances in Eucrite Basalts: Enrichment or Depletion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castle, N. R.

    2018-05-01

    It is not clear how incompatible trace element (ITE) variation in eucrite basalts originated. Here, mechanisms for relative ITE enrichment or depletion are experimentally evaluated in an attempt to reconcile the Stannern and main group eucrites.

  16. The Alpha Centauri binary system. Atmospheric parameters and element abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto de Mello, G. F.; Lyra, W.; Keller, G. R.

    2008-09-01

    Context: The α Centauri binary system, owing to its duplicity, proximity and brightness, and its components' likeness to the Sun, is a fundamental calibrating object for the theory of stellar structure and evolution and the determination of stellar atmospheric parameters. This role, however, is hindered by a considerable disagreement in the published analyses of its atmospheric parameters and abundances. Aims: We report a new spectroscopic analysis of both components of the α Centauri system, compare published analyses of the system, and attempt to quantify the discrepancies still extant in the determinations of the atmospheric parameters and abundances of these stars. Methods: The analysis is differential with respect to the Sun, based on spectra with R = 35 000 and signal-to-noise ratio ≥1000, and employed spectroscopic and photometric methods to obtain as many independent T_eff determinations as possible. We also check the atmospheric parameters for consistency against the results of the dynamical analysis and the positions of the components in a theoretical HR diagram. Results: The spectroscopic atmospheric parameters of the system are found to be T_eff = (5847 ± 27) K, [Fe/H] = +0.24 ± 0.03, log g = 4.34 ± 0.12, and ξt = 1.46 ± 0.03 km s-1, for α Cen A, and T_eff = (5316 ± 28) K, [Fe/H] = +0.25 ± 0.04, log g = 4.44 ± 0.15, and ξt = 1.28 ± 0.15 km s^-1 for α Cen B. The parameters were derived from the simultaneous excitation & ionization equilibria of Fe I and Fe II lines. T_effs were also obtained by fitting theoretical profiles to the Hα line and from photometric calibrations. Conclusions: We reached good agreement between the three criteria for α Cen A. For α Cen B the spectroscopic T_eff is ~140 K higher than the other two determinations. We discuss possible origins of this inconsistency, concluding that the presence of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects is a probable candidate, but we note that there is as yet no consensus on

  17. The abundances of the elements in sharp-lined early type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    1992-01-01

    An International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observing strategy that has yielded co-added spectra with enhanced S/N ratios for several A and B stars was established. New observations by Roby and Adelman using the same technique were added two new Hg-Mn stars into this sample. A long-term study of elemental abundances in this uniform, high-quality set of IUE spectra for 13 stars was begun. The first stages of this project are reported: abundances for N, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni. The study of the Fe-peak elements show that our data set can provide accurate abundances and that abundances obtained from UV and optical spectra often are in good agreement. The groundwork for selfconsistent abundance analyses of more exotic elements in our long term project was provided.

  18. Abundances of Elements in Jupiter’s Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desch, Steven; Monga, Nikhil

    2014-11-01

    As measured by the Galileo mission, Jupiter’s atmosphere is enriched (relative to H and a protosolar composition) in Ar, Kr, Xe, C, N, S and P, by a similar factor of 3 [1]; it is depleted in He, Ne and O. Fractionation of Ar from H requires temperatures < 35 K [2], but multiple theories exist invoking trapping of species in ices, in principle explaining these enrichments [3-5]. He is depleted by 18%, and Ne by 88% [1]. At the ~1 Mbar level in Jupiter’s atmosphere, where H transitions to a metallic state, He droplets can form that precipitate to Jupiter’s core; Ne, but not Ar, is expected to dissolve into these droplets, explaining the depletion of both He and Ne [6]. The factor-of-2 depletion of O is currently unexplained but is attributed to meteorological effects [7]. The Juno mission en route to Jupiter will measure the global abundance of O [8].We present a model for the enrichments of Ar, Kr, Xe, C, N, S and P. Our model [8] builds on that of [5] in which Jupiter accretes nebular gas depleted in H by photoevaporation. Our model improvements allow enrichments with less mass loss, and explain how water vapor can be produced at T < 35 K, necessary for trapping of Ar and other species. We predict that Jupiter accreted with a factor-of-3 enrichment of O, but was then sequestered into Jupiter’s core along with He and Ne, potentially explaining its factor-of-2 depletion.References:[1] Desch, SJ, Shumway, J, & Monga, N, submitted to Icarus.[2] Bar-Nun, A, Herman, G, Laufer, D, & Rappaport, ML 1985. Icarus 63, 317.[3] Owen, T, et al.1999, Nature 402, 269. [4] Gautier, D, Hersant, F, Mousis, O, & Lunine, JI 2001, Ap.J. 550, L227.[5] Guillot, T & Hueso, R 2006, Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 367, L47.[6] Wilson, HF & Militzer, B 2010, Phys Rev Lett.104, 121101.[7] Atreya, SK et al. 1999, Planet. Space Sci. 47, 1243.[7] Janssen, MA et al. 2005, Icarus 173, 447. [8] Monga, N & Desch, SJ, submitted to Ap.J.

  19. The elemental abundances (with uncertainties) of the most Earth-like planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyang S.; Lineweaver, Charles H.; Ireland, Trevor R.

    2018-01-01

    To first order, the Earth as well as other rocky planets in the Solar System and rocky exoplanets orbiting other stars, are refractory pieces of the stellar nebula out of which they formed. To estimate the chemical composition of rocky exoplanets based on their stellar hosts' elemental abundances, we need a better understanding of the devolatilization that produced the Earth. To quantify the chemical relationships between the Earth, the Sun and other bodies in the Solar System, the elemental abundances of the bulk Earth are required. The key to comparing Earth's composition with those of other objects is to have a determination of the bulk composition with an appropriate estimate of uncertainties. Here we present concordance estimates (with uncertainties) of the elemental abundances of the bulk Earth, which can be used in such studies. First we compile, combine and renormalize a large set of heterogeneous literature values of the primitive mantle (PM) and of the core. We then integrate standard radial density profiles of the Earth and renormalize them to the current best estimate for the mass of the Earth. Using estimates of the uncertainties in i) the density profiles, ii) the core-mantle boundary and iii) the inner core boundary, we employ standard error propagation to obtain a core mass fraction of 32.5 ± 0.3 wt%. Our bulk Earth abundances are the weighted sum of our concordance core abundances and concordance PM abundances. Unlike previous efforts, the uncertainty on the core mass fraction is propagated to the uncertainties on the bulk Earth elemental abundances. Our concordance estimates for the abundances of Mg, Sn, Br, B, Cd and Be are significantly lower than previous estimates of the bulk Earth. Our concordance estimates for the abundances of Na, K, Cl, Zn, Sr, F, Ga, Rb, Nb, Gd, Ta, He, Ar, and Kr are significantly higher. The uncertainties on our elemental abundances usefully calibrate the unresolved discrepancies between standard Earth models under

  20. Anatomy of a cluster IDP. Part 2: Noble gas abundances, trace element geochemistry, isotopic abundances, and trace organic chemistry of several fragments from L2008#5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Mckay, David S.; Messenger, S.; Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Walker, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: noble gas content and release temperatures; trace element abundances; heating summary of cluster fragments; isotopic measurements; and trace organic chemistry.

  1. The Abundances of the Fe Group Elements in AV 304, an Abundance Standard in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Geraldine J.; Lanz, Thierry; Bouret, Jean-Claude; Proffitt, Charles R.; Adelman, Saul J.; Hubeny, Ivan

    2018-06-01

    AV 304 is a B0.5 IV field star in the Small Magellanic Cloud with ultra-sharp spectral lines that has emerged as an abundance standard. We have combined recent spectroscopic observations from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope with archival data from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and ESO’s VLT/UVES to determine the abundances of the Fe group elements (Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, & Ni). The analysis was carried through using the Hubeny/Lanz NLTE programs TLUSTY/SYNSPEC. The COS observations were secured with the G130M, G160M, G185M, and G225M gratings. Combined with the FUSE data, we have achieved spectral coverage in the UV from 950 to 2400 A. Measurable lines from the Fe group, except for a very few multiplets of Fe II, III are not observed in optical spectra. The following stellar parameters were found: Teff = 27500±500 K, log g = 3.7±0.1 cm/s2, Vturb= 1±1 km/s, and v sin i = 8 ±2 km/s. The Fe abundance appears to be only slightly lower than the mean depletion in the SMC, but the other Fe group elements are underabundant by 0.3 dex or more. This study confirmed the low abundance of nitrogen (-1.25 dex relative to the solar value) that was reported by Peters & Adelman (ASP Conf. Series, 348, p. 136, 2006). Whereas the light elements are delivered to the ISM by core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), the Fe group elements are believed to come mostly from low/intermediate mass binaries containing white dwarfs that undergo SNe Ia explosions. A single SNe Ia can deliver 0.5 solar masses of pure Fe (and maybe Mn) to the ISM compared with about 0.07 solar masses from a CCSNe. It appears that there is very little processed material from its interior in the atmosphere of AV 304 and that the star did not form from an interstellar cloud that was enriched by material from earlier supernova activity. Support from STScI grants HST-GO-14081.002 and HST-GO-13346.022, and USC’s Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) program is

  2. Elemental Abundances of Ultra-Heavy Galactic Cosmic Rays from the SuperTIGER Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    The SuperTIGER (Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) experiment was launched on a long-duration balloon flight from Williams Field, Antarctica, on December 8, 2012. The instrument measured the relative elemental abundances of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) for charge (Z) Z>10 with excellent charge resolution, displaying well resolved individual element peaks for 10 ≤ Z ≤ 40. During its record-breaking 55-day flight, SuperTIGER collected ˜4.73 x10^{6} Iron nuclei, ˜8 times as many as detected by its predecessor, TIGER, with charge resolution at iron of 0.17 cu. SuperTIGER measures charge (Z) and energy (E) using a combination of three scintillator and two Cherenkov detectors, and employs a scintillating fiber hodoscope for event trajectory determination. The SuperTIGER data have been analyzed to correct for instrument effects and remove events that underwent nuclear interactions within the instrument. The data include more than 600 events in the charge range 30 < Z ≤ 40. SuperTIGER is the first experiment to resolve elemental abundances of every element in this charge range with high statistics and single-element resolution. The relative abundances of the galactic cosmic ray source have been derived from the measured relative elemental abundances using atmospheric and interstellar propagations. The SuperTIGER measured abundances are generally consistent with previous experimental results from TIGER and ACE-CRIS, with improved statistical precision. The SuperTIGER results confirm the earlier results from TIGER, supporting a model of cosmic-ray origin in OB associations, with preferential acceleration of refractory elements over volatile elements ordered by atomic mass (A). A second SuperTIGER Antarctic flight is planned for December 2017. Details of the instrument, flight, data analysis, and ongoing preparations will be presented.

  3. Developing ISM Dust Grain Models with Precision Elemental Abundances from IXO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencic, L. A.; Smith, R. K.; Juet, A.

    2009-01-01

    The exact nature of interstellar dust grains in the Galaxy remains mysterious, despite their ubiquity. Many viable models exist, based on available IR-UV data and assumed elemental abundances. However, the abundances, which are perhaps the most stringent constraint, are not well known: modelers must use proxies in the absence of direct measurements for the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). Recent revisions of these proxy values have only added to confusion over which is the best representative for the diffuse ISM, and highlighted the need for direct, high signal-to-noise measurements from the ISM itself. The International X-ray Observatory's superior facilities will enable high-precision elemental abundance measurements. We ill show how these results will measure both the overall ISM abundances and challenge dust models, allowing us to construct a more realistic picture of the ISM.

  4. Isotope-abundance variations and atomic weights of selected elements: 2016 (IUPAC Technical Report)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Shrestha, Yesha

    2016-01-01

    There are 63 chemical elements that have two or more isotopes that are used to determine their standard atomic weights. The isotopic abundances and atomic weights of these elements can vary in normal materials due to physical and chemical fractionation processes (not due to radioactive decay). These variations are well known for 12 elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, bromine, and thallium), and the standard atomic weight of each of these elements is given by IUPAC as an interval with lower and upper bounds. Graphical plots of selected materials and compounds of each of these elements have been published previously. Herein and at the URL http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7GF0RN2, we provide isotopic abundances, isotope-delta values, and atomic weights for each of the upper and lower bounds of these materials and compounds.

  5. STATISTICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE RATIOS: OBSERVATIONS FROM THE ACE SPACECRAFT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.-L.; Zhang, H.

    We statistically analyze the elemental galactic cosmic ray (GCR) composition measurements of elements 5 ≤ Z ≤ 28 within the energy range 30–500 MeV/nucleon from the CRIS instrument on board the ACE spacecraft in orbit about the L1 Lagrange point during the period from 1997 to 2014. Similarly to the last unusual solar minimum, the elevated elemental intensities of all heavy nuclei during the current weak solar maximum in 2014 are ∼40% higher than that of the previous solar maximum in 2002, which has been attributed to the weak modulation associated with low solar activity levels during the ongoing weakestmore » solar maximum since the dawn of space age. In addition, the abundance ratios of heavy nuclei with respect to elemental oxygen are generally independent of kinetic energy per nucleon in the energy region 60–200 MeV/nuc, in good agreement with previous experiments. Furthermore, the abundance ratios of most relatively abundant species, except carbon, exhibit considerable solar-cycle variation, which are obviously positively correlated with the sunspot numbers with about one-year time lag. We also find that the percentage variation of abundance ratios for most elements are approximately identical. These preliminary results provide valuable insights into the characteristics of elemental heavy nuclei composition and place new and significant constraints on future GCR heavy nuclei propagation and modulation models.« less

  6. COMPLETE ELEMENT ABUNDANCES OF NINE STARS IN THE r -PROCESS GALAXY RETICULUM II

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Alexander P.; Frebel, Anna; Chiti, Anirudh

    We present chemical abundances derived from high-resolution Magellan /Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle spectra of the nine brightest known red giant members of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Reticulum II (Ret II). These stars span the full metallicity range of Ret II (−3.5 < [Fe/H] < −2). Seven of the nine stars have extremely high levels of r -process material ([Eu/Fe] ∼ 1.7), in contrast to the extremely low neutron-capture element abundances found in every other ultra-faint dwarf galaxy studied to date. The other two stars are the most metal-poor stars in the system ([Fe/H] < −3), and they have neutron-capture elementmore » abundance limits similar to those in other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We confirm that the relative abundances of Sr, Y, and Zr in these stars are similar to those found in r -process halo stars, but they are ∼0.5 dex lower than the solar r -process pattern. If the universal r -process pattern extends to those elements, the stars in Ret II display the least contaminated known r -process pattern. The abundances of lighter elements up to the iron peak are otherwise similar to abundances of stars in the halo and in other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. However, the scatter in abundance ratios is large enough to suggest that inhomogeneous metal mixing is required to explain the chemical evolution of this galaxy. The presence of low amounts of neutron-capture elements in other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies may imply the existence of additional r -process sites besides the source of r -process elements in Ret II. Galaxies like Ret II may be the original birth sites of r -process enhanced stars now found in the halo.« less

  7. The Abundance of Iron-Peak Elements and the Dust Composition in eta Carinae: Manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, M. A.; Melendez, M.; Hartman, H.; Gull, T. R.; Lodders, K.

    2010-01-01

    We study the chemical abundances of the Strontium Filament found in the ejecta of (eta) Carinae. In particular, we derive the abundances of iron-peak elements front spectra of their singly ionized ions present in the optical/IR spectra. In this paper we analyze the spectrum of Mn II using a new non-LTE model for this system. In constructing this models we carried out theoretical calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact excitation rate coefficients. We find that relative to Ni the gas phase abundance ratio of Mn is roughly solar, similar to the Cr abundance but in contrast to the large enhancements in the abundances of Sc and Ti. NVe interpret this result as an indication of non-equilibrium condensation in the ejecta of (eta) Carinae.

  8. Solar abundance ratios of the iron-peak elements in the Perseus cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie

    The metal abundance of the hot plasma that permeates galaxy clusters represents the accumulation of heavy elements produced by billions of supernovae1. Therefore, X-ray spectroscopy of the intracluster medium provides an opportunity to investigate the nature of supernova explosions integrated over cosmic time. In particular, the abundance of the iron-peak elements (chromium, manganese, iron and nickel) is key to understanding how the progenitors of typical type Ia supernovae evolve and explode2–6. Recent X-ray studies of the intracluster medium found that the abundance ratios of these elements differ substantially from those seen in the Sun, suggesting differences between the nature ofmore » type Ia supernovae in the clusters and in the Milky Way. However, because the K-shell transition lines of chromium and manganese are weak and those of iron and nickel are very close in photon energy, highresolution spectroscopy is required for an accurate determination of the abundances of these elements. Here in this paper we report observations of the Perseus cluster, with statistically significant detections of the resonance emission from chromium, manganese and nickel. Our measurements, combined with the latest atomic models, reveal that these elements have near-solar abundance ratios with respect to iron, in contrast to previous claims. Comparison between our results and modern nucleosynthesis calculations disfavours the hypothesis that type Ia supernova progenitors are exclusively white dwarfs with masses well below the Chandrasekhar limit (about 1.4 times the mass of the Sun). The observed abundance pattern of the iron-peak elements can be explained by taking into account a combination of near- and sub-Chandrasekhar-mass type Ia supernova systems, adding to the mounting evidence that both progenitor types make a substantial contribution to cosmic chemical enrichment.« less

  9. Solar abundance ratios of the iron-peak elements in the Perseus cluster

    DOE PAGES

    Aharonian, Felix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; ...

    2017-11-13

    The metal abundance of the hot plasma that permeates galaxy clusters represents the accumulation of heavy elements produced by billions of supernovae1. Therefore, X-ray spectroscopy of the intracluster medium provides an opportunity to investigate the nature of supernova explosions integrated over cosmic time. In particular, the abundance of the iron-peak elements (chromium, manganese, iron and nickel) is key to understanding how the progenitors of typical type Ia supernovae evolve and explode2–6. Recent X-ray studies of the intracluster medium found that the abundance ratios of these elements differ substantially from those seen in the Sun, suggesting differences between the nature ofmore » type Ia supernovae in the clusters and in the Milky Way. However, because the K-shell transition lines of chromium and manganese are weak and those of iron and nickel are very close in photon energy, highresolution spectroscopy is required for an accurate determination of the abundances of these elements. Here in this paper we report observations of the Perseus cluster, with statistically significant detections of the resonance emission from chromium, manganese and nickel. Our measurements, combined with the latest atomic models, reveal that these elements have near-solar abundance ratios with respect to iron, in contrast to previous claims. Comparison between our results and modern nucleosynthesis calculations disfavours the hypothesis that type Ia supernova progenitors are exclusively white dwarfs with masses well below the Chandrasekhar limit (about 1.4 times the mass of the Sun). The observed abundance pattern of the iron-peak elements can be explained by taking into account a combination of near- and sub-Chandrasekhar-mass type Ia supernova systems, adding to the mounting evidence that both progenitor types make a substantial contribution to cosmic chemical enrichment.« less

  10. Solar abundance ratios of the iron-peak elements in the Perseus cluster.

    PubMed

    2017-11-23

    The metal abundance of the hot plasma that permeates galaxy clusters represents the accumulation of heavy elements produced by billions of supernovae. Therefore, X-ray spectroscopy of the intracluster medium provides an opportunity to investigate the nature of supernova explosions integrated over cosmic time. In particular, the abundance of the iron-peak elements (chromium, manganese, iron and nickel) is key to understanding how the progenitors of typical type Ia supernovae evolve and explode. Recent X-ray studies of the intracluster medium found that the abundance ratios of these elements differ substantially from those seen in the Sun, suggesting differences between the nature of type Ia supernovae in the clusters and in the Milky Way. However, because the K-shell transition lines of chromium and manganese are weak and those of iron and nickel are very close in photon energy, high-resolution spectroscopy is required for an accurate determination of the abundances of these elements. Here we report observations of the Perseus cluster, with statistically significant detections of the resonance emission from chromium, manganese and nickel. Our measurements, combined with the latest atomic models, reveal that these elements have near-solar abundance ratios with respect to iron, in contrast to previous claims. Comparison between our results and modern nucleosynthesis calculations disfavours the hypothesis that type Ia supernova progenitors are exclusively white dwarfs with masses well below the Chandrasekhar limit (about 1.4 times the mass of the Sun). The observed abundance pattern of the iron-peak elements can be explained by taking into account a combination of near- and sub-Chandrasekhar-mass type Ia supernova systems, adding to the mounting evidence that both progenitor types make a substantial contribution to cosmic chemical enrichment.

  11. The Abundances of the Iron Group Elements in Early B Stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, C.

    FUSE observations of four sharp-lined early B main-sequence band stars in the Magellanic Clouds will be carried through to determine the abundances of the heavy elements, especially those of the Fe group. The FUSE spectral region contains numerous Fe III lines, including the resonance multiplet (UV1) near 1130 A that is excellent for abundance determinations and two strong multiplets of V III, an ion that does not produce measurable lines longward of 1200 A in metal-deficient stars. In addition there are several measurable lines from Cr III and Mn III. Although abundances of the Fe-peak elements are of interest because they are important for assessing opacities for stellar evolution calculations and the validity of theoretical calculations of explosive nucleosynthesis, ground-based studies do not yield this information because measurable lines from these species, except for a few Fe III lines, are found only in the UV spectral region. The abundances of heavy elements provide information on the production of such elements in previous generations of stars. From FUSE data obtained in Cycle 3 we are determining the abundances of the Fe group elements in two sharp-lined early B stars in the SMC (AV 304, a field star, and NGC346-637, a star in a mini-starburst cluster). This project will allow one to compare the abundances in AV 304 and NGC346-637 with those in the LMC and other regions in the SMC and look for asymmetry in heavy element production in the Magellanic Clouds.

  12. Elemental Abundance Distributions in Basalt Clays and Meteorites: Is It a Biosignature?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, M. R.; Storrie-Lombardi, M. C.; Joseph, J.

    2005-01-01

    Volcanic glass altered by microorganisms exhibits distinctive textures differing significantly from abiotic alteration [1-4]. We have previously presented morphological evidence of bioweathering in sub-oceanic basalt glass [5] and olivine [6], and noted similar alterations in Nakhla [7]. We have also introduced an autonomous Bayesian probabilistic classification methodology to identify biotic and abiotic alteration in sub-oceanic basalts using elemental abundance data [8]. We now present data from multiple sub-oceanic sites addressing the more general question of utilizing elemental abundance distribution in clays as a valid biosignature for the exploration of putative clay alteration products in meteorites.

  13. The AMBRE Project: r-process element abundances in the Milky Way thin and thick discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiglion, Guillaume; de Laverny, Patrick; Recio-Blanco, Alejandra; Worley, C. Clare

    2018-04-01

    Chemical evolution of r-process elements in the Milky Way disc is still a matter of debate. We took advantage of high resolution HARPS spectra from the ESO archive in order to derive precise chemical abundances of 3 r-process elements Eu, Dy & Gd for a sample of 4 355 FGK Milky Way stars. The chemical analysis has been performed thanks to the automatic optimization pipeline GAUGUIN. Based on the [α/Fe] ratio, we chemically characterized the thin and the thick discs, and present here results of these 3 r-process element abundances in both discs. We found an unexpected Gadolinium and Dysprosium enrichment in the thick disc stars compared to Europium, while these three elements track well each other in the thin disc.

  14. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Optical Extension for Neutron Capture Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melendez, Matthew; O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Donor, John; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Stassun, Keivan G.; APOGEE Team

    2017-01-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey is a systematic survey of Galactic open clusters using data primarily from the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. However, neutron capture elements are very limited in the IR region covered by APOGEE. In an effort to fully study detailed Galactic chemical evolution, we are conducting a high resolution (R~60,000) spectroscopic abundance analysis of neutron capture elements for OCCAM clusters in the optical regime to complement the APOGEE results. As part of this effort, we present Ba II, La II, Ce II and Eu II results for a few open clusters without previous abundance measurements using data obtained at McDonald Observatory with the 2.1m Otto Struve telescope and Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph.This work is supported by an NSF AAG grant AST-1311835.

  15. Ionization ratios and elemental abundances in the atmosphere of 68 Tauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouina, A.; Monier, R.

    2017-12-01

    We have derived the ionization ratios of twelve elements in the atmosphere of the star 68 Tauri (HD 27962) using an ATLAS9 model atmosphere with 72 layers computed for the effective temperature and surface gravity of the star. We then computed a grid of synthetic spectra generated by SYNSPEC49 based on an ATLAS9 model atmosphere in order to model one high resolution spectrum secured by one of us (RM) with the échelle spectrograph SOPHIE at Observatoire de Haute Provence. We could determine the abundances of several elements in their dominant ionization stage, including those defining the Am phenomenon. We thus provide new abundance determinations for 68 Tauri using updated accurate atomic data retrieved from the NIST database which extend previous abundance works.

  16. Search for white dwarf companions of cool stars with peculiar element abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, E.

    1984-01-01

    A search for a white dwarf companions of cool stars with peculiar element abundances was undertaken. One additional star the xi Cet, was found with a white dwarf companion. It was found that HR 1016, 56Uma, 16 Ser, have high excitation emission lines which indicate a high temperature object in the system. It is suggested that since these indications for high temperature companions were seen for all nearby Ba stars, it is highly probable that all Ba stars have white dwarf companions, and that the peculiar element abundances seen in the Ba stars are due to mass transfer. Observations, arguments and conclusions are presented. White dwarf companions were not found. Together with the Li and Be abundances and the chromospheric emission line spectra in these stars were studied. No white dwarf companions were seen for subgiant CH stars.

  17. Abundances and Depletions of Neutron-capture Elements in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchey, A. M.; Federman, S. R.; Lambert, D. L.

    2018-06-01

    We present an extensive analysis of the gas-phase abundances and depletion behaviors of neutron-capture elements in the interstellar medium (ISM). Column densities (or upper limits to the column densities) of Ga II, Ge II, As II, Kr I, Cd II, Sn II, and Pb II are determined for a sample of 69 sight lines with high- and/or medium-resolution archival spectra obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. An additional 59 sight lines with column density measurements reported in the literature are included in our analysis. Parameters that characterize the depletion trends of the elements are derived according to the methodology developed by Jenkins. (In an appendix, we present similar depletion results for the light element B.) The depletion patterns exhibited by Ga and Ge comport with expectations based on the depletion results obtained for many other elements. Arsenic exhibits much less depletion than expected, and its abundance in low-depletion sight lines may even be supersolar. We confirm a previous finding by Jenkins that the depletion of Kr increases as the overall depletion level increases from one sight line to another. Cadmium shows no such evidence of increasing depletion. We find a significant amount of scatter in the gas-phase abundances of Sn and Pb. For Sn, at least, the scatter may be evidence of real intrinsic abundance variations due to s-process enrichment combined with inefficient mixing in the ISM.

  18. New CNO Elemental Abundances in Planetary Nebulae from Spatially Resolved UV/Optical Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Richard A.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Henry, Richard B. C.; Dufour, Reginald J.; Balick, Bruce; Corradi, Romano

    2015-01-01

    We obtained HST/STIS long-slit spectra spanning 0.11 to 1.1 μm of co-spatial regions in 10 Galactic planetary nebulae (Dufour, et al., this conference), of which six present substantial changes in ionization with position. Under the assumption that elemental abundances are constant within these nebulae (but exterior to the wind of the central star), these spectra present a unique opportunity to examine the applicability of common ionization correction factors (ICFs) for deriving abundances. ICFs are the most common direct method in abundance analysis for accounting for unobserved or undetected ionization stages in nebulae, yet most ICF recipes have not been rigorously examined through modeling nor empirically tested through observation. In this preliminary study, we focussed on the astrophysically important abundances of C and N where strong ionic transitions are scarce in optical band, but plentiful in the satellite UV. We derived physical diagnostics (extinction, Te, Ne) and ionic abundances for the species of interest at various positions along the slit for each PN. We compared the elemental abundances derived from direct summation of the ionic abundances in the UV and optical to those derived using only optical emission, but corrected using standard ICFs. We found that the abundances were usually in good agreement, but there were significant exceptions. We also found that setting upper limits on emission from undetected ions was sometimes helpful in constraining the correction factors. Work is underway to construct photoionization models of these nebulae (see Miller, et al., this conference) to address the question of why ICFs are sometimes inaccurate, and to explore other ICF recipes for those cases.Support for Program number GO-12600 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Incorporated, under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  19. The superTIGER instrument: Measurement of elemental abundances of ultra-heavy galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Binns, W. R.; Bose, R. G.; Braun, D. L.

    2014-06-10

    The SuperTIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) instrument was developed to measure the abundances of galactic cosmic-ray elements from {sub 10}Ne to {sub 40}Zr with individual element resolution and the high statistics needed to test models of cosmic-ray origins. SuperTIGER also makes exploratory measurements of the abundances of elements with 40 < Z ≤ 60 and measures the energy spectra of the more abundant elements for Z ≤ 30 from about 0.8 to 10 GeV/nucleon. This instrument is an enlarged and higher resolution version of the earlier TIGER instrument. It was designed to provide the largest geometric acceptance possible andmore » to reach as high an altitude as possible, flying on a standard long-duration 1.11 million m{sup 3} balloon. SuperTIGER was launched from Williams Field, McMurdo Station, Antarctica, on 2012 December 8, and made about 2.7 revolutions around the South Pole in 55 days of flight, returning data on over 50 × 10{sup 6} cosmic-ray nuclei with Z ≥ 10, including ∼1300 with Z > 29 and ∼60 with Z > 49. Here, we describe the instrument, the methods of charge identification employed, the SuperTIGER balloon flight, and the instrument performance.« less

  20. Diversity of abundance patterns of neutron-capture elements in very metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Misa; Aoki, Wako; Ishimaru, Yuhri; Wanajo, Shinya

    2014-05-01

    Observations of Very Metal-Poor stars indicate that there are at least two sites to r-process; "weak r-process" and "main r-process". A question is whether these two are well separated or there exists a variation in the r-process. We present the results of abundance analysis of neutron-capture elements in the two Very Metal-Poor stars HD107752 and HD110184 in the Milky Way halo observed with the Subaru Telescope HDS. The abundance patterns show overabundace at light n-capture elements (e.g. Sr, Y), inferring the element yielding of weak r-process, while heavy neutron-capture elements (e.g. Ba, Eu) are deficient; however, the overabundance of light ones is not as significant as that previously found in stars representing the weak r-process (e.g. HD122563; Honda et al. 2006). Our study show diversity in the abundance patterns from light to heavy neutron-capture elements in VMP stars, suggesting a variation in r-process, which may depend on electron fraction of environment.

  1. THE SuperTIGER Instrument: Measurement of Elemental Abundances of Ultra-Heavy Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Bose, R. G.; Braun, D. L.; Brandt, T. J.; Daniels, W. M.; DowKonnt, P. F.; Fitzsimmons, S. P.; Hahne, D. J.; Hams, T.; Israel, M. H.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The SuperTIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) instrument was developed to measure the abundances of galactic cosmic-ray elements from Ne-10 to Zr-40 with individual element resolution and the high statistics needed to test models of cosmic-ray origins. SuperTIGER also makes exploratory measurements of the abundances of elements with 40 < Z < or = 60 and measures the energy spectra of the more abundant elements for Z < or = 30 from about 0.8 to 10 GeV/nucleon. This instrument is an enlarged and higher resolution version of the earlier TIGER instrument. It was designed to provide the largest geometric acceptance possible and to reach as high an altitude as possible, flying on a standard long-duration 1.11 million cu m balloon. SuperTIGER was launched from Williams Field, McMurdo Station, Antarctica, on 2012 December 8, and made about 2.7 revolutions around the South Pole in 55 days of flight, returning data on over 50 x 10(exp 6) cosmic-ray nuclei with Z > or = 10, including approx.1300 with Z > 29 and approx.60 with Z > 49. Here, we describe the instrument, the methods of charge identification employed, the SuperTIGER balloon flight, and the instrument performance.

  2. Element Abundances in Meteorites and the Earth: Implication for the Accretion of Planetary Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezger, K.; Vollstaedt, H.; Maltese, A.

    2017-12-01

    Essentially all known inner solar system materials show near chondritic relative abundances of refractory elements and depletion in volatile elements. To a first approximation volatile element depletion correlates with the respective condensation temperature (TC) of the elements. Possible mechanisms for this depletion are incomplete condensation and partial loss by evaporation caused by heating prior to or during the planetesimal accretion. The stable isotope compositions of almost all moderately volatile elements in different meteorite classes show only minor, or no evidence for a Rayleigh-type fractionation that could be attributed to partial condensation or evaporation. The different classes of meteorites also show that the degree of depletion in their parent bodies (i.e. mostly planetesimals) is quite variable, but nevertheless systematic. For primitive and least disturbed carbonaceous chondrites the element depletion pattern is a smooth function of TC. The accessible silicate Earth also shows this general depletion pattern, but in detail it is highly complex and requires differentiation processes that are not solely controlled by TC. If only highly lithophile elements are considered the depletion pattern of the silicate Earth reveals a step function that shows that moderately volatile lithophile elements have abundances that are ca. 0.1 times the chondritic value, irrespective of their TC. This element pattern observed for bulk silicate Earth can be modelled as a mixture of two distinct components: ca. 90% of a strongly reduced planetary body that is depleted in highly volatile elements and ca. 10% of a more volatile element rich and oxidized component. This mixture can account for the apparent Pb- paradox observed in melts derived from the silicate Earth and provides a time constraint for the mixing event, which is ca. 70 My after the beginning of the solar system. This event corresponds to the giant impact that also formed the Moon.

  3. Abundance of Chemical Elements in RR Lyrae Variables and their Kinematic Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozha, M. L.; Marsakov, V. A.; Koval', V. V.

    2018-03-01

    A catalog of the chemical and spatial-kinematic parameters of 415 RR Lyrae variables (Lyrids) in the galactic field is compiled. Spectroscopic determinations of the relative abundances of 13 chemical elements in 101 of the RR Lyrae variables are collected from 25 papers published between 1995 and 2017. The data from different sources are reduced to a single solar abundance scale. The mean weighted chemical abundances are calculated with coefficients inversely proportional to the reported errors. An analysis of the deviations in the published relative abundances in each star from the mean square values calculated from them reveals an absence of systematic biases among the results from the various articles. The rectangular coordinates of 407 of the RR Lyrae variables and the components of the three-dimensional (3D) velocities of 401 of the stars are calculated using data from several sources. The collected data on the abundances of chemical elements produced by various nuclear fusion processes for the RR Lyrae variables of the field, as well as the calculated 3D velocities, can be used for studying the evolution of the Galaxy.

  4. Elemental Abundances of Blue Compact Dwarfs from Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy with Spitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanling; Bernard-Salas, J.; Charmandaris, V.; Lebouteiller, V.; Hao, Lei; Brandl, B. R.; Houck, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    We present a study of elemental abundances in a sample of 13 blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies, using the ~10-37 μm high-resolution spectra obtained with Spitzer IRS. We derive the abundances of neon and sulfur for our sample using the infrared fine-structure lines probing regions which may be obscured by dust in the optical and compare our results with similar infrared studies of starburst galaxies from ISO. We find a good correlation between the neon and sulfur abundances, although sulfur is underabundant relative to neon with respect to the solar value. A comparison of the elemental abundances (neon and sulfur) measured from the infrared data with those derived from the optical (neon, sulfur, and oxygen) studies reveals a good overall agreement for sulfur, while the infrared-derived neon abundances are slightly higher than the optical values. This indicates either that the metallicities of dust-enshrouded regions in BCDs are similar to the optically accessible regions, or that if they are different they do not contribute substantially to the total infrared emission of the host galaxy.

  5. Probabilisitc Geobiological Classification Using Elemental Abundance Distributions and Lossless Image Compression in Recent and Modern Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    Last year we presented techniques for the detection of fossils during robotic missions to Mars using both structural and chemical signatures[Storrie-Lombardi and Hoover, 2004]. Analyses included lossless compression of photographic images to estimate the relative complexity of a putative fossil compared to the rock matrix [Corsetti and Storrie-Lombardi, 2003] and elemental abundance distributions to provide mineralogical classification of the rock matrix [Storrie-Lombardi and Fisk, 2004]. We presented a classification strategy employing two exploratory classification algorithms (Principal Component Analysis and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis) and non-linear stochastic neural network to produce a Bayesian estimate of classification accuracy. We now present an extension of our previous experiments exploring putative fossil forms morphologically resembling cyanobacteria discovered in the Orgueil meteorite. Elemental abundances (C6, N7, O8, Na11, Mg12, Ai13, Si14, P15, S16, Cl17, K19, Ca20, Fe26) obtained for both extant cyanobacteria and fossil trilobites produce signatures readily distinguishing them from meteorite targets. When compared to elemental abundance signatures for extant cyanobacteria Orgueil structures exhibit decreased abundances for C6, N7, Na11, All3, P15, Cl17, K19, Ca20 and increases in Mg12, S16, Fe26. Diatoms and silicified portions of cyanobacterial sheaths exhibiting high levels of silicon and correspondingly low levels of carbon cluster more closely with terrestrial fossils than with extant cyanobacteria. Compression indices verify that variations in random and redundant textural patterns between perceived forms and the background matrix contribute significantly to morphological visual identification. The results provide a quantitative probabilistic methodology for discriminating putatitive fossils from the surrounding rock matrix and &om extant organisms using both structural and chemical information. The techniques described appear applicable

  6. An elemental abundance analysis of the superficially normal A star Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Gulliver, Austin F.

    1990-01-01

    An elemental abundance analysis of Vega has been performed using high-signal-to-noise 2.4 A/mm Reticon observations of the region 4313-4809 A. Vega is found to be a metal-poor star with a mean underabundance of 0.60 dex. The He/H ratio of 0.03 as derived from He I 4472 A suggests that the superficial helium convection zone has disappeared and that radiative diffusion is producing the photospheric abundance anomalies.

  7. Rhenium-osmium isotope and highly-siderophile-element abundance systematics of angrite meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riches, Amy J. V.; Day, James M. D.; Walker, Richard J.; Simonetti, Antonio; Liu, Yang; Neal, Clive R.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2012-11-01

    Coupled 187Os/188Os compositions and highly-siderophile-element (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, and Re) abundance data are reported for eight angrite achondrite meteorites that include quenched- and slowly-cooled textural types. These data are combined with new major- and trace-element concentrations determined for bulk-rock powder fractions and constituent mineral phases, to assess angrite petrogenesis. Angrite meteorites span a wide-range of HSE abundances from <0.005 ppb Os (e.g., Northwest Africa [NWA] 1296; Angra dos Reis) to >100 ppb Os (NWA 4931). Chondritic to supra-chondritic 187Os/188Os (0.1201-0.2127) measured for Angra dos Reis and quenched-angrites correspond to inter- and intra-sample heterogeneities in Re/Os and HSE abundances. Quenched-angrites have chondritic-relative rare-earth-element (REE) abundances at 10-15×CI-chondrite, and their Os-isotope and HSE abundance variations represent mixtures of pristine uncontaminated crustal materials that experienced addition (<0.8%) of exogenous chondritic materials during or after crystallization. Slowly-cooled angrites (NWA 4590 and NWA 4801) have fractionated REE-patterns, chondritic to sub-chondritic 187Os/188Os (0.1056-0.1195), as well as low-Re/Os (0.03-0.13), Pd/Os (0.071-0.946), and relatively low-Pt/Os (0.792-2.640). Sub-chondritic 187Os/188Os compositions in NWA 4590 and NWA 4801 are unusual amongst planetary basalts, and their HSE and REE characteristics may be linked to melting of mantle sources that witnessed prior basaltic melt depletion. Angrite HSE-Yb systematics suggest that the HSE behaved moderately-incompatibly during angrite magma crystallization, implying the presence of metal in the crystallizing assemblage. The new HSE abundance and 187Os/188Os compositions indicate that the silicate mantle of the angrite parent body(ies) (APB) had HSE abundances in chondritic-relative proportions but at variable abundances at the time of angrite crystallization. The HSE systematics of angrites are

  8. X-shooter spectroscopy of young stellar objects in Lupus. Lithium, iron, and barium elemental abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biazzo, K.; Frasca, A.; Alcalá, J. M.; Zusi, M.; Covino, E.; Randich, S.; Esposito, M.; Manara, C. F.; Antoniucci, S.; Nisini, B.; Rigliaco, E.; Getman, F.

    2017-09-01

    Aims: With the purpose of performing a homogeneous determination of elemental abundances for members of the Lupus T association, we analyzed three chemical elements: lithium, iron, and barium. The aims were: 1) to derive the lithium abundance for the almost complete sample ( 90%) of known class II stars in the Lupus I, II, III, and IV clouds; 2) to perform chemical tagging of a region where few iron abundance measurements have been obtained in the past, and no determination of the barium content has been done up to now. We also investigated possible barium enhancement at the very young age of the region, as this element has become increasingly interesting in the last few years following the evidence of barium over-abundance in young clusters, the origin of which is still unknown. Methods: Using the X-shooter spectrograph mounted on the Unit 2 (UT2) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT), we analyzed the spectra of 89 cluster members, both class II (82) and class III (7) stars. We measured the strength of the lithium line at λ6707.8 Å and derived the abundance of this element through equivalent width measurements and curves of growth. For six class II stars we also derived the iron and barium abundances using the spectral synthesis method and the code MOOG. The veiling contribution was taken into account in the abundance analysis for all three elements. Results: We find a dispersion in the strength of the lithium line at low effective temperatures and identify three targets with severe Li depletion. The nuclear age inferred for these highly lithium-depleted stars is around 15 Myr, which exceeds by an order of magnitude the isochronal one. We derive a nearly solar metallicity for the members whose spectra could be analyzed. We find that Ba is over-abundant by 0.7 dex with respect to the Sun. Since current theoretical models cannot reproduce this abundance pattern, we investigated whether this unusually large Ba content might be related to effects due to stellar

  9. Element abundance measurements in gas-rich galaxies at z~5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, Suraj; Kulkarni, Varsha; Morrison, Sean; Peroux, Celine; Som, Debopam; Rahmani, Hadi; Quiret, Samuel

    2018-01-01

    Element abundances in high-redshift galaxies offer key constraints on models of the chemical evolution of galaxies. The chemical composition of galaxies at z>~5 are especially important since they constrain the star formation history in the first ~1 Gyr after the Big Bang and the initial mass function of early stars. Observations of damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) absorbers in quasar spectra enable robust measurements of the element abundances in distant gas-rich galaxies. In particular, abundances of volatile elements such as S, O and refractory elements such as Si, Fe allow determination of the dust-corrected metallicity and the depletion strength in the absorbing galaxies. Unfortunately measurements for volatile (nearly undepleted) elements are very sparse for DLAs at z > 4.5. We present abundance measurements of O, C, Si and Fe for three gas-rich galaxies at z~5 using observations from the Very Large Telescope (VLT) X-shooter spectrograph and the Keck Echellette Spectrograph and Imager. Our study has doubled the existing sample of measurements of undepleted elements at z > 4.5. After combining our measurements with those from the literature, we find that the cosmological mean metallicity of z ˜ 5 absorbers is consistent with the prediction based on z < 4.5 DLAs within < 0.5 σ. Thus, we find no significant evidence of a sudden drop in metallicity at z > 4.7 as reported by prior studies. Some of the absorbers show evidence of depletion of elements on dust grains, e.g. low [Si/O] or [Fe/O]. These absorbers along with other z~5 absorbers from the literature show some peculiarities in the relative abundances, e.g. low [C/O] in several absorbers and high [Si/O] in one absorber. We also find that the metallicity vs. velocity dispersion relation of z~5 absorbers may be different from that of lower-redshift absorbers.We acknowledge support from NASA grant NNX14AG74G and NASA/STScI support for HST programs GO-12536, 13801 to the Univ. of South Carolina.

  10. Siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in oceanic basalts, Pb isotope evolution and growth of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.; White, W. M.; Jochum, K. P.; Hofmann, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis that the mantle Pb isotope ratios reflect continued extraction of Pb into the earth's core over geologic time is evaluated by studying the depeletion of chalcophile and siderophile elements in the mantle. Oceanic basalt samples are analyzed in order to determine the Pb, Sr, and Nd isotropic compositions and the abundances of siderophile and chalcophile elements and incompatible lithophile elements. The data reveal that there is no systematic variation of siderophile or chalcophile element abundances relative to abundances of lithophile elements and the Pb/Ce ratio of the mantle is constant. It is suggested that the crust formation involves nonmagmatic and magmatic processes.

  11. Coronal Element Abundances of the Post-Common Envelope Binary V471 Tauri with ASCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Still, Martin; Hussain, Gaitee; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report on ASCA observations of the coronally active companion star in the post-common envelope binary V471 Tau. While it would be prudent to check the following results with grating spectroscopy, we find that a single-temperature plasma model does not fit the data. Two temperature models with variable abundances indicate that Fe is underabundant compared to the Hyades photospheric mean, whereas, the high first ionization potential element Ne is overabundant. This is indicative of the inverse first ionization effect, believed to result from the fractionation of ionized material by the magnetic field in the upper atmosphere of the star. Evolutionary calculations indicate that there should be no peculiar abundances on the companion star resulting from the common envelope epoch. Indeed, we find no evidence for peculiar abundances, although uncertainties are high.

  12. Heavy Element Abundances in Planetary Nebulae from Deep Optical Echelle Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashburn, Amanda; Sterling, Nicholas C.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Garofali, Kristen; Jensema, Rachael; Turbyfill, Amanda; Wieser, Hannah-Marie N.; Reed, Evan C.; Redfield, Seth

    2016-01-01

    We present the abundances of neutron(n)-capture elements (atomic number Z > 30) and iron determined from deep optical echelle spectroscopy of 14 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe). The spectra were obtained with the 2D-coudé spectrograph on the 2.7-m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory. The abundances of n-capture elements can be enhanced in PNe due to slow n-capture nucleosynthesis in the progenitor asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. The high spectral resolution of these data (R = 36,700) allow most n-capture element emission lines to be resolved from other nebular and telluric features. We detect Kr in all of the observed PNe (with multiple ions detected in several objects), while Br, Rb, and Xe were each detected in 4--5 objects. Using the new Kr ionization correction factors (ICFs) of Sterling et al. (2015, ApJS, 218, 25), we find [Kr/O] abundances ranging from 0.05 to 1.1 dex. We utilize approximate ICFs for the other n-capture elements, and find slightly lower enrichments for Br and Rb (-0.1 to 0.7 dex), while Xe is enhanced relative to solar by factors of two to 30. The [Xe/Kr] ratios range from -0.3 to 1.4 dex, indicating a significant range in neutron exposures in PN progenitor stars. Interestingly, the largest [Xe/Kr] ratio is found in the thick-disk PN NGC 6644, which has a lower metallicity than the other observed PNe. We detect iron emission lines in all but one target. Fe can be depleted into dust grains in ionized nebulae, and its abundance thus provides key information regarding dust-to-gas ratios and grain destruction processes. We find that [Fe/O] ranges from -1.3 to -0.7 dex in the observed PNe, a smaller spread of depletion factors than found in recent studies (Delgado-Inglada & Rodriguez 2014, ApJ, 784, 173) though this may be due in part to our smaller sample. These data are part of a larger study of heavy elements in PNe, which will provide more accurate determinations of n-capture element abundances than previous estimates in

  13. Elemental abundance anomalies in the late Cenomanian extinction interval: a search for the source(s)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orth, C.J.; Attrep, M.; Quintana, L.R.; Elder, W.P.; Kauffman, E.G.; Diner, R.; Villamil, T.

    1993-01-01

    Elemental abundances have been measured by neutron activation methods across the Cenomanian-Turonian (late Cretaceous) extinction interval in samples collected from sixteen sites in the Western Interior Basin of North America and from twelve widely separated locations around the globe, including six ODP/DSDP sites. In most Western Interior Basin sites, in Colombia, and in western Europe (weaker), two closely spaced elemental abundance peaks occur in the upper Cenomanian (??? 92 m.y.), spanning the ammonite zones of Sciponoceras gracile through Neocardioceras juddii. Elements with anomalously high concentrations include Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Ir, Pt and Au. The lower peak coincides with the disappearance (extinction) of the foraminifer Rotalipora cushmani. In North American sections R. greenhornensis also disappears at or just below this horizon, but in Europe it disappears considerably earlier than R. cushmani. A series of molluscan extinction and speciation or migration events also begins near the stratigraphic level of the lower elemental abundance peak. The well-documented positive ?? 13C excursion begins just before the extinctions and the elemental anomalies, and continues into the lower Turonian, well above the upper anomaly. This carbon isotope excursion has been observed in East European sections where we find little or no evidence of the elemental anomalies, suggesting that the two phenomena may not be tightly coupled. Elemental abundance ratios in the anomalies closely resemble those of Mid-Atlantic Ridge basalt or Hawaiian lava (tholeiitic), but not those of C1 chondrite, black shale, average crustal rocks, or lamproite and kimberlite of roughly similar age in southeastern Kansas. The excess Ir and other siderophiles hint at possible large-body impact(s) for the source. However, we have not located microspherules (other than biogenic calcispheres) or shocked mineral grains in any of our samples. Furthermore, Sc, Ti, V and Mn are not enriched in

  14. Disk evolution, element abundances and cloud properties of young gas giant planets.

    PubMed

    Helling, Christiane; Woitke, Peter; Rimmer, Paul B; Kamp, Inga; Thi, Wing-Fai; Meijerink, Rowin

    2014-04-14

    We discuss the chemical pre-conditions for planet formation, in terms of gas and ice abundances in a protoplanetary disk, as function of time and position, and the resulting chemical composition and cloud properties in the atmosphere when young gas giant planets form, in particular discussing the effects of unusual, non-solar carbon and oxygen abundances. Large deviations between the abundances of the host star and its gas giants seem likely to occur if the planet formation follows the core-accretion scenario. These deviations stem from the separate evolution of gas and dust in the disk, where the dust forms the planet cores, followed by the final run-away accretion of the left-over gas. This gas will contain only traces of elements like C, N and O, because those elements have frozen out as ices. PRODIMO protoplanetary disk models are used to predict the chemical evolution of gas and ice in the midplane. We find that cosmic rays play a crucial role in slowly un-blocking the CO, where the liberated oxygen forms water, which then freezes out quickly. Therefore, the C/O ratio in the gas phase is found to gradually increase with time, in a region bracketed by the water and CO ice-lines. In this regions, C/O is found to approach unity after about 5 Myrs, scaling with the cosmic ray ionization rate assumed. We then explore how the atmospheric chemistry and cloud properties in young gas giants are affected when the non-solar C/O ratios predicted by the disk models are assumed. The DRIFT cloud formation model is applied to study the formation of atmospheric clouds under the influence of varying premordial element abundances and its feedback onto the local gas. We demonstrate that element depletion by cloud formation plays a crucial role in converting an oxygen-rich atmosphere gas into carbon-rich gas when non-solar, premordial element abundances are considered as suggested by disk models.

  15. Disk Evolution, Element Abundances and Cloud Properties of Young Gas Giant Planets

    PubMed Central

    Helling, Christiane; Woitke, Peter; Rimmer, Paul B.; Kamp, Inga; Thi, Wing-Fai; Meijerink, Rowin

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the chemical pre-conditions for planet formation, in terms of gas and ice abundances in a protoplanetary disk, as function of time and position, and the resulting chemical composition and cloud properties in the atmosphere when young gas giant planets form, in particular discussing the effects of unusual, non-solar carbon and oxygen abundances. Large deviations between the abundances of the host star and its gas giants seem likely to occur if the planet formation follows the core-accretion scenario. These deviations stem from the separate evolution of gas and dust in the disk, where the dust forms the planet cores, followed by the final run-away accretion of the left-over gas. This gas will contain only traces of elements like C, N and O, because those elements have frozen out as ices. ProDiMo protoplanetary disk models are used to predict the chemical evolution of gas and ice in the midplane. We find that cosmic rays play a crucial role in slowly un-blocking the CO, where the liberated oxygen forms water, which then freezes out quickly. Therefore, the C/O ratio in the gas phase is found to gradually increase with time, in a region bracketed by the water and CO ice-lines. In this regions, C/O is found to approach unity after about 5 Myrs, scaling with the cosmic ray ionization rate assumed. We then explore how the atmospheric chemistry and cloud properties in young gas giants are affected when the non-solar C/O ratios predicted by the disk models are assumed. The Drift cloud formation model is applied to study the formation of atmospheric clouds under the influence of varying premordial element abundances and its feedback onto the local gas. We demonstrate that element depletion by cloud formation plays a crucial role in converting an oxygen-rich atmosphere gas into carbon-rich gas when non-solar, premordial element abundances are considered as suggested by disk models. PMID:25370190

  16. Trace element abundances in single presolar silicon carbide grains by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiv, Yoav

    2004-12-01

    Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) was applied to the study of presolar grains for the first time in this study. 41 single SiC grains of the KJF size fraction (mass-weighted median size of 1.86 μm) from the Murchison (CM2) Meteorite were analyzed. The absolute abundances of the following elements were determined (not every element in every grain): S, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ru, Os, Ir and Pt (underlined elements were detected here for the first time in single grains). There is good agreement between the heavier trace element abundances in the grains and s-process nucleosynthesis calculations. It suggests that smaller 13C pocket sizes are needed in the parent stars, a free parameter in the stellar models, than is deduced from isotopic analyses of s-, and s-mainly, elements, such as Zr and Mo. In addition, the data confirms the radiogenic nature of the Nb in the grains, due to the in situ decay of 93Zr (t 1/2 = 1.5 × 106 year). The data suggest that the trace elements condensed into the host SiC grains by a combination of condensation in solid solution and incorporation of subgrains. It seems that many of the trace elements reside mainly in subgrains of two solid solution: (1)a TiC based solid solution, and (2)a Mo-Ru carbide based solid solution. The presence of subgrains of an Fe-Ni alloy solid solution is suggested as well. Subgrains of all 3 solid solutions were observed previously in presolar graphite grains.* *This dissertation is a compound document (contains both a paper copy and a CD as part of the dissertation). The CD requires the following system requirements: Adobe Acrobat.

  17. Meteoritic Constraints on Models of the Solar Nebula: The Abundances of Moderately Volatile Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, Patrick; Cuzzi, Jeff (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The "moderately volatile" elements are those which condense (or evaporate) in the temperature range 650 - 1350 K, as a mix of material with solar abundances is cooled (or heated) tinder equilibrium conditions. Their relative abundances in chondritic meteorites are solar (or "cosmic", as defined by the composition of Cl meteorites) to within a factor of several, but vary within that range in a way that correlates remarkably well with condensation temperature, independent of chemical affinity. It has been argued that this correlation reflects a systematically selective process which favored the accretion of refractory material over volatile material from a cooling nebula. Wasson and Chou (Meteoritics 9, 69-94, 1974, and Wasson and co-authors in subsequent papers) suggested that condensation and settling of solids contemporaneously with the cooling and removal of nebular gas could produce the observed abundance patterns, but a quantitative model has been lacking. We show that the abundance patterns of the moderately volatile elements in chondritic meteorites can be produced, in some degree of quantitative detail, by models of the solar nebula that are designed to conform to observations of T Tauri stars and the global conservation laws. For example, even if the local surface density of the nebula is not decreasing, condensation and accretion of solids from radially inflowing gas in a cooling nebula can result in depletions of volatiles, relative to refractories, like those observed, The details of the calculated abundance patterns depend on (but are not especially sensitive to) model parameters, and can exhibit the variations that distinguish the meteorite classes. Thus it appears that nebula characteristics such as cooling rates, radial flow velocities, and particle accumulation rates can be quantitatively constrained by demanding that they conform to meteoritic data; and the models, in turn, can produce testable hypotheses regarding the time and location of the

  18. Low Abundances of Highly Siderophile Elements in the Lunar Mantle: Evidence for Prolonged Late Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.; Horan, M. F.; Shearer, C. K.; Papike, J. J.

    2004-01-01

    The highly siderophile elements (HSE: including Re, Au, Ir, Os, Ru, Pt, Pd, Rh) are strongly partitioned into metal relative to silicates. In the terrestrial planets these elements are concentrated in metallic cores. Earth s mantle has sufficiently high abundances of the HSE (0.008 times CI abundances) that it has been hypothesized approximately 0.1-0.5% of the mass of the Earth was added following the last major interaction between the core and mantle [e.g. 1]. The additional material added to the Earth and Moon has been termed a late veneer , and the process has often been termed late accretion [2]. The timing of the dominant late accretionary period of the Earth and Moon is still poorly known. The abundances of HSE in the lunar mantle could provide important constraints on when the late veneer was added. The material that ultimately became the silicate portion of the Moon was likely stripped of most of its HSE prior to and during coalescence of the Moon. Consequently the initial lunar mantle likely had very low concentrations of the HSE. Unlike Earth, the generation of permanent lunar crust by 4.4 Ga prevented subsequent additions of HSE to the lunar mantle via continued accretion. Thus, if a substantial portion of the late veneer was added after 4.4 Ga, the lunar mantle should have retained very low HSE concentrations. Conversely, if the late veneer was mostly added prior to 4.4 Ga, HSE abundances in the lunar mantle may be roughly similar to abundances in the terrestrial mantle.

  19. Trace element abundances in megacrysts and their host basalts - Constraints on partition coefficients and megacryst genesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irving, A. J.; Frey, F. A.

    1984-01-01

    Rare earth and other trace element abundances are determined in megacrysts of clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, amphibole, mica, anorthoclase, apatite and zircon, as well as their host basalts, in an effort to gather data on mineral/melt trace element partitioning during the high pressure petrogenesis of basic rocks. Phase equilibria, major element partitioning and isotopic ratio considerations indicate that while most of the pyroxene and amphibole megacrysts may have been in equilibrium with their host magmas at high pressures, mica, anorthoclase, apatite, and zircon megacrysts are unlikely to have formed in equilibrium with their host basalts. It is instead concluded that they were precipitated from more evolved magmas, and have been mixed into their present hosts.

  20. Trace element abundance determinations by Synchrotron X Ray Fluorescence (SXRF) on returned comet nucleus mineral grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    Trace element analyses were performed on bulk cosmic dust particles by Proton Induced X Ray Emission (PIXE) and Synchrotron X Ray Fluorescence (SXRF). When present at or near chondritic abundances the trace elements K, Ti, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, Se, and Br are presently detectable by SXRF in particles of 20 micron diameter. Improvements to the SXRF analysis facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source presently underway should increase the range of detectable elements and permit the analysis of smaller samples. In addition the Advanced Photon Source will be commissioned at Argonne National Laboratory in 1995. This 7 to 8 GeV positron storage ring, specifically designed for high-energy undulator and wiggler insertion devices, will be an ideal source for an x ray microprobe with one micron spatial resolution and better than 100 ppb elemental sensitivity for most elements. Thus trace element analysis of individual micron-sized grains should be possible by the time of the comet nucleus sample return mission.

  1. Gas-phase abundances of refractory elements in planetary nebulae - A hot-wind model

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, G.A.

    Planetary nebulae (PN) characteristically show large gas-phase depletions of some refractory elements, with Fe/H and Ca/H concentration ratios approximately equal to -1.5. In contrast, the gas-phase abundance of carbon is large, with a C/H concentration ratio greater than approximately +0.3. This pattern is difficult to understand in terms of grain formation and destruction during PN formation. However, these abundances are consistent with a model (Kwok, Purton, and FitzGerald, 1978) in which the PN shell consists of material expelled as a wind during the red-giant phase and subsequently compressed and accelerated by the impact of a hot stellar wind from themore » central star.« less

  2. SP_Ace: a new code to derive stellar parameters and elemental abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Ongoing and future massive spectroscopic surveys will collect large numbers (106-107) of stellar spectra that need to be analyzed. Highly automated software is needed to derive stellar parameters and chemical abundances from these spectra. Aims: We developed a new method of estimating the stellar parameters Teff, log g, [M/H], and elemental abundances. This method was implemented in a new code, SP_Ace (Stellar Parameters And Chemical abundances Estimator). This is a highly automated code suitable for analyzing the spectra of large spectroscopic surveys with low or medium spectral resolution (R = 2000-20 000). Methods: After the astrophysical calibration of the oscillator strengths of 4643 absorption lines covering the wavelength ranges 5212-6860 Å and 8400-8924 Å, we constructed a library that contains the equivalent widths (EW) of these lines for a grid of stellar parameters. The EWs of each line are fit by a polynomial function that describes the EW of the line as a function of the stellar parameters. The coefficients of these polynomial functions are stored in a library called the "GCOG library". SP_Ace, a code written in FORTRAN95, uses the GCOG library to compute the EWs of the lines, constructs models of spectra as a function of the stellar parameters and abundances, and searches for the model that minimizes the χ2 deviation when compared to the observed spectrum. The code has been tested on synthetic and real spectra for a wide range of signal-to-noise and spectral resolutions. Results: SP_Ace derives stellar parameters such as Teff, log g, [M/H], and chemical abundances of up to ten elements for low to medium resolution spectra of FGK-type stars with precision comparable to the one usually obtained with spectra of higher resolution. Systematic errors in stellar parameters and chemical abundances are presented and identified with tests on synthetic and real spectra. Stochastic errors are automatically estimated by the code for all the parameters

  3. Ages and Heavy Element Abundances from Very Metal-poor Stars in the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Camilla Juul; El-Souri, Mariam; Monaco, Lorenzo; Villanova, Sandro; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Caffau, Elisabetta; Sbordone, Luca

    2018-03-01

    Sagittarius (Sgr) is a massive disrupted dwarf spheroidal galaxy in the Milky Way halo that has undergone several stripping events. Previous chemical studies were restricted mainly to a few, metal-rich ([Fe/H] \\gtrapprox -1) stars that suggested a top-light initial mass function (IMF). Here we present the first high-resolution, very metal-poor ([Fe/H] =‑1 to ‑3) sample of 13 giant stars in the main body of Sgr. We derive abundances of 13 elements, namely C, Ca, Co, Fe, Sr, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Dy, Pb, and Th, that challenge the interpretation based on previous studies. Our abundances from Sgr mimic those of the metal-poor halo, and our most metal-poor star ([Fe/H] ∼ -3) indicates a pure r-process pollution. Abundances of Sr, Pb, and Th are presented for the first time in Sgr, allowing for age determination using nuclear cosmochronology. We calculate ages of 9+/- 2.5 {Gyr}. Most of the sample stars have been enriched by a range of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with masses between 1.3 and 5 M ⊙. Sgr J190651.47–320147.23 shows a large overabundance of Pb (2.05 dex) and a peculiar abundance pattern best fit by a 3 M ⊙ AGB star. Based on star-to-star scatter and observed abundance patterns, a mixture of low- and high-mass AGB stars and supernovae (15–25 M ⊙) is necessary to explain these patterns. The high level (0.29 ± 0.05 dex) of Ca indicates that massive supernovae must have existed and polluted the early ISM of Sgr before it lost its gas. This result is in contrast with a top-light IMF with no massive stars polluting Sgr. Based on data obtained UVES/VLT ID: 083.B-0774, 075.B-0127.

  4. Evolution of heavy-element abundances in the Galactic halo and disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, G. J.; Cowan, J. J.; Schramm, D. N.

    1988-01-01

    The constraints on the universal energy density and cosmological constant from cosmochronological ages and the Hubble age are reviewed. Observational evidence for the galactic chemical evolution of the heavy-element chronometers is descirbed in the context of numerical models. The viability of the recently discovered Th/Nd stellar chronometer is discussed, along with the suggestion that high r-process abundances in metal-poor stars may have resulted from a primordial r-process, as may be required by some inhomogeneous cosmologies.

  5. Trace Element Abundances in an Unusual Hibonite-Perovskite Refractory Inclusion from Allende

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mane, Prajkta; Wadhwa, M.; Keller, L. P.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs) are thought to be the first-formed solids in the Solar protoplanetary disk and can provide information about the earliest Solar System processes (e.g., [1]). A hibonite-perovskitebearing CAI from the Allende CV3 chondrite (SHAL, [2]) contains a single of 500 micrometers hibonite grain and coarse-grained perovskite. The mineralogy and oxygen isotopic composition of this CAI shows similarities with FUN inclusions, especially HAL [2]. Here we present trace element abundances in SHAL.

  6. Chemical Abundances of Hydrostatic and Explosive Alpha-elements in Sagittarius Stream Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Sheffield, Allyson A.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.

    2018-05-01

    We analyze chemical abundances of stars in the Sagittarius (Sgr) tidal stream using high-resolution Gemini+GRACES spectra of 42 members of the highest surface-brightness portions of both the trailing and leading arms. Targets were chosen using a 2MASS+WISE color–color selection, combined with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) radial velocities. In this Letter, we analyze [Fe/H] and α-elements produced by both hydrostatic (O, Mg) and explosive (Si, Ca, Ti) nucleosynthetic processes. The average [Fe/H] for our Sgr stream stars is lower than that for stars in the Sgr core, and stars in the trailing and leading arms show systematic differences in [Fe/H]. Both hydrostatic and explosive elements are depleted relative to Milky Way (MW) disk and halo stars, with a larger gap between the MW trend and Sgr stars for the hydrostatic elements. Chemical abundances of Sgr stream stars show similar patterns to those measured in the core of the Sgr dSph. We explore the ratio of hydrostatic to explosive α-elements [α h/ex] (which we refer to as the “HEx ratio”). Our observed HEx ratio trends for Sgr debris are deficient relative to MW stars. Via simple chemical evolution modeling, we show that these HEx ratio patterns are consistent with a Sgr IMF that lacks the most massive stars. This study provides a link between the chemical properties in the intact Sgr core and the significant portion of the Sgr system’s luminosity that is estimated to currently reside in the streams.

  7. Central Elemental Abundance Ratios In the Perseus Cluster: Resonant Scattering or SN Ia Enrichment?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupke, Renato A.; Arnaud, Keith; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have determined abundance ratios in the core of the Perseus Cluster for several elements. These ratios indicate a central dominance of Type 1a supernova (SN Ia) ejects similar to that found for A496, A2199 and A3571. Simultaneous analysis of ASCA spectra from SIS1, GIS2, and GIS3 shows that the ratio of Ni to Fe abundances is approx. 3.4 +/- 1.1 times solar within the central 4'. This ratio is consistent with (and more precise than) that observed in other clusters whose central regions are dominated by SN Ia ejecta. Such a large Ni overabundance is predicted by "convective deflagration" explosion models for SNe Ia such as W7 but is inconsistent with delayed detonation models. We note that with current instrumentation the Ni K(alpha) line is confused with Fe K(beta) and that the Ni overabundance we observe has been interpreted by others as an anomalously large ratio of Fe K(beta) to Fe K(alpha) caused by resonant scattering in the Fe K(alpha) line. We argue that a central enhancement of SN Ia ejecta and hence a high ratio of Ni to Fe abundances are naturally explained by scenarios that include the generation of chemical gradients by suppressed SN Ia winds or ram pressure stripping of cluster galaxies. It is not necessary to suppose that the intracluster gas is optically thick to resonant scattering of the Fe K(alpha) line.

  8. Light, alpha, and Fe-peak element abundances in the galactic bulge

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. Michael; Kobayashi, Chiaki

    2014-10-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu for a sample of 156 red giant branch stars in two Galactic bulge fields centered near (l, b) = (+5.25,–3.02) and (0,–12). The (+5.25,–3.02) field also includes observations of the bulge globular cluster NGC 6553. The results are based on high-resolution (R ∼ 20,000), high signal-to-noise ration (S/N ≳ 70) FLAMES-GIRAFFE spectra obtained through the European Southern Observatory archive. However, we only selected a subset of the original observations that included spectra with both high S/N and that did notmore » show strong TiO absorption bands. This work extends previous analyses of this data set beyond Fe and the α-elements Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti. While we find reasonable agreement with past work, the data presented here indicate that the bulge may exhibit a different chemical composition than the local thick disk, especially at [Fe/H] ≳ –0.5. In particular, the bulge [α/Fe] ratios may remain enhanced to a slightly higher [Fe/H] than the thick disk, and the Fe-peak elements Co, Ni, and Cu appear enhanced compared to the disk. There is also some evidence that the [Na/Fe] (but not [Al/Fe]) trends between the bulge and local disk may be different at low and high metallicity. We also find that the velocity dispersion decreases as a function of increasing [Fe/H] for both fields, and do not detect any significant cold, high-velocity populations. A comparison with chemical enrichment models indicates that a significant fraction of hypernovae may be required to explain the bulge abundance trends, and that initial mass functions that are steep, top-heavy (and do not include strong outflow), or truncated to avoid including contributions from stars >40 M {sub ☉} are ruled out, in particular because of disagreement with the Fe-peak abundance data. For most elements, the NGC 6553 stars exhibit abundance trends nearly identical to comparable metallicity bulge

  9. Complexity on Small Scales. III. Iron and α Element Abundances in the Carina Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas; Grebel, Eva K.; Gilmore, Gerard F.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Kleyna, Jan T.; Harbeck, Daniel R.; Wilkinson, Mark I.; Wyn Evans, N.

    2008-04-01

    We have obtained high-resolution spectroscopy of ten red giants in the Carina dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy with the ultraviolet and visual echelle spectrograph at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope in order to study the detailed chemical evolution of this Galactic satellite. Here we present the abundances of O, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, and Fe. By comparison of the derived iron abundances [Fe/H] with metallicities based on the well-established calcium triplet (CaT) calibration, [Fe/H]CaT, we show that the empirical CaT technique yields good agreement with the high-resolution data for [Fe/H] gsim 2 dex, but tends to deviate from these data at lower metallicities. With [Fe/H] ~ 1.7 dex the mean iron abundance of our targets is fully consistent with the peak metallicity of Carina as derived from medium-resolution spectroscopy and previous photometric studies, all calibrated onto iron via Galactic globular cluster scales. We identify two metal-poor stars with iron abundances of 2.72 and 2.50 dex. These stars are found to have enhanced [α/Fe] ratios similar to the elemental ratios of stars in the Milky Way halo. In this context, it is conceivable that the moderately metal-poor halo stars may originate from an early dSph accretion event. The bulk of the Carina red giants exhibit a depletion in the [α/Fe] abundance ratios with respect to the Galactic halo at a given metallicity. One of our targets with a moderately low [Fe/H] of 1.5 dex is considerably depleted in almost all of the α-elements by ~0.5 dex compared to the solar values. Such low values of the ratio of α-elements to iron can be produced by stochastical fluctuations in terms of an incomplete mixing of single type Ia and type II supernova (SN) events into the interstellar medium. Moreover, the system's slow star-formation (SF) rate grants sufficient time for SNe I to occur. Our derived chemical element ratios are consistent with the episodic and extended SF in Carina previously derived from

  10. Stellar abundances and ages for metal-rich Milky Way globular clusters. Stellar parameters and elemental abundances for 9 HB stars in NGC 6352

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltzing, S.; Primas, F.; Johnson, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Metal-rich globular clusters provide important tracers of the formation of our Galaxy. Moreover, and not less important, they are very important calibrators for the derivation of properties of extra-galactic metal-rich stellar populations. Nonetheless, only a few of the metal-rich globular clusters in the Milky Way have been studied using high-resolution stellar spectra to derive elemental abundances. Additionally, Rosenberg et al. identified a small group of metal-rich globular clusters that appeared to be about 2 billion years younger than the bulk of the Milky Way globular clusters. However, it is unclear if like is compared with like in this dataset as we do not know the enhancement of α-elements in the clusters and the amount of α-elements is well known to influence the derivation of ages for globular clusters. Aims: We derive elemental abundances for the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 6352 and we present our methods to be used in up-coming studies of other metal-rich globular clusters. Methods: We present a study of elemental abundances for α- and iron-peak elements for nine HB stars in the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 6352. The elemental abundances are based on high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra obtained with the UVES spectrograph on VLT. The elemental abundances have been derived using standard LTE calculations and stellar parameters have been derived from the spectra themselves by requiring ionizational as well as excitational equilibrium. Results: We find that NGC 6352 has [Fe/H] = -0.55, is enhanced in the α-elements to about +0.2 dex for Ca, Si, and Ti relative to Fe. For the iron-peak elements we find solar values. Based on the spectroscopically derived stellar parameters we find that an E(B-V) = 0.24 and (m-M) ≃ 14.05 better fits the data than the nominal values. An investigation of log gf-values for suitable Fe i lines lead us to the conclusion that the commonly used correction to the May et al. (1974) data should not be

  11. High-resolution mapping of elemental abundances of the lunar regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöhler, Christian; Berezhnoy, Alexey; Evans, Richard

    Many attempts have been made to derive elemental abundances of the lunar surface from mul-tispectral images (cf. e.g. [1]). The gamma ray spectrometer on board the Lunar Prospector spacecraft (LP GRS) provided the first "direct" global measurements of lunar elemental abun-dances including Fe, Th (15 km surface resolution), Ti, K, Sm (60 km), Al, O, Si, Mg, Ca, and U (150 km). In this study we rely on the elemental abundance estimation method intro-duced in [2], which is based on spectral features derived from the Clementine UVVIS+NIR data set and estimates the abundances of Ca, Al, Fe, Mg, Ti, and O by applying a second order polynomial regression model with the corresponding LP GRS abundances as "ground truth". The regarded spectral features are the continuum slope, the FWHM of the ferrous absorption trough near 1000 nm after continuum division, and the absorption wavelengths and relative absorption depths (cf. [2,3] for details). A petrographic analysis is performed based on the abundances of the key elements Al, Fe, and Mg [4]. The relative abundances of the endmem-bers mare basalt, Mg-rich rock, and ferroan anorthosite are estimated using Fe-Mg and Al-Mg diagrams, where the endmember compositions are determined based on the three-endmember plane fitted in Al-Fe-Mg space to the elemental abundances at 150 km resolution obtained with the regression model. The root-mean-square deviation from the three-endmember plane is only 0.3 wt percent. Our petrographic map shows Mg-rich rocks in the Mare Frigoris region, on the edges of large maria, in the South Pole Aitken basin, and in some cryptomaria such as the Schiller-Schickard basin. The presence of Mg-rich rocks in Mare Frigoris explains the Fe and Ti depletion discussed in [5]. Furthermore, our analysis confirms that the basalts of eastern mare Frigoris have an atypically high Al content [6]. The region south of Lichtenberg and around Seleucus and Briggs in northwestern Oceanus Procellarum is characterised by

  12. The Chelyabinsk Fall Highly Siderophile Element Abundance and 187Os/188Os Composition and Comparison with Ordinary and Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, J. M. D.; Corder, C. A.; Dhaliwal, J. K.; Liu, Y.; Taylor, L. A.

    2014-09-01

    New osmium isotope and highly siderophile element abundance data are presented for the Chelyabinsk ordinary chondrite fall (February 2013) and placed into context with new data for ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites.

  13. Relationship between the Elemental Abundances and the Kinematics of Galactic-Field RR Lyrae Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsakov, V. A.; Gozha, M. L.; Koval, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    Data of our compiled catalog containing the positions, velocities, and metallicities of 415 RR Lyrae variable stars and the relative abundances [el/Fe] of 12 elements for 101 RR Lyrae stars, including four α elements (Mg, Ca, Si, and Ti), are used to study the relationships between the chemical and spatial-kinematic properties of these stars. In general, the dependences of the relative abundances of α elements on metallicity and velocity for the RR Lyrae stars are approximately the same as those for field dwarfs. Despite the usual claim that these stars are old, among them are representatives of the thin disk, which is the youngest subsystem of the Galaxy. Attention is called to the problem of lowmetallicity RR Lyrae stars. Most RR Lyrae stars that have the kinematic properties of thick disk stars have metallicities [Fe/H] < -1.0 and high ratios [α/Fe] ≈ 0.4, whereas only about 10% of field dwarfs belonging to the so-called "low-metallicity tail" have this chemical composition. At the same time, there is a sharp change in [α/Fe] in RR Lyrae stars belonging just to the thick disk, providing evidence for a long period of formation of this subsystem. The chemical compositions of SDSS J1707+58, V455 Oph, MACHO176.18833.411, V456 Ser, and BPSCS 30339-046 do not correspond to their kinematics.While the first three of these stars belong to the halo, according to their kinematics, the last two belong to the thick disk. It is proposed that they are all most likely extragalactic, but the possible appearance of some of them in the solar neighborhood as a result of the gravitational action of the bar on field stars cannot be ruled out.

  14. Elemental abundances and classification of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, D. M.; Ryan, S. G.; Rossi, S.; Beers, T. C.; Tsangarides, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a detailed study of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, based on high-resolution spectroscopic observations of a sample of 18 stars. The stellar spectra for this sample were obtained at the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope in 2001 and 2002, using the Utrecht Echelle Spectrograph, at a resolving power R ~ 52 000 and S/N ~ 40, covering the wavelength range λλ3700-5700 Å. The atmospheric parameters determined for this sample indicate temperatures ranging from 4750 K to 7100 K, log g from 1.5 to 4.3, and metallicities -3.0 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ -1.7. Elemental abundances for C, Na, Mg, Sc, Ti, Cr, Cu, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy are determined. Abundances for an additional 109 stars were taken from the literature and combined with the data of our sample. The literature sample reveals a lack of reliable abundance estimates for species that might be associated with the r-process elements for about 67% of CEMP stars, preventing a complete understanding of this class of stars, since [Ba/Eu] ratios are used to classify them. Although eight stars in our observed sample are also found in the literature sample, Eu abundances or limits are determined for four of these stars for the first time. From the observed correlations between C, Ba, and Eu, we argue that the CEMP-r/s class has the same astronomical origin as CEMP-s stars, highlighting the need for a more complete understanding of Eu production. Tables 1, 3, 4, 8-10, A.1, and B.1-B.4 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFull Tables 2, 5, and 7 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/548/A34

  15. On the Measurement of Elemental Abundance Ratios in Inner Galaxy H II Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Rubin, Robert H.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Haas, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    Although abundance gradients in the Milky Way Galaxy certainly exist, details remain uncertain, particularly in the inner Galaxy, where stars and H II regions in the Galactic plane are obscured optically. In this paper we revisit two previously studied, inner Galaxy H II regions: G333.6-0.2 and W43. We observed three new positions in G333.6-0.2 with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory and reobserved the central position with the Infrared Space Observatory's Long Wavelength Spectrometer in far-infrared lines of S++, N++, N+, and O++. We also added the N+ lines at 122 and 205 microns to the suite of lines measured in W43 by Simpson et al.. The measured electron densities range from approx. 40 to over 4000 per cu cm in a single HII region, indicating that abundance analyses must consider density variations, since the critical densities of the observed lines range from 40 to 9000 per cu cm. We propose a method to handle density variations and make new estimates of the S/H and N/H abundance ratios. We find that our sulfur abundance estimates for G333.6-0.2 and W43 agree with the S/H abundance ratios expected for the gradient previously reported by Simpson et al., with the S/H values revised to be smaller owing to changes in collisional excitation cross sections. The estimated N/H, S/H, and N/S ratios are the most reliable because of their small corrections for unseen ionization states (< or approx. 10%). The estimated N/S ratios for the two sources are smaller than what would be calculated from the N/H and S/H ratios in our previous paper. If all low excitation H II regions had similar changes to their N/S ratios as a result of adding measurements of N+ to previous measurements of N++, there would be no or only a very small gradient in N/S. This is interesting because nitrogen is considered to be a secondary element and sulfur is a primary element in galactic chemical evolution calculations. We compute models of the two H II regions to estimate corrections for the other

  16. \\Space: A new code to estimate \\temp, \\logg, and elemental abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeche, C.

    2016-09-01

    \\Space is a FORTRAN95 code that derives stellar parameters and elemental abundances from stellar spectra. To derive these parameters, \\Space does not measure equivalent widths of lines nor it uses templates of synthetic spectra, but it employs a new method based on a library of General Curve-Of-Growths. To date \\Space works on the wavelength range 5212-6860 Å and 8400-8921 Å, and at the spectral resolution R=2000-20000. Extensions of these limits are possible. \\Space is a highly automated code suitable for application to large spectroscopic surveys. A web front end to this service is publicly available at http://dc.g-vo.org/SP_ACE together with the library and the binary code.

  17. (F)UV Spectroscopy of K648: Abundance Determination of Trace Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad-Yob, S. J.; Ziegler, M.; Rauch, T.; Werner, K.

    2010-11-01

    We present preliminary results of an ongoing spectral analysis of K 648, the central star of the planetary nebula Ps 1, based on high resolution FUV spectra. K 648, in M 15 is one of only four known PNe in globular clusters. The formation of this post-AGB object in a globular cluster is still unclear. Our aim is to determine Teff, log g, and the abundances of trace elements, in order to improve our understanding of post-AGB evolution of extremely metal-poor stars, especially PN formation in globular clusters. We analyzed FUSE, HST/STIS, and HST/FOS observations. A grid of stellar model atmospheres was calculated using the Tübingen NLTE Model Atmosphere Package (TMAP).

  18. Abundances of neutron-capture elements in stars of the Galactic disk substructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishenina, T. V.; Pignatari, M.; Korotin, S. A.; Soubiran, C.; Charbonnel, C.; Thielemann, F.-K.; Gorbaneva, T. I.; Basak, N. Yu.

    2013-04-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to present and discuss the observations of the iron peak (Fe, Ni) and neutron-capture element (Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, and Eu) abundances for 276 FGK dwarfs, located in the Galactic disk with metallicity -1 < [Fe/H] < +0.3. Methods: Atmospheric parameters and chemical composition of the studied stars were determined from an high resolution, high signal-to-noise echelle spectra obtained with the echelle spectrograph ELODIE at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (France). Effective temperatures were estimated by the line depth ratio method and from the Hα line-wing fitting. Surface gravities (log g) were determined by parallaxes and the ionization balance of iron. Abundance determinations were carried out using the LTE approach, taking the hyperfine structure for Eu into account, and the abundance of Ba was computed under the NLTE approximation. Results: We are able to assign most of the stars in our sample to the substructures of the Galaxy thick disk, thin disk, or Hercules stream according to their kinematics. The classification of 27 stars is uncertain. For most of the stars in the sample, the abundances of neutron-capture elements have not been measured earlier. For all of them, we provide the chemical composition and discuss the contribution from different nucleosynthesis processes. Conclusions: The [Ni/Fe] ratio shows a flat value close to the solar one for the whole metallicity range, with a small scatter, pointing to a nearly solar Ni/Fe ratio for the ejecta of both core-collapse SN and SNIa. The increase in the [Ni/Fe] for metallicity higher than solar is confirmed, and it is due to the metallicity dependence of 56Ni ejecta from SNIa. Under large uncertainty in the age determination of observed stars, we verified that there is a large dispersion in the AMR in the thin disk, and no clear trend as in the thick disk. That may be one of the main reasons for the dispersion, observed for the s-process elements in the thin disk (e

  19. Evolutionary transitions in the Asteraceae coincide with marked shifts in transposable element abundance.

    PubMed

    Staton, S Evan; Burke, John M

    2015-08-20

    The transposable element (TE) content of the genomes of plant species varies from near zero in the genome of Utricularia gibba to more than 80% in many species. It is not well understood whether this variation in genome composition results from common mechanisms or stochastic variation. The major obstacles to investigating mechanisms of TE evolution have been a lack of comparative genomic data sets and efficient computational methods for measuring differences in TE composition between species. In this study, we describe patterns of TE evolution in 14 species in the flowering plant family Asteraceae and 1 outgroup species in the Calyceraceae to investigate phylogenetic patterns of TE dynamics in this important group of plants. Our findings indicate that TE families in the Asteraceae exhibit distinct patterns of non-neutral evolution, and that there has been a directional increase in copy number of Gypsy retrotransposons since the origin of the Asteraceae. Specifically, there is marked increase in Gypsy abundance at the origin of the Asteraceae and at the base of the tribe Heliantheae. This latter shift in genome composition has had a significant impact on the diversity and abundance distribution of TEs in a lineage-specific manner. We show that the TE-driven expansion of plant genomes can be facilitated by just a few TE families, and is likely accompanied by the modification and/or replacement of the TE community. Importantly, large shifts in TE composition may be correlated with major of phylogenetic transitions.

  20. Relative elemental abundance and heating constraints determined for the solar corona from SERTS measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Intensities of EUV spectral lines were measured as a function of radius off the solar limb by two flights of Goddard's Solar EUV Rocket Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS) for three quiet sun regions. The density scale height, line-ratio densities, line-ratio temperatures, and emission measures were determined. The line-ratio temperature determined from the ionization balances of Arnaud and Rothenflug (1985) were more self-consistent than the line-ratio temperatures obtained from the values of Arnaud and Raymond (1992). Limits on the filling factor were determined from the emission measure and the line-ratio densities for all three regions. The relative abundances of silicon, aluminum, and chromium to iron were determined. Results did agree with standard coronal relative elemental abundances for one observation, but did not agree for another. Aluminum was overabundant while silicon was underabundant. Heating was required above 1.15 solar radii for all three regions studied. For two regions, local nonconductive heating is needed for any filling factor, and in all three regions for filling factor of 0.1.

  1. Elemental and Molecular Relative Abundances in the Ejecta of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kober, G. V.; Gull, T. R.; Nielsen, K.; Bruhweiler, F.; Verner, K.; Stahl, O.; Weis, K.; Bomans, D.

    2006-01-01

    We are measuring relative elemental abundances for the ejecta in the line of sight from Eta Carinae using high dispersion spectroscopy with the HST/STIS and the VLT/UVES. While multiple velocity components have been identified, we focus on the -513 and -146 km/s components originating from the Homunculus and the Little Homunculus. Complicating factors are the complex nebular structures in the immediate vicinity of the bright, massive star: the very bright emission structures, Weigelt blobs B, C and D, the broad, clumpy structures of the extended wind apparently not photoionized by Eta Car B, and general scattered starlight from the extended wind and the dusty core of the circumstellar material. We have used the 3050 to 3160A region of overlap between STIS and UVES to intercompare equivalent widths of absorption lines to estimate the 'contributing factor', namely the amount of light originating from the star compared to nebular structures. While the extracted STIS spectra are from 0.1" wide aperture, the UVES spectra are limited by the 1" seeing conditions. Curiously we find that the scattering contribution in the UVES spectra changes with time, apparently with orbital phase of the 5.54-year period. This indicates that the dust may be modified by changes in the central source with phase. The noticeable drop in scattered light appears to occur about 1.7 years (phase 0.35) after the spectroscopic minimum. Relative abundances of iron peak elements and some molecules will be estimated. Observations in this study were accomplished with HST through STSci and with VLT through ESO and funded under STIS GTO resources.

  2. On the differences in element abundances of energetic ions from corotating events and from large solar events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Barbier, L. M.

    1991-01-01

    The abundances of energetic ions accelerated from high-speed solar wind streams by shock waves formed at corotating interaction regions (CIRs) where high-speed streams overtake the lower-speed solar wind are examined. The observed element abundances appear to represent those of the high-speed solar wind, unmodified by the shock acceleration. These abundances, relative to those in the solar photosphere, are organized by the first ionization potential (FIP) of the ions in a way that is different from the FIP effect commonly used to describe differences between abundances in the solar photosphere and those in the solar corona, solar energetic particles (SEPs), and the low-speed solar wind. In contrast, the FIP effect of the ion abundances in the CIR events is characterized by a smaller amplitude of the differences between high-FIP and low-FIP ions and by elevated abundances of He, C, and S.

  3. Abundance patterns of the light neutron-capture elements in very and extremely metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spite, F.; Spite, M.; Barbuy, B.; Bonifacio, P.; Caffau, E.; François, P.

    2018-03-01

    Aims: The abundance patterns of the neutron-capture elements in metal-poor stars provide a unique record of the nucleosynthesis products of the earlier massive primitive objects. Methods: We measured new abundances of so-called light neutron-capture of first peak elements using local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) 1D analysis; this analysis resulted in a sample of 11 very metal-poor stars, from [Fe/H] = -2.5 to [Fe/H] = -3.4, and one carbon-rich star, CS 22949-037 with [Fe/H] = -4.0. The abundances were compared to those observed in two classical metal-poor stars: the typical r-rich star CS 31082-001 ([Eu/Fe] > +1.0) and the r-poor star HD 122563 ([Eu/Fe] < 0.0), which are known to present a strong enrichment of the first peak neutron-capture elements relative to the second peak. Results: Within the first peak, the abundances are well correlated in analogy to the well-known correlation inside the abundances of the second-peak elements. In contrast, there is no correlation between any first peak element with any second peak element. We show that the scatter of the ratio of the first peak abundance over second peak abundance increases when the mean abundance of the second peak elements decreases from r-rich to r-poor stars. We found two new r-poor stars that are very similar to HD 122563. A third r-poor star, CS 22897-008, is even more extreme; this star shows the most extreme example of first peak elements enrichment to date. On the contrary, another r-poor star (BD-18 5550) has a pattern of first peak elements that is similar to the typical r-rich stars CS 31082-001, however this star has some Mo enrichment. Conclusions: The distribution of the neutron-capture elements in our very metal-poor stars can be understood as the combination of at least two mechanisms: one that enriches the forming stars cloud homogeneously through the main r-process and leads to an element pattern similar to the r-rich stars, such as CS 31082-001; and another that forms mainly lighter

  4. THE ABUNDANCES OF LIGHT NEUTRON-CAPTURE ELEMENTS IN PLANETARY NEBULAE. III. THE IMPACT OF NEW ATOMIC DATA ON NEBULAR SELENIUM AND KRYPTON ABUNDANCE DETERMINATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, N. C.; Porter, R. L.; Dinerstein, Harriet L., E-mail: nsterlin@westga.edu, E-mail: ryanlporter@gmail.com, E-mail: harriet@astro.as.utexas.edu

    The detection of neutron(n)-capture elements in several planetary nebulae (PNe) has provided a new means of investigating s-process nucleosynthesis in low-mass stars. However, a lack of atomic data has inhibited accurate trans-iron element abundance determinations in astrophysical nebulae. Recently, photoionization (PI) and recombination data were determined for Se and Kr, the two most widely detected n-capture elements in nebular spectra. We have incorporated these new data into the photoionization code Cloudy. To test the atomic data, numerical models were computed for 15 PNe that exhibit emission lines from multiple Kr ions. We found systematic discrepancies between the predicted and observedmore » emission lines that are most likely caused by inaccurate PI and recombination data. These discrepancies were removed by adjusting the Kr{sup +}–Kr{sup 3+} PI cross sections within their cited uncertainties and the dielectronic recombination rate coefficients by slightly larger amounts. From grids of models spanning the physical conditions encountered in PNe, we derive new, broadly applicable ionization correction factor (ICF) formulae for calculating Se and Kr elemental abundances. The ICFs were applied to our previous survey of near-infrared [Kr iii] and [Se iv] emission lines in 120 PNe. The revised Se and Kr abundances are 0.1–0.3 dex lower than former estimates, with average values of [Se/(O, Ar)] = 0.12 ± 0.27 and [Kr/(O, Ar)] = 0.82 ± 0.29, but correlations previously found between their abundances and other nebular and stellar properties are unaffected. We also find a tendency for high-velocity PNe that can be associated with the Galactic thick disk to exhibit larger s-process enrichments than low-velocity PNe belonging to the thin-disk population.« less

  5. Short interspersed element (SINE) depletion and long interspersed element (LINE) abundance are not features universally required for imprinting.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Michael; de Burca, Anna; McCole, Ruth B; Chahal, Mandeep; Saadat, Ghazal; Oakey, Rebecca J; Schulz, Reiner

    2011-04-20

    Genomic imprinting is a form of gene dosage regulation in which a gene is expressed from only one of the alleles, in a manner dependent on the parent of origin. The mechanisms governing imprinted gene expression have been investigated in detail and have greatly contributed to our understanding of genome regulation in general. Both DNA sequence features, such as CpG islands, and epigenetic features, such as DNA methylation and non-coding RNAs, play important roles in achieving imprinted expression. However, the relative importance of these factors varies depending on the locus in question. Defining the minimal features that are absolutely required for imprinting would help us to understand how imprinting has evolved mechanistically. Imprinted retrogenes are a subset of imprinted loci that are relatively simple in their genomic organisation, being distinct from large imprinting clusters, and have the potential to be used as tools to address this question. Here, we compare the repeat element content of imprinted retrogene loci with non-imprinted controls that have a similar locus organisation. We observe no significant differences that are conserved between mouse and human, suggesting that the paucity of SINEs and relative abundance of LINEs at imprinted loci reported by others is not a sequence feature universally required for imprinting.

  6. What Factors Control Platinum-Group Element (PGE) Abundances in Basalts From the Ontong Java Plateau?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazey, W. J.; Neal, C. R.

    2002-12-01

    Eleven samples encompassing four sites drilled by Ocean Drilling Program Leg 192 to the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) were analyzed for major, trace and platinum-group (PGEs: Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, and Pd) elements. Based on major and trace element chemistry, these are divided into two groups: a primitive group, which was newly discovered on Leg 192, and Kwaimbaita-type basalts, which are ubiquitous on the OJP (cf. Tejada et al., 2002, J. Pet. 43:449). The primitive group is relatively enriched in MgO, Ni, and Cr and relatively depleted in incompatible elements compared to the Kwaimbaita-type basalts. Petrography indicates that the fractionating phases during emplacement of both types of basalts were olivine and Cr-spinel +/- plagioclase +/- cpx. Normalized PGE profiles are fractionated, but exhibit a flattening between Ru and Ir and occasionally an enrichment in Ir. It has been shown that chromite can preferentially incorporate Os and Ru (Kd ?150) over Ir (Kd ?100), which may account for the Ir and Ru systematics. We do not consider sulfide to be a factor in fractionating the PGEs because it is either absent or present as a trace phase in these basalts and the OJP basalts are sulfur undersaturated (Michael and Cornell, 1996, EOS 77:714). Additionally, the primitive samples from the OJP also have Cu/Pd ratios (4500-8000) that are roughly similar to primitive mantle (7300), and have a generally flat transition from Pd to Y on a primitive mantle-normalized plot. It is unlikely that these samples reached sulfur saturation. The Kwaimbaita-type basalts have slightly elevated Cu/Pd ratios (9000-14000). While there are subtle differences between the PGE profiles of basalts from the Leg 192 drill cores compared to OJP basalts from subaerial outcrops in the Solomon Islands (e.g., the former have general lower Pt/Rh and higher Rh/Ru ratios), it is apparent that silicate and oxide phases are controlling the PGE profiles and abundances. For example, the six samples analyzed from Site

  7. Identifying Type Ia Supernova Mechanisms in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies through Analysis of Iron-peak Elemental Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rachel; Xie, Justin Long; Kirby, Evan N.

    2017-01-01

    Through the fusion of nucleons to produce elements heavier than hydrogen and helium, stellar nucleosynthesis produces most of the elements in the universe. Such is the case in a supernova explosion, which creates most of the elements on the periodic table—including iron-peak elements, atomic numbers 21 through 30—through nucleosynthesis and ejects them into the interstellar medium. In this study, we determine the best theoretical supernova model appropriate for the stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Sculptor, Fornax, Ursa Minor, and Leo II by calculating the abundances of iron-peak elements in these stars. To determine iron-peak elemental abundances, we compare synthesized spectra with observed spectra from medium-resolution spectroscopy and determine the best-fitting spectrum by way of a chi-squared minimization. Through inspecting the relationship between the iron-peak element abundances and the abundance of iron itself and by comparing them to previously hypothesized supernova model theories, we discover that the near-Chandrasekhar mass “n1” model, as predicted by Seitenzahl et al., most accurately represents the trends and patterns within our data, presenting new insight into Type Ia supernovae mechanisms within the Milky Way and beyond.

  8. The Abundances of the Fe Group Elements in Early B Stars in the Magellanic Clouds and Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Geraldine J.; Adelman, Saul J.

    2016-01-01

    The abundances of three Fe Group elements (V, Cr, and Fe) in 9 early main-sequence band B stars in the LMC, 7 in the SMC , and two in the Magellanic Bridge have been determined from archival FUSE observations and the Hubeny/Lanz NLTE programs TLUSTY/SYNSPEC. Lines from the Fe group elements, except for a few weak multiplets of Fe III, are not observable in the optical spectral region. The best set of lines in the FUSE spectral region are Fe III (UV1), V III 1150 Å, and Cr III 1137 Å. The abundances of these elements in early B stars are a marker for recent SNe Ia activity, as a single exploding white dwarf can deliver 0.5 solar masses of Ni-56 that decays into Fe to the ISM. The Fe group abundances in an older population of stars primarily reflect SNe II activity, in which a single explosion delivers only 0.07 solar masses of Ni-56 to the ISM (the rest remains trapped in the neutron star). The abundances of the Fe group elements in early B stars not only track SNe Ia activity but are also important for computing evolutionary tracks for massive stars. In general, the Fe abundance relative to the sun's value is comparable to the mean abundances for the lighter elements in the Clouds/Bridge but the values of [V,Cr/Fe]sun are smaller. This presentation will discuss the spatial distribution of the Fe Group elements in the Magellanic Clouds, and compare it with our galaxy in which the abundance of Fe declines with radial distance from the center. Support from NASA grants NAG5-13212, NNX10AD66G, STScI HST-GO-13346.22, and USC's Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) program is greatly appreciated.

  9. Formation of Globular Clusters with Internal Abundance Spreads in r-Process Elements: Strong Evidence for Prolonged Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Kenji; Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2017-07-01

    Several globular clusters (GCs) in the Galaxy are observed to show internal abundance spreads in r-process elements (e.g., Eu). We propose a new scenario that explains the origin of these GCs (e.g., M5 and M15). In this scenario, stars with no/little abundance variations first form from a massive molecular cloud (MC). After all of the remaining gas of the MC is expelled by numerous supernovae, gas ejected from asymptotic giant branch stars can be accumulated in the central region of the GC to form a high-density intracluster medium (ICM). Merging of neutron stars then occurs to eject r-process elements, which can be efficiently trapped in and subsequently mixed with the ICM. New stars formed from the ICM can have r-process abundances that are quite different from those of earlier generations of stars within the GC. This scenario can explain both (I) why r-process elements can be trapped within GCs and (II) why GCs with internal abundance spreads in r-process elements do not show [Fe/H] spreads. Our model shows (I) that a large fraction of Eu-rich stars can be seen in Na-enhanced stellar populations of GCs, as observed in M15, and (II) why most of the Galactic GCs do not exhibit such internal abundance spreads. Our model demonstrates that the observed internal spreads of r-process elements in GCs provide strong evidence for prolonged star formation (˜108 yr).

  10. Abundances of the light elements from UV (HST) and red (ESO) spectra in the very old star HD 84937

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spite, M.; Peterson, R. C.; Gallagher, A. J.; Barbuy, B.; Spite, F.

    2017-04-01

    Aims: In order to provide a better basis for the study of mechanisms of nucleosynthesis of the light elements beyond hydrogen and helium in the oldest stars, the abundances of C, O, Mg, Si, P, S, K, and Ca have been derived from UV-HST and visible-ESO high resolution spectra in the old, very metal-poor star HD 84937, at a metallicity that is 1/200 that of the Sun's. For this halo main-sequence turnoff star, the abundance determination of P and S are the first published determinations. Methods: The LTE profiles of the lines were computed and fitted to the observed spectra. Wherever possible, we compared the abundances derived from the UV spectrum to abundances derived from the visible or near-infrared spectra, and also corrected the derived abundances for non-LTE effects. Three-dimensional (3D) CO5BOLD model atmospheres have been used to determine the abundances of C and O from molecular CH and OH bands. Results: The abundances of these light elements relative to iron in HD 84937 are found to agree well with the abundances of these elements in classical metal-poor stars. Our HD 84937 carbon abundance determination points toward a solar (or mildly enhanced above solar) value of [C/Fe]. The modest overabundance of the α elements of even atomic number Z, typical of halo turnoff stars, is confirmed in this example. The odd-Z element P is found to be somewhat deficient in HD 84937, at [P/Fe] = -0.32, which is again consistent with the handful of existing determinations for turnoff stars of such low metallicity. We show that the abundance of oxygen, deduced from the OH band from 3D computations, is not compatible with the abundance deduced from the red oxygen triplet. This incompatibility is explained by the existence of a chromosphere heating the shallow layers of the atmosphere where the OH band, in 3D computations, is mainly formed. Conclusions: The abundance ratios are compared to the predictions of models of galactic nucleosynthesis and evolution. Based on

  11. Al-26, Pu-244, Ti-50, REE, and trace element abundances in hibonite grains from CM and CV meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, A. J.; Mckeegan, K. D.; Zinner, E.; Goswami, J. N.

    1987-01-01

    Hibonites from the CM meteorites Murchison, Murray, and Cold Bokkeveld, and hibonites and Ti-rich pyroxene from the CV chondrite Allende are studied. Electron microprobe measurements of major element concentrations and track and ion probe measurements of Mg and Ti isotopic ratios, rare earth elements (REEs), and trace element abundances are analyzed. Correlations between isotopic anomalies in Ti, Al-26, Pu-244, and Mg-26(asterisk) are examined. Ti isotopic anomalies are compared with REE and trace element abundance patterns. Reasons for the lack of Al-26 in the hibonites are investigated and discussed. It is observed that there is no correlation between the Ti isotopic compositions, and the presence of Mg-26(asterisk), Pu-244, and REE and trace element patterns in individual hibonite samples. The data reveal that hibonites are not interstellar dust grains but formed on a short time scale and in localized regions of the early solar system.

  12. Cosmic-ray abundances of the even charge elements from Sn-50 to Ce-58 measured on HEAO-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.; Garrard, T. L.; Krombel, K. E.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.; Brewster, N. R.; Fickle, R. K.; Waddington, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    Elements with even atomic number (Z) in the interval Z = 50-58 have been resolved in the cosmic radiation using the Heavy Nuclei Experiment on the HEAO-3 satellite. The observation that Sn-50 and Ba-56 are more abundant than Te-52 and Xe-54 indicates a substantial s-process contribution to the cosmic ray source. A significant abundance of Ce-58 provides further support for this finding.

  13. Elemental abundance analyses with Complejo Astronomico. EL Leoncito REOSC echelle spectrograms. I. κ Cancri, HR 7245, and ξ Octantis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintado, O. I.; Adelman, S. J.

    1996-08-01

    Elemental abundances are derived for three sharp-lined stars κ Cnc, HR 7245, and ξ Oct using REOSC echelle spectrograms obtained at CASLEO. Comparisons are made with published equivalent widths. The derived abundances for κ Cnc and ξ Oct are slightly larger than those obtained with other high dispersion spectrographs. HR 7245 exhibits a pattern of abundance anomalies similar to other Mercury-Manganese stars. The spectra of the two HgMn stars in the λλ4640-5100 region exhibit an interesting and useful variety of lines which can be used to supplement analyses of the photographic region.

  14. Heavy Element Abundances in Two B0-B0.5 Main Sequence Stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Geraldine J.

    We propose FUSE observations of AV304 (B0.5V) and NGC346-637 B0V), two sharp-lined main-sequence stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud, to determine the abundances of heavy elements, especially those of the iron group. The FUSE spectral region contains numerous Fe III lines, including the resonance multiplet (UV 1) near 1130 Angstroms, that is excellent for abundance determinations and two strong multiplets of V III, an ion that does not produce measurable lines longward of 1200 Angstoms, in metal-deficient stars. In addition there are several measurable lines from Cr III and Mn III. A limited analyses of ground-based spectra of these stars by Dufton et al. (1990) and Rolleston et al. (1993) indicated an average underabundance of 0.7-0.8 dex for most light elements and a recent analysis of HSTSTIS data on AV304 by Peters & Grigsby (2001) suggests that the Fe group elements are depleted by the same amount relative to the sun. When combined with the HST-STIS results, this effort will represent the first attempt to measure the abundances of Fe group elements in the photospheres of early B, main sequence stars in an external galaxy. Although abundances of the Fe-peak elements are of interest because they are important for assessing opacities for stellar evolution calculations and the validity of theoretical calculations of explosive nucleosynthesis, the ground-based study did not yield this information because measurable lines from these species are found only in the UV spectral region. Abundances and abundance ratios of both heavy & light elements will be compared with the HST-STIS results from AV304, H II regions, supernova remnants, evolved massive stars in the SMC, and theoretical calculations of nucleosynthesis.

  15. The origin of diverse α-element abundances in galaxy discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackereth, J. Ted; Crain, Robert A.; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom; Schaller, Matthieu

    2018-04-01

    Spectroscopic surveys of the Galaxy reveal that its disc stars exhibit a spread in [α/Fe] at fixed [Fe/H], manifest at some locations as a bimodality. The origin of these diverse, and possibly distinct, stellar populations in the Galactic disc is not well understood. We examine the Fe and α-element evolution of 133 Milky Way-like galaxies from the EAGLE simulation, to investigate the origin and diversity of their [α/Fe]-[Fe/H] distributions. We find that bimodal [α/Fe] distributions arise in galaxies whose gas accretion histories exhibit episodes of significant infall at both early and late times, with the former fostering more intense star formation than the latter. The shorter characteristic consumption timescale of gas accreted in the earlier episode suppresses its enrichment with iron synthesised by Type Ia SNe, resulting in the formation of a high-[α/Fe] sequence. We find that bimodality in [α/Fe] similar to that seen in the Galaxy is rare, appearing in approximately 5 percent of galaxies in our sample. We posit that this is a consequence of an early gas accretion episode requiring the mass accretion history of a galaxy's dark matter halo to exhibit a phase of atypically-rapid growth at early epochs. The scarcity of EAGLE galaxies exhibiting distinct sequences in the [α/Fe]-[Fe/H] plane may therefore indicate that the Milky Way's elemental abundance patterns, and its accretion history, are not representative of the broader population of ˜L⋆ disc galaxies.

  16. The origin of diverse α-element abundances in galaxy discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackereth, J. Ted; Crain, Robert A.; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom; Schaller, Matthieu

    2018-07-01

    Spectroscopic surveys of the Galaxy reveal that its disc stars exhibit a spread in [α/Fe] at fixed [Fe/H], manifest at some locations as a bimodality. The origin of these diverse, and possibly distinct, stellar populations in the Galactic disc is not well understood. We examine the Fe and α-element evolution of 133 Milky Way-like galaxies from the EAGLE simulation, to investigate the origin and diversity of their [α/Fe]-[Fe/H] distributions. We find that bimodal [α/Fe] distributions arise in galaxies whose gas accretion histories exhibit episodes of significant infall at both early and late times, with the former fostering more intense star formation than the latter. The shorter characteristic consumption time-scale of gas accreted in the earlier episode suppresses its enrichment with iron synthesized by Type Ia SNe, resulting in the formation of a high-[α/Fe] sequence. We find that bimodality in [α/Fe] similar to that seen in the Galaxy is rare, appearing in approximately 5 per cent of galaxies in our sample. We posit that this is a consequence of an early gas accretion episode requiring the mass accretion history of a galaxy's dark matter halo to exhibit a phase of atypically rapid growth at early epochs. The scarcity of EAGLE galaxies exhibiting distinct sequences in the [α/Fe]-[Fe/H] plane may therefore indicate that the Milky Way's elemental abundance patterns, and its accretion history, are not representative of the broader population of ˜L⋆ disc galaxies.

  17. HAT-P-26b: A Neptune-mass Exoplanet with Primordial Solar Heavy Element Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeford, Hannah R.; Sing, David K.; Kataria, Tiffany; Deming, Drake; Nikolov, Nikolay; Lopez, Eric; Tremblin, Pascal; Skalid Amundsen, David; Lewis, Nikole K.; Mandell, Avi; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Knutson, Heather; Benneke, Björn; Evans, Tom M.

    2017-01-01

    A trend in giant planet mass and atmospheric heavy elemental abundance was first noted last century from observations of planets in our own solar system. These four data points from Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune have served as a corner stone of planet formation theory. Here we add another point in the mass-metallicity trend from a detailed observational study of the extrasolar planet HAT-P-26b, which inhabits the critical mass regime near Neptune and Uranus. Neptune-sized worlds are among the most common planets in our galaxy and frequently exist in orbital periods very different from that of our own solar system ice giants. Atmospheric studies are the principal window into these worlds, and thereby into their formation and evolution, beyond those of our own solar system. Using the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer, from the optical to the infrared, we conducted a detailed atmospheric study of the Neptune-mass exoplanet HAT-P-26b over 0.5 to 4.5 μm. We detect prominent H2O absorption at 1.4 μm to 525 ppm in the atmospheric transmission spectrum. We determine that HAT-P-26b’s atmosphere is not rich in heavy elements (≈1.8×solar), which goes distinctly against the solar system mass-metallicity trend. This likely indicates that HAT-P-26b’s atmosphere is primordial and obtained its gaseous envelope late in its disk lifetime with little contamination from metal-rich planetesimals.

  18. HAT-P-26b: A Neptune-mass Exoplanet with Primordial Solar Heavy Element Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeford, Hannah; Sing, David; Deming, Drake; Kataria, Tiffany; Lopez, Eric

    2016-10-01

    A trend in giant planet mass and atmospheric heavy elemental abundance was first noted last century from observations of planets in our own solar system. These four data points from Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune have served as a corner stone of planet formation theory. Here we add another point in the mass-metallicity trend from a detailed observational study of the extrasolar planet HAT-P-26b, which inhabits the critical mass regime near Neptune and Uranus. Neptune-sized worlds are among the most common planets in our galaxy and frequently exist in orbital periods very different from that of our own solar system ice giants. Atmospheric studies are the principal window into these worlds, and thereby into their formation and evolution, beyond those of our own solar system. Using the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer, from the optical to the infrared, we conducted a detailed atmospheric study of the Neptune-mass exoplanet HAT-P-26b over 0.5 to 4.5 μm. We detect prominent H2O absorption at 1.4 μm to 525 ppm in the atmospheric transmission spectrum. We determine that HAT-P-26b's atmosphere is not rich in heavy elements (≈1.8×solar), which goes distinctly against the solar system mass-metallicity trend. This likely indicates that HAT-P-26b's atmosphere is primordial and obtained its gaseous envelope late in its disk lifetime with little contamination from metal-rich planetesimals.

  19. Higher Signal-to-Noise Measurements of Alpha-element Abundances in the M31 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escala, Ivanna; Kirby, Evan N.

    2018-06-01

    The stellar halo and tidal streams of M31 provide an essential counterpoint to the same structures around the Milky Way (MW). While measurements of [Fe/H] and [$\\alpha$/Fe] have been made in the MW, little is known about the detailed chemical abundances of the M31 system. To make progress with existing telescopes, we expand upon the technique first presented by Kirby et al., applying spectral synthesis to medium-resolution spectroscopy at lower spectral resolution (R $\\sim$ 1800) across an optical range (4100~\\AA \\ $<$ $\\lambda$ $<$ 9100~\\AA) that extends down the blue. We have obtained deep spectra of red giants in the tidal streams, smooth halo, and disk of M31 using the DEIMOS 600ZD grating, resulting in higher signal-to-noise per spectral resolution element (S/N $\\sim$ 30 \\AA$^{-1}$). By applying our technique to red giant stars in MW globular clusters with higher-resolution ($R$ $\\sim$ 6000) spectra in the blue (4100 - 6300 \\AA), we demonstrate that our technique reproduces previous measurements derived from the red side of the optical (6300 - 9100 \\AA). For the first time, we present measurements of [Fe/H] and [$\\alpha$/Fe] of sufficient quality and sample size to construct quantitative models of galactic chemical evolution in the M31 system.

  20. Trace element abundances of high-MgO glasses from Kilauea, Mauna Loa and Haleakala volcanoes, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, T.P.; Clague, D.A.; Hauri, E.H.; Grove, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    We performed an ion-microprobe study of eleven high-MgO (6.7-14.8 wt%) tholeiite glasses from the Hawaiian volcanoes Kilauea, Mauna Loa and Haleakala. We determined the rare earth (RE), high field strength, and other selected trace element abundances of these glasses, and used the data to establish their relationship to typical Hawaiian shield tholeiite and to infer characteristics of their source. The glasses have trace element abundance characteristics generally similar to those of typical shield tholeiites, e.g. L(light)REE/H(heavy)REE(C1) > 1. The Kilauea and Mauna Loa glasses, however, display trace and major element characteristics that cross geochemical discriminants observed between Kilauea and Mauna Loa shield lavas. The glasses contain a blend of these discriminating chemical characteristics, and are not exactly like the typical shield lavas from either volcano. The production of these hybrid magmas likely requires a complexly zoned source, rather than two unique sources. When corrected for olivine fractionation, the glass data show correlations between CaO concentration and incompatible trace element abundances, indicating that CaO may behave incompatibly during melting of the tholeiite source. Furthermore, the tholeiite source must contain residual garnet and clinopyroxene to account for the variation in trace element abundances of the Kilauea glasses. Inversion modeling indicates that the Kilauea source is flat relative to C1 chondrites, and has a higher bulk distribution coefficient for the HREE than the LREE.

  1. Using Elemental Abundances and Petrophysical Properties to Trace Sediment Transport in the Hudson River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Kenna, T. C.; Nitsche, F. O.

    2016-12-01

    The IPCC predicts that the frequency and severity of storms worldwide will increase due to climate change, a growing concern for the highly populated coastal areas near the Hudson River estuary. Storms have the potential to change the river's sediment budget, and it is necessary to update the current understanding of the effect of storms on sediment dynamics. In 2011, Tropical Storm Lee and Hurricane Irene delivered over 2.7 million tons of sediment to the Hudson River including over 1.5 million tons from the Mohawk River, a freshwater tributary, in addition to record amounts contributed from other major tributaries. The goals of this project are to use sediment elemental compositions to trace the major tributaries contributing to this storm-deposited sediment and to determine where sediment is accumulating as a result of storm activity. Chemical analysis of over 800 archived sediment samples are compiled to provide a pre-storm background level. These samples are compared to newly deposited sediment and material from specific tributaries. Elemental abundances (K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Zr, Pb, and U) are measured using a field portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) unit and core scanning XRF unit. Bulk matrix density is measured using a pycnometer. The measurements are used to identify elemental signatures from tributary sediment and to trace the influence of specific tributaries on deposition through the river. Our results suggests measureable signatures in sediment from individual tributaries. The Mohawk River contributes high concentrations of Ca due to the calcite deposits in its watershed. XRF measurements also show the effect of human activity on sediment deposition; variations in Rb and Zr indicate changes in deposition due to dredging in Haverstraw Bay. The salt wedge front, where ocean and fresh water meets is evident in areas of below average matrix density. This project shows significant geochemical variability between sediment from different

  2. Light and Heavy Element Abundance Variations in the Outer Halo Globular Cluster NGC 6229

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christian I.; Caldwell, Nelson; Rich, R. Michael; Walker, Matthew G.

    2017-10-01

    NGC 6229 is a relatively massive outer halo globular cluster that is primarily known for exhibiting a peculiar bimodal horizontal branch morphology. Given the paucity of spectroscopic data on this cluster, we present a detailed chemical composition analysis of 11 red giant branch members based on high resolution (R ≈ 38,000), high S/N (>100) spectra obtained with the MMT-Hectochelle instrument. We find the cluster to have a mean heliocentric radial velocity of -{138.1}-1.0+1.0 {km} {{{s}}}-1, a small dispersion of {3.8}-0.7+1.0 {km} {{{s}}}-1, and a relatively low {(M/{L}{{V}})}⊙ ={0.82}-0.28+0.49. The cluster is moderately metal-poor with < [{Fe}/{{H}}]> =-1.13 dex and a modest dispersion of 0.06 dex. However, 18% (2/11) of the stars in our sample have strongly enhanced [La, Nd/Fe] ratios that are correlated with a small (˜0.05 dex) increase in [Fe/H]. NGC 6229 shares several chemical signatures with M75, NGC 1851, and the intermediate metallicity populations of ω Cen, which lead us to conclude that NGC 6229 is a lower mass iron-complex cluster. The light elements exhibit the classical (anti-)correlations that extend up to Si, but the cluster possesses a large gap in the O-Na plane that separates first and second generation stars. NGC 6229 also has unusually low [Na, Al/Fe] abundances that are consistent with an accretion origin. A comparison with M54 and other Sagittarius clusters suggests that NGC 6229 could also be the remnant core of a former dwarf spheroidal galaxy.

  3. The abundances of major elements in Cas A and Tycho supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this program was to map the abundances of major elements such as O, Si, S, and Fe in the supernova remnants, Tycho and Cas A. The approach was based upon using archival cosmic X-ray data from several space missions, notably, the Einstein Observatory, EXOSAT, ROSAT, BBSRT, and ASCA. Two of the missions, Einstein and ROSAT, had high resolution telescopes that provided excellent images, but no spectral information. Two missions with much poorer resolution telescopes, BBXRT and ASCA, gave good spectral information through pulse height of signals in their cooled solid state detector, but rather crude spatial information. Our goal was to extract spectral information from the combined analysis of the Einstein and ROSAT images of Cas A and Tycho and to verify or refine the spectral map by checking its agreement with the BBSRT or ASCA spectra results for larger regions. In particular, we note that the Einstein and ROSAT telescopes have different spectral responses. The Einstein bandwidth includes the 2-4 keV region which is absent from ROSAT. Hence, by forming linear combinations of the Einstein and ROSAT images, we are able to resolve the contributions of the 0.5-2 keV band from the 2-4 keV band. The former contains lines of O and Fe while the latter is dominated by Si and S. We correct for the expansion that has taken place in the remnants during the ten-year interval between the Einstein and ROSAT measurements, but we must assume that no significant spectral changes have occurred during that time. The analysis of the Tycho SNR was completed and the results have been published. A copy of the paper is included. The analysis of Cas A has proved to be more complicated. It is continuing with support from another program. Part of the problem may be due to difficulties in the aspect information which is needed to precisely register the ROSAT and Einstein images.

  4. Platinum group element abundances in the upper continental crust revisited - New constraints from analyses of Chinese loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung-Woo; Hu, Zhaochu; Gao, Shan; Campbell, Ian H.; Gong, Hujun

    2012-09-01

    Platinum group element (PGE) abundances in the upper continental crust (UCC) are poorly constrained with published values varying by up to an order of magnitude. We evaluated the validity of using loess to estimate PGE abundances in the UCC by measuring these elements in seven Chinese loess samples using a precise method that combines NiS fire assay with isotope dilution. Major and trace elements of the Chinese loess show a typical upper crustal composition and PGE abundances are consistent with literature data on Chinese loess, except for Ru, which is a factor of 10 lowe than published values. We suggest that the high Ru data and RuN/IrN values of Chinese loess reported by Peucker-Ehrenbrink and Jahn (2001) (Geochem. Geophys. Geosys.2, 2001GC000172) are an analytical artifact, rather than a true geochemical characteristic of loess because likely sources of loess are not significantly enriched in Ru and transport and deposition processes cannot preferentially enrich Ru in loess. The effect of eolian fractionation on PGE abundances in loess appears to be limited because Chinese loess from different locations shows similar PGE patterns and concentrations. This conclusion is supported by strong positive correlations between the PGE (except for Pt) and other compatible elements such as Fe2O3, Ni, Cr, Co. Using a compilation of PGE data for loess from China, Argentina and Europe, including our data but excluding one sample with an anomalously high Pt content, we propose average PGE abundances for global loess of Ir = 0.022 ppb (ng/g), Ru = 0.030 ppb, Rh = 0.018 ppb, Pt = 0.599 ppb, and Pd = 0.526 ppb, and suggest that these are the best current estimates for the PGE abundances of the UCC.

  5. Formation of Globular Clusters with Internal Abundance Spreads in r -Process Elements: Strong Evidence for Prolonged Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bekki, Kenji; Tsujimoto, Takuji

    Several globular clusters (GCs) in the Galaxy are observed to show internal abundance spreads in r -process elements (e.g., Eu). We propose a new scenario that explains the origin of these GCs (e.g., M5 and M15). In this scenario, stars with no/little abundance variations first form from a massive molecular cloud (MC). After all of the remaining gas of the MC is expelled by numerous supernovae, gas ejected from asymptotic giant branch stars can be accumulated in the central region of the GC to form a high-density intracluster medium (ICM). Merging of neutron stars then occurs to eject r -processmore » elements, which can be efficiently trapped in and subsequently mixed with the ICM. New stars formed from the ICM can have r -process abundances that are quite different from those of earlier generations of stars within the GC. This scenario can explain both (i) why r -process elements can be trapped within GCs and (ii) why GCs with internal abundance spreads in r -process elements do not show [Fe/H] spreads. Our model shows (i) that a large fraction of Eu-rich stars can be seen in Na-enhanced stellar populations of GCs, as observed in M15, and (ii) why most of the Galactic GCs do not exhibit such internal abundance spreads. Our model demonstrates that the observed internal spreads of r -process elements in GCs provide strong evidence for prolonged star formation (∼10{sup 8} yr).« less

  6. Abundances of Ag and Cu in mantle peridotites and the implications for the behavior of chalcophile elements in the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zaicong; Becker, Harry

    2015-07-01

    Silver abundances in mantle peridotites and the behavior of Ag during high temperature mantle processes have received little attention and, as a consequence, the abundance of Ag in the bulk silicate Earth (BSE) has been poorly constrained. In order to better understand the processes that fractionate Ag and other chalcophile elements in the mantle, abundances of Ag and Cu in mantle peridotites from different geological settings (n = 68) have been obtained by isotope dilution ICP-MS methods. In peridotite tectonites and in a few suites of peridotite xenoliths which display evidence for variable extents of melt depletion and refertilization by silicate melts, Ag and Cu abundances show positive correlations with moderately incompatible elements such as S, Se, Te and Au. The mean Cu/Ag in fertile peridotites (3500 ± 1200, 1s, n = 38) is indistinguishable from the mean Cu/Ag of mid ocean ridge basalts (MORB, 3600 ± 400, 1s, n = 338) and MORB sulfide droplets. The constant mean Cu/Ag ratios indicate similar behavior of Ag and Cu during partial melting of the mantle, refertilization and magmatic fractionation, and thus should be representative of the Earth's upper mantle. The systematic fractionation of Cu, Ag, Au, S, Se and Te in peridotites and basalts is consistent with sulfide melt-silicate melt partitioning with apparent partition coefficients of platinum group elements (PGE) > Au ⩾ Te > Cu ≈ Ag > Se ⩾ S. Because of the effects of secondary processes, the abundances of chalcophile elements, notably S, Se, but also Cu and the PGE in many peridotite xenoliths are variable and lower than in peridotite massifs. Refertilization of peridotite may change abundances of chalcophile and lithophile elements in peridotite massifs, however, this seems to mostly occur in a systematic way. Correlations with lithophile and chalcophile elements and the overlapping mean Cu/Ag ratios of peridotites and ocean ridge basalts are used to constrain abundances of Ag and Cu in the BSE

  7. Hyperfine Structure and Abundances of Heavy Elements in 68 Tauri (HD 27962)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinet, S.; Monier, R.

    2017-12-01

    HD 27962, also known as 68 Tauri, is a Chemically Peculiar Am star member of the Hyades Open Cluster in the local arm of the Galaxy. We have modeled the high resolution SOPHIE (R=75000) spectrum of 68 Tauri using updated model atmosphere and spectrum synthesis to derive chemical abundances in its atmosphere. In particular, we have studied the effect of the inclusion of Hyperfine Structure of various Baryum isotopes on the determination of the Baryum abundance in 68 Tauri. We have also derived new abundances using updated accurate atomic parameters retrieved from the NIST database.

  8. Elemental abundance differences between nuclei acclerated in CIR shocks and solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, W. F.; Simpson, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Measurement of the ratios of nuclear abundances H/He, CNO/Fe-group and the Fe-group/HE for 51 passages of Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) at 1 AU, and measurement of these ratios from 620 solar flares in the energy range 0.6 to 4 MeV per nucleon, show that CIR shock acceleration alone does not change significantly these ratios from the values they have for solar system abundances or the solar wind. The solar flare ratios continue to reflect strong biases in the abundances, consistent with requirements for multistage acceleration rpocesses at the Sun.

  9. The Abundances of the Fe Group Elements in Early B Stars in the Magellanic Clouds and Our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Geraldine Joan; Adelman, Saul Joseph

    2015-08-01

    The abundances of the Fe-peak elements (Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni) are of interest as they are important for assessing opacities for stellar evolution calculations, confirming theoretical calculations of explosive nucleosynthesis, and inferring the past history of supernova activity in a galaxy. FUSE FUV spectra of early B stars in the LMC and SMC and HST/STIS FUV/NUV spectra of nearby B stars in our galaxy are analyzed with the Hubeny/Lanz programs TLUSTY/SYNSPEC to determine abundance for the Fe group elements and produce a map of these abundances in the Magellanic Clouds (MC) and Magellanic Bridge (MB). Except for four weak multiplets of Fe III there are no measurable lines from the Fe group in the optical region. The Fe group species found in the FUV spectra of early B stars are primarily in the second stage of ionization. The best set of lines in the FUSE spectral region are Fe III (UV1), V III 1150 Å, and Cr III 1137 Å. Analysis of the galactic B stars provides a good assessment of the reliability of the atomic parameters that are used for the MC calculations. Twenty-two early B stars in the MC and MB and five in our galaxy were analyzed. In general the Fe group abundances range from solar to slightly below solar in our region of the galaxy. But in the MCs the abundances of V, Cr, and Fe tend to be significantly lower than the mean metal abundances for the galaxy. Maps of the Fe group abundances and their variations in the LMC and SMC, tracers of recent enrichment of the ISM from supernova activity, are shown. Support from NASA grants NAG5-13212, NNX10AD66G, STScI HST-GO-13346.22, and USC’s Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE) program is greatly appreciated.

  10. Determination of the calcium elemental abundance for 43 flares from SMM-XRP solar X-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemen, J. R.; Sylwester, J.; Bentley, R. D.

    The helium and lithium-like X-ray transitions of Ca XVIII-XIX have been used to make an absolute measurement of the coronal calcium elemental abundance relative to hydrogen (ACa) in solar flares. Cooling phase spectra of 43 flares obtained in channel 1 of the Bent Crystal Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission have been analyzed. The abundance is determined from the intensity ratio of the Ca XIX resonance line (1S0 - 1P1) and nearby continuum. Attempts to correlate the ACa measurements with other observable features are discussed.

  11. Elemental abundance analyses with Complejo Astronomico EL Leoncito REOSC echelle spectrograms. III. HR 4487, 14 Hydrae, and 3 Centauri A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintado, O. I.; Adelman, S. J.; Gulliver, A. F.

    1998-05-01

    Using CASLEO echelle spectrograms, elemental abundances are derived for the sharp-lined non-magnetic CP stars HR 4487, 14 Hya, and 3 Cen A. The first two stars are members of the Mercury-Manganese subgroup and have abundances which are similar to other such peculiar stars. The third is a hotter related star. The detection of Mn II lines in its spectrum adds to this relationship. Table 3 is avaible electronically vit the CDS via anonymous ftp 130.79.128.5 or http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Neutron-capture elements abundances in Cepheids (da Silva+ 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, R.; Lemasle, B.; Bono, G.; Genovali, K.; McWilliam, A.; Cristallo, S.; Bergemann, M.; Buonanno, R.; Fabrizio, M.; Ferraro, I.; Francois, P.; Iannicola, G.; Inno, L.; Laney, C. D.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Matsunaga, N.; Nonino, M.; Primas, F.; Przybilla, N.; Romaniello, M.; Thevenin, F.; Urbaneja, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    The abundances of Fe, Y, La, Ce, Nd, and Eu for our sample of 73 Cepheids plus data available in the literature for other 362 Cepheids are shown. We first show the abundances derived based on individual spectra for the 73 stars, then the averaged values, and finally the data from the literature. The original abundances available in the literature were rescaled according to the zero-point differences listed in Table 5. The priority was given in the following order: we first adopt the abundances provided by our group, this study (TS) and Lemasle et al. (2013A&A...558A..31L, LEM), and then those provided by the other studies, Luck & Lambert (2011AJ....142..136L, LIII), and Luck et al. (2011AJ....142...51L, LII). (4 data files).

  13. METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS, RADIAL VELOCITIES, AND ALPHA ELEMENT ABUNDANCES IN THREE OFF-AXIS BULGE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. Michael; Kobayashi, Chiaki

    2013-03-10

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundance ratios of [Fe/H], [O/Fe], [Si/Fe], and [Ca/Fe] for 264 red giant branch stars in three Galactic bulge off-axis fields located near (l, b) = (-5.5, -7), (-4, -9), and (+8.5, +9). The results are based on equivalent width and spectrum synthesis analyses of moderate resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 18,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N {approx} 75-300 pixel{sup -1}) spectra obtained with the Hydra spectrographs on the Blanco 4 m and WIYN 3.5 m telescopes. The targets were selected from the blue side of the giant branch to avoid cool stars that would be strongly affectedmore » by CN and TiO; however, a comparison of the color-metallicity distribution in literature samples suggests that our selection of bluer targets should not present a significant bias against metal-rich stars. We find a full range in metallicity that spans [Fe/H] Almost-Equal-To -1.5 to +0.5, and that, in accordance with the previously observed minor-axis vertical metallicity gradient, the median [Fe/H] also declines with increasing Galactic latitude in off-axis fields. The off-axis vertical [Fe/H] gradient in the southern bulge is estimated to be {approx}0.4 dex kpc{sup -1}; however, comparison with the minor-axis data suggests that a strong radial gradient does not exist. The (+8.5, +9) field exhibits a higher than expected metallicity, with a median [Fe/H] = -0.23, that might be related to a stronger presence of the X-shaped bulge structure along that line-of-sight. This could also be the cause of an anomalous increase in the median radial velocity for intermediate metallicity stars in the (+8.5, +9) field. However, the overall radial velocity and dispersion for each field are in good agreement with recent surveys and bulge models. All fields exhibit an identical, strong decrease in velocity dispersion with increasing metallicity that is consistent with observations in similar minor-axis outer bulge fields. Additionally, the [O/Fe], [Si

  14. Project VeSElkA: a search for the vertical stratification of element abundances in HD 157087

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalack, V.

    2018-06-01

    The new spectropolarimetric spectra of HD 157087 obtained recently with ESPaDOnS (Echelle SpectroPolarimetric Device for Observations of Stars) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are analysed to verify the nature of this object. The fundamental stellar parameters Teff = 8882 K, log g = 3.57 were obtained for HD 157087 from the analysis of nine Balmer line profiles in two available spectra. A comparison of the results of our abundance analysis with previously published data shows a variability of the average abundance with time for some chemical species, while the abundances of other elements remain almost constant. The abundance analysis also reveals evidence of a significant abundance increase towards the deeper atmospheric layers for C, S, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni and Zr. Together with the discovered enhanced abundance of Ca and Sc, this finding contradicts the classification of HD 157087 as a marginal Am star. An analysis of the available measurements of radial velocity revealed long- and short-period variations. The long-period variation supports the idea that HD 157087 is an astrometric binary system with a period longer than 6 yr. The presence of the short-period variation of Vr, as well as the detection of the temporal variation of the average abundance, suggests that HD 157087 may be a triple system, in which a short-period binary rotates around a third star. In this case, the short-period binary may consist of slowly rotating Am and A (or Ap with a weak magnetic field) stars that have similar effective temperatures and surface gravities, but different abundance peculiarities.

  15. Elemental abundance analyses with Complejo Astronomico El Leoncito REOSC echelle spectrograms. IV. Extensions of nine previous analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, S. J.; Pintado, O. I.

    2000-02-01

    Using new CASLEO echelle spectrograms, we extended our elemental abundances of the sharp-lined Mercury-Manganese stars mu Lep, 14 Hya, kappa Cnc, HR 4487, HR 4817, 28 Her, and HR 7245, the closely related star 3 Cen A, and 7 Sex an A0 V star with Population I abundances, but with Population II star space motions. The lambda lambda 4500-6200 region contains a sufficient number of lines to derive high-quality abundances of these stars. For most stars, the new spectra provide additional lines for the analyses which improve their quality as well as help fill in the periodic table. Table~5 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr(130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strabg.fr/Abstract.html}

  16. Elemental gas-phase abundances of intermediate redshift type Ia supernova star-forming host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Raya, M. E.; Galbany, L.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Mollá, M.; González-Gaitán, S.; Vílchez, J. M.; Carnero, A.

    2018-05-01

    The maximum luminosity of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) depends on the oxygen abundance of the regions of the host galaxies, where they explode. This metallicity dependence reduces the dispersion in the Hubble diagram (HD) when included with the traditional two-parameter calibration of SN Ia light-curve parameters and absolute magnitude. In this work, we use empirical calibrations to carefully estimate the oxygen abundance of galaxies hosting SNe Ia from the SDSS-II/SN (Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova) survey at intermediate redshift by measuring their emission-line intensities. We also derive electronic temperature with the direct method for a small fraction of objects for consistency. We find a trend of decreasing oxygen abundance with increasing redshift for the most massive galaxies. Moreover, we study the dependence of the HD residuals (HR) with galaxy oxygen abundance obtaining a correlation in line with those found in other works. In particular, the HR versus oxygen abundance shows a slope of -0.186 ± 0.123 mag dex-1 (1.52σ) in good agreement with theoretical expectations. This implies smaller distance modulii after corrections for SNe Ia in metal-rich galaxies. Based on our previous results on local SNe Ia, we propose this dependence to be due to the lower luminosity of the SNe Ia produced in more metal-rich environments.

  17. THE CURIOUS CASE OF ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE DIFFERENCES IN THE DUAL HOT JUPITER HOSTS WASP-94A AND B

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, Johanna K.; Khanal, Sandhya; Ramírez, Ivan, E-mail: jteske@carnegiescience.edu

    Binary stars provide an ideal laboratory for investigating the potential effects of planet formation on stellar composition. Assuming that the stars formed in the same environment/from the same material, any compositional anomalies between binary components might indicate differences in how material was sequestered in planets, or accreted by the star in the process of planet formation. We present here a study of the elemental abundance differences between WASP-94A and B, a pair of stars that each host a hot Jupiter exoplanet. The two stars are very similar in spectral type (F8 and F9), and their ∼2700 au separation suggests that their protoplanetarymore » disks were likely not influenced by stellar interactions, but WASP-94Ab’s orbit—misaligned with the host star spin axis and likely retrograde—points toward a dynamically active formation mechanism, perhaps different from that of WASP-94Bb, which is not misaligned and has a nearly circular orbit. Based on our high-quality spectra and strictly relative abundance analysis, we detect a depletion of volatiles (∼−0.02 dex, on average) and enhancement of refractories (∼0.01 dex) in WASP-94A relative to B (standard errors are ∼0.005 dex). This is different from every other published case of binary host star abundances, in which either no significant abundance differences are reported or there is some degree of enhancement in all elements, including volatiles. Several scenarios that may explain the abundance trend are discussed, but none can be definitively accepted or rejected. Additional high-contrast imaging observations to search for companions that may be dynamically affecting the system, as well as a larger sample of binary host star studies, are needed to better understand the curious abundance trends we observe in WASP-94A and B.« less

  18. HAT-P-26b: A Neptune-mass exoplanet with a well-constrained heavy element abundance.

    PubMed

    Wakeford, Hannah R; Sing, David K; Kataria, Tiffany; Deming, Drake; Nikolov, Nikolay; Lopez, Eric D; Tremblin, Pascal; Amundsen, David S; Lewis, Nikole K; Mandell, Avi M; Fortney, Jonathan J; Knutson, Heather; Benneke, Björn; Evans, Thomas M

    2017-05-12

    A correlation between giant-planet mass and atmospheric heavy elemental abundance was first noted in the past century from observations of planets in our own Solar System and has served as a cornerstone of planet-formation theory. Using data from the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes from 0.5 to 5 micrometers, we conducted a detailed atmospheric study of the transiting Neptune-mass exoplanet HAT-P-26b. We detected prominent H 2 O absorption bands with a maximum base-to-peak amplitude of 525 parts per million in the transmission spectrum. Using the water abundance as a proxy for metallicity, we measured HAT-P-26b's atmospheric heavy element content ([Formula: see text] times solar). This likely indicates that HAT-P-26b's atmosphere is primordial and obtained its gaseous envelope late in its disk lifetime, with little contamination from metal-rich planetesimals. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. HAT-P-26b: A Neptune-mass exoplanet with a well-constrained heavy element abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeford, Hannah R.; Sing, David K.; Kataria, Tiffany; Deming, Drake; Nikolov, Nikolay; Lopez, Eric D.; Tremblin, Pascal; Amundsen, David S.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Mandell, Avi M.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Knutson, Heather; Benneke, Björn; Evans, Thomas M.

    2017-05-01

    A correlation between giant-planet mass and atmospheric heavy elemental abundance was first noted in the past century from observations of planets in our own Solar System and has served as a cornerstone of planet-formation theory. Using data from the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes from 0.5 to 5 micrometers, we conducted a detailed atmospheric study of the transiting Neptune-mass exoplanet HAT-P-26b. We detected prominent H2O absorption bands with a maximum base-to-peak amplitude of 525 parts per million in the transmission spectrum. Using the water abundance as a proxy for metallicity, we measured HAT-P-26b’s atmospheric heavy element content (4.8-4.0+21.5 times solar). This likely indicates that HAT-P-26b’s atmosphere is primordial and obtained its gaseous envelope late in its disk lifetime, with little contamination from metal-rich planetesimals.

  20. Determination of Trace and Volatile Element Abundance Systematics of Lunar Pyroclastic Glasses 74220 and 15426 Using LA-ICP-MS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McIntosh, E. Carrie; Porrachia, Magali; McCubbin, Francis M.; Day, James M. D.

    2017-01-01

    Since their recognition as pyroclastic glasses generated by volcanic fire fountaining on the Moon, 74220 and 15426 have garnered significant scientific interest. Early studies recognized that the glasses were particularly enriched in volatile elements on their surfaces. More recently, detailed analyses of the interiors of the glasses, as well as of melt inclusions within olivine grains associated with the 74220 glass beads, have determined high H2O, F, Cl and S contents. Such elevated volatile contents seem at odds with evidence from moderately volatile elements (MVE), such as Zn and K, for a volatile- depleted Moon. In this study, we present initial results from an analytical campaign to study trace element abundances within the pyroclastic glass beads. We report trace element data determined by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) for 15426 and 74220.

  1. Elemental abundance analyses with coadded DAO spectrograms. IV - Revision of previous analyses. V - The mercury-manganese stars Phi Herculis, 28 Herculis and HR 7664

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in chromium, manganese, and nickel abundances derived from singly ionized lines are incorporated into the elemental abundance of Adelman and Hill (1987) in order to provide more accurate gf values and damping constants for several atomic species. An improved agreement with the values from neutral lines of the same element is found. In the second part, the method is applied to an elemental abundance analysis of three mercury-manganese stars, and correlations are found between the derived abundances and the effective temperature.

  2. Elemental abundances in star-forming regions: results in Lupus and future analysis in Orion .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biazzo, K.; Frasca, A.; Alcalá, J. M.; Zusi, M.; Covino, E.; Randich, S.; Esposito, M.; Manara, C. F.; Antoniucci, S.; Nisini, B.; Rigliaco, E.; Getman, F.; Spina, L.

    We present a recent study in press on lithium, iron, and barium abundance measurements obtained for low-mass (˜ 0.025-1.8 M_⊙) stars in four Lupus clouds and future investigations on chemical content to be performed in the Orion A cloud.

  3. Major and trace element abundances in volcanic rocks of orogenic areas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakes, P.; White, A. J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The composition of recent island-arc volcanic rocks in relation to their geographic and stratigraphic relations is discussed. The differences in composition between volcanic rocks and those in continental margins are pointed out. Trace elements and major elements are shown to suggest a continuous gradational sequence from tholeiites through calc-alkaline rocks to shoshonites.

  4. Trace element abundances in major minerals of Late Permian coals from southwestern Guizhou province, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Jiahua; Ren, D.; Zheng, C.; Zeng, R.; Chou, C.-L.; Liu, J.

    2002-01-01

    Fourteen samples of minerals were separated by handpicking from Late Permian coals in southwestern Guizhou province, China. These 14 minerals were nodular pyrite, massive recrystallized pyrite, pyrite deposited from low-temperature hydrothermal fluid and from ground water; clay minerals; and calcite deposited from low-temperature hydrothermal fluid and from ground water. The mineralogy, elemental composition, and distribution of 33 elements in these samples were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS), atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), inductively coupled-plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and ion-selective electrode (ISE). The results show that various minerals in coal contain variable amounts of trace elements. Clay minerals have high concentrations of Ba, Be, Cs, F, Ga, Nb, Rb, Th, U, and Zr. Quartz has little contribution to the concentration of trace elements in bulk coal. Arsenic, Mn, and Sr are in high concentrations in calcite. Pyrite has high concentrations of As, Cd, Hg, Mo, Sb, Se, Tl, and Zn. Different genetic types of calcite in coal can accumulate different trace elements; for example Ba, Co, Cr, Hg, Ni, Rb, Sn, Sr, and Zn are in higher concentrations in calcite deposited from low-temperature hydrothermal fluid than in that deposited from ground water. Furthermore, the concentrations of some trace elements are quite variable in pyrite; different genetic types of pyrites (Py-A, B, C, D) have different concentrations of trace elements, and the concentrations of trace elements are also different in pyrite of low-temperature hydrothermal origin collected from different locations. The study shows that elemental concentration is rather uniform in a pyrite vein. There are many micron and submicron mosaic pyrites in a pyrite vein, which is enriched in some trace elements, such as As and Mo. The

  5. Rare earth element abundances in rocks and minerals from the Fiskenaesset Complex, West Greenland. [comparison with lunar anorthosites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, P.; Fishlock, S. J.; Laul, J. C.; Cooper, T. D.; Conard, R. L.; Boynton, W. V.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reports activation-analysis determinations of rare-earth-element (REE) and other trace-element concentrations in selected rocks, plagioclase, and mafic separates from the Fiskenaesset Complex. The REE abundances are found to be very low and atypical in comparison with other terrestrial anorthosites. The plagioclases are shown to be characterized by a deficiency in heavy RE elements relative to light ones and a positive Eu anomaly, while the mafic separates are enriched in heavy rare earths and have no Eu anomaly, except in one sample. It is found that the bulk and trace-element abundances of the plagioclases are similar to those observed in some lunar anorthosites, but the degree of Eu anomaly is less in the plagioclases. The data are taken as confirmation of the idea that fractionation processes were involved in the origin of the Complex, and it is concluded that the Complex may have been produced from a magma generated by partial melting of a garnet-bearing source.

  6. The Abundances of the Fe Group Elements in Three Early B Stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, G. J.; Adelman, S. J.

    2005-12-01

    The photospheric abundances of V, Cr, and Fe have been determined for three sharp-lined early B stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud using FUV spectra obtained from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and the Kurucz LTE model atmosphere/spectrum synthesis codes ATLAS9/SYNTHE. The program stars include NGC1818/D1, NGC2004/B15, and NGC2004/B30 (star designations are from Robertson 1974, A&AS, 15, 261). The calculations were carried through with model parameters close to those adopted by Korn et al. (2000, A&A, 353, 655). Values of Teff, log g, ξ T, and v sin I are 25000/4.0/0/30, 20000/3.1/6/25, and 23500/3.3/14/30 for NGC1818/D1, NGC2004/B15, and NGC2004/B30, respectively. The abundances quoted below are in sequence for the latter stars. The vanadium abundances, [V/H], determined from V III λ λ 1150,1152 (UV 2), are -0.6, -0.9, and -0.9 dex. Cr was determined from Cr III λ λ 1118,1136. Values of -0.5, -0.8, and -0.7 dex were found. Uncertainties in the V and Cr abundances are ˜0.3 dex. The Fe abundance is primarily from 7 lines of Fe III (UV 1) in the region λ λ 1122-32. Values are -0.8±0.3, ˜-1.1, and -0.4±0.3. Since there is no evidence for N enhancement in the program stars ([N/H] ˜ -0.9, -1.0, and -0.6 from the N III doublet at 1183,1184 Å) the photospheric abundances have probably not been altered by mixing of processed material from the star's interior and the derived abundances represent pristine values for the two young clusters in the LMC. It should be noted that the N and Fe abundances derived for NGC1818/D1 are about 0.5 dex lower than those determined by Korn et al. from much weaker optical lines. We will discuss possible reasons for the discrepancy. The generally low abundances for the Fe group elements in these young cluster B stars imply that supernova activity has been minimal in the regions of the LMC in which the stars were formed. GJP appreciates support from NASA grant NAG5-13212.

  7. Carbon abundances, major element chemistry, and mineralogy of hydrated interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Thomas, K. L.; Mckay, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) comprise a major fraction of the interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere. While much is known about the mineralogy and chemistry of hydrated IDP's, little is known about the C abundance in this class of IDP's, the nature of the C-bearing phases, and how the C abundance is related to other physical properties of hydrated IDP's. Bulk compositional data (including C and O) for 11 hydrated IDP's that were subsequently examined by the transition electron microscopy (TEM) to determine their mineralogy and mineral chemistry are reported. Our analysis indicates that these hydrated IDP's are strongly enriched in C relative to the most C-rich meteorites. The average abundance of C in these hydrated IDP's is 4X CI chondrite values. The bulk compositions (including C and O) of 11 hydrated IDP's were determined by thin-window, energy-dispersive x ray (EDX) spectroscopy of the uncoated IDP's on Be substrates in the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). As a check on our C measurements, one of the IDP's (L2006H5) was embedded in glassy S, and microtome thin sections were prepared and placed onto Be substrates. Thin-film EDX analyses of multiple thin sections of L2006H5 show good agreement with the bulk value determined in the SEM. Following EDX analysis, the mineralogy and mineral chemistry of each IDP was determined by analyzing ultramicrotome thin sections in a TEM equipped with an EDX spectrometer.

  8. Improved Precision and Accuracy of Quantification of Rare Earth Element Abundances via Medium-Resolution LA-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funderburg, Rebecca; Arevalo, Ricardo; Locmelis, Marek; Adachi, Tomoko

    2017-07-01

    Laser ablation ICP-MS enables streamlined, high-sensitivity measurements of rare earth element (REE) abundances in geological materials. However, many REE isotope mass stations are plagued by isobaric interferences, particularly from diatomic oxides and argides. In this study, we compare REE abundances quantitated from mass spectra collected with low-resolution (m/Δm = 300 at 5% peak height) and medium-resolution (m/Δm = 2500) mass discrimination. A wide array of geological samples was analyzed, including USGS and NIST glasses ranging from mafic to felsic in composition, with NIST 610 employed as the bracketing calibrating reference material. The medium-resolution REE analyses are shown to be significantly more accurate and precise (at the 95% confidence level) than low-resolution analyses, particularly in samples characterized by low (<μg/g levels) REE abundances. A list of preferred mass stations that are least susceptible to isobaric interferences is reported. These findings impact the reliability of REE abundances derived from LA-ICP-MS methods, particularly those relying on mass analyzers that do not offer tuneable mass-resolution and/or collision cell technologies that can reduce oxide and/or argide formation.

  9. Improved Precision and Accuracy of Quantification of Rare Earth Element Abundances via Medium-Resolution LA-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Funderburg, Rebecca; Arevalo, Ricardo; Locmelis, Marek; Adachi, Tomoko

    2017-11-01

    Laser ablation ICP-MS enables streamlined, high-sensitivity measurements of rare earth element (REE) abundances in geological materials. However, many REE isotope mass stations are plagued by isobaric interferences, particularly from diatomic oxides and argides. In this study, we compare REE abundances quantitated from mass spectra collected with low-resolution (m/Δm = 300 at 5% peak height) and medium-resolution (m/Δm = 2500) mass discrimination. A wide array of geological samples was analyzed, including USGS and NIST glasses ranging from mafic to felsic in composition, with NIST 610 employed as the bracketing calibrating reference material. The medium-resolution REE analyses are shown to be significantly more accurate and precise (at the 95% confidence level) than low-resolution analyses, particularly in samples characterized by low (<μg/g levels) REE abundances. A list of preferred mass stations that are least susceptible to isobaric interferences is reported. These findings impact the reliability of REE abundances derived from LA-ICP-MS methods, particularly those relying on mass analyzers that do not offer tuneable mass-resolution and/or collision cell technologies that can reduce oxide and/or argide formation. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Transposable element distribution, abundance and role in genome size variation in the genus Oryza.

    PubMed

    Zuccolo, Andrea; Sebastian, Aswathy; Talag, Jayson; Yu, Yeisoo; Kim, HyeRan; Collura, Kristi; Kudrna, Dave; Wing, Rod A

    2007-08-29

    The genus Oryza is composed of 10 distinct genome types, 6 diploid and 4 polyploid, and includes the world's most important food crop - rice (Oryza sativa [AA]). Genome size variation in the Oryza is more than 3-fold and ranges from 357 Mbp in Oryza glaberrima [AA] to 1283 Mbp in the polyploid Oryza ridleyi [HHJJ]. Because repetitive elements are known to play a significant role in genome size variation, we constructed random sheared small insert genomic libraries from 12 representative Oryza species and conducted a comprehensive study of the repetitive element composition, distribution and phylogeny in this genus. Particular attention was paid to the role played by the most important classes of transposable elements (Long Terminal Repeats Retrotransposons, Long interspersed Nuclear Elements, helitrons, DNA transposable elements) in shaping these genomes and in their contributing to genome size variation. We identified the elements primarily responsible for the most strikingly genome size variation in Oryza. We demonstrated how Long Terminal Repeat retrotransposons belonging to the same families have proliferated to very different extents in various species. We also showed that the pool of Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposons is substantially conserved and ubiquitous throughout the Oryza and so its origin is ancient and its existence predates the speciation events that originated the genus. Finally we described the peculiar behavior of repeats in the species Oryza coarctata [HHKK] whose placement in the Oryza genus is controversial. Long Terminal Repeat retrotransposons are the major component of the Oryza genomes analyzed and, along with polyploidization, are the most important contributors to the genome size variation across the Oryza genus. Two families of Ty3-gypsy elements (RIRE2 and Atlantys) account for a significant portion of the genome size variations present in the Oryza genus.

  11. High-precision abundances of Sc, Mn, Cu, and Ba in solar twins. Trends of element ratios with stellar age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, P. E.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: A previous study of correlations between element abundances and ages of solar twin stars in the solar neighborhood is extended to include Sc, Mn, Cu, and Ba to obtain new information on the nucleosynthetic history of these elements. Methods: HARPS spectra with S/N ≳ 600 are used to derive very precise (σ ~ 0.01 dex) differential abundances of Sc, Mn, Cu, and Ba for 21 solar twins and the Sun. The analysis is based on MARCS model atmospheres with parameters determined from the excitation and ionization balance of Fe lines. Stellar ages with internal errors less than 1 Gyr are obtained by interpolation in the log g - Teff diagram between isochrones based on the Aarhus Stellar Evolution Code. Results: For stars younger than 6 Gyr, [Sc/Fe], [Mn/Fe], [Cu/Fe], and [Ba/Fe] are tightly correlated with stellar age, which is also the case for the other elements previously studied; linear relations between [X/Fe] and age have χ^2red ˜ 1, and for most stars the residuals do not depend on elemental condensation temperature. For ages between 6 and 9 Gyr, the [X/Fe] - age correlations break down and the stars split up into two groups having respectively high and low [X/Fe] for the odd-Z elements Na, Al, Sc, and Cu. Conclusions: While stars in the solar neighborhood younger than ~ 6 Gyr were formed from interstellar gas with a smooth chemical evolution, older stars seem to have originated from regions enriched by supernovae with different neutron excesses. Correlations between abundance ratios and stellar age suggest that: (I) Sc is made in Type II supernovae along with the α-capture elements; (II) the Type II to Ia yield ratio is about the same for Mn and Fe; (III) Cu is mainly made by the weak s-process in massive stars; (iv) the Ba/Y yield ratio for asymptotic giant branch stars increases with decreasing stellar mass; (v) [Y/Mg] and [Y/Al] can be used as chemical clocks when determining ages of solar metallicity stars. Based on data products from observations made

  12. Absolute Single Photoionization Cross Sections of Se^3+ For the Determination of Elemental Abundances in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteves, David; Sterling, Nicholas; Aguilar, Alex; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Phaneuf, Ronald; Bilodeau, Rene; Red, Eddie; McLaughlin, Brendan; Norrington, Patrick; Balance, Connor

    2009-05-01

    Numerical simulations show that derived elemental abundances in astrophysical nebulae can be uncertain by factors of two or more due to atomic data uncertainties alone, and of these uncertainties, absolute photoionization cross sections are the most important. Absolute single photoionization cross sections for Se^3+ ions have been measured from 42 eV to 56 eV at the ALS using the merged beams photo-ion technique. Theoretical photoionization cross section calculations were also performed for these ions using the state-of-the-art fully relativistic Dirac R-matrix code (DARC). The calculations show encouraging agreement with the experimental measurements.

  13. Elemental abundances of cosmic rays with Z 33 as measured on HEAO-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Garrard, T. L.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Heavy Nuclei Experiment on (HEAO-3) high energy astronomy observatory 3 uses a combination of ion chambers and a Cerenkov counter. During analysis, each particle is assigned two parameters, Z sub c and Z sub i, proportional to the square roots of the Cerenkov and mean ionization signals respectively. Because the ionization signal is double valued, a unique assignment of particle charge, Z, is not possible in general. Previous work was limited to particles of either high rigidity or low energy, for which a unique charge assignment was possible, although those subsets contain less than 50% of the total number of particles observed. The maximum likelihood technique was used to determine abundances for the complete data set from approx. 1.5 to approx. 80 GeV/amu.

  14. CONSTRAINTS ON THE FORMATION OF THE GALACTIC BULGE FROM Na, Al, AND HEAVY-ELEMENT ABUNDANCES IN PLAUT's FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. Michael; Kobayashi, Chiaki

    2012-04-20

    We report chemical abundances of Na, Al, Zr, La, Nd, and Eu for 39 red giant branch (RGB) stars and 23 potential inner disk red clump stars located in Plaut's low-extinction window. We also measure lithium for a super Li-rich RGB star. The abundances were determined by spectrum synthesis of high-resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 25,000), high signal-to-noise (S/N {approx} 50-100 pixel{sup -1}) spectra obtained with the Blanco 4 m telescope and Hydra multifiber spectrograph. For the bulge RGB stars, we find a general increase in the [Na/Fe] and [Na/Al] ratios with increasing metallicity, and a similar decrease in [La/Fe] and [Nd/Fe].more » Additionally, the [Al/Fe] and [Eu/Fe] abundance trends almost identically follow those of the {alpha}-elements, and the [Zr/Fe] ratios exhibit relatively little change with [Fe/H]. The consistently low [La/Eu] ratios of the RGB stars indicate that at least a majority of bulge stars formed rapidly ({approx}<1 Gyr) and before the main s-process could become a significant pollution source. In contrast, we find that the potential inner disk clump stars exhibit abundance patterns more similar to those of the thin and thick disks. Comparisons between the abundance trends at different bulge locations suggest that the inner and outer bulges formed on similar timescales. However, we find evidence of some abundance differences between the most metal-poor and metal-rich stars in various bulge fields. The data also indicate that the halo may have had a more significant impact on the outer bulge initial composition than the inner bulge composition. The [Na/Fe], and to a lesser extent [La/Fe], abundances further indicate that the metal-poor bulge, at least at {approx}1 kpc from the Galactic center, and thick disk may not share an identical chemistry.« less

  15. DcSto: carrot Stowaway-like elements are abundant, diverse, and polymorphic

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We investigated nine families of Stowaway-like MITEs in the carrot genome, named DcSto1 to DcSto9. All of them were AT-rich and shared a highly conserved 6 bp-long TIR typical for Stowaways. The copy number of DcSto1 elements was estimated as ca. 5,000 per diploid genome. We observed preference for ...

  16. Platinum Group Element (PGE) Abundances in Lava Flows Generated by the Hawaiian Plume: Insights into Plume Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, J. T.; Neal, C. R.

    2003-12-01

    Picritic and high-MgO (7.7-24 wt.%) basalt samples from Detroit (/sim81-76 Ma) and Koko (/sim48 Ma) Seamounts along the ESC have been analyzed for PGEs (Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir, and Pt) allowing an examination of how the PGEs in lavas from the Hawaiian plume have changed over time. Major and trace element (including the PGEs) concentrations were quantified by ICP methods at the University of Notre Dame. See Ely et al. (1999, Chem. Geol. 157:219) for the PGE analytical method. Bennett et al. (2000) analyzed Hawaiian picrites and found PGE abundances slightly greater than average MORB and comparable to the low-PGE basaltic komatiites. These authors modeled the PGE abundances of these picrites by using variable amounts of residual sulfide during melting, such that Koolau (low PGE contents) formed from a relatively sulfide-rich source and Loihi (high PGEs) from a sulfide-poor source. Our PGE data from Detroit Seamount show slightly higher PGE abundances than Loihi and Kilauea, suggesting these picrites formed from a source lacking residual sulfide. These results suggest that, if the model of Bennett et al. (2000) is correct, the dilution of plume lava with MORB source, as hypothesized on the basis of depleted isotope ratios and lower trace element abundances than modern Hawaii (Keller et al., 2000, Nature 405:603; Kinman & Neal, 2002, Eos 83:F1282; Regelous et al., 2003, JPet 44:113), was not the controlling factor in PGE abundances. However, since MORB PGE concentrations are not substantially different than low-PGE Hawaiian picrites, incorporation of MORB material within the Hawaiian plume at Detroit Seamount would not have drastically reduced the PGE abundances. Koko Seamount has relatively high PGE concentrations (/sim3-12 times greater than those from Detroit lavas). This may be the result of a lack of residual sulfide facilitated by higher degrees of partial melting. Although our initial data are consistent with variable degrees of partial melting and/or source

  17. Assimilation of trace elements ingested by the mussel Mytilus edulis: effects of algal food abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.-X.; Fisher, N.S.; Luoma, S.N.

    1995-01-01

    Pulse-chase feeding and multi-labeled radiotracer techniques were employed to measure the assimilation of 6 trace elements (110mAg, 241Am, 109Cd, 57Co, 75Se and 65Zn) from ingested diatoms in the mussel Mytilus edulis feeding at different rates (0.1, 0.49 and 1.5 mg dry wt h-1). Uniformly radiolabeled diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana were fed to mussels for 0.5 h, and the behavior of the radiotracers in individual mussels was followed for 96 h in a depuration seawater system. Assimilation efficiency (AE) of each element declined with increasing ingestion rate and increased with gut passage time. The importance of extracellular digestion relative to intracellular digestion increased with ingestion activity, which, when coupled with a decline in AE, suggested that extracellular digestion is less efficient in metal absorption. Zn assimilation was most affected by ingestion rate, suggesting that AE may play a role in the physiological regulation of this metal in M. edulis. In an experiment to simulate the effects of an acidic gut, lowered pH (5.5) enhanced the release of elements from intact diatom cells, especially at low particle concentration. These results indicate that both feeding components of the mussel (i.e. gut passage time, digestive partitioning) and metal chemistry (i.e. metal release at lowered pH within the bivalve gut) are responsible for the difference in the assimilation of trace metals at different food quantities observed in mussels.

  18. Heavy-element yields and abundances of asymptotic giant branch models with a Small Magellanic Cloud metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, Amanda I.; Lugaro, Maria; Carlos, Marília; Cseh, Borbála; Kamath, Devika; García-Hernández, D. A.

    2018-06-01

    We present new theoretical stellar yields and surface abundances for asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models with a metallicity appropriate for stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC, Z = 0.0028, [Fe/H] ≈ -0.7). New evolutionary sequences and post-processing nucleosynthesis results are presented for initial masses between 1 and 7 M⊙, where the 7 M⊙ is a super-AGB star with an O-Ne core. Models above 1.15 M⊙ become carbon rich during the AGB, and hot bottom burning begins in models M ≥ 3.75 M⊙. We present stellar surface abundances as a function of thermal pulse number for elements between C to Bi and for a selection of isotopic ratios for elements up to Fe and Ni (e.g. 12C/13C), which can be compared to observations. The integrated stellar yields are presented for each model in the grid for hydrogen, helium, and all stable elements from C to Bi. We present evolutionary sequences of intermediate-mass models between 4 and 7 M⊙ and nucleosynthesis results for three masses (M = 3.75, 5, and 7 M⊙) including s-process elements for two widely used AGB mass-loss prescriptions. We discuss our new models in the context of evolved AGB and post-AGB stars in the SMCs, barium stars in our Galaxy, the composition of Galactic globular clusters including Mg isotopes with a similar metallicity to our models, and to pre-solar grains which may have an origin in metal-poor AGB stars.

  19. Mineralogical analyses of surface sediments in the Antarctic Dry Valleys: coordinated analyses of Raman spectra, reflectance spectra and elemental abundances.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Janice L; Englert, Peter A J; Patel, Shital; Tirsch, Daniela; Roy, Alex J; Koeberl, Christian; Böttger, Ute; Hanke, Franziska; Jaumann, Ralf

    2014-12-13

    Surface sediments at Lakes Fryxell, Vanda and Brownworth in the Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADV) were investigated as analogues for the cold, dry environment on Mars. Sediments were sampled from regions surrounding the lakes and from the ice cover on top of the lakes. The ADV sediments were studied using Raman spectra of individual grains and reflectance spectra of bulk particulate samples and compared with previous analyses of subsurface and lakebottom sediments. Elemental abundances were coordinated with the spectral data in order to assess trends in sediment alteration. The surface sediments in this study were compared with lakebottom sediments (Bishop JL et al. 2003 Int. J. Astrobiol. 2, 273-287 (doi:10.1017/S1473550403001654)) and samples from soil pits (Englert P et al. 2013 In European Planetary Science Congress, abstract no. 96; Englert P et al. 2014 In 45th Lunar and Planetary Science Conf., abstract no. 1707). Feldspar, quartz and pyroxene are common minerals found in all the sediments. Minor abundances of carbonate, chlorite, actinolite and allophane are also found in the surface sediments, and are similar to minerals found in greater abundance in the lakebottom sediments. Surface sediment formation is dominated by physical processes; a few centimetres below the surface chemical alteration sets in, whereas lakebottom sediments experience biomineralization. Characterizing the mineralogical variations in these samples provides insights into the alteration processes occurring in the ADV and supports understanding alteration in the cold and dry environment on Mars. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Assimilation of trace elements ingested by the mussel Mytilus edulis: effects of algal food abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.-X.; Fisher, N.S.; Luoma, S. N.

    1995-01-01

    Pulse-chase feeding and multi-labeled radiotracer techniques were employed to measure the assimilation of 6 trace elements (110mAg, 241Am, 109Cd, 57Co, 75Se and 65Zn) from ingested diatoms in the mussel Mytilus edulis feeding at different rates (0.1, 0.49 and 1.5 mg dry wt h-1). Uniformly radiolabeled diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana were fed to mussels for 0.5 h, and the behavior of the radiotracers in individual mussels was followed for 96 h in a depuration seawater system. Assimilation efficiency (AE) of each element declined with increasing ingestion rate and increased with gut passage time. The importance of extracellular digestion relative to intracellular digestion increased with ingestion activity, which, when coupled with a decline in AE, suggested that extracellular digestion is less efficient in metal absorption. Zn assimilation was most affected by ingestion rate, suggesting that AE may play a role in the physiological regulation of this metal in M. edulis. In an experiment to simulate the effects of an acidic gut, lowered pH (5.5) enhanced the release of elements from intact diatom cells, especially at low particle concentration. These results indicate that both feeding components of the mussel (i.e. gut passage time, digestive partitioning) and metal chemistry (i.e. metal release at lowered pH within the bivalve gut) are responsible for the difference in the assimilation of trace metals at different food quantities observed in mussels.

  1. The rendez-vous of mobile sieve-element and abundant companion-cell proteins.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Federica; Le Hir, Rozenn; Dinant, Sylvie

    2018-06-01

    Thousands of sieve tube exudate proteins (STEP) have now been identified and predicted to fulfill a diversity of functions. However, most STEPs should be considered putative, since methods to collect sieve tube exudates have many technical drawbacks, and advanced functional characterization will be required to distinguish contaminant from bonafide proteins, and determine the latter's location and activity in sieve elements (SE). One major challenge is to develop new approaches to elucidate the function of these SE proteins, which in turn, is expected to shed light on intriguing aspects of SE cell biology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Geochemical maps showing the distribution and abundance of selected elements in stream-sediment samples, Solomon and Bendeleben 1 degree by 3 degree quadrangles, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.C.; King, H.D.; O'Leary, R.M.

    Geochemical maps showing the distribution and abundance of selected elements in stream-sediment samples, Solomon and Bendeleben 1{degree} by 3{degree} quadrangles, Seward Peninsula, Alaska is presented.

  3. Confirmation of Element Abundance Inhomogeneity in Interstellar Matter from a Study of the O-type Supergiants HDE 226868 (Cyg X-1) and α Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karitskaya, E. A.; Bochkarev, N. G.; Shimansky, V. V.; Galazutdinov, G. A.

    2011-09-01

    Chemical abundances derived for two O-type supergiants with similar parameters confirm the inhomogeneity of heavy-element distribution on a scale of 2 kpc and a lifetime of ISM superclouds exceeding 1 Gyr.

  4. The diffuse gamma-ray background, light element abundances, and signatures of early massive star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Schramm, David N.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is drawn to a potentially observable flux of diffuse extragalactic gamma rays produced by inelastic cosmic-ray interactions that is inevitably a by-product of spallation-synthesized Be. The epoch of cosmic ray-induced Population II light element nucleosynthesis is constrained to be at redshift greater than 0.5. A spectral feature in the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background with amplitude 0.1 above 10 MeV is predicted if the Be is synthesized at z less than 10. The possibility is discussed that the cosmic-ray flux responsible for Population II Be and B synthesis may be associated with a precursor hypothesized Population III.

  5. SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements in Proteus species reveal abundant genetic diversity and multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinyue; Du, Yu; Du, Pengcheng; Dai, Hang; Fang, Yujie; Li, Zhenpeng; Lv, Na; Zhu, Baoli; Kan, Biao; Wang, Duochun

    2016-01-01

    SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) are self-transmissible mobile genetic elements that are found in most members of Enterobacteriaceae. Here, we determined fifteen SXT/R391 ICEs carried by Proteus isolates from food (4.2%) and diarrhoea patients (17.3%). BLASTn searches against GenBank showed that the fifteen SXT/R391 ICEs were closely related to that from different Enterobacteriaceae species, including Proteus mirabilis. Using core gene phylogenetic analysis, the fifteen SXT/R391 ICEs were grouped into six distinct clusters, including a dominant cluster and three clusters that have not been previously reported in Proteus isolates. The SXT/R391 ICEs shared a common structure with a set of conserved genes, five hotspots and two variable regions, which contained more foreign genes, including drug-resistance genes. Notably, a class A β-lactamase gene was identified in nine SXT/R391 ICEs. Collectively, the ICE-carrying isolates carried resistance genes for 20 tested drugs. Six isolates were resistant to chloramphenicol, kanamycin, streptomycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, sulfisoxazole and tetracycline, which are drug resistances commonly encoded by ICEs. Our results demonstrate abundant genetic diversity and multidrug resistance of the SXT/R391 ICEs carried by Proteus isolates, which may have significance for public health. It is therefore necessary to continuously monitor the antimicrobial resistance and related mobile elements among Proteus isolates. PMID:27892525

  6. A novel abundant family of retroposed elements (DAS-SINEs) in the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus).

    PubMed

    Churakov, Gennady; Smit, Arian F A; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2005-04-01

    About half of the mammalian genome is composed of retroposons. Long interspersed elements (LINEs) and short interspersed elements (SINEs) are the most abundant repetitive elements and account for about 21% and 13% of the human genome, respectively. SINEs have been detected in all major mammalian lineages, except for the South American order Xenarthra, also termed Edentata (armadillos, anteaters, and sloths). Investigating this order, we discovered a novel high-copy-number family of tRNA derived SINEs in the nine-banded armadillo Dasypus novemcinctus, a species that successfully crossed the Central American land bridge to North America in the Pliocene. A specific computer algorithm was developed, and we detected and extracted 687 specific SINEs from databases. Termed DAS-SINEs, we further divided them into six distinct subfamilies. We extracted tRNA(Ala)-derived monomers, two types of dimers, and three subfamilies of chimeric fusion products of a tRNA(Ala) domain and an approximately 180-nt sequence of thus far unidentified origin. Comparisons of secondary structures of the DAS-SINEs' tRNA domains suggest selective pressure to maintain a tRNA-like D-arm structure in the respective founder RNAs, as shown by compensatory mutations. By analysis of subfamily-specific genetic variability, comparison of the proportion of direct repeats, and analysis of self-integrations as well as key events of dimerization and deletions or insertions, we were able to delineate the evolutionary history of the DAS-SINE subfamilies.

  7. The metallicity and elemental abundance gradients of simulated galaxies and their environmental dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Philip; Kobayashi, Chiaki

    2017-11-01

    The internal distribution of heavy elements, in particular the radial metallicity gradient, offers insight into the merging history of galaxies. Using our cosmological, chemodynamical simulations that include both detailed chemical enrichment and feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN), we find that stellar metallicity gradients in the most massive galaxies (≳3 × 1010M⊙) are made flatter by mergers and are unable to regenerate due to the quenching of star formation by AGN feedback. The fitting range is chosen on a galaxy-by-galaxy basis in order to mask satellite galaxies. The evolutionary paths of the gradients can be summarized as follows: (I) creation of initial steep gradients by gas-rich assembly, (II) passive evolution by star formation and/or stellar accretion at outskirts, and (III) sudden flattening by mergers. There is a significant scatter in gradients at a given mass, which originates from the last path, and therefore from galaxy type. Some variation remains at given galaxy mass and type because of the complexity of merging events, and hence we find only a weak environmental dependence. Our early-type galaxies (ETGs), defined from the star formation main sequence rather than their morphology, are in excellent agreement with the observed stellar metallicity gradients of ETGs in the SAURON and ATLAS3D surveys. We find small positive [O/Fe] gradients of stars in our simulated galaxies, although they are smaller with AGN feedback. Gas-phase metallicity and [O/Fe] gradients also show variation, the origin of which is not as clear as for stellar populations.

  8. Probabilistic Classification Using Elemental Abundance Distributions and Lossless Image Compression in Apollo 17 Lunar Dust Samples from Mare Serenitatis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.; Hoover, Richard B.; Abbas, Mian; Jerman, Gregory; Coston, James; Fisk, Martin

    2006-01-01

    We have previously outlined a strategy for the detection of fossils [Storrie-Lombardi and Hoover, 2004] and extant microbial life [Storrie-Lombaudi and Hoover, 20051 during robotic missions to Mars using co-registered structural and chemical signatures. Data inputs included image lossless compression indices to estimate relative textural complexity and elemental abundance distributions. Two exploratory classification algorithms (principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis) provide an initial tentative classification of all targets. Nonlinear stochastic neural networks are then trained to produce a Bayesian estimate of algorithm classification accuracy. The strategy previously has been successful in distinguishing regions of biotic and abiotic alteration of basalt glass from unaltered samples. [Storrie-Lombardi and Fisk, 2004; Storrie-Lombardi and Fisk, 2004] Such investigations of abiotic versus biotic alteration of terrestrial mineralogy on Earth are compromised by .the difficulty finding mineralogy completely unaffected by the ubiquitous presence of microbial life on the planet. The renewed interest in lunar exploration offers an opportunity to investigate geological materials that may exhibit signs of aqueous alteration, but are highly unlikely to contain contaminating biological weathering signatures. We here present an extension of our earlier data set to include lunar dust samples obtained during the Apollo 17 mission. Apollo 17 landed in the Taurus-Littrow Valley in Mare Serenitatis. Most of the rock samples from this region of the lunar highlands are basalts comprised primarily of plagioclase and pyroxene and selected examples of orange and black volcanic glass. SEM images and elemental abundances (C6, N7, O8, Na11, Mg12, Al13, Si14, P15, S16, Cll7, K19, Ca20, Fe26) for a series of targets in the lunar dust samples are compared to the extant cyanobacteria, fossil trilobites, Orgueil meteorite, and terrestrial basalt targets previously

  9. The abundance and relative volatility of refractory trace elements in Allende Ca,Al-rich inclusions - Implications for chemical and physical processes in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kornacki, Alan S.; Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The relative volatilities of lithophile refractory trace elements (LRTE) were determined using calculated 50-percent condensation temperatures. Then, the refractory trace-element abundances were measured in about 100 Allende inclusions. The abundance patterns found in Allende Ca,Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) and ultrarefractory inclusions were used to empirically modify the calculated LRTE volatility sequence. In addition, the importance of crystal-chemical effects, diffusion constraints, and grain transport for the origin of the trace-element chemistry of Allende CAIs (which have important implications for chemical and physical processes in the solar nebula) is discussed.

  10. Element Abundances in a Gas-rich Galaxy at z = 5: Clues to the Early Chemical Enrichment of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Sean; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; Som, Debopam; DeMarcy, Bryan; Quiret, Samuel; Péroux, Celine

    2016-10-01

    Element abundances in high-redshift quasar absorbers offer excellent probes of the chemical enrichment of distant galaxies, and can constrain models for population III and early population II stars. Recent observations indicate that the sub-damped Lyα (sub-DLA) absorbers are more metal-rich than DLA absorbers at redshifts 0 < z < 3. It has also been suggested that DLA metallicity drops suddenly at z > 4.7. However, only three DLAs at z > 4.5 and no sub-DLAs at z > 3.5 have “dust-free” metallicity measurements of undepleted elements. We report the first quasar sub-DLA metallicity measurement at z > 3.5, from detections of undepleted elements in high-resolution data for a sub-DLA at z = 5.0. We obtain fairly robust abundances of C, O, Si, and Fe, using lines outside the Lyα forest. This absorber is metal-poor, with [O/H] = -2.00 ± 0.12, which is ≳4σ below the level expected from extrapolation of the trend for z < 3.5 sub-DLAs. The C/O ratio is {1.8}-0.3+0.4 times lower than in the Sun. More strikingly, Si/O is {3.2}-0.5+0.6 times lower than in the Sun, whereas Si/Fe is nearly (1.2{}-0.3+0.4 times) solar. This absorber does not display a clear alpha/Fe enhancement. Dust depletion may have removed more Si from the gas phase than is common in the Milky Way interstellar medium, which may be expected if high-redshift supernovae form more silicate-rich dust. C/O and Si/O vary substantially between different velocity components, indicating spatial variations in dust depletion and/or early stellar nucleosynthesis (e.g., population III star initial mass function). The higher velocity gas may trace an outflow enriched by early stars. Based on observations obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  11. Elemental Abundances and their Implications for the Chemical Enrichment of the Boötes I Ultrafaint Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Gerard; Norris, John E.; Monaco, Lorenzo; Yong, David; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Geisler, D.

    2013-01-01

    We present a double-blind analysis of high-dispersion spectra of seven red giant members of the Boötes I ultrafaint dwarf spheroidal galaxy, complemented with re-analysis of a similar spectrum of an eighth-member star. The stars cover [Fe/H] from -3.7 to -1.9 and include a CEMP-no star with [Fe/H] = -3.33. We conclude from our chemical abundance data that Boötes I has evolved as a self-enriching star-forming system, from essentially primordial initial abundances. This allows us uniquely to investigate the place of CEMP-no stars in a chemically evolving system, in addition to limiting the timescale of star formation. The elemental abundances are formally consistent with a halo-like distribution, with enhanced mean [α/Fe] and small scatter about the mean. This is in accord with the high-mass stellar initial mass function in this low-stellar-density, low-metallicity system being indistinguishable from the present-day solar neighborhood value. There is a non-significant hint of a decline in [α/Fe] with [Fe/H]; together with the low scatter, this requires low star formation rates, allowing time for supernova ejecta to be mixed over the large spatial scales of interest. One star has very high [Ti/Fe], but we do not confirm a previously published high value of [Mg/Fe] for another star. We discuss the existence of CEMP-no stars, and the absence of any stars with lower CEMP-no enhancements at higher [Fe/H], a situation that is consistent with knowledge of CEMP-no stars in the Galactic field. We show that this observation requires there be two enrichment paths at very low metallicities: CEMP-no and "carbon-normal." Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (Proposal P82.182.B-0372, PI: G. Gilmore).

  12. Element-abundance inhomogeneity of interstellar matter as it follows from the chemical composition of the O-type supergiants HDE 226868 (Cyg X-1) and *alpha; Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, N. G.; Karitskaya, E. A.; Shimanskii, V. V.; Galazutdinov, G. A.

    2013-10-01

    By means of synthetic spectrum modeling with non-LTE effects, we determined element abundances in the atmospheres of two O supergiants with similar physical characteristics: HDE 226868 (the optical component of Cyg X-1) and α Cam. These objects are situated at the distance about 2.5 kpc from each other. HDE 226868 has higher abundances compared to α Cam. The differences of Al, S, Zn, and averaged CNO abundances are within 0.15-0.30 dex. This is in a good qualitative agreement with the inhomogeneity of the heavy-element distribution over the Galactic disk derived by Luck et al. (2006) from Cepheids. This finding confirms the inhomogeneity of chemical-element distribution on the scale of 2 kpc and is in agreement with the concept of interstellar-matter superclouds preserving their intrinsic particularities on a time scale in excess of 1 Gyr.

  13. Elemental abundance analyses with coadded DAO spectrograms. VI - The mercury-manganese stars Nu Cancri, Iota Coronae Borealis and HR 8349

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    1989-01-01

    The elemental abundances of three mercury-manganese stars, Nu Cancri, Iota Coronae Borealis, and HR 8349, were found to be consistent with previous analyses of this series. As Iota CrB is a double-lined spectroscopic binary with a small velocity amplitude for most of its period, its study required determining whether the observed lines were produced in the primary or secondary or both. The derived abundances and effective termperatures were used along with those of mercury-manganese stars previously analyzed in order to extend the study of probable correlations between abundances, with the effective temperature and surface gravity in accordance with radiative diffusion explanations.

  14. Elemental abundance analyses with DAO spectrograms: XXXII. HR 6455 (A3 III), δ Aqr (A3 V), η Lep (F2 V), and 1 Boo (A1 V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüce, K.; Adelman, S. J.; Gulliver, A. F.; Hill, G.

    2011-08-01

    We examine the sharp-lined stars HR 6455 (A3 III, v sin i = 8.7 km s-1) and η Lep (F2 V, v sin i = 13.5 km s-1) as well as δ Aqr (A3 V, v sin i = 81 km s-1) and 1 Boo (A1 V, v sin i = 59 km s-1) to increase the number consistently analyzed A and F stars using high dispersion and high S/N (≥200) spectrograms obtained with CCD detectors at the long Coudé camera of the 1.22-m telescope of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory. Such studies contribute to understanding systematic abundance differences between normal and non-magnetic main-sequence band chemically peculiar A and early F stars. LTE fine analyses of HR 6455, δ Aqr, and 1 Boo using Kurucz's ATLAS suite programs show the same general elemental abundance trends with differences in the metal richness. Light and iron-peak element abundances are generally solar or overabundant while heavy element and rare earth element abundances are overabundant. HR 6455 is an evolved Am star while δ Aqr and 1 Boo show the phenomenon to different extents. Most derived abundances of η Lep are solar. Table 3 is available at the CDS via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/AN/332/681

  15. AKARI observations of brown dwarfs. IV. Effect of elemental abundances on near-infrared spectra between 1.0 and 5.0 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Sorahana, S.; Yamamura, I.

    2014-09-20

    The detection of the CO{sub 2} absorption band at 4.2 μm in brown dwarf spectra by AKARI has made it possible to discuss CO{sub 2} molecular abundance in brown dwarf atmospheres. In our previous studies, we found an excess in the 4.2 μm CO{sub 2} absorption band of three brown dwarf spectra, and suggested that these deviations were caused by high C and O elemental abundances in their atmospheres. To validate this hypothesis, we have constructed a set of models of brown dwarf atmospheres with various elemental abundance patterns, and we investigate the variations of the molecular composition and themore » thermal structure, and how they affect the near-infrared spectra between 1.0 and 5.0 μm. The 4.2 μm CO{sub 2} absorption band in some late-L and T dwarfs taken by AKARI is stronger or weaker than predicted by corresponding models with solar abundance. By comparing the CO{sub 2} band in the model spectra to the observed near-infrared spectra, we confirm possible elemental abundance variations among brown dwarfs. We find that the band strength is especially sensitive to O abundance, but C is also needed to reproduce the entire near-infrared spectra. This result indicates that both the C and O abundances should increase and decrease simultaneously for brown dwarfs. We find that a weaker CO{sub 2} absorption band in a spectrum can also be explained by a model with lower 'C and O' abundances.« less

  16. Elemental Abundances of Kepler Objects of Interest in APOGEE. I. Two Distinct Orbital Period Regimes Inferred from Host Star Iron Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert F.; Teske, Johanna; Majewski, Steven R.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne; Souto, Diogo; Bender, Chad; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Troup, Nicholas; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Stassun, Keivan G.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Almeida, Andrés; García-Hernández, D. A.; Zamora, Olga; Brinkmann, Jonathan

    2018-02-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has observed ∼600 transiting exoplanets and exoplanet candidates from Kepler (Kepler Objects of Interest, KOIs), most with ≥18 epochs. The combined multi-epoch spectra are of high signal-to-noise ratio (typically ≥100) and yield precise stellar parameters and chemical abundances. We first confirm the ability of the APOGEE abundance pipeline, ASPCAP, to derive reliable [Fe/H] and effective temperatures for FGK dwarf stars—the primary Kepler host stellar type—by comparing the ASPCAP-derived stellar parameters with those from independent high-resolution spectroscopic characterizations for 221 dwarf stars in the literature. With a sample of 282 close-in (P< 100 days) KOIs observed in the APOGEE KOI goal program, we find a correlation between orbital period and host star [Fe/H] characterized by a critical period, {P}{crit}={8.3}-4.1+0.1 days, below which small exoplanets orbit statistically more metal-enriched host stars. This effect may trace a metallicity dependence of the protoplanetary disk inner radius at the time of planet formation or may be a result of rocky planet ingestion driven by inward planetary migration. We also consider that this may trace a metallicity dependence of the dust sublimation radius, but we find no statistically significant correlation with host {T}{eff} and orbital period to support such a claim.

  17. Elemental abundances via X-ray observations of galaxy clusters and the InFOCmuS hard X-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Wayne H.

    2004-08-01

    The first part of this dissertation deals with the oxygen abundance of the Milky Way interstellar medium. Previous measurements had shown that oxygen in the ISM was depleted compared to its abundance in the sun. This dissertation presents new measurements of the ISM oxygen abundance taken in the X-ray band by observing the oxygen 0.6 keV photoionization K-edge in absorption towards 10 galaxy clusters. These measurements show that the ISM oxygen abundance is 0.9 solar, much greater than earlier depleted values. The oxygen abundance is found to be uniform across our 10 lines of sight, showing that it is not dependent on the depth of the hydrogen column. This implies that the galactic oxygen abundance does not depend on density, and that it is the same in dense clouds and in the more diffuse ISM. The next part of the dissertation measures elemental abundances in the galaxy clusters themselves. The abundances of the elements iron, silicon, sulfur, calcium, argon, and nickel are measured using the strong resonance K-shell emission lines in the X-ray band. Over 300 clusters from the ASCA archives are analyzed with a joint fitting procedure to improve the S/N ratio and provide the first average abundance results for clusters as a function of mass. The α elements silicon, sulfur, argon and calcium are not found to have similar abundances as expected from their supposed common origin. Also, no combination of SN Ia and SN II yields can account for the cluster abundance ratios, perhaps necessitating a contribution from a cosmologically early generation of massive population III stars. The last part of this dissertation details the development of the Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors on the InFOCμS hard X-ray telescope. InFOCμS is a balloon-borne imaging spectrometer that incorporates multi-layer coated grazing-incidence optics and CZT detectors. These detectors are well suited for hard X-ray astronomy because their large bandgap and high atomic number allow for

  18. Globular Cluster Abundances from High-resolution, Integrated-light Spectroscopy. IV. The Large Magellanic Cloud: α, Fe-peak, Light, and Heavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Cameron, Scott A.; McWilliam, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    We present detailed chemical abundances in eight clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We measure abundances of 22 elements for clusters spanning a range in age of 0.05-12 Gyr, providing a comprehensive picture of the chemical enrichment and star formation history of the LMC. The abundances were obtained from individual absorption lines using a new method for analysis of high-resolution (R ~ 25,000), integrated-light (IL) spectra of star clusters. This method was developed and presented in Papers I, II, and III of this series. In this paper, we develop an additional IL χ2-minimization spectral synthesis technique to facilitate measurement of weak (~15 mÅ) spectral lines and abundances in low signal-to-noise ratio data (S/N ~ 30). Additionally, we supplement the IL abundance measurements with detailed abundances that we measure for individual stars in the youngest clusters (age < 2 Gyr) in our sample. In both the IL and stellar abundances we find evolution of [α/Fe] with [Fe/H] and age. Fe-peak abundance ratios are similar to those in the Milky Way (MW), with the exception of [Cu/Fe] and [Mn/Fe], which are sub-solar at high metallicities. The heavy elements Ba, La, Nd, Sm, and Eu are significantly enhanced in the youngest clusters. Also, the heavy to light s-process ratio is elevated relative to the MW ([Ba/Y] >+0.5) and increases with decreasing age, indicating a strong contribution of low-metallicity asymptotic giant branch star ejecta to the interstellar medium throughout the later history of the LMC. We also find a correlation of IL Na and Al abundances with cluster mass in the sense that more massive, older clusters are enriched in the light elements Na and Al with respect to Fe, which implies that these clusters harbor star-to-star abundance variations as is common in the MW. Lower mass, intermediate-age, and young clusters have Na and Al abundances that are lower and more consistent with LMC field stars. Our results can be used to constrain both

  19. p-capture reaction cycles in rotating massive stars and their impact on elemental abundances in globular cluster stars: A case study of O, Na and Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanta, Upakul; Goswami, Aruna; Duorah, Hiralal; Duorah, Kalpana

    2017-08-01

    Elemental abundance patterns of globular cluster stars can provide important clues for understanding cluster formation and early chemical evolution. The origin of the abundance patterns, however, still remains poorly understood. We have studied the impact of p-capture reaction cycles on the abundances of oxygen, sodium and aluminium considering nuclear reaction cycles of carbon-nitrogen-oxygen-fluorine, neon-sodium and magnesium-aluminium in massive stars in stellar conditions of temperature range 2×107 to 10×107 K and typical density of 102 gm cc-1. We have estimated abundances of oxygen, sodium and aluminium with respect to Fe, which are then assumed to be ejected from those stars because of rotation reaching a critical limit. These ejected abundances of elements are then compared with their counterparts that have been observed in some metal-poor evolved stars, mainly giants and red giants, of globular clusters M3, M4, M13 and NGC 6752. We observe an excellent agreement with [O/Fe] between the estimated and observed abundance values for globular clusters M3 and M4 with a correlation coefficient above 0.9 and a strong linear correlation for the remaining two clusters with a correlation coefficient above 0.7. The estimated [Na/Fe] is found to have a correlation coefficient above 0.7, thus implying a strong correlation for all four globular clusters. As far as [Al/Fe] is concerned, it also shows a strong correlation between the estimated abundance and the observed abundance for globular clusters M13 and NGC 6752, since here also the correlation coefficient is above 0.7 whereas for globular cluster M4 there is a moderate correlation found with a correlation coefficient above 0.6. Possible sources of these discrepancies are discussed.

  20. Neutron-capture element abundances in the planetary nebula NGC 5315 from deep optical and near-infrared spectrophotometry★†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonna, S.; García-Rojas, J.; Sterling, N. C.; Delgado-Inglada, G.; Mesa-Delgado, A.; Luridiana, V.; Roederer, I. U.; Mashburn, A. L.

    2017-10-01

    We analyse the chemical composition of the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 5315, through high-resolution (R ˜ 40000) optical spectroscopy with Ultraviolet-Visual Echelle Spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope, and medium-resolution (R ˜ 4800) near-infrared spectroscopy with Folded-port InfraRed Echellette at Magellan Baade Telescope, covering a wide spectral range from 0.31 to 2.50 μm. The main aim of this work is to investigate neutron (n)-capture element abundances to study the operation of the slow n-capture ('s-process') in the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) progenitor of NGC 5315. We detect more than 700 emission lines, including ions of the n-capture elements Se, Kr, Xe and possibly Br. We compute physical conditions from a large number of diagnostic line ratios, and derive ionic abundances for species with available atomic data. The total abundances are computed using recent ionization correction factors (ICFs) or by summing ionic abundances. Total abundances of common elements are in good agreement with previous work on this object. Based on our abundance analysis of NGC 5315, including the lack of s-process enrichment, we speculate that the most probable evolutionary scenario is that the progenitor star is in a binary system as hinted at by radial velocity studies, and interactions with its companion truncated the AGB before s-process enrichment could occur. However there are other two possible scenarios for its evolution, that cannot be ruled out: (I) the progenitor is a low-mass single star that did not undergo third dredge-up; (II) the progenitor star of NGC 5315 had an initial mass of 3-5 M⊙, and any s-process enhancements were heavily diluted by the massive envelope during the AGB phase.

  1. Platinum-group element abundance and distribution in chromite deposits of the Acoje Block, Zambales Ophiolite Complex, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacuta, G.C.; Kay, R.W.; Gibbs, A.K.; Lipin, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) occur in ore-grade concentration in some of the chromite deposits related to the ultramafic section of the Acoje Block of the Zambales Ophiolite Complex. The deposits are of three types: Type 1 - associated with cumulate peridotites at the base of the crust; Type 2 - in dunite pods from the top 1 km of mantle harzburgite; and Type 3 - like Type 2, but in deeper levels of the harzburgite. Most of the deposites have chromite compositions that are high in Cr with Cr/(Cr + Al) (expressed as chromium index, Cr#) > 0.6; high-Al (Cr# Pd, thought to be characteristic of PGE-barren deposits) and positive slope (Ir < Pd, characteristic of PGE-rich deposits). Iridium, Ru and Os commonly occur as micron-size laurite (sulfide) inclusions in unfractured chromite. Laurite and native Os are also found as inclusions in interstitial sulfides. Platinum and Pd occur as alloy inclusions (and possibly as solid solution) in interstitial Ni-Cu sulfides and as tellurobismuthides in serpentine and altered sulfides. Variability of PGE distribution may be explained by alteration, crystal fractionation or partial melting processes. Alteration and metamorphism were ruled out, because PGE contents do not correlate with degree of serpentinization or the abundance and type (hydroxyl versus non-hydroxyl) of silicate inclusions in chromite. Preliminary Os isotopic data do not support crustal contamination as a source of the PGEs in the Acoje deposits. The anomalous PGE concentrations in Type 1 high-Cr chromite deposits are attributed to two stages of enrichment: an early enrichment of their mantle source from previous melting events and a later stage of sulfide segregation accompanying chromite crystallization. High-Al chromite deposits which crystallized from basalts derived from relatively low degrees of melting owe their low PGE content to partitioning of PGEs in sulfides and alloys that remain in the mantle. High-Cr deposits crystallized from melts that were

  2. Development of low-cost technology for the next generation of high efficiency solar cells composed of earth abundant elements

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Rakesh

    2014-09-28

    The development of renewable, affordable, and environmentally conscious means of generating energy on a global scale represents a grand challenge of our time. Due to the “permanence” of radiation from the sun, solar energy promises to remain a viable and sustainable power source far into the future. Established single-junction photovoltaic technologies achieve high power conversion efficiencies (pce) near 20% but require complicated manufacturing processes that prohibit the marriage of large-scale throughput (e.g. on the GW scale), profitability, and quality control. Our approach to this problem begins with the synthesis of nanocrystals of semiconductor materials comprising earth abundant elements and characterizedmore » by material and optoelectronic properties ideal for photovoltaic applications, namely Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe). Once synthesized, such nanocrystals are formulated into an ink, coated onto substrates, and processed into completed solar cells in such a way that enables scale-up to high throughput, roll-to-roll manufacturing processes. This project aimed to address the major limitation to CZTSSe solar cell pce’s – the low open-circuit voltage (Voc) reported throughout literature for devices comprised of this material. Throughout the project significant advancements have been made in fundamental understanding of the CZTSSe material and device limitations associated with this material system. Additionally, notable improvements have been made to our nanocrystal based processing technique to alleviate performance limitations due to the identified device limitations. Notably, (1) significant improvements have been made in reducing intra- and inter-nanoparticle heterogeneity, (2) improvements in device performance have been realized with novel cation substitution in Ge-alloyed CZTGeSSe absorbers, (3) systematic analysis of absorber sintering has been conducted to optimize the selenization process for large grain CZTSSe absorbers, (4) novel

  3. A history of violence: Insights into post-accretionary heating in carbonaceous chondrites from volatile element abundances, Zn isotopes and water contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, Brandon; Moynier, Frédéric; Beck, Pierre; Pringle, Emily A.; Siebert, Julien

    2018-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites (CCs) may have been the carriers of water, volatile and moderately volatile elements to Earth. Investigating the abundances of these elements, their relative volatility, and isotopes of state-change tracer elements such as Zn, and linking these observations to water contents, provide vital information on the processes that govern the abundances and isotopic signatures of these species in CCs and other planetary bodies. Here we report Zn isotopic data for 28 CCs (20 CM, 6 CR, 1 C2-ung, and 1 CV3), as well as trace element data for Zn, In, Sn, Tl, Pb, and Bi in 16 samples (8 CM, 6 CR, 1 C2-ung, and 1 CV3), that display a range of elemental abundances from case-normative to intensely depleted. We use these data, water content data from literature and Zn isotopes to investigate volatile depletions and to discern between closed and open system heating. Trace element data have been used to construct relative volatility scales among the elements for the CM and CR chondrites. From least volatile to most, the scale in CM chondrites is Pb-Sn-Bi-In-Zn-Tl, and for CR chondrites it is Tl-Zn-Sn-Pb-Bi-In. These observations suggest that heated CM and CR chondrites underwent volatile loss under different conditions to one another and to that of the solar nebula, e.g. differing oxygen fugacities. Furthermore, the most water and volatile depleted samples are highly enriched in the heavy isotopes of Zn. Taken together, these lines of evidence strongly indicate that heated CM and CR chondrites incurred open system heating, stripping them of water and volatiles concomitantly, during post-accretionary shock impact(s).

  4. Elemental abundance analyses with DAO spectrograms. VII - The late normal B stars Pi Ceti, 134 Tauri, 21 Aquilae, and Nu Capricorni and the use of Reticon spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents elemental abundance analyses of sharp-lined normal late B stars. These stars exhibit mostly near-solar abundances, but each star also shows a few abundances which are a factor of 2 less than solar. The coadded photographic spectrograms are supplemented with Reticon data. A comparison of 261 equivalent widths on 2.4 A/mm spectra of sharp-lined B and A stars shows that the Reticon equivalent widths are about 95 percent of the coadded equivalent mean. The H-gamma profiles of the coadded and Reticon spectra for eight sharp-lined stars show generally good agreement. The generally high quality of the coadded data produced from 10 or more spectrograms is confirmed using the REDUCE graphics-oriented computed reduction code. For five stars, metal lines which fall in the gap between the U and V plates are analyzed using Reticon data.

  5. Elemental abundance analyses with DAO spectrograms. VII - The late normal B stars Pi Ceti, 134 Tauri, 21 Aquilae, and Nu Capricorni and the use of RETICON spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    1991-09-01

    This paper presents elemental abundance analyses of sharp-lined normal late B stars. These stars exhibit mostly near-solar abundances, but each star also shows a few abundances which are a factor of 2 less than solar. The coadded photographic spectrograms are supplemented with Reticon data. A comparison of 261 equivalent widths on 2.4 A/mm spectra of sharp-lined B and A stars shows that the Reticon equivalent widths are about 95 percent of the coadded equivalent mean. The H-gamma profiles of the coadded and Reticon spectra for eight sharp-lined stars show generally good agreement. The generally high quality of the coadded data produced from 10 or more spectrograms is confirmed using the REDUCE graphics-oriented computed reduction code. For five stars, metal lines which fall in the gap between the U and V plates are analyzed using Reticon data.

  6. Elemental abundances of the B and A stars. 2: Gamma Geminorum, HD 60825, 7 Sextantis, HR 4817, and HR 5780

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Philip, A. G. Davis

    1994-01-01

    We extend fine analyses of the B and A stars, gamma Geminorum, 7 Sextantis, HR 4817, and HR 5780 using additional spectroscopic data from the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) coude feed telescope with a TI CCD, camera 5, and grating A, and ATLAS9 model atmospheres. In addition we study HD 60825, which had colors similar to the FHB A stars, but was found to be a Population I star. HD 60825, as is gamma Gem, is a sharp-lined early-A star with nearly solar derived abundances. HR 5780 and 7 Sex are also examples of stars which for the most part have solar abundances. The newly derived abundances for HR 4817 reveal important differences with respect to 53 Tau, a somewhat similar HgMn star.

  7. Elemental abundances of the B and A stars Gamma Geminorum, 7 Sextantis, HR 4817, and HR 5780

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Philip, A. G. D.

    1992-01-01

    Fine analyses of the B and A stars, Gamma Geminorum, 7 Sextantis, HR 4817, and HR 5780 are performed. Although the data cover rather limited spectral regions, still useful results were obtained. The data were mostly obtained at the KPNO coude feed telescope with CCD TI No. 3, camera 5, and grating A. The He/H ratio of HR 4817 confirms the similarity of many abundance values with those of the peculiar Mn star 53 Tauri. For the most part Gamma Gem, 7 Sex, and HR 5780 have derived abundances similar to those of other normal sharp-lined stars of similar effective temperature.

  8. Cosmic-ray elemental abundances from 1 to 10 GeV per amu for boron through nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwyer, Robert; Meyer, Peter

    1987-01-01

    The relative abundances of cosmic-ray nuclei in the charge range boron through nickel over the energy range 1-10 GeV per amu were measured with a balloon-borne detector. The instrument consists of a scintillation and Cerenkov counter telescope with a multiwire proportional chamber hodoscope and has been flown in four high-altitude balloon flights. Good charge resolution (sigma = 0.2 charge units at iron) and high statistical accuracy have been achieved. These data are used to derive the energy dependence of the leakage path length using the leaky box model of propagation and confinement in the galaxy. This energy dependence is found to be best fit by lambda = E(tot) exp -n, where n = 0.49 + or - 0.06 over 1-10 GeV per amu. Relative abundances at the source are consistent with an energy-independent composition.

  9. The predominantly selfing plant Arabidopsis thaliana experienced a recent reduction in transposable element abundance compared to its outcrossing relative Arabidopsis lyrata

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transposable elements (TEs) are major contributors to genome evolution. One factor that influences their evolutionary dynamics is whether their host reproduces through selfing or through outcrossing. According to the recombinational spreading hypothesis, for instance, TEs can spread more easily in outcrossing species through recombination, and should thus be less abundant in selfing species. We here studied the distribution and evolutionary dynamics of TE families in the predominantly selfing plant Arabidopsis thaliana and its close outcrossing relative Arabidopsis lyrata on a genome-wide scale. We characterized differences in TE abundance between them and asked which, if any, existing hypotheses about TE abundances may explain these differences. Results We identified 1,819 TE families representing all known classes of TEs in both species, and found three times more copies in the outcrossing A. lyrata than in the predominantly selfing A. thaliana, as well as ten times more TE families unique to A. lyrata. On average, elements in A. lyrata are younger than elements in A. thaliana. In particular, A. thaliana shows a marked decrease in element number that occurred during the most recent 10% of the time interval since A. thaliana split from A. lyrata. This most recent period in the evolution of A. thaliana started approximately 500,000 years ago, assuming a splitting time of 5 million years ago, and coincides with the time at which predominant selfing originated. Conclusions Our results indicate that the mating system may be important for determining TE copy number, and that selfing species are likely to have fewer TEs. PMID:22313744

  10. Neutron-capture element abundances in the planetary nebula NGC 5315 from deep high-resolution optical and near-IR spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonna, S.; García-Rojas, J.; Sterling, N. C.; Luridiana, V.

    2017-03-01

    We have done a spectroscopical analysis of the type I planetary nebula (PN) NGC 5315, through high-resolution (R ˜ 40000) optical spectroscopy with UVES at the 8.2m Very Large Telescope, and medium-resolution (R ˜ 4800) near-IR spectroscopy with FIRE at the 6.5m Magellan Baade telescope, covering a wide spectral range from 0.31 μm to 2.50μm. The main aim of this work is to investigate the slow neutron(n)-capture process (the s-process) in the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) star progenitor of a type I PNe. We detected and identified about 700 features, including lines from the n-capture elements Kr, Se, and possibly Br and Xe. We compute physical conditions using line ratios of common ions. Ionic abundances are computed for the species with available atomic data. We calculate total abundances using recent ionization correction factors (ICFs) or by summing ionic abundances. Our results for common elements are in good agreement with previous works on the same object. We do not find a substantial s-process enrichment in NGC 5315, which is typical for type I PNe.

  11. Effects of superabsorbent polymers on the abundances of antibiotic resistance genes, mobile genetic elements, and the bacterial community during swine manure composting.

    PubMed

    Guo, Aiyun; Gu, Jie; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Ranran; Yin, Yanan; Sun, Wei; Tuo, Xiaxia; Zhang, Li

    2017-11-01

    Superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) are considered suitable amendments for reducing the selection pressure due to heavy metals and the abundances of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during composting. In this study, three SAP (sodium polyacrylate) levels (0, 5, and 15mgkg -1 of compost) were applied and their effects on the abundances of ARGs, mobile genetic elements (MGEs), and the bacterial community were investigated. After composting, the abundances of ARGs and MGEs decreased to different extent, where the removal efficiencies for tetW, dfrA7, ermX, aac(6')-ib-cr and MGEs exceeded 90%. The high SAP concentration significantly reduced the abundances of ARGs and MGEs, and changed the microbial community. Redundancy analysis indicated that the moisture content mainly explained the changes in ARGs and MGEs. Network analysis determined the potential hosts of ARGs and MGEs, and their co-occurrence. The results suggested that applying 15mgkg -1 SAP is appropriate for reducing ARGs in compost. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Highly Sideophile Element Abundance Constraints on the Nature of the Late Accretionary Histories of Earth, Moon and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. J.; Puchtel, I. S.; Brandon, A. D.; Horan, M. F.; James, O. B.

    2007-01-01

    The highly siderophile elements (HSE) include Re, Os, Ir, Ru, Pt and Pd. These elements are initially nearly-quantitatively stripped from planetary silicate mantles during core segregation. They then may be re-enriched in mantles via continued accretion sans continued core segregation. This suite of elements and its included long-lived radiogenic isotopes systems (Re-187 (right arrow) Os-187; Pt-190 (right arrow) Os-186) can potentially be used to fingerprint the characteristics of late accreted materials. The fingerprints may ultimately be useful to constrain the prior nebular history of the dominant late accreted materials, and to compare the proportion and genesis of late accretionary materials added to the inner planets. The past ten years have seen considerable accumulation of isotopic and compositional data for HSE present in the Earth's mantle, lunar mantle and impact melt breccias, and Martian meteorites. Here we review some of these data and consider the broader implications of the compiled data.

  13. Determinations of rare earth element abundance and U-Pb age of zircons using multispot laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Takaomi D; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Kon, Yoshiaki; Hirata, Takafumi

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a new calibration technique for multielement determination and U-Pb dating of zircon samples using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) coupled with galvanometric optics. With the galvanometric optics, laser ablation of two or more sample materials could be achieved in very short time intervals (~10 ms). The resulting sample aerosols released from different ablation pits or different solid samples were mixed and homogenized within the sample cell and then transported into the ICP ion source. Multiple spot laser ablation enables spiking of analytes or internal standard elements directly into the solid samples, and therefore the standard addition calibration method can be applied for the determination of trace elements in solid samples. In this study, we have measured the rare earth element (REE) abundances of two zircon samples (Nancy 91500 and Prešovice) based on the standard addition technique, using a direct spiking of analytes through a multispot laser ablation of the glass standard material (NIST SRM612). The resulting REE abundance data show good agreement with previously reported values within analytical uncertainties achieved in this study (10% for most elements). Our experiments demonstrated that nonspectroscopic interferences on 14 REEs could be significantly reduced by the standard addition technique employed here. Another advantage of galvanometric devices is the accumulation of sample aerosol released from multiple spots. In this study we have measured the U-Pb age of a zircon sample (LMR) using an accumulation of sample aerosols released from 10 separate ablation pits of low diameters (~8 μm). The resulting (238)U-(206)Pb age data for the LMR zircons was 369 ± 64 Ma, which is in good agreement with previously reported age data (367.6 ± 1.5 Ma). (1) The data obtained here clearly demonstrate that the multiple spot laser ablation-ICPMS technique can become a powerful approach for elemental and isotopic

  14. Shifts in Abundance and Diversity of Mobile Genetic Elements after the Introduction of Diverse Pesticides into an On-Farm Biopurification System over the Course of a Year

    PubMed Central

    Dealtry, Simone; Holmsgaard, Peter N.; Dunon, Vincent; Jechalke, Sven; Ding, Guo-Chun; Krögerrecklenfort, Ellen; Heuer, Holger; Hansen, Lars H.; Springael, Dirk; Zühlke, Sebastian; Sørensen, Søren J.

    2014-01-01

    Biopurification systems (BPS) are used on farms to control pollution by treating pesticide-contaminated water. It is assumed that mobile genetic elements (MGEs) carrying genes coding for enzymes involved in degradation might contribute to the degradation of pesticides. Therefore, the composition and shifts of MGEs, in particular, of IncP-1 plasmids carried by BPS bacterial communities exposed to various pesticides, were monitored over the course of an agricultural season. PCR amplification of total community DNA using primers targeting genes specific to different plasmid groups combined with Southern blot hybridization indicated a high abundance of plasmids belonging to IncP-1, IncP-7, IncP-9, IncQ, and IncW, while IncU and IncN plasmids were less abundant or not detected. Furthermore, the integrase genes of class 1 and 2 integrons (intI1, intI2) and genes encoding resistance to sulfonamides (sul1, sul2) and streptomycin (aadA) were detected and seasonality was revealed. Amplicon pyrosequencing of the IncP-1 trfA gene coding for the replication initiation protein revealed high IncP-1 plasmid diversity and an increase in the abundance of IncP-1β and a decrease in the abundance of IncP-1ε over time. The data of the chemical analysis showed increasing concentrations of various pesticides over the course of the agricultural season. As an increase in the relative abundances of bacteria carrying IncP-1β plasmids also occurred, this might point to a role of these plasmids in the degradation of many different pesticides. PMID:24771027

  15. Abundance, distribution and bioavailability of major and trace elements in surface sediments from the Cai River estuary and Nha Trang Bay (South China Sea, Vietnam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukina, S. E.; Lobus, N. V.; Peresypkin, V. I.; Dara, O. M.; Smurov, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    Major (Si, Al, Fe, Ti, Mg, Ca, Na, K, S, P), minor (Mn) and trace (Li, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Zr, Mo, Cd, Ag, Sn, Sb, Cs, Ba, Hg, Pb, Bi and U) elements, their chemical forms and the mineral composition, organic matter (TOC) and carbonates (TIC) in surface sediments from the Cai River estuary and Nha Trang Bay were first determined along the salinity gradient. The abundance and ratio of major and trace elements in surface sediments are discussed in relation to the mineralogy, grain size, depositional conditions, reference background and SQG values. Most trace-element contents are at natural levels and are derived from the composition of rocks and soils in the watershed. A severe enrichment of Ag is most likely derived from metal-rich detrital heavy minerals such as Ag-sulfosalts. Along the salinity gradient, several zones of metal enrichment occur in surface sediments because of the geochemical fractionation of the riverine material. The parts of actually and potentially bioavailable forms (isolated by four single chemical reagent extractions) are most elevated for Mn and Pb (up to 36% and 32% of total content, respectively). The possible anthropogenic input of Pb in the region requires further study. Overall, the most bioavailable parts of trace elements are associated with easily soluble amorphous Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides. The sediments are primarily enriched with bioavailable metal forms in the riverine part of the estuary. Natural (such as turbidities) and human-generated (such as urban and industrial activities) pressures are shown to influence the abundance and speciation of potential contaminants and therefore change their bioavailability in this estuarine system.

  16. Abundance and distribution of selected elements in soils, stream sediments, and selected forage plants from desert tortoise habitats in the Mojave and Colorado deserts, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaffee, M.A.; Berry, K.H.

    2006-01-01

    A baseline and background chemical survey was conducted in southeastern California, USA, to identify potential sources of toxicants in natural and anthropogenically-altered habitats of the threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii). Soil, stream sediment, and plant samples were collected from six tortoise habitat study areas in the Mojave and Colorado deserts and analysed for up to 66 different elements. The chemical analyses provided new information on the abundances and distributions of selected elements in this region. Soil, stream-sediment, and plant analyses showed distinct variations in bulk chemistries from locality to locality. Variations were, in general, consistent with the many types of exposed rock units in the region, their highly variable bulk mineralogies, and chemical contents. Of elements in soils that might have been toxic to tortoises, only As seemed to be anomalous region-wide. Some soil and plant anomalies were clearly anthropogenic. In the Rand and Atolia mining districts, soil anomalies for As, Au, Cd, Hg, Sb, and(or) W and plant anomalies for As, Sb, and(or) W extend as far as ???15 km outward from the present area of mining; soils containing anomalous Hg were found at least 6 km away from old piles of tailings. The anomalous concentrations of As and Hg may have been the source of elevated levels of these elements found in ill tortoises from the region. In the Goldstone mining district, soil anomalies extended several km from the mining area. These areas probably represented anthropogenic surface contamination of dust redistributed by wind, vehicles, and rainfall. One of two study areas transected by a paved road (Chemehuevi Valley) showed weakly elevated levels of Pb, which extended as far as ???22 m from the pavement edge and were probably related to vehicle exhaust. No soil or plant samples from historically used military areas (Goldstone, Goffs, Chemehuevi Valley, Chuckwalla Bench) contained anomalous concentrations of the elements

  17. Anomalous abundance and redistribution patterns of rare earth elements in soils of a mining area in Inner Mongolia, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2016-06-01

    The Bayan Obo Mine, the largest rare earth element (REE) deposit ever found in the world, has been mined for nearly 60 years for iron and rare earth elements. To assess the influences of mining activities on geochemical behavior of REEs in soils, 27 surface soil samples and three soil profile samples were collected from different directions in the vicinity of the mine area. The total concentrations of REEs in surface soils varied from 149.75 to 18,891.81 mg kg(-1) with an average value of 1906.12 mg kg(-1), which was apparently higher than the average values in China (181 mg kg(-1)). The order of the average concentrations of individual REEs in surface soils was similar to that in Bayan Obo ores, which confirmed that the concentration and distribution of REEs in the soils was influenced by the mining activities. The concentrations of single REE in the soil profiles showed a similar trend with depth with an increase at 0-25 cm section, then decreased and remained relatively stable in the deep part. The normalized curves inclined to the right side, showing the conspicuous fractionation between the light and heavy REEs, which supported by the North American Shale Composite (NASC) and Post-Archean Australian Shale (PAAS) normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (La N /Yb N , La N /Sm N , Gd N /Yb N ). Slight positive Ce anomaly and negative Eu anomaly were also observed.

  18. Geochemical maps showing the distribution and abundance of selected elements in nonmagnetic heavy-mineral-concentrate samples from stream sediment, Solomon and Bendelehen 1 degree by 3 degree Quadrangles , Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    King, H.D.; Smith, S.C.; Sutley, S.J.

    Geochemical maps showing the distribution and abundance of selected elements in nonmagnetic heavy-mineral-concentrate samples from stream sediment, Solomon and Bendelehen 1{degree} by 3{degree} Quadrangles , Seward Peninsula, Alaska is presented.

  19. Bird Surveys at DARHT Before and During Operations: Comparison of Species Abundance and Composition and Trace Element Uptake

    SciTech Connect

    P. R. Fresquez, D. C. Keller, C. D. Hathcock

    2007-11-30

    The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility Mitigation Action Plan specifies the comparison of baseline conditions in biotic and abiotic media with those collected after operations have started. Operations at DARHT at Los Alamos National Laboratory started in 2000. In this study, the abundance and composition of birds collected near the DARHT facility from 2003 through 2006 were determined and compared to a preoperational period (1999). In addition, the levels of radionuclides and other inorganic chemicals in birds were compared to regional statistical reference levels (RSRLs). The number and diversity of bird species generally increased over preoperational levels with themore » greatest number of birds (412) and species (46) occurring in 2005. The most common bird species collected regardless of time periods were the chipping sparrow (Spizella passerina), the Virginia's warbler (Vermivora virginiae), the western bluebird (Sialia mexicana), the broad-tailed hummingbird (Selasphorus platycercus), the sage sparrow (Amphispiza belli), and the western tanager (Piranga ludoviciana). Most radionuclides, with the exception of uranium-234 and uranium-238, in (whole body) birds collected after operations began were either not detected or below RSRLs. Uranium-234 and uranium-238 concentrations in a few samples were far below screening levels and do not pose a potential unacceptable dose to the birds. In contrast, many inorganic chemicals, particularly arsenic and silver, in birds collected before and after operations began were in higher concentrations than RSRLs. Because birds (skin plus feathers) collected in the years before operations began contained higher levels of arsenic and silver than RSRLs and because there was no evidence of these metals in soil and sediment directly around the DARHT facility, the elevated levels of these metals in birds during early operations are probably not related to DARHT operations. Arsenic and silver in birds, however

  20. Formation of Apollo 16 impactites and the composition of late accreted material: Constraints from Os isotopes, highly siderophile elements and sulfur abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleißner, Philipp; Becker, Harry

    2017-03-01

    Fe-Ni metal-schreibersite-troilite intergrowths in Apollo 16 impact melt rocks and new highly siderophile element (HSE) and S abundance data indicate that millimeter-scale closed-system fractional crystallization processes during cooling of impactor-derived metal melt droplets in impact-melts are the main reason for compositional variations and strong differences in abundances and ratios of HSE in multiple aliquots from Apollo 16 impact melt rocks. Element ratios obtained from linear regression of such data are therefore prone to error, but weighted averages take into account full element budgets in the samples and thus represent a more accurate estimate of their impactor contributions. Modeling of solid metal-liquid metal partitioning in the Fe-Ni-S-P system and HSE patterns in impactites from different landing sites suggest that bulk compositions of ancient lunar impactites should be representative of impact melt compositions and that large-scale fractionation of the HSE by in situ segregation of solid metal or sulfide liquid in impact melt sheets most likely did not occur. The compositional record of lunar impactites indicates accretion of variable amounts of chondritic and non-chondritic impactor material and the mixing of these components during remelting of earlier ejecta deposits. The non-chondritic composition appears most prominently in some Apollo 16 impactites and is characterized by suprachondritic HSE/Ir ratios which increase from refractory to moderately volatile HSE and exhibit a characteristic enrichment of Ru relative to Pt. Large-scale fractional crystallization of solid metal from sulfur and phosphorous rich metallic melt with high P/S in planetesimal or embryo cores is currently the most likely process that may have produced these compositions. Similar materials or processes may have contributed to the HSE signature of the bulk silicate Earth (BSE).

  1. Combinatorial Platform for Discovery of Nanocrystal-Ink Based Earth Abundant Element PV with Efficiency Greater than 20%

    SciTech Connect

    Hillhouse, Hugh W.

    (1) We successfully developed an ultrasonic spray coating system that can be used to deposit thin chalcogenide films with composition gradients. 4 publications under the contract have been published with the instrument. The instrument was used to reveal the effects of intrinsic composition and examine the effects of 25 different dopant elements. Surprisingly, doping with most elements had little to no effect on the quasi-Fermi level splitting of bare films. Ge and Li were explored in depth, and our best devices utilize lithium doping. (2) We developed a new model of absorption coefficients, that when combined with absolute intensity photoluminescence,more » yield the steady-state quasi-Fermi level splitting and a way to quantify the sub-bandgap absorption. This has resulted in 2 publications on the method, with another in preparation. This is a significant development that should impact other PV technologies. (3) We found that lithium doping has several beneficial effects on CZTSSe. It improves the open-circuit voltage, short circuit current, fill factor, and shunt resistance. By using scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) and conductive AFM (along with device measurements, DLPC, and XPS), we discovered that lithium acts to increase the p-type doping in both the grain and grain boundaries (GBs). The effect is stronger in the GBs and changes the direction of the electric field at the GB. In lithium doped devices, an electric field repels minority carrier electrons away from the GB. This resulted in a publication and the fabrication of 11.8% efficient devices from a DMSO-thiourea molecular ink. The mechanism of action is most likely due to the formation of LiCu, which inhibits the formation of the donor defect ZnCu. This reduces compensation and increases the net p-type doping. (4) By alloying with germanium, we have fabricated CZTGSSe devices with the best open-circuit voltage (relative the maximum theoretical open-circuit voltage for the bandgap) for any

  2. Mineralogy and Major Element Abundance of the Dust Particles Recovered from Muses-C Regio on the Asteroid Itokawa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Tanaka, M.; Zolensky, M. E.; Kimura, M.; Nakato, A.; Ogami, T.; Ishida, H.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Yada, T.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing by the spacecraft Hayabusa suggested that outermost surface particles of Muses-C regio of the asteroid Itokawa consist of centimeter and sub-centimeter size small pebbles. However, particles we found in the sample catcher A stored in the Hayabusa capsule, where Muses-C particles were captured during first touchdown, are much smaller. i.e., most are smaller than 100 microns in size. This suggests that only small fractions of Muses-C particles were stirred up due to the impact of the sampling horn onto the surface, or due to jets from chemical thrusters during the lift off of the spacecraft from the surface. X-ray fluorescence and near-infrared measurements by the Hayabusa spacecraft suggested that Itokawa surface materials have mineral and major element composition roughly similar to LL chondrites. The particles of the Muses-C region are expected to have experienced some effects of space weathering. Both of these prospects can be tested by the direct mineralogical analyses of the returned Itokawa particles in our study and another one. This comparison is most important aspect of the Hayabusa mission, because it finally links chemical analyses of meteorites fallen on the Earth to spectroscopic measurements of the asteroids.

  3. Elemental abundance analyses with coadded Dominion Astrophysical Observatory spectrograms. II - The mercury-manganese stars 53 Tauri, Mu Leporis and Kappa Cancri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    1987-01-01

    Elemental abundance analyses based on the coaddition of at least 10 2.4 A/mm Ila-O Dominion Astrophysical Observatory spectrograms have been performed for three mercury-manganese stars, 53 Tauri, Mu Leporis, and Kappa Cancri. These fine analyses show a greater degree of internal consistency than previous studies based on lower signal-to-noise data. Lines as weak as of order 3 mA are employed in these studies, and lines of atomic species not previously identified have been discovered. The status of 53 Tau as an anomalous member of this class is confirmed in that it lacks a Hg II 3984 A line even at the 2 mA level. Further, its surface gravity indicates it is less evolved than Mu Lep and Chi Cnc. Violations of the odd-even effect in the photospheric abundances of all three stars suggest that nonnuclear processes have operated in their atmospheres. Some of the values are substantially changed from their presumably initial solar values.

  4. Soft X-ray spectrum of BL Lacertae object AO 0235+164 as a tracer of elemental abundances at z approximately 0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madejski, Greg

    1994-01-01

    We report the soft X-ray spectrum of BL Lac object AO 0235+164, observed with the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC). This object (z = 0.94) has an intervening galaxy (or a protogalactic disk) at z = 0.524 present in the line of sight, producing both radio and optical absorption lines in the background BL Lac continuum. The X-ray spectrum exhibits a substantial soft X-ray cutoff, corresponding to several times that expected from our own Galaxy; we interpret that excess cutoff as due to the intervening galaxy. The comparison of the hydrogen column density inferred from the 21 cm radio data and the X-ray absorption allows, in principle, the determination of the elemental abundances in the intervening galaxy. However, the uncertainties in both the H I spin temperature and X-ray spectral parameters only loosely restrict these abundances to be 2 +/- 1 solar, which even at the lower limit appears higher than that inferred from studies of samples of optical absoprtion-line systems.

  5. Elemental abundances in corotating events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonrosenvinge, T. T.; Mcguire, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Large, persistent solar-wind streams in 1973 and 1974 produced corotating interaction regions which accelerated particles to energies of a few MeV/nucleon. The proton to helium ratio (H/He) was remarkably constant at a value (22 + or 5) equal to that in the solar wind (21 + or - 3), suggesting that particles were being accelerated directly out of the solar wind. Preliminary results were presented from a similar study approximately 11 years (i.e., one solar cycle) later. Corotating events have been identified by surveying the solar wind data, energetic particle time-histories and anisotropies. This data was all obtained from the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft. These events also show H/He ratios similar to that in the solar wind. It is flund that in these cases there is evidence for H/He ratios which are significantly different from that of the solar wind but which are consistent with the range of values found in solar flare events.

  6. Elemental abundances in corotating events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonrosenvinge, T. T.; Mcguire, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Large, persistent solar-wind streams in 1973 and 1974 produced corotating interaction regions which accelerated particles to energies of a few MeV/nucleon. The proton to helium ratio (H/He) reported was remarkably constant at a value (22 + or - 5) equal to that in the solar wind (32 + or - 3), suggesting that particles were being accelerated directly out of the solar wind. Preliminary results from a similar study approximately 11 years (i.e., one solar cycle) later are reported. Corotating events were identified by surveying the solar wind data, energetic particle time-histories and anisotropies. This data was all obtained from the ISEE-3/ICE spacecraft. These events also show H/He ratios similar to that in the solar wind. In addition, other corotating events were examined at times when solar flare events could have injected particles into the corresponding corotating interaction regions. It was found that in these cases there is evidence for H/He ratios which are significantly different from that of the solar wind but which are consistent with the range of values found in solar flare events.

  7. Evidence of enrichment by individual SN from elemental abundance ratios in the very metal-poor dSph galaxy Boötes I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltzing, S.; Eriksson, K.; Kleyna, J.; Wilkinson, M. I.

    2009-12-01

    Aims. We establish the mean metallicity from high-resolution spectroscopy for the recently found dwarf spheroidal galaxy Boötes I and test whether it is a common feature for ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies to show signs of inhomogeneous chemical evolution (e.g. as found in the Hercules dwarf spheroidal galaxy). Methods: We analyse high-resolution, moderate signal-to-noise spectra for seven red giant stars in the Boötes I dSph galaxy using standard abundance analysis techniques. In particular, we assume local thermodynamic equilibrium and employ spherical model atmospheres and codes that take the sphericity of the star into account when calculating the elemental abundances. Results: We confirm previous determinations of the mean metallicity of the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy to be -2.3 dex. Whilst five stars are clustered around this metallicity, one is significantly more metal-poor, at -2.9 dex, and one is more metal-rich at, -1.9 dex. Additionally, we find that one of the stars, Boo-127, shows an atypically high [Mg/Ca] ratio, indicative of stochastic enrichment processes within the dSph galaxy. Similar results have previously only been found in the Hercules and Draco dSph galaxies and appear, so far, to be unique to this type of galaxy. The data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  8. CubeX: The CubeSAT X-ray Telescope for Elemental Abundance Mapping of Airless Bodies and X-ray Pulsar Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittler, L. R.; Hong, J.; Kenter, A.; Romaine, S.; Allen, B.; Kraft, R.; Masterson, R.; Elvis, M.; Gendreau, K.; Crawford, I.; Binzel, R.; Boynton, W. V.; Grindlay, J.; Ramsey, B.

    2017-12-01

    The surface elemental composition of a planetary body provides crucial information about its origin, geological evolution, and surface processing, all of which can in turn provide information about solar system evolution as a whole. Remote sensing X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy has been used successfully to probe the major-element compositions of airless bodies in the inner solar system, including the Moon, near-Earth asteroids, and Mercury. The CubeSAT X-ray Telescope (CubeX) is a concept for a 6U planetary X-ray telescope (36U with S/C), which utilizes Miniature Wolter-I X-ray optics (MiXO), monolithic CMOS and SDD X-ray sensors for the focal plane, and a Solar X-ray Monitor (heritage from the REXIS XRF instrument on NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission). CubeX will map the surface elemental composition of diverse airless bodies by spectral measurement of XRF excited by solar X-rays. The lightweight ( 1 kg) MiXO optics provide sub-arcminute resolution with low background, while the inherently rad-hard CMOS detectors provide improved spectral resolution ( 150 eV) at 0 °C. CubeX will also demonstrate X-ray pulsar timing based deep space navigation (XNAV). Successful XNAV will enable autonomous deep navigation with little to no support from the Deep Space Network, hence lowering the operation cost for many more planetary missions. Recently selected by NASA Planetary Science Deep Space SmallSat Studies, the first CubeX concept, designed to rideshare to the Moon as a secondary spacecraft on a primary mission, is under study in collaboration with the Mission Design Center at NASA Ames Research Center. From high altitude ( 6,000 km) frozen polar circular orbits, CubeX will study > 8 regions ( 110 km) of geological interest on the Moon over one year to produce a high resolution ( 2-3 km) elemental abundance map of each region. The novel focal plane design of CubeX also allows us to evaluate the performance of absolute navigation by sequential observations of several

  9. Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are abundant in Solanaceae and have a family-specific impact on gene structure and genome organization.

    PubMed

    Seibt, Kathrin M; Wenke, Torsten; Muders, Katja; Truberg, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are highly abundant non-autonomous retrotransposons that are widespread in plants. They are short in size, non-coding, show high sequence diversity, and are therefore mostly not or not correctly annotated in plant genome sequences. Hence, comparative studies on genomic SINE populations are rare. To explore the structural organization and impact of SINEs, we comparatively investigated the genome sequences of the Solanaceae species potato (Solanum tuberosum), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), wild tomato (Solanum pennellii), and two pepper cultivars (Capsicum annuum). Based on 8.5 Gbp sequence data, we annotated 82 983 SINE copies belonging to 10 families and subfamilies on a base pair level. Solanaceae SINEs are dispersed over all chromosomes with enrichments in distal regions. Depending on the genome assemblies and gene predictions, 30% of all SINE copies are associated with genes, particularly frequent in introns and untranslated regions (UTRs). The close association with genes is family specific. More than 10% of all genes annotated in the Solanaceae species investigated contain at least one SINE insertion, and we found genes harbouring up to 16 SINE copies. We demonstrate the involvement of SINEs in gene and genome evolution including the donation of splice sites, start and stop codons and exons to genes, enlargement of introns and UTRs, generation of tandem-like duplications and transduction of adjacent sequence regions. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Exploring the Milky Way stellar disk. A detailed elemental abundance study of 714 F and G dwarf stars in the solar neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensby, T.; Feltzing, S.; Oey, M. S.

    2014-02-01

    Aims: The aim of this paper is to explore and map the age and abundance structure of the stars in the nearby Galactic disk. Methods: We have conducted a high-resolution spectroscopic study of 714 F and G dwarf and subgiant stars in the Solar neighbourhood. The star sample has been kinematically selected to trace the Galactic thin and thick disks to their extremes, the metal-rich stellar halo, sub-structures in velocity space such as the Hercules stream and the Arcturus moving group, as well as stars that cannot (kinematically) be associated with either the thin disk or the thick disk. The determination of stellar parameters and elemental abundances is based on a standard analysis using equivalent widths and one-dimensional, plane-parallel model atmospheres calculated under the assumption of local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE). The spectra have high resolution (R = 40 000-110 000) and high signal-to-noise (S/N = 150-300) and were obtained with the FEROS spectrograph on the ESO 1.5 m and 2.2 m telescopes, the SOFIN and FIES spectrographs on the Nordic Optical Telescope, the UVES spectrograph on the ESO Very Large Telescope, the HARPS spectrograph on the ESO 3.6 m telescope, and the MIKE spectrograph on the Magellan Clay telescope. The abundances from individual Fe i lines were were corrected for non-LTE effects in every step of the analysis. Results: We present stellar parameters, stellar ages, kinematical parameters, orbital parameters, and detailed elemental abundances for O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Y, and Ba for 714 nearby F and G dwarf stars. Our data show that there is an old and α-enhanced disk population, and a younger and less α-enhanced disk population. While they overlap greatly in metallicity between -0.7 < [Fe/H] ≲ +0.1, they show a bimodal distribution in [α/Fe]. This bimodality becomes even clearer if stars where stellar parameters and abundances show larger uncertainties (Teff ≲ 5400 K) are discarded, showing that it is

  11. The mitochondrial genome of the gymnosperm Cycas taitungensis contains a novel family of short interspersed elements, Bpu sequences, and abundant RNA editing sites.

    PubMed

    Chaw, Shu-Miaw; Shih, Arthur Chun-Chieh; Wang, Daryi; Wu, Yu-Wei; Liu, Shu-Mei; Chou, The-Yuan

    2008-03-01

    The mtDNA of Cycas taitungensis is a circular molecule of 414,903 bp, making it 2- to 6-fold larger than the known mtDNAs of charophytes and bryophytes, but similar to the average of 7 elucidated angiosperm mtDNAs. It is characterized by abundant RNA editing sites (1,084), more than twice the number found in the angiosperm mtDNAs. The A + T content of Cycas mtDNA is 53.1%, the lowest among known land plants. About 5% of the Cycas mtDNA is composed of a novel family of mobile elements, which we designated as "Bpu sequences." They share a consensus sequence of 36 bp with 2 terminal direct repeats (AAGG) and a recognition site for the Bpu 10I restriction endonuclease (CCTGAAGC). Comparison of the Cycas mtDNA with other plant mtDNAs revealed many new insights into the biology and evolution of land plant mtDNAs. For example, the noncoding sequences in mtDNAs have drastically expanded as land plants have evolved, with abrupt increases appearing in the bryophytes, and then in the seed plants. As a result, the genomic organizations of seed plant mtDNAs are much less compact than in other plants. Also, the Cycas mtDNA appears to have been exempted from the frequent gene loss observed in angiosperm mtDNAs. Similar to the angiosperms, the 3 Cycas genes nad1, nad2, and nad5 are disrupted by 5 group II intron squences, which have brought the genes into trans-splicing arrangements. The evolutionary origin and invasion/duplication mechanism of the Bpu sequences in Cycas mtDNA are hypothesized and discussed.

  12. Hepatic nuclear sterol regulatory binding element protein 2 abundance is decreased and that of ABCG5 increased in male hamsters fed plant sterols.

    PubMed

    Harding, Scott V; Rideout, Todd C; Jones, Peter J H

    2010-07-01

    The effect of dietary plant sterols on cholesterol homeostasis has been well characterized in the intestine, but how plant sterols affect lipid metabolism in other lipid-rich tissues is not known. Changes in hepatic cholesterol homeostasis in response to high dietary intakes of plant sterols were determined in male golden Syrian hamsters fed hypercholesterolemia-inducing diets with and without 2% plant sterols (wt:wt; Reducol, Forbes Meditech) for 28 d. Plasma and hepatic cholesterol concentrations, cholesterol biosynthesis and absorption, and changes in the expression of sterol response element binding protein 2 (SREBP2) and liver X receptor-beta (LXRbeta) and their target genes were measured. Plant sterol feeding reduced plasma total cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol concentrations 43% (P < 0.0001), 60% (P < 0.0001), and 21% (P = 0.001), respectively, compared with controls. Furthermore, there was a 93% reduction (P < 0.0001) in hepatic total cholesterol and >6-fold (P = 0.029) and >2-fold (P < 0.0001) increases in hepatic beta-sitosterol and campesterol concentrations, respectively, in plant sterol-fed hamsters compared with controls. Plant sterol feeding also increased fractional cholesterol synthesis >2-fold (P < 0.03) and decreased cholesterol absorption 83% (P < 0.0001) compared with controls. Plant sterol feeding increased hepatic protein expression of cytosolic (inactive) SREBP2, decreased nuclear (active) SREBP2, and tended to increase LXRbeta (P = 0.06) and ATP binding cassette transporter G5, indicating a differential modulation of the expression of proteins central to cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, high-dose plant sterol feeding of hamsters changes hepatic protein abundance in favor of cholesterol excretion despite lower hepatic cholesterol concentrations and higher cholesterol fractional synthesis.

  13. Element Abundances in the Galactic Cosmic Rays with Atomic Number (Z) in the Interval 30 is less than or equal to Z is less than or equal to 40

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbier, Louis; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E.; deNolfo, G.; Geier, S.; Israel, M. H.; Link, J. T.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Mitchell, J.; Rauch, B. F.

    2004-01-01

    We present new results on the elemental abundances of galactic cosmic rays with atomic number, Z, greater than 30, and comparison of these observations with abundances expected from galactic propagation of various suggested models of the cosmic-ray source. We combine preliminary results from the 2003-04 flight of the Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (TIGER) cosmic-ray detector with previously reported results from the 2001-02 flight. This instrument flew over Antarctica for nearly 32 days at a mean atmospheric depth of 5.2 mb in December 2001 - January 2002. At the time of submission of this abstract, January 8, 2004, TIGER was again in the air over Antarctica having completed 22 days of an expected 30day flight at a mean atmospheric depth of about 4 nb, Data from the first flight demonstrated excellent resolution of individual elements, and we expect similar resolution from the second flight.

  14. Elemental abundance analyses with DAO spectrograms: XXX. The middle B through early A stars ξ2 Ceti (B9 III), 21 Aquilae (B8 II-III), ι Aquilae (B5 III), and ι Delphini (A2V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, S. J.; Westbrook, P. C.; Gulliver, A. F.

    2010-04-01

    This series of high quality elemental abundance analyses of mostly main-sequence band normal and peculiar B, A, and F stars defines their properties and provides data for the comparison with the analyses of somewhat similar stars and with theoretical predictions. Most use high dispersion and high S/N (≥ 200) spectrograms obtained with CCD detectors at the long camera of the Coudé spectrograph of the 1.22-m Dominion Astrophysical Observatory telescope. Here we reanalyze 21 Aql with better quality spectra and increase the number of stars consistently analyzed in the spectral range B5 to A2 by analyzing three new stars for this series. In the early A stars the normal and non-mCP stars have abundances with overlapping ranges. But more stars are needed especially in the B5 to B9 range. ξ2 Cet on average has a solar composition with a few abundances outside the solar range while both 21 Aql and ι Aql have abundances marginally less than solar. The abundances of ι Del are greater than solar with a few elements such as Ca being less than solar. It is an Am star. Table 3 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/ftp/cats/J/other/AN/331/378

  15. Estimating abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutherland, Chris; Royle, Andy

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a non-technical overview of ‘closed population capture–recapture’ models, a class of well-established models that are widely applied in ecology, such as removal sampling, covariate models, and distance sampling. These methods are regularly adopted for studies of reptiles, in order to estimate abundance from counts of marked individuals while accounting for imperfect detection. Thus, the chapter describes some classic closed population models for estimating abundance, with considerations for some recent extensions that provide a spatial context for the estimation of abundance, and therefore density. Finally, the chapter suggests some software for use in data analysis, such as the Windows-based program MARK, and provides an example of estimating abundance and density of reptiles using an artificial cover object survey of Slow Worms (Anguis fragilis).

  16. Characteristics of Martian Crustal Materials and Implications for Magmatic Assimilation: Preliminary Re-Os Isotope and Highly Siderophile Element Abundance Data for Nakhlites and Tissint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, N.; Riches, A. J. V.; Hallis, L. J.; Lee, M. R.

    2017-07-01

    This project, for the first time, aims to integrate nakhlite Os-isotope compositions and HSE abundance data with S-isotope compositions for sample fractions for which textural information is constrained prior to destructive analyses.

  17. 186Os-187Os and highly siderophile element abundance systematics of the mantle revealed by abyssal peridotites and Os-rich alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, James M. D.; Walker, Richard J.; Warren, Jessica M.

    2017-03-01

    Abyssal peridotites are oceanic mantle fragments that were recently processed through ridges and represent residues of both modern and ancient melting. To constrain the nature and timing of melt depletion processes, and the composition of the mantle, we report high-precision Os isotope data for abyssal peridotites from three ocean basins, as well as for Os-rich alloys, primarily from Mesozoic ophiolites. These data are complemented by whole-rock highly siderophile element (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, Re), trace- and major-element abundances for the abyssal peridotites, which are from the Southwest Indian (SWIR), Central Indian (CIR), Mid-Atlantic (MAR) and Gakkel Ridges. The results reveal a limited role for melt refertilization or secondary alteration processes in modifying abyssal peridotite HSE compositions. The abyssal peridotites examined have experienced variable melt depletion (2% to >16%), which occurred >0.5 Ga ago for some samples. Abyssal peridotites typically exhibit low Pd/Ir and, combined with high-degrees of estimated total melt extraction, imply that they were relatively refractory residues prior to incorporation into their present ridge setting. Recent partial melting processes and mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) generation therefore played a limited role in the chemical evolution of their precursor mantle domains. The results confirm that many abyssal peridotites are not simple residues of recent MORB source melting, having a more complex and long-lived depletion history. Peridotites from the Gakkel Ridge, SWIR, CIR and MAR indicate that the depleted MORB mantle has 186Os/188Os of 0.1198356 ± 21 (2SD). The Phanerozoic Os-rich alloys yield an average 186Os/188Os within uncertainty of abyssal peridotites (0.1198361 ± 20). Melt depletion trends defined between Os isotopes and melt extraction indices (e.g., Al2O3) allow an estimate of the primitive mantle (PM) composition, using only abyssal peridotites. This yields 187Os/188Os (0.1292 ± 25), and 186Os

  18. Is trace element concentration correlated to parasite abundance? A case study in a population of the green frog Pelophylax synkl. hispanicus from the Neto River (Calabria, southern Italy).

    PubMed

    De Donato, Carlo; Barca, Donatella; Milazzo, Concetta; Santoro, Raffaella; Giglio, Gianni; Tripepi, Sandro; Sperone, Emilio

    2017-06-01

    Bioaccumulation of 13 trace elements in the livers of 38 Pelophylax sinkl. hispanicus (Ranidae) and its helminth communities were studied and compared among three sites, each with a different degree of pollution along River Neto (south Italy) during September, 2014. Trace element concentrations in water and liver were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For most elements, the highest concentration was recorded in the frogs inhabiting the third site, the one with the highest degree of pollution. The trend of trace element concentration in the liver can be represented as follows: Cu > Zn > Mn > Se > Cr. Concentrations of some elements in water and liver samples were significantly different among the three sites and this is evidenced by the bioaccumulation in the frogs. Four species of helminths, all belonging to Nematoda, were found: Rhabdias sp., Oswaldocruzia filiformis (Goeze, 1782), Cosmocerca ornata (Dujarden, 1845), Seuratascaris numidica (Seurat, 1917). The parasite survey presents an important difference of prevalence and average number of helminths in frogs between the three sites. Correlating parasitological and ecotoxicological data showed a strong positive correlation between prevalence and number of parasites with some trace elements such as Mn, Co, Ni, As, Se, and Cd.

  19. Pop III i-process nucleosynthesis and the elemental abundances of SMSS J0313-6708 and the most iron-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, O.; Herwig, F.; Pignatari, M.

    2018-02-01

    We have investigated a highly energetic H-ingestion event during shell He burning leading to H-burning luminosities of log (LH/L⊙) ˜ 13 in a 45 M⊙ Pop III massive stellar model. In order to track the nucleosynthesis which may occur in such an event, we run a series of single-zone nucleosynthesis models for typical conditions found in the stellar evolution model. Such nucleosynthesis conditions may lead to i-process neutron densities of up to ˜1013 cm-3. The resulting simulation abundance pattern, where Mg comes from He burning and Ca from the i process, agrees with the general observed pattern of the most iron-poor star currently known, SMSS J031300.36-670839.3. However, Na is also efficiently produced in these i-process conditions, and the prediction exceeds observations by ˜2.5 dex. While this probably rules out this model for SMSS J031300.36-670839.3, the typical i-process signature of combined He burning and i process of higher than solar [Na/Mg], [Mg/Al], and low [Ca/Mg] is reproducing abundance features of the two next most iron-poor stars HE 1017-5240 and HE 1327-2326 very well. The i process does not reach Fe which would have to come from a low level of additional enrichment. i process in hyper-metal-poor or Pop III massive stars may be able to explain certain abundance patterns observed in some of the most metal-poor CEMP-no stars.

  20. Relative abundances of elements (20 or = Z or = 28) at energies up to 70 GeV/amu using relativistic rise in ion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelmy, S. D.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a new balloon borne cosmic ray detector flown from Palestine, TX in Sept., 1982 are discussed. The exposure of 62 square meter-ster-hr is sufficient to prove the concept of using gas ionization chambers as energy measuring devices in the relativistic rise region. The abundances, relative Fe-26, of the pure secondaries Cr-22 and Ti-24, the pure primary Ni26, and the mixed primary and secondary Ca-20 between 6 and 70GeV/amu were measured.

  1. Interstellar abundances - Gas and dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, G. B.

    1974-01-01

    Data on abundances of interstellar atoms, ions and molecules in front of zeta Oph are assembled and analyzed. The gas-phase abundances of at least 11 heavy elements are significantly lower, relative to hydrogen, than in the solar system. The abundance deficiencies of certain elements correlate with the temperatures derived theoretically for particle condensation in stellar atmospheres or nebulae, suggesting that these elements have condensed into dust grains near stars. There is evidence that other elements have accreted onto such grains after their arrival in interstellar space. The extinction spectrum of zeta Oph can be explained qualitatively and, to a degree, quantitatively by dust grains composed of silicates, graphite, silicon carbide, and iron, with mantles composed of complex molecules of H, C, N, and O. This composition is consistent with the observed gas-phase deficiencies.

  2. Chemical classification of iron meteorites. XI - Multi-element studies of 38 new irons and the high abundance of ungrouped irons from Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasson, John T.; Ouyang, Xinwei; Wang, Jianmin; Jerde, Eric

    1989-01-01

    Concentrations of 14 elements in the metal of 38 iron meteorites and a pallasite are reported. Three samples are paired with previously classified irons, raising the number of well-classified, independent iron meteorites to 598. Several of the new irons are from Antarctica. Of 24 independent irons from Antarctica, eight are ungrouped, a much higher fraction than that among all classified irons. The difference is probably related to the fact that the median mass of Antarctic irons is about two orders of magnitude smaller than that of non-Antarctic irons. Smaller meteoroids may tend to sample a larger number of asteroidal source regions, perhaps because small meteoroids tend to have higher ejection velocities or because they have random-walked a greater increment of orbital semimajor axis away from that of the parent body.

  3. Comparison of abundances of chemical elements in mineralized and unmineralized sandstone of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Smith Lake District, Grants uranium region, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, C.T.; Spirakis, C.S.; Robertson, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Statistical treatment of analytical data from the Mariano Lake and Ruby uranium deposits in the Smith Lake district, New Mexico, indicates that organic carbon, arsenic, barium, calcium, cobalt, copper, gallium, iron, lead, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, strontium, sulfur, vanadium, yttrium, and zirconium are concentrated along with uranium in primary ore. Comparison of the Smith Lake data with information from other primary deposits in the Grants uranium region and elsewhere in the Morrison Formation of the Colorado Plateau suggests that these elements, with the possible exceptions of zirconium and gallium and with the probable addition of aluminum and magnesium, are typically associated with primary, tabular uranium deposits. Chemical differences between the Ruby and Mariano Lake deposits are consistent with the interpretation that the Ruby deposit has been more affected by post-mineralization oxidizing solutions than has the Mariano Lake deposit.

  4. Platinum-group element abundances and Re-Os isotopic systematics of the upper continental crust through time: Evidence from glacial diamictites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Walker, Richard J.; Rudnick, Roberta L.; Gao, Shan; Gaschnig, Richard M.; Puchtel, Igor S.; Tang, Ming; Hu, Zhao-Chu

    2016-10-01

    The fine-grained matrix of glacial diamictites, deposited periodically by continental ice sheets over much of Earth history, provides insights into the average composition and chemical evolution of the upper continental crust (UCC) (Gaschnig et al., 2016, and references therein). The concentrations of platinum-group elements (PGEs, including Os, Ir, Ru, Pt and Pd) and the geochemically related Re, as well as 187Re/188Os and 187Os/188Os ratios, are reported here for globally-distributed glacial diamictites that were deposited during the Mesoarchean, Paleoproterozoic, Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic eras. The medians and averages of PGE concentrations of these diamictite composites decrease from the Mesoarchean to the Neoproterozoic, mimicking decreases in the concentrations of first-row transition elements (Sc, V, Cr, Co and Ni). By contrast, Re concentrations are highly variable with no discernable trend, owing to its high solubility. Assuming these diamictites are representative of average UCC through time, the new data are fully consistent with the previous inference that the Archean UCC contained a greater proportion of mafic-ultramafic rocks relative to younger UCC. Linear regressions of PGEs versus Cr and Ni concentrations in all the diamictite composites from the four time periods are used to estimate the following concentrations of the PGEs in the present-day UCC: 0.059 ± 0.016 ng/g Os, 0.036 ± 0.008 ng/g Ir, 0.079 ± 0.026 ng/g Ru, 0.80 ± 0.22 ng/g Pt and 0.80 ± 0.26 ng/g Pd (2σ of 10,000 bootstrapping regression results). These PGE estimates are slightly higher than the estimates obtained from loess samples. We suggest this probably results from loess preferentially sampling younger UCC rocks that have lower PGE concentrations, or PGEs being fractionated during loess formation. A Re concentration of 0.25 ± 0.12 ng/g (2σ) is obtained from a regression of Re versus Mo. From this, time-integrated 187Re/188Os and 187Os/188Os ratios for the UCC are

  5. Abundances and distribution of minerals and elements in high-alumina coal fly ash from the Jungar Power Plant, Inner Mongolia, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dai, S.; Zhao, L.; Peng, S.; Chou, C.-L.; Wang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Li, D.; Sun, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The fly ash from the Jungar Power Plant, Inner Mongolia, China, is unique because it is highly enriched in alumina (Al2O3>50%). The fly ash mainly consists of amorphous glass and mullite and trace amounts of corundum, quartz, char, calcite, K-feldspar, clay minerals, and Fe-bearing minerals. The mullite content in fly ash is as high as 37.4% because of high boehmite and kaolinite contents in feed coal. Corundum is a characteristic mineral formed during the combustion of boehmite-rich coal.Samples from the economizer were sieved into six size fractions (<120, 120-160, 160-300, 300-360, 360-500, and >500 mesh) and separated into magnetic, mullite+corundum+quartz (MCQ) and glass phases for mineralogical and chemical analysis. The corundum content increases but amorphous glass decreases with decreasing particle size. Fractions of small particle sizes are relatively high in mullite, probably because mullite was formed from fine clay mineral particles under high-temperature combustion condition. Similarly, fine corundum crystals formed in the boiler from boehmite in feed coal. The magnetic phase consists of hematite, magnetite, magnesioferrite, and MgFeAlO4 crystals. The MCQ phase is composed of 89% mullite, 6.1% corundum, 4.5% quartz, and 0.5% K-feldspar.Overall, the fly ash from the power plant is significantly enriched in Al2O3 with an average of 51.9%, but poor in SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO, Na2O, P2O5, and As. Arsenic, TiO2, Th, Al2O3, Bi, La, Ga, Ni, and V are high in mullite, and the magnetic matter is enriched in Fe2O3, CaO, MnO, TiO2, Cs, Co, As, Cd, Ba, Ni, Sb, MgO, Zn, and V. The remaining elements are high in the glass fraction. The concentration of K2O, Na2O, P2O5, Nb, Cr, Ta, U, W, Rb, and Ni do not clearly vary with particle size, while SiO2 and Hg decrease and the remaining elements clearly increase with decreasing particle size. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Chemical classification of iron meteorites. XI. Multi-element studies of 38 new irons and the high abundance of ungrouped irons from Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Wasson, J.T.; Ouyang, Xinwei; Wang, Jianmin

    1989-03-01

    The authors report concentrations of 14 elements in the metal of 38 iron meteorites and a pallasite. The meteorites are classified based on these data and on structural observations. Three samples are paired with previously classified irons; thus, these additional 35 irons raise the number of well-classified, independent iron meteorites to 598. One Yamato iron contains 342 mg/g Ni, the second highest Ni content in an IAB iron after Oktibbeha County. Two small irons from Western Australia appear to be metal nodules from mesosiderites. Several of the new irons are from Antarctica. Of 24 independent irons from Antarctica, 8 aremore » ungrouped. The fraction, 0.333, is much higher than the fraction 0.161 among all 598 classified irons. Statistical tests show that it is highly improbably ({approximately}2.9% probability) that the Antarctic population is a random sample of the larger population. The difference is probably related to the fact that the median mass of Antarctic irons is about two orders of magnitude smaller than that of non-Antarctic irons. It is doubtful that the difference results from fragmentation patterns yielding different size distributions favoring smaller masses among ungrouped irons. More likely is the possibility that smaller meteoroids tend to sample a larger number of asteroidal source regions, perhaps because small meteoroids tend to have higher ejection velocities or because small meteoroids have random-walked a greater increment of orbital semimajor axis away from that of the parent body.« less

  7. Interannual variation of rare earth element abundances in corals from northern coast of the South China Sea and its relation with sea-level change and human activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Yajing; Peng, Z.; Wei, G.; Chen, T.; Sun, W.; He, J.; Liu, Gaisheng; Chou, C.-L.; Shen, C.-C.

    2011-01-01

    Here we present interannual rare earth element (REE) records spanning the last two decades of the 20th century in two living Porites corals, collected from Longwan Bay, close to the estuarine zones off Wanquan River of Hainan Island and Hong Kong off the Pearl River Delta of Guangdong Province in the northern South China Sea. The results show that both coral REE contents (0.5-40 ng g-1 in Longwan Bay and 2-250 ng g-1 in Hong Kong for La-Lu) are characterized with a declining trend, which are significantly negative correlated with regional sea-level rise (9.4 mm a-1 from 1981 to 1996 in Longwan Bay, 13.7 mm a-1 from 1991 to 2001 in Hong Kong). The REE features are proposed to be resulted from seawater intrusion into the estuaries in response to contemporary sea-level rise. However, the tendency for the coral Er/Nd time series at Hong Kong site is absent and there is no significant relation between Er/Nd and total REEs as found for the coral at Longwan Bay site. The observations are likely attributed to changes of the water discharge and sediment load of Pearl River, which have been significantly affected by intense human activities, such as the construction of dams/reservoirs and riverbed sediment mining, in past decades. The riverine sediment load/discharge ratio of the Pearl River decreased sharply with a rate of 0.02 kg m-3 a-1, which could make significant contribution to the declining trend of coral REE. We propose that coastal corals in Longwan Bay and similar unexplored sites with little influences of river discharge and anthropogenic disruption are ideal candidates to investigate the influence of sea-level change on seawater/coral REE. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Coronal Abundances and Their Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1996-01-01

    This contract supported the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution soft X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study were a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This is the Final Report, summarizing the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred during the period of performance, June 1993 - December 1996.

  9. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1994-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution software X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred since the last report, submitted two months early, in April 1994, to facilitate evaluation of the first year's progress for contract renewal. Hence this report covers the period 15 April 1994 - 15 December 1994. A list of publications resulting from this research is included.

  10. Beryllium and Boron abundances in population II stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The scientific focus of this program was to undertake UV spectroscopic abundance analyses of extremely metal poor stars with attention to determining abundances of light elements such as beryllium and boron. The abundances are likely to reflect primordial abundances within the early galaxy and help to constrain models for early galactic nucleosynthesis. The general metal abundances of these stars are also important for understanding stellar evolution.

  11. Ferropericlase inclusions in ultradeep diamonds from Sao Luiz (Brazil): high Li abundances and diverse Li-isotope and trace element compositions suggest an origin from a subduction mélange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, Hans-Michael; Brey, Gerhard P.; Harris, Jeffrey W.; Durali-Müller, Soodabeh; Ludwig, Thomas; Höfer, Heidi E.

    2018-05-01

    The most remarkable feature of the inclusion suite in ultradeep alluvial and kimberlitic diamonds from Sao Luiz (Juina area in Brazil) is the enormous range in Mg# [100xMg/(Mg + Fe)] of the ferropericlases (fper). The Mg-richer ferropericlases are from the boundary to the lower mantle or from the lower mantle itself when they coexist with ringwoodite or Mg- perovskite (bridgmanite). This, however, is not an explanation for the more Fe-rich members and a lowermost mantle or a "D" layer origin has been proposed for them. Such a suggested ultra-deep origin separates the Fe-rich fper-bearing diamonds from the rest of the Sao Luiz ultradeep diamond inclusion suite, which also contains Ca-rich phases. These are now thought to have an origin in the uppermost lower mantle and in the transition zone and to belong either to a peridotitic or mafic (subducted oceanic crust) protolith lithology. We analysed a new set of more Fe-rich ferropericlase inclusions from 10 Sao Luiz ultradeep alluvial diamonds for their Li isotope composition by solution MC-ICP-MS (multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry), their major and minor elements by EPMA (electron probe micro-analyser) and their Li-contents by SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry), with the aim to understand the origin of the ferropericlase protoliths. Our new data confirm the wide range of ferropericlase Mg# that were reported before and augment the known lack of correlation between major and minor elements. Four pooled ferropericlase inclusions from four diamonds provided sufficient material to determine for the first time their Li isotope composition, which ranges from δ7Li + 9.6 ‰ to -3.9 ‰. This wide Li isotopic range encompasses that of serpentinized ocean floor peridotites including rodingites and ophicarbonates, fresh and altered MORB (mid ocean ridge basalt), seafloor sediments and of eclogites. This large range in Li isotopic composition, up to 5 times higher than `primitive upper mantle' Li-abundances

  12. Solar coronal and photospheric abundances from solar energetic particle measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, H. H.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) elemental abundance data from the cosmic ray subsystem (CRS) aboard the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are used to derive unfractionated coronal and photospheric abundances for elements with Z = 6-30. It is found that the ionic charge-to-mass ratio (Q/M) is the principal organizing parameter for the fractionation of SEPs by acceleration and propagation processes and for flare-to-flare variability, making possible a single-parameter Q/M-dependent correction to the average SEP abundances to obtain unfractionated coronal abundances. A further correction based on first ionization potential allows the determination of unfractionated photospheric abundances.

  13. Solar coronal and photospheric abundances from solar energetic particle measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, H.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) elemental abundance data from the Cosmic Ray Subsystem (CRS) aboard the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are used to derive unfractionated coronal and photospheric abundances for elements with 3 = or Z or = 30. The ionic charge-to-mass ratio (Q/M) is the principal organizing parameter for the fractionation of SEPs by acceleration and propagation processes and for flare-to-flare variability, making possible a single-parameter Q/M-dependent correction to the average SEP abundances to obtain unfractionated coronal abundances. A further correction based on first ionization potential allows the determination of unfractionated photospheric abundances.

  14. Solar Coronal and photospheric abundances from solar energetic particle measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, H.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) elemental abundance data from the cosmic ray subsystem (CRS) aboard the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are used to derive unfractionated coronal and photospheric abundances for elements with 3 Z or = 30. It is found that the ionic charge-to-mass ratio (Q/M) is the principal organizing parameter for the fractionation of SEPs by acceleration and propagation processes and for flare-to-flare variability, making possible a single-parameter Q/M-dependent correction to the average SEP abundances to obtain unfractionated coronal abundances. A further correction based on first ionization potential allows the determination of unfractionated photospheric abundances.

  15. Interstellar Abundances Toward X Per, Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2014-01-01

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to measure elemental abundances in the local ISM. We examine absorption features of 0, Mg, and Si along this line of sight using spectra from the Chandra Observatory's LETG/ ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments. In general, we find that the abundances and their ratios are similar to those of young F and G stars and the most recent solar values. We compare our results with abundances required by dust grain models.

  16. Interstellar Abundances Toward X Per, Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2012-01-01

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to measure elemental abundances in the local ISM. We examine absorption features of O, Mg, and Si along this line of sight using spectra from the Chandra Observatory's LETG/ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments. In general, we find that the abundances and their ratios are similar to those of young F and G stars and the most recent solar values. We compare our results with abundances required by dust grain models.

  17. RELATIVE ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS IN PLUMES AND INTERPLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    Guennou, C.; Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W., E-mail: cguennou@iac.es

    2015-07-10

    We present measurements of relative elemental abundances in plumes and interplumes. Plumes are bright, narrow structures in coronal holes that extend along open magnetic field lines far out into the corona. Previous work has found that in some coronal structures the abundances of elements with a low first ionization potential (FIP) <10 eV are enhanced relative to their photospheric abundances. This coronal-to-photospheric abundance ratio, commonly called the FIP bias, is typically 1 for elements with a high-FIP (>10 eV). We have used Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations made on 2007 March 13 and 14 over a ≈24 hr period tomore » characterize abundance variations in plumes and interplumes. To assess their elemental composition, we used a differential emission measure analysis, which accounts for the thermal structure of the observed plasma. We used lines from ions of iron, silicon, and sulfur. From these we estimated the ratio of the iron and silicon FIP bias relative to that for sulfur. From the results, we have created FIP-bias-ratio maps. We find that the FIP-bias ratio is sometimes higher in plumes than in interplumes and that this enhancement can be time dependent. These results may help to identify whether plumes or interplumes contribute to the fast solar wind observed in situ and may also provide constraints on the formation and heating mechanisms of plumes.« less

  18. Solar abundance of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Holweger, H.

    1973-07-01

    An analysis of 19 photospheric Si I lines whose oscillator strengths have recently been detertmined by Garz (1973) leads to a solar abundance of silicon, log epsilon /sub Si/ = 7.65 plus or minus 0.07, on the scale where log epsilon /sub H/ = 12. Together with the sodium abundance determained earlier by the same method, a solar abundance ratio /sup epsilon /Na//sup epsilon /Si = 0.045 ( plus or minus 10%) results. Within the error limits this a grees wtth the meteoritic ratio found in carbonaceous chondrites. Results concerning line-broadening by hydrogen are discussed. (auth)

  19. Abundances in very metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jennifer Anne

    We measured the abundances of 35 elements in 22 field red giants and a red giant in the globular cluster M92. We found the [Zn/Fe] ratio increases with decreasing [Fe/H], reaching ~0.3 at [Fe/H] = -3.0. While this is a larger [Zn/Fe] than found by previous investigators, it is not sufficient to account for the [Zn/Fe] observed in the damped Lyα systems. We test different models for the production of the s-process elements by comparing our [Y/Zr] values, which have been produced by the r- process, to predictions of what the s-process does not produce. We find that the models of Arlandini et al. (1999), which calculate s-process production in a model AGB star, agree the best. We then look at the r-process abundances across a wide range in mass. The [Y/Ba] values for most of our stars cluster around -0.30, but there are three outliers with [Y/Ba] values up to 1 dex higher. Thus the heavy element abundances do not show the same pattern from Z = 39 to Z = 56. However, our abundances ratios from Pd (Z = 46) to Yb (Z = 70) are consistent with a scaled solar system r- process pattern, arguing that at least the heavy r- process elements are made in a universal pattern. If we assume that this same pattern hold through thorium, we can determine the ages of our stars from the present abundance of radioactive thorium and an initial thorium abundance based on the abundance of stable heavy elements. Our results for five stars are consistent with those stars being the same age. Our mean age is 10.8 +/- 2 Gyr. However that result depends critically on the assumed Th/stable ratio, which we adopt from models of the r-process. For an average age of 15 Gyrs, the initial Th/Eu ratio we would need is 0.590. Finally, the [element/Fe] ratios for elements in the iron group and lower do not show any dispersion, unlike for the r- process elements such as Y and Ba. Therefore the individual contributions of supernovae have been erased for the lighter elements.

  20. Estimating abundance: Chapter 27

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a non-technical overview of ‘closed population capture–recapture’ models, a class of well-established models that are widely applied in ecology, such as removal sampling, covariate models, and distance sampling. These methods are regularly adopted for studies of reptiles, in order to estimate abundance from counts of marked individuals while accounting for imperfect detection. Thus, the chapter describes some classic closed population models for estimating abundance, with considerations for some recent extensions that provide a spatial context for the estimation of abundance, and therefore density. Finally, the chapter suggests some software for use in data analysis, such as the Windows-based program MARK, and provides an example of estimating abundance and density of reptiles using an artificial cover object survey of Slow Worms (Anguis fragilis).

  1. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTEmore » analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.« less

  2. Solar abundances as derived from solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that there are well defined average abundances of heavy (Z above 2) solar energetic particles (SEPs), with variations in the acceleration and propagation producing a systematic flare-to-flare fractionation that depends on the charge per unit mass of the ion. Correcting the average SEP abundances for this fractionation yields SEP-derived coronal abundances for 20 elements. High-resolution SEP studies have also provided isotopic abundances for five elements. SEP-derived abundances indicate that elements with high first ionization potentials (greater than 10 eV) are depleted in the corona relative to the photosphere and provide new information on the solar abundance of C and Ne-22.

  3. Rare-earth abundances in chondritic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evensen, N. M.; Hamilton, P. J.; Onions, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    Fifteen chondrites, including eight carbonaceous chondrites, were analyzed for rare earth element abundances by isotope dilution. Examination of REE for a large number of individual chondrites shows that only a small proportion of the analyses have flat unfractionated REE patterns within experimental error. While some of the remaining analyses are consistent with magmatic fractionation, many patterns, in particular those with positive Ce anomalies, can not be explained by known magmatic processes. Elemental abundance anomalies are found in all major chondrite classes. The persistence of anomalies in chondritic materials relatively removed from direct condensational processes implies that anomalous components are resistant to equilibrium or were introduced at a late stage of chondrite formation. Large-scale segregation of gas and condensate is implied, and bulk variations in REE abundances between planetary bodies is possible.

  4. Photoelectric absorption cross sections with variable abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balucinska-Church, Monika; Mccammon, Dan

    1992-01-01

    Polynomial fit coefficients have been obtained for the energy dependences of the photoelectric absorption cross sections of 17 astrophysically important elements. These results allow the calculation of X-ray absorption in the energy range 0.03-10 keV in material with noncosmic abundances.

  5. Clustering in the stellar abundance space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesso, R.; Rocha-Pinto, H. J.

    2018-03-01

    We have studied the chemical enrichment history of the interstellar medium through an analysis of the n-dimensional stellar abundance space. This work is a non-parametric analysis of the stellar chemical abundance space. The main goal is to study the stars from their organization within this abundance space. Within this space, we seek to find clusters (in a statistical sense), that is, stars likely to share similar chemo-evolutionary history, using two methods: the hierarchical clustering and the principal component analysis. We analysed some selected abundance surveys available in the literature. For each sample, we labelled the group of stars according to its average abundance curve. In all samples, we identify the existence of a main enrichment pattern of the stars, which we call chemical enrichment flow. This flow is set by the structured and well-defined mean rate at which the abundances of the interstellar medium increase, resulting from the mixture of the material ejected from the stars and stellar mass-loss and interstellar medium gas. One of the main results of our analysis is the identification of subgroups of stars with peculiar chemistry. These stars are situated in regions outside of the enrichment flow in the abundance space. These peculiar stars show a mismatch in the enrichment rate of a few elements, such as Mg, Si, Sc and V, when compared to the mean enrichment rate of the other elements of the same stars. We believe that the existence of these groups of stars with peculiar chemistry may be related to the accretion of planetary material on to stellar surfaces or may be due to production of the same chemical element by different nucleosynthetic sites.

  6. Stellar Oxygen Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeremy

    1994-04-01

    This dissertation addresses several issues concerning stellar oxygen abundances. The 7774 {\\AA} O I triplet equivalent widths of Abia & Rebolo [1989, AJ, 347, 186] for metal-poor dwarfs are found to be systematically too high. I also argue that current effective temperatures used in halo star abundance studies may be ~150 K too low. New color-Teff relations are derived for metal-poor stars. Using the revised Teff values and improved equivalent widths for the 7774A O I triplet, the mean [O/Fe] ratio for a handful of halo stars is found to be +0.52 with no dependence on Teff or [Fe/H]. Possible cosmological implications of the hotter Teff scale are discussed along with additional evidence supporting the need for a higher temperature scale for metal-poor stars. Our Teff scale leads to a Spite Li plateau value of N(Li)=2.28 +/- 0.09. A conservative minimal primordial value of N(Li)=2.35 is inferred. If errors in the observations and models are considered, consistency with standard models of Big Bang nucleosynthesis is still achieved with this larger Li abundance. The revised Teff scale raises the observed B/Be ratio of HD 140283 from 10 to 12, making its value more comfortably consistent with the production of the observed B and Be by ordinary spallation. Our Teff values are found to be in good agreement with values predicted from both the Victoria and Yale isochrone color-Teff relations. Thus, it appears likely that no changes in globular cluster ages would result. Next, we examine the location of the break in the [O/Fe] versus [Fe/H] plane in a quantitative fashion. Analysis of a relatively homogeneous data set does not favor any unique break point in the range -1.7 /= -3), in agreement with the new results for halo dwarfs. We find that the gap in the observed [O/H] distribution, noted by Wheeler et al

  7. Accurate abundance determinations in S stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyskens, P.; Van Eck, S.; Plez, B.; Goriely, S.; Siess, L.; Jorissen, A.

    2011-12-01

    S-type stars are thought to be the first objects, during their evolution on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), to experience s-process nucleosynthesis and third dredge-ups, and therefore to exhibit s-process signatures in their atmospheres. Until present, the modeling of these processes is subject to large uncertainties. Precise abundance determinations in S stars are of extreme importance for constraining e.g., the depth and the formation of the 13C pocket. In this paper a large grid of MARCS model atmospheres for S stars is used to derive precise abundances of key s-process elements and iron. A first estimation of the atmospheric parameters is obtained using a set of well-chosen photometric and spectroscopic indices for selecting the best model atmosphere of each S star. Abundances are derived from spectral line synthesis, using the selected model atmosphere. Special interest is paid to technetium, an element without stable isotopes. Its detection in stars is considered as the best possible signature that the star effectively populates the thermally-pulsing AGB (TP-AGB) phase of evolution. The derived Tc/Zr abundances are compared, as a function of the derived [Zr/Fe] overabundances, with AGB stellar model predictions. The computed [Zr/Fe] overabundances are in good agreement with the AGB stellar evolution model predictions, while the Tc/Zr abundances are slightly over-predicted. This discrepancy can help to set stronger constraints on nucleosynthesis and mixing mechanisms in AGB stars.

  8. Abundance, size distributions and trace-element binding of organic and iron-rich nanocolloids in Alaskan rivers, as revealed by field-flow fractionation and ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolpe, Björn; Guo, Laodong; Shiller, Alan M.; Aiken, George R.

    2013-03-01

    Water samples were collected from six small rivers in the Yukon River basin in central Alaska to examine the role of colloids and organic matter in the transport of trace elements in Northern high latitude watersheds influenced by permafrost. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), selected elements (Al, Si, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Ba, Pb, U), and UV-absorbance spectra were measured in 0.45 μm filtered samples. 'Nanocolloidal size distributions' (0.5-40 nm, hydrodynamic diameter) of humic-type and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb were determined by on-line coupling of flow field-flow fractionation (FFF) to detectors including UV-absorbance, fluorescence, and ICP-MS. Total dissolved and nanocolloidal concentrations of the elements varied considerably between the rivers and between spring flood and late summer base flow. Data on specific UV-absorbance (SUVA), spectral slopes, and the nanocolloidal fraction of the UV-absorbance indicated a decrease in aromaticity and size of CDOM from spring flood to late summer. The nanocolloidal size distributions indicated the presence of different 'components' of nanocolloids. 'Fulvic-rich nanocolloids' had a hydrodynamic diameter of 0.5-3 nm throughout the sampling season; 'organic/iron-rich nanocolloids' occurred in the <8 nm size range during the spring flood; whereas 'iron-rich nanocolloids' formed a discrete 4-40 nm components during summer base flow. Mn, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn were distributed between the nanocolloid components depending on the stability constant of the metal (+II)-organic complexes, while stronger association of Cr to the iron-rich nanocolloids was attributed to the higher oxidation states of Cr (+III or +IV). Changes in total dissolved element concentrations, size and composition of CDOM, and occurrence and size of organic/iron and iron-rich nanocolloids were related to variations in their sources from either the upper organic

  9. TEA: A Code Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature-pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows & Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  10. TEA: A CODE CALCULATING THERMOCHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM ABUNDANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver, E-mail: jasmina@physics.ucf.edu

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature–pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows and Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows and Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but withmore » higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.« less

  11. Nucleosynthesis: Stellar and Solar Abundances and Atomic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John J.; Lawler, James E.; Sneden, Christopher; DenHartog, E. A.; Collier, Jason; Dodge, Homer L.

    2006-01-01

    Abundance observations indicate the presence of often surprisingly large amounts of neutron capture (i.e., s- and r-process) elements in old Galactic halo and globular cluster stars. These observations provide insight into the nature of the earliest generations of stars in the Galaxy the progenitors of the halo stars responsible for neutron-capture synthesis. Comparisons of abundance trends can be used to understand the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the nature of heavy element nucleosynthesis. In addition age determinations, based upon long-lived radioactive nuclei abundances, can now be obtained. These stellar abundance determinations depend critically upon atomic data. Improved laboratory transition probabilities have been recently obtained for a number of elements. These new gf values have been used to greatly refine the abundances of neutron-capture elemental abundances in the solar photosphere and in very metal-poor Galactic halo stars. The newly determined stellar abundances are surprisingly consistent with a (relative) Solar System r-process pattern, and are also consistent with abundance predictions expected from such neutron-capture nucleosynthesis.

  12. Bringing abundance into environmental politics: Constructing a Zionist network of water abundance, immigration, and colonization.

    PubMed

    Alatout, Samer

    2009-06-01

    For more than five decades, resource scarcity has been the lead story in debates over environmental politics. More importantly, and whenever environmental politics implies conflict, resource scarcity is constructed as the culprit. Abundance of resources, if at all visited in the literature, holds less importance. Resource abundance is seen, at best, as the other side of scarcity--maybe the successful conclusion of multiple interventions that may turn scarcity into abundance. This paper reinstates abundance as a politico-environmental category in its own right. Rather than relegating abundance to a second-order environmental actor that matters only on occasion, this paper foregrounds it as a crucial element in modern environmental politics. On the substantive level, and using insights from science and technology studies, especially a slightly modified actor-network framework, I describe the emergence and consolidation of a Zionist network of abundance, immigration, and colonization in Palestine between 1918 and 1948. The essential argument here is that water abundance was constructed as fact, and became a political rallying point around which a techno-political network emerged that included a great number of elements. To name just a few, the following were enrolled in the service of such a network: geologists, geophysicists, Zionist settlement experts, Zionist organizations, political and technical categories of all sorts, Palestinians as the negated others, Palestinian revolts in search of political rights, the British Mandate authorities, the hydrological system of Palestine, and the absorptive capacity of Palestine, among others. The point was to successfully articulate these disparate elements into a network that seeks opening Palestine for Jewish immigration, redefining Palestinian geography and history through Judeo-Christian Biblical narratives, and, in the process, de-legitimizing political Palestinian presence in historic Palestine.

  13. The Coronal Abundance Anomalies of M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Laming, J. Martin; Karovska, Margarita

    2012-07-01

    We analyze Chandra X-ray spectra of the M0 V+M0 V binary GJ 338. As quantified by X-ray surface flux, these are the most inactive M dwarfs ever observed with X-ray grating spectroscopy. We focus on measuring coronal abundances, in particular searching for evidence of abundance anomalies related to first ionization potential (FIP). In the solar corona and wind, low-FIP elements are overabundant, which is the so-called FIP effect. For other stars, particularly very active ones, an "inverse FIP effect" is often observed, with low-FIP elements being underabundant. For both members of the GJ 338 binary, we find evidence for a modest inverse FIP effect, consistent with expectations from a previously reported correlation between spectral type and FIP bias. This amounts to strong evidence that all M dwarfs should exhibit the inverse FIP effect phenomenon, not just the active ones. We take the first step toward modeling the inverse FIP phenomenon in M dwarfs, building on past work that has demonstrated that MHD waves coursing through coronal loops can lead to a ponderomotive force that fractionates elements in a manner consistent with the FIP effect. We demonstrate that in certain circumstances this model can also lead to an inverse FIP effect, pointing the way to more detailed modeling of M dwarf coronal abundances in the future.

  14. Interstellar Dust Models Consistent with Extinction, Emission, and Abundance Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubko, Viktor; Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.

    2004-01-01

    We present new interstellar dust models which have been derived by simultaneously fitting the far ultraviolet to near infrared extinction, the diffuse infrared emission, and, unlike previous models, the elemental abundances in dust for the diffuse interstellar medium. We found that dust models consisting of a mixture of spherical graphite and silicate grains, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, in addition to porous composite particles containing silicate, organic refractory, and water ice, provide an improved .t to the UV-to-infrared extinction and infrared emission measurements, while consuming the amounts of elements well within the uncertainties of adopted interstellar abundances, including B star abundances. These models are a signi.cant improvement over the recent Li & Draine (2001, ApJ, 554, 778) model which requires an excessive amount of silicon to be locked up in dust: 48 ppm (atoms per million of H atoms), considerably more than the solar abundance of 34 ppm or the B star abundance of 19 ppm.

  15. Carbon and nitrogen abundances determined from transition layer lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika; Mena-Werth, Jose

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of determining relative carbon, nitrogen, and silicon abundances from the emission-line fluxes in the lower transition layers between stellar chromospheres and coronae is explored. Observations for main-sequence and luminosity class IV stars with presumably solar element abundances show that for the lower transition layers Em = BT sup -gamma. For a given carbon abundance the constants gamma and B in this relation can be determined from the C II and C IV emission-line fluxes. From the N V and S IV lines, the abundances of these elements relative to carbon can be determined from their surface emission-line fluxes. Ratios of N/C abundances determined in this way for some giants and supergiants agree within the limits of errors with those determined from molecular bands. For giants, an increase in the ratio of N/C at B-V of about 0.8 is found, as expected theoretically.

  16. Bulk and rare earth abundances in the Luna 16 soil levels A and D.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillum, D. E.; Ehmann, W. D.; Wakita, H.; Schmitt, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Determination of the abundances of major, minor, and trace elements by means of sequential INAA (instrumental neutron activation analysis) in two Luna 16 soils, at levels A (about 7 cm depth) and D (about 30 cm depth). Abundances of the bulk elements in Luna 16 soils generally agree with the values reported by Vinogradov (1971). Elemental abundances of both bulk and trace elements are nearly the same for the two A and D soil levels. Overall, the chemical compositions of the two Luna 16 soils are more closely related to Apollo 11 soil 10084 than to Apollo 12 and 14 soils, with the exception of TiO2 abundances.-

  17. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  18. Twilight of Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, David

    2014-03-01

    Baby boomers enjoyed the most benign period in human history: fifty years of relative peace, cheap energy, plentiful grain supply, and a warming climate due to the highest solar activity for 8,000 years. The party is over - prepare for the twilight of abundance. David Archibald reveals the grim future the world faces on its current trajectory: massive fuel shortages, the bloodiest warfare in human history, a global starvation crisis, and a rapidly cooling planet. Archibald combines pioneering science with keen economic knowledge to predict the global disasters that could destroy civilization as we know it - disasters that are waiting just around the corner. But there's good news, too: We can have a good future if we prepare for it. Advanced, civilized countries can have a permanently high standard of living if they choose to invest in the technologies that will get them there. Archibald, a climate scientist as well as an inventor and a financial specialist, explains which scientific breakthroughs can save civilization in the coming crisis - if we can cut through the special interest opposition to these innovations and allow free markets to flourish.

  19. Trek and ECCO: Abundance measurements of ultraheavy galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Andrew J.

    2000-06-01

    Using the Trek detector, we have measured the abundances of the heaviest elements (with Z>70) in the galactic cosmic rays with sufficient charge resolution to resolve the even-Z elements. We find that the abundance of Pb compared to Pt is ~3 times lower than the value expected from the most widely-held class of models of the origin of galactic cosmic ray nuclei, that is, origination in a partially ionized medium with solar-like composition. The low abundance of Pb is, however, consistent with the interstellar gas and dust model of Meyer, Drury and Ellison, and with a source enriched in r-process material, proposed by Binns et al. A high-resolution, high-statistics measurement of the abundances of the individual actinides would distinguish between these models. This is the goal of ECCO, the Extremely Heavy Cosmic-ray Composition Observer, which we plan to deploy on the International Space Station. .

  20. IUE/IRAS studies of metal abundances and infrared cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansteenberg, M. E.; Shull, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A survey is reported of interstellar densities, abundances, and cloud structure in the Galaxy, using the IUE and IRAS satellites. Heavy element depletions are discussed along with their correlations with mean density, reddening, and galactic location. Interesting correlations between the Fe/Si abundance ratio and the infrared diffuse cirrus is also reported, which may provide information on the history and formation of grains in the galactic halo.

  1. SP_Ace: Stellar Parameters And Chemical abundances Estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.

    2018-05-01

    SP_Ace (Stellar Parameters And Chemical abundances Estimator) estimates the stellar parameters Teff, log g, [M/H], and elemental abundances. It employs 1D stellar atmosphere models in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE). The code is highly automated and suitable for analyzing the spectra of large spectroscopic surveys with low or medium spectral resolution (R = 2000-20 000). A web service for calculating these values with the software is also available.

  2. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Galactic Neutron Capture Abundance Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Melendez, Matthew; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; APOGEE Team

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of elements, as a function or age, throughout the Milky Way disk provides a key constraint for galaxy evolution models. In an effort to provide these constraints, we have conducted an investigation into the r- and s- process elemental abundances for a large sample of open clusters as part of an optical follow-up to the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. Stars were identified as cluster members by the Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey, which culls member candidates by radial velocity, metallicity, and proper motion from the observed APOGEE sample. To obtain data for neutron capture elements in these clusters, we conducted a long-term observing campaign covering three years (2013-2016) using the McDonald Observatory Otto Struve 2.1-m telescope and Sandiford Cass Echelle Spectrograph (R ~ 60,000). We present Galactic neutron-capture abundance gradients using 30+ clusters, within 6 kpc of the Sun, covering a range of ages from ~80 Myr to ~10 Gyr .

  3. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Galactic Neutron CaptureAbundance Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Melendez, Matthew; Cunha, Katia; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; APOGEE Team

    2017-06-01

    The evolution of elements, as a function or age, throughout the Milky Way disk provides a key constraint for galaxy evolution models. In an effort to provide these constraints, we have conducted an investigation into the r- and s- process elemental abundances for a large sample of open clusters as part of an optical follow-up to the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. Stars were identified as cluster members by the Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey, which culls member candidates by radial velocity, metallicity and proper motion from the observed APOGEE sample. To obtain data for neutron capture elements in these clusters, we conducted a long-term observing campaign covering three years (2013-2016) using the McDonald Observatory Otto Struve 2.1-m telescope and Sandiford Cass Echelle Spectrograph (R ~ 60,000). We present Galactic neutron capture abundance gradients using 30+ clusters, within 6 kpc of the Sun, covering a range of ages from ~80 Myr to ~10 Gyr .

  4. Solar photospheric and coronal abundances from solar energetic particle measurements. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, H.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of solar energetic particles (SEP) from 22 solar flares in the 1977 to 1982 time period are reported. SEP abundances were obtained for all elements with 3 approximately less than Z approximately less than 30 except Li, Be, B, F, Sc, v, Co and Cu for which upper limits were obtained. Statistically meaningful abundances of several rare elements (P, Cl, K, Ti, and Mn) were determined for the first time, and the average abundance of the more abundant elements were determined with improved precision.

  5. Dust formation in a galaxy with primitive abundances.

    PubMed

    Sloan, G C; Matsuura, M; Zijlstra, A A; Lagadec, E; Groenewegen, M A T; Wood, P R; Szyszka, C; Bernard-Salas, J; van Loon, J Th

    2009-01-16

    Interstellar dust plays a crucial role in the evolution of galaxies. It governs the chemistry and physics of the interstellar medium. In the local universe, dust forms primarily in the ejecta from stars, but its composition and origin in galaxies at very early times remain controversial. We report observational evidence of dust forming around a carbon star in a nearby galaxy with a low abundance of heavy elements, 25 times lower than the solar abundance. The production of dust by a carbon star in a galaxy with such primitive abundances raises the possibility that carbon stars contributed carbonaceous dust in the early universe.

  6. Oxygen abundances in halo stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessell, Michael S.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Ruan, Kui

    1991-12-01

    The present study determines the oxygen abundance for a sample of metal-poor G dwarfs by analysis of OH lines between 3080 and 3200 A and the permitted high-excitation far-red O I triple. The oxygen abundances determined from the low-excitation OH lines are up to 0.55 dex lower than those measured from the high-excitation O I lines. The abundances for the far-red O I triplet lines agree with those rederived from Abia and Rebolo (1989), and the abundances from the OH lines in dwarfs and giants are in agreement with the rederived O abundances of Barbuy (1988) and others from the forbidden resonance O I line. Because the chi = 0.1.7 eV OH lines are formed in the same layers as the majority of Fe, Ti, and other neutral metal lines used for abundance analyses, it is argued that the OH lines and the forbidden O I line yield the true oxygen abundances relative to the metals.

  7. Precision Measurements of Solar Energetic Particle Elemental Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, H.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Data from the Cosmic Ray Subsystem (CRS) aboard the Voyager 1 and 2 spaceraft were used to determined, solar energetic particle abundances or upper limits for all elements with Z 30 from a combined set of 10 solar flares during the 1977 to 1982 time period. Statistically meaningful abundances were determined for several rare elements including P, C1, K, Ti and Mn, while the precision of the mean abundances for the more abundant elements was proved. When compared to solar photospheric spectroscopic abundances, these new SEP abundances more clearly exhibit the step-function dependence on first ionization potential previously reported.

  8. Abundance ratios in dwarf elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şen, Ş.; Peletier, R. F.; Boselli, A.; den Brok, M.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Hensler, G.; Janz, J.; Laurikainen, E.; Lisker, T.; Mentz, J. J.; Paudel, S.; Salo, H.; Sybilska, A.; Toloba, E.; van de Ven, G.; Vazdekis, A.; Yesilyaprak, C.

    2018-04-01

    We determine abundance ratios of 37 dwarf ellipticals (dEs) in the nearby Virgo cluster. This sample is representative of the early-type population of galaxies in the absolute magnitude range -19.0 < Mr < -16.0. We analyse their absorption line-strength indices by means of index-index diagrams and scaling relations and use the stellar population models to interpret them. We present ages, metallicities, and abundance ratios obtained from these dEs within an aperture size of Re/8. We calculate [Na/Fe] from NaD, [Ca/Fe] from Ca4227, and [Mg/Fe] from Mgb. We find that [Na/Fe] is underabundant with respect to solar, whereas [Mg/Fe] is around solar. This is exactly opposite to what is found for giant ellipticals, but follows the trend with metallicity found previously for the Fornax dwarf NGC 1396. We discuss possible formation scenarios that can result in such elemental abundance patterns, and we speculate that dEs have disc-like star formation history (SFH) favouring them to originate from late-type dwarfs or small spirals. Na-yields appear to be very metal-dependent, in agreement with studies of giant ellipticals, probably due to the large dependence on the neutron-excess in stars. We conclude that dEs have undergone a considerable amount of chemical evolution, they are therefore not uniformly old, but have extended SFH, similar to many of the Local Group galaxies.

  9. APOGEE Chemical Abundances of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselquist, Sten; Shetrone, Matthew; Smith, Verne; Holtzman, Jon; McWilliam, Andrew; Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Beers, Timothy C.; Majewski, Steven R.; Nidever, David L.; Tang, Baitian; Tissera, Patricia B.; Fernández Alvar, Emma; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres; Anguiano, Borja; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Carigi, Leticia; Delgado Inglada, Gloria; Frinchaboy, Peter; García-Hernández, D. A.; Geisler, Doug; Minniti, Dante; Placco, Vinicius M.; Schultheis, Mathias; Sobeck, Jennifer; Villanova, Sandro

    2017-08-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment provides the opportunity of measuring elemental abundances for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni in vast numbers of stars. We analyze thechemical-abundance patterns of these elements for 158 red giant stars belonging to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr). This is the largest sample of Sgr stars with detailed chemical abundances, and it is the first time that C, N, P, K, V, Cr, Co, and Ni have been studied at high resolution in this galaxy. We find that the Sgr stars with [Fe/H] ≳ -0.8 are deficient in all elemental abundance ratios (expressed as [X/Fe]) relative to the Milky Way, suggesting that the Sgr stars observed today were formed from gas that was less enriched by Type II SNe than stars formed in the Milky Way. By examining the relative deficiencies of the hydrostatic (O, Na, Mg, and Al) and explosive (Si, P, K, and Mn) elements, our analysis supports the argument that previous generations of Sgr stars were formed with a top-light initial mass function, one lacking the most massive stars that would normally pollute the interstellar medium with the hydrostatic elements. We use a simple chemical-evolution model, flexCE, to further support our claim and conclude that recent stellar generations of Fornax and the Large Magellanic Cloud could also have formed according to a top-light initial mass function.

  10. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-01-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  11. Isotopic compositions of the elements, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; De Laeter, J. R.; De Bievre, P.; Hidaka, H.; Peiser, H.S.; Rosman, K.J.R.; Taylor, P.D.P.

    2005-01-01

    The Commission on Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry completed its last review of the isotopic compositions of the elements as determined by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry in 2001. That review involved a critical evaluation of the published literature, element by element, and forms the basis of the table of the isotopic compositions of the elements (TICE) presented here. For each element, TICE includes evaluated data from the “best measurement” of the isotope abundances in a single sample, along with a set of representative isotope abundances and uncertainties that accommodate known variations in normal terrestrial materials. The representative isotope abundances and uncertainties generally are consistent with the standard atomic weight of the element Ar(E)">Ar(E)Ar(E) and its uncertainty U[Ar(E)]">U[Ar(E)]U[Ar(E)] recommended by CAWIA in 2001.

  12. Isotopic Compositions of the Elements, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhlke, J. K.; de Laeter, J. R.; De Bièvre, P.; Hidaka, H.; Peiser, H. S.; Rosman, K. J. R.; Taylor, P. D. P.

    2005-03-01

    The Commission on Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry completed its last review of the isotopic compositions of the elements as determined by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry in 2001. That review involved a critical evaluation of the published literature, element by element, and forms the basis of the table of the isotopic compositions of the elements (TICE) presented here. For each element, TICE includes evaluated data from the "best measurement" of the isotope abundances in a single sample, along with a set of representative isotope abundances and uncertainties that accommodate known variations in normal terrestrial materials. The representative isotope abundances and uncertainties generally are consistent with the standard atomic weight of the element Ar(E) and its uncertainty U[Ar(E)] recommended by CAWIA in 2001.

  13. Enhanced Abundances in Spiral Galaxies of the Pegasus I Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Paul; Shields, Gregory A.; Blanc, Guillermo A.

    2012-03-01

    We study the influence of cluster environment on the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster. We determine the gas-phase heavy element abundances of six galaxies in Pegasus derived from H II region spectra obtained from integral-field spectroscopy. These abundances are analyzed in the context of Virgo, whose spirals are known to show increasing interstellar metallicity as a function of H I deficiency. The galaxies in the Pegasus cluster, despite its lower density and velocity dispersion, also display gas loss due to interstellar-medium-intracluster-medium interaction, albeit to a lesser degree. Based on the abundances of three H I deficient spirals and two H I normal spirals, we observe a heavy element abundance offset of +0.13 ± 0.07 dex for the H I deficient galaxies. This abundance differential is consistent with the differential observed in Virgo for galaxies with a similar H I deficiency, and we observe a correlation between log (O/H) and the H I deficiency parameter DEF for the two clusters analyzed together. Our results suggest that similar environmental mechanisms are driving the heavy element enhancement in both clusters.

  14. Galactic Abundance Patterns via Peimbert Types I & II Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milingo, J. B.; Barnes, K. L.; Kwitter, K. B.; Souza, S. P.; Henry, R. B. C.; Skinner, J. N.

    2005-12-01

    Planetary Nebulae (PNe) are well known fonts of information about both stellar evolution and galactic chemical evolution. Abundance patterns in PNe are used to note signatures and constraints of nuclear processing, and as tracers of the distribution of metals throughout galaxies. In this poster abundance gradients and heavy element ratios are presented based upon newly acquired spectrophotometry of a sample of Galactic Peimbert Type I PNe. This new data set is extracted from spectra that extend from λ 3600 - 9600Å allowing the use of [S III] features at λ 9069 and 9532Å. Since a significant portion of S in PNe resides in S+2 and higher ionization stages, including these features improves the extrapolation from observed ion abundances to total element abundance. An alternate metallicity tracer, Sulfur is precluded from enhancement and depletion across the range of PNe progenitor masses. Its stability in intermediate mass stars makes it a useful tool to probe the natal conditions as well as the evolution of PNe progenitors. This is a continuation of our Type II PNe work, the impetus being to compile a relatively large set of line strengths and abundances with internally consistent observation, reduction, calibration, and abundance determination, minimizing systematic affects that come from compiling various data sets. This research is supported by the AAS Small Research Grants program, the Franklin & Marshall Committee on Grants, and NSF grant AST-0307118.

  15. Abundances of sulfur in the Milky Way Disk from Peimbert Type II planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milingo, Jacquelynne Brenda

    2000-08-01

    Sulfur abundance gradients and heavy element ratios for the Milky Way Disk are constructed based upon newly acquired spectrophotometry of Type II planetary nebulae (PN). These spectra extend from 3600-9600 angstroms allowing us to use the [SIII] 9069 and 9532 angstrom lines to improve upon earlier sulfur abundance estimates. Considering a significant portion of sulfur in PN exists in the S(+2) ionization stage (and higher) this method should allow us to extrapolate more reliable total element abundance from ionic abundances. Given the progenitor mass and location of Type II PN (close to the Galactic disk), this sample of objects is free of nucleosynthetic self-contamination and thus their S abundances in particular are expected to reflect levels of these elements in the interstellar medium at the time of PN progenitor formation. These sulfur abundances provide constraints for studying various aspects of GCE such as massive star yields and the distribution of S across the Milky Way disk.

  16. Project VeSElkA: results of abundance analysis for HD 53929 and HD 63975

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndiaye, M. L.; LeBlanc, F.; Khalack, V.

    2018-03-01

    Project VeSElkA (Vertical Stratification of Element Abundances) has been initiated with the aim to detect and study the vertical stratification of element abundances in the atmosphere of chemically peculiar stars. Abundance stratification occurs in hydrodynamically stable stellar atmospheres due to the migration of the elements caused by atomic diffusion. Two HgMn stars, HD 53929 and HD 63975 were selected from the VeSElkA sample and analysed with the aim to detect some abundance peculiarities employing the ZEEMAN2 code. We present the results of abundance analysis of HD 53929 and HD 63975 observed recently with the spectropolarimeter ESPaDOnS at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Evidence of phosphorus vertical stratification was detected in the atmosphere of these two stars. In both cases, phosphorus abundance increases strongly towards the superficial layers. The strong overabundance of Mn found in stellar atmosphere of both stars confirms that they are HgMn type stars.

  17. Carbon and sulfur distributions and abundances in lunar fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Moore, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    Total sulfur abundances have been determined for 20 Apollo 14, 15, and 16 soil samples and one Apollo 14 breccia. Sulfur concentrations range from 474 to 844 microg S/g. Volatilization experiments on selected samples have been carried out using step-wise heating. Sample residues have been analyzed for their total carbon and sulfur abundances to establish the material balance in lunar fines for these two elements. Volatilization experiments have established that between 31 to 54 microg C/g remains in soils which have been heated at 1100 C for 24 hours under vacuum. The residual carbon is believed to be indigenous lunar carbon whereas all forms of carbon lost from samples below 1100 C is extralunar carbon. Total carbon and sulfur abundances taken from the literature have been used to show the depletion of volatile elements with increasing grade for the Apollo 14 breccias.

  18. NEON AND OXYGEN ABUNDANCES AND ABUNDANCE RATIO IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Testa, P., E-mail: elandi@umich.edu

    2015-02-20

    In this work we determine the Ne/O abundance ratio from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) off-disk observations of quiescent streamers over the 1996-2008 period. We find that the Ne/O ratio is approximately constant over solar cycle 23 from 1996 to 2005, at a value of 0.099 ± 0.017; this value is lower than the transition region determinations from the quiet Sun used to infer the neon photospheric abundance from the oxygen photospheric abundance. Also, the Ne/O ratio we determined from SUMER is in excellent agreement with in situ determinations from ACE/SWICS. In 2005-2008, the Ne/O abundancemore » ratio increased with time and reached 0.25 ± 0.05, following the same trend found in the slowest wind analyzed by ACE/SWICS. Further, we measure the absolute abundance in the corona for both oxygen and neon from the data set of 1996 November 22, obtaining A {sub o} = 8.99 ± 0.04 and A {sub Ne} = 7.92 ± 0.03, and we find that both elements are affected by the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, with oxygen being enhanced by a factor of 1.4-2.1 over its photospheric abundance, and neon being changed by a factor of 0.75-1.20. We conclude that the Ne/O ratio is not constant in the solar atmosphere, both in time and at different heights, and that it cannot be reliably used to infer the neon abundance in the photosphere. Also, we argue that the FIP effect was less effective during the minimum of solar cycle 24, and that the Ne/O = 0.25 ± 0.05 value measured at that time is closer to the true photospheric value, leading to a neon photospheric abundance larger than assumed by ≈40%. We discuss the implications of these results for the solar abundance problem, for the FIP effect, and for the identification of the source regions of the solar wind.« less

  19. Chemical Compositions and Abundance Anomalies in Stellar Coronae ADP 99

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Progress has been made using both EUVE (Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer) and ASCA (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics) data and a new postdoctoral scientist has now been hired. Stars studied to date include YY Gem (dMe binary), xi Boo A (intermediate activity G8 V), xi UMa (more active G quadruple system) HR1099 (K1 IV + G5 V) RS CVn-like, AU Mic (dMe). In addition to a paper that concentrated on abundancies in HR1099, a paper was recently submitted on the coronal abundances of AR(tilde)Lac that revealed an interesting pattern of overabundances of very low FIP elements (Al and Ca) compared to the low FIP elements Si, Mg and Fe. Two papers are nearing completion on methods of analysis and on the abundances in the corona of AU(tilde)Mic. Additionally, two invited conference proceedings papers are being published on this work. The main conclusion of the study to date is that our existing ideas of coronal abundance anomalies need complete revision. The solar-like FIP effect is replaced by a pattern than appears to enhance high FIP elements rather than low FIP elements in very active stars. The archival studies we are undertaking now are revealing some key details of these patterns, and are beginning to map out the anomalies as a function of spectral type, a key goal of this study.

  20. BOND: A quantum of solace for nebular abundance determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vale Asari, N.; Stasińska, G.; Morisset, C.; Cid Fernandes, R.

    2017-11-01

    The abundances of chemical elements other than hydrogen and helium in a galaxy are the fossil record of its star formation history. Empirical relations such as mass-metallicity relation are thus seen as guides for studies on the history and chemical evolution of galaxies. Those relations usually rely on nebular metallicities measured with strong-line methods, which assume that H II regions are a one- (or at most two-) parameter family where the oxygen abundance is the driving quantity. Nature is however much more complex than that, and metallicities from strong lines may be strongly biased. We have developed the method BOND (Bayesian Oxygen and Nitrogen abundance Determinations) to simultaneously derive oxygen and nitrogen abundances in giant H II regions by comparing strong and semi-strong observed emission lines to a carefully-defined, finely-meshed grid of photoionization models. Our code and results are public and available at http://bond.ufsc.br.

  1. Chemical abundances and kinematics of TYC 5619-109-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, C. B.; Smith, V. V.; Drake, N. A.; Roig, F.; Hasselquist, S.; Cunha, K.; Jilinski, E.

    2017-07-01

    Previous determinations of chemical abundances of the metal-poor red giant TYC 5619-109-1, derived via high-resolution near-infrared spectra from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey, indicate that this star is strongly enriched in the elements N and Al. Here, we obtain and analyse high-resolution optical spectra of TYC 5619-109-1 to verify these large N and Al overabundances and to measure abundances of a wider range of chemical elements. Our analysis confirms the N- and Al-rich nature of this star, and shows that the abundances of the s-process elements are also strongly enhanced, particularly in the heavy second s-process peak elements (Ba, La, Ce, Nd). Lighter s-process elements (Y, Zr) show smaller overabundances, and the ratio of the light-to-heavy s-process elements is consistent with the 13C(α, n)16O neutron source operating in a low-metallicity environment. The lack of Tc I lines and the abundance of Nb compared to Zr indicate that this red giant is probably not a thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) star. Mass transfer from a former s-process-rich TP-AGB companion may produce the observed overabundances, but our radial velocity analysis provides no evidence that TYC 5619-109-1 is a binary with a white dwarf companion. We suggest that TYC 5619-109-1 formed from gas already strongly enriched in s-process elements, as found in many dwarf galaxies and globular clusters. A dynamical analysis reveals that there is only a small probability that TYC 5619-109-1 is an escaped member of a globular cluster, and in this case the most likely candidate would be ω Cen.

  2. Robust Abundance Estimation in Animal Abundance Surveys with Imperfect Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of animal abundance are central to the conservation and management of living natural resources. However, detection uncertainty complicates the sampling process of many species. One sampling method employed to deal with this problem is depletion (or removal) surveys in whi...

  3. Improved Yttrium and Zirconium Abundances in Metal-Poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violante, Renata; Biemont, E.; Cowan, J. J.; Sneden, C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We present new abundances of the lighter n-capture elements, Yttrium (Z=39) and Zirconium (Z=40) in the very metal poor, r-process rich stars BD+17 3248 and HD 221170. Very accurate abundances were obtained by use of the new transition probabilities for Y II published by Biémont et al. 2011, and Zr II by Malcheva et al. 2006, and by expanding the number of transitions employed for each element. For example, in BD+17 3248, we find log ɛπσιλον=-0.03 +/- 0.03 (σιγμα=0.15, from 23 lines) for Y II. As for Zr II, log ɛπσιλον = 0.65 +/- 0.03 (σɛγμα = 0.1, from 13 lines). The resulting abundance ratio is log ɛπσιλον [Y/Zr] = -0.68 +/- 0.05. The results for HD 221170 are in accord with those of BD+17 3248. The quantity of lines used to form the abundance means has increased significantly since the original studies of these stars, resulting in more trustworthy abundances. These observed abundance ratios are in agreement with an r-process-only value predicted from stellar models, but is under-abundant compared to an empirical model derived from direct analyses of meteoritic material. This ambiguity should stimulate further nucleosynthetic analysis to explain this abundance ratio. We would like to extend our gratitude to NSF grant AST-0908978 and the University of Texas Astronomy Department Rex G. Baker, Jr. Endowment for their financial support in this project.

  4. APOGEE Chemical Abundances of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselquist, Sten; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Smith, Verne V.; Holtzman, Jon A.; McWilliam, Andrew; APOGEE Team

    2018-06-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment provides the opportunity of measuring elemental abundances for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni in vast numbers of stars. We analyze the chemical-abundance patterns of these elements for 158 red giant stars belonging to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr). This is the largest sample of Sgr stars with detailed chemical abundances, and it is the first time that C, N, P, K, V, Cr, Co, and Ni have been studied at high resolution in this galaxy. We find that the Sgr stars with [Fe/H] > -0.8 are deficient in all elemental abundance ratios (expressed as [X/Fe]) relative to the Milky Way, suggesting that the Sgr stars observed today were formed from gas that was less enriched by Type II SNe than stars formed in the Milky Way. By examining the relative deficiencies of the hydrostatic (O, Na, Mg, and Al) and explosive (Si, P, K, and Mn) elements, our analysis supports the argument that previous generations of Sgr stars were formed with a top-light initial mass function, one lacking the most massive stars that would normally pollute the interstellar medium with the hydrostatic elements. We use a simple chemical-evolution model, flexCE, to further support our claim and conclude that recent stellar generations of Fornax and the Large Magellanic Cloud could also have formed according to a top-light initial mass function. We then exploit the unique chemical abundance patters of the Sgr core to trace stars belonging to the Sgr tidal streams elsewhere in the Milky Way.

  5. Abundances of sodium, sulfur, and potassium in lunar volcanic glasses: Evidence for volatile loss during eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, J. W.; Mcguire, J.

    1992-01-01

    Six varieties of lunar volcanic glass are known to occur within the Apollo 17 sample collection. Investigations have shown that 25 volatile elements are known to be concentrated on the exterior surfaces of individual volcanic glass spheres. Since bulk analyses of volcanic glass provide an integrated abundance of an element on and with the glass spherules, other methods must be relied on to determine the interior abundance of an element. The interior abundance of an element with a volcanic glass sphere establishes the abundance of that element in the melt at the time of quench. The current study is part of a comprehensive attempt to measure the abundance of three volatile elements (Na, S, and K) within representative spheres of the 25 varieties of lunar volcanic glass currently known to exist at the Apollo landing sites. Comparison of the measured abundances of these elements within the interiors of individual glasses with bulk analyses and crystalline mare basalts will furnish new constraints on the geochemical behavior of volatile elements during lunar mare volcanism.

  6. Trace element geochemistry of Archean volcanic rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, B.-M.; Shih, C.-Y.; Murthy, V. R.

    1974-01-01

    The K, Rb, Sr, Ba and rare-earth-element contents of some Archean volcanic rocks from the Vermilion greenstone belt, northeast Minnesota, were determined by the isotopic dilution method. The characteristics of trace element abundances, supported by the field occurrences and major element chemistry, suggest that these volcanic rocks were formed in an ancient island arc system.

  7. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T.J.; Podosek, F.A.; Johnson, M.L.; Burnett, D.S.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of 244Pu fission Xe, U, Th, and light REE (LREE) abundances, along with modal petrographic determinations of phosphate abundances, were carried out on equilibrated ordinary chondrites in order to define better the solar system Pu abundance and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. Our data permit comparison of the directly measured Pu/ U ratio with that determined indirectly as (Pu/Nd) ?? (Nd/U) assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. Except for Guaren??a, and perhaps H chondrites in general, Pu concentrations are similar to that determined previously for St. Se??verin, although less precise because of higher trapped Xe contents. Trapped 130Xe 136Xe ratios appear to vary from meteorite to meteorite, but, relative to AVCC, all are similar in the sense of having less of the interstellar heavy Xe found in carbonaceous chondrite acid residues. The Pu/U and Pu/Nd ratios are consistent with previous data for St. Se??verin, but both tend to be slightly higher than those inferred from previous data on Angra dos Reis. Although significant variations exist, the distribution of our Th/U ratios, along with other precise isotope dilution data for ordinary chondrites, is rather symmetric about the CI chondrite value; however, actinide/(LREE) ratios are systematically lower than the CI value. Variations in actinide or LREE absolute and relative abundances are interpreted as reflecting differences in the proportions and/or compositions of more primitive components (chondrules and CAI materials?) incorporated into different regions of the ordinary chondrite parent bodies. The observed variations of Th/U, Nd/U, or Ce/U suggest that measurements of Pu/U on any single equilibrated ordinary chondrite specimen, such as St. Se??verin, should statistically be within ??20-30% of the average solar system value, although it is also clear that anomalous samples exist. ?? 1990.

  8. Abundance estimation and conservation biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; MacKenzie, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001). The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959) and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965) open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992), and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993). However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001). The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004) is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004) emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004) also suggest that our attention

  9. Genomic Repeat Abundances Contain Phylogenetic Signal

    PubMed Central

    Dodsworth, Steven; Chase, Mark W.; Kelly, Laura J.; Leitch, Ilia J.; Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Piednoël, Mathieu; Weiss-Schneeweiss, Hanna; Leitch, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of genomic information, particularly repetitive elements, is usually ignored when researchers are using next-generation sequencing. Here we demonstrate the usefulness of this repetitive fraction in phylogenetic analyses, utilizing comparative graph-based clustering of next-generation sequence reads, which results in abundance estimates of different classes of genomic repeats. Phylogenetic trees are then inferred based on the genome-wide abundance of different repeat types treated as continuously varying characters; such repeats are scattered across chromosomes and in angiosperms can constitute a majority of nuclear genomic DNA. In six diverse examples, five angiosperms and one insect, this method provides generally well-supported relationships at interspecific and intergeneric levels that agree with results from more standard phylogenetic analyses of commonly used markers. We propose that this methodology may prove especially useful in groups where there is little genetic differentiation in standard phylogenetic markers. At the same time as providing data for phylogenetic inference, this method additionally yields a wealth of data for comparative studies of genome evolution. PMID:25261464

  10. Chemical Abundance Analysis of Moving Group W11450 (Latham 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Julia E.; Martens, Kylee; Frinchaboy, Peter M.

    2016-12-01

    We present elemental abundances for all seven stars in Moving Group W11450 (Latham 1) to determine if they may be chemically related. These stars appear to be both spatially and kinematically related, but no spectroscopic abundance analysis exists in literature. Abundances for eight elements were derived via equivalent width analyses of high-resolution (R ˜ 60,000), high-signal-to-noise ratio (< {{S}}/{{N}}> ˜ 100) spectra obtained with the Otto Struve 2.1 m telescope and the Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph at McDonald Observatory. The large star-to-star scatter in metallicity, -0.55 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤slant 0.06 dex (σ = 0.25), implies these stars were not produced from the same chemically homogeneous molecular cloud, and are therefore not part of a remnant or open cluster as previously proposed. Prior to this analysis, it was suggested that two stars in the group, W11449 and W11450, are possible wide binaries. The candidate wide binary pair show similar chemical abundance patterns with not only iron but with other elements analyzed in this study, suggesting the proposed connection between these two stars may be real.

  11. Abundance analysis of roAp stars. IV. HD24712

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikova, T. A.; Landstreet, J. D.; Gelbmann, M. J.; Bolgova, G. T.; Tsymbal, V. V.; Weiss, W. W.

    1997-11-01

    We present the first abundance analysis of the rapidly oscillating chemically peculiar star HD24712, and determine a T_eff,=7250K, log {g},=4.3, and xi_t ,=1kms(-1) . Microturbulence seems to be entirely simulated by a magnetic field with a polar field strength of 4.4kG and of dipolar structure, both of which are supported by our polarimetric observations. Rotation of HD24712 and a spotty surface distribution of the elements result in different mean abundances for different (magnetic) phases. Our results do not support the hypothesis of a monotonic correlation between the amplitude of abundance variations and the atomic number Z, and we present arguments in favour of one of the rotation periods (Prot=12\\fd 4610) discussed in the literature. Rare earth elements are the most overabundant elements relative to the sun, and they have the largest abundance amplitude during a rotation cycle; only Mg has a larger amplitude. For HD24712 we find a clear overabundance of Co while most of the other iron peak elements are underabundant. A comparison of the abundance pattern with the other three roAp stars analyzed so far by us concludes the paper. A systematic difference between surface gravities obtained from spectroscopy and from both asteroseismology and evolutionary tracks is found for the roAp stars HD 24712, alpha Cir, and gamma Equ. Based on observations obtained with the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope, operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Centre Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique de France, and the University of Hawaii, and on observations obtained at CARSO, Las Campanas, Chile

  12. Energetic-particle abundances in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Cane, H. V.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The abundances of elements and of He-3 in 90 solar electron events have been examined. It is found that the events fall into two distinct groups based upon their F/C ratio. Events in the F-rich group frequently have high He-3/He-4 ratios and are associated with type III and type V radio bursts in the parent flare. The F-poor events are associated with type IV bursts. These results on individual events support the conclusions of earlier work done with daily-averaged abundances.

  13. Echelle Spectroscopy and Abundances in Ruprecht 106 and ARP 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jeffery A.; Wallerstein, George; Zucker, Daniel

    1996-04-01

    This is a preliminary report on abundances for two red giants each in the young globular clusters Ruprecht 106 and Pal 12. For Rup 106, we find [Fe/H] = -1.50 but almost all other elements are more deficient than iron, in reverse of the pattern in most metal-poor stars; the exception is oxygen, with [O/Fe] =~ 0.0. Pal 12 is less depleted, with [Fe/H] = -1.0, and has more nearly solar abundance ratios; we have no data on oxygen in Pal 12.

  14. Abundance of nitrogen in QSOs

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, G.A.

    1976-03-01

    Models of photoionized QSO emission-line regions show that measurements of O iii/N iv/C iv or N iii/C iii can yield the C/N/O ratios to an accuracy of a factor 2 or better. The N iii/C iii intensity ratios observed for the QSO PKS 1756+237 (z=1.72) implies a N/C abundance ratio 5 times larger than the solar value. This is comparable with the nitrogen overabundance in the nuclei of nearby galaxies, and it points to advanced chemical evolution in this QSO, with Zapproximately-greater-thanZ/sub sun/. Such a large abundance of nitrogen appears to be exceptional; composite spectra indicate that most QSOs havemore » (N/O) approximately one-fourth to one-half the solar value. (AIP)« less

  15. Abundances, Ionization States, Temperatures, and FIP in Solar Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2018-04-01

    The relative abundances of chemical elements and isotopes have been our most effective tool in identifying and understanding the physical processes that control populations of energetic particles. The early surprise in solar energetic particles (SEPs) was 1000-fold enhancements in {}3He/{}4He from resonant wave-particle interactions in the small "impulsive" SEP events that emit electron beams that produce type III radio bursts. Further studies found enhancements in Fe/O, then extreme enhancements in element abundances that increase with mass-to-charge ratio A/Q, rising by a factor of 1000 from He to Au or Pb arising in magnetic reconnection regions on open field lines in solar jets. In contrast, in the largest SEP events, the "gradual" events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by fast, wide coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Averaging many events provides a measure of solar coronal abundances, but A/Q-dependent scattering during transport causes variations with time; thus if Fe scatters less than O, Fe/O is enhanced early and depleted later. To complicate matters, shock waves often reaccelerate impulsive suprathermal ions left over or trapped above active regions that have spawned many impulsive events. Direct measurements of ionization states Q show coronal temperatures of 1-2 MK for most gradual events, but impulsive events often show stripping by matter traversal after acceleration. Direct measurements of Q are difficult and often unavailable. Since both impulsive and gradual SEP events have abundance enhancements that vary as powers of A/Q, we can use abundances to deduce the probable Q-values and the source plasma temperatures during acceleration, ≈3 MK for impulsive SEPs. This new technique also allows multiple spacecraft to measure temperature variations across the face of a shock wave, measurements otherwise unavailable and provides a new understanding of abundance variations in the element He. Comparing coronal abundances from SEPs

  16. Chlorine Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D.D.; Garrison, D.H.; Park, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine measurements made in martian surface rocks by robotic spacecraft typically give Chlorine (Cl) abundances of approximately 0.1-0.8%. In contrast, Cl abundances in martian meteorites appear lower, although data is limited, and martian nakhlites were also subjected to Cl contamination by Mars surface brines. Chlorine abundances reported by one lab for whole rock (WR) samples of Shergotty, ALH77005, and EET79001 range 108-14 ppm, whereas Cl in nakhlites range 73-1900 ppm. Measurements of Cl in various martian weathering phases of nakhlites varied 0.04-4.7% and reveal significant concentration of Cl by martian brines Martian meteorites contain much lower Chlorine than those measured in martian surface rocks and give further confirmation that Cl in these surface rocks was introduced by brines and weathering. It has been argued that Cl is twice as effective as water in lowering the melting point and promoting melting at shallower martian depths, and that significant Cl in the shergottite source region would negate any need for significant water. However, this conclusion was based on experiments that utilized Cl concentrations more analogous to martian surface rocks than to shergottite meteorites, and may not be applicable to shergottites.

  17. Spectroscopic abundance analyses of the 3He stars HD 185330 and 3 Cen A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadakane, Kozo; Nishimura, Masayoshi

    2018-06-01

    Abundances of 21 elements in two 3He stars, HD 185330 and 3 Cen A, have been analysed relative to the well-studied sharp-lined B3 V star ι Her. Six elements (P, Ti, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Br) are over-abundant in these two peculiar stars, while six elements (C, O, Mg, Al, S, and Cl) are under-abundant. Absorption lines of the two rarely observed heavy elements Br II and Kr II are detected in both stars and these elements are both over-abundant. The centroid wavelengths of the Ca II infrared triplet lines in these stars are redshifted relative to those lines in ι Her and the presence of heavy isotopes of Ca (mass number 44-46) in these two stars is confirmed. In spite of these similarities, there are several remarkable differences in abundance pattern between these two stars. N is under-abundant in HD 185330, as in many Hg-Mn stars, while it is significantly over-abundant in 3 Cen A. P and Ga are both over-abundant in 3 Cen A, while only P is over-abundant and no trace of absorption line of Ga II can be found in HD 185330. Large over-abundances of Kr and Xe are found in both stars, while the abundance ratio Kr/Xe is significantly different between them (-1.4 dex in HD 185330 and +1.2 dex in 3 Cen A). Some physical explanations are needed to account for these qualitative differences.

  18. Spectroscopic abundance analyses of the 3He stars HD 185330 and 3 Cen A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadakane, Kozo; Nishimura, Masayoshi

    2018-04-01

    Abundances of 21 elements in two 3He stars, HD 185330 and 3 Cen A, have been analysed relative to the well-studied sharp-lined B3 V star ι Her. Six elements (P, Ti, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Br) are over-abundant in these two peculiar stars, while six elements (C, O, Mg, Al, S, and Cl) are under-abundant. Absorption lines of the two rarely observed heavy elements Br II and Kr II are detected in both stars and these elements are both over-abundant. The centroid wavelengths of the Ca II infrared triplet lines in these stars are redshifted relative to those lines in ι Her and the presence of heavy isotopes of Ca (mass number 44-46) in these two stars is confirmed. In spite of these similarities, there are several remarkable differences in abundance pattern between these two stars. N is under-abundant in HD 185330, as in many Hg-Mn stars, while it is significantly over-abundant in 3 Cen A. P and Ga are both over-abundant in 3 Cen A, while only P is over-abundant and no trace of absorption line of Ga II can be found in HD 185330. Large over-abundances of Kr and Xe are found in both stars, while the abundance ratio Kr/Xe is significantly different between them (-1.4 dex in HD 185330 and +1.2 dex in 3 Cen A). Some physical explanations are needed to account for these qualitative differences.

  19. Solar Flare Abundances of Potassium, Argon, and Sulphur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor); Phillips, K. J. H.; Sylwester, J.; Sylwester, B.; Landi, E.

    2003-01-01

    The absolute coronal abundances of potassium has been determined for the first time from X-ray solar flare line and continuous spectra together with absolute and relative abundances of Ar and S. Potassium is of importance in the continuing debate concerning the nature of the coronal/photospheric element abundance ratios which are widely considered to depend on first ionization potential since it has the lowest FIP of any common element in the Sun. The measurements were obtained with the RESIK crystal spectrometer on the Coronas-F spacecraft. A differential emission measure DEM = const. x exp (-(beta)T(sub e) was found to be the most consistent with the data out of three models considered. We find that the coronal ratio [K/H] = 3.7 x 10(exp - 7), a factor 3 times photospheric, in agreement with other observations using line-to-line ratios. Our measured value for the coronal ratio [Ar/H] = 1.5 x 10(exp -6) is significantly less than photospheric, indicating that there is a slight depletion of this high-FIP element in the corona. For S (an intermediate-FIP element) we obtained [S/H] = 2.2 x 10(exp - 5), approximately the same as in previous work.

  20. Silicon to iron abundances in solar cosmic rays and in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vahia, M. N.; Biswas, S.; Durgaprasad, N.

    1985-01-01

    Differential spectra of even charged nuclei between Si and Fe in the August 4, 1972 event were made in the energy region of 10 to 40 MeV/n-1 using rocket borne plastic detectors. The resulting relative abundances of elements and low energy enhancements are obtained and compared with spectroscopically determined photospheric abundances. The implications of the relative abundances on the acceleration mechanisms is discussed.

  1. Energetic particle abundances in solar electron events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Cane, H. V.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive search of the ISEE 3 energetic particle data for solar electron events with associated increases in elements with atomic number Z = 6 or greater are reported. A sample of 90 such events was obtained. The events support earlier evidence of a bimodal distribution in Fe/O or, more clearly, in Fe/C. Most of the electron events belong to the group that is Fe-rich in comparison with the coronal abundance. The Fe-rich events are frequently also He-3-rich and are associated with type III and type V radio bursts and impulsive solar flares. Fe-poor events are associated with type IV bursts and with interplanetary shocks. With some exceptions, event-to-event enhancements in the heavier elements vary smoothly with Z and with Fe/C. In fact, these variations extend across the full range of events despite inferred differences in acceleration mechanism. The origin of source material in all events appears to be coronal and not photospheric.

  2. Dust, Abundances, and the Evolution of Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Charles; Bode, Michael; Evans, Anuerin; Geballe, Thomas; Gehrz, Robert; Helton, Andrew; Krautter, Joachim; Lynch, David; Ness, Jan-Uwe; Rudy, Richard; Schwarz, Greg; Shore, Steve; Starrfield, Sumner; Truran, James; Vanlandingham, Karen; Wagner, R. Mark

    2008-03-01

    Evolved stars are the engines of energy production and chemical evolution in our Universe. They deposit radiative and mechanical energy into their environments. They enrich the ambient ISM with elements synthesized in their interiors and dust grains condensed in their atmospheres. Classical novae (CNe) contribute to this cycle of chemical enrichment through explosive nucleosynthesis and the violent ejection of material dredged from the white dwarf progenitor and mixed with the accreted surface layers. Our capstone study of 10 CNe will provide an ensemble of objects, well-populated in CNe parameter space (fast, slow, 'coronal', dusty) for detailed photoionization modeling and analysis. CNe are laboratories in which several poorly-understood astrophysical processes (e.g., mass transfer, thermonuclear runaway, optically thick winds, common envelope evolution, molecule and grain formation, coronal emission) may be observed. With Spitzer's unique wavelength coverage and point-source sensitivity we can: (i) investigate the in situ formation, astromineralogy, and processing of nova dust, (ii) determine the ejecta elemental abundances resulting from thermonuclear runaway, (iii) constrain the correlation of ejecta mass with progenitor type, (iv) measure the bolometric luminosity of the outburst, and (v) characterize the kinematics and structure of the ejected envelopes. Extensive ground-based and space-based (Chandra, Swift, XMM-Newton) programs led by team CoIs will complement Spitzer CNe observations.

  3. APOGEE Chemical Abundances of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselquist, Sten; Holtzman, Jon; Shetrone, Matthew

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment provides the opportunity of measuring elemental abundances for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni in vast numbers of stars. We analyze thechemical-abundance patterns of these elements for 158 red giant stars belonging to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr). This is the largest sample of Sgr stars with detailed chemical abundances, and it is the first time that C, N, P, K, V, Cr, Co, and Ni have been studied at high resolution in this galaxy. We find that the Sgr stars withmore » [Fe/H] ≳ −0.8 are deficient in all elemental abundance ratios (expressed as [X/Fe]) relative to the Milky Way, suggesting that the Sgr stars observed today were formed from gas that was less enriched by Type II SNe than stars formed in the Milky Way. By examining the relative deficiencies of the hydrostatic (O, Na, Mg, and Al) and explosive (Si, P, K, and Mn) elements, our analysis supports the argument that previous generations of Sgr stars were formed with a top-light initial mass function, one lacking the most massive stars that would normally pollute the interstellar medium with the hydrostatic elements. We use a simple chemical-evolution model, flexCE, to further support our claim and conclude that recent stellar generations of Fornax and the Large Magellanic Cloud could also have formed according to a top-light initial mass function.« less

  4. CNO abundances in the quintuplet cluster M supergiant 5-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, S. V.; Sellgren, K.; Blum, R.; Terndrup, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    We present and analyze infrared spectra of the supergiant VR 5-7, in the Quintuplet cluster 30 pc from the Galactic center. Within the uncertainties, the [C/H],[N/H], and [O/H] abundances in this star are equal of Ori, a star which exhibits mixing of CNO processed elements, but distinct from the abundance patterns in IRS 7.

  5. Metaproteomics reveals abundant transposase expression in mutualistic endosymbionts

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, Manuel; Young, Jacque C; Shah, Manesh B

    2013-01-01

    Transposases, enzymes that catalyze the movement of mobile genetic elements, are the most abundant genes in nature. While many bacteria encode an abundance of transposases in their genomes, the current paradigm is that transposase gene expression is tightly regulated and generally low due to its severe mutagenic effects. In the current study, we detected the highest number of transposase proteins ever reported in bacteria, in symbionts of the gutless marine worm Olavius algarvensis using metaproteomics. At least 26 different transposases from 12 different families were detected and genomic and proteomic analyses suggest many of these are active. This high expressionmore » of transposases indicates that the mechanisms for their tight regulation have been disabled or destroyed. Based on recent studies on other symbionts and pathogens that showed high transposase transcription, we speculate that abundant transposase expression might be common in symbionts and pathogens.« less

  6. A search for stars of very low metal abundance. VI. Detailed abundances of 313 metal-poor stars

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, Ian U.; Preston, George W.; Thompson, Ian B.

    2014-06-01

    We present radial velocities, equivalent widths, model atmosphere parameters, and abundances or upper limits for 53 species of 48 elements derived from high resolution optical spectroscopy of 313 metal-poor stars. A majority of these stars were selected from the metal-poor candidates of the HK Survey of Beers, Preston, and Shectman. We derive detailed abundances for 61% of these stars for the first time. Spectra were obtained during a 10 yr observing campaign using the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle spectrograph on the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory, the Robert G. Tull Coudé Spectrograph on the Harlan J. Smith Telescope atmore » McDonald Observatory, and the High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We perform a standard LTE abundance analysis using MARCS model atmospheres, and we apply line-by-line statistical corrections to minimize systematic abundance differences arising when different sets of lines are available for analysis. We identify several abundance correlations with effective temperature. A comparison with previous abundance analyses reveals significant differences in stellar parameters, which we investigate in detail. Our metallicities are, on average, lower by ≈0.25 dex for red giants and ≈0.04 dex for subgiants. Our sample contains 19 stars with [Fe/H] ≤–3.5, 84 stars with [Fe/H] ≤–3.0, and 210 stars with [Fe/H] ≤–2.5. Detailed abundances are presented here or elsewhere for 91% of the 209 stars with [Fe/H] ≤–2.5 as estimated from medium resolution spectroscopy by Beers, Preston, and Shectman. We will discuss the interpretation of these abundances in subsequent papers.« less

  7. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, F.

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  8. The solar abundance of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevesse, N.

    2009-07-01

    With Martin Asplund (Max Planck Institute of Astrophysics, Garching) and Jacques Sauval (Observatoire Royal de Belgique, Brussels) I recently published detailed reviews on the solar chemical composition ({Asplund et al. 2005}, {Grevesse et al. 2007}). A new one, with Pat Scott (Stockholm University) as additional co-author, will appear in Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics ({Asplund et al. 2009}). Here we briefly analyze recent works on the solar abundance of Oxygen and recommend a value of 8.70 in the usual astronomical scale.

  9. FAMA: An automatic code for stellar parameter and abundance determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Laura; Randich, Sofia; Friel, Eileen; Spina, Lorenzo; Jacobson, Heather; Cantat-Gaudin, Tristan; Donati, Paolo; Baglioni, Roberto; Maiorca, Enrico; Bragaglia, Angela; Sordo, Rosanna; Vallenari, Antonella

    2013-10-01

    Context. The large amount of spectra obtained during the epoch of extensive spectroscopic surveys of Galactic stars needs the development of automatic procedures to derive their atmospheric parameters and individual element abundances. Aims: Starting from the widely-used code MOOG by C. Sneden, we have developed a new procedure to determine atmospheric parameters and abundances in a fully automatic way. The code FAMA (Fast Automatic MOOG Analysis) is presented describing its approach to derive atmospheric stellar parameters and element abundances. The code, freely distributed, is written in Perl and can be used on different platforms. Methods: The aim of FAMA is to render the computation of the atmospheric parameters and abundances of a large number of stars using measurements of equivalent widths (EWs) as automatic and as independent of any subjective approach as possible. It is based on the simultaneous search for three equilibria: excitation equilibrium, ionization balance, and the relationship between log n(Fe i) and the reduced EWs. FAMA also evaluates the statistical errors on individual element abundances and errors due to the uncertainties in the stellar parameters. The convergence criteria are not fixed "a priori" but are based on the quality of the spectra. Results: In this paper we present tests performed on the solar spectrum EWs that assess the method's dependency on the initial parameters and we analyze a sample of stars observed in Galactic open and globular clusters. The current version of FAMA is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/558/A38

  10. Heavy Elements and Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Norris, Ryan P.

    2008-01-01

    We report on progress in the analysis of high-resolution near-IR spectra of alpha Orionis (M2 Iab) and other cool, luminous stars. Using synthetic spectrum techniques, we search for atomic absorption lines in the stellar spectra and evaluate the available line parameter data for use in our abundance analyses. Our study concentrates on the post iron-group elements copper through zirconium as a means of investigating the slow neutron-capture process of nucleosynthesis in massive stars and the mechanisms that transport recently processed material up into the photospheric region. We discuss problems with the atomic data and model atmospheres that need to be addressed before theoretically derived elemental abundances from pre-supernova nucleosynthesis calculations can be tested by comparison with abundances determined from observations of cool, massive stars.

  11. Cosmological element production.

    PubMed

    Wagoner, R V

    1967-03-17

    Two recent observations appear to have provided critical information about the past history of the universe. The thermal character of the microwave background radiation suggests that the universe has expanded from a state of high temperature and density, and places constraints on such a big-bang cosmology. The observations of very weak helium lines in the spectra of certain stars in the halo of our galaxy are possibly due to a low primeval abundance of this element. However, the simplest model of a big-bang cosmology leads to much higher helium abundances, such as are observed in the solar system and in many stars. The production of helium can be reduced either by altering the early expansion rate or by introducing degenerate electron neutrinos. Observations of interstellar and intergalactic deuterium and He(4), and possibly even He(3) and Li(7), are needed to test the various models.

  12. Elemental analysis of scorpion venoms.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, AbdulRahman K; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Al Saadon, Khalid; Idris, Mohammed M

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion venom is a rich source of biomolecules, which can perturb physiological activity of the host on envenomation and may also have a therapeutic potential. Scorpion venoms produced by the columnar cells of venom gland are complex mixture of mucopolysaccharides, neurotoxic peptides and other components. This study was aimed at cataloguing the elemental composition of venoms obtained from medically important scorpions found in the Arabian peninsula. The global elemental composition of the crude venom obtained from Androctonus bicolor, Androctonus crassicauda and Leiurus quinquestriatus scorpions were estimated using ICP-MS analyzer. The study catalogued several chemical elements present in the scorpion venom using ICP-MS total quant analysis and quantitation of nine elements exclusively using appropriate standards. Fifteen chemical elements including sodium, potassium and calcium were found abundantly in the scorpion venom at PPM concentrations. Thirty six chemical elements of different mass ranges were detected in the venom at PPB level. Quantitative analysis of the venoms revealed copper to be the most abundant element in Androctonus sp. venom but at lower level in Leiurus quinquestriatus venom; whereas zinc and manganese was found at higher levels in Leiurus sp. venom but at lower level in Androctonus sp. venom. These data and the concentrations of other different elements present in the various venoms are likely to increase our understanding of the mechanisms of venom activity and their pharmacological potentials.

  13. Carbon and nitrogen biogeochemistry in the ocean: A study using stable isotope natural abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rau, G. H.; Desmarais, David J.

    1985-01-01

    Determining the biogeochemical pathways traveled by carbon and nitrogen in the ocean is fundamental to the understanding of how the ocean participates in the cycling of these elements within the biosphere. Because biological production, metabolism, and respiration can significantly alter the natural abundance of C-13 and N-15, these abundances can provide important information about the nature of these biological processes and their variability in the marine environment. The research initially seeks to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns of stable isotope abundances in organic matter, and to relate these abundances to C and N biogeochemical processes within selected areas of the northeastern Pacific Ocean.

  14. Absolute quantification of microbial taxon abundances.

    PubMed

    Props, Ruben; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Rubbens, Peter; De Vrieze, Jo; Hernandez Sanabria, Emma; Waegeman, Willem; Monsieurs, Pieter; Hammes, Frederik; Boon, Nico

    2017-02-01

    High-throughput amplicon sequencing has become a well-established approach for microbial community profiling. Correlating shifts in the relative abundances of bacterial taxa with environmental gradients is the goal of many microbiome surveys. As the abundances generated by this technology are semi-quantitative by definition, the observed dynamics may not accurately reflect those of the actual taxon densities. We combined the sequencing approach (16S rRNA gene) with robust single-cell enumeration technologies (flow cytometry) to quantify the absolute taxon abundances. A detailed longitudinal analysis of the absolute abundances resulted in distinct abundance profiles that were less ambiguous and expressed in units that can be directly compared across studies. We further provide evidence that the enrichment of taxa (increase in relative abundance) does not necessarily relate to the outgrowth of taxa (increase in absolute abundance). Our results highlight that both relative and absolute abundances should be considered for a comprehensive biological interpretation of microbiome surveys.

  15. Precision measurements of solar energetic particle elemental composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, H.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    Using data from the Cosmic Ray Subsystem (CRS) aboard the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft, solar energetic particle abundances or upper limits for all elements with 3 = Z = 30 from a combined set of 10 solar flares during the 1977 to 1982 time period were determined. Statistically meaningful abundances have been determined for the first time for several rare elements including P, Cl, K, Ti and Mn, while the precision of the mean abundances for the more abundant elements has been improved by typically a factor of approximately 3 over previously reported values.

  16. Metal abundance of Tal 13

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, R.; Diaz, A.I.

    1982-08-01

    Low-resolution spectrograms have been obtained of the three RR Lyrae variables in the distant and very sparse globular cluster Pal 13. A comparison of these spectrograms with similar ones of several RR Lyrae variables in the globular clusters M4, M5, and M22 reveals that Pal 13 is intermediate to M5 and M22 in metal abundance. A value of (Fe/H) = -1.67 +- 0.15 is obtained for Pal 13 by adopting Zinn's (1980a (Astrophys. J. Suppl. 42,19)) values of (Fe/H) for these other clusters. Pal 13 is another example of a distant halo object that is not extremely metal poor.

  17. Hematite Abundance Map at Echo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows the hematite abundance map for a portion of the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop near where the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity landed. It was acquired by the rover's miniature thermal emission spectrometer instrument from a spot called 'Echo.' Portions of the inner crater wall in this region appear rich in hematite (red). The sharp boundary from hematite-rich to hematite-poor (yellow and green) surfaces corresponds to a change in the surface texture and color. The hematite-rich surfaces have ripple-like forms suggesting wind transported hematite to these surfaces. The bounce marks produced during landing at the base of the slope on the left are low in hematite (blue). The hematite grains that originally covered the surface were pushed below the surface by the lander, exposing a soil that has less hematite.

  18. Palila abundance estimates and trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banko, Paul C.; Brink, Kevin W.; Camp, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The palila (Loxioides bailleui) population was surveyed annually during 1998−2014 on Mauna Kea Volcano to determine abundance, population trend, and spatial distribution. In the latest surveys, the 2013 population was estimated at 1,492−2,132 birds (point estimate: 1,799) and the 2014 population was estimated at 1,697−2,508 (point estimate: 2,070). Similar numbers of palila were detected during the first and subsequent counts within each year during 2012−2014, and there was no difference in their detection probability due to count sequence. This suggests that greater precision in population estimates can be achieved if future surveys include repeat visits. No palila were detected outside the core survey area in 2013 or 2014, suggesting that most if not all palila inhabit the western slope during the survey period. Since 2003, the size of the area containing all annual palila detections do not indicate a significant change among years, suggesting that the range of the species has remained stable; although this area represents only about 5% of its historical extent. During 1998−2003, palila numbers fluctuated moderately (coefficient of variation [CV] = 0.21). After peaking in 2003, population estimates declined steadily through 2011; since 2010, estimates have fluctuated moderately above the 2011 minimum (CV = 0.18). The average rate of decline during 1998−2014 was 167 birds per year with very strong statistical support for an overall declining trend in abundance. Over the 16-year monitoring period, the estimated rate of change equated to a 68% decline in the population.

  19. Empirical relationships between gas abundances and UV selective extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Charles L.

    1990-01-01

    Several studies of gas-phase abundances in lines of sight through the outer edges of dense clouds are summarized. These lines of sight have 0.4 less than E(B-V) less than 1.1 and have inferred spatial densities of a few hundred cm(-3). The primary thrust of these studies has been to compare gaseous abundances in interstellar clouds that have various types of peculiar selective extinction. To date, the most notable result has been an empirical relationship between the CN/Fe I abundance ratio and the depth of the 2200 A extinction bump. It is not clear at the present time, however, whether these two parameters are linearly correlated or the data are organized into two discrete ensembles. Based on 19 samples and assuming the clouds form discrete ensembles, lines of sight that have a CN/Fe I abundance ratio greater than 0.3 (dex) appear to have a shallow 2.57 plus or minus 0.55 bump compared to 3.60 plus or minus 0.36 for other dense clouds and compared to the 3.6 Seaton (1979) average. The difference in the strength of the extinction bump between these two ensembles is 1.03 plus or minus 0.23. Although a high-resolution IUE survey of dense clouds is far from complete, the few lines of sight with shallow extinction bumps all show preferential depletion of certain elements, while those lines of sight with normal 2200 A bumps do not. Ca II, Cr II, and Mn II appear to exhibit the strongest preferential depletion compared to S II, P II, and Mg II. Fe II and Si II depletions also appear to be enhanced somewhat in the shallow-bump lines of sight. It should be noted that Copernicus data suggest all elements, including the so-called nondepletors, deplete in diffuse clouds (Snow and Jenkins 1980, Joseph 1988). Those lines of sight through dense clouds that have normal 2200 A extinction bumps appear to be extensions of the depletions found in the diffuse interstellar medium. That is, the overall level of depletion is enhanced, but the element-to-element abundances are similar to

  20. Boron Abundances in A and B-type Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, David L.

    1997-01-01

    Boron abundances in A- and B-type stars may be a successful way to track evolutionary effects in these hot stars. The light elements - Li, Be, and B - are tracers of exposure to temperatures more moderate than those in which the H-burning CN-cycle operates. Thus, any exposure of surface stellar layers to deeper layers will affect these light element abundances. Li and Be are used in this role in investigations of evolutionary processes in cool stars, but are not observable in hotter stars. An investigation of boron, however, is possible through the B II 1362 A resonance line. We have gathered high resolution spectra from the IUE database of A- and B-type stars near 10 solar mass for which nitrogen abundances have been determined. The B II 1362 A line is blended throughout; the temperature range of this program, requiring spectrum syntheses to recover the boron abundances. For no star could we synthesize the 1362 A region using the meteoritic/solar boron abundance of log e (B) = 2.88; a lower boron abundance was necessary which may reflect evolutionary effects (e.g., mass loss or mixing near the main-sequence), the natal composition of the star forming regions, or a systematic error in the analyses (e.g., non-LTE effects). Regardless of the initial boron abundance, and despite the possibility of non-LTE effects, it seems clear that boron is severely depleted in some stars. It may be that the nitrogen and boron abundances are anticorrelated, as would be expected from mixing between the H-burning and outer stellar layers. If, as we suspect, a residue of boron is present in the A-type supergiants, we may exclude a scenario in which mixing occurs continuously between the surface and the deep layers operating the CN-cycle. Further exploitation of the B II 1362 A line as an indicator of the evolutionary status of A- and B-type stars will require a larger stellar sample to be observed with higher signal-to-noise as attainable with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  1. Taking Another Look: Zr and Y abundances in Halo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris, Debra L.; Jones, E.

    2007-12-01

    The elements Zirconium and Yttrium are produced via neutron capture (n-capture). These elements reside in the mass range where there is uncertainty about the production mechanism at early time. The rapid n-capture process (r-process) was believed to be responsible for the production, but no study (Burris et al 2000, Gilroy et al 1988 and others) has been able to successfully use the r-process to reproduce the abundance signature for elements in this mass range for metal-poor halo stars. It has been suggested (Sneden and Cowan 2003) that there may be an undiscovered component to the r-process. New abundance calculations for these elements have been conducted for a sample of metal-poor halo stars. Transition probabilities for Zr II from Malcheva et al (2006) and for YII from Hannaford et al (1982) were utilized in these calculations. This work is supported in part by the AAS Small Grant Program, the Arkansas Space Grant Consortium and the UCA Undergraduate Research Council.

  2. Surface abundances of ON stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Palacios, A.; Howarth, I.; Georgy, C.; Walborn, N. R.; Bouret, J.-C.; Barbá, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Massive stars burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle during most of their evolution. When mixing is efficient or when mass transfer in binary systems occurs, chemically processed material is observed at the surface of O and B stars. Aims: ON stars show stronger lines of nitrogen than morphologically normal counterparts. Whether this corresponds to the presence of material processed through the CNO cycle is not known. Our goal is to answer this question. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of ON stars with atmosphere models. We determined the fundamental parameters as well as the He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We also measured the projected rotational velocities. We compared the properties of the ON stars to those of normal O stars. Results: We show that ON stars are usually rich in helium. Their CNO surface abundances are fully consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis. ON stars are more chemically evolved and rotate - on average - faster than normal O stars. Evolutionary models including rotation cannot account for the extreme enrichment observed among ON main sequence stars. Some ON stars are members of binary systems, but others are single stars as indicated by stable radial velocities. Mass transfer is therefore not a simple explanation for the observed chemical properties. Conclusions: We conclude that ON stars show extreme chemical enrichment at their surface, consistent with nucleosynthesis through the CNO cycle. Its origin is not clear at present. Based on observations obtained 1) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope; 2) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii; 3) at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under programs 081.D-2008, 083.D-0589, 086.D-0997; 4) the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La

  3. Mineral Abundances in Martian Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2011-01-01

    Using traditional geochemical calculations with in situ Martian cosmochemical data researchers Harry (Hap) McSween Jr. and Ian McGlynn (University of Tennessee) and Deanne Rogers (SUNY at Stony Brook) have developed a method for identifying the major and minor minerals in soils at the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) landing sites. The team used information from the MER Athena instrument package operating on Mars since January, 2004. They created two models using MiniTES spectra, Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) data, and Mossbauer spectrometer data to calculate the mineralogy of average dark soils on the Gusev crater plains and on Meridiani Planum, located on opposite sides of Mars. Soils at both locations are similarly composed of minerals derived from the comminution of basalts (about three quarters by weight) and other minerals derived from rocks altered by chemical weathering (about one quarter by weight). This mixture of possibly unrelated materials (primary and altered) might mean that the alteration of soil did not occur in place and that the basaltic and alteration suites of minerals came from different sources. The nearly identical modal mineralogy at two widely-separated locations on the planet supports a previous hypothesis based on comparable chemical compositions that soils have been homogenized, if not globally then at least over large areas of the Martian surface. Yet, global maps of orbital remote sensing data have not shown surface abundances of alteration minerals as high as those in the Martian soils.

  4. Palila abundance estimates and trend

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Camp, Richad; Banko, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    The Palila (Loxioides bailleui) is an endangered, seed-eating, finch-billed honeycreeper found only on Hawai`i Island. Once occurring on the islands of Kaua`i and O`ahu and Mauna Loa and Hualālai volcanoes of Hawai`i, Palila are now found only in subalpine, dry-forest habitats on Mauna Kea (Banko et al. 2002). Previous analyses showed that Palila numbers fluctuated throughout the 1980s and 1990s but declined rapidly and steadily since 2003 (Jacobi et al. 1996, Leonard et al. 2008, Banko et al. 2009, Gorresen et al. 2009, Banko et al. in press). The aim of this report is to update abundance estimates for the Palila based on the 2012 surveys. We assess Palila trends over two periods: 1) the long-term trend during 1998–2012 and 2) the short-term trajectory between 2003 and 2012. The first period evaluates the population trend for the entire time series since additional transects were established (Johnson et al. 2006). These additional transects were established to produce a more precise population estimate and provide more complete coverage of the Palila range. The initial year for short-term trajectory was chosen subjectively to coincide with the recent decline in the Palila population. Additionally, stations in the core Palila habitat were surveyed on two occasions in 2012, thus allowing us to address the question of how repeat samples improve estimate precision.

  5. Renal cell carcinoma containing abundant non-calcified fat.

    PubMed

    Wasser, Elliot J; Shyn, Paul B; Riveros-Angel, Marcela; Sadow, Cheryl A; Steele, Graeme S; Silverman, Stuart G

    2013-06-01

    Renal masses found to contain macroscopic fatty elements on CT or MRI imaging can generally be classified as benign angiomyolipomas. Rarely, renal cell carcinomas may also contain evidence of macroscopic fat. When true adipocytic elements are present, this is generally due to a process of osseous metaplasia in which both fat cells and calcification are co-localized within the mass. We present a patient with a large papillary renal cell carcinoma containing abundant fat with sparse, punctate calcification remote from the fatty elements on imaging. This report highlights the need for radiologists to maintain caution when diagnosing renal angiomyolipomas on the basis of macroscopic fat and reviews the current literature on fat-containing renal masses.

  6. Elemental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Esther Gnanamalar Sarojini; Saat, Rohaida Mohd.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a learning module integrating three disciplines--physics, chemistry, and biology--and based on four elements: carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and silicon. Includes atomic model and silicon-based life activities. (YDS)

  7. Superheavy Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of creating elements with an atomic number of around 114. Describes the underlying physics responsible for the limited extent of the periodic table and enumerates problems that must be overcome in creating a superheavy nucleus. (GS)

  8. Element 117

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2018-06-12

    An international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, including two Department of Energy national laboratories and two universities, has discovered the newest superheavy element, element 117. The team included scientists from the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), the Research Institute for Advanced Reactors (Dimitrovgrad), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

  9. Messages from the Reversing Layer: Clues to Planet Formation in Spectral Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, John Michael; Fischer, Debra; Basu, Sarbani

    2017-01-01

    The abundances of elements in the protoplanetary disk evolve over time, but stellar abundances will reflect the initial chemical composition of the disk and this can provide constraints on the range of possible outcomes for planet interiors. Rocky planet habitability depends not just on the availability of liquid water, but also on volcansim and plate tectonics that can stabilize the climate on long timescales. The slow evolution of abundances in stellar photospheres, particularly abundance ratios between elements, makes them ideal laboratories to study primordial disk compositions.In my thesis work, I developed a new spectroscopic analysis procedure that derives gravities consistent with asteroseismology to within 0.05 dex as well as abundances for 15 elements. Using this procedure, we analyzed and published a catalog of accurate stellar parameters and precise abundances for more than 1600 stars and used those to investigate questions of planet formation. The C/O and Mg/Si ratios in the solar neighborhood could affect rocky planet habitability. For lucky cases where planet atmosphereic abundances can be measured, the stellar host C/O and [O/H] ratios carry information about the formation site and migration of hot Jupiters. I will present results on both rocky planet compositions and hot Jupiter migration and discuss how they can help us identify potentially habitable systems and discriminate between different planet formation models.

  10. High-resolution abundance analysis of HD 140283

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira-Mello, C.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Barbuy, B.; Spite, M.; Spite, F.; Korotin, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Context. HD 140283 is a reference subgiant that is metal poor and confirmed to be a very old star. The element abundances of this type of old star can constrain the nature and nucleosynthesis processes that occurred in its (even older) progenitors. The present study may shed light on nucleosynthesis processes yielding heavy elements early in the Galaxy. Aims: A detailed analysis of a high-quality spectrum is carried out, with the intent of providing a reference on stellar lines and abundances of a very old, metal-poor subgiant. We aim to derive abundances from most available and measurable spectral lines. Methods: The analysis is carried out using high-resolution (R = 81 000) and high signal-to-noise ratio (800 abundances for 26 elements, and NLTE calculations for the species C i, O i, Na i, Mg i, Al i, K i, Ca i, Sr ii, and Ba ii lines. Results: The abundance analysis provided an extensive line list suitable for metal-poor subgiant stars. The results for Li, CNO, α-, and iron peak elements are in good agreement with literature. The newly NLTE Ba abundance, along with a NLTE Eu correction and a 3D Ba correction from literature, leads to [Eu/Ba] = + 0.59 ± 0.18. This result confirms a dominant r-process contribution, possibly together with a very small contribution from the main s-process, to the neutron-capture elements in HD 140283. Overabundances of the lighter heavy elements and the high abundances derived for Ba, La, and Ce favour the operation of the weak r-process in HD 140283

  11. Interstellar abundances and depletions inferred from observations of neutral atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P.

    1984-01-01

    Data on neutral atomic species are analyzed for the purpose of inferring relative elemental abundances and depletions in diffuse cloud cores, where it is assumed that densities are enhanced in comparison with mean densities over integrated lines of sight. Column densities of neutral atoms are compared to yield relative column densities of singly ionized species, which are assumed dominant in cloud cores. This paper incorporates a survey of literature data on neutral atomic abundances with the result that no systematic enhancement in the depletions of calcium or iron in cloud cores is found, except for zeta Ophiuchi. This may imply that depletions are not influenced by density, but other data argue against this interpretation. It is concluded either that in general all elements are depleted together in dense regions so that their relative abundances remain constant, or that typical diffuse clouds do not have significant cores, but instead are reasonably homogeneous. The data show a probable correlation between cloud-core depletion and hydrogen-molecular fraction, supporting the assumption that overall depletions are a function of density.

  12. The Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Hg in Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauretta, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    During the past three year grant period we made excellent progress in our study of the abundances and isotopic compositions of Hg and other volatile trace elements in extraterrestrial materials. As part of my startup package I received funds to construct a state-of-the-art experimental facility to study gas-solid reaction kinetics. Much of our effort was spent developing the methodology to measure the abundance and isotopic composition of Hg at ultratrace levels in solid materials. In our first study, the abundance and isotopic composition of Hg was determined in bulk samples of the Murchison (CM) and Allende (CV) carbonaceous chondrites. We have continued our study of mercury in primitive meteorites and expanded the suite of meteorites to include other members of the CM and CV chondrite group as well as CI and CO chondrites. Samples of the CI chondrite Orgueil, the CM chondrites Murray, Nogoya, and Cold Bokkeveld, the CO chondrites Kainsaz, Omans, and Isna, and the CV chondrites Vigarano, Mokoia, and Grosnaja were tested. We have developed a thermal analysis ICP-MS technique and applied it to the study of a suite of thermally labile elements (Zn, As, Se, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Hg, Au, Tl, Pb, and Bi) in geologic materials as well.

  13. Anomalous abundances of solar energetic particles and coronal gas: Coulomb effects and First Ionization Potential (FIP) ordering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The first ionization potential (FIP) ordering of elemental abundances in solar energetic particles and in the corona which can both be explained Coulomb effects is discussed. Solar energetic particles (SEP) and coronal gas have anomalous abundances relative to the photosphere. The anomalies are similar in both cases: which led to the conclusion that SEP acceleration is not selective, but merely preserves the source abundances. It is argued that SEP acceleration can be selective, because identical selectivity operates to determine the coronal abundances. The abundance anomalies are ordered by first ionization potential (FIP).

  14. Carbon Abundances in Starburst Galaxies of the Local Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Peña-Guerrero, María A.; Leitherer, Claus; Mink, Selma de

    The cosmological origin of carbon, the fourth most abundant element in the universe, is not well known and a matter of heavy debate. We investigate the behavior of C/O to O/H in order to constrain the production mechanism of carbon. We measured emission-line intensities in the spectral range from 1600 to 10000 Å on Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) long-slit spectra of 18 starburst galaxies in the local universe. We determined chemical abundances through traditional nebular analysis, and we used a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to determine where our carbon and oxygen abundances lie in the parameter space. Wemore » conclude that our C and O abundance measurements are sensible. We analyzed the behavior of our sample in the [C/O] versus [O/H] diagram with respect to other objects such as DLAs, neutral ISM measurements, and disk and halo stars, finding that each type of object seems to be located in a specific region of the diagram. Our sample shows a steeper C/O versus O/H slope with respect to other samples, suggesting that massive stars contribute more to the production of C than N at higher metallicities, only for objects where massive stars are numerous; otherwise, intermediate-mass stars dominate the C and N production.« less

  15. Carbon Abundances in Starburst Galaxies of the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Guerrero, María A.; Leitherer, Claus; de Mink, Selma; Wofford, Aida; Kewley, Lisa

    2017-10-01

    The cosmological origin of carbon, the fourth most abundant element in the universe, is not well known and a matter of heavy debate. We investigate the behavior of C/O to O/H in order to constrain the production mechanism of carbon. We measured emission-line intensities in the spectral range from 1600 to 10000 Å on Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) long-slit spectra of 18 starburst galaxies in the local universe. We determined chemical abundances through traditional nebular analysis, and we used a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to determine where our carbon and oxygen abundances lie in the parameter space. We conclude that our C and O abundance measurements are sensible. We analyzed the behavior of our sample in the [C/O] versus [O/H] diagram with respect to other objects such as DLAs, neutral ISM measurements, and disk and halo stars, finding that each type of object seems to be located in a specific region of the diagram. Our sample shows a steeper C/O versus O/H slope with respect to other samples, suggesting that massive stars contribute more to the production of C than N at higher metallicities, only for objects where massive stars are numerous; otherwise, intermediate-mass stars dominate the C and N production.

  16. The Cosmic Abundance of 3He: Green Bank Telescope Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balser, Dana; Bania, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    The Big Bang theory for the origin of the Universe predicts that during the first ~1,000 seconds significant amounts of the light elements (2H, 3He, 4He, and 7Li) were produced. Many generations of stellar evolution in the Galaxy modifies these primordial abundances. Observations of the 3He+ hyperfine transition in Galactic HII regions reveals a 3He/H abundance ratio that is constant with Galactocentric radius to within the uncertainties, and is consistent with the primordial value as determined from cosmic microwave background experiments (e.g., WMAP). This "3He Plateau" indicates that the net production and destruction of 3He in stars is approximately zero. Recent stellar evolution models that include thermohaline mixing, however, predict that 3He/H abundance ratios should slightly decrease with Galactocentric radius, or in places in the Galaxy with lower star formation rates. Here we discuss sensitive Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations of 3He+ at 3.46 cm in a subset of our HII region sample. We develop HII region models and derive accurate 3He/H abundance ratios to better constrain these new stellar evolution models.

  17. Abundance Analysis of the Helium Weak Star 20-TAURI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon, M.; Hirata, R.; Sadakane, K.

    An abundance analysis of the helium-weak star 20 Tauri is performed with a fully line-blanketed model atmosphere. The adopted atmospheric parameters are Teff =12600 K and log g=3.2. These values are lower by about 1000 K in Teff and 0.3 in log g than those used in previous investigations, and 20 Tau is the coolest star among the group of helium-weak star. A value of log N(He)/N(H)=-1.7 is found from the average of six He I lines. Mg, Si, Ca, and Ni are underabundant, while P and Mn are overabundant. The abundances of C, Ti, Cr, and Fe coincide with the solar values within ±0.3 dex. Upper limits of the abundances of S, Sc, and Sr are estimated and these elements are not overabundant. The observed abundance pattern in 20 Tau is quite different from those in other helium-weak stars, while it shows a mild characteristic of Mn-Hg stars.

  18. Non-CI refractory lithophile abundances in bulk planetary materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphas, N.

    2015-12-01

    Refractory inclusions in meteorites show evidence for fractionation of refractory lithophile elements relative to one another. For bulk planetary materials, it is most often assumed that refractory lithophile elements (e.g., Ca, Al, Ti, REEs) are in proportions similar to CI carbonaceous chondrites, which is taken to be a proxy for solar composition. A diagnostic feature of REE patterns in refractory inclusions in meteorites is the presence of thulium anomalies, arising from the fact that this heavy REE is more volatile than the highly refractory HREEs surrounding it (Tm/Tm* is defined relative to either Er-Yb or Er-Lu). Tm anomalies thus represent an excellent diagnostic tool to test the assumption that refractory lithophile elements have uniform relative abundances at a bulk planetary scale. Prior to this work, high precision Tm measurements were lacking because it is mono-isotopic and as such is not amenable to high-precision single spike measurements. We have developed a multi-collector REE abundance measurement technique to measure all REEs at high precision, including the mono-isotopic ones. This technique was used to revise the abundance of CI and PAAS REE abundances (Pourmand et al. 2012) and the CI composition agrees well with an independent study (Barrat et al. 2012). The same technique was applied to measure REE patterns in 41 chondrites as well as terrestrial rocks (Dauphas and Pourmand, 2015). Our results reveal the presence of Tm anomalies of about -4.5 % in terrestrial rocks, enstatite and ordinary chondrites, relative to carbonaceous chondrites including CIs. This demonstrates that the assumption that refractory lithophile elements are in constant proportions among planetary bodies is unwarranted. It also shows that carbonaceous chondrites cannot be a major constituent of the Earth. The presence of Tm anomalies in meteorites and terrestrial rocks suggests that either (i) the material in the inner part of the solar system was formed from a gas

  19. Lead and uranium group abundances in cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadav, J. S.; Perelygin, V. P.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of Lead and Uranium group abundances in cosmic rays is discussed in understanding their evolution and propagation. The electronic detectors can provide good charge resolution but poor data statistics. The plastic detectors can provide somewhat better statistics but charge resolution deteriorates. The extraterrestrial crystals can provide good statistics but with poor charge resolution. Recent studies of extraterrestrial crystals regarding their calibration to accelerated uranium ion beam and track etch kinetics are discussed. It is hoped that a charge resolution of two charge units can be achieved provided an additional parameter is taken into account. The prospects to study abundances of Lead group, Uranium group and superheavy element in extraterrestrial crystals are discussed, and usefulness of these studies in the light of studies with electronic and plastic detectors is assessed.

  20. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Firn, Jennifer; Moore, Joslin L.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Harpole, W. Stanley; Cleland, Elsa E.; Brown, Cynthia S.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Pyke, David A.; Farrell, Kelly A.; Bakker, John D.; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Adler, Peter B.; Collins, Scott L.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Hautier, Yann; Morgan, John W.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Kay, Adam; McCulley, Rebecca; Davies, Kendi F.; Stevens, Carly J.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Holl, Karen D.; Klein, Julia A.; Fay, Phillip A.; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Buckley, Yvonne M.

    2011-01-01

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites - grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of introduced species are assembling similarly on different continents. Overall, we found that substantial changes to populations are not necessarily a pre-condition for invasion success and that increases in species abundance are unusual. Instead, abundance at home predicts abundance away, a potentially useful additional criterion for biosecurity programmes.

  1. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Bean, R.W.

    1963-11-19

    A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

  2. Do stellar and nebular abundances in the Cocoon nebula agree?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rojas, J.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Esteban, C.

    2015-05-01

    The Cocoon nebula is an apparently spherical Galactic HII region ionized by a single star (BD+46 3474). This nebula seems to be appropriate to investigate the chemical behavior of oxygen and other heavy elements from two different points of view: a detailed analysis of the chemical content of the ionized gas through nebular spectrophotometry and a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the spectrum of the ionizing star using the state-of-the-art stellar atmosphere modelling. In this poster we present the results from a set of high-quality observations, from 2m-4m class telescopes, including the optical spectrum of the ionizing star BD+46 3474, along with long-slit spatially resolved spectroscopy of the nebula. We have used state-of-the-art stellar atmosphere codes to determine stellar parameters and the chemical content of several heavy elements. Traditional nebular techniques along with updated atomic data have been used to compute gaseous abundances of O, N and S in the Cocoon nebula. Thanks to the low ionization degree of the nebula, we could determine total abundances directly from observable ions (no ionization correction factors were needed) for three of the analyzed elements (O, S, and N). The derived stellar and nebular abundances are compared and the influence of the possible presence of the so-called temperature fluctuations on the nebula is discussed. The results of this study are presented in more detail in García-Rojas, Simón-Díaz & Esteban 2014, A&A, 571, A93.

  3. Mercury, elemental

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mercury , elemental ; CASRN 7439 - 97 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  4. Element Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Describes a research assignment for 8th grade students on the elements of the periodic table. Students use web-based resources and a chemistry handbook to gather information, construct concept maps, and present the findings to the full class using the mode of their choice: a humorous story, a slideshow or gameboard, a brochure, a song, or skit.…

  5. Design of template-stabilized active and earth-abundant oxygen evolution catalysts in acid† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: CVs for unary metal oxides deposition, electrochemical stability at higher current densities for unary metal oxides at pH 2.5, EDS maps for CoMnOx and CoPbOx, STEM images and PXRD of CoMnOx and CoFePbOx, high-resolution XPS of Fe 2p for CoFePbOx, Pourbaix diagrams (of Mn, Co, Pb, and Fe), and elemental analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc01239j Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Michael; Ozel, Tuncay; Liu, Chong; Lau, Eric C.

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts that are earth-abundant and are active and stable in acid are unknown. Active catalysts derived from Co and Ni oxides dissolve at low pH, whereas acid stable systems such as Mn oxides (MnOx) display poor OER activity. We now demonstrate a rational approach for the design of earth-abundant catalysts that are stable and active in acid by treating activity and stability as decoupled elements of mixed metal oxides. Manganese serves as a stabilizing structural element for catalytically active Co centers in CoMnOx films. In acidic solutions (pH 2.5), CoMnOx exhibits the OER activity of electrodeposited Co oxide (CoOx) with a Tafel slope of 70–80 mV per decade while also retaining the long-term acid stability of MnOx films for OER at 0.1 mA cm–2. Driving OER at greater current densities in this system is not viable because at high anodic potentials, Mn oxides convert to and dissolve as permanganate. However, by exploiting the decoupled design of the catalyst, the stabilizing structural element may be optimized independently of the Co active sites. By screening potential–pH diagrams, we replaced Mn with Pb to prepare CoFePbOx films that maintained the high OER activity of CoOx at pH 2.5 while exhibiting long-term acid stability at higher current densities (at 1 mA cm–2 for over 50 h at pH 2.0). Under these acidic conditions, CoFePbOx exhibits OER activity that approaches noble metal oxides, thus establishing the viability of decoupling functionality in mixed metal catalysts for designing active, acid-stable, and earth-abundant OER catalysts. PMID:29163926

  6. Minor elements in Keweenawan lavas, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cornwall, H.R.; Rose, H.J.

    1957-01-01

    The distribution of minor elements in three basaltic flows of the Keweenawan series, of Michigan, is related to differentiation in the flows. Thus, nickel is most abundant in the early differentiates; nickel, chromium, and barium are generally deficient in the pegmatites, which formed late; whereas copper, vanadium, yttrium, and other minor elements are concentrated in the pegmatites. The minor-element content of individual minerals in the Greenstone flow varies markedly from one mineral to another and seems to depend primarily on the presence or absence in the minerals of major elements for which the minor elements can substitute. Minor elements have substituted most readily for those major elements with similar ionic radii. Valence and electronegativity also seem to influence the ease of substitution. The distribution of other minor elements in copper-bearing lodes of the Michigan copper district shows no apparent relation to copper mineralization. ?? 1957.

  7. Trace elements in ocean ridge basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, R. W.; Hubbard, N. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of the trace elements found in ocean ridge basalts. General assumptions regarding melting behavior, trace element fractionation, and alteration effects are presented. Data on the trace elements are grouped according to refractory lithophile elements, refractory siderophile elements, and volatile metals. Variations in ocean ridge basalt chemistry are noted both for regional and temporal characteristics. Ocean ridge basalts are compared to other terrestrial basalts, such as those having La/Yb ratios greater than those of chondrites, and those having La/Yb ratios less than those of chondrites. It is found that (1) as compared to solar or chondrite ratios, ocean ridge basalts have low ratios of large, highly-charged elements to smaller less highly-charged elements, (2) ocean ridge basalts exhibit low ratios of volatile to nonvolatile elements, and (3) the transition metals Cr through Zn in ocean ridge basalts are not fractionated more than a factor of 2 or 3 from the chondritic abundance ratios.

  8. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes

    PubMed Central

    Knouft, Jason H.; Anthony, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa. PMID:27429769

  9. Transition Region Abundance Measurements During Impulsive Heating Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.; Brooks, David H.; Doschek, George A.; Feldman, Uri

    2016-06-01

    It is well established that elemental abundances vary in the solar atmosphere and that this variation is organized by first ionization potential (FIP). Previous studies have shown that in the solar corona, low-FIP elements such as Fe, Si, Mg, and Ca, are generally enriched relative to high-FIP elements such as C, N, O, Ar, and Ne. In this paper we report on measurements of plasma composition made during impulsive heating events observed at transition region temperatures with the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. During these events the intensities of O IV, v, and VI emission lines are enhanced relative to emission lines from Mg v, VI, and vii and Si VI and vii, and indicate a composition close to that of the photosphere. Long-lived coronal fan structures, in contrast, show an enrichment of low-FIP elements. We conjecture that the plasma composition is an important signature of the coronal heating process, with impulsive heating leading to the evaporation of unfractionated material from the lower layers of the solar atmosphere and higher-frequency heating leading to long-lived structures and the accumulation of low-FIP elements in the corona.

  10. The solar system/interstellar medium connection - Gas phase abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, Barry L.

    1987-01-01

    Gas-phase abundances in the outer solar system are presented as diagnostics of the interstellar medium at the time of the solar system formation, some 4.55 billion years ago. Possible influences of the thermal and chemical histories of the primitive solar nebula and of the processes which led to the formation and evolution of the outer planets and comets on the elemental and molecular composition of the primordial matter are outlined. The major components of the atmospheres of the outer planets and of the comae of comets are identified, and the cosmogonical and cosmological implications are discussed.

  11. Determination of Li abundance in Solar type stars of intermediate brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amazo-Gómez, E. M.; Hernandez-Águila, B.; Dagostino, M. C.; Bertone, E.; de la Luz, V.

    2014-10-01

    The determination of the lithium abundance in stellar atmospheres is of fundamental importance in multiple contexts of contemporary astrophysics. On the one hand, the lithium present in stars with global sub-solar metal abundances provides a strong restriction on the abundance of this element as a result of primordial nucleo-synthesis. On the other hand, Li can be an age indicator for stars with convective envelopes. Additionally, Li abundance appears to be correlated with the presence of sub-stellar companions. We present preliminary results of a project aimed at determining the Li abundance in an extended sample of solar-like stars (spectral type G and luminosity class V) of intermediate brightness. High resolution spectroscopic data (R=65000) were obtained with the CanHiS echelle spectrograph on the 2.11m telescope of the Guillermo Haro Observatory in Cananea, Sonora, Mexico. We report the equivalent widths of a first sub-sample of 33 stars.

  12. Chempy: A flexible chemical evolution model for abundance fitting. Do the Sun's abundances alone constrain chemical evolution models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybizki, Jan; Just, Andreas; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2017-09-01

    Elemental abundances of stars are the result of the complex enrichment history of their galaxy. Interpretation of observed abundances requires flexible modeling tools to explore and quantify the information about Galactic chemical evolution (GCE) stored in such data. Here we present Chempy, a newly developed code for GCE modeling, representing a parametrized open one-zone model within a Bayesian framework. A Chempy model is specified by a set of five to ten parameters that describe the effective galaxy evolution along with the stellar and star-formation physics: for example, the star-formation history (SFH), the feedback efficiency, the stellar initial mass function (IMF), and the incidence of supernova of type Ia (SN Ia). Unlike established approaches, Chempy can sample the posterior probability distribution in the full model parameter space and test data-model matches for different nucleosynthetic yield sets. It is essentially a chemical evolution fitting tool. We straightforwardly extend Chempy to a multi-zone scheme. As an illustrative application, we show that interesting parameter constraints result from only the ages and elemental abundances of the Sun, Arcturus, and the present-day interstellar medium (ISM). For the first time, we use such information to infer the IMF parameter via GCE modeling, where we properly marginalize over nuisance parameters and account for different yield sets. We find that 11.6+ 2.1-1.6% of the IMF explodes as core-collapse supernova (CC-SN), compatible with Salpeter (1955, ApJ, 121, 161). We also constrain the incidence of SN Ia per 103M⊙ to 0.5-1.4. At the same time, this Chempy application shows persistent discrepancies between predicted and observed abundances for some elements, irrespective of the chosen yield set. These cannot be remedied by any variations of Chempy's parameters and could be an indication of missing nucleosynthetic channels. Chempy could be a powerful tool to confront predictions from stellar

  13. Chemical Abundances of Two Stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud Globular Cluster NGC 1718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakari, Charli M.; McWilliam, Andrew; Wallerstein, George

    2017-05-01

    Detailed chemical abundances of two stars in the intermediate-age Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) globular cluster NGC 1718 are presented, based on high-resolution spectroscopic observations with the MIKE spectrograph. The detailed abundances confirm NGC 1718 to be a fairly metal-rich cluster, with an average [Fe/H] ˜ -0.55 ± 0.01. The two red giants appear to have primordial O, Na, Mg and Al abundances, with no convincing signs of a composition difference between the two stars - hence, based on these two stars, NGC 1718 shows no evidence for hosting multiple populations. The Mg abundance is lower than Milky Way field stars, but is similar to LMC field stars at the same metallicity. The previous claims of very low [Mg/Fe] in NGC 1718 are therefore not supported in this study. Other abundances (Si, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Ni, Cu, Rb, Y, Zr, La and Eu) all follow the LMC field star trend, demonstrating yet again that (for most elements) globular clusters trace the abundances of their host galaxy's field stars. Similar to the field stars, NGC 1718 is found to be mildly deficient in explosive α-elements, but moderately to strongly deficient in O, Na, Mg, Al and Cu, elements that form during hydrostatic burning in massive stars. NGC 1718 is also enhanced in La, suggesting that it was enriched in ejecta from metal-poor asymptotic giant branch stars.

  14. Influence of Coronal Abundance Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D. (Technical Monitor); Kashyap, Vinay

    2005-01-01

    The PI of this project was Jeff Scargle of NASA/Ames. Co-I's were Alma Connors of Eureka Scientific/Wellesley, and myself. Part of the work was subcontracted to Eureka Scientific via SAO, with Vinay Kashyap as PI. This project was originally assigned grant number NCC2-1206, and was later changed to NCC2-1350 for administrative reasons. The goal of the project was to obtain, derive, and develop statistical and data analysis tools that would be of use in the analyses of high-resolution, high-sensitivity data that are becoming available with new instruments. This is envisioned as a cross-disciplinary effort with a number of "collaborators" including some at SA0 (Aneta Siemiginowska, Peter Freeman) and at the Harvard Statistics department (David van Dyk, Rostislav Protassov, Xiao-li Meng, Epaminondas Sourlas, et al). We have developed a new tool to reliably measure the metallicities of thermal plasma. It is unfeasible to obtain high-resolution grating spectra for most stars, and one must make the best possible determination based on lower-resolution, CCD-type spectra. It has been noticed that most analyses of such spectra have resulted in measured metallicities that were significantly lower than when compared with analyses of high- resolution grating data where available (see, e.g., Brickhouse et al., 2000, ApJ 530,387). Such results have led to the proposal of the existence of so-called Metal Abundance Deficient, or "MAD" stars (e.g., Drake, J.J., 1996, Cool Stars 9, ASP Conf.Ser. 109, 203). We however find that much of these analyses may be systematically underestimating the metallicities, and using a newly developed method to correctly treat the low-counts regime at the high-energy tail of the stellar spectra (van Dyk et al. 2001, ApJ 548,224), have found that the metallicities of these stars are generally comparable to their photospheric values. The results were reported at the AAS (Sourlas, Yu, van Dyk, Kashyap, and Drake, 2000, BAAS 196, v32, #54.02), and at the

  15. Infrared Abundances and the Chemical Enrichment of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. D.

    Elements heavier than helium make up only a small fraction of the mass of the present day Universe, yet they heavily impact how galaxies and stars form and evolve. The chemical enrichment history of the Universe therefore forms an essential part of any complete understanding of galaxy evolution, and with the advent of incredibly sensitive IR/sub-mm/radio facilities, we are poised to begin unraveling it. Nonetheless, significant, decades-old problems plague even the most data-rich local methods of measuring gas phase metal abundance, with large (up to 10x) disagreements stemming principally from unknown and unseen temperature structure in ionized gas. The farinfared fine structure lines of oxygen offer a path out of this deadlock. Oxygen is the most important coolant of ionized gas, and the dominant metal abundance indicator. Its ground state fine structure lines, in particular [OIII] 88¼m, arise from such low-lying energy levels that they are insensitive to temperature. And unlike the faint "auroral" lines used by the gold-standard direct abundance method, they are bright, and readily observable at all metallicities. Indeed this crucial line has already been observed with ALMA in a number of galaxies directly in the era of reionization at z=7-9. Herschel has mapped and archived more than 150 nearby (d<25Mpc) galaxies on scales of 1 kiloparsec and below in the important [OIII] 88¼m line. We propose a comprehensive program to develop the far-infrared fine structure lines of oxygen into direct, empirical gas phase metal abundance measures. We will validate directly against the largest, deepest survey of direct spectroscopic optical metal abundances ever undertaken - the LBT/MODS program CHAOS. We will leverage spatially matched nebular emission lines ([NeII], [NeIII], [SIII], [SIV]) from Spitzer/IRS for ionization balance. We will employ our extensive optical IFU data (PPAK, MUSE, and VENGA) for strong line abundance comparisons, and to bridge the physical scales

  16. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN A SAMPLE OF RED GIANTS IN THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 2420 FROM APOGEE

    SciTech Connect

    Souto, Diogo; Cunha, K.; Smith, V.

    NGC 2420 is a ∼2 Gyr old well-populated open cluster that lies about 2 kpc beyond the solar circle, in the general direction of the Galactic anti-center. Most previous abundance studies have found this cluster to be mildly metal-poor, but with a large scatter in the obtained metallicities. Detailed chemical abundance distributions are derived for 12 red-giant members of NGC 2420 via a manual abundance analysis of high-resolution ( R = 22,500) near-infrared ( λ 1.5–1.7 μ m) spectra obtained from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey. The sample analyzed contains six stars that are identified asmore » members of the first-ascent red giant branch (RGB), as well as six members of the red clump (RC). We find small scatter in the star-to-star abundances in NGC 2420, with a mean cluster abundance of [Fe/H] = −0.16 ± 0.04 for the 12 red giants. The internal abundance dispersion for all elements (C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co and Ni) is also very small (∼0.03–0.06 dex), indicating a uniform cluster abundance distribution within the uncertainties. NGC 2420 is one of the clusters used to calibrate the APOGEE Stellar Parameter and Chemical Abundance Pipeline (ASPCAP). The results from this manual analysis compare well with ASPCAP abundances for most of the elements studied, although for Na, Al, and V there are more significant offsets. No evidence of extra-mixing at the RGB luminosity bump is found in the {sup 12}C and {sup 14}N abundances from the pre-luminosity-bump RGB stars in comparison to the post-He core-flash RC stars.« less

  17. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Zumwalt, L.R.

    1961-11-28

    A fuel element was developed for a gas cooled nuclear reactor. The element is constructed in the form of a compacted fuel slug including carbides of fissionable material in some cases with a breeder material carbide and a moderator which slug is disposed in a canning jacket of relatively impermeable moderator material. Such canned fuel slugs are disposed in an elongated shell of moderator having greater gas permeability than the canning material wherefore application of reduced pressure to the space therebetween causes gas diffusing through the exterior shell to sweep fission products from the system. Integral fission product traps and/or exterior traps as well as a fission product monitoring system may be employed therewith. (AEC)

  18. The Moon: Biogenic elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Chang, Sherwood

    1992-01-01

    The specific objectives of the organic chemical exploration of the Moon involve the search for molecules of possible biological or prebiological origin. Detailed knowledge of the amount, distribution, and exact structure of organic compounds present on the Moon is extremely important to our understanding of the origin and history of the Moon and to its relationship to the history of the Earth and solar system. Specifically, such knowledge is essential for determining whether life on the Moon exists, ever did exist, or could develop. In the absence of life or organic matter, it is still essential to determine the abundance, distribution, and origin of the biogenic elements (e.g., H, C, O, N, S, P) in order to understand how the planetary environment may have influenced the course of chemical evolution. The history and scope of this effort is presented.

  19. Trace Elements in River Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillardet, J.; Viers, J.; Dupré, B.

    2003-12-01

    Trace elements are characterized by concentrations lower than 1 mg L-1 in natural waters. This means that trace elements are not considered when "total dissolved solids" are calculated in rivers, lakes, or groundwaters, because their combined mass is not significant compared to the sum of Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, H4SiO4, HCO3-, CO32-, SO42-, Cl-, and NO3-. Therefore, most of the elements, except about ten of them, occur at trace levels in natural waters. Being trace elements in natural waters does not necessarily qualify them as trace elements in rocks. For example, aluminum, iron, and titanium are major elements in rocks, but they occur as trace elements in waters, due to their low mobility at the Earth's surface. Conversely, trace elements in rocks such as chlorine and carbon are major elements in waters.The geochemistry of trace elements in river waters, like that of groundwater and seawater, is receiving increasing attention. This growing interest is clearly triggered by the technical advances made in the determination of concentrations at lower levels in water. In particular, the development of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has considerably improved our knowledge of trace-element levels in waters since the early 1990s. ICP-MS provides the capability of determining trace elements having isotopes of interest for geochemical dating or tracing, even where their dissolved concentrations are extremely low.The determination of trace elements in natural waters is motivated by a number of issues. Although rare, trace elements in natural systems can play a major role in hydrosystems. This is particularly evident for toxic elements such as aluminum, whose concentrations are related to the abundance of fish in rivers. Many trace elements have been exploited from natural accumulation sites and used over thousands of years by human activities. Trace elements are therefore highly sensitive indexes of human impact from local to global scale. Pollution

  20. Monitoring Butterfly Abundance: Beyond Pollard Walks

    PubMed Central

    Pellet, Jérôme; Bried, Jason T.; Parietti, David; Gander, Antoine; Heer, Patrick O.; Cherix, Daniel; Arlettaz, Raphaël

    2012-01-01

    Most butterfly monitoring protocols rely on counts along transects (Pollard walks) to generate species abundance indices and track population trends. It is still too often ignored that a population count results from two processes: the biological process (true abundance) and the statistical process (our ability to properly quantify abundance). Because individual detectability tends to vary in space (e.g., among sites) and time (e.g., among years), it remains unclear whether index counts truly reflect population sizes and trends. This study compares capture-mark-recapture (absolute abundance) and count-index (relative abundance) monitoring methods in three species (Maculinea nausithous and Iolana iolas: Lycaenidae; Minois dryas: Satyridae) in contrasted habitat types. We demonstrate that intraspecific variability in individual detectability under standard monitoring conditions is probably the rule rather than the exception, which questions the reliability of count-based indices to estimate and compare specific population abundance. Our results suggest that the accuracy of count-based methods depends heavily on the ecology and behavior of the target species, as well as on the type of habitat in which surveys take place. Monitoring programs designed to assess the abundance and trends in butterfly populations should incorporate a measure of detectability. We discuss the relative advantages and inconveniences of current monitoring methods and analytical approaches with respect to the characteristics of the species under scrutiny and resources availability. PMID:22859980

  1. Predicting the Dynamics of Protein Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Ahmed M.; Patrick, Ralph; Bailey, Timothy L.; Bodén, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Protein synthesis is finely regulated across all organisms, from bacteria to humans, and its integrity underpins many important processes. Emerging evidence suggests that the dynamic range of protein abundance is greater than that observed at the transcript level. Technological breakthroughs now mean that sequencing-based measurement of mRNA levels is routine, but protocols for measuring protein abundance remain both complex and expensive. This paper introduces a Bayesian network that integrates transcriptomic and proteomic data to predict protein abundance and to model the effects of its determinants. We aim to use this model to follow a molecular response over time, from condition-specific data, in order to understand adaptation during processes such as the cell cycle. With microarray data now available for many conditions, the general utility of a protein abundance predictor is broad. Whereas most quantitative proteomics studies have focused on higher organisms, we developed a predictive model of protein abundance for both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe to explore the latitude at the protein level. Our predictor primarily relies on mRNA level, mRNA–protein interaction, mRNA folding energy and half-life, and tRNA adaptation. The combination of key features, allowing for the low certainty and uneven coverage of experimental observations, gives comparatively minor but robust prediction accuracy. The model substantially improved the analysis of protein regulation during the cell cycle: predicted protein abundance identified twice as many cell-cycle-associated proteins as experimental mRNA levels. Predicted protein abundance was more dynamic than observed mRNA expression, agreeing with experimental protein abundance from a human cell line. We illustrate how the same model can be used to predict the folding energy of mRNA when protein abundance is available, lending credence to the emerging view that mRNA folding affects translation

  2. Predicting the dynamics of protein abundance.

    PubMed

    Mehdi, Ahmed M; Patrick, Ralph; Bailey, Timothy L; Bodén, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    Protein synthesis is finely regulated across all organisms, from bacteria to humans, and its integrity underpins many important processes. Emerging evidence suggests that the dynamic range of protein abundance is greater than that observed at the transcript level. Technological breakthroughs now mean that sequencing-based measurement of mRNA levels is routine, but protocols for measuring protein abundance remain both complex and expensive. This paper introduces a Bayesian network that integrates transcriptomic and proteomic data to predict protein abundance and to model the effects of its determinants. We aim to use this model to follow a molecular response over time, from condition-specific data, in order to understand adaptation during processes such as the cell cycle. With microarray data now available for many conditions, the general utility of a protein abundance predictor is broad. Whereas most quantitative proteomics studies have focused on higher organisms, we developed a predictive model of protein abundance for both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe to explore the latitude at the protein level. Our predictor primarily relies on mRNA level, mRNA-protein interaction, mRNA folding energy and half-life, and tRNA adaptation. The combination of key features, allowing for the low certainty and uneven coverage of experimental observations, gives comparatively minor but robust prediction accuracy. The model substantially improved the analysis of protein regulation during the cell cycle: predicted protein abundance identified twice as many cell-cycle-associated proteins as experimental mRNA levels. Predicted protein abundance was more dynamic than observed mRNA expression, agreeing with experimental protein abundance from a human cell line. We illustrate how the same model can be used to predict the folding energy of mRNA when protein abundance is available, lending credence to the emerging view that mRNA folding affects translation efficiency

  3. ASPCAP: THE APOGEE STELLAR PARAMETER AND CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES PIPELINE

    SciTech Connect

    García Pérez, Ana E.; Majewski, Steven R.; Shane, Neville

    2016-06-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has built the largest moderately high-resolution ( R  ≈ 22,500) spectroscopic map of the stars across the Milky Way, and including dust-obscured areas. The APOGEE Stellar Parameter and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP) is the software developed for the automated analysis of these spectra. ASPCAP determines atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances from observed spectra by comparing observed spectra to libraries of theoretical spectra, using χ {sup 2} minimization in a multidimensional parameter space. The package consists of a fortran90 code that does the actual minimization and a wrapper IDL code for book-keeping and datamore » handling. This paper explains in detail the ASPCAP components and functionality, and presents results from a number of tests designed to check its performance. ASPCAP provides stellar effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities precise to 2%, 0.1 dex, and 0.05 dex, respectively, for most APOGEE stars, which are predominantly giants. It also provides abundances for up to 15 chemical elements with various levels of precision, typically under 0.1 dex. The final data release (DR12) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III contains an APOGEE database of more than 150,000 stars. ASPCAP development continues in the SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 survey.« less

  4. The bliss (not the problem) of motor abundance (not redundancy).

    PubMed

    Latash, Mark L

    2012-03-01

    Motor control is an area of natural science exploring how the nervous system interacts with other body parts and the environment to produce purposeful, coordinated actions. A central problem of motor control-the problem of motor redundancy-was formulated by Nikolai Bernstein as the problem of elimination of redundant degrees-of-freedom. Traditionally, this problem has been addressed using optimization methods based on a variety of cost functions. This review draws attention to a body of recent findings suggesting that the problem has been formulated incorrectly. An alternative view has been suggested as the principle of abundance, which considers the apparently redundant degrees-of-freedom as useful and even vital for many aspects of motor behavior. Over the past 10 years, dozens of publications have provided support for this view based on the ideas of synergic control, computational apparatus of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis, and the equilibrium-point (referent configuration) hypothesis. In particular, large amounts of "good variance"-variance in the space of elements that has no effect on the overall performance-have been documented across a variety of natural actions. "Good variance" helps an abundant system to deal with secondary tasks and unexpected perturbations; its amount shows adaptive modulation across a variety of conditions. These data support the view that there is no problem of motor redundancy; there is bliss of motor abundance.

  5. A high deuterium abundance at redshift z = 0.7.

    PubMed

    Webb, J K; Carswell, R F; Lanzetta, K M; Ferlet, R; Lemoine, M; Vidal-Madjar, A; Bowen, D V

    1997-07-17

    Of the light elements, the primordial abundance of deuterium relative to hydrogen, (D/H)p, provides the most sensitive diagnostic for the cosmological mass density parameter, omegaB. Recent high-redshift D/H measurements are highly discrepant, although this may reflect observational uncertainties. The larger primordial D/H values imply a low omegaB (requiring the Universe to be dominated by non-baryonic matter), and cause problems for galactic chemical evolution models, which have difficulty in reproducing the steep decline in D/H to the present-day values. Conversely, the lower D/H values measured at high redshift imply an omegaB greater than that derived from 7Li and 4He abundance measurements, and may require a deuterium-abundance evolution that is too low to easily explain. Here we report the first measurement of D/H at intermediate redshift (z = 0.7010), in a gas cloud selected to minimize observational uncertainties. Our analysis yields a value of D/H ((2.0 +/- 0.5) x 10[-4]) which is at the upper end of the range of values measured at high redshifts. This finding, together with other independent observations, suggests that there may be inhomogeneity in (D/H)p of at least a factor of ten.

  6. How binarity affect the abundance discrepancy in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rojas, J.; Monteiro, H.; Jones, D.; Boffin, H.; Wesson, R.; Corradi, R.; Rodríguez-Gil, P.

    2017-11-01

    The discrepancy between chemical abundances computed using optical recombination lines (ORLs) and collisionally excited lines (CELs) is a major unresolved problem in nebular astrophysics, with significant implications for the determination of chemical abundances throughout the Universe. In planetary nebulae (PNe), a common explanation of this discrepancy is that two different gas phases coexist: a hot component with standard metallicity, and a much cooler plasma with a highly enhanced content of heavy elements. This dual nature is not predicted by mass loss theories, and observational support for it is still weak. We present recent findings which show that the largest abundance discrepancies (ADs) are reached in PNe with close binary central stars. Our last long-slit spectroscopic studies as well as direct imaging of the gas in the faint O II ORLs and high spatial resolution IFU spectroscopy support the fact that probably two different gas phases coexist in these nebulae and that high ADs should be explained in a framework of binary evolution. Although the exact scenario is still not understood, a promising proposal is that nova-like ejecta have a crucial role in the strong ORL emission in these objects.

  7. The Absolute Abundance of Iron in the Solar Corona.

    PubMed

    White; Thomas; Brosius; Kundu

    2000-05-10

    We present a measurement of the abundance of Fe relative to H in the solar corona using a technique that differs from previous spectroscopic and solar wind measurements. Our method combines EUV line data from the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory with thermal bremsstrahlung radio data from the VLA. The coronal Fe abundance is derived by equating the thermal bremsstrahlung radio emission calculated from the EUV Fe line data to that observed with the VLA, treating the Fe/H abundance as the sole unknown. We apply this technique to a compact cool active region and find Fe&solm0;H=1.56x10-4, or about 4 times its value in the solar photosphere. Uncertainties in the CDS radiometric calibration, the VLA intensity measurements, the atomic parameters, and the assumptions made in the spectral analysis yield net uncertainties of approximately 20%. This result implies that low first ionization potential elements such as Fe are enhanced in the solar corona relative to photospheric values.

  8. Revisiting Zirconium: New Abundance Determinations with Improved Oscillator Strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris, Debra L.; Jones, M.; Nichols, R.

    2006-12-01

    The element Zirconium is produced via neutron capture (n-capture). It resides in the mass range where there is uncertainty about the production mechanism at early time. The rapid n-capture process (r-process) was believed to be responsible for the production, but no study (Burris et al 2000, Gilroy et al 1988 and others) has been able to successfully use the r-process to reproduce the abundance signature for elements in this mass range for metal-poor halo stars. It has been suggested (Sneden and Cowan 2003) that there may be an undiscovered component to the r-process. New transition probabilities for Zr II have been reported by Malcheva et al (2006). We utilize these values to make new abundance determinations for Zr in the Sun and the metal-poor halo star BD +17 3248. This work is supported in part by the AAS Small Grant Program, the Arkansas Space Grant Consortium and the UCA Undergraduate Research Council.

  9. Observationally Constraining Gas Giant Composition via Their Host Star Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teske, Johanna; Thorngren, Daniel; Fortney, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    While the photospheric abundances of the Sun match many rock-forming elemental abundances in the Earth to within 10 mol%, as well as in Mars, the Moon, and meteorites, the Solar System giant planets are of distinctly non-stellar composition — Jupiter's bulk metallicity (inferred from its bulk density, measured from spacecraft data) is ∼ x5-10 solar, and Saturn is ∼ x10-20 solar. This knowledge has led to dramatic advances in understanding models of core accretion, which now match the heavy element enrichment of each of the Solar System's giant planets. However, we have thus far lacked similar data for exoplanets to use as a check for formation and composition models over a much larger parameter space. Here we present a study of the host stars of a sample of cool transiting gas giants with measured bulk metal fractions (as in Thorngren et al. 2016) to better constrain the relation Zplanet/Zstar — giant exoplanet metal enrichment relative to the host star. We add a new dimension of chemical variation, measuring C, O, Mg, Si, Ni, and well as Fe (on which previous Zplanet/Zstar calculations were based). Our analysis provides the best constraints to date on giant exoplanet interior composition and how this relates to formation environment, and make testable predictions for JWST observations of exoplanet atmospheres.

  10. The Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Hg in Extraterrestrial Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, J. D.; Klaue, Bjorn

    2005-01-01

    During the three year grant period we made excellent progress in our study of the abundances and isotopic compositions of Hg and other volatile trace elements in extraterrestrial materials. At the time the grant started, our collaborating PI, Dante Lauretts, was a postdoctoral research associate working with Peter Buseck at Arizona State University. The work on chondritic Hg was done in collaboration with Dante Lauretta and Peter Buseck and this study was published in Lauretta et a1 (2001a). In July, 2001 Dante Lauretta accepted a position as an Assistant Professor in the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory at the University of Arizona. His funding was transferred and this grant has supported much of his research activities during his first two years at the U of A. Several other papers are in preparation and will be published soon. We presented papers on this topic at Goldschmidt Conferences, the Lunar and Planetary Science Conferences, and the Annual Meetings of the Meteoritical Society. The work done under this grant has spurred several new directions of inquiry, which we are still pursuing. Included in this paper are the studies of bulk abundances and isotopic compositions of metreoritic Mercury, and the development of a thermal analysis ICP-MS technique applied to thermally liable elements.

  11. Stochastic species abundance models involving special copulas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huillet, Thierry E.

    2018-01-01

    Copulas offer a very general tool to describe the dependence structure of random variables supported by the hypercube. Inspired by problems of species abundances in Biology, we study three distinct toy models where copulas play a key role. In a first one, a Marshall-Olkin copula arises in a species extinction model with catastrophe. In a second one, a quasi-copula problem arises in a flagged species abundance model. In a third model, we study completely random species abundance models in the hypercube as those, not of product type, with uniform margins and singular. These can be understood from a singular copula supported by an inflated simplex. An exchangeable singular Dirichlet copula is also introduced, together with its induced completely random species abundance vector.

  12. Germanium abundances in lunar basalts: Evidence of mantle metasomatism

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, T.; Taylor, G.J.; Keil, T.K.

    1988-01-01

    To fill in gaps in the present Ge data base, mare basalts were analyzed for Ge and other elements by RNAA and INAA. Mare basalts from Apollo 11, 12, 15, 17 landing sites are rather uniform in Ge abundance, but Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalts and KREEP are enriched in Ge by factors of up to 300 compared to typical mare basalts. These Ge enrichments are not associated with other siderophile element enrichments and, thus, are not due to differences in the amount of metal segregated during core formation. Based on crystal-chemical and inter-element variations, it does not appear thatmore » the observed Ge enrichments are due to silicate liquid immiscibility. Elemental ratios in Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalts, green and orange glass, average basalts and KREEP suggest that incorporation of late accreting material into the source regions or interaction of the magmas with primitive undifferentiated material is not a likely cause for the observed Ge enrichments. We speculate that the most plausible explanation for these Ge enrichments is complexing and concentration of Ge by F, Cl or S in volatile phases. In this manner, the KREEP basalt source regions may have been metasomatized and Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalt magmas may have become enriched in Ge by interacting with these metasomatized areas. The presence of volatile- and Ge-rich regions in the Moon suggests that the Moon was never totally molten. 71 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.« less

  13. Composition and abundance of tree regeneration

    Treesearch

    Todd F. Hutchinson; Elaine Kennedy Sutherland; Charles T. Scott

    2003-01-01

    The composition and abundance of tree seedlings and saplings in the four study areas in southern Ohio were related to soil moisture via a GIS-derived integrated moisture index and to soil texture and fertility. For seedlings, the total abundance of small stems (less than 30 cm tall) was significantly greater on xeric plots (81,987/ha) than on intermediate (54,531/ha)...

  14. Report on carbon and nitrogen abundance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the proposal was to determine the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios from transition layer lines in stars with different T(sub eff) and luminosities. The equations which give the surface emission line fluxes and the measured ratio of the NV to CIV emission line fluxes are presented and explained. The abundance results are compared with those of photospheric abundance studies for stars in common with the photospheric investigations. The results show that the analyses are at least as accurate as the photospheric determinations. These studies can be extended to F and early G stars for which photospheric abundance determinations for giants are hard to do because molecular bands become too weak. The abundance determination in the context of stellar evolution is addressed. The N/C abundance ratio increases steeply at the point of evolution for which the convection zone reaches deepest. Looking at the evolution of the rotation velocities v sin i, a steep decrease in v sin i is related to the increasing depth of the convection zone. It is concluded that the decrease in v sin i for T(sub eff) less than or approximately = 5800 K is most probably due to the rearrangement of the angular momentum in the stars due to deep convective mixing. It appears that the convection zone is rotating with nearly depth independent angular momentum. Other research results and ongoing projects are discussed.

  15. Modeling abundance effects in distance sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Dawson, D.K.; Bates, S.

    2004-01-01

    Distance-sampling methods are commonly used in studies of animal populations to estimate population density. A common objective of such studies is to evaluate the relationship between abundance or density and covariates that describe animal habitat or other environmental influences. However, little attention has been focused on methods of modeling abundance covariate effects in conventional distance-sampling models. In this paper we propose a distance-sampling model that accommodates covariate effects on abundance. The model is based on specification of the distance-sampling likelihood at the level of the sample unit in terms of local abundance (for each sampling unit). This model is augmented with a Poisson regression model for local abundance that is parameterized in terms of available covariates. Maximum-likelihood estimation of detection and density parameters is based on the integrated likelihood, wherein local abundance is removed from the likelihood by integration. We provide an example using avian point-transect data of Ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapillus) collected using a distance-sampling protocol and two measures of habitat structure (understory cover and basal area of overstory trees). The model yields a sensible description (positive effect of understory cover, negative effect on basal area) of the relationship between habitat and Ovenbird density that can be used to evaluate the effects of habitat management on Ovenbird populations.

  16. Quantifying Elements of a Lunar Economy Based on Resource Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenblatt, J. B.

    2017-10-01

    We model a simplified lunar economy from human life support, Earth materials consumption, and energy and propulsion requirement estimates, constrained by lunar elemental abundances; estimate likely imports/exports and "gross interplanetary product."

  17. Origin of central abundances in the hot intra-cluster medium. I. Individual and average abundance ratios from XMM-Newton EPIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mernier, F.; de Plaa, J.; Pinto, C.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kosec, P.; Zhang, Y.-Y.; Mao, J.; Werner, N.

    2016-08-01

    The hot intra-cluster medium (ICM) is rich in metals, which are synthesised by supernovae (SNe) explosions and accumulate over time into the deep gravitational potential well of clusters of galaxies. Since most of the elements visible in X-rays are formed by type Ia (SNIa) and/or core-collapse (SNcc) supernovae, measuring their abundances gives us direct information on the nucleosynthesis products of billions of SNe since the epoch of the star formation peak (z ~ 2-3). In this study, we use the EPIC and RGS instruments on board XMM-Newton to measure the abundances of nine elements (O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni) from a sample of 44 nearby cool-core galaxy clusters, groups, and elliptical galaxies. We find that the Fe abundance shows a large scatter (~20-40%) over the sample, within 0.2r500 and especially 0.05r500. Unlike the absolute Fe abundance, the abundance ratios (X/Fe) are uniform over the considered temperature range (~0.6-8 keV) and with a limited scatter. In addition to an unprecedented treatment of systematic uncertainties, we provide the most accurate abundance ratios measured so far in the ICM, including Cr/Fe and Mn/Fe which we firmly detected (>4σ with MOS and pn independently). We find that Cr/Fe, Mn/Fe, and Ni/Fe differ significantly from the proto-solar values. However, the large uncertainties in the proto-solar abundances prevent us from making a robust comparison between the local and the intra-cluster chemical enrichments. We also note that, interestingly, and despite the large net exposure time (~4.5 Ms) of our dataset, no line emission feature is seen around ~3.5 keV.

  18. Species abundance and potential biological control services in shade vs. sun coffee in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borkhataria, Rena R.; Collazo, Jaime A.; Groom, Martha J.

    2012-01-01

    Birds, lizards and insects were surveyed in three sun and three shade coffee plantations in Puerto Rico to provide a comprehensive comparison of biodiversity between plantations types and to identify potential interrelationships (e.g., biological or natural control services) between members of each taxon and coffee pests. Abundance of avian species, including insectivorous species, was significantly higher in shade coffee. Anolis cristatellus and A. stratulus were significantly more abundant in sun plantations whereas A. gundlachi and A. evermanni were detected more frequently in shade plantations. Insects in the orders Coleoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, Neuroptera, and Psocoptera were significantly more abundant in shade coffee, while orthopterans were more abundant in sun. The coffee leaf miner (Leucoptera coffeela) and the flatid planthopper (Petrusa epilepsis) did not differ significantly between plantation types, nor did the abundance of the wasp complex that parasitizes the coffee leaf miner. These findings confirmed that shade plantations harbor a wide array of elements of biodiversity; but sun plantations may also harbor many elements of biodiversity, and in some cases, in higher abundance than in shade plantations.

  19. Abundances of Local Group Globular Clusters Using High Resolution Integrated Light Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakari, Charli; McWilliam, A.; Venn, K.; Shetrone, M. D.; Dotter, A. L.; Mackey, D.

    2014-01-01

    Abundances and kinematics of extragalactic globular clusters provide valuable clues about galaxy and globular cluster formation in a wide variety of environments. In order to obtain such information about distant, unresolved systems, specific observational techniques are required. An Integrated Light Spectrum (ILS) provides a single spectrum from an entire stellar population, and can therefore be used to determine integrated cluster abundances. This dissertation investigates the accuracy of high resolution ILS analysis methods, using ILS (taken with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope) of globular clusters associated with the Milky Way (47 Tuc, M3, M13, NGC 7006, and M15) and then applies the method to globular clusters in the outer halo of M31 (from the Pan-Andromeda Archaeological Survey, or PAndAS). Results show that: a) as expected, the high resolution method reproduces individual stellar abundances for elements that do not vary within a cluster; b) the presence of multiple populations does affect the abundances of elements that vary within the cluster; c) certain abundance ratios are very sensitive to systematic effects, while others are not; and d) certain abundance ratios (e.g. [Ca/Fe]) can be accurately obtained from unresolved systems. Applications of ILABUNDS to the PAndAS clusters reveal that accretion may have played an important role in the formation of M31's outer halo.

  20. Planetary Nebula Abundances and Morphology: Probing the Chemical Evolution of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanghellini, Letizia; Guerrero, Martín Antonio; Cunha, Katia; Manchado, Arturo; Villaver, Eva

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents a homogeneous study of abundances in a sample of 79 northern Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) whose morphological classes have been uniformly determined. Ionic abundances and plasma diagnostics were derived from selected optical line strengths in the literature, and elemental abundances were estimated with the ionization correction factor developed by Kingsbourgh & Barlow in 1994. We compare the elemental abundances to the final yields obtained from stellar evolution models of low- and intermediate-mass stars, and we confirm that most bipolar PNe have high nitrogen and helium abundance and are the likely progeny of stars with main-sequence mass greater than 3 Msolar. We derive =0.27 and discuss the implication of such a high ratio in connection with the solar neon abundance. We determine the Galactic gradients of oxygen and neon and found Δlog(O/H)/ΔR=-0.01 dex kpc-1 and Δlog(Ne/H)/ΔR=-0.01 dex kpc-1. These flat PN gradients are irreconcilable with Galactic metallicity gradients flattening with time.

  1. Clonal growth and plant species abundance

    PubMed Central

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Zuzana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Both regional and local plant abundances are driven by species' dispersal capacities and their abilities to exploit new habitats and persist there. These processes are affected by clonal growth, which is difficult to evaluate and compare across large numbers of species. This study assessed the influence of clonal reproduction on local and regional abundances of a large set of species and compared the predictive power of morphologically defined traits of clonal growth with data on actual clonal growth from a botanical garden. The role of clonal growth was compared with the effects of seed reproduction, habitat requirements and growth, proxied both by LHS (leaf–height–seed) traits and by actual performance in the botanical garden. Methods Morphological parameters of clonal growth, actual clonal reproduction in the garden and LHS traits (leaf-specific area – height – seed mass) were used as predictors of species abundance, both regional (number of species records in the Czech Republic) and local (mean species cover in vegetation records) for 836 perennial herbaceous species. Species differences in habitat requirements were accounted for by classifying the dataset by habitat type and also by using Ellenberg indicator values as covariates. Key Results After habitat differences were accounted for, clonal growth parameters explained an important part of variation in species abundance, both at regional and at local levels. At both levels, both greater vegetative growth in cultivation and greater lateral expansion trait values were correlated with higher abundance. Seed reproduction had weaker effects, being positive at the regional level and negative at the local level. Conclusions Morphologically defined traits are predictive of species abundance, and it is concluded that simultaneous investigation of several such traits can help develop hypotheses on specific processes (e.g. avoidance of self-competition, support of offspring) potentially

  2. Origin and Evolution of the Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliam, Andrew; Rauch, Michael

    2004-09-01

    Introduction; List of participants; 1. Mount Wilson Observatory contributions to the study of cosmic abundances of the chemical elements George W. Preston; 2. Synthesis of the elements in stars: B2FH and beyond E. Margaret Burbidge; 3. Stellar nucleosynthesis: a status report 2003 David Arnett; 4. Advances in r-process nucleosynthesis John J. Cowan and Christopher Sneden; 5. Element yields of intermediate-mass stars Richard B. C. Henry; 6. The impact of rotation on chemical abundances in red giant branch stars Corinne Charbonnel; 7. s-processing in AGB stars and the composition of carbon stars Maurizio Busso, Oscar Straniero, Roberto Gallino, and Carlos Abia; 8. Models of chemical evolution Francesca Matteucci; 9. Model atmospheres and stellar abundance analysis Bengt Gustafsson; 10. The light elements: lithium, beryllium, and boron Ann Merchant Boesgaard; 11. Extremely metal-poor stars John E. Norris; 12. Thin and thick galactic disks Poul E. Nissen; 13. Globular clusters and halo field stars Christopher Sneden, Inese I. Ivans and Jon P. Fulbright; 14. Chemical evolution in ω Centauri Verne V. Smith; 15. Chemical composition of the Magellanic Clouds, from young to old stars Vanessa Hill; 16. Detailed composition of stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies Matthew D. Shetrone; 17. The evolutionary history of Local Group irregular galaxies Eva K. Grebel; 18. Chemical evolution of the old stellar populations of M31 R. Michael Rich; 19. Stellar winds of hot massive stars nearby and beyond the Local Group Fabio Bresolin and Rolf P. Kudritzki; 20. Presolar stardust grains Donald D. Clayton and Larry R. Nittler; 21. Interstellar dust B. T. Draine; 22. Interstellar atomic abundances Edward B. Jenkins; 23. Molecules in the interstellar medium Tommy Wiklind; 24. Metal ejection by galactic winds Crystal L. Martin; 25. Abundances from the integrated light of globular clusters and galaxies Scott C. Trager; 26. Abundances in spiral and irregular galaxies Donald R. Garnett; 27

  3. Doppler Imaging and Chemical Abundance Analysis of EK Dra: Capabilities of Small Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilicoglu, Tolgahan; Senavci, H. V.; Bahar, E.; Isik, E.; Montes, D.; Hussain, G. A. J.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the chromospheric and spot activity behaviour of the young Solar-like star EK Dra via Doppler imaging and spectral synthesis methods, using mid-resolution time series spectra of the system. We also present the atmospheric parameters and detailed elemental photospheric abundances of the star. The chemical abundance pattern of EK Dra do not suggest any remarkable peculiarities except few elements. The Titanium Oxide (TiO) bandheads at 7000 - 7100 A region also give clues about the spot temperature that may be cooler than 4000 K. In addition, we also discuss the capabilities of small telescopes (40 cm in our case) and medium resolution spectrographs in terms of Doppler imaging and chemical abundance analysis.

  4. Abundances in Eight M31 Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Kerry G.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Corradi, Romano; Galera-Rosillo, R.; Balick, Bruce; Henry, Richard B. C.

    2014-06-01

    As part of a continuing project using planetary nebulae (PNe) to study the chemical evolution and formation history of M31 (see accompanying poster by Balick et al.), we obtained spectra of eight PNe in the fall of 2013 with the OSIRIS spectrograph on the GTC. All of these PNe are located outside M31’s inner disk and bulge. Spectral coverage extended from 3700-7800Å with a resolution of ~6 Å. Especially important in abundance determinations is the detection of the weak, temperature-sensitive auroral line of [O III], at 4363Å, which is often contaminated by Hg I 4358Å from streetlights; the remoteness of the GTC eliminated this difficulty. We reduced and measured the spectra using IRAF, and derived nebular diagnostics and abundances with ELSA, our in-house five-level-atom program. Here we report the chemical abundances determined from these spectra. The bottom line is that the oxygen abundances in these PNe are all within a factor of 2-3 of the solar value, (as are all the other M31 PNe our team has previously measured) despite the significant range of galactocentric distance. Future work will use these abundances to constrain models of the central star to estimate progenitor masses and ages. In particular we will use the results to investigate the hypothesis that these PNe might represent a population related to the encounter between M31 and M33 ~3 Gy ago. We gratefully acknowledge support from Williams College.

  5. Hierarchical models of animal abundance and occurrence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Dorazio, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    Much of animal ecology is devoted to studies of abundance and occurrence of species, based on surveys of spatially referenced sample units. These surveys frequently yield sparse counts that are contaminated by imperfect detection, making direct inference about abundance or occurrence based on observational data infeasible. This article describes a flexible hierarchical modeling framework for estimation and inference about animal abundance and occurrence from survey data that are subject to imperfect detection. Within this framework, we specify models of abundance and detectability of animals at the level of the local populations defined by the sample units. Information at the level of the local population is aggregated by specifying models that describe variation in abundance and detection among sites. We describe likelihood-based and Bayesian methods for estimation and inference under the resulting hierarchical model. We provide two examples of the application of hierarchical models to animal survey data, the first based on removal counts of stream fish and the second based on avian quadrat counts. For both examples, we provide a Bayesian analysis of the models using the software WinBUGS.

  6. Abundances and Kinematics of OB Stars in the Leading Arm of the Magellanic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Moni Bidin, C.; Casetti-Dinescu, D. I.; Mendez, R. A.; Girard, T. M.; Korchagin, V. I.; Vieira, K.; van Altena, W. F.; Zhao, G.

    2018-01-01

    We determined seven element abundances (He, C, N, O, Mg, Si, and S) and kinematics for eight O-/B- type stars which is selected from 42 candidates (Casetti-Dinescu et al. 2014) of membership in the Leading Arm (LA) of the Magellanic System. The high resolution spectra were taken with the MIKE instrument on the Magellan 6.5m Clay telescope.

  7. Rubidium and Lead Abundances in Giant Stars of the Globular Clusters M13 and NGC 6752

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, David; Aoki, Wako; Lambert, David L.; Paulson, Diane B.

    2006-03-01

    We present measurements of the neutron-capture elements Rb and Pb in five giant stars of the globular cluster NGC 6752 and Pb measurements in four giants of the globular cluster M13. The abundances were derived by comparing synthetic spectra with high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra obtained using HDS on the Subaru telescope and MIKE on the Magellan telescope. The program stars span the range of the O-Al abundance variation. In NGC 6752, the mean abundances are [Rb/Fe]=-0.17+/-0.06 (σ=0.14), [Rb/Zr]=-0.12+/-0.06 (σ=0.13), and [Pb/Fe]=-0.17+/-0.04 (σ=0.08). In M13 the mean abundance is [Pb/Fe]=-0.28+/-0.03 (σ=0.06). Within the measurement uncertainties, we find no evidence for star-to-star variation for either Rb or Pb within these clusters. None of the abundance ratios [Rb/Fe], [Rb/Zr], or [Pb/Fe] are correlated with the Al abundance. NGC 6752 may have slightly lower abundances of [Rb/Fe] and [Rb/Zr] compared to the small sample of field stars at the same metallicity. For M13 and NGC 6752 the Pb abundances are in accord with predictions from a Galactic chemical evolution model. If metal-poor intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch stars did produce the globular cluster abundance anomalies, then such stars do not synthesize significant quantities of Rb or Pb. Alternatively, if such stars do synthesize large amounts of Rb or Pb, then they are not responsible for the abundance anomalies seen in globular clusters. Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and on observations made with the Magellan Clay Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory.

  8. Imaging the elusive H-poor gas in planetary nebulae with large abundance discrepancy factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rojas, Jorge; Corradi, Romano L. M.; Boffin, Henri M. J.; Monteiro, Hektor; Jones, David; Wesson, Roger; Cabrera-Lavers, Antonio; Rodríguez-Gil, Pablo

    2017-10-01

    The discrepancy between abundances computed using optical recombination lines (ORLs) and collisionally excited lines (CELs) is a major, unresolved problem with significant implications for the determination of chemical abundances throughout the Universe. In planetary nebulae (PNe), the most common explanation for the discrepancy is that two different gas phases coexist: a hot component with standard metallicity, and a much colder plasma enhanced in heavy elements. This dual nature is not predicted by mass loss theories, and direct observational support for it is still weak. In this work, we present our recent findings that demonstrate that the largest abundance discrepancies are associated with close binary central stars. OSIRIS-GTC tunable filter imaging of the faint O ii ORLs and MUSE-VLT deep 2D spectrophotometry confirm that O ii ORL emission is more centrally concentrated than that of [Oiii] CELs and, therefore, that the abundance discrepancy may be closely linked to binary evolution.

  9. Potassium isotope abundances in Australasian tektites and microtektites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, G. F.; O'D. Alexander, C. M.; Berger, E. L.; Delaney, J. S.; Glass, B. P.

    2008-10-01

    We report electron microprobe determinations of the elemental compositions of 11 Australasian layered tektites and 28 Australasian microtektites; and ion microprobe determinations of the 41K/39K ratios of all 11 tektites and 13 of the microtektites. The elemental compositions agree well with literature values, although the average potassium concentrations measured here for microtektites, 1.1 1.6 wt%, are lower than published average values, 1.9 2.9 wt%. The potassium isotope abundances of the Australasian layered tektites vary little. The average value of δ41K, 0.02 ± 0.12‰ (1σ mean), is indistinguishable from the terrestrial value (= 0 by definition) as represented by our standard, thereby confirming four earlier tektite analyses of Humayun and Koeberl (2004). In agreement with those authors, we conclude that evaporation has significantly altered neither the isotopic nor the elemental composition of Australasian layered tektites for elements less volatile than potassium. Although the average 41K/39K ratio of the microtektites, 1.1 ± 1.7‰ (1σ mean), is also statistically indistinguishable from the value for the standard, the individual ratios vary over a very large range, from -10.6 ± 1.4‰ to +13.8 ± 1.5‰ and at least three of them are significantly different from zero. We interpret these larger variations in terms of the evaporation of isotopically light potassium; condensation of potassium in the vapor plume; partial or complete stirring and quenching of the melts; and the possible uptake of potassium from seawater. That the average 41K/39K ratio of the microtektites equals the terrestrial value suggests that the microtektite-forming system was compositionally closed with respect to potassium and less volatile elements. The possibility remains open that 41K/39K ratios of microtektites vary systematically with location in the strewn field.

  10. ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION OF WEAK G BAND STARS: CNO AND Li ABUNDANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczak, Jens; Lambert, David L., E-mail: adamczak@astro.as.utexas.edu

    We determined the chemical composition of a large sample of weak G band stars-a rare class of G and K giants of intermediate mass with unusual abundances of C, N, and Li. We have observed 24 weak G band stars with the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory and derived spectroscopic abundances for C, N, O, and Li, as well as for selected elements from Na-Eu. The results show that the atmospheres of weak G band stars are highly contaminated with CN-cycle products. The C underabundance is about a factor of 20 larger than for normalmore » giants and the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratio approaches the CN-cycle equilibrium value. In addition to the striking CN-cycle signature the strong N overabundance may indicate the presence of partially ON-cycled material in the atmospheres of the weak G band stars. The exact mechanism responsible for the transport of the elements to the surface has yet to be identified but could be induced by rapid rotation of the main sequence progenitors of the stars. The unusually high Li abundances in some of the stars are an indicator for Li production by the Cameron-Fowler mechanism. A quantitative prediction of a weak G band star's Li abundance is complicated by the strong temperature sensitivity of the mechanism and its participants. In addition to the unusual abundances of CN-cycle elements and Li, we find an overabundance of Na that is in accordance with the NeNa chain running in parallel with the CN cycle. Apart from these peculiarities, the element abundances in a weak G band star's atmosphere are consistent with those of normal giants.« less

  11. Atmospheric Composition of Weak G Band Stars: CNO and Li Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczak, Jens; Lambert, David L.

    2013-03-01

    We determined the chemical composition of a large sample of weak G band stars—a rare class of G and K giants of intermediate mass with unusual abundances of C, N, and Li. We have observed 24 weak G band stars with the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory and derived spectroscopic abundances for C, N, O, and Li, as well as for selected elements from Na-Eu. The results show that the atmospheres of weak G band stars are highly contaminated with CN-cycle products. The C underabundance is about a factor of 20 larger than for normal giants and the 12C/13C ratio approaches the CN-cycle equilibrium value. In addition to the striking CN-cycle signature the strong N overabundance may indicate the presence of partially ON-cycled material in the atmospheres of the weak G band stars. The exact mechanism responsible for the transport of the elements to the surface has yet to be identified but could be induced by rapid rotation of the main sequence progenitors of the stars. The unusually high Li abundances in some of the stars are an indicator for Li production by the Cameron-Fowler mechanism. A quantitative prediction of a weak G band star's Li abundance is complicated by the strong temperature sensitivity of the mechanism and its participants. In addition to the unusual abundances of CN-cycle elements and Li, we find an overabundance of Na that is in accordance with the NeNa chain running in parallel with the CN cycle. Apart from these peculiarities, the element abundances in a weak G band star's atmosphere are consistent with those of normal giants.

  12. Germanium, Arsenic, and Selenium Abundances in Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Ian U.

    2012-09-01

    The elements germanium (Ge, Z = 32), arsenic (As, Z = 33), and selenium (Se, Z = 34) span the transition from charged-particle or explosive synthesis of the iron-group elements to neutron-capture synthesis of heavier elements. Among these three elements, only the chemical evolution of germanium has been studied previously. Here we use archive observations made with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope and observations from several ground-based facilities to study the chemical enrichment histories of seven stars with metallicities -2.6 <= [Fe/H] <= -0.4. We perform a standard abundance analysis of germanium, arsenic, selenium, and several other elements produced by neutron-capture reactions. When combined with previous derivations of germanium abundances in metal-poor stars, our sample reveals an increase in the [Ge/Fe] ratios at higher metallicities. This could mark the onset of the weak s-process contribution to germanium. In contrast, the [As/Fe] and [Se/Fe] ratios remain roughly constant. These data do not directly indicate the origin of germanium, arsenic, and selenium at low metallicity, but they suggest that the weak and main components of the s-process are not likely sources. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. This research made use of StarCAT, hosted by the Mikulski Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute (MAST). These data are associated with Programs GO-7348, GO-7433, GO-8197, GO-9048, GO-9455, and GO-9804.Based on data obtained from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Science Archive Facility. These data are associated with Programs 67.D-0439(A), 074.C-0364(A), 076.B-0055(A), and 080.D-0347(A).This research has made use of the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA), which is operated by

  13. Exploring the Milky Way Disk Abundance Transition Zone Rgc 10 kpc with Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Heather R.; Friel, E.; Pilachowski, C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies of the radial chemical abundance distribution among stellar populations in the Galactic disk have shown a change in the abundance trend at galactocentric distance Rgc 10 kpc, as first noted by Twarog et al. (1997). Here the gradient in [Fe/H] with distance appears to vanish, with abundances of stars at greater distances dropping to [Fe/H] -0.3, independent of galactocentric distance. Much is still unknown about the exact nature of the transition from inner to outer disk, and it is still uncertain if the outer disk has had a distinct evolutionary history from that of the inner disk. While current chemical evolution models can well match the outer disk abundances (Cescutti et al. 2007), abundances of many more stars at Rgc 9-12 kpc must be determined to better characterize the nature of the transition from inner to outer disk. We have initiated a survey of abundances of 20 open clusters in this region using spectroscopy obtained with the WIYN, KPNO 4m, CTIO 4m and Hobby-Eberly telescopes. Chemical abundances are determined for Fe, O, Na, and alpha-elements, among others. Results for the survey to date are presented here.

  14. Beryllium Abundances of Six Halo Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorburn, J. A.; Hobbs, L. M.

    1996-05-01

    High signal-to-noise (S/N≍80), high-resolution (R≍25 000) spectra of six warm halo stars have been obtained in the Be II λ3130 region. Beryllium abundances derived through spectrum synthesis are generally consistent with [Be/Fe]≍0 and probably do not support the simplest models of cosmic-ray nucleosynthesis. Alternative scenarios whereby energetic C, N, and O nuclei collide with ambient He nuclei-rather than the converse-are more compatible with the data. However, these observations constrain net Be production only. If Galactic astration of Be is important, then Be production mechanisms must be proportionally more efficient. In the case of the near twin stars HD 94028 and HD 194598, log(Be/H) differs by 0.3 dex despite effectively identical Li abundances. A difference in initial Be abundance rather than stellar depletion is proposed to account for the discrepancy. Our Be abundances are typically ˜0.3 dex lower than those reported by Boesgaard & King [Al, 106, 2309 (1993)] for five stars in common. The disparity in Be abundance scales is due to the combined influences of differences in assigned stellar parameters and overestimated Be ii λ3131.066 line strengths in the Boesgaard & King study. Systematic errors in published Be abundances may be greater than has previously been suggested. A consistency check of the line list used for the synthesis reveals an unidentified blending feature of moderate strength slightly blueward of λ3131.066 in the Sun. Results of the present investigation are not significantly influenced by the ambiguous identity of the contaminating feature. However, studies which include cooler, more metal-rich stars may, as a consequence of neglecting or improperly identifying this line, report incorrect slopes of log(Be/H) vs [Fe/H] or erroneously large scatter in log(Be/H).

  15. Variability in Abundances of Meteorites in the Ordovician

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, P. R.; Schmitz, B.; Kita, N.

    2017-12-01

    The knowledge of the flux of extraterrestrial material throughout Earth's history is of great interest to reconstruct the collisional evolution of the asteroid belt. Here, we present a review of our investigations of the nature of the meteorite flux to Earth in the Ordovician, one of the best-studied time periods for extraterrestrial matter in the geological record [1]. We base our studies on compositions of extraterrestrial chromite and chrome-spinel extracted by acid dissolution from condensed marine limestone from Sweden and Russia [1-3]. By analyzing major and minor elements with EDS and WDS, and three oxygen isotopes with SIMS we classify the recovered meteoritic materials. Today, the L and H chondrites dominate the meteorite and coarse micrometeorite flux. Together with the rarer LL chondrites they have a type abundance of 80%. In the Ordovician it was very different: starting from 466 Ma ago 99% of the flux was comprised of L chondrites [2]. This was a result of the collisional breakup of the parent asteroid. This event occurred close to an orbital resonance in the asteroid belt and showered Earth with >100x more L chondritic material than today during more than 1 Ma. Although the flux is much lower at present, L chondrites are still the dominant type of meteorites that fall today. Before the asteroid breakup event 467 Ma ago the three groups of ordinary chondrites had about similar abundances. Surprisingly, they were possibly surpassed in abundance by achondrites, materials from partially and fully differentiated asteroids [3]. These achondrites include HED meteorites, which are presumably fragments released during the formation of the Rheasilvia impact structure 1 Ga ago on asteroid 4 Vesta. The enhanced abundance of LL chondrites is possibly a result of the Flora asteroid family forming event at 1 Ga ago. The higher abundance of primitive achondrites was likely due to smaller asteroid family forming events that have not been identified yet but that did

  16. Oxygen Abundances in the Rings of Polar-Ring Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, I. R.; Eskridge, P. B.; Pogge, R. W.

    2003-05-01

    Polar ring galaxies (PRGs) are typically early-type (S0 or E) galaxies surrounded by rings of gas, dust, and stars orbiting nearly perpendicular to the principle plane of the host galaxy (Whitmore et al. 1990 AJ 100 1489). Given that PRGs have two separate, perpendicular axes of rotation, it is clear on dynamical grounds that PRGs are the products of merger events between two galaxies, but are observed in a state where two distinct kinematic and morphological structures are still apparent. As such, they present a unique opportunity to study merger events in systems where the debris is not confused with material from the host. Our understanding of the relative importance of polar ring systems in the overall process of galaxy evolution is confounded by our lack of knowledge regarding the typical lifetimes and evolutionary histories of polar rings. A crucial factor for understanding the formation and evolution of PRGs is information regarding the elemental abundances of the ring material. Polar rings are typically rich in {\\protectH 2} regions. Optical spectroscopy of these {\\protectH 2} regions can tell us their density, temperature, and oxygen abundance. Our earlier work (Eskridge & Pogge 1997 ApJ 486 259) revealed roughly Solar oxygen abundances for {\\protectH 2} regions in the polar ring of NGC 2685. We have extended this project, and now have spectra for six PRGs. Analysis of the data for II Zw 73 and UGC 7576 reveal the polar rings of these galaxies to have {\\protectH 2} region oxygen abundances in the range 0.3 to 0.6 Solar, substantially less than found for NGC 2685. Abundances in this range are much easier to explain with conventional models of chemical enrichment and polar ring formation. We shall present results for our full sample. Taken as a whole, this sample will provide a clear foundation for the typical chemical enrichment patterns in polar rings, and thus provide a clearer understanding of the formation and evolution of these curious objects. We

  17. Relative coronal abundances derived from X-ray observations 3: The effect of cascades on the relative intensity of Fe (XVII) line fluxes, and a revised iron abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, A. B. C., Jr.; Rugge, H. R.; Weiss, K.

    1974-01-01

    Permitted lines in the optically thin coronal X-ray spectrum were analyzed to find the distribution of coronal material, as a function of temperature, without special assumptions concerning coronal conditions. The resonance lines of N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, and Ar which dominate the quiet coronal spectrum below 25A were observed. Coronal models were constructed and the relative abundances of these elements were determined. The intensity in the lines of the 2p-3d transitions near 15A was used in conjunction with these coronal models, with the assumption of coronal excitation, to determine the Fe XVII abundance. The relative intensities of the 2p-3d Fe XVII lines observed in the corona agreed with theoretical prediction. Using a more complete theoretical model, and higher resolution observations, a revised calculation of iron abundance relative to hydrogen of 0.000026 was made.

  18. ABUNDANT OR RARE? A HYBRID APPROACH FOR DETERMINING SPECIES RELATIVE ABUNDANCE AT AN ECOREGOIONAL SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Everyone knows what abundant and rare species are, but quantifying the concept proves elusive. As part of an EPA/USGS project to assess near-coastal species vulnerability to climate change affects, we designed a hybrid approach to determine species relative abundance at an ecoreg...

  19. ABUNDANT OR RARE? A HYBRID APPROACH FOR DETERMINING SPECIES RELATIVE ABUNDANCE AT AN ECOREGOIONAL SCALE - 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    Everyone knows what abundant and rare species are, but quantifying the concept proves elusive. As part of an EPA/USGS project to assess near-coastal species vulnerability to climate change affects, we designed a hybrid approach to determine species relative abundance at an ecoreg...

  20. Highly siderophile elements in chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horan, M.F.; Walker, R.J.; Morgan, J.W.; Grossman, J.N.; Rubin, A.E.

    2003-01-01

    The abundances of the highly siderophile elements (HSE), Re, Os, Ir, Ru, Pt and Pd, were determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry for bulk samples of 13 carbonaceous chondrites, 13 ordinary chondrites and 9 enstatite chondrites. These data are coupled with corresponding 187Re-187Os isotopic data reported by Walker et al. [Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2002] in order to constrain the nature and timing of chemical fractionation relating to these elements in the early solar system. The suite of chondrites examined displays considerable variations in absolute abundances of the HSE, and in the ratios of certain HSE. Absolute abundances of the HSE vary by nearly a factor of 80 among the chondrite groups, although most vary within a factor of only 2. Variations in concentration largely reflect heterogeneities in the sample aliquants. Different aliquants of the same chondrite may contain variable proportions of metal and/or refractory inclusions that are HSE-rich, and sulfides that are HSE-poor. The relatively low concentrations of the HSE in CI1 chondrites likely reflect dilution by the presence of volatile components. Carbonaceous chondrites have Re/Os ratios that are, on average, approximately 8% lower than ratios for ordinary and enstatite chondrites. This is also reflected in 187Os/188Os ratios that are approximately 3% lower for carbonaceous chondrites than for ordinary and enstatite chondrites. Given the similarly refractory natures of Re and Os, this fractionation may have occurred within a narrow range of high temperatures, during condensation of these elements from the solar nebula. Superimposed on this major fractionation are more modest movements of Re or Os that occurred within the last 0-2 Ga, as indicated by minor open-system behavior of the Re-Os isotope systematics of some chondrites. The relative abundances of other HSE can also be used to discriminate among the major classes of chondrites. For example, in comparison to the enstatite chondrites

  1. In Abundance: Networked Participatory Practices as Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Bonnie E.

    2015-01-01

    In an era of knowledge abundance, scholars have the capacity to distribute and share ideas and artifacts via digital networks, yet networked scholarship often remains unrecognized within institutional spheres of influence. Using ethnographic methods including participant observation, interviews, and document analysis, this study investigates…

  2. Cosmological evolution of the nitrogen abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vangioni, Elisabeth; Dvorkin, Irina; Olive, Keith A.; Dubois, Yohan; Molaro, Paolo; Petitjean, Patrick; Silk, Joe; Kimm, Taysun

    2018-06-01

    The abundance of nitrogen in the interstellar medium is a powerful probe of star formation processes over cosmological time-scales. Since nitrogen can be produced both in massive and intermediate-mass stars with metallicity-dependent yields, its evolution is challenging to model, as evidenced by the differences between theoretical predictions and observations. In this work, we attempt to identify the sources of these discrepancies using a cosmic evolution model. To further complicate matters, there is considerable dispersion in the abundances from observations of damped Lyα absorbers (DLAs) at z ˜ 2-3. We study the evolution of nitrogen with a detailed cosmic chemical evolution model and find good agreement with these observations, including the relative abundances of (N/O) and (N/Si). We find that the principal contribution of nitrogen comes from intermediate-mass stars, with the exception of systems with the lowest N/H, where nitrogen production might possibly be dominated by massive stars. This last result could be strengthened if stellar rotation which is important at low metallicity can produce significant amounts of nitrogen. Moreover, these systems likely reside in host galaxies with stellar masses below 108.5 M⊙. We also study the origin of the observed dispersion in nitrogen abundances using the cosmological hydrodynamical simulations Horizon-AGN. We conclude that this dispersion can originate from two effects: difference in the masses of the DLA host galaxies, and difference in their position inside the galaxy.

  3. The Abundance of Large Arcs From CLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Coe, Dan A.; Clash Team

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an automated arc-finding algorithm to perform a rigorous comparison of the observed and simulated abundance of large lensed background galaxies (a.k.a arcs). We use images from the CLASH program to derive our observed arc abundance. Simulated CLASH images are created by performing ray tracing through mock clusters generated by the N-body simulation calibrated tool -- MOKA, and N-body/hydrodynamic simulations -- MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH X-ray selected sample. We derive a lensing efficiency of 15 ± 3 arcs per cluster for the X-ray selected CLASH sample and 4 ± 2 arcs per cluster for the simulated sample. The marginally significant difference (3.0 σ) between the results for the observations and the simulations can be explained by the systematically smaller area with magnification larger than 3 (by a factor of ˜4) in both MOKA and MUSIC mass models relative to those derived from the CLASH data. Accounting for this difference brings the observed and simulated arc statistics into full agreement. We find that the source redshift distribution does not have big impact on the arc abundance but the arc abundance is very sensitive to the concentration of the dark matter halos. Our results suggest that the solution to the "arc statistics problem" lies primarily in matching the cluster dark matter distribution.

  4. Clonal growth and plant species abundance.

    PubMed

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Zuzana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2014-08-01

    Both regional and local plant abundances are driven by species' dispersal capacities and their abilities to exploit new habitats and persist there. These processes are affected by clonal growth, which is difficult to evaluate and compare across large numbers of species. This study assessed the influence of clonal reproduction on local and regional abundances of a large set of species and compared the predictive power of morphologically defined traits of clonal growth with data on actual clonal growth from a botanical garden. The role of clonal growth was compared with the effects of seed reproduction, habitat requirements and growth, proxied both by LHS (leaf-height-seed) traits and by actual performance in the botanical garden. Morphological parameters of clonal growth, actual clonal reproduction in the garden and LHS traits (leaf-specific area - height - seed mass) were used as predictors of species abundance, both regional (number of species records in the Czech Republic) and local (mean species cover in vegetation records) for 836 perennial herbaceous species. Species differences in habitat requirements were accounted for by classifying the dataset by habitat type and also by using Ellenberg indicator values as covariates. After habitat differences were accounted for, clonal growth parameters explained an important part of variation in species abundance, both at regional and at local levels. At both levels, both greater vegetative growth in cultivation and greater lateral expansion trait values were correlated with higher abundance. Seed reproduction had weaker effects, being positive at the regional level and negative at the local level. Morphologically defined traits are predictive of species abundance, and it is concluded that simultaneous investigation of several such traits can help develop hypotheses on specific processes (e.g. avoidance of self-competition, support of offspring) potentially underlying clonal growth effects on abundance. Garden

  5. Standard big bang nucleosynthesis and primordial CNO abundances after Planck

    SciTech Connect

    Coc, Alain; Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Vangioni, Elisabeth, E-mail: coc@csnsm.in2p3.fr, E-mail: uzan@iap.fr, E-mail: vangioni@iap.fr

    Primordial or big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is one of the three historical strong evidences for the big bang model. The recent results by the Planck satellite mission have slightly changed the estimate of the baryonic density compared to the previous WMAP analysis. This article updates the BBN predictions for the light elements using the cosmological parameters determined by Planck, as well as an improvement of the nuclear network and new spectroscopic observations. There is a slight lowering of the primordial Li/H abundance, however, this lithium value still remains typically 3 times larger than its observed spectroscopic abundance in halo starsmore » of the Galaxy. According to the importance of this ''lithium problem{sup ,} we trace the small changes in its BBN calculated abundance following updates of the baryonic density, neutron lifetime and networks. In addition, for the first time, we provide confidence limits for the production of {sup 6}Li, {sup 9}Be, {sup 11}B and CNO, resulting from our extensive Monte Carlo calculation with our extended network. A specific focus is cast on CNO primordial production. Considering uncertainties on the nuclear rates around the CNO formation, we obtain CNO/H ≈ (5-30)×10{sup -15}. We further improve this estimate by analyzing correlations between yields and reaction rates and identified new influential reaction rates. These uncertain rates, if simultaneously varied could lead to a significant increase of CNO production: CNO/H∼10{sup -13}. This result is important for the study of population III star formation during the dark ages.« less

  6. Thorium: Crustal abundance, joint production, and economic availability

    DOE PAGES

    Jordan, Brett W.; Eggert, Roderick G.; Dixon, Brent W.; ...

    2015-03-02

    Recently, interest in thorium's potential use in a nuclear fuel cycle has been renewed. Thorium is more abundant, at least on average, than uranium in the earth's crust and, therefore, could theoretically extend the use of nuclear energy technology beyond the economic limits of uranium resources. This paper provides an economic assessment of thorium availability by creating cumulative-availability and potential mining-industry cost curves, based on known thorium resources. These tools provide two perspectives on the economic availability of thorium. In the long term, physical quantities of thorium likely will not be a constraint on the development of a thorium fuelmore » cycle. In the medium term, however, thorium supply may be limited by constraints associated with its production as a by-product of rare earth elements and heavy mineral sands. As a result, environmental concerns, social issues, regulation, and technology also present issues for the medium and long term supply of thorium.« less

  7. Thermal relics: Do we know their abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Turner, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The relic abundance of a particle species that was once in thermal equilibrium in the expanding Universe depends upon a competition between the annihilation rate of the species and the expansion rate of the Universe. Assuming that the Universe is radiation dominated at early times the relic abundance is easy to compute and well known. At times earlier than about 1 sec after the bang there is little or no evidence that the Universe had to be radiation dominated, although that is the simplest and standard assumption. Because early-Universe relics are of such importance both to particle physics and to cosmology, three nonstandard possibilities are considered in detail for the Universe at the time a species' abundance froze in: energy density dominated by shear (i.e., anisotropic expansion), energy density dominated by some other nonrelativistic species, and energy density dominated by the kinetic energy of the scalar field that sets the gravitational constant in a Brans-Dicke-Jordan cosmological mode. In the second case the relic abundance is less than the standard value, while in the other two cases it can be enhanced by a significant factor. Two other more exotic possibilities for enhancing the relic abundance of a species are also mentioned--a larger value of Newton's constant at early times (e.g., as might occur in superstring or Kaluza-Klein theories) or a component of the energy density at early times with a very stiff equation of state (p greater than rho/3), e.g., a scalar field phi with potential V(phi) = Beta /phi/ (exp n) with n greater than 4. Results have implications for dark matter searches and searches for particle relics in general.

  8. Post-entry and volcanic contaminant abundances of zinc, copper, selenium, germanium and gallium in stratospheric micrometeorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Some fraction of Zn, Cu, Se, Ga and Ge in chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the lower stratosphere between 1981 May and 1984 June has a volcanic origin. I present a method to evaluate the extent of this unavoidable type of stratospheric contamination for individual particles. The mass-normalized abundances for Cu and Ge as a function of mass-normalized stratospheric residence time show their time-integrated stratospheric aerosol abundances. The Zn, Se and Ga abundances show a subdivision into two groups that span approximately two-year periods following the eruptions of the Mount St. Helens (1980 May) and El Chichon (1982 April) volcanoes. Elemental abundances in particles collected at the end of each two-year period indicate low, but not necessarily ambient, volcanic stratospheric abundances. Using this time-integrated baseline, I calculate the straospheric contaminant fractions in nine IDPs and show that Zn, SE and Ga abundances in chondritic IDPs derive in part from stratospheric aerosol contaminants. Post-entry elemental abundances (i.e., the amount that survived atmospheric entry heating of the IDP) show enrichments relative to the CI abundances but in a smaller number of particles than previously suggested.

  9. The Roles of Flares and Shocks in determining SEP Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Cohen, C. M. S.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.

    2007-01-01

    We examine solar energetic particle (SEP) event-averaged abundances of Fe relative to O and intensity versus time profiles at energies above 25 MeV/nucleon using the SIS instrument on ACE. These data are compared with solar wind conditions during each event and with estimates of the strength of the associated shock based on average travel times to 1 AU. We find that the majority of events with an Fe to 0 abundance ratio greater than two times the average 5-12 MeV/nuc value for large SEP events (0.134) occur in the western hemisphere. Furthermore, in most of these Fe-rich events the profiles peak within 12 hours of the associated flare, suggesting that some of the observed interplanetary particles are accelerated in these flares. The vast majority of events with Fe/O below 0.134 are influenced by interplanetary shock acceleration. We suggest that variations in elemental composition in SEP events mainly arise from the combination of flare particles and shock acceleration of these particles and/or the ambient medium.

  10. The RRc Stars: Chemical Abundances and Envelope Kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Sneden, Christopher; Adamów, Monika; Preston, George W.

    2017-10-10

    We analyzed series of spectra obtained for 12 stable RRc stars observed with the echelle spectrograph of the du Pont telescope at Las Campanas Observatory and we analyzed the spectra of RRc Blazhko stars discussed by Govea et al. We derived model atmosphere parameters, [Fe/H] metallicities, and [X/Fe] abundance ratios for 12 species of 9 elements. We co-added all spectra obtained during the pulsation cycles to increase signal to noise and demonstrate that these spectra give results superior to those obtained by co-addition in small phase intervals. The RRc abundances are in good agreement with those derived for the RRabmore » stars of Chadid et al. We used radial velocity (RV) measurements of metal lines and H α to construct variations of velocity with phase, and center-of-mass velocities. We used these to construct RV templates for use in low- to medium-resolution RV surveys of RRc stars. Additionally, we calculated primary accelerations, radius variations, and metal and H α velocity amplitudes, which we display as regressions against primary acceleration. We employ these results to compare the atmosphere structures of metal-poor RRc stars with their RRab counterparts. Finally, we use the RV data for our Blazhko stars and the Blazhko periods of Szczygieł and Fabrycky to falsify the Blazhko oblique rotator hypothesis.« less

  11. Peculiar Abundances Observed in the Hot Subdwarf OB Star LB 3241

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayer, Pierre; Dupuis, J.; Dixon, W. V.; Giguere, E.

    2010-01-01

    We present a spectral synthesis analysis of the hot subdwarf OB star LB 3241. The analysis is based on spectra obtained by the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). With an effective temperature of 41,000 K and a gravity of log g = 5.7, the position of LB 3241 in a Teff-log g diagram suggests that it has evolved from the extreme horizontal branch. Such stars evolve into white dwarfs without ascending the asymptotic giant branch after the helium core exhaustion. Arsenic (Z = 33), selenium (34), and tellurium (52) are observed in the atmosphere of LB 3241, and are a first for a hot subdwarf star. LB 3241 shows peculiar chemical abundances that exhibit trends observed in cooler sdB stars. The content of its atmosphere in light elements is about a factor ten lower than that of the Sun, except for nitrogen which has a solar abundance. The Fe abundance is consistent with a solar abundance, but abundances of elements beyond the iron peak (As, Se, Te, Pb) show enrichments over the solar values by factors ranging from 10 to 300. These observations suggest that competing mechanisms must counterbalance the effects of the downward diffusion. The FUSE observations also suggest that LB 3241 is a radial velocity variable.

  12. Trace elements in chondritic stratospheric particles - Zinc depletion as a possible indicator of atmospheric entry heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Major-element abundances in 11 C, C?, and TCA cosmic dust particles have been measured using SEM and TEM energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) systems. The Fe/Ni ratio, when coupled with major element abundances, appears to be a useful discriminator of cosmic particles. Three particles classified as C?, but having Fe/Ni peak height ratios similar to those measured on the powdered Allende meteorite sample in their HSC EDX spectra, exhibit chondritic minor-/trace-element abundance patterns, suggesting they are extraterrestrial. The one particle classified as C-type, but without detectable Ni in its JSC EDX spectrum, exhibits an apparently nonchondritic minor-/trace-element abundance pattern. A class of particles that are chondritic except for large depletions in the volatile elements Zn and S has been identified. It is likely that these particles condensed with a C1 abundance pattern and that Zn and S were removed by some subsequent process.

  13. Stellar Abundances for Galactic Archaeology Database. IV. Compilation of stars in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Takuma; Hidaka, Jun; Aoki, Wako; Katsuta, Yutaka; Yamada, Shimako; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.; Ohtani, Yukari; Masuyama, Miyu; Noda, Kazuhiro; Wada, Kentaro

    2017-10-01

    We have constructed a database of stars in Local Group galaxies using the extended version of the SAGA (Stellar Abundances for Galactic Archaeology) database that contains stars in 24 dwarf spheroidal galaxies and ultra-faint dwarfs. The new version of the database includes more than 4500 stars in the Milky Way, by removing the previous metallicity criterion of [Fe/H] ≤ -2.5, and more than 6000 stars in the Local Group galaxies. We examined the validity of using a combined data set for elemental abundances. We also checked the consistency between the derived distances to individual stars and those to galaxies as given in the literature. Using the updated database, the characteristics of stars in dwarf galaxies are discussed. Our statistical analyses of α-element abundances show that the change of the slope of the [α/Fe] relative to [Fe/H] (so-called "knee") occurs at [Fe/H] = -1.0 ± 0.1 for the Milky Way. The knee positions for selected galaxies are derived by applying the same method. The star formation history of individual galaxies is explored using the slope of the cumulative metallicity distribution function. Radial gradients along the four directions are inspected in six galaxies where we find no direction-dependence of metallicity gradients along the major and minor axes. The compilation of all the available data shows a lack of CEMP-s population in dwarf galaxies, while there may be some CEMP-no stars at [Fe/H] ≲ -3 even in the very small sample. The inspection of the relationship between Eu and Ba abundances confirms an anomalously Ba-rich population in Fornax, which indicates a pre-enrichment of interstellar gas with r-process elements. We do not find any evidence of anti-correlations in O-Na and Mg-Al abundances, which characterizes the abundance trends in the Galactic globular clusters.

  14. Abundance Analysis of 17 Planetary Nebulae from High-Resolution Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrard, Cameroun G.; Sterling, Nicholas C.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Madonna, Simone; Mashburn, Amanda

    2017-06-01

    We present an abundance analysis of 17 planetary nebulae (PNe) observed with the 2D-coudé echelle spectrograph on the 2.7-m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory. The spectra cover the wavelength range 3600--10,400 Å at a resolution R = 36,700, and are the first high-resolution optical spectra for many objects in our sample. The number of emission lines detected in individual nebulae range from ~125 to over 600. We derive temperatures, densities, and abundances from collisionally-excited lines using the PyNeb package (Luridiana et al. 2015, A&A, 573, A42) and the ionization correction factor scheme of Delgado-Inglada et al. (2014, MNRAS, 440, 536). The abundances of light elements agree with previous estimates for most of the PNe. Several objects exhibit emission lines of refractory elements such as K and Fe, and neutron-capture elements that can be enriched by the s-process. We find that K and Fe are depleted relative to solar by ~0.3--0.7~dex and 1-2 dex, respectively, and find evidence for s-process enrichments in 10 objects. Several objects in our sample exhibit C, N, and O recombination lines that are useful for abundance determinations. These transitions are used to compute abundance discrepancy factors (ADFs), the ratio of ionic abundances derived from permitted lines to those from collisionally-excited transitions. We explore relations among depletion factors, ADFs, s-process enrichment factors, and other nebular stellar and nebular properties. We acknowledge support from NSF awards AST-901432 and AST-0708429.

  15. Abundance patterns of evolved stars with Hipparcos parallaxes and ages based on the APOGEE data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y. P.; Chen, Y. Q.; Zhao, G.; Bari, M. A.; Zhao, J. K.; Tan, K. F.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the abundance patterns for four groups of stars at evolutionary phases from sub-giant to red clump (RC) and trace the chemical evolution of the disc by taking 21 individual elemental abundances from APOGEE and ages from evolutionary models with the aid of Hipparcos distances. We find that the abundances of six elements (Si, S, K, Ca, Mn and Ni) are similar from the sub-giant phase to the RC phase. In particular, we find that a group of stars with low [C/N] ratios, mainly from the second sequence of RC stars, show that there is a difference in the transfer efficiency of the C-N-O cycle between the main and the secondary RC sequences. We also compare the abundance patterns of C-N, Mg-Al and Na-O with giant stars in globular clusters from APOGEE and find that field stars follow similar patterns as M107, a metal-rich globular cluster with [M/H] ∼- 1.0, which shows that the self-enrichment mechanism represented by strong C-N, Mg-Al and Na-O anti-correlations may not be important as the metallicity reaches [M/H] > -1.0 dex. Based on the abundances of above-mentioned six elements and [Fe/H], we investigate age versus abundance relations and find some old super-metal-rich stars in our sample. Their properties of old age and being rich in metal are evidence for stellar migration. The age versus metallicity relations in low-[α/M] bins show unexpectedly positive slopes. We propose that the fresh metal-poor gas infalling on to the Galactic disc may be the precursor for this unexpected finding.

  16. Spectroscopic Analyses of Neutron Capture Elements in Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Julia E.

    The evolution of elements as a function or age throughout the Milky Way disk provides strong constraints for galaxy evolution models, and on star formation epochs. In an effort to provide such constraints, we conducted an investigation into r- and s-process elemental abundances for a large sample of open clusters as part of an optical follow-up to the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 near infrared survey. To obtain data for neutron capture abundance analysis, we conducted a long-term observing campaign spanning three years (2013-2016) using the McDonald Observatory Otto Struve 2.1-meter telescope and Sandiford Cass Echelle Spectrograph (SES, R(lambda/Deltalambda) ˜60,000). The SES provides a wavelength range of ˜1400 A, making it uniquely suited to investigate a number of other important chemical abundances as well as the neutron capture elements. For this study, we derive abundances for 18 elements covering four nucleosynthetic families- light, iron-peak, neutron capture and alpha-elements- for ˜30 open clusters within 6 kpc of the Sun with ages ranging from ˜80 Myr to ˜10 Gyr. Both equivalent width (EW) measurements and spectral synthesis methods were employed to derive abundances for all elements. Initial estimates for model stellar atmospheres- effective temperature and surface gravity- were provided by the APOGEE data set, and then re-derived for our optical spectra by removing abundance trends as a function of excitation potential and reduced width log(EW/lambda). With the exception of Ba II and Zr I, abundance analyses for all neutron capture elements were performed by generating synthetic spectra from the new stellar parameters. In order to remove molecular contamination, or blending from nearby atomic features, the synthetic spectra were modeled by a best-fit Gaussian to the observed data. Nd II shows a slight enhancement in all cluster stars, while other neutron capture elements follow solar abundance trends. Ba II shows a large cluster-to-cluster abundance spread

  17. Vesta's Elemental Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prettyman, T. H.; Beck, A. W.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, D. J.; McCoy, T. J.; McSween, H. Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peplowski, P. N.; Raymond, C. A.; Reedy, R. C.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Many lines of evidence (e.g. common geochemistry, chronology, O-isotope trends, and the presence of different HED rock types in polymict breccias) indicate that the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites originated from a single parent body. Meteorite studies show that this protoplanet underwent igneous differentiation to form a metallic core, an ultramafic mantle, and a basaltic crust. A spectroscopic match between the HEDs and 4 Vesta along with a plausible mechanism for their transfer to Earth, perhaps as chips off V-type asteroids ejected from Vesta's southern impact basin, supports the consensus view that many of these achondritic meteorites are samples of Vesta's crust and upper mantle. The HED-Vesta connection was put to the test by the NASA Dawn mission, which spent a year in close proximity to Vesta. Measurements by Dawn's three instruments, redundant Framing Cameras (FC), a Visible-InfraRed (VIR) spectrometer, and a Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND), along with radio science have strengthened the link. Gravity measurements by Dawn are consistent with a differentiated, silicate body, with a dense Fe-rich core. The range of pyroxene compositions determined by VIR overlaps that of the howardites. Elemental abundances determined by nuclear spectroscopy are also consistent with HED-compositions. Observations by GRaND provided a new view of Vesta inaccessible by telescopic observations. Here, we summarize the results of Dawn's geochemical investigation of Vesta and their implications.

  18. Deuterium Abundance in Consciousness and Current Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Elizabeth A.

    We utilize the deuterium-hydrogen abundances and their role in setting limits on the mass and other conditions of cosmogenesis and cosmological evolution. We calculate the dependence of a set of physical variables such as density, temperature, energy mass, entropy and other physical variable parameters through the evolution of the universe under the Schwarzschild conditions as a function from early to present time. Reconciliation with the 3°K and missing mass is made. We first examine the Schwarzschild condition; second, the geometrical constraints of a multidimensional Cartesian space on closed cosmologies, and third we will consider the cosmogenesis and evolution of the universe in a multidimensional Cartesian space, obeying the Schwarzschild condition. Implications of this model for matter creation are made. We also examine experimental evidence for closed versus open cosmologies; x-ray detection of the "missing mass" density. Also the interstellar deuterium abundance, along with the value of the Hubble constant set a general criterion on the value of the curvature constant, k. Once the value of the Hubble constant, H is determined, the deuterium abundance sets stringent restrictions on the value of the curvature constant k by an detailed discussion is presented. The experimental evidences for the determination of H and the primary set of coupled equations to determine D abundance is given. 'The value of k for an open, closed, or flat universe will be discussed in terms of the D abundance which will affect the interpretation of the Schwarzschild, black hole universe. We determine cosmology solutions to Einstein's field obeying the Schwarzschild solutions condition. With this model, we can form a reconciliation of the black hole, from galactic to cosmological scale. Continuous creation occurs at the dynamic blackhole plasma field. We term this new model the multiple big bang or "little whimper model". We utilize the deuteriumhydrogen abundances and their role in

  19. Boron Abundances Across the “Li-Be Dip” in the Hyades Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Lum, Michael G.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.; King, Jeremy R.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Somers, Garrett

    2016-10-01

    Dramatic deficiencies of Li in the mid-F dwarf stars of the Hyades cluster were discovered by Boesgaard & Tripicco. Boesgaard & King discovered corresponding, but smaller, deficiencies in Be in the same narrow temperature region in the Hyades. Using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, we investigate B abundances in the Hyades F stars to look for a potential B dip using the B I resonance line at 2496.8 Å. The light elements Li, Be, and B are destroyed inside stars at increasingly hotter temperatures: 2.5, 3.5, and 5 × 106 K, respectively. Consequently, these elements survive to increasingly greater depths in a star and their surface abundances indicate the depth and thoroughness of mixing in the star. We have (re)determined Li abundances/upper limits for 79 Hyades dwarfs, Be for 43 stars, and B for 5 stars. We find evidence for a small drop in the B abundance across the Li-Be dip. The B abundances for the four stars in the temperature range 6100-6730 K fit the B-Be correlation found previously by Boesgaard et al. Models of rotational mixing produce good agreement with the relative depletions of Be and B in the dip region. We have compared our nLTE B abundances for the three high B stars on either side of the Li-Be dip with those found by Duncan et al. for the two Hyades giants. This confirms the factor of 10 decline in the B abundance in the Hyades giants as predicted by dilution due to the deepening of the surface convection zone. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program #HST-G0-12294.

  20. BORON ABUNDANCES ACROSS THE “Li–Be DIP” IN THE HYADES CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Lum, Michael G.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.

    2016-10-10

    Dramatic deficiencies of Li in the mid-F dwarf stars of the Hyades cluster were discovered by Boesgaard and Tripicco. Boesgaard and King discovered corresponding, but smaller, deficiencies in Be in the same narrow temperature region in the Hyades. Using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope , we investigate B abundances in the Hyades F stars to look for a potential B dip using the B i resonance line at 2496.8 Å. The light elements Li, Be, and B are destroyed inside stars at increasingly hotter temperatures: 2.5, 3.5, and 5 × 10{sup 6} K, respectively. Consequently,more » these elements survive to increasingly greater depths in a star and their surface abundances indicate the depth and thoroughness of mixing in the star. We have (re)determined Li abundances/upper limits for 79 Hyades dwarfs, Be for 43 stars, and B for 5 stars. We find evidence for a small drop in the B abundance across the Li–Be dip. The B abundances for the four stars in the temperature range 6100–6730 K fit the B–Be correlation found previously by Boesgaard et al. Models of rotational mixing produce good agreement with the relative depletions of Be and B in the dip region. We have compared our nLTE B abundances for the three high B stars on either side of the Li–Be dip with those found by Duncan et al. for the two Hyades giants. This confirms the factor of 10 decline in the B abundance in the Hyades giants as predicted by dilution due to the deepening of the surface convection zone.« less

  1. Tungsten Abundances in Hawaiian Picrites: Implications for the Mantle Sources of Hawaiian Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, T. J.; Arevalo, R. D.; Walker, R. J.; McDonough, W. F.

    2008-12-01

    Tungsten abundances have been measured in a suite of Hawaiian picrites (MgO >13 wt.%) from nine Hawaiian shield volcanoes (Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Loihi, Koolau, Kilauea, Kohala, Lanai and Molokai). Tungsten concentrations in the parental melts for these volcanoes have been estimated via the intersection of linear W-MgO trends with the putative MgO content of the parental melt (~16 wt.%). Tungsten behaves as a highly incompatible trace element in mafic to ultramafic systems; thus, given an independent assessment of the degree of partial melting for each volcanic center, the W abundances in their mantle sources can be determined. The mantle sources for Hualalai, Kilauea, Kohala and Loihi have non- uniform estimated W abundances of 11, 13, 16 and 27 ng/g, respectively, giving an average source abundance of 17±5 ng/g. This average source abundance is nearly six times more enriched than Depleted MORB Mantle (DMM: 3.0±2.3 ng/g) and slightly elevated relative to the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE: 13±10 ng/g). The relatively high abundances of W in the Hawaiian sources relative to the DMM can potentially be explained as a consequence of crustal recycling. For example, incorporation of 30% oceanic crust (30 ng/g W), including 3% sediment (1500 ng/g W), into a DMM source could create the W enrichment observed in the Loihi source, consistent with estimates from earlier models based on other trace elements and isotope systems. The Hualalai source, however, has also been suggested to contain a substantial recycled component, as implied by similarly radiogenic 187Os/188Os, yet this source has the lowest estimated W abundance among the volcanic centers studied. The conflict between these results may: 1) reflect chemical differences among recycled components, 2) indicate a more complex history for Hualalai samples, e.g. involvement of a melt percolation component, or 3) implicate other sources of W.

  2. THE MYSTERIOUS CASE OF THE SOLAR ARGON ABUNDANCE NEAR SUNSPOTS IN FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P.

    Recently we discussed an enhancement of the abundance of Ar xiv relative to Ca xiv near a sunspot during a flare, observed in spectra recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft. The observed Ar xiv/Ca xiv ratio yields an argon/calcium abundance ratio seven times greater than expected from the photospheric abundance. Such a large abundance anomaly is unprecedented in the solar atmosphere. We interpreted this result as being due to an inverse first ionization potential (FIP) effect. In the published work, two lines of Ar xiv were observed, and one line was tentatively identified as anmore » Ar xi line. In this paper, we report observing a similar enhancement in a full-CCD EIS flare spectrum in 13 argon lines that lie within the EIS wavelength ranges. The observed lines include two Ar xi lines, four Ar xiii lines, six Ar xiv lines, and one Ar xv line. The enhancement is far less than reported in Doschek et al. but exhibits similar morphology. The argon abundance is close to a photospheric abundance in the enhanced area, and the abundance could be photospheric. This enhancement occurs in association with a sunspot in a small area only a few arcseconds (1″ = about 700 km) in size. There is no enhancement effect observed in the normally high-FIP sulfur and oxygen line ratios relative to lines of low-FIP elements available to EIS. Calculations of path lengths in the strongest enhanced area in Doschek et al. indicate a depletion of low-FIP elements.« less

  3. A Review of Stellar Abundance Databases and the Hypatia Catalog Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, Natalie Rose

    2018-01-01

    The astronomical community is interested in elements from lithium to thorium, from solar twins to peculiarities of stellar evolution, because they give insight into different regimes of star formation and evolution. However, while some trends between elements and other stellar or planetary properties are well known, many other trends are not as obvious and are a point of conflict. For example, stars that host giant planets are found to be consistently enriched in iron, but the same cannot be definitively said for any other element. Therefore, it is time to take advantage of large stellar abundance databases in order to better understand not only the large-scale patterns, but also the more subtle, small-scale trends within the data.In this overview to the special session, I will present a review of large stellar abundance databases that are both currently available (i.e. RAVE, APOGEE) and those that will soon be online (i.e. Gaia-ESO, GALAH). Additionally, I will discuss the Hypatia Catalog Database (www.hypatiacatalog.com) -- which includes abundances from individual literature sources that observed stars within 150pc. The Hypatia Catalog currently contains 72 elements as measured within ~6000 stars, with a total of ~240,000 unique abundance determinations. The online database offers a variety of solar normalizations, stellar properties, and planetary properties (where applicable) that can all be viewed through multiple interactive plotting interfaces as well as in a tabular format. By analyzing stellar abundances for large populations of stars and from a variety of different perspectives, a wealth of information can be revealed on both large and small scales.

  4. Light element geochemistry of the Apollo 16 site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, J. F.; Kaplan, I. R.; Petrowski, C.; Chang, S.

    1975-01-01

    The abundance and isotopic composition of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen, the abundance of helium and hydrogen, and the content of metallic iron are reported for lunar surface samples from the Apollo 16 landing site at Cayley-Descartes. The light elements show marked interstation variability at the site. The abundances in soils of C, N, He, and H are apparently controlled mainly by exposure to the solar wind, through implantation or stripping processes. Carbon abundances (but not observed isotopic distributions) are compatible with a model in which equilibrium is established after 10,000-100,000 yr between solar wind input and loss by proton stripping. Sulfur abundances in soils are apparently controlled by abundances in local country rocks, but the lunar S cycle is quite complex. A metallic iron component may have originated by solar wind reduction of lunar Fe(2+).

  5. High-resolution abundance analysis of the metallic-line star HR 7250

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmaslı, Aslı; Ünal, Kübraözge; Çalışkan, Şeyma

    2018-07-01

    We estimated the stellar parameters and chemical abundances of the highly neglected A-type star HR 7250. The star's high resolution spectrum, spanning a wavelength range from 3900 to 7900 Å, was obtained at the TÜBİTAK National Observatory. We derived the abundances of 14 elements (O, Na, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Sr, Y, and Ba) for HR 7250 from the unblended lines of the star's spectrum. Our analysis shows that HR 7250 is a chemically peculiar Am star. We also estimated its age and mass as 400 ± 70 Myr and 3.25 ± 0.17 M⊙ from evolutionary tracks and isochrones.

  6. Deuterium Abundance in the Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferlet, R.; Gry, C.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    1984-01-01

    The present situation of deuterium abundance evaluation in interstellar space is discussed, and it is shown that it should be or = .00001 by studying in more detail lambda the Sco line of sight and by observing two NaI interstellar components toward that star, it can be shown that the D/H evaluation made toward lambda Sco is in fact related to the local interstellar medium (less than 10 pc from the Sun). Because this evaluation is also or = .00001 it is in striking contrast with the one made toward alpha Aur (D/H or = .000018 confirming the fact that the deuterium abundance in the local interstellar medium varies by at least a factor of two over few parsecs.

  7. Precision measures of the primordial deuterium abundance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, R. J.; Pettini, M.; Jorgenson, R. A.; Murphy, M. T.; Steidel, C. C.

    Near-pristine damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs) are the ideal environments to measure the primordial abundance of deuterium. In this conference report, I summarise our ongoing research programme to obtain the most precise determination of the primordial deuterium abundance from five high redshift DLAs. From this sample, we derive (D/H)_p = (2.53±0.04)×105, corresponding to a baryon density 100 Omega_b ,0 h2 = 2.202±0.046 assuming the standard model of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. This value is in striking agreement with that measured from the temperature fluctuations imprinted on the cosmic microwave background. Although we find no strong evidence for new physics beyond the standard model, this line of research shows great promise in the near-future, when the next generation 30+ m telescopes equipped with echelle spectrographs come online.

  8. Lithium Abundance in M3 Red Giant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givens, Rashad; Pilachowski, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the abundance of lithium in the red giant star vZ 1050 (SK 291) in the globular cluster M3. A previous survey of giants in the cluster showed that like IV-101, vZ 1050 displays a prominent Li I 6707 Å feature. vZ 1050 lies on the blue side of the red giant branch about 1.3 magnitudes above the level of the horizontal branch, and may be an asymptotic giant branch star. A high resolution spectrum of M3 vZ1050 was obtained with the ARC 3.5m telescope and the ARC Echelle Spectrograph (ARCES). Atmospheric parameters were determined using Fe I and Fe II lines from the spectrum using the MOOG spectral analysis program, and the lithium abundance was determined using spectrum synthesis.

  9. Attenuation of species abundance distributions by sampling

    PubMed Central

    Shimadzu, Hideyasu; Darnell, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying biodiversity aspects such as species presence/ absence, richness and abundance is an important challenge to answer scientific and resource management questions. In practice, biodiversity can only be assessed from biological material taken by surveys, a difficult task given limited time and resources. A type of random sampling, or often called sub-sampling, is a commonly used technique to reduce the amount of time and effort for investigating large quantities of biological samples. However, it is not immediately clear how (sub-)sampling affects the estimate of biodiversity aspects from a quantitative perspective. This paper specifies the effect of (sub-)sampling as attenuation of the species abundance distribution (SAD), and articulates how the sampling bias is induced to the SAD by random sampling. The framework presented also reveals some confusion in previous theoretical studies. PMID:26064626

  10. ELEMENT MASSES IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Sibley, Adam R.; Katz, Andrea M.; Satterfield, Timothy J.

    Using our previously published element abundance or mass-fraction distributions in the Crab Nebula, we derived actual mass distributions and estimates for overall nebular masses of hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur. As with the previous work, computations were carried out for photoionization models involving constant hydrogen density and also constant nuclear density. In addition, employing new flux measurements for [Ni ii]  λ 7378, along with combined photoionization models and analytic computations, a nickel abundance distribution was mapped and a nebular stable nickel mass estimate was derived.

  11. Bacterial community structure and abundances of antibiotic resistance genes in heavy metals contaminated agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengli; Zhao, Xiaoxue; Li, Qingbo; Liu, Jia; Ding, Jizhe; Wu, Huiying; Zhao, Zongsheng; Ba, Yue; Cheng, Xuemin; Cui, Liuxin; Li, Hongping; Zhu, Jingyuan

    2018-04-01

    Soil contamination with heavy metals is a worldwide problem especially in China. The interrelation of soil bacterial community structure, antibiotic resistance genes, and heavy metal contamination in soil is still unclear. Here, seven agricultural areas (G1-G7) with heavy metal contamination were sampled with different distances (741 to 2556 m) to the factory. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Shannon index were used to analyze bacterial community diversity. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR was used to detect the relative abundance of ARGs sul1, sul2, tetA, tetM, tetW, one mobile genetic elements (MGE) inti1. Results showed that all samples were polluted by Cadmium (Cd), and some of them were polluted by lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn). DGGE showed that the most abundant bacterial species were found in G7 with the lightest heavy metal contamination. The results of the principal component analysis and clustering analysis both showed that G7 could not be classified with other samples. The relative abundance of sul1 was correlated with Cu, Zn concentration. Gene sul2 are positively related with total phosphorus, and tetM was associated with organic matter. Total gene abundances and relative abundance of inti1 both correlated with organic matter. Redundancy analysis showed that Zn and sul2 were significantly related with bacterial community structure. Together, our results indicate a complex linkage between soil heavy metal concentration, bacterial community composition, and some global disseminated ARG abundance.

  12. Revised Thorium Abundances for Lunar Red Spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagerty, J. J.; Lawrence, D. J.; Elphic, R. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Vaniman, D. T.; Hawke, B. R.

    2005-01-01

    Lunar red spots are features on the nearside of the Moon that are characterized by high albedo and by a strong absorption in the ultraviolet. These red spots include the Gruithuisen domes, the Mairan domes, Hansteen Alpha, the southern portion of Montes Riphaeus, Darney Chi and Tau, Helmet, and an area near the Lassell crater. It has been suggested that many of the red spots are extrusive, nonmare, volcanic features that could be composed of an evolved lithlogy enriched in thorium. In fact, Hawke et al. used morphological characteristics to show that Hansteen Alpha is a nonmare volcanic construct. However, because the apparent Th abundances (6 - 7 ppm) were lower than that expected for evolved rock types, Hawke et al. concluded that Hansteen Alpha was composed of an unknown rock type. Subsequent studies by Lawrence et al. used improved knowledge of the Th spatial distribution for small area features on the lunar surface to revisit the interpretation of Th abundances at the Hansteen Alpha red spot. As part of their study, Lawrence et al. used a forward modeling technique to show that the Th abundance at Hansteen Alpha is not 6 ppm, but is more likely closer to 25 ppm, a value consistent with evolved lithologies. This positive correlation between the morphology and composition of Hansteen Alpha provides support for the presence of evolved lithologies on the lunar surface. It is possible, however, that Hansteen Alpha represents an isolated occurrence of non-mare volcanism. That is why we have chosen to use the forward modeling technique of Lawrence et al. to investigate the Th abundances at other lunar red spots, starting with the Gruithuisen domes. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  13. A global database of ant species abundances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibb, Heloise; Dunn, Rob R.; Sanders, Nathan J.; Grossman, Blair F.; Photakis, Manoli; Abril, Silvia; Agosti, Donat; Andersen, Alan N.; Angulo, Elena; Armbrecht, Ingre; Arnan, Xavier; Baccaro, Fabricio B.; Bishop, Tom R.; Boulay, Raphael; Bruhl, Carsten; Castracani, Cristina; Cerda, Xim; Del Toro, Israel; Delsinne, Thibaut; Diaz, Mireia; Donoso, David A.; Ellison, Aaron M.; Enriquez, Martha L.; Fayle, Tom M.; Feener Jr., Donald H.; Fisher, Brian L.; Fisher, Robert N.; Fitpatrick, Matthew C.; Gomez, Cristanto; Gotelli, Nicholas J.; Gove, Aaron; Grasso, Donato A.; Groc, Sarah; Guenard, Benoit; Gunawardene, Nihara; Heterick, Brian; Hoffmann, Benjamin; Janda, Milan; Jenkins, Clinton; Kaspari, Michael; Klimes, Petr; Lach, Lori; Laeger, Thomas; Lattke, John; Leponce, Maurice; Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Longino, John; Lucky, Andrea; Luke, Sarah H.; Majer, Jonathan; McGlynn, Terrence P.; Menke, Sean; Mezger, Dirk; Mori, Alessandra; Moses, Jimmy; Munyai, Thinandavha Caswell; Pacheco, Renata; Paknia, Omid; Pearce-Duvet, Jessica; Pfeiffer, Martin; Philpott, Stacy M.; Resasco, Julian; Retana, Javier; Silva, Rogerio R.; Sorger, Magdalena D.; Souza, Jorge; Suarez, Andrew V.; Tista, Melanie; Vasconcelos, Heraldo L.; Vonshak, Merav; Weiser, Michael D.; Yates, Michelle; Parr, Catherine L.

    2017-01-01

    What forces structure ecological assemblages? A key limitation to general insights about assemblage structure is the availability of data that are collected at a small spatial grain (local assemblages) and a large spatial extent (global coverage). Here, we present published and unpublished data from 51,388 ant abundance and occurrence records of more than 2693 species and 7953 morphospecies from local assemblages collected at 4212 locations around the world. Ants were selected because they are diverse and abundant globally, comprise a large fraction of animal biomass in most terrestrial communities, and are key contributors to a range of ecosystem functions. Data were collected between 1949 and 2014, and include, for each geo-referenced sampling site, both the identity of the ants collected and details of sampling design, habitat type and degree of disturbance. The aim of compiling this dataset was to provide comprehensive species abundance data in order to test relationships between assemblage structure and environmental and biogeographic factors. Data were collected using a variety of standardised methods, such as pitfall and Winkler traps, and will be valuable for studies investigating large-scale forces structuring local assemblages. Understanding such relationships is particularly critical under current rates of global change. We encourage authors holding additional data on systematically collected ant assemblages, especially those in dry and cold, and remote areas, to contact us and contribute their data to this growing dataset.

  14. A global database of ant species abundances.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Heloise; Dunn, Rob R; Sanders, Nathan J; Grossman, Blair F; Photakis, Manoli; Abril, Silvia; Agosti, Donat; Andersen, Alan N; Angulo, Elena; Armbrecht, Inge; Arnan, Xavier; Baccaro, Fabricio B; Bishop, Tom R; Boulay, Raphaël; Brühl, Carsten; Castracani, Cristina; Cerda, Xim; Del Toro, Israel; Delsinne, Thibaut; Diaz, Mireia; Donoso, David A; Ellison, Aaron M; Enriquez, Martha L; Fayle, Tom M; Feener, Donald H; Fisher, Brian L; Fisher, Robert N; Fitzpatrick, Matthew C; Gómez, Crisanto; Gotelli, Nicholas J; Gove, Aaron; Grasso, Donato A; Groc, Sarah; Guenard, Benoit; Gunawardene, Nihara; Heterick, Brian; Hoffmann, Benjamin; Janda, Milan; Jenkins, Clinton; Kaspari, Michael; Klimes, Petr; Lach, Lori; Laeger, Thomas; Lattke, John; Leponce, Maurice; Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Longino, John; Lucky, Andrea; Luke, Sarah H; Majer, Jonathan; McGlynn, Terrence P; Menke, Sean; Mezger, Dirk; Mori, Alessandra; Moses, Jimmy; Munyai, Thinandavha Caswell; Pacheco, Renata; Paknia, Omid; Pearce-Duvet, Jessica; Pfeiffer, Martin; Philpott, Stacy M; Resasco, Julian; Retana, Javier; Silva, Rogerio R; Sorger, Magdalena D; Souza, Jorge; Suarez, Andrew; Tista, Melanie; Vasconcelos, Heraldo L; Vonshak, Merav; Weiser, Michael D; Yates, Michelle; Parr, Catherine L

    2017-03-01

    What forces structure ecological assemblages? A key limitation to general insights about assemblage structure is the availability of data that are collected at a small spatial grain (local assemblages) and a large spatial extent (global coverage). Here, we present published and unpublished data from 51 ,388 ant abundance and occurrence records of more than 2,693 species and 7,953 morphospecies from local assemblages collected at 4,212 locations around the world. Ants were selected because they are diverse and abundant globally, comprise a large fraction of animal biomass in most terrestrial communities, and are key contributors to a range of ecosystem functions. Data were collected between 1949 and 2014, and include, for each geo-referenced sampling site, both the identity of the ants collected and details of sampling design, habitat type, and degree of disturbance. The aim of compiling this data set was to provide comprehensive species abundance data in order to test relationships between assemblage structure and environmental and biogeographic factors. Data were collected using a variety of standardized methods, such as pitfall and Winkler traps, and will be valuable for studies investigating large-scale forces structuring local assemblages. Understanding such relationships is particularly critical under current rates of global change. We encourage authors holding additional data on systematically collected ant assemblages, especially those in dry and cold, and remote areas, to contact us and contribute their data to this growing data set. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  15. 2015-2016 Palila abundance estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Camp, Richard J.; Brinck, Kevin W.; Banko, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The palila (Loxioides bailleui) population was surveyed annually during 1998−2016 on Mauna Kea Volcano to determine abundance, population trend, and spatial distribution. In the latest surveys, the 2015 population was estimated at 852−1,406 birds (point estimate: 1,116) and the 2016 population was estimated at 1,494−2,385 (point estimate: 1,934). Similar numbers of palila were detected during the first and subsequent counts within each year during 2012−2016; the proportion of the total annual detections in each count ranged from 46% to 56%; and there was no difference in the detection probability due to count sequence. Furthermore, conducting repeat counts improved the abundance estimates by reducing the width of the confidence intervals between 9% and 32% annually. This suggests that multiple counts do not affect bird or observer behavior and can be continued in the future to improve the precision of abundance estimates. Five palila were detected on supplemental survey stations in the Ka‘ohe restoration area, outside the core survey area but still within Palila Critical Habitat (one in 2015 and four in 2016), suggesting that palila are present in habitat that is recovering from cattle grazing on the southwest slope. The average rate of decline during 1998−2016 was 150 birds per year. Over the 18-year monitoring period, the estimated rate of change equated to a 58% decline in the population.

  16. How selection structures species abundance distributions

    PubMed Central

    Magurran, Anne E.; Henderson, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    How do species divide resources to produce the characteristic species abundance distributions seen in nature? One way to resolve this problem is to examine how the biomass (or capacity) of the spatial guilds that combine to produce an abundance distribution is allocated among species. Here we argue that selection on body size varies across guilds occupying spatially distinct habitats. Using an exceptionally well-characterized estuarine fish community, we show that biomass is concentrated in large bodied species in guilds where habitat structure provides protection from predators, but not in those guilds associated with open habitats and where safety in numbers is a mechanism for reducing predation risk. We further demonstrate that while there is temporal turnover in the abundances and identities of species that comprise these guilds, guild rank order is conserved across our 30-year time series. These results demonstrate that ecological communities are not randomly assembled but can be decomposed into guilds where capacity is predictably allocated among species. PMID:22787020

  17. The GAPS programme with HARPS-N at TNG. X. Differential abundances in the XO-2 planet-hosting binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biazzo, K.; Gratton, R.; Desidera, S.; Lucatello, S.; Sozzetti, A.; Bonomo, A. S.; Damasso, M.; Gandolfi, D.; Affer, L.; Boccato, C.; Borsa, F.; Claudi, R.; Cosentino, R.; Covino, E.; Knapic, C.; Lanza, A. F.; Maldonado, J.; Marzari, F.; Micela, G.; Molaro, P.; Pagano, I.; Pedani, M.; Pillitteri, I.; Piotto, G.; Poretti, E.; Rainer, M.; Santos, N. C.; Scandariato, G.; Zanmar Sanchez, R.

    2015-11-01

    Binary stars hosting exoplanets are a unique laboratory where chemical tagging can be performed to measure the elemental abundances of both stellar components with high accuracy, with the aim to investigate the formation of planets and their subsequent evolution. Here, we present a high-precision differential abundance analysis of the XO-2 wide stellar binary based on high-resolution HARPS-N at TNG spectra. Both components are very similar K-dwarfs and host planets. Since they formed presumably within the same molecular cloud, we expect that they possess the same initial elemental abundances. We investigated whether planets can cause some chemical imprints in the stellar atmospheric abundances. We measure abundances of 25 elements for both stars with a range of condensation temperature TC = 40-1741 K, achieving typical precisions of ~0.07 dex. The northern component shows abundances in all elements higher by +0.067 ± 0.032 dex on average, with a mean difference of +0.078 dex for elements with TC > 800 K. The significance of the XO-2N abundance difference relative to XO-2S is at the 2σ level for almost all elements. We discuss that this result might be interpreted as the signature of the ingestion of material by XO-2N or depletion in XO-2S that is due to locking of heavy elements by the planetary companions. We estimate a mass of several tens of M⊕ in heavy elements. The difference in abundances between XO-2N and XO-2S shows a positive correlation with the condensation temperatures of the elements, with a slope of (4.7 ± 0.9) × 10-5 dex K-1, which could mean that both components have not formed terrestrial planets, but first experienced the accretion of rocky core interior to the subsequent giant planets. Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), operated on the island of La Palma by the INAF - Fundación Galileo Galilei at the Roche de los Muchachos Observatory of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) in the

  18. The Th and U abundances in chondritic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. H.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Papanastassiou, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    We present new analyses of Th-232/U-238 in CI and CM meteorites. The relative abundance of these nuclides is important in estimates of the age of r-process elements. The cosmochronology based upon the Th-232/U-238 ratio (kappa) depends on the precise determinations of these two different elements in meteorites and on the production ratios. Both parameters are subject to substantial errors. Recent recalculations of this chronology have used selected values from compilations but do not adequately address the errors in terms of a reliable data base. Morgan and Lovering provided extensive neutron activation analyses for ordinary chondrites which yield an average kappa of 3.6 +/- 0.4. Their work on carbonaceous chondrites showed a wide range in kappa from 2 to 6. More recent investigations by isotopic dilution have established the following: (1) highly variable kappa from 2.7 to 11 in Allende Ca-Al-rich inclusions and a value of 3.6 in the Orgueil CI1 chondrite; (2) a range from 2.71 to 6.63 for 7 L-type chondrites and a range from 2.7 to 4.4 for 6 L, H, and LL chondrites. A further investigation of this subject matter is presented.

  19. The solar photospheric abundance of hafnium and thorium. Results from CO5BOLD 3D hydrodynamic model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, E.; Sbordone, L.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Bonifacio, P.; Steffen, M.; Behara, N. T.

    2008-05-01

    Context: The stable element hafnium (Hf) and the radioactive element thorium (Th) were recently suggested as a suitable pair for radioactive dating of stars. The applicability of this elemental pair needs to be established for stellar spectroscopy. Aims: We aim at a spectroscopic determination of the abundance of Hf and Th in the solar photosphere based on a CO5BOLD 3D hydrodynamical model atmosphere. We put this into a wider context by investigating 3D abundance corrections for a set of G- and F-type dwarfs. Methods: High-resolution, high signal-to-noise solar spectra were compared to line synthesis calculations performed on a solar CO5BOLD model. For the other atmospheres, we compared synthetic spectra of CO5BOLD 3D and associated 1D models. Results: For Hf we find a photospheric abundance A(Hf) = 0.87 ± 0.04, in good agreement with a previous analysis, based on 1D model atmospheres. The weak Th II 401.9 nm line constitutes the only Th abundance indicator available in the solar spectrum. It lies in the red wing of a Ni-Fe blend exhibiting a non-negligible convective asymmetry. Accounting for the asymmetry-related additional absorption, we obtain A(Th) = 0.08 ± 0.03, consistent with the meteoritic abundance, and about 0.1 dex lower than obtained in previous photospheric abundance determinations. Conclusions: Only for the second time, to our knowledge, has a non-negligible effect of convective line asymmetries on an abundance derivation been highlighted. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations should be employed to measure Th abundances in dwarfs if similar blending is present, as in the solar case. In contrast, 3D effects on Hf abundances are small in G- to mid F-type dwarfs and sub-giants, and 1D model atmospheres can be conveniently used.

  20. Abundant Solar Nebula Solids in Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Clemett, S.

    2016-01-01

    Comets have been proposed to consist of unprocessed interstellar materials together with a variable amount of thermally annealed interstellar grains. Recent studies of cometary solids in the laboratory have shown that comets instead consist of a wide range of materials from across the protoplanetary disk, in addition to a minor complement of interstellar materials. These advances were made possible by the return of direct samples of comet 81P/Wild 2 coma dust by the NASA Stardust mission and recent advances in microscale analytical techniques. Isotopic studies of 'cometary' chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and comet 81P/Wild 2 Stardust samples show that preserved interstellar materials are more abundant in comets than in any class of meteorite. Identified interstellar materials include sub-micron-sized presolar silicates, oxides, and SiC dust grains and some fraction of the organic material that binds the samples together. Presolar grain abundances reach 1 weight percentage in the most stardust-rich CP-IDPs, 50 times greater than in meteorites. Yet, order of magnitude variations in presolar grain abundances among CP-IDPs suggest cometary solids experienced significant variations in the degree of processing in the solar nebula. Comets contain a surprisingly high abundance of nebular solids formed or altered at high temperatures. Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples include 10-40 micron-sized, refractory Ca- Al-rich inclusion (CAI)-, chondrule-, and ameboid olivine aggregate (AOA)-like materials. The O isotopic compositions of these refractory materials are remarkably similar to their meteoritic counterparts, ranging from 5 percent enrichments in (sup 16) O to near-terrestrial values. Comet 81P/Wild 2 and CP-IDPs also contain abundant Mg-Fe crystalline and amorphous silicates whose O isotopic compositions are also consistent with Solar System origins. Unlike meteorites, that are dominated by locally-produced materials, comets appear to be composed of

  1. Abundance analysis of the supergiant stars HD 80057 and HD 80404 based on their UVES Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanrıverdi, T.; Baştürk, Ö.

    2016-08-01

    This study presents elemental abundances of the early A-type supergiant HD 80057 and the late A-type supergiant HD 80404. High resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectra published by the UVES Paranal Observatory Project (Bagnulo et al., 2003) were analyzed to compute their elemental abundances using ATLAS9 (Kurucz, 1993; 2005; Sbordone et al., 2004). In our analysis we assumed local thermodynamic equilibrium. The atmospheric parameters of HD 80057 used in this study are from Firnstein and Przybilla (2012), and that of HD 80404 are derived from spectral energy distribution, ionization equilibria of Cr I/II and Fe I/II, the fits to the wings of Balmer and Paschen lines as Teff = 7700 ± 150 K and log g = 1.60 ± 0.15 (in cgs). The microturbulent velocities of HD 80057 and HD 80404 have been determined as 4.3 ± 0.1 and 2.2 ± 0.0 km s^-1, respectively. The rotational velocities are 15 ± 1 and 7 ± 2 km s^-1 and their macroturbulence velocities are 24 ± 2 and 2 ± 1 km s^1. We have given the abundances of 25 ions of 19 elements for HD 80057 and 36 ions of 25 elements for HD 80404. The abundances are close to solar values, except for some elements (Na, Sc, Ti, V, Ba, and Sr). We have found the metallicities [M/H] for HD 80057 and HD 80404 as -0.16 ± 0.24 and -0.04 ± 0.16 dex, respectively. The evolutionary status of these stars are discussed and their nitrogen-to-carbon (N/C) and nitrogen-to-oxygen (N/O) ratios show that they are in their blue supergiant phase before the red supergiant region.

  2. Solar particle abundances at energies of greater than 1 MeV per nucleon and the role of interplanetary shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Reames, D. V.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1991-01-01

    The abundances of elements in large solar energetic-particle events in the energy range of 2-12 MeV per nucleon are examined. It is confirmed that the abundances relative to mean values vary approximately monotonically as a function of mass, except for He-4; some events show a gradual depletion of heavy ions, whereas a small number displays a gradual increase. A further organization of abundance data is shown, which depends on the longitude of the source region. Enhancements in Fe/C and other heavy elements relative to C occur when source regions are near west 60 deg; the enhancements are attributed to the sampling of a flare-heated material. Depletions of these elements are found to be greatest for source regions near central meridian; they are matched by a steepening of the spectrum and can be understood in terms of diffusive shock acceleration.

  3. Bi-Abundance Ionisation Structure of the Wolf-Rayet Planetary Nebula PB 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danehkar, A.

    2018-01-01

    The planetary nebula PB 8 around a [WN/WC]-hybrid central star is one of planetary nebulae with moderate abundance discrepancy factors (ADFs 2-3), which could be an indication of a tiny fraction of metal-rich inclusions embedded in the nebula (bi-abundance). In this work, we have constructed photoionisation models to reproduce the optical and infrared observations of the planetary nebula PB 8 using a non-LTE stellar model atmosphere ionising source. A chemically homogeneous model initially used cannot predict the optical recombination lines. However, a bi-abundance model provides a better fit to most of the observed optical recombination lines from N and O ions. The metal-rich inclusions in the bi-abundance model occupy 5.6% of the total volume of the nebula, and are roughly 1.7 times cooler and denser than the mean values of the surrounding nebula. The N/H and O/H abundance ratios in the metal-rich inclusions are 1.0 and 1.7 dex larger than the diffuse warm nebula, respectively. To reproduce the Spitzer spectral energy distribution of PB 8, dust grains with a dust-to-gas ratio of 0.01 (by mass) were also included. It is found that the presence of metal-rich inclusions can explain the heavy element optical recombination lines, while a dual-dust chemistry with different grain species and discrete grain sizes likely produces the infrared continuum of this planetary nebula. This study demonstrates that the bi-abundance hypothesis, which was examined in a few planetary nebulae with large abundance discrepancies (ADFs > 10), could also be applied to those typical planetary nebulae with moderate abundance discrepancies.

  4. A Large C+N+O Abundance Spread in Giant Stars of the Globular Cluster NGC 1851

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, David; Grundahl, Frank; D'Antona, Francesca; Karakas, Amanda I.; Lattanzio, John C.; Norris, John E.

    2009-04-01

    Abundances of C, N, and O are determined in four bright red giants that span the known abundance range for light (Na and Al) and s-process (Zr and La) elements in the globular cluster NGC 1851. The abundance sum C+N+O exhibits a range of 0.6 dex, a factor of 4, in contrast to other clusters in which no significant C+N+O spread is found. Such an abundance range offers support for the Cassisi et al. scenario in which the double subgiant branch populations are coeval but with different mixtures of C+N+O abundances. Further, the Na, Al, Zr, and La abundances are correlated with C+N+O, and therefore NGC 1851 is the first cluster to provide strong support for the scenario in which asymptotic giant branch stars are responsible for the globular cluster light element abundance variations. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 meter Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  5. On the interpretation and implications of nova abundances: An abundance of riches or an overabundance of enrichments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livio, Mario; Truran, James W.

    1994-01-01

    We reexamine the question of the frequency of occurrence of oxygen-neon-magnesium (ONeMg) degenerate dwarfs in classical nova systems, in light of recent observations which have been interpreted as suggesting that 'neon novae' can be associated with relatively low mass white dwarfs. Determinations of heavy-element concentrations in nova ejecta are reviewed, and possible interpretations of their origin are examined. We conclude that, of the 18 classical novae for which detailed abundance analyses are availble, only two (or possibly three) seem unambiguously to demand the presence of an underlying ONeMg white dwarf: V693 CrA 1981, V1370 Aql 1982, and possibly QU Vul 1984. Three other novae which exhibit significant neon enrichments, relative to their total heavy-element concentrations, are RR Pic 1925, V977, Sco 1989, and LMC 1990 No. 1. This result is entirely consistent with present frequency estimates, and our interpretation of the lower levels of enrichment in other systems explains, in a natural way, the existence of relatively low mass white dwarfs in some of the 'neon' novae.

  6. Can Occupancy–Abundance Models Be Used to Monitor Wolf Abundance?

    PubMed Central

    Latham, M. Cecilia; Latham, A. David M.; Webb, Nathan F.; Mccutchen, Nicole A.; Boutin, Stan

    2014-01-01

    Estimating the abundance of wild carnivores is of foremost importance for conservation and management. However, given their elusive habits, direct observations of these animals are difficult to obtain, so abundance is more commonly estimated from sign surveys or radio-marked individuals. These methods can be costly and difficult, particularly in large areas with heavy forest cover. As an alternative, recent research has suggested that wolf abundance can be estimated from occupancy–abundance curves derived from “virtual” surveys of simulated wolf track networks. Although potentially more cost-effective, the utility of this approach hinges on its robustness to violations of its assumptions. We assessed the sensitivity of the occupancy–abundance approach to four assumptions: variation in wolf movement rates, changes in pack cohesion, presence of lone wolves, and size of survey units. Our simulations showed that occupancy rates and wolf pack abundances were biased high if track surveys were conducted when wolves made long compared to short movements, wolf packs were moving as multiple hunting units as opposed to a cohesive pack, and lone wolves were moving throughout the surveyed landscape. We also found that larger survey units (400 and 576 km2) were more robust to changes in these factors than smaller survey units (36 and 144 km2). However, occupancy rates derived from large survey units rapidly reached an asymptote at 100% occupancy, suggesting that these large units are inappropriate for areas with moderate to high wolf densities (>15 wolves/1,000 km2). Virtually-derived occupancy–abundance relationships can be a useful method for monitoring wolves and other elusive wildlife if applied within certain constraints, in particular biological knowledge of the surveyed species needs to be incorporated into the design of the occupancy surveys. Further, we suggest that the applicability of this method could be extended by directly incorporating some of its

  7. Linking species abundance distributions in numerical abundance and biomass through simple assumptions about community structure.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Peter A; Magurran, Anne E

    2010-05-22

    Species abundance distributions (SADs) are widely used as a tool for summarizing ecological communities but may have different shapes, depending on the currency used to measure species importance. We develop a simple plotting method that links SADs in the alternative currencies of numerical abundance and biomass and is underpinned by testable predictions about how organisms occupy physical space. When log numerical abundance is plotted against log biomass, the species lie within an approximately triangular region. Simple energetic and sampling constraints explain the triangular form. The dispersion of species within this triangle is the key to understanding why SADs of numerical abundance and biomass can differ. Given regular or random species dispersion, we can predict the shape of the SAD for both currencies under a variety of sampling regimes. We argue that this dispersion pattern will lie between regular and random for the following reasons. First, regular dispersion patterns will result if communities are comprised groups of organisms that use different components of the physical space (e.g. open water, the sea bed surface or rock crevices in a marine fish assemblage), and if the abundance of species in each of these spatial guilds is linked to the way individuals of varying size use the habitat. Second, temporal variation in abundance and sampling error will tend to randomize this regular pattern. Data from two intensively studied marine ecosystems offer empirical support for these predictions. Our approach also has application in environmental monitoring and the recognition of anthropogenic disturbance, which may change the shape of the triangular region by, for example, the loss of large body size top predators that occur at low abundance.

  8. Linking species abundance distributions in numerical abundance and biomass through simple assumptions about community structure

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Peter A.; Magurran, Anne E.

    2010-01-01

    Species abundance distributions (SADs) are widely used as a tool for summarizing ecological communities but may have different shapes, depending on the currency used to measure species importance. We develop a simple plotting method that links SADs in the alternative currencies of numerical abundance and biomass and is underpinned by testable predictions about how organisms occupy physical space. When log numerical abundance is plotted against log biomass, the species lie within an approximately triangular region. Simple energetic and sampling constraints explain the triangular form. The dispersion of species within this triangle is the key to understanding why SADs of numerical abundance and biomass can differ. Given regular or random species dispersion, we can predict the shape of the SAD for both currencies under a variety of sampling regimes. We argue that this dispersion pattern will lie between regular and random for the following reasons. First, regular dispersion patterns will result if communities are comprised groups of organisms that use different components of the physical space (e.g. open water, the sea bed surface or rock crevices in a marine fish assemblage), and if the abundance of species in each of these spatial guilds is linked to the way individuals of varying size use the habitat. Second, temporal variation in abundance and sampling error will tend to randomize this regular pattern. Data from two intensively studied marine ecosystems offer empirical support for these predictions. Our approach also has application in environmental monitoring and the recognition of anthropogenic disturbance, which may change the shape of the triangular region by, for example, the loss of large body size top predators that occur at low abundance. PMID:20071388

  9. Iron abundance in the hot DA white dwarfs Feige 24 and G191 B2B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vennes, Stephane; Chayer, Pierre; Thorstensen, John R.; Bowyer, Stuart; Shipman, Harry L.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to model calculations of the far- and extreme-UV line spectra of highly ionized Fe species (Fe IV, Fe V, and Fe VI) for hot high-gravity H-rich stars. A spectral analysis of 31 hr of exposure of the DA white dwarf Feige 24 with IUE in the echelle mode reveals the presence of Fe with an abundance relative to H by number of (5-10) x 10 exp -6 with an uncertainty dominated by the determination of stellar parameters. An analysis of IUE data from the white dwarf G191 B2B results in a similar Fe abundance if this star shares similar atmospheric parameters (Teff, g) with Feige 24. Fe is thus the second most abundant photospheric element in hot DA white dwarfs.

  10. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Current Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frinchaboy, Peter; O'Connell, Julia; Donor, John; Cunha, Katia; Thompson, Benjamin; Melendez, Matthew; Shetrone, Matthew; Zasowski, Gail; Majewski, Steven R.; APOGEE TEAM

    2018-01-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Analysis and Mapping (OCCAM) survey aims to produce a comprehensive, uniform, infrared-based data set forhundreds of open clusters, and constrain key Galactic dynamical and chemical parameters using the SDSS/APOGEE survey and follow-up from the McDonald Observatory Otto Struve 2.1-m telescope and Sandiford Cass Echelle Spectrograph (R ~ 60,000). We report on multi-element radial abundance gradients obtained from a sample of over 30 disk open clusters. The APOGEE chemical abundances were derived automatically by the ASPCAP pipeline and these are part of the SDSS IV Data Release 14, optical follow-up were analyzed using equivalent width analysis and spectral synthesis. We present the current open cluster sample that spans a significant range in age allowing exploration of the evolution of the Galactic abundance gradients. This work is supported by an NSF AAG grants AST-1311835 & AST-1715662.

  11. Calcium ionization balance and argon/calcium abundance in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonucci, E.; Marocchi, D.; Gabriel, A. H.; Doschek, G. A.

    1987-12-01

    An earlier analysis of solar flare calcium spectra from XRP and P78-1 aimed at measuring the calcium ionization balance resulted in an ambiguity due to a line blend between the calcium q line and an Ar XVII line. In the present work the calcium line 'r' is included in the analysis in order to resolve this problem. It is shown that the correct calcium ionization balance is that indicated in the earlier paper as corresponding to an argon/calcium abundance ratio of 0.2. The argon/calcium abundance ratio in the group of solar flares studied is shown to be 0.2 + or - 0.2. It is further argued that while the abundance of heavy elements may be enhanced in energetic flare events, this enhancement is less for argon than for calcium, leading to an argon/calcium ratio smaller than that present in the quiet sun.

  12. XMM-Newton Observations of NGC 507: Supersolar Metal Abundances in the Hot Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Fabbiano, Giuseppina

    2004-10-01

    We present the results of the X-ray XMM-Newton observations of NGC 507, a dominant elliptical galaxy in a small group of galaxies, and report supersolar metal abundances of both Fe and α-elements in the hot interstellar medium (ISM) of this galaxy. These results are robust in that we considered all possible systematic effects in our analysis. We find ZFe=2-3 times solar inside the D25 ellipse of NGC 507. This is the highest ZFe reported so far for the hot halo of an elliptical galaxy; this high iron abundance is fully consistent with the predictions of stellar evolution models, which include the yield of both Type II and Type Ia supernovae (SNe). Our analysis shows that abundance measurements are critically dependent on the selection of the proper emission model. The spatially resolved, high-quality XMM-Newton spectra provide enough statistics to formally require at least three emission components in each of four circumnuclear concentric shells (within 5' or 100 kpc): two soft thermal components indicating a range of temperatures in the hot ISM plus a harder component, consistent with the integrated output of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in NGC 507. The two-component (thermal+LMXB) model customarily used in past studies yields a much lower ZFe, consistent with previous reports of subsolar metal abundances. This model, however, gives a significantly worse fit to the data (F-test probability<0.0001). The abundance of α-elements (most accurately determined by Si) is also found to be supersolar. The α-element-to-Fe abundance ratio is close to the solar ratio, suggesting that ~70% of the iron mass in the hot ISM originated from Type Ia SNe. The α-element-to-Fe abundance ratio remains constant out to at least 100 kpc, indicating that Types II and Ia SN ejecta are well mixed on a scale much larger than the extent of the stellar body.

  13. Using Genotype Abundance to Improve Phylogenetic Inference

    PubMed Central

    Mesin, Luka; Victora, Gabriel D; Minin, Vladimir N; Matsen, Frederick A

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Modern biological techniques enable very dense genetic sampling of unfolding evolutionary histories, and thus frequently sample some genotypes multiple times. This motivates strategies to incorporate genotype abundance information in phylogenetic inference. In this article, we synthesize a stochastic process model with standard sequence-based phylogenetic optimality, and show that tree estimation is substantially improved by doing so. Our method is validated with extensive simulations and an experimental single-cell lineage tracing study of germinal center B cell receptor affinity maturation. PMID:29474671

  14. Chemical abundances in cold, dark interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, William M.; Kaifu, Norio; Ohishi, Masatoshi

    1991-01-01

    Current tabulations are presented of the entire range of known interstellar molecules, giving attention to that subset which has been identified in the cold, dark interstellar clouds out of which the sun has been suggested to have formed. The molecular abundances of two such clouds, Taurus Molecular Cloud 1 and Lynd's 134N, exhibit prepossessing chemical differences despite considerable physical similarities. This discrepancy may be accounted for by the two clouds' differing evolutionary stages. Two novel classes of interstellar molecules are noted: sulfur-terminated carbon chains and silicon-terminated ones.

  15. Dependence of Nebular Heavy-element Abundance on H I Content for Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Paul; Shields, Gregory A.; Davé, Romeel; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Wright, Audrey

    2013-08-01

    We analyze the galactic H I content and nebular log (O/H) for 60 spiral galaxies in the Moustakas et al. (2006a) spectral catalog. After correcting for the mass-metallicity relationship, we show that the spirals in cluster environments show a positive correlation for log (O/H) on DEF, the galactic H I deficiency parameter, extending the results of previous analyses of the Virgo and Pegasus I clusters. Additionally, we show for the first time that galaxies in the field obey a similar dependence. The observed relationship between H I deficiency and galactic metallicity resembles similar trends shown by cosmological simulations of galaxy formation including inflows and outflows. These results indicate the previously observed metallicity-DEF correlation has a more universal interpretation than simply a cluster's effects on its member galaxies. Rather, we observe in all environments the stochastic effects of metal-poor infall as minor mergers and accretion help to build giant spirals.

  16. High energy density rechargeable magnesium battery using earth-abundant and non-toxic elements

    PubMed Central

    Orikasa, Yuki; Masese, Titus; Koyama, Yukinori; Mori, Takuya; Hattori, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Okado, Tetsuya; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Minato, Taketoshi; Tassel, Cédric; Kim, Jungeun; Kobayashi, Yoji; Abe, Takeshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries are poised to be viable candidates for large-scale energy storage devices in smart grid communities and electric vehicles. However, the energy density of previously proposed rechargeable magnesium batteries is low, limited mainly by the cathode materials. Here, we present new design approaches for the cathode in order to realize a high-energy-density rechargeable magnesium battery system. Ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 demonstrates a high reversible capacity exceeding 300 mAh·g−1 at a voltage of approximately 2.4 V vs. Mg. Further, the electronic and crystal structure of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 changes during the charging and discharging processes, which demonstrates the (de)insertion of magnesium in the host structure. The combination of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 with a magnesium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide–triglyme electrolyte system proposed in this work provides a low-cost and practical rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density, free from corrosion and safety problems. PMID:25011939

  17. Elemental Abundances in the Intracluster Gas and the Hot Galactic Coronae in Cluster A194

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, William R.

    1997-01-01

    We have completed the analysis of observations of the Coma cluster and are continuing analysis of A1367 both of which are shown to be merging clusters. Also, we are analyzing observations of the Centaurus cluster which we see as a merger based in both its temperature and surface brightness distributions. Attachment: Another collision for the coma cluster.

  18. A Comparison of Elemental Abundance Ratios in SEP Events in Fast and Slow Solar Wind Regions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-24

    Ulysses values pertain only to SW with speeds of 700 to 800 km s-1, which occurs predominately at high ecliptic latitudes, so those SW ratios are...less likely to be source regions of the SEPs measured by EPACT in the ecliptic plane. Comparing only with the Bochsler et al. SW values, both the SEP...factors depend critically upon the magnetic obliquity of the shock. It is obvious that such processes and seed populations could vary substantially

  19. The role of CAX1 and CAX3 in elemental distribution and abundance in Arabidopsis seed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ability to alter nutrient partitioning within plant cells is poorly understood. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a family of endomembrane cation exchangers (CAXs) transports Ca(2+) and other cations. However, experiments have not focused on how the distribution and partitioning of calcium ...

  20. Photographic region elemental abundance analyses of Dr. David S. Leckrone's GTO HST stars 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.

    1994-01-01

    Activities are presented for the grant-funded work at the Dominion Astrophysical (DAO) and Casleo Observatories. A comparison is planned for the spectrograms taken at both observatories of similar stars. It is reported that of the Northern Hemisphere program stars, only 112 Her remains to be analyzed. A preliminary solution for the components of this binary system has been found. The new ATLAS9 models have been used to reevaluate the effective temperatures and surface gravities derived for all program stars. Model atmospheres are being calculated by extensive grids on workstations upgraded to the DEC 3000 model 300X running Open VMS. An attached paper describes a plan to obtain the needed gf values as well as some first applications of astrophysical gf values, the most important of which was Vega.

  1. High energy density rechargeable magnesium battery using earth-abundant and non-toxic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orikasa, Yuki; Masese, Titus; Koyama, Yukinori; Mori, Takuya; Hattori, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Okado, Tetsuya; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Minato, Taketoshi; Tassel, Cédric; Kim, Jungeun; Kobayashi, Yoji; Abe, Takeshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2014-07-01

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries are poised to be viable candidates for large-scale energy storage devices in smart grid communities and electric vehicles. However, the energy density of previously proposed rechargeable magnesium batteries is low, limited mainly by the cathode materials. Here, we present new design approaches for the cathode in order to realize a high-energy-density rechargeable magnesium battery system. Ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 demonstrates a high reversible capacity exceeding 300 mAh.g-1 at a voltage of approximately 2.4 V vs. Mg. Further, the electronic and crystal structure of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 changes during the charging and discharging processes, which demonstrates the (de)insertion of magnesium in the host structure. The combination of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 with a magnesium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-triglyme electrolyte system proposed in this work provides a low-cost and practical rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density, free from corrosion and safety problems.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Elemental abundances of solar sibling candidates (Ramirez+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, I.; Bajkova, A. T.; Bobylev, V. V.; Roederer, I. U.; Lambert, D. L.; Endl, M.; Cochran, W. D.; MacQueen, P. J.; Wittenmyer, R. A.

    2017-06-01

    We used the Tull coude spectrograph on the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory (Tull et al. 1995PASP..107..251T) to observe most of our targets (23). All but three of them were observed in 2012 December; the others were observed in 2013 March. The rest of our targets (seven) have too-low declinations to be observed from McDonald Observatory. Instead, they were observed using the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle (MIKE) spectrograph on the 6.5 m Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory (Bernstein et al. 2003SPIE.4841.1694B) in 2013 April. Slit sizes were chosen so that the spectral resolution of the data is about 60000 in the visible part of the spectrum. We targeted a S/N per pixel of at least 200 at 6000 Å. Only one of our targets (HD 46100) has a significantly lower S/N spectrum. (2 data files).

  3. DETAILED ABUNDANCES OF THE SOLAR TWINS 16 CYGNI A AND B: CONSTRAINING PLANET FORMATION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Schuler, Simon C.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.

    2011-08-20

    Results of a detailed abundance analysis of the solar twins 16 Cyg A and 16 Cyg B based on high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio echelle spectroscopy are presented. 16 Cyg B is known to host a giant planet while no planets have yet been detected around 16 Cyg A. Stellar parameters are derived directly from our high-quality spectra, and the stars are found to be physically similar, with {Delta}T{sub eff} = +43 K, {Delta}log g = -0.02 dex, and {Delta}{xi} = +0.10 km s{sup -1} (in the sense of A - B), consistent with previous findings. Abundances of 15 elements aremore » derived and are found to be indistinguishable between the two stars. The abundances of each element differ by {<=}0.026 dex, and the mean difference is +0.003 {+-} 0.015 ({sigma}) dex. Aside from Li, which has been previously shown to be depleted by a factor of at least 4.5 in 16 Cyg B relative to 16 Cyg A, the two stars appear to be chemically identical. The abundances of each star demonstrate a positive correlation with the condensation temperature of the elements (T{sub c}); the slopes of the trends are also indistinguishable. In accordance with recent suggestions, the positive slopes of the [m/H]-T{sub c} relations may imply that terrestrial planets have not formed around either 16 Cyg A or 16 Cyg B. The physical characteristics of the 16 Cyg system are discussed in terms of planet formation models, and plausible mechanisms that can account for the lack of detected planets around 16 Cyg A, the disparate Li abundances of 16 Cyg A and B, and the eccentricity of the planet 16 Cyg B b are suggested.« less

  4. DETAILED ABUNDANCES OF STARS WITH SMALL PLANETS DISCOVERED BY KEPLER. I. THE FIRST SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Schuler, Simon C.; Vaz, Zachary A.; Santrich, Orlando J. Katime

    2015-12-10

    We present newly derived stellar parameters and the detailed abundances of 19 elements of seven stars with small planets discovered by NASA's Kepler Mission. Each star, save one, has at least one planet with a radius ≤1.6 R{sub ⊕}, suggesting a primarily rocky composition. The stellar parameters and abundances are derived from high signal-to-noise ratio, high-resolution echelle spectroscopy obtained with the 10 m Keck I telescope and High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer using standard spectroscopic techniques. The metallicities of the seven stars range from −0.32 to +0.13 dex, with an average metallicity that is subsolar, supporting previous suggestions that, unlike Jupiter-typemore » giant planets, small planets do not form preferentially around metal-rich stars. The abundances of elements other than iron are in line with a population of Galactic disk stars, and despite our modest sample size, we find hints that the compositions of stars with small planets are similar to stars without known planets and with Neptune-size planets, but not to those of stars with giant planets. This suggests that the formation of small planets does not require exceptional host-star compositions and that small planets may be ubiquitous in the Galaxy. We compare our derived abundances (which have typical uncertainties of ≲0.04 dex) to the condensation temperature of the elements; a correlation between the two has been suggested as a possible signature of rocky planet formation. None of the stars demonstrate the putative rocky planet signature, despite at least three of the stars having rocky planets estimated to contain enough refractory material to produce the signature, if real. More detailed abundance analyses of stars known to host small planets are needed to verify our results and place ever more stringent constraints on planet formation models.« less

  5. On Using the Color-Magnitude Diagram Morphology of M67 to Test Solar Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magic, Z.; Serenelli, A.; Weiss, A.; Chaboyer, B.

    2010-08-01

    The open cluster M67 has solar metallicity and an age of about 4 Gyr. The turnoff (TO) mass is close to the minimum mass for which solar metallicity stars develop a convective core during main sequence evolution as a result of the development of hydrogen burning through the CNO cycle. The morphology of the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of M67 around the TO shows a clear hook-like feature, a direct sign that stars close to the TO have convective cores. VandenBerg et al. investigated the possibility of using the morphology of the M67 TO to put constraints on the solar metallicity, particularly CNO elements, for which solar abundances have been revised downward by more than 30% over the last few years. Here, we extend their work, filling the gaps in their analysis. To this aim, we compute isochrones appropriate for M67 using new (low metallicity) and old (high metallicity) solar abundances and study whether the characteristic TO in the CMD of M67 can be reproduced or not. We also study the importance of other constitutive physics on determining the presence of such a hook, particularly element diffusion, overshooting and nuclear reaction rates. We find that using the new solar abundance determinations, with low CNO abundances, makes it more difficult to reproduce the characteristic CMD of M67. This result is in agreement with results by VandenBerg et al. However, changes in the constitutive physics of the models, particularly overshooting, can influence and alter this result to the extent that isochrones constructed with models using low CNO solar abundances can also reproduce the TO morphology in M67. We conclude that only if all factors affecting the TO morphology are completely under control (and this is not the case), M67 could be used to put constraints on solar abundances.

  6. Boron Abundances Across the "Li-Be Dip" in the Hyades Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Lum, Michael G.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.; King, Jeremy R.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    2015-08-01

    Dramatic deficiencies of Li in the mid-F dwarf stars of the Hyades cluster were discovered by Boesgaard and Tripicco in 1986. Using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra from the Keck 10-m telescope, Boesgaard and King discovered the corresponding, but smaller, deficiencies in Be in the same narrow temperature region in the Hyades. With the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on HST we investigate B abundances in the Hyades F stars to look for a potential B dip. We use the resonance line of B I at 2497 A. These three elements are destroyed inside stars at increasingly hotter temperatures: 2.5 x 10$^6$, 3.5 x 10$^6$, and 5 x 10$^6$ K for Li, Be, B respectively. Consequently, these elements survive to increasingly greater depths in a star and their surface abundances act as a report on the depth and thoroughness of mixing in the star. We have used updated photometry from Hipparcos to find stellar parameters for the Hyades stars and have redetermined Li abundances (or upper limits) for 79 Hyades dwarfs, Be for 34 stars, and B in five stars. We find evidence for a small dip in the B abundance across the Li-Be dip. We have compared our nLTE B abundances for the three high B stars on either side of the Li-Be dip with those found by Duncan for the Hyades giants. This confirms the factor of ten decline in the B abundance in the Hyades giants as predicted by dilution due to the deepening of the surface convection zone.

  7. Rapid Determination of Mineral Abundance by X-ray Microfluorescence Mapping and Multispectral Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscati, R. J.; Marshall, B. D.

    2005-12-01

    X-ray microfluorescence (XRMF) spectrometry is a rapid, accurate technique to map element abundances of rock surfaces (such as thin-section billets, the block remaining when a thin section is prepared). Scanning a specimen with a collimated primary X-ray beam (100 μm diameter) generates characteristic secondary X-rays that yield the relative chemical abundances for the major rock-/mineral-forming analytes (such as Si, Al, K, Ca, and Fe). When Cu-rich epoxy is used to impregnate billets, XRMF also can determine porosity from the Cu abundance. Common billet scan size is 30 x 15 mm and the typical mapping time rarely exceeds 2.5 hrs (much faster than traditional point-counting). No polishing or coating is required for the billets, although removing coarse striations or gross irregularities on billet surfaces should improve the spatial accuracy of the maps. Background counts, spectral artifacts, and diffraction peaks typically are inconsequential for maps of major elements. An operational check is performed after every 10 analyses on a standard that contains precisely measured areas of Mn and Mo. Reproducibility of the calculated area ratio of Mn:Mo is consistently within 5% of the known value. For each billet, the single element maps (TIFF files) generated by XRMF are imported into MultiSpec© (a program developed at Purdue University for analysis of multispectral image data, available from http://dynamo.ecn.purdue.edu/~biehl/MultiSpec/) where mineral phases can be spectrally identified and their relative abundances quantified. The element maps for each billet are layered to produce a multi-element file for mineral classification and statistical processing, including modal estimates of mineral abundance. Although mineral identification is possible even if the mineralogy is unknown, prior petrographic